<%BANNER%>
The Tribune.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03721
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03721

Full Text










[ ODUDLEY'S



SOLVAUIA TVs-
P.0. BOX 540 P4ONE 2-1 306/2.3237


Sribu tt


r**4 withPotmastr of Bahamas for post& concemtons within the Bah.mas, Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper ..
VOL. LXX1, No. 67 Monday, February 11, 1974. Price: 20 Cents


= ANOTHER Nassau foodstore was held
up by a masked gunman on Saturday and
a quantity of money stolen.

The robbery at Centreville Food
Market on the corner of 6th Terrace
Centreville and East Avenue seems a
carbon copy of the previous Saturday
night hold-up of the manager ot
Kenneth's Food Store on Bahamas
Avenue.
Just like the Kenneth robbery, a young
man, described as no more than 5 foot
three inches, of slim build, dark
complexion and wearing dark clothing
and a hat, walked into the Centreville


Food Store after the store was closed and
demanded money.
The store manager and owner, Mr.
Jerome Major, said that he had closed the
store and was cleaning up, although there
were still two women customers in the
store. "One of the packing boys opened
the doors for a regular customer he knew
and this chap must have come in."

Mr. Major said that he was at the front
of the store and this "young chap with a
stocking mask over his face and holding
what looked like a gun, mentioned
something about money in a very low
voice.
"All mv money had been locked away


and I only had some change in the cash
register," said Mr. Major. He said he
pulled the money out of the cash register
- "it was very little" and put it on the
counter. "He picked out the large notes,
$10 and $5 notes but left a pile of one
dollar bills, and with the money still in
his hand made for the door."
Mr. Major said he did not give chase
but locked the door after the robber had
fled.
On Saturday, February 2 Kenneth
Carey and his wife, owners of Kenneth's
Food Store on Bahama Avenue were
robbed of $2,100 by a masked gunman as
they were locking up the premises for the
night.


Bahamas losing







'tourist share'


TOURISM receipts for the
Caribbean, including the
Bahamas and Bermuda, are not
keeping pace with the growth
rate being experienced in other
areas of the world. Tourism
Minister Clement Maynard said
in New York today.
Mr. May a id's observation
was made at 'tie Ainerii .an
Management Association i,
aninsual nic eting on
Travel and Tourism, ;p ...
meeting at the Waldorf'-Ast'na
Hotel,
As one of the guest
speakers, the Ministei discussed
the means for turning tout:i, I
I inltu a Iat.itt.iai.i IesoI;rft-,.
lie noted that the Bahamas's
annual tourist growth rate had
declined to less than a quart :r
of what it was in the lOois,
and emphasized the need both
for intensified promotion and
produce improvement to meet
the increased competition.
During the last four years.
Mr. May nard said. the
Caribbean, including thlie
Bahamas and Bermuda, has
been losing its share -if the
world tourist market.
Receipts trom tourism in


MEMBERS of the Crippled
Children's Committee check -
books of tickets and cash- 2
returned by sellers in last'
month's raffle.
Prizes this year are a
Chrysler Newport and a
Dodge Monaco Custom
station wagon, donated by
Mr. Alexis Nihon.
The draw will take place at
The Cat and Fiddle night
Club tomorrow at 9 p.m. and
tickets will again be on sale
from 3 p.m. until the draw
time at that location.
Each book of raffle tickets
issued by the committee I
members is numbered and Net
scrupulously accounted for, BA
after which they fold all tor
ticket stubs so that they aicti
cannot stick together in the nel
barrel from which the draw is is
made. por
Station ZNS will broadcast .ani
Tuesday night's event live I
from The Cat and Fiddle. lrai
Left to right, above, Mrs. by
Robert Orr (raffle organizer), leas
Mrs. Lionel Chapman, Mrs. Car
Allan Butler (committee for
chairman), Mrs. Paul moi
Adderley and Mrs. Cyril BA1
Joseph. B
lear
a.a m
IMPORTED Car,
MIRROR inst
afte

CONSOLE BAN

MII FMRI l sLh
NASSAU FREEPORT spo
E athe


SMEARED...


1-)72. reported by about 100
countries, and excluding
expondituie on air tlres,
iihwed a 16 per cent increase
ovcr I971, making a total of
S24 2 billion.
I -iurisn receipts for the
( 0hi'heanT iwever, showed ani
in tice.i of less than 7 pIer cent
in the same year. the Minister
pnoiced out.
I siunated receipts tor 1973
are S28 billion, an increase of
12 per cent to 14 per cent, the
margin being due to currency
iiluctuations. But the increase
)i he (',i ih, .in was not
hkclI tio be more than five per
Snt, 'I Maynard said.
"' 1 i; n rcau.iii.
'com pet ition foir the tourist
dollar from many areas of the
world and from several new
upconuing destinations," he
continued.
"Nearer to the Bahamas,
there is far more awareness of
the economic value of tourism
among the Caribbean countries
resulting in g greater
competition. For instance, lihe
J.inaica tourist Boards. which
spent less than half of what the
Bahanias spent a few years ago
oil tourist promotion, spent
S250,000 more in 1973."


Bermuda, Piuerto Rico.
Barbados and some n of the
smaller islands like the
Canymins and Antigua had also
stepped up their promotional
efforts. Hlaiti was a new
competitor and there were
some indications ot a change of
posi'ture in 'ub.i.
Thle Minister .also referred to
the e ,)its or Venezuela and
Mexico, which, with far larger
resources, were developing new
multi-nillion dollar resorts on
their Caribbean coastlines.
In a lew years these would
become major competitors, Mr.
Ma inard stressed.
Comparing the Bahamas's
lt'inst growth rate in the
I 'r.li and 1970s, the Minister
noted that in the six years
between 1 o(i4 and 1969. this
country experienced an average
annual lupsiilgc of more than
16 per cent.
Visitor totals went from
605.000 in 1964 lo 1.332,000
in 1969.
In the touur \ears of 1970 tot
1973. average annual growth i
was tnot quite tloir per lleni
"In these \ear lust closed, we
welcoi)med 1.520,000 visitors ,a


BANC plea for


chairs, desks


ItEF BAHAMAS Aid for
edy Children (known as
NC) has acquired a building
educational and play
ivities for pre-school age
edy children, but
appealing to the public for
table blackboards, chairs
I desks.
he Patricia Myers School of
ice on Village Road. owned
Mr. Michael Myers and
sed by Mrs. Janet
twright, has been donated
use of the children for the
derate rent of $5 a week, a
NC spokesman said today.
IANC are to form the
n-and-play group between 9
. and 12 noon while Mrs.
wright will continue to
ruct her dance classes in the
moon.
)f the 20 or so children
NC worked with last year,
have successfully entered
ool this year, a BANC
kesmnan said, and the
ents of these children feel
happy adjustment of their


children to school li e has been
largely due to the efforts of
BANC and its subsidiary, the
"Birds of Paradise"'. which
consists of wives of casino
employees.
Members oi the "Birds" will
continue to actively support
BANC and to train aind work
with news children again this
year. a spokesman said.
But the group still needs
some portable blackboards,
and a few chairs and desks for
the children, the spokesman
added. Anyone who can help
should contact Mr. lerbt
Stewart. president of BANC. at
2-4542.

JUMBLE SALE

A JUMBLE sale will be held
at St. Matthew's Parish School
Saturday, February 1t6 at 10
ami. Clothing for men, women
and children will be on sale.
Proceeds are in aid of St.
Matthew's Parish School.


respectable figure but not quite
good enough for an
independent nation where
tourism contributes more than
70 per cent of the gross
national product and half the
government's revenues," Mr.
Maynard declared.
Growth rates for the '70s
were not expected to duplicate
the record-setting pace of the
'ities, he said. This was
especially true since the energy
crisis began to show its
dampening effects on the
world travel industry.
Detailing earlier efforts
made to promote tourism the
Ministci observed that the
tourism budget has ranged
from $500,000 in 1951 to $8
million in 1972. whereas cost
per visitor dropped from $8.34
to S5.30 in the same period.
In 1951 nearly S400,000 of
the half-million-dollar total was
spent on advertising, publicity
and sales aids, compared to
over S4.4 million in 1972.
Ilowever the cost of
coimmuntlications per visitor was
reduced during this period
Iroim $5.46 to $2.89. "showing
that it is not just the amount
oi the budget which is
iniportant, but rather what
those dollars produce."
Ilie Minister said that the
$13 million which government
and the hotels combined
annual to spend on promoting
the Balamas had nade millions
of people conscious of the
attractions offered by these
islands.
\t the same tinse however.
tht, had fostered the
de clopmien t of mass or
budget-minded tourism as
opposed to the affluent
tourism of the recent past.
1n t his connect ion
Mr Maynard emphasized the
need to construct low budget
acconinondation so as to
lower the cost for middle and
lower-middle income group
vis itors who cannot afford
luxury hotels and expensive
goods and services.
Most tourist accommoda-
trons in the Bahamas, but
especially in Freeport, were
designed to cater to middle and
upper income visitors.
A changover to the
a c c o in in o d a t i o n o t
b udget-minded tourists
entailed a certain decline in
financial return, Mr. Maynard
said. hence the need for
alernate accommodations "sok
that the luxury hotels are not
financially over-burdened."
The Minister in addition
advocated more tourist resorts
in the Out Islands, special
package deals that also
included visits to some Out
Islands, more scetnit
attractions, especially in
Erecport-Lucaya and the
maintenance of law-and-order.
n\ % believe that the
stability and peacefulness ot
our society are of a very high
order, and we know that it is
important to maintain a
congenial law-and-order
situation. Any deterioration in
that is bound to dis,,mimr.ag,
tourism." Mr. Maynard said.
It was important in addition
to continue the campaign to
educate Bahamians that by
serving the interests of the
tourists they would be serving
their own interests and
benefitting the country.


'LITTLE GUNMAN' RAIDS STORE


S




"7'y


Brrrr!


It's going


to stay


chilly
THE COLD weather that
came in over the weekend is
likely to be with us for a day
or so, although the Nassau
Metereological Offtice
reports it should be much
warmer by Wednesday.
A cold front lies :r I ..,ll:
stationary over the southeast
Bahamas today and a large high
pressure system over the Gull
of Mexico is moving eastwards
pushing the cold air our way.
Winds, which on Saturday
blew in gusts up to nearly 40
m.p.h., are gradually coming
round to the northeast, but
within a day or so, says the
Met. Office, they should be
easterly and then southeasterly
which will bring warmer
weather.
"There is a gradual warming
trend it's warmer today than
yesterday and yesterday's
minimum was only 62 degrees
because of good cloud cover.
The maximum today should be
72 degrees," the Met Office
said.
However, the general
weather forecast is mainly lair
with winds diminishing and by
Wednesday warming Lip quite a
bit
Acting director of the Met
Office, E.V Tynes. said that
during January the Bahamas
had unusually warm weather.
"Maxinmum temperatures
during the month were nearly
four degrees higher and
minimum temperatures two
degrees higher than normal at
Nassau.
Sunshine was above average
and rainfall below average.
being confined to a few light
showers."


EXTRADITION



CASE IS


SA 1 1- T 1TXTTUTYl7T-


AIDJ V U NI1EiDL i

EXTR \ I) Itio\ proceedings brought against a Sears Road
certified accountant wanted in the U.K. by Her Majesty's
Government were adjourned until Thursday when the 39-year-old
man made a request for additional time to "properly instruct" his
two attorneys, neither of whom appeared in court for the case
this morning.
The proceedimNs against
Hubert Leopold Pinder. a
former British resident, accuse
him o)f offences comningtted
between February 1970 an d
October 1972.
Pinder was released on a
$15.000 cash bond after the
impounding of all his travel
documents, Hie was arrested on
January 22. minutes after a
Supreme Court jury acquitted
him of swindling $10,000 from
English school-teacher b a
Margaret Joan Ostcroftt
The terms ot his release were
set by the Chieft Magistrate on
Jantlarv 23 sshen attolrnev
Ce cil Wallace-Whittficld ,I
appeared in court for him.
The case for the British
Government is being put
forward by attorney Keith
l)uncombe of the firm t
Dupuch and Turnquest.
Attorney llenry Bostwick.,
who represented Pinder during
his case in the Supremne Court HUBERT PINDER
was named defence counsel bs
the accused during this brought as grounds for
morning's short hearing. extradition accuse him of
Attorney Wallace-Whitfield is biganmy, stealing, fraudulen
reported! being retained by trading and obtaining property
Pinder to assist attorney by false pretences. The charges
Bostwick, also involve several hundred
Although both lawyers thousand pounds.
aire said to be representing the Among the person
accused neither appeared in reportedly victims of thi
court with him this morning, offences is a British Baronet
They were involved in other Sir J o h n P a t r i ck
matters in the Supreme Court. MacLannahamn Power. o
Charges against Pinder, Newlands Manor a director o


Haitian boats rapped


I ~f-i


o
.

_' ' 'S 2. -.-' -. 7- L".-, .- " . .

.. _.._ ,,, .,. ^-T


Outten's

first day
MR SINCLAIR Outten,
e-appointed as parliamentary
secretaryy Ministry of
I-ducation and Culture, is to
act as co-ordinator of the
ministryy school building
programme.
Mr Outten began his first
Jai at the Ministry this
snorning, following his victor\
1it .'anuary's St Barnabas
hb -election,
liHe told the Tribune today
lhat he would be inspecting
the two junior high schools
now tinder construction onl
Bernard Road and Baillou Hill
road.
"The school on Bernard
road should be ready by early
\larch and the one on Baillou
hIill probably by the end of
\larch," \Mi Outten said
He said the Ministry hoped
;t would be able to have
students transferred to the
schoolss in time for the summer
term.
Students destined for L.W.
Young on Bernard Road are
presently housed in the Eastern
Secondary School on Mackey
Street. Those for S.C.
McPherson are in the former
Baillou Hill premises of
Jordan/Prince Williams schools.
Mr. Outten has relinquished
his pre-election employment
with Bahamas World Airlines
to return to the Ministry of
Education.
The St. Barnabas
representative was originally
elected for the district ia the
1972 general election but
relinquished his seat because of
nationality difficulties.


THE INTERDENOMIN-
ATIONAL Christian Youth
Association (ICYA) has
warned that the tourist
industry could be jeopardized
unless government cleans up
the "unhealthy, unattractive
and appalling" condition
created at the Market Range
by Haitian boats.
A statement from ICYA
president Alfred Sears said
today that if the situation
was no t corrected
immediately and effectively,
"the inevitable result will be
serious epidemics affecting
both the health of
Bahamians and the already)
staggering tourist industry."
Mr. Sears called on related
government Ministries to
make a policy statement on
all matters pertaining to the
trafficking of Haitian vessels
throughout the Bahamas and
their use of the Market Range
and all other wharfs in the
Bahamas.
He also asked a number of
questions.
Mr Sears wanted to
know if immigration checks
were made on the incoming
and outgoing voyage of each
Haitian boat passing Inagua;
what the stipulated time
period was for these boats to
remain at a Nassau wharf;
whether their sanitary
condition met required health
standards; whether work
permits or passports were
required of the crew, as well
as health certificates, and
why the quarantine station in
Haiti was operated only to
serve the interests of a few
members of the Bahamian
public.
The ICYA suggested
through its president that


government "in the best
interests of the Bahamian
people.' establish an agency
in Nassau which could
guarantee that products out
of Haiti met the required
health standard, and to which
complaints by purchasers
could be addressed.
"With such an agency we
would be able to ban those
products which are in
demand but are available at
the local Produce Exchange,"
Mr. Sears said
LADY BUTLER
STILL IN PMH
I.LADY BL -11R. swife of
Governor General Sir Milo
Butler. is still in hospital and is
understood now to be allowed
visitors, although no
spokesman at the hospital
would contirn or deny any
question put by this
new paper.
MR. ZACKIES
MILLER BURIED
,XK Z/ACKIFS MILLER.
XS, who died at his home
Millci's. long Island, on
Saturday morning. was buried
at St. Andrew's Church, Long
Island at 8 15 a.m. yesterday.
Interment was made in the
church cemetery.
Mr Miller, who married Mrs.
Beatrice Miller after the death
of his first wife, Martha, is
survived by 11 daughters, four
sons. including Mr. Edward
m ,i, of New York, 59
grandchildren. and 28
ji ji- rindhildren
Also surviving are two
sisters. Mrs Gertrude Knowles
of Hallandale, Florida, and
Mrs. Louise Knowles; two
brothers, Mr. Eddie Miller of
New York and Mr. Gladstone
Miller of Hallandale. Florida.


the Kingsway Offices Co. and
several other associated
companies. Sir Patrick is also
managing director of Arthur
Beale Ltd.
Pinder is alleged to have
stolen the sum of 10,000
pounds from Sir John after
causing him to issue a cheque
for I 1.000 pounds by "falsely
representing that he was due to
be paid 430,000 Swiss francs
b Ma\ 1, 1470 ..."
The charge of bigamy
accuses hin ot marrying Diana
Mary Golden while being
married to his first wife, Nila
Pinder.
During the hearing this
morning. Pinder told the court
that he had no knowledge
about the charges brought
against him bh the British
Goverin'eint .s he never was
supplied with copies of the
docket-.
Ihe magistrate read him the
17 charges and informed him
that the documents numbered
200 pages. There are also 259
exhibits in the case, he said.
Pinder said that neither of
his attorneys had been given
copies of the documents. This
however w5as not true attorney
Duncombe said h\ informing
the court that attorney Wallace
Whitfield had been given copies
of the documents in the case
by the British High Commis-
sion
BIMINI iI'IP
FULFILLING a promise
made by leader Kendal Isaacs
at last year's convention, a
numberolt the Free National
Moven-rfit executive paid a
flyin ,isit to Bimini over the
weekend.
The Bimini trip is the first in
a series the FNM plans to make
througho'.-t the Family Islands.
Next w.. the group willgo to
the A., ins-Crooked Island
district.
Among those in the party
were Mr. Isaacs, chairman
Orv ille Turnquest,
secret a ry-general Clifford
Cooper, vice-chairman Fred
Ramsey and Senator Arthur
Foulkes.
A fair was held at the
island Friday and Saturday,
followed on Saturday evening
by a "very successful"
campaign meeting, a party
spokesman said.


THE SENATE today had
its opening prayers offered by
the first woman ever named a
chaplain to the legislature.
The Rev. Harriet
McDonald (pictured) has been
appointed chaplain to the
Senate to replace the Rev.
Preston Moss, who has been
named a Monsignor of the
Catholic church.
Mrs. McDonald was
introduced to Senators by
president Dr. Doris Johnson,
a close friend of the new
chaplain
She said that in keeping
with the practice of rotating
churchmen of the various
denominations, Mrs.
McDonald, a Baptist, had
been appointed to succeed
Father Moss.


ROTARY LUNCH
THE REGULAR weekly
luncheon meeting of the
Rotary Club of Nassau will not
be held tomorrow. Instead, the
club will hold a supper meeting
that evening in the Governor's
Hall of the Sheraton British
Colonial Hotel, to be attended
by Rotarians. their wives and
guests.
Speaker for the evening will
be Hon. Fugene Dupuch. Q.C.
Following Mr. Dupuch's
address, Michael Londsdale of
the British High Commission
will screen 'he official filin of
the Royal Wedding of Princess
Anne and Capt. Mark Phillips
C,,i ti', will be served from
7:30 p n.,. with dinner at 8:301
p.m.


LUCAS CA.V. GIRLING
BATTERIES
,- other ORIGINAL Spares

BAY STREET GARAGE
Sw)Wl ii %EL S.1 1 T PHONE 2 2434


r









f
f


hp


r*













2 Mody Febuar 11,- 1974


Police widen hunt for seven after heiress


The


worl


THLE SO ITH
government rele
ciN lian prisoner
Vietcong todat iit
dav of an exc
Vietconii reported

DEMOCRATIC
Idward Kennedv
impression jester
he sight the
presidential l0on1
1976. hite would
part *priilmri ,,

.USTIR \l I
Pliilippinie- atet b
stand onil their oxv
.! '. ud less oni
States, saxs Austr
Minister Gough Wil

A LONE gunn
n hs>tt l'nih ss
da'ith w hini he tri
bhaik i Hiistiiion
Thir ma was ki
-.tl dr,' polie.-in;
,.s a security guard

I'l t I! 1 nmist
Gand lI' giterm
0 o r itit :1dhninii

S% ,rd in af ter
i me a ir
rjutderN aild rir,

i A \FI-TS ^.i





.'.'. it S FnI





ai-i lb "nit
+,M+ t,, + 1*





(;tt t~ Il


Vitnarmelse
cased 141
s to the
tihe second
change. the


Senator
gave the
day that if
democratic
lination inll
enter the


:Ind the
i.giimiiii to
'i feet and
the United
alian Prime


ian -oith a
ia shot to
ed ti rob a
police -,aid
lled bs an
an w working


BERKELEY The FBI
says it now seeks seven
people in the kidnapping of
newspaper heiress Patricia
Hearst and is "running out
any number of leads" outside
the state.
But the weekend passed
without further word from
the Symbionese Liberation
Army (SLA), which said in a
letter Thursday it was holding
19-year-old Miss Hearst.
At the Hearst mansion in
H illsborough, a family
spokesman said yesterday was
"a day of nothingness" for
the victim's distraught
parents. Mr. and Mrs.
Randolph Hearst. The father
is president and editor of the
San Francisco Examiner
FBI agent Thomas Druken
said that in addition to five
persons previously sought.
authorities were looking for a


GERMAN

COMMUTERS

HIT BY

STRIKES


I R A N K F L R I
ter Indira Commruters got to work todas
ment look b private car bhry cle or
station ou t th;kmg as public service
rat state workers seeking higher wages
the state went on "focai point" strikes
resigned in West (,ermnant
th of cmil A airport s m un i;pal
transport, garbage co election
and street Je.ienmg were
rnmng thai a affectej
a group has Streetcars and buses stopped
into Israel in ost I "Ocr ite and in
ftolldl in West Berlin llundreds of
..a senCtral thousands were late 'or work.
said Passengers at tile aiport' in
Frankfurt Europe's third
s d reCd a 'argestr and other cit'cs, had to
Sut ,I n Carr their own luggage
nuintdIties Departure were delak ed isoimr
.ur inport 'light, were .anceliled
- .,ntrol Janitors asked apartment
dwellers *t- keep their garbage
i home until sanitation
S kers returned to their jobs.
( oimmuter trains and
umher rlai, h''ses were operating,
1Ill r and s s er me most postal
s.e. Ices. But spokesmen for the
wokes on them saidth d lhe
planning to strike also.
S government negotiators
1' i;', pinned to submit a new wage
: . :.Y to union le aders today .
n n t j the .' . .m were
rgnai planned to last onlQ
t L orrow But the unions
.. ,a settle'nent was not
j .-,,, .. _' I of' clerks and
S n on he altobahn-
.... strik- uI sdat
I here ha. not been an
S ued puNit serve '.1
;e Wr (he-r-';:a' since Word
l earii a tmll ion
S'on!ed gct rnniment workers
Sted overwhelmingly last
S ve.ek t, trikc kes public,
ck..i t atter the government
reted their demand tor a 15
'r ent pa\ boost.


says she was a nonviolent
person.
Other friends say Nancy
Ling Perry, 26. has a keen
and inquiring mind, runs to
the defence of others and
always questions rules.
Mrs. Perry, who wrote a
rambling letter about
revolution and the
Symbionese Army to the San
Francisco Examiner, is
wanted by police on a
warrant charging her with
arson at a house used as an
intelligence headquarters for
the terrorist group.
Randolph Hearst, father of
the kidnapped woman,
ordered the San Francisco
Examiner to run in full the
five-page letter sent Jan. 17
from Mrs. Perry. In it she
declared: "There is no flight
to freedom except that of an
armed projectile." (AP)


white couple in their 20s.
The two were parked in a
dark. late model Volkswagen
sedan near the Berkeley
apartment from which Miss
Hearst was carried last
Monday night, screaming for
help.
Druken said people in the
area saw the couple waiting in
the car for "well over an hour
in the immediate area where
the apartment would be
visible" but did not see them
immediatelyy after the
kidnapping.
Composite drawings of the
white woman and two black
men who broke into the
apartment and carried Miss
Hearst off in the trunk of
their car were released by the


WA-Ill\i I, ,\ Secretart
of State Henri Kissingeri
opened a 1 3-nution energy
conference todai with ti plel.
r T' "~-i.. and productive
dialtoc ue" betwcerl ,il
producing and oil consuming
nations
Addressing more tha: 100
delegates from 13 countriess
which consuine 85 petr cent oi
the world's petroleun.
Kissinger outlined a seven -point
programme for meCtiTg cthe
current energy crisis.
Kissinger called on the
countries represent .t tilhe
conference to join the Itrnitcd
States in conserving tuel to
reduIe pressures on world



A new

NEW YORK Another
singing nun has a hit record.
Back in 1964, it was the
lilting "Dominique" which
became the llth best-selling
record of that year.
In 1974, it's Sister Janet
Mead. 36, of Australia,
singing "The Lord's Prayer"
with a rock beat.
In the last 10 days, "The
Lord's Prayer" has sold half a
million copies in the United
States and it isn't even on the
radio yet in all cities.
The record says "The
Lord's Prayer" and
underneath that "Arnold
Strals." Strals is the
Australian who composed the
rock tune sung by Sister
Janet. The lyrics have been
around a long time.
Sister Janet was born in
Adelaide, Australia, studied


BAHAMAS NATIONAL TRUST


ANNOUNCES

AUDUBON WILDLIFE FILM SERIES 1974



"TREASURE OF EASI AFRICA"

ii'. --,isur -opportunity to relive a visit to East Africa or plan the idyllic trip for the future
i-mro d at'lis such as the cape buffalo, giraffes, hippos and many others in their natural
hajtJt Some of the famous places visited include the Rift Valley and the Serengeti Plains.

By: BOWER E. RUDRUD


TEACHERS TRAINING COLLEGE AUDITORIUM

OAKES FIELD



TUEMISDAY, FEBRUARY 12T1h,1974 at 0:00 PM.


ADMISSION $2.00


CHILDREN $1.00


Tickets and information obtainable from the Bahamas National Trust,
Star Plaza, Mackey Street or at the auditorium on the evening of the
programme.

FUTURE PROGRAMMES.


SEA, ICE AND FIRE FEB. 26


FOUR FATHOM WORLD MAR. 14.


FBI Friday. A white man and
a white woman who waited
outside also are sought as
participants.
Publication of the drawings
brought calls from Chicago.
Seattle, Washington, D.C.,
New York and some southern
states and expanded the
investigation beyond
California, Druken said.
Miss Hearst's fiance
pledged that neither he nor
his bride-to-be will testify
against the kidnappers if she
is returned safely.
A fugitive spokeswoman
for the Symbionese
Liberation Army once
scrawled "death to the pigs"
in her own blood on a wall.
but her estranged husband


supply.
Hle also suggested that
efforts he made to dlevlop
alternate sources of energy and
called for emergency energy
i iriit by the oilt onsumtr ine
nations.
Kissi nger's seven-p'-!it
programme also) included
proposals for international
t i n a n cial coperat,,n .
increased research ,rd
development oin ernerg iimattitis
and irnmeidiate consultat rion
and collaboration with the
developing nations, whose
needs he said are particular I
urgent.
However. Kissinger said the
ultimate goal must he to cre.itt


ST GEORGES The
Roman Catholic Bishop of
Grenada, an outspoken critic
of Prime Minister Eric Gairy.
called yesterday for
reconciliation on this
strike t orn, newly
independent Caribbean isle.
Bishop Patrick Webster's
appeal came at a special high
mass in observance of
independence from Britain
and before today's striking
telephone and electric
workers vote on an order
from their employers to end a
three-week old walkout.
A middle-aged insurance
salesman described as a
supporter of the New Jewel
Movement, a leftist group
opposed to Gairy. was
reportedly shot three times
Saturday night but not
seriously wounded.
Informants said Anthony
Lewis. 43, was wounded as he
drove between St. Georges
and the town of Grenville.
"We are here to pray
together for our nation ..., "
Bishop Webster said. "Let us
forgive one another. At the


a cooperative framework in
winch oil producers and oil
consumers will accommodate
their differences and reconcile
their needs and aspirations.
The producing nations must
he given a secure stake in an
c\panding world economic andl
the consuming nations a secure
source of supply. Kissinger
said.
Kissinger said the United
States believes that another
conference of consunicers
should be called at the foreign
ministers level which would
include representatives of the
less-developed countries.
He said this would lead to a
third conference of consumers


nun hits the top


piano and violin, and went
into a convent at 17. She
studied, then later taught,
music and drama at St.
Aloysius College.
Five years ago she met a
family named Van Der Sman
in Mt. Gambier, Australia.
who felt about music like she
did.
For the past two years
Theo Van Der Sman has been
leading a rock band backing
tip Sister Janet's clear
soprano.
She started rock masses
which drew upwards of 2.000
every Sunday, and every
Monday she also conducts a
half-hour music programme


SKYL
SAN )DIG(;O Skylab 3
astronauts, recovering rapidly
from the deconditioning
ettects of hlstor 's longest
space flight, passed an
cx hau stive m d i c a
examiniatiun "'with tlying
colours," officials said
Astronauts Gerald Carr
William Pogue and I-dward
Gibson underwent almost 12
hours of tests Saturday and
three hours on Sunday aboard
their prime recovery ship. the
USS \ew Orleans.
S I heir condition is
c, i. r said Dr. Jerrv


on radio.
"The Lord's Prayer"
record turned gold in
Australia, which there means
that it sold between 50,000
and 70,000 copies. She is
working with ABC-TV on a
production of a rock mass for
television.
Sister Janet told a record
company biographer: "I see
(hrist as a person with a
vision of drawing all people
together in happiness and I
see my work as part of his
vision, to bring people to God
through music. I am grateful
to God for the happiness and
deep understanding I have
found in my life." (AP)


fir t opportunity, let us
reconcile ourselves one with
another."
Webster is a member of the
Committee of 22, the alliance
of labour, business and
religious leaders that called
for Gairy's resignation.
charging Gairy used his
sercret police to stifle
political dissent,
The electric and telephone
workers' strike was also in
protest of Gairy's leadership
but Saturday the companies
told the workers their strike
was illegal.
The 133-square mile island
off the northeast tip of
Venezuela has also been
hobbled by a waterfront
workers' strike since New
Year's day.
At Sauters, on the north
coast, there were reports of
new looting. Several stores
were plundered there last
month, following a
confrontation between
anti-Gairy demonstrators and
security forces in which a
businessman, the father of a
Jewel Movement leader, was
killed. (AP)


-SUMMONS-

FOR SOVIET

AUTHOR
MOSCOW The Soviet
prosecutor's office has issued a
summons to Alexander
Solzhenitsyn in what could be
the first step toward legally
silencing the author, family
friends reported.
Solzhenitsyn, the Nobel
prize-winning novelist, has
been under a hail of official
press criticism since
publication in the west of his
book "Gulag Archipelago," an
expose of the Stalinist prison
camp system.
The informants said an
official of the prosecutor's
investigative unit attempted to
deliver the document to
Solzhenitstyn's wife on Friday,
but she refused to accept it.
Solzhenitsyn has been
denounced as a traitor for
writing the book. (AP)


and producers, with the entire
process to be completed by
May 1.
He called on delegates to the
current conference to resohe
"to prepare for a positive and
productive dialogue with the
producing nations.
"As we look toward the end
of this century we know that
the energy crisis indicates the
b i rthl pains of global
interdependence." Kissinger
said.
"Our response could well
determine our capacity to deal
with the international agenda
of the future."
More than 100 delegates
from countries that consume
85 per cent of the world's
petroleum were on hand when
Kissinger formally gavelled the
two-day meeting to order.
German Foreign Minister
Walter Scheel. in a television
broadcast before the opening.
said the conference will be the
first step of a worldwide
discussion on how to overcome
the difficulties resulting from
the energy crisis.
"VWe will not be able to
make any concrete decisions,
but we will certainly have to
think about the fields and the
scope in which cooperation is
t-.. h, Scheel said. The
conference as the spokesman
for the nine Common Market
countries France, Germany,
B ri tain, Ireland, the
Netherlands, Italy, Denmark,
Luxembourg and Belgium.


Miners clash



with other



workers


LONDON Striking miners
clashed with other workers at a
Nottinghamshire colliery
yesterday in the first
confrontation of a nationwide
walkout that closed Brit'an's
coal pits from midnight.
Police cleared a way through
picket lines at Gedling tollir:,
for a group of maintenance
men who arrived for work as
usual.
The maintenance workers do
not belong to the National
Union of Mineworkers, which
called its 280,000 members out
on strike for more pay.
About 30 strikers were in
the picket lines barring the
non-strikers. Both groups
shouted abuse at each other
and waved lists, but no
violence took place.
A spokesman for the
National Coal Board, which
manages the state-owned
mines, said there was only
scanty picketing at other
coalfields throughout the
country. "It was largely
good-hunmoured," he said.
The strike added immense
industrial disruption to the
strains of a bitter national
election.
Heath called the election
Thursday, more than a year
before his full five-sear term
expires. setting polling for Feb
28.
The basic issue plugged bs
Heaths Conservative Party is
Who runs the country, the
elected government or the
280.000 miners and their
unions?
The debate has been
widened and embittered bs
the Conservative claim that
leftists in the Miners' Union.
among them Moscow-aligned
Communists, are bent on
destroying British democracy.
The Opposition Labour
Party, led by former Prime
Minister Harold Wilson and
based on support from the
union rank and file, sass it
'would settle and get Britain
back to work It has disputed
the Conservative charges of
"Reds under the bed" and says
the real issue is a decent living
for the miners.
Heath has maintained he
cannot offer more than a S5 70
a week addition to the basic
average miners' pay ot $81 a
week. Io do more he insists,
would shatter his ant-nflat ion
programme.
The miners are holding out
for at least S 10150 a week
average basic pa> .
Public opinion polls show


,AB CREW RECOVER QUICKLY


Hordinsky, a space agency
doctor. "'Ihere are no areas of
concern I hey got through the
tests with ', ,,, colours "
The astronauts returned on
Friday from an 84-da\x 34
2-nt illion-nile space voyage,
splashing down in the Pacific
ocean I1'6 miles from San
Diego I hey have remained
aboard the New Orleans while
doctors conducted the medical
teats
Ilordinsky said tests showed
there was no significant
muscular decline. He also


reported a slight decrease in
exercise endurance for all
three, and said Pogue and Carr
experienced very mild feelings
of vertigo, or dizziness.
Officials said all three men
were able to walk without
difficulty and helped
technicians sort out the 1.700
pounds of scientific film,
electronic tape and biologic
samples stored aboard the
Apollo command module
which brought the astronauts
back to earth.
The Skylab station, where
the men of Skylab 3 lived in
space for 12 weeks, is now a
ghost ship in orbit. Mission
control ran a series of tests
Saturday, put the unmanned
orbiting lab in a stable attitude


General

Electric
exclusive

Ice

Dispensor

models deliver
Crush Ice or Cubes
right to your door
NO FROST TFF 2 4R
Available in 24 Cu. Ft.
White, Dark Copper.
Avocado Green &
Harvest Gold


and then turned off all of its
electric power
Skylab will orbit for 5 to X
years before falling toward the
earth and burning up in the
atmosphere (AP)


the country's 40 ,,,. ,
are generally unsulre u ',
story to buy.
Conservative .
forecast Sunday i,
C o ser v a t ive ,
manifesto due out today\
seek to change the w,re
system under which
families are paid relief
Payment of social bencttI
they said, would deperd ,
unions' paying strike pt, s
the British wi ll t stat ,.
have been able t,
without drastic reduction n
family incomes and .. i
depletion ot union fund,
The power short.g
forced the giant Britis ,. i
Corp. to schedule a ) p ,
production cut b FeI b s
will idle tens o( i ,,i
work rs.
An eight-week stink-,h:
is not unlikely, il .1 ,. 1
production down to .
cent and idle all the 2:,)',
steel workers, a :orl' .r,!
spokesman said.
At the present ri,
conisumlption. stocks t'ild rjiL
out some time in the sptrt-
effectively paraly/mg !l:r ,
fleath said it was .'a
shameful" that Wilson hn, 7-,.
,inoed him in asking the :--
to postpone their e 'ro
during campaign s.i t'-
ele t ion.
\leianwhile ldt kers,, h
North Sea port mrt .Ii niu'n:1c
reluscd 1to unload an1r !,;
Ireelihter laden w ith P i ; .. ;
t)r British powei st.i .
Ilonr.'hihireiien said th ,r
supporting the col ;,,'
strike
Front fire
S'iRIAN and Israc ,
batteries blamed awaj\ t a Si
other on the (Golan lie!s,
again today but ls.!ie .
Russia would try to pers
Sria to meet Tel Av-v n
conditions for negotiatimgn
troop separation .i,'..
along the tense front


A C IN

HOSE




SI, sow thn S
I)ru i II!S e V L l





1- iir n e t. d qv it c
teA %iilAI cI m fo th


FOR SALE
Opportunity to purchase established
RETAIL-.USINESS with prime Bay Street
LOCATION (West of Rawson Square), long-term
lease. Business sold at net Asset value.
Enquiries: Servac International Ltd.,
P. 0. Box N-88,
Nassau.


"I COMPLETE SERVICE DEPT


America's No.1

Major Appliance

Value

$130000

10% CASH DISCOUNT
CHIE t WATrIn TFFa2oNL)v


kidnapping


Big 13 meet to beat




the energy crisis


Bishop calls for


Grenada peace


All proy rammes personally presented bi National Audubon speakers in co-operation with the Hahamas
Noional Trust.
P. O. BOX N-4105 NASSAU TEL: 2-8333


4 5
< .<.


TGEOFFREY JON ES 0 C.,
PHONE 22188.9 PALMTD.


W^ 41
so, i ob


__ __ ~_ I __~_ __ _ _____ _ -_ -- -- ,


- -


--~ --1-I -"~I-~~~ ~~"~ ~'--I-~------~~ -~~- -- c- ---. I-. ._,,_____.


Monday, February 11, 1974.


Monday, February 11, 1974.


2


Thr TributiP


-o-












Monday, February 11, 1974.

(Uht Ulribun
Nuujus ADw S JusAm IN VERBA MACISTRI
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903- 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Publisher/Editor 1917-1972
Contributing Editor 1972 -
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRONM.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972 -
Published Daily Monday to Saturday


Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Monday, February 11, 1974.


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
FREEPORT, January 29:- We arrived in Freeport last night.
By "we" I mean Dr. and Mrs. Charles R. Burbacher and my wife
and me.
After attending an art exhibition sponsored by the Rotary
Club of Lucaya to help finance the education of a Bahamian
artist we attended a dinner given in our honour by Albert
Tranter, President of the Club, and Mrs. Tranter.
Before the ceremony at noon today, when Dr. Burbacher and I
received an award of the coveted Paul Harris Fellowship, we were
taken on a drive by an old friend of mine at Freeport.
Dr. and Mrs. Burbacher had never visited this town which had
earned the names of "Magic City" .... "A twentieth century
wonder" at the height of its development.
It was, therefore, interesting for me to see the city through the
eyes of a complete stranger.
The hotel area in which we were staying was wonderful. I said
so in my article in this column on Saturday.
As we started our tour along broad, spotlessly clean, well-kept
roads, lined with avenues of palms and flowering shrubs, with
carefully groomed lawns as a finishing touch ... Dr. Burbacher
leaned back comfortably in the car, eyes wide with surprise and
admiration.
"It's a wonderful experience," he commented, "to see a
well-laid out town."
And then we struck a deserted area.
Five apartment buildings and homes that were no longer
occupied bore evidence of the work of destructive vandals, who
had smashed windows and otherwise damaged the buildings
which are now surrounded by neglected gardens.
The next stage was a formerly fine residential area that has
been taken over by working class people. It had descended into a
slum with abandoned, rusted cars lining the roads ... streets
littered with empty bottles, cans and cardboard cartons.
neglected gardens, and run down houses.
Then we passed miles and miles of undeveloped land through
which roads had been cut and prepared for surfacing. These were
areas that had been prepared for a new development by settlers
on the island when the growth of this city ground to a halt.
It is interesting to note that construction figures for Freeport
rose steadily from $16,016,000 in 1965 to a peak of $36,771,500
in 1968. It dropped to $36,353,800 in 1969. Since then the
figures have plunged. Official figures for nine months to
September last year show that construction for that period had
dropped to $815,650 ... a drop of nearly $36,000,000!
This figure does not include work on an oil refinery which
does not reflect building activity in the island.
* * ***
It was interesting to see the reaction of Dr. Burbacher as we
passed through these areas. He fell silent and kept shaking his
head in sorrow without making any comment.
His face brightened and was wreathed in smiles again during a
tour of the magnificent Garden of the Groves with its gurgling
waterfalls ... something that is new to the Bahamas.
"I have never seen anything of this kind anywhere that is more
beautiful," the doctor commented.
We returned to our hotel by the seashore drive and the
beautiful Ranfurly Circle.
"I understand now why people were eager to put money into
this place," the doctor commented quietly.
"This has been a wonderful experience for my wife and me."
the doctor told my friend as we parted with him at the hotel. "I
had no conception of what this place HAD BEEN."
Mark the words ... "HAD BEEN".
This comment called to my mind the quotation:
Of all sad words of tongue or pen.
The saddest are these: "It might have been. "
This was followed by a more poignant quotation.
'Tis true that the saddest words of tongue or pen
.4 Are these. "It might have been."
But sadder still are the words
"It is. But it hadn't ought to be."
These quotes are from memory. They may not be word perfect
and I am sorry I can't remember the names of the authors but in
a few words they tell the story of today's Freeport ... the once
Magic City and wonder of the world.

An interesting fact is that there is still an active movement of
real estate at this island among Germans and Scandinavians who
are buying "sight unseen".
"It breaks my heart," a Bahamian friend commented to me
today "when I see an old couple who had sunk all their savings in
land here, come to the island to see their investment. It simply
shatters them."
It's funny how things fit in. On the flight from the Caymans to
Miami over the weekend a French Canadian passenger on the
flight had a long talk with me. This man knelt in the corridor of
the plane by my seat while he talked.
He was among the great number ot admirers of The Tribune 1
meet wherever I travel these days. I am always
embarrassed because I seldom know any of the people who are
eager to shake my hand.
This man told me that he had gone to Freeport with the
intention of retiring. He became tired of inactivity and so he got
involved in real estate sales and was soon the top real estate
salesman on the island, moving property at an average rate of $1
million a week. He was making a fabulous income.
As time progressed and development ground to a halt under
the government's declared "bend or break" policy for Freeport,
S his conscience bothered him. He had a war within himself.
He broke down completely one day when a coloured
young couple came to his office. They were New Yorkers who
wanted to invest but before the deal was closed the couple started
discussing among themselves the sacrifices they would have to
make in order to make the investment.
"I just couldn't sell to this young couple," he said, "when I
realized that even their baby would be affected by the sacrifices
they would have to make. I told them to go back home and


return to the island two years later when they might be able to


Shy tribune_



,lIUlllilttmfihll Chinese diplomat still in Grenada


WORLD TOURISM AWARD
BAHAMAS MINISTER OF TOURISM, the Hon.
Clement T. Maynard, left, was presented last week with
"Man of The Year Award in World Tourism" by the World
Travel Digest. Making the presentation at the Minister's
office was Dr. Heinz Patzak, chairman of the Awards
Committee of the North American publication. Mr.
Maynard has become the third person to be presented with
the award since it was inaugurated in 1971. He received the
honour "because of his scientific approach to the problems
of international transportation, his practical contribution to
the development of travel and his prolific ideas furthering
better understanding among people." Letf to right are: Mr.
Maynard; Dr. Patzak; Mrs. Maynard and Mr. S.N. Chib,
Bahamas Director of Tourism. The photograph was taken at
Mr. Maynard's home "Five Acres" where Dr. Patzak was
entertained following the presentation.
Photo: Wendell Cleare.


UNITED NATIONS (AP) -
Grenada was reported
Saturday to be in line to
become the 136th member
of the United Nations.
perhaps within six weeks.
A U.N. source said a
membership application was
expected early in the coming
week from the Caribbean
island, which became
independent of Britain
Thursday.
A Security Council meeting
will be necessary to
recommend Grenada for
membership, he noted, and
after that the new country
can be admitted the next
time the General Assembly
meets.
That could take place, he said,
at the special session of the
Assembly on raw materials
that Algeria has proposed
and that other members are
being polled on now.
Twenty-nine U.N. members are
already on record in favour
of holding the special session
and the necessary majority,
68 of the 135 members, is
expected to be in hand soon.
Under the rules,
Secretary-General Kurt
Waldheim has to convene the !
session within 15 days of the
Time he gets the majority-or
March 18, at the latest.
But some members have talked
of delaying the opening for a
month or two to allow more
time for preparation. The
U.N. sources said that could
be done by majority request.


US voters drop voter identifications


PRINCETON, N.J. (AP) -
Voters identification with a
partisan political party has
dropped to its lowest point in
34 years, according to the
latest Gallup Poll.
The 12,306 adults, age 18
and older, interviewed in eight
separate surveys taken from
September 1973 to January
1974, were asked, "in politics,
as of today, do you consider
yourself a Republican,
Democrat or Independent?"
Forty-two per cent of those
surveyed classified themselves
as Democrats, and 24 per cent
identified themselves as
Republicans. Both figures
represent the smallest
percentage to affiliate with


either party since 1940, when
the Demorcratic figure was also
42 per cent and Republican
allegiance dropped to 38 per
cent.
The remaining 34 per cent
of those polled did not align
themselves with a political
party. This represents an
increase of eight percentage
points since 1970 and 14
percentage points since 1940 in
the number of voters calling
themselves Independents.
Immediately after the 1972
Presidential election 27 per
cent of the voters called
themselves Republicans. The
three-point decline to 24 per
cent came initially last May
and August when the


make the investment without making such great sacrifices. They
took my advice and left."
"The building was wired for sound throughout," he continued,
"so that the boss could tune in on the sales pitch of his staff.
Immediately after this couple left the boss called me to his office.
"You muffed that sale" he told me angrily and then gave me a
good dressing down. I was making big money in that job but my
conscience hurt me so badly I just couldn't carry on. I went home
and never returned to the office.
"Soon after this I left the island. A long time after this I
received a letter from the company informing me that, since I had
not been to the office for some time, I was fired," he laughed.
He then told me what he was now doing. He said he went to
the U.S. where he launched an enterprise that has developed into
a multi-million dollar operation.
At the time I didn't think I would be writing this article and so
this part of the conversation didn't register on my mind. I don't
remember where he said he was now located or what he is doing.
But one thing is certain ... this man is at peace with his conscience
and ... whatever he may now be doing ... it is both satisfactory
and highly successful.

During the day I talked with another friend in the community
about the shocking changes I had seen during the morning.
He explained to me that houses in the areas which had gone
into complete decay had been owned by people who had orders
to leave the island quickly without being able to sell their homes.
In many cases those who did sell took a long term mortgage
and most of the new owners are not bothering themselves about
meeting payments. It's a question whether most of these people
will collect their money.
Another interesting case is that of a certain powerful man who
has occupied a very expensive place for several years. I am told he
ignores all bills for the rent. This property is owned by foreigners
who find it discreet to be silent!

This was an interesting day in more ways than one.
As we were going into the Rotary lunch for me to receive the
Paul Harris Fellowship we were saddened by the news that a man
had been seriously stabbed in a public place a few minutes earlier
"Is it serious?" I asked my informant.
"He was very badly wounded," he replied. "I think he may be
dead." Fortunately he didn't die.
And I thought of the article I published in this column
Saturday in which I quoted a statement by Senator the Hon. Dr
Doris Johnson, President of the Senate, in which she said there
had been no increase in crime in the Bahamas ... and that these
reports of an increase in crime had been a creation of the
newspapers!
During the past three or four weeks there have been five
murders in Nassau, three bank robberies in Freeport, several cases
of rape and other cases of violence in several forms.
I have no comment to make.

I had a pleasing experience at the International.
During the day we returned to our room to find a bottle of
cold champagne with a note signed "Felix".
I enquired and found that Felix was the Resident Manager of
this magnificent hotel.
I went to his office to thank him and found that Felix was my
old friend Felix Seymour of Cat Island. He recalled when I went
to his island with the late Dr. Stevan George to help inoculate the
children against polio during a minor epidemic in the colony.
We also talked about our mutual friend Alonzo Taylor.
Maitre d' at the Nassau Beach Hotel. Alonzo is one of the last of
my friends with whom I attended the Boys Central School as a
boy.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
It may make a difference to all eternity whether we do right or
wrong today:- JAMES FREEMAN CLARKE


W atergate hearings were
televised,
The D,mocrats, however,
were unable to capitalize on
the decline in Republican
allegiance and the entire
three-point Republican loss
over the last year has shown up
among voters calling
themselves Independents.
Although the Democratic
Party has been the majority
party since before 1940. voter
allegiance has shown a
substantial drop in the last 10
years, falling from a high of 53
per cent after the assassination
of President John F. Kennedy
to the current 42 per cent low.
The Republicans Party was
second in affiliation until 1967
when it was then passed by
those calling themselves
Independents.


I


He said lie knew of no
opposition to the admission
of Grenada.
The top-ranking Chinese
here, Undersecretary -Gener-
al Tang Ming-Chao, has not
yet returned fron Grenada's
independence celebrations.
But the U.N. source said Tang
had been in touch with
Grenadans beforehe left and
had learned of plans for the
U.N. application. The
informant said a
representative was also
expected from Grenada in
the coming week.


Natural Menthol is why.
. Salem uses only natural
menthol, not the artificial
kind. That's why Salem
never tastes harsh or hot.


*.
* '9~)R.J.~fl"O'~&' "rS~r'~


MmOiWuER CO., LTD.r 1


GRAND PRIZE





CUTLASS
Complete with 50 H.P.
Johnson or Evinrude Motor
(Valued at $4,220)
The luxurious interior of this
magnificent ORLANDO CLIPPER isthe
result of brilliant styling. It has
anodized metal frame with tempered
shatter-proof glass, full reclining seats.
The hull is time tested and will give
you outstanding performance. There is
no finer boat afloat for the money.
Made by a firm with over 20 years
experience. That's ORLANDO
CLIPPER! What a boat!!


- ~' C -- - .


/-T- -EVINRUDE
The outboard motor that's built for everyone. It's right at
home with the jet fun set as well as the commercial
fisherman. EVINRUDE 50, the motor that's built for work
o- 1- or play. IT FEATURES:
Fire power breakerless CD electronic ignition Power pilot,
power shift with positive mechanical follow through e New
pre-set tilt lock Pressure backed piston rings Pulse tuned
---'- .. exhaust Automatic pressure-temperature controlled
cooling Power port loop-charged engine 9 Computer
matched gearing!
l itAnd options you never even dreamed about. "No motor so
little ever did so much."







PHONE 24001 24101AS
l^ o P. O. Box N-8177. NASSAU


I -'II


SOME ARE GOOD

and some are AWFUL!
We're talking about Passport Photographs.

OURS ARE THE GOOD ONES.




on the waterfront at East Bay & William Sts.
PHONE 5-4641


A.


NEWSPAPER

COPIES

AVAILABLE AT

THE TRIBUNE

OFFICE


THIS WEEK!


Be a BIG WINNER...Enter the


I


- -- - - - -- -- -- - .


- --- ------- ..........


I' I


S0o









Monday, February 11, 1974


I


Avon Gift Sets,
", Etc., Etc.
.,4,:_


" For the Lady
I in Your Life
. LOVELY DRESSES,
LONG & SHORT.
BLOUSES. BAGS,
PANT SUITS

4; AGATHAS
Phone
'X :-A' '.


ig


love Her?

Then




SRACHEL'S BOUTIQU
- Phone 53364 8 '. I


THEY'LL
LOVE
THESE


V*7


for
Oi~~~- *


Vt


STERLIM, SILVER BANGLES
STERL I SILVER CHAIN AND
I' \11\\T SETS
14KT (,OLD)CHMNS


SfjAYJ J, j


V6ieaY e,


Ladies' & Gernti
Sweaters frorn SA1,te-ij-iC
S'' Lad.es' Hand Made r latchir
Beads & Earrings


i:", CENTREVILLE
_.


ALSO
A BE UTIFL'L SELECTION IN RUGS
A14RCASITES CULTURED PEARLS ONYX
IN F \N(1 OLD AND STERLING SETTINGS
\\D 111 1 MORE

SBarry's Ltd
CORNER BAY &
G GEORGE STREETS
.... arrt


p Valentine V' -
Gifts
Suggestions
Cologne, Cuft Ln Sets.
GIFT SETS, FIGURINES, P
CAMERAS. JEWELLERY
BOXES. HAIR DRYERS

SCentreville Drugs ,
.Dept. Store
ftI Phone 5-9342
g'# 1' / ^''' /'"r '' .I 'L l


ARNOLD'S DEPI. STORE
Corner of Bay St. & Victoria Ave.

SALE
mlil ri rl's i r [ ', li t. 1 tc.. .po r t ct. o ats
JuSt ir r :i,'1 ,
BGr i s ;- d'i

Free customer parking
-~' rear of store t -C d S


For the

man in


your

life...


HOUSE OF
CHURCHILL LTD.
has the most
expressive suits
of the season.
t ;a crdfil ck. liI,,'l
,i1l all other

isit
011IuS Of


Q urcbtll Itt
Nassau's Finest %len's Boutique
PI \ 'I ) i % R( \< I)
P 0.\ Bs \ i
k ,.sn


r..;jgj


iw -p'

Give That Special
Some One,...


'.
1**:


* a SWISS Watch
* a ZODIAC & Chain
or a Beautiful Ring
French Perfume
and Ladie Dresses


l a" au Stop,


1,


BAY STREET PHONE 2 I20
flint rtudilerp
from arounbt the Wortb.
SWISS ORFINA
&
LOUIS ROSSEL
SQualily Watches
for Men & _
Women ..


A .. .* i.!,
.. ??.?W ?... -.s


ft "4
Vy~giSfl
'C' 1i~I 5r1
* *tj~I2;;*
r
a
&;t~,


PIXIE'S DEP. STORE


Konica Autoreflex T


^;..'-..

:;-,,,


fr KOmC


SALE
* r' Ladies' Clothing and Shoes
* ,. ,idrirn's Clothing and Shoes
AND SALE ON ....
-[L '.lEr SHOES AND SHIRTS
SO VISIT

PIXIE'S ALENTIN'Sll


ON ...ay St.
'- "" n.'.vA


1.8 Lens
(plus CASE)
$229.50
1.4 lens
(plus CASE)
. $259.50


$56.50


-. 0BAY STREET .C'


-. I


PHONE
I 2-8857

to "


OfpicJ S/ rices J..


I


TIME IS MONiE Y,
Take .i.taJ iu, 4 t ." i .,,,. ,_, 'b-. ,,.
here! Your eyes examined and get youth
glasses the same day.
Try the New Miracle Lens that becomes a
sunglass in the sun.
Call today for an appointment 2 3910


British Colonial
L Arcade


ha.


SAY HAPPY VALENTINE


with
MORTIMER BRAND CANDY
Milky Chocolate Fudge Andros Coconut Cake
Bennie Cake After Dinner Mints
Mortimer Balls
All Packed in a Beautiful
Gift Box-Price $2.00


HlIl COY I1111
S F-ast St Tel. 2-2572 4
Il Nassau. Bahamas A


S COHIE'S BAZAAR "
East St. opp. Lewis Street
Phone 5-9039 Box 5490-M.S.
Mifte fM I, thn I Arefi fior hwr


Lingeries
Ladies' Blouses Ladies' Dresses
Ladies' Evening Wear
Ladies' Pant Suits
I-'' Costume Jewellery I.-.:r:
L' Men's Shirts
Men's Bush Jackets l1--'
Men' s Pants &
B^Socks


it. ..
p...


SAY IT WITH
FABRIC
FROM A

DOwgard Shopping Piaza
l .. Madeira St. .A


ii
-'Si.


,$--1,

w



'w

w'~
IJ










N.
4














..)


/F~


2wa


A
.'-"



il


qiwflj

,.f
1i ^i
up...

let


r


Fl.


W.4^;


UJPIE


;';


042api


&akle~ditwl


-.1- 9.


<,


Shr Ertbunt









Monday, February 11, 1974.


SEat and Grow Younger


Dry, skim milk provides


good, low-calorie protein

By LELORD KORDEL
Number Fight of a Series "AVE -
Milk, man's first and oldest beverage, has taken on a / A -roo!
new form that puts it in the front ranks of concentrated
protective foods. I refer to dry skim milk-an inexpen-
sive, readily digested, high-protein food that is handy -
to use and short on calories. /1 q' 1-vJ


I. must confess to taking a few
liberties with history when I say
that dried milk is "new." Ac-
Wually, long before the birth of
'Ciiirist the ancient Egyptians
prepared a concentrated milk
by drying it in the sun.
'And the sturdy Mongol horse-
men who made up the invading
armies of the conqueror Gen-
ghis Kahn were supplied with
sun-dried milk as a concentrated
marching ration that would as-
sure them full nourishment nec-
essary for their strenuous cam-
paigns.
HELPS DIET PROGRAM
So, we're a few centuries late
in learning that dried milk is a
wonderfully concentrated food.
If everyone in this country were
to use this economical food ini
their daily diet, it could over-
come the widespread deficien-
cies of protein, calcium and rib-
oflavin which afflict thousands
upon thousands of persons, caus-
ing them to fall ready victims
to the diseases and problems of
aging.
Did you know that the addi-
tion of even so little as a table-
spoonful of powdered skim milk
to your daily servings of food
would be a worthwhile contribu-
tion to your Eat-and-(;row-
Younger program?
Did you know that powdered
skim milk is tolerated by per-
sons who find whole fresh milk
hard to digest?
Did you know that the highly
concentrated amounts (f pro-
tein. calcium and riboflavin in
dry skim milk can help prolmin
your "prime of life" and aid
you in retaining youthfulness'.
A mistaken belief popularly
held about fresh milk is that
the "richer the milk, the bet-
ter." Nothing could be further
from the truth. The protein,
minerals and vitamin B complex
(riboflavin and thiamine main-
ly) are all contained in the skim
milk. not in the cream.
If you want to gain weight,


dry skim milk, used liberally,
will provide extra amounts of
the protein, minerals and vita-
mins, lack of which probably
caused you to be underweight
in the first place.
If, on the other hand, over-
1 i 'li is your problem, and
yours should be a reducing diet,
then dry skim milk is equally
good. Liberal amounts of this
powdered skim milk can be used
without making your calorie
(oulint jump up like the ther-
mometer on a hot day.
This milk can be incorporated
into your reducing menu in a
numt ber of Fi ,'r,,f,il and appe-
tite-satisfying ways. Moreover,
the highly concentrated protein
in this type of milk is a valu-
able aid to a !6h.li pr'f-.in re-
ducing diet, since the more pro-
tein you eat (without adding
calories) the more quickly your
Sluggish thyroid gland can be
prodded into taking over and
bringing your body weight back
to normal.
SKIM MII.K CAN HELP
Then again youi may not like
the lat' Of either sweet milk or
buttermilk well enough to drink
it Ift s. dry s-kim milk makes
it possible for you to obtain all
the ,, li1 .-i1, tive values in
this protein food without offend-
i V1 ynoFr selise of taste.
Incorporate at least one-half
uip Iof thi milk powder into your
fiod each day, and you'll get all
th- benefits of a quart of fresh
liquid milk.
:'fl i now powdered skim
milk is tihe biggest food bargain
of all. You can slice your milk
-.11 to a third with powdered
skmn milk as well as supple-
nicntinlig your diet with the val-
uable proteins and vitamins and
minerals found in this wonder-
ful food,
Frn i the standpoint of econo-
my anrid convenience a 1 o n e,
ihouisewilv s tell me they would
not be without skim milk powder


E66S SOUPS (2A -aS
rfir CUSTARD .......
after once using it. Yet economy
and convenience are but two of
the advantages gained by the
advent of dry skim milk.
A teaspoon of skim milk pow-
der thoroughly mixed into the
beaten eggs makes wonderful
scrambled eggs for breakfast,
an excellent high-protein dish
with which to start off the day.
At lunch, dry skim milk can be
added to soups. At dinner, the
fruit pudding or egg custard
served for dessert should con-
tain a tablespoonful or more of
dry skim milk in addition to the
liquid milk specified in recipes.
REAL NUTRITION BARGAIN
If you want an extra-juicy-ex-
tra-plump, and extra-rich broil-
ed hamburger soon, just add a
couple of tablespoons of skim
milk powder to the mixture.
For about 40 cents a day you
can furnish 60 percent of your
family's daily protein allowance.
Compare this with getting an
equivalent amount of complete
protein from other sources. Your
savingss in the food budget .can
be quite substantial.
Dry skim milk can help build
strong and healthy bodies in
childhood and adolescence. In
adult life, it will help maintain
and sustain you. In old age, it
can help you find the balanced
level of nourishment that c a n
ward off the illnesses associated
with increased years.
Is there a real need for dried
skim milk? With more than half
of our "civilized" people losing
their youth before they are 40, I
should say there is.
Condensed from the book "Eat and
Grow Younger' by Lelord Kordel. All
rights reserved. Distributed by Specialty
Features Syndicate.
Next: Honey, a natural sweet,
provides fast energy at mini-
mum cost.


SOME OF THE COMMITTEE MEMBERS concerned with decorations for the Tenth
Annual Heart Ball to be held in the Crown Ballroom of the Loews Paradise Island Hotel
on February 16th are, (left to right): Mrs. Benson McDermott, Mrs. George Smith, Mrs.
Kate Seiler, Mrs. Charles Vaughan-Johnson and Mrs. Maxim Gurney.





CRAWFISH EXPORTING CO., LTD.


offering to Dealers, Hotels

& Restaurants


FRESH, FROZEN,
CHOICE




TURTLE ,

STEAK


PRODUCED IN

GRAND CAYMAN
under strictly controlled
& inspected conditions from

CULTIVATED GREEN TURTLE
ALWAYS IN STOCK

Call 23310 for our Salesmen


By Abigail Van Buren
= 1174 by Chicago Tribune-N. Y. News Synd., Inc.
DEAR ABBY: Please print this for that woman in
Boston whose husband wets his pants. My husband did, too,
but he refused to see a urologist. After two and a half
years. ruined furniture and mattresses. I told him if he
didn't see a doctor I was going to put him in diapers and
rubber bloomers to protect the furniture. [They have them
for adults, you know.1 To my surprise, he agreed, and now
I realize that part of his problem was the desire to be
"babied." So I "baby" him, but it's saving my furniture
and my sanity.
For the record, Abby, there are 16 million bed-wet-
ters in the United States, and 4 million chronic ones.
These figures are from Time magazine. R. P. D.
DEAR R.: Thanks for the statistics. It will be a great
comfort to those who are swimming against the tide.

DEAR ABBY: Our son [221 recently married a nice 21-
year-old girl. They invited Dad and me to dinner, and she
served a meal of Chinese food. It was terrible, but we ate
it anyway so as not to hurt anyone's feelings.
The next time they invited us, she made a Hawaiian
dinner. Abby. this was worse than the Chinese dinner. My
poor husband was up all night with heartburn.
They invited us again, and I called my son and asked
him what she was making this time He said: "Mexican
food." Well, maybe I shouldn't have said it, but I asked
him when his wife was going to learn how to make Ameri-
can food. He got mad and said when people are invited to
dinner they eat whatever is served, and don't complain
about it.
Was I wrong? How can I make up for that remark?
My husband and I are both Italian, and we can eat any-
thing, but this girl's cooking is murder. Maybe I need
mother in law lessons. MOTHER IN LAW
DEAR MOTHER IN LAW: You don't need mother in
law lessons-your daughter in law needs cooking lessons.
Invite her over and offer to give her a few. But never
criticize her cooking. no matter what she serves. At least
she invites you. which is more than some brides do. I

DEAR ABBY: Apropos the letter from "Bereaved":
Years ago when I was "bereaved" I had the following
experience:
My husband la physician I had died after a long illness.
I started writing my letters of thanks for condolences al-
most immediately after the memorial services.
When I was about midway thru my letters I had a
telephone call from a woman I hardly knew who had sent
flowers. She had been a patient of my husband's. IHer side
of the conversation went like this: "How are you getting
along? . Did you get my flowers? . Exactly what
did the doctor die of?"
I'm sure her flowers were an expression of sincere


By Itlh \escMlted Press


l ret il the \ Ha: e
In(l))A wY Mond:,


Il ;l I ln tl S in h s ,int >'r,
Ih ilts d -t.
markei'l' In \Vc"1 '!I. I 11ro|- '



I11.' 1 'irt t
hIn tinigi o\n 'r nc\\i pItinn'; ol
i ncv %t ah 'lt", il l,-
I19V I lr I S. a nd the
S1, l i on '' ?1 ,
jlN II "CIIl i 110"Nl f,' i. lsN ill

piohlvins
I '71 1 I reu ,il\ harinn g'
Iln It lc.1r \'\ 1'.j i p Il1N ill| 1 t1n '.n
n"o 1 Is l i \d.' i i3no hilN in
n dColl ha nd i \\N NIllaI' !,
t o ). lo', s il \In jukl s '














lN'I.>( i, In tou h \I c lI .
l l u'( t li t li i II o pi's ctI \c t ',fil )
ci\ il.11 1 mandI h il h lit ii i
inIF, ngr.i c>d tltin)r illtllii' !<"
tli ) ill llic
Im p ).ose ld in Pcking kill i,!' ;\ 'I!
ms lit' in ll ('c !lli slmll (T lnad
1l('4 (1 1 cks ,ndl l ik

b\ l tll ,a 1111, i n ll I I' I


NI In r[ q t, 11 \ 1 N 0i i' ti 'l'i 1'
" Al 1 t1') n ;I i'l a. w !' I.'
1Mikiing N l\ t l
lu 3 t I nicd N\iow-

,oill goi'i ,111 iimi in c, IN.' ; -,i I
daw\ W el lip l rl rn!
I Q o i V \.l h ( a l l ,-1 l O11
1)4 ^'k !,.!lolrinl!, \ \ ,tr !
( alloros O ll, B In ph' I'c itc

M n:ii s t W n1 t i'![ till eid \ ai[;,,! l
,Is 0 c le '.Icr o \l s mltilCis
It Q .A't k i I ll I i N a i li ll
I l ,l Iha' l I I ilci, I.i- l




\'.it | i. ti n \ t IN iled
I' S. Pra sd"I n l I niih I l


I


Hubby groes too far


playing baby's role

sympathy, but what of the telephone interview'? ,hniI ,,
now' What is this notion that it is perfectly all right to
inquire into the nature of a person's illness, terminal or
otherwise? APPALLED
DEAR APPALLED: People with tact, sensitivity and
good manners do not have this notion. But unfortunately
those qualities are not taught-they're "caught."


EDDIE'S DEPT. STORE
BAY STREET east of STOP-.NSHOP Phone 22227


Were $16


ARRIVI D ITODAY: Grand
Slurk trom Miami. Jona from
Ja sksonvill,

SAIl I D IODAY: Joma
ter J .J' k ,, ". 1i.

ARRIVING TOMORROW:
Bahama Star. L merald Seas,
Flavia from Miami; Oceanic
from New York


I


GREAT AIAMNTIN SALES-IGREA IE-A-WAY


LADIES' WEAR


All LADIES' SLACKS Were $16.00-$18.00

NOW $10.00--$12.00


Ir4;


A,

11


BABYDOLLS & NIGHTGOWNS (Nylon & Dacron) $5.00
SHOES $5.00 to $8.


MEN'S WEAR


MEN'S PANTS
Were $16
Were $14


Now 2 for $15
Now 2 for $10


MEN'S PLAID POLYESTER PANTS
Were$16 S18 Now $10-$12.


MEN'S SUITS

MEN'S HATS
Were $16.


w cc7im sur


Now $15


Now $10.


MEN'S LONG SLEEVED POLYESTER SHIRTS r
Were $20. Now $14.
GREAT SAVINGS ON A VARIETY OF SHIRTS,
ALL STYLES, COLOURS & SIZES.


DAMONTIES Were$10 Now $6.


MEN'S BUSH JACKETS
Were $35 Now $25


I


NOW $10


MEN'S


SHOES on SAl


MEN'S BASEBALL SHIRTS (short & Long Sleeves)


MEN'S SUITINGS MOHAIR & TERRYLENE $4. a yd.


Zhf oribuur








Monday. February 11. 1974


OUR
BAHAMA
HARBOUR IS

A SMASHING

SUCCESS!


NOW


SAN ANDR


OFFERS TO YOU


CHOICE PROPERTY


IN


BAHAMA


VILLAGE!


It's unique ... with oversize homesites... extravagantly covered with tall pines and
blazing flora ... offering gracious living at the focal point of the proposed
San Andros town center. But most of all ... it holds a fabulous future for you!
HAVEN'T YOU ALWAYS WANTED TO BE FIRST IN LINE? TO ATTEND A PREVIEW?
NOW YOU CAN!
Bahama Village is a PREVIEW OFFER a rare opportunity to acquire some of the finest
land at San Andros-while INAUGURAL PRICES are still in effect at BOTTOM-LINE TERMS!


:". '.....':5 -^ ^ ''* :. .. : ...."-:.s':.^ ^'B-^-^ ^.S*: "*'.: .'.
::*<*. .... ",:. :'; ": ..:.-.*^ .yi *\*. :' -*:-.
*. ." . ...' ."". .... :..,. .:.':.... . .,:.........- ...,.... . ..


SAN ANDROS
BAHAMA VILLAGE III
12,000 SQ. FT. HOMESITES
(OVER /4 ACRE)


only 34951
....... ..$
. : :: :. : F F : .: :*i. F F 5 F c c i. : : :::::.


FUTURE DEVELOPMENT
PLANS INCLUDE:
* /lion Dar 8 -Hoe
i-' a Course
isd V;a Shr case area
* F ea""s p-.rea' Center
on
* F. "cec t:er Horse Corral
* F scae Deve .cment of Deep
ater Harbour
* icr xpans,;n 'fAg' uiratural Co'[ plex
-under Con ''. t'on
* Many Other Amemineso
SAN ANDROS
BAHAMA VILLAGE SUBDIVISION
* Resderna .' ned sites
' d dis p icrty ,,.,i'! drainage
* Abundant c.erage :tlh to 6' pines and large
palmetto.
* F .ow'eng sbs s: as hibiscus,. bougainvillea and
c ti gr A' and ,i urantli in fertile soil.
* Lcatd n "es from San Andros Harbour and
a few 'tei frnom' the San Andros Hotel with its
mrvnad actvit!ps
* C'eared' and compacted roads making
Pve-' hine:te accessible by car in early 74.
* ;'D ia designed to blend with the Island's
oeapit are contracted to a Bahamian company
med C nnabar International. Ltd.-or you may choose
vour wAn contractor when you are ready to build.
Con. uctin costs A I include a fresh water well for
atiot $600. and an electric generator (until public
service is available. for approximately $1600.
* Perpetua right of access to the private Evans Bay
Beach is conveved w:th Title Deed to Property.
* Membership in the San Andros Beach Club 9 miles
from Bahama Village by paved toad is automatic
with property ownership.
* No future building commitment required by purchaser.
* Title: Fee simple, Free, Clear and Marketable.


AT PR


all sites
all ... :'c:.
o-!i(:.ii ~ *.,*,


SAN ANDROS
BAHAMA VILLAGE II
14,500 SQ. FT. HOMESITES
(THAT'S ALMOST 1/3 ACRE)


oly$'3995!
...M...

::,...


EVIW TEM TOURISTS
REVIEW TERM S THIS MAY BE JUST THE OPPORTUNITY
YOU'VE BEEN SEEKING. THE IDEAL TIME
TO GET ALL THE FACTS IS WHILE YOU'RE
I W VISITING NASSAU. THESE LOW TERMS
downA!$ monthly ARE NOT OFFERED IN THE STATES. SEE
INCLUDES YOUR NASSAU BROKER HE CAN AR-
7 PER CENT RANGE FOR YOU TO SPEND A DAY ON
SIMPLEINTEREST ANDROS AS HIS GUEST.
., :',..' iL! i-' i. .- "' ; A.k. ; k:*: ':-.3 ::.,. ... .


BAHAM A VIL LA GE IS NOWV! There's an ample supply of Dream Time
But there's a shortage of Buying Time
If you plan for a holiday retreat, a year 'round villa, or a wise investment for your future in Bahama Village,
a subdivision of San Andros, the time for your decision has been reduced'drastically. Pressure will be increasing
almost daily for this limited supply of great land, as sales in the U.S. are now underway! and the better parcels
go first. That's why we say your dream of tomorrow must begin with a wide awake decision today!


GET THE WHOLE STORY. CALL OR DROP IN AT ANY OF THE FOLLOWING OFFICES TODAY:


Berkley Ferguson Real Estate Cosmopolitan Realty
Berwin House on Frederick Street King's Court
Phone: 2-1238 or 2-4913 Phone: 5-7477 or 5-7478


McDeigan & Associates Ltd.
Bernard Sunley Building
on Bay Street
Phone: 2-4284


Maxwell Woodside Real Estate
Corner of Bias and Blue Hill
Phone: 3-5632


Grosham Property Ltd.
107 Shirley Street
Phone: 2.7662 or 2-8966


Morley & O'Brien Real Estate
Harris Building on Shirley Street
Phone: 2-2794


C. A. Christie
Real Estate Company
2nd Floor Norfolk House
Frederick Street
Phone: 5-9737


Davson Real Estate Company Ltd.
Bay & East Streets (upstairs)
Phone: 2-1178


Frank Carey Real Estate Ltd.
*Bay & Deveaux Streets
Phone: 2-7667 or 2-4815
Tennant & Cooper Ltd.
First National Bank Bldg.
Freeport
Phone: 2-7841 or 2-2097


Ty Saunders Real Estate
Norfolk House, 2nd floor.
Frederick St.
Phone: 2-4818


Wenty Ford
Phone: 3-4946


- ~%u. m7~i4


S


IJ


II II ii I I I


':',i, : '


.- J.











Monday, February 11, 1974.


IN THI' SUPREME COURT
OF THE BAHAMAS
1 quity side


Whr Gribittle


NO 37
1973


IN THE. MATTER of the Petition of Joseph N.
\inder
ANI)
IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act 1959
ANI)


IN THill : MATTER of All that piece parcel or
tract of land being Allotment number 24 of the
Malcolm Allotments and Containing 3.835 Acres
and Situate 1900 feet South of Soldier Road
and 775 feet East of 1:ast Street in the Southern
District of the Island of News Providence and
bounded on the North by a Public Road
Reservation known as Malcolm Road and
running thereon 318.12 feet on the South by a
10 foot Road and running thereon 357.10 feet
on the West by a Road 30 feet wide and
thereon 357.10 feet on the West by a Road 30
feet wide and running thereon 530.32 feet and
on the East b\ land now or formerly the
property of Nathaniel inder and running
thereon 474.10 feet.

NOTICE
The Petition of JOSEPH N. WINI)DR of the
Southern District of the Island of New Providence
ill respect of:

All. THAT piece parcel or lot of land
being Allotment number 24 of the Malcolm
Allotments and Situate 1900 feet South of
Soldier Road and 775 feet East of East Street
and containing 3.835 Acres and Situate in the
Southern District of the Island of New
Providence and bounded on the East by land the
property of Nathaniel Winder and running
thereon 474. 10 feet and on the West by a Road
30 feet Wide Separating it from land the
property now or formerly the property of Adam
Munroe and running thereon 530.32 feet on the
North by a Road known as Malcolm Road and
running thereon 318.12 feet and on the South
by a Road 10 feet \Wide Separating it from land
now or formerly the Cleveland Wilson and
running thereon 35 .10 feet.

JOSEPH N. WINDER the Petitioner in this Matter
claims to be the owner of the unincumbered fee
simple Estate in possession of the said parcel of
land and has made application to the Supreme
Court of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas under
Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have
his Title to the said tract of land investigated and
the nature and extent thereof determined and
declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by
the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas in accordance with the provisions of the
Act.

COPIES of the said plan may be inspected during
normal office hours at the following places

A. The Registry of the Supreme Court of the
Bahamas inl the City of Nassau in the Island of
New Providence.
B. The Chambers of the undersigned

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having
dower or a right to dower or an adverse
Claim or a claim not recognized in the Petition
shall on or before the 15th day of March A.D.
1974 file in the Supreme Court in the City of
Nassau in the Island of New Providence and serve
on the Petitioner or his Attorneys a Statement of
his claim in the prescribed form verified by an
Affidavit to be filed therewith.
Failure of any such person to File and Serve a
Statement of his Claim on or before the 15th day
of March A.D. 1974 will operate as a bar to such
claim.
BETHEL GOTTLIEB & ZERVOUS
Attorneys for the Petitioner,
The Bernard Sunley Building
Situate Bay Street
Nassau Bahamas.


AP


I..IT ALL ADDS UP




your reusable but unwanted

items of

clothing, tools,

appliances, clocks,

fans, etc.. clear out

m your closets, garage, storeroom ..

all can be of help

to someone else.

Donate them to






SBzaar
ROSETTA STREET
TWO DOORS WEST OF
MONTROSE AVE


THE FOB CAMERA Club
last week received a
much-needed air
conditioner-donated by the
Sheraton-British Colonial
Hotel, for their new
darkroom at C.R. Walker
Technical College, Old Trail.
Pictured at the presentation
are, from left, club
equipment officer Edgar Hall,
club public relations officer
Margaret Guilluame, club
programme director Vincent
Vaughan and hotel general
manager John 0. Green.
(Photo: Sylvia Andrews)
TIDES
High 1 1:02 a mt and 11:35


and 5:05


Low 4:52 am


SUN
Rises (a 48 a
Sets 6:01 p.m
MOON
Rises 1 :10 pim.
Sets q: 24 p.m.




I OWaS
iO~~ffi,^ IGMWH


USE


bhr (ribunr


CLASSIFIED
ADVTS.


FO CAMRA lu


FOB CAMERA Club
secretary Linda Huber, right
helps prospective club
members mix developing
chemicals at the club's new
darkroom at the C.R. Walker
Technical College, Old Trail.
PHOTO: Margaret Guilluame.


photos



by laser



beam

NEW YORK (API A
shaken presidency and a
shaken economy underscored
the responsibility of newsmen
for objective, dispassionate and
informative reporting during
1973, Wes Gallagher. President
of The Associated Press, said
Thursday.
In his annual report to the
news service's membership,
Gallagher said that Watergate
and the energy shortage further
eroded the public's faith in
institutions, including the
Press
lie noted that widespread
public criticism may have
shifted from media to
"politicians, government and
the oil companies," and that
criticism of the Press by public
officials and cu niii '., of the
public seemed to abate in
1973.
It may only be temporary.
however, "since as public issues
become more complex, they
generate more controversy
and partisanship. The Press in
reporting such emotional issues
finds itself under partisan
attack,"G ( illt lh. i said.
Ihe AP and other news
organizations had to struggle
for basic information and
answers to complex public
(questions snot onily abort
\,i.. tre.i.' anid energy, he said,
but about prisoners of war
status at tihe windupi of
Vietnam last yeat and
censorship-coluded events of
the Mideast War.
Last year also saw a major
technical development in the
AP, the announcement of a
revolutionary new s\ stem
harnessing the laser beam in
the delivery of newsphotos by
wire.


across the nation in 1lu73.
"Few stories required such
concentrated effort as the
energy shortage," G.,II.ll, r
said. "It was difficult to
establish beyond doubt
whether a genuine crisis
existed, thile amount of
shortfall, the reasons for wide
variations between states and
other key elements."
The reportorial focus and
a special energy desk was
established in New York to
coordinate the effort had to
be on digging up basic
information. Gallagher noted
that one AP survey showed
energy officials in 14 states
lacked reliable figures on their
fuel supply.
The emphasis on Watergate.
once the investigative phase
ebbed, was to maintain
perspective and keep track of a
torrent of spectacular breaking
news. (allagher continued.
"The watchword was to take
nothing for granted, to ckeck
and recheck. to test one
source's statements against
others and to keep readers
solidly backgrounded."
"During the Watergate
hearings, for example. AP
provided a clear narrative or
analytical summary each


week." Gallagher said.
"The kind of official
confusion that beset major
domine'.tic event, in 1 7 also
marked the opening phases of
the Mideast War." said
(, jl.hiL r early in the
fighting, reporters were barred
from the fronts and ran into
galling censorship obstacles."
By sticking carefully to what
was said by either side and
what could be learned. he said,
AP staffers avoided
"'unwarranted conclusions and
assumptions that led some
others to dispatches that were
overly optimistic about Israeli
prospects."


7

FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE

FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157


NOTICE


NOW YOU CAN EARN EXTRA CA$H
by selling your unwanted boat, truck,
car, real estate, household items....
in a Tribune Classified Advertisement!


NOTICE


NOTICE is hereby given that SHU WAH NG of Harbour
Moon Restaurant is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration should not be granted should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 11th day of February 1974 to
The Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.


NOTICE


NOTICE is hereby given that MORRIS CRADWICK
SIMMONS of P. O. Box F. 1594 Freeport, Grand Bahama is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration should not be granted should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 11th day of Feb. '74 to The Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau.


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS


TENDER FOR TREASURY BILLS


The Treasurer hereby gives notice that tenders will be received on Tuesday.
12th february, 1974 for Treasury Bills to be issued under the Public
Treasury Bills Act 1959 and the Public Treasury Bills Amendment Act 1965
on TIhursday. 14th February. 1974 as follows:


Bills denominated and payable in
Bahamian dollars ......B$4,000,000.00


Laserphoto's new principles
of photo reproduction and
transmission produce far better
pic ture quality than
conventional methods. They
represent the first step toward
electronic editing of pictures
on TV screens and higher
transmission speed when digital
communications facilities
become available, Gallagher
said.
The system was developed
jointly by the AP and
Massachusetts Institute of
Technology and will be
installed at member
newspapers within the next
two years.
Ihie Associated Press last
year received its third Pulitzer
Pri/e ftor photo coverage in
Vietnam, (;allagher noted. the
picture, by Huynh C(ong ti of
AP's Saigon staff, showed
children -'k. ntg a misdirected
napalm strike. UIP's photo also
won every other major award
in 10731
In delivering its news report
to newspapers and
broadcasters, the AP continued
expansion of electronic
handling of dispatches. More
than 150 cathode ray tube
writing and editing terminals
were operating in AP bureaus


Ministry tof Finantce
\assaua. lBaham7as
5th February, 1974.


The bills will be in minimum multiples of S 100 and are redeemable
ninelty-one' (01 das ( from the date of issue.

The bills will be issued and paid at the Bahamas Monetary Authority. Details
of pa ymetnt will be notified to successfttl tenderers in letters of acceptance.

Each tender must be in a sealed envelope marked "Tender" addressed to:

THiE BANKING ; MANAGER
Bahamas Monetary Authority

and should be delivered to the office of the Authority iin the I. D. Sassoon
Building, corner of Shiirlec and Parliament Streets, Nassau before 3:00 p.m.
on Tuesday. 12th Februarys. I )4.

lenders must be made on special forms which may be obtained from the
Bahamas Monetary Authority and the Commercial Banks and must be for
not less than the minimum amount stated in ;.rair.,rph 2. Tenders must state
the net price per cent (being a multiple of one cent) which will be paid.

The Treasurer reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.


I -- .-~-- IW434 IRW4__


--


---


lrftNAIK],.


Ir











ahi' _rihuii


Monday, February 11, 1974.


Environmental services



help meet health standards /,


TIl DEPARTMENT of
Snvirnm entail health
Service, with a staff of more
ithin 350 dispered throughout
\ w Providence and the
I aimlh Islands, is charged with
p that public health
'inetes spe ticl standards
I hei depart mient has grow n
SIi ot the Public Health
P.-pa:,rent PlllDi. and came
w istenciLe in November,

I i-I- w .lowed a survey 'of
ri.li' bs consultants
th World Health
S, :r c d e d t h e
ih 'Iit U it which
:* i ~c1~h ec 1he PltD o! a
.- -! dulles I he PHDll)
;' ci!; -t *I, !'o !being
-: '-.bi ,.." medical

S partt :11n c t .
n..*m ei:tal lriAth Senrices
{!- n he prtol!, m, the
S \ 1 'r is R.kcr, M inite
i t . a '.i o





S er r '' garbage

,. t 1"I i: i C. I tI C lo ,dd .


'^.: i pu~blc buildings:

::'.,-,l *, t c l-rd atc, a ld

ei ,l : le- land






P r i h \(,
l- i *' !": nibe n and






I .. :h th, addition on

S!i e stand s
t 2'. ; A -ni nine and








S1 s r r *l t V' in
ii s te
















i : ::. :LP! .TO M PdC:' w ray .s
,iz r, :' ear ic.l~ v
''-:] P 'r h q .idd: ttt" na I


Mr. McCorquodale.
He also notes that the
department is working on
pulverization a more modern
method of garbage disposal.
This would come into effect
with the introduction of a new
sewage disposal system. A
mixture of shredded garbage
and residual sludge would yield
a soil conditioner which could
help the Ministry of
Agriculture and farmers to
develop their acreage The
product would be similar to an
imported soil conditioner now
sold at garden supply outlets.
The staffers of the roads and
parks division of the Ministry
of Works were transferred to
the Department of
t environmental Health Services
on January 1. 1973.
ANTI-POLLU Ti ,
The Department intends to
renew the anti-pollution laws,
with emphasis on new
regulations regarding the
cleanliness of the islands Plans
tor such a review were
formulated in the last quarter
of 173, and the Ministry of
Health is receiving assistance in
this venture from WHO and the
Pan American Health
Organization (PAHO).
Three officers of the
Ministry ,F. C',ie7 attended a
WHO and PAAHO seminar in
Jamaica called to plan a
two-year environmental!
sanitation pilot project. It will
provide training il:
environmental management
During the entire period WHO
and PAHO will assist the
Ministry in developing all
phases of environmental
,.i n j, n, ",,i t and control.
The Ministry has also
solicited, and received, support
trorn other governmental
bodies, such as the Project
Coordinating Committee, to
ensure that each governmental
agents is involved in the

OLD WRECKS
Departmental personnel also
tow derelit vehicles to
Cowpen Road after serving
notices on owners to remove
them within two weeks At
Cowpen Road a contractor.
I rederick Dillet. under an
agr e C e nt with t he
department, shears the hulks
with a cutter and compresses
the metal for export to scrap
steel de.ilers.
What can the public do to
highten the workload of the


department's staff?
For a start, Environmental
Health would like the abuse of
roadside litter bins to stop.
they were made for light, not
heavy, refuse. People who rip
off roofs and place them at the
sides of streets hoping the
department would haul them
away should look alter
transportation themselves.
"We should try to inculcate
a spirit of civic cleanliness and
not throw bottles and cans
from cars," notes Mr.
McCorquodale. "We should
keep our yards and premises
clean and report to the
department anyone who
doesn't.
HFALTH OFFICERS
"Restaurant and hotel
owners should anticipate
general and intermediate
inspections by health officers.
and keep their facilities up to
the mark The Department ft
Environmental Health Service,
would especially like to gi\e.
support to its representative in.
Freeport who is carrying out a
very difficult b
singlehandedly under %ery
trying circumstances."
However, Mr. McCorquodale
says, 'The standards in newer
restaurants and hotels 'n the
Bahamas are as good as I haec
seen elsewhere in the world."
The department has 26
part-time sanitary inspectors in
the Family Islands, a senior
health inspector and a fulltime
health assistant at Grand
Bahama, and a full-time health
assistant at Moores Island.
Abaco.
In New Providence there are
the Acting Director and Acting
Chief Health Inspector, three
senior health inspectors, 14
qualified inspectors, f!our
trainee inspectors, seven
health assistants (unqualified i,
a rodent control supervisor.
two rodent control assistant.
five insect control assistants. a
superintendent of cleaning of
public buildings and touL
assistants. ihO persons in the
cleaning department headed by
another cleaning g
superintendent, and 127
employees in the parks and
beaches section headed by a
parks and beaches
superintendent.
The department's
headquarters are located on
School Lane. off Shirley
Street.


s"l'





' h
f-


THE DEPARTMENT of
Environmental Health Services
is responsible for removing
abandoned vehicles from New
Providence streets. They are
hauled to the Government
Car Pound on Cowpen Road
where they are cut up for
shipment to scrap metal
dealers abroad for conversion
into industrial steel.
In TOP PHOTO, cutter,
which can shear
four-inch-thick lengths of
steel, slices through car
bumpers.
BOTTOM PHOTO shows a
tin bailer which, with 100-ton
hydraulic pressure, can
compress a maximum of 600
Ibs. of metal at one time.
From left to right, on the
bailer, are Acting Chief
Health Inspector C.A.
Nottage; Livingston Hepburn,
Health Inspector in charge of
removal of derelict vehicles;
Frederick Dillet, contractor
and General Manager of the
oound: and Alexander
McCorquodale, Acting
Director of Enviromental
Health.
An electrical magnet


:apable of snaicning up 1,500
Ibs. of steel is to be installed.
Mr. Dillet says that in the
past five months his staffers
have collected between
18,000 and 20,000 vehicles.


Three million dollars has been
invested in the project, and
he plans to extend the
operation to Grand Bahama.

Photo: Wendell Cleare.


WEATHER
WIND: North-easterly 12 to
21 m.p.h.
WEATHER: Mainly fair
SEA: Slight to moderate
TEMP: Min tonight 60
Max tomorrow 75


SItANIDS SC11


EniE IE FEI SPIFIN M

The Secondary Shool D.t280 on roll, average class size 25)
1. Head of ENGLISH Department
2. BIOLOGY & CHEMISTRY
3. GEOGRAPHY
These posts will involve teaching to G.C.E. '0' level,
possibly 'A' level and preparing students for entry into
American Universities.
4. MODERN MATHEMATICS (S.M.P. preferably) with
some BIOLOGY or CHEMISTRY & GENERAL
SCIENCE.
This post will involve teaching in the lower forms of the
Secondary School
5. Boy's PHYSICAL EDUCATION
6. Girl's PHYSICAL EDUCATION
These posts will also involve the organisation of
programmes for and teaching in the Junior School
7. ART, with ability to teach lower form FRENCH an
advantage.
Minimum Requirements for Aplicants
Post 1-4: A good degree, professional training and three
years teaching experience.
Posts 5-7: Recognised three year professional training and
five years teaching experience.
The Primary School (520on rgJl)
8. FIVE CLASSROOM TEACHERS. Each to be res-
ponsible for the full timetable of a Middle or Lower
Junior Class of up to twenty five boys and girls.

Minimum Qualifications
Recognized Teaching Certificate and three years recent, full
time teaching experience.
Ability to teach beginner's FRENCH, play the PIANO
and/or teach PHYSICAL EDUCATION to several year
groups an advantage.


Salary Scales
Three Year Teacher Training
General Degree with Teacher
Training
Honours Degree with Teacher
Training

Annual Increments:


Point of entry dependent


B$6,100 -- B$10,800

95$7,000 B$12,000

B$7,300 B$12,400

X B$3,000 to B$10,000

X B$400 to B$12,000
upon qualifications and


experience. One increment is given for every two years of
teaching experience outside the Bahamas
Application forms available:
THE HEADMASTER
St. Andrew's School
P.O. Box N7546
Nassau, Bahamas


LA PRIMA SVENDITA
"*x" 1[' ii -' 1 '^


FEB.8th TO 16th1



FOR MEN


& WOMEN SO% Off


SWEATERS HANDBAGS

COSTUME JEWELLERY
from Italy
.Lomte.... I r mm am m m mm m m mm m
Loatadl in the PrinG.... Aede


NOTICE

NOTICE h.treby given that JUDY KATHERINE CATES
or Twynam Avenue, Nassau Bahamas is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationalityv and .t, ,. shu for
1 .1, i .-.. as a citizen of The Bahamas. and that any
person who krows any reason *why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight davs from the 4th day of Feb.
to The Minister responsible f'r0 Nationalitv arid Citizenship,
P 0. Box N7147. Nassau.


7 1 frop I c a
- pe-S t Contro


0Thv aribhttr


o -p


;" O_




, i lir .












Monday, February 11, 1974


February 23rd


From 9:30a.m.


column i wrote about a visit! ti
the Stapledon School and tli
results of an interview with
Mrs. Sybil Blydeni, ie
principal of the School, .in
the evidence I saw' o! h,
terrific rapport with, ind
understanding iof, hcn
children.
Because I think that itie
needs of the retarded have suchl
a priority in our coiiniunit\x I
will repeat certain .tatetiini
in that column to-da ilo i h
help of those who miss i
earlier column or hl ix
forgotten it.
The most basic need is hr


l here are 125 children
.1 ii anii(dated at the
S< .itt. ,n School for retarded
,h.idren. Here are over 200
d.hi tlii whose names are on
1h' '-, list And, based on
''i'ortionaie figures in other
P lU" tionis, there are probably
1'-0I 2.00 other children in
I. ], as a whole who
.I ret aided "
"Diagnostic facilities are
'ii l.il to establish just how
S: chd can he educated or
I*; Residential facilities
.1 i d,'. d tii those children
hioe lahmilie. cannot give
ihiciin tll i help they need.
"And a sheltered workshop
i, also a priority where the
,i.iin h .ian learn a trade and
thn Iet integrated into the
0ommunitiy as a whole and
Mir th '^n anntwnL


a


Canada's Senate, and Mrs.
Martin in the Martins' suite at
Holiday Inn, Paradise Island.
Mr. and Mrs. Martin, who
returned to Ottawa today,
had been in Nassau since
January 26. The Martins are
frequent visitors to the
Bahamas. Seen from left to
right: Mr. Larry Koen,
senior vice president, director
of International Relations,
Mr. and Mrs. Pindling, Mr.
Martin and Mr. Nick
Melnechuk, director of sales.


Gunmen

shoot

girl

and

boy

BELFAST Two gunmen
killed two men as they came
out of a Roman Catholic bar in
Belfast. The wife of one of the
men was badly injured.
The attack Sunday raised
confirmed death toll in
Northern Ireland's Protestant
Catholic war to 940 since
August 1969.
Early today a car drew
up alongside a 19-year-old
Catholic boy and girl parked
on a side road in county
Tyrone, A man got out and
fired a burst with a submachine
gun. The girl was critically
injured in the back, and the
boy was hit in the hand.(AP)


9


2 groups working for



retarded 'married'

N tI I) AI'HINF WA I.AC('E WHITFIELD
1 r -t un vnr' u ... .


without supervision and
guidance can have the
satisfaction and dignity of
earning a living through
working at, say, a flat
laundry". (Communitv Nov
8th, 1973).
At the time of this article I
tried to find out what had
happened to the new
Stapledon Institute and how
much money the fund raising
committee had in the kitty.
THE FACTS
At the time of my
investigation I drew a blank.
Yet, what appeared to be a
state of stagnation didn't jell
with the facts as I had read
them.
These were the facts:-
(1) NOVEMBER 1968
The Bahamas Government
signed a 21 year lease for an
11"2 acre plot off John F.
Kennedy Drive. According to
the release at this time "plans
moved ahead for the Stapledon
Institute. The institute will
include a 16-room day school,
a sheltered work shop, a
diagnostic centre, parent and
child guidance centre, clinic,
pre-school unit and an
administrative office".
(2) JANUARY 1970. In
an interview a spokesman of
the Bahama Association for
Retarded Children told The
Tribune that the first phase in
a five-year building plan for the
new Stapeldon Institute is
scheduled to get underway this
year (1970) at a cost of
$500,000.

(3) NOVEMBER 1973. In
an interview at the Stapeldon
School for Retarded Children
Mrs. Sybil Blyden described
her dreams for these necessary
facilities as "wishful thinking".
Unable to find out the
answers to the apparent
discrepancy between plans and
the actual reality I asked the
following questions in the
column.
"How much closer to-day is
the Association to its
announced goal of five years
ago?




; ^H^^






a


OPENS: 6:30. Shows start 7 p im
No one under 18 addmitt i
See 2 features late LI 'i i0
FINAL 2 NITES! *
DAY of the JACKAI' 7 & 1 o
"PLAY MISTYI"at Y p











MRME" R R
IflO Mr" R


The Bahamas Association
for Retarded Children actually
ran the school.
A group of "mostly
expatriate women 11 to begin
with, who were interested in
the school formed themselves
into a fund raising group and
simply called themselves "The
Fund Raising Group for the
Stapledon School".
When Lady Cumming Bruce
arrived in the Bahamas she
took the retarded as her special
project.
She used her position to get
a number of people to help
with donation.
TWO GROUPS
Out of the fund raising
group was born the Institute
for the Mentally retarded.
Lady Cumming-Bruce (later


SvMn I N, one, under 17 admitted


NOW I II I I Rlll !II \Y
Matinee 3:00 & 5:00, Evenina 8 30 Phone 2-1004, 2-10







HE 'BBERS THE MOB AS



NOO/ i' ( it 17 lI)M11777:I).
Reservations not1101 claimed by 8:15 will he sold
on first comee, ir..t served basis.



Now thru Friday Last Day Tuesday
Matinee starts at 2:15
Evening 8:30 Continuous Showings
"BLOOD OF THE from 3:00
DRAGON" R.
Wang Yu "THE DEATH MAKERS
PLUS Pi
"TODAY WE KILL, Lilli Palmer,
TOMORROW WE DIE" R. Klaus Kinski
ET IOmO under I7 will h,, i adrt,d PLUS
PLUS Late Feature
Tuesday night. "RETURN OF SABATA
Phone 2-2534 Lee Van Cleef P



LAST DAY TUESDAY
Matinee Continuous from 2: Evening 8:30-'Phone 3-4


051













I

















Ii


THE BAHAMAS ASSOCIATION FOR THE MENTALLY RETARDED


A DAY OF FUN





AUCTION

at GOVERNMENT HOUSE


Canada: Dr. Lester Crinspoon,
Harvard University; Dr Aida
Guzman; Dr. Irma Morales de
Flores. Costa Rica; Dr. Morris
E. Chafetz, Director, National
Institute on Alcohol Abuse and
Alcholism.


Child trapped

down well
MIAMI Rescuers were
using excavation equipment in
an effort to reach a child who
fell down a 25-foot-deep well
Sunday, police said.
Rescuers were having
difficulty with loose dirt that
was falling on the
youngster.(AP)


Dr. Eneas says that it took
eighteen months for both these
organizations to agree that
they were both doing the same
thing. From 1971 to 1973 they
went through the legal process
of "marrying" the two
companies, another two years.
The result of this merger is
the Bahamas Association for
the Mentally Retarded which
incorporates both The Institute
for the Mentally Retarded and
The Bahamas Association for
Retarded Children.
The Government has been
persuaded to extend the lease
of the land to 42 years
although 90 was originally
asked for.
In 1972 the Deed of
Surrender (of the land from
the Bahamas Association for
Retarded Children) was started
and is now finally concluded.
Now, Dr. Eneas said,
Government can make the new
lease to the Bahamas
Association for the Mentally
Retarded for 42 years.
"Possibly within the next
month or two we'll have the
land in our hands", he told me.
"When we have the land we
can run the fund raising
campaign on a professional
basis" with tax deductions.
How many people will the
new Stapledon Institute be
able to cater to? I asked Dr.


Eneas who told me 800
(between now and 1980).
Maybe not the estimated
2,000 children in need of this
sort of teaching and care but a
big improvement quantitatively
on the 120 children now
accommodated at: the present
Stapledon School.
Now about money. The
Association have over $20,000
or enough to do the first stage
of the proposed building.
However, Dr. Eneas told me
that negotiations are presently
going on with the Canadian
Government for them to
finance the whole project
this loan to be guaranteed by
the Bahamian Government.
Meanwhile fund raising
efforts are still going on.
The Annual Auction will
again be held at Government
House on February 23rd in aid
of the Stapledon School.
Mrs. Bianca Cole Chairman
of the Benefits Committee,
told me recently that part of
the proceeds of the auction
will go for current expenses of
the school and the rest will go
towards the planned new
school and facilities.
It does appear that Mrs.
Sybil Blyden's and Lady
Thrulow's and many others'
dream of facilities for the
retarded of the Bahamas more
in keeping with the civilised
community we claim to be is
closer to being translated into
reality.
A reality in which many
precious human lives will be
made useful and happy that
otherwise might have led a
limbo (and in many cases a
hell) on Earth.


Lady Thurlow) was bursting
over with ideas and very
"ambitious". The Institute was
to take care of the retarded of
the Bahamas "from birth to
grave", Dr. Eneas explained.
Lady Cumming-Bruce
succeeded in infecting quite a
few wealthy people with her
enthusiasm to the point that
'hey gave "goodly sums".
They got an architect to
incorporate these ideas the
new school, diagnostic centre,
parent and child guidance
centre, pre-school unit and
sheltered workshop on
paper.
However, this is where the
snag came, explained Dr.
Eneas.
The land had been leased to
the Bahamas Association for
the Mentally Retarded and the
funds were being raised by The
Bahamas Association for
Retarded Children two
groups desiring the same ends
but two groups nevertheless.
Business men are hardly
going to give money to a group
for a building that was leased
to another group.
'MARRIAGE'
The necessity was brought
home strongly to them,
explained Dr Eneas, of setting
the whole project on a sound
business base so that donations
could be tax deductible. For
example a heavy donation had
to be recently returned because
it could not be tax deducted.

CONFERENCE

ON DRUGS
A NUMBER of people from
the Caribbean region and from
countries overseas, will attend
the meeting in Nassau
sponsored by the World
Federation for Mental Health,
in association with the
International Council on
Alcohol and Addictions and
the Government of the
Bahamas. from March 3-5,
The Conference on
"Strategies for the Prevention
of Drug Abuse in Developing
Countries with Special
Reference to the Caribbean",
will be a multi-disciplinary one,
but the accent will be upon the
role of education and the role
of legislation and law
enforcement, though other
strategies, including secondary
and tertiary prevention, will be
examined, a government press
release said.
All the Caribbean
governments have been invited
to send people to this meeting,
and in addition a number of
well-known experts from
overseas have already indicated
their willingness to attend and
to speak.
Among those who will be
arriving in Nassau for the
Conference are: Dr. Helen
Nowlis, director of the U.S.
Office of Education Drug
Programmes, Washington; Dr.
Vincent Nowlis, consultant
formerly director, Education
and Manpower, White House
Special Action Office for Drug
Abuse Education; Mr. Aubrey
Frazer, director of legal
education, U.W.I. Jamaica; Dr.
Vera Rubin, director, Research
Institute for the Study of Man,
Columbia University, N.Y.; Dr.
Alfred Freedman. Department
of Psychiatry. New York
Medical College, president of
the American Psychiatric
Association: Dr. Dale C.
Cameron, senior medical
officer, office of mental health,
World Health Organization,
Geneva; Dr Guido Belsasso,
general director, Centre
Mexicano de Estudios en
Pharmacodependencia, Mexico.
Dr. & Mrs Archer Tongue,
International Council on
Alcohol and Addictions: The
Hon. Rafael Santon-Del Valle,.
secretary of Addiction Control
Services, Puerto Rico; Dr Jose
Nunez Lopez, Venezuela; Dr
Tolani Asuni, Nigeria: Dr. D.
SLynton Porter, England Mr
David Archibold, Ontario,


IN THE SUPREME COURT
Equity Side


IN THE MATTER OF
Limited

AND IN THE MATTER
Act


No. 79


Island Merchants,


OF The Companies


Notice is hereby given that a Petition presented
to the Supreme Court of the Bahama Islands on
the Seventh day of February. 1974. for confirming
the Reduction of the Capital of the above-named
Company.

From S2.207.160.00 divided as follows into
700,000 Ordinary Shares of $2.00 each
7,900 Class A Ordinary Shares of $2.00 each
'0.680 6'. Cumulative Preference
Shares of $2.00 each
7.500 89' Cumulative Preference
Shares of $100.00 each

TO S22,071.60 divided as follows into


700.000 Ordinary Shares of 2c each
7,900 Class A Ordinary Shares of 2c each
20.680 6" Cumulative Preference
Shares of 2c each
7.500 8'i Cumulative Preference
Shares of $1.00 each

by cancelling capital which has been lost or is
unrepresented by available assets to the extent
of S 1.98 per share upon each of the $2.00 shares
which have been issued and are now outstanding
And to the extent of $99.00 per share on each
of the S 100.00 shares which have been issued
and are now outstanding And by reducing the
nominal amount of all the shares in the
Company's capital in the case of the $2.00
shares from $2.00 to 2c and in the case of the
S 100.00 from S 100.00 to $ 1.00
is directed to be heard before The Honourable the
Chief Justice on Thursday the Twenty-eighth day
of February, 1974 at 10 a.m.
Any Creditor or Shareholder of the said
Company desiring to oppose the making of an
Order for confirmation of the said Reduction of
Capital should appear at the time of hearing by
himself or his Counsel for that purpose.
A copy of the Petition will be furnished to any
person requiring the same by the undersigned on
payment of the regulated charge for the same.
DATED the Seventh day of February, 1974.

HIGGS & JOHNSON
Attorneys for the Compady,
Sandringham House,
83 Shirley Street,
Nassau, Bahamas.


Has the goal announced five
years ago been changed in any
way'? Is it now more ambitious
to meet the needs of a growing
population or less ambitious
due to financial problems?
How much money does the
Association have now in its
building fund? Is it enough to
begin phase one of the plans?
If so why hasn't it begun yet'"
(Cominunity-Nov 8th, 1973.)
filE SIORY
last week Dr. Cleveland
Eneas, president of the
Bahamas Association for the
Mentally Retarded, came to
The tribune to see me and my
Questions have finally been
answered
I here were two
incorporated bodies involved
with the Stapeldon School, Dr.
Eneas explained.


LAND FOR SALE

tABACO)
(On the Main Highway, Turtle Rocks, Near Treasure Cay).
We are selling small tracts of 5 acres and upwards on
high ground at the very advantageous price of $750.00
per acre with good title. Cash or Terms. Very attractive
offer with good prospects for early CAPITAL PROFIT,
as other buyers nearby have sold well above this price
for similar land.

LAKE VIEW DEVELOPMENT

COMPANY LIMITED
P. 0. Box N-1957 or N-4305, NASSAU, Bahamas
Telephone, evenings 23133.



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 1974


- . - _nn


[EZ" E3stso


_ - -- ---


XShr Sritunp














(3hr aribunr


Monday, February 11, 1974.


CLASSIFIED


SECTION


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS- FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV. TELEPHONE 21986 EXT. 5


REAL ESTATE


C13321
BUY A LOT
in EASTWOOD
or
WINTON MEADOWS
Cali Frank Carey

F rank Carey
Real Estate
Bou N4/ 6
B[ V & LiPVail S',


CL.U4 70
2 E.l i- 0 ";..'-,, 1 bathi
m,,ushed house, closed yard in
Retrernent Road Call after 7
Pn,-. 74155

C13422
2 two storey buildings or
"Vulf Road opposite Bahamia,
iL mber.
I two storey building on
S'1oldier Road opposite
'Tel hnical Training College
hone 42981

1450
i -F URNISIL H FOU R
S ROOM, two bath house ,
S- g roo arnd carport for
Sre't CaiI 31 7 !
',.vot.'ern '9 arr) 5 r irn





a"l e ii'iir and Bahana





0URAN CENT propD 4 Bedrty or
,,,le. Lot 3, Block 26, Unit 1.




te Ga00 mer- ResubPclivioeo
S i to the Past ofl Feeporut.








' P '., .: s, rde, Suitf 31 5itr
i t est Wa Farsh ringto n S tont,
S w h ,q t o ll ro Carroll. U.S ood
..000. Phone after 7 0527



acres Johnsonp PRa.
',LOe C: srale ee00 l pie00 wth




,<-unabltv priced at $21,000
Chester Thompson
S 4777 Evenings 3-1425 or



) your Real Estate
iihase, arid rentals call D &
SALES and RENTALS in
iti' tear on Centrepville Diuq &
'.-,,t meant Stoies Ltd., l th
i i iCe o ntrteville Phone
: '342 n 3 1-'00


J SOP'S PFAL i STATE
CO. LTD.
i. *- i, -d R fe '-t ite B ro, ers
yhoels2i7 55408

Na Iau, Bahamas
Pioudiv pr Lc' .
StMlASiINi G R. AL
FST BARGA NS
iUGHOUT Tri
t Or.',.4ONWEAL T
S .d 4 BE DOO-'
: ,.; ,. ., th' 'f oi io ,r ',.
j' i (.2.
t '> ;Pr- f ;


W iN -T 0
it ( T'i it i i '




VILLA! OA. .
GOLDEN GAT -
HIGHL N ) ,.- T
PROS!'. i -ltJ(,l
WESTV.Ar V! iLL S
C O ( J0 M i "; J ".
APART'L', TS P,. PT,'ADIS!
ISLAND
EAST BAY iSTI1 f T
WEST BAY ST LjlET
HOTELS arnd HOT[L Si LS,
BEACH LOT S, COM EERc-
IAL LOTS, RESIDENT IAL
LOTS
AC R E A G f 0
DEVELOPMENT IN FHE
NASSAU AND FAMILY
ISLANDS SUCH AS GRAND
BAHAMA LONG ISLAND.
EFLEUTHERA, ABACO
45 ACRE CAY IN TIHE
EXUMAS WITH DEEP
WATER HARBOUR AND
MORE
CALL
DAVSON'S REAL
ESTATE AGENCY
Phone 21178 or 80932 21178
P. 0. Box N-4648
Nassau, Bahamas

FOR RENT
C13490
UNFURNISHED 2 bedroom i
bath apartment. Mount Royal
Avenue. Telephone 2 1599

C 13497
2 one bedroom fully furnished
apartments Centreville
District. Ring 5-8679 Don
Pritchard


I


Mortgage dated 27th March.
1966 Koenneth Andr7 lan
Rodgur s t Fi n inc,'
Corporation of Bahamaas
Limited
Reco)rded in Buoik 977 at Pages
257 ti, 264.
The sale is subioct to a resew ve
price and to the right for the
AuctioUe-Cl O anry person on
his behalf to bid up to that
pi ice
Terms: 10% of the purchase
price t fte time of sal" and
balance on completion.
Dated this 11th day of
JanuaIv A D. 1974.
Kuk S. Hinsey
Public Auictioneei

MARINE SUPPLIES
C 13468
23' ANACAPRI 160
'. o P r r v C r u i ser
Ship-to-Shore. In Excellent
( !1:1 $'. '-il: Phone
34527 28293.

1 -1i4t/


?breqiq ss cruiser.
L[ aeii i head, tove, cooler.
2 new 225 h.p.
M' h nl r M r~i ip Engines, twi'
tioi, shi to shore radio.
ideal for fishing. $12,000 or
'rpr' Pt of fer Telephone
S205B days i 2163 nights.


f 3 it CHRIS CRAFT
:;'z'' T-ti-d r Sleeps six, private
1how. r two 230 h.p. engines
with ,i, than 200 hours,
Ki', ronri -. good condition
( i iltl 7 540i

( J38
ipA ( K I R 44 ft.
i L' Cr ,'t q yacht
Phone j 2371


AT T RA( [' stom built
i.:.., .lojtd Sri,, 'cr trtid t i ,


dif Jief .l i t !' e.r .'e, f i idge.
t ,our, ,11 ',iti oi ned, arid
r! j i 1 ll( ,]'it extras
%ophtir v sri fned ..'..i,
with 18", it lmn, Cocktail bar
with ii M.ii tirie Inmmrediate
piri'sessioi $24,000 Wi ie
"HN(Mehboit" P 0 Box
N ti,48 Na,sau

S CARS FOR SALE
C 3491
19/2 TRIUMPH Spitfire sports
car This car has been.
beautifully maintained and
comes with hard top, soft top.
covers, radio etc. $500.
Overhaul lust completed. Cost
new $4.500 plus. Bargain at
$3,000. Phone 57541.
Ii


C13378
TUITION
THE RAPID RESULTS
COLLEGE World-famous
postal tuition for the GCE,
Schorni Cert. and
Accountancy. Banking. law,
Marketing, Company
Secretaryship Examinations.
For details of our specialised
courses write for Free copy
of YOUR CAREER to The
Rapid Results College
Department. TNI Tuition
House London SW19 4DS.


C13477
1972 CHEVY Van G-30 series.
Low mileage 350 V8-2 barrel.
Good condition, licensed for
1974. Priced for quick sale.
$3600.00. Telephone 55556.

FOR SALE
13511
FOLDING BICYCLE only
four months used. Fits easily ins
cai. $100. Ask Pete Clark, New
Olympia Hotel, after 6 p.m.

BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
C 13380
ARE YOU INTERESTED IN
EARNING $1788.00 PER
MONTH PART-TIME WITH
ONLY $6900.00 TO INVEST?
(FULLY RETURNABLE
UNDER CONTRACT).
WRITE: MR CHEEK, 2642
GULF LIFE TOWER,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA

ANNOUNCEMENTS
C13524













SEAT COVERS 20%
DISCOUNT Roofing, Rugs,
Wind Laces, Door Draperies,
Furnitures, Canvas Awnings,
Bedspreads.
SALE ON VINYL
ADDERLEY'S UPHOLSTERY
SHOP
Telephone 34518
P. 0. Box 5766
Lincoln Boulevard, Nassau


ANNOUNCEMENTS


C13388
COTTAGES and apartments
daily, weekly or monthly
arrconditioned, fully furnished,
maid service available. Lovely
garden and swimming pool.
Telephone 31297, 31093

C13510
ONE bedroom apartment.
Twynam Avenue aiF'.
Basically furnished.
Decorative iron guards on all
windows Master TV Antenmia
To view call 2 3261.

C 13473
OPPOSITE Scottish Shop.
Charlotte Street. Ideal for stor,
or office, large parking.
immediate occupancy. 41476

C13522
Furnished and unfurnished
apartments one and twoe
bedroom. Phone 3-2396 iatto 5
p.m.

PUBLIC AUCTION

C 13249
KIRK S. HINSEY wii setl at
Haibour Moon Hotel, FaV
Street, on the 15'htday oi Feb.
1974 at 12 noon the follolwOni
pr ope ty :-
"ALL THAT piece pa cel oi
lot of laind sitaited inr the
Western Side of Nassau Stieet
in the Western District of
t he Island of New
Pi evidence aforesaid ati
bounded on the East by th'
said Nassau Street ind
ui n it i n q t he r 't -
Twenty-eight (2'n; ierli i
the South by pioperttes c'
rLthel Carter Kate Mamua aid
Malvina Robinson aind
running thereon jointly Two
Hundred and Thity -foul
(234) feet on the West by
land forfimeivl the property.
of Doctor WaltPI Hess and
runnrinq thereon Foity-one
and Fifty Hundredths
(41.50) feet and i-i th-
North hy Land the propeit y
of Carimeta Rodgert arid
running thereon Two
Hundred and Twentt, (220)
feet.


C 13386
LEWIS AUTO SCHOOL
Learn to drive with confidence.
Phone 59805 between 7 an i
8:30 a.m. or after 6 p.m. or
35084 anytime.


HELP WANTED
C13502
CASTLE BANK requires the
services of a stage 2
Bookkeeper also capable of
typing accounting statements
swiftly and accurately.
Candidates should telephone
21626 for appointment and
test.:


C13464
LEGAL or otherwise fully
qualified secretary required to,
position with law firm.
Shorthand required. For details
enouire telephone 2-251 1


C 13526
ABC MOTORS
Budget-priced, A-1 used cars.
Best value for your money
1 9 7 2 L I NCOLN
CONTINENTAL, automatic
transmission, air conditioning
stereo $6,500
1973 MORRIS MARINA
ESTATE automatic
transmission $3,800
1970 CHEVROLET MALIBU
automatic transmission, air
conditioning $2.100
1972 CHEVROLET VEGA
automatic transmission $3.300
1972 MERCURY COMET
2 -door automatic
transm mission, air (.- li ..r
radio $4.000
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
automatic transmission $1 .300
1970 FORD LTD automatic
transmission, air conditioning,
stereo $3,000
1970 FORD LTD air
conditioning, automatic
transmission $2,750
1970 VAUXHALL VICTOR
STATION WAGON 4-door,
standard $800
1970 CHEVROLET PICKUP
$2.000
1970 FORD ESCORT $1.300
1969 BUICK SKYLARK
autorratic transmission, air
conditioning $1,250
1968 FORD FALCON
SPORTS $1,450
1969 MERCURY COUGAR
automatic transmission $1,500
1970 FORD CAPRI standard
$1.000
1969 MERCURY COUGAR
automatic transmission $1,500
1971 DODGE AVENGER
automatic transrnissior
$1.500
1969 FIAT STATION
WAGON standard $350
1969 FORD GALAXIE
automatic transmission, air
,rdn .. iiii,' $1,500
1969 FORD CORTINA
automatic transmission $700
1969 FIAT 124 $600
1968 CORTINA E/C $500
1973 CHEVROLET NOVA
automatic transmission, air
conditioning $4,800
ABC MOTORS
Collins Avenue
Phone 2-1031
OPEN MONDAY TO FRIDAY
8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
SATURDAY 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

C 13462
LINCOLN Continental
engine Al, body in good shape
A/C, 8 track tape, power
steering, windows, brakes. Call
41577 after 6 p.m.

C13379
BLACK CHEVROLET
CAPRICE in excellenL
condition. L J. Knowles, Tel:
58134.
C13467
SAVE $1200 on new 1973
Plymouth Duster Deluxe. Will
Take Trade. $5600. Phone
3-4527 2-8293.
C13474
1960 CADILLAC Convertible
white, all equipped minus
A/C. Best offer. 41476.

C 13480
1973 PONTIAC Firebird, 8
months old. Perfect condition.
Automatic, power steering and
brakes. Factory airconditioned.
Stereo tape player built into
radio. Rally sports wheels.
Beautiful burgundy colour with
white interior. $6000 (ONO).
Phone 24698 daytime.


C13523
HONOUR ROLL
Nassau Christian Academy
Kindergarten Eighth Grade
1973 1974
High Honour (A)

TERM !

Kreiser, David
Pyfrom, Ricardo
Roberts, Tina
Thompson, Stephen
Kreiser, Jonathan
Wright, Eugene
Kay, Lori
Lowe, Jonathan
Kreiser, Danny


TERM I1

Lowe, Pamela
Kreiser, Jonathan
Roberts, Michelle
Kay, Lori
Lowe. Jonathan
Kreiser, Danny


HONOUR (A & B) TERM I
Duncanson, Cherita
Kerr, Kayla
Malcolm, Daron
Moss, Sean
Roberts, Chet
Wells, Giles
Butler, Faith
Collie, Karen
Ferguson, Atwell
Godet. Paula
Hanna, Elston
Isaacs, Deron
Jones, William
Nixon, Jasmine
Sands, Darrin
Burrows, Stephen
Carney. Samuel
Dixon, Viveca
Gardiner, Sharon
Pinder, Ryan
Roberts, Michelle
Rolle, Joseph
Thompson, Alicia
Vanderpool, Brent
Brown, Michelle
Gilbert, Mitzi
Glinton, Larry
Harris, Per
Mills, Mikt.
Smith, Aless-
Thompson, Kirkwood
Braynen, Michelle
Kreiser, Joanna
Sweeting. Forrest
Lowe, Crystal
Ramsey, Andre
Wilson, Maqnola
Cartwright, Rosemarie
Smith, Troy
Fountain, Neil
Kemp, Charles
Thompson. Bonnie
Pinder, Bill
Beckless, Anthony



TERM II
Duncanson, Janet
Lowe, Sherry
Rolle, Marvette
Carney, Daniel
Malcolm, Daron
Roberts, Marie
Watkins, Keely
Blair, Nancy
Butler, Faith
Collie Karen
Godet, Paula
Kreiser, David
Pyfrom, Ricardo
Roberts, Melanie
Sands, Darrin
Thompson. Stehpen
Burrows, Stephen
Carney, Samuel
Gardiner, Sharon
Wright. Eugene
Gates, Brian
Gilbert, Mitzi
Glinton, Larry
Harris, Penny
Smith, Alessa
Smith, Brett
Burrows, David
Gardiner, Michelle
Krerser, Joanna
Sweeting, Forrest
Lowe, Crystal
Huyler, Marlene
Pinder, Bobby
Smith, Troy
Beckless, Anthony
Lewless, Diane
Pinder. Bill

[ DINING GUIDE

C13179
F and S TAKEAWAY
Open daily from 7 a.m.
til 10 p.m. daily
Monday thru. Saturday
Serving all native dishes
Phone 24911


SCHOOLS


C13503
DECALS, Bumper Stickers,
poster s, quantity signs,
quantity printing on plastic
work, metal paper, fabrics etc.
ARAWAK ART. Phone
2-3709, Montrose Avenue.


C13442
FOR ALL your Gardening
needs, trimming; hedging,
pruning, beach cleaning, for
prompt reasonable and
efficient service call 5-7810.

C13498
FOR your building needs and
CRANE hire see:
ISLAND BUILDERS
LIMITED P. O. Box
N-4559 Phone 31671 31672


I TRADE SERVICES I


C13443
SEWING MACHINE
PARTS AND REPAIRS
Island Furniture Co.
P. 0. Box N-4818,
NassauDowdeswell and
Christie Streets
Telephone 21197, 23152


C13390
T.V. ANTENNAS
Boosters for homes,
apartments and hotels
SALES AND SERVICES
Call 5-9404
WORLD OR MUSIC,
Mackey Street
next to Frank's Place.


C 13505 *
QUALIFIED Welders and
Fitters with experience with
API 650 and pipeline work.
Must have up to date test
certificate. Only Bahamiars
need apply to P. 0. Box 5647,
Nassau-

C 13446
SPORTSFISHfERMAN boat
captain. Must have 5 years
experience with diesel engines.
Permanent position. Give full
information: Worldoil, P. 0.
Box N7776, Nassau.
C 13350
MANAGER requited for Out
i-land cottage colony ar.c
marina. Must be full'
experienced in catering
industry and have ability to
train school leavers in catering.
Salary with commission,
commensurate with ability and
experience.
Apply Green Turtle Club, Box
270, Green Turtle Cay, Abaco.

C 13455
ST. MATTHEW'S PARISH
SCHOOL require for twu
months fully qualified t-a-h"rs
for B.J.C., Maths General
Science, Health Science and
Biology. Phone Headmaster
22198.

C6677
INTERNATIONAL MODEL
BEAUTY LTD. and Elegant
Lady Beauty Salon Ltd. in
need of:
1) Experienced MASSEUSE
nad FACIALIST
2) Experienced HAIRSTYL-
IST, capable of doing Tinting,
Bleaching, Frostings and
expertly cut hair.
3) SHAMPOO GIRL
Bahamians only netd apply: P.
0. Box F-775, Freeport or call
352-7041, Mrs. Higgs.

C13519
MAJOR cosmetic compass
requires experienced, (reatieo.
assistant to sales representative.
Business experience essential,
secretarial skills necessary y
Please apply to Mrs. D
Knowles, 32391.

C13517
THE HOME INSURANCE
COMPANY require a qualified
bookkeeper experienced in all
insurance a cc ou nt Inc
procedures and specifically in
claims statistics, treaty and
faculat iv e reinsurance
allocations. Applicant must be
qualified to train accounts staff
in all above phases. Apply by
phoning 2-8802.


L BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES-
C6661
Well established beauty salon
with good following in high
traffic area looking for buyer
at sacrifice price.
For further particulars write
-to: P. 0. Box F-190, Freeport.


HELP WANTED

C66/3
E xpei iened JANITOR for
night duties.
Apply: Box F-2456, Freepoit,
M & J Maintenance. Bahamians
Only

C6675
SURVEYOR
Qualified to piactise inI
L.onmonweialIth Countines .:.dlh
a rinnurim of 8 years
e x per ience in Cadastral,
Hydr.', gra.phic. Topographic and
Cornsti otion SuIveys MoLst tI)e
bible to supei vise othei
Suivevon s and office staff.
Chee-A-Tow & Co. Ltd. P 0
Box F I 08 Telephone
352-7287.


HELP WANTED

C6679
PAYROLL CLERK
Young man to assume
responsibility for payroll and
general accounting duties.
Candidate should have high
school diploma or '0" level
certificate in Maths and
English.
Apply in person to:
Personnel Department,
Bahama Cement Company,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


LEGAL SECRETARY wanted
with at least two years previous
experience preferably in a law
office. Excellent shorthand and
typing skills a must as this
position consists of a heavy
volume of dictation and the
preparing and typing of legal
documents.
Apply to: Callenders, Orr,
Pyfrom & Roberts, 26C
Kipling Building, Freeport
3528311.


"Th


BUSINESS 5 PROFESSIONAL


DIRECTORY


Save Time


bl list It TDlh ti

I [Ill ilt0h 'IF'


ANTENNAS
Island Tv 2-2618

AUTOMOTIVE
Lucas Batteries
Bay Street Garage 2-2434

BODY BUILDING
Wong's Barbel! Club
5-45069
BOOKSTORE
The Christian Book Shop
5-8744
BUILDERS
Richiard'i Cnnstruction 5-7080
BUSINESS FORMS
Executive
Printers 2-4267/5-4011
CAMERAS
Johi F;t:ll 2-4252/3

CARPETS
Lee's Carpet Craft 3.1993

DRAPERIES
Lee's Carpet Craft 3-1993

DRUGS &
PRESCRIPTIONS
McCartney's 5-6068/5-2127
ENTERTAINMENT
Movies I
Film & Equip. Service 2-2157
GARDEN & PET
SUPPLIES
Modernistic Garden
& Pet______ 2-2868
Nassau Garden & Pet
Montrose Avenue 2-4259
HARDWARE
John S. George 2-8421/6
WRECKER SERVICE
Gibson Wrecker
Service
2-8896


U


L -


/


i 1I21I EXT. 5

2 LM hPir tI '


HOUSE PLANS
Evangelos G. Zervos 2-2633
LAUNDRY
DRY CLEANING
New Oriental Laundry
2-4406
LOCKSMITH
Bahamas Lock & Key
2-4591 ext.C147
MEN'S & BOY'S WEAR.
The Wardobe 5-5599

MUSIC
Cody's Records 2-8500

OPTICIANS
Optical Service Ltd. 2-3910/1

PRINTING
Wong's Printing 5-4506
Executive
Printers 2-4267/5-4011

RADIO & T.V. SALES
Carter's Records 2.4711

RUBBER STAMPS
Wong's Rubber Stamp
Co. 5-4506
SPORTS GOODS
Champion Sport Land 2-1862

TRAVEL
Playtours 2.2931/7


R.H.Curry & Co..


2-8681/7


TRUCKING SERVICE
Gonzalez Trucking
3-1562/2-4726
WATER CONDITIONING
Bah. Water Refining


Miracle Water


3-4351

3-4351


&- ________________ & .[


HELP WANTED


HELP WANTED TRADE SERVICE


has the
opportunities
Bahamians to
Oil Refinery:


following job
available for
work at BORCO


3 Field Foremen for
Instrument Installment.
5 Instrument Fitters
5 Pneumatic Line Fitters
5 Electricians for Industrial
Plants.
5 Instrument Engineers
5 Pipe Fitters for Explosive
Works
Applicants should have
previous experience in similar
jobs in oil refineries or
chemical plants. For
information please apply in
writing to: PETROCHEMICAL
1.1. CO., P. 0. Box F-343,
Freeport, G.B.

REAL ESTATE
C6676
THREE APARTMENTS
ON THE BEACH
Two apartments and one
Penthouse, beautifully
f urnished, all two
Bedroom/two bath, duty paid,
recorded', ready for immediate
transfer. $35,000' to $58,000
cash net to seller D'Emilio,
Riviera Towers 373-1902.


FOR RENT CARS FOR SALE


-` ``


1 SAVElu TME1SAV IY

C 13448
THREE BEDROOM upstairs
apartment. Suitable for large
family. Mount Royal Avenue,
Shirley Heights. Call Mrs.
Nottaae c/o 21338.


I I I I I


I


-


. I II -- ----- 9


-


I


I


I


I I


Im


I 1


1


I - - I - w -r- --r-


I-
C6678
LANDSCAPE GARDENER
Qualifications required:
knowledge of Airlayering,
grafting and budding, fertilizer
mixes, equipment
maintenance, five years
experience, written references,
police certificate.
All replies to: P. 0. Box
F-2945, Freeport, G.B.I.

C13525

SAM P. WALLACE
OVERSEAS CORPORATION
HAS THE FOLLOWING
VACANCIES:-

PROCESS PIPING &
INSTRUMENTATION
FITTERS.
Minimum of six years
experience in the construction
of chemical plants or related
industries.
Qu a I ifications require
knowledge and experience in
pharmaceutical or chemical
plant process piping, the use of
PVC, stainless steel,
polypropylene, duriron and
carbon steel pipe, installation
of piping systems by use of
drawings and flow diagrams.
Welding of certain piping
systems, installation of
industrial instrumentation,
knowledge of installation and
commissioning of industrial
refrigeration equipment.
Applicants must be fully
qualified in pipefitting,
plumbing and instrumentation
for installation of all process
systems and related tasks to
include layout, fabrication,
cutting, burning, rigging of
heavy equipment and erection.
Successful applicant must
engage in start-up and
commissioning duties required
for acceptance after
completion of project.
PROJECT MANAGER
Direct the complete
construction of the addition to
a pharmaceutical process plant
Coordinate for logistics,
budgeting and finance.
Minimum of 10 years
experience required.
PROJECT
SUPERINTENDENT
Coordinate all related
tradesmen and subcontractors.
Direct the installation of
process piping, plumbing, fire
deluge system, Pneumatic
controls and HVAC.
Responsible for testing arnd
commissioning for all systems.
Minimum of 10 years
experience required.
CIVIL ENGINEER
(CONSTRUCTION)
Responsible for layout, setting
grade, checking drawings,
contractor logistics related to
structural steel, concrete,
reinforcing steel, and all
general civil work. Minimum of
6 years experience required,
Engineer degree or equivalent
education.
ELECTRICAL ENGINEER
(CONSTRUCTION)
Responsible for electrical
installations; requiring
experience in H.V. and M.V.
equipment. Coordinate the
electrical installation with
subcontractor personnel, check
drawings and related
engineering with design
engineers. Schedule and
prepare logistics data.
Responsible for electrical
testing and commissioning for
all systems. Minimum of 6
years experience required In
the construction field.
Engineer degree or equivalent
education.
CONSTRUCTION (COST
ACCOUNTANT/ANALYST)
Responsible for updating
computer cost print-out.
Project cost record entry.
Related general office
experience required 10
years. Responsible for banking
and related-duties. Certified as
an accountant or equivalent
experience.
Applicants should apply c/o
Syntex Corporation Bahamas
Chemical Division P. 0. Box
F-2430, Freeport, Bahamas.
C6664
PETROCHEMICAL I.I. CO.


GRAND BAHAMA

Classified-
01 f dI
4 I


C13516
VEHICLE SERVICE WRITER
(MALE) ABC MOTORS LTD
Must have these qualities.
Thorough knowledge of all
phases of automotive repair
and maintenance, sober;
ambitious; pleasing personality;
legible handwriting. Paid
holidays, uniforms and many
other fringe benefits. Call Mr.
Williams at 2-1031.

C 13496
DEPOSIT arid Foreign
exchange Dealer required.
Appointment will be that of
senior dealer and will involve
responsibility for smooth
operation of existing money
functions. It will also involve
participation in development
of new areas of business and
supervision of professional
development of existing team
of young but enthusiastic
deposit dealers. Salary
commensurate with experience
and qualifications. Although
aqe is not a limiting factor, the
ideal candidate will be in his
late twenties or early thirties
and will have had a minimum
of five years deposit and/or
foreign exchange experience in
a major money center.
Previous 9e eral banking
experience wouldd be a distinct
advantage as would be
knowledge of a second major
language. Qualified candidates
invited to submit written
resumes of educational
background qualifications and
experience to World Banking
Corportion Limited, P. 0. 3ox
N-100, Nassau.

TRADE SERVICES

C13391

ftlndr; Ceuoms

B2rokLera dLtd.
Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU. BAHAMAS
P. O. BOX N3714
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE:2-3795, 2-3796
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 7-7434
FREE ESTIMATES


FOR TIC ATI Vol WANT



Shop Nassau Me chants

For Business And Services


i- I I


I


.I


I .


Ism


--- ~~~ ~


b.
"7-












Monday, February 11, 1974.


_b Urbin


SKing F .atur Syadicate Inc.,1974. World right rmserved. 2 I
"The boss called it either 'Wilson's crazy idea' or
'Crazy Wilson's idea.' Anyway, he doesn't like it."


Broth 2- Ju


Brte Jpe


"Nothing to it.

"ROSSWORD
PUZZLE
ACROSS 25 Butcher's pin
1. Hirsute 29. Sun god
6. March date 30. Star facet
10. Beebread 31. Simple sugar
11. Large pill 33. Literary
13. Ransacked initials
14. Starred lizard 36. Mythical bird
15 Mrs. Lindbergh 37. Large tub
16. Sea bird 38. Absent S
18. Baking pit 39 Solo
19. Recolor 41. Dangerous
20. Digit 43. Weather
21. Clove hitch satellite
22. Three-toed 44. Field of work
sloth 45. Salamander


Thyr m It Gv.

"^ M 9HI E




L sEA 8E EVA
TETE D fT


Eager to ty the Jolly $folly, RUpert runs all
S wy to the mansion where Ma lives, lHe
ghis little chum alone in the* garden,
downcast as she wnders along the paths.
" Oh, hulo Rupert," *h'; I "' came out
for a wat b use my rnW Is gloomier
tMan ever today. t%* s expect his Aofln
to oan." t a few moments Rupert has told


lbQm3~1IR


Chess
By LEONARD BARDEN


Black's last move in this actual
play position from a master
tournament was . R-Kt5
attacking two white pawns. On
the other hand; White is rook
for knight ahead in the diagram.
With White to move, what
should be the result ?
Par times: 10 seconds, chess
master or expert: 30 seconds.
county player, 2 minutes, club
standard: 5 minutes, average:
10 minutes, novice.


Chess Solution
White wins by force with 1
RxRP chi KtxR; 2 RxKt ch,
K-BI:; 3 RxB, KxR; 4 BxP
ch, K moves; 5 BxR with a
bishop ahead.


Mary about the wonderful holly. It's made
my Mummny and Daddy happy," he says. "Try
hanging a piece indoors and it might make
your grandfather more cheerful." But he
wouldn't allow it," says Mary. Unless-yes,
we could hide it somewhere, couldn't we ?
Then he wouldn't know I "
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


Winning

Bridge
By VICTOR MOLLO
QUIZ
Dealer North: N/S Vul:
North
A A52
K K32
0 AK432
4 76
SOUTH
SK7643
Q AQ
0 Q5
S A 1098
North

3
South
3
3
6*
The bidding is venturesome, to
say the least, but West doesn't
find the killing club opening and
3n the lead of the VJ the con-
tract isn't so unreasonable. How
should South play to give him-
self the best chance?
ANALYSIS: Trumps must break
3-2 or there's no hope. If the
diamonds split 3-3 all is well,
but that's too much to expect.
Declarer can greatly improve his
chances by taking two rounds of
diamonds and ruffing a dia-
mond, before touching trumps.
Again, if the diamonds are 3-3,
there's no problem, but now
declare brings home his con-
tract even if they are 4-2, .so
long as the defender who is
short in diamonds has the three
trumps.
West
SQ 109
( J 10 9 8
S7 6
4 KJ32
East
4 J 8
V 7654
0 J 10 9 8
If est overruffs, the *5 is an
entry to the long diamond. If
he doesn't, South takes two
rounds of trumps, ending in
duanmy, and leads diamonds
discarding clubs till West ruffs.


t | 1 L; I I I

No. 7.348 by TIM McKA 0
Across
1. Boxer learns It. (4-5)
9. Best possible. (5)
11. Unexuressed ambition. (, 4) M
12. Cuts In two. (a) L
13. RIders' track. <(. 3)
14. Endplete.- (4)
16, Jewish preacher. (5)
19. Went into rapturme (5)
*i. SIgn of zodiac.
23. Thought. (4)
24. Paddles. (4)
25. Declare inalslity to bld. (4)
M(. Grind teeth together. (5)
Down
1. Along the Thames, perhaps.
0). 4)
"' Amertcan State. (5)
:4. ('Canteraman's tens. 9)
4. Old France. (4)
l: Wll-tIrailed canine. (6, 3)
i. Hi alitail naine. (4)
O. oerdresmed types. (4)
8. linoluntiin nerve s move-
ments (3. 6) U
o0. Invitation Is given to
drinkers to say It. (4) 5
13. NM e a -
(4) 1 a S7SI V 0

n .Man i
aser g er. A D
to. tr I'
na. ae i
22. Age. .43) svi.ai "otea&


.__ ~ __


CARROLL RIGHTER'S

HOROSCOPE
from the Carroll Righte Institute
GENERAL TENDENCIES: Some curious
influences are in operation so take no chances
where others are concerned But with a cooperative and
conventional attitude, you can achieve much of value and get
the unwavering support of others
ARIES (Mar 21 to Apr 19) Be conscientious where your
duties are concerned for a better understanding with
associates. Don't upset present set-up because of restless
influences
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Forget that notion to
redecorate your surroundings in an ultra-modern manner and
stick to the more conventional Improve health.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) New horizons open, so start
making plans in an intelligent, efficient manner Surprise mate
with a lovely gift Think prosperity
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Show devotion at
home, then you can handle any situation that arises. Make
repairs that add to charm and comfort of home
LEO (July 22 to Aug 21) You can accomplish much today
provided you are most careful in motion and in conversations.
Don't lose your temper with mate in p m
VIRGO (Aug 22 to Sept 22) Study for wise investments. A
fast-talking person should be avoided or you could lose some
of your assets. Have fun tonight socially
LIBRA (Sept 23 to Oct 22) Assert yourself and speak the
truth bluntly today for right results Don't be crooked with
anyone, or you would regret it later
SCORPIO (Oct 23 to Nov 21) Don't waste time on gossip
One who supports you secretly can help you attain some
cherished aim now Keep active
SAGITIARIUS (Nov 22 to Dec 21) Show loyalty to allies
who have been helpful and honest with you instead of being
taken in by an overly glamorous person.
CAPRICORN (Dec 22 to Jan. 20) Do public or career work
that makes your life far more prosperous and meaningful
Don't try to go back on responsibilities.
AQUARIUS (Jan 21 to Feb. 19) Ideal day to investigate
new outlets Avoid fast talkers with eye on your assets who
want to con you into something unfavorable
PISCES (Feb 20 to Mar 20) Study collections and debts
and go after the former first, then improve credit. Being
straight-shooting with mate can bring fine results
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY. he or she will get
excellent results if active in some constructive outlet, but can
get into big trouble if going in the wrong direction Teach
early to have will power Be sure to give right religious
training, sports, kood food,and praise for whatever is done that
is outstanding There is a quality of leadership that soon
manifests itself and great promise is in this chart
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU'


By Alex Kotzky


STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders


& overgardI


I


V


Yle Comic Page



REX MORGAN, DMD. By DAL CURTIS

IT' ALMOST NOON / STA ICOME TO THINK OF IT, I
WILL 4AVE LEFT AND THE I1SENT THAT LETTER TO
THIS IS DR CARfTER/ I'LL SE MAIL SHOULD BE THERE 'MISFFICE

WILL TAKE MY CALLS UNTIL


APARTMENT 3-G


ITARGET


--~- -------


Ohr X Zributtp


A-73L J6 ILA JL V J6 ^V -













12 Zihe' Gribttur


Volleyball





teams beat





the best

By GLADSTONE THURSTON


THI BAHAMAS'S men and
ladies national volleyball teams
under the coaching superisionT
of (;ene Seli/nick have virtually
proven tlienselves chalpi aponss
in tihe Region Six ) D sioln
Up against 28 ofI the lop
teams in the 1(nited States, the
Bahamarr s dcsixvely aplit ed
the mnlen's 'A'. 'B' ar- d lidle
championship in Satiiirldri 's
Seminoles \'ollcs lall
I n itational tourrailni inl
Iort L.auderdale, I hlida
It was the tirst lime in I our
sears that the mren's \'
d Vision captured tihe
championship. Having lost to
nine \cars region chamilps St
Petersburg in divisional pla>.
the Bahamianri ain tie trials
took tile first gamIe 1)-14 arId
the second 15-1.
"I don't think an\hod\ is
going to make there Ballal!ia
team afraid againn" beamnCd
team rmanrager l)r Nornianr
(;ad "'Now lihes kInos the\
can w'in arid it I bhig
dilferen e l'et'\\Cween seeing tihe
potential, having the potlnt!.l
and then having that potentic ul
reallsed


Led by team captain Ralph
Burrows the 'B' squad
continued the rally and xwon
their title undefeated, Thec
beat Tlanmpa 15-1 1. ,Bresard
S5-12. (Col I 5-4. (Como 1 5-(.
and Winter Park 15-3.
With stellar ottence compiling
frotnL ke\ spikers Kerin Rolle.
I ubert Willanw and \Iark
('larke' cont inuied illn the
plav ol s witli victories over
Brevard 15-I and 15-. hbeore
stopping Seminole 1 5-n and
15-~

lhe ladies who are presently
defending Region Six champs,,
also went through their
division undefeated. In the
semi-finals, they stopped
foriner champs irallin(i Golds
15-6 and 15-9 before topping
Jacksonville I 5-9 and 15-9
going g into the Cent ra
American anid ('anrhbean
(;ames later this month., the
Bahamas can expect that thr'se
two teams carn make thecn
presence tel We plan it bring
back a medal in ltear sport in
the menl armi women dlik so,
said Dr Ga\


W-.


4.: *

















National side's Bert Laing dribbles past Select XI defender in Saturday's trial game.


Knight hat-trick could clinch



squad's games trip


I


Ilhe Select XI closed the gap
to 3-1 five minutes into the
second half through a penalty
from Mihas.
But the diminutive P'ace
Nunez, made it 4-1 in the 52nd
minute scoring from a free
kick and Laing(55th min I aind
Stewart (80th min.) ensured a
convincing win for the
Nat ionals.
National coach Dick Wilsoni
pleased with his side's


performance, commented after
the game: "I and the players
would be very disappointed it
we didn't go to the games now.
today y we proved to the
committee thai we have
iunproved as a teal since the
first trial game two weeks ago
and with more games we will
improve even more as 'he
play ers build tip an
understanding between onet
another."


PARIS .\ man who kno\
a lot about boxing whispered
in Jose Napoles' ear last June
that he could win the
middleweight title
Wrong iuce, the expect rnowi
sas ( arlos Moi/ono could take
away Bobh oster's world light
heavy\ weight championship
The counsel cornes', troI m
Angelo Dundle, the cutl man 1ir ii
Napoles' cornet Saturd.i\ iho
raised his hand toI sto( p the
tight atlcr the sixth round.
With his right eye near
l )seCd. tihe Mexican
weIlterweight champion had


I ( N I)()N results in
Hrlntish sin er league gai eS
I N ( ,I IS11 I I \ I c' cI

trdlll r\ lt l Paic la' p p ed
igr 'und it N a ierlrc', d i
stt'hrrr'it llc lc c l-tpmr edc
\Proton l \l ^ ,l 1n I ti rres 1 I




ir cll l i I' l l 't 1' '1c i th I
"'ccrit i 'c\lit"< 1 ci c


taken an almost tnniilianti'
one-sided beating troiai m.i
who had a two year a l\lnti ric
over him in n iouth, tie inrch'es
in reach and more than si,\
pounds in weight.

Diundt ee, who train' i
Moihaimmad All. said: "I a.diiut
I nevei sasw MOM1/1on ight li
before. I don't know now who ti,
could heat him lie's a reil
outstanding champion and he's
such a big middleweight that I
think lie could heat Bob I'oster
who hasn't looked tooi good
lately.


ivsision I o)ur:
i:!i .l,,rdt 4 1 i n oln 0
Shisttr I I Darlingion 0
Illi)imiliam 3 Hartlepvoo o
\lanii t'eld iI' reisi' 2
I'readinig 4 I \eter
S.thtrhTmiri Nt'\port I
s, itlilirp'' 1 Norttiilr pc icn 2
S[, . I rqwroii c 't'r' i rc.i ll (pi istpintir
'A, rkinil. .n l t).iic icaslcr 1

"t I 1 I ,!t I \i 1
I II I 1 ( l ,


Aldora is racing Valentine


\LI)(OR\ KNOWLES
(pictured) a 19-year-old
bookkeeper tN pist of the
Home Insurance was named
today to reign at Miss
Valentine of Hobby Horse
Race T rack bi Garth Kemp.
general manitger
Miss knowsles was chosen
from a iniintber of contestants
who submitted their names
and photos to racing
In a11 ag el elt for their
selectin ll
She will preselit the winner
of the Valentine's Day Cup
race with a trophN tomorrow,
;it the end of the feature race.
Ht Fr Imeasurements are
14-25 37
She is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs Christie Knowles of
South Beach states,

1 i'e ip li ton111ion 'c
racing lat Hob Horse track
Isl ) 4 i rhlo ies,
I 1iss I tll c 1 1
,2 t cr pl te linage I 1ii
l Itheah Hl mi nin 1 16
it I r a \ 1\ I i i t
5 .Ilm I I r I 1 t
Spanish Jtiis n I i

t I rrilll vli I It

I 1st II l- rlue l S ri.e Sugar II .


2n1d <(aiLe I uriirigIs
(Cl I s 11 3 3 1 lt l ri ngS er n 1 i,
4 (i lili.Is .,ikt' 1 il
'I Sirlctl\ 11 6
. \ric s 1 14
7 (,itinigis Klan 1 14
I I tille KRier 114
)i iunlg i iuamian I I
Also F gible I ive hv I tve I 14
3rdn Rine 5 I urhiigs

I lamiun I 165
2 Reai News 1 16
3 Stillrtto 120
4 Roi)al Mail 1 16
5 Magm D eor 16
( Wrintilester 1I 7
7 Annie Hell 116
8. I a Negrn Sueth 1 16


4 Able Sugar
5 t ti",p
6 tile Bad
7. Mania Brice
- Chilme's Sing
4. Flusive Nu)NN


4th ,rui 4'si I urlmngs
2 'Sea, I cr

4 I :nlit Mairnii
5 I amniette Dial)
6 I)rink N' I)rims
7 1 ecsel
K. lend tleuti
'4 \% ai l A\ liil<
Sisc1 I lglhlie I)ruc i ,irl
5th Raen )1 I uriings
1 Knightl Manner
2 N exi'u i)i,
3 I link lre
4. I 'ulsar
15 I hrl
r I ri)ule Mnaker
7 (. ,, Ihlli (,(
il. '\[mnhtl '
' 1 orest I ire iI

6ii Rcice 4c: 1 urliongs
I tier teel
2. Sun I iger
3 *\nir/iiglv
4 Dtialiiiidl
q ('iiiudai's H<>B)
6.I iI Will
7. Mtelin's liken
(Misih Star)
8. Jan Sirsilus
(Roial I \press)
9. Stagerl,
7th Race 5 I urlongs
I. ,(i) Sugar
2. Nobod, 's Business
3. Soullhern I lame


114
114
S 18
14
14
I 14
I 1b




114
I1i



Its
1 14
1 I1
120
I IS


113

113
113



115




114
119


Sth PRike 4' : I urinmits
I. lad\ 's Luck II5
2 Illel itl lntr 1 i8
3. Red Pigg l Bank 1 15
4. Red ,uiinei 11
5 L ti -.x 1 in 1i Is
6 t)itlrissa i IS
7. Slip' -\SMs\ Ix
S 1 tiltle liger 115
9. Step li me 1I S
\lsi I eligible Si Deiar i 5
Res tlls u iti puscctis
1. I a,,. Sigh t (7 (1 C Muiiinrm s
S 30.75, i6.)6 0, .3 10
2. i ruble Iire (2 1 illt.
'Saundiier ,4 40. -3 20
3. the Stranger (91 1 lirin
s2 90
SI O()NI i t 1 I irliigs
I I imlnh i ueen (4 \it
Scrurnders \s0 15. '2 di. 12 "4
2 ,alil l e (3) S i 5 Neit
3 0( ; 2 '2 5
I uck I 1 itn (2) 1. Itin
13 O D )ilt, D,,uhie (7 8) '7 05
I first (Quinella ( 3 8) Si ,65
I lRI) R c lI 4'; I urlongs
I lI( Rider (1) (; Serchxl ell
2t(, 45. 16 20, 53 75
2 Southern I larned 2) N
S'eetiing '.4 40, $3 10
3 Able Sugar (4) J. lirten
S3 20
.,eiond Q)uinella ( 1 2) $21 MO
I) it'I SRAC I 4'i Furlongs
SI)reanm (irl (6) P Nexw bold
$12.5. $645. $340
2 China Doll (2) II nWoodiside
$2.50. S3.50
3 Miss Pumipkin (81) C.
Muniilings $ 2.75
Ihi urd uinella (2 6) $16.15
1I1 IH RAIt 9 I furlongs
1 ,rest l ire II (b) ) A.
Saunuders $4.60. $2.80, $2.50
2. Drink Iin Draw (5) (;. Baiin
55.55, $3 30
3 lamette Dial (2) I. Sturrup
$2.05
I ,urtlli Quinelli ( 5-6) $10.00
SIX IH RA( I 5 lfurlungs
1 Iher Aenger (1) J. Bain
$3.6r. S2.7. $2.80
2 Bhinsi (8) K. Johnson
$ 3.60o. 3 360
3 Dait 1 ike tDat (2) A. Gibbs
$9I.50
I iifth Quiinella (1 8) $12.05
St VI NTH RAC" -- 4'' t furlongs
1 Brother John (1) G. Bain
$6.10, $ 3,9S, $3,45
2 (,o News (7) J. lHorten
54.40. $2 70


Il F1- N\W IProvidence
divisionn ot the Bahamas ( lI
Association begin their junior
programme this Saturdl i
morning 9) o'clock with a clinic
and a tournament at Iliet
Sonesta Beach Golf Course.
This year, like last, tihe
B.(.A. is expected to send
possibly two juniors to ihe
Arnold Palmer tGolf AcadelnII.
Last ,ear, jtiniol chainpion
Vernon Lockhartl i s awarded
the scholarship.
Going into this ear's
session, I ric (ibson Jr. leads
with 13 points, followed hy
Dwayne Hepburn with 12 and


Mike Rolle with 11
This week's tournament will
he a best hall event with
iuntiors aild seniors teamrled
together. lHowever, the results
will nrot count towards the
(;lt Academy scholarship.
Following that on Sunday\ at
the Soonesta Beach wiill be the
B.(;.A.'s lirst regcilai
tournament tIe Williamn
Brewer 'sBecks Best ball.
This event onie oIf ihe
mant tuon events scheduled hI
the New Providence Division
will be a stahlelord (par points)
partnership tournament.


Monday, February 11, 1974.




Saints
stop



Heastie's

88-80
S NOEL RAHMING scored a
team high of 18 points and
captured 11 rebounds while
B.A.B.A. all-star forward
Kermit Rolle added 17 points
and snatched 16 from the
boards as the Nassau League
leading Container Saints
stopped Heastie's Supersonics
88-80 Saturday.
This victory gave the Saints
a wholesome 15 and three
record and a one game lead
over the second place
defending champs Becks
Cougars.
Reef Basketball Club hold
third, four games back with an
I 1I and seven record with
'" Rodgers Basketball Club in
fourth.
Central Avengers take on
Nassau League pennant
winners the Collegians in the
final regular scheduled junior
league game. Superwasb
Arawaks meet Bain Town in
'* the senior game at 8:30.
(..X At the A. F. Adderley
S(;- iym, the Classic Pros play the
Fox Hill Nangoes in the second
game at 8:30. Budweiser Eagles
S meet Pabst Brewers in the first
game.

NASSAUL LAGUI STANDINGS
Saints 15 3
Cougars 14 4
Reef 1 1
Rodgers 4
Pinders 9 8
Arawaks 6 1(
Supersonics 5 1.
Biain Town 0 1'


U PARADISI l- A(;l'

Strachan 's
SColonels
John Bull
Warriors
Police
Andy Gantine-Select XI. Nnngoes
Schlit/


S IAND)ING
W L
14 3
14 4
13 S
1 7
10 9
5 12
3 14
0 16


NOTICE

St. Augustine's C(ollege's Entrance
Examination will he held on Friday, February
22 at 9 a.m. at the College. Students who
have not received a Form through their school
may pick one up at the College from
February 10 to February 14. All Forms must
be returned to the college by February 18th.
There will be an Entrance Fee of $5 per
student and all applicants MUST be 11 years
of age by September 1974.


GATES OPEN11i.30a.m.


POST TIME 1.15p.m.

1111i IIl IAI I IIAll INAY


IAIIT 11110(1 ist k720IACLI
AID IIIUFIIAS

GOVERNMENT SUPERVISED PARIMUTUEL
BETTING.
COMFORTABLE AIR CONDITIONED DINING
ROOM & BAR OVERLOOKING THE TRACK.


Dundee tips Monzon


Junior golf programme


__ I I I I I ~


-----. -


- r ---


By IVAN JOHNSON
ill1 SPECIAL Olympic
(om'nittee. headed by Mr
Arlington Butler, will put
soccer fans and players out of
their misery when it announces
tomorrow whether the national
soccer side will be sent to
represent the Bahamas in the
upcoming Central American
and Caribbean games.
The national side has toiled
under the watchful e\e of the
committee, Arlington Butler,
Dr Lawerence Dav is and
Dl)c ard Knowles throughout
three trial games against a
Select XI
[he side won the first two
games 1-0 and 2-1. [he
\ i stores were not over
convincing and a third and
final trial was held last
Saturday.
On Saturday the nationals
finall, clicked into top gear
and cruised to a 6-I victor.
(:p until Saturday there wasa
speculation that unless the
nat ilonal side could produce a
resounding win against the
Select XI the\ wsvould be denied
the trip to the gaines by the
committee.
S \ f t er Sa turd a 's
performance Mr. Butler and his
advisors would be hard pushed
to turn down the application
,t the side for a trip to the

I he national side dominated
throughout the game as striker
Colin Knight scored a fine
hitl.ri k in the first halt
Knight s goals came in tirhe
lUth. 2"'th and 37th mintites.


U K SCCER ESULT