<%BANNER%> THE TRIBUNE Tuesday, Augurt 27, 1974
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 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: August 27, 1974
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03702

Full Text

















slinesu wiltUmaor$ 0rf 6SahamMe for pOMtam coneaMIss withn the Mahmam..


(rituLnn


aiB~tErS

C0. ROIETTA ST. & MT. ROYAL AVE.

EKO Guitars &
Guitar Strings


VOL. LXXI, No. 230 Tuesday, August 27, 1974 Price: 20 Cents


$U,900 for

family

of slain

police

inspector
A COMMITTEE formed
recently to raise funds for
the family of slain police
Inspector Henderson
Norville has already
collected almost $5,000
from donors.
Inspector Norville was fatally
wounded by gunfire while
engaged in the April 10
re-capture of escaped
convict Errol Dean at
Pinder's Point, Grand
Bahama. He is survived by
his widow and two children.
Chairman of the committee is
Roy M. Solomon, president
of Solomon Brothers
Limited. Also on the
committee are Grant's Town
M.P. Franklyn Wilson, Police
Commissioner Salathiel
Thompson, General
Bahamian Companies
president and former House
Speaker Robert UH.
Symonette, and former
Deputy Police Commissioner
Albert Miller, who is now
president of Freeport's
Bahamas Amusements
Limited.
Mr. Solomon announced today
that the committee has
received the patronage of
Prime Minister L. 0.
Pindling, and he added that
Darrell E. Rolle, Minister of
Home Affairs, has accepted
the Honorary Chairmanship
Mr. Miller is proceeding with
the formation of a
sub-committee in Grand
Bahama, which will include
the officer commanding the
Police there, to obtain
contributions to the fund
from residents of that
Island. 4
The Committee has already
received donations totalling
$4,920 and will begin work
this week on a programme
of soliciting the support of
the general public for the
Fund.
Mrs. Norville and her children,
aged three years and nine
months respectively, now
live in her sister's home. She
will receive from the
Government a gratuity equal
to the late Inspector's
annual salary. No pension is
provided.
"Our objective for the Fund,"
Mr. Solomon said, "is that
Mrs. Norville and her family
be accommodated
comfortably in their own
home, and the education of
her children guaranteed. We
anticipate a generous
response from the public
and especially from
corporate members of the
community in
appreciation of the devotion
to duty and superb courage
displayed by Inspector
Norville in the service of our
Commonwealth.
All donations will be
acknowledged in the Press
and may be mailed or taken
to The Royal Bank of
Canada, Main Branch, Bay
Street, Nassau, or The Royal
Bank of Canada, Main
Branch, Freeport, Grand
Bahama. Cheques should be
made payable to The
Norville Family Fund.
The following donations are
acknowledged: Mr. David
Lightbourn $20; Higgs &
Kelly $50; Royal Bank of
Canada $100; Henry Melich
$100; David White $100;
Percy Merrells $100;
Bahamian Lumber &
Building Supplies $100; R.
H. Curry & Co. Ltd. $150;
Anonymous $200: Peat
Marwick, Mitchell & Co.
$250; Franklyn Wilson, M.
P. $250; Nassau


Underwriters Agency Ltd.
$250; Ambrosine $250;
Solomon Bros. Ltd. $500;
Fane Solomon $500; Nassau
Shop $500; Roy M.
Solomon $500; Eunice,
Lady Oakes & Mr. Harry
Oakes $1,000.



AuT
RATTAN
LIVING ROOMS
From HONG KONG


Demonstrators


'sat in hotel


dining room'
LATE FLASH Chief June had no c
Magistrate Wilton Hercules Mr. Hercules
late this afternoon agreed evidence
with a submission by "'contradic
attorney Jeanne Thom son dismissed the
that nine hotel unionists the nine. Five
charged with tres passing at still face charge
the Emerald Beach Hotel in.
NINE HOTEL union FI
demonstrators, on trial for
trespassing at the Emerald
Beach Hotel during the June
12 Je. .' .-, *.'q, were itt if
in the hotel's dining room FIVE forei
when ordered off the premises, were fined a tc
a police witness testified in the when they pie
magistrate's court trial today. illegally taking
Deputy Supt: Joseph Cay, in the Ri
yesterday testified that he saw on Sunday.
the nine women outside the Cat. Ira Go
door of the BAMA MAMA Capt. Ira G
when they were told by the with crew
hotel's manager Dennis Davis Alfreend Khachatl, Rob
to leave as they were based, pleaded
obstructing the entrance. based pleaded
After they left, some of they appeared
them insisted in returning t Magistrate Wi
the premises after union today.
secretary Bobby Glinton The men,
arrived, their boat, "F
Constable Charles Carey, the officers on th
fourth police witness called to Acklins, were
testify in the hearing, said the
women left the dining room Emera
after he heard Deputy
Superintendent Cyril Joseph GOVERNM]
tell them to leave, assume cont
* "Mr. Joseph and other 386-room Er
officers came from the hotel Hotel on West
lobby with the women," after midnight ton


they were ordered to leave,
Carey said.
Carey said the nine women,
whose faces he was able to
remember as he had seen them
earlier that day, were arrested
when they walked back onto
the hotel's premises.
"When Bobby Glinton came
on the scene, he told them to
remain on the hotel's premises
and let police lock them up,"
Carey said.
Carey was the first
prosecution witness to testify
during the hearing today.
Charges against Glinton and
two others, who are also
represented by Miss. Jeanne
Thompson are expected to be
heard later.
Carey said that the group of
demonstrators was comprised
mostly of women.


case to answer.
s found the
of police
tory" and
charges against
other unionists
esE.

34 HE R13


A WRECKED surrey after
a horse bolted this morning.
The horse was frightened
by a low-flying helicopter
that brought a casualty onto
the Ministry of Education
grounds from Andros.
The animal bolted from its
harness throwing two
American visitors and its
driver to the ground.
Both visitors were taken to
the hospital for treatment.
The accident occurred on
Shirley Street.
It's not known if the
surrey will be able to be
repaired.


4EN


-ED $13,000


ign fishermen
)tal of $13,000
aded guilty to
fish near Beach
ding Rocks area

ldbeck, charged
men Donald
ert Jones and
urian, all Miami
Guilty when
before Chief
Iton Hercules

arrested aboard
ritzi" by police
e patrol launch
e apprehended


with the crewmen of the
"Maria Theresa" which was
captained by Cuban American
seaman Sixto Fuet.
Fuet's crewmen, Ramon
Alonso and Jose Minna, also
from Miami, pleaded not guilty
and had charges of illegal
fishing withdrawn by police
who offered evidence only
against the boat's captain.
Fuet had pleaded guilty.
Magistrate Hercules fined
him $4,000 and Captain
Goldbeck $3,500 or six
months in prison. Goldbeck's
crewmen, Greenhill, Jones and
Khachaturian were fined
$2,000 each.


ild takeover 'tonight'


ENT is to
rol of the
emerald Beach
Bay Street at
might. sources


said.
It is the last of three hotels
to be officially taken over by
Government under a $20
million loan approved by the
House August I.
The Emerald, bought for
$4.8 million from Corrigan
Hotels, was expected to have
been taken over last week -

Two on
TWO Bahamians are among
90 Caribbean government
officials participating in
two-week courses on Basic
Storage Principles being
conducted at the Barbados
campus of the University of
the West Indies by Britain's
Crown Agents' Supply and
Materials Management
Advisory Service.
Attending the course from
the Bahamas are Mr. O.C.
Pratt. Superintendent of


no later than Friday -
according to Financial
Secretary Reginald Wood. Mr.
Wood declined comment
today.
Other sources said,
however, that "for all
practical purposes" the hotel
on its 23 acres of Cable Beach
waterfront property could
have been taken over at
midnight Friday, but legal
questions are said to have
delayed completion of the
deal.
course
Works, and Mr. Stanley
Fernander of the Prisons
Department.
The courses are for
storekeepers ,"th';r staff
engaged in stock control in
various government
departments and public
authorities throughout the
region, ranging from Guyana to
the Bahamas.
Two courses of two weeks
each are being offered, running
consecutively from August 19.


Hanging: judge







delays decision


By MIKE LOTHIAN
FIVE AND A HALF
HOURS of intricate legal
argument ended late
Monday when Supreme
Court judge Maxwell
Thompson adjourned sine
die a hearing on two
murder convicts' attempt
to petition the Queen
personally for a reprieve.
The Governor General
refused to forward the petition
of Wendell Burrows and Philip
Humes, and they were to have
been hanged August 13. But
Mr. Justice Thompson ordered
a last-minute stay of execution,
and attorneys for the convicts
are seeking a Supreme Court
ruling that the petition must be
transmitted to the Queen for
her consideration.
Mr. Justice Thompson was
not expected to deliver a ruling
as soon as arguments were
completed yesterday. His
adjournment of the case with
no specific date set for delivery
of his judgment is believed to
be based on the fact that
another Supreme Court hearing
slated for September 3 could
significantly affect the
outcome of the convicts'
application.
In the Sept. 3 hearing
attorneys for the Governor
General are to seek an order to
the effect that the Supreme
Court should never have issued
the stay of execution, and
should never have granted the


MR. JUSTICE THOMPSON
convicts leave to initiate
Monday's court action.
The hair-splitting arguments
yesterday at Attorney David C.
Bethell for Humes and Burrows
and of Solicitor General
Langton Hilton for the
Governor General focused on
one basic question:
Could an order issued by
the Court against the Governor
General have any conceivable
beneficial result for the
convicts?
Argument centring on that
question led the attorneys
through a maze of related legal
points.
Is there, in view of the
constitutional existence of a
local body deciding whether
the Royal prerogative of mercy
should be exercised by the
Governor General as the
Queen's representative, any
residual power left to the
Queen to grant reprieves'?
Mr. Bethell, supported by
attorney L.P.J. Trenchard,
argued that the wording of the
Constitution on the point is
"permissive," allowing the
Governor General to exercise
the Queen's prerogative, but


SOLICITOR GENERAL
LANGTON HILTON
not abolishing the prerogative
of the source, the Queen
herself.
Mr. Hilton countered with
the submission that the
Constitutional passages
providing for local exercise of
the prerogative have
automatically supercededd and
at least suspended the Royal
prerogative exercisable by the
Queen."
Can the Court issue an order
against the Governor General,
who is a Crown servant?
Generally. the Crown and
Crown servants are immune to
such orders except where the
order is an instruction to
pertrlrm some public duty
imposed on the official
concerned but not performed.
That point led immediately
to the further question: does
the Governor General have a
public duty to forward a
common u n ication from a
Bahamian citizen to the
Queen?
Mr. Bethell has argued that
by refusing to forward the
petition the Governor General


Union to take pay



case to Pindling


T Il PUBLIC Service Union
is to take its case for better pay
and liq huidation of the Widows
and Orphans Pension Fund to
PI inme Minister Lynden
Pi ldliig.
(;arth Greene, secretary
general of the union, said the
delay in approaching Mr.
l'indling was due to the fact
that the union is still without a
president, following protests
lodged earlier this month
against the re-election of Mr.
Thliaddeus Darling.
I he union controversy was
aired before Labour Minister
(liflord Darling Friday, and a
tiling was to have been handed
down yesterday through Chief
Industrial Officer Lambert
Parker.
Mi. Parker was reportedly ill
however and no coin-
munication has yet been made
to thIe union.
The two other presidential
candidates Mr. Victor Rolle
and Mr. Arlington Miller
have alleged that Mr. Darling
improperly had a number of
blank presidential ballot papers
in his possession during the
election.
"We already have the letter to
the 'rime Minister drafted and
will dispatch it as soon as a
decision is reached on who the
union's new president will be,"
Mr. (Greene said.
Tlhe Salaries Review
Co in mission, named by
gov ernment to consider


revision of the public service
salary structure, granted a
temporary interim increase of
$20 per month to members of
the BPSU in July.
Both the BPSU and the
Teachers' Union regard this
settlement as unsatisfactory.
particularly in view of the fact
that it was reached unilaterally.
Another sore point for both
unions is the imminent
introduction of national
insurance while the future of
the Widows and Orphans
Pensions Fund has still to be
woi ked out.
Although both schemes
could continue to operate
simultaneously, since they are
separately structured entities
under different Ministries,
none of the members of the
2400 strong BPSU or the 1300
members of the Teachers
Union, want to make double
contributions.
"Finance Minister Arthur
HIanna (who handles the public
service portfolio) told us in
June that the Widows and
Orphans Fund would be
discontinued in July, but it is
still continuing," Mr. Greene
said.
"We are still insisting that
we get our money back and
with interest," he declared.
Both unions recognize that
there are problems to
liquidating the Fund. Beside
the fact that nearly $2 million


is wrapped up in investments.
there are numerous retired civil
servants presently drawing
benefits from the Fund.
If and when the I-'Uind
ceases, provision must be iade
to continue paying these
benefits.
National Insurance Minister
Clifford Darling has indicated
that the insuracne scheme is to
become operative in October.
following passage of the
regulations next month.
But Teachers Union
president Flnoch Backford
thought the date somewhat
pro nature.
Mr. Backfodrd said that
information reaching him from
Iniun members in tle various
government Ministries
indicated that all the necessary
paperwork has not yet hben
completed.
"I see a date somewhat
closer to Chri.stmas,'" he said.
According to the Teachers
Union president, his group was
seeking a meeting with Mr.
ilanna this week to discuss the
question of tihe Widows and
Orphsms lFund.
"Once national insurance
becomes law we will have to
abide by it," he acknowledged.
Mr. Leonard Archer,
secretary general of the
Teachers Union. said yesterday
that teachers were being asked
to with-hold their insurance
forms as a form of protest until
the Pension Fund was settled.


FNM to debate its stand on national insurance


By NICKI KELLY
The Central Council of the
Free National Movement will
meet in emergency session
Thursday evening to discuss
the position the party is to
take on national insurance
when debate on the regulations
comes up in Parliament.
Although not opposed to
national insurance in principle,
the FNM is against its
introduction at this time
"while the economy is in
recession," Senator Arthur
Foulkes, a member of the
party executive, said today.
The Senator told The
Tribune that the FNM
executive and its parliamentary


group had studied the
regulations to be considered by
the House on September 11
and "are now more than ever
concerned that the scheme will
have catastrophic effects on
the economy and possibly on
industrial relations in the
country.
"We believe that the
deductions from workers and
the contributions from
management will be hard on
both," Mr. Foulkes said. "Our
information is that some
businesses will be forced to
close while others will have no
option but to enforce serious
staff cutbacks," he warned.
In putting their findings to


the Council, the party's
executive will be seeking
guidance on what action the
party as a whole proposes to
take on the issue.
The FNM, through its
various spokesmen, has from
time to time alleged that
national insurance under the
PLP government will amount
to nothing more than another
method of taxation.
The basis for this
assumption was the statement
by National Insurance Minister
Clifford Darling last year that
reserves accumulated by the
National Insurance Fund in the
early years of the scheme are
to be invested.


I he money will be invested,
"as far as is possible, in the
development of the economy
and thus provide greater
opportunities for employment
for our growing population,"
Mr. Darling observed at the
time.
Mr. Darling's statement is
interpreted by the FNM to
mean that the government will
squander the vast sums elicited
from the Fund to bolster some
of its pet projects and will thus
be financially incapable of
paying the requisite benefits
when they fall due.
In the long run, the FNM
claims, introduction of


national insurance during the
present inflationary period will
spell further erosion of the
people's investment.
Although it is generally
conceded the party will oppose
the measure when it comes up
for debate in the House, the
public temper is such that
protest against the scheme may
not be confined to Parliament
alone.
The precedent for public
demonstration has already
been established when the
People's Positive Action
Committee, now the People's
Democratic Party, expressed its
active support in Parliament


Square for a committee to
investigate the economic, social
and cultural plight of the
Bahamian.
The Action Committee also
demonstrated its disapproval of
the Emergency Powers Act.
In both instances, general
feeling favoured the committee
and opposed any attempt by
government to deprive citizens
of their constitutional rights.
The reaction to both
measures was an
acknowledgement that all was
not well in the country,
making any move by
government subject to the
deepest suspicion.


"frustrated the subject's right
to access to his monarch." The
duty, he said, was imposed by
the statute that gave the
former functions of the
Colonial Secretary to the
Governor General.
Mr. Hilton argued that in his
capacity as a Crown servant the
Governor General could not be
the subject of an order,
notwithstanding any. dual role
that may have been created by
his functioning also as the
independent counterpart to the

Colonial Secretary.
After deciding on those and
many other points raised, Mr.
Justice Thompson will still
have to decide whether, if an
order is made, it could possibly
have any beneficial affect on
the position of the two
convicts now on death row. A
basic rule of the court, Mr.
Thompson observed yesterday,
is that no order should be
made "if it clearly can have no
meaningful effect."
That question, in turn, raises
another: Would the Queen act
on a petition sent to her from
an independent Bahamas, and,
if so, in what manner.
Mr. Hilton asserted that "an
order would provide no
effectual remedy; it will be
futile in its ultimate results."
Hie argued that the Queen,
if she did not merely return the
petition without comment for
local handling, would be bound
to consult her Privy Council
which includes British Cabinet
Ministers before making any
decision. British Government
involvement in internal
Bahamian affairs is barred by
the Constitution, he said.
Further, he said, it was
debatable whether the
Governor General, if ordered
to forward the petition, could
constitutionally do so.
Under the Constitution, he
said, the Governor General can
act only on the advice of the
Bahamas Cabinet. lie acted on
that advice, Mr. Hilton said,
when he refused to forward the
petition. If he obeyed a Court
order to send the petition to
the Queen he would be acting
unconstitutionally against the
advice of the Cabinet.
That brought the comment
from Mr. Justice Thompson:
"You are saying the
Governor General is above the
law?"
Mr. Hilton skirted around
that question by repeating his
argument that an order would
result in constitutional
conflict.
Mr. Bethell's counter-argu-
ment was that British Cabinet
Ministers need not be involved
in any decision by the Queen
in regard to the petition.
If she desired consultation
on a decision relating to a
petition from the Bahamas, of
which she is Queen besides
being Queen of England, she
could seek that consultation
from her Bahamian
representative, the Governor
General. The Governor General
could respond to the Queen's
request for advice, he argued,
without seeking the advice of
anyone.
Mr. Bethell also fell back on
a fundamental rule of law:
where there is doubt the ruling
on the issue must favour the
accused.
The Supreme Court's stay of
execution remains in force
until Mr. Justice Thompson
reaches a final decision on the
convicts' application for the
order against the Governor
General.
Humes, 21, and Burrows,
25, face the death penalty for
the September 5, Wlt
shooting murder of mne
Rarrv Ma'in.


Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading News
paper


l


Shr














Guinea Bissau gets independence


Death plot
KARACHI Police claim to
have discovered a plot to
assassinate Prime Minister
Zulsiuar Ali Bhutto on Aug. I
when he was addressing a
public meeting in Quetta,
capital of Baluchistan.
They have arrested a
Baluchi, Abdur Rehman, who
they say has confessed '


Athens
Rome
Paris
London
Berlin
Amsterdam
Brussels
Madrid
Moscow
San Francisco
Los Angeles
New York
Chicago
Miami
Tokyo
Hong Kong
Buenos Aires
Montreal
Honolulu
Toronto
Rio
Lisbon


MIN F
72
70
52
52
59
54
46
59
61
53
63
68
70
78
73
77
57
so50
67
52
20
64


MAX
82 clear
81 variable
77 sunny
69 sunny
64 rain
66 cloudy
70 sunny
86 sunny
68 clear
62 clear
85 clear
75 rain
90 rain
86 cloudy
88 cloudy
86 cloudy
64 clear
78 cloudy
86 cloudy
82 cloudy
94 clear
90 sunny


LONDON Worried soccer officials
planned new moves against crowd
violence today as a 14-year-old fan was
charged with stabbing a rival supporter to
death.
Denis Howell, British Minister of
Sport, hastily called a conference with
senior administrators of the English
Football Association (FA) and English
League to discuss the latest upsurge in
hooliganism which is undermining
Britain's national game.
At Blackpool, where a young fan died
from stab wounds at an English


can


UNITED NATIONS
peacekeeping troops will
apparently be allowed to
remain in Turkish controlled
parts of Cyprus, U.S. Secretary
General Kurt Waldheim
indicated today.
Arriving here from talks
with Turkish leaders in Ankara.


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AUGUST 20th. to 31st.

ON ALL UBBEY GLASSWARE
Many sizes and styles
Decanters. Home Barware, Casual at
/(A HAROLD ROAD
Just east of Angelo's Art Centre
)UlU Tel.5071-2-3-4 PO Box N1070



Fishing without a Fishline?

BUSINESSMEN ARE ALWAYS FISHING
'-OR CUSTOMERS.
A GOOD BAIT IS PHOTOGRAPHY BY


/(ooZ) o C s(

"The Beautiful Bahamian Studio"
on the Waterfront
At East Bay & William St .
Box ES 61t5- Nassau Phone 5-4641


Second Division game last Saturday, a
14-year-old boy from Bolton was charged
with murder and remanded at the local
magistrate's court.
It was the first death from soccer
violence in Britain. Under British law
concerning juvenile offenders, the boy
was not identified.
Blackpool and Bolton were rivals in the
match.
Howell, who formerly refereed
First Division games, said he planned to
visit the Blacknool stadium with soccer


NIXON

AND

THE

MILITARY

WASHINGTON President
Ford conferred with U.S.
Defence Secretary James
Schlesinger Monday about
reports that a close watch was
kept during the last days of
President Richard Nixon's term
to make sure that no orders
were given to military units
outside the normal chain of
command.

"I have been assured that no
measures of this nature were
acutally undertaken," Ford
said in a statement issued by
his Press Secretary Jerald R.
Terhorst.
Terhorst did not explain
exactly to what measures the
President was referring. But he
did mention published reports
of unusually close control over
the lines of command.


tay

Waldheim told newsmen: "I
have discussed this problem
with the Turkish Government
and they have not requested
me to withdraw our troops
from Turkish-held areas."
Senior U.S. officers in
Nicosia complained last week
they were under mounting
pressure to pull out of
Northern Cyprus.
They said Turkish troops
were driving U.N. troops out of
their positions, often under
threat of force, and were
blocking U.N. convoys with
food and medicine for Greek
Cypriots marooned in the
Turkish zone.
Waldheim met for two hours
with Premier Constantine
C('aramanlis and Foreign
Minister George Mavros and
reported afterward that there
was still a "considerable gap"
in the positions of the Greeks
and Turks toward resumption
of negotiations.
"More efforts are necessary
to bring them closer,"
Waldheim said.
The Secretary General's
second visit to the Greek
leaders completed his
fact-finding tour of the capitals


officials to get an on-the-spot report on
the worsening situation of soccer crowds.
Sir Andrew Stephen, chairman of the
FA, said the outlook for soccer will be
bleak if violence cannot be checked.
"It is bound to have a serious effect on
attendances at a time when the game is
already in financial difficulties," Stephen
said.
"I think the ultimate solution is
stadiums with all-seating capacity. The
trouble is usually among crowds standing
on the terraces."


The English season started
only 10 days ago and already
police have battled with
hooligan fans in London and
Bristol.
Magistrates' courts started
stepping up penalties as fans
made their usual Monday
appearances on lesser charges
- using threatening words
and behavior.
At West London
Magistrate's Court, police said
two Cardiff youths stood
outside Fulham's stadium
shouting "let's fight, let's
fight ' after the
Fulham-Cardiff game.
No violence occurred,
police said, but the youths
were each fined $72.

Boy shot
TAMPA, Florida Police
are searching for a teenager
who tried to shoot a toy
airplane from a companion's
head but missed and killed the
youth.
Police said Michael David
Gonzalez, 12, was shot in the
head with a .25-calibre pistol
Sunday night and died within
an hour.


Fourth German bank collapses


BERLIN The fourth West
German bank failure in two
months was reported today.
The Federal Supervisory
Office for credit in Berlin said
it has withdrawn the licence of
the Frankfurt Trade Bank, a
small bank in Frankfurt,
because a recent stockholders'
meeting and the institution's
last annual report established
that it could not meet its
obligations.
In Frankfurt, the bank was


Shots that killed envoy
NICOSIA The shots that killed U.S. Ambassador to Cyprus
Rodger Davies and a secretary during an anti American riot wre
fired from an unfinished building next to the embassy and not
by Greek Cypriot rioters out front the Nicosia coroner has


ruled.
The coroner's verdict was
hat the deaths on Aug. 19 of
Ambassador Davies, 53, and
Antoinette Varanva, a Greek
Cypriot embassy secretary,
'were due to homicide by a
person or persons unknown."
The killings happened while
a mob of Greek Cypriot rioters
protesting America's alleged
support of the Turkish invasion
if Cyprus first set fire to 13
Embassy cars and then began
hooting at the embassy
building.

The coroner, A. loannides,
found that according to the
evidence the two both died
after being hit by "blind" -
stray bullets when a number
if bullets were "fired
indiscriminately from a
building under construction
south of the American embassy
by a person or persons un-
known.


t


p




a

p




C
o
s
b

a
s
o



i
s


closed for business and all
queries were referred to the
Federal Credit Office in Berlin.
The bank had a balance
sheet total of $5.38 million
- and capital equivalent to
$538,000, the office said.
A spokesman said
repayment of private deposits
was guaranteed by the National
German Bank Association and
the Frankfurt City Savings
Bank.


New move to curb crowd violence as


soccer fan is charged with murder


'Lone Eagle'


HANA, Hawaii Aviator
Charles Lindbergh was buried
yesterday near Hana,
Hawaii. He had died of cancer
about eight hours earlier at
the age of 72.
His widow Anne Morrow
Lindbergh, and his son, Land,
were with him when he died.
Encomiums and sympathy
for the family poured in
from all over the world.
President Ford paid tribute to
him, calling him a brave,
sincere patriot.
Pan American World
Airways, whose routes across
the Atlantic and Pacific were
pioneered by Lindbergh, said
he decided to return to his
home in Hana a week ago
Saturday "when he realized
things were desperate."
Lindbergh's epochal flight
catapulted the tousle-haired,
then 25-year-old former
A merican wingwalker,
barnstormer and mail pilot to
international fame. He was
the toast of two continents,
followed by a comet's tail of
publicity, honours, adoration
and eventually tragedy
and controversy.
He went into self-imposed
exile following the
sensational trial and
conviction of Bruno
Hauptmann for the 1932
kidnap-murder of Lindbergh's
infant son, Charles Augustus
ir.


Guinea Bissau on Sept. 10.
It pledged the removal of all
Portuguese troops by Oct. 31
and stipulated a referendum -
at an unspecified date on the
future of the strategic Cape
Verde Islands which have long
been administered as .part of
Portuguese Guinea.
The agreement was
negotiated secretly in London
and Algiers since last May. It
was the first formal step in the


He emerged again to
campaign against U.S. entry
into World War II, alienating
many. He resigned his
colonel's commission in the
U.S. Army Air Corps after
President Franklin D.
Roosevelt indirectly but
publicly questioned his
patriotism.
Lindbergh was laid to rest
in a lava-stone grave of his
own design as friends sang a
Hawaiian hymn near a small
white church.
About 20-close friends ana
relatives gathered at the
Kipahulu Hawaiian Church
about 11 miles south of here
for the funeral.
"The Lone Eagle planned
this final trip as much as he
planned his Atlantic trip, or
anything else he ever did,"
said Dr. Milton M. Howell,
Lindbergh's personal
physician and friend.
Lindbergh, at his own
request, was buried wearing a
khaki shirt and dark cotton
trousers. His casket was built
from eucalyptus wood by
cowboys he knew from
nearby ranches. (AP)

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FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
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liquidation of Portugal's huge
African empire promised by
the military regime of Gen.
Antonio de Spinola.

It stressed the intention of
Portugal and Guinea Bissau to
maintain "a relationship of
active cooperation" pointing
the way to possible similar
agreements with the guerrilla
movements in Angola and
Mozambique. (AP)


ALGIERS Portugal signed
an historic eight-point
agreement Monday granting
full national independence to
the smallest and poorest of its
three African colonies, Guinea
Bissau.
The agreement proclaimed
an immediate cease-fire in
Portuguese Gtuinea 's
12-year-old guerrilla war and
said Portugal would formally
recognize the new nation of

Pope axes

VATICAN CITY Pope
Paul VI dismissed the chief
Roman Catholic prelate of
Mozambique Monday.
A Vatican announcement
said Archbishop Custodio
Alvim Pereira of Lourenco
Marques resigned, and Pope
Paul accepted his resignation.
The Vatican announcement
carried no explanation for the
resignation, which in Vatican
terms means the decision was
prompted from above. The
decision came after Italian
Cardinal Umberto Mozzoni
visited Mozambique as a papal
factfinder.
Vatican officials who
declined to be identified said


the Cardinal found the
Archbishop was opposed by a
wide section of local clergy
because of his support of the
dictatorial Portuguese regime
ousted in April and its
anti-guerrilla tactics.
Archbishop Pereira clashed
publicly with another
Mozambique prelate, Bishop
Manuel Vieira Pinto of Tete,
over colonial policies.
Bishop Pinto was deported
to Portugal under military
escort and kept under
confinement until he was
ousted in April after he voiced
solidarity with missionaires
who had denounced atrocities


allegedly committed by
Portuguest soldiers.
In a public statement
Archbishop Pereira branded
these denunciations as
Marxist propaganda and said
those who had any role in
them were departing from their
task as church ministers. (AP)

DESERT SHIELD

WASHINGTON The
Egyptian Army has built an
extensive system of
fortifications to shield its strip
of Sinai desert from possible
Israeli attack, U.S. intelligence
sources report.


Lindbergh -and modern
aviation
.. ; *


Mozambique prelate


Turks say




UN troops


Lindbergh is buried


2 _______THE TRIBUNE * Tusdy, Augmt 27,1974











THE TRIBUNE - Tuesday, August 27, 1974


ihU e ribunr
NUwUMS AzICMs JUtaE IN VE=DA MACIS-u
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903. 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Publisher/Editor 1917-1972
Contributing Editor 1972.
EILEEN DUL'UCH r N,NM.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972.
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Tuesday, August 27 1974


EDITORIAL

How history is made


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
(This is the ninth article in a series I am writing on world
figures who have passed across my horizon, some of whom have
played an important role in shaping the history of the Bahamas).

GRAND CAYMAN, August 1. In this column yesterday I
wrote another story about the Duke and Duchess of Windsor,
arising out of Ralph G. Martin's biography 'The Woman iHe
Loved"."
At the back of the book Mr. Martin devoted four and a half
pages to acknowledgements in which he states that "a book is
many people".
The people he thanks are drawn from places all over the world,
including the Bahamas, of course.
"In the Bahamas," he states, "my thanks first to Bill Kalis.
director of the Bahamas News Bureau, and Steve Libby, whose
assistance was constant and indispensable. Mrs. Greta Moxlcy,
the Duke's former secretary was also a great help. The single
major source of necessary information came from Sir Etienne
liupuch, publisher of The Nassau Daily Tribune. He was
umstinting of his time and assistance. I am also grateful to the
Wrune editors Eileen and Roger Carron and to Mrs. Dorins
Bullard, who was so patient in finding facts I needed.
. "In Nassau, I also thank Sir Berkeley Ormerod and Lady
Ormerod, at whose house the Duke and Duchess lived for a time.
Sir Harold and Lady Christie, Lady Solomon, Sir Roland
Symonette, Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Higgs and again, Lady Dudley, so
gracious a lady and hostess. Lady Dudley was with the Duchess
during the Duke's final days and accompanied her to the funeral
in England. Her husband was one of the Duke's closest friends."
: I am particularly pleased that Mrs. Bullard is mentioned in this
list. Mrs. Bullard, who is among the old and valued members of
Fhe Tribune staff, is the keeper of the news files in our
organization. This is a great responsibility.
Her patience and efficiency in doing research for information
in the files is really amazing..
The thing I believe Mr. Martin appreciated most is that Mrs.
Bullrd produced a copy of The Murder of Sir Harry Oakes,
published by The Tribune some time after the tragedy. This book
has been out of print for years now. Even I didn't know she had a
copy.
Ordinarily this book should not have left the office but she
asked me about it and I told her to lend it to him. I was sure he
would return it.
He later returned it and also sent Mrs. Bullard an autographed
copy of "Jennie: The Life of Lady Randolph Churchill; The
Romantic Years 1854-1895. "
Jennie, an American, was the mother of Sir Winston Churchill
and also one of the women in the life of King Edward VII. She
was a stimulating influence on the king in the same way that
Wallis Warfield later dominated the life of his grandson the Duke
of Windsor who occupied the throne of England as Edward VIII
forjess than a year.
This Oakes book is the only really authentic record of the
murder of Sir l1arry and the trial of his son-in-law, Count Alfred
de Marigtny. It was based on a report of the trial published in The
Tribune.
This was the most comprehensive piece of reporting ever done
by a newspaper in the Bahamas. It was the work of my brother,
the Hon. Eugene Dupuch, C.B.E., Q.C., who was Assistant Editor
of The Tribune before he took law.
This book is an example of what can be done by cooperation
and devotion to a job.
Mr. Dupuch sat in court throughout the trial and wrote the
evidence down in long hand as the case progressed.
My two elder children Eileen (Mrs. Eileen Carron, presently
Editor and Publisher of The Tribune) and my son Etienne, Jr.
(now publisher of The Bahamas Handbook and Business Man 's
,- nual and other books and pamphlets on Bahamian life and
affairs) were then small children.
They acted as relay messengers and throughout the day ran
copy from my brother in court to me at The Tribune where I
edited it and put it in final shape. We had only one Linotype then
and I also had to do a good deal of setting of the copy on the
machine. At the end of each day The Tribune came out with a
full report of the day's proceedings. This was quite an
achievement in those days.
Years later the law department of Toronto University heard
about the masterful reporting done on this case and they
requested a file of clippings for their reference library. When we


later published the book we sent them a copy. This was the first
time in the history of the university that a newspaper report of a
case was considered sufficiently authentic to be classified as a
reference work in the law department.

FOOTNOTE TO HISTORY The U.S. today seems to be
carrying out a campaign to clean up dishonesty in the nation.
They have started with President Nixon and many big fish have
been caught in the net, including Vice President Agnew who has
been forced out of office.
They are also giving attention to what may be considered
exaggerated advertising, both home and abroad.
An interesting report of what is happening in Bermuda
appeared in the August I st issue of The Caymianian Compass, this
island's leading newspaper. It appears under the by-line of "The
Roving Reporter"
I will quote bits from this report.
"Our neighbours, quite a bit to the north ... Bermuda," he
wrote, "have been making some interesting news in the travel and
trade publications in the U.S. and Canada recently. Some of the
news is good; some not so good.
"Because Bermuda is such a consistently fine resort area, it is
important for us to know what is going on there in order for us to
learn some lessons from those who have been in the tourism
business a long, long time.
1"The not-so-good news first, not because it is bad, but it is an
interesting case in communications.
"It seems that Bermuda's advertising campaign last winter.


As others see us
TIE following Editorial on conditions in the Bahamas
appeared in The Royal Gazettte. Bermuda on July 30. (See
Editorial this page for comments).
Mr. Carlton Francis, chairman of the Bahamas
Development Corporation and former Minister of Finance
is a wise man that is if it is true that the wise man is the
man who recognizes when it is time to change his mind.
In November, .1970, Mr. Francis declared that he would
rather return to the fishing village way of life than "suffer
the humiliation, defeat and puppetry", of domination by
foreign investors.
Now, less than four years later, he is asking the bankers
to provide a "survival loan" and says the Bahamas must
"turn to the financial community for a push-off" bankers
"already historically intertwined with us ... our bedfellows
for quite a long time." And he pleads with the financiers to
"develop new avenues whereby the economy can be
refurbished and unemployment placed in a state of
obscurity." And, significantly, he adds: "Taking into
consideration the present economic condition, it is time for
us to chart a different course and pursue new directions if
we are to survive and become buoyant again".
What he is saying is that the Bahamas has got itself in a
mess. There is no immediate prospect of relief as far as
unemployment is concerned, and the situation is worsened
because this year some 1,500 students have left school and
cannot find jobs. Those are facts, not fancies, which cannot
be concealed or passed over with a glib tongue. Mr. Francis
realises that ... it is a wise man who knows when the time
has come to change his mind.
There also appears to be a turnabout in the thinking of
Bahamas Government leaders over the very strict
immigration policy. Said Mr. Henry Bowen recently: "We
need people, and more people, than now inhabit our shores.
We need all kinds of people from all over the world ... the
permanent settlement of new Bahamians. I am not saying
that we in Grand Bahama should revert to the days when
all a person coming from abroad needed to get past
immigration was a letter of a job offer. But I am saying that
the Bahamas is dreadfully short of skilled manpower, and if
we are to develop our full potential we need immigrants
and need them now."
The simple fact of the matter is that the Bahamas, far
from having any money to spare on expansion, housing,
and mortgages, has not enough to meet commitments.
Bahamian banks have already lent out more B-dollars than
their total B-dollar deposits, and the country's money
supply (currency plus demand deposits) totals only $27
million. This emphasises how completely dependent the
Bahamas is on foreign direct investment.
All that now remains to be seen is whether Mr. Pindling
will change course and, if he does, whether the foreign
investors will trust him enough to pour money into the
islands. Confidence once lost is not easily regained.

which appeared in several national magazines and New York
newspapers, depicted persons in bathing suits and noted that
visitors to the island 'can see a different beach every day.'
"New York. in which the ads appeared, took exception to the
implications in the advertisements that persons can sunbathe and
swim at Bermuda beaches during November-March.
"The New York State Attorney General's office, in initiating
action against Bermuda, alleged that, based on Bermuda's winter
weather records 'during the time period from November 15 to
February 15 and possibly later, it is too cool for swimming in the
Atlantic Ocean, where Bermuda is located, or lying on the beach
in a swimsuit.
"As a result, the Bermuda Department of Tourism has told
the N.Y. Attorney General's office that it will discontinue such
winter season advertising.
"You cannot mislead people by advertising or publicity
because, sooner or later, it's going to catch up with you. We're
certain that it wasn't the intention of Bermuda to cheat or
mislead. Perhaps their advertising people got carried away a bit.
"In the meantime. Bermuda's business continues to boom, year
round."

Further on in the article "The Roving Reporter" writes:
"Final news from our mother island neighbours may embrace
the most important lesson we can learn from them.
"At a recent meeting of the Bermuda Rotary Club, members
were addressed by the Hon. DeFrost Trimmingham, Bermuda's
Minister of Tourism. His message, pure and simple, was that
Bermuda only wants 'nice people' as tourists.
"He pointed to resort areas like Costa del Sol, Acapulco and
Miami as being 'in the numbers game' and said it would take
years to repair the damage they have done. Most of all.' he said,
'they have, I think, insulted their own people.'
The Minister went on to say that if quantity tourism becomes
more important, Bermuda could import an 'unpleasant
atmosphere.'
"Later he said, 'who wants to be nice to people who visit our
shores whom we don't respect or. even worse, whom we dislike?'
"He told the audience that Bermuda chooses the publications
in which it advertises carefully tn appeal to 'the kind of persons
whtn you, the Bermudians, would want to welcomee'
"He added that in order to limit our tourist industry, building
of hotels was stopped and the number of cruise ships limited.
'We have done this for our own good. What does it gain if we
make our fortune today and ruin our island for tomorrow? Where
would, and how would, our next generations survive? he asked."

This is the end of the Bermuda story. Now a bit about Tourism
in the Bahamas.
It is now acknowledged by the P.L.P. government in Nassau
that tourism in the Bahamas is stagnant.
When this party took over the government they went out of
their way to stimulate travel to the islands. They wanted to break
Sir Stafford Sands' record.


In the process they dragged in the dregs of the tourist world,
both white and black, so that many desirable white and black
tourists now shy away from our islands.
Minister of Tourism Clement Maynard has declared that they
must get the "quality" tourists coming back to Nassau but, as Mr.
Trimmingham stressed 'i his speech to the Rotarians, when this
trade is lost it takes a long time ... perhaps a generation, if ever ...
to recover it.
They should also have learned from experience that gambling
casinos do not attract a particularly desirable type of tourist.
Many of them are not only undesirable but they come to Nassau
on overnight flights from Miami, spend all their time at the
gaming tables until they are cleaned out, and then return to
Miami without spending much if any money in the town.
As I told you in an earlier article, a survey made in Miami of air
travel to Nassau claims that two out of every three tourists who
now fly to Nassau come without any luggage.
This can only mean one thing ... and it certainly doesn't
contribute to the economy and stability of our society.

I bring you this information for what it may be worth. Don't
ask me what should be done because I don't know. The damage
has been done and, as Mr. Trimmingham correctly pointed out, it
is going to take a long time to correct it, if ever.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
And the thicket closed
Behind her. and the forest echoed 'fool'. TENNYSON'


MOTOR CENTRE LIMITED




END OF AUGUST



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THE TRIBUNE - Tuesday, August 27,1974


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MODERNISTIC GARDEN

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MADEIRA SHOPPING CENTRE TEL: 22868


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A PLACE 506 RESERVATIONS CALL
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OR FUN 2nd FLOOR, PRINCE GEORGE HOTEL
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THE SAND IS ONE OF THE BEST
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SALE! n
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FJephant, Bells, Baggies.
Jeans & Low Rise I)Dashikis.
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Bring this AD & get S$5.00 diwa'ont nt
on AlL PANTS.


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BEAUMONT ARCADE


Now Serving Lunch from 11.00 a.m.
Daily Specials ONLY $2.50
* Bahaimian Dishes
eAmerican Dishes
* Sea Food
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* And your lavourite Cocktail
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PLENTY OF FREE PARKING


TAKE-OUT PIZZA -
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P.O. BOX 4184 NASSAU, BAHAMAS


Manager
tFrit ily ,7ig
A I C(, lli


Serving Dinner 5 p.m. Til 1 a.m.
Phone 32077 East Bay at the Foot of Bridge


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YOU DO THE TRAVELING....
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BAY STREET PHONES: 24350 57268


Conceived In Love And Dedicated to the
U U U


Conceived In Love And Dedicated to the
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CORNUCOPIA
T The Horn of Plenty
where you can get
all the FOODS -
P.O O JUICES VITAMINS


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P.O.BOX N 7948 Tel: 28431


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Speciahzing in
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High Fashion Shoes

NOW SERVING



LOCATIONS
ste PlumihdV Sth Nm0, Ph spLsM
Eat Suwin Shopping Canfre F emp"


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AT

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Charcoal Grey White Light Grey
Green Navy Black -Brown


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UNCLAIMED Custom-Made
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and sizes. Lined and
Unlined. 20% to 50% off
regular price LIMITED
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Also,
LIMITED STOCK of FABRIC
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MARKET ST.. DR. ESFAKIS BLDG.PHONE 24264
Boys' & Girls' Back to School Shoes,
assorted styles and sizes.
Girls' Clogs assorted styles& sizes
Boys' & Girls' Sandals assorted
styles & sizes.
Boys' polyester Pants -
assorted colours & sizes


FOR SAVINGS SHOP AT
CLONARIS KUTE KIDDY
MARKET STREET


T.V. SALE


19" PORTABLE
BLACK & WHITE TV
FROM $246.00 *
ANTENNA &
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CANRTWEIl SIITCEI1D
Bay Street Phone 24350 57268


GENERAL SALES AIDS & SEASONAL PROGRAMS
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we have stocked a wide variety of general sales aids
for the merchant's everyday needs

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BOX N-1470 1 PH. 2-3709


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An 8-page Pullout Supplement


Education abroad



lures our students

By LYNDA CRAWLEY
MANY BAHAMIAN students will be leaving this week and next to attend college or university
abroad for the first time.
If you're one of these students, there is no doubt that you're excited and anxious but yet
somewhat afraid of approaching your freshman year in a strange country, a new school and
meeting new people from different cultural backgrounds.


Hundreds of questions must
.be passing through your mind
and your imagination must be
"doing you a job." If this is


happening to you don't feel
bad because all college students
at one time or the other went
through the same mental
torture.
Incoming freshman like
yourself, always get reams of
advice on college life. Take it
from me, none of it is reliable
because college happens to be a
personal experience. Your first
year will be a time of
adjustment and confusion; it is
a period of individual growth
and discovery.
If you want not only to
survive your freshman year but
to love it, you must approach
it with the right attitude. As
you arrive on the campus with
an armful of bags, a nervous
stomach and a dazed look on
your face, be prepared for
some strange surprises.
You will be away from
home and there will be nobody
checking on what you do or
care about your moral social
behaviour. You will have no
one to account to and how you
deal with this new freedom will
be totally up to you.
This year will give you the
opportunity to develop and
express yourself in new ways.
But despite the fun and social
adjustments, remember that
your main purpose in attending
a university is to study and be
successful in whatever you set
out to do.
** lt*** *i *


business management ar
looking forward to return
home after she has comp
her four-year course.
Gaynell is the daughter
Miss E.K. Hanna of L
Village and a former
reporter with Radio Baha
She decided to at
Southern University aftei
was influenced by a c
who is already attending sc
there, and "because it ha
reputation.of being a very
school."
She added, "I am also
there because I would lik
get the black exper
because Southern is the la
black state supported scho
the United States."
Willame Johnson, 20,
the daughter of Jo
Johnson and Catherine S
of Second Street, Coc
Grove, will be joining


Among the many students
going abroad to attend college
or university for the first time
this year is Gaynell Ellis, a
Queen's College graduate, who
will be attending Southern
University, Baton Rouge,
Louisiana._She will major in


id is
rning
leted
er of
Jnion
news
imas.
attend
r she
cousin
school
s the
good
going
ke to


ience student body of Fisk
irgest University, Nashville,
Dol in Tennessee.
A graduate of Prince William
Baptist High, she will major in
and Spanish and minor in English.
)seph Willame, who is very
Sands enthused about leaving home
;onut for the first time on her own
the said, "I am going to Fisk
because I've heard a lot of nice
things about that school plus it
has a high standard."
**************
Seventeen year old Adelma
Roach, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Leon Roach of South
Beach, leaves in September for
Fisk University in Tennessee
where she will pursue a degree
course in music.
Adelma comes from a family
of musicians. Two of her sisters
have already earned college
degrees in music and another
sister will graduate with a
Music degree next summer.
A graduate of Adelphian
Academy in Holly, Michigan,
she served as director of the
Girls choir at that school.
E When asked why she chose
Page 8 Col. I


- THE TRIBUNE TEAM -


LYNDA CRAWLEY LcLLS/v itnmAvnvI ,
was graduated this year is a graduate of State
from Southern University, University of New York
Baton Rouge, Lousiana Rochester Cooperative
with a B.A. in liberal College and taught for two
studies, majoring in years at a Ministry of
journalism with a minor in Education and Culture
broadcasting. An honour school before joining the
student, Lynda was news Tribune this summer. He is
and feature editor of the in his final year of law
campus newspaper and a studies as an external


memebr of the TV team.
Lynda it the fourth
daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
John Oawley of Lyon
Road.


student of La Salle
University.
Elliston is the son of
Mr. and Mrs. Ishmael
Rahming of Yellow Elder
Gardens.


By ELULISTON RAHMING
ALL MINISTRY OF EDUCATION and Culture Schools will
re-open for the Christmas Term on Monday, September 9.
Opening for the first time for classes are the new L.W. Yeo.g
Junior High School (above)and the S.C. McPherson Juanr igh
(at left). L. W. Young is situated on Bernard Road sad cPhaf see
is on Baillou Hill Road to the north of CarmichAeL.
A course in agriculture will be introduced at L.W. Young and a
special class for the deaf will be featured at the other new school.
New Providence Primary and Junior High Schoob:- All
students who are moving from primary to junior high or from
junior high to senior high, should report to the school to which
they have been transferred on September 9 rather than reporting
to the school they attended last term.
ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE
Orientation programme for new students entering seventh
grade will be held on August 28. New students will also register at
that time.


Last term, students attending the Fox Hill high school were
charged a tuition fee of $420 per annum. When school re-opensa
however, the fees will have gone up by $30.
About 17 teachers will join the SA.C. staff in September
BAHAMAS ACADEMY
The elementary division of Bahamas Academy of Seventh Day
Adventists, Wulff Road, will have two new staff members when
school re-opens on September 4.
Mrs. Alice McMillan and Mrs. Rowena Smith will join the lower
school staff. They are both graduates of the Bahamas Teachers.
College.
ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE
St. John's College studetns will return to the 'old school site on
Market St. on September 9 but can anticipate entering the new
college building on Gladstone Road in September of next year.
About 590 students are expected back at school on
September 9, a few of whom are sixth form students. This is the
first time S.J.C. has had a sixth form programme, according to
headmaster Fr. Strachan.
Nine teachers are expected to join the staff at SJ.C.
Page S, Col. 3 *


UNITED


BOOKSHOPS




STATIONERS




A MADEIRA

Shopping Plaza


TELEPHONE 2-8597


Weare headquarters for all



yourBack to School supplies



and sundry needs!


We have the largest



stock of mathematical



instruments in Nassau


TWO NEW GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS open next month. The L. W. Young Junior High -
(above), built at a cost of $1.6 million, will open its doors on Bernard Road to 900 students JE
September 9. Headmistress is Mrs. Marina Walcott. The S.C. McPherson Junior High(below) on the WA NW
corner of Ballfou and Carmichael Roads, which also cost $1.6 million, expects 1,650 students
when the school opens Sept. 9 Headmistress is Mrs. Carol Hanna. A T S C HO O L S
'^iM~lI^Ma~i^^' 'AT *S AA L1


'1..


R,
.. 1 .


6 , I


n


. d


OrI











THE TRIBUNE ... Tuesday, August 27,1974


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ALDEN ELENEZER
PALMER of Sea Grape, Grand Bahama is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of The Bahams. and that any person
who know any reason why registration should not be
granted should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 20th day of August
1974, to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, PO. Box N-3002,
Nassau.


1S 4


BOYS' PANTS
SHIRTS

POLYESTER PUL
FLARE JEANS


$6.60 & UP
$3.50 & UP

LLOVER SHIRTS


CLOTHING FOR BABIES & TODDLERS


THOM MCAN SHOES
ROY'S SHOP
PALMDALE SHOPPING PLAZA Phone 2-2724


Daughter is retarded

and pregnant
By Ab.ail vYen Burm
0" 1IW C MOP rTid V. g mo e-.
DEAR ABBY: We are just about to lose our minds over
this problem and ane hoping you can at least tell us where to
go to get some help.
Our 14-yewarold daughter has always been very developed
for her age but ahaes slightly retarded mentally. We ust
found out that she is pregnant. The boy responsible for it is
only 16. (He doesn't even shave yet.) The kids say they
went all the way only once, but that is awfully hard for us to
believe.
Anyway, the boy's father has been very nice about it.
(He's divorced and has custody of the boy.) He has agreed
to do anything we want, but we don't know what we want
yet.
We really don't want to punish the boy because he's not a
,bad kid. He's never been in any trouble before, and sending
him to a penal institution wouldn't help our daughter any.
A forced marriage, if it's possible for kids of their ages,
doesn't seem right either.
We've considered an abortion, also letting her carry the
child to term and adopting it out, or even keeping it
ourselves to raise. We are so confused. Everyone we talk to
has a different solution.
Can you help us decide what is right for all concerned?
TROUBLED
DEAR TROUBLED: Consider all the options and
discuss them with a professional who has had experience in
such matters. Your cergyman, Family Service, or a
counselor from your local Planned Parenthood Association
can help you. You are wise to ask for guidance. God bless
you, and good luck.
DEAR ABBY: I am a 20-year-old woman who might
have a problem.
You see, about six weeks ago there was a 14-year-boy
living in my neighborhood who had a pretty wild crush on
me. His folks were fairly bad off, he didn't seem to have any


friends and he seemed so blue and downhearted, one day I
Invited him in for milk and freshly-baked cookies. He was
painfully shy at first, but by the end of the visit he was
talking up a storm, and when he left, he looked happier than
I've ever seen him.
Two days later I received a letter from him. It said all the
usual stuff a 14-year-old might say in a "love" letter. I
received one nearly every day after that. Also, he would
walk by my house fairly often.
A few weeks ago, his family suddenly moved out of town
for some unknown reason and his letters stopped coming.
Now, finally, we come to my problem. I miss him
dreadfully. It's awfully lonely without him popping up from
out of nowhere. Is it abnormal for me to feel this way? I
mean, does it seem right for me to be affected this way by a
teen-age boy? LONESOME
DEAR LONESOME: If you actually are entertaining
romantic Ideas about this lad, yes, it is a bit unusual. But
apparently he filled a need in your life, so don't feel guilty
about an honest emotion. It's not all that "abnormal."
Everyone has a problem. What's yours? For a personal
reply, write to ABBY: Box No. 69700, L.A., Calif. 90069.
Enclose a stamped, self-addressed envelope, please.
For Abby's new booklet, "What Teen-agers Want to
Know," send $1 to Abigail Van Buren, 132 Lasky Dr.,
Beverly Hills, Cal. 90212


Many firsts by


Bahamas graduate


LEON L. HIGGS (pictured),
son of Mr. and Mrs. Leroy
Higgs of Churchill
Development in Nassau
graduated this month from
Northern Illinois University
with a M.Sc. in Business
Education.
He also holda a B.Sc. degree
in Business Education from
Union College in Lincoln,
Nebraska.
During the university's
College of Business annual
awards dinner, Leon was the
recipient of the Richard H.
Howland award. This award is
presented to the graduate
student who shows the most
potential in the fields of sales
and sales management.
At Union, he served as
business manager of the
Associated Student Body.
Leon's election to the office
was only the beginning of his
success as a college student. He
served in about 15 school
organizations and on three
occasions, was the first black
student to head the
organizations.


Higgs is a firm believer in
professional organizations and
as a result, applied and was
accepted into the American
Vocational Education
Association and the National
Business Education
Association.
He received his early
education at Nassau Technical
College and Oakwood High
School in Alabama.
Since returning home, he has
taken up a post as Lecturer at
the C.R. Walker Technical
College a section of the
College of the Bahamas.


ROYAL MAIL

LINES LIMITED


REGULAR FREIGHT
SERVICE FROM
U.K. TO NASSAU


THE PACIFIC STEAM

NAVIGATION CO


ARRIVED TODAY:
Bahama Star, Emerald Seas,
Flavia and Oceanic.
SAILED TODAY:
Southward.
ARRIVING TOMORROW:
Tropic Flyer.
SAILING TOMORROW:
Tropic Flyer
SUN
Rise: 5:48 a.m.
Set: 6:37 p.m.
MOON


Rise: 3:11 p.m.
Set: 1:18 a.m.
TIDES


High 3:30
p.m.
Low: 9:24
p.m.
WEATHER


a.m. and 4:02
a.m. and 10:23


Tonight and tomorrow:
variable cloudiness with a few
showers or thunderstorms.
Wind: easterly 8-14 m.p.h.,


gusty near showers.
Sea smooth to
choppy near showers.
TEMP.
Max: 88 Min: 73.
Humidity: 71 percent.
Bar. Pres: 30.08 inches.


slight,


1974 FORD MAVERICK
4-door Sedan for only

$p5,960


Financing available


Centreville


Economical 6-cyl. engine, auto.
trans., power steering, radio.
(Also 2 and 4-door sedans with air
conditioning.)
Liberal trade-ins


MOTORS
Tel: 2-1031


I
S-
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%










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i


mr


I


For information contact the agents

R.H.CURRY&Co.,Ltd.
PHONE 2-8683 2-8686 P. U. BOX N8168 BAY STREET












THE TRIBUNE -. Tuesday, August 27,1974



Cl A&C.^I.EIE-- C E^^ T i^^l~i ASSFED ADVS. BRING RELT-FS
L^^^y~yI * ^^ ^9 ^M I I^^F1^1TO PLACE YOUR ADV.,TELEPHONE296-X.
CLASSIFIED SECTION ______


m UKRE. ESTATE OI N SALE __TSF SALE SCHOOLS LOST HELP MNTEI HELP UNTED


C16450
MUST SELL: Corner Lot,.
Seebreae, Section I 100 x
100 ft. Will accept first $6,000
offer. Telephone 24350, or
346238 after 6.

C17252
BUY A LOT
IN SAN ANDROS
ALMOST 1/3 acre
$35 down, $35 per month.
Call or visit
FRANK CAREY
REAL ESTATE
P.O. Box N-4764
Bay and Deveaux Streets .

Telephone 2-7667 24815

C16412
LARGE Lot on West Bay
Street 100 by 300 feet
Reasonable price. Also
Commercial lot Bay Street near
town. Easy Finance available.
8 acres prime Hilltop West Bay
Street, suitable for Apartments
or Condominium.
For information call Bill's Real
Estate 23921.

C16483
CORNER LOT SEABREEZE
127 by 100. Only $6,200.00
VISTA MARINA half block,
from Waterfront rights
SANDY BEACH 130 on
road by 90 depth. Listed as
$9,500.00. Views of Sea.
OUT EAST-WINTON 100 ft.
EAST BAY by 241 depth.
Views of Sea rights to beach.
ON THE WATER 100 foot
on East Bay St. price upon
inquiry. Ideal for lovers of the
Sea. Good swimming. Need no
pool.
CORNER LOT SEABREEZE
- 100 x 100, only $6,000.0
DIAL 22033, 22307, evenings
41197.

C17280

LAST CHANCE
DONt MISS OUT
Only a few choice Lots left in
Golden Gates 11 Subdivision
where Nassau's newest
Shopping Centre is now under
construction. Call or come by
today $4,800 as low as $200
down and $97.42 per month.
GROSHAM PROPERTY
LIMITED
107 Shirley Street
at Sassoon House
Phone 2-7662 or 2-8966.


C 17287
SEA BREEZE VICINITY. Lots
50 x 260. $4000 cash or terms
$300 down and balance
financed at $103.03 month.
ALSO, lots 70 x 550 $6500.
$400 down. Balance financed
at $151.80 month. Tel: 4-1141
any day or night or 2-3027.
MORLEY & O'BRIEN
REAL ESTATE LTD.
C17306
* SEA BREEZE Lovely
3-bedroom, 2-bath fully
furnished home on lot 100 x
161 $45,000 financing
available.
* VILLAGE ROAD -
furnished cottage on beautiful
corner Lot 90 x 200 with lots
of bearing fruit trees -
completely enclosed priced
for quick sale at $32,000.
* PALMDALE 3-bedroom,
IiW bath house with large
recreation room, beautifully
furnished, including washing
machine, dryer and many extra
features $45,000.
GROSHAM PROPERTY
LIMITED
107 Shirley Street
Phone 2-7662 or 2-8966
Night Phone 4-2166.


C17311
COMMERCIAL PROPERTIES
3 Lots, Chesapeake Road
Pyfrom's Subdivision 150 x
105 asking $35,000.00.
Interfield Road vicinity YWCA
100 x 600 or 60,000 sq. ft.
Askin $50,000.00.
JEROME AVENUE AND
WULFF ROAD 39,488 sq. ft.
asking $85,000.00.
Lot 55 x 105 or 5775 sq. ft.
Southeast Corner Chesapeake
and Arawak, asking
$10,000.00.
SOUTHWEST CORNER
Bernard and Dan Nottage
20,660 sq.ft. (97x213) asking
$35,000.00.
PYFROM'S ESTATES
Northeast Corner Chesapeake
and Arawak 55 x 105 asking
$10,000.00.
DIAL DAMIANOS 22305,
22307 evenings 41197.


C17309
ATTRACTIVE three-bedroom,
two-bath residence Village
Road hilltop, separate dining
room, study, patio, porch, etc.
plus garage apartment. $65,000
furnished.
Attractive residence on large
lot Montagu hilltop area three
bedrooms, two baths, living
room, Bahama room, separate
dining room, large kitchen,
detached garage, maid's room
and laundry. Asking price
$55,000 furnished.
Charming Cable Beach
residence near the sea. 3
bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, large
ving/dnlng, patio, kitchen,
aundry, carport. Lot 100 ft. x
120 ft. $55000 furnished.
H. G. CHRISTIE LTD.
Phone 21041/2/3/4.


I


C17291
LOT of land in Blair
Subdivision 60x120 Cash
$5,500. Terms $6,000. Call
23735.



C16489
3 BEDROOM 2 bath house,
unfurnished. Blair Estates.
Phone 32095.

1 FURNTK
C6498
3 BEDROOM 2 bath house,
unfurnished, Seven Hills Estate
Call 3-2731.

C16448
ONE unfurnished and one
furnished 2 bedroom
apartment, located Prison
Lane, Ft. Fincastle. Call
5-2695.
C16379
2 bedroom apartment, Winton
Highway, fully furnished,
balcony with excellent views.
All utilities included. $350 per
month. Phone 21631.


C16488
OCEANVIEW, Eastern Road,
freshly redecorated one
bedroom apartment, balcony.
pool, burglar guarded. Phone.
Call 7-7468.

C16119
COTTAGES and-
APARTMENTS montrbi,
airconditoned, fully furnbhed,
m"id service available. Lovely
garden and swimming pool
Telephone 31297, 31093.

C16499
COMPLETELY furnished two
bedroom apartment, Blue Hill
Road south opposite
McPherson Primary School.
$235 per month. Washing
machine on premises. Tel.
23287.

C16500
3 BEDROOM 1% bath
unfurnished house on Soldier
Road.
3 bedroom 2 bath fully
furnished house, Village
Estates off Soldier Road.
Phone 35066 or 24605 after 5
p.m. or weekends.

C16136
LOVELY 2 bedroom
a ir conditioned apartment ,
Dundas Court, Pyfrom's
Addition, Master T.V. antenna
and laundry room facilities
enclosed parking area. For
information call 3-4953 or
54258.

C17263
TASTEFULLY furnished very
spacious one bedroom
apartment, Nice quiet area,
near schools ideal for
teachers. Air conditioned,
telephone, master antenna,
washing facilities etc. No
children or pets, two references
required. Rents $250 per
month including water. Phone
21030 office hours or 42787
after 5 p.m.


C17281
ONE bedroom furnished
apartment, Shirley Slope.
$250. Call 3-1671/2 9 a.m. 5
p.m.; after 5 p.m. 5-2261.

C17300
Furnished 3 bedroom, 2 bath
house in Tuckaway. Has
burglar alarm installed. $525
per month. Phone 4-2155.

C17314
2 BEDROOM 1 bath
unfurnished apartment, in
Centreville. $185 per month.
Telephone 5-6963.

C17310
ONE 2-bedroom apartment,
one efficiency apartment,
available. Centreville. Call Don
Pritchard 5-8679.

FOR SALE
C16485
CARPETING IS A SENSIBLE
LUXURY
It's the CHEAPEST
FLOORING FOR NEW
HOMES
It's EASY TO CLEAN....
SOFT TO TOUCH ...
NICE TO LOOK AT,
AND IT COSTS AS LITTLE
AS $5 PER SQUARE YARD,
CASH
AT CENTRAL FURNITURNL
ON BAY STREET AND
WULFF ROAD.
VISIT CENTRAL
FURNITURE TODAY FOR
SENSIBLE LUXURY.
Bay Street, Phone: 24122,
open 8:45 5 p.m. Monday to
Friday 8:45 5 p.m. Saturday.
Wuiff Road, Phone: 59600,
open 10 a.m. 6 p.m.
Monday, Thursday and
Saturday, 10 a.m. 1:30 p.m.
Friday.


C16490
A "clean the warehouse" sale
on glassware. August 20th to
31st at ABCO (BAHAMAS)
LTh. FHarold Road Just
east of Angelo's Art Centre.


I 17278
6 month old, 4 octave, EKO
organ. Equipped with rhythm
box. Asking $875. Call
Roberta 77910.
C17294
THOUSANDS AND
THOUSANDS
of items
at V2 price
MACKEY STREET
DEPARTMENT STORE
Mackey Street and
Palmdale Avenue
OPPOSITE BAR
20 CORNER.
Telephone 52398
STORE HOURS: Monday -
Friday and Saturday 8 a.m. to
8 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday
and Thursday 8 a.m. to 6 p.m..

C17295
ALMOST NEW
1 two drawer cash register
-$1000.00
$100.00
1 hot dog machine --$40.00
1 large filing cabinet $60.00
1968 PONTIAC, minor repairs
needed. Car in present use. -
$700.00
Phone 42643 C. Chestnut.


I CARS FOR SALE
C 17282
ABC MOTORS
END-OF-SEASON SALE
OF USED CARS

1974 MERCURY MARQUIS
4-Door hardtop. A.T., air
cond., radio, stereo, power
steering, power windows. A
practically new, luxurious car.
$8500.00

1973 VAUXHALL FIRENZA
2-Door, A.T. $3300.00

1973 ESCORT 2-Door Sedan.
A.T. Very low mileage
$3200 00


1973 CHEVROLET
4-Door Sedan. A.T.,
steer., radio, air
$4400.00


1973 FORD GRAN TORINO
2-Door. A.T., power steer.,
radio, air cond. $4200.00

1972 FORD TORINO 4-Door
Sendan. A.T., radio, power
steer, air cond. Like new.
$4200.00

1972 AUSTIN MAXI 4-Door
Sedan. S.T. $2400.00
1972 Chevrolet Impala 4-Door
Hardtop. A.T., radio, air cond.,
power steer. $3200.00

1971 FORD CUSTOM 4-Door
Sedan. A.T., radio, power
steer., air cond. $2300.00

1971 DODGE AVENGER
4-Door Sedan. S.T. $1350.00

1971 MORRIS 1100 4-Door
Sedan. S.T. $1300.00

1971 FORD ESCORT 2-Door.
S.T. $1000.00

1971 FORD CAPRI 2-Door,
S.T. $1200.00

1971 HILLMAN HUNTER
4-Door. A.T. $1500.00

1971 FORD MUSTANG
2-Door Fastback, A.T., radio,
power steer. $2600.00

1971 PONTIAC LEMANS
2-Door. A.T., radio air cond.
$3000.00

1970 FORD LTD 4-Door
Hardtop. A.T., air cond.
$2450.00

1970 HILLMAN MINX 4-Door
Sedan. S.T. $1000.00

1969 DODGE CORONET
4-Door. A.T., radio, air cond.
$1000.00

1969 PL Y.MOUTH
BELVEDERE 4-Door. A.T.,
radio $1200.00

1967 FORD FAIRLANE
4-Door. S.T. Very good
condition. $1050.00
CASH BARGAINS


1971 FORD CAPRI 2-Door.
A.T. $600.00
1970 VAUXHALL VICTOR
S/Wagon 4-Door $550.00

1968 FORD ESCORT 2-Door.
S.T. $650.00

1969 FORD CORTINA 4-Door
Sedan $450.00
1969 FIAT S/Wagon. S.T.
$250.00

1969 FORD CORTINA 4-Door
Sedan $250.00

1965 CHEVY 8-Passenger Bus
$450.00


ABC MOTORS
Phone 2-1031
Collins Ave.
open MONDAY to FRIDAY
8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
SATURDAY, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.


C17303
ONLY FOUR DOBERMAN
PUPS LEFT
One Male $150
Three Females $125 each -
Hind Eastern Road. Telephone
41128.

MARINE SUPPLIES
C16439
24' BERTRAM CAMPER
Twin 165 H.P. Mercruisers
Refrigerator, ship to shore,
toilet. Excellent condition.
Phone between 6 and 7 p.m.
55382.

C11894
1969 31 ft. CHRIS-CRAFT
Commander. sleeps six, private
shower, two 230 h.p. engines
with less than 200 hours.
Kitchenette, good condition.
Call 24267, 54011.

C17273
1973 22 ft. Mako, twin 85
h.p., tack meters, hour meters,
tem. gauges, amp. meter, depth
finder. $9,500. Can be seen at
Bayshore Dock E30. Phone
2-4100.

C17272
SUPER clean 24' 1973
Seabird. One of the classiest
and sportiest boats in Nassau.
You must have a look!
Telephone 77993 Mr. Davis.

C17304
19 ft. Fibreglass Cathedral --
95 H.R. Mercury -completely
overhauled in April; ship-shore
radio, compass, tachometer,
spare prop, new battery,
Marina Dolly first-class
condition. $1750.00. May be
seen on Sunday Phone
74150.

C17302
60' SHIRIMPER BOAT. M.V.
STAR TRADER. Outfitted
with 400 new crawfish traps,
complete hydraulic system for
hauling traps. WHITE CEDAR
HULL first class condition,
also outfitted for DEEP
WATER RED SNAPPER
FISHING, 3 newest type
electric reels wire lines and all
necessary, fittings including
new extra heavy duty batteries,
165 H.P. CUMMINGS DEISEL
ENGINE in top condition
completely overhauled. Sleeps
6. 10,000 Ibs. coldstorage
below deck, 2000 lbs. NEW
ICE BOX built to ice red
snappers. Can be seen at East
Bay Marina. Phone 51729
JOHN ROBERTS.



C16138
NOW In stock at Bahamian
Paint Supply, Bay Street:
* Decoupage
* Clear Cast
* Candle Craft
* Tissue Craft
Phone 2-2386, 2-2898.

' HANFOO
C16497
HURRY, HURRY
HURRY
Get supplies
while stock last
JUST ARRIVED FROM
ENGLAND
Lecithin Capsules
Kelp Tablets
Garlic Capsules
Wheat Germ Oil Capsules, Std.
Acerola Cherry C. Tablets
Desiccated Liver Tablets
Dolomite Magnesium Tablets
High Potency B-Complex
Capsules
Garlic & Parsley Capsules
Junior Formula Tablets
PREVENTION September
1974 Issue.
Phone 54506.

I SCHOOLS I

C16114
LEWIS AUTO SCHOOL
Learn to drive with confidence.
Phone 59805 between 7 and
8:30 a.m. or after 6 p.m. or
3-5034 anytime.

C16360


WEE WISDOM
Collins Avenue
Nassau's finest Prep
3 year old Nursery 4 and 5
year old Kindergarten
* Low Tuition
* Supervised Play
" Quality Teaching Programme
* Phonics
e Reading
Office Hours
9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
or call
32641 or 21586

C16413
SAVE on clothing for yourself
and your family. LEARN TO
SEW with and without
patterns.
Competent Instructors!
Simplified lessons
There are a few spaces left.
Registration daily, Mon. -
Sat., 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
D'ELEGANT SCHOOL OF
FASHION AND
DRESSMAKING.
Corner East Shirley and Fowler
Streets. Telephone 53223.


C17259
SHIRLEA NURSERY SCHOOL
& DAY CARE CENTRE

Lancaster St., Eastern end.
Quality Teaching
Ages 2 months 5 years
Reasonable Rates
Full or Day
Opening Sept. 2nd, 1974
See Mrs. Nellie Lowe
at the School

C17293
KIDDIESKOOL NURSERY
SCHOOL
Finest Pre-School Education
Half day and Full Day
Reasonable Rates
Two locations Collins
Avenue,
Village Road.
Telephone 3-1595 days and
evenings.

ENTERTAINMENT

C17312
If you need a Band for Parties,
Weddings or other functions,
Call THE HIGHBERIANS
5-5866.


NiZNCE
C17274
IF YOU would like your
property to be listed for sale or
rent in the next Raal Estate
Bulletin, contact Bill Sands of
Bill's Real Estate, telephone
23921, P. 0. Box 5449 ES,
Nassau.

C16369
The Bahamas Transport,
Agricultural, Distributive, &
Allied Workers Trade Union
will hold its Annual General
Meeting 10th September,
1974, at the House of Labour,
Wulff Road, at 7:30 p.m. At
this meeting an election of
officers will take place. All
financial members are asked to
be present.
Signed,
MAXWELL. N. TAYLOR
General Secretary


i


C17290
$500 REWARD
Moroccan Leather Duffle Bag
with jewelry, cameras and
passports Disappeared
moving from Villa 294 to Villa
267. Lowes Paradise Hotel.
Contents must be intact.
Contact E. D. SASSOON
BUILDING, P. O. Box N-3045,
Nassau, Telephone 2-4643.

I ELP WANTED

C16494
WANTED 2 Bahamian
gardeners. $60 per week. Tel.
7-8187 ask for Mr. I. Sawyer.

C16126
WANTED IMMEDIATELY
Experienced Offset Pressman,
40 hours per week, good
working conditions. APPLY
BAHAMAS PRINTING, Oaket
Field.

C17260
SECRETARY:- Must be able
to type accurately. Must have
knowledge of Bookkeeping to
TRIAL-BALANCE. Two
references required. Write: The
Manager, Box N-8079.

C16391
AMBITIOUS and hard working
Bahamian between 21-26 years
required as male management
trainee. Two years business
experience preferred. All
applications in own
handwriting to Adv. C16391,
c/o The Tribune, P. 0. Box
N-3207, Nassau.

C17254
APPLICATIONS are being
sought immediately for a
qualified teacher to teach
children ages eight through
eleven years in a small school
at Treasure Cay, Abaco. Apply
in writing enclosing resume of
qualifications and experience
to:
SCHOOLTEACHER
c/o P.O. Box N-3229
Nassau, N.P., BAHAMAS.


K BUSINESS I PROFESSIONAL

DIRECTORY

Save Time







blbtItIbhutv i2Uxis

IlMfti VI_.2tieFduIF.

>JAIflE IEV


ALARMS/SECURITY
Low's Alrin Services I'h. 3-2042
ANTENNAS
Island TV .... -261
AUTOMOTIVE
Michael Aotlo
HlIly ep.airs I'h. 32544
LIcas lmitlcrsjs
Iay SIrfet (.arage P h. 2 2434
rri'imisiissio f riairs
SI'll Action Statin lih. S52000
Walldce '- Auto Parts
& Accessories
Marathon Road Ph. 5-9650
BOOKSTORE
The (.'Christiam ItHk
SIhp I'll. S-8744


BUSINESS FORMS
I.Mcutivv
'rinlerr I'Ph. 2-4267/5 4011
KITCHEN CABINETS
rI urnitnr, rIh. 3 | 1 20

CAMERAS
lihn Iull l'h. 2-4252/3
CAR RENTAL
Wallace's U-Drive-it Cars
Marathon Road 'h. 5-9650/4-2765
DOWNTOWN PARKING
hmonhly lte $is1


IllI


om. 2-4727(da) 7-7387(nile)


ENTERTAINMENT
ldkio Visual & MNovirs
'ilmn & Iquip. Service I'h. 2-21 S7

FLORISTS
lslandl I -wist I'h. 2-2702/1-5419

GARDEN & PET SUPPLIES
Modernistic Harden&l Pt
Madeifra lIppinF I'ktia Ph. 2-286B
N aau Caurden & I'P
Mnmlrse Avenue Ph. 2-4259


HUNNICANE AWNINGS
John S. (;ete I'h. 2 -421/6

LAUNDRY&DRY CLEANING
New Oriental L Uundry I'h. 2-4403

MEN SWEAR
I ashionelte Lid Ph. 2-2376/7

OPTICIANS
Optuial Services. Ltd. I'h. 2-3910/1

PAPER
(t'nmimrcial I'aperllousw Ph. 5-9731
PRINTING
W,,n, Pl'rinting PhI. S-4506
I" sc liv" -**" --.
Printer, 'Ph. 2-4267/5-4011

RUBBER STAMPS
Wonis h Kulhhr Stamps 'h. S-4S06
rhf Tribune I'l. 2-1986

SPORTS GOODS
Cham.npionn SpWrts Land Ph. 2 1862

TRAVEL
I'laytours l'h. 2-2931/7
R. 11. Curr7 VN'S .l'h. 2-8681/7

TRUCKING
JohnoMn"s
Trucking & Landscape Ph. S-9574
Conch salad Trucking
&I)x 56S4 1P1. 2-4726/3-1562 ..

TV REPAIRS
(Channe.-I lectrtmics Ltd.P'h. 3-S475

TYPEWRITER RPEAIR
Junior Itlh Pt. 5-1044

UPHOLSTERING
Iddi*% llphat~e.rin Pht. 5-9713


mImm m II IIilllmllmmmmlm




S~howp NamU Merdmht J
S Foree IMse And Stevim
Illl III~ 8 ll l l l ~ l
L8


C17266
1 Auto-Electric Mechanic
1 Auto-Transmission Mechanic
I Handyman Cleaner
2 Auto Mechanics General
For immediate employment.
Mechanics must have a
minimum of 6 years in trade as
well as recommendations and
clean driver's licence.
Apply in person to Service
Manager, Mr. K. Campbell,
Nassau Motor Company Ltd.

C17265
1 MASTER MECHANIC
capable of carrying out all
phases of repairs to British and
American automobiles without
supervision. Also, capable of
training apprentice. Must have
references, clean driver's licence
and complete set of tools.
Apply in person to Service
Manager, Mr. K. Campbell,
Nassau Motor Company Ltd.

C17269
RESERVATIONS
MANAGER/MANAGERESS
required for 115 Room Hotel
in Nassau. Should have at least
5 years experience in this
position, a good manner with
guests, and very accurate with
all paper work. Write P. 0. Box
N598.

C17284
ACCOUNTANT
for Bay Street store with
experience in retail accounting
or equivalent. Applicant must
'submit qualifications. This a
great opportunity for the
qualified person. Write: Adv.
C17284, c/o The Tribune, P.
0. Box N-3207, Nassau
Bahamas.

C17313
Three Driver/Salesmen for ice
cream trucks. Must have
driver S licence,
recommendations and health
certificate. Only Bahamians
need apply. Call Bahamas
Icecreams Ltd., 2-3236 or
2-1864, between 10 a.m. and 5
p.m., for interview.

C17308
REQUIRED IMMEDIATELY
Paint Technician with 5-8 years
experience for a managerial
position. References required.
Phone 57939 )r write P. 0.
Eklx 5599, Nass a.

C17348
ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE
requires general office clerks
between the ages of 22-35.
Applicant must be able to type
50-65 words per minute.
Should have some knowledge
of public relations and business
administration. Must be willing
to work beyond normal
working hours. For
appointment call 4-1511.


C17307
HOLIDAY INN PARADISE
ISLAND HAS VACANCIES
FOR Shift Engineers with
experience in operation and
maintenance of absorption
chillers, automatic oil fired
boilers and water softening
plant.
Re frigeration and
Air-conditioning mechanics
with experience in operation
and maintenance of absorption
chillers, Ice makers, walk-in
freezers, etc.
APPLY WITH REFERENCE
TO GENERAL MANAGER, P.
0. Box 6214.

C17277
WANTED IMMEDIATELY
Handyman for weeding
property. $45.00 per week.
Telephone 35496.


TRADE SERVICES
C17292
NOW OPEN
DOG GROOMING SALON
by
DOREEN BUTLER HICKS
at
Warwick Street, Shirlea
Phone 5-2195.

C16110
C. W. (BILL) PEMBERTON
for
INSURANCE
Life, Fire, Hurricane, Motor,
etc.
Telephone 52539
Malton House
P. O. Box N1014
Collins Avenue

C16133
FOR YOUR BUILDINGS
NEEDS AND CRANE HIRE ..4
see:-
ISLAND BUILDERS
LIMITED
P. 0. Box 6285 ES
Phone 3-1671 3-1672

C16134
BACKHOE FOR HIRE
Need a septic tank or trenching
done?
Call
CARL G. TRECO
CONTRACTORS LTD.,
2-4996 or 5-8725


C16127
MASTER TECHNICIANS LTD
Mackey Street
YOUR "WHIRLPOOL
DISTRIBUTORS OFFER:
Refrigerators, Washers, Dryers.
Compactors, Freezers, Ice
Makers, Air Conditioners and,
Garbage Disposers. With full
warranty on every home
appliance we sell.
Service done by factory trained
mechanics. Telephone 23713;
59322.


GRAND BAHAMA


CLASSIFIED


I REAL ESTATE
C 15456
EXUMA ACREAGE
One acre land near The Forest,
Great Exuma. Excellent for
farming. $2,500.00.
Contact: Brown, P. 0. Box
F-2480, Freeport, Grand
Bahama. Phone: 352-7305.

ANNOUNCEMENTS
C16137
SHAWNEE
Dally Service between West
Palm Beach and West End. For
reservations call The Grand
Bahama Hotel (Ext. 5).

HELP WANTED
C15469
RADIOGRAPHER wanted
part-time. Phone
Administrator, Lucayan
Medical Centre. Freeport
352-7288.


C15477
DEPUTY TO MANAGING
DIRECTOR of large food and
beverage operation. The man
selected for this post will
require to have the
qualifications, abilities and
experience to take complete
control of the operations and
will be held solely responsible
for the Companies, in the
Director's absence.
Qualifications required:


Education minimum of 4 '*'
levels plus 2 'A' levels G.C.E.
or the equivalent.
ProfeMional to the
equivalent of national diploma
of hotel keeping and catering.
Specilelled trainIng In publI
house, food and beverage
service, management and
control. Basic bookkeeping and
accountancy. Personnel
administration and control.
Installation and operation of
prestsurised draught beer.

Apply to: BASS (BAHAMAS)
LTD., P. 0. Box F-331,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


HELP ANTED

C15475
CUSTOMS BROKER Must
have minimum 7 years
experience as Customs Broker
and Expeditor for large
company. Completely familiar
with Standard International
Trade Classification (SITC)
tariffs and local Customs
regulations; willing to learn
Brussels Nomenclature; able to
manage staff; prepared to work
shifts and weekends; own car.
OFFICE MAID Honest and
with highest character
references; many years
experience in cleaning large
office; outside normal office
hours.
BOOKKEEPER Many years
experience maintaining
accounts receivable
preparation of monthly
statements; monthly ledger
balancing; daily banking;
general knowledge of travel
agency business essential; more
specialised knowledge of airline
ticketing and reporting is a
considerable asset.
Apply in writing ONLY to E.
H. Mundy & Co. (Bahamas)
Ltd., P. 0. Box F-2492.
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


C15476
JOB TITLE: GENERAL
REPAIRMAN LEADERS (24
MINIMUM EDUCATION
Good basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCES.
5-10 years. Good cement plant
mechanical background.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Direct and work in inspecting,
repairing, replacing, Installing
and adjusting and maintaining
all mechanical equipment in x
major producing unit or
assigned area in a cement
plant.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


NOVA
power
cond..


I


I


- - I


I


I L


I


0









THE TRIBUNE- - Tuesday, August 27, 1974


RANDBAHAMA


CLASSIFIED

ELP NOTED HELP WANTED
C15480
CHAINMAN/RODMAN with C15473
at least 3 years experience. RESIDENT ENGINEER: To
Must have a knowledge of be responsible for the correct
gaining with steel tape and operation and maintenance of
plumb bob, operate a levelling electrical machinery and plant
staff for surveyor, be willing to and the maintenance of the
work In swampy areas and internal and external structure.
travel to Family Islands when Machinery and plant includes
necessary, boilers, air-conditioning,
Apply: R. Warren & Associates refrigeration, sewage plant,
Ltd., P. 0. Box F-836, kitchen, laundry and diesel
Freeport, Grand Bahama. engines.

C15464 FOOD & BEVERAGE
POWERHOUSE FOREMAN: CO-ORDINATOR: Purchasing
be in charge of Powerhouse, and control, including cost
Supervise staff and help to comparison, quality
repair broken engines. 8-12 comparison, yield test, sales
rears experience in diesel control including menu
engines. Has to be sober (it's a analysis issue comparisonsquet
must), reliable and willing to banquet analysis, banquet
ork liable and willing to precosting. Beverage control
necessary.odd hours when including full food/beverage
necessary. Police record, health inventory, reconciliation of
certificate and letters of inventory reconciiaton of
reference required. ths inventory, food cost
LAUNDRY MANAGER:-' percentages, bar analysis and
Manage laundry and dry separate bar percentages.
cleaning department and dry Training of all personnel in all
cleaning department and positions.
Supervise all staff. 5-8 years positions.
experience in dry cleaning and ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE
laundry. Must be reliable and CLERK: One must have
able to work odd hours if' worked as a front office cashier
necessary. Police record, health in hotel for at least two years.
certificate and letters of Must be completely familiar
referestnce required with front of the house
interested persons apply: operation, must be experienced
GRAND BAHAMA HOTEL, N.C.R. 3300 operator. Also
WEST END, GRAND must be familiar with travel
BAHAMA, Personnel Office agents, convention master
between the hours of 9:00 a.m. accounts and credit cards
and 3:00 p.m., Monday account/receivables.
through Friday. Mailing For all of the above please
Address: 324 Datura St., Suite apply to the Personnel Office,
211, West Palm Beach, Fla. Holiday Inn of Lucayan Beach,
33401. Elon Martin, Jr., P. 0. Box F-760, Freeport,
Personnel Director. Grand Bahama, Bahamas.
C15471
Grand Bahama Telephone C15479
Company, Ltd., has an Air Canada requires a
immediate opening for a M A I N T E N A N C E
JUNIOR ENGINEER. REPRESENTATIVE.
Applicant must have drafting Applicant must be qualified in
ability and experience and the maintenance of DC8 and DC9
ability to work with figures. Aircraft. Applicants must be
Duties will include Bahamian Nationals.
responsibility for drawing up Apply in writing to: P. 0. Box
job orders and repair jobs; F-391, Freeport, Bahamas
Calculating costs on routine enclosing resume of work
type job orders and other experience and employment
requirements as may be and photostat copies of
necessary under the general Licences held.
direction of the Plant Engineer.
Apply: Personnel Department, KEEP mFWWED
Grand Bahama Telephone
Company, Ltd., 2C Kipling TAKE
Building, P. 0. Box F,2478, NOME
Freeport. Telephone: (809) r un
352-9352. Uh Xribunr


S-1


CROSSWORD
PUZZLE
ACROSS
1. Italian lake 30. Solid
5. Fabulous bird 32. Fictitious
8. Weep name
11. Upon 34. Of course
12. Annex 35. Steelhead
13. Wield 37. Grape
14. Misplace 39. Afraid
15. Longed for 44. UN member
17. Music timer 47. Sole
19. Armpit 48. Turmeric
20. Navy 49. Egg drink
chaplain 50. Flirt
24. Horned viper 51. Make edging
27. Anything 52. French
bow-shaped season
29. School dance 53. Social affairs


SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE
4. Musical
DOWN drama
1. Serene 5. The fox
2. Siouan 6. Dairy product
3. Lion's share 7. Vise
8. Daystar
Sr'" o* R 1 9. Simple sugar
S10. Bunk
S i 16. Harvest
18. Palm leaf
21. Satirical
22. Caviar
23. German city
2 24. Astern
25. Title
W - 26. Expert
28. Nerve
1 i 34 31. Silent
33. Midianite king
6 36. Tin plating
38. Walking
41 14-4 40. Melee
41. Broadway
playwright
42. Girl's name
43. Colorants
- 44. Knack
45. Meadow
tures 8-29 46. Ship channel


CARROLL IGHTERWS


from the CaroN RVlssr Infte"W
GENERAL TENDENCIES: You have a good
chance for a new start by listening otosely to
what an ally has to say and following the practical suggestions.
Arrange to put ideas of the past two days into execution. Be
on the alert for sudden changes.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) Handle the work load in your
usual efficient way and gain the goodwill of co-workers. Don't
be tempted to go off on a tangent.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Take care of important
duties first before engaging in fun ventures you like so much.
Make an excellent impression on others. Be wise.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Fundamental affairs need
handling today so waste no time in doing that. Show others
you have ingenuity. Let harmony reign at home.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Get busy making
appointments that will pay off handsomely. Be conscientious
in business matters. Use extreme care in motion.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Make sure you are accurate in
monetary matters. If you have any doubts seek advice of
business experts. Do not invest unwisely.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Try to get your abode in as
fine a condition as you can and then go after your most
cherished personal desires. Engage in hobby.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Don't postpone handling
personal affairs. Once your work is complete engage in the
romantic side of life. Strive for more happiness.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) There are certain conditions
you should get help for in order to cope with them properly.
Take time to visit congenials.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) You can now whittle
down a difficult project to a workable formula. If you use
wisdom, you can add appreciably to your income.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) You now understand
what should be done to improve conditions around you.
Contact those who can give the support you desire.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Make business
arrangements now that will lead to greater success. Your
intuitive perception is fine now so put it to good use.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Find the right persons who
can assist you to gain the aims that are uppermost in your
mind. Avoid a situation that is confusing.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY ... he or she will have
a most practical mind and could become successful in financial
matters. Give a fine training in moral and spiritual ethics so
that life can be met in a courageous way. A college education
is essential to successful career. Make sure you give the benefit
of sports. Music lessons should be given early in life.
"The Stars impel, they do not compeL" What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!

TARGE


U m nianny
Swords ot
rt o llr le t rs
SN or iore cIan
itU f U it ik


r I W lInil 1 i e
Chess te




By LEONARD BARDEN












White mates in four moves,
against any defence (by Dr R.
Cherubim). For average and
novice solvers, maybe the lafirste









letterchance to work out a four-mover
Par times: 1 minute, problem
minutes. average: 10 minutes,
novice.
Chess solution
1 P-B4. II 1.. PxP en
passant; 2 P-Kt4, P-B7; 3
R-R3, either P= Q; 4 P-Kt5
mate. I1 . K-R4; 2 K-Kt7.
WhiB-Kt6 mates in four moves.









e rubim). For average bu and


CLASSIFIED ADVS.

BRING RESULTS




TO PLACE

YOUR ADV.

TELEPHONE
2186 EXT. 5
21986 EXT. 5


Rupert and the Wooden Horse-48


1 i..
" "*Vi


. s walks slowly towards the young
r'rrm," he ays sternly. If you are
pl*7" But Rupert has begun to speak
Stube. "lUttle tree," he says, "tell
MnO what you'd like to be when you grow up."
ThM he oftr th gadget to the teacher.
P"m IlIten," he begs. Still frowning. Dr.
hold thq receiver against his ear.


Goodness me I There is a voice," he gasps.
He falls silent until the reply has ended.
SPlease. what did it say?" asks Rupert.
"Th-the tree told me it was happy to stay in
this garden always." falters the teacher. It-
it said it wasn't the restless kind."
ALL RIGHTS RE;ERV~p


least one ellilt-letter word In stie
list. No plilals; no foreln word-;
no Ifler naies. TOIDAV'S
lAR<;KlT : 16 w o r (i 9, good ;
1!1 words, very good: 2 words,
excellent Solution tomorrow.
l'ESTI'EK A)t 's 50L UTIOIN :
Aisle llen aline anulil anle ariel
aril earl ile luin lair lan.e laser
lassI lean learn lens less Ilane
liar IlHa lien line linear liner
nail nailer rail KAINI.,SS real
renal sail sailer sale salile seal
serial sihal -Mainn -nall snarl.


Bridge
By VICTOR MOLLO
The hand below higghts
one of the many facets of
match popt scoring which
players, uncmustomed to dupli-
cate, may meet for the the first
tUme at the Evening Standard
Charity Bridge Oongre.
Dealer North: EW Vul.
North
Q 2
A K Q J 6
K 8
S10 8 7 4
West East
K 4 93
V 10 32 y 9 84
0Q J1073 09642
4AJ5 4 Q 9 6 3
South
AJ10 8 7 6 5
775
0 A 6
North South
19 1l
iNT 44
West leads the 0Q. Declarc
wins ti dumin and rues the
4Q to West's 4K. How shouLd
West defueld ?
Prospe.-s ar-e bleak. Souhs can
hardly have another lore
trump and dumnay's hearts wita
take care of the rest. The one
slender hqpe Is to find South
wth three ubtes and East with
the 4K.
At rubber bri t West .eads
tsl 4*5 and if he is iuc y-Soulh
c.uld have 4Q 3 2-the ametract
is beaten.
At dupY.-ate, ,this could -be
di astrous, (for if the cards lie
as above, this S utat wl:l make
12 t:it:eks. while a0l the others
wil be kep' to 11, and that
would mean zero or thereabtuts
(or Elaet-West. 80, f play*jf fcr
an avnerae, ,Weste laiel the 4A.
It's a lackuste defence, but it
can hardly m.sflre, for &h;ugh
South nay really have 6Q 3 2,
no other West is 4k'aCy to unde--
lead his 4A.


r --"r-





------ m--



No. :,1: toy TIM McKAY
I. For oisIr coinilort in cineissl
and theater. (3-., 4)
U. tsilin the li0e. (t, 4)
fl. Cuntnry'a lslu. A. 4)
I3. Relnaln. (4)
II. Hunt. (3, 3, ,)


13. Zoo animal. (4)
1. ulatemnper. (.)
18. Sinilng artist. (4)
19. Fear. (a)
to0. Mlite$,. i(4)
1: Places. ( 3)
Down
I. litlcult situation
4 Tavern. (4)
I. I al ilni e. <.. 4 )
4. AlMeailre (4|
Prollt. (4)
H. Hleiiish. <4)
Ill. Southanplonll
(iH)
I tiers.
13. i n I51 1
c e r el
to end a
I e tier
14. 4 u r a.
Il. H I I ler
f 11 nr-..neii


43 4)


I ---- Conc Payl


REX MORGAN, M.D.


JUDGE PARKER
T FOR ONE THING,
WHY DO YOU FEEL THAT THEY NEVER
WALT AND HOWIE ARE KNOCKED ON
TRYiNG TO MAKE MISS MY DOOR AS
SPENCER THINK THAT THEY CLAIM.!
YOU'RE MENTALLY ILL ?


STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD
I FOLLOW "9OU' JO"ERI
EWETATE OF ..-BUT WHAT THIS
,C A/R6@OL/ND CRAZY JAZZ
NOMAD;.... ABOUTA---

--NO COP'/




2.. A SLLLL


Mtballera


DCris


Paul Nichols
PEOPLE ARE AFRAID OP MENTAL
ILLNESS! THEY DON'T WANT
ANYONE AROUND WHO REMINDS
THEM THAT EVERYBODY IS6
VULNERABLE...THAT EVERYONE
-- HAS A BREAKING POINT! _


BUT WHAT'S IF WHAT YOU SAY B
THE USE IN IS 1 TRUE, WHAT WOULD
TRYING TO BE THEIR PURPOSE?
EXPLAIN ?. rC ----


t ,


S C
T E DI E











8 _THE TRIBUNE -


off for Minist


By Gladstone Thurston
BOLDRIDGE ELLIS'
gamble on Anthony Bowe's
infield hit to second baseman
Gilbert Moncur in the bottom
of the seventh and final inning,
paid off with him scoring the
winning tally in New
Providence champs the
Ministry of Works' 3-2 triumph
over Paradise Casino in last
night's featured N.P.S.A.
match.
Having taken the lead in the
fourth on Willie Knowles
two-run double, the Ministry
were forced into a do or die
situation when left fielder Joe
Jones slapped a high drive into
shallow centre scoring Kendal
Munroe with the tying run.
With two down Simeon
Humes ground out to short
stop and Randy Rodgers struck
out Ellis brought new life to
the Ministry's game with a
sizzling single into left field. liHe
moved to second as Jones
misfielded.
Bowe who until that frame
had no hits from his three at
bats, collected a one strike
count before he slapped the
following pitch streaking along
the ground to Moncur's right.
From the time the ball hit
the bat, Ellis started for third
base and, defying third base
coach Fred Taylor's signal to
halt, went on to beat out the
high relay home. Moncur was
hit with a throwing error.
"When I left second base,
that ball looked like it was
headed straight through,"
pondered Ellis. "The coach


way. Jones' high drive in the
top of the seventh just barely
missed being caught by Simeon
Humes who made a valient
attempt covering some 40
yards. The ball however,
bounced off the edge of his
gloves giving Munroe enough
time to score.
Many thought the game
would have gone into overtime.
Ellis saw it elsewise. He
gambled against Paradise
Casino and won.
MINISTRY OF WORKS


Ellis gamble pays


A. Bowe (4)
H. Miller (S)
S. Taylor (3)
A. Rodgers (2)
F. Taylor (6)
W. Knowles (7)
S. Hlumes (8)
R. Rodgers (1)
B. Illis (9)


into centre field.
Picture I- hFFREY 7THOMPSON
told me to hold up, but two
was out and the ball was up the
middle, and it we didn't do it
then, we wouldn't have done it
at all."
Taylor was more cautious.
"Gilly (Moncur) already had
the ball and was ready to
throw," he recalled. "If he had
made a good throw, Boldridge
would have been out. But the
game consists of gambling and
it paid off."


Mn 2 NOW THRU THURSDAY m
Matinee 2:45 & 4:55, Evening 9:00'Phone 2-1004, 2-1005

I T f 1











Reservations not claimed by 8:45 will be sold.



Wednesday thru Friday Wednesday thru Friday
Matinee Starts at 2:00 Continuous Showings
Evening 8:30 from 3:00
"THE SPOOK WHO SAT "ALABAMA'S
BY THE DOOR" PG. GHOST" PG.
Lawrence Cook, Paula Kelly All Star Cast
PLUS PLUS
"SEVEN GOLDEN MEN" PG.
Rosanna Podesta, "BROTHER ON
Philippe Leroy THE RUN" R.
Terry Carter, Kyle Johnson
'Phone 2-2534 No one under I S admitted.



STARTS WEDNESDAY
Matinee Continuous from 1:30, Evening 8:30-
'Phone 3-4666
I I





09;;1 %v I gA MM
gwihC AsGeehieDan
: UPWTOWN :
* : ATR&Aw M6M: I

I A She s 6 feet'2"of
ANon-

TE -'C'o 4


Winning pitcher Randy
Rodgers, remembered for his
strong relief pitching in their
victory over the Roaring Tigers
last week, proved deceptive last
night though he gave up six
hits and struck out four going
the route. Backed by a near
perfect defence, Rodgers kept
Paradise scoreless for five
innings.
Opposing hurler Charles
Rolle struck out six and
walked two but gave up seven
hits in taking his first loss of
the season. He however helped
his batting average with two
hits from three at bats.
Paradise however still remain
in first place but one and a half
games ahead of the Ministry
who now hold sole possession
of second place a half game
ahead of the former
undefeated league leading
Roaring Tigers.
A freak play in the top of
the third inning gave Paradise
their first run. Rolle who
scored it led off that inning
with a single through second
and moved to second on a wild
pitch. Moncur with one down
followed with a base on balls.
Jones who was the fourth
batter of that inning grounded
to Taylor at short. He
misfielded and both batters
began to advance. On
recovering the ball, he was
undecided as to who to put out
first. The relay finally went to
catcher Adrian Rodgers, but it
was too late.
Known for their
courageousness especially in
situations like these, the
Ministry powered themselves
back into contention with
Knowles' two-bagger in the
following frame.
Both Harry Miller and
Sherwin Taylor were on with
singles and with two out,
Knowles in picking up his sole
hit of the game slapped a fly
ball into shallow centre. Both
Moncur and right fielder Lloyd
Taylor attempted the put out.
Neither got it.
Paradise were lucky in a

England


ab r
4 0
3 t
3 1
2 0
2 0
3 0
3 0
2 0
3 1


PARADISE CASINO
K. Munroe (8) 3 1 0 0
G. Moncur (4) 3 0 0 0
J. Jones (7) 3 0 1
R. Smith (6) 4 0 0 0
R. Rodgers (3) 3 0 0 0
B. Rolle (S) 3 0 2 0
H. White (2) 3 0 2 0
L. Taylor (9) 2 0 0 0
A. Rodgers (ph) I 0 0 0
C. Rolle (I) 2 1 1 0
By right, St. Michael's
Dodgers should have loss by
default last night since 20
minutes after the scheduled
start of play they were still
without their full team.
However, with the use of
time stalling tactics, they
delayed long enough for their
ninth player to arrive just when
they were about to hit the field
going into the bottom of the
first inning.
This grieved Melroso Ginger
a bit, but, they eventually got
all together and waled the
Dodgers 10-4 in the first game
of the New Providence Softball
Association's double header.
Fifteen minutes into game
time, the Saints weie still short
by three. Gradually, players
began sauntering in. John
Martin arrived just in time to
save them from the inevitable
decision.
St. Michael's took
advantage of the unsettled
Melroso to take the lead 2-0 by
the top of the second.
Melroso erased this in the
fourth with four lead-taking
runs, and, with David Johir;on
coming in in the fourth with
sound relief pitching never gave
the Saints a chance.
First baseman Leslie
Johnson and catcher John
Wallace each scored two runs.
Starter turned short stop
Michael Carroll scored one and
knocked in two. Right fielder
Jeffery Fowler knocked in a
run with a sacrifice fly. He also
scored one.
Third baseman Roosevelt
Turner picked up his third
home run of the season with
one in the park. Anthony
Bostwick, Lawrence Smith and
Martin scored the other runs.
** * * * * *
IN rescheduled games
released by the N.P.S.A. last
night, Baintown play Taylor
Trucking in tomorrow's first
game at 7 o'clock. Super Value
meet Holiday Inn in the second
game at 9 o'clock.
On Thursday, the Police
Royals play St. Bernard's at 7
o'clock, and Fort Fincastle
play Paradise Casino at 9
o'clock.


plod


towards safety
LONDON England's The most significant event
batsmen plodded to save the of a slow day's cricket, cut
follow-on Monday and the short by rain, was when
third cricket test match against Intikhab Alam. the Pakistani
Pakistan at the Oval appeared captain, took his 100th wicket
heading for a tame draw. in Test matches He is the only
England finished the day on Pakistani player to complete
438 for 6 in reply to Pakistan's the test double 1,.000 runs
score of 600 for 7 declared, and 100 wickets.
Heavy rain in the morning
left the field partly flodded,
and dozens of volunteers
helped to drain the water away
and make the ground fit for
play. The match eventually got
going at !. 15 p.m.
The first blow to England
was an injury to Dennis Amiss.
who was hit on the cheekbone
by a bouncer from Sarfraz
when he had scored 178 and
had to leave the field.
Keith Fletcher and Tony
Greig pushed the score along so
slowly that the crowd of
12.000 at the Oval sometimes
gave them the slow handclap.
Pakistan's hopes of
enforcing the follow-on slowly
er disappeared. Intikhab
eventually bowled Greig, and
that was his 99th test wicket.
Alan Knott helped Fletcher
re" to reach the target of 401
needed to avert the follow-on.
TELEPHONE: 2-4626/7/8 Then Knott became Initkhab's
100th test wicket, also clean
bowled. (AP)


- Tuesday, Augut 27, 1974


Lz


-MARLINS--
OUT TO
SNATCH
SECOND

CROWN
By Alfred Walkes
THE 1973-74 Bahamas
American Football
Champions the Nassau
Marlins are looking forward
to a second crown this year,
according to coach Craig
Weineck.
The Marlins who romped
over the then defending
champs the Nassau Jets see
no reason why they should
not do it again.
"I see no reason why we
should lose this year, we have
all of our guys back, and a lot
of promising rookies", said
Weineck.
"Our team this year will be
playing mostly fundamentals
in our games." Mr. Weineck
added that he is depending
mostly on his rookies, he said
that they are strong and
willing to play the game.
The team this year which is
mostly Bahamians likes
playing this sort of game,
they are not afraid to get hit,
like most of the other guys
on different teams, and they
have a lot of discipline which
makes a better team, said
Craig.
Weineck said he would also
like to see the League
improved. He said that the
scheduling and so forth were
not in concordance with most
of the teams last year, and
therefore cost a lot of
changing around. Some teams
only played one team once.
The coach also stressed
that he is looking forward to
a lot of help coming from his
Key Quarterback Andy Key.
Andy who helped with his
great offensive power last
year, along with Ricky
Thompson should prove to be
the best again this year.
Being in one of the
toughest leagues this year one
would need lots of defence,
and this is exactly what
Weineck and his Nassau
Marlins consist of.
Playing a lead role in
defence last year was
defensive end Edison Butler.
Butler will get a lot of help
this year from Big Bill Albury
who is also a defensive end,
and Jerry Sherril who is an
offensive tackle.
160 pounder little Bill
Albury will also see action
for the first time. He will be
playing defensive end also.
The team holds practice
every Tuesday and Saturday
at 7:30 at the Queen
Elizabeth Sports Centre.


HUSTLERS WIN
LEFT HAND centre fielder
Kermit Graham drove in two
inning runs with his seventh
inning double giving Bahamas
Champs the Governor's
Harbour Hustlers a 4-3 victory
over the Rock Sound Heroes in
Eleuthera softball action.
This win moved the Hustlers
three games in the lead. They
took a double header from the


Heroes last week.
Glen Griffin took the win
and Doug Smith got the loss.

PONY LEAGUE pennant
winners the Nassau Mets were
held to a seven-all tie in the top
of the fifth inning of their
champion playoffs against
third place Del Jane Saints.
With the Saints at bat, two
batters out and one on third


base, the game will be
completed Saturday morning
(10 o'clock) at the Southern
Recreation Grounds.
Tomorrow, St. Michael's
Dodgers play Rodgers Sport
Shop in the second half of the
playoffs. The finals are slated
for Saturday morning.
In Little League action, Irvin
Knowles Construction meet St.
Bernard's 6 p.m. today


LADIES SINGLES champion Charmain Goddard (right) receives her award from resident pro
Al Smith following yesterday's 6-0, 6-4 victory over Hazel Cameron (2nd from left) in the finals
of the Balmoral Beach Club finals. Hans Schopper (left) won the.men's singles.


Bahamas Telecommunications Corporation
P. 0. BOX N-3048 NASSAU BAHAMAS


NOTICE



1975


TELEPHONE DIRECTORY


The Bahamas Telecommunications Corporation wishes to inform the
public that the closing date for the acceptance of WHITE PAGE LISTINGS in
the 9)75 Telephone Directory will be 30th September, 1974.


A form tor your listings can be found in your current Telephone Directory
immediately following the White Page Listings. Please complete the form
ONLY if a change or additional listings are required and return as early, as
possible to:-


BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CORPORATION
ATTENTION: COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT
P. O. BOX N3048
THOMPSON BOULEVARD
OAKES FIELD
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

In connection with YELLOW PAGE ADVERTISING, Agents of the
Corporation will conduct their annual sales campaign throughout the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas. beginning Monday August 19th, and
throughout September 13th. During this period they will canvass all local
business firms for advertising matter.
A. E. CURLING
GENERAL MANAGER

r"


PanAm is your best


wayto jet...0evfrywhre.

Board a Pan Am jet in Nassau and fly to almost
anywhere in Europe or the Pacific, without changing airlines.
Pan Am flies direct from Worldport TM, our new JFK terminal,
to more European cities than any other airline. And flies daily to
Tokyo, Hong Kong and Bangkok -- to name just a few.
With a change of planes in Miami, you can fly in Pan Am
comfort from Nassau to just about anywhere in Latin America
and the Caribbean.
Where do you want to go? Your Pan Am travel agent or
Pan Am sales office in Nassau or Rock Sound wi/
tell you how to get there. .
. with incomparable Pan Am service all the wayl
When you're going to travel, ee your Travel Agent..
When you're going to fly, fly Pan Am.




First 1inthe Bama.


Cl Ile^^









An 8- page Pullout Supplement


Eascation abroad
"


lires our students
A A U IBy LYNDA CRAWLEY I..M


MANY BAHAMIAN students will be leaving this week and next to attend college or university
abroad for the first time.
If you're one of these students, there is no doubt that you're excited and anxious but yet
somewhat afraid of approaching your freshman year in a strange country, a new school and
meeting new people from different cultural backgrounds.
Hundreds of questions must happening to you don't feel business management and is
be passing through your mind bad because all college students looking forward to returning
and your imagination must be at one time or the other went home after she has completed
"doing you a job." If this is through the same mental her four-year course.
torture. Gaynell is the daughter of
Incoming freshman like Miss E.K. Hanna of Union
yourself, always get reams of Village and a former news
advice on college life. Take it reporter with Radio Bahamas.
from me, none of it is reliable She decided to attend
because college happens to be a Southern University after she
personal experience. Your first was influenced by a cousin
year will be a time of who is already attending school
adjustment and confusion; it is there, and "because it has the
a period of individual growth reputation.of being a very good
and discovery, school."
If you want not only to She added, "I am also going
survive your freshman year but there because I would like to
to love it, you must approach get the black experience
it wi with the right attitude. As because Southern is the largest
you arrive on the campus with black state supported school in
an armful of bags, a nervous the United States."
stomach and a dazed look on *************
S3your face, be prepared for Willame Johnson, 20, and
some strange surprises, the daughter of Joseph
You will be away from Johnson and Catherine Sands
ADELMA ROACH home and there will be nobody of Second Street, Coconut
Fisk checking on what you do or Grove, will be joining the
care about your moral social
one to account to and how you
deal with this new freedom will
be totally up to you.
This year will give you the
opportunity to develop and
express yourself in new ways.
But despite the fun and social
adjustments, remember that
your main purpose in attending
a university is to study and be
successful in whatever you set
out to do.
*************


Among the many students
going abroad to attend college
or university for the first time
this year is Gaynell Ellis, a
Queen's College graduate, wvho
will be attending Southern
University, Baton Rouge,
Louisiana. She will maior in


Tallahassee


A


TWO NEW GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS open next month. The L. W. Young Junior High
(above), built at a cost of $1.6 million, will open Its doors on Bernard Road to 900 students us{ W
September 9. Headmistress Is Mrs. Marina Walcott. The S.C. McPherson Junior High(below) on the W
corner of Baillou and Carmichael Roads, which also cost $1.6 million, expects 1,650 students
when the school opens Sept. 9 Hdlmistress I Mrs. Carol Hanna.
i AT SCHOOLS


student body of Fisk
University, Nashville,
Tennessee.
A graduate of Prince William
Baptist High, she will major in
Spanish and minor in English.
Willame, who is very
enthused about leaving home
for the first time on her own
said, "I am going to Fisk
because i've heard a lot of nice
things about that school plus it
has a high standard."
Seventeen year old Adelma
Roach, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Leon Roach of South
Beach, leaves in September for
Fisk University in Tennessee
where she will pursue a degree
course in music.
Adelma comes from a family
of musicians. Two of her sisters
have already earned college
degrees in music and another
sister will graduate with a
music degree next summer.
A graduate of Adelphian
Academy in Holly, Michigan,
she served as director of the
girls choir at that school.
When asked why she chose
Page 8LCol. I


-- THE TRIBUNE TEAM


L YNDA CRAWLEY ELLISTUN RAHMING
was graduated this year is a graduate of State
from Southern University, University of New York
Baton Rouge, Lousiana Rochester Cooperative
with a B.A. in liberal College and taught for two
studies, majoring in years at a Ministry of
journalism with a minor in Education and Culture
broadcasting. An honour school before joining the
student, Lynda was news Tribune this summer. He is
and feature editor of the in his final year of law
campus newspaper and a studies as an external
memebr of the TV team. student of La Salle
Lynda ia the fourth University.
.. ,,, fM n u ,, ,,u Elliston is the son of


u g ercr j. r a vir.
John Oawley of Lyon
Road.


Mr. and Mrs. Ishmael
fahming of Yellow Elder
Gardens


By ELUSTON RAHMING
ALL MINISTRY OF EDUCATION and Culture Schools will
re-open for the Christmas Term on Monday, September 9.
Opening for the first time for classes are the new L. W. Your
Junior High School (above)and the S.C. McPherson Jmior Hih *
(at left). L. W. Young is situated on Bernard Road and McPhesen
is on Baillou Hill Road to the north of CarmichAel.
A course in agriculture will be introduced at L:W. Young and a
special class for the deaf will be featured at the other new school,
New Providence Primary and Junior High School:- All
students who are moving from primary to junior high or from
junior high to senior high, should report to the school to which
they have been transferred on September 9 rather than reporting
to the school they attended last term.
ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE
Orientation programme for new students entering seventh
grade will be held on August 28. New students will also register at
that time.
Last term, students attending the Fox Hill high school were
charged a tuition fee of $420 per annum. When school re-opens
however, the fees will have gone up by $30.
About 17 teachers will join the SA.C. staff in September.
BAHAMAS ACADEMY
The elementary division of Bahamas Academy of Seventh Day
Adventists, Wulff Road, will have two new staff members when
school re-opens on September 4.
Mrs. Alice McMillan and Mrs. Rowena Smith will join the lower
school staff. They are both graduates of the Bahamas Teachers.
College.
ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE
St. John's College studetns will return to the bold school site on
Market St. on September 9 but can anticipate entering the new
college building on Gladstone Road in September of next year.
About 590 students are expected back at school on
September 9, a few of whom are sixth form students. This is the
first time S.J.C. has had a sixth form programme, according to
headmaster Fr. Strachan.
Nine teachers are expected to join the staff at SJ.C.
Page 8, Col. 3


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Pap 2 -- THE TRIBUNE BACK-TO-SCHOOL SECTION


"1 MARS OFAGOOD STUDENT
* He is ambitious and keen to learn
* He is cooperative, but not easily persuaded.
* He is attentive and alert
9 He is interested in the welfare of others
" He has a determination to succeed
" He learns from past mistakes
" He sets his priorities straight
He is respectful and courteous to others at all times
" He has a desire to make a contribution to his country
* He is not satisfied unless he gets an "A"


THE TRIBUNE wishes to
thank all students who
answered our invitation to
bring us news about
themselves and their school
activities. In this issue they
will not only read about
themselves, but also about
their friends.
And with our thanks goes
our apologies ... apologies to
those students whose
photographs did not come
out and therefore, who will
not see themselves in this
issue.


S'T. JOHN'S
STUDENTS displaying
uniforms from the senior
school and preparatory
school. From left to right
are. senior students Lynn
Fergus,,. and Keith
Strachan. Junior students
are Rhonda Wood and Ian
Poiter.


TFie Blls Are Ringing


ACKTO SCHOOL


at


ON BAYSTREET


MAKE US YOUR SHOE CENTER

FOR BACK TO SCHOOL


ROZALIA CRAWLEY, youngest
daughter of Asst. Commr. John
Crawley and Mrs. Crawley, in her
St. Anne's High School uniform
- grey blouse, blue skirt and navy
blue socks.


RI ADY TO RETURN TO GOVERNMENT HIGH SCHOOL this term from left: Sharon and
Sheldon Symonette, children of Mr. and Mrs. Stafford Symonette of Yellow Elder Gardens and Belva
Zonicle, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Zonicle of Union Village. Sharon and Sheldon are wearing
the traditional G.H.S uniform and Belva the new optional uniform.

The best looking Bay or

Girl ontheSchool Canpus

j could be YOURS!...


s. --.-*


ST. ANDREW'S: Two 5-year-olds pose in their St. Andrew's uniforms
for photographer Andrew Toogood. Robert C(arron son of Mr. and Mrs.
Roger Carron, wears the grey trousers and navy blue and white striped tie,
and Anya Hickman, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Denis Hickman is seen in the
navy blue and white-striped dress.


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THE TRIBUNE BACK-TO-SCHOOL SECTION - PgI 3


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Four Into one will go with

the College of the Bahamas
By Elliston Rahming
In September, the C. R. Walker Technical College, the two Teachers' Colleges and
eventually, the sixth form of the Government High School, will amalgamate and
form the nucleus of the much talked about and long anticipated COLLEGE OF THE


Th


DR. JOHN KNOWLES


-BAHAMAS.
During the first year, the
college will pass through a
stage of evolution. Therefore,
students of the four
institutions will continue to
attend classes at their
respective centres of learning.
It is also anticipated that
there will be no drastic changes
in the curricula of any of these
institutions during the one year
evolution period.
The President (Principal) of
the college, Dr. John Knowles,
Ph.D., told the Tribune that
the almost 100 lecturers
assigned to the college will find
it necessary to work doubly
hard in an effort to create one
centralized and unified
institution out of the four
schools of higher learning as
they exist presently.
If Dr. Knowles' plans are
approved by the Governing
Body of the college, the
present administrative practices
of the four institutions will be
change.
At present there is a
Mathematics Department, an
English Dept. and others at the
four centres, Dr. Knowles
envisages however, one Maths
Dept. that will be responsible
for maths in the institutions.
The same applies for all other
subjects.
He also expressed the need
for a General Education
Programme which will be made
compulsory for all first year
students. The College President
feels that after taking the one
year General Education course,
students would then be
allowed to enroll in the
Teaching Programme or the
Commercial and Vocational
Programmes offered.
All students, after successful
completion of any of the three
programmes, will be awarded a
standardized certificate. This,
in Dr. Knowles' view will seek
to discredit the Bahamian
myth that a holder of a
certificate in carpentry etc., is
professionally inferior to the
person who holds a Teachers
certificate.
If, for example, a person
graduates from the College of
the Bahamas with a certificate
in plumbing, masonry or dress
making and design. the


A


Tribune that "many mentally
high powered Bahamians" who
are presently teaching abroad,
have expressed the desire to
return home and teach at the
Bahamian college.
He said further that a plan is
being devised to upgrade
present lecturers at the college
whose qualifications to teach
at such an institution are
inadequate.
It has been confirmed that
the college will not continue to
operate out of four campuses
indefinitely. The Government
has "put aside" 120 acres of
land in the Oakes Field
area South of the Queen E.
Sports Centre and east of the
Police Training College on
which the permanent college
structure will be constructed.
Plans for the college call for
the construction of a series of
unit buildings scattered
across the 120 acres rather
than one large building.
Construction of the college
is expected to be completed by
1980. It is understood
however, that a National
Library will be erected on the
college site by 1976. Funds for
the library, according to an
informed source, have been
provided by several rich
Bahamains who are desirous of
making a national
contribution.
All students at the local
college will be required to pay
very moderate tuition fees.
Financial aid will be provided
however, to deserving students.
After years of waiting, the
College of the Bahamas is now
a reality.
Students presently in their
senior year at a local high
school and all those interested
in pursuing higher education
can attend the local college for
two years and receive a
professional Diploma before
going abroad to complete the
final two years requirements
for the Bachelors Degree.


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BLOUSES in yellow and white.
SOCKS long-short & bobby.
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SHORT PANTS in navy. brown,
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certificate awarded to that
student will be of the -me
standard as the one awarded to
student who completed the
Teaching Course.
The College will offer two
types of certification. A
certificate will be awarded to a
student who completes the one
year General Education
Program and a Diploma
equivalent to an Associate's
Degree- will be awarded to
those who go on to specialize
in any one of the three.
programs.
According to Dr. Knowles,
the executive officers of the
college are working tirelessly to
have the college gain
accreditation from four year
colleges and universities in the
U.K., U.S. and Canada.
It is hoped that by 1976,
students who complete a two
year program at the local
college, will be eligible for
entry as a third year student at
an institution of higher
learning abroad.
No doubt, many students
contemplating pursuing higher
education will be reluctant to
consider the possibility of
attending the college of the
Bahamas for their first two
years of study.
Students have expressed the
opinion that the lecturers
posted to the institution are
not sufficiently qualified to
teach at college level.
Dr. Knowles assured the












Page 4 - THE TRIBUNE BACK-TO-SCHOOL SECTION



Freshmen, keep a steady head, says Mavis


FISK UNIVERSITY
student Mavis Ingraham's
advice to incoming freshman
students is: "Come in with a
positive attitude knowing
what you want to do. Try to
succeed in whatever you set
out to do. Keep a steady head


and' remember you're not
home. But most of all come
with an open mind."

Mavis is a senior at Fisk
University, Nashville
Tennessee and her major is
physiotheraphy. She is
21-years-old and the daughter


Glendina Ford will be
entering her sophomore year at
the University of Detroit, a
small Roman Catholic school
located in the northwest
section of Detroit Michigan.
She is a graduate of
Government High School and
the daughter of Mr. Joseph
Ford, M.P. for Inagua and Mrs.
Ford of Nassau East.
An international law major,
she maintains that you should
not let your social life at
school interfere with your


of the late Robert Ingraham
and Mrs. Iva Ingraham of
Churchill Avenue.
At Fisk, she is a member of
Delta Sigma Theta, Public
Service Sorority, the
International Students
Association and is on this
year's homecoming


studies.
Glendina finds the cost of
living in Detroit very high, and
advises anyone who will be
attending school there, to
come prepared with a "fair
amount of money."
Even though she finds the
students on her mainly white
campus prejudice towards
blacks, and black Americans
prejudice towards the
Bahamian students, she said
she's totally against the
Bahamians there sticking


committee.
She finds Fisk to be a very
expensive school and the cost
of living in Nashville very
high. The social life there she
said is what you make it
because there is something
going on around the campus
at all times.

together and not mingling with
the others.
"There are 12 Bahamians
going there, and all of us stick
together. I find this bad
because we should mingle with
the foreign students so that we
can learn their cultural habits
and at the same time they can
learn ours."
Glendina finds the American
education system easier than
the English but prefers the
American because it is "far
more modern."


Denise Mortimer describes
Clark College, a private
Methodist school in Atlanta
Georgia, as expensive but in a
very exciting city.
A senior majoring in
physical education at Clark
College, her advise to
students leaving home for the
first time is, "work first and
play later"
Denise is the oldest
daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Lester Mortimer of Baillou
Hill Estates. She has a
sister and two brothers who
are also attending university
in the United States.


Denise said that Atlanta is
a very exciting city and the
people you get to meet there
are very interesting.
She finds the cost of living
there cheaper than northern
cities in the U.S. and the
climate ideal.
Denise, who has been
staying in an apartment
off-campus for the past year,
finds it cheaper and more
exciting than staying
on-campus.
The food prepared on
campus, she said, is very good
but the social life is
"terrible."


"Bahamiana are well liked
by the people in Atlanta,
even though people tend to
think I experience a lot of
prejudice because my school
is located in Georgia. Since
I've been there, I have never
experienced any of this," she
said.
According to Denise,
Atlanta has been known to be
a city too busy to hate, but
because of some recent
events, it is said that it is
learning to hate. She also said
that the black people living
there, does not consider it a
part of the prejudice Georgia.


"I don't think a person will
ever really grow up until or
unless he goes to an institution
of higher learning." was the
view expressed by Deborah
Delaney after spending one


year at McMaster University in
Canada.
Deborah's major field of
study is English and she minors
in a subject most people can't
cope with history.
She attended the
Government High School in
Nassau and completed two
years of sixth form work.
Although Deborah hasn't
decided whether she will teach
after she graduates, she
admitted that, "there is a need
for qualified teachers in the
Bahamas educational system."
When asked about the social
life at the Canadian University
Deborah said that the social
life is "pretty good but you
must be on your guard."


Trevor Hanna will return to
St. Benedict's College in St.
Joseph's, Minnesota in
September to move nearer


towards her goal which is to
obtain a degree in one of the
most difficult languages of all
- English.

A 1972 graduate of St.
Augustines College in Nassau,
Trevor "definitely plans to
teach" after she graduates from
the Catholic college.

According to Trevor, the
school is mainly white, "but
the people are friendly."

After a year abroad she is of
the opinion that the academic
standard at her school is very
high. She said: "You must be
prepared to work very hard at
St. Benedict because of the
high competition rate."


Michael Anthony Brooks
will return to Academy of Art
- Lane Mountain College in
San Francisco to enter his
second year of studies.
A graduate of St.
Augustine's College in Nassau,
Michael's major field of study
is Fine and Commercial Arts.
After a year of study there,
he feels that Lane Mountain
College is a "fine place for
working and studying and the
area is not polluted or
conjested."
Michael also stated that the
student body is comprised of
students from all around the
world but added: "There are
only a few West Indians."
mammmmmmmmme


Henry Lightbourn will
return to Byrand College in
Rhode Island to continue a
four year course that leads to
a B.Sc. in Management and
Economics.
He has completed one year
of training at Byrand and
sounded this warning to
students .contemplating going
there: "Be on your guard
because the other students
will try to stifle your
potential."
Henry says that he decided
to go abroad to school
because he realizes that the
Bahamas is in growing stage
and as a result, needs
qualified persons "to help run
the country."
Henry is a member of the
college's swimming team and
has competed in swimming
competitions all over the
U.S.A.
He "definitely" plans to
return to the Bahamas after
he graduates "so that l can
ftke a contribution to my
country he said.









THE TRIBUNE BACK-TO*SCHOOL SECTION - StC 5


END OF


mI


Sp AT


ARNOLD'S DEPT. STORE
ON CORNER OF BAY ST. & VICTORIA AVENUE
)YS'. POLYESTER PANTS 4-6X .............. S4.95
POLYESTER PANTS 8-18 was 9.95 Now $7.95 or 3 for $21.00
SHOES was 7.95.. . ................... Now $4.95
BRIEFS .. . . . ................from $2.50 pkg. of 3
COTTON & RAYON PANTS ...... ...... from $2.50
SHIRTS.. .........................from $1.95
GIRLS': DRESSES . . . ....... .. from $2.50
SHOES was 7.95.. . . ..... ...... Now $4.95
HOT PANTS SETS . . . . . .. . . $4.95
MEN'S: POLYESTER PANTS... .. . 2 for $20.00
POLYESTER SHIRTS were up to 14.95 Now $7.95 or 2for $12'
POLYESTER SUITS ......... ...... from $59.00 3
SHEET SETS DOUBLE. .. . .. . . .... $9.9


Bahamas

graduates


FIVE BAHAMIANS
received LL.B. Degrees in May
and plan to be called to the
Bahamas Bar in 1976 after
completing a two year course
in Legal Education at Norman
Manley Law School in Mona,
Jamaica.
Receiving Law Degrees
were: Rhonda Bain. Hartman
Longley, Paul A.E. Knowles,
Burton Hall and Thomas A.E.
Evans. They graduated with
upper-second class honours.
The future lawyers were


trained at Care Hill Campus of
the U.W.I. in Barbados and
described the three years they
spent there as "exciting ones."
Paul Knowles presently
holds a B.A. Degree in
Economics from the University
of Western Ontario in Canada.
The others graduated from
local high Schools.
The young collegians are
"eager" to return to the
Bahamas "to help build this
wonderful country of ours,"
A im*
". fIIIIIIB M


BESSIE BOWE


they said almost in unison.
Bessie Bowe, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Frederick H.
Bowe of Third St. in the
Grove, graduated from Fisk
University in May with a B.S
degree in Economics.
Bessie graduated from Prince
Williams High School
and completed a one year
course in General Business and
Accounts at Bahamas
Technical College before going
to Fisk.
At Fisk, she was a member
of various clubs. Among them
were: Home Coming Club,
member of Fisk's House of
Representatives, member of
the Economics and Business
Clubs, member of the copying
and editing committee for the
school's newspaper,
secretary/treasurer for the
International Student Club and
a member of Fisk's Black Mass
Choir.
Bessie is presently employed
at the Central Bank and has no
I immediate plans of pursuing
further studies.
Arthur Fountain, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Arthur B. Fountain of
Twynam Avenue, recently
received his B.S. degree in
hotel and restaurant
management from Oklahoma
State University, Stillwater,
Oklahoma. He is also a
graduate of St. Augustine's
College, Nassau.
************
Jeffrey Lloyd, 22, son of
Miss Elroy Taylor and Mr.
Stanford Lloyd of Marathon
Estates, graduated in May from
Xavier University, New
Orleans, Louisiana with a B.A.
degree in drama and
communications.
He also received an associate
degree in arts and humanities
from St. Gregory's College,
Shawney, Oklahoma.
A graduate of St.
Augustine's College, Nassau,
Jeffrey is now employed as a
news reporter with
Radio Bahamas.


ARTHUR FOUNTAIN


Rosemund Clarica
Wilkinson, second daughter of
Mrs. Maisie Wilkinson and the
late Carl Wilkinson, recently
received a first class diploma
after a two year medical
secretarial course at St.


Godric's College, London.
Before entering St. Godric's,
she attended St. James High
School in Worcestershire,
England for two years.
Rosemund is a former student
of St. John's College.


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Pag9 6- THg TRIBUNE BACK-TO-SCHOOL SECTION




vo


By Lynda Crawley
GETTING your c
back-to-school war
together can really be a p
the neck, especially if yo
working mother and have
it on your lunch hour
you're fortunate,
weekends off.
To make shopping tor
pleasure instead of a pai
have prepared this
shopping guide that wil
only save you time but ga
too. And when y
completed your shopping
can also guarantee
satisfaction.
This year we will stai
shopping spree once aga
Bay Street, seeing that it
number one shopping
on the Island.
Our first stop will bi
House of Values, located
Nassau Arcade. This
carries a complete lin
wearing apparel for the
family which includes,
shirts and polos, long and
pants, socks, underwear,
and ties.
Girls dresses, slips, p
and bras, socks, long and
Skirts and blouses, hot
and shorts, which are ide
after school hours.
Mike's Shoe Store w
the next stop after leavir
Nassau Arcade. Here yo
purchase a sturdy, s
collection of shoes fo
entire family.
Choose from the ev
popular platform look
you're not too keen on a
a couple or even a few
onto your height there ar
low heels in all the
fashions.
All of these shoes corn
variety of colours and
with black and brown
the most popular colours.
Helen's Shoe Stores
locations on Bay Street a
the Madeira Shopping
also carries a wide ran
shoes for the entire fi
starting from baby size f(
a ladies ten.
These stores also hav
latest platform fashions
large collection of tennis
and socks for the whole f
Roberts Department
- on Bay Street near East
may be small but it has
collection of girls and
shoes in the latest fashion
store also has a wide rai
boys polyester pants to t
from and many
miscellaneous items for s
The Park Store
Parliament Street of
Street, carries large vari
school uniforms plus
bags and lunch tins.
The store also carric
popular Hanes briefs
T-shirts for boys. There
a large supply of boys
and shirts and girls blous
socks.


child's Larry's Department Store in
drobe Palmdale, is the exclusive store
ain in that carries school uniforms for
u re a St. Thomas More and Aquinas
to do College. They also have
or if uniform material, shirts and
or, blouses for the majority of the
schools in the Nassau area.
r your Although Larry's stores are
n, v,e located on Bay Street and
n, se Market Street, the Palmdale
easy
11 not store is the uniform centre for
soline the back-to-school shoppers.
'ou've The store also carries
ig we underwear and socks for
you school.
Linda's Children's Fashions
rt our is not just a store for little
,in on people, they have selections for
is the big and little.
centre The shop is located on
Market Street north off Wulff
e The Road and carries a complete
in the line of school bags, books,
store pens, pencils and toys, plus
ne of uniforms all made up.
entire You can also find shoes in
boys latest fashions, all types of
short underwear for children and lots
belts of infant wear as well.
Deal's Department Store on
anties Market Street, can supply any
short, student with school items that
pants area needed for the entire year.
al for There are Remington and
Evoy typewriters to ensure
ill be neat, legible notes and reports.
ng the There are notebooks, paper,
u can textbooks and black-boards for
stylish pre-school-age children.
r the G. R. Sweeting and Son in
Palmdale, better known to
er so some as the school uniform
or if centre, is prepared as usual for
adding you school shoppers.
inches They are well stocked with
e also all Nassau school uniforms,
latest plus school supplies pencils,
clip boards, notebooks,
ie in a geometry sets and a new
styles, supply of their ever popular
being Clark Shoes from England.
Artie's Dry Goods and
with Barry's both located on Bay
and in Street, are always packed with
Plaza, the essentials for back to
ge of school, whether its for local
family, Nassau schools or for schools
ourto abroad.
They have an almost
'e the complete line of school
and a uniforms, luggage, name brand
shoes underwear for boys and girls
amily- and a large collection of wool
Store sweaters.
Street, Optical Services in the
a large British Colonial Hotel Arcade,
boys' are still selling the new photo
ns. The Sun Lens, which look like an
nge of ordinary lens when worn
:hoose indoors, but darkens to
other sunglasses when worn
school. outdoors. These are ideal for
on the person who hates switching
Bay from one pair of glasses to
ety of another.
school Bausch and Lomb have
developed the new soft contact
es the lens and optical services can
and supply them. These contact
is also lenses actually breathe while
pants you wear them and it is said
es and that they are the most
comfortable lens ever


developed.
Imperial Optical Company
on Collins Avenue, are also
experts in the glasses field and
their prescription lenses are the
most stylish in town. They also
have in stock a wide selection
of frames for those who are
very fashion conscious glasses
wearers.
Pixies Department Store on
Bay Street, opposite the
Stop-N-Shop, has a complete
line of children's shoes,
underwear, ladies and men's
sandals and shoes and all of the
back-to-school clothing.
John S. George is always
equipped with the essentials,
but right now they are
concentrating on the
back-to-school crowd. They
have in stock a large collection
of school bags, lunch boxes
with thermoses, and loose leaf
binders.
Nassau Stati( ners on Ernest
Street in the Out risand Traders
Building can supply practically
any specified text book
required by the school.
Those books which are not
stocked can be quickly
ordered. Note books, loose leaf
notebooks, refills, are all
available at the Nassau
Stationers.
Cartwright Office and
School Supplies, located on
Bay Street, carries a complete
line of school books, bags and
lunch kits, geometry sets, pens
and pencils, rulers and a variety
of other back-to-school items.
Bicycles are some of the best
sellers during this time of year.
Western Auto on Rosetta
Street is not only equipped
with new bicycles, but are also
equipped to repair anything
they sell.
Their bicycles are so smart
looking until you might even
buy one for yourself.
Commonwealth Industrial
Bank Limited, with locations
in Palmdale and Dunmore
Lane, in Nassau and the
Churchill Building in Freeport,
Grand Bahama, loans money
for useful purposes which
includes an education.
They lend money to
students going to school
abroad or for the financing of
school right in the Bahamas,
for the purchase of clothing,
shoes and school supplies.
The New Oriental Laundry
and Dry Cleaning with
locations on Shirley Street and
Madeira Avenue are always
ready to supply your mothers
who want your children to
look clean all the time with
A-1 back-to-school service.
They specialize in quality
cleaning and minor repairs and
alterations, plus they have a
home delivery service twice a


week.
George Ageeb's East Street
north, Dad and Lad Bay Street
and Oakes Field Shopping
Centre, stock complete school
outfits for St. Augustine's
College and S.E. McPherson
School.
They also have a supply of
boys polyester and cotton
shirts in a variety of colours to
choose from.
Also available are boys
polyester long pants in these
colours, white, navy, charcoal
grey, black, dark brown and
dark green.
Wee Care on Madeira Street,
Palmdale, is stocked with
back-to-school fashions for the.
kindergarten crowd. Ladybird
grey school shorts, girls
underwear, nursery school
dresses and play-suits which
come in sizes 0-6X.
Rachel's Boutique, located
on Lincoln Boulevard and
Cordeaux Avenue, will make it
their business to see that the
best looking boy or girl on the
school campus is yours.
The only way to achieve
this according to Rachel's, is to
dress them in one of England's
largest and best selling shoes,
LOTUS. They have them in all
colours and styles.
Thompson's Boy Centre and
Thompson's Department
Store, Bay Street,
back-to-school set-up is really
way out.
They have boys pants and
shirts in all sizes and colours.
Girls dresses, blouses and socks
too in a variety of colours.
Visit them and see their
competitive prices for your
children.
Arima on Wulff Road and
Mackey Street are saying,
"shop early for school uniform
fabric and avoid disappoint-
ment and last minute rush."
Fabrics are available there
for a large number of schools
and they also have seamstresses
available to make them if you
order on time.
Stanley V.S. Albury, they've
got it all for back-to-school. A
variety of exercise books, sheet
protectors, clipboards, folders,
index dividers, loose leaf
papers etc.
They also have a supply of
pens, pencils, markers, erasers,
pocket pencil sharpeners and
rulers.

Bahamian Lumber
Company, Wulff Road, is
saying "back-to-school begins
with them."
Everything for the students
of all ages and all subjects is
available. All you have to do is
go in and tell them exactly
what you want and don't
be surprised if they find you
more.


United Bookshops and
Stationers with locations in the


Madeira Shopping Plaza and
Oakes Field Shopping Centre
are the headquarters for all
your back-to-school supplies
and sundry needs.
They have the largest stock


of mathematical instruments in
Nas mu.
Babamin Paint Supply
Limited on Bay Street,
specializes in school art
supplies and are equipped with


tempra-poster colours, sketch
pads, tracing paper and you
name it.
Be sure to call on them (or
your art supplies before tley
are all sold out.


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THE TRIBUNE BACK-TO-SCHOOL SECTION - A 7


FourBahamlan

ea" sars kept

; artlflll'S OffiX Jacksonontop ll@
C G BAHAMAS' all-star "If you don't have self I
basketballers Michael confidence, you wouldn't
Thompson and Osborn succeed," he noted.ath l te
Lockhart take their talent to Michael graduated from
the University of Minnesota Queen's College obtaining two
PHONE -7233 P.O. BOX N8090 where they have obtained of three subjects in the G.C.E.
PHONE 5-7233 P.O. BOX N8090 four-year scholarships. Along ordinary level. At Jackson High
with fellow Bahamians Charles he continued in plain
Thompson and Cecil Rose they academics and intends to
have proven themselves to be specialize in business
the best in Florida during the administration during his BAHAMAS' triple jumper
past season when they led career at Minnesota. G Wellington Wood, going into
Michael added that there isa his fourth year at Southern
SCHOOL BAGS LUNCH KITS vast difference between University in Louisiana, will
basketball in the Bahamas and I be quite a boost to the
BINDERS & FILLERS that in the United States. CHARLES (LEFT) AND MICHAEL THOMPSON ... Bahamas Amateur Atetic
BINDERS & FILLERS Nevertheless, although the looking forward to another successful season. Association's Olympic squad.
necessary height might be wod, who is a .
BOOKS EXERCISE BO lacking here, there is still the aven of inso Hich rau
CRAYONS PENS His primary concern though, hio a h in we
since returning forha the thWestern Athletic Conferene.
SNRULERS ERAS ERS G nmentoa tnai the SINCF SPORT can play a His top performance won him
kept constantly closed Many vital part in the full the 'best athlete award' at
GEOMETRY SETS days, he pointed out, they personality, then it shou il Currently, Wood is
wanted to practise, only to come as no surprise that interested d i
SLJackson High to an undefeated find the gyms closed. basketball standout Carl Minnsi inmetition indeislookng
championship. Besides that, all He is also concerned about stays constantly on the honour competition and is looking
our players have received tha e the future development of roll. forward to a much improved
four. h highest ranking in the state, basketball in the country and Minns, who graduated from season with hopes that he will
Charlghest ranking Rosein this state.hool decided that if he becomes Prince Williams High School be called upon to represent
/ yCharles and Rose this school successful in his college and with five General Certificate of the country.
year will be heading for the university career, he will return Education ordinary levels, Wellington studies
. '' L" University of Houston. university c areer heonduct clinics turn leaves this month for Gonzaga engineering and architecture.
Michael,just l9yearsoldand and conduct clr makin it to the University, Spokane, He figures that he canbea
standing six-foot-nine, is As for making it to the Washington where he will
remembered in Nassau for his professional ranks, "It's up to continue his studies in business bth ain letes cn fi
STENO PADS jtop performances in the United me now, how dedicated I am." administration.
Brotherhood Basketball If he can get an offer he cannot In winning the sportsman of CARLwith his studies.
WRITING TABLETS League. There he averaged 22 refuse, he just might turn pro. the year award at Prince Will, He intends to alleviate this
eague. ere e average Charles, a six-foot-eight Carl averaged 65 points and 28 inj red his knees. But, being in problem though and spend
points per game. graduate from Prince Williams rebounds. He was also named demand, he was forced to play more time on athletics.
PENCILS MARKERS Moreover, since he was High might be just the player valedictorian of the 1971 the remainder of the season
growing and still is so Houston needs to keep them graduating class, with the injury.
much, Michael figured that it Having been awarded a "I was slower than I am
PENCIL CASES SCRAP BOOKS would be as well to put his on top. basketball scholarship, the usually in my jump shot. was
height to good use. In his spare He is hoping that the six-foot-five forward/guard going at half speed," he said.
PEtim het practised basketball. Bahamas Amateur Basketball continued his studies at "I'm hoping to get well soon
PENCIL SHARPENERS tIe he practisd basketball," Association will take into Cochise College where, after though and it should be in
he id of his career at Jackson. consideration the remarkable two years, he graduated with shape for next season."
he said of his career at Jackson. talent the Bahamas has in honours with a bachelor of arts Despite his athletic ability,
CONSTRUCTION PAPER "But yet, I had so much to colleges and universities in the degree. Minns was not the student to
learn. I thought I knew United States when considering On the court, Minns spend most of his time on the
BINDERS & FOLDERS something but I didn't know entering a team in the averaged 25 points per game court. "I'm there to learn," he
anything." Olympics. Pan Am Games or and broke seven records. His said. "You can't put all your
Confident that he had the o t h e r i n t ernationa 1 66 percent from the field years in one basket and
potential to become tops in the competition. ranked him ninth in the nation. nothing comes out."
ONE TWO LOCATIONS field, Michael simply subjected "I think they should Also a member of the Before leaving for Cochise,
W CATO M.ielf t thael tutela thino they Bahamas Volle y ball he turned down a number of
BaZEN Cor. Mt. Royal Ave. himself to the tutelage of seriously consider that," Federation's national squad, volleyball scholarships to
Bay Street & Ludlow Street Jackson High's coach and from Michael agreed. Minns' top performance came universities including U.C.LA.,.,
then on, he was on the move. Charles averaged 17 points to the knowledge of the U.S.C. and U.C.S.B.
and 11 rebounds and Michael administration of Gonzaga, So far, Minns has not
13 points and 13 rebounds at where he was given another considered going into the pro
B O Y S C E N T R E Jackson and that's playing basketball scholarship. scene, but noted that if a good
only half the time. However, last year he was .offer comes his way he might
slowed down a bit having just take advantage of it WELLINGTON WOOD
AND

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BAY STREET



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BOYS' PANTS WE'VE SOT IT ALL!


IN ALL SIZES & COLOURS IHILROY
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GILS' DRE E LESSON ASSIGNMENT BOOKS
GIRLS' DRESSES EXAMINATION PADS NOTE BOOKS
BLOUSES & DUO TANG COVERS ART PAPER
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Page 8 - THE TRIBUNE BACK-TO-SCHOOL SECTION


ELSA BOWE
Canada


CRAIG MAJOR
lOakwood-r


LONNA TAYLOR


KAREN DEMERITTE
Murinu


..1... . ...AnI. .. . .
D i l IIII I I I II I I1. "


PAMELA NEWBOLD
Nursina


PRINCE ROLLE
Music


DIANE HOLOWESK
Foreign Languages


ASHWARD FERGUSON
Arch itectecture


From Page 1
Fisk, Adelma said that Fisk has
always been known and
recognized for its high
standards and reputable Music
Department.
"When I graduate, I have no
immediate plans of coming
back home I plan to perform
internationally," Adelma said.

Another Bahamian who
realizes the importance of
higher education and has
decided to broaden her mental
vistas is 17-year-old Judith
Brennen.
In September, Judith begins
a four year course at West
Indies College in Jamaica that
leads to a B.Sc. in Secretarial
Science.
She has chosen W.I.C. and
that particular course of study
she said "because of its high
educational and moral
standard." She said further
that she chose Sec. Science
because she loves meeting
people and dealing with them.

The College of the Holy
Cross in Worcester,
Massachusetts will have at least
one new student in September.
Diane Holowesko plans to go
there to enroll in its foreign
languages programme.
Diane, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. William Holowesko ot
Montagu Heights, aspires to
become a linguist and believes
the best way to prepare herself
is to attend College of the Hly
Cross and work towards a
degree in Foreign Languages.
She went on a "college
survey" last year and visited
colleges all over the U.S. but
"liked C.H.C. most of all," she
said.
Diane graduated from St.
Andrews High School in June
and plans to teach there after
she receives her degree.
According to Diane, "it is
worth it to go to an institution
of higher learning so as to have
the experience of meeting
people of different countries
and cultures."

Craig Major, I6-year-old son
of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Major
of Perpall Tract will enter


Oakwood College in Huntsville,
Alabama in September to
pursue a course that leads to
the B.Sc. in Secondary
Education with a major in
history.
Although Craig received his
secondary education at a
Jamaican high school, he feels
that he should attend college in
the U.S.A. Craig told the
Tribune: "I want to meet
people of different heritage,
culture and social and
academic backgrounds."
tie plans to return home
after obtaining his Masters'
Degree and after working for a
few years, return to school to
pursue a Doctorate.

Iwo nurses who recently
graduated from the
Department of Nursing
educationn of the Princess
Margaret Hospital, will be
studying at Cresswell Maternity
Ilospital. Dumfries, Scotland.
this fall.
They are Karen Demeritte.
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. ('.
Demeritte of Soldier Road and
Pamela Newbold, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Newbold of
Kensington Gardens, South
Beach.
A graduate of St. Anne's
IHigh School. Karen will study
midwifery and family planning
Both of these courses will take
approximately a year and a
half to complete.
Pamela is a graduate of
Government High School and
she will pursue a two year
course in mid-wifery and
intensive care nursing.
* * * ** *
Elsa Bowe, the 16-year-old
daughter of Mr. Simeon Bowe,
M.P. and Mrs. Bowe of Winton
Heights, will be leaving for
Bishop Strachan High School,
Toronto, Canada.
A recent graduate of St.
Andrew's College, Elsa said, "I
will be entering grade 13 there
which is the last grade and then
I plan to attend a Canadian
university.'
Tribune photographer.
Philip Symonette, has left us
this year also. lHe will be
attending Tal lahassee
Community College,
Tallahassee, Florida where he


will pursue a degree in mass
communications.
A 1971 graduate of St.
Augustine's College, he is the
son of Mrs. Ruth Symonette of
Delancy Street.
Philip, who has been
employed with The Tribune
for the past five years, decided
he would not only be a good
photographer but a writer as
well.

City Market Scholarship
holder Carl Sweeting, will be
attending Bethune Cookman
College, Daytona Beach,
Florida where he will study
pre-dentistry. He is the son of
Mrs. Emma Sweeting of Davis
Street Oakes Field.
A graduate of St.
Augustine's College, Carl said,
"I selected Cookman because
many of my friends influenced
me to do so. Plus they have a
good course connected to
Maharry Medical School.
Nashville, Tennessee where I
plan to obtain my degree in
dentistry."

Miss Bernadette L.
Thompson, the present Miss
Discovery Day, will leave
Nassau next month to enter
the Sacred Heart School in
Beechwood, Kent, England.
Bernadette was an honour
student at St. Augustine's
College and graduated in June.
She will pursue her "A"
levels at Sacred Heart and plans
to enter law school in England
depending upon her
achievement in the "A" level
examinations.
Bernadette is the daughter
ot Mr. and Mrs. James M.
Thompson and grand daughter
of Mr. Justice Maxwell and
Mrs. Thompson.
Kendal Pinder, 18, and a
graduate of Aquinas College
will be attending Belmont
Abbey College, North Carolina.
The son of Miss Albertha
Bain of Curtis Street, Kendal
will major in education and
would like to minor in a
business related field.
Kendal who is determined to
achieve his goal said, "I don't
want to be like a lot of
Bahamians who go abroad to
school and stay after they have


completed their education. I
want to return to my country
so that I can help other young
Bahamians."
Another student who will be
attending college in North
Carolina is Patti Symonette,
the oldest daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Stafford Symonette of
Yellow Elder Gardens. She will
be attending St. Augustine's
Coll ege, Raleigh, North
Carolina.
A graduate of St.
Augustine's College, Nassau,
Patti, who has proven herself
to be a very versatile ball
player while in high school,
and even after she graduated,
will major in Physical
Education.
When asked what motivated
her to attend St. Augustine's
she replied, "they have a very
outstanding physical education
programme plus it is a small
school and I've always wanted
to attend a small college."

Prince Rolle, a recent
graduate of Highbury High
School, will leave this week for
Prarie View College in Texas
where he will pursue a degree
course leading to a B.A. in
music with a major in piano.
Prince is the eldest son ot
Mr. and Mrs. Isiah Rolle of
Johnson Road in Fox Hill and
he plans to pursue a career in
teaching after graduating from
college.
Lonna Taylor, although a
fully qualified Registered
Nurse, will leave in September
for Creswell University in
Scotland to pursue an 18
month course in Orthopaedics
and Mid-wifery.
She was made a R.N. after
passing an examination set by
the U.W.I. and the local
Ministry of Health. If she is
successful at Creswell, when
she completes the course, she
would gain the designations:
State Certified Mid-wife and
Orthopaedic Specialist.
Lonna graduated from St.
Augustine's College in 1969
and since then, has been
employed by the Health
Ministry.
She is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. John Taylor of Hay
Street and declared that she


What's new at the schools


From Page 1
QUEEN'S COLLEGE
New students will report to
Q.C. on Monday, September 9
for orientation. Students of the
primary division will report on
the tenth and the high school
section will report on Sept. 11.
A course in Arts and
Creative Skills will be
introduced when the school
re-opens. The course will be
made compulsor. for junior
and senior high school students
and they will be taught skills in
Pottery, needle work, dress
making and design, metal
work, wood work,


photography. dance an
Last term Mr
Middleton served as
of the high school w-
Joan Lonsdale served
of the primary scho
year however, Mr. M
will be principal of tI
school and Miss Lons
serve in the capacity
principal of the higl
section.
AQUINAS COLLEGE
Students entering


d music.
Hlaydn
Prinoin l


for the first time reported to
the school on August 26.
Returning students should
report for classes on the 28 of
this month.
A new programme in
Accountancy has been
designed particularly for boys
attending the Madeira St. high
school. The girls three year
secretarial training will
continue. The course is divided
into two years of shorthand
and typing and one year's
training in bookkeeping.
Eleven teachers are expected
to join Aquinas' staff, under
headmaster Andrew Curry.
ST. ANDREW'S SCHOOL


''ile Miss St. Andrew's High School on
while Miss
as head Yamacraw Road opens on
s heads September 18 with the
I dletos addition of four new
ie entire classrooms. A biology lab. and
dale will a music room are included in
Sof vice the new structure.
1 school Students at the school are
now allowed to study for "A"
levels and prepare themselves
to take the American College
Aquinas Entrance Examination SAT


- which is a pre-requisite for
students who wish to attend an
American college or University.
An addition of 15 new staff
members will be teaching the
850 students expected this
year. With the new staff
addition, the school has a staff
of 45.
Unlike most private high
schools, St. Andrew's does not
offer commercial subjects.
ST. ANNE'S HIGH SCHOOLS
Students of St. Anne's will
not only have an elaborate new
building complex when school
re-opens on September 9. there
also will be a new head teacher
at the school.
Replacing Miss Rita Pugh as
headmistress of the school is
Mrs. Muriel Eneas, wife of Dr.
Cleveland Eneas.
She has taught at St. Anne's
for 18 years and has worked in
almost every department in the
school.
The new addition ,is
comprised of 10 classrooms
and a spacious assembly hall.
There has also been an addition
to seven old classrooms.


8:30 to 7:00 Weekdays
Wulff Road at Mackey Street o 0


decided to pursue further
education because, "I do not
want to be just another nurse, I
want to be a hospital
executive."
The young nurse added:
"There is a need for trained
midwives in the Bahamas
because the population is
growing rapidly and will
continue to grow."

Kenneth V. Cartwright, 20,
will be enrolling at the
University of Western Ontario,
London, Ontario, Canada in
September, where he will be
taking a four-year honours
programme in electrical
engineering.
Educated at St. John's
College, he obtained seven
G.C.E. '0' levels and has
completed one year of 'A' level
work. He also studied an
electronics course at Cleveland
Institute for Electrical
Broadcasting Engineering and
is the recipient of a Marine
Radio Telephone licence.
An employee of Dudley's
Record Centre for the past five
years, Kenneth, who was
awarded a scholarship by
Dudley's to pursue a degree in
electronics recently spent two
weeks in Puerto Rico at the
G.T.E. Sylvania Service School.
After he has completed his
course he will be returning to
work at Dudley's.

Milton T. Lewis and Melvin
C. Lewis, sons of Mr. and Mrs.
Joseph B. Lewis of Rosebud
Road, will be returning to West
Indies College, Jamaica on
September 8 as sophomores.
Milton is majoring in history
with a minor in English. In his
freshman year he was liberian
of the men's club on his
campus. He is also a 1972
graduate of Bahamas Academy.
Melvin has a major in
business administration.
Presently he holds the
positions of sergeant at arms of
the business club and


circulating editor of his
school's year book.
Melvin is also a graduate of
Bahamas Academy and plans
to get a Ph.D. in Economics.
Phyllis Albury, 18, and the
daughter of Mrs. Florence
Lockhart of Johnson Road,
will be attending Ryerson
Polytechnical Institute,
Toronto, Canada, this fall.
Phyllis, who is transferring
from Ontario Lady's College,
Whilby, Ontario, will enter
Ryerson as a sophomore. She
will major in secretarial
science.
After she has completed her
studies, she plans to remain in
Canada for a short period, for
work experience. "My reason
for doing this," Phyllis said, "is
because the jobs are just not
available at home."
**.0 C*$ ***


Mr. George A. Ferguson of
Centreville returns to Southern-
University in Baton Rogue,:
Louisiana to continue studies,
leading to a degree inr
Architectural Engineering,
He has completed three
years at Southern and said that
the social and academic
standards there are very h
iMpwAIFM DONu
WORLD EVENTS
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41' '6^.& Carmichael William Gordon William Phipps
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