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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03722
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03722

Full Text















[h1u


lrtibunt


tgiatered wit Postmater of Bahamas (or potge ceoneor within th Bahamas.) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


VOL. LXX1, No. 68 Tuesday, February 12, 1974. Price: 20 Cents


Now Ministry will check on all films


SEA SEARCH


THE HOME AFFAIRS Ministry and the
Film Censorship Board have greater ability to
control the quality of movies shown here
under a new procedure instituted on Monday.
Sources said today that in the past the
Board has routinely viewed any film coming in
with an "R" (restricted) rating, but checking
on the contents of movies with lower ratings
has been a hit-or-miss affair, with the Board
able to act only on reports from persons who
had seen the films before, or on reviews in
various publications.
It was announced yesterday that in future,
however, local cinema operators have agreed to
supply the Ministry with a synopsis of every
coming movie four weeks in advance of its


Salesman

used

false

bottom

case for

marijuana

By SIDNEY DORSETT
MONTFG(O BAY, Jamaica.
salesman Victor Bernard Ottey
who arrived here Sunday with
intentions of capitalising on a
quantity of marijuana he
carried for distribution on the
local market was heavily fined
by. Magi-ti.ite i.nLmanuel
Osadebay Monday.
The 32-yea:-old man had
pleaded guilty to charges of
importing m.ia ijuana and
possessing dangerous drugs
The magistrate, informed of
the facts bhy Chief Insp. Okell
Cartw eight fined Ottey $1.200
or IS-months for the first
mount and S300 or three
months on the second kharg>
fie told ithe co'irt th '
card reports in Jamaica that
"things here were good" and so
he decided to come here andt
sell the drug. His intention was
to use the profit to purchase a
farm at Mount Salem. Jamaica.
lie also said that he had a
wife and family at home in
Jamaica and pleaded for
leniency adding that he "'really
needed the money "
Insp. Cartwright told the
court that the accused was
detained by customs officers at
the airport after his arrival on
Sunday by Air Jamaica and
later turned over to police.
luring a routine
examination of arriving
passengers' luggage, customs
officer Brendan C. Colebrooke
suspected that his suitcase hailed
a false bottoni fe informed t
senior officer of the matter.
The accused made a request
to see the senior officer in
private, but the officer also
allowed Mr Colebrooke to sit
in on their conversation.
During it, Ottes attempted
to bribe the men saving lie
could pay them otf if they did
not cut open the bottom of the
suit-case in the presence of the
other officers
lie was later turned ouer to
police who charged lhin after
the officers confirmed their
suspicions bh cutting open the
false bottom
DEATH OF
GEORGE SAWYER
MIAMI (cGeorge M. (Pop)
Sawyer, 81, a native of Marsh
Harbour. Abaco. the Bahamas,
and resident of Mianmi since
1917, died Thursday in a local
nursing home. lie previously
lived at 1430 NW 30th Ave
Mr. Sawyer had been a boat
builder, teacher and engineer in
the Bahamas and in Miamnui.
In his later years, he was
associated with Sawyer
Laboratories Corp., a dental
laboratory.
Survivors include two sons,
Everette R. and (;. Warren;
three grandchildren and two
great-grandchildren, and a
sister Mrs. Sadie
Albury.
Services were held at
3.30 p.m. Feb. 9 at the
Lowe anks Palm
Springs-North Ilialeah Funeral
Home.



METAL
SCULPTURES



NASSAU -FREEPORT


scheduled screening here.
Acting on the synopsis, the Ministry could
then order a Board viewing of any film of
questionable content.
In addition, a Government Information
Services press release said, the theatre
operators have agreed to make prints of films
available for Board viewing three weeks ahead
of scheduled public screening.
AGE LIMIT
The GIS release added that, effective
Monday, the age for viewing adult-type movies
has been raised from 17 to 18 years.
A spokesman for Theatres of Nassau,
operators of the island's five movie houses,
said today that enforcement of the age rule is
largely "a matter of judgement."


The spokesman said "when there is a
question (of age) the burden of proof is on
them to prove they're 18 or over."
He said if the operators have doubts and the
patron cannot prove his or her age "we just
don't let them in."
'NO COMMENT'
It is known that in the past theatre
operators have brought in films only a matter
of days or less before they are scheduled to be
public shown. The Theatres of Nassau
spokesman was asked how practical it is. from
the company's point of view to bring in the
films three weeks in advance for the Board's
benefit.
The spokesman had "no comment" on the


Union calls







for big



0



pay rise


By MIKE LOTHIAN
THE 8,000-MEMBER Public
Service Union has hit
Government with a demand for
salary increases ranging as high
as 68 percent for the lower
ranks of the civil service and
for pay increases for all civil
servants.
PsR president Thaddeus L.
bartfg changed today ilia inI
the last salary review, in early
1970. the Government "gave
to us with one hand and took
it back with the other."
Th lie union proposits.
submitted on January 14, also
included demands for increasci
pensions f()r former csl i
servants, the return of iioneie
paid by civil servants to thei
Widows and Orphans I und.
aind the abolition of lthe
present Ptltiic Scrmce'
Co( oInission
Mr Darling in a press release'
and a telephone interview said
the union wants the starting
salary for civil servants
increased ftomn S2.500 a ,ear
to S4.200 a year a iOS
percent rise
lie said the increases
demanded drop to a low' ot
about tell percent for tile
higher-salaried senior officials
Mr Darling told I he
I ribt n e that w he n
Government in Januariy t)70)
put into effect a genei ra salary.
review which granted large
across-the-board iniicr.eascs, it
simultaneously cut the nitnual
incremienlt altoo i.atic leCIicasi
it the end ot the \ear) in half.
Ile said workers it thli
bottom of the cisil service
enjoyed a $200 annual
increment before Januar .,
\1970, at which time it was cut
to $100.
lie said the across-the-board
increase and the annual
increment reduction have
balanced out lHaving had a
general increase and having
suffered a cut in increment, he


THADDEUS DARLING
Revealed demands
said, civil servants are now
making almost exactly the
figure the\s would hliic' got it
there had been no general
increase and if the increiment
had remained tlhe same
\ further point that has
icauIfsed disgrunllemnicil. Mi
l)arling said.l was Gioveimnment's
response to a union request tor
an interim increase l.a yeal
w while a special comuiileCe Cwas
considering a general salai\
re\ lew
I'he union leader recalled
that the PS first began
pressing tor a general salary
reCiew in March. I1)72, and.
appreciating the 1act that such
a revxwV would take a long
tune, tlie un on asked for an
interim increase amounting, to
30 percent of the lowest salary.
then being paid.
( IIOPPI 1D DOWN
Iie said the interim increase
would have come to Stu25 a
car
Instead, he charged.
G(overnItment. when it hdid
finally come up with the
interim in JuIInIeC. 1973, had
chopped tie figure down to
S31
Mr Darlihng also revealed
that although the union first
made a request for a review
two sears ano. the special
review con'nittee was finally
oppomicted ornly a few weeks
ago "
I 'lat was why thle union


ESCAPED PRISONER


BACK BEHIND BARS


housebreaking and stealing.
He pleaded guilty to the new
charge of housebreaking and
stealing.
Prosecutor. Insp. Wilfred
Jack told the court that the
youth left his uniform behind
in the house after making a
change to a suit and shirt and
a pair of shoes.
Police are still searching for
another prison escapee, Errol
Dean, 20, who made his
getaway from the Central
Police Station last August.
Police however have
reported that Dean had
fought his way out of the
police station after making a
request to use the men's
room. His escape did not
occur during the regular
transfer of prisoners.
Dean had also been
arrested on a stealing and
shopbreaking charge.


only last month submitted
detailed proposals.
On the committee, among
others, a re Agrculture and
Fisheries Minister Anthony
Roberts. John Bamforth of the
Public Service Conimmission.
Financial Secretary Ralph
Woods. directorr of Public
Personnel lianford Darville and
: ducat ion Per manent
Secretary Baltron Bethel.
PI \Slti\S REVIEW
Mr. Darling said the PSU is
also of the opinion that
whenever salaries for existing
civil servants are reviewed, the
pensions of retired civil
set-ants should also be
increased, and that is one of
the demands the union is now
making.
lie went on to point out
that for y,,ears male cnil
servantits have contributed
rolghil four percent of their
salaries to the Widows and
Orphans Fund, which will
cease to exist when National
Insurance comes into being.
The question the union
wants to discuss with
Government is what is to
become of the monex in the
fulld now.
-'We prefer to have the
nioney returned to the cisii
servants," Mr Darling said
And, although the matter is
negotiable, "we don't want
an\ one in authority to just tell
us it's going to hbe transferred
to National Insurance, or tel:
us anything else We wont
ac ept being just told what i,
going to happen to that
money.
NOT INDI PI \Dil1 I
On the question of the
Public Service Commission. Mr
Darling said the union wants
the Commission as it exists to
be abolished and replaced by a
nesw body consisting of
"members from the religious
faith, Chamber of 'Commerce
and Government.'"
The C(onmmunission is presently\
a Governmnent-appointed bodc
which is supposed to consider
applications for Government
cmplo. ment, independent ot
any outside influence.
"We find they are still
hamstrung when they're
supposed to be independent,'
Mr Darling said. "We find in a
lot of things they aren't sc
independent. It isn't working
in the best interests of the civil
service. If it isn't working
properly it shouldn't be there
at all." the unionist declared
Mr. Darling said Government
has been given no deadline bh
which to comply with or begin
negotiating the union's
demands, because "we want
them to do this thoroughly
it's very comprehensive and it
we pressure them they might
leave out something important.
and we want everything
considered."
However, the union is
"hoping" to begin negotiating
with the review committee 'in
ten days or two weeks," Mr
Darling said.


question.
Anglican Bishop Michael Eldon, one of
many outspoken critics of the quality of films
shown locally, today termed the Ministry's
move as "a step in the right direction."
He said he felt the move showed that "we
are now taking the matter much more
seriously"
The GIS release said the new moves
followed recent discussions between the
Ministry, the Board and both local and U.S.
representatives of the film industry.

"Representatives of the film industry
pledged their full co-operation in this
endeavour to raise the standard of movies in
local cinemas," the release concluded.


TORTUGA


MOVES

ENDED
PORT-AhU-PRIN('F. HAITI
.\P) An attempt to develop
the one-timie buccaneer
stronghold on Tortuga Island
hb a Texas firm has ended,
according .0 the Haitian
government .
Dupont Caribbean Freeport
-\uthority. Inc., (D(t FA),
headed bs foimni'r Fastland,
I'exas mayi Don Pearson, had
filed a S5005.0O0 damage suit
against the govcrnnient, and
the suit was rejected by island
courts last week.
A government spokesman
explained that the exclusive
development contract had been
cancelled last year after the
company allegedly violated the
agreement.
The violation was the
subcontracting of another
company. Transliear. also of
Texas, to do part of the work.
according to the government.
Dupont Caribbean filed the
claim in an attempt to recover
expenses to build an airstrip.
and to cover survey expenses.
The company signed a
contract with former President
Francois Duvalier, shortly
before his death on April 21.
1971, and according to that
agreement. Dupont Caribbean
was awarded an exclusive
contract to turn Tortuga
Island, off the north coast of
Haiti, into a free port.


Hotel

dispute

talks


UNION and management
negotiators in the hotels
contract dispute met with
Chief Industrial Officer
Lambert L. W. Parker for
three and a half hours
Monday, but never got
beyond what a union
spokesman termed
"preliminaries."

Mr. Parker, a senior official
in the Labour Ministry, has
entered the talks as mediator
after union and management
spent eight weeks in
negotiations without a
settlement.

A spokesman for the Hotel
and Catering Workers Union
said this morning that at
Monday's meeting, begun 10
a.m., "not a single section of
the contract was discussed."

Instead, the spokesman
said. Hotel Employers
Association executive
director and chief negotiator
Trevelyan Cooper occupied
most of the time discussing
"preliminaries." Mr. Parker
has so far said very little, the
spokesman reported.

The negotiators were to
meet with Mr. Parker again at
10 o'clock this morning.


FOR FIVE


FLORIDIANS

FIVE FLORIDIANS, two in a small boat and three in a private
aircraft, are the objects of searches in Bahamian waters today by
the Bahamas Air Sea Rescue Association and the U.S. Coastguard,


a BASRA spokesman said.
A 23-foot Seabird craft,
painted white with a canvas
covering, left Fort Lauderdale
last Friday, February 8, on
what was to have been a quick
run to Bimini and back. The
vessel, with a Mr. Hugh and his
27-year-old son aboard, never
arrived in Bimini and has not
been seen since.
The vessel's registration is
FI0548AA.
A search begun by the Coast
Guard on Sunday has so far
yielded no results. Yesterday
the Coast Guard had two
cutters, four aircraft and a
helicopter involved in
searching, and operations were
continuing today.
An alert has also been issued
in connection with a
twin-engine Cessna 414 aircraft
with a Percy Morrin and two
others aboard. The aircraft,
registration N8103Q, left
Orlando Monday afternoon
bound for Treasure Cay.
At about 3.30 p.m., a
BASRA spokesman reported,
the pilot radioed that he could
not see for a landing at
Treasure Cay, presumably
because of bad weather.
The missing plane is painted
white with orange trim.


Cayman Islands post


MR. KENNETH Wright,
formerly permanent secretary
to the Bahamas Ministry of
Works, is now attached to the
Cayman Islands government as
Development Adviser.
Mr. Wright was with the
Ministry of Works for five
years before retiring in
mid-1973.
He assumed his new duties
in the Caymans on February 1,
and is attached to the
Department of Finance where
he is working with the United
Nation Economist there.


Prior to his tenure in the
Bahamas, Mr. Wright was
attached to the British
government's Building and
Engineering Division. He also
worked in Nigeria as
Administrative Officr in Lagos.
Mr. Wright is serving in the
Caymans on a two-year
contract under the British
Technical Assistance
programme.
Mr. Wiight is married and
the ttheicr ot lb-.ea :-old twin
daughters. Ihs wile is due to
jonll hlnim ('a ni,:n Itowards
thi end )l thli1s monui0th.


Two may be charged


TWO MEN, captured by
police last year, are expected
to be charged in the lower
court tomorrow in connection
with the armed robbery of the
Robinson Road Barclays Ban'
on October 29, 1973.
The men, one believed to be
in his twenties, the other a
teen-ager, allegedly got away
with an estimated S4,000


during the 11 a.m hold-up.
I he bank had been raided
I'.st live days following a
hold up at the Canadian
Imperial Bank of Commerce.
Coconut Grove, where $S2.500
was reportedly stolen
In both cases, the men made
their get-away in cars and
-,arried shot-guns and wore
stocking-masks.


Thousands blacked out


A FAULtL in secondary
wiring at the Blue Hills
generation plant left
thousands of consumers on
the island without electricity
for up to almost three hours
this morning.
Areas affected included
Paradise Island, Wulff Road.
Village Road, the Eastern
Distriktt and Palmdale.
A Bahamas Flect ricit.
Corporation spokesman told
The Tribune that there was
no problem with the main
generation system or the
distribution system.


WHY NOT WIN
$4,220 BOAT?


THE TRIBUNE'S special
boat prize can still be won
this week in the Prize
Crossword Puzzle contest.
Extra copies of Saturday's
Tribune which contained the
crossword are still available at
the Tribune office.


WATER BILLS
WATER bills for the
November, 1973 quarter have
been rendered. Consumers
should note that if accounts
are not settled before February
15, 1974, their water supply
may be disconnected. If the
consumer has not received a
bill, the duplicate may be
obtained by contacting the
Public Treasury.


He said the problem was
traced to "secondary wiring"
in some auxiliaryy circuits"
xw hi c h p r evented
ss chronisat ion of the various
generators, which as a result
could not be put on full
load.
The power cut began at
about 7 50 a.m., according to
the Bl:C spokesman, supplies
w e re fully restored
throughout the island by
10 40.
BI C technicians were this
afternoon still engaged in
repairing the fault.


TOWN IS TODAY
TOWN AND AROUND,
the weekly feature by
Daphne Wallace Whitfield, is
published in today's edition
of The Tribune, because of
pressure on news space
tomorrow.
CONSULAR OFFICER
On Wednesday a Jamaican
Consular Officer will be at the
Training Centre of the Port
Authority at the Kipling
Building, Freeport, from 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m. and from 2.30 to 4.30


ti DUDLEY'S


SYLVANIA -TV -s
P.O. BOX 5850 PHONE 2-1306/2-3237


A FORMER magistrate in
the Bahamas has been named
Stipendiary and Circuit
Magistrate in the Cayman
Islands.
Mr. Frank Field, 63,
(pictured) served in the
Bahamas from 1941 to 1947
and was in private practice in
Grenada before taking up his
new appointment.
After leaving Nassau Mr.
Field went to Nigeria as
Crown Counsel for three
years, then to his native
Barbados as Solicitor General
and Puisne Judge and in 1963
to the Windward and
Leeward Islands as Chief
Justice until his retirement in
1967.
At that time he went into
private practice in Grenada.


. ,
Picture HIOWA RD GLASS
When Count Basie's band is on the stand, everybody swings
and that includes Mrs. Basie and Prime Minister Lynden
Pindling, shown here on the dance floor of the Camelot Room,
King's Inn & Golf Club. The occasion was a benefit gala to
raise funds for the Rainbow Pavilion at the Rand Memorial
Hospital.


AN ESCAPED Fox Hill
prisoner who exchanged the
dirty uniform he wore for a
set of clothing and $80 he
stole from the home of Mary
Neymour, South Beach Road.
found himself behind bars
once more and serving an
additional nine month prison
sentence imposed by
Magistrate George Hannays
yesterday.
Livingstone Sands, 18.
re-captured last week, Friday,
by police officers searching
for him after he escaped from
the piggery at the prison on
February 4.
The youth told the court
that he made the escape in
order to be able to participate
in the Goombay Summer
festivities due to begin in
June.
He had been serving 18
months sentence for


I FLY


...............


I













2 __ha' e rtithun


Tuesday, February 12, 1974.


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BRASILIA English train robber
Ronald Biggs says he has spent his share
of the $7 million which he and a group of
14 others netted from the Great Train
Robbery in 1963

"-I am completely broke and don't
know how I will be able to pay all my
debts I hope my friends are starting a
iund raising campaign in Rio de Janeiro,"
Biggs said calmly

tHe did not say how much was due
him Irom the robbery, a world record


Security agents




seize author




Solzhenitsyn


%IOS (CO)* Soviet security
ageills and police arrested
author Alexander Solzhenitsvn
xit his wife's Moscow home
todav after the 1970 Nobel
I laureatee refused to answer
two summonses to the state
prosecutor's office, family
friends reported
li. .iJ ,i!n,- a:J. t hc .ik.


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'lxxix


".as detained his family had
heard nothing It was not
known if Slo/henit s ha.id
oltered an\ resistance
Sol /hentis n l s lstrI
culminatedi a vieit'us si\t-wcck
campaign in the Soviet prs x
against the author. .dadintnin1
him for the publication in the
west in late December o0 hII
"(dulag" book which chroilies
the terror of the So'let secret
police and the. nation's l:ihuur
.lin p system tiro 1 i018 I lo

lIast Fridas anid again
cst'erda.\ the Soviet state
pitoscutor's ot'ice suniunolt)L.d
ol/henxits\ n hut he refused to
appear otr acknowledge the


CALL OF DEATH
BERLIN A 0man called the police emergency number
in West Berlin today and told officers to hurry to a temple
oI a district park
'There is a dead man there." he said, promising to show
pt)lice where
\ spokesan said a police squad hurried to the park
wher- the\ s; w a man waving to them. As they approached
hin tthe. man dr-w .a pistol and shot himself, dead, the
,ptk'cnan! said.
titIer,, to nd a letter in which it was stated the man,
,a.d to be German, was sutlering from complete physical
xthai1sion Htie had lived in (aracas. Venezuela. for many
wars
Pdlce aid txhe was a 52-year-old artist. (AP)



Market split


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I a' t rF statement
x ii i x iii h x tx I turopican
- ii' n u n it x l negotiating

.mic.'rda\ l \iiA stIroniginan
C."'. Mantlillar K hadal,
n,i li /x1dil/ct the Libyan
-pr' i't !I, O l three Americanl
"ll >..'iii't!i t !s in iesponsc to
ha.i ct h ic c ll'dIl W5 .ik ingtonl's
"pi ,\ ,.i;miu'" lonicrencc of
,il x m xi ustiliinip !lauiins.
\ in ''ri meiint decree issued
bx' Khx d.i\' Rs ols' untionar\
i( n'lii.l x ( xiti ili ordered
tIt 1 l .i tI i ali/dh atioti xI the
,pL 1" ,t ,1 os I -cxaco
( .ili:,xrni.i \ .iaic (il itCo. and
Ih h 1 iHidtn-AInclItaI Oc il Co.
Ini, W hington. gternnment
1:!.ij sald the\ had not
cx.i x.'x i i'po it triul the I'.S.
t lilx',ss\ in 1 ih x, a. it added
th.ii' i1 L ib.it had ci/cd the till
xx ili an|it cs' hi ldings tori a
p 1ltic.il purposeI 1 Washingtorx
wo)uldt c'l nOIuellac suits against
thel tb. an u}n\toirrnmntc


ago, is booked through to Brasilia.
Sydney's Daily Mirror newspaper
today quoted Mrs. Brent as saying: "I have
heard nothing fom him, the police or the
Brazilian authorities. I've got to go for
my peace of mind. Surely he can't have
rejected me after 14 years of marriage?"
Biggs has been reported as saying he
wants to live with a Brazilian girl,
Raimunda de Castro, who claims Biggs is
the father of her unborn child.
He was taken into custody pending
extradition negotiations between Brazil
and Britain.


Biggs, 44. who took part in
the seven million dollar
British train robbery in 1963,
had been on the run for eight
years since escaping from
prison where he had served
14 months of a 30-year.
sentence.
He only just eluded
capture in Melbourne in 1969
when a police swoop missed
him by a few hours. His wife
and children were later
granted permission to remain
in Australia.
It is understood that the
couple 's children.
Christopher. 10 and Farley,
6, are staying with friends in
Melbourne where Mrs. Brent
has been taking an arts course
at Melbourne University. The
Biggs eldest son, Nicholas,
was killed in a car accident in
Melbourne three years ago.
(AP)


Nixon

subpoena

'lost


in post'

LOS ANI-Lt S A state
ilidge said Monday that tie was
"speechless" on learning that a|
subpoena he issued on Feb. 4
for President Nixon to appear
in his court still hadn't found
its way through the mail to
Washington.
Superior Court Judge
Giordon Ringer. who issued the
unprecedented subpoena of a
president, had his clerk contact
thie local post office, and a
tracer was placed on lthe
envelope. The subpoena swas
sent IFeb 4 by registered niail.
In V, ,hixiil .i the White
"louse said it had not received
the subpoena, which Nixon's
attorneys have said he would
not honour.
The subpoena was issued at
the request of fornier
presidential aide John I).
I-hrlichinan. It orders the
President to appear at a pretrial
hearing Feb. 25 for
IFhrlichaian, ((. (ordon LIiddy
and David Young.
The three are charged with
burglary and conspiracy in the
I)"71 break-in at the office of
Dr. Daniel I llsberg's
psychiatrist. They want Nixon
to testify about the formation
of the secret White Ilouse
investigations unit that became
known as "the plumbers The
plumbers engineered the
break-in ait tie psychiatrist's
office
Public defender Charles
tiessler. representing Liddy in
the case. said the pretrial
hearing tinighlit have to be
postponed it the subpoena is
niot totind soon
"We are at a standstill at
trying to obtain one of the key
witnesses the President of
the United States." Gessler
said
Lo is Ange1l's Postm aster
Janmes J. S\ imbol said most
registered inmail moves slower
than regular mail because of
security precautions and
because it is delivered only
during daylight hours
But he said that the average
registered letter is delivered
within two or 2'- days front
tlhe time it is nailed. Symbol
said he would personally put a
tracer on the envelope
containing the subpoena
Ringer, in court lor a
hearing on another pretrial
matter in the case. said, "I''ni
rendered speechless"


Golan battle
SYRIAN artillery fire
blasted Israeli military
positions and settlements along
the 40-mile Golan heights
cease-fire line. killing two
persons and wounding five.
The Israeli military command
announced.


I've no cash left, says Biggs


Train drivers



call off the



go-slow action


for a single robbery., nor how he spent the
money.
Biggs, 44, talked to the Brazilian and
foreign press at the federal police
headquarters here.
He is under an extendable 60-day
sentence pending an extradition request
from Britain.
Meanwhile, in Sidney. Australia. Mrs.
Charmian Brent. Biggs' wife, left to join
him in Brazil
Airline sources said Mrs. Brent, who
changed her name by deed poll four years


-GERMAN

STRIKE

CHAOS

MOUNTS
FRANKFURT West
Germany's public service strike
brought mounting problems as
it went into its second day
today and Chancellor Willy
Brandt's government appealed
tor reason on both sides.
Strikers have crippled
commuter services, disrupted
some telephone conmmuni-
cations, left overfilled garbage
cans along uinswept streets and
halted health inspector
set-vices.
Skippers of pilot boats
walked oft their vessels.
practically closing down the
North Sea port of Hamburg
and the Kiel Canal, a major
shipping lane between the
north and baltic seas.
In two tOwVits schools were
closed by janitor strikes.
The unions late last night
rejected a government offer to
raise low income pa\ by about
10 percent But union and
employer representatives
agreed to go back to the
negotiating tables today in an1
effort to end the nationwide
strike
1 ,-1i- '. nil: an em ergenc\
Cabinet meeting. Brandt's
government asked both sides toi
"'act responsible\ In this
difficult situation."
G over meant t spokesman
Ruediger son Wechmar told
newsmen that the outcome ot
the current labour conflict is
bound to strongly influence
this year's price developments
Government and federal
bank experts previously
maintained that wage hIike
exceeding 10 per cent will
cause constitmer prices ito clitb
beyond last year's l.i) per cent
increase in tile cost oft living.
I he national, state and
municipal employers had
offered to raise wages for lower
paid emplo ees bh\ about ll0
per cent trom a niinitinumtl ot
$46 to S51 per month.
But the union held to their
demand for a 15 per cent pa\
boost for all the 2.2 million
public service workers.
Ilein/ Kluncker, chief of the
largest of the public serlce
unions with over half a million
members, said the first phase
of the strike would end tonight
at midnight .to be replaced b\
a progranumme of selecli e
strikes until agreement is
reached
lihe R..,li .1 Workerx
L'nion, its txiVm bi.'is i i;I
5 working with nil a ltew
exceptitions, allnto1l011,ed t1a1t
'..ik *i, *., were 11 no longel
a\oidablC." :Ad pAl usal rker s
said their s\ork stoppll geis
would he "broadenled ."
('coiuitlters continued to
struggle into congested cities
bh all a\ailablt c'tians.
Passengers at air terminals
carried their own 'i'-Li'.-. toi
planes, causing delays and
cancellations.


In London, police went lnt,,
large power station l[o keep a1,
eve on picketing ., ii, ,,
only to find no one had shox wi
tip. The miners could ntit goi 1
train from Kent to I lndi
because of wildcat strikes 'n.
the railroads.
Meanwhile, union ii, ,
and a group of industrirals,,t.
inet to discuss a cOilpiiilll..
arrangement increasing itincr.
pay if they return to wotrk \
special meeting of the minci I
union executive was called in,
today.
(oal provides 70 per cent ir
Britain's power needs. I h,-
C'otiion Market's execuxit
said in Brussels the British hini
sought permission to ban It i
export of both steel and cio.
to other market partners. l1 I
cominmiission must approve xl:1
acliitn and British sources .1i
it ilas shown symlpalthy o tIli

ltcath initiated Ith
Conisc\natlivc Partv can!ipaiPI"
lor I lhe general electioni1 I
called leeb. 28 with a cl.
that victor would pernit h!-
governlientl to settle \wllh xli
st raking niines.
W\% .1- sait re'-electi i
I lcath's party would iiim.
continuation ot policies 1li,;
have 'brought Buti.
dx isast rl u si 1\ closi E
bank uiplcx ., industrial pai.ils;
and econonuinC ruin." (Al'i


Hearst kidnappers

'to break silence'

BI RKI I An I BI she w as dead.
Iicial predicts that the i xi,, to beliesvc '' 11e
mill ot kidnapped newspaper dtughtcr is a captive ec
iress Patricia Hearst will hear the St hlbtolles t Libera l,-
xoii her abductors bi tonight ArIhdnt. sthich boasted thai
Shirle's Batex. special agent t the tt cd I
hatrtoe cIt ihe i:FBI ititnt Mlonda> night
cdilced wolrd would e it'he only outhlc posseiilii.
c'i\cd wt within 24 hours., is ain solute cra/y persm i l.i-
"' ut l tiat's list a guess." he lakL'Ir her ott and killed 1:
id "I'lin just assuming that and I dot'art aln t it bthl,','
1i the fact that they sent a hlat tHearst said at a hi11'
tet last I hursdav and if tht ine\"s onferenc on the steps l,'
e going to send 'another like hi' Itillsborough itnansit:
e\ Indicated t he would tiere the faIlil h ll
en it should be about time maintancd a 24-hour vigil
r it "' I t th i s is a n .l 11 i i ,i i I '
Bates Imade the collent make ie tleel badcl their >
ter spendm]i., some two hours succeeding ver% well ." liHei!
th Mr and Mrs. Randolph said "But I think the perx'-
:arst. patenls of the they're really hurting is P.attm
l- car-olti \iss IHearst She hasn't done anything ti
Miss lieaIsil s. ahi tni,,i h anyi of them


IM xi arint ed men l e 4 A group
which cails itself the
Symbionese Liberation Army
claimed it kidnapped her and
was holding her in protective
custody
No ransom demand has been
received.
\Mr tHearst said he was
frightened by the silence ot her
captors but refused to believe


L (I)\PIt\ Britain's
30.000 train drivers have
agreed to call oft their
eight-week go-slow action
during the campaign for the
Feb. 28 national elections "to
get the return ot a Labour
govern imen t.
Ray Buickton, boss of the
drivers' union, told newsmen
th lie decision to end the
w ork-by-the- ulebook slow-
down and rotating one-day
strikes was taken because o1 a
request by former Prime
Minister Harold Wilson, leader
of the Labour Party.
The national's 280.000 coal
winners rejected a sinillar plea
bv Conservative Prune Minister
I dward Heath last week and
went ahead with a national
strike that is now in its second

Miners formed picket lines
in driving rain and wind
outside mines on the third da\
of a nationwide strike.
Joe Wlilancin. a miners' union
official in the Nottingham area,
said he had been threatened
with dcalth 11 after safet
workers. charged with keeping
thle inIes in opCerable
condition. crossed picket lines.
"I here will be bitterness,
even between tathei and son.
fol \ eas to come ii this
sittlluaton iconlitlICs. Len
Clarkc. the regional union
leadtc in Nottinghani. said.


ol
ita
he



fr

sa i


lth
t lix


ait
jtt
all
wi
Hle
1 '


legality of tile summons.
"'In a situation of general
illegalits which for many years
has existed in our country
and the personal eight-year
campaign of slander anti
harassment I refuse to
acknowledge the legality of
%our summons and will not
come for an interrogation to
any state organ, the writer said
in a statement esterda\ .
The statement ot the*
authorities arid released toi
western newsmen added
"Betore asking for legality
from citizens learn how to
observe it yourself. Free theta
innocent itrinum .. ii iii t 1 ii "
Tuesday "s action against
Sol/henitsyn could be the first
st'Cp to puItting himn on trial tor
"'anti-Soviet slander" or imerel.
an official warning in the
prosecutor's office to desist
trom further contact with
western newsmen

It the government has
decided to proceed with a trial,
the author may not be released
and could be imprisoned
during the "investigation"
period which can last tip to
nine lmonthlis.


Woman


saves

policeman
LONDION A policeman
chasing a gang of bank
robbers through a south
London street pulled up short
when one of them turned and
pointed a shotgun at him at a
close range.
"But the raider fled in
confusion when a woman
bystander shouted: "Don't
you shoot my policeman."
unstablele Grahamn
McClarty said later: "When I
faced the shotgun my mind
just went blank. But I knew I
had to have a go,"
McClarty, who like all
British policemen was
unarmed, normally directs
traffic in the area and "I
suppose most of the mothers
have got to know me.
"I don't personally know
the woman who shouted," he
added. "But I will be
eternally grateful to her."
Police said they are
keeping the woman's identity
secret as "she is our best
witness She was able to give
us a full description of the
gang.
The five robbers got away
with 4.000 pounds (8,400
dollars) in the raid Monday int
Kennington.


y HAP Y -Thursday .
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Tuesday, February 12, 1974.


X tribunt 9
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903- 1914
SIR FTIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt.. LL.D.
Publisher/Editor 1917.1972
Contributing Editor 1972.- i
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,.M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972.
Published Daily Monday to Saturday "


Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Tuesday, February 12, 1974.


By ETIF \\N DLPUCHI
WHETHER the Hon. Dr. Doris Jolhnson wants to believe it or
not ... crime in the Bahamas has increased to an alarming degree.
I am not talking about petty crimes when a man may be
tempted to steal because his family is hungry.
I am talking about cold, calculated bloody murder and other
forms of vicious infractions of the law. including rape, bank
hold-ups and aimed robbery.

I et ime say here and now that I consider rape the worst of all
possible crimes Sometimes I think I would hang a man for rape
before I would hang him for murder.
I suppose I have a weakness for the "stronger" sex ... let me
tell you, there is nothing "weak" about women ... and so I feel
S, '. about any abuse of a woman's pride and dignity.
Iln murder the person is dead and past all feeling. Rape is a
hi, ,Jiltr ri', experience with which a woman must live for the rest
other life.

Before I stray too far and write an article on the beauty and
dignity of womanhood. let me get back on the track.
Today I'm going to write about capital punishment.
Is it right to follow the dictum of "an eye for an eye, and a
tooth for a tooth" as laid down m the Old Testament ... or is the
modern conception that capital punishment is barbarous ..
correct*'
My distinguished lawyer brother Eugene is bitterly opposed to
capiuai punishment. I hate to see him lose a murder case because
he becomes so involved in the life of his client that he is
emotionally upset for a long time afterwards.
I have always been an advocate of capital punishment but he
has at least convinced me that there is reason for leniency in
crimes of passion which are sometimes justifiable.

I will always recall a conversation I had with Major Gerald
French, son of Field Marshal Lord French who was one of
Britain's great military leaders in the first world war and in other
wvais at tlIe turn of thie ceinturv'
Major French was sent to Nassau to reorganize the police force
after thlie specacular furner-Yates Police Commission enquiry
that rocked tihe comtiIli niti y.i
This case arose out of the fact that Major Turner,
Commissioner of Police. had personally arrested a white socialite
anid took hiim tt1iroh li he streets to the guardroom. Mr. Yates
vsias the Magistrate. lie was accused of colhlusion with Turner.
'lie then ruling gltroup inl this island exploded over the
"indignitm they ielt had been inflicted onl one of their kind and
foi moniiths tIe commilunity was torni apart by' this affair

As night be expected, I got into the middle of it and caught
plenty hell because I raii_'-,d myself on the side of Turner and
Yatles. All tie power grouip.s made me their target.
I won't go into detail. Thlie upshot of tile case was that Turner
and Yates were justified by the Colonial Office but, foi the sake
of peace in the communtli ity,. they were transferred to other posts
in thIe Empiie while poor little me lhad to stiy in Nassau to bear
tle wrath of thlie otlended gentry for a lI ng time.
B13 lhe lime it was all over thei police force was ,omipltelel
deinoralized. Majoi Frenchs was sent here by the Colonial Office
to reorganit/e the force and restore discipline to its ranks.
Because I had gonCe ut1 onli a lhnb tor Tuiner and Yates, Major
I relich became a I lend of e inte.
One da\ we were discussing miIurder and lie said tlat theree are
cicutiinsilainccs in which a man is no man if lie doesn't kill"
I aglee wii th at Onil examinaOtiio ot il heart I know that
there are ciicumstlalno.,s thialt would provoke me to murder
,without teeleiicn .it remorse ltor iy action.
But these .c' e\xt :"'id;:iary circumstances which very often a
juiny would consitdel "justitiable homicide".

What I am J.in about today is cold-blooded, calculated
inurdei ini winch. a mian sets out deliberately to kill another.
Some \ ears ago there was a case in one of the Out Islands ... 1
think it was Fi iill 1.1 .. in whist iwo nien set out one night with
the .s ILJ intention of killing the first pCeisoti they met. The first
person they timet was a diiink. hey killed him and hanged for the
crime,
SomntC \ears ast two men set out from somewhere in llhe
Middle Western U.S. oiln an excursion in cirime.e
They forged cheques all along the route. At Miami they picked
up a girl, stole a boat. and set offt on a cruise through (li e islands.
These men had no experience with handling a boat and so they
ran up onl a lock at an abandoned lighthouse li the western
Bahamas.
The captain of a .Miamni fishing boat, out of Florida with a
group of tourists aboard . I think they were Canadians ... sas\
the wrecked vessel and went to the rescue of the men.
One of the men shot line captain. They left the tourists and
their girl friend on the rocks, stole the captain's boat and
continued their cruise.
Through inexperciience. once again they ran on a cay off the
coast of Cuba. I'hi were arrested and biouglt back to Nassau
where my brothel defended them In court.
My brother was terribly upset when they were condemned to
hang.
The murdered captain had a family in Miamni who depended on
him for support.
I don't mind saying that my feelings in this case at the time
was that it was too damn bad they couldn't hang these men
twice.
There is no excuse or justification for this kind of crime and I
feel that the extreme penalty should be administered.
The last man to be hanged in Nassau was an inexperienced
bank robber. This was really a very stupid case.
This man drove utip to a bank somewhere in the Oakes Field
area. Without cause or hesitation hle shot the manager of the bank
who had offered no resistance, filled a sack with money, and took
off for Andros where he was caught in the bush a few days later.


(OLD JlJMPS $3 AN OUNCE


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F


There had not been a hanging for a long time before this case
but the community was so shocked by the cold-blooded.
senselessness of this crime that this man was sent to the gallows.
Nowadays nobody is hanged in Nassau. however brutal and
senseless the murder.

The man who killed Robert Kennedy in California is still in
prison, as also is the man who murdered the Rev. Martin Luther
King. They are both a burden on the state and an existent cause
of public agitation.
In recent years there has been an epidemic of mass murders all
over the world, especially in the U.S. Terrorists are running wild
in Argentina.
Take the case of the Jewish athletes who were murdered by
Arab terrorists at the Olympic games in Germany. These men
finally got away with it!
All over the world today terrorists, who not many years ago
would have been executed, are held in prison and they have
become a rallying cry ... and the cause for further brutal murders
.. by associates who demand their release.
The cause for these later murders would have been removed
had these men been dispatched from the scene by the application
of the extreme penalty.

My brother argues that capital punishment is no deterrent to
murder and that murder is a crime that is seldom repeated.
There was some truth in this claim at the time he advanced this
argument some years ago but the whole pattern has changed in
recent years and murder has become a 'ay of life 'or :, segments
ot itrgar,;/ed society.

Is capital punishment a deterrent to murder?
I will tell you some of my own experiences with violence.
Because of my constant involvement in highly controversial
public issues, all my life I have lived under the threat of violence
Four times I have been very near it.
The first occasion was in The Tribune yard when a man stood
over me with an upraised butcher knife.
"Go ahead, do it," I challenged him, looking him dead in the
eyes.
I saw in his eyes that my attitude surprised him. He hesitated a
moment and in that moment I knocked him out.
The second occasion was during an election campaign at Bets.
Bay, \1.,v jtLiji.i when a gioup of men came to mnI assistance and
dragged my assailant away.
The third time was on the beach at Pirates Well. 1.,\ \L ija
when a man threatened all my supporters with a lone butcher
knife and I called them all away. I told them to forget it An
election was not that important to me. Up to that time I was
leading the poll at Mayaguana but. rather than have amone
injured or killed, I abandoned the whole affair. To hell with it, I
told my supporters.
The fourth time was during an election at Inagua.
i was a guest in the house of Bill Erickson in Mathew, I >wi
ltiring the campaign.
One night the Ericksons were all out. I was alone reading in the
parlour when there was a rap on the front door.
I went to the door and opened it. No one was there I stepped
out on the dark porch to see where the person had gonit when a
man, who had obviously been drinking, stepped out of the
shadows. He was brandishing a long butcher's knife. He told m:
in so many words that lie had come to kill me. Hlie had a 'im.st
curious reason for wanting to do this.
Although the Ericksons gave the people of this island thie onl
industry that provided employment ... from the day the\ l ewnli
there a group in the island were violently opposed to them.
You maI remember how two men went berserk when i.s
family first went to the island. A man was murdered and the two
young men, who had terrorized the community lfor several da\ s
. burnt down several of the Erickson properties .. and thelc
escaped to Haiti where they were later betrayed by a sweetheart
1ol a price. They were brought back to Nassau tried. con'icled
and hanged.
Well ... many years later this resentment of the Erncksons was
still harboured by a small unit in the island.
This man told me that he had come to murder me because I
was their representative in thile House and I had no business giving
with the Ericksons. He felt that I had betrayed the people
through this association!
None of this makes sense, of course. But does crime ever ;nake
sense'.,
Sensible or not ... I was alone on a dark poich w'iih an
intoxicated man with a knife at ml throat.
At this point in my story let me give you a piece of advice
Should you ever find yourself in such a position ... don't lose
your nerve. That's the best and surest way of getting killed
"All right." 1 said to my assailant calmly, "go ahead Kill me
But remember ... you will hang."
Hie hesitated a moment. He then lowered his arm. Turned
around and staggered away, disappearing into the darkness as
suddenly as he had appeared.
This man is still alive and performing a useful service at the
island.
I don't have to tell you that I amn still alive and kicking
thanks to thie fact that. at least in some cases,Jear ni the ropr is a
dsterrent to murder.
In any case ... I don't think there is any justification fo
Lold-blooded, unprovoked inurder. In such cases 1 feel that a
murderer should swing.
And don't forget this ... I also think that rapists should be dealt
with most severely.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
I don't think minuchi of a man who is not wiser today than he
was yesterday: ABRAHAM LINCOLN


FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA Prime Minister
and Mrs. Pindling dine with
Count Basie and Mrs. Basie in
the Camelot Room of the
King's Inn & Golf Club to
benefit the new Rainbow
Pavilion at the Rand
Memorial Clinic. Count
Basie's band played for
dancing later. Honorary
chairman for the event were
Mrs. Basie, Mr. and Mrs.
Henry Bowen, Mrs. Dorothy
Rand Connor and Mr. and
Mrs. Kendal Nottage.
Ii I I43
th to lwaragiaas










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rriIe .If I.42 22 ar i,,nnce to
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ilmrtsasc t'hie .alu,' ., ih'ir monetary
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Tuesday, February 12, 1974


--


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77',I 7Ml t **itl o


I


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Tuesday, February 12, 1974.


llhe Tribunrm


.. ...









By Abigail Van Buren
t 1974 by Chicago Triwne-N. Y. News Synd., Inc.
DEAR ABBY: I am a 17-year-old boy-nearly 18, and
I've always been big for my age. I live with my mother
Sand a younger brother in a nice. friendly neighborhood.
That's the trouble, it's too friendly.
One of my neighbors is my mother's friend. She's mar-
ried to a great guy in his forties, and they have two nice
kids. They're beautiful people, and "Mrs. Friendly" has
always treated me like one of her kids-until lately. She's
-Abeen petting me, kissing me and running her fingers thru
Smy hair. This was okay when I was 9, but now she gets me
all aroused. It's not like she doesn't know what she's doing
Either. She does it on purpose.
Now I find myself hanging around her place, and I
know this is not going to get me anywhere but in trouble.
Don't tell me to stay away from her. I know that's what I
should do, but I keep finding reasons to hang around her.
She's a good looking lady for her age, and half of me says,
S "Stay" and half of me says, "Run."
Have I got a problem or not? HALF AND HALF
S DEAR HALF: You bet you have. But you're' bright
S enough to see it coming, and wise enough to ask how to
S head it off. Listen to the half with the brains in it, and stay
S as far away from "Mrs. Friendly" as you can.

DEAR ABBY: An 18-year marriage has me bored stiff
Sand dissatisfied. A moderate income provides adequate
clothes, food and a small home with nothing left for my
Spurs, vacation trips and these extra wants People say,
"Count your blessings," but I ask n,-,.Ife "Am I supposed
s' to be satisfied with so little as a home, three healthy,
trouble-free kids, a vice-free husband who's home every
night, who helps with the housework, embraces, and com-
pliments me daily, and is good in bed I hut his age is
beginning to rob me of that d?"
Would anyone blame me if I left for a man who can
show me some fun even if only for a little while?
BOREE
DEAR BORED: I would be among those who would
remind you to count your blessings. And yes, I would
"blame you" for jeopardizing those blessings for "some
fun," even if only "for a little while,"

DEAR ABBY: I have a 2-year-old son, and whenever
we are in public a stranger is sure to say. "My, what
cute little girl!'" This happens even ien he's wearing hi"
Football suit.
I never dress him like a girl Hi, hair is cut like mos
- boys his age, but what really disturbs me is after 1 correct


'Mrs. Friendly' is too friendly to young lad


ARR VLD TODAY: WEATHER
-11 -- C'. Q I. Ul. th F;n- .


people, they go right on saying. "What a ieautifu! .'. girl DEI.R MIOTHEl: Consider it done. And equally dam- banama Star. imcrai Seas, earner: rair tonight, su
he would make." aginb to a child's self-image is the little girl who is con- Flavia from r Mia Fro pic tomorrow
My son is learning the difference between bohs and stanth mistaken for a boy: avenLfrom W) s Pa Beach Stap Sight. ton modet
girls, and when people mistake his sex,. they confuse him I Day for West Pal Beach Max tomorrow 77
worry about what will happen to his deve.lpment .nd lf- (,,I r\ IIE TO VIRGO: It is not true that people TIDES SUN Ries6:48 am.
image. who threaten to commit suicide "never" do. Your friend .m.
Abby, please tell people to keep sueth comments to needs help. I urge you to involve yourself and insist that low 5 46 a. ind 5:54 Sets :01 p.m.
themselves. There are other mothers ,h ha'e the -ame she get it. Your Suicide Prevention 'Center offers free land p.m. MOON Rise-s 13907 p.m.
problem, so please print and I'll gel 10 copies to hand to excellent counseling in the Los Angeles area. Tell her to Wind: North-easter1l 8 to 15 Sets 9:03 a.m.
thoughtless people. MOTHER OF AN ALL-BOY BOY call :81-5111 for help. m.p.h. High 11.51 a.m.


"With the taxes I pay, I deserve more than a junior
clerk to tell me that my tax returns are incorrect."


SI. AMREWS SCHOOL


TEACHERS REQUIRED FOR SEPIEHER, 1914


Thye SecoSndarychQL(280 on oill, aveiatje class s. 2b)
1 Head oi iNGLISH Depintment
2 BIOt OGY & CHFFMISTRY
3. (.l , .' tY
These posts will involve .t'jching to G.C E. '0' hevel,
possibly 'A' lvel anid pitep'liing -tun dentst fo l ei'i i V liit
American Univels ties.
4. MODI RN MATiHE MATICS (S.M.P. pieteiahblv) with
some BIOLOGY o C CHEMISTRY & GENE RAl
SCIENCE .
This post will involve teaching in the lowi toinis of the
Secondai y bShool
5. Boy's PHYSICAL ILDUCATION
6. Girl's PHiYSICAL EDUCATION
These posts will also involve the oiganistion of
programmes fori and teat thnig in the Juniioi School
7. ART, with ability to teach lower foin F RENC.H tan
advantage.

Minimum Requirements for Applca.n
Post 1-4: A good dcgiec, pri ofessioinal training and thiee
years teaching expeliencce
Posts 5-7: Recognised thie veal pioltessional training and
five years teaching expoei inct.
The Primary Sof L(220 on roll)
8. FIVE CLASSROOM TFACtIERS. {Lach to be es-
ponsible for thet full timetable of ,i Middle oi t power
J Jurnioi C(lass ot up to twenty five boys and gir ls.

Minimum Qualifications
Recognised Teaching Ce iif t ite rand th ee year s i recent, f Ill
time teaching expert ience
Ability to teach beginner 's FRENCH, play the PIANO
and/or teach PHYSICAL EDUCATION to several year
groups an advantage


Salary Scales
Three Year Teacher Tiaininii
General Degree with Teacher
Training
Honours Degree with Teacher
Training

Annual Increments:


B$6,100 B$10,800

3$7.000 B$12,000

B$7,300 B$12,400

X B$3,000 to B$l10,000


X B$400 to B$12,000

Point of ently dependent upon qualifications and
experience. One incement is given for eveiy two years of
teaching experience outside( the Bahamas
Application foinms available:
THE HEADMASTER
St. Andrew's School
P. O. Box N7546
Nassau, Bahamas


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Tuesday, February 12, 1974


_TI gribtune


MR. Robert Munroe has recently been promoted to manager of the Gazebo Coffee Shop at
the Loews Paradise Island Hotel and Villas, where he first started in April, 1972, as a waiter in
the Imperial Dining Room and Terrace. In August of that same year he was promoted to
captain and in April 1973, to Asst. Maitre d' Hotel. Mr. Munroe is married and the father of
four (4). Picture shows Mr. Munroe (left) and food and beverage service manager, Dewitt
Duncanson.











Loews Paradise Island Hotel and Villas has announced the appointment of Mr. Dagobert
Hammer as executive chef. Mr. Hammer is a graduate of Hotel and Grand Restaurant, Dulac
Lucerne and Hotel Fachschule Montana Lucerne, Switzerland. He is pictured (right) with
Dewitt Duncanson, food & beverage service manager.


Owners and managing
directors of some of the most
deluxe establishment min
France and Belgium recently.
spent a %eek enjoymg the
sand, sun and sea in the
Bahamas
A group of them i
pictured frighti during a
dinner partN at the Nassau
Harbour Club.
Bottom row from left to
right are Mr. and Mrs. Henri
Frachot and Mrs. Anita
Blesgen.
Second row: Mrs. Odette
Duchateau, Mr. John
Deleveaux, Assistant
Director, Ministry of Tourism
and Mr. Joe Eleslgn.
Third row: Mrs. Kay
Gurney, Mr. M.J. Gurney,
Honorary Consul of Monaco
in the Bahamas and Director
of Pan American World
Airways here, and Mrs.
Andrea Weissen.
Last row: Mr. Albert
Duchateau, Mr. Marcel
Verdier, and Mr. Fred
Weissen.
The group was enchanted
with the Bahamas and say
they intend to promote the
islands among their clientele.


S.1


I)


What's your






heart's desire?


A Royal Bank




Savings Account




can help you


The most important thing lUv
about savings is to do it
regularly. When you do,
your money builds up.
Another important thing is
to put your savings to work
for you. Earning interest. In
The Helpful bank. Savings
offer security for rainy
days, future investments,
flexibility.
Savings also offer you something else.
Your chance to buy your heart's desire.
Helpful Bankers in Nassau and the Family
Islands can tell you about savings. Just ask one.


The Royal The Helpful Bank
ROYAL BANK
Branches throughout the Bahamas


Roy Solomon, (right) managing director of Solomon
Brothers Limited, tours the firm's warehouse in Chesapeake
Road with E. Patrick Cash who has been selected as a
candidate in the company's current management training
programme.


Management trainee


TWI NTY-TH RtFF YEAR
01l D Patrick (Cash is the
second management trainee to
be recruited by Solomon
Brothers Limited in their
current programme of in depth
training leading eventually to
middle-and-top-management
posts in the local firm.
Mr. C('ash joins Brian
Wilkinson who was the first
applicant selected for the
training scheme which was
announced last month by Roy
M. Solomon. managing director
of Solomon Brothers
The son of Mr & Mrs. Eric
B. Cash, Patrick was born in
Nassau in April. 11450.
Educated at St Augustine's
College, he obtained four '0'
level passes in the General
Certificate of Education
examinations He continued his
education at Marquette
University in the United States
and was awarded a B.A. degree
in Communications and Public
Relations.
After his return to Nassau
Mr. Cash was employed as an
announcer'producer by Radio
Bahamas He later joined
I.B.M. Bahamas Limited as a


computer operator at tat
firm's Freeport oft Iice i
relaxation, Patrick enio
photography and reading
In welcoming M (Cash
his new appointment this w\eck
Mr. Solomon stated thl;
the programme of train iti
which Mr. Cash will undergo
designed to familiarize I f'!
with all aspects of Solomto:
Brothers' operations, and to i,
him for eventual promotion t
managerial responsibility ie-
"I am extremely pleajsd.
Mr, Solomon coilnilcn t 'I
"that we have been .ible
select Brian Wilkinson aJ'.'
Patrick Cash to join
intensive training program.
for young Bahalians .
confident that they
respond adniira bl to thl
opportunity,. and tl,;' it
capabilities and es cutn
thorough knowledge ol th
business will strengthen ,
plans for the further expanT-'":
of Solomon Brothers.'
Mr. Solomon added that hi
hoped in the near future to l-
able to announce the selection
of one or two additional
management trainees


Beat the bush blazes


ONCE MORE the dry
season period is fast
approaching and the public is
advised to take basic
precautions to avoid serious
property loss during this
particularly dangerous period.
Check the following fire
prevention points issued by
the director of fire services,
L.J.E. Baillargeon:
If you live in an area
where there is bush near your
house, make sure that none is
nearer than 50 feet. For those
living in dense bush areas the
distance should be at least
100 feet.
Keep a garden hose
pre-connected to a water tap.
If you must burn rubbish
or bush, only burn a small
quantity at a time in order to
keep it under control. Never
burn on a windy day. Water
the area surrounding the fire
before lighting it this will give
you better control, should
the fire try to get out of
hand.
If your roof is


constructed of flammable
shingles and becomes
seriously exposed during a
bush fire, concentrate your
efforts in protecting your
roof by spraying with your
garden hose.
Beating with a broom.
branch or an old wet sack is
also an effective way of
preventing a fire from
spreading.
To attack a bush fire you
should approach down wind
first, then work your way
along the sides until you have
it surrounded.
Owners of undeveloped
land should have some
consideration for adjoining
properties by making a fire
break on exposed'1pa ndaries.
Be extra careful when
travelling along roads with
grass or bush verges not to
discard your cigarettes or
cigars carelessly.
If you see a bush fire call
the Fire Brigade telephone
No. 919 don't assume that
someone else has reported it.


I I









Tuesday, February 12, 1974.


(hb Urtibunt


forw W

VIRGINIUS WELLS
celebrated his 87th birthday on
January 11.
The interview with him had
to be postponed because of a
death in the family but Friday
I went to see Mr. Wells at his
present home in Johnson
Estates.
Better late than never! Mr.
Wells is the father of nine
children, six sons and three
daughters (all living).
In 1971 his children brought
him from Grays, Long Island
where he was born and bred
and where he worked until this
time at the age of 84.
For Virginius Wells and
work are no strangers.
As a child he used to get up
at 5 a.m. and do a few chores
before he walked nine miles to
school. After walking the nine
miles home again more chores
awaited him.
Life might have been hard
for Virginius Wells. the boy.
But life was also sweet in those
days before the beginning of
this century for children.
Play was unhampered by
traffic in fact Mr. Wells said
that when he returned tromn
"the project" in 1919 there
were only two bicycles in
Nassau, apart from carraiges,
When he was thirteen the
young Virinius's father


ild'


VIRGINIUS WELLS


died arid he and his mother
"had to battle together" to
raise ithe younger children.
"I -ould only go to school
two day\ of the week (then)",
Mr, Wells said. "I spent the rest


of the week helping inymother
on the farm".
I niertainment was minimal.
Church provided some
outl;t. \ir s i'is I was the
catechist for fifty-six years at


p


I


DECIDING ON THEIR BAHAMIAN MENU are Blair Lancaster, Miss Canada; Judy
Muir manager of the group; Miss Tish Williams, secretary to the group and Mrs. Duke
(Joan) Hanna. (See this column for story). Photo: Vincent Vaughan


TOWN"andOIUN, il


Old Bahamian (87)



blames cow's milk


becomes British Colonial Secretur>.
1912 Manchu l)ynasts
abdicates in China and provincial
Republic is established.
IS95 Japanese forces score
impressive victor, at Wei-liai-Wei in
C.hini.
1887 Britain and Italy agree to
maintain status 4110 in
Mediterranean.
1885 German Iast Alrica
C company is chartered.
1782 Indecisive battle of
Sadras. Madras. hetseen British and
I reach and India.
1742 C'harles Albert is
crowned HIoi Roman 1 emperor
Charles VII.
17316 Nadir Shah becomes
King iti Persia.
1733 lEnglish colonists led h,
Janmes ldwvard Oglethorpte land at
Saaunnul. (Georgia.
1( ,9 -t Declaration of Rights in
I nisland in which William and Mary
are proclaimed King and Queen for
life: (.ernian Diet declares war on
I race follotsiiig devastation o(f the
Palatine.
1610 Hlenry IV uf I-rance signs
alliance with German Protestant
Il77 LDon John of Austria,
ines governor of the Netherlands.
issues edict to settle civil war.
1;;4 a- lsd% Jane ( re's is
e\estuted for treason in IEngland.


...by Daphne Wallace-Whitfield


1 3


eiU


children


St. Mary's the Virgin Church.
One made one's own
entertainment and Mr. Wells
recalled with relish the
occasional dances that were
held in private homes.
Dancing was not to a band
or a record player. Accordians I
and hand drums provided the I
beat i
"I was taught dancing by
one of my cousins who had
been to England she'd gone
to dancing school", he told me.
They would dance polkas,
merengues, waltzes ... in fact "I
could dance anything the
music played", Mr. Wells
reminisced proudly.
This wiry old man looks
much younger than his years.
His hearing is perfect, his
memory, he described as
"wonderful", his eyesight is
quite good although he
admitted that he cannot see to
"do fine reading".
He prefaced many of his
remarks with "By jove" and
answered many of my
questions with "You bet".
He is not at ease with the
casual swearing and profanities
used frequently in the speech
of to-day. "The first time I
heard 'g.. d...' was in the
United States", Mr. Wells said.
Life might have been hard
but sweet in the islands but
money was short, so the young
Virginius went to the United
States in 1906 on the project
to farm. When the First
World War broke out he
returned home but went back
again in 1919 to 1920. For two
years after that he worked at
Rose Island.
Project life would tax the
endurance of many young men
of to-day but young Virginius
Wells saw nothing usually
hard about it.
.He lived in a shack
explaining that all the
bachelors lived in shacks. A
working week was ten hours a
day, six days a week and "I
was paid $10.50 a week". Mr.
Wells pointed out that living
was so much cheaper with a
loal of bread costing 10c., beef
steak 25c. a lb. and stewing
beef 15c.
In fact, Mr. Wells thinks that
life to-day is much harder with
everything costing so much.
In 1912 Virginius Wells
wedded Keloria to whom he
was married fifty-nine years
until her death in 1971.
"I had my house before I
got married", Mr. Wells said.
From 1923 until his children
retired him in 1971 Mr. Wells
worked his own farm and has
never left the Bahamas once
after his project days.
Changes came slowly to the
island, lIe first got a radio in
1917. "I enjoy it", he said
adding that nowadays he only
likes to listen to the news.
"Life wasr better in those
days", Mr. Wells reminisced,



By The Associated Press
IOD)AY is Tuesday, Februars
12th, the 43rd day of 1974. There
are 322 days left in the year.
HICGH IGIHTS in history on
this date:
1973 United States announces
a ten per cent dollar deCvaluation.
1972 -tritain is hurt by a coal
miners' strike.
1971 Fight U.S. helicopters
are shot down over Laos.
1970 Israeli air raid on scrap
mental plant in E.gypt kills 70
civilians.
1969 Communists help deal
India's governing Congress P'arty a
stunning defeat in West Bengal.
1968 UN Secretary-Gen
eral II Thant discusses Vietnam
peace prospects with Soviet leaders
in Moscow.
1967 Soviet Union hacks
dos\n from an attempt to restrict
allied use of air corridors to Berlin.
1956 Russia warns that
dispatch of U.S. or British troops to
Middle Fast will violate United
Nations charter.
1953 Blritain and lg ypt reach
a.grcement on Sudan; Russia severs
relations with Israel.
1938 Adolph Hitler forces
Kurt Schushnigg to promise release
ot Na/is in Austria.
1934 Workers stage general
strike in I rnnce.
19421 Winston Churchill


"not so much worry. You
could get a room anywhere in
Nassau in those days for 50c a
night".
He seemed somewhat at a
loss to understand to-day's
children.
"I never had no trouble with
any of my children. Arthur
(one of his sons) at 23 was
more obedient than little
children to-day".
He attributed the bad
behaviour of to-day's children
to being fed cows' milk.
"Children never seemed to be
so wild. Since they raised
children on animal milk the\
get wild", he said.
On the other hand, in
response to a query as to
whether children and parents
talked to each other more in
those days Virginius Wells
replied emphatically: "You
bet".
So, maybe it isn't only cows
milk that is responsible for
to-day's growing generation
gap.

LAST WEEK the Raffle
Committee of the Bahamas
Humane Society received the
car from Central Garage which
is the first prize of the raffle
being held during the month of
February.
The car is a Dodge Avenger
red exterior and black
upholstery.
Incidentally, this year part
of the proceeds from the sale
of the raffle tickets are going


.1opc'


THE RAFFLE
COMMITTEE of the
Bahamas Humane Society
receives the Dodge Avenger,
Ist prize in the raffle from
Central Garage. Left of the
car are Mrs. Pat McCarthy
and Mr. Bernard Thompson.
Left to right (right of the car)
are Mrs. Jennie Mackey (in
charge of private sales), Mrs.
Donald Brogden, Mrs. Betty
Kenning (President of the
Humane Society), Mr. Henry
Lindsey and Inspector Jack
Rycroft, staff members of the
Society. Raffle committee
members missing from photo
are Mrs. Kendal Isaacs, Mrs.
Trevor Marshall, Mrs. Mary
Stevenson and Mr. Donald
Brogdon. Photo: Philip
Symonette.


Khrushchev's
Wife


K hrusch s firstwife, we are bld by
lohn Nobel, a prisoner of 13 yars i
Communist prison camps, spent I ears
In the concentration camp of Pata,
Russia. She was plead in prison by her
own husband.
John Nobel adds that his wife was a
Christian and was preying for Khrush.
che. Khrushchev was touring the United
States shaking hands ad exchanging
smiles with Americans. HIs wn first
wife, though, and thousands and thou'
sands of Christians were tortured to
death in Communist prisons.
A moving account of their coura-
geous faith and stand for the Lord is
contained in the book TORTURED FOR
CHRIST, by Rev. Richard Wurmbrand,
a best-seller in 27 languages.
Be interested in the plight
of our persecuted brethren
behind the Iron and Bam-
boo Curtains. You can help!
Mail coupon for the book,
"Tortured for Christ" by
Rev. Richard Wurmbrand.
m m mm mmmm
SClip and mail to:
VOICE OF THE MARTYRS
.O. Box 345, Grmnd Cayman, B.W.I
3"Remember the m tha are in bonds"


I Address
cny
COUNTRY 42TT
m m m mi 1im i imm


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A ESTATEP.O. BOX 4278
REAL TA BERWIN HOUSE on FREDERICK STREET,
NASSAU.


-C


to help the Humane Societ\ in
Freeport which I'm told are in
need ofI help.
fhe raffle sale got off to a
swin-ning start with Humane
Page 9. Col. I


"THERE BUT FOR THE GRACE OF GOD GO I",
appears to be this lucky dog's attitude towards his less
fortunate brethren as he does his thing in promoting the
raffle ticket sales for the Bahamas Humane Society. The
dog, Duke is accompanied by his master, Philip Stubbs,
staff member of the Society who sells a ticket to a
passer-by.


I I I I


I


S IIII III III I lUI I I II . .


_ ....._._ __,, -,~.,, _~____.._ ~ ----I-.~-~--- --- -- -` ~i----- ---- t ,_


ho t i *
. 4" ..k












lay, February 12, 1974.


ALCOHOL DOES THE DAMAGE


By Jimun Alberse
WHAT ( AUSI-S alcoholics to
develop cirrhosis and other
freq uLentl tatal liver
diseases'. Mans physicians.
noting the tendency of
alcoholics to drink moic
than thc cat believe that
po' i tIitrltion plays a ke\
rle. But B L o resetichers
noil f the \1liO:, Sinai
S h ,...i ,1 Medicine and the
Bril \ Veteirans tlosplitl in
\ .'ik now clJaimn that it
i- n k .ilo c \hicih dtl o
the Jjna ,e. *\ ltoii- \ ca
l u\ s >']\in l i h' eml
Sltid ,x in \ ccd Ihei n i
^,a vl! .: tilrl, d .il,.oh,,>l jIt


I s. I Ru0i th.
halr thibeI i












USE





CLASSIFIED

ADVTS.


Charles Lieber selected
baboons for their stud,
because the primates live is
long as 15 years, far longer
than most other laboratory)
animals, and have livers
similar to man's. The
researchers put 26 baboons
on high -protein ,
high-vitamin diets, butt for
1 3 of the animals
substituted ethanol, or grain
alcohol, for much of the
carbohydrate portion of the
dietary requirements. The
alcohol provided the animals
with fully half their caloric
int L i'

'.\ reported in TIMIE magazine,
the baboons responded to
the booze-equivalent to
about a fifth of a gallon per
da\ for a man just as
humans do. They became
intoxicated and, ultimately,
dependent on drink. Two of
the 13 animals became so
addicted to alcohol that
the\ experienced withdrawal
s mptoms when denied it,
including what seemed to be
delirium tremens. or the
DTs.
1)1STROYS MYTH
1'hc most significant result o!
the study would seen to be
the destruction of the myth
that alcoholic liver damage is
the result of bad diet rather
than boo/e. All the animals
which were kept on the
drinker's diet for anywhere


from nine months to Itou
years developed sonice kinlt
of alcoholic licer danl.iLc.
More than halt the baboons
developed fatt liveIs, ain,
four contracted alcodholli
hepatitis;. Two anini .il
which were kept on tile
bottle for tour yeIs
developed cirrhosis, tile
progressive and severe
hardening and contraction
of' the liver
The .study provided othei
insights into alcoholism
which Rubin and l.icbei
consider to be one of mtan's
worst "env iron mental"
ailments. Because pure
alcohol was used exclusivel\
in the experiments,. it
became evident that the
toxic effects were the result
of the alcohol itself and nol,
as some other recsearcheis
have suggested, caused bL.
any of the impulriths ,or
additives found in bter, ini
or hard liquor. ( Om.ludl.'
Doctor Rubin: ou can't
protect yourself a.ii!
alcoholic damage hx .rt in
well: what counts is the itl
amount of alcohol \(il
drink."
I here's no truth at all in tl t
rumnour that this research
report was banned i1
France, where C \i\ c 011
worries about his lier, think
all he can afford. and cats 'is
though it made a difference


Eat and Grow Younger



Honey, one of finest sweets,




unexcelled as energy food

By LELORD KORDEL
Number Nine of a Series
Please don't get the idea that I am against all sweets S/ -IAF'5
in your Eat-and-Grow-Younger diet. I enjoy a sweet as "
much as you. But I try to confine these sweet sprees to
a type of carbohydrate that will make a definite contri-
bution to my daily quota of vitamins and minerals-that
is, to confections and desserts made with pure honey.


Perhaps you've never been
told that honey is the only ani-
mal carbohydrate available to
us as a sweet; that it is the only
predigested sugar in nature, be-
ing 99 percent predigested when
it reaches your table. Although
the dextrose of levulose (some-
times called "grape sugar" or
"blood sugar") in honey is the
sweetest of all sugars, it is also
the mildest, the easiest to digest
and the best source of quick,
lasting energy.
loney is one of the few sweets
that possess natural laxative
properties. It is also one of the
quickest stimulants known. More
over, the use of honey in the
diet as a sweetener does not re-
sult in the heavy production of
body fat that follows use of 100-
percent carbohydrate, no-vita-
min, no-mineral white sugar.


loney has a high vitamin C
content. The darker the honey,
the more nutrition it contains.
VITAMINS IN HONEY
Most honeys can also supply
your diet with thiamine and rib-
oflavin (along with other B-vita-
mins) and a good proportion of
food minerals, plus some hor-
mones and a few amino acids
(protein). together with diastase
and enzymes to help digestion.
(an the same be said of re-
fined, white sugar? Indeed not!
You get nothing but pure starch
when you buy white sugar-and
viir problem is how to cut down
on starches, not increase them.
As a supreme conditioner for
strenuous activity, honey was
appreciated in ancient times.
The unparalleled athletes of an-
cient Greece trained for their
Olympic games on honey. Today
mountain climbers and long-dis-
tance swimmers use lar ge
amounts of honey in their train-
ing diets.
There is an easily proved,
wholly scientific reason why hon-
ey is a wonderful food to build
quick energy in run-down bodies,
to promptly stimulate fatigued
bodies back to normal, and to
feed weakened heart muscles.
Honey contains as its prime
ingredient the sugar dextrose -
which is readily converted in
the body to glycogen the only
form sugar can be stored in the
body for ready use when energy
is needed, (main storage places
are the liver, gland cells and
muscles).
Every bite of carbohydrate
you eat (flour. bread, cake,
spaghetti, rice, white sugar, can-.
dy. chocolate) must first be bro-
ken down to dextrose-a long
and intricate process.
You have heard the expres-
sion "blood sugar level" many
times. What it means is that a
certain amount of glycogen must
be present in your bloodstream
at all times; otherwise your
body efficiency grows less and
less. In case of a severely de-
creased blood sugar level (insu-
lin shock, brought on by an
overdose of the diabetes treat-
ment, is one instance), the brain
slows down so completely that
the person goes into a coma.


snack when you begin feeling
brain-and-body tired.
COUNTERACTS FATIGUE
Whenever your blood sugar
falls to such a low level that it
needs raising almost instantly to
counteract severe fatigue and a
general slowing down of the
heart muscle would you be
wise in eating a food that re-
quires long, intricate digestive
processing before it can be turn-
ed into dextrose that produces
instantly usable glycogen? Or
should you choose a food that is
already 99 percent predigested
dextrose'? That means honey!
When yi u depend on other
carbohydrates for energy (the
lactosi' in milk is the one excep-
tion), your heart muscle, your
brain cells, your bloodstream
must all wait for that urgently
needed glycogen until the long,
intricate digestive process is fin-
ished.

EXPERTS AGREE
Not only is honey itself the
purest of foods, it is also a good
purifier for your digestive tract.
D)r Schuette of the University
(if Wisconsin says dark honey
coiitains practically all the min-
erals composing the human skel-
eton Dr. Metchnikoff, famous
lii",iarn scientist, attributed the
unusually long life of Bulgarian
peasants to their milk-and-hon-
,y diet. )Dr liubner of Berlin
t'ni\ersity. an eminent nutri-
tional physiologist, has proved
that honey contains an abun-
dance of important B-vitamins.
Two or more teaspoonfuls of
honey with each meal will insure
adequate honey nutrients for
your body needs.
The ancients believed this nat-
ural sweet meant a great deal
to their survival. And, judging
frniom the results of many mod-
ern experiments. I believe it of-
fers all of us an opportunity to
live life to its fullest.


In a much milder form, a sive high protein foods
lowered blood sugar level causes should know about; how
you to seek a between-meals can boost your health.

BRITAIN'S FLOWER-POWER

SAVES BRAZILIAN COLONY
A BRITISH seed firm is flower at the top of a (
helping lo conserve a rare plant high rock face some 1,00O
in danger of extinction, above sea level. When
Iarly last year hompson flowers faded they were abl
and Morgan Ltd. of Ipswich, collect seeds from the 1
eastern Fngland, heard from round pods
one of their suppliers that Mr. Bruce Sangster,
what was believed to be the director of Thompson
only remaining colony of blue Morgan said: "We have bee
amaryllis had been located in a the seed business since 1
remote corner of the central and our reputation is pa
highlands of Bra/il. based on innovation. F'
lhe firm immediately ear we try to c
contacted a leading Brazilian 'something out of the ordit
botanist and commissioned to the hall million custor
him to try and find the colony who regularly receive
and bring back some seed catalogue 'his year, with
Ten weeks later, after a blue amaryllis, we think
journey by plane, boat and have excelled ourselves.
finally on foot, a team of Not only is the I
scientists found the plants in amaryllis a beautiful plant


RALPH BELLAMY, famous actor, discusses the health-way
of living with Lelord Kordel, noted nutrition expert and
author of "Eat and Grow Younger."
According to Mr. Bellamy: "Acting is a demanding profession.
Health and vitality are an actor's greatest assets. Without them,
even the most talented worker finds it difficult to do his best
work. That's why I take good care of myself. Among other things,
I consider wholesome diet to be very important."
Which is another way of saying that Ralph Bellamy lives ac-
cording to the principles advocated by Lelord Kordel-something he
has done almost instinctively for many years.


THANK YOU CONTESTANTS!

"NAME THE BABY- STUDIO"

Thank you for sending 385 names for our new
baby studio. Each entrant is now being
i:cktnowledged through the mail and a selection
of happy ideas will be published in the press
shortly together with the chosen name.
I--

---OIOGIAP94V
on the waterfront at East Bay & William Sts.
PHONE 5-4641
L -" -


NOTICE


TO: MICKI BIONDO
RE: Quieting Title Action No. 70 of 1967
Alice S. Nesbitt and Daisy Cox


Notice is hereby given that the trial of the
above-referenced action will commence
before His Lordship the Chief Justice, The
I lonourable Leonard J. Knowles in the
Supreme Court, Public Square, Nassau, on
Thursday 21st February 1974 at 10 a.m.



('ARSON, LAWSON, KLONARIS,
SAWYER & KNOWLES
Attorneys for the Petitioners
309 Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas


Coffee smell
I-VtRI f, WASHING ION (AP)
When Bargreen's coffee roaster is
perking, some say it "makes the
whole town smell good."
But the Puget sound air pollution
control agency says the coffee plant
must install an afterburner that will
eliminate the smell of the roasting
coffee.
tHos, ard Bargreen says the public
is "really up in arms about losing
the coffee aroma" from his pioneer
roasting plant, built in 1898 and
the only one left of more than 50
that once operated in western
Washington.
More than 100 persons have
signed a petition saying they like
their air with a coffee smell
And even pollution agents say
they appreciate the Dickensian
flavour of the warehouse with its
steep and narrow wooden stairs, its
ancient cage elevator and lofts
laden with sacks of coffee from
Colombia, Kenya, Brazil, El
Salvador. Costa Rica and
Guatemala. in addition to spices
and tea.
Some anonymous critics.
however, have complained the smell
outside the plant doesn't match the
fresh ground, mountaingrown
coffee smell found inside. One
resident described the odor as "just
like burning hair."
Bargreen insists the complaints
should he directed at a nearby pulp
mill


Tuesd


_1_1 _


/ ,AW ^ <

c 7


'lie _ribuitte













Tuesday, February 12, 1974.


ihr rtbunt,


From Page 7
Society staff member Philip
Stubbs' adopted dog, Bruce.
touting for sales to help his less
fortunate brothers and sisters
This is a gamble that will not
take the milk from the babies
- (tickets are only SI each)t the
'. house's "cut" goes to help the
animals of Nassau and IFreeport
and you have the chance of
winning the car or one of the
other lovely eight prices
S*** *****
In ''own recently was Miss
Canada. Blair Lancaster, wilth l
group of top ( andian fashion
designers and Canadian models
to work on a promotion for a
Canadian fashion magarinei
ile group were guests otf
Mr. George Myers of tlic
Nassau Bicach llIo;l
During her visit Miss ( janad;l
enjoyed dining at the
Iravellers' Rest, out West, as
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Duke
Hanna.

In town on m Sunldax w's th'
submarine "(tter'" iln hcr i c
crew of II1 M 's nav
"Otter" left I niglml in earl:
January and calime to \,s


ENGAGED TO BE MARRIED -
Scott and Mr. Stephen G. Eldon.


io I i cport tor some rest
,il rI e tIpei l tion" leave. On


FOR SALE
Opportunity to t rt, ha P1t iblished
RETAIL-EPUSINESS with p It l Hai Street
LOCATION (West of Raw<,n Squiro). long-terrn
IPase. Business *,,l jt <11 iss t vIalue
Enquiries: Servac IntPrnational Ltd.,
P. O. Rox N-88,
Nassau.




The itching drove me crazy

and I was too ashamed to


get help."


medical

inEg of


THOMPSON DRUG CO. LTD.
P. O. BOX 6027 PHONE 2-2351


4


You're riot aloit e. i
Thousandiris suffer the iMiS
tourmnent of
vaginal or iectal itch.
Thes' areas need pet. di iil (i .
That's BiCOZE NE. (Say it "By (o Zeeni.") This ni
fo inuli soothes away ttchmiq fst
Quiets youi t g(e to sri.tch, I vi)i piomo)tes Iheadl
inf lamed tissue.
Find out. Just ask your diq(j),t about t3BiCOZFINE.


S HE BBERS THE MOB ASI ENI







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Evening 8:30 Continuous Showings
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S "TODAY WE KILL, PLUS

TOMORROW WE DIE" R. "MIND OF
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N o ,e ,undr, is ,/ad.ro Terence Stamp,
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Plus 'THE HOUSE THAT DRIPPED BLOOD"
V \7. ',V IRR I/I I H L. HI )11 ADMI/ED71 1).


















AOmONo ('vD*I"RIS l h' I-*.D1.1 -DMIF'


Monday morning they left for
Charleston where Otter will
undergo maintainance and
thence to the Autec base at
Andros.
Submarine living is not for
those who need the wide open
spaces even 'though those
spaces he sea. Living in a long
narro' arc'ommnodation of a
submarine with nothing to see
except your seventy odd
shipmates requires much
togetherness in living, sleeping
and washing.
Top priority when "Otter"
docks, I understand, is a long,
deep bath in privacy after
.*** 'i.


sharing four toilets with
seventy odd others!

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Scott
announce .the engagement of
their daughter Jacqueline Anne
to Mr. Stephen G. Eldon, son
of Mr. and Mrs. William Eldon.
Miss Scott, a former Miss
Nassau lHigh School, is
employed by the Imperial Life
Assurance Company and Mr.
Eldon is a clerk with the law
firm of Higgs & Johnson.
Vincent E. Hamilton of
Nassau. a freshman at Luther
College in Iowa. spent the cold
month of January in Texas on
an off-campus study
programme.
Vincent was one of 17
Luther students studying camp
counselling and outdoor
recreation at Camp Chrysalis in
Kerrville, Texas. Archery,
canoeing, boating, campcraft
and bait and fly casting are
some of the activities included
in the three week course.

"1 1)O OVE YOU" is the
theme of the Bahamas
Secretaries Association second
Annual Valentine's D)inner and
Fashion Show to be held on
Saturday February 16 at Tiki
Village in the Nassau Beach
Hotel.
Cocktails will be served an
7.30 p m.
A number of professional
secretaries will model clothes
from local stores and these will
be buttressed by two
professional models.
The sensational Lolita Smith
will entertain guests after the
fashion show.
Door prices will be given to
the lucky ticket holders
Tickets can be obtained by
calling Mrs. Sandra Albury at










t .. 66
" 5-' ,

->* A
*.^ ^^

r^W


I) I'- -.,SI'b ,



H.M.S. OTTER VISITS NASSAU HARBOUR.





Kissinger: the super diplomat


LIKE MANY JOURN-
ALISTS in Washington
who work late into the night,
Hugh Sidney of I'imet
magazine likes to sleep in when
he can. Last week. though, he
was delighted to be up and
stirring for a pre-dawn
breakfast with Henry Kissinger,
the U.S. Secretary of State.
Kissinger had a soft-boiled egg
and black coffee, and he talked
about the personal aspects of
international diplomacy
In his former days as a
professor, said Kissinger, "I
tended to think of history as
being made by impersonal
forces. But when you see it in
practice you see the differences
that the personalities make.
The overtures in China would
not have worked without Chou
En-lai. There would have been
no settlement in the Middle
Fast without Sadat and (olda
Meir and Dayan."
According to Sidey,,
Kissinger is convinced that the
men and women who run the
world are dedicated to
improving the lot of their
people rather than solely


HENRY KISSINGER


amassing personal power Of
course the two mix in curious
ways, but Kissinger has always
been able to find what he
believes to be the human heart
and soul which are often
disguised by tough-looking
nationalistic exteriors. *
NO SPECIALS
In his first two trips to the
Middle East. Kissinger tried not
to talk specifics but concepts


like the conduct of the war and
the general philosophy of the
area. He also tried to obtain
trust by giving it. "I always tell
them the truth They know
that I will do what I say." lie
did something else When
either side asked uhim to
advance proposition A on its
behalf and, if rejected, to settle
for Proposition B. Kissinger
refused. "The other side will
think I am your lawyer," he
told his hosts. "Give rme one
position. Tell me what you
believe."
Very much on the personal
side, one luncheon in Syria
opened with jokes about
Kissinger's girl friends. What is
Jill St. John really like'!?
someone wanted to know. "I'll
give you three phone
numbers." He paused a bit and
then added: "On second
thought, that's no deal. You
can put :.he, oil embargo back
anytime o6u *ant, but if I give
you the phlninumber I can't
get them back ',
SYMPATHY
There came a day when
Egypt's Sadat asked that the


road to Suez City be opened
because it was his daughter's
wedding day, a request more
personal than official. Kissinger
took it to the Israelis, who
granted it. Then there was the
time when the Israelis wanted
to send a party, accompanied
by rabbis, to retrieve the
bodies of some of their dead
soldiers from Egyptian soil.
The request might have been
laughed a; earlier, but this time
it found immediate sympathy
and was approved,
Kissinger offered Sidney two
new items from the Secretary's
developing handbook of
international diplomacy. First.
when making concessions in a
supercharged atmosphere.
make them two days before
they become inevitable and
give 10'% more than asked. The
response to such unexpected
generosity is amazing. Second,
travel by jet. Had the trip
between Aswan and Tel-Aviv
been in a prop plane (five
hours) instead of a jet (two
hours), the chances for
misgiving and delay would have
multiplied.


UN's Secretary General


MISS JOHANNA RENAY, one of Canada's top models,
pictured modelling a design made from material from
Dominion Textiles and designed by Marilyn Brooks during
the Fashion Show held at the Nassau Beach Hotel on
Friday, February 1Ist.
23321, Mrs. Marina I)aes at
2879" or purchased at the
IIdoor.
lIhe President of the
Bahamas Secretaries
Association is Mrs. Lorraine
IOW SHOWING! 7 & 10:30 Fraser.
Mrs. Sheila Butler, wife ot
the Speaker of Parliament, wi l
be the guest of honour.




"Fst 8f ur"


No one unerIdmed


.. |
SECRETARY VIKKI
GRANT who will model at the
Bahamas Secretaries
Association's 2nd annual
Valentine's Dinner and Fashion
Show on Feb. 16.


UNITED NATIONS (AIP)
Kurt Waldheim, an
indomitable traveller in the line
of duty, is off again this week
on a tour of 13 West African
countries.
The 18-day jaunt will bring
to 63 the number of countries
the lanky United Nations
Secretary-General will have
visited since he began his
five-year term January 1972.
In two terms, U Thant, his
predecessor, visited 29.
Waldheim says he hears of
criticism from some people
who ask whether it's "really
necessary to go on all these
trips.'
Listing the physical strain,
the sudden changes in climates
and altitudes, the grind of
protocol, Waldheinm told a
reporter, "believe me, I'd much
prefer to spend a quiet
weekend in my farmhouse in
Ridgefield, Connecticut."
But he says the trips are
essential and of enormous
benefit to the United Nations,
adding that he doesn't want tu
"sit here m the ivory tower like
a bureaucrat not really close to
the realities."
No report, even if it is the
best report, can replace the
personal impression."
The contacts he makes with
national leaders are invaluable.
lie contends, particularly when
he wants to get in touch with
them quickly at times of crisis
In two years, Waldheinmi,
travels have taken him, among
other places, to Moscow atni
Peking, India and Pakistan.
various African and
Latin-American countries If lie


has slighted Furope, no one'
will take offense, he sass.,
because he's Austrian.
Waldheim's Middle Fast tour
last September was a source ot
potential embarrassment War
broke out only a month after
he said he found everywhere a
desire for peace. iHe
acknowledges he was not aware
that war was that close, but he
points out he warned the
situation was dangerous.
On the current tour, starting
Thursday in Mauritadia,
Waldheim will visit a number
of countries devasted by the
sub-Sahara drought and
famine, one of the worst of this
century. "We're working out a
long-range programme
irrigation, fertilizers -- it's a
very big affair." Waldheim said
Waldheim has been invited
by practically all of the 135
members of the United
Nations Hie says he doubts he
can make them all, but at the
current rate he has a good
start
'he United Nations p.ys.
transportation bills tfor
Waldheim and his staff. Other
expenses are borne by the host
countries. Whenever practical,
Waldheim likes to use a white
executive jet emblazoned with
the name and symbol of the
world organization
Hie picks up some handsome
gifts, like a Tanzanian ebony
sculpture of a mother and child
that adorns a corner of his
office. His tall brunette wife,
Elizabeth, goes on some trips,
but is not with him this time.


SKYLAB 3 SETS RECORDS
SIPA(I CFNT R, HOUSTON Skvlab 3 has returned to Earth with a
long list of records.
The 84 dais, I hour and 16 minutes of Skylab 3 that ended Friday top
by more than three weeks the previous record of 59Vi days of Skylab 2.
Other records include:
Longest individual time in space. Gerald I'. Carr, William R. Pogue and
i-dward G. Gibson were rookies when they were launched, but their
mission gave each of them more total time than space veteran Alan L.
Bean. who spent 69 days, IS hours, 45 minutes in space on Apollo 12 and
Skylab 2.
most orbits of I-artlh: a total of 1,214.
most distance travelled in space: a total of 34.5 million miles, equal toI
about 70 round trips to the Moon.
longest individual spacewalk time: besides the Christmas IDa
spacewalk. Pogue also worked outside for 6 hours. 33 minutes on
Thanksgiving, the second longest spacewalk for a total individual time of
13 hours, 34 minutes.
oldest space rookie: Pogue was 43 when he went into space for the
first time. lie celebrated his 44th birthday on Jan. 23 in orbit.
and there are two medical records that are sure to stand for a while:
the most food consumed in space, 1.505 pounds, and the most water
drunk. 187 gallons.


Waldheim is a diplomat's
diplomat, his aides say, when it
comes to eating strange foods
with grace
\s the 55-year-old Waldhein
puts it. "if you're the guest of
honour sitting usually next to
the President or the hostess,
you can't refuse to eat things
which you don't know or don't
like But it needs quite a good
stomach and sometimes you
suffer the consequences."



Kidnap gro

BI RKFIl Y. CALIFORNIA
(AP) The Symbionese
Liberation Arimy, which claims
responsibility tor kidnapping
Patricia Hearst and slaying a
school official earlier, had
never been heard from four
months ago
"Conmmnunique No. I" oni
Nov. claimed the group had
assassinated Oakland shcool
superintendent Marcus Foster
and wounded Robert
Blackburn. his chief deputy ,
the day before.
The coimmnunique was a
letter, mailed from San
Francisco to Berkeley radio
station KPFA, the Sap
Francisco Chronicle and
Oakland Iribune. It touched
off an effort by authorities to
find out more about what Ui S
Attorney General Williamn
Saxbe has called a baffling
organization.
Police in Oakland say the
SLA is a young. multiracial
revolutionary group with at
least 25 heavily armed
members. Captain John
Lothrop said it is "extremely
dangerous" and police said
they seized guns, bombs,
cyanide and dossiers on
businessmen from a
Symbionese army headquarters
in nearby Concord.
The Nov. 7 letter said Foster
and Blackburn were marked as
targets for promoting a "police
in the schools" and student
i n identification card
programme, and warned that
school board supporters of the
project would be executed. It
said cyanide bullets had been
used in the shootings, a fact
later confirmed by police.
The Oakland school board
dropped the identification card
programme Nov. 14.


KURT WALDHEIM


up's history

"Communique No.2" on
Nov. 17, a letter mailed to the
Oakland Tribune, rescinded the
"shoot on sight" warrant for
school board members.
On Jan. 10. Joseph Remiro,
27, and Russel Little, 24, were
arrested after a shootout with a
policeman who made a routine
traffic stop in nearby Concord.
Police said they found
Symbionese army literature
and weapons in their van,
registered to a Concord
residence.
That night an arson fire
damaged the residence. When
the fire was extinguished,
police said they found bombs,
cyanide, lists of potential
kidnap victims and group
literature. They said the house
was a Symbionese army
headquarters.
On Jan. 11, a warrant was
issued charging Nancy Ling
Perry, said to have been living
in the house, with the arson
On Jan. 17, a "letter to the
people" signed by Mrs. Perry --
now calling herself Fahizah,
discussed her philosophy and
said to Little and Remiro "you
have not been forgotten and
you will be defended."
Little and Remiro, now
charged with murdering Foster,
are being held in high-security
San Quentin prison.
On Feb. 4, Miss Hearst was
kidnapped amid gunfire.
On Feb. 7, "Communique
No. 3" arrived at KPFA, saying
Miss Hearst was a "prisoner of
war" who would not be
harmed unless an attempt was
made to. rescue her or harm
Symbionese army members. It
called her father a "corporate
enemy of the people," and
promised further
communication.


I


: --- II I IIT L 't4~~ ~II


i4)OZVNEI'
t camt,--


Nassau, Bahamas.


A


'1












10


CLASSIFIED


uS h Eribunr





SECTION


Tuesday, February 12. 1974


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS-FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV. TELEPHONE 21986 EXT. 5


REAL ESTATE


3 31


I !


BUY A LO6
in LASTWOOD
of
WINTON MEADOWS
Call Frank Carey
ait 2/'t67 or 24815
Fra'-k Carev
Real Estate
Box. NT4704
Bay & Diev.r,, s.
C13495
4.2 acres Johnson Road
suitable for small development.
Reasonably priced at $21,000.
Call Chester Thompson
24777 Evenings 3-1425 or
4 2035
L 13472
MAGNIFICENT property for
sale. Lot 3, Block 26, Unit 1,
the Grasmere Resubdivision,
irnq to the East of Freeport.
n the land of Giand Bahama
Private M. Erde, Suite 3155.
9" West Washingtor Street,
Chi ago, Illinois, U.S A.

13422:'
two storey build ldigs
Au'Iff Road opposiite tBaha'"'.'
Lumber
I two storey btil dig r -
Soldier Road oppor5 to
Technical Training College
Phone 42981

OR vP o i Rcai I -,;ti
pulhhase-, and rental. "all I) &
V SAL ES and RF NTALS ',r
ithe -'ear iCentrevll. D &
Depaitmerint Stoi's L' -
Ter racee .Ce'trevill.' I" .t
5 -342 ur 3-1300
C 13441
PRIME LOTS FOR bALL
WESTWARD VILLAS Bus:es',
St 102?' 10 oppc s;t-
,hopp'iqg ce-tre Lot ? Blo(I 4
$8,000
Apartmert lot 60' 130' Lot
42 Block 4 close to .,hopping
"entre and with beach h i n iqhts.
57,000
Residential, lot b0' 130' Lot
14 block 16 nejr shopping
eontreit and *with beach right,.
$6.500
F ERGUSON MANn'' of'
West Bay Street Lots r ', 4
65 $4,000 ei .
DOAD 6: aj.ire at $4 000 Oer
ac'e
H ROLD ROAD (, acr. at-
$4.000 pr ac rie
Dpiv 0 H G Chr ist i LtI
Phone 2104 -1

_3375
A T rR ACTIVE hlltop
residerice I astprn Dist ri .
3 bedroom' 2 bath livingri
'OOm. dining 'o'ni, porch
patio, kitchen, laiundriv Also
charminIg guest suite ori ground
floor Lot 101 ft. x 185 ft
$110,000 furnished
Desirable hilltop two stores
residerne Mo'rtag ; Beach area
2 bedrc'orm, o-e bath. living
r dm.r (j t 1, o m patln.
i tchen, !,in d . 'jid
bathour $27,000 fur t shu' d
Cha 'ir Cable Firea'
7 esde' n",a' the sea 3
b.-Oalou', n bathriurn'' iarc-
Ilvi:,' di;il;iq pa'it,. itche' .
laurdryi afpor't Lot 100 ft
120 f $ >).000 u -L ished
Ci G 'P!'STII LIMI T D
;)+ 1 "Tl l l. .r..? :. 3 54
F it 3 4

'-0 '.'


P O 'I 4.




THROnr- SOI i>c


ar i'a'


SA'i ') ( iJ
R1L AI' '- 1,T ,

W ,Ni L''.


NASSAU LAST
SEA BRf ZI Z
VILLAGES ROAD
GOLDEN GATi S
m,1GHt AN P .K
PROSPF (I nRiluGf
rWESTWAPR)D VILLAS
C 0 N D 0 v i N U I
APARTMENTS PARADISE0
ISLAND
EAST BAY STREET
WEST BAY STREO T
HOTELS and HOTEL SITES.
BEACH LOTS, COMMERC-
IAL LOTS, RESIDENTIAL
LOTS
ACREAGE FOR
DEVELOPMENT IN THE
NASSAU AND FAMILY
ISLANDS SUCH AS GRAND
BAHAMA LONG ISLAND,
ELEUTHERA, ABACO.
45 ACRE CAY IN THE
EXUMAS WITH DEEP
WATER HARBOUR AND
MORE
CALL
DAVSON'S REAL
ESTATE AGENCY
Phone 21178 or 80932 21178
P. 0. Box N-4648
Nassau, Bahamas.


REAL ESTATE


C 13469 1
UNFURNISHED4 Bedroom, 2
Bathroom, airconditioned
house Shniley Park Avenue,
$46,000. Phone 34527 -
28293.
C 13470
2 BEDROOMS, 1 bath
furnished house, closed yard in
Retirement Road. Call after 7
p.m. 74155.

C13450
UN FURNISHED FOUR
BEDROOM, two bath house
sewing room and carport for
sale or rent Call 31671
between 9 a.m. 5 p m

C13542

LOOK!
We're No. 1. Take advantage of
this once in a lifetime
opportunity. 3-bedroom and
4-bedroom houses for a low
$2,000.00 down payment and
easy monthly instalments
Barrv Petty Phones: 2 3854,
Home 5-5960.

C13536
LOT for sale 100 x 100 with
two rented houses F arrington
Road west of Carroll's Food
Store. Phone 77298 after h 00
p. m


C 13537
4 BEDROOM 2 bathio,.mn'
house $2,200 00 down Batlat
in 15 years. Phone 34471 aftei
b p m.


L FOR RENT
C13473
OPPOSITE Scottish Shop.
Charlotte Street Ideal 'or tor,
or office, large Darking.
Immediate occupancy 41,176.

C13490
UNFURNISHED 2 bednro), i
bath apatmernt. Mount Royal
Avenue. Telephone 2 1 59

( 13510
ONE bedroom apar tent,
Twynar m Av enue aie,i.
Basically furnished.
Decorative iron guards -.iall
windoAs. Master TV Anteoi j.
To view call 2-3261.

C 13447
2 one bedroom fully furnished
rpar tments Centrevil e
r'i0 tct Ring 5-8679 Don
Pritc hard


i'ii ,sh d and uirfcurrnished
anpar' .-'- 1 oi and two
bed,, ... Phune 3 2396 after 5
p i


C1 3538
COTTAGES and apartments
mnc thi a1n i conditioned,
fully .no hief, rd maid service '
avollahi,. LuvdyIv arden and
swi 'rIn7Ig 1 p il Telephone
31 ;> /, 310t 3.

CARS FOR SALE

L13L2
; 'OTOR/S
1 eii tr' o Ad, A/ I used cars
Se I .. u money



1 9 7 2 LINCOLN
CONTINENTAL, automatic
t s ns an i conditioning,
$itpr.,, ,.500
1973 MORRIS MARINA
ESTATE aut omatic
,asr a ,,, i, $3,800
1970 CHEVROLET MALIBU
aut.i an.ai transmission, air
$2.100
1972 CHEVROLET VEGA
a ii' at1.,_ '- ansmission $3.300
1972 MERCURY COMET
a u t o m a t I c
'r' nis i air conditioning.
$dI, C $4 .00
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
aut i"t t a tran mission $1 300
1970 FORD LTD automatic
ti' *,r- 1,'i.'- air conditioning,
11 ,ri. $3 000
1970 FORD LTD air
i .0d ti ,'i g, autom atic
ta,,m :.n r, $2.750
1970 VAUXHALL VICTOR
STATION WAGON 4 door,
stlnd,ard $800
1970 CHEVROLET PICKUP
$?.00ji
1970 FORD ESCORT $1.300
1969 BUICK SKYLARK
Sutomn tit transmission, air
conrditoing $1,250
1968 FORD FALCON
SPORTS $1.450
1969 MERCURY COUGAR
1970 FORD CAPRI standard
$1,000
1969 MERCURY COUGAR
autumattc transmission $1,500
1971 DODGE AVENGER
ut0 foTat c transmission
$1,500
1969 FIAT STATION
WAGON standard $350
1969 FORD GALAXIE
automatic transmission, air
conditioning $1,500
1969 FORD CORTINA
automatic transmission $700
1969 FIAT 124 $600
1968 CORTINA E/C $500
1973 CHEVROLET NOVA
automatic transmission, air
conditioning $4,800
ABC MOTORS
Collins Avenue
Phone 2-1031
OPEN MONDAY TO FRIDAY
8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
SATURDAY 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.


CARS FOR Si


CAPRICE
condition. L.
58134.


ILL


CHEVROLET
in excellenri
J Knowles, Tel:


C13462
LINCOLN Continental
engine Al., body in good shape.
A/C. 8 track tape, power
steering, windows, brakes. Call
41577 after 6 p.m.

C 13467
SAVE $1200 on new 197T
Plymouth Duster Deluxe. Will
Take Trade. $5600. Phone
3-4527 2-8293.

C13477
1972 CHEVY Van G-30 series.
Low mileage 350 V8-2 barrel
Good condition, licensed for
1974. Priced for quick sale.
$3600.00. Telephone 55556.

C 13480
1973 PONTIAC Firebird, 8
months old. Perfect condition.
Automatic, power steering and
brakes. Factory airconditioned.
Stereo tape player built into
radio. Rally sports wheels.
Beautiful burgundy coloul with
white interior. $6000 (ONO).
Phone 24698 daytime.

C13474
1960 CADILLAC Convertible
white, all equipped minus
A/C. Best offer. 41476,

C13491
1972 TRIUMPH Spitfire sports
car. This car has been
beautifully maintained and
comes with hard top, soft top.
covers, radio etc. $500.
Overhaul just completed. Cost
new $4,500 plus. Bargain at
$3,000. Phone 57541

C 13530
1965 CHEVROLET, 4 door.
Factory Air. A T.
Al-condition. $1375. Phurn
4 2904.
C13531
1967 OLDS MOBILE
CUTLASS A'T, Factory Air,
Radio Al-condition. $1975
1968 CHEVY M'P-4LA, 2 dr.
Very good condition. $1875.
Phone 23137.

FOR SALE

C13527
KING size bed.
Kinq size dresser.
Double mirror
Telephone 5-4834.


ANNOUNCEMENTS
C 13524


C13381
PACEMAKER 44 ft.
Luxurious Cruising yacht
Phone 3-2371.

C13447
28 ft. fibreglass cruiser.
Excellent condition Sleeps 4
private head, stove, cooler,
sink. 2 new 225 h.p.
Chrysler Marine Engines. twin
controls, ship to shore radio.
Ideal for fishing. $12,000 or
nearest offer. Telephone
2-2058 days 3-2163 nights.

C11894
1969 -- 31 ft. CHRIS CRAFT
Commander. Sleeps six, private
shower, two 230 h.p. engines
with less than 200 hours,
kitchenette, good condition
Call 24267, 54011.

C13468
23' ANACAPRI 160
Mercur y Cruiser ,
Ship-to-Shore. In Excellent
Condition. $5,500. Phone
34527 2-8293.

C13507
ATTRACTIVE, custom buillt
houseboat, perfect condition,
luxuriously furnished and
equipped. Washer, diver.
dishwasher, deep freeze, fridge,
television, air conditioned, and
many e lectinca: extras.
Completely screened lounge
with 18ft. ceiling. Cocktail bai
with ice machine. Immed ate
possession. $24,000. WVnite
"Houseboat", P. 0. Box
N1648, Nassau.


SCHOOLS

C 13386
LEWIS AUTO SCHOOL
Learn to drive with confidence.
Phone 59805 between 7 ani
8:30 a.m. or after 6 p.m. or
35084 anytime.


HELP WANTED
C13516
VEHICLE SERVICE WRITER
(MALE) ABC MOTORS LTD
Must have these qualities.
Thorough knowledge of all
phases of automotive repair
and maintenance, sober;
ambitious; pleasing personality;
legible handwriting. Paid
holidays, uniforms and many
other fringe benefits Call Mr.
Wiliamns at 2-1031.

C13520
EXPERIENCED diver for
shows and upkeep. Apply
Manager, Seaflooi Aquarium
or phone 3-6896 for
appointment t.

C 13446
SPORTSFISHERMAN boat
captain. Must have 5 years'
experience with diesel engines.
Permanent position. Give full
information: Worldoil, P. 0.
Box N7776, Nassau.

C6677
INTERNATIONAL MODEL
BEAUTY LTD. and Elegant
Lady Beauty Salonr Ltd. ,n
need of:
1) Experienced MASSEUSE
mad FACIALIST
2) ExpeArenced HAIRSTYL-
IST, capable of doing Tinting,
Bleaching, Fiostnigs and
expertly cut hair.
3) SHAMPOO GIRL
Bahamrnians only need apply: P.
0. Box F-775, Freeport or call
352 7041, Mrs. Higgs.

C 13350
MvANAGER required for Out
Island cottage colorny and
marina. Must be fully
ex per fenced in catering
industry and have ability to
train school leavers in catering.
Salary with commission,
commensurate with ability and
experience.
Apply Green Turtle Club, Box
270, Green Turtle Cay, Abaco.
C13519
MAJOR cosmetic company
requires experienced, creative,
assistant to sales representative.
Business experience essential,
secretarial skills necessary.
Please apply to Mrs. D.
Knowles, 32391.
C 13496
DEPOSIT and Foreign
exchange Dealer required.


SEAT COVERS 20
DISCOUNT Roofing, Rugs,
Wind Laces, Door Draperies,
Furnitures. Canvas Awnings,
Bedspreads.
SALE ON VINYL
ADL)DERLEY'S UPHOLSTERY
SHOP
Telephone 34518
P 0. Box 5766
Lincoln Boulevard, Nassau


BUSINESS
-OPPORTUNITIES--
C 13380
ARE YOU INTERESTED IN
EARNING $1788.00 PE R
MONTH PART-TIME WITH
ONLY $6900.00 TO INVEST?
(FULLY RETURNABLE
UNDER CONTRACT).
WRITE: MR. CHEEK, 2642
GULF LIFE TOWER,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


DINING GUIDE

C13179
F and S TAKEAWAY
Open daily from 7 a.m.
til 10 p.m. daily
Monday thru. Saturday
Serving all native dishes
Phone 24911

CARD OF THANKS
C13532

S"


THE FAMILY of the late
Samuel Williams "Uncle Sam"
wish to thank their many
friends and relatives for their
expressions of sympathy, cards
and floral arrangements during
their recent bereavement.


air I I IiN


I- II N A r -rn-t -- 9-09l' W MID 161Wi TREAF EviF .


Appointment will be that of
senior dealer and will involve
responsibility for smooth
operation of existing money
functions. It will also involve
participation in development
of new areas of business and
supervision of professional
development of existing team
of young but enthusiastic
deposit dealers. Salary
commensurate with experience
and qualifications. Although
aqe is not a limiting factor, the
ideal candidate will be in his
late twenties or early thirties
and will have had a minimum
of five years deposit and/or
foreign exchange experience in
a major money center.
Previous ge ieral banking
experience w-onid be a distinct
advantage as would be
knowledge of a second major
language. Qualified candidates
invited to submit written
resumes of educational
background qualifications and
experience to World Banking
Corporation Limited, P. 0. Box
N-100, Nassau.


C13517
THE HOME INSURANCE
COMPANY require a qualified
bookkeeper experienced in all
insurance accounting
procedures and specifically in
claims statistics, treaty and
faculative reinsurance
allocations. Applicant must be
qualified to tiain accounts staff
in all above phases. Apply by
phoning 2-8802.

C13505
QUALIFIED Welders and
Fitters with experience with
API 650 and pipeline work.
Must have up to date test
certificate. Only Bahamians
need apply to P. 0. Box 5647,
Nassau.
C13533
HANDYMAN to weed and
keep yard clean. Write: D.J.
Brown, P.O. Box 1594, Nassau.

C13529
GIRL FRIDAY. Must ha'e
driver's licence. Phone 34881
between 6-7 p.m.

C13528
WANTED -3 farmers.
Contact Mr. Alexander Harris,
0. O Box M.S. 6249, Nassau.

TRADE SERVICES
C13442
FOR ALL your Gardening
needs, trimming, hedging,
pruning, beach cleaning, for
prompt reasonable and
efficient service call 5-7810.
C13498
FOR your building needs arid
CRANE hire see:
ISLAND BUILDERS
LIMITED P. 0. Box
N 4559 Phone 31671 31672

C13390
T.V. ANTENNAS
Boosters for homes,
apartments and hotels
SALES AND SERVICES
Call 5-940-4
WORLD OR MUSIC,
Mackey Street
next to Frank's Place.


ANTENNAS
Island Tv 2-2618

AUTOMOTIVE
Lucas Batteries
Bay Street Garage 2-2434
BODY BUILDING

5-4506





Richard's Cnnstruction 5.7080
BUSINESS FORMS

Printers 2.4267/5-4011
CAMERAS
John Rull .2-4252/3

CARPETS
Lee's Carpet Craft 3-1993

DRAPERIES
Lee's Carpet Craft 3-1993


PRESCRIPTIONS
McCartney's 5-6068/5-2127
ENTERTAINMENT
Movies *
Film & Equip. Service 2-2157
GARDEN & PET
SUPPLIES
Modernistic Garden
& Pet 2-2868
Nassau Garden & Pet
Montrose Avenue 2-4259
HARDWARE
John S. George 2-8421/6
WRECKER SERVICE
Gibson Wrecker
Service
2-8896


2.8896


I


C13391

flnder;d CusdomJ

Broorac Ltd.
Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU. BAHAMAS
P. O. BOX N3714
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE:2-3795, 2-3796
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 7-7434
FREE ESTIMATES

C13503
DECALS, Bumper Stickers,
poster 5, quantity signs,
quantity printing on plastic
work, metal paper, fabrius etc.
ARAWAK ART. Phone
2-3/09, Montrose Avenue.


HOUSE PLANS
Evangelos G. Zervos 2-2633
LAUNDRY
DRY CLEANING
New Oriental Laundry
2-4406
LOCKSMITH
Bahamas Lock & Key
2-4591 ext. C147
MEN'S & BOY'S WEAR
The Wardobe 5-5599

MUSIC
Cody's Records 2-8500

OPTICIANS
Optical Service Ltd. 2-3910/1

PRINTING
Wong's Printing 5-4506
Executive
Printers 2-4267/5-4011

RADIO & T.V. SALES
Carter's Records 2-4711
RUBBER STAMPS
Wong's Rubber Stamp
Co. 5-4506
SPORTS GOODS
Champion Sport Land 2-1862
TRAVEL
Playtours 2-2931/7
R.H. Curry & Co.,
2-8681/7
TRUCKING SERVICE
Gonzalez Trucking
3-1562/2-4726
WATER CONDITIONING
Bah. Water Refining
3-4351
Miracle Water
3-4351


For Business And Services j


GRAND BAHAMA




CLASSIFIED


II FREEPORT TEL. 352-I61


I REAL ESTATE ]

C6676
THREE APARTMENTS
ON THE BEACH
Two apartments and one
Penthouse, beautiful ly
f furnished, all two
Bedroom/two bath, duty paid,
recorded, ready for immediate
transfer. $35,000 to $58,000
cash net to seller D'Emilio,
Riviera Towers 373-1902.


HELP WANTED
C13525

SAM P. WALLACE
OVERSEAS CORPORATION
HAS THE FOLLOWING
VACANCIES:-

PROCESS PIPING &
INSTRUMENTATION
FITTERS.
Minimum of six years
experience in the construction
of chemical plants or related
industries.
Qualifications require
knowledge and experience in
pharmaceutical or chemical
plant process piping, the use of
PVC, stainless steel,
polypropylene, duriron and
carbon steel pipe, installation
of piping systems by use of
drawings and flow diagrams,
Welding of certain piping
systems, installation of
industrial instrumentation,
knowledge of installation and
commissioning of industrial
refrigeration equipment.
Applicants must be fully
qualified in pipefitting,
plumbing and instrumentation
for installation of all process
systems and related tasks to
include layout, fabrication,
cutting, burning, rigging of
heavy equipment and erection.
Successful applicant must
engage in start-up and
commissioning duties required
for acceptance after
completion of project.
PROJECT MANAGER
Direct the complete
construction of the addition to
a pharmaceutical process plant
Coordinate for logistics,
budgeting and finance.
Minimum of 10 years
experience required.
PROJECT
SUPERINTENDENT
Coordinate all related
tradesmen and subcontractors.
Direct the installation of
process piping, plumbing, fire
deluge system, Pneumatic
controls and HVAC.
Responsible for testing and
commissioning for all systems.
Minimum of 10 years
experience required.

CIVIL ENGINEER
(CONSTRUCTION)
Responsible for layout, setting
grade, checking drawings,
contractor logistics related to
structural steel, concrete,
reinforcing steel, and all
general civil work. Minimum of
6 years experience required,
Engineer degree or equivalent
education.


HELP WANTED
ELECTRICAL ENGINEER
(CONSTRUCTION)
Responsible for electrical
installations; requiring
experience in H.V. and M.V.
equipment. Coordinate the
electrical installation with
subcontractor personnel, check
drawings and related
engineering with design
engineers. Schedule and
prepare logistics data.
Responsible for electrical
testing and commissioning for
all systems. Minimum of 6
years experience required in
the construction field.
Engineer degree or equivalent
education.
CONSTRUCTION (COST
ACCOUNTANT/ANALYST)
Responsible for updating
computer cost print-out.
Project cost record entry.
Related general office
experience required 10
years. Responsible for banking
and related duties. Certified as
an accountant or equivalent
experience.
Applicants should apply c/o
Syntex Corporation Bahamas
Chemical Division P. 0. Box
F-2430, Freeport, Bahamas.
C6679
PAYROLL CLERK
Young man to assume
responsibility for payroll and
general accounting duties.
Candidate should have high
school diploma or "0" level
certificate in Maths and
English.
Apply in person to:
Personnel Department,
Bahama Cement Company,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
C6678
LANDSCAPE GARDENER
Qualifications required:
knowledge of Airlayering,
grafting and budding, fertilizer
m i x es equ i pment
maintenance, five years
experience, written references,
police certificate.
All replies to: P. 0. Box
F-2945, Freeport, G.B.I.

C6680
1-BROILER CHEF (COOK):
Minimum of three (3) years
experience in first class hotels
or restaurants in preparation of
Gourmet Cuisine. Must be able
to relieve chef anytime. Good
references and Police
Certificate required.
Applicants should apply in
person to:
The Personnel Department
Bahamas Amusements Limited
El Casino
P.O. Box F-787
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C6681
LEGAL SECRETARY wanted
with at least two years previous
experience preferably in a law
office. Excellent shorthand and
typing skills a must as this
position consists of a heavy
volume of dictation and the
preparing and typing of legal
documents.
Apply to: Callenders, On,
Pyfrom & Roberts, 26C
Kipling Building, Freeport
352-8311.


II


"I'd like my paycheck early because I won't be in the
rest of the week. We employees are forming a picket
line tomorrow."


' or Shine



It's Fairlieather


Sholpng in


The Tribune


Classified ad. Section


ad Sect----


ASSAU .


BUSINESS 5 PROFESSIONAL


DIRECTORY


Save Time


SHOP .'





b lst Ik k liift1 Call 21i EXT. 5

1 LIN hurlht 2 Vll PrMItih l 1.I


> Svt IIN SAE MOEY <


FOR TlC MTACOll WANT1

2 BU


Shop Nassau Merchants


I I -


-- --


i 1


m


RIF I IM R 0 2 i I I Br n lauvrn, I I ---- -- i, a...a b I IF


a


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L-


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I1


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f ;", I f I ) ( ). /% i n ,-


OKi- Fe ur Snic .a, he., 1974.Wod rlls reoorveL


-7.


I I m inr ourrLi


HII P WANTE


T DE SERVICES













Tuesday, February 12, 1974.


Thlie ribune


King Feature Syndcate Inc 1974. d served
"Go have lunch without me. I haven't managed to get
one bit of office gossip worth waiting fort
1*


"Get a load of these genuine simulated fender dents.
V'er, hig \'it' swingers."


CROSSWORD

PUZZLE
ACROSS


'i~li





.1.





"p.,


P I LA IDES
CERAG BOL S
LOOTED AGA A
AN NE ERN I M)
D YE TOE KNOT
Al SERENE
SK EWER RA
PANE OSE TSE
ROC VAT AWAY
ALONE UNSAFE
I 'iROS ETIER
NE T PAINS
LUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE


DOWN
S'ott. r
.' ^ i l' f


Thel, I tn already We
The little girl has brighterned already 'We
mustnt be seer sne whispers s she takes
Rupert into the large house or my grand
father Will make us throw that holly away
They reach one t lthr nair flrtiO0roo and Mary
Points 10 a screen TrheO a a p.:.tu behind
It" she says Yriu rn' hanQ he holly there.'
RUpert climbs i c'P-i aid s 'ust t in1g


4 Travelers'
lodgings
5 Wire service
6 Additional
7 Nibble
8 Respect
9 Humor
I0 V-1lcamc matter
15 Cloak
1 illed cloth
19 Wufk unit
'I Brlpun storm
22 Wheedle
23 i', winds
'5 Soup
ingredient
26 Baker's shovel
29 British news
agency
32 Off color
34 Desist
37 Trifle
39 Chinese civet
S411 Suiinam toad
43 Meadow
44 Rascal
45. Hotbed
47 Pronoun
48 Mortals
51 There

Jolly HIi


SCARROLL RIGHTER'S


HOROSCOPE
from the Carroll Righter Institute
GENERAL TENDENCIES Take part in
N "discussions or other activities that will place
you in a secure position with powerful persons and the general
public You want to produce results --- make them worthwhile
ARIES (Mar 21 to Apr 19) Analyze reports and be sure
they pass muster with higher-ups Show devotion to loved one
for gre iter harmony, happiness Avoid a troublemaker
TAURUS (Apr 20 to May 20) Discuss mutual aims with
associates and clear up moot points Ignore those who oppose
you and all is fine
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Improve your relationship
with fellow workers Get into policy matters that add to
benefits of all concerned Make your home a haven of
comfort
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Recreation you
like can tone up your system and make you more efficient A
wise person has good advice for you in p m
LEO (July 22 to Aug 21) A good day to make your home
more charming and to check utilities for good condition and
safety from fire hazards Please kin at home
VIRGO (Aug 22 to Sept 22) Make sure reports are
accurate Then help an associate who is having rough sledding
Evening can be fine from the social standpoint
LIBRA (Sept 23 to Oct 22) Get advice from expert on
planning better financially for easier life Avoid some situation
that could get you into trouble
SCORPIO (Oct 23 to Nov 21) Concentrate on personal
matters Attend only those social functions that can be of help
to you Show that you have true charm
SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 to Dec 21) Quietly analyze ways
to make your life more ideal and to increase income Listen to
what an adviser has to suggest
CAPRICORN (Dec 22 to Jan 20) Join with clever friends
at a meeting that can be most helpful to you Avoid one who
has a sadistic viewpoint
AQUARIUS (Jan 21 to Feb 19) Listen to what higher-ups
have to suggest and further your career activities Join in a
public affair that can help you and your community
PISCES (Feb 20 to Mar 20) Get the nght approach to
activities to become more successful in them Forget business
and concentrate on fun in p m
It YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY he or she will have
tine abilities but they have to be made workable through
proper educational courses Teach not to be so secretive and to
learn to work with others cooperatively for real success Give
dunes while young so the important habit of taking
responsibility and carrying through wisely is formed early
"the Stars impel, they do not compel What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU'


Bridge
By VICTOR MOLLO
This fascinating hand came up
recently in the big game at the
Eccentric Club.
Dealer South : Both Vul.
North
4832
Z 4
9AKJ852
6J 65
West East
4K *1054
SKQ986 A5
9 974 Q 1063
410 9 8 7 S A 4 3 2
South
A AQJ97 6
0 J 10732
4KQ
South North
14 20
2 7 24
3; 44
3West led the 410. East won
and continued with the ,)A and
9 5. Declarer ruffed in dummy.
but he knew that he couldn't
get back to the table by ruffing
another heart. for East would
surely over-ruff. Parking two
hearts on the OAK wouldn't
help, for he would still have a
heart and a trump to lose.
A trump finesse suggested
itself, but South had other
ideas. He played the A, unex-
pectedly dropping West's 4K.
cashed the 4Q. then the 4K.
and excited with a low spade.
East made a trump to which he
wasn't entitled, but now had to
lead a club or a diamond, allow-
ing South to get rid of three
hearts.
And yet East can counter this
elegant p:ay-by jettisoning his
410 on South's 4Q Now South
must lead hearts from his hand.
Had East started with the
4K. he would have been exposed
to the same end play-and he
would have had the ,same
remedy.





-JH- w many
HW wordss of

m fron ttile
Sltte r hotter
*' * --- ii n aiike

h e r e' Ini
imiiak- I n g a
r word, ;ea e h
L L letter ma y
ii t lolnce
n lrol ut coniamii the large
let er. anii there itust he iat
lra-I o ii ,ighh-letter iordl i the
list. I.%i plilltraIl-; l io Itrelii wIords;
ni proper nlalie*'.. T'tIOAY's1
TAtI:ET': 11 it word s. good;
'!tH nords. i'rry ; good ; *!3 words.
it'ciicnt %olutioun tomorrow.
',It ttI).A1 N OL'LTION :
l-li islrt lt!e lipper lisp tl.st
litre peril Ipler pile pipe piper
priest pri-r ripe ripple ripplet
ri-e rill e sit llI lt sre site ,slip
'llpper slit spilhe split spire spirt
-pli *pite plil. sprit sprite stile
lilie tiplvel -tipple NTII'IPLE
,tir strip stripe tier tile tilet
tiliple tipller tire trip tripe
i riple


lly--10


the sprigs when voices are heard. It's my
grandfather with his cousin gasps 'Mary.
"Oh dear, they are coming into this room!"
Then we must keep very quiet," murmurs
Rupert. "The screen is in between so
perhaps they won't notice us"
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


Chess
By LEONARD BARDEN













An interestng pleoe of play
from Sa.zman v. Podgt in a
R.ussian ournament. B1a ( to
move) retreated ras attacked
queenby 1 .. Q-Q1, where-
upon White pushed on with his
king's side pawn attack by 2
P5 ? ? Why did the conmnen-
tators give White's move the
double question mark symbol for
a bad blunder ?
Par times: 10 seconds, chess
master or expert; 1 minute,
county player: 3 minutes. club
standard; 5 minutes, average; 10
minutes, novice.

Chess Solution
After 1 Q-Ql: 2 P-B5?? i2
RxP keeps White in the game" ,
Q-B2! the threat of 2 .
P-QKt3 trapping the queen is
decisive. White tried 3 P--K6,
P-QKt3: 4 B-Kt3. but 4 .
Kt-K6 ch: 5 K-B3, QxB ch; 6
K x Q, P x Q won Black a bishop
and the game.


n% ;.,J4!9 h 1'1%1 lick KN
Stro a
I 1Wlil t on l r l l o illl t ihteln
ii lllntilt n rlstrike (; i
Rile,. (i;
*I. % Ip IiI %ll l oilr lli -A, 111 iiii,
riice. 4 1 'v5
II. eilken-. (31
13 Ciir, 44)
14 Enitert lnii g si tr III)
I lield inI resllne I I
IN E:llilhles. (4)
I!. ( llpld. (4)
!Il (irli of tit res on I lt e rolM d
1(4

t1 ree:l lillP l lle I i r. l4. l:


I. Kenll tr lck lierlI ll-. h i. So
i lllllhere tlellll stie r
.; I5 re iil llr l ld ll. aI-r real
1Irep1 1 inllle r. *(4. 4)
Old Kelit d in trl iset, i 11
litill. ended
1). to l t. Rl I l .1 A T
Oi a. r 7ll, 'i


L
l ,r. (- 4 H
toi i. to A
t.''.'l l ,,, tt+,, & B St+


11


ITe Comic Page


SREX MORGAN, M.D. By DAL CURTIS


JUDGE PARKER By PAUL NICHOLS
III I I I2 i


I APARTMENT 3-G By Alex Kotzky


I UNPERSTAN LOOK IMR. THANK YOU, I HOPE YOU PON'T MINI IF I
POCTOR- N LESTER---CAN SERGEANT--- STOP BY IN THE MORNING! YOU
WE P11 E.,ER' THIN% WE CCULP I PRIVE BUT I THINK KNOW--- SO I CAN FINISH MY
MR. LESTER! WE JUST COULDN'T YOU HOME? I'P LIKE TO REPORT, MR. LESTER!
SAVE HER! THERE WAS MASSIVE WALK---IL
INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGE--- 1E





E





STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & overgardf


I 'I


=-L


L--













_lie' ributngit __ _


Tuesday, February 12, 1974.


BOSTON WHIRLS TO 53-SECOND VICTORY


By GLA)SlO)\ IIHL RHSIO\
BAllM-iAS hcarjs wcght championII
Boston Bla, kie .J1d heat> wc gtill t
,.ontendl r Bob l-ret e i'both c ,rdied
decisive viic o cI.F s II, Lr hi0ih! rC'gajrd d
opl ilonetliN las nighti.'li o n le'ti d len
rotindersat tih-e R Ha B ilt'\ I> ii
llruppIng Lto a ',v, 'I3 pou'Mi -
Boston! took i' :" s.' condod s .' !Th
f:i'st roN uni J t1, o J, iIpost c IL' Ih I N titcd
SlecTs ppo,, I 1nt l),tc Mat.i.ns 110h d
knotk.,
I n c : \ii. i i'ghci
m akin hils !r' .t .: r_ pp -i[,|;'-c r

hem. "wcigl chtlqpi ( .ita B.IM the
ldcl n. tho W c l l l i olls
dA sipy .', h cr~ .ii h t


ulh c l taIr> S i i .
I I''. c 1 I I ;c _,Wi
B : : i t



-.- \ -ithi hii- \ .;,''ic Rondor
I. kill ,iN'


''-I


I great." h-
S i l to ihc
s-p oi most o IllI
i^ .m '.il :, "1 ltha k


\ \ :. ij r c i i t 1 '
S i ii i' : 1 .i hi l ,' iook w as all
B3 'os ,.. 1 Jtc i c dc 'l N. Ii \l hill' ,,e s tlo lthe
V.IS;.i with 1I ..,' ,,"-'" Iroiml hisN


a.,l ga., it the firi st
runnter in at ceremony
on the 1 ,000( o) l it lhigh
hitll >, the -t .i in
souh't .I stirn \lcxi < i
( Ii k
\ll I e-I .1 i nsiitd1 I 000

lhI lori I iI l l 1
tIhrc -d.i ti ip tr1n11


I ih-l. SW ill bte
pla.-cd aboard tlhe
D o i 1 ii i 1 ii I t r ig le
( an ';l.ib T ho br ltiken to
I a saticla where i ii s
scheduled ,o .rl-mue I eb

lThe runners wetre to
carr i troiIr NO0t ti
I .000 meters each
Runeiis all take tlhe
torch u rland fromti La
lsatla.i tI th siaduiutm


l'a' t rc'>. who worked Mathews'
cor n'. on iicnded that the fans did
no'I sc 'lie real Dave MS.3t1w1cv,
'BH.l-" ',in1' give hin a chance to
-i lita!td I never sai Boston fight so

I Ni tir'hi marked the first time
\lih. A'.l i s stJopped in the first

\is> N 'jp tor Boston later this
.1 ..-.ihle detence ot his title

\l. i-.;''r Rodney lieastie was verse
.,1,;-.pcs d ''tisi t Free/e's decision over
ih :ti e 1Ftcran. "We have been
Siki:wf hard l. ith this boy so he just
;n,' hicp I'.i improve," he said.
I. astO, figuredd that Freeze now is
in j .ali, f bxy himself, a notch above


Cash call to send three




teams to Games


By IV VN Ji'ilI\" i\

SO() t { K ,, i ,.'. !'.i, ,,

NC -tI IN l 1 1 1 .' I

( i'. I 1 'aI I.



lii\b vJ. Bu-; '' .;.!*.
' i cA ..





'I. n 1


ARLINGTON BUTLER
$5.000 wanted

t ; I hin. 1; . .
": I-. = 2h: a { {\ ,s ,
} i- h ,- i "' :


"'l H ow1 ci .t l! tI lli II ,t-
'I 11 I i'n;\ he ''iI! Ihn (IN N 11i K
\ s o Il I -. N l i =i.i s 1 Ni'l
I 11 i N tlk' h \f \ ,, --
I ic r I' i so

w ii h. I to r I 'I I I'
si ii t t h e !i c !'. tii,

jonalt



,! l ao 1. w 1 ""



I h v NO, w"
ons;- v P ASa i' r
\ a.llc\ hall in~ hdcs !',, i'i
,. (l t'+ 'j\ ,, ih { inci t l'd


ladies) and sonle seven athlete's
are expected to be sent by l the
BAAA a total ,t 45

\ I. I. .1ill will probably
have first preference over the
other two tearnms after their
recent successes in Miami it the
S5000 is not raised.
On the other hand tlhe
committee might decide to
leave out the small compliment
of athletes and send the two,
larger teams.
Dolnalors to the funds forI
thle teams a,ire urged to sell
cheques made out to the
Bahamas Oh inpic Association.
as soon as possible
Th e eaiesN begin in Santo
)o0m)nll1got) olI t:ebrlalr 27.


N\aiie dauices o the
At/lees. .lito wounded
Mexico Cits. were
prrlorlmed at the
pri d a n light Ing
cercIliemonit

Runners carried tihe
orcli throumi tie ciity
It the Olvmpic sports
centre where Mexican
i Illmpilc Committlee
nt'rimni President


Alejandro Ortega San
Vincente received it.
Ortega San Vicente
gave it to a representa-
tive of the Dominican
Republic who in turn
handed it to the next
runner.

The flame will pass
through 23 Mexican
towns and villages en
route to Veracrut.


Communist China steps


nearer world sport


I',


liii i I
I -
I . I

Iii


Time for suspended matches


FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE

ON T HCl
TROPICAL 2 2157


I' '-


i .p'Nsied his agreement.
t ,ime wi ll o g ini
: .iand China
P' "" R '-,,ili I, ilM ,




S I" h,. i; i h 1 )t I T


* n .i i tl ) 1 ,iIu c


_-











I -.






E
" .... ..

1!" k *" ''^,'.v



< : '- .,. .




+'- Ca ) ;.- \ .


FAM)IOS tunny man George Kirbv was
enoyi mg uoll laciities ot the Princess I emerald
and Princess Ruby Courses this pasi w, ek as
part of the Bondu's Bon Ad'enture
Tournament. sponsored by Eastern Air Lines
Kirby and his friends were guests of the
International Princess Hotel, and played 36


favourites Johnny Hud Hudgins, light
heavyweight champ Baby Boy Rolle
and even Boston himself. "I think
Freeze is out of class with these
i .as He's just too good for them,"
he said.
The local promoters Heastie said are
not giving him a fair shake They do
not want to give Freeze that
international exposure.
Baker who sat in the dressing room
nursing a cut bottom lip explained
that Freeze's unorthodox style
kept him oft. "You always get in
trouble when fighting guys like these
because they have no set was of
moving," he said.
In other bouts last night, K. 0.
(Itan t and Roscoe boxed an
exhibition.


I


Nangoes


shock


Classic

Pros

Slt t iUD PLAL( Classic
Pros' hopes of beating last
place Fox Hill Nangoes last
night to share first place with
league leading Strachan's .Autto
Afrikans turned into a last
minute treiCy when the
underrated Nangoes rallied
tromi a ten point deficit toi a
commanding 77-73 upset.
Trailing 34-29 at half tli e.
the Pros turned on their
offence and top performance-s
by (olson Bain and six-foot-six
Ilisha McSweeney saw lhcn
holding a strong h3-52 lead
with 7 20 left.
This seemed to spark the
N.ingoes into action and rookie
oi the year contender Jjlles
C'larke teamed tip w\ith inc
Alburs in notching the game it
73 all with 30 seconds left
Albury then sank two trcc
throws and gave one of Ihs
eight assists to The o lumes
clinching the win.
The Pros in that pCrit-d
scored 22 of 4t field gu.ll
attempts. The Nangoes scored
only 19 of 55 irom the ieild
hbut six of eight from lihe trt'
throw linc
With nothing to Iose, tihe
Nangoes went out fight ing andl
although theN trailed 23-19
with 4:30 left in the first hall
rallied behind the scoring t)
Alhurs and Lioncl (larke hoi
the halt llie (ad.


Mhurs
I m cirltN

I Cl.irk -
Sti)rr
i ..irl"iii'r
I r uiAlt


\i. slliun ,
i Silt\rNt


I Iti iI r i


S inii ti
Muitn i

I',,.it'


.SANi~iil t'
il rb
I 2
h I
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Four-pedal

LONDON Bitalii' ( ,olii
( hapnlan. Je -igncL r W I tii
whts h hatve won S ii wFt ,ilt
chaImpionships, i n',c l hd.i
tn veiled j r'\o ihlit n ii lH-
(;land Prix l ct, loi ilhe 1974
series
'l1w car. knotn .ri lih Jihn
Plaou ei spcit 1.l arid pi -'IW cd bIh
ithe same I old V- en'1 hlia'
tour pedals
. .. . .. #


Ki:

:. :1


holes of golf every day.
In the above photo from left are Glen
Hilton, of Watergate. Washington; Ralph Amis.
Washington. D.C.: George Kirby, Jim Taylor.
of Boston, Mass.; and Ken Johnson, Resident
Golf Pro for the King's Inn & Golf Club, at
Princess Hotel.


Peter Butler receives a trophy from Jack Weingart, director of golf for Lucayan, Shannon and
Reef Golf Clubs, commemorating his 65, a new course record at Bahama Reef Yacht and Golf
Club.


Butler breaks record


FREFPORT British professional golfer.
Peter Butler broke a seven-year course record
at Bahama Reef Yacht and Golf Club with a
65.
The course record of 66 wsas held jointly by
four golfers, until Butler brought in his 65 last
month.
Butler is no stranger to Freeport, hel
captured the Grand Bahama International
Pro-Am title in 1971 and 172' and this visit
makes his fifth trip to Freeport.
Butler has won 24 major tilt';iin hNi, gckingi


career, including the French Open in 1968. He
competed in the Masters' Tournament in
Augusta. Georgia, seven times and until 1973
was the highest ranking British golfer to play
the prestigious tournament, placing llth once
and 1 3tl twice.

A member of the British Ryder Cup team
and the World Cup team. Butler scored a
hile-in-one, in the Ryder Cup matches played
in September 1973, the first hole-in-one scor-d
in the history of the Ryder Cup play.


What kept Spencer and


Obed apart for so long


By C.l \lS(ll)\l T R111 R ul
r 11 1 \I J \ \1 I ( \ \
1ni d dilc c t i ll i : '. ;,dl i
; ,- .i I.I Spcii ,cti knilocke' d ii i
ahauils l Shei i ir k lm 'li t' ti

Owl. ll 'rwei it, I I' p I liI i.
5,i1212t'i (li _0 l I thqi
(Ibed. scilcd .l 5 in' e.ide. I \,i is


c\cnIh) i lI \ 1 hit \I 'I1 1 .
I he jty I A h licd i k,
itlinl I I'll ( h [ll' I I )u I c.

t Ig N'- Fl \|siN \cl >,r pl ItlI

1t lg lp i 'AI d- I i J .
"Wtll]l I ." I 205 I
"S'pcl c i c in kmn ,k I ,m !
bN o c k ,)It "" }ic nd n d
p eol p le \\ l l .i\ ,o I i

)Io lSii r I I' i i llI o
u hl \i-s scrapipi'', in 11Jc'.. t il. l.

lcl l iw Jai)],n .,ii Bi ]ini> (. ni
t l Ii .s ,S1 m ,i \1 i 'l- I I C

Fl it F | o n i ..| ,
h teu to i;i. F .i li i7
I p l ct t t l ii ,I s h i tI !. !' 1 > l i , !i i
ths, OW bcJ i .. ni p I ., "1i n -1 ,

\\ in d ll S p| ;,_,. i ..- ... !, i ."}i

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1" i 10t il, .I" I .



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p I es-, Ml tih Id I, *.(, I,

thI \l o l Id d" nl ti t .ifir^

I u i 11 C l tt !.' I l!, ti

S lich ad h e d lll*


l'..J,\ ,,h tl take .

Sn .. hl ii i. i i


11tJlld l' os tN in
L I, 5 t I I Ji I thllIn lh in




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h l !' l':I t' J tl I l' l I t d kall,


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pl c h kttl 1

I I k l
'I Ihit .i li ( t Fl i d putiit-iI

Si hil 'IK I I .1 l ot 1) I"t '


a If h illlil .i d b'd his

I cc il Ii

\ It u11 Spencci is
kll, dcl.at d like ( O)l'vd, Ilis
ri.'id tAl 2 ani l t i. \Oith 14
k n 'ko Nt ildit.Iles thai he
I liNh lihe mirin g h.il l ti l.
h v n Il I"'-l t abot I i.s cNI reCed i

"\o Ibhg lihn." he- shluggd.
" N1 1 oulid hi.n ldid owi 5tl
iltll'h bs I l)\,` ltll I ,il.,,i s had
!d li l v1 1 \ t io ii u |a )I o I 1ncnts.'"
M! a 't (ho w e. r alw ,ay s st t\ s


NOTICE

NOT IC(L is hereby qiven that ALLAN ALVIN TRENTON
YOUNG of Nor olk Storet Shtledi NJassid is applying to
the Ministri responsible for Nationality and Citi ienshtlip, for
ieqisti ition as a uti/en of The Bahajn s, iand that any
person who knows aniy reason why registration should nrot
be qraoted should send 3a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty -eight days hiom the 12th day of
F ebruaiiy 19714 to The Miistei responsible for Nationality
and Citiuenship. P. 0 Box N/147. NassJau




NOTICE

l, ; | h i'v <|. that I",StI fC RI RUDM
'1 RGUSOf )S f V f t (ih hinsi. ,n Stir t, N P. i
; .t: p<" -ble for Nitiot alit, and
t i.,e'nship). f I rle isti-'.n a.s utti/'ei of The Bah,.nias, ajnd
thjit .i0,i. proi .ion who knlws anly season why t' tegistiation
l,,i ,, t h' giO,'ted should bend a witten .nd sign d
't'i t, 'nt of htI, t .t- within twenity-eight (days fiIofr ttiiW
ih da, F, i r .b ai 1 1 74, to The Ministei iespornsible for
N .Itw its .iid t Cl F. t i tshop, P. 0. Box N/147. Nassai.





NOTICE

NOl .F is her1ey ijvein that tB RNARD PAUl of Peirpall
I .ii k, isstaI, INhaplm is ipp jivng to the Ministei
i- ai;'sble fo' Natioinality tInd Citi/enship, foii
;djt ll atl.tOn ds 1d itizenl of The BadhdrTias, and that any
'',)'..''i who krnow1ii' ny tea' soi why w a' I rati lisatlioi should
0n' i: g iinted s should a send a v litn II nd t StjiCtd statement
uf the fact' within twentv eich ays fr'on ttie 1 th dday of
F ebmtid l'.t/4 to Thei r 'istet iL,.ponsbile toi Nattionality
jtid Citizenship. P 0 Bo1 N7147, Nassau




NOTICE

NOl1 IC is h iciy given that HERMAN ANDREW ARENS
oi White Sound, Little Guanid Cy. Abaco, Lays is applying
to the Ministeri responsible for Nationality and Citi/enship,
o0 nriatuidlisation as d citizen of The Bahaimas, and that
any person who, knows any Ieason why 'inatui dlisition
should niot be granted should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days ftinm the
bth clay of February, 1914 to The Minister responsible for
Nationality and CLtienship, P.O. Box N7147, Nassau.




NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CHUNG CHOI DAVID
KWAN ut Coffee House, Last Street is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
iegisti.tion as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should riot
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 12th day of
February 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N7147, Nassau.
I IMM


TORCH STARTS JOURNEY TO GAMES


I. .-. I \li .tuauilr uti
I : \ r Sr rachan
, [- 't i ir Ftrdl t iI fL itir r L si i

I ihe l Pr I n ',c ss
I I: N it i,, 1 rlitt iki.r he A k i
.i .i tvd i tes rda i
a; I rIn i buIr i nIs i-


aN it atlelnpled to turn nino
. ... ', l+,j~l! ,iu ",1 H I s t i % ( a ,t, \ Lane s ,o tlh i (f
., id itl R ,,udi r; c h a1n ,i ls .i fP ar k T h e rc. ,incc r
t...,1 ,ltl. % alliedd tili a car bl| r i llimto lam1,es on i'pl ct


LAND FOR SALI

(ABACO)
(On the Main Highway, Turtle Rocks. Neat Treasuire
W e ,' illt 'im q tll.t -, ts .'*" .i : "** ," ;:,.-"
high group iid A I the .oir v ji i d' jqe .-, .
pe' atce with good (,sh T .''i .
offer with good pr, iip 'N1o : r
aj otheL bhvers nieadb. hCie sold i .: .
for $imilai land

LAKE VIEW DEVELOPMENT

COMPANY LIMITED
P 0 Box N1957SSr N4305NASS ;
Telephone, evenings 23 13


I I I


1M \I(O C'ITU
The Central suiner.in
torch was hlit lodi andi
started iis twt w t-ek
trip bh ruinrier and ,hip
toi Santo l'om inlgo,
'w here it w ill be ,used to
light the flame tlot the
Central Amlericaln aitid
Caribbean (lanwts et

I symbolic r/letI
high priest III lthe turchr


i