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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03704
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: August 29, 1974
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03704

Full Text














hIu


IRgitered wth Postmaater of Bahmas for postae conceons within Nassau and Bahama Islsends Leading Newspaper
VOL. LXXI, No. 232 Thursday. August 29, 1974 Price: 20 Cents


to buy







bank


THE GOVERNMFNT, fresh from its $20 million
purchase of three Cable Beach hotels, is now moving to
buy a bank that is in serious financial difficulties, The
Tribune has confirmed.
Reliable sources said Deputy Prime Minister Arthur D. Hanna,
Minister of Finance, is drafting a resolution seeking House


approval of the new Governmeni
The bank involved could not
be immediately identified. Nor
could it be ascertained when
the enabling resolution will be
taken to the legislature. The
House next meets on
September 11.
The sources said the bank
involved has been back-sliding
closer and closer to financial
failure for some months. -
Government did not initiate
negotiations for the takeover.
It is understood that
Government was asked by
bank officials to assist, as the
only other option was
liquidation in the near future.
Government has decided to
bail out the bank rather than
stand by and watch its collapse
threaten economic stability
and the nation's prestige.
The Government plans to
mern,c the Post Otfice Savings
Bank. a colonial legacy, with
the hank it takes over to create
a National Savings lBank, The
Tribune sources said.
The Government h',s spoken
Iot yc.. u iitdanstorlning the
Post Office Savings Bank into a
more effective National Savings
Bank. Those plans were
explained in the 1972
Independence White Paper:
"The Government is to
reorganise and reconstitute the
Post Office Savings Bank as a
National Savings Bank. It must
be acknowledged that the
success of the Post Office
Savings Bank to date has been
limited, but it is believed that
the formation of a National
Savings Bank, accompanied by
a special campaign to
encourage usage, will see a
significant improvement in the
co immunity's interest in
savings, not only for its own
benefit but as a very real
contribution to the country's
economic stability.
"This new institution will be
free to make loans to the
Government to finance
Bahamian development
projects. The Post Office
Savings Bank cannot do this as
presently constituted."
The Government is only this
weekend winding up its
takeover of three hotels with a
combined total of almost
1,000 rooms.
The 400-room Sonesta
Beach Hotel, renamed the
Ambassador Beach Hotel by
the Government, was taken
over on July 31. The former
owners, General Pahamian
Companies, had earlier warned
the operation would be shut
down as a losing proposition
August 3 unless a buyer was
found. Government paid $10.6
million for that property at
the eastern end of the Cable
Beach hotel row.
The Government paid $3.5
million for the 200-room
Balmoral Beach Hotel at the
western end of the Cable Beach
strip. The property was taken
over on Aug 14, narrowly
averting the possible
complications arising from the
collapse just hours later of the
former owners, Britain's Court
Lines travel firm.
The 386-room Emerald
Beach Hotel, which along with
the Nassau Beach Hotel is
flanked by the Ambassador
and the Balmoral, is costing
Government $4.8 million.


SEE
WHY YOU CAN
AFFORD
DOLLY'S BEST

iriMUK


t advance into the private sector.

By MIKF LOTHIAN

Government is to assume
control of the property this
weekend, possibly at midnight
today.
Those purchases have been
financed by a $20 million loan
from the Bank of Nova Scotia,
approved by the House on
August 1. The $1.1 million left
after the hotels are paid for is
earmarked for further property
buys and for renovation of the
Imerald Beach, which in June
had to close half its rooms and
fire half its employees because
of a lack of business.
The three hotels, according
to Government, are to be the
nt|',us of a planned
a ,tierence centre/casino
gambling complex at Cable
Beach.

Crewmen

discharged
FOUR CREWMEN of the
Panamanian registered "Sea
Trader',. freighter who failed to
be convicted during a Supreme
Court trial earlier this month
were discharged from custody
today when the Solicitor
General withdrew a suit of
prosecution against them.
The men, Eddie Edwards,
25, Richard Bennett, 28,
Arnold Zuckerman, 41 and
Jack Kubatz, 27, were jointly
charged with ship's captain
Terry II Daniels and Louis
Tomiselli who were sent to jail
for four years on August 15
after being convicted on a
dangerous drug possession
charge.
The six were jointly accused
of having a $15-million load of
hashish which the Crown
alleged to have been purchased
by Tomiselli for the sum of
$210,000 in Morocco and
transported to the freighter
when it was in Ceuta, Spain.
The six were arrested at
Little Sturrup Cay after the
ship was boarded by police and
customs authorities who found
the drugs inside a locked cabin.
The jury disagreed on the
verdict in the case of the four
men convicting only Daniels
and Tomiselli.


Schola

THEl GOVERNMENT'S
million-dollar scholarship
programme for attendance at
private high schools will end
next year, because by then the
public school system will be
able to accommodate all
deserving students, Education
Minister Livingston N. Coakley
revealed today.
The scholarship programme
will end with the hoped-for
completion in time for the
start of the 1975/76 academic
year of the Government's $2.6
million, 2000-student senior
high school in Oakes Field the
Minister said.
The disclosure came in a
press conference called to mark
the completion two years
behind schedule of the L. W.
Young and S. C. McPherson
Junior High Schools on
Bernard Road and Baillou Hill
Road South respectively.
Mr. Coakley said the pattern
of development of secondary
education facilities on New
Providence is leading to
centralisation of senior high
schools min the Oakes Field area,
where the national library and
the physical structure of the
just- launched College of the
Bahamas will also be located,.


SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS and committee members of Bahamas Supermarkets Foundation Winn-Dixie
Stores executives and Miss Bahamas Commonwealth Contestants at a banquet given last night in their honour
in the Nassau Room of the Sheraton British Colonial Hotel. Pictured top from left are: Bradlev Knowles.
Anthony Carey, Wilcott Rahming and Michael Humes. Middle row from left are: Dr. R. V. Moore, president
of Bethune Cookman College; J. R. Davis, chairman of the Board of Winn Dixie: M. H. lIollingsworth, senior
vice president of Winn-Dixie; Bobbie Edwards, Eldora Knowles; Sabrina Ingraham; Irank Hamilton,
Winn-Dixie attorney and Kendal Isaacs, director and member of scholarship committee. Front row from left:
Dr. Cleveland Eneas, director and scholarship committee member; Adline Ferguson; Veronica Williams;
Deborah Carew; A. S. Brian, attorney; and Gerald Fryers. executive vice president and general manager of
City Markets. (Photo: R ICKE.Y WELLS).


Eleven students win awards


T 11 E B A H A M A S
Supermarkets Scholarship
Foundation awarded 11 more
Bahamian students with
university scholarships last
night at a banquet given in
their honour at the Sheraton
British Colonial Hotel.
The scholarships represent
$22,000 for the 1974-75
school year. This makes a total
of over $522,000, set aside by
the Foundation for
scholarships to 102 students
since its inception in 1968.
Keynote speaker for the
dinner, which was held in the
Nassau Room, was Dr. Richard
V. Moore, president of
Bethune Cookman College,
Daytona Beach, Florida and a
member of the board of
directors of the Winn-Dixie
Stores.
An educator for 42 years,
with 27 of those years, as
president of Bethune Cookman
College, Dr. Moore pointed out
in his brief but stirring speech
that the Supermarkets
Scholarship Foundation had
given out more scholarships
than the Bahamas government
since its inception five years
ago.
He also urged the
scholarship recipients present
at the dinner to consider four
steps "'vhich he felt were


By LYNDA CRAWLEY

essential for successful living.
First Dr. Moore told them
that they must have the ability
to begin, and to remember that
in orderto be a good leader you
must be a good follower.
He then told them: to have
continuity and ingenuity in
whatever they do; to be
objective and see a man before
they see his colour; to have
personal and institutional
integrity and to have faith in
someone greater than
themselves, or otherwise they
will faiL
Following Dr. Moore's
address, the new scholarship
recipients were introduced by
Mr. Gerald Fryers, executive
vice president and general
manager of City Markets, who
wished the students success in
their college career and urged
them to take advantage of the
opportunity awarded them.
Among the guest attending
the dinner were, J.E. Davis,
president of the Board of
Winn-Dixie Markets, the parent
company of City Markets; Max
Hollingsworth, vice president
of Winn Dixie and Kendal
Isaacs, a director of City
Markets and a member of the
scholarship committee.


Following are the
scholarship winners and
colleges to which they are
going.
Carl D. Sweeting, Bethune
Cookman College; Bradley M.
Knowles, Exeter, Durham or
Edinburgh (UK): Robert I.
Mitchell, Fisk University;
Alfred M. Sears, Columbia
University; Michael A. Humes,
Oklahoma College of Arts;
Rudolph N. Francis, University
of Kansas.
Anthony D. Carey, Florida
State University; Peter F.
Major, Iamiami Dade
Community College; Wilcott C.
Rahming, Oakwood College;
Veronica C. Williams,
University of Waterloo and
Sabrina L. Ingraham,
University of Western Ontario.
Three Miss Bahamas
Commonwealth contestants
this year, were also awarded
scholarships last night to
Bethune Cookman College.
They were Eldora Knowles,
first runner-up in Miss Bahamas
Commonwealth; Bobbie
Edwards, third runner-up and
Adline Ferguson, winner of
Miss Photogenic award.
These scholarships were
awarded to the beauties who
will begin school this fall by
Dr. Richard Moore, president
of Bethune Cookman College.


Shareholders' meeting


TIlE ANNUAL General
Meeting of Shareholders of
Bahamas Supermarkets
Limited, operators of 10 City
Markets stores in Nassau and
Marsh Harbour and Winn-Dixie
store in Freeport, will be held
in the Nassau Rounmi, Sheraton
British Colonial Hotel on
Tuesday, October 15,
commencing at 6:00 p.m..
according to an announcement
by the Board of Directors.
At a special meeting held
today, the Board of Directors
of Bahamas Supermarkets
Limited recommended a final
dividend of 15cents per share
for fiscal year ended June 29
for approval by the
shareholders at the Annual


trships to

in "close proximity" to the
Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre.
When the L. W. Young/S.C.
McPherson project was
announced in 1972, a Ministry
press release said they would
accommodate 1,000 students
each.
The press conference was
told today that in fact they can
each handle over 1,500
students, and that 1,000 was
the accupancy figure
anticipated for their first
planned year of operation,
1972/73.
L. W. Young has 900
students enrolled for this year,
while S. C. McPherson has a
full allotment of over 1.500.
Each of the two cost $1.6
million to build, and an
additional $300,000 was spent
on furnishing and other site
work. The two schools cost a
combined total of $3 8 million.
The work was financed by
loans from the I-xport-Import
Bank of the United States and
front the First National City
Bank. The American source of
financing led to the
construction contract being
given to Panelfab Incorporated
of Miami.
Each of the two schools


General Meeting. If approved,
the final 15cents dividend will
be payable on October 31 to
shareholders of record of the
Company on October 15.
The Board previously
declared interim monthly
dividends of 3 cents per share
payable on August 31 and
September 30 to the


shareholders of


record on


August 15 and September 13,
respectively.
Formal notice of Annual
General Meeting of
Shareholders and copy of the
Annual Report of the
Company for the year ending
Junme 29, 1974 will be mailed in
late September to all Bahamian
shareholders of the Company.


Government moves


Carmichael takeover


SUNSHINE DRIVE-INNS effective September 1. 1 /4.
Limited, an affiliate of the The directors of Sunshine
locally owned Sunshine Drive-Inns Ltd. and the
Theatres Ltd., will assume full directors of ('armichael
responsibility for thIe l)rive-lnns Ltd., owners of the
management and operation of Carmichael Drive-ln, have
the Carmichael Road theatre entered into a long time

end next year


contains an administration
block, a tuck shop, an 800-seat
auditorium, a library and
reading room, staff work room
and lounge, toilet and shower
facilities and 37 classrooms.
Thirteen of the classrooms
are for general use, three for
science, two for maths, two tor
arts and craft, two for music.
two for food and nutrition
studies and one each for the
teaching of deaf children.
painting, drawing, wood craft.
metal craft, English and foreign
languages.
While the schools are
designed to cater to 1,500
students each, Mr. Coakley
said, "if occasion demands it"
the combined total could be
brought up to 3.500.
The 900-student Yellow
Elder Primary II, being bui!t by
Panelfab for $1.1 million, is
"well ahead of schedule" and
should be ready for use in time
for the term beginning in
January, Mr Coakley said
He said no specific site had
yet been chosen for the new
2,000 student senior high
school. Parliamentary
Secretary Sinclair Outten heads
the committee that is studying


the Oakes Field area and
planning the location ot
various facilities slated for
construction there. Mr. Outten
said an American consultancy
firm has been called in, and is
expected to make its report
"shortly."
Mr. Coakley confirmed that
fewer scholarships have been
granted by the Ministry for
attendance at private
high schools, and "next year
there may not be any."
It depended, he said, on the
Go vernment system's
capability to handle all
deserving students. This in
turn, he said, depended largely
on the progress of work on the
Oakes Field senior high.
lie at first said the new
school would "certainly" be
ready by September next year.
But he added that "in thesp
times of the energy crisis" he
would be more "cautious'" in
his predictions and saj he
"hoped" for completion in
time for the opening of the
1975/76 academic year
Government's subsidy of 65
percent of teachers' salaries in
private high schools would be
continued, he said


agreement according to A.
Bismark Coakley, president of
Sunshine Theatres.
Sunshine Theatres is a
Bahamian owned company
which recently announced the
commencement of the- first
twin and most modern Theatre
on New Providence. It is being
constructed on propcrt\ to the
East of the Big Pond Power
Station on Blue Hill Road.
Commenting on the
takeover, Mr. Coakley said:
"Sunshine is out to create first
class entertainment to the
Bahamian movie public." He
said that this type to takeover
allows his company to cater to
all moviegoers and to upgrade
the quality and type of films
shown at the Carmichael in
particular.Speaking on behalf
of his clients, Mr. Joseph
Hollingsworth, attorney for the
Carmichael Theatres Ltd. said,
"'We are confident that the
takeover by Sunshine shall lead
to better movies and services
for the Bahamian public."
Death of Mr


HANGING:

CLEMENCY

MOVE

RULING

TOMORROW
SUPREME COURT Justice
Maxwell J. Thompson will
deliver a ruling tomorrow in
the attempt by two convicted
murderers to have a clemency
petition forwarded to the
Queen.
The Governor General Sir
Milo Butler, has refused the
request on the advice of the
Attorney General.
Attorneys for appellants
We:idell Leroy Burrows and
Phillip "Polka" Humes
submitted lengthy legal
arguments Monday with the
Solicitor General, T. Langton
Hilton who is appearing on
behalf of the Governor
General.
Representing Purrows and
Humes are attorneys L. P. J.
Trenchard and David C.
Bethell.
The attorneys, in a last
minute bid to save their
clients from the gallows on
August 12, filed a petition
with the Supreme Court
seeking a ruling that Sir Milo
should have granted a stay of
execution and send the
petition to the Queen.
The two were scheduled to
hang on August 13.
But the Solicitor General,
in a later move, made
application for a new order to
set aside the one made by
Justice Thompson. Hearing in
this matter was set for
September 3, however.
reliable sources state that Mr.
Hilton will file for
withdrawal of his order.
His application was
supposed to have been heard
before Chief Justice Sir
Leonard Knowles, Justice
Thompson and Justice James
Smith who is presently off
the island.
Contacted on the matter of
withdrawal yesterday, the
Solicitor General stated that
"officially, no withdrawal has
been made" as yet.
The withdrawal is,
however, likely to be made
sometime tomorrow.
GUIDES CAMP
THE Bahamas Girls' Guides
Association announced today
that all Commission Guiders
who would like to attend the
Association's camp, should
have completed application
forms into the headquarters no
later than August 31. The
camp runs September 20-22.

JUMBLE SALE
THE SOCIETY of St.
Vincent de Paul of St. Francis
Xavier's Parish, will sponsor a
jumble sale this Saturday at
10.00 a.m. in the Priory
Grounds, West Street.


lIe said he had been told
that over the last 13 months
Police Commissioner Salathiel
Thompson had expelled more
than 70 men from the force
and predicted that next month
would see some resignations
and reshuffles.
Detailing his efforts to have
the force investigated, Mr.
Ferguson said he had written
initially on May 10 this year to
Home Affairs Minister Darrell
Rolle who has responsibility
for police matters, requesting a
Joint Civil Service and Citizens
Committee.
"As a citizen of the Bahamas
who believes in fair play I
deplore the things that are
going on," Mr. Ferguson
declared.
Following his
communication he re caied
M.E. Johnson
Mr. M. E. Johnston,
(pictured) formerly Bahamas
Chief Industrial Officer, died
in Wales on August 12 at the
age of 61. following a long
illness.
He is survived by his wife
Wynne, daughters Maureen
and Chris and three
grandchildren.
Mr. Johnston succeeded
Mr. Martin Pounder In 1966
as CIO and remained here
until 1972 when he rtumned
to the United Kinedom.


jacket :


mB


Iranklyn Fe rguson


Drug r



police



are


named

SOME h igh-ra nking
policemen were last night
publicly accused of
involvement in the drug racket.
Fret lance photographer
Franklyn Ferguson, a member
of the PLP but outspokenly
critical of the administration
on numerous issues,
claimed before an audience ot
Cable Beach Kiwanians that
while young Bahamians were
being jailed for drug
possession, "pushers" among
the police were going scot free.
And he named names.
Censuring all Bahamians for
passively accepting this alleged
corruption, Mr. Ferguson
revealed that he has fruitlessly
sought, through official
channels, to have a Joint Civil
Service and Citizens'
Commission appointed to
channels, to have a Joint Civil
Service and Citizens'
Commission appointed to
investigate matters linking
policemen with "corruption,
injustice and drug-pushing."
"Usually major political
parties have always neglected
to investigate their members. Is
there something to hide?" Mr.
Ferguson asked.
Some law enforcement
officers were violating the law
and yet they were appealing
for law and order, he declared.
"It is alleged," he said, "that
the FBI investigated one of our
senior law enforcement officers
in 1969 for aiding and
instigating an unlawful act
between the U.S. and the
Bahamas."
Mr. Ferguson claimed that
"just about every month there
is a headline implicating police
in some crime." It had been
alleged that the Bahamas was
involved in the world's largest
organized narcotics operation,
lie charged.
"We see microscopic police
involvement in crime
daily. What is the
administration doing about it?
It has the constitutional
weapon. Is it also involved?"
ihe challenged.
Mr. Ferguson emphasized
that his remarks should not be
interpreted as an attack on the
police force as a whole but
only on certain men. lie
claimed that the majority of
those to whom he was referring
had become involved "for
economic reasons."
"Keeping up with the isms
of greed, this type of officer is
peculiar and must be dealt with
realistically," he said.
The young photographer
contended that both the
Attorney General and the
Commissioner of Police would
agree that there is police
involvement in corrupt
activities.


I DUODLEY'S
COR. ROSETTA ST. & MT. ROYAL AVE.

E KO Guitars &
Guitar Strings o


letters from the Minister and
the Acting Commissioner
asking for a meeting "to
discuss and learn the precise
nature of the information on
which your allegations are
founded."
Mr. Ferguson refused on
grounds that it would be
"unethical" to discuss the
contents of his allegations.
Instead he recommended
that a five-member
Commission be appointed to
include Chief Justice Sir
Leonard Knowles or Mr.
Justice Maxwell Thompson, as
well as a member of The
Bahamas Christian Council and
two members of any youth
body.
Mr. Ferguson circularised
the Government General, the
Prime Minister, the Minister of
Home Affairs and the Attorney
General regarding his request.
His letter, dated June 19 to
the Attorney General
reiterated his charge of
"corruption, injustice and drug
pushing" within the force, and
alleged that policemen were
receiving protection money.
Mr. Ferguson has to date
heard nothing further on his
request.
He maintained in his address
to Kiwanians that "the only
way to get rid of these
elements is through a Bureau
of Sanction Law with the
Governor General as the
ex-officio member."
This body could be
extremely effective because the
politician. would have no
say-so in its day-to-day
operations, Mr. Ferguson said.
"I believe that if you get an
enforcement agency with
college-trained professionals in
the areas of criminology,
psychology and economics,
with good salaries, they would
do an efficient job of keeping
both the politicians and police
away from corruption," he
asserted
What must be taken into
consideration at this time was
the practicalities, and they had
to change for the better. "That
is the only way standardization
of our law enforcement can be
achieved," Mr. Ferguson said.
The 2 -year-old
photographer last crossed
swords with police in 1971
when, as a member of a
seven-member coroner's jury,
he charged that inadequate
investigation on the part of
police had been responsible for
the "accidental electrocution"
verdict brought in on the death
of BEC linesman Joseph
Ferguson.
Mr. Ferguson, no relation of
the dead man, claimed in a
press conference after the
verdict that evidence had
shown the power could only
have been switched on
manually while Ferguson was
still on the line.
fHe said that in his opinion
the police had not investigated
the case thoroughly.
Mr. Ferguson subsequently
wrote the Attorney General
asking that the matter be
re-opened.
After reviewing the record
of the inquest, Solicitor
General T. Langton Hilton
advised Mr. Ferguson that he
did not consider the verdict of
the coroner's jury would have
been different if further
statements and reports taken
by police had been submitted
in evidence before the jury.
SCHOLARSHIP
BANQUET
THE BAHAMIAN American
Federation Inc. will hold its
fourth annual Back-To-The-
Rock festival banquet this
Sunday at 7:30 p.m. at the
Sonesta Beach Hotel.


l7rtbuttp









STHE TRIBUNE ... Thursday, August 29,1974


LOS ANGELES The
braless bandit struck for the
second time in two days, but
this time she dropped the
loot.
Police said the woman,
wearing a sheer blue blouse
without a bra, robbed a
branch of the Bank of
America of about $400


Let Greek


HURRICANE
BECKY.
POSES NO

THREAT
MIAMI Hurricane Becky
and her winds of 100 m.p.h.
swirled further into the open
Atlantic today, and
weathermen said the season's
first hurricane poses no threat
to land.
Meanwhile, a strong tropical
wave heading toward the
Leeward Islands strengthened
into a tropical depression, said
forecasters at the National
Hurricane Centre in Miami.
Heavy showers and some
flooding were expected there.
At 6 a.m. Becky was
centred about 250 miles north
of Bermuda. The season's first
hurricane was moving
northeast at about 15 m.p.h.
with gale-force winds
extending 100 miles to the east
and 50 miles to the west.
Small craft warnings were
issued for the Leeward Islands,
the Virgin Islands and Puerto
Rico, and residents were
advised to be ready for quick
action.
Alice, the first hurricane of
last year, also formed oft
Bermuda. That storm passed
by the island early in July
1973 but did little damage.


Cypriots



back-plea

NEW YORK The Greek Cypriot government wants the
security council to demand that Turkey let the Greek Cypriots
driven from their homes by the invasion of Cyprus return and live
under the protection of United Nations troops.
The plea was to be made to the council this afternoon at a
meeting called at the request of the Greek Cypriots to "consider
the grave situation in Cyprus, including the refugee problem."
K id ap thThe Greek Cypriots claim
K idnap that 200,000 of their people
are refugees from the nearly 40
search per cent of the island that the
Turkish invasion force has
GUADALAJARA Soldiers occupied.
and police searched for the Cypriot Ambassador Zenon
father-in-law of Mexico's Rossides also was going to tell
President today after his the council that his
bold abduction in midtown government would let the U.N.
Guadalajara fanned feelings of peacekeeping force protect
fright and tension in the Turkish Cypriots in the Greek
nation's second largest city. area if the Turks would let the
The kidnapping of Jose U.N. troops protect Greeks in
Guadalupe Zuno Hernandez, the Turkish area.
83 was the most daring in a The council may also discuss
long string of guerrilla activities the Soviet proposal for an
in Guadalajara and elsewhere in international conference on
the past two years. Cyprus attended by the 15
Zuno, an old line leftist council members plus Greece,
within the ruling Institutional Turkey and representatives of
Revolutionary Party (PRI) was the two Cypriot communities.
abducted about 9.30 a.n. at Some council delegates said
one of Guadalajara's busiest privately that the proposal
intersections only a few blocks could not get the nine council
from the Jalisco State votes needed to endorse it, and
government headquarters. they doubted that the Russians
Zuno was once Mayor of would submit a resolution to
Guadalajara and later, in the that effect.


mid 1920s, Governor of Jalisco
State. He is a retired army
general


Why Britain is

short of sugar


LONDON Britain is
virtually alone in suffering a
sugar shortage, an Associated
Press survey shows.
But increasing demand
among developing countries,
coupled with restrictions on
production and limited refining
capacity, mean that supplies
elsewhere are likely to remain
under heavy pressure.
The British shortage is local
and even artificial, due mainly
to failure to look ahead to the
world market and ensure
supplies against a background
of escalating world prices.
Britons consume 2,600,000
tons of sugar a year. Of this
900,000 tons is beet sugar
produced at home. The rest is
imported mainly from the
Commonwealth.
From the less developed
commonwealth nations, Britain
took in about 1,400,000 tons.
The rest came mainly from
Australia and South Africa.
Britain's sugar troubles
started the day it joined the
European Common Market.


The Market's Common
Agricultural Policy with its
rigid rules demands that its
members remain self-sufficient
in sugar growing and selling.
Britain joined the European
Community on January 1,
1973, but was allowed to phase
out its arrangements with the
Commonwealth by December
this year.
Prime Minister Michael
Manley asked for higher prices.
The British ignored the
Manley's threat that if this
price was not met, the West
Indies would sell on the free
market mainly to the United
States to get all the foreign
currency it could amass.
The British argued that for
many years, when the world
price of sugar was around 19
pounds a ton, they had paid
the Commonwealth 42 pounds.
It was the commonwealth's
turn to help Britain, they said.
But the commonwealth was
disappointed with Britain's
performance in Brussels on
their behalf and thought
otherwise. (AP)


Greece and the Greek
Cypriots have embraced the
proposal, but Turkey rejected
it and demanded a renewal of
the negotiations between the
Greek and Turkish Cypriots
and Turkey, Greece and
Britain, the signers of the 1959
independence treaty for
Cyprus.
Yesterday, Cyprus was
reported "completely quiet"
for the first time ir, several
days.
"The situation is very quiet,
there have been no reports of
firing for the pift 24 hours,"
the U.N. peaceforce spokesman
told his daily.. news briefing.
(AP)
OIL DROP:
CARACAS Venezuela's
average daily oil production
over the first eight months of
this year. fell by 295,000
barrels and will continue
declining, as the country
approaches state take-over of
the foreign-run industry, a
Mines Ministry spokesman
says. He says the cut is in
keeping with the country's
conservation policy. (AP)

BLACKOUT
ROME A massive power
failure left almost half of Italy
without electricity Tuesday.


Tuesday after telling a female
teller in a note: "Give me all
The bandit ran from the.
bank with the money in an
envelope but dropped it while
hopping into a late model
Cadillac. The car, driven by a
man, sped away before 'she
could retrieve it. officers said.
Monday, a bandit believed


to be the same woman held
up a Los Angeles savings and
loan office and made good
her getaway with $2,600.
Police said a red-faced male
teller was unable to describe
the female bandit's fac,._
noting only that she was
braless under a light-coloured
blouse.


France

tops

the VIP

list


ROME A group of Rome
professors has conducted a
census of illustrious persons
in the world broken down by
nations and centuries from
the year 1000 to 1900.
France has the lion's share
with nearly half. Germany,
Britain and Italy have about
10 per cent each out of a
worldwide total of 29,771
VIPs.
The study, conducted by
Rome University's
Demography Institute, was
based on the French Larousse
Encyclopedia, which, the
authors said, might explain in
part the predominance of
French. To a certain extent.
the authors said they
sonsulted also the
Encyclopedia Britannica and
the Italan Treccani.
VIPs of all fields were
included: authors, musicians,
churchmen, sataesmen,
artists, scientists, warriors,
magistrates and doctors.
France had a total of
13.303 or 44.7 per cent in
the nine centuries, followed
by Germany with 3,171 or
10.7 per cent, Britain with
2,900 or 9.7 per cent and
Italy with 2,898 or 9.7 per
cent. Spain was fifth with
910 VIPs or 3.1 per cent.
Nearly half of the VIPs
considered or 12,635 lived in
the 19th century, when their
average age was virtually the
same for all nations ranging
from 68 for France to 68.7
for Italy.

Police end

pop festival


WINDSOR, England
Police moved into a park
adjacent to Windsor Castle
early today to disperse some
2,000 young people camped
there to attend a pop music
festival.
Many of the fans had
pitched makeshift tents for
overnight stays in Windsor
Great Park, where the festival
has attracted from 1,000 to
6,000 persons a day since it
began last Saturday.
"The pop fans are leaving,
some peaceful, some not," a
police spokesman said, adding
that some arrests have been
made.
A police statement said:
"The crown estate
commissioners have not given
permission for the free festival
to be held there, nor have they
given permission to anyone to
camp overnight in the park."
The statement said that
about 525 policemen have
been assigned to the festival
daily to keep order, and that
they have "had their hands full
of the drug problem."
Police said about 250
persons had been arrested since
the festival began, most of
them on drug offences.
The festival claimed to have
an emological theme. But some
of those who camped overnight
ripped branches from the
park's ancient oak trees to fuel
their campfires. (AP)


Ford: I


pardon for

WASHINGTON President policy as
Ford said Wednesday he feels affairs, whe
that Richard Nixon has former Assii
suffered enough for Watergate. State could r
He said he would make no contribution
commitment now on what he Also, For
might do should his will be cI
predecessor face criminal executive s
prosecution. assuring right
He added that an eventual Ford has hea
Presidential pardon remains an
option and "I do not rule it On other p
out." ,


At his first White House
press conference, Ford also
flatly rejected any return to
wage and price controls in the
United States as an
inflation-fighting weapon.
"Wage and price controls are
out, period," Ford said.
He also promised a
budget-cutting drive to hola
U.S. government spending
below $300 billion during the
year that ends next June 30.
That would mean a spending
reduction of at least $3.5
billion, and Ford said it will
"convince people who might
have some doubts that we
mean business."


Responding to the first
question at his first White
House news conference, Ford
said he shares the views
expressed by Vice
President-designate Nelson A.
Rockefeller, who has said that
"the tone and the mood of the
country" is that Nixon should
not face further action.
"Of course I make the final
decision," Ford said when
asked 'whether presidential
pardon remains an option. "I
do have the option as President
to make that decision. I do not
rule it out."
Ford said it is up to Special
Prosecutor Leon Jaworski to
take whatever action he deems
warranted against anyone
involved in Watergate.
Asked his position -on
possible prosecution of his
predecessor, Ford recalled that
on taking office Aug. 9, he had
said he hopes "our former
President who brought peace
to millions would find it for
himself."
He then endorsed the
Rockefeller viewpoint on
prosecution. Rockefeller, in
turn, had declared his support
of the position taken by Senate
Republican leader Hugh Scott,
who had declared: "Everyone
hopes we can say enough is
enough. This is the end."
But Ford noted that no
action has been taken against
Nixon, and said in those
circumstances, he will make no
commitment on what he would
do.
On another matter, Ford
dismissed suggestions that as
President his political views
have begun to veer away from
Conservative Republicanism.
He said his stated willingness
to extend amnesty to draft
resisters who give service to the
country and his choice of a
GOP liberal, Rockefeller, for
Vice President "don't fall in
the political spectrum rignt
or left."
Rather, Ford said, these
were judgments "I think are
right for the country."
Ford said he plans to make
use of Rockefeller as Vice
President in framing domestic


don't rule out


Nixon


well as foreign
ere he said the
stant Secretary of
make "a significant

d said. Rockefeller
chairman of the
subcommittee on
ts of privacy which
ded.
points, Ford:


Repeated that ne probably
will be a candidate in 1976.
Ford said he and Rockefeller
would make a good team in
that election year, adding that
final judgment on the ticket
will be up to the party
convention.


Said that the United States
must accelerate "project
independence," the effort to
energy self-sufficiency, in the
face of continuing limits on
production by exporting
nations.
Declared that if Cuba
"changes its policy toward us."
his government will reconsider
American policy. He said any'
move toward closer ties with
Cuba would be in concert with
other western hemisphere
nations.
Said he supports the
development of a U.S. navy
base on Diego Garcia in the
Indian Ocean. He said this
should not cause friction with
the Soviet Union. (AP) '


Probation for Nixon?
TORONTO The former president of the American Bar
Association says he believes Richard Nixon will face heavy
fines and probation but not imprisonment for his part in
the Watergate cover-up.
Chesterfield Smith, here for the annual meeting of the
Canadian Bar Association, said in an interview that he
believes Americans oppose putting Nixon in jail but he
believes they also oppose his going unpunished.
Smith said similar fines and probation should be given to
members of Nixon's staff under indictment by the
Watergate grand jury. He said they can hardly be
imprisoned if Nixon is allowed to go free.

WEHAVMOVED


"From a Bra to a Cocktail Dress"
S111 N.E. 2nd Ave. Miami 6th FI.Congress Bldg.
Come Upstairs and Save


Australia

puts up

migrant

barrier
CANBERRA The
Australian government will
severely restrict entry of
migrants to Australia in the
present financial year, Labour
and Immigration Minister
Clyde Cameron said yesterday.
Entry will be limited to
6,500 specially-selected
families.
Officials estimate this will
total about 23,000 people.
Cameron said that selection'
criteria would be tightened
considerably. Only people with
special skills who could get
employment immediately on
arrival, would be allowed to
enter Australia, he said.
They would also have to
obtain employment in an
industry which would provide
employment to people out of
work because of a shortage of
that particular skilled labour,
he added.
Cameron said that the
government's immigration
target of 80,000 for the
1974-75 financial year
necessitated the tighter
controls.
The target includes 40,000
assisted migrants and 40,000
unassisted.
A large number of
applications for entry already
are in the immigration
department pipeline.
Cameron said Australia was
facing one the gravest
e economic and industrial
situations in his political
experience. (AP)


Athens
Rom-
Paris
London
Berlin
Amsterdam
Brussels
Madrid
Moscow
San Francisco
Los Angeles
Chicago
Miami
Tokyo
Hong Kong
Montreal
Honolulu
Toronto
Rio
Lisbon
Tehran
Vancouver


Best tase




ontheisian


- MMW -mw wWl


MINF MAX
68 81 clear
59 82 sunny
54 72 sunny
54 70 sunny
55 73 sunny
55 72 sunny
47 68 cloudy
63 88 sunny
52 73 clear
54 58 cloudy
62 82 clear
66 68 cloudy
78 87 cloudy
77 90 fine
78 87 cloudy
54 74 cloudy
70 86 clear
48 73 cloudy
64 101 clear
59 88 sunny
82 102 clear
56 78 clear


1.


SoRedaLSoIgdh. GoeL
1017, NJ'v~?aea eepas *,kOaa*SACCO C s o


Somnied mmembe Queen visits oil rig Cromarty Firth, through
of the Royal Family, the Quwhich the platform will pass
Queen and Prince Philip visit on the 200-mile journey to
Nigg Bay, north-east prepared for floating out to the specially excavated the oilfield.
Scotland, where Highland British Petroleum's Forties graving dock at Nigg, which is With its massive flotation
One, the world's largest oil oilfield in the North Sea. being flooded to bring the tanks, Highland One weighs
production platform is The Royal Family toured water level up to that of the more than 37,000 tonnes


BRALESS BANDIT DROPS THE LOOT


IcAlllstItr


DOWNTOWN MIAMI
im t itl
-u-iI a I lia.
SINGLE .............. 10.00
DOUBLE ............. 11.00
TWIN ................. 12.00
TRIP ............... 14,00
QJAD ............. 17.00
Home of the
AME R I CAN-BAHAM I AN
FEDERATION
. . . . .


jEND OF




SUMMER SALE

AT




ARNOLD'S DEPT. STORE
ON CORNER OF BAY ST. & VICTORIA AVENUE '

BOYS': POLYESTER PANTS 4-6X ............ .$4.95
POLYESTER PANTS 8-18 was 9.95 Now $7.95 or 3 for $21.00
SHOES was 7.95 ....... ............. .. Now $4.95
BRIEFS. ... .. ... .......... ... from $2.50 pkg. of 3
COTTON & RAYON PANTS .................from $2.50
SHIRTS....... . ........ .......... .. from $1 95

GIRLS' DRESSES ....... .... ... from $2.50
SHOES was 795.................... Now $4.95 1
OTF PANTS SETS. ... ........ .........$4.95

MKE'S: POLYESTER PANTS ........ 2for $20.00
POLYESTER SHIRTS were up to 14.95 Now $7.95 or 2for S1


p I










THE TRIBUNE ... Thursday, August 29, 1974 3


UrbiW ribuir
NuWUus Assczus JumAs IN VEBA MACGrMT
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmau Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH,Publiar/lEdltor 1903. 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Publiser/Editor 1917-1972
Conoribting Editor 1972.
EILEEN DUPUCH C& ,sRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
PubHl er/Editor 1972.
Published Daily Monday to Saturday


Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 24532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2.2768

Thursday, August 29, 1974


EDITORIAL

The true measure of success


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
TWO IMPORTANT and pleasing events took place during my
recent visit to Nassau.
The first was that international and Olympic yachtsman R. H.
"Bobby" Symonette was selected to be chairman of the
International Jury for the America's Cup race. This is the first
time a Bahamian yachtsman has been given this high recognition
in the most prestigious international yachting event of our times.
The second was the opening by Levi Gibson of his own
building on Christie Street where he will now conduct his own
real estate business after being in tiie employment of Sir Harold
Christie, who pioneered in real estate development in these
islands, for over 40 years.
These events are widely separated. They have no relationship
to each other. But they have one important thing in common ...
they are the rewards for honest endeavour by two of our very
own Bahamian boys.

I will deal with Bobby Symonette first because his news came
out ahead of the Gibson story.
Nassau was just emerging from a fishing village economy in the
1920's.
The waterfront section of the island east of Fowler Street was
known as Fish Alley. It still bears that name for some of us
oldsters. These were the real Conchie-Joes. They were pilots,
seamen and fishermen ... sturdy men who "go down to the sea in
ships".
One of the first activities in which these people indulged when
they came on prosperous times was to race their small boats in
the harbour.
At the time the entire north shore where the Nassau Harbour
Club and other fine residences are now situated was occupied by
the small modest homes of fishermen. Here also was a large open
shack that was used as a public hall by this group of people.

I think that everyone will agree that Sir Roland Symonette has
been one of the most forceful leaders of our times. He is still
alive, alert and most active.
As a young man he dreamed of the day when he could give this
island a modern dockyard that would attract foreign ships and
yachts to these waters.
In the same way that Sir Harold Christie visioned a great future
on land for our people, Sir Roland Symonette was conscious of
the potentialities of our seas.
Sir Roland didn't come out of Fish Alley but he came from a
fishing and farming community in the Current and up to this time
when this story begins all his financial success had been garnered
from the sea. At the time he was a rising business man and
politician.
The time came when he got together with the seamen in Fish
Alley and they decided to form a club with a view to promoting
racing among themselves in.the eastern harbour.
A meeting was held in the hall described above. I attended this
meeting as a representative of The Tribune. The two most active
men at the meeting were R. T. Symonette and Captain Harry
Knowles, one of the leading pilots on the Nassau Bar.
Originally the idea was for these people to have fun among
themselves. But at the time R. T. Symonerte was operating a
freight and passenger steamship service between Nassau and
Jacksonville and he got the idea that our boys should spread their
sails a bit farther afield.
R. T. as he is popularly known, took several Nassau boats and
some of our boys to Jacksonville for a small meet that was being
held there.
I look back now and think of the odd figure that these boats
must have cut in those races. They were of all sizes but not of any
particular class or design. They were just sailing boats with island
boys at the helm ... that's all.
After this event R. T. went one step further ... he financed the
building of the Nassau Yacht Club on the foreshore west of Fort
Montagu. This was Nassau's first yacht club to which foreign
competitors could be invited:
R.T. then went still one step further. He, along with
Commodore Bosworth of the Miami Yacht Club, organized the
Miami-Nassau boat race. This race has become an important
international event. It is now a leg in what is known as the
Southern Conference, a group of international races organized
and sailed in this hemisphere.

His son, "Bobby" Symonette, is one of the ablest and finest
young men of his generation. Like his father, he too looked to
the sea for an outlet for his ability. He built the Pilot House Club
and Yacht Haven which provided accommodations that attracted
yachtsmen and international racing to Nassau.
And now let us jump forward over the years.
Capt. Harry Knowles is now dead but he lived long enough
to see his son Capt. Durward Knowles win many international
trophies, including the world championship in Star class races in
Chicago and an Olympic gold medal in Japan in 1964. He also
saw a grandson ... son of Mr. Percival Knowles ... become the


island's champion swimmer. Durward Knowles has taken his
father's place as a pilot on Nassau Bar.
"Bobby" Symonette has also won many laurels in international
racing but perhaps the highest honour to come to the Bahamas
from men who "go down to the sea in ships" is that "Bobby"
Symonette should have been selected to be chairman of the
International Jury for the world's most prestigious yacht race.
Both Sir Roland Symonette and Capt. Harry Knowles can take
pride in the achievements of their sons and these are young men
of whom the Bahamian people have reason to be proud.

And now ... what do I say about Levi Gibson?
Other Bahamians have built larger and more pretentious
business places than the offices opened on Christie Street by Mr.
Gibson. But somehow his story has a special flavour. And it is
particularly important at this time when black Bahamians are
conscious of status. In the process they are getting their values


EDITOR, The Tribune,
D' editor did ring muh up
las' week, say, "Ketch d' first
t'ing t' Current an' carry two
notebook 'cause things getting'
warm-up down dere, far as Ah
c'-uld-a hear." Ah hurry t'
patch da tube bin leakin' since
June an' Ah hop on muh
bicycle an' Ah gone.
When Ah reach Current,
errybody looking' like it jes' had
electionn an' Missa Brennan win.
Man, dem people vex! All y'
could-a see, little bunch here,
little bunch dere. D' dawg even
looking like y' teef he fish-head
he bury las' Friday.
Soon as Ah reach, Ah smell
dis funny smell, like tyre
burnin' up. Ah say: "What dis
strange smell y' could-a smell
cbmin' down d' road?"
One man say: "Das motor
yinna gub'ment burn up." Ah
yuck out muh notebook. Ah
say: "How much-a motor burn
up?"
"Well, right up t' now," d'
fellah say, ''t is only
twenty-t'ree water pump, four


or five refrigerator, coupl-a
compressor, two or tree
washing machine, ice machine
an' t'ing like dat. D' Current
Club lose dey main freezer
t'ree time in one week. Das
t'ree motor burn up right dere.
But it slack down little bit.
Only 'bout two motor burn up
so far today."
Ah say: "Who burnin' up all
dese motor an' ting?"
D' man say: "Well, das a
good question y' ask. Y' better
ask d' 'lootra Power and Light
Company. 't is dem does sen'
d' bill, so, maybe dey could-a
tell y' who burnin' up d'
things."
"Sum'pin mussie wrong,"
Ah say. "All dem t'ing ain't
burn up jes' so." Ah gone t'
look for d' head man. Ah find
him leaning' up 'ginst one old
generator on wheel, look like
somebody did buy it from
gub'ment surplus sale jes' after
d' Civil War.
"Y' could-a tell muh
anything 'bout all dese t'ing
burn up?" Ah ask him,
sharpenin' muh pencil wi muh


confused.
I am particularly interested in the Gibson man and wife team
- because they are an example of quality and honesty that come
out of good homes.
Simms in Long Island is one of our finest Out Island
settlements. Levi Gibson's father was a merchant and a large land
owner in this community. This was a family who could hold their
heads high in Long Island.
His wife is a Nassau girl. Her family owned a large area of land
in Christie Street. When it was divided up her grandmother had a
lot with a small house on it. Virginia Gibson grew up with her
grandmother. She was a beautiful girl of outstanding character.
She became one of the island's best nurses.
Levi Gibson was a young man when he came to Nassau. He
took a lowly job with Sir Harold Christie. But he had rare human
qualities that are priceless to, an employer.
lie was intelligent, he was honest, lie was loyal with a high
sense of duty and responsibility ... and lihe had a great capacity for
work.
There was no stopping such!) a young nmai. And as the years
passed, Mr. Gibson became an important part of the Christie team
because he was the man ... in fair or foul weather, in success or
failure ... on whom Sir Harold knew he could depend.
You know ... there are some families who seem to produce fine
men. Canon Theodore Gibson is a cousin of Levi. lie has a church
in Miami and is an elected member of the City Commission. Most
of his votes for this high position came from the American white
and Cuban communities.
Canon Gibson is recognized as a rare man in his community.
Like Levi, he is not a racist, and because of his sober approach to
human problems he has perhaps done more than anyone in
Coloured Town in Miami to bridge the gap between the races.
Levi ... I will call him Levi because this is how I know him and
I use it as a term of warm personal regard ... would have spent his
life with Sir Harold. But when Sir Harold died the tie was broken
and now he will be able to apply to his own business a wealth of
experience he gained in the shadow of the island's most
prestigious real estate operator.
** * * * *
Arthur W. Newcomb wrote that "the character and
qualifications of the leader are reflected in the men he selects,
develops and gathers around him. Show me the leader and I will
know his men. Show me the men and I will know their leader".
This observation might well be applied to the success story of
my friend Levi.
The people who attended the opening of his business place
were drawn from the highest segments of all races in this island.
They were all happy to be there and they glorified in the success
of this young man who, at some time or another, had gone out of
his way to do something helpful for them. I feel safe in making
this statement because this is typical of Levi ... he is always doing
something to help someone else ... a friend, a neighbour or just an
ordinary human being he has probably never seen before in his
life and may never see again.

And now one last little touch. Niise Gibson inherited the
house in which she grew up with her grandmother.
It is on this site that the Gibson business house now stands but
they have a picture of the little house and it will occupy a proud
place in the new offices. They can be proud of their small
beginnings because their new venture represents the long, hard
mile they have travelled on the road of life.
They have named the office building "Shan". Someone at the
party asked me if this was a Chinese name of some special
significance.
No ... Nurse Gibson's grandmother's name was Flora Ann
Symonette but her first grandchild couldn't pronounce the name.
All she could manage to say was "Shan" and the name stuck.
That this name should be perpetuated in the new building
reveals the fact that Nurse Gibson was brought up in a home in
which love had first place ... and levi shared this joy when he
entered Virginia's small but cozy haven.

Oh yes, I take joy in writing aboul I cvi because when all the
muck and dirt which has in recent years cast a shadow over the
life of the Bahamian people, has cleared away, it will be people
like Levi Gibson who will provide a foundation of honesty and
high integrity on which a new and creditable breed of black
Bahamians will be reared.

For a moment I would like to go back to "Bobby" Symonette.
I don't think anyone would dispute a statement I have
repeatedly made in this column that the late Sir Stafford Sands
was probably the ablest Bahamian of this century. But there is
also no denying the fact that it was men like the late Sir Harold
Christie and Sir Roland Symonette who laid the foundations on
which the tourist industry was developed by Sir Stafford ... all of
which raises the question: "Which came first, the chicken or the
egg?"

THOUGHTS FOR TODAY
Green, the historian, tells us that the world is moved not only
by the mighty shoves of the heroes, but also by the aggregate of
the tiny pushes of each honest worker. HELEN KELLER.

They that go down to the sea in ships: and occupy their
business in great waters:
These men see the works of the Lord: and His wonders in the
deep. BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER


Generator


problems


EDITO


Pleas
your va
our vie
"Nation


Bahamasair's delays
R THE TRIBUNE at 4:20 p.m., and only carried responsible for these people
e allow me space in an additional 15. A thrid flight being where they are and
allow me space was again promised for 5:15, deserves better service.
liable paper to express which arrived at 7:11 and To conclude, "I guess a 26
ral Flag carrier of the departed at 7:20. hrs. 5 mins. delay is not too
Sir. we feel that if bad?".


Bahamas".
On Friday 23rd of August
1974, a group of 33 people
from the Southern Youth
Corp., left Nassau for George
Town Exuma, at the
approximate time 8:15 a.m., to
depart on Sunday at 5:15 p.m.
that flight never did arrive.
The group was re-scheduled
to depart at 8:15 a.m. Monday
morning the 2the 26th. The flight
was then delayed for some
3 hrs., and when it did arrive, it
had sore battery problem and
never departed until 11:15
a.m., and only carried 13
members from our group.
A second flight was then
promised at 1:15. That arrived


government owns the airline
they should improve the
service to the out Islands or
give another airline these runs,
because after all; we are



iv The Associated Press
TODAY is THURSDAY,
AUGUST 29th the 241st day of
1974. There are 124 days left In the
year.
HIG1i IGITS in history on this
date:
1973 Arab and Libya leaders
announce birth of "a new Arab
state" but make clear that actual
unification still is in distant future.
1972 North and South Korean
red cross officials meet in North
Korea openly for first time to


Social and Reception
Chairman
Southern Youth Corps.


little pocket knife.
"Ah could-a tell y' dis
company ain't payin' nobody a
damn copper," d' man say.
"But ain't it true yinna leave
all dese old, break-down engine
running' an' ain't leave nobody
t' watch 'em all night? An'
yinna gone back t' Rock Sound
ninety mile away?"
"Das a lie," d' head man say,
"we get engineer working' for us
an' he does live only twenty
mile from Current. Anything
happen, somebody could-a run
an' get him in coupl-a hours, if
he home. Y' ain't want service
quicker 'n dat?"
"But who does look after
dese generator when errybody
gone t' bed?" Ah ask him.
"Well, we get one rooster
does crow when d' cycle drop
down t' fifty-seven," d' man
say, "and if d' voltage drop
down past ninety-four one
fowl snake does crawl out from
under d' floor an' holler: "All
d' way!" If dis doan work,
somebody most sure t' wake
up an' tell he wife, say, he
smell sum'pin burnin'. So, 't
ain't no need t' keep nobody
watching' generator all night."
"Dese people tell mtlh, say,
six, eight t'ousan' dollar worth
o' motor an' t'ing get burn
up," Ah say. "Y' ain't hear
how gub'ment trying' t' help
people in dese fam'bly islun'?
What dese people go t'ink
when yinna burn up all dey
pump, an' gub'ment tellin' 'em
he scratchin' he head trying' t'
t'ink o' different way t' help
'em in dese hard time?"
D' man yawn one big yawn,
like he done ready for bed
half-past ten in d' morning .
"An' all dem tourist leaving'
'cause dey can't wash dey
face," Ah say. "what y' gotta
say 'bout dat?"
"Well, 't is d' people own
fault," d' man say, "dey
should-a buy motor can't bum
up. Dey know dese old,
wear-out generator an' engine
all d' time brokin' down. 'sides,
we only get fourty-nine
percent share in d' company,
anyhow. Why y' doan go talk t'
dem people get fifty-one per
cent share?"
"Who dem?" Ah ask.
"Who y' t'ink?" d' man say.
COUSIN ZEPH


discuss reunifying divided famills.
1969 Transm World Airlines
ne, with I13 persons aboard, is
jacked by Arab guerrillas and
forced to land In Damascus while
flying from Rome to Athens and
Tel Aviv.
1967 Communist Chinese
diplomats armed with sticks, axes
and bottles fight British police
outside the Chinese legation in
London.
1960 Hazza el-Majali, Premhier
of Jordan, is assassinated.


K. FERGUSON


Bahamas Telecommunications Corporation
P. O. BOX N-3048 NASSAU BAHAMAS


NOTICE



1975


TELEPHONE DIRECTORY


The Bahamas Telecommunications Corporation wishes to inform the
public that the closing date for the acceptance of WHITE PAGE LISTINGS in
the 1975 Telephone Directory will be 30th September, 1974.

A form for your listings can be found in your current Telephone Directory
immediately following the White Page Listings. Please complete the form
ONLY if a change or additional listings are required and return as early as
possible to: -


BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CORPORATION
ATTENTION: COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT
P. O. BOX N3048
THOMPSON BOULEVARD
OAKES FIELD
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

In connection with YELLOW PAGE ADVERTISING, Agents of the
Corporation will conduct their annual sales campaign throughout the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas, beginning Monday August 19th, and
throughout September 13th. During this period they will canvass all local
business firms for advertising matter.
A. E. CURLING
GENERAL MANAGER


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A GLIMPSF of Nicaragua is
what the jam-packed audience
at Le Cabaret Theatre on
Paradise Island got Sunday
evening as they viewed the
final event in the Ministry of
Tourism's Goombay summer
'74 "guest Artists in Concert"
music, versatile dancing all
went to make this performance
an entertaining evening.
Vibrant Folksongs, gusty
series It w s performed by the


.0 %"


4 THE TRIBUNE -- Thursday, August 29, 7







TOOGOODS TOx8"0DS


"The Beautiful Bahamian Studio"
on the waterfront at East Bay & William Sts.
Telephnne 5-4641


ORALEE'S FASHIONS
Madeira St. Opp. John S. George
Phone 2-1744

PARENTS SHOP EARLY FOR
SCHOOL UNIFORM FABRICS!
Avoid disappointment and last minute Rush.

IMdo tle Drycold's Sfotm
Has fabrics for a large number of schools, including: St.
Anne's, St. Andrews, D.W. Davis, Carmichael, St.
John's College, Queen's College, C. I. Gibson, Jordon
Memorial, William Gordon, Government High, St.
Matthews. R. M. Baily, L. W. Young, Yellow Elder,
William Phipps, Woodes Rodgers, Chippingham.

Modmstie Dry ood's Store
STORE HOURS WEEK-DAY 8 a.m. 8 p.m.
SAT 8 to 9 p.m.


"ballet Folklorico de
Nicaragua."
High praise must go to the
gro up's choreographer,
Professor Antonio Davila, who,
despite the lengthy programme
20 dance numbers in all
was able to create colourful
scenes in which the troupe
portrayed customs and
traditions of the people of
Nicaragua.
Three spirited numbers

I weddings


, ^ a ir ow uiulity
CALL:
ANDREW AITKEN OR
HELFNA LIGHTBOURN





PHONE 5-1 771
BOX 5690
-MADEIRA STREET
EAST,
'PALMDALE


dominated the programme:
"Aquella Indita" a folktale
about the life of a little
Nicaraguan Indian girl;
"Palomita Guasircua" in
which a boy and girl
demonstrate, through a series
of body movements and facial
expressions, that their love for
each other is as pure and
innocent as the love of two
pigeons and "La Vaquita" --
which portrayed a carnival
scene in Nicaragua and bought
the entire 23 dancers on stage
together.
Among the dignitaries at
Sunday's performance were
their Excellencies, Sir Milo
Butler, the Governor-General
of the Bahamas, and Lady
Butler; Dame Albertha Isaacs;
LI. S. Congress-woman Shirley
Chisholm: the Minister of
Tourism. the Hon. Clement T.
Maynard and Mrs. Maynard
and the Chief Justice of the
Bahamas, Sir Leonard


Knowles.
The Minsiter of Tourism
opened the programme by
welcoming the dancers to the
Bahamas and expressing his
thanks to the audience for
attending. In his brief remarks
he labelled the "Guest Artists
in Concert" series "a
worthwhile innovation for our
Goombay programme." He
also informed the gathering
that the appearance by the
well-known cultural groups had
been arranged on a reciprocal
basis.
"This form of cultural
exchange among the peoples of
this region is a good thing since
it encourages us to look
beyond our horizons and
appreciate what others deem to
be worthwhile and beautiful,"
he said. "It not only gives our
people the chance to view the
culture of other nations, but
provides our performers with a
chance to broaden their


experience before foreign
audiences."
Apart from the "Ballet
Folklorico de Nicaragua", the
cultural exchange programme
also brought to the stages of Le
Cabaret Theatre and the
Kasbah Celebrity Room of El
Casino, such other outstanding
groups as the Black Repertory
Dance Company from
Washington, D. C., who
performed on the same card
with the Bahamas' own New
Breed Dancers; and the
Chicago Sammy Dyer School
of the Theatre who appeared
with the Bahamas School of
the Theatre in a lively
preformance called "Black
Magic."


Geoombay








wlet toAug.3lst.


Goombay Summer ends this
weekend an. .' is the last of
the Tribune special weekly
Goombay pages.


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Folk group brighten Goombay


living a grunt for Goomoay, tnis youngster, orougnht all
the way from Andros for the affair, showed up at the grand
final of the Goombay Fashion Show, held last Monday at
the Nassau Beach Hotel. The event featured products of
Androsia on Andros Island. The two youngsters here are
both wearing Androsia fashions, and are the children of
Dick and Rosie Birch of Small Hope Bay.


* SPORT SOCKS
* TRAINING SUITS
* SOCCER SHOES


m I






THE TRIBUNE - Thursday, August 29, 1974


Intimacy

and the

married

woman.


Commonwealth .scholarships

for Canadian universities
Under the Commonwealth Scholarship and Fellowship Plan Canada is offering scholarships
tenable from September, 1975 at universities in Canada.
The purpose of these scholarships is to enable persons of high intellectual promise to pursue
advanced courses of study or undertake research in Canada for two academic years. The
scholarships are primarily for post-graduate study or research, but in exceptional cases may be
granted for under-graduate study, and are open to men and women who will not reach their 35th
birthday by October 1, 1975.


Candidates should be
holders of a Bachelor's or
Master's degree from others
who wish to take a first degree
course may be considered if
they have the requisite
qualifications. Scholarships will
not normally be awarded


and application forms should
be made as soon as possible to
the Permanent Secretary,
Ministry of Education and


Culture, P.O. Box 3913,
Nassau.
Closing date for application
is October 4, 1974.


IV
40


Al.
irp~wr




I


'A


Piano recital Sunday


to candidates who already have The Bahamas Music Society Mr. Eric Russell is a well
a Ph. D degree or for clinical will present Miss Donna known musician and piano
training, nor will they be Russell, (below) B. Mus. in a teacher, received her early
awarded to candidates wishing piano recital Sunday, musical training under her
to undertake medical or dental September 8 at 9 p.m. in St. father's direction. Before going
degrees. Mary's Hall, St Augustine's abroad to study further she
Requests for preliminary College, Fox Hill. was a regular winner in the
interviews, further information Miss Russell, whose father piano division of the annual
.... Bahamas Music Festival.


"A6'
!31A24


AIR


a ne mmuatry Os uumeamon a. mUm W -mse a
summer youth programme to deve interest la failly
Island mailboats. Part of the groups of #rilhul
sailors who participated in the programme are shown on the
bow of the mailboat "Air Swift" whek'it docked at Potters
Cay after her weekly run to Eleuthera. From left are
Kirkwood Campbell, Philip Bastian, Dwayne belancey,
Brian Bastian, Don Grey, Frank Rahmlng, who coordinated
the programme for the Ministry Capt. Leonard Wallace, and
Mr. Sinclair Outten, M.P., Parliamentary Secretary for the
Ministry of Education and Culture. Others who took part lo
the programme, but are not pictured, wee Rudolph
Basden, Marvin Lighlbourne, Ervin Lightbourne, Keith
Boyd and Steve Baen.


.L"J
NASSAU AMATEUR
operatic society president Mr.
Ted Kallergis presented Mr.
Rupert Missick of the New
World Theater with a cheque
for $S250.00 as e contribution
lu his summer workshop
programme. The society feels


III


that in conjunction with the
rapid development and
growing awareness with the
arts, this programme will
hopefully attract and utilize
the tremendous amount of
talent that exists here.


y .J


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In 'm i MAA
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MIXES WITH TASTE

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DEAR ABBY: We drove 500 miles to attend the wedding
of a relative. Our son was to be in the bridal party. The
wedding was to take place at 4 P.M. on Saturday. On the
Friday night before the wedding, the bride and groom got
into a fight and the groom broke the bride's nose so the
wedding was cancelled.
What do we do with the wedding gift we were going to
take to the church? Who pays for the tuxedo our son rented
for the occasion and never got to wear? And how about the
motel bill?
I think the bride's parents who invited us here for nothing
should help us out. Should we ask them to?
STUCK IN ILLINOIS
DEAR STUCK: That's what you are. Stuck. Stuck for
the wedding gift--unless you can return it. You're stuck for
sure for your son's rented tuxedo, and you're stuck for the
motel bill.
And no, don't ask the bride's parents to help you out.
They've got enough trouble trying to comfort a bride with a
broken nose.
DEAR ABBY My husband died very suddenly not long
ago. It, was a terrible shock as he had been in the best of
health and had no warning whatsoever. We had 43 good
years together, which is more than many couples have, but
somehow, I still feel cheated.
I was in such a state of shock when this happened that
my eldest daughter took me to her home where I stayed for
three weeks. When I returned to my own home, I was
stunned to find that every trace of my beloved husband had
been removed. Not one thing belonging to him remained!
My two daughters and one son (all married) took it upon
themselves to go through my house and dispose of all their
father's clothes.
I broke right down and wept. They tried to explain that
they thought they had done me a big favor.


ARRIVE I ) TODAY:
S ttl J s ard
SAIl II) OI)DAY; Bahama
Slar, FImcralid Seas. Flavia,
() canic and Southward
ARRIVING ii)\lm RRI )
Mirdi (iraGi. Slra, ard and


WEATHER
Tonight and Tomorrow:
Mostly fair, hut with a chance
of a shower
Wind: Southeast 8-12 m.p.h.
Sea: Slight becoming
smooth


Bride's broken beak

breaks bank
Abby. wasn't it MY right to dispose of my late husband's
things in my own good time? Perhaps I wanted some
memories of him around.
It's too late in my case, but please print this for others
who one day may presume to do what my children did.
CRUSHED
DEAR CRUSHED: Please consider the motivation. They
undoubtedly wanted to spare you what they thought would
be an agonizing task. But you make a good point. Perhaps
they should have asked.
DEAR ABBY: I am a 21-year-old male college student. I
am being married in the near future. Both of us would like to
have a big wedding and invite our many friends, but the
cost would empty her parents' pocketbook.
My fiancee and I feel that the tradition that says her
parents must foot the bill for the wedding is entirely
outmoded, but I'm afraid her folks would feel hurt if my
parents offered to chip in.
As it stands now, my future in-laws feel a bit inadequate
alongside my well-to-do-family.
If you can come up with a solution, it would be a most
welcome early wedding gift. DOOMED GROOM
DEAR DOOMED: Why not break with tradition in the
interest of common sense? Perhaps your future in-laws
wouldn't be as "hurt" as you think if your parents chipped
in for the kind of wedding you want. Ask them. If they
refuse, go the traditional route, and after you return from
your honeymoon, your parents can throw a party for you
and all your friends.


AND SO IT ENDS ... With the same galitythat introduce it in la w,. mas
Goombay Summer '74 bows out this week with the usual finale. And this swinging
scene was the finale of the weekly fashion shows that was a feature of the
o o m b a three-month festival. The final show was held at the Nassau Beach Hotel and
featured Androsian garments manufactured at Andros. Prime Minister Pindling and
Mrs. P ndling and Tourism Minister Clement T. Maynard were among the fans that
Turned out. Swinging it out for the last time is Mrs. Pindling and partner (left) and
fl Goombay Summer planner and Assistant Director of Tourism Basil Albury (centre).
Tourism Minister Mr. Maynard and Tourism Director Basil Atkinson (right) beat
out the rhythm with their hands. Photo: Roland Rose.


S* ii
SAVOYCONIT^^DiON


- "THE SPOOK WHO SAT
SBY THE DOOR" PG.
Lawrence Cook, Paula Kelly
PLUS
"SEVEN GOLDEN MEN" PG
Rosanna Podesta,
S Philippe Leroy
PLUS Late Feature
Friday rii"ht.
'Phone 2-2534

WULF -


Last Da'
Continuou'
from
"ALAB
GHOS
All Sta
S PL
"BROT
THE R
Terry Carter
Nil in(' iiiiuJ


NOW SHOWING
Matinee Continuous from 1:30, Eve
'Phone 3-4666



4


ANDM
.54 0
' s0u

Xaa~~ i MI


2-1004,2.1005










I be sold.


y Friday
s Showings
3:00
AMA'S
T" PG.
ar Cast
-US
HER ON
!UN" R.
, Kyle Johnson I
r I adliitted.



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THE TRSUNE ... Thursday, August 29,1974
U 7


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that CHARLIE JOHN of Hunters
Grand Bahama is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why naturalisation should not be granted should
serd a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 22nd day of August, 1974 to
The Minister responsible for Nationality andCitizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs, P.O. Box N-3002,
Nassau.




NOTICE
NOTICE Is hereby given that BETTA ROSALIA
BAPTISTE DUCLAR of 64A. Bruce Avenue, Freeport,
Grand Bahama, Bahamas is- applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalisation should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 22nd day of
August 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citiaenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box
N-3002, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MARIA L. CARTER of
Malcolm Road, New Providence is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration should not be granted
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 22nd day of August
1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002,
Nassau.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that AARON ERIC PRATT of
Coconut Grove N.P. Bahamas is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration should not be granted
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 22nd day of August
1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002,
Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that SIDNEY BAPTISTE of
Pinders Point, Grand Bahama is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalisation as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalisation should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 29th day of
August 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Boy
N-3002, Nassau, Bahamas. .



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that IANTHE ALBERTHA
DUNCANSON of Montrose Avenue Nassau, Bahamas P. O.
Box 5298 is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration should not be granted should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 29th day of August 1974 to
The Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002, Nassau,




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that BERTRAM BERNARD
DUNCANSON of Montrose Avenue Nassau, Bahamas P. O.
Box 5298 is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration should not be granted should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 29th day of August 1974 to
The Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs, P. O. Box N-3002, Nassau.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MRS. CLAUDINA CLARKE
PARKER of Matthewtown, Inagua, Bahamas is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be*granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 29th day of
August, 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. O. Box
N-3002, Nassau, Bahamas.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that THEOPHILUS PARKER of
Matthewtown, Inagua, Bahamas is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration should not be granted
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 29th day of August
1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002,
Nassau, Bahamas.




NOTICE
NOTICE Is hereby given that OTTO KARL MUSALL of 62
Silver Point Freeport is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalisation as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalisation should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 29th day of.
August 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality'
and Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box
N-3002, Nassau.


Two more beauties for pageant


Lovely Bahamian beauties
throughout the Commeoawelth
of the Bahamas are making pre-
parations for the annual
Miss Bahamas Beauty Pageant,
to be held on Sunday at Le
Cabaret Theatre, Paradise
Island.
Prior to the contest the
contestants will be feted at an
evening cruise aboard the
catamaran, "Tropic Bird,"
compliments of the Bahamas
Sightseeing and Tour Operators
Association, and of the Hon.
George A. Smith, Minister of
Transport and the Bahamas
Beauty Pageant Committee,
sponsors of the Miss Bahamas
Beauty Pageant.
Two more beauties have
entered the contest.
Taking part in the 1974
Pageant is lovely Deborah Ann
Knowles. Born in Nassau
October 12, 1956, Deborah
attended Queen's College and
Government High School. She
has four Bahamas Junior
Certificates in English
Language, Biology, History and
French and Pitman's
Bookkeeping stages one and
two.
Deborah is 5'5", weights
107 pounds and measures
32-25-36. She was First
runner-up in the 1973 Miss
Nassau High School contest
and hopes to become a Dental
Hygientist.
The beauty title hopeful has
entered as Miss Star Life and is
being sponsored by Star Life
Insurance.
Erin Elizabeth Hall, born in
Nassau October 2, 1955, is a
beautician at Barbara's Beauty
Salon, the beauty queen
hopeful attended Queen's
College, Nassau; Lymm
Grammer School, England;
Mary Bolton School,
Nottingham; Clark School of
Hairdressing, Manchester and
Vidal Seasoon, London.
She is 5'3" tall, weighs 115
pounds and has statistics of
35-26-36. Her ambition is to
become an interior decorator.
She also likes travelling and
meeting people.
Erin is Assistant Guider at
Queen's College Guide
Company and was a Girl Guide
representative at the World


ELIZABETH HALL
Youth Camp in Mexico last
year.
An ardent traveller, she has
toured Western Europe and
Southern Ireland. She also


holds a Bronze Medallion for
swimming from the Royal
Lifesaving Society and her
hobbies are swimming, skiiing.
horse-back riding, power


boating and flying.
Entered as Miss Chris', Erin
is being sponsored by Chris'
Boutique.
Tickets for the Pageant may
be purchased at Cleary Optical,
next door to Pipe of Peace,
Bay Street from 10 a.m. to 5
p.m. daily.
FIRE DANCE
THE BAHAMAS Workers
Council is sponsoring a dance
at the Grants Town Hotel off
Lewis Street beginning 9 p.m.
Friday to raise money for a fire
relief fund benefitting
Jonathon Johnson, Nathaniel
Gardiner and King Rolle.
The dance is also to raise
funds for "community
financial development,"
according to a press release.


Some 200 delegates
comprising Speakers, Ministers
and Members of Parliaments
from nearly 90 legislatures of
the Commonwealth will meet
in Colombo as guests of the Sri
Lanka Branch of the
Commonwealth Parliamentary
Association.
Leading the Bahamas
Delegation will be Mr. Joseph
R. Ford, MP. He will be
accompanied by Mrs. Ford.
Other members are: Senator
Leander C. Minnis, Senator
Arthur A. Foulkes and Mr.
Percy 0. Saunders, Chief
Clerk of the House and
Secretary to the Bahamas
Branch of the C.P.A.
Conference sessions will be
formally opened Sept. 6 by the
President of the Republic of
Sri Lanka, Mr. W. Gopallawa.
The opening and business
sessions of the Conference will
be held at the Bandaranaike
Memorial International
Conference Hall. Hon. Stanley
Tillerkeratne, MP. Speaker of
the National State Assembly,
Sri Lanka, and President of the
Association, will be Chairman
of the Conference.
Prior to the Conference
sessions, visitors will tour
places of historical and scenic
interest.
The object of plenary
Conferences of the Association
is to bring together Members of
Parliaments of Commonwealth


countries so that they may
exchange views on matters of
common interest.
The Commonwealth
Parliamentary Association is an
association of Members, of
Commonwealth Parliaments
who, irrespective of race,
religion and culture, are
united in the Commonwealth by
community of interest, respect
for the rule of law and the
rights of the individual citizen
and the pursuit of the ideals
parliamentary democracy.
The Association is unique in
providing the machinery for
regular consultation and the
exchange of information
between Commonwealth
Parliamentarians.
The Association has
Branches in almost all
legislatures in the
Commonwealth, and has strong
support in those legislatures -
support that is reflected by the
fact that most delegations to
the forthcoming Conference
are led by Speakers or
Ministers.
Some of the subjects on the
agenda will be discussed in
plenary session, others in
committee, and in panel
discussions.
Fopics on the agenda are:
The Indian Ocean as a Zone of
Peace; South-East Asia and
Problems of Peace and
Neutrality in other regions:
The World Energy Crisis; The


Come and bring a friend!
YOUR TICKET TO PARADISE!


ESCAPE
from the hum drum

to the TROPICAL SETTING of the


L


PARADISE BEACH PAVILION
overlooking beautiful Paradise Beach

Pleasant service of reasonably priced meals under the
personal direction of Bernard Perron.
Breakfast e Lunch e Dinner. Open from 7:30 a.m. to 11 P.h..

RESERVATIONS: 5-7541
Paradise Beach Pavilion is just west of the Holiday Inn.
WHERE JAMES BOND MADE THUNDERBALL


0
0


Law of the Sea: International
Aid Scope, Form and
Direction; Unrest Among
Youth; The Challenge to
Educational Systems: The
Problems of the Smaller
Countries of The
Commonwealth; The Member
and his Information;
Broadcasting and Television in
Parliaments; Bicameral and
Unicameral Parliaments; World
Population Year; Control of
Pollution and Protection of the
Environment; One Party and
Multi-Party Parliaments:
Electoral Systems and
Referenda and their Impact on
Parliamentary Democracy;
Improving the Efficiency of
Parliament; Commodity Prices
and the Future Relationship
between the Industrialised and
the Primary Producing
Countries with Reference to
the European Community and
other Organisations.

Mrs. Archer's

funeral

Sunday

Funeral services for Mrs.
Sybelene Olive Archer, 68, of
Yellow Elder Gardens and
formerly of Governors
Harbour, Eleuthera, will be
held 3 p.m. Sunday at Salem
Baptist Church, Taylor street.
Rev. Charles W. Saunders and
Rev. Enoch Backford Sr. will
officiate and interment will be
in Western Cemetery.
She is survived by her
daughter. Mrs. Anna Brooks:
three adopted daughters, Mrs.
Oleta Carroll, Mrs. Rossie Davis
and Mrs. Irma Archer: three
sons, Samuel, Everette and
Thomas; one sister, Mrs. Ellen
Sawyer of Miami; 25 grand and
15 great-grand children.


A Party


without



BACARDI



just isn't


a party!
j---t^fiifi ^ E^


BACARDI


ISACARDI CO. tl-


--man





SI
/ """ K5
^ Y..........mou8^


TAKE HOME A SUPPLY TODAY


FROM YOUR

FAVOURITE DEALER


DISTRIBUTORS FOR THE BAHAMAS


The



General Agency Lilit
PATTON ST. -PALMDALE
P. O. BOX ES.5276 PHONE 2-1661


"BACARDI" AND THE BAT DEVICE AR '4 -
REGISTERED TRADEMARKS
OF BACARDI & COMPANY UMITEg


Four represent, Bahamas


at CPA's Sri Lanka meet
THE Twentieth Plenary Conference of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association will be
held in Sri Lanka (Ceylon) September 1-15.


om OM 0= AM @m


: .'A jt












L ASF DET OTHE TRIBUNE - Thursday, August 29, 1974





CLASSIFIED SECTION I TO PLACE YOUR ADV. TELE


L ESTATE FOR R ENT PETS FOR SALE SCHOOLS HELP WANTED IELP WANITE H ELP MATED TRADE SERVICES
-'-- -


C16450
MUST SELL: Corner Lot,
Seabreeze, Section 1 100 x
100 ft. Will accept first $6,000
offer. Telephone 2-4350, or
3-5238 after 6.

C17291
LOT of land in Blair
Subdivision 60x120 Cash
$5,500. Terms $6,000. Call
23735.
C16160
BUILD ANYTIME. 70 x 100
lots. YAMACRAW BEACH
ESTATES. $75 deposit. From
$80 month. Private beach and
lake. No interest charges. Tel:
41141 any day or night or
2-4148.
MORLEY & O'BRIEN REAL
ESTATE (BREA BROKERS).

C17252
BUY A LOT
IN SAN ANDROS
ALMOST 1/3 acre
$35 down, $35 per month.
Call or visit
FRANK CAREY
REAL ESTATE
P.O. Box N-4764
Bay and Deveaux Streets

Telephone 2-7667 24815

C17280

LAST CHANCE
DON'T MISS OUT
Only a few choice Lots left in
Golden Gates !1 Subdivision
where Nassau's newest
Shopping Centre is now under
construction. Call or come by
today $4,800 as low as $200
down and $97.42 per month.
GROSHAM PROPERTY
LIMITED
107 Shirley Street
at Sassoon House
Phone 2-7662 or 2-8966.

C17287
SEA BREEZE VICINITY. Lots
50 x 260. $4000 cash or terms
$300 down and balance
financed at $103.03 month.
ALSO, lots 70 x 550 $6500.
$400 down. Balance financed
at $151.80 month. Tel: 4-1141
any day or night or 2-3027.
MORLEY & O'BRIEN
REAL ESTATE LTD.

C17306
SEA BREEZE Lovely
3-bedroom, 2-bath fully
furnished home on lot 100 x
161 $45,000 financing
available.
VILLAGE ROAD -
furnished cottage on beautiful
corner Lot 90 x 200 with lots
of bearing fruit trees -
completely enclosed priced
for quick sale at $32,000.
PALMDALE 3-bedroom,
1'/I bath house with large
recreation room, beautifully
furnished, including washing
machine, dryer and many extra
features $45,000.
GROSHAM PROPERTY
LIMITED
107 Shirley Street
Phone 2-7662 or 2-8966
Night Phone 4-2166.

C17311
COMMERCIAL PROPERTIES
3 Lots, Chesapeake Road
Pyfrom's Subdivision 150 x
105 asking $35,000.00.
Interfield Road vicinity YWCA
100 x 600 or 60,000 sq. ft.
Askinq $50,000.00.
JEROME AVENUE AND
WULFF ROAD 39,488 sq. ft.
asking $85,000.00.
Lot 55 x 105 or 5775 sq. ft.
Southeast Corner Chesapeake
and Arawak, asking
$10,000.00.
SOUTHWEST CORNER
Bernard and Dan Nottage
20,660 sq.ft. (97x213) asking
$35,000.00.
PYFROM'S ESTATES
Northeast Corner Chesapeake
and Arawak 55 x 105 asking
$10,000.00.
DIAL DAMIANOS 22305,
22307 evenings 41197.


ATTRACTIVE three-bedroom,
two-bath residence Village
Road hilltop, separate dining
room, study, patio, porch, etc.
plus garage apartment. $65,000
furnished.
Attractive residence on large
lot Montagu hilltop area three
bedrooms, two baths, living
room, Bahama room, separate
dining room, large kitchen,
detached garage, maid's room
and laundry. Asking price
$55,000 furnished.
Charming Cable Beach
residence near the sea. 3


bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, large
living/dining, patio, kitchen,
laundry, carport. Lot 100 ft. x
120 ft. $55,000 furnished.
H. G. CHRISTIE LTD.
Phone 21041/2/3/4.

FN SALE N ENT

C16489
3 BEDROOM 2 bath house,
unfurnished. Blair Estates.
Phone 32095.

I m ENT
C16499
COMPLETELY furnished two
bedroom apartment, Blue Hill
Road south opposite
McPherson Primary School.
235 per month. Washing
machine on premises. Tel.
23287.


C 16498
3 BEDROOM 2 bath house,
unfurnished, Seven Hills Estate
Call 3-2731.

Cl/281
ONE bedroom furnished
apartment, Shirley Slope.
$250. Call 3-1671/2 9 a.m. 5
p.m.; after 5 p.m. 5-2261.

C17310
ONE 2-bedroom apartment,
one efficiency apartment,
available. Centreville. Call Don
Pritchard 5-8679.

C17350
UNFURNISHED apartment 3
bedroom 1 bath in Pinedale -
$170 water included. Phone
5-7948 or 2-3032.

C16119
COTTAGES ,a nd
APARTMENTS monthly
airconditioned, fully furnished,
maid service available. Lovely
garden and swimming pool.
Telephone 31297, 31093.

C16136
LOVELY 2 bedroom
a ir conditioned apartment ,
Dundas Court, Pyfrom's
Addition, Master T.V. antenna
and laundry room facilities
enclosed parking area. For
information call 3-4953 or
5-4258.

C17263
TASTEFULLY furnished very
spacious one bedroom
apartment, Nice quiet area,
near schools ideal for
teachers. Air conditioned,
telephone, master antenna,
washing facilities etc. No
children or pets, two references
required. Rents $250 per
month including water. Phone
21030 office hours or 42787
after 5 p.m.


WANTS TO SREI
C17356
HOUSE to share out east -
ideal for a teacher. Also, have
Yamaha 100 for sale. Call Mr.
Rose 4-2216 or 3-1411.

FOR SALE
C17294
THOUSANDS AND
THOUSANDS
of items
at Va price
MACKEY STREET
DEPARTMENT STORE
Mackey Street and
Palmdale Avenue
OPPOSITE BAR
20 CORNER.
Telephone 52398
STORE HOURS: Monday -
Friday and Saturday 8 a.m. to
8 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday
and Thursday 8 a.m. to 6 p.m..

C17354
SACRIFICE
CASH AND CARRY SALE
Entire household on sale at
fraction of cost price
Cars
Furniture
Appliances
Clothing
Carpets
Four Days only:
THURSDAY, FRIDAY,
SATURDAY, SUNDAY Large
pink oceanfront house across
from Olympia Hotel (West Bay
Street).

C17295
ALMOST NEW
I two drawer cash register
$1000.00

1 hot dog machine $40.00
1 large filing cabinet $60.00
1968 PONTIAC, minor repairs
needed. Car in present use. -
$700.00
Phone 42643 C. Chestnut.



C16485
CARPETING IS A SENSIBLE
LUXURY
It's the CHEAPEST
FLOORING FOR NEW
HOMES
It's EASY TO CLEAN ....
SOFT TO TOUCH ...
NICE TO LOOK AT,
AND IT COSTS AS LITTLE
AS $5 PER SQUARE YARD,
CASH
AT CENTRAL FURNITURE
ON BAY STREET AND


WULFF ROAD.
VISIT CENTRAL
FURNITURE TODAY FOR
SENSIBLE LUXURY.
Bay Street, Phone: 24122,
open 8:45 5 p.m. Monday to
Friday 8:45 5 p.m. Saturday.
Wulff Road, Phone: 59600,
open 10 a.m. 6 p.m.
Monday, Thursday and
Saturday, 10 a.m. 1:30 p.m.
Friday.


I PETS FOR SALE

C17303
ONLY FOUR DOBERMAN
PUPS LEFT
One Male $150
Three Females $125 each -
Hind Eastern Road. Telephone
41128.


L1 I347
PUREBRED German Shepherd
Puppies 7 weeks old -
already wormed. Telephone
34038.


CARS FOR SALE
C17352
1970 CHEVY NOVA 23400
miles. 4 door, 6 cyl., good
condition. $1900. O.N.O.
Phone 77520 after 6.30 p.m.

C17357
1974 BUICK CENTURY
LUXUS, fully equipped,
airconditioned, power disc
brakes including 8-track tape
deck. 5000 miles. $6,300
O.N.O. Call 22058. 32163.


MARINE SUPPLIES I
C17332
10 ft "INVADER" Runabout
powered by 35 H.P. Mercury
$600. Boat $250. Motor $350.
To view phone 3-2022 and ask
for Andrew.
C11894
1969 31 ft. CHRIS-CRAFT
Commander. sleeps six, private
shower, two 230 h.p. engines
with less than 200 hours.
Kitchenette, good condition.
Call 24267, 54011.

C17273
1973 22 ft. Mako, twin 85
h.p., tack meters, hour meters,
tem. gauges, amp. meter, depth
finder. $9,500. Can be seen at
Bayshore Dock E30. Phone
2-4100.

C17272
SUPER clean 24' 1973
Seabird. One of the classiest
and sportiest boats in Nassau.
You must have a look!
Telephone 77993 Mr. Davis.

C17304
19 ft. Fibreglass Cathedral -
95 H.R. Mercury -completely
overhauled in April; ship-shore
radio, compass, tachometer,
spare prop, new battery,
Marina Dolly -- first-class
condition. $1750.00. May be
seen on Sunday Phone
74150.

C17302
60' SHIRIMPER BOAT. M.V.
STAR TRADER. Outfitted
with 400 new crawfish traps,
complete hydraulic system for
hauling traps. WHITE CEDAR
HULL first class condition,
also outfitted for DEEP
WATER RED SNAPPER
FISHING, 3 newest type
electric reels wire lines and all
necessary, fittings including
new extra heavy duty batteries,
165 H.P. CUMMINGS DEISEL
ENGINE in top condition
completely overhauled. Sleeps
6. 10,000 Ibs. coldstorage
below deck, 2000 lbs. NEW
ICE BOX built to ice red
snappers. Can be seen at East
Bay Marina. Phone 51729
JOHN ROBERTS.

CRAFT SUPPES

C16138
NOW in stock at Bahamian
Paint Supply, Bay Street:
* Decoupage
* Clear Cast
* Candle Craft
* Tissue Craft
Phone 2-2386, 2-2898.



C16497


HURRY, HURRY
HURRY
Get supplies
while stock last
JUST ARRIVED FROM
ENGLAND


Lecithin Capsules
Kelp Tablets
Garlic Capsules
Wheat Germ Oil Capsules, Sta.
Acerola Cherry C. Tablets
Desiccated Liver Tablets
Dolomite Magnesium Tablets
High Potency B-Complex
Capsules
Garlic & Parsley Capsules
Junior Formula Tablets
PREVENTION September
1974 issue.
NASSAU DRUG STORE
Phone 5-4506.
MACKEY STREET

SCHOOLS
C16114
LEWIS AUTO SCHOOL
Learn to drive with confidence.
Phone 59805 between 7 and
8:30 a.m. or after 6 p.m. or
3-5034 anytime.

C16360
WEE WISDOM
Collins Avenue
Nassau's finest Prep
3 year old Nursery 4 and 5
year old .Kindergarten
* Low Tuition
o Supervised Play
* Quality Teaching Programme
* Phonics
* Reading
Office Hours
9a.m.to 1 p.m.
or call
26fA -- 1ar


SI Jau wfo 156o0


C17259a
SHIRLEA NURSERY SCHOOL
& DAY CARE CENTRE


Lancaster St., Eastern end.
Quality Teaching
Ages 2 months 5 years
Reasonable Rates
Full or A Day
Opening Sept. 2nd. 1974
See Mrs. Nellie Lowe
at the School

C17293
KIDDIESKOOL NURSERY
SCHOOL
Finest Pre-School Education
Half day and Full Day
Reasonable Rates
Two locations Collins
Avenue.
Village Road.
Telephone 3-1595 days and
evenings.

C17305
SAVE on clothing for yourself
and your family. LEARN TO
SEW with and without
patterns. Competent
Instructors! Simplified lessons.
There a few spaces left.
Registration daily, Mon. --
Sat., 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
D'ELEGANT SCHOOL OF
FASHION AND
DRESSMAKING. Corner East
Shirley and Fowler Streets.
Telephone 53223.

S ENTERTAINMENT

C17312
If you need a Band for Parties,
Weddings or other functions,
Call THE HIGHBERIANS
5-5866




C 17274
IF YOU would like your
property to be listed for sale or
rent in the next Real Estate
Bulletin, contact Bill Sands of
Bill's Real Estate, telephone
23921, P. 0. Box 5449 ES,
Nassau.

C17351
THE FOLLOWING LOT
OWNERS AT YAMACRAW
BEACH ESTATES ARE IN
ARREARS OF PAYMENT
AND UNLESS A
SUBSTANTIAL PAYMENT IS
MADE BY THE 16
SEPTEMBER 1974. THE LOT
WILL BE PLACED BACK ON
THE MARKET FOR
RE-SALE:-

LOT NAME
123&124 Manassah &
Susan Bain
319 Beatrice Mullings
320 James & Susan Mullings
415 Lloyd Lowe
417 Ricardo Roberts
424 Perry Gomez
425 Carman Gomez
430 George Forbes
475 Virgil Coakley

HELP WANTED
C16126
WANTED IMMEDIATELY
Experienced Offset Pressman,
40 hours per week, good
working conditions. APPLY
BAHAMAS PRINTING, Oake.,
Field.
C17260
SECRETARY:- Must be able
to type accurately. Must have
knowledge of Bookkeeping to
TRIAL-BALANCE. Two
references required. Write: The
Manager, Box N-8079.


C17254
APPLICATIONS are being
sought immediately for a
qualified teacher to teach
children ages eight through
eleven years in a small school
at Treasure Cay, Abacc. Apply
in writing enclosing resume of
qualifications and experience
to:
SCHOOLTEACHER
c/o P.O. Box N-3229
Nassau, N.P., BAHAMAS.
C 17266
1 Auto-Electric Mechanic
1 Auto-Transmission Mechanic
1 Handyman Cleaner
2 Auto Mechanics General
For immediate employment.
Mechanics must have a
minimum of 6 years in trade as
well as recommendations and
clean driver's licence.
Apply in person to Service
Manager, Mr. K. Campbell,
Nassau Motor Company Ltd.


C 17265
1 MASTER MECHANIC
capable of carrying out all
phases of repairs to British and
American automobiles without
supervision. Also, capable of
training apprentice. Must have
references, clean driver's licence
and complete set of tools.
Apply in. person to Service
Manager, Mr. K. Campbell,
Nassau Motor Company Ltd.

C 17284
ACCOUNTANT
for Bay Street store with
experience in retail accounting
or equivalent. Applicant must
'submit qualifications. This a
great opportunity for the
qualified person. Write: Adv.
C17284, c/o The Tribune, P.
0. Box N-3207, Nassau
Bahamas.


C17313
Three Driver/Salesmen for ice
cream trucks. Must have
driver S l i cence,
recommendations and health
certificate. Only Bahamians
need apply. Call Bahamas
Icecreams Ltd., 2-3236 or
2-1864, between 10 a.m. and 5
p.m., for interview.


C17277
WANTED IMMEDIATELY
Handyman for weeding
property. $45.00 per week.
Telephone 35496.

C17353
One Bahamian Farm Labourer
- 5 days a week. $35 per
week. Phone 4-2289.
C17307
HOLIDAY INN PARADISE
ISLAND HAS VACANCIES
FOR Shift Engineers with
experience in operation and
maintenance of absorption
chillers, automatic oil fired
boilers and water softening
plant.
Re frigeration and
Air-conditioning mechanics
with experience in operation
and maintenance of absorption
chillers, ice makers, walk-in
freezers, etc.
APPLY WITH REFERENCE
TO GENERAL MANAGER, P.
0. Box 6214.


C17333
MARKETING AND
MERCHANDISING
businesswoman capable of
organising and directing all
phases of sales promotions.
Training sales personnel in
modern merchandising
methods of the retail and
wholesale perfume and
cosmetic business a must.
Applicant must have at least a
basic knowledge of French and
Spanish, and four year!
experience in the retail ano
wholesale of French perfume
in Duty Free shops and othet
tourist markets. Bahamian!
only. Apply to the Manager, P.
0. Box N-4039, Nassau,
Bahamas.
C17331
LYFORD CAY CLUB requires
a Club Secretary to take full
responsibility for corporate,
legal, and confidential work,
correspondence, etc.
concerning Club Membership.
Will also be responsible for
organizing committee meetings
and compiling agendas and
minutes, assisting in the
organization of golf and tennis
tournaments, lectures and
various club social activities.
Should enjoy meeting people.
Bahamians only should apply.
Please reply in writing to
Managing Director, P. 0. Box
N-7776, Nassau.


C17308
REQUIRED IMMEDIATELY
Paint Technician with 5-8 years
experience for a managerial
position. References required.
Phone 57939 r write P. 0.
Box 5599, Nass J.

C17348
ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE
requires general office clerks
between the ages of 22-35."
Applicant must be able to type
50-65 words per minute.
Should have some knowledge
of public relations and business
administration. Must be willing
to work beyond normal
working hours. For
appointment call 4-1511.

C17355
ENTERTAINERS NEEDED at
Dirty Dick's
Limbo Dancer
Shake Dancer
Under new entertainment
director Mr. David Kemp.
Telephone 5-7116.

C17330
A CHARTERED
ACCOUNTANT, Bahamian
citizen, aged about 35 years, is
required for our Building and
Property Companies based in
Nassau. Responsibilities
include production of financial
accounts and office
administration together with a
contribution to the general
management of the companies
involved. This is anticipated
being a permanent
appointment, probably more
suitable for a single person,
with salary commensurate with
experience, together with
generous allowances.
Please reply in confidence with
full personal details, etc. to
Financial Comptroller, Sir
Robert McAlphine & Sons
(Bahamas) Ltd., P. 0. Box
N-3919, Nassau.


|rea smal ds
| ybu'Ms wrong. You wr
Reading this aren't you?
Call 2-2768 for
informationon smaN or
atrge display ads.


ANNOUNCEMENTS
C16137
SHAWNEE
DaIly Service between West
Palm Beach and West End. For
reservations call The Grand
Bahama Hotel (Ext. 5).

HELP WANTED

C 15483
Live-in MAID. References


required from
employers.
Write P. 0. Box
Freeport. 'Morgan'.


former


F-2039, II


C15469
RADIOGRAPHER wanted
part -time. Phone
Administrator, Lucayan
Medical Centre. Freeport
352-7288.


C15479
Air Canada requires a
MAINTENANCE
REPRESENTATIVE.
Applicant must be qualified in
maintenance of DC8 and DC9
Aircraft. Applicants must be
Bahamian Nationals.
Apply in writing to: P. 0. Box
F-391, Freeport, Bahamas
enclosing resume of work
experience and employment
and photostat copies of
Licences held.


C15484
Heavy Construction: Field
Clerk with specific experience
with the operation of heavy
equipment, should have 8 years
experience, with a college
education or its equivalent;
required to prepare estimates,
process all daily machine
reports and the preparation of
equipment summaries and be
able to work without
supervision.
Box F-306, Freeport.
(373-1046).



C15486
Bahamas Princess requires 12
DISHWASHERS who will be
responsible for washing all
plates, cups and keeping them
clean. Must also see that the
trolley for dishes is always
clean. Must keep working areas
clean at all times. Job entails
long periods of standing.Clean
police certificate and health
certificate essential.
Experienced persons preferred.
Interested applicants apply to
Bahamas Princess Personnel
Office, P. 0. Box F207,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


C17292
NOW OPEN
DOG GROOMING SALON
by
DOREEN BUTLER HICKS
at
Warwick Street, Shirlea
Phone 5-2195.

C16110
C. W. (BILL) PEMBERTON
for
INSURANCE
Life, Fire, Hurricane, Motor,
etc.
Telephone 52539
Malton House
P. 0. Box N1014
Collins Avenue

tC16133
FOR YOUR BUILDING1
NEEDS AND CRANE HIRE ...
see:-
ISLAND BUILDERS
:LIMITED
P. 0. Box 6285 ES
Phone 3-1671 3-1672

C16134
BACKHOE FOR HIRE
Need a septic tank or trenching
done?
Call
CARL G. THECO
CONTRACTORS LTD.,
2-4996 or 5-8725

C16127
MASTER TECHNICIANS LTD
Mackey Street I
YOUR WHIRLPOOL
DISTRIBUTORS OFFER:
Refrigerators, Washers, Dryers;
Compactors, Freezers, Ice'
.Makers, Air Conditioners and
Garbage Disposers. With full
warranty on every home
appliance we sell.
Service done by factory trained
mechanics. Telephone 23713,
59322.

C16112
SEWING MACHINE PARTS
AND REPAIRS
- ISLAND FURNITURE
COMPANY
P. 0. Box 4818, Nassau
Dowdeswell and Christie
Streets
Telephone 21197, 23152.


HELP WANTED


C15482

SECURITY GUARDS required
for Trace Ltd., male only. Must
have drivers' licence, able to
read and write fluently.
Apply in person only between
10:00 a.m. and 12:00 Noon,
30B Kipling Building,
Freeport.


C15485
Bahamas Princess requires 5
POTWASHERS who will be
responsible for cleaning all
pots, pans and any utensils.
Must keep working areas clean
at all times. Job entails long
periods of standing.
Experienced persons preferred.
Clean police and health
certificates essential.
Interested applicants apply to
Bahamas Princess Personnel
Office, P. 0. Box F-207,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.



C15487
GOLF M'E CHANIC
FOREMAN (2) Required *o
supervise the day to day
maintenance and repair of golf
carts, hotel vehicles, body
repair work, installation and
equipment. Knowledge of golf
carts and engines absolutely
essential. Past proven ability to
supervise and delegate
essential. Previous experience
in this area essential. Good
letters of references and clean
police certificate also essential.
STAFF QUARTERS
TRASHMAN Responsible
for the collection of trash and
garbage of the grounds.
Dependability, good references
and clean police certificate
esse' tial.
DATA PROCESSING
MANAGER- Responsible for
the installation and
.maintenance of computer
programmes on the IBM
System 3. Must have the ability
to convert symbolic statement
of business problems to
detailed logic flow charts for
coding into computer language
for programming. Specific
programmes involving payroll,
general ledger, inventory
control, receivable, guests
reservations and guest history,
room occupancy, cash flow
analysis and budget control.
Good references and clean
police certificate absolutely
essential.
Interested applicants apply to
Bahanris Princess Personnel
Office, P. 0. Box F-207,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


_____u-I______________ ___


I


lI&










THE TRIBUNE... Thursday, Auust 29, 1974

SJJJIJpim ^


But that's only the beginning of what happened in
the office while you were away on business."


AWUR GOD THING AMOT PEANUT UE ...NE JAR
MAY IA EMPrYW& W UCAN GETSOL
MOE OUT OF fTI*


,NQ,WE HWE ONLY ONE CAT,BUTHEUABVT 5SOLEP.

CROSSWORD ARA BOSO
PUZZLE V aR I
ACROSS 30. Engineering R, E S3 S0 I
degree AN ET E
1. Police 31. SeasonalW I R
bulletin visitor
4. Navy 32. More positive
recruit 34.3.1416 C A
8. Box top 35. Brain scan
11. The Lion 36. Seed covering I 1 AWA
12. Await 37. Collapse T L O
13. Shoshonean 39. About
14. Grandma 40. Indicator SOLU ION O YESTERDAY'S OUZ;
Moses 42. Blackjack 5. Therefore 5. Lubricate
16. Dictionary 44. Knightly 56. Small cyst 6. Music hall
18. Compass point champion DOWN
20. Siouan 47. Insect 7. Topic
21. At bat 50. United 1. Past 8. Swiss lake
23. Psalm 51. Enthusiasm 2. Cob's mate 9. Japanese
25. Journey 53. Japanese fan 3. Rib statesman
28. Pilfer 54. Affix 4. Size of shot 10. Retreat


9


SCARROLL RIGHTER'S




GENERAL TENDENCIES: Thi is a day when
you would be wise to modernize and tone up
your surroundings. You are now able to get some relief from
tensions and strain. Get together with frier.s and enloy the
mutual pleasures that appeal to you.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) Plan how to gain your finest
desires of a personal nature. A good friend can help you to get
ahead socially. Show that you have poise.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) If you listen to what an
expert has to suggest, you can become more successful in your
career. Lend a helping hand where needed.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Find newer and better
projects through which to advance in the future. Learn more
about a fun hobby and make it more enjoyable.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) If you use new
methods, you can handle all those obligations ahead of you
quickly and well. A wise friend gives good advice.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) If you are explicit in stating your
aims to associates, you will get full cooperation. Don't let
anyone come between you and your mate.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Try to cooperate more with
associates and be more cheerful. Take the health treatments
you need and become more dyamic. Be logical.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Once you have attended to
regular duties, go out and enjoy the company of congenials.
Take no risks where money is concerned. Be wise.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Try to straighten out any
misunderstanding between you and those at home. A good day
to start a new project with right allies.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Approach a new ally
more intelligently and get better results. Take no chances
where your reputation is concerned. Think.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) Plan time to put your
property in better condition. Listen to the suggestions of a
trusted adviser. Don't argue with mate tonight.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Do whatever will improve
your appearance and then go to social activities that you
enjoy. Discuss your aims with good friends.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Make plans for the future and
contact persons who can be of help to you. Listen to what an
expert has to say. Think logically.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY... he or she could
easily develop an awareness of the needs of others. It would be
wise to have the finest personalities around so your progeny
will absorb much culture since the mind here is very active.
Try to direct the education along humanitarian lines. Music
lessons should also be given.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel"' What you make of
vour life is largely up to YOU!



THE Make You Vr.ry CR(OS-word. The one with no numbers.
and. erept for the iCrtM in each setlion, no order to the clues.
ON: HINT hIy comptler TIM McKAY : An eight-letter total will
give you a welimie honiM. Solution on Monday.


----- -I--




('Jin'. A.Tro%
Pure 4sle%. (.nag.). (qo
(irl %alirs. (i5)
Featlhery feature. (Op
%hen you plant. (4 4)
Fratldulenl piece ol work. 14)
I'iece of niE' chiner). (9


S
I,


REX MORGAN, M.D. Diel Curtis
HE DID H4VE DR MORGAN, HOW I HAD A CALL
A SERIOUS DID YOU HAPPEN FROZEN EARLY W K
WHEN I LEFT BEN AT HEART TO BE HERE T TWS AFTERNOON, AYF TTER 1UNG
EIGHT-THIRTY, HE SEEMED CONDITION
50 RELAXED ANDUPI---ANCID
--AN TO FLY IN NERE .
HAPP Y' IJUSTCAN'T W-- 14E
BELIEVE HES GONE / E
l WAVE OPEN MW
"*SURGERY


tso

I




JUDGE PARKER Paul Nichols
BECAUSE I DON'T IF THAT'THOArI hMY I THINK W TOULD ITAY
IF YOU'RE RIGHT, WHY WANT TO MAKE ANY DECIGION, I'LL TELL. ECIiION, UNTIL *6 OPENER CA
DO YOU WANT TO MORE TROUBLE FOR MI6 SPENCER! MR. DRIVER! REPLA OU!
LEAVE HERE, .UTIN.? MISS PENCER THAN AND 0
I HAVEAEA FA'4OR...
ALREADY! -,DON'T TELL
ANYBODY
THAT YOu'RE
LEAVING!










APARTMENT 3-G By Alex Kotzkh


Fall away. (3)
Aplomb. (9)
Preceding In time. (3)
Calminf medicines. (9)
Clues Down
Companions in diversions. (9)
Competent. (4)
('Cut off. (3)
I uttered In words. (9)
Withered. (4)
Refreshing drink. (3)
Blinding spray blown from the
iea's surface. (9)
U n I v e r-
sity town's A A
river. (1) K
(C o m m i-
il e n 1, of
teach e r m.
(3)

a a r metM

I n e rease.
(3:) i.'icrdaei rolei .


TARGE


LE
L.
A


E
N
D
E

ZLE


15i. Rowan tree
17. Greek letter
19. Flirt
21. The Bear
22. Serve tea
24. Myself
26. Roman road
27. Errand boy
29. Suppressed
31. Missile
shelter
33. Lamb
34. Dad
37. Handbill
38. Loiter
41. Cutting tool
43. Understand
44. Blue grass
45. Also
46. Henpeck
48. Majority


4 w ord, o
A M f A u r letters
or mere c n
ii0-- 1u make
r f rou the
letters shown
A h e here? In
minak i n a
Sword. e a c b
S I letter my
be used oace
only. Bach
word must contain the large
letter, and there lmut he at


Chess


W hite inm tet I ''1 I .' no'..f .
a',ImnII' awn d"f I I bv H.
Tiv nblacn;
P n'r" 1 Iin;:'t' p '1t"rm
n-r m i nt-- 5
inmnut"'s. o o d ; 8 minute-.
aiverage: 20 ninutc. non\vtes


Chess solution
I Kt-Kt6 db ch. If I . .
K-B4; 2 Kt-B8. or if K-Q-;3
2 Kt-K4. or if K-K4: ZKt-K2,
or if K-Q5: 2 Kt-Q7. An
unnrthnonr key. ustified bu the


I- I t // 1 /49. son metar ...... ..
\ I.... ^A I | | Iarietuj of mating
Par time 28 min. AP Newsf.eaures 8-31 52. Behold

Rupert and the Wooden Horse- 50


moves.


Dr. Sheep soon gathers his wils and stays you too mucn trouble. Then you must loin
chatting to Mrs. Bear until she hears the us fu. lea replies Mummy Rupert. please
chimes of the hall loak. Dear me." she b ing an extra chair.' During the meal the
says how time flies 1 We must have tea." teacher talks about school I now know
" I'll lay ne table for you. Mummy." says that Or. Chimp understands his pupils, he
Rupert Presently Dr. Sheep surprises Mrs. says I must see that I do not treat them
Best hy sying *I've changed my mind IoO st',itIv while I am in his place
about having meals in my room. It gives ALL qRiGHS RESERVEL'


least Iwo eight-letter words In the
list. No plural;: no foreign word":
no proper imlinne. TODAY'S
TARG(ETF: I words. good ;
vlo words. ery good ; 37 words.
prrellent. Solution tomorrow.
V'sTERDAV'S <(MU'TION :
Kking enlile enaile gene genie
glen Ingle keeling keen kiln
king knee kneel leim lien liken
line lin k tlnk Ilnks telnx ,seek-
ing selling een ,eine senile
"Ignm silken %Ilnc Ilng singe
-Ainsle ink kelin skene skin
s F.FKIM(i linx slink.

KEEP'WOMD'OON
WORLD EVENTS
KEEP ABREAST OF
THE LOCAL SCENE



TAKE
TIME
THE
TRIWARE ;


rTe BAHAMA ISLAAOS
tLEAOIM NgWSaPER


Bridge
Ty VICTOR MOLLO
THE ictum that truth is
stranger than fiction is especially
applicable to bridge. A pithy
example is this hand from an
American tournament, reported
by Alan Truscott in the
veuw York Times. to
North U
SAK85
Z 832
0 -
S A Q 10987
West East
' 742 QJ83
QJ 105 9 4
0 9 4 3 2 AJ75
4 5 3 ou, K J2
South
109
SAK 76
0 K Q 1086
464
CONTRACT: 64: LEAD ZQ.
That South should be declarer
in a club contract was due to
the artificial system in use. It's
the play., however, that matters.
Declarer appears to have three
inescapable lsers. a heart and
two clubs. Yet two of them
vanish without a trace.
Going up with the VA at trick
one. South led the OK. hope-
fully, ruffing in dummy when the
ace didn't appear. A heart to
the Z7K and another diamond
ruff were followed by the 4AK
and a spade ruff. A third
diamond was ruffed on the table
and now came a surprise. As
South trumped dummy's last
spade with the V6. held the
trick. With nothing better than
the 45. West couldn't over-ruff.
A fourth diamond ruff left
East with nothing but trumps
and dummy with a hart and the
SAQ. Having to ruff the heart.
Emst was forced to lead away
from his 4K into dummy's
tenace.


k .i.


b











10 THE TRIBUNE - Thursday, August 29, 1974


Do or die for


Florence as



Stars win it

FLORENCE ROLLE is at home with Holiday Inn Stars. She proved it last night
with her sixth inning single that got past right fielder Earnestine Butler scoring
winning pitcher Linda Ford for their 14-13 triumph over Super Value Baintowners
last night.
"It was do or die, and we did it," said Rolle. She also scored in the third inning. Being with
Holiday Inn, she said was inexplicable. "We have togetherness." Actually, Florence and teammates
Daisy Walker and Barbara Knowles helped Baintown formerlyy the Tribune Blazers) to Bahamas
-hampionship title last year. Their leaving would seem to be a big loss to the Baintown offence.


In taking sole possession of
first place in the Columbus
League, Holiday Inn erased a
six-run deficit and crammed six
runs in the bottom of the fifth
sending the game into
over-time.
In that frame, Baintown
coach Norman Gay recalled
starting pitcher Margaret
Albury from right field to
replace Butler bho came in as
relief in the bottom of the
fourth.
Ford, after collecting a two
ball /two strike count clipped
the following pitch past short
stop through Hattie Moxey's
legs and into left field.
Facing her old teammate,


SECOND PLACE finishers
St. Michaels Dodgers edged
their way nearer to a
championship crown yesterday
by romping home over fourth
place Rodgers Sport Shop 14-5
in a one game knock-out series
at the Southern Recreation
Grounds.
St. Michaels who were
known to opponents as the
Lumber men for their good
hitting, breezed past starting
pitcher Brian Taylor for a total
of eight hits in the first inning.
Taylor who could not
subdue the Dodgers bats was
moved from the mound to do
the catching. Starting catcher
Arthur Seymour replaced him.
Seymour bought a little
change to Rodgers lineup. He
silenced the Dodgers on two
runs and 1 hit in the bottom of
the second inning. Seymour
struck out two in the inning.
In the bottom of the third
inning, catcher Ken Wood, and
third baseman Richard
Newbold were involved in a
fracas. Ken who reached first
base via a walk, tried to reach
third on Brad Wood's single.
Ken slided into third, but
Newbold who was playing the
bag wrong was hit.

Construct
YOUNG B FRTI E
Murray Jr. threw a one hitter
and struck out three Tuesday
leading Little League pennant
winners Irvin Knowles
Construction to an 8-2 victory
over St. Bernard's.
In a best of three
championship playoff
beginning Saturday 1 2 noon at
the C. 1. Gibson Grounds ILvin
Knowles play the winner of
today's St. Michael's
Dodgers/Rodgers Sport Shop
encounter.
Both of the Saints* runs


By GLADSTONE THURSTON


Roll who twice previously was
walked jumped on Albury's
third pitch for a line drive
single into right field. Butler
made a vain attempt to stop
the ball. It bounced off her
mitt which was all Ford needed
to score the winning tally.
Although Holiday Inn did
not play up to their fullest
potential, head Coach Adrian
Rodgers was satisfied that "we
have a good team. At least they
showed me that they have
good hustle in them," he said,
now looking forward to a


Newbold who thought that
Wood meant doing this kicked
him. Dave Wood, Ken's brother
was also involved in a scuffle.
The game which was halted
for about 15 minutes got on
the way without any more
disturbances.
Shcrt stop Michael Adderley
collected four hits in his four
times at bat. This included a
solo blast home run in the
third, a triple in the fourth
and two singles in the first.
Adderley also collected three
rbi's in the game.
Winning pitcher Brad Wood
was dominant on the base
path. Wood stole three bases in
his three times at bat. He got
one hit.
Brad Wood got the win as he
struck out a total of seven
batters and gave up six hits.
Arthur Seymour was tagged
with the loss. Seymour gave up
a total eight runs, and seven
hits.
Pennant winners Nassau
Mets will complete a
deadlocked game with the Del
Jane Saints at 10:00 a.m.
Saturday at the C. 1. Gibson
school grounds. The game was
tied 7-7 going into the top of
the fifth. St. Michaels will play
the winner of this encounter at
2 p.m.

on on top
were unearned. The first came
in the top of the first inning
when their lead off batter got
on with an error and scored
on a pass ball.
Held blank until the fourth
frame, St. Bernard's got their
second run from catcher. T.
Paul. He lined a single into
centre and scored on short stop
Mike Knowles' error. Prior to
that, Knowles played
exceptionally well.
Irvin Knowles scored five
runs in the first, two in the
second and one in the third.


successful second half. "They
have a good attitude about the
game."
Rodgers, a diamond veteran
himself, figured that last
night's encounter would have
been tough, but was confident
that his girls had the edge. He
respects the Baintown squad.
Albury's best performance
was the first inning when she
forced Holiday Inn to ground
out scoreless and although the
latter team had to play
catch-up ball until the fifth, it
was evident that Baintown was
gradually getting into trouble.
Taking a 2-0 first inning lead
on runs by Corrine Sabala and
Celestine Wilson, Baintown in
the top half of the following
frame went ahead by seven
with five more runs on two hits
that included Albury's two rbi
single. She scored on an error.
However, Albury lost her
form in the bottom of the
second and, with two out went
on to walk four consecutive
batters. Ford was wild pitched
home and Maria Strachan's
single got past Flora Mackey at
second causing two more to
score.
Holiday Inn out-scored their
opponents 4-2 over the third
and fourth inning to trail by
only two going into the fifth
and final inning of regular
scheduled play.
For a while, it seemed as if
Baintown would have pulled
off the victory, when they
added four more runs to their
score. Albury. Mackey and
Sabala each scored their second
run of the game. Sabala's rbi
single drove in Moxey.
However, they were not
enough to stop the talented
Holiday Inn who triumphantly
conquered the goal and went
on to give Baintown their first
loss in five played.
Holiday Inn took sole
possession of first place
undefeated in five. Bahama
World (3-2) are third and the
Centreville Sisters (2-3) hold
fourth.


HOLIDAY INN
ab
N. Strachan 2
M. Thompson 4
P. Saunders 4
D. Walker 4
A. Sears 4
L. Ford 3
F. Rolle ?
S. Kemp 0
M. Fianna 0
A. Cambridge 0
E. McMinns 2
BAINTOWNERS
H. Moxey 3
C. Sabala 4
C. Wilson 3
E. Smith 4
W. Davidson 3
D. Moss 4
F. Butler 2
F. Mackey 2
M Albury 3


EDDIES DEPARTMENT STORE
BAY STREET NEXT DOOR TO THE STOP 'N SHOP
P. 0. BOX 4457 PHONE 22227


NOW OFFERS


CUSTOM TAILORING

For Men and Boys

Come and select your fabrics from our large
assortment and have our tailor (on premises) tape and
Make your outfit any style.

S Tel us how and

well make it!" T f


-ONE MONTH-

BAN FOR

BREMNER

AND
KEEGAN
LONDON Scotland and
Leeds captain Billy Bremner
and Liverpool's Kevin Keegan
were suspended from soccer
for one month Wednesday
and fined 500 pounds
($1,200) each for bringing
the game into disrepute.
A three-man disciplinary
commission of the English
Football Association ordered
the ban and fine at a hearing
in London.
The ban follows a
three-match suspension for
both players who were sent
off the pitch in an FA
Charity Shield match
between Leeds and Liverpool
on Aug. 10. They will now
miss seven games each.
In that match at Wembley,
opening the 1974-5 season,
millions watched on
television as Bremner and
Keegan pulled their shirts off
as they were sent off by
referee Bob Matthewson for
fighting.
Both players appeared
shaken after being
disciplined, but neither would
make any comment. Reports
said neither player tried to
defend his actions before the
panel. Both said they
regretted it and asked for
leniency.
Two other players booked
in the match, Tommy Smith
of Liverpool and Johnny
Giles of Leeds, also appeared
at the hearing, but no action
was taken against them.


Pictures: RICKEY WELLS
Michael Knowles smashes away during his
6-2 victory over Kevin Lightbourn.

Sisters take


SISTERS CATHY and
Camile Adderley yesterday
took top honours in the 13 and
14 year-old divisions of the
Pepsi Cola Junior tournament
played at the Emerald Beach
courts.


9.,

Cathy Adderley
Linda Davis in
tournament.


enroute to defeating
yesterday's junior


the honours


Cathy, a student of tennis
pro Vicky Knowles defeated
Paradise Island's Linda Davis
6-5. Camile who is also of
Emerald Beach upset Jennifer
Isaacs 6-4.
Britania's Maurice Bastian
captured the boys 11 and
under crown by beating
eight-year-old Larry Glinton
6-4 in a hard fought match.
Glinton who won that division
in the last Bahamas Lawn
Tennis Association's junior
tournament led 4-3 when


Bastian won his serve in the
eight game and took the
remaining two.
In other matches played,
Michael Knowles defeated
Kevin Lightbourn 6-2 for the
boys 13 and under title. Monty
Ward stopped Alex Miller 6-1
for the 16 and under title.
Mr. Phillip Pinder president
of Bahamas Beverages donated
and presented the prizes.
Caribbean's number two
contender John Antonas was
on hand to assist in the event.


Taylor's edge in


DONNA MURRAY, the
glamour girl of British
athletics, winning the 400
metres at the British
International Games at
Crystal Palace in south
London recently.
Miss Murray, a 19-year-old
from Southampton in
southern England, has come
to the forefront of
international athletics this
season during which she has
become the British record
holder for 400 metres with a
time of 51.8 seconds.
Earlier in the season she
also ran the fastest ever 200
metres in a time of 22.9
seconds although this was
wind assisted and does not
count in the record books.
She has been selected to
run for Britain at 400 metres
in the European
Championships which open in
Rome in September.
AUSSIES WIN
World ranking Australia
7 ALadies National softball squad
defeated the Grand Bahama
Ladies all-star 3-0 during a
series last week. The
Australians were enroute home
following their participation in
the World championships.
BASEBALL RESULTS
Pittsbiurgh 3. San I rancisco I
lHouston 3. Net Y(ork 2. 10 innibigs
Cin.nati 4, Philadelphia 3
Atlanta 4. Montreal 2
St Louis 5, San Diegu I
Los Angeles 7. Chicago 6
New York 5. Minnesuota 0


GEORGE PETTY and
winning pitcher Junior
Hepburn crossed the plate for
two winning runs in the
bottom of the sixth inning
giving Taylor Trucking a 7-6
edge over Starlife Baintowners
in last night's first N.P.S.A.
game.
Baintown, having been held
scoreless on one hit over four
innings blasted out of the
slumps with six runs and three


hits in the top of the fifth
taking the lead by one.
Hepburn in taking the win
struck out 10 and walked
three. He collected two hits
from his three at bats.
IMPERIAL LEAGUE
w L
Casino 6 1
M.O.W. 5 3
Taylor's 4 2
Tigers 4 3
B.E.C. 4 4
Melroso 3 3


Softball

all-stars

named
THE FOLLOWING are
players chosen by the New
Providence Softball
Association for their men
all-star game to be played
Saturday night (8:30) at the
John F. Kennedy Softball
Park.
Majestic League Garth
Rahming (Taylor's), Ronald
Turnquest (Keyboard), Glen
Johnson (Coke), Roy
Farrington (Coke), Patrick
Demeritte (Keyboard), Kendal
Rodgers (Customs), Anthony
Neeley (Coke), Lorenzo Culmer
(San Sal), Charles McKinney
(Customs), Eugene Higgs
(Taylor's), Bernice Sands
(Keyboard), Joe McPhee
(Taylor's), Charles Moss
(Customs), Arthus Lee
(Customs), Foster Bethel
(Keyboard), Max Sweeting
(Customs), Christopher
Cardron (San Sal), Leroy
Thompson (Freetown).
Imperial League Paul
Johnson (Trucking), Anthony
Bowe (M.O.W.), Robert
Sawyer (Baintown), Rico,
Hamilton (Trucking), John
Wallace (Melroso), Joe Jones
(Casino) Dencil Clarke (Tigers),
Gregory Austin (Baintown),
Sherwin Taylor (M.O.W.),
Wardy Ford (Tigers); Char:es
Williams (Trucking), George
Williamins (Trucking), Wayde
Davis, (Tigers), Kendal Davis
(Melroso), Hasting Campbell
(Tigers), Charles Rolle
(Casino), Junior Hepburn
(Trucking), Vincent Pratt
(B.E.C).
The ladies all-star game will
be played tomorrow following
the Radio/Press match which
begins at 7:30
BASKETBALL CLINIC
UNDER the auspices of the
Bahamas Amateur Basketball
Association, the Bahamas
Association of Basketball
officials which is a member of
the International Association
of Approval Basketball
Officials will conduct a four
day clinic beginning September
16 through 19.
They will be conducted at
the A. F. Adderley Gym and
all B. A. B. A. coaches and
prospective coaches will be
required to attend qt least
three sessions. Further, they
will sit a rules exam.
Open to everybody, these
clinics will cover all basketball
rules and techniques of
officiating.


ST MICHAELS EDGE


NEAR CROWN
By ALFRED WALKES


k .


Your Authorised Chevrolet Dealer
Nasau fMoIor ComIpm y eadih

"Where after-sales service is a pleasure"
"QUAiITY and SER VICE"
P.O. BOX N-8165 SHIRLEY STREET TELEPHONE: 24626/7/8






IMMEDIATE VACANCY FOR




STOCK CONTROLLER/ACCOUNIANT


(MALE)



DUTIES: Stock control, general office work, typing.


Must have experience in Liquor Industries or similar
operation.

Excellent opportunities for advancement. Good salary
and Company benefits. Must be conscientious and alert.
References required.

Apply in p-I-on to:




TOD HUNTER MITCHELL CO. LTD.

Queen's Highway Freeport


-1 --,