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 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03711

Full Text








A REMINDER TO
CUSTOMERS
PLEASE COLLECT YOUR REPAIRED
ITEMS IMMEDIATELY!!


SDUDLEY'S ROYAL AVE


clu


ritbutw


Rcsgi.tered with Postmaster of Bahamas for postale conceulons within the Bahamas) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


VOL. LXXI, No. 57 Wednesday, January 30, 1974. Price: 15 Centa


MARSH HARBOUR murder
accused Leroy Nicholas Key,
47, who yesterday told a
supreme court jury that he
fatally shot his sister-in-law in
the face and chest during an
argument was unanimously
acquitted of the murder charge
this afternoon.
But, the jury, headed by Mr.
Matthew Sawyer returned a
guilty manslaughter verdict
with a same finding.
Mr. Justice Maxwell
Thompson, hearing the case
against the Abaco carpenter
who was arrested by police
officers two days after the
shooting on September 28 last
year remanded Key in custody
for sentencing later.
The judge adjouined the
matter sine die and requested
that a report of the accused be
prepared.
Key, who yesterday testified
in his own defence, was
represented by attorney Cay
Gottleib. lie had pleaded not
guilty to the murder charge of
intentionally shooting Mrs.
Minerva Key, his sister-in-law
and a mother of ten children.
to death.
Key, during his testimony,
told the court that he was a
sick man. He was prone to
being very nervous and plagued
with terrible headaches at
times. A traffic accident 15
years ago had caused him to
suffer serious head and back
injuries, Hie also said that he
had seen psychiatrists for
treatment on occasions.
He testified that prior to the
ho- g h} gone to 'uis
brother's home and told his
sister-in-law that her children
had emptied a load of garbage
on his property instead of
taking it to the refuse pit. Hie
said he asked her to have them
remove it by 5 p.m.
The garbage was never taken
away as he had asked and
around 7 p.m., he said he put
the garbage in his wheel-barrow
and took it down to his
brother's home. Hie showed it
to his sister-in-law and he said
she threw it into a road which
led to his property.


SEVEN PERSONS, one of
them an employee of
Barclays Bank International,
were charged in Freeport
Magistrate's Court yesterday
in connection with the
January 18 hold-up of the
Queen's Highway branch of
Barclays at Freeport.
Eddie Thomas, 20, a bank
clerk, was charged before
Magistrate Kenneth
McAllister with abettment of
the robbery and a second
count of dishonestly receiving
$9,420 in Bahamian currency
and $7,715 in U.S. currency,
all allegedly part of the
money taken by two armed
and masked bandits.
Also charged in connection
with the robbery were two
women Virginia Outten,
29. and Gloria Turnquest,
26. James Turnquest,
believed to be a relative of
Gloria, was also charged along
with Solomon Hanna, 68;
Ezekiel Baillou, 28, an
unemployed accountant and
Isaiah Colebrooke, a
32-year-old mechanic.
Baillou and Colebrooke are
accused of holding up
Barclays Bank employee
Yvonne Spence and robbing
her of $70,855 in Bahamian
currency and $21,010 in U.S.
currency, representing bank
funds.
Colebrooke was further


PLASTIC

PARSONS
TABLES


NASSAU FREEPORT


"She told ne all kinds of
bad things," he said. He told
the court that he had also
taken the gun with him "to
frighten her" and after she told
him that "the only property
you got is in your pants," he
shot her twice.
Key said that he owned two
guns and when he took the gun
with him, he never intended
shooting his brother's wife. He
told the jury he took the
loaded gun because it was the
first one he put his hands on
when he thought he would
take it and frighten the
deceased.
He told the court that he
used to get along fine with his
sister-in-law before the
incident. It was in fact his idea
that his brother should leave
Nassau and live at Abaco, he
said.
Key said he got his brother
to move to Abaco when he
advised him to build a house
for his family. Htie allowed his
brother the land and also
worked free of charge on his
brother's house.
Key's wife, Ginny, however
said that although she never
visited her brother-in-law's
home, she had nothing against
the deceased.
But in her testimony, she
referred to the deceased as
being a "very nasty woman"
who was "loud" and had a lot
of men at her house quite
fi qluentll which "gave me
ideas about why they were
there."
They lived a short distance
- 5r ... lut said, but .he told the
court that she never called on
Mrs. Key because once, "my
son went to her home and she
asked him to come in through
the back door. When her kids
came to my house, I always let
them in through the front."
But, she maintained to the
court that they had a sound
relationship and used to speak
to each other.
Mrs. Key also told the court
that her husband underwent a
change in behaviour shortly
after his brother arrived at the
island with his wife and family.


charged with dishonestly
receiving $6,121 in Bahamian
currency and $807 in U.S.
currency.
They were remanded in
custody without bail pending
a hearing on February 8 at 3
p.m.
Outten, James Tumrnuest
and Hanna were charged with
dishonestly receiving $12,300
in Bahamian currency and
$905 in U.S. currency.
Gloria Turnquest was
charged separately with
abettment in dishonestly
receiving stolen property -
$ 2 100 in Bahamian
currency and $905 in U.S.
currency.
She, with Outten, Hanna
and Turnquest were granted
bail of $2,000 cash each and
will also appear February 8.
No bail was set in the case
of accused bank employee
Thomas.

CAR PRIZE
Mr. and Mrs. Trevor Kelly
have donated a Dodge Avenger
car which is to be the first
prize in the Humane Society
raffle during the month of
February.
The Society had appealed to
civic-minded citizens to donate
a car for the raffle.
But the Society are still in
need of ticket sellers. Anyone
who is interested to help may
call Mrs. John Kenning
(chairman of the raffle
committee); Mrs. Jennie
Mackey (chairman of private
sales section); Mrs. Kendal
lsaacs, Mrs. Pat McCarthy, Mrs.
Mary Stevenson, Mr. and Mrs.
Donald Brogdon, Mrs. Bernard
Thompson, Inspector Jack
Rycroft and Mrs. Trevor
Marshall.


UP goes el4

By NICKI KELLY
FOR THE second time in a month the
Bahamas Electricity Corporation is being
forced to add a second surcharge because of
steadily increasing fuel prices.
The Corporation announced today that a
0.5 cents per unit surcharge is to be added on
All billings based on meter readings taken after
January 31.
This surcharge, to be shown on the account
as a separate item below the standard tariff
charges, is in addition to an earlier surcharge of
0.5 cents per unit added to all bills after
January 1.
On October 31 BEC announced a 16 per
cent rate increase, again because of fuel costs,
and has since then been forced to .aake two
other upward adjustments stemming from the
international energy crisis.
The most recent surcharge of 0.5 cents


ectricity for second time in a month


covers the additional cost of fuel up to the
price of $50 per long ton for Automotive
Diesel Oil, the Corporation's principal fuel.
The fuel surcharge clause provides that this
amount shall with the Minister's consent, be
increased by the amount of 0.046 cents per
unit for each increase or decrease of $1 above
or below $50 per long ton.
The BEC statement said the surcharge will
be fixed each month and will be based upon
the fuel price; in effect three months earlier.
There is, however, a restriction in the clause
that limits the increase in any one month to
0.25 cents.
BEC chairman Preston Albury pointed out
that the price of fuel oil has increased
"alarmingly" over the past four months.
"Whereas the fuel surcharge clause was
based upon a fuel price of $50 operative
November 1, 1973. the price at December 1


increased to $62.30 and the Corporation has
just been advised that the price from January 1
is $98.76."
As a result of the December I increase the
Minister has approved surcharge increases of
0.25 cents on March 1 and a further 0.25 cents
on April 1.
Mr. Albury explained that the fuel price
increases arise from increases in "host
government take" increases in taxation
imposed by the oil producing countries
which, under the terms of its fuel oil contract.
the Corporation has to bear.
"Ever since the oil producing countries
started increasing taxes more than three years
?go all fuel supply contracts make provision
for passing on the increases to the purchaser."
he said.
"If the Corporation did not have a long-term


Police: We're







beating crime


wave

THE ROYAL Bahamas Police Force, despite having to contend
with a massive manpower shortage, has already begun to dampen
the wildfire of recent crime and is hoping to snuff it out within
six weeks, according to Commissioner Salathiel H. Thompson.
Street robberies in the Cable Beach, City, Paradise Island and
Montagu areas, where tourists were the main victims, have been
virtually "wiped out" since the re-institution of foot patrols on a
large scale three weeks ago, he said.
Mooile patrols of armed police officers are limiting the
activities of gangs of armed youths in densely populated areas.
The detective work of the Criminal Investigation Department,
together with foot patrols have begun and will hopefully
complete within six weeks the rounding up of youths between
the ages of 17 and 25 who are known to be largely responsible for
the crime wave, Mr. Thompson told The Tribune.


Meanwhile, the
Commissioner is having to
resort to a number of measures
to alleviate, the Force's
crippling under-staffing:
administrative personnel has
been streamlined and the
34-man world-famous Police
Band has been itL'mp.[.tlr. \
broken up to add to the
Force's crime prevention
capability.
Mr. Thompson blamed the
crime wave on rising drug
usage, coupled with the
unwillingness of Bahamians
!fenler.ally to take available
work outside their own
job-preferences.
In an hour-long,
comprehensive interview with
the 55-year-old Commissioner
in his office at Force
Headquarters on East Street
this morning, Mr. Thompson
discussed the outbreak of
crime of all sorts in recent
months, police action to
combat the sudden rise in
criminal activity, and the
Force's problems relating to
recruiting and public
assistance.
The interview with the
Commissioner projected an
image of a soft-spoken, calm
and capable man quietly
dealing with a difficult
situation and willing to discuss
that situation with complete
frankness.
But there were two areas he
would not talk about: the
effectiveness of the courts as
crime deterrents, and the effect
on crime of intervention by the
Committee for the Prerogative
of Mercy.
Although in the recent crime
wave the public eye has
focused mainly on bank
robberies, murders and rapes,
police have also had to fight
against soaring incidents of
break-ins, thefts, hold-ups in
the streets, gang beatings and
other crimes.
CID in both New Providence
and Freeport have in the last
few days left little question in
anyone's mind as to their
ability to deal with the
spectacular crimes. Numerous
arrests have been made of
persons to be tried later for
many of the robberies and
murders.
Mr. Thompson today
focused on what the Force is
doing about the lesser crimes
that affect more people.
He said that all over the


By MIKE LOTHIAN

world, including the Bahamas,
police have been reducing foot
patrols and substituting with
mobile patrols.
"Personally, I have always
contended that the beat system
is by far the best method of
policing. While a mobile patrol
can cover a larger area, it
doesn't give you the same kind
of detection capability," he
said. "The copper on mobile
couldn't possibly be as
knowledgeable about his area
as if he were on foot."
However, Mr. Thompson
said, he hesitated to move
quickly back to foot patrolling
after he became Commissioner
seven months ago, because
policemen, having become
accustomed to the
sophistication and relative ease
of mobile patrols, would have
been "disgruntled" if they
were told to walk a beat again.
"Fortunately, the energy
crisis has given me a good plug,
a good excuse and I have
brought in foot patrolling."
Because foot patrols
required extra men the Force
has been unable to obtain
through recruiting, "I have
streamlined the 8 to 5 staff
working in administrative
areas, and I have broken up the
band and put them on foot
patrols."
He said foot patrolling was
re-introduced three weeks ago,
and the bandmen were added
to the patrolling staff two
weeks ago.
He said the band would not
be available for performances
until the crime situation
improves, and although the
band members will eventually
be going back to their
instruments, "foot patrolling is
here to stay as far as I'm
concerned."
As an additional measure.
designed specifically to combat
the nocturnal bands of roving
youths armed with assorted
weapons, including knives and
firearms, two senior officers
have been taken out of their
administrative posts and put in
charge of two groups of
policemen who spend each
night constantly patrolling the
island. The senior officers are
constantly armed, he said, and
firearms for other officers in
the special duty groups are


i .
Commissioner Thompson ... 'Six weeks and they'll all be
behind bars'


kept in the four patrol cars
they use each night.
He said because of the
manpower shortage, he has had
to limit extensive
foot-patrolling to the business
sections of the City and other
areas frequented by tourists. In
the residential areas,
particularly over-the-hill.
mobile patrols are still carrying
the main burden of crime
prevention, although there are
two "small" areas over-the-hill
also covered by officers on
foot.
"We have curtailed street
robberies," Mr. Thompson
said, "and we have wiped out
theft in the hotel areas in Cable
Beach, Montagu Beach,
Paradise Island and the City."
Mr. Thompson said he was
certain that the crime wave
would fall off "when I have
been able to get behind bars
quite a lot of youngsters who
we know about and are Just
waiting to catch.
Although reluctant to make
any predictions, the
Commissioner told Ihe
Tribune: "I would say that I
am hoping that within six
weeks I would have them all
behind bars. We are doing verN
well now. Progress is good
since this new patrolling
system was started."
Mr. Thompson said he was
convinced that the drug
problem was "the principal
cause" of the crime wave, and
of the violence involved.
He said most of the arrests
already made indicate that
youths between 17 and 25
years are primarily responsible
for the rising crime rate.
He said the youths need
money to buy marijuana and
to pay for all their other
entertainments and "flashy
clothes," and as thev
"wouldn't work for hell," the
only way they can get the
money, he said, is through
crime.
He stressed that in his view
the joblessness of the youths
was not the result of a lack of
opportunity generally, but the
lack of job opportunities in the
fields they want to enter.
"You find chaps who
because they would like to
work in a hotel and there are
no jobs in the hotels they


wouldn't accept a job in any
other area.
t'he carpenter who gets a
white-collar job and then
can't have that white-collar job
doesn't want to go back to
being a carpenter."
And even if there are no
other jobs, he said, the people
in question would refuse to
work at gardening or any other
menial task.
lHe said that although there
are not enough jobs on the
island for everyone, a lot of
people who are out of work
could find employment but
refu-se to do so unless it is on
their terms.
Mr. Thompson added that
the police "are not getting the
assistance from the public we
should be able to get '"
Part of the problem, he said.
was fear. He pointed out that if
an informant has to give
evidence in court he has reason
to be afraid that the criminal
even if convicted will be free
"in a short period" and will
have revenge in mind He
conceded that it was a valid
tear.
But he stressed that
information given to police is
strictly confidential, except in
the relatively rare cases where
that information and that
informant are essential to
obtain a conviction.


contract the cost of its oil could be
substantially greater and reliability of supplies
could be a problem."
The Corporation, he added, regretted having
to impose those additional charges on its
consumers, buitit had to recover the additional
costs from the fuel price increases if it was to
remain a viable, self-supporting concern.
"In order to minimise the effects of the
increases all consumers were advised to reduce
consumption as much as possible," Mr. Albury
advised.
In the course of the next few weeks the
Corporation would publish information on
how best to do this, he said.
The Bahamas Electricity Corporation has a
contract with the Bahamas Oil Refining
Company at Freeport for delivery of its fuel
supplies.


Force


'is a

third

under

strength'

THE POLICE Force has
only two-thirds the number
of men it needs to effectively
police the Bahamas,
Commissioner Salathiel H.
Thompson revealed in an
interview this morning.
He said the force
establishment the optimum
figure is presently 1,375,
but actual strength, including
recruits in training, is only
934.
The cause. Mr. Thompson
believes, is the refusal of
Bahamian youths to
voluntarily subject themselves
to a disciplined life.
On the bright side,
however, the 14-month-old
Police College in 0.' -s Field,
with its modern facilities, was
definitely a factor in
attracting higher quality
human material.
"We have had a lot of
fellows with GCE's applying,
and that's a new trend." the
Commissioner said.
He said the main recruiting
problem was that "youngsters
generally dislike the
discipline. In the Force they
can't wear all that hair or a
beard."
In addition, he said,
applicants wanted to be able
to pick which branch of the
force they would work in.
"They all want to join and,
for example, go straight into
being a detective, but it
doesn't work like that."
He said officers have terms
of duty in each of the
branches, and are assigned
permanently to the branch in
which their past performance
proved most efficient and
useful.
He agreed that there was a
number of young officers
who became disenchanted
with slow promotion.

But, Mr. Thompson,
pointed out, no one can be
promoted unless there are
vacancies to be filled.
At present, he said, the
officer corp of the force is
"choc-a-bloc full" having
regard to the number of
junior policemen. More
officers will be needed, he
said. only when the Force
grows or vacancies occur
through resignations or
deaths.


College staff get new posts


TWO STAFF members of
Queen's College have been
appointed to new posts.
principal H.W. Middleton has
informed the Methodist Synod.
The Queen's College
committee has named Mr.
Roger Kelty vice-principal
with responsibility for the High
School and Miss Joan Lonsdale
as vice-principal of the Primary
School.
Both appointments take
effect from the new academic
school year beginning in
September.
Born in Java, Indonesia, Mr.
Kelty lived for some years in
Australia and South Africa
with his mother and twin
brother. He received his
secondary education at
Aberdeen Grammar School in
Scotland.


Mr. Kelty is presently
deputy headmaster of the High
School.
Miss Lonsdale was born and
educated in Durham, England.
She attended Bishop Aukland
Girls' Grammar School and did
teacher training at Southlands
College, Wimbledon, London, a
Methodist College.
She first taught at a
newly-established junior school
in a new town in the north of
England, then served for three
years in a British Army school
in Hone Kone
Coming to Nassau in August
1964, Miss lonsdale joined the
staff as an assistant teacher.
She has been deputy head of
the Primary Department since
January 1966.


Freeport

painter

jailed

VERNAL SMITH, 41, a
Freeport painter and seaman
who went on trail in the
Supreme Court Monday before
Chief Justice Leonard Knowles
was sentenced today to
21-years in jail for catising the
death of Oscar Wright on
October 10, last year.
Moxey, who pleaded not
guilty to a murder charge, was
found guilty of manslaughter
by a 10-2 verdict.
He was represented by
attorney Jeanne Thompson.
Crown Counsel Alpih Russel
prosecuted the trial which saw
the Crown alleging that the
accused stabbed the deceased
in the abdomen during an
argument at Freeport.
The accused told the court
the stabbing occurred when
Wright broke into his
apartment and assaulted his
girlfriend, a former sweetheart
of the dec-ased. H- aid that
while attempting to pat the
two, Wright was killed.

BCC looks

at gambling
SIX WEEKS after the
explosive casino gambling
debate in the House, the
Bahamas Christian Council has
discussed the question of
gambling.
A statement from the
council today said that the
matter was discussed at the
council's regular monthly
meeting.
"The council has appointed
a select committee to work to
prepare a statement in due
course when they have
considered all ol the
ramifications of this question
and have received the approval
of the entire council,' the
Rev. J. J. Perna said.
Father Perna is assistant to
the president of the council,
the Rev. Dr. R. E. Cooper.
The Baptists and Methodists
of the Bahamas have already
come out strongly against
casino gambling.

COMET
HOUSTON Kohoutek, the
comet that earlier disappointed
eager stargazers on earth, is
now disappointing the men of
Skylab 3.
Astronauts Gerald Carr,
William Z. Pogue and Edward
Gibson, who got the best look
of anybody at the streaking
comet, said today they were
having difficulty even
glimpsing Kohoutek now.
They attempted to aim
instruments at the comet to
gather scientific data, but Carr
said the first try was "a
bummer."
"I don't hold out much
hope for finding the comet,"
said Carr. "I haven't seen it
yet. We'll keep plugging away
at it, but I'm afraid things
don't look too good."
Kohoutek was discovered
last March, while it was still far
out in space, and- astronomers
predicted it would be "the
comet of the century."


INK- SMEARED


KEY FOUND



GUILTY OF



SLAYING

By SIDNEY DORSETT


Bank with




SBarclays


Bank hold-up:


seven charged


I











2 Thet ribunt


Wednesday, January 30, 1974.


Brezhnev: No export of revolution


AUSTRALIAN Foreign
Minister Donald Wilesee has
blasted the French
government for giving notice
ot more impending nuclear
tetine- in the Pacific Ocean.

S Mtl \tNItH prosecutor
said nim\ sigatioilt just
xc u dple ted i ia it d lth at a
Hugiiilh n I ritl t.lmisporled
4.3 ; otf shi! valued
at A 4 iiiin fru-.i Turkev
io st ((;- i is: ox r the
J! N

Pi' SIDl NI tHugo Ban/er
said to-dax civilians and
military 'iar, implicated in a
t'.lrrnul subsNertsive plt. 1to
ox xerihrow the Bolixian
governcn ie

xL LI!ORN|I\ police think
lht nmav lii he broken up a
-ic e t .-ing that assaulted
Mild rlbl- d 'I,. Mexican
entern7 the ULnited
itt 01t t ot along
Hii lit; found ailr. ,J track",

iRI: e |l(>ionsi rocked
scLuous and a bar in
i '- rlighl No casualties
r t rep., rrted bun t police said
I h .s c slightly
i thi h ls and


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i t.. nis ire prestenIt
tr pej ii !he i nliited



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!+ 'i-r K ir 1.. i5, i :. -i re iew
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btih l IS (t ,-I C I r ,.urt ,of


'slumped
ftdax
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'nlft l it export of


fill LIst .1 t~~x
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IF I N I 's
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and a rten-'- C il* f
Crtis i an l ,ihi 1
c ois el ion ai '
thu- lix,, i .a -


prospect ot W \SillN I1 President
a'ks s-Nkmig N\ix n hias \cTbil'l piildPed the
p; Li'iitm is senate to gi\' hi; iihe power
t ii li.it r ils 1-'kx e r. lollning i
Senate lln!N !nlt 'ic.der ilinelt
pI Pi, \ |I S (, \! SI l i ;l t | t,,t r
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'- I sa x s Senate It lxxxi'. xx 'helt
ii l c lltiuse the dillwn h ets .'nx -cen

en oegl t ltegislt
Si ill xii t Nix. i' lti r
'Pd --iid tui t biu ke d itia i im ., ,,io i n t
-!.-h i!.l\ hI s the bill bNH k ,, ,, "W;wlwLmte
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S i,'!.irv ,| f ht d.l\ b S n ( ia, l rd
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Sen ate ma niiit \ lI-Ji d r Mi ke
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ShIdaUK! in chairman Out r\ \1 Jj Ks,'".
1)- l.ni.nuh . last n, K tal ,
p d lw ic d p assa g h 1, I

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a BHruows Rmtioning is a strong
ii ie'x lFikehio id itl sunh ni tr i I .he

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but
,al s. . .es sa .
gic +it the im barg i is n lt liiU d.
we d fia n a ter' i u h l i
sl'' hi g .i xxi\ ti t h r l i
S"

MOS COW e conid Brczhnce. lmakin)"
his first speech bin Cuba, said Collmlilns-
doi not support the export of revolutinlt
a stand opposite to that which noIljtIii
Cuban Prime Minister -Fidel Castr.i st ll
appears ti ta\tour.
With this assertion. Bre/hneI tueleil
speculation that he is pressing Castr ~
toIward re-establishing relations with thie
-'itleld States ThIis would he in haniiion I
with the general lines of the dltente ibth-
two superpowers are promoting bet\weer
thcnise e ,,
I he 1.' !c S tates has s t.ul .n e :L.


Golda:



the pea


JI RSALS1[t M
Ixrael saud t'daxl
bOgtilnilge t the
.ri h,.


Pr'emiert
that "'we
road toi


reasons lor not i "i nn- a return to
Ixl tons with lb i, i-;11s- t (n b1 ta is
'as.tri's %ex\porl si '\'e' tOn" to other
l atin Aimenicano < !
But the S ippienl \ hl as I it the
doot open should ilte ( .tr.L o\cIlllrni-ntI
!iod-it\ its pt, li c p; iul 'i sta'ie sot
Bre/hnei 's -' h s earne d ix the
Si'lcet nex 5s ain cix.
Brc/hnc\"s .J it,. So itl I nion
S tnsulet s I !i i" .i", 'tltem p s to
c\p|irt Lounii t \ .i but .ddcd lhal
there i an l. !:,
ith er


We re on



tce road


l,! .,t O ti ,ber \i.b ',i ] \ar. has not ar cd l,,

.,,, s \l.... i I li I , , se pa.. ..


(iolda
might b.-
pt'dLL" w


Mrs. MWe expressed hei i|iiplwin as she
begin tlormal steps to t," he' 'iiurth

I Ie S\rian Lomlnuld cpo" leidm imn"!
Akniishesi"A with Ilsraeh s tora s n tlhe (c l ii
icttchi t or the fourth straight lia
I cbianese newspapers Irep'otled lthati '.Ii
\ I n i leaders do not shar-' hMr \lOit -
.pF inlsim and thdt the DamascLis rc mIL i m -illt
o ecr whether t, o give Israel th i\t ln. lh ,
a Ild shoulder.
S. rla, unlike its partner I gI pF in lI.tA


et~ ltt t n ift to. t ll tll a tden t p 'a L ))U itn l t
that begin Lat^ mi
th ;i r .( i -! i,, !t
liardlinris h i/khila'i s ecgion.il .iil!.nd
the Itttiiir [i .ith B ,l'.i l s highest .ait li i 1 itl\ l,'
;hat S f\ 'l N., '! n jke e, inm L s , Isracel. t t [-k ; \-\\spapi 1 O" '! .,1 ll


O 'th.-i ; ; .i;.
Ioall d \ il
1,0 L l ll Vi % Hil l x .i 'l
the \t ar 1I-i (),
l itx T t i \ 0i ,


It illl Il i' -- i-i
t(i'lai, 1 ii !


a'dtis, in 1hi Regiinal
)iid i It'indet x which lIsiael
S nii) all le I it r' ccux pied 1in
Ale l and thlen pull out ot
S iil the 1 'h \\ar, but


SI thet.i he l lt I 'ltI S "lll l i
l':i\ l i'\\'xx papei hitsa\dia said
.,paiiitlr' of hlte I gs ptn? ,i aih
Ira li illit s .thln the silt'
I( al ',;.lld be a pos-11 ilCne steIp
,!nIl ] it Is lN ,i ted b\ "hi%
.dAil measures" leading t
,.i lhtl-ai,~t t ,tI I- raetli t Ir upi
' i aill \ lab lands.

ra\ds a sail that xoiltnllite
: M.cupaliMon ,I \ib landll "Is
ti at lxiii I t a itt c
i .i-ighi xxi il h ,Vt'li li'x'
x'\pxl'ixilin that can itlil t Ii
SIt i-niisdou tldexlsiatition at nd

1, I eI.np- i t Ii e ix sil pet c't i
\1- Mieii'-s it k iIIn litIIItlg .
il i 'i-1% '11I1 n c l xxix th it 1hrS lt!
i %t Ness I't= l I' V Is 1 t't ill-i

l ti iii i | ia s t c
\Mecan\ hi Ite. c tL t tleents xI



1I '.ie Ie ei thing the l te ed,
1 t ii h rin d tt iilli
I l i 1)1 1 inllt an lr Ihntl dr
iet I i !ii '" t 1t
1it (i en. \hmed ad w t \t

the \i li t t l 'ilii 250i
r iu i- i l I ''pi i il \Ii I it
Min.l 1 ( \ -.! ieA al \hmdel
ii'eal it 'i x i e ,- t !
I I l i I c

thlte Ill i. .- ,1 ix i t


l ,ial\ ti Ic'II u \ ll


his a liI i'ntil C '.-. l lh t 1 -' 1 1 li iirs


t ow n r 1p i -i l 11.'dl\ du l." hi l.i\
as.l" t |Iti~in I ld i Iis ie' l lii






McAllister Hotel
|OWM\ IM 1 NW1N ItAI I

Specll

1h1alau Rates
Single $ 9
Double $1 1
Triple $13
Quadruple $16

Home of the
AMERICAN-BAHAMIAN
FEDERATION


He stressed that "revolution matures
Oiln ldomiic' d -i" and its forms and
methods "aic all i matter ftor the people
oi a given cli o lt tio decide. i'

Bret/hncx :!i .l .d to tilhe "bloody
iascist ciiupe 'ii hilte" as !nle of the
d Cleats otl the lhblaloin isti gglc. but lie
autl "noi01C '' tlhe lessons of the past is
oxsti. Spcct ic.i l tShe l experience of the
advent toi- p,\\. it the popular unity
panics t lt h h .ill he unildoutledlt usi il
)Id Hl: -d1P h 1 '-


I p-


( ;Ili'' xi' ., l iS p itex er"
S.. i hlhi v. ,: !!;e \iip i de
"A n HlRi in i n hilt' it d aI
S\p d h!al Soine, IAdhCA
't : ';- ! (1 I 't ,ild lotl ao .1

I l'ie ( .tIlin iegm' lie w as
a 1 "0 ( 1n -ttIAIM \n I


i iI. iii' i i \\ Ias spelled

\n1 -i:..* ",tS ates in lo)o4. A ll
( \i tii'!;t' except MLexico
l ikc ii itih It. anaa
.:i .1 tde i blockade w .i
:ii ialt'il againsill [ the isaind

,' ,, l w iinlg a struliggli Io
-. Brt'lihnt-v said "We are
, p.it iis'NItsN We ardit not for
i a.'. l,t price and w e are
* .; .l I c iiiirsC. ior arl \ t'1'iieex g



ix c ti m i '' ll i ll rel atl i i' s
S v%.en Ili th St I t ia) n aa i
I;.ir'i'c. W, est (iernlma; ,y, the
I 1ilttd StJtes an "soIe Otlh r
1" y Leos sta "tes."


L'S. SeLcrItill' ol S!iatet
IHenr Kissinlger p' dMted that
the emi arni i, i ,'uli be dlnipped
before l he Is eli \lab
disengagemieni l .. )li1plL'lted
this spring
e'S cre 'l ii -' lad wi ilthi
ou tn db Sle < a.it )l
pr(t g allllt'. ain ''Ic5g tiirct
"aid. \ lot Lltpe d. th1 e
em bargi l I1 t it listed., the
ga.i'iti ne si l lii lx x li.'t iI this
sp lLlit and cal ti ii nlli! Is
g ing to ben tic il L
John \ Saw hill. deputies
director l I hi e I iierI \ O iiic.x
rema ina d t p t ini'llt Iit
ratiloning lt ult be iWe dedd
I he eitilngh in recent
wseekx has Clit c iill clfcttl\c
c ictg' es i til. d. dating
thole i s ois iilal ih li t !i eami h it iiitlines at

Sill'i n sa ti that Illh \!ab a il
,ycaitt "mecl\ l ans i lthatl
we must ic l i't)t utr i iim nrilias
and modiht\ uiit r lit e st ls non\\.
andi no a few sceal I' r llnII m .
"We iCnusll t '' s!tlxil toI
make this a pcrianent part o i
i 'ur lnati al h ile It uLl t
become fr e\tr\ Alittician a
news energy ethic a war onll
w aste
Simon said the I niedl StLates
Imius adt opt ia nail il nal' cierg
pAWlic .
''We ne d i inid tIst I
cooperatti in i pr) idtillng
adequate e intoriatt iii aIn outii
the energy\ situationn" hle ai&d


A to Z


on what's

bad in


the U.S.
BL CHA.REST "The
USA from A to Z" is the
subject of a column in the
latest issue of the official
Bulgarian weekly "Sofia
News" ... And it's all bad.
It starts oftt:
"Advertisement a


permanent pressure
maintained by 22 billion
dollars a year, telling you
how to spend your money.
"Business a kind of work
the purpose of which is to
appropriate the results of
someone else's work."
The column has 26
alphabetical entries oil
American life indicating no
change in Bulgaria's attitude
as the slowest of the Warsaw
Pact countries to approach
detente with the United
States.
Some of the others:
"Golden rule whoever
has the gold makes the rule.
"'Humanism the
generous attitude towards
dogs (no matter what race).
Queer normal for
Americans.
"Violation a cult amonu
adults, blacks, whites. vouth
and children.
"Year a period otf 365
disappointments." (AP)


The Paris


\ I d i lIe I mperI al sm n a I
Si means xi 1nged I' IV Ic llllt' I
-. li nature." Breie 1 pyrom aniac
.lid t he ldetncit pili y l had
-.-. I wned with successes, I PARIS Fifty policemen
Il cited SoIet-Amenrcan
,c itelt x S prevent nuleatr and 10 squad cars are on lh

a ie Pai arontt lockout for him. bul th
i \'ictna0ii wa.r and the mysterious pyromltaniac oi Part
i t c sefire \p et two ore cars aflame la-
night and got awax .
The fires brought his total ii
massive in one month to 42 cars,. ost o
them ect ollonly i model
r g nm n dipped ith a sun roof. Oi
for g nm en ite night of Jai 25. ie se
Seven cars afire.
SA\N I:R .kN(CIS()Co Police
SN FRANC'SC' Police ilie pvrotianiac s lavoure
pt'essed a massive manhunt ethoe py buro niac's a car
S -Operatio zeb- method of burning a car t
.I l 'iope a i u t i t cinders is to slash a hole in th
oking iat last txo Negro siun roof anid throw in two car
looktiif !'o;' at least txw'o Negro
tll unliti n belietvexd responsible of liquid, polic
Ior (.) r.in oP m as' ingsx in the reported.
past t n n t ainghs in the always sstrikes at nigh
The latest wave of killings 1 4th arrondissemet
came Mnd night.hen five 14(distr arict ron ihe sementha
people were shot in a two-hour secdistrioncts) of Pari the soundthea
period o-- cit, .,r-ets. All but s to an ey ha
on c dw Id and doctors sas the investigators sax, thle., have nt
ln1e c1w -i,.i mao h bthe clue as to who he is or why h
pa l, i,,c i likes to burn cars. ( AP)
"S',t5 t' pic l ale ;ifaid."
l icc l Wilalia 0( otinr VENEZUELA may be
said -'I i t ii intider had a willing to sell Puerto Rico
litne ist I W i >-i rilbert it more crude oil, a government
\s lWulll In -i iinghtcning spokesman says. Juan J.
I his i 1I-iblc Ilicres a lot of Rigau, director of the
haitt ix:,,it' in i' he cowardltv 8' goveernimreii 's petroleum
.iActs oi ig.ilg .ip 1i atin isolated office, says Venezuela has
person ani hlio,,tin him." about 16 per cent of its
I \ aI n production ready for sale.


Id

,t I

is


t

d


is
e


s
dt
t.

ue


NOW LABOUR


HITS OUT AT


COMMUNISTS
LONDON Opposition labour nmenibers havN jxit1111l 1
government in denouncing xwhat the\ called a C omnniii t p, ini ,
exploit the nation's industrial crisis to knock doIwn the I.e
government.
The rare public censure of the (ominmuni sts, led bh I,!:
Prime Minister Harold Wilson. catmte amid reports ot secret ,.,i
to avert a strike threatened h> the nation's 280.000 coal n!.s


A Labour party statement C
said "We utterl repudiate ayll
attempt bs CominIlni st or
others to use the mliners a.s a
political biatiering rai io billig
about a general strIkeC, or ito
call onl troops to dio-obe
lawliitul order inl the ex-it of a
strike. That is sillA ant
daIlgerous nonsensllc."
he ill a plain FC renetC to
MI hael \lc;a he. the
CommItIn stls vice-presidlent ot
the National Ltn(,itn of \Mners.
the party added:
-" et the extremist
spokesman on the N1 '1
eXccuti\c rccal! lihat. \vhalc\e'
happen s in l hci cl iiit s. .ix
J1 1si in tilis Itit we lla

giecrnmel ts at the iiinI
booths and 11n l ,othe wa" ,
\ iCaheI had aid a:IliJ cr :ni
the da\ that the ul miner,',
S rc l fighting aigm aiil "'
d a cli n i nt g a p i talist
soaicti ...Itr in ts o lLt' l t I
otrkers their r) milIt II
iiuht-.'
In te hlnalf-the-n i s pci

Ia lno ledge, ta h s lC -ite
( ,.il Board has lad eC .1 -c, Lt"

i e ttc to 1 Iin p rk Irc~l
Sccrctarx WVillian W\hltc'i~la.
regarded ais one )t the "doi"
in the ( abmet
I lie approach suggesIted a
precise formula for ave!iing a
mineIrs' strike that could tii l l
next xweek it a A ..I -l I utrcniti
unlIdk r w as witllllh tl he 111I1n
\tIliS, a 55 pCe cellt "\cs" ite
RCe Sil I l the \oite ar
expectCd w iihIll i li\e iat
(Olle cIos r a cnt 1 pron1'
t I,! oI l 5 l tIl e t e' Ith 1lll;Ic't ,
flit" pa, \"\noi reported unll ;

I 11"- '! iniMvement in the .al mining
dispute had arisen in part over
r-ports quoting Mailc\ ai -
Si l g t he T nII ,is wiVl6I c.tll 'nl
Biilisthi itto, ps t, lh p theit i ,.
in a strike, Heath were to usei
the military
1 cdaies insist iid hs wolds
had bi n ditisttotCd. No soldier
would be asked to disobte
orders, he said. ( AP)


Prisoner

force fed
L I I iN iiAn aiicd
robber serving a 27- e r iaii
sentence has been on huner
strike for more than two \,eal
and is being ii i l I ."
tile British government sax
The man. 2->year-old Kcili
Baillie. is thought to bet-
orthodox Jew and rtiefu se
eat the non-kosher food sii:x d
in Parkhurst Pri.son. a I a
security iail oln tlh lc I .,
, ighl oft: the soutliherill .ia
I iiglatnd.
Home Oi '.. MiniistCi .I
(arlnsl told the ) 11 us .I I
( 'om t hl l atil the I1 i' .
through a tube inwertckl miiti, i,
iioutli anid pushed diowC l ;;
his stomalih.
Baillie has been oln ii ::ie
strike for S 1l dtta s (ar:,



I ro l l.ibour l : ',
Ih! lllas iCoix ai t \ :!
StIllard


Hijackers

hit city

l)t BI IN \ kx,xi


lw'xtlix 11 x 1k Ii
!iitl ki 11 i Iu .' .
\ en a' ned men e -" k ,, "
I'ius s ,i lt it r ks a t r i;'. "

xx1!iii axoiii l he i's ii \ ,iF *.
Sith what I lik d lk i .
Misidc









Bus pIasseingeis Clwere );i
off at -gunpoiint and h -i .
,iit ht wsi rtt-s leaitt lhi- ;.i
wit \8re put i l trucks I ,l;!i
were pil lon truck,. ( \p)


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POLICE HOLD PLAYBOY

IN AUTHOR'S MURDER
I I)\O --N An Irishman described by friends as a
playboy has been indicted for murder in the death of Jamnes
Pope-Hennessy, a royal biographer xwho was slain last week
The defendant, John O'Brien, 23, was arrested near the
Pope-Hennessy home a few hours after the murder last
Saturday.
O'Brien's friends said he was a hanger on in the fringes (,I
London's jet-set society.
The police said they were questioning two other men
about the murder.
Pope-Hennessy, 37, was in his apartment when he w"as
brutally beaten, bound, gagged and left to choke in his owsn
blood. The house was ransacked.
The author wrote more than 50 books, including a
biography of Queen Mary. ( API



Nixon gives a


rationing nudge


B.R. SWEEPING




& SON LIt



WILL J



CLOSED






FRIDAY, FEB. 1,9I74


[I ^1 What future


74 does she face?



N as.II C(hristian Schools Itachc A chlildicn li i\m to
live': not lujst hiow\ to lnakc a litin.- lh. csx v51is
fot \ our child in things tlit i-cill c tint
thortou'hl (Christ in11 Full\ AcJadcini.

Wee Wisdom Nassau Christian Academy
Call: 21586 Call: 32641
Prepare today for tomorrow.
ENROLL your child NOW


-------------p--- I


_______________^ W...........wimwi .........


I


- -


1


I







Wednesday, January 30, 1974.


hpr eritbutn


Xhe r ribune
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTIU
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
I FON E H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903 1914
SIR FTIFNNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G D.Litt.. LL.i).

I EDITORIAL



By LTII\\I DUPU'CH
IONDON, November 23: Because King Feisal ibn Abd
al-Azi/, absolute ruler of Saudi Arabia, till wears the flowing
costumes it the Arab ,leikdi'm he is probably the most
colourful figure in the present Middle East oil conflict with the
West And so his picture often appears in the press and on the TV
screen. Hlie is also often quoted in the news.
In answer to any .i... i.ii. that industrial nations may be
aggravated to the point where they may take the oil fields by
iorce, lie is quoted as saying that he will blow them up it any
attemptt of this kind were made.
One is inclined to remember the Middle Last as a land of
poverty, dirt and beggars.
In Ircent years their ulers have accumulated great wealth from
lie ir vat oil resources. Poverty and filth seem to be still true for
the peiaants oft most oft the countries ini the area with one
notable exception ... the state of Iran, thie Persia of the Old
Testaimeiill sorry.
hran has a history that goes back 2,500 years. Persia was one of
the great! nations il the records of the Old Testament. In our time
we knew it only as a a country of nomadic peoples whose great
clite, had been swallowed up by the advancing sands of the
Sahai desert
Vtheni oil displaced coal a.s the primary source of industrial
poiwe' heI Middle last. which included Egypt, the land of the
Pli.,i r achieved a new foothold in world affairs.
Ihle :\nio-l 'aiini Oil Co.. one of the sources of Britain's
wealth a nwi L'd largely by British shareholders.
The Shalh. inow 4 is the iuler of Iran. His father. an otTfficer in
ihe Persian (Co.sack Regiment, seized the Peacock Throne and
dcclaied hinisell FInperor. lhe bejewelled Peacock Throne is
ipeIhaps the most tabiulous piece of furniture in the world today.
\\|i.. lie abdicated in 19Q41, hi son Re/a Pahlevi, acceeded to
,lie thrl.-ne and took the title ol Shall. He was then only 21 years.
Britain, the 1'.S. and Russia exercised influence in the area.
(ocit ptIlc'nis laced the yotn, trulet.
lis tiiub!ecs began seriotisl\s sirie wars later wheti Prime
Minister Mossedeq started a revolt. The twin object of this revolt
was it s/c/e the oil-wells from the British aind to overthrow the
hi '.iicd itn Ihi attack ion l Sll. but. with the
nie Oi-gecn et; 0 Aimetican o il interests wltho wanted a piece of
tlie '"akc'". the Bui tish wece uprooted.
i Pi .., prrobabl' tb'e tirst -ci .us blow to Western influence
in DhC M:little laIt. The nieatest blow was struck in li10 when
American pressure on Britain, France and Israel allowed Nasser to
i s.tc, Ii, e tle Suez C(anal. That ssas the beginning of the end
of Biiiain' world power. This eent introduced a period of
initel national hiiLgalidace that has since Taiken ianI foris.
And today the West is paying the price of these two fateful
decisions in Aiielican foreign policy. It is not tor mI e to n d..
whether they were right or wron ('Certainml the'y were had for
outl p.Ir o the world.
\ni article in the iaa/i;'ei section ..i 'e Dailv Teligraiph oft
Novemlbei 23d iclecals tIle i changes that are being brought about
in Iran with iike sast oil revenues that have:, "..we into the
countlir since the Mid last nations have seized control of their
natural iestitces .aiid driveti western investors out l the area.
All lhc othC't Mid I ast rulers have piled utip great reserves inl
ranks all mci tlie weoild. l11is is a new source of pt)wer lor the
mnrigs, Shalis a,;id Sheiks
But tilSe Shih til Iarlt. wi' lihas sturS .eu two attempts ont his
lie. lhas not takcni the lie)alCe tvew that lie will blow up the oil
ields it attacked
lie I eels that lie hlas sometlhling to protect *ind so hie is taking
neasures to build in an itt niav and arll force capable o1 it.'..I.t
ffeclive resistance to possible invaders. Hle has invested billions
it 1.'ll.I in modern at niuminelts. But lie is more concerned about
us ininiediale neighbours than about any possibilio', tl o ain
\merican invasion.t
I lie oil niationis ;ie inow united in a |Xihey to isolate and criisli
srael hut still lthe Shalt l Ir han iegards the neighbouing rtile; oh
raq s arn 'itenit. A\id lie is also conscious o oitlicer irive Jaungeii
ilding ut p on t Ins btordeis It is important to hIn thatii Pakistani
hoiuld he maintained .is a '. t state between his counitr\ and
he ast sub-cint ioent ol Ind.ia.
I lie ShAlh i ccogii/es that hlie hlas onl\ 20 to 30 y ears in whiih
o givc its counitrt a substitute lor oil which will eitheli be
'xhliaistel ... o1 A new' s urC o cii esgy be discovered by the
ndistnal nations a... lnd so hei is tisitit Is oil wealth to make lian
i geat iilduslrial natinli o the last.
in his article John Bullch quotes Abbas ltoveyda. Puinme
irtisi tei (t hain. as sayiig iltha "within the next five years Swe aie
goingg to spend nio less tlihii 15 billion pounds sterling on our
protlraiunliie otl national dcselopneniil, and that is unote than thile
totall ot ouii developieni budget for thie last 40 years."
Btulloch iepoits that the Shah is confident of a great futuite to,
hiis ctintr ie is nii oii oicerniled that oil power hias only about 20


ht>pe to break the previous record of 57 years."
I was surprised. He didn't look very old. I asked him his age
Anid I got a second surprise when he said he was 73. This means
that hie has been with the Savoy since he was 17.
ie told tire that he was chief valet for many years until he had
a heart attack. Then he was given the softer job of operating the
elevator.
It is really wonderful to have a business that has been staffed
by men for a life time.
This is the strength ... and the joy too ... of The Tribune.
We thought we were doing well when we retired Mrs. Louise
Hall after she had completed 50 years with us.
Our senior staffer is now Sammie Haven. Hie has been with us
over 47 years. He now knows he has to compete with the Savoy's
senior man. Hie has to beat 57 years. He can ... and will ... do it.
I am constantly amazed by the courtesies I receive frotr
perfect strangers when I travel abroad.
When I visited my wife's town in Pennsylvania some years ago
the Mayor presented me with the keys of the city and I was made
a honorary life member of the Lions Club. I realized that these
courtesies were a tribute to my wife by her own countrymen.
I visited a Rotary meeting in Boston during an IAPA press
conference in that city in October.
Just before I left Miami on this visit to Lngland I received a
letter from the Secretary of the club expressing pleasure at nmy
visit and informing me that I had been made an honorary member
of the club for a year.
I am amused when these things happen. I think of some of Imn
own countrvymen who are actually scared to have me around
these days.
It must be terrible for men when they become victims of fear
and turn into spineless worms.
Some time ago I read a story in The Readerv Digest which
showed the great futility of pride and prejudice.
It wats the story of two men who were ,i I,. t.,i with a terrible
disease. They were both threatened with blindness.
One of the men had completed his operation. He had been
bhnidfolded. It wouldn't be known until the bandages were
removed if he were blind.
The bandages were removed ... he saw. Throughout his ordeal
this man was cheerful and unafraid.
The second mnan underwent his operation at this time. This
man was from a '*.., li Southern family. He was lull of pride
and power that the accident of race and money conferred on old
Southern families.
Unlike the first man, this one was full of tear and doubt at the
possibility of being blind when the band.tge' were reov r ed. lie
was in a terrible way.
The hospital i.il' asked the first man whether he 'would cheer
tip the second man. IHe agreed.
The result was a great boost for the morale oit' tihe second main
who was thrilled to find that his companion had come front the
same area ot the South wheie his family hel ld s \I cou'tld notit
understand why he had not met such a fine person behtre.
He planned all the great things they were going to dlo when lie
got out of the hospital. They agreed that they vsuld meet and
have a wonder'tul friendship' .. i -E.
But the first man left the hospital a day before the h:indages
were removed froin the eyes of his friend. This operation was also
a success. The first thing the rich WHITF mian asked the nutse
was to bring his tliend to his rooni so that they could celebrate.
But his friend was gone. And he was never to know that this
nend. twho had helped him through the night ,of us life, was ..
BI ACK.
T his was in the rough days of the South when white anid black
did not nl\.
I thought about this story yesterday \when I attended a meet in
oi alln ilnpotlant tIugaruization here ol i wheit h I a a member ot thec
Board. I will not reveal tie name iof the organization.
The chairman of the Board raised a question that is ve y inumti
in the miinds of people these days. lie said that it had hien!i
brought tto his attention that the Board was noti lul
representative because there swas not a Jew ot a Roman Caithoitc
marIor. th el
I hies agreed to invite ai Jew aind a Roman tCatholic t, i
the iii,
I lhae been a mneiinbc of tins Board uor nierls 10 yIcas. li hs
hawe been happy with my company but they didn't knotv, fit I
was not only a Romana ( atholic bui also a Knight iCoiunaidti i ':
the Vaticani court!
This incident was particularly interesting at this time hecis' tti
came in the midst of the crazx religious conflicts that halct tlakie:
th'e lives of nearly a thousand people in Northern Ireland
I his strty recalls an incident tliat look place in Nassau .iti i
the aditnlstration of tie D)uke of WVindsor.
One day the Duke went to the golf course iat the Bahniuuts
(uut 1i (tlub anld found a labourer cutting down a ire'. Ihe,
o 'lered himi to stop.
hIe man took one look at the ntiudie. Hle didn't kis,, 'ss i>,
he was. And so he proceeded to cut down the tree.
Th Duike was infurnited. lIe hurried to the club and iep',;.
the incidentt to Stanle\ Marsh. Societaly io the club Mi \l.i.
ran to the spot.
"W''ieren't ou told to stop cutting diown this tree .'". Mi. S.ts'Is
shouted.
"Yes sir." tlne labourer said lu king up inom his job. "Ol. litil |t
sed man came here 'ell mte tei stop cutting dmown de tree. u.t1 'ss'
boss manu Si lharry Oakes, tell 'ie ter cut it down and I ,uioin
cut it down."
Stulpped of his rank and titles the formier King of I-iglanid \ii
onl "a'i little red mani" in the e es ot a Bahalnan labiounel
Another good story wsas told about the Duke in Nassaut. It ss i
lold itic bs the late Wi li, ... Arniha.m, Crown Lands Otticir
One da thIe Duike issited the Crown Lands Ottice n r cI\s .,


sprang to atitentin and were ilerit
iAn olId Andios Island woman was inl the roomLi at the iite h ie
old people oi Andtos reared Queen Victoria because lc Ic!!
she had been responsible for freeing the slaves. Thely alwa\ s,. spk
of her as "Aunty Vicky".
"'Who dat?", the old wonan swhpeted in IMr. Aranbha's c.it
Knowing the reverence held tfo the Queen bs the old pc',plc iu
Andios. lie whispered "'lihat's the King. that's Anunt, \ ,k
grandson ."
"O()h my Gawd!", she exclaimed undei hI i bleath, lthli 'ui n .'e
head back and rolling her eyes tMow.id heaven c lihle she coue.',
heri mouth with her hands,. "an yer meanc te s\ hlie dili,' \-ik u.m
tla k and ack like people'"
This renunds me of the day in St. Paul's churchh in I ox thll
wlIen a young woman introduced mie as Sir Harold Christic
This was a blow tot my vanity because I believed at tlic inte
thaIt ves one inl that village knew me.
THOUGHTS tFOR TODAY
Despise inot any man, and do not spurn anything to! hte is
no ian lthat has inot his nu 1101ti, is there anything that has not
its place. RABBI BEN AZAI
Among the aimless, unsuccessful or worthless, you often hear
talk about "killing time".
Ilie man who is always killing time is really killing his own
chances in life: while the man who is destined to success is the
nain i lio makes time live by makuig it useful. ARTHL R
BRI'B\'Ni


MENTAL HEALTH


GROUP SAYS THANKS
FDITOR The Tribune,
The Organizing Conmmittee we extend our most heartlel
for the Bahamas Mental Health thanks for yur co-operation
Week wishes to acknowledge BARBARA STRANGE
with very sincere thanks the Publicity Chairman,
generosity of so manly 'Mental Health Week Cominutte
individuals and firms that made
otur week a sticcess.
Those who contributed
prizes lor the Oratorical
Contest are British Amencan
Life Insiurance oI the Bahamas
Limited. I.B.M. Bahamas
Limit ed. \ir Jamaica.
Bahamasaii, Ro:. west Banking
Corporation Iiuit-d, Firnance
Corporation 1i the Bahamas
Limited, (o nnionwealth
Industrial Bank Limited, Cross
& Thomas, Sassoon Property
Developments I mited, Mr.
Kendal Isacs. Di. K. V.
Rodge r s. Aiinony mous
I)onations.
The Cominuttee is also very
grateful to the following:
Queen's College Itostel and
St. Martin's (ConI' nt for
a t- c o ni t i n o d t i i n t for
contesteits. BihiiNa. as Taxicab
Corporation imonl for free
transport tor iontestents froin
the airport, (;i',riniment High
School and C 1. t;ibson Senior
High ior the use of the
hb:ilding. Bahai nasair for -t.
inee ina arainitsy island .A lll
contestants. Count Bernadino;
All people whs, served as
jud ges.
Thanks also io Mr. Willis
Woods and the members of the
New lHeritage Players who gave
their time during the entire
week and performed plays with
the mobile van at various
schools and public area, to the NO FROS
mnemhb --', I. the St. Atigustine's
Band andi to all tih' people wsho
so kindly wrotc articles and to other mo(d
those whoi participated in our
discussions.
Mani hankss ti thoe w lho
donated adve'rtisiung spa,C. I\
Bethc llRobertson i&. i, The
Bank of Ntov, Sccta. hice
Nassau Shop (,encrai genee ,
Batcardi & Co.. iltiin Breweri
& Co,, Mademoiselle l.imited. E
Coco-cola Bottling (o., Nassau
Ready-Mixed Concrerte Co.
To the Nassau (Guardian and
The Tribune editors and star, CE
U ..


t


c


ST REFRIGERATOR-FREEZER

lels and SIZES to choose from


D% discount for cash


:NERAL HARDWARE
COMPANY LIMITED
NTREVILLE PHONE: 2-1960/2-8844


Victor aDept Store



GREAT VALANTINE SALES-GREAT GIVE-A-WAY


I


1 3 111


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FEBRUARY 23rd
Set+,( I "i -mol tiln') ttflw 11(1 A III#'
M) jmup- Tifed rld (live
Awtimi h), he RhWlh
meflLilly TotAtilledl
Phone 313507r53330 or 41430


I


- ---- - ---- -- -I-- --- .-- ----~ -I '~- ~' ~ -'-- -~


years ahead of it. HIe believes that b that litnne Iran will be one of
thlie wild's leading industrial nations, exporting its products to
'utrope and no longer depending on oil.
"We shall do as Japan did." said Mr. Iloveyda, "except that
they took 200 years to become ian industrial nation and we are
goigl to do it ini 20."
And believe it oi not, tlie way I teel today. I'll still be around
to write the stores of the most ailiazilng century ill recorded
histoi. i, nii;' ytou can imaginite ... and some of them have
seemed i .p. ',il ...h lias happened dining this century.
It \wsill be tragic tfo the oth li oil nations it. as aI result of the oil
squiiece. the tniator cti enclieis ate devalued and thlie fortunes the\
hlae piled up iui banks dtliop 1to io.
Atler mit visit to Inglaitd eilicir tills sear said that the cost
of living had soared so high that I didn't feel I could indulge ltyM
onlie exrasagtnice otf having at the Savoy
But mir dughiter.i w1hto now controls thIe purse strings, is kind.
When her mother and I were leaving she said not to be foolish.,
thal we are now on itlie countdown and so we should nolt denl
ourselves i, rl i, That leans we are back at the Savoy.
IThis place has a Cdiail aill its own.
At a press dinner on the first evening of our arrival iln London a
friend commented that a great man\ changes had taken place int
hotels in liadon. So many new hotels had been built that stafls
were constantly changing around.
I could tell him Ihat this had not happened to the Savoy. The
same staff members are here that I met when I first lived at this
place 20 years ago. And so I know thlirc all ... and it is like
coiinUlg ihoLie fol myi wife anId ile.
I asked an elevator operatloi loda how long lite had been with
the Savoy.
it .1l\ 50 years." lie said. "I am t lie senior man in the hotel. I








4 UWhr Grtbunt


Wednesday, January 30, 1974.


TOWN0 and 'R6UND


...by Daphne Wallace-Whitfield


This female eunuch


"SHE'S VERY SHY".
"She's got an enormous ego.
She is difficult (with
news-reporters)".
This is just a sample of the
advice I was offered before I
went to see Germaine Greer
(Author of "the Female
Eunuch") at the Ocean Club
over the weekend. Germaine is
here to conduct a seminar on
the "Role of Women in Society
and Poetry" every day this
week between 1 p.m. and 2
p.m.
Germaine is one of a series
of experts in their respective
fields sponsored by the John
Fisher Leisure Lecture Tours
to enable visitors to combine
the tropical pleasures of sun
and sea with intellectual
stimulation and to provide the
latter for interested residents as
well.
Although, Germaine is not
here to talk about the Women's
Liberation Movement per se,
the ugly face of sexism rears its
face in literature as well as in
any other area of life. (Sexism
is society ascribing roles to
men and women that deny
other dimensions of their
humanity. For example' Man is
aggressive and protective,
woman is submissive and needs
to be looked after. Thus, a man
who is tender and gentle is
reviled by society as is a
woman who is assertive and
tough. The Women's
Liberation Movement
emphasises that all these
characteristics deemed to be
specifically masculine and
feminine are humar
characteristics and have
nothing to do with being male
or female).
I have heard and read a
number of pronouncements
and assertions in Nassau
recently that have shown a
misunderstanding of what the
second Liberation front is all


about.
An example of recent
pronouncements are-
( 1 ) "'he Women's
Liberation Movement is
repnil'lc for the recent
supposed increase in
promiscuity (this promiscuitS
had been previously defined as
sex for gain or revenge) among
Bahamian wives This froin a
Bahamian male writer who has
focused attention on
Bahamian sexuality.
(2) "I don't go in for this
Women's Liberation thing"
this from a .ihr.i'.I Bahamian
woman who is at the top in hei
chosen profession and whose
household responsibilities are
equitably divided betwcenc
herself and her husband
(3) "I believe in equal pali
and '-pp. rliui r ., but a: home
my husband wears the pants"
this from a black American
woman who is in a top political
position in the United States.
I asked Germaine to define
,ri" FI% for the benefit of Town
readers what Women'i,
Liberation is.
"Women's Liberation is
what happens when a woman
decides to accept total
responsibility for her own life
when she doesn't shelter
behind the usual excuses
because she realises that they
are tyrannical when she
realises that she has a mind and
soul to be put to the service ot
her community and herself."
This is straight from the
horse's mouth.
"Unfortunately". Germaine
continued, "we women) have
centuries of inculcation of
training to react in certain
ways which are said to be
feminine but are ways in which
people are oppressed"
She readilN admitted that
promiscuity could be a possible
result of liberation "'When we
realise we own our own bodies,


no eunuch


(not our husbands, ministers or
doctors) then we realise we
have the right to use it for our
own pleasure," she said.
But being promiscuous to
get even with men or
because that is what they're
doing is reaction or rebellion
and not an assertion of
Liberation Liberation lies not
in heing like men or doing
w hat the\ do but in developing
o e' s o1\ h wn human ity
Pronlscuit' for gain is a
Severs on to women's
traditional role when they sold
themselves for security in
marriage or gain as sexual
professlon'i '
Germaine castigates many of
the womenn who have reached
to top in their chosen fields.
"We know that such women
do not cha;;pion their own sex
Ournc he\ are in positions ot
power. ihat when they are
cmplo\ er, they do not emplo%
their own sex. even when there
is no other basis for
discrimination ... Such women
are like the white man's black
man, the professional nigger;
they are the obligatory woman.
the exceptional creature who is
as good as a man and much
more decorative," (The Female
I unuchI
In short in Germaine is
proclaimed philosophy no-one
"wejrs the pants" she
purports to believe in
democracy in all :.l.,i.n 'hip,
in society.
Now to return to the advice
I was given i at the beginning of
this article)
I did not find Germaine shy.
As \ou would expect from a
person of her high academic


crederti *' .';d the author of a
hb.- t eller she talks and acts
with confidence
( Biographical note: she took
a BA honours from Melbourne
University, an MA with 1st
class honours from Sydney in
1463 and PhD from Cambridge
in 1JQ8 and is a university
lecturer. "The Female
I unuch," a bestseller, was
published in 1970).
On the contrary I saw no
concrete evidence of any
"enormous ego". It is possible
that iny adviser does not
believe that women should
have egos at all.
She did nothing to retract
her philosophy of the necessity
for democratic relationships as
espoused in "The Female
I unuch"
When I first telephoned her
to make an appointment with
her she asked me when I
wanted to see her. Not when it
would be convenient for her to
see me.
She might be an authority
on literature and on the
politics of power relationships.
She does not appear necessarily
to act like an authority as a
human being although she
appears to reject the
conventional format of good
manners.
During the interview she
called across to a waiter for an
iced-coffee. She did not offer
mie one.
But why should she'? We
were in a public place flowing
with waiters, I was quite free
to order my drink if I'd felt so
inclined. If she'd played the
traditional role of hostess I'd
Page 10. Col. I


Centreville Food Market
6th TERRACE EAST PHONE 58106 P. 0. Box 5714
STORE HOURS Monday to Thursday 8 am. 8:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday 8 a.m. ,9 p.m.
Sunday 8a.m. -10a.m.
mmmmmmmMmmmmmm mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm Nmm ----------mu


N


to" ^r


w F'COLGATE TOOTH PASTE
(MEDIUM SIZE) 56C


LIBBY'S
MEAT BALL STEW


LIBBY'S
BEEF STEW
RIBENA


FAB DETERGENT
(KING SIZE)
$1.56


TIDE


GIANT SIZE


CELERY
30C


$1.05


GRAPEFRUIT
5 LB. BAGS $1.19


1TP and CANNED PEPSI COLA
(12 OZ. CAN) 6 FOR 99C


______II ______________________________________


240Z.CAN $1.33


24 OZ. CAN $1.33


LARGE BOTTLES


OCTAGON
WASHING LIQUID


$2.09


48 Z. 89C


CHAMPION
PIGEON PEAS (LARGE CAN)
2CANS FOR


CHAMPION
WHOLE TOMATOES


CRISCO
SHORTENING


U. S. CHOICE
BOTTOM ROUND ROAST
U. S. CHOICE
SIRLOIN TIP ROAST
U.S. CHOICE
PORTERHOUSE STEAK
U. S. CHOICE
TOP ROUND STEAK


U. S. CHOICE
T-BONE STEAK


79t


2 CANS FOR 99C


3 LB CAN $1.69


lb. $1.99


lb. $2.09


lb. $2.25


lb. $1.99


lb. $2.25


Faces of Germaine Greer
as seen by
Philip Symonette.


I:.


OPEN 'TIL 4 P.M.
SATURDAYS!


MEATS

FISH

POULTRY
IN 10 LB.
CONTAINERS


aeiatt portion Control Cintrt

HOMEOWNERS. . BUY WHOLESALE
SPECIALS FOR THIS WEEKEND


10 Ibs. AMERICAN MUTTON
CANADIAN BOLOGNA


10 Ibs. DANISH SPARE RIBS


WHOLE GROUPERS .89 per lb.
5 Ibs. GROUPER FILLET $6.40 ($1.28 per lb.)
FRESH CRAWFISH TAILS (Minimum Order 5 lbs. All Sizes) $3.70 per lb.
TELEPHONE 2-3237 5th TERRACE, CENTREVILLE


-?


"The way men
dress in the
company of
women often tells


A man may use clothes Ito tell a vowoimini thiii'ns lie iwoukilni't say iboul hitinsclf.
That he's powerful, tender, suIcccssful oir adctelcroirs.
IIOUSt OF C0HURCH(IIILL LT). hs the mst expressive sills of the season.
Gaberdines. linens and all other contcliempoar\ stI, Its. Soi il yiou'rt the mIll nl
who doesn't want to talk about liImNselC. i it ...


)urttill It .


ouse Cet
NASSAU'S I I\ SI-
Beaumont Arcade/P. 0. Box


I


is


10 Ibs. NEW ZEALAND SHOULDER LAMB CHOPS S9.90


$9.00 (.90per Lb.)
(by the stick) (.85 per lb.)


10 Ibs. FRESH DAILY GROUND HAMBURGER $12.00 ($1.20 per lb.)


(.99 per Ib.)


$9.50 (.95 per Ib.)


MEN'S BOU Tl() 1
N-3"00N,, iu, Bahamas.


.. .


I


ammmommom


I


m


*~~z


I







Wednesday, January 30, 1974.


Oranges and oranges


ORAN\(FS are in good
suIpply at thc- Potter's C(av
Produce [ change and, it you
don't happen to have a tree or
two in your own garden now is
the time to take I., ,I.m of
the hundreds which are
aaijtble at the exchange.
lctke 1 a, group of recipes
dcsiwn-d to help you enjoy the
omaIn-g, crop n,0w and in the
I inst. loi thle future.
Pl'e terve ,ni mi i'nge slices for
I': m r i doi d rnks, meats or
1.uad, (oti three oranges in


thick slices. Put in a saucepan
and add boiling water to cover.
Cook for one hour and drain
on paper towels. In the
saucepan, mix one and a
quarter cups water with one
cup of sugar and three
tablespoons lemon juice Cook
for five minutes. Add the
orange slices and cook for
another hour. Place the slices
in sterilized jars and pour in
enough syrup to cover. Add a
little rye or bourbon. Seal and
store in the refrigerator.


Clothes and shoes push


up living costs


heat until the mixture has
thickened enough to coat the
spoon. Remove from the heat
and strain. Add two teaspoons
grated lemon rind and a
teaspoon grated orange rind.
Pour the cream into small


I DER'S FOOD MARKTlTY WG
.P.0.... WIN7SIOIb01.25 PHONE 2403"1 1 R WI NGS l b S1.25


FRESH CUT UP

CHICKENS


HAMBURGER


Ib. 98C


lb. $1.29


U.S. CHOICE

SIRLOIN TIP ROAST lb. $2.49


SLICED

BOLOGNA


Ib. 99C


U.S. CHOICE |

CHUCK ROAST lb.S1.39
NATIVE ORANGES PER DOZEN $1.10 \
MORTON SALT 210


ROBINHOOD
FLOUR
SPRY


5LB. $1.10
3LB. $1.55


COKE

TIDE


MADEIRA FOOD STORE
PHONE 24524 P. 0. BOX 6143


ALPEN CEREAL NOW IN STOCK


CREST TOOTH PASTE


CRISCO


LARGE 65C


7 CANS FOR


GIANT


99C
990


U


LIBBY'S DICED BEETS

303 350


TIDE


GIANT $1.00


DANISH SPARE RIBS

lb. $1.00


3-LB. TIN $1.50


AJAX CLEANSER


PUNCH DETERGENT


LOCAL TOMATOES


LOCAL ORANGES


14-OZ. 230


20-OZ. 350


IIb. 30C


BAG $1.00


CLOTHINt, and footwear
were the major contributors to
the 0.88 percent increase
registered in living costs
between October and
November.
The Retail Price Index
issued hb the Department of
Statistics for November shows
that the index for New
Providence increased 1.0 point
or 088 per cent to 114.5 in
November from 113.6 in
October
The groups that contributed
the largest increases were
clothing and footwear which
rose by 1 37 per cent from
116.8 in October to 118.4 in
November, and health and
personal care, which rose by
1.34 per cent from 112.0 in
October to 113.5 in November.
The food index rose by 1.2
points to 118.5 in November
from 1 17.3 in October.
The food and housing
groups each rose by 1.02 per
cent. Recreation and reading
and transport groups showed
increases of 0 26 per cent and
0.09 per cent recIelively.
There was no change
recorded in the other goods
and services group, which
stood at 114.6
The All Items Index stood at
114.5 in November, an increase
of 9 per cent over November


1972 which stood at 105 0.
With the addition of the
November Index, general living
costs in New Providence show
an increase of 7.05 per cent
over the I 1-month period with
food costs rising 1 1.06 per
cent
The major food changes
were in the price of grouper,
milk, apples, turkey, beef, the
seasonal fish basket, bacon.
chicken ham, sweet potatoes
and breakfast cereal.
The Housing Index increased
by 1.1 points or 1.02 per cent
from 108 2 in October to
109 3 in November. Cooking
gas and telephone bills
contributed the largest
increases to this rise. FLich ro,:e
by 0.16 and 0.07 of a point.
respectively
The clothing and footwear
index recorded the largest


increase in November. The
index rose by 1.6 points or
1.37 per cent to 1 18.4 in
November from 116 8 in
October. The major
contributors to this increase
were women's clothing which
rose by 0.10 of a point, and
men's and girls' clothing which'
each rose by 0.03 of a point.
Women's footwear decreased
b> 0.04 of a point.
The Transport index
increased by 0. I of a point or
009 per cent to 110.2 in
November from 110.1 in
October. The cost of cars, due
to incoming models, rose by
0.01 of a point, and
contributed the major
increase to this rise.
The health and personal care
index rose by 1.5 points to
Page 9, Col. 7


LIBBYS PEACH, PINEAPPLE,
RASPBERRY, STRAWBERRY,
ORANGE.
FRUIT FLOATS 9ozn.590


DR. PEPPER
SOFT DRINK


10TINS $1.00


LESUEUR
PEAS


JIM DANDY
GRITS


LIBBY'S
CUT GREEN BEANS

LIBBY'S
TOMATO CATCHUP


u
^



9
^K^^^f

^


303 49c


5 1bs. 76C


303 430


20.oz 69C


LIBBY'S ASSORTED FLAVOURS
FRUIT FLOATS 9ozS. 590


LIBBY'S
FRUIT COCKTAIL

LIBBY'S
STEWED TOMATOES


21 790


303 460


a__a m^


LIBBY'S


FRESH WHOLE

BROILING CHICKENS lb. 85C


U.S. CHOICE

CHUCK ROAST


U.S. CHOICE

LAMB LEGS


U.S. CHOICE

CHUCK STEAK


Ib. $1.20


Ib. S1.79


Ib. $1.49


FOR DISHES
AJAX LIQUID KING $1.10


SPRY SHORTENING

3b.b $1.35


FRESH WHOLE

CHICKENS Ib. 95C
LIBBY'S

TOMATO KETSUP 20 oz 73
COLD POWER GIANT 95C


Lemons and oranges
combine for this creamy spread
or filling. In a saucepan,
combine eight egg yolks, a cup
of sugar, half a cup of butter
and the juice or two lemons
and two oranges. Stir over low


I I n


-- -- --


sterilized jars. Dip a round of
paper in brandy or rum and
place on top of the jar before
screwing down the top. Store
in the refrigerator. This will
keep for about a month in the
frig arid it can be used as either
a spread for toast or, mixed
with whipped cream, as a cake
filling.
Orange caramel sauce is
served with orange or lemon
souffles. Mix a cup of sugar
and half a cup of water in a
saucepan and cook over low
heat stirring constantly until
the water evaporates and the
mixture is a golden colour.
Add a little water and stir
until blended. Cook until the
mixture is thick. Add a little
orange juice and a cup of
orange sections.
For an orange and onion
salad, peel a large orange and
cut it into thin slices. Quarter
each slice and put them in a
salad bowl on a bed of torn up
lettuce. Cut six slices from a
sweet onion and separate them
into rings. Place on top of the
orange pieces. Add six sliced
black olives. Just before
serving, pour on French
dressing and mix well.
Here is a fast soup made
from tomato juice and orange
juice. In a Saucepan, mix
together three cups of tomato
juice and three cups of orange
juice, a cup of chicken stock or
broth, half a cup of Sherry, the
juice of a lemon and a
tablespoon sugar. Bring to boil,
reduce heat and simmer for
five minutes. Remove from
heat and mix in a cup of lightly
whipped heavy cream. Season
with salt and pepper.
Have sugared orange pecans.
Combine one and a half cups
sugar with half a cup of water
in a small saucepan. Bring to a
boil, stirring constantly.
Cook until it reaches 240
degrees on a candy
thermometer. Remove from
heat and stir in two cups
shelled pecan nuts and the
grated rind of two oranges.
Continue to stir the syrup
until it becomes cloudy and
looks grainy. Remove the nuts
from the syrup with a slotted
spoon and place on a buttered
tray or pan to cool and harden.
Or have an orange cake for a
change. Sift together two and a
half cups of sifted cake flour, a
teaspoon baking powder half a
teaspoon salt.
Chop six pitted dates and
four ounce of walnuts. Stir
three tablespoons of the flour
mixture in with the dates and
nuts and set aside. Cream eggs,
one at a time, beating well
after each addition. Combine a
teaspoon of baking powder
with a cup of buttermilk.
Add the buttermilk mixture
to the butter and egg mixture
alternately with the flour. Stir
in the grated rind of two
oranges, a teaspoon vanilla and
the dates and nuts. Pour the
batter into a buttered 10-inch
tube pan and bake at 300
degrees for an hour and 20
minutes.
Boil the juice of two oranges
with a cup of sugar for five
minutes and pour over 'he cake
Page 9, Col. 7


-I
WIN A TRIP
TO MIAMI!'
The baby is our new nursery studio
designed to enthrall the small fry while
we snap captivating pictures of them at
play - but we can't think of a good
name!
We've thought of "Pixie Portraits",
"Playtime pictures". Merry Mites",
"Sugar 'n Spice" and others, but none
quite hits the mark.
Help us and win a Bahamasair trip to
Miami and a special colour portrait of
you or any member of your family. Even
if you're not sure how good your effort is
send it anyway because each entry will
receive a gift coupon for a free picture
with every regular kiddie portrait.
The new studio will be in .ur
waterfront building on East Bay Street
and will. of course, be in addition to our
regular portrait studio. We're planning to
make it a Valentine's Day Opening, so
hurry, we need your help!
Mail in your idea, along with YOUR name
and address to:
TOOGOODS' PORTRAITS
East Bay Street, on the waterfront
P. O. Box 6125 Telephone 5-4641.
I


lwhr rtbur


i


Wed CLSEIpm.Thrsa




OPE al aFrias


G5


uw-







6 Wednesday, January 30, 1974.


YOU'LL FEEL

A NEW PERSON

WITH

'EARTH SHOES'
B JIM Al HIBRSf
NFIW YORK Here is
al ways, it seems. a new slant in
women's shoes Sky-high
stiletto heels and th tiptoe
iook ea.e "wa to r 'latively
level short-heeled pumps,
i .shoes and ,flats Heels
'aed up 'once again in the
piator m look, which is still
riding high Bill now comes a
; !'w ol :l otwear In which
!he l', .ctua dropped
0, :h toes. The 're
Jd 0ok: c lodhoppers
I -,-* 40 ,hop-, atoss the
,,;';:, : h;,h spCc:Jalh e in
I x1h s m.,"' shoppers are
., .:;r or i itted supplies
S: otwear which
1 ,. principles or
,h ,e u .i-n; I:s:tead o! sloping
A .:.i ,the toe the heel
:! ?h I earth Shoe I-
jppo\: :;'.ii one-!i 'w l inch
h n the forward part.
1'ho, *-iber sole. in turn.
I tkens in the
di'no- of the toe. elevating
h2: !.r. A the foot and
Aj ing ihe ,ejarer balancing on
h, heel& "It's like walking
i,'.ii: oot i.n a solt. sandy
1,.tch,'h sa\ s the I S
Ji-,r;h'tor o! the footwear
I h,.' distributor has no
p:'pcm boosting his product
det prices ranging from
S5i0 o 542.l 50 per pair
scandals shoes or boots
buyerm themselves tout the
!"{lort of Farth Shoes. "'Fher
i-" about all I wear" says a
t Aiftoria housewife A mran in
R XY N\ Y notes that his Earth
Siles did what four years at
0-'i Air Forces Academy could
I do teach him to stand up
".efht I'he .curious
-; *.^-dos,.w.i nstr ti totion forces
:' wearer to leatr backward
a d thus to tulck in the
.: and bottom, and
-"..@h'. tIte spine Some
i aat., concerts claim that
Sirth Shoes cure bunions and
!.-.I stimulate 1 blood
Sil-on Pod:atrst, have yet
S ke 1 altitude. but to
'..enr,< i 1t -1\l- 'nagaa ine
I -:"h hs e A, Cm ti ar less
.x:_.. -er .,s than platforms,
.-hi', n h te caused countless
rdp"in ajnd :r.tl,;res Most
.c::r .j,? ~to,.l, that ihe
10Rd fev, '. ks can be
tin, r arth-Shoe
ro,'kC r A nom" JT.plain ot
chn .'nd and a
I arch 'h. c their
ar<:._ .*: :he I S. o to the
h : b i' ; : ''A li first
ca:::.' 1i.,, ihe' ::1 a sm all
h n C'nhae- "I tried
th 'n 0' .;n ;: "'it.'dia Sei niy
le.,.. i : Ihj J o ery
:ed T! .- ..h:,cs to Jk down
;he h er ,Ighr, Danish
teach r k >.ga wh. ad for
arm Ow:e'd tie e:cots of
h -)-,,It:te O- i +
Bra/. a w.ri ItJ i:, t. l iuded.

Retrn ri I D;i: ushe

herself1 o 5' ; ;., ..i
It. v.r .. .. 'he - .: ':;. ir
d trib ti o n nrii s: Jaco s
topenida te a' i',a'ta- shop n

the past yeat **It's ':., : st a
bintessr itisn him .S.

are mnto thiit s lh a it. ;
vegetatian t ail "at- :|i t ate


also total into th 'eTr ,rangC
footwear


ARRIVED TODAY Joma
from Jacksonville
ARRIVING IlT)P'ki kW
fropic lHaven from West Palm
Beach.
WEATHER
Weather mainlyy fla with a
slight chance of a shower
Wind: South-easterly I2 to
1i6 n.p.h.
Sea Slight
ltemp. fMmir tonight 65
Max. tomorrow 80
SUN
Rises 6:55 a.m.
Sets 5:5 1 pin.
MOON
Rises 10:17 a.m.
Sets 11:30 p.m.


RECORD BAF
LONG
MACARONI*1-LB 3/89 WH
LONG & ELBO
MACARONI* /-LB 3/49

SPAGHETTI 1/2-LB3/49
*WHILE THEY LAST!


SPECIALS FOR THE WEEK JANUARY 31st, THROUGH FEBRUARY 3rd, 1974.


HAMIAN GROWN

OLE .


690


31 4


SMOKED HAMS HOLE OR
SMOKED HAMS-SHANK PORTIONS


SMOKED HAMS

DAISY CHEESE


-BUTT PORTION


F1I1AOUR GROCERY SHELVES


PRO
TOOTH BRUSHES BIORAL
DUNCAN HINES
CAKE MIXES


LIBBYS
PEAS&CARROTS


AXION


I ,i'l,


IRISH
SPRING SOAP
BAGGIES
TRASH BAGS
BAGGIES
SANDWICH BAGS
RENUZIT
AIR FRESHENER
MACLEANS
TOOTH PASTE
PHENSIC
COUGH SYRUP


BAHAMIAN GROWN

TOMATOES


CELERY


RED DELICIOUS

APPLES


BAHAMIAN GROWN

GREEN CABBAGE


PER LB


EACH


7-OZ


ECON.


LARGE


250


I


Ib.


PER LB

PER LB

PER LB


1.29

$1.39


99C


No.998


18-OZ.


16-OZ

GIANT


BATH


10's


80's


59C


790


2/79C


790


2/690


99C


2/89C


.'s $1.10


PER LB 1


I I I I


4 .
r~f^y~ALEGRE yqy~



Mag/Pnapl11-z


GAKRDE FES PODCE


-- -- ------ -- -c- --- -------- --r -- ------- --Y1 -- ---- -----~ -~- _-~ --LIC ~-- -~-C -- -.L11~-L---~---


41 1111i'llsill'il







UhWrbmWdnda, Jnay30 94


974. ^


ALL STORESS NOW OPEN ON
SUNDAY... INCLUDING OUR
MACKEY &MADEIRA STREET
STORE, A.M.-I1O: A.M.


CHOICE

SIRLOIN I




U.S. CHOICE
SIRLOIN TIP ROAST


U.S. CHOICE
TOP ROUND ROAST
NEW ZEALAND PRIME
LAMP SHOULDER CHOPS


m-- b.


PER LB

PER LB

PER LB


s2.49

$2.29

990


-jANDWIlHEATS


RATH
SLICED BACb. ..


OSCAR MAYER
SALAMI FOR BEER
OSCAR MAYER
SMOKIE LINKS
OSCAR MAYER .
CHOPPED HAM


FAMILY FARE
ORANGE JUICE


EAGLE BR/.ND
BUTTER
HATCHET BAY
MILK





CHEF CHOICE FRENCH
FRY POTATOES 0-oz
MCKENZIE
GREEN PEAS 24-oz
MCKENZIE
MIXEDVEGETABLES
MRS. PAULS
FISH STICKS
BIRDSEYE WHOLE
STRAWBERRIES
SARA LEE
POUND CAKES


8-OZ

12-OZ


8-OZ


%-GALLS.


12-LB


/2 Gallons


:$1.59


$1.05

$1.39

$1.19


$1.39

3/99C

850


4/99C


75C


9-OZ

16-OZ

12-OZ


79

950

950


$1.29


SPECIALS FOR THE WEEK JANUARY 31st, THROUGH FEBRUARY 3rd, 1


ROINHO
,-1
F R


I


/


FA





I


I
i





i


* ,


I


I















I

I


I I I


.... _._ 111 I


'r


I


I


i


Wednesday, January 30,1974. 7


----- --


year of Post Basic Training:-
Mrs. Prenetta Deveaux, Mrs.
Leoni Farquharson, Mrs.
Rosalie Johnson, Mrs. Veronica
Poitier, Mrs. Shirley Saunders,
Mrs. Shirley Daniels, Mrs.
Lucinda Forbes, Mrs. Carlotta
King, Miss Miriam Storr and
Mrs. Gwendolyn Turner.
FASHION SHOW
MRS. Lynden 0. Pindling
and Mrs. Shelia Butler will be
guests of honour at the second
annual Valentine dinner and
fashion show to be held at Tiki
Village, Nassau Beach Hotel
Saturday, February 16 at 8
p.m.
Professional model Paulette
Browl will direct the fashion
show and has selected guest
models from members of the
Bahamas Secretaries
Association who are sponsoring
tte event. Mrs. Vernice Cooper
will be commentator for the
Fashion Show.
The Secretaries anticipate a
record crowd to attend this last
fund-raising event of the
season. Advance reservations
may be obtained from any of
the Secretaries.


JI ANDY)
QIC GRIT
5 *1 s


DIRY DELIGHTS


MM"


BAHANAS
TO HOST
DRUGS

CONFERENCE
THE Bahamas Government,
cognizant of the budding
problem of drug abuse and
alcohol addiction in the
country has accepted
responsibility for organizing
and financing a Caribbean
Conference on "Strategies for
the Prevention of Drug Abuse
in Developing Countries."
The Conference which is
jointly sponsored by the World
Federation for Mental Health,
the International Council on
Alcohol and Addictions and
the Bahamas Government, will
be held at the Sonesta Beach
Hotel during March 3rd-5th.
Professor Michael Beaubrun
President of the World
Federation for Mental Health
who is liaising with the
Bahamas Ministry of Health
Conference Organizers, has
presented a list of speakers,
among whom are top
psychiatrists and educators,
working in the field of drug
prevention and alcohol
addiction.
The general feeling in the
Caribbean is that methods
applicable to countries where
hard drugs problems are
already endemic, rhav not be
appropriate for countries
which are still relatively free
from hard drugs. The
conference will be placing
special emphasis on the role of
education, legislation and law
enforcement, though other
strategies including secondary
and tertiary prevention will be
examined.
The Registration Fee for
Bahamians is $3 and the Public
is invited to apply to Mrs. A.
Seymour at the Ministry of
Health (phone 27425).
80 PERCENT

OF NURSING
STUDENTS
SUCCESSFUL
OVER 80 percent of the
nursing students who wrote the
final examination in
November, 1973 at the
conclusion of three years of
basic training was successful.
it was announced Monday by
the Ministry of Health.
In addition, eleven
Community Nurses passed
their final examination at the
Department of Nursing
Education after completing
one year of Post Basic
Training.
In releasing the names of
successful candidates, the
Ministry of Health praised the
Department of Nursing
Education in maintaining a
high standard and
demonstrating efficient
performance.
The following nursing
students were successful at the
conclusion of the three year
Basic Training:- Janet Delancy,
Cecilia Demeritte, Alfred
Ferguson, Lillian Johnson,
Pamela Newbold, Deanna
Saunders, Karen Demeritte,
Emily Dorsette, Nancy Forbes,
Alelia Miller, Sharlene Sands.
Gayle Smith and Lonna
Taylor.
The following nurses were
successful after completing one


k


LN


TA


FAA


TAd


I


lSht Zribute





hk (.tilUlI Wednesday, January 30, 197'.




That's the new slogan of The Big Q, and a really simple explanation of our service policy. At Quality Market, we want to give you what
you want, as you like it best. If it's saving, we'll give you saving as you like it best. If it's service, we'll give you service as you like it best.
If it's selection, we'll give you selection as you like it best. So come to The Big Q where you'll find everything as you like it best.

MEAT SPCALS GR
HAMBURGER N.Z LAMB C
PATTIES SHOULDER SP IAL.
6 PATTIES PER PKG CHOPS
1.^~ 99LB 1CANA 20oz
1 ; 1.099i .99,.LB I V c ono 7q
CORN ON COB *
LAMB SHOULDER CHOPS 1.59 LB L~ COTT ATHOOM ,
/3LADY SCOT BATHROOM /
LAMB LOW CHOPS 2.89LB TISSUE 2p 49
LAMB RI CHOPS 2.79 LB
LAMB BREAST 79 LB PUNCH GIANT SIZE
LA LEGJWHOLE OR BUTT) 1.79L ROBN HONo 1.09 DETERGENT .85
LAMB LEGS (SHANK HALF) 1.89LB FLOUR 5LB VEL UQUID GIANT SIZE
JJ7 N.Z. LAMB LOIN CHOPS 1.49LB SPARKY DETERGENT .95
CHARCOAL 10 LB 1.29 ..._ ___
CHUCK ROAST 1.25 LB HELLMANNS I LB
NATIVE PORK 1.19LB MAYONNAISE OT 1.29 TWININGS TEA TINS
NATIVE PORK LEGS 1.29 LB OVALTINE e16 1.25 BUY ONE-GET ONE FREE
CHUCK STEAK 1.39 LB PHOSFERINE
HOU DE STEA 1 TONEC WINE uT 1.69 SAWYERS 16oz
i SHOULDER STEAK 1.69LB coGATESUPER GUAVAJAM .59 JAM
SHOULDER ROAST 1.59LB TOOTHPASTE 1.99 MAHATMA RICE
MEATY^ SHORT^ RIBSf $1.39 L _______- <20 Lb. AVAILABLE
\ MEATY SHORT RIBS $1.39 LB GOLDEN GRAIN 7-1/2 oz TREETOP 26 oz
OSCAR MAYER ALL MEAT MACARONI ORANGE SQUASH .85 -
SBOLOGNA 12 oz 1.19 LB 3/.99 WISE TWIN PACK
MAPLE LEAF LIPTONS LEMON POTATO CHIPS .99
BOLOGNA .95 LB TEA BAGS 20 CT 2/.99 6PACK 16 oz
S .MAPLLAFLIBBYS 303 PEPSIF LCOLA Plus Deposit .
S WENERS 1.29LB WHOLE CORN 2/.89 CAMPBELLS 10-3 4oz
A BOILED HAM 1.79LB EATWELL VEGETABLE SOUP
HORMEL SUNDAY TUNA -1/2 oz 2/.99 5/1.00 /
) ,BACON 1.69LB BY 3'
S--.QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED LIBBYS 303
'P D PRICES GOO SLICED BEETS 3/.99
THURSDAY, JAN. 31st MILKMAID
TASTY BAHAMIAN THRU MILK 14/oz 3/.99 ,
TOMATOES .29Ls SUNDAY, FEB. 3rd FARM 14-1/2 oz LGE
ONIONS 3 LB BAG CRE9A

DAIRYBAHAMIAN


SUMMER COUNTY GR U E
MARGARINE 1/2 LB 4/.88 GROUPER
RAINBOW FARM F&I ET 1.49LB 0 o
EGGS x LGE DQZEN .95
7'1' BORDENS
MILK GALLON 1.69

FROZEN FOOD
BIROSEYE 10 lo
:BROCCOLI SPEARS .69
BIRDSEYE 10 oz
BLACKEYE PEAS 3/.88
____ QUALITY MARKETS PREMIUM
CE CREAM 1/2 GALLON 1.59 FOR YOUR SHOPPING CONVENIENCE,
MONDAY THROUGH THURSDAY CNE O 7
8:30AM-7:O0PM CORNER OF WULFF
FRIDAY & SATURDAY 8:30AM-9:00PM AN VILLAGE ROADS
SUNDAY 7:00AM-10:00AM P.O. BOX N-3939
PHONE 3-26667 8-9







Wednesday, January 30, 1974. i
---__- _____ Sh rtbmuli


ALWAYS



FOR YOU


FROM


1 I

Aft




..


ALSO---


[WIN A|I


FREE



GOLD FRAMED




20"IT


SET


BY &a


-1974 MODEL-


Fantastic!!!


So you're Ging To Spend $40.00 or
More This Weekem on Food Iteas-**
Then Spend it aid Colect a FREE
Ticket... Some Lucky Shpper wil
Take Hose a FREE Television Set.

WITH EVERY PURCHASE OF $40,
CUSTOMERS WILL BE GIVEN A FREE
TICKET. THE LUCKY WINNER WILL BE
ANNOUNCED IN STORE ON SATURDAY
EVENING FEB. 2ND AT 7 P.M.


Ab
By Abigail Van Buren
c 114 IW eCuSc1Trolo.SN. Y. News Smin., Inc.
DEAR ABBY: I am a 35-year-old widow with a 4-year-
old son I'll call "Jimmy." Six months ago I married John.
Sunday, the three of us were dining in a restaurant when
Jimmy deliberately threw a dinner roll on the floor. John
promptly slapped Jimmy across the face so hard it left an
imprint on the boy's cheek. Jimmy didn't cry out, he whim-
pered a little and bit his lip, then big tears started to run
down his cheeks.
A man at a nearby table witnessed the incident, and
walked over to John and said, "The boy is hardly a match
for you. Why don't you pick on somebody your size and
step outside with me?"


Her husband's slap didn't teach a lesson
My husband told the stranger to "get lost," and 1 promise to refrala from using a term that puts women on
quietly said, "Thank you, sir, please let me handle this." the same level with a used car.
The stranger left, and not a word was said for the rest of
the evening. DEAR ABBY: I am an officially-engaged young woman
My husband insists that he only wanted to teach Jimmy with a serious problem. Last wpk I went somewhere with
a lesson. I say he shouldn't have slapped the child's face in a girl friend without telling my dance. (We went to a
public. What is your opinion? JIMMY'S MOM singles bash.]
The first person I saw at t4 bash was my fiance! He
DEAR MOM: One should never slap a child's face in was angry with me so I left immediately. Now he won't
public-or in private. The "lesson" Jimmy learned was that even speak to me whe!Je call him on the telephone.
"might makes right." I hope you handled It by explaining I'd like to see him4o I can patch things up. But how?
to John that reasonable men educate with words-not vio- 1 STILL SINGLE
DEAR STILL: Go to the ,aet "singles bash"-you'll
DEAR ABBY: Your stand against spouse-swapping, I probably find him there. Yu have as much reason to be
agree with, but I must protest your use of the term. "wife- angry with him as he has to be angry with you. And unless
swapping A wife is not a possession, or a commodity or a he's willing to bury the hatche* I suggest you become
mindless ninny who may be swapped or lent at the will of officially single again.
her husband. Yet, this is exactly what that term implies. Problems? You'll feel better If you get it off your chest
[Have you ever heard anyone call it "husband swapping"?] Per a personal reply, write to ABBY: Box No. W 0. L.A.,
WORDS COUNT Calif. SO6. Enclose stamped, self-addressed envelope.
DEAR WORDS: You are right, of course. The whole idea Please.
of "mate trading" [better?] is disgusting to me, but I Hate to write letters? Seed $1 to Abigail Van Burea,
132 Lasky Dr., Beverly Hills, Cal. 90212 for Abby's booklet.
"How to Write Letters for All Occasiess."


. In-B...t cr.t.r,..a W ORANGES AND ORANGES


From Page 5
when it is done. Let cake cool
in the pan.
Another orange cake has a
spicy ginger flavour combined
with the orange. Put an
unpeeled orange and a cup of
sultana raisins through the
food chopper.
In a bowl, cream half a cup
of butter and one and a quarter
cups of sugar. Add two eggs
and beat the mixture until it is
light. Beat in a cup of
buttermilk.
In another bowl, sift two
cups sifted flour, one and a
half teaspoons ginger, a

CLOTHES
From Page 5
113.5 in November from 112.0
in October. Barbers' fees and
deodorants showed increases of
0.08 and 0.02 of a point
respectively.
The recreation and reading
index increased by 0.3 of a
point, from 114.4 in October
to 114.7 in November. Drinks
in bars contributed 0.02 to this
increase.
The November other goods
ad ser icr et index of 114.6


showed no change


October's index.


teaspoon baking soda and hall
a teaspoon each of baking
power and salt.
Add the flour mixture to the
egg and butter mixture andstir
until the batter is smooth. Add
the orange and raisin mixture
and blend well. Pour into a
buttered nine-inch square pan
and bake at 350 degrees for an
hour and five minutes or until
the cake tests done.
Let the cake cool on a wire
rack and wrap it in Saran and
foil. Let it stand for at least a
day before serving.
The cake can be served as it
is or cut in slices and broiled.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that JOSEPH NATHANIEL
LEWIS of Matthew Town,. Inagua is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 23rd day of
Jan. 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship. P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that GEORGE ALISTAIR
McKENZIE of Village Road, Nassau is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 23rd day of
January 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau.


NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MERLENE BEATRIC
FORBES of Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 30th day of
January 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship P.O. Box N7147. Nassau.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that RODNEY WALTER FORBES
of Eight Mite Rock, Grand Bahama is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 30th day of
January 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship P.O. Box N7147, Nassau.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ANITA FRANCIS of P.O.
Box N-7776, The Cottages, Lyford Cay, New Providence.
Bahamas is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration should not be granted should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 30th day of January, 1974 to
The Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship
P.O. Box N7147, Nassau.


I


---


from









Wednesday, January 30, 1974.


From Page 4
have had to play the traditional
role of guest and subtly have
felt compelled, out of good
manners, to give my hostess
maybe a slightly more
favourable write-up than I'd
intended or I'd have at least
felt uncomfortable if I'd
wanted to ask her any
questions that might have put
her in a bad light
One question people have
asked me after I'd seen her is
what shy looked like. As if if
she was reprehensibly ugly or
masculine looking that
would explain away all her
philosophy
She is no glamour girl. She is
nice looking and has a strong
face She, in no way looks like
an imitation of a man. Her
shoulder length hair was
uncoiffed and her face devoid
of make-up. After all she was
presumablh at the pool so that
she could swim. She wore the
appropriate clothes for the
occasion a bikini (not a scant
as the more popular) and a
..%..-r i matching jacket.
She might not be feminine
as we are taught to be but, to
coin a local phrase, she appears
to he 'all woman"'
The Caledonian Society of
the Bahamas celebrated Robbie
Burns' Night on Friday.
January,. 25 in the t,.nlil .'i.in
manner at their banquet held
at the Sheraton British
Colonial Hotel


Hlaggis, the famous Scottish
delicacy, was served through
the courtesy of British Airways
BOAC who presented a gift
of the special dish for the
occasion.
What is haggis? As a child I
used to think it was meat from
some weird animal of'the same
name! And I lived considerably
closer to Scotland then than
we do in the Bahamas.
Meat, as we know it in the
New World, is a luxury to
many in the Old World. Only
for the relatively comfortably
well of is there the daily eating
of steaks. ihops and roasts.
Ilaggis. considered the
national dish of Scotland, was
common in England until the
eighteenth century.
It consists of calf's, sheep's
or other animals hearts, livers
and ,' and also sometimes
of the ii, intestines boiled
in the stomach of the animal,
with seasoning of pepper, salt,
onions etc chopped fine with
suet and oatmeal
I wonder what is done with
these parts of the slaughtered
animals in Nassau'? Are they
thrown* d va0'
In these days of
skyrocketing prices maybe
some ingenious Bahamian cook
will come up with a Bahamian
dish incorporating the
traditional thrift of the Scots
and the traditional seasonings
of the Bahamas A Bahamian
haggis''


On Monday, January 28 at
the Governor's Hall of the
Sheraton British Colonial Hotel
S t. Augustine's College
presented the St. John's
University Men's Choir.
As Lou Adderley the
Headmaster of St. Augustine's,
said "St. Augustine's, in a way,
was born from the imagination
and zeal of the Benedictine
missionaries from St. John's,
and as a result many of our
students have had the
opportunity of furthering their
educational advancement at
this great mid-western college,
sometimes when circumstances
had ruled out any other way."
The Minister of Education
and Culture mentions in his
foreword to the programme a
few distinguished Bahamians
who are alumni of St. John's:
Mr. Arthur Barnett, Permanent
Secretary to the Ministry of
Home Affairs; Dr. Timothy
McCartney, Clinical
Psychologist and Author and
one of our most distinguished
lawyer, Mr. Eugene Dupuch,
Q.C., who, while a student at
St. John's left a Bahamian
cultural memorial there by
composing the College song.
The St. John's University
Chorus is one of international
renown. Director Axel
Theimer. was former member
of the world-famous Vienna
Boys' Choir.
This one of a series of
concerts was held in aid of the


I


10 -'Ahe ribunet


SEEN AT THE PRESENTATION OF THE HAGGIS TO THE CALEDONIAN
SOCIETY are Mrs. Frances Millar vice president, Mr. Robert H. Cook, district sales
manager, British Airways BOAC, Mr. Ian Davidson, committee member, Mr. Ken
Thompson, treasurer and Mr. Ian Taylor, president of the Caledonian Society.


St. Augustine's College School
Development Fund.


Mr. and Mrs. Harry B. Sands
have announced the
engagement of their daughter
Shelley Marie to Mr. John E.
Lindley, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Robert J. Lindley.
The wedding is to take place
in July.

BY ALL accounts the
Governor-General Sir Milo
Butler and Lady Butler had a
"ball" at the Red Cross Ball at
the Haylcon Balmoral Beach
Hotel.
Reports are that everyone,
coaxed along by emcee Jerry
Tinlin. had a marvellous time
with Sir Milo and Lady Butler
participating fully in the fun
and frolic.
The party didn't break up
until 2.30 a.m. The Butlers,
whose stamina is truly
amazing, outdistanced Sir
Milo's aide Colonel Lionel
Chapman who got sleepy and
went home to bed.
It would appear that having
a Bahamian couple in
Government House is
introducing a new salutory
dimension into high class social
life in Nassau. For Bahamians
know how to have fun and let
their hair down.
Right on, Sir Milo.


SAN ANDRVS
WELCOMES




AS A NEW PROPERTY OWNER

AND A MEMBER OF OUR

PUBLIC RELATIONS STAFF


Hd Im Paul Wafeeld
Right now I'm on two winning teams the MIAMI DOLPHINS and
SAN ANDRRS, whete my new teammate is Wenty Ford
Ever since I started to play football in pk-up games aS a kid in
Warren. Ohio. I set my goal on lDne day playing frst-strlng on a, pro
tenm gigoo dStoIugh t win th l world cmpionthip As i you know. that
dream came true
Now", I'm starting to look toward my future and financial scunity
One of the first things I did was buy land good land in San Andros,
NOW at theft right pice Just as I did in my footbl ca,ree, lI reed
on aOpf ,eno, knowledge and knowmhow I have cohidence in th men
at the helm of San Andros wth over 100 curmulsate years expeence
in successful land development. both in the Bahamas and Florida
Ada idfrom investment potential, l espially wanted to fid a Get-
A-Way placeI like to fish, al. lsm and relax Honelstly, If there
a better place than San Andros to do all those thing, It' a well kept
secret'
I made a good move buying San Andros property for my enioy
me nt today and my security tomorrow.
I'll be in Nassau and San Andros to get acquainted with my propwty
owner nghbourso
I'd like to meet you' San Andros will be hosting Open House parties
You're all invited to join the festttites
At 300 pmn., Saturday, February 2nd at RONNIE'S REBEL ROOM,
S behindd the Anchorage Hotel) Wenty Ford and I will be on hand to personally
great ~yary one. You'll Sear tome interesting facts about the great progress that
hi been made at San Andros and, perhaps., some football and baseball
taorlies you heeni't heard betforiet
In the meantime, why don't you look into the opportunities at Sa' Andros
Store youriel. Petaps s'l1 be ny neighbour by the timt I 0eetl you Any of the
Sn Andros brokrs will be glad to pe you the whole story, and I'll try to help
when we got together


7'


9


YOU CAN FOLLOW
PAUL WARFIELD'S LEAD AND BUY

PRIME LAND IN SAN ANDRVS
AT THE RIGHT PRICE TODAY I


AT A


DO WHAT PAUL WARFIELD SUGGESTS DROP IN
BROKER'S OFFICE TODAY AND GET THE
SAN ANDIWS STORY FIRST HAND I

A,ial M nOS property mmm U bttIo Mhl U
SUWESTARS at


nI aSS IT:
Driks,bi& t his mes, PaWl tam ,Wmty Fod,
Soan esxKEmtms, udifggfr Wy,.


CHAT WITH THE BOSS Bahamas Minister of
Tourism, the Hon. Clement T. Maynard, right, chats with
Mr. and Mrs. T. Outten at a banquet held recently for
Bahama Islands Tourist Office managers at the Camelot
Room of the King's Inn and Golf Club. The banquet
brought to a close a three-day meeting of the managers.
Mrs. Outten is on the staff of the Freeport/Lucaya Tourist
and Convention Board. Photo: Wendell Cleare.

Jerry, national sales manager came over from Mi.
for the Nassau Beach Hotel. especially for the Ball.


NOTICE
n--immi-ni



BAHAHNAN PAIT SUPPLY LTD.
Bay Street

will be closed all day Thursd3y, January 31st,
1974, for stocktaking.
Our Market Street branch will remain open.

We regret any inconvenience to our customers.










PEACHY SPICE CAKE

Bake one-layer spice or
N3* gingerbread cake mix in
I, 8" or 9" round cake
layer. Frost with 1 cup
sweetened whipped
cream flavored with 1
teaspoon almond extract.
Dust top with nutmeg_
Top with chilled,
well-drained Libby's
Sliced Cling Peaches. 8
servings.


|QL LTY OVER ALL SNVCE 1868 I

DISTRIBUTORS THROUGHOUT THE BAHAMAS
THE GENERAL AGENCY LTD
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WILL BE


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JANUARY 31,1974


FOR STOCKTAKING!


NK--S

INK- S


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II. I I I -Il ll III[II


I I I I I I I I II II I I I .


I


--`LL--- -f ~L LC ~-- -~-- -I___~~ L ~. ~~y __ _~I _~Cy.~_____ r__~ --1-1 -~C -~-I-~ --Y C --_ _L_ ~ -~ -~--- -I


"=-'=-'l









Wednesday, January 30, 1974. UPh Gribunt


inflation now the danger, says


Citibank


0554 lb iav prt l .i! ;i -,ji;=.
lllgel ill sl M. !' tV, .|l m,I.|
owth thain ll-- C i: i .
ist Nationu l (t \ K I i d
\ew York r -l
I lrtio ii 'oti l. I i -s v i
T 1.al lllt cl! \ ,to k ti t,)


494 ~~'a7~


p-n i where businesses and
honwholds may respond by
S dUlcll gi expenditures,
tihsank warned in the Bank's
I.miliar\ ccml onmic letter.
Cilh.ink in Nassau, which
Sas theMis! merican Banking
1 inti"'- t l open in the
BAiliha ,,s Il -( 1 ). has made the
inltoiilatil available for
Bahanlin c onsurners,
1 I t I !eve Iti !! : ,i, ,, from
making the slowdown or
'cessiont even deeper in the
I silced States, the growth of
lthe money, stock would have to
h' accelerated to a


WE'RE COPY CATS!


fi 'i~i BRING IN
YOUR
,~ 4 PHOTOS
M ./ ANDSEE.
the waterfront at LEst
/.: i ay St. & William St. -
Phone 5-4641


"^- .ai


Call the eI pe:s'. the ones who think about your
children ait viOsi grandchildren, and about
quick m-lAi t--ts rnts. too.


We do. We think about your children's children, too.
And, we think San Andrps is the investment
opportunity with a future.
By the time your children are old enough to buy real
estate for themselves--the choice land may be gone.
And the prices may be so high they could not afford
land anyway.
You can solve that problem for them. Invest for them
in San Andros. NOW. These low terms cannot last
forever:
45 DOWN 45 MONTHLY.
(Just $3495 for more than 1/4-acre; $3995 for almost
1/3-acre!)


CALL
C. A.Christ ie Real Estat .S ... ........ .
Nofolk tHol ,,?i 2iid floor, Suite 8 Phone: 5-9737
"The name that's a tradition in Bahamas real estate."




Cor.Rosetta St.& Mt. Royal Ave.

5th Terrace East, Centreville




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-:.ilirliall, higher rate thar
in 1973. Citibank economists
said.
I his confronts monetary
policy with a hard decision,
not only in the United States,
but abroad: Accept a
full-blown recession or pump
up the money supply and
boost prices even further, the
letter noted.
Citibank economists also
pointed out that one of the
effects of the oil shortfall has
been a cutting back in the
dollar overhang-dollar assets
held by foreign central banks.
In fact, the train of events
have moved so swifly that the
world may once again be
visited by a dollar shortage.
The oil embargo and price
boosts have accelerated the
trend of a stronger dollar by
imposing a huge burden of
added import costs that falls in
a highly uneven fashion on the
industrialized countries.
Because the blow to the U.S.
balance of payment is probably
less severe than that sustained
by other countries, the dollar is
gaining on foreign markets.
Citibank estimates that the


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industrialized countries will
have to pay a staggering $50
billion more for oil in 1974,
assuming that the oil price
increases will stick and that oil
shipments will return to more
normal levels.
Thus the U.S. would pay an
additional $10 billion,
equivalent to some 14 per cent
of its total merchandise import
bill
But Japan's added cost will
come to 28 per cent of its total
import bill, and western
Europe's to about 35 per cent
of imports from outside the
continent, Citibank economists
pointed out.
What's more, less than one
third of the additional foreign
exchange so suddenly acquired
by the oil-exporting countries
will be spent for imports from
the advanced industrial
countries in 1974.
The Lions share will be
invested in financial assets.
with the bulk of it finding its
way into Eurodollar deposits
and U.S. securities rather than
into other currencies, thus
further strengthening the


dollar.
The oil squeeze will also
have an unsettling effect on
interest rates in ll)74
On one hand. the business
ioniimunity here and abroad
seems to regard the .. ,'e? as
: '.' i more severe
business slowdown than had
been anticipated earlier
including expectations of
outright recessions in the
United States. Germany and
Japan
A recession wo'lod result in a
decline in real short-term rates
in the United State- ultimately
amounting t!o '() per cent,
Citibank pointed out.
However in the short run,
lte energy q 1Ce/c could
moderate the usual cyclical
decline in money market rates.
The most obvious reason is
that the .liii. pirenium in
short term rates the
expected rate ot inflation
during the ensuing few months
- is likely to rise even above its
late 1973 level. if. as is wi idel
anticipated, the stquee/c
mandates an extension into
1974 of the 7 to percent rate
of inflation that persisted
through 1973.


Steve Norton (second from
right) vice president of
Resorts International Ltd.
was voted chairman of the
N;ssaiiParadise Island
Promotion Board for 1974 at
the annual meeting.
Mr. Norton takes over the
duties of chairmanship from
Ron Overend (second from
left) general manager of the
Flagler Inn.
Also pictured are George
Mers (left) general manager
of the Nassau Beach Hotel
viho was elected vice
chairman n for the 1974 year
and Ron Muzii Executive
Director of the Promotion
Board.


BAHAMIAN BORN Brian Wilkinson (right above) is the
first management trainee to join Solomon Brothers Limited
in the company's current programme of in-depth
development of Bahamian management potential.
Roy M. Solomon. managing director of Solomon
Brothers, (left above) announced last week that the firm
was seeking to employ qualified Bahamians with the
intention of training them for positions in
middle-management and eventually for top leadership of
the 66-vear-old company.
The son of Mr. and Mrs. Harold Wilkinson. Brian was
born in Nassau in 1954 and educated at Uppingham School
in England where he obtained four A level and six 0 level
passes in the General Certificate of Education. He returned
to Nassau in 1972 and spent a year articled to a prominent
firm of chartered accountants.
"It is encouraging." Mr. Solomon said today in
announcing the appointment, "to know that there are
young Bahamians of Mr Wilkinson's calibre who are
interested in making a career in business in our country. We
are aiming for the complete Bahamianization of Solomon
Brothers, including top management, and that programme
can succeed only to the degree that we can attract
ambitious and energetic young people with the ability to
learn and the willingness to work hard."
Mr. Wilkinson will spend a number of months in each
department of the company, which includes The Pipe of
Peace and its branch stores in Nassau and Freeport and the
firm's extensive wholesale business here and in Grand
Bahama.
It is planned that after succvssutil completion of this
intensive local training Mr Wilkmsoni will attend specialized
management training course, abroad


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ihr l h ribun _


Wednesday, January 30, 1974.


Energy liberation


INCRFl)IBLE-! Outrageous!
Ludic rousi
I hat's how women
responded to a suggestion that
the feminist movement is
part to blame for the energy
Crisis
John C. Fisher, manager of
(;cneral Electric Co 's energy
systems planning, mad, the
suggestion in a speech in
Washington.
I he initial reaction from
most women was laughter.
Vhe way Fisher explained it.
the liberation movement has
meant more women in the
working force. And, he added:
"Since most energy


consumption is associated with
factory and office work and
since the rest of energy
consumption is accelerated by
the affluence that comes from
two jobs per family, we find
that the changing life-style of
Americans with liberated
women entering the labour
force in the same manner as
men, approximately doubles
our per capital energy
consumption."
"1I think he's nuts," replied
Karen Decrow, 36. of
Syracuse. NY. author of a new
book called "Sexist Justice.
(AP)


THREE HOTEL EMPLOYEES receive cash prizes from the management of the Hyatt
Emerald Beach Hotel for their outstanding service during the past month. Pictured from
left: Mrs. Millicent Munroe, executive housekeeper, Mrs. Ruth Fisher, inspectoress of the
month for the second time, Mrs. Harriet Ferguson, maid of the month and David J.
Knowles, assistant manager. Not shown is Eroll Horton, houseman of the month.


Get the red carpet treatment from

San AndrVs and Cosmopolitan.


YVETTE BETHEL



YVETTE BETHEL


You can be onc of the wise investors with San Andros property ... at low introductory terms. But
hurry., land is going fast on North Andros!


Cosmopolitan friendly, knowledgeable staff' i, waiting to give you
heard ... details of investment opportunity at San Andros.
DID YOU KNOW...
You can get a 2-bedroom villa for S20,000, plus lot? And, your
big Bahanims Village lot will cost you just S45 DOWN and S45
MONTHLY. Up to 14,500 sq. ft!
Ths is lthe dell you \ve been waiting for: I enjoy San Andros
recreation now. Sell your prime property for a tidy profit in the
near future.
You desert the best. And. you get the i'd carpet treatment from
us.


details you may not have

.
Z:-



KINGS COURT
PHONE: 5-7477 or 5-7478


A A= ,-- IIJI


Mrs Pindling plaits

a new hobby

A NATIVE straw market at t[ long Bai? No it's just a
new hobbs of M\rs MIarguerite Pindling straw plailing
The lovely wife of the Prime Minister said that she was
walking in her backyard one dan and saw the palm fronds
froni a coconut tree drn ir in the sunu
Thinking of her childhood in \ndros when she used to
plait palm fronds and sell them in order to buy school
supplies, she autoniaticalls started plaiting
It was such fun that she decided to plait some more, and
in less than four days during her spare time she completed
some 42 veards
Her specialist is the "11 string plaits."
She is also trvin her hand it the "seven string
insertion.' However, she sas that one is a little tricky and
takes longer to do
%hen she has completed several more yards. Mrs.
Pindling hopes to have a variety of straw items made up.
The proceeds from the sale of the items will be donated
to charity
Photo shows her under a cool coconut tree busily
plaiting.



Exciting things are

happening at the Fabuldous

Trade Winds Bar & Lounge

Paradise Island

NOW APPEARING



















WENDELL STUART
SHOWTIMES NIGHTLY. 10:40 & 12:40

Make the evening complete with a gourmet dinner
in the Imperial Dining Room.
Dinner from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.





IshuMI I


Planned Savings

with the Commerce.Together

we'll make beautiful things happen.


There's always something beautiful
worth saving for. The day you become
engaged, for example. Whatever the occasion,
you'll find that Planned Savings can work for
you.
Each payday, why not put part of what you
earn into a Commerce Savings Account?


Soon, you'll have saved the money you need
for that special occasion. We help your
money grow by adding interest regularly.
That's why we say, "You and the Commerce.
Together we're both stronger".



<11>


CANADIAN IMPERIAL
BANK OF COMMERCE





































You and the Commerce.

Together we're both stronger.


x


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S LAST DAY THURSDAY
Matinee 3:00 & 4:55, evening 8:30 -'Phone 21004, 21005

iRiET vRIEXC
WILL EUA TO
SCOLOM A Naitonai G*n .ral.
PARENTAL DISCRETION ADVISED.
Reservations not claimed by 8:15 will be sold
on first come, first served basis.


Now thru Friday Now thru Friday
Matinee starts at 1:45 Continuous Showings
Evening 8:30 from 3:00
*"THE DEATH MAKERS" PG. ,
Lilli Palmer "A FEW BULLETS
Klaus Kinski MORE" G.
PLUS Peter Lee Lawrence,
"IF HE HOLLERS, Diane Zura
LET HIM GO" PG. PLUS
Raymond St. Jacques
Barbara McNair "THE ASTRO ZOMBIES" G.
'Phone 2-2534 All Star Cast


NOW SHOWING
Matinee continuous from 2 00, Evening 8:30 'Phone 3.4666*


*



IPlus! "TODAY WE KILL TOMORROW WE DIE"FR
% = NO ONE UNDER 17 ADMITTED






Restaurant and Lounge

Now Serving Lunch From 11:00 a.m.
'til 5:00 p.m.

Starting Monday, January 28th.



Bahamian Dishes

American Dishes

Sea Food

Sandwiches

and your favorite
cocktail.......
Manager
: .::::::::::::::::::::::::::::;:::: :::::: : :::: : Friendly B ig
Al Collie
Plenty of FREE Parking Social Hostess
Ms Penny Kemp


Serving Dinner 5 p.m.Till 1 am. n
East Bay at the Foot of Bridge

Phone 32077
.... 111^ .. ,LK"rA ^^r


TOASTMASTERS
SEMINAR
TEIF first Bahamas branch
of toastmasters inti national
will be hosting a seminar in
S" com mn n i c a t i o n and
leadership" at the Sonesta
Beach lotel beginning at 10
a.m. on S iSlii1.1., Fehi uart 2.


iShe ributtn


r


The programme will be
sponsored by the 47th district
of international body.
FIRST AID COURSE
All those First Aiders
registered for the Red Cross
Higher First Aid Course should
note that the course will be
held at headquarters on


NOTICE

This is to advise the public that Mr. Preston
Sands is no longer employed by Besco Limited
and is not authorised to make collections on our
behalf.
BESCO LIMITED
W.L. Roberts, Director.


Dowdeswell Street beginning
tomorrow at 7.30 p.m.
ARCHITECTS' SEMINAR
The first Seminar of I B.A.
will be held at the C. R. Walker
Technical College, tomorrow at
7 p.m. in building G. room 3 or
4.
The session will be officially
open by a Government official.
'"These Seminars are
mandatory for all persons who
are interested in becoming
Corporate Members of I.B.A."
a spokesman said.


13


Wednesday, January 30, 1974.

FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157


And he also said that the
members of the church had "a
personal responsibility to be in
Christ ... and to move out and
be a hope, not only for their
parish but also for the entire
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas.
"We all can work together
because there is a natural
continuity in St. Joseph's," he
said.
Father John F. Sullivan,
responding appropriately, gave
the vote of thanks after the
address.
He is the present pastor of
the church and was included
among the group honoured at
the head table. Others in the
group included Msgrs. Moss
and Finger, Frs. Elias Achatz,
Marcian Peters, Michael Kelly,
Fr. Cornelius. Fr. Michael, Fr.
Herman, Fr. Silvan and Fr.
George. They were introduced
to the gathering by Mr. Harold
Woodside following a solo, "I
Did It My Way," by Mrs. Rose
Richards.
MODELS
Fifteen models participated
in the "Parade of Nations"
costume display which was
commentated by chairman
Mrs. Agnes Richardson. Some
of the costumes included the
Indian national dress, a
beautiful silk sari, modelled by
Mrs. Doris Bullard. with Mrs.
Zoe Galanis modelling a white
embroidered Japanese kimono
and a head-dress that included
large carved hair-pins.
Giving the show a taste of
south of the border was young
Theresa Carroll in a Mexican
costume, complete with a wide
sombrero.
Others participating in the
costume display wcrc Carmetta
Basden, Africa: Barbara Tynes,
Spain: Deborah Connolly,
Ceylon; Cynthia Elliott,
Scotland: Ilonka Roker,
Jamaica; Deborah Miller,
America; Audrey Wright,
Rome; Donna Richardson. the
Bahamas: Diane Dean, Pakistan
and Norma Lightbourne,
Holland.
St. Joseph's Parish has, since
1934 been pastored by 31
priests, several of whom have
been re-located throughout
parishes in other countries and
the Bahamas.
Last night s function ended
following a dance to music of
the "Biosis Now."

TOASTMASTERS BALL
THE first Bahamas branch
of toastmasters will hold its
annual President's Ball on
Saturday February 2, at 7:30
p.m. at the Sonesta Beach
Hotel tickets are available from
members or can be purchase at
the door. One of the highlights
of the evening will be an
appearance by Kayla Lockhart
Edwards.


DORIS BULLARD in an Indian saree


St. Joseph's parish


holds its jubilee

By SIDNEY DORSETT
MEMBERS of the St. Joseph's Church, Farrington Road, last night honoured the former pastors
of their church at a dinner-dance held in the Governor's Hall of the Sheraton British Colonial
Hotel.
The celebration also marked .':' "
the 40th. anniversary of St. ,.-
Joseph's Church which has
been in use since January 28,
1934, the date of the first Holy
Mass ever offered in the
building.
The Church is now pastored
by Fr. John F. Sullivan, SS.
CC., and Fr. Michael Kelly, SS.
CC.
Principal speaker at the
function, which also included a
costume display by the ladies
of the parish, was Monsignor
Preston A. Moss, also a former
pastor.
Speaking at the
dinner-dance, which was well
attended, Monsignor Moss
noted that the church has
grown from a small
congregation of adults to a
large one that is made up -.,
generally of young people -
representing a second
generation. .
FELLOWSHIP I'." -'
In his address he also
stressed the need for greater .
fellowship and urged the St. "
Joseph parishioners to become
more fully acquainted with DEBORAH MILLER portrays the U.S.A.
each other as their parish had .- .
expanded to include five -
different constituencies in New .
Providence. : -
Times, he said, have changed
from the days when a priest
could get to know the names
of each member of his parish.
But the needs of the members
must still be found out and
known. They will have to
create a new way to become a
parish family, Monsignor Moss
said.


JUBILEE CELEBRATION participating included (from 1. to r.), Fr. Marcian Peters,
O.S.B., Fr. Cornelius Osendorf, O.S.B., Monsignor John B.
FORMER PASTORS of the St. Joseph's Church, Finger, Deacon Lawrence Bethel, Fr. Herman Wind, O.S.B.,
Farrington Road, held a concelebrated mass on Monday at Fr. Elias Achatz, O.S.B., Prior at St. Augustines Monastery,
the church to mark its 40th anniversary. Priests and Fr. George Boogmans, S.M.M.

"T;' -. "A
I 'fl I ^ ._^ I .


ZOE GALANIS in a Japanese kimono

HEE ndTHR












nesday, January 30, 1974.


I -.

Arawaks' Vincent Symonette (third from right) out jumps Buccaneers' Winston Clark.


Arawaks crush Buccaneers for first win


ARAWAKS gained their first win ol
the season with a decisive \ictori ome'
Buccanccrs hb 22-3.
For ,much of the first half of the
match, at I astern Parade, the side-
contained ea ch other, with good tackling
restricting pla> to the mid-field area
iHowever lust as it seemed that hall ttime
would show ino score. lony Hicks put a
high kick d eep into Buccaneers territory
1 he dnccc were unable to clear the
ball and it was switched left where Jim
Law ler am.inie bursting into the hnce to take
a good pass and go over to put Araw aks
toiir pioinits up.
I hit was iust the incentive \ArawA a
needed Iand Trom a line out a few inutI i
lati r. Wnton Clarke brok broke stronmi


down the middle. he found Joey Alfred
tip in support who pul out a good pass
:or Danny Lowe t, increase Arawaks lead
to eight at halt time
I'here was rno 't t lor Buccaneers
aiter the inte-rv.Al nd despite good cover
tackling, particularly. b, ( ntres Coates
'nd ( aiel ,in iher eIic seemed
imminent
It .came when Win. I io ard Vincent
S munnette char'ce'd dio itn ai Buccaners
kick, he picked up the resultant loose ball
and put in a tremendous lilty yard sprint
to touch down hci% ween the posts. Jim
Lawlder added the conversion and
Arawaks lead was' n,,% 14
Buccaneers now ironed to come back.
using their forward and strong runs wert-
made hb locks John Smith and Alan


Ingram. however the Arawaks pack
proved stronger all round and forced play
back into Buccaneers twenty five. From
here they gained quick possesion from a
set scrum and a blind side break saw
Clarke again going powerfully for the
line. This time he went all the way
himself and Buccaneers were now trailing
by 1 8 points to nil.

I here was no holding Arawaks now
and they completed the scoring following
good possession from a loose maul. The
ball came to Stand Off Alan Murray who
beat his man in a strong run, then slipped
the ball inside to Danny Lowe who went
over for his second try, and Arawaks
finished the game with a 19 point
winning margin.


By GLAD)SIONF THI'RSrO\
THE SENSATIONAL
Classic Pros no doubt had
ant icipated whipping
Strachan's Auto Atrikans last
week taking sole possession
of first place in the closely
contested Paradise League
However, it ended the other
way around.
This loss evidently has
placed more pressure on the
Pros because the idea of
coining second third or
fourth has not yet rested in
their minds.
Holding a 12 and four
third place position, the Pros
seek to regain their status
Friday when they take on the
second place defending
champs Kentucky Colonels.
"The game this week like
any other game we play from
now on until the end of the
season will be \ery important
so we have to be very careful
what we Dlan." noted Pros
player coach Cleve Rodgers.
"We can't afford to lose
aMn more games"
There is a chance as long ais


every team has more games to
play that some team miuiht
lose one. "Thus we might eet
a chance to get back into
winning the league again,"
said Rodgers
Recalling their third los. to
the highly regarded
Strachan's Auto. "we knew


CtIIRIIt llt'R(II "Oh.
no. not those flatini tunes
again," said once 'l the jpatclt
crowd at the t'omon,'wealth
Games swin-iming events.
lHe and otlhct 4,'i9i)
spectators waltecd M.i(tildci and
"went downii th. rod to
gundagai three t(mes with the
Nc'w Zealand arini bla.ss haind
J A ustrdlalln swk- niI c! i .1
the tune.
The ionl dcisc tod.i *ii ,ori
\Aussic supporllters .1 iti Quen


Bra\c" as D)avid ,ilk ,.n thc
seconitd () his to l il . l-idals


that if we can control the
rebounds, we can control the
game," said Cleve. However,
playing without the services
of six-foot-five forward Elisha
McSweeney. their forwards
got into foul trouble ear;y
and there was no relief from
the bench to stop the Jerome


I


today .
Wilkic. the all\-American
Scol studymIg marine biolog}
al tihe I niver,,ty of Miami.
IIta ga\e J Iesslon iIIn n tineC
propulsion Ihen hlie 'Ii.n b,
tingelt p in the inc;i s 200
mclers backstroke lintl.


ALL-STAR BOXING



BIRDLAND *

MT. ROYAL &CAREW STREETS


FRIDAY- FEB. 1st.


DOORS OPEN 7:45 P.M.


MAIN EVENT


RENNIE

PINDER
MIDDLEWEIGHT
CHAMPION


- vs-


CRAFTY

JOE HILL
UPCOMING FLORIDA
MIDDLEWEIGHT


SEMI-FINAL POPULAR LEADING
LIGHTWEIGHT
RANDYSCOTT vs SUGAR RAY
FLORIDA'S
CONTENDER SEARS



AFRO DAVIS -- ROSCOE BELL



Plus I 4 EXCITING AMATEUR BOUTS


CHILDREN (UNDER 12) $3.00
GEN. ADMISSION $5.00
S1 RINGSIDE $7.00
-. o ,--------


r AND


"White Label"


WI WILL BE THERE!.. WILL YOU?


Barney led attack.
While confrontation
continue to brew between the
three top teams, the lowly
John Bull has quietly crept
into contention and victory
over the Colonels has earned
them the respect of every
other team.


Fie touched out England's
David _Leigh to win in 224.4..
i new games record.

Medals:


Australia
Canada
I neland
New /ealandt
Kent.a
India
Scotland
Northern
Ireland
Jamaica
%% ales
(hana
I "tanda
Nigeria
Western Sam.im
I rinidud and
lobago
Malaysia
I an/anltin
/amrbia
SingapoTe


ABACONIANS
ARISE!
anl buy .a 120 acre tract
between Marsh IHarbour and
Treasutre u(a. thligmaN o d
%%atcr froiitagi. Si,'. i tt I
elevations. fant.aslit I u jat
onl $S800.00 per acre.
Orgiira i/e a ",. idlj'ate and
take advantage of this
bargain.
CHESTER THOMPSON
REAL ESTATE
I .. 2 4777
(I %euilgs 4 2035 3 1425


Be the man

you want to be'
and be the

want to
see!


Keep it with

DeWitt's Pills







with the strong action
against BACKACHE
and MUSCLE PAINS
-- I mm I I m I i mill I il


-Barr

wins

courage

trophy

THE 'Battling Douglas
Trophy', symbolic of fighting
potential and ring
courage has this year been
awarded to middleweight
Sammy "Kid" Barr.
The presentation takes
place Friday night at the
Birdland Arena on the Rennie
Pinder/Joe Hill middleweight
card.
Donated by promoter
Wilfred Coakley, the award is
presented annually to the
young boxer who in the spirit
of its patron Wilfred
"Battling" Douglas, aspires to
high fistic standards.
A former welterweight
champion. Battling Douglas
ranks in the Hall of Fame
as one of the all time greats
of Bahamian boxing.
He retired in 1968 after
more than 20 years of
outstanding demonstrations
of the art of self defence.
During his career. Douglas
was noted for the
determination, courage and
combativeness that typified
his ring efforts. During the
latter part of his career he
was trained and advised by
Mr. Coakley.
Barr more than any other
fledgling boxer demonstrated
these qualities.
Bahamas welterweight
champ Elisha Obed was the
first of five recipients of this
award in 1969. It followed in
order with Bert Woods.
Cleveland Williams, Buddy
Taylor and Sugar Ray
Sears.
The 21-year-old fighter, in
his first year of professional
activity, fought II bouts,
winning eight and losing
three. Only Obed with 12
wins in 1973 had a busier
year.
In an apparent resurrection
of his hand injury. Barr was
forced to take his fourth
defeat Friday when he was
stopped by a revenge-seeking
Ike Hooks.
"Barr didn't get careless.
He broke the middle finger of
his right hand," manager
Marty Goldstein disclosed
yesterday. "In the seventh,
Barr was uing the right in
defence of a left hook and
Ike's blow landed right on the
broken finger."
Goldstein said Barr
dropped his hand in pain and
left himself wide open for a
vicious left hook from Ike
followed by a combination.
" Barr couldn't defend
himself," he said.
"Not taking anything away
from Hooks who is a great
boxer, I feel certain in the
rematch Barr will stop him
for sure," Goldestein said.
Barr's injury has him out
of ring action for at least six
weeks.


Pinder back

in action
BAHAMAS middleweight
champ Rennie Pinder, after a
long layoff due to three
accidents, returns to action
Friday at the Birdland in a ten
rounder against the crafty Joe
Hill of Fort Lauderdale.
Popular leading lighl ,.ight
contender Sugar Ray Sears will
be featured in the semi finals
agianst an opponent to be
named


RI) (;GUINA,. ridden by
Gilbert Searchwell won the
fourth race at Hlobby Horse
Race Track's eighth meet
yesterday to send out this
season's highest payoff of
S260.50.
On a day of good payoffs
the second largest pay off
occurred in the daily double
when Joe Horton on Dark Star
won the first race and Stan
McNeil won the second race.
This 2-4 combination paid
S106.40
Results and pia. otis
I IR% "F A I 4' .,Iurl.. n, s
I. Dark Star (2) J.Hortoni
$9.85, i5S. S. 55.00.
2. At's twist (8) (;. Bain S3.75.
S3.70.
3. 'oiiplele liiage (4)-
P.Newhold S9.35.
SI CON)D RACE-4'':I urlongs
1. Miss Nethlea (4) S.McNeil

Playoff in
LED BY Anthony Rolle, the
Distribution Department
defeated the Generation
Department to win the 1st
annual BE(C table tennis
tourney trophy last night at
Big Pond Station.
With both teams tied at two
matches each, Rolle defeated


By GLADSTONE THURSTON

THEF UNBFIATEN St.
Augustine's College Senior
Girls offset a fourth quarter
attack and rallied behind the
all-around play to Denise Moss
to a 35-30 victory over St.
John's College yesterday.
With five more left to play,
St. Augustine's need to win
just four more to successfully
defend their high school
championship. They are yet to
lose a game in three seasons of
regular play.
In defence of their i-astem
Division junior girls
championship, S.A.C. is
undefeated in six played with
four left. Aquinas College
junior girls are their closest
rivals.
Yesterday at St. John's, St.
Augustine's snatched the lead
by one at the end of the first
quarter and preserved it
throughout.
St. John's fourth quarter
rally was ignited by back to
back baskets by Phyllis Ellis
bringing them one behind at
21-20. Winsome Davidson
followed going one for oune
from the hne for the tie with a
little over two minutes
remaining.
Ball handler Laural


S 36 30. Si I IS, .3 20.
2 iia/mingti (6) A Saunders
$2 .95. S2.35
3 Star Irek () I. Bain S2 45
)Duuble (2 4) S 106.40
I first )umnella (4 6)S 2 .50
THIIRI) RAC( 6 I urlongs
1 I ad%. Marina (6) R.
I erguson .2 3 SO, S b.7S. S4.45
2. Doe Doe (2) ;. Bain $2.iS.
S2.45.
3. Miss (,1(') () Ant. Saunders
$4.15,
Second Quinella (2 6) S24 OS.
I OURI11H RAC 4i I rulings
1. Red (;uinea (3) (,
Serchwell 6.05, s8.5)., S8 55
2. I ast Sigl'tl (8) C. Munnings
534.t 0, S7 25.
2 l little River (6) A Sands
$4.60.
SThird Quinella (3-8) 5S260.50.
I'111 RAu-I 6 urlonigs
1. Anialone (5) A Gihhs
S8.90. S3.40. 3.00.
2. Sea I ury (4) 1). I'arl $5 75.
$4.25.
3. lamette Dial (2) Ant.


Lawerence Debbage of the
Generation Department in
straight sets 21-19, 21-14 in
the playoff.
Trophy for the tourney
winners was presented by BEC
chairman Preston Albury.
Results: B. Damianos
(Distribution Dept.) bt H.


Lightbourne captured at St.
John's trunover and laid it up
successfully once more giving
S.A.C. the lead. Moss cemented
it with a jumper from the left
post.
Ellis who proved most
productive for St. John's
during the crucial part of the
game teamed up with Mavis
Bullard to once more try and
stop the 'red machine.'
But to no avail. Stephanie
Knowles sank a runaway and
Pamela Wilson was good for
two from the line as S.A.C.
cruised ahead 31-26. Moss and
Bastian finished if off.
Moss topped the scoring for
S.A.C. with a game high of 18.
Joyce Thompson and Paula
Grant combined for a total of
24 points yesterday leading
Aquinas College senior girls to
a 48-38 victory over L. W.
Young.
Ingrid Symonette scored a
game high of 10 points while
Flora Mackey and Karen
Turnquest added six each in
Government IHigh School's
47-13 victory over R. M. Bailey
High senior girls.
in junior boys action
yesterday, St. Augustine's
College behind the 31-point
performance of Peter Dorsett
defeated Aquinas College 88-8.


REGATTA WINNERS
THE SECOND Bahamas Sunfish winter Regatta was held last
weekend by the Royal Nassau Sailing Club with approximately
ten visiting yachtsmeit from various countries.
After a close battle on Saturday in heavy winds with Chuck
Millican of Wisconsin, reigning world champion Pierre
Siegenthaler won again by defeating his direct opponent on
Sunday when the wind subsided.
The winner's record over the six-race series was three firsts and
three seconds against Millican's two first, two seconds, a sixth and
an eleventh.
Final placings were as follows: Pierre W. Siegenthaler, Chuck
Millican, Wisconsin, John Dunkley, Nassau, Richard Rudert, New
York, Robert Knapp, Connecticut


Highest payoff at races


Saunders S13.70.
I iurth Quinellai (4 5) .41 2S.
SIX Iit RACl 4, t 1urongs
1. Cruw Dancer (1) A (,ibhs
57.90. $4.25, $3.85
2, Wall : e (2) S M( Neil
S4 50, $3.20.
3 My Dear (S) ( Munnings
$4.55S
I itth Quinellta l 2)1i2 35.
St Vt NITH RACI- 6 I urtiingi.
I. the tHustier (4) (., Bain
S4.65, S2.75, $2.'S5
2 Knightly Manor (2) M
Brown $13.75, $55 20
3. Rgeals Maiden (7) S M Neil
S3. 70.
Sixth Quinella (2 4) S46 50.
I IG.HTH RA('t 41 It urlongs
I. Limbo Queen (S) iAnt
Saunders $4.70, $3.10, S3.55.
2. Strictly (1) J. Bain $8.15,
S4.40.
3. Diogerlossa (2) G. Bnan
$5.70.
Seventh Quinella (i 5) $29.30.


Bullard (Generation Dept.)
21-14, 19-21, 21-19; M. Moss
(Gen. Dept.) bt C. Stubbs
(Distr. Dept.) 13-21, 22-20,
21-16, L. Debbage (Gen.
Dept.) bt L. Rahming 21-19.
21-12, A. Rolle (Distr. Decpt.)
bt D. Taylor 14-21, 21-17,
21-19.


II


Wed


Denise



darts in




for SAC


Pressure on the Pros for Colonels clash


Aussies snatch more medals


table tennis tourney


IW


I


Cthe rributt




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