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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03694
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: August 17, 1974
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03694

Full Text









ODUoLEEY'S
COR. ROSETTA ST. & MT. ROAL .
AMPEX
Blank Recording
TAPES --
with Postmaster of Baham for poutage concesions within the Bahamas, Nassau and Baham a I islands
VOL. LXXI, No. 222 Saturday, August 17, 1


3 survive sharks & 15-hour swim to sho:
THREli exhausted Bahamians crawled ashore couldn't manouevre the boat, so we decided to about two feet above water. It
S at Yamacraw Beach at midnight last Saturday disconnect the steering from one engine. I was she sank in about 19 feet of wa
after a 15-hour swim. during which they fought in the process of disconnecting the other. The "Sammy's watch was in th
off three sharks, when their boat sank earlier boat was drifting over a shoal and Sammy and went down. He dived down t(
that day off Yellow Banks. Gregory got out to go down and check the watch said: 9:45 a.m. In the
"Don't panic just pray!" was the advice shoal." we took out one of the seats to
.f that Patrick Turnquest,Sammy Knowles and All of a sudden, he said, the "boat came to protect ourselves again
Gregory Culmer had for any fisherman who to the waves and a big wave came while I was barracudas." Turnquest said.
might find himself in a similar predicament. disconnecting the engine. It broke into the The three decided not to ha
*' Turnquest, a schedule despatcher at Esso boat. When I realized what was happening, I of the boat, but to try to swi
Standard Oil, Clifton Pier; Culmer, an agent started the engine to take off in hopes the boat shore. They took with them f
with British American Insurance Company; and would self-bale. But the water must have got to for protection, two face goggli
Knowles, staff manager at American Life the spark plugs. The engine froze. Then two of flippers.
Insurance Company, left on their weekly more waves broke into the boat and that was They set out at 10 a.m. T
fishing trip at 7:30 a.m. Saturday. They arrived the end. while two were swimming or
at Yellow Banks about 9 a.m. "I realized that the boat was going down the raft. One was always to ha
"In about 20 minutes we had fished two very fast," he said. with his face partially under
shoals," Patrick Turnquest of Montfort Street Although the men had left Nassau in calm sharks. The flippers were to be
told The Tribune today. "Sammy and Gregory seas, a wind had suddenly sprung up and the tired to enable them to floa
were in the water spearing and I was in the seas turned choppy. backs. During the next several
boat." "I just couldn't believe that the boat was men took turns floating with
The two swimmers then joined Turnquest in sinking. I almost got trapped because the resting on the raft, with one
". 1 1 -; -AJ +,L-.. .. 1-I C__ _4U -... ..... .. || w.. . .. _ in -;# +. t_ +, I h _._ C11-


the boat and they started to lOOK for another
shoal. Already they had brought up a large
margot fish, a grouper and a crawfish.
"At this point the steering jammed and we


cav uum was pulling me in with the boat. I had
to fight my way out," Turnquest said.
The two outboard motors of the 21-foot Sea
Bird, pulled her to the bottom, leaving her bow


00
Ve
a
ho
00
ly
d.
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y.
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u,
iy
ce
in


Basil Miller

0 MIAMI, Aug. 17 (AP)
S After spending $100,00
and four months in thr<
countries on a hunt for
b e convicted, drug-dealer wh
skipped out on a $500,00
9M^ bond, a surety company
5 offered a $25,000 rewar
/* | ,^ '-^.. ^^^. *^.j^ Within 20 minutes, official
Sof the company said Frida
the man was in their custody
4 5 Mut Basil Miller, 36, of Nassa
Bahamas, had last been seen b
agents of the Public Servii
Mutual Insurance Co.i


February when he was on trial
e in Miami on federal charges of
**^^^A -^B U n ---"conspiracy to import more
s k Be k t ji, l i than $1 million in cocaine.
S -- .--,-. During-a trial recess, he
slipped out and away.
Sto en d it Miller was convicted in
Qants' tO end itS absentia and was sentenced to
45 years and ordered to pay a
$75,000 fine. Public Service
hflihadto either deliver him to
TCIfederal custody or make good
f li g t tA on the $500,000 bond.
Ed Stanton, general agent
QANTAS Airways weekly support we have had from the for Public Service, said he later
Sydney-London service people of the Bahamas over the learned that after Miller left
though Nassau will be years, and hope to retain our the courtroom he flew to
discontinued from September links in the future." Bimini, sailed from that
24, with no indication of when Qantas' service has given Bahamian island to Freeport,
it might be resumed, the Bahamas links to the Grand Bahama, and then
Qantas area manager M.A. tourist markets in Europe, disappeared.
George and Caribbean sales Mexico and the South Pacific
manager lan Morris were in since December, 1964. Stanton said Public Service
Nassau on Thursday to The through flight for this searched for Miller throughout
officially intorti Tourism and week and next are already the Bahamas and in England
Aviation Minister Clement T. cancelled, but for a different without finding any trace of
Maynara of the blow to reason: labour problems him. Then late last month
Bahamian air service, relating to cabin crews Stanton said, he received
The Australian flag-carrier necessitated the cancellation of information that Miller was in
cited "a combination of low a number of services, including Kingston, Jamaica.
frequency and high route the one through the Bahamas. Stanton said he flew down,
operating costs" foi the Service between now and bought time on a Kingston
cut-back, the Sept. 24 closure of the television station on July 5 and
Mr. George told the route will be reviewed weekly, flashed Miller's picture,
Minister Qantas said. offering a $25,000 reward.
"We are sad that this action Mr. Maynard said British
has been necessary, but in the Airways, Qantas' general sales Within 20 minutes Miller
light of present economic agent, will arrange the transfer was under arrest and lodged in
conditions in the airline of existing bookings on Qantas a Kingston cell, Stanton said.
industry it iq just not viable to to other lines "so that the Last week, Stanton and t\\o
operate a weekly service of this minimum of inconvenience is aides boarded a crowded Ail
type. expected to the travelling Jamaica jet with Miller to
"We are appreciative of the public." return him to Miami.


NASSAU will be ready to
cater to large convertior
groups by 1976. )eputy Prioc.
Minister and NMinisitr of
Finance Arthur D. lHanna told
a thousand members of the
Improved Benevolent and
Protective Order of Elks of the
World at their 75th annual
convention in New York City
this week.
It was the first official
indication of the planned
completion date for the
Government's Cable Beach
resort complex.
Government last month


Take a sndlehome

today !

... with

\ Kodak
Pockt SMILE SAVER Kit
ckeMONO


announced plans to buy the
Sonesta Beach Hotel, the
imerald Beach Hotel and the
Balmoral Beach Hotel on the
Cable Beach hotel row for a
combined price of $18.9
million. The hotels,
Government said, would form
the nucleus of a planned resort
that would include a
conference/convention centre
and a gambling casino.
In his address at the New
York Hilton, the Deputy Prime
Minister invited the Elks to
hold an annual convention in
the Bahamas in the near future.
"I am told." he said, "that
this has been considered in the
past but plans had to be
shelved because of the Lck of
proper convention and other
facilities.
"This deficiency will soon
he corrected," he said before
geing on to expidin the Cable
Beach complex proposal.
"W/e shall be ready to receive
you in 1976," he told the Elks.


But Miller began shouting,
"Nobody on this plane is going
to live you're all going to die."
and Air Jamiaica asked lIthe
three to leave.
The trio arrived in Miami
early this week aboard a Di 9
that Stanton said he chartered
for $7,700.
Stanton said he hopes to get
back through the court much
of the $100,000 he estimated
it cost to hunt Miller down.
Besides the cash, Miller posted
$200,000 in collateral in the
form of a boat and some
Bahamian properly.
Miller was indicted Thursday
by a federal grand jury in
Miami on a charge of jumping
bail. lie was booked into the
Dade County jail, without
bond.
It was not known whether
Miller's captors went through
the usually long procedure of
extradition. It was reported
earlier that when arrested by
Jamaican police July 5 lie and a
Jamaican woman with him at
the time were found with small
quantities of m:irijuana and
cUcdifrc in the.. possession.
It was not known what had
become of any Jamaican
charges of unlawful possession
against Miller


for sharks.
The sea continued choppy.
"We had been swimming
hour when the first shark c


Jamaican

Minister

has second

bomb scare

HOMESTEAD AFB, Fla.
A Jamaican official who
escaped a possible
assassination attempt in
Miami earlier this week had
to go through another threat
before he could return home
from a U.S. vacation.
Thursday, Eli Matalon,
Jamaican minister of defense
and justice, escaped injury
when a hand-grenade placed
in his rental car failed to
explode because it was
wrapped too tightly in
newspaper, authorities said.
Friday. Matalon, his wife
and their son were being
retutrled-"onlme in a private -
plane when an anonymous
caller told U.S. customs in
Miami that a bomb was
aboard plane. Federal
officials said.
They said Matalon's plane.
which had taken off from
Opalocka Airport near Miami,
was nearly over Cuba when
the call came in. The pilot
flew back to Homestead Air
Force Base southwest of
Miami, th,- nearest U.S.
landing strip.
FBI agents and air force
personnel found nothing
aboard the twin-engine plane
during a two hour search,
base officials said and tihe
flight resumed.
Bomb-soiuad c\perts who
removed the grenade said it
would have gone off had
Matalon, who became
suspicious of its weight.
unwrapped it. It had been
put in the car while he was
making a courtesy call at the
Miami office of the Federal
Drug Enforcement
Administration.
Matalon controls the
Jamaican army, police.
judiciary and prison systems.
Officials said his life has
been threatened several times
in Jamaica since that country
began a push against illegal
drug-and gun trafficking
(AP)

Victims 'fair'
SI RVI I Sti at ilin t tl. i lt
Ted LaFleur and I i: A\e,,ssie.
an Italian visitor. both cviOtil
of separ ie shootin i tnindents.
arc in satisfactory tnditlion
today at the Princkss Marraieti
I hospital.
Ia'Fleur. a (;p old n ('aik's
states resident and .i CseI\ce
station attendant al Shi '11's
I ast Bay prcmismes. \as shot in
his face and neck earl, list
Saturday inoininig in a gias
station robbery.
l.uigi Alessi-, th e tali,n
visitor, wias shot y one ot
Three tmen who attempted to
rob him on Thursdal at ablilt
112 I 5 prm. on lleathtield
Street. off Virginia Street.
Although the 2'-year-old
Italian did not resist, hie was hit
in the back ol his neck bhy a
blast froim one of the robbers'
sawed-off shotgun.
Luig!i was admitted to the
inleinsue 1atrc unitl oi tile
Princess Margari HoIlspital on
Thursday. night lie was
Iralmnslerred to Ihe private wird
of the hospiaidl yesterday.


Leading Newspaper


JOHNSON'S


In Regular Lime. or entlwhe
Distributed by -
PRIM KIOWCTS
Box N8717 Ph.7 "47


974 Pric: 20 Cents



re
is estimated that
ter.
e boat when she


o get it out. The
next 15 minutes
n use as a raft and
nst sharks or

ng on to the bow
m the 18 miles to
ive fishing spears
es, and two pairs

he plan was that
te would rest on
yve the goggles on
water, watching
e used when they
t easily on their
I hours the three
the flippers, or
always on watch


for about a half
came at us," Pat


Turnquest recalled. "We
hung onto the raft.
kicking at him and sucking him
with our spears. We were able
to fight him off."
Before their boat sank they
knew the direction in which
the waves were moving, "so we
decided to swim in the
direction of the waves."
About two hours later they
were lifted up on a big wave
"and we spotted the Water
Tower." The Tower at Fort
Fincastle looked to Turnquest
"like a cigarette." Shortly
afterwards they could see land
clearly.
Around noon another shark
attacked. Again he was fought
off.
"We then saw a boat, but
the sail was not up. It must
have had a motor," Turnquest
said. "It se-med to be coming
directly towards us and so we
swam towards it. I actually saw
two people walking on the
decks. But then it went off
course. It sailed right around
us. They didn't see us.
.".J could just feel myself
g.'cing Iup on that deck,"
sighed the hefty 170-pounder.
"We were really tired.
"We swam for several more
hours when a third shark came
up. lie seemed the most
vicious Sammy had to push his
head off with his flipper.
"It was after seeing the boat
and land so clearly that we
decided that the raft was
keeping us back. We decided to
turn it loose and make it on
our own." Turnquest said.
"The sun was setting. I think
it was the flood tide that was
pulling us out forcing us to
swim further down south. We
had to fight two tides a cross
current. By that time it was
dark and we stayed as close
together as possible. All we
could do after dark was swim
and hope for the best.
For t una tely about
midnight we landed at
Yamacraw Beach after being
stung by all the jelly fish in the
passage," he recalled.
"We walked to Gordon
Carey's house. He gave us
bottles of ice water we were
very thirsty and hot tea. lie
called Gregory's mother, Mrs.
Sarah Culmer, and Sammy's
wife, Vicki. My wife, Janet,
and Gregory's wife, Gloria, had
no phones," he said.
Vickie Knowles. tennis pro
at the Hyatt Emerald Beach
Hotel, let the other wives know
that their husbands were safe.
This morning Sammy
Knowles and Gregory Culmer
were back fishing on the
banks. And Patrick Turnquest?
"Well, I declined," he
buckled.

Puzzlers:

5 more
weeks
PUZZLERS have just five
more weeks to complete The
Tribune's Prize Crossword
and win prizes worth more
than $6,000 the Orlando
Clipper Challenger boat, a
70-horsepower Johnson or
Evinrude engine and a Gator
boat trailer.
Despite Maura Lumber
Company's withdrawal from
the joint sponsorship of the
puzzle contest, The Tribune
is continuing to offer this
fabulous collection of prizes
to Tribune readers.
Twenty-seven chances have
produced no winners from
among the thousands of
entries, so y-u have a few
more tries.
Try your vocabulary on
The Tribune Prize Crossword
on today's back page.


LONG SWIM Three friends swam for 15 hours last Saturday before reaching
Yamacraw Beach and a welcome cup of tea at a friend's house. Left to right: Sammy M.
Knowles of The Grove, West Bay Street, Patrick Turnquest of Montfort Street, and
Gregory Culmer also of Montfort Street had to swim 18 miles after the boat from which
they were fishing off Yellow Banks sank in 19-feet of water.


Accused bank


robber gave


names

THE $90,000 Barclays Bank
Supreme Court armed robbery
trial, hampered by a two day
"trial-within-a-trial" continued
Friday as prosecution witness
Det. Insp. Kendall Lightbourne
testified he received a written
statement from one of the
three men naming the other
co-accused.
Led by prosecution attorney
Pericles Maillis, Det.
Lightbourne said accused
robber Ezekiel Baillou was very
co-operative with the
investigative officers. However,
he hesitated to include himself
with the robbers.
In a written statement, he
said, Baillou stated that
Erskine Darling approached
him about "pulling off the
job." Elmore Colebrooke was
identified as the person with a
plan of the set-up of the bank
and Ed Thomas as the "inside
man" in his statement.
The three youths, originally
charged with Eddie Thomas,
21, pleaded not guilty.
Thomas, represented by
attorney J. Henry Bostwick,
pleaded guilty.
The trial opened before Mr.
Justice Maxwell J. Thompson
on August 8 and accused
Biallou and Darling led their
own defence with Colebrooke
represented by attorney
Michael Horton.
Also appearing for the
prosecution is attorney
Algernon Allen.
Det. Lightbourne said he
recorded the statement from
Baillou on January 28.
In the statement Baillou had


to police

said they had stolen :, car and
parked it a short distance fror.
Barclays Bank on January 17.
The morning of the robbery,
they drove in Colebrooke's car
to the stolen vehicle and
changed their clothes before
heading for the bank.
They met one customer and
four bank staffers inside and
they left them tied up after
taking about $90,000. Later,
they shared the money and he
received about $25,000.
The statement also read that
ld Thomas said afterwards
that they missed $70,000
which was inside the vault
because they had hurried the
robbery.
Baillou later came to Nassau
and buried his money in Mrs.
Gloria Turnquest's backyard
the statement read.
He was arrested, however,
when the two of them tried to
leave Nassau for Andros. Police
seeking to recover the stolen
money found that "most of
the big notes" were missing
from the buried bag of money,
the statement read.
Cross-examined by Mr.
Horton, Insp. Lightbourne said
that Colebrooke n,'ver involved
himself in the robbery,
although he was supposed to
have driven the get-away car.
He said that "all Colebrooke
said was that he knew about
the robbery and he told them
'man you got to give me some
money' when he saw them."
He said that hc later
collected about 1,000 from
(olebrooke when they went to
search the Colombus Hotel
where he was staying.


Warns of

another


Watergate

coming

By ELLISTON RAHMING
THE STATE of New Mexico
has filed a suit against the
Federal Government of
America for secretly working a
gold mine in New Mexico
without the permission of the
relatives of the late Dr. Milton
Noss who discovered the
treasure in the Victor Peak
area, a well known landmark
on White Sands Missile Range,
New Mexico.
This was revealed Friday by
Mr. Norman Scott when he
addressed members of the East
Nassau Rotary Club at their
weekly luncheon at Flagler Inn
Iotel.
Mr. Scott, who was
scheduled to attend a
dinner-dance sponsored by the
Rotary Club last Saturday
night, apologized to Rotarians
for not being there. He said he
was engaged in investigating
the legal material in
preparation for the suit He
said that he and his brother, a
lawyer, would represent Dr.
Noss' family at the trial.
According to Mr. Scott
president of Expeditions
Unlimited Aquatic Enterprises,
Dr. Noss, while on an
expedition, discovered the vast
treasure in 1937 and after
keeping quiet about his
discovery for about three
years, decided to sell some of
the gold bars to a mint factory
in Denver, Colorado.
The mint officials took the
bars, but did not compensate
Dr. Noss for them. He,
therefore, became suspicious
and as a result,did not sell any
more. In 1949, he was
mysteriously murdered.
Shortly after his death, the
United States Government
took over the large area that he
had discovered and turned it
into White Sands Missile Base,
which by law his family was
not allowed to enter.
In 1958, it was discovered
that the U.S. Government was
secretly working the mine said
Mr. Scott. Consequently, Dr.
Noss' relatives got a "cease and
desist" order against the
Government which provided
that the Government should
stop working and recovering
their property the gold bars
embedded in the treasure area.
The Government stopped.
The suit,. iled by the State
of New Mexico against the
Federal Government of the
United States, will be heard in
the U.S. on August 22.
Mr. Scott told The Tribune
Friday that the results of the
hearing would reach Nassau
within two weeks.
It was his opinion that
America "might be faced with
another Watergate" depending
upon the results of next
Thursday's court hearing.


turned up expecting to fly to
Europe's summer playgrounds
found they had booked
vacations to nowhere. Some
had paid their money as late as
6 p.m. Thursday, just hours
before the company
announced its collapse.
Alan Thompson and his
family paid $852 for a 10-day
holiday on the Spanish island
of Mallorca.
"Last night we went to bed
really happy that we were
going away." Thompson said.
"Now we're unpacking our
holiday clothes. We can't
afford to go anywhere now,
not even down to the beach for
the day."
Court Line, a shipping and
aviation conglomerate with a
half-dozen major package tour
subsidiaries, has been in
financial straits for several
months and received $38.4
million in government aid in
June in a desperate bid to save
its lucrative travel business.
The collapse of Court Line
sent the London stock
exchange plunging to a 16-year
low Friday. The Financial
Times Index of industrials hit
209.4 near the close, a drop of
10.3 points, the lowest level
since November. 1958. There
were also reports that several
large insurance companies and
a larger merchant bank were in
financial troubles. (AP)


Cable Beach complex


! ready by 1976?


Court Line collapse


blights Britishers


LONDON An angry
crowd of Britons who saw their
vacations fizzle with the
collapse of the giant Court
Line travel company stormed
the firm's London
headquarters Friday.
Police blocked the crowd's
charge into the boardroom
where Court Line directors
were holding an emergency
session to try to find ways to
save their company, which
controls one-third of Britain's
foreign package tour business
The crowd besciged the
office, demanding their money
back. More than 150,000
Britons faced losing their
money and summer vacations
after Court Line announced its
liquidation late Thursday
night.
Meanwhile, tour operators
and airline chiefs came to the
lirm's aid with a massive rescue
airlift to bring home up to
50.000 persons who were
already on holiday but
stranded abroad by the
liquidation.
The operation, worked out
in an all-night session by the
tour officials, will cost an
estimated $8.4 million taken
front an emergency trust fund
set up some time ago by the
association of British travel
agents.
At airports around the
country, thousands of
would-be vacationers who


Af









THE TRIBUNE Saturday, August 17


Killer disease

stalks Brazil
SAO PAULO, Brazil
Meningitis killed at least 115
persons in Sao Paulo during the
first 15 days of August,
newspapers compiling health
department and hospital
figures reported.
Official totals have not been
given, but newspapers said that
the deadly, contagious disease
killed more than 300 persons
in Sao Paulo during July.
National health officials
have estimated that 10 per cent
of more than 10,000 persons
stricken by meningitis during
the first seven months of the
year died throughout Brazil.
The Sao Paulo state health
department said Friday that
four persons died of meningitis
Thursday in this metropolitan
area, the hardest hit part of
Brazil. Eleven deaths were
reported for Wednesday in Sao
Paulo.
Friday, 25 Sao Paulo
hospitals contained a total of
1,802 meningitis patients.
Vaccinations of
schoolchildren proceeded in the
hard hit Osasco district, a#
health officials made plans for
innoculation campaigns in
other city neighborhoods.
State health officials say
comprehensive innoculation of
S:;,. Paulo's two million
students must await for the
arrival of "type A" and "C"
vaccines manufactured in the
United States and France.
Six hundred thousand doses
of "Type A" vaccines scheduled
to arrive Thursday had not yet
been received by vaccination
workers.
All but one Sao Paulo school
remained open despite reports
of some meningitis cases
among students. Mater Dei
high school, where one boy
came to class with meningitis,
closed Friday until August 26


WASHINGTON President Ford has
placed in the hands of his new White
House counsel the issue of what to do
with Richard M. Nixon's Watergate tapes,
a source close to the President said
Friday.
The source reported that Philip
Buchen, a long-time Ford friend who was
named White House counsel Thursday,
was handed the issue because the new
President thought it was "better to get
legal advice from a Ford man who was
untouched" by the Watergate scandal.
Soon after his appointment, Buchen
and the man he is replacing, J. Fred
Buzhardt, met with representatives of the
office of special prosecutor Leon


Jaworski to discuss the status of Nixon's
tapes.
Afterward the special prosecutor's
office said, "none of the files will be
moved pending further discussionn"
Indications were that Ford was
unhappy with the manner in which an
informal opinion had been rendered by
White House lawyers thhe tapes were
the personal property of Nixon.
That opinion by Buzhardt and James
D. St. Clair. Nixon's chief Watergate
lawyer was announced as St. Clair
returned to his private law practice in
Boston.
While Ford was making no clear
attempts to overturn the opinion, sources
said he saw that the issue could become a


Cyprus fighting wanes,



Turks demand federation


NICOSIA, AUG. 17 Major
fighting waned on a divided
Cyprus today after a 60-hour
Turkish blitz that brought the
northern third of the
Mediterranean island under the
invaders' control.
The cease-fire declared
Friday evening held through
the night, but at daybreak
machine gun and recoilless rifle
fire erupted along the western
edge of the "Green Line" in
Nicosia dividing the Turkish
and Greek sections of the City.
After about four hours the
guns again fell silent, and
Greek Cypriots who had fled
the city Friday began
streaming back.
A Greek Cypriot radio
station pleaded for key
government personnel to
return and for bakeries and
grocery stores to reopen. The
foreign ministry and public
information offices ordered
their staffs to come back or
face immediate dismissal.
The United Nations
command in Nicosia reported


The Quality goes in before the

name goes on...

Nursery Day Care
3 yr.old 1-5:30 pm.

Kindergarten
4 & 5 yr. old lHelp Classes

Elementary
1-6 Personal Concern

Junior High
7-9 Proven Program
Fall Enrolment Being Accepted.

Nassau Christian Academy
Soldier Road At Old Trail Cemetery
THOROUGHLY CHRISTIAN FULLY ACADEMIC
ENROLL TODAY 32641
NURSERY thru 9th GRADE


that two Danish soldiers of the
peacekeeping force were killed
and three wounded when their
vehicle struck a landmine near
Morphou on Friday night.
The casualties brought the
U.N. toll to five dead and 50
wounded since the Turkish
invasion began on July 20.
In Ankara, Turkish Cypriot
leader Rauf Denktash said
plans for autonomous
administration of the
northern third of Cyprus would
be put into effect if Greeks
and Greek Cypriots refuse to
attend a peace conference.
Noting that Turkish-Cypri-
ots had administered their own
affairs in their enclaves spotted
throughout the island for the
last 11 years, Denktash said
"the geographical basis for a
federation has (now) become a
reality."
He said Greek or Turkish
Cypriots who want to move
out of one sector into the
other voluntarily would be
able to do so. But he said a
population exchange would
not be forced.
As the cease-fire went into
effect on the island Friday
Turkish Prime Ministcr Bulent
Ecevit declared that his troops
had achieved their objective
and had laid "the foundation
for a federated Cyprus state
with two separate autonomous
regions, one for the Greek
Cypriot majority and one for
the Turkish minority."
Turkish Cypriots are
outnumbered by Greeks.
520,000 to 120,000. Ecevit
said Greeks would remain in
the Turkish region and vice
versa as protection for the
minorities on each side.
LEcevit said he was willing to
renew as soon as possible peace
negotiations in Geneva, which
his government abandoned on
Wednesday before starting its
latest advance. The Greek
government, however, curtly
rejected the invitation.
"It would be naive for
anyone to believe that Greece


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would be prepared to t
in negotiations und
pressure of accomplish
said Premier Con
Caramanlis.
Turkey had prop
federated Cyprus at
but the Greeks rejec
proposal. The lighting
offensive that follow
breakdown of the talk
for the Turks what tt
been unable to ob
Geneva.
The underarmed
outnumbered Greek
National Guard was
driven back by the
force of 40,000
warplanes and 300 tar
Cypriot government
President Glafcos Cler
an estimated 150,00(
Cypriots abandoned N
the Turks bore down,
government returned
capital just before
night's cease-fire.
The U.N. Security
which has app-aled f
cease-fires on the isl
Friday called on all
renew talks in Geneva
States ambassador Jo
spoke for the resolution
In Washington, Secir
State Henry A. I
offered to mediate
Turkey and Greece
necessary to commute
opposing sides on Cyp
Athens government
Kissinger's offer coolly
Greece's U.N. ami
Denis Carayannis, said
"presumptuous" fo
United States to
mediator role at this sta
"There is a feeling r
in Greece, but in
generally, that the U.
have prevented what h
if it had acted
Carayannis said.
Greek Premier Ca
turned down an ii
from President Ford to
the situation in Was
Thousands of Gre.k:,
the streets shouting
slogans in Athens and S
Greece, on the Greek
Crete and in Toronto,
The United Stat
important military I
both Greece and Tur
eastermost members
iJorth Atlantic
Organization. When tl
fighting broke out,
angrily pulled out of
participation in NATO


controversial one and wanted his own
appointee in the post as White House
counsel.
"He'll be guided by what Phil Buchen
recommends," the source said.
A White House spokesman had
announced Wednesday that counsel for
the President had declared that the tapes
left behind by Nixon when he resigned
were the former President's personal
property and would be shipped to him.
That opinion was the work of St. Clair
and Buzhardt, who were the principal
architects of Nixon's defense strategy
including his attempts to withhold the
tapes from the prosecutor and
congressional investigators.
The White House spokesman
originally said it was arrived at
after consultation with the
prosecutor's office. He
amended this comment the
next day by saying the Special
Prosecutor and Justice
Department did not actively
o n particiapte in reaching the
opinion but were advised of it.

ake part A BUSY WEEK
ler the COMPLETING his first
ed fact," week in office, President Ford
istantine searched for ways to cut
federal spending Friday and
closed a received without comment a
Geneva labour leader's suggestion that
Geneva, he freeze prices and wages to
ted the shock Americans "back into
Turkish reality."
Yed the Ford held separate meetings
s gained with holdover economic
hey had counselor Kenneth Rush and
itain at budget officials after the Oval
Office meeting with the
and Teamsters president Frank
Fitzsimmons, the second
Cypriot labour leader Ford has
swiftly conferred with in four days.
Turkish As Ford's first-week
men, anniversary passed, there were
nks. The these other developments at
nt of the White House:
ides and His new lawyer. Philip
0 Greek Buchen, relayed a decision that
icosia as Richard Nixon's tapes and
but the documents will remain in
White louse custody until
to the Watergate legal issues are
Friday resolved.
Ford rounded out his press
Council, staff, naming Justice
or three Department information
and, on officer John W. Hushen as
sides to deputy press secretary to
. United Jerald F. terHorst. In addition,
hn Scali two Ford vice presidential
aide" Paul Miltich, and William
n. Roberts, will be blended into a
retary of staff of five holdover Nixon
Kissinger administration spokesmen -
between James Holland, Larry Speaks,
and if John Calrson, Tom Decair and
between Andrew Falkiewicz.
rus. The Ford met with his tirst
received visiting chief of state. King
Hussein of Jordan, and hosted
a White House state dinner in
bassador, the King's honour Friday
d it was night.
- f-h-


r the
seek a
age.
not only
Europe
S. could
happened
earlier,"

ra manlis
invitation
o discuss
shington.
took to
anti-U.S.
Salonika,
island of
Ontario.
tes has
bases in
k.y. the
of tlh
Treaty
lie latest
Greece
military
S(AP)


PRINCE, Charles, heir to
the British throne, completed
18 months of sea duty
Saturday and has received
orders to begin a helicopter
course, Buckingham palace
announced. He will begin the
helicopter training early next
month.

NORTH Vietnamese
troops, striking with tanks,
launched fresh attacks at
dawn Saturday about 20
miles northwest of Saigon,
the South Vietnamese
command said.
Government artillery fire
killed 39 North Vietnamese
and Viet Cong soldiers and
knocked out a T54 tank

THE U.S. Senate
a appropriations committee
Friday approved a $82.07
billion military spending
budget, cut $4.97 billion
below the request submitted
by former President Richard
M. Nixon. The cut is 5.7 per
cent below the Nixon budget
request and more than $1.3
billion below the $83.4
billion bill passed by the
House.
The Senate committee sent
the massive bill to the full
Senate where action is
expected next week.

BRITAIN has assured India
that it was not in a hurry to
follow the United States to
establish a base in the Indian
Ocean island of Diego Garcia.
Report from AP.


Ford wants decision on Nixon tapes


'Alphabet' bomber


has police puzzled


-LIFE WAS-

TOO MUCH

FOR UPSET

HUSBAND
LITTLE SILVER, New
Jersey The world of
securities broker Robert E.
Mottershead came apart at
the seams Friday, punctuated
by the shooting of two of his
children, one fatally.
Police said Mottershead
took an old revolver and shot
his son and daughter to
send them to "heaven."
Mottershead, 44, whose
wife is dying of cancer, was
trembling and appeared to be
dazed during his
arraignment a few hours
after the shootings. He was
charged with murder and
attempted murder.
Killed was Michael
Mottershead, 10. His sister
Holly, 13, was in critical
condition at Riverview
Hospital in Red Bank,
following surgery for removal
of a bullet from her head.
Police said they arrived at
the home shortly after
Mottershead's wife, Eugenia,
39, took a rifle and an old
.38-caliber revolver from him
as he stood, "apparently in a
stupor," in the den where the
children were shot. The boy
was on the floor in a sleeping
bag and the girl was asleep on
a sofa bed.
Police said five shots were
fired.
Mrs. Mottershead ran from
the S50,000 house in this
Monminout h County
community and hid the guns
in a neighbour's car while
another daughter, Betsy, 17,
summoned po li ce.
Mottershead surrendered
without resistance.
"Hie said lie wanted to take
their lives, that they would go
to heaven," police chief John
Foster said. "His wife has
cancer, and that may have
triggered the whole thing."
Police said the children
were sleeping in the den
because their room was
occupied by Mottershead's
mother, who was caring for
his wife.
Both women were
hospitalized Friday in shock.
Mottershead has been with
the Wall Street firm of Blyth,
Dillon & Eastman for a year.
The spokesman described
Mottershead as a "very quiet,
mild-mannered person ... and
a good trader." ((AP)


stood for oil refineries. But I
excluded as a target the
owned by Standard Oil fo.
"Standard Oil (o h
courageously taken a stanl,
reasoning for the AXvjriv
people on the matter of t,
For that reason, w( |. t
excluded each and c ters'
refinery of Standard Oi| c
From applicability to the lctte
'0O' in our name which und
all circumstances shal! sa
for oil refinery," Rasini said
the latest tape.
Much of the rest ol i,. Ip
contained an emotin,
condemnation of ...
religious oppression and .,.
taboos.
To guard against nth
bomber, an additional .
police otticers will bolsr ,
600-man force scheduled f
dcty Sunday, authorities sai


LOS ANGELES Police
have safely removed a
25-pound explosive device
from a bus terminal locker, but
are still trying desperately to
find a man who says. he has
already planted another
"alphabet bomb."
The mysterious, for-
eign accented man,
self-proclaimed military chief
of Aliens of America,
continued his alphabet assault
on Los Angeles Friday night by
planting an explosive device in
a locker at a downtown
Greyhound bus depot.
Earlier, the same voice said
the organization had planted a
bomb which devastated a
terminal at Los Angeles
International Airport on Aug.
6, killing three persons and
injuring 35 others.
The man, who calls himself
Isaac Rasim in tape-recorded
communiques, has vowed to
spell out Aliens of America"
across the face of the nation
"in blood." He has said "A"
was for airport and "L" was
for locker. In a tape
recording directed to the Los
Angeles Herald-Examiner
Friday he said bomb "I"
already had been planted.
"Nothing could make us
happier than if we could
conclude that we can reveal the
location of bomb 'I' which is
already planted," the speaker
said in a casual, confident
manner.
Bomb "I" could be a device
which Rasim said would be
exploded in a crowded area
Sunday if two now-retired
police officers are not charged
in connection with the death
of two Mexican nationals in
1970.
Asked if lie thinks the threat I
still stands for Sunday, Asst.
Police Chief Daryl Gates said,
"'1 assume so.
Rasim said the "0" in
"Of" in "Aliens of America"


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'I.,,. *t

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3


THE TRIBUNE -----Saturday, August 17, 1974


EDITORIAL

How history is made



By ETIENNE DUPUCH
G(EORGL '*nd C'a'man, July 25th. -- This is
Wednesday J ,. e back in the Caymans for a
16-day visit.
We flew from Nassau to Coral GabL', yesterday morning. After
lunch I went with my wife to Miracle Mile, It is really surprising
the number of friends we have made in business houses along this
shopping centre.
We had been away for over three months on our trip around
the world and a few weeks in Nassau for me to relieve the Carrons
for a vacation in England. This was much longer than usual and so
we were welcomed with open arms wherever we went yesterday.
Soon after I moved from Nassau to Coral Gables on election
day in July 1972 a local newspaper published a story about me.
I had refused to be interviewed by the newspapers, radio and
TV when I left the Bahamas. The editor of the Coral Gables paper
was sufficiently interested to go to Nassau and Eleutheia to
collect material for the story about me. In his story the editor
described me as "a legend in the Bahamas".
This was a great compliment. Few men become legends while
they are still alive and most men are forgotten as soon as the
breath leaves their bodies.
Several days after this story was published we walked into a
shop in Coral Gables. The manager a charming woman -- had
clipped the page out of the paper and stuck it up in a prominent
place in the shop for people to read when they came in to make
purchases. Even today I don't know her name.
We went to this shop yesterday. As we entered die lady
manager looked up.
"Funny you should come in at this moment," she said "we
were talking about you yesterday. And right here now I'm
reading about you in this book about the Duke and Duchess of
Windsor." She showed me the page and there was my name
staring up at e.
"I'm neatly finished it." she said. "I don't lend my books out
but I will lend it to you."
"Is it veyv bad?", I asked.
"Oh no ... no ... no," she said. "Very good."
I went to the book shop next door and bought a copy because,
S' xl.'l. I was curious to see how I figured in a book bearing the
ittl "The Woman lie Loved ... The Story of the Duke and
Duchess of Windsor".
It is written by Ralph G. Martin, author of several important
bk- milcludig ith ic F ., liiug Jennie. The Life of ladyr
Randolph Churchill, mother of Sir Winston Churchill. Martin also
served as consult. it for the ABC Television series on Winston
a.u:,hil.

It is interesting ... sometimes almost uncanny ... the way things
work out in nmy lite ... so strange that I have long been convinced
t J I h; l a ,Iln ildiAin 1 nigl somewhere.
A couple oi weeks ago James Blown wrote a letter to ThJi
Tribune in which lie compared me with some of the other local
characters in Nassau today. I think this letter must have been
prompted by the suggestion made by one of the new boys that I
was jealous of them.
I decided that comparisons were odious and put the letter
aside. But I feel that several events since then may justify my
-publishing his comments on me.
___ h.',lgih you are only here to relieve your daughter and
somn -law for a short period," he wrote. "we are always happy
and feel secure when you are in the island. You are a child of the
universe. You have a.right to be here, you are not a Bahamian by
ac. idcnt There are generations of Bahamian-born Dupuchs to
prove this fact."

Yesterday we were flying to Miami with an American friend
whi- had been our guest at Camperdown over the week-end. iHe
had cicnt '-tned his booking but when lie aiiiied at tli aiirpoit
he found that his reservation had been somehow cancelled and
the flight was fully booked. lie had to be put on the waiting lisl.
And so mi stitc aind I s.at lut with hill) to we whelthe he would
get ot n tiim.' tlh tl. Ilh did.
While waiting a Bahamian came and sat with me. I believe lie
has a job at the airport. lie wanted to talk.
"These stupid men in the government," he said. "every time
you set a i ap t or them they step right into it."
I had to go to great lengths to explain to him that I never set a
trap for aln one. I merely write what I believe to be the truth. If
the men in government paid more attention to the advice I give
them in this column they wouldn't make so many mistakes:
Certainly they wouldn't have made the major mistakes that have
destroyed the economy and brought them into disrepute with
maniy of their most ardent supporters of former times.
They are not peculiar in this respect. The U.B.IP. took the same
attitude lor them, anything I wrote had to be wrong and they
went tut of their way trying to prove it was wrong. But they
earned too late that no one can make right wrong any more thIan
anyone can make wrong right. The truth is simple and history has
shown that. on the long stretch, the truth will prevail.
The Bahamian who talked with me in the airport also said that
someone should instruct ithe governor, Sir Milo Butler, on the
proper form of dress. "Hlie makes some outrageous mistakes," lihe
said. "Imagime a long black tie with a white shell coat!"
* ******
A.n interesting fact is that on Tuesday ... the day all these
t' ings happened ... I quoted in this column from an article in The
D)ail' Telegraph (London). It was the fourth article in a series on
a book. now being written by a former member of 'the Duke of
Windsor's staff. This book is to be published soon. In this article
considerable space was given to the part I have played i:; i..g


i to sliitpe Bahami ian his'ol v.
iThe wiitel emphasi.'ed something that I have long tried to
establish, It is that I va-a not a rebel against the establishment.
The w'ritei described mie rather as an honourable man who
recognized that it was his duty to expose injustices and cases of
questionable dealings in the old government
Indeed. I was theii best friend because I was telling them the
iuthtI. Ihe refused to accept it and destroyed themselves. In ihe
end they recognized this fact. They came to me and said so. They
asked me to help them put their house in order. I tried. But it was
then too late. The position had passed the point of no return.
SThle P.1 P. is following the same route today but at a much
taste pace ... and in the process they will not only destroy
themselves ... they will carry the Bahamian people to the
bottomless pit with them.
I lie difference between thlie U.B.P. and P.L.P. is that the U.BP.
had a limit beyond which they did not venture. The P.L.P. seem
to have no limit. I hey don't know when, where and how to stop.
Thev have gone "hog wild" with their excesses.
In his book Mr. Martin tells some stories about difficult
decisions I had to make during the Duke of Windsor's regime
when I had to make sacrifices in order to carry out what I
considered my duty to the Bahamian people.
The story I will quote from the book on Monday illustrates
how fat I was prepared to go to maintain the dignity of the
Bahamian people.

FOOTNOTE TO HISTORY: Two of the most pleasing things
that have happened in Nassau for a long time were the recent
appointment of international and Olympic yachtsman R. IH.
'Bobby' Symonette to be chairman of the International Jury for
the uDcomine America's Cup races to be held later this month off


Dangerous



nonsense

THIE PLP (o\erniment. in the process
of taking over three hotels on the Cable
'Beach strip, early committed iitsell to a
police of nationaliJation Like so many
other things which thii ( oserninent duos.
there was no national debhiie aLnd n.
mandate ft r such .i p. lit1 riie Jitst doi i
and then Prime Mimnlsir L 0 Pindling
gets on the radio it .isiire hli, fjithful
followers that it is re.ill, nothing to
worrn at oit
Mr Pinillin i_ g-01.1d .1 1 tis. oif course
He can sell a.tn t ar' thiing on an',
condition. One 'l his tl iIA lr f al i. n .'
search the %otrld ric"Iid ti. s.hiw his
people th.a thcir M t i In i.p ti it .ill.
I here are many pretcedent. i.n b.i.k tip
what tils Go,ernnment is during, he s.
Buit t) m.hati'
I'hel it 'a, ne er i ti e 1 tih> histo.ir
ol the world, l. tr c atimlie.' that
somewh,.,re peph aI rt n. 't llnin- g in tlhe


midst of poverty, strike and
imiseiy. In the Caribbean, in
Africa, in Europe, in South
America. even in the northern
ghettoes and southern bayous
of the great United States,
poverty has been the chronic
condition of too many.
But that is no justification
and no consolation for the
destruction of an economy
which held the real prospect of
abolishing poverty altogether
in this (C'onimonwealth of the
Bahamas. Indeed, with our
comparatively small population
and spicc for generations of
expansion, the prospect xwas
for a level of national
prosperity and stability second
to none in the world.
Pointing to the poverty and
misery of others should be an
inspiration for us to move
away Iv,,n ihI phl,"hi rmlhci
than a isMIgntitlon of wiillt by
which we ineekly accept it.

rMr 'P litiimI, iivrd Htie
c a ',m plc '1 ( ti ',.i>L. i, b'1., ;
h i s ( o (i v e I n it e n t I'
nationalization of the hotels.
Ile said that was one of a
number of precedents. Again,
so what? What lie should have
told his followers is why and
how these precedents came to
be and why our present
condition came to be.
Nationalization of all, most
or some of the means of
production and resources is a
fundamental plank in the
socialist philosophy which is
ef fected by socialist
governments which come to
power either by democratic
vote o r by revolution
I \,iiuplics ot litlional atItion
also cxist in lice enit:rprise
countries lfor ai minibl'i of
Cleistions. St lillines Ithen': rti
.,ervicc-; which :i.cd i0o e
provided in the first instance
but which arc not prmvidl by
private entei prise bvc im'i of
lack of incentiv\:e or, Lick of
resources. The gov.i nimient
then has a duty io p:otvide
these seln ices it it can
Sometimes there arrc .r ic,'s
or industries which hi\t been
provided by private miilerpinst
but which threaten to ,itll apart
on occasion. I'ree tenicprise
gove ilmcnts oit en s:i\c these
situations b) s.ibsiud or by
direct nationialits.l ion.
So it is not cnoulghi to point
to examples oll nilt ionAl/ed
industries or sciv'ict: we\titlh I
examining t iur Owt n tJ uitii iutii.
In the Bahamas and in ot hir
parts of tlie ("j InbI,' iin,
governments started investing
moniIcy in resort htcils ,tcars
ago in c torlts (o piniiic ltic
pullip ol f lite tlour lr ind slt \.
in i ii c i tas.'. tlh utlus i \
caught oln anld bhioug1lil p il
invest ent i i I ll ii t So 1lil il
wias no longer nrcessiry or llthi
governn nienlti i nvest (l tt. lly
in hotels. Indeed, it would hi\.,c
beenll impoMble 11i the1
G o \ c t Iiin ncmmt vI ci I o
accumi ul.ate Ile cl-'tit l \xxihit h
built .all tle great holl in
Nassau. P'aradisc I lind tind
F'reeport.
Today ithe hilli tilth i.s
that tlihe Bahaiin s i' bec ie
far less aliltr Iin. and
investment is no iongei p1-uiing
in. I lie lGovelinllinUt liias lo act
out of despeit tion and hmcy are


now foolishly covering it up by
proclaiming a policy of
nationalization. And that, of
course, is going to make an
already bad situation worse.

If the Government did not
have a desperate situation on
its hands m the Cable Beach
hotels and if it had $20 million
to invest in the tourist
business, it would have been
far wiser to have primed the
pump in another island, say
(at Island. That amount of
money invested there in small
resort hotels and other
amenities would make that
island an immediate hit. It
would make it feasible to fly
FIuropean tourists directly
thele by jet.

Mr. Pindlng has said that
Cuba is on tihe way back in
toui ismn. Speaking in the House
ot Assembly during the debate
on I he take-over of the three
I< ,i. Beach hotels. Mr.
.. ',,;: gaiv that as one
reason why tihe Bahamas has
got to be competitive.
Well, Mr. Pindling is a little
late. The possibility of Cuba's
re-entry into the tourist
business after the consolidation
of the Castro revolution has
been seen now for some years.
During these years the
Bahamas had a clean lead in
the Caribbean.
We could have been so far
ahead of all the competition
today that we would need
have no worry. But instead of
making hay while the sun was
shining, the Pindling
administration was cutting up.
playing the fool, delay!iq
frustrating and discouraging
investment needed to keep us
ahead in the game.
We had hundreds of millions
on the line to develop further
our tourist potential. Now we
are down to borrowing $20
million to keep three hotels
open. But Cuba, said Mr.
1Imdling, is going to have its
old hotels refurbished and 40
new ones built under an
atrringement with Spain. Now
that is investment.
Indeed, Cuba is coming. Not
long after the Europeans move
back in the Anmericans also will
bI visiting Havana again. Mr.
Pindling must have known this
had to happen. Hie should have
thought of it when he and his
miserable Government were
destroying confidence in the
country and talking nonsense
to thlie people.

A good example of PI.P
nonsense more recently was
the argument put forward by
Ii inklyn Wilson in support of
the nationalization of the three
hotels or. at least, in the case
,l wne of them. Mr. Wilson
i.1'cticd (ite fact that decisions
,iictinmg I lie Ba;hanmas had to
he iniadc in Nashville and then
it. made this statement.
itlier one accepted the
b i. ic Pt iinciple that
decision-making should rest in
the country or one did not."
Now that is nothing more
than demagoguery, an attempt
t o t rade on nationalistic
emotions at the expense of
intelligent assessment.
Of course, every country


Newport. Rhode Island ... and the opening by Mr. Levi Gibson on
Thursday aftemooitn of his new offices on Christie Street.
I have wtten ian t irle for this column about both these
events. In my refcieimces to Bobby Symonctte I give a brief report
onli how yacht racing was started in Nassau and the important part
played in its promotion and development by Mr. Symonette's
father. Sir Roland Symoinette. and the late Capt. Harry Knowles.
father of world clhaunpion yachtsman and Olympic gold medallist
Capt. Duiward Knowles.
This article will be published when the 10-part series started
today has been completed.
*************
It was announced today that Qantas, the Australian airline will
no longer fly to Nassau.
Is this another Sign of the Times?

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
The truth shall make you free.- St. John 8-32.


wants the greatest degree of
control over its affairs as
possible but no government
should be stupid enough to
believe that it is possible to
have decision-making affecting
the country confined within its
own orders. This applies in
the area of international and
even sometimes local politics as
well as in the area of
economics.
Mid-East oil money now
owns about 25 per cent of the
giant Krupp empire in West
Germany and some decisions
made by the sheiks are going to
affect the economy of
Germany. Multi-national
corporate boards sitting in
London. New York, '.russels
and Geneva make deamsions
affecting their own countries as
well as a dozen others every
day
Sot. whai are we going to do
in the Bahamas? Tell our
people that the decisions must
be made here so we are yooiig
to take over the Sheriton.'
Lowes, Holiday Inn and
Flagler hotels? Then the
Royal, Scotia, Montreal,
Chase-Manhattan, First
National and Barclays banks?
Then Eastern, PanArn, Delta,
Lufthansa and British Airways?
Mr. Wilson's pronouncement
is obviously utter nonsense but
so much nonsense gets adopted
these days as policy that it is
just as well to state the obvious
once again, particularly when
the nonsense can be so
dangerous.


A churchman's view on


death penalty


EDITOR, The Tribune,
The Church has been
criticized for silence on the
issue of capital punishment.
The enclosed article .is not
intended to speak on behalf "f
the Church on this lighiv'
controversial issue, but to help
people in their thinking on the
subject. Please include it in
your valuable columns.
J. EMMETTE WEIR
Rode< moral Methodist


I'Dli-'K Th- Tribune.
That a man should be
punished for wrong-doing is
one of the axioms of all moral
codes. Throughout the ages
this idea has served as the basis
for dealing with those who
break the moral rules deemed
essential for the survival of
humanity. As Paulsen puts it,
"The belief that it fares well
with the good and ill with the
evil is the first great
fundamental truth which
reflection on morality leads all
people."
Now, while it is agreed that
some form of punishment
should be inflicted upon the
evil doer, the question as to the
form and extent of the
punishment is at once highly
complex and controversial. So
moral and religious leaders,
legalists and philosophers have
devoted themselves to this
question from the time of'
Moses and tlie Fent
Commandments until the
present day. Of all the forms ol
punishment none is more
controversial and difficult than
the death penalty coinimonil
known as capital punishment.
The reason for this is quite
understandable Man by nature
regards life as extienielyn
precious. And so the question
as to whether the life of one
person should be t;tke'n ie.anm' "
he has hit:' lf p .liily '>i
taking the iife f& another is
bound to be one involving
serious moral. legal and soci.il
issues.
In tile Bahamas at this time
(as in many other countries in
the world today) the question
of capital punishment is beino
debated in view of the fate of
the murderers of Raymond
Barry Major. There ale
complex legal matters to be
dealt with in this particular
case. And while \Ne must
concentrate here on the moral


and religious issues involved,
we cannot ignore them as they
are closely related.
In considering this case, it is
essential that we distinguish
between the Judicial and
Executive branches of our
Government. For, it is one of
the basic principles of
democratic government that
the functions of these two
branches of (Government be
separated. Anyone who has
followed the intricacies of the
Watergate scandal can
appreciate the significance of
this fact!
In the case under
consideration, it was the
Judicial branch of Government
which sentenced the guilty
men with the death penalty.
The prerogative of mercy,
however, is vested in the
Executive branch of our
Government tinder the terms
of our Constitution. And while
it must be left to the legal
experts to argue as to whether
the ultimate authority in this
issue is the Governor-General
or the Queen; it must be
understood that it was the
Judicial branch of Goverunment
(i.e the courts) in which the
decision to inflict capital
punishment upon these men
was made!
Since the courts are
expected to be entirely
impartial tin the best traditions
of British Justice) we must
assume that at the level of the
decision in the Judictial branch
there were no political issues
involved. Whether they ia,'
involved ;it the 'Executive level
is a matter outside the scope of
this article. So we must turn
nt w to consider the moral and
leligiolis arguntents involvct l in
the problem of capital
putit sh Im ''l t.
During the panel on the
"Increase of Crime in the
('olniuminit.' ", it was the
Attorney General and Minister
of External Affairs, the Hon.
Paul Adderley who pointed out
that there are many theories of
the reason why people should
tie punished for wrong-doing.
Anyone who has made even a
cursory study of Ethics or the
legal system cannot disagree
with him. Generally speaking,
however, se theories fall
into three main classes.
First, there are those
theories based on the idea of
punishment as a deterrent.


Here the purpose i-, It ini!.,
punishment so se\ r.' .:pon tilt
wrong-doer that oil.,oker:.
will not daie. ti' recp,'at h:,
action. usually the ipini'hnienr
involved is very hlihi. even
cruel as for instaniv cniulitiion
invented by the arciteri
Romans to ditS.our.agt
disobedience to ( caJ-.r!
A much monie chightenred
approach is to he tound ii,
these theories bha.iJ upoi. Ihe'
idea of reforming the criminal
The purpose is to punish him
in such a manner that hie will
no longer commit evil and
eventually become a good
law-abiding citizen. This is the
theoritical basis of the modern
penal sistemn although there
are tiany who argue that it
does not work in practice.
Finally, there a:re those
theories based upon the idea of
retribution. Retribution
(ieanin", literally "to give
back") i.; stily undcistcod but
not easily expies.ssed in words.
It is the sense ot justice which
seents to bI basic to humnian
nature; the strong feeling that a
person "ought to be punished'
for evil. the emotion of
indignation which arises in us
when we see a big bully taking
advantage t( a little boy or th'
rich oppressing the very poor.
Let us examine capital
punishment ii thi' light ot
these tintI'h t1 .' rie, : .
punishment.
Those who favour Capital
PunishineT;t often refer to tlht
thIcoriC ba,.eI upi'. tH i.:lcj
punishing' it as a detcri lnt.
Thev poitit to lthe cuelty anid
sifterii, i'lflicted upon tlith
victim li *urderersl. *in
argue tih : ''i''v Inksit it.t
punished in this way to i'revcxer
others froit d'ing the saie.
Suchi aiguiriiunts carry a lo'
of weight in primitive soities
and were certainly vieri
inmpressile in ancient time,. Otr
the other hand, it is the
consensus of contemporary
morality that it is wrong to-
simply "use'" a person as .an
example by taking his life even
if he has been guilty of murder
For, Kant, eminent moramisi
Page 4. Col -j


~',~1


'C'


rS.MI... i


.. .-. '.















EXPLANATION OF MORE
DIFFICULT CLUES
CLUES DOWN:
1. MAN-HATER not
man-eater. You'd expect
"a mystery movie about a
man-eater" to be "a
thrilling one," surely.
Thus, the clue phrase, "a
surprisingly thrilling one,"
ties in better with
MAN-HATER, which is a
cliche about a woman
usually used comically as
regards "a movie."
2. DETECT not detest. An
"Opera lover would"
certainly DETECT it, but
if it's only a "hint of


FII
Pastor -
H. Mills


X-WORD SOLUTION


throatiness in his voice."
detest is too strong. It
could be due to a slight
cold, or a minor flaw,
which the "new singer"
can still rectify.,
4. GIN not gun. That of
GIN, exactly the same
product as now is more to
the point for this positive
clue. Guns, however, have
changed so much with the
passing years that "a
years-old" and a new one
are not easily comparable.
Consequently, many a


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person would not be
"amazed" at the "price"
differential.
8. GARBLED not gabbled.
"Near hysteria" won't
affect the speed of her
speech, necessarily she
may already talk fast. for
instance, but rather her
coherence of thought.
making GARBLED the
more precise answer.
1). MFNIAL not mental.
"Who does MENIAL
work" and "in seemingly
easier jobs" (e.g. a desk
"job") which seems
"easier" to him but is.
usually, harder because
it's more exacting. "A.
person who does mental
work might envy those in
easier jobs" nonmental
"work," a type which he
knows would be "easier"
for him and his nerves.
11. LONG not lone. The fact
that there's no one with
him (a "lone ex-
amination") doesn't
make for any greater
tenseness, since two can
get blown up as easily as
one. In "a LONG
.'xanrination," it becomes
a "particularly tense
scene." as the longer the
"bomb" takes to
dismantle, the greater the
risk.
1 2. POTS not pods. If the.
are pods (i.e. seedcases),
t h ey already are
"productive," inasmuch as
they yield seeds, making
POTS the better answer,
which may or mar not
produce seedlings.
14. STRIVES not strikes.
Since the decision
whether to strike or not is
taken b\ his union bosses,
it is not what will "deter"
him but what will "deter"
his leaders that is relevant.
Certainl\, when an
independent person
STRIVES individually
"for what hlie believes is
his due he's unlikely to be
easily deterred."

CLULS ACROSS
1. Mi I)DD)LING not
muddling. The clue
phrase '' only
M IDD)LING," suggests
that this is a respected
verdict of a comparably
"intelligent student" who
is saying there are far
better to be had. Thus his
"close fellow student is
not likely to buy it."
"Only muddling" shows
that the "student"
con meeting doesn't
understand it (i.e.. the
"F:rench grammar" may
be good. but the "friend"
second-rate as a
"student.")
6. MAN not can. fan, pan or
van. "Previously thought


reliable" implies this was
not actually so, but the
can, fan, pan and van were
"reliable" until, perhaps
with time, they "started
to give trouble." If "a
MAN starts to give
trouble" now, he wasn't.
in fact, ever "reliable,"
since this 'is his true
character showing itself.
7. TOUTING not touring.
"TOUTING in search of
business" makes a direct
answer to the clue's
statement, but it's rather
that he would be "touring
in search of" new outlets
for his merchandise where
he will subsequently
TOUT.
10. SLAP not slop. Since to
slop it is to. be careless.
the clue word,
''carelessly ," is
unnecessary for slop,
making SLAP the better
answer.
16. VEIL not veal. A "VEIL
or similar commodity" is
normally paid for (i.e.
"bought") immediately
and thus can easily be left
on the counter. But meat
(i.e. veal) is usually
procured in a
super-market. Even
though left on the counter
it is not "bought" until
paid for at the cashier's
desk, hardly a place where
anything is left behind,
with usually the cashier
aind a helper to pack your
items.
18. TYPED not taped. Being
"a methodical author"
and obviously anxious to
get any new thought on
record, "he" would
probably carry a tape
recorder in his car to
dictate any new "idea for
a plot" wherever "he"
happens to be. TYPED is
more apt for. "drive home
quickly."
19. HARE not hake. More to
the point for IIARE,
which has a distinctive
gamey (i.e. "special")
taste to fit "a special
meal. But haddock, say.
could be substituted for
hake without upsetting
"olans."
20. SEEK not seem. "If" she
genuinely "SEEKs to shun
publicity," yes, making
her something of a
mystery to reporters and
columnists. "If a movf
actress" only "seems to
shun" it. the press "is
likely to" regard this as an
obvious attempt to create
mystery and tend to
disregard her.
21. TINY not tidy. It is not
the way in which she
keeps it that she's proud
of, as tidy would suggest,
but the fact that it's "her
own," TINY though it is.
There is nothing in the
clue to indicate that she is
tidy by nature.


LETR OTH DIO


From Page 3
and philosopher taught that
under no circumstances should
a human being be treated as if
his life were a means to an end.
The Christian concept of the
sanctity of life also lends no
support to the idea of taking
the life of a person as a means
of setting an example for
others. A person may be
punished in some other way if
hi; punishment is to serve as a
deterrent; human life is too
precious. The theory of
punishment as a deterrent,


Ginghan

ARTIE'S
228 BAY


therefore, can hardly be used
to justify capital punishment.
Difficult as it is to justify
capital punishment on the basis
o" the idea of punishment as a
deterrent, it is impossible to do
so on the basis of the idea of
reform. For, we cannot claim
that the criminal can be
reformed by taking away his
life. Indeed, it is the theory of
punishment as reformative
which is the strongest
argument against capital
punishment!
Here we are led to discuss a
fundamental question in
morals and religion. Is there
such a thing as a person who is
so evil and depraved that he
cannot be reformed? Those
who favour capital punishment
would tend to answer this
question positively, while those
who are not would prefer the
negative.
In the realm of things
religious it is the argument as
to whether all men can be
saved. There is the Calvinist
view which rejects the idea of
universal salvation as opposed
to the Arminian which teaches
that all men can be saved.
Those who believe that there is
the slightest spark of hope that
a person, no matter how evil
his deeds, can be encouraged to
do better, cannot really believe
in the death penalty.
Since then it is difficult to
justify capital punishment on
the basis of the idea of it as a
deterrent and impossible on
the basis of the idea of reform,
obviously its strongest basis is
to be found in the idea of
retribution. It is the main
argument of those who favour
capital punishment today.
They believe strongly that the
person who deliberately takes
the life of another should
himself be deprived of his own
life!
As the Rev. Earl Francis,
vice-president of the Bahamas
Christian Council. stated when
asked about this issue, there is
Page 9, Col. 3


By Abigail Van Buren
a 1974 br CMe Trflue-N. Y. ines ei.,o Ia.
DEAR ABBY: I am a 44-year-old widow with three
children-two teen-aged boys and a daughter, 12.
My husband died last year after a lingering illness that
nearly put us in the poorhouse. I am not destitute, but I
have to be a very good .manager to make ends meet. '
My problem: At his funeral, friends and family hovered
around me, expressing their sincere sympathy, and the last
thing I heard from ALL of them was: "If you need
anything, please call me."
Abby, I need EVERYTHING! I need someone to take an
interest in two teen-aged boys who have no father. I need
someone to cheer me up when I'm feeling low. I need
someone to dress up for. I need someone to get me out of the
house and invite me to a movie, a bridge game, a play, a
concert, or an evening of conversation so I will know I'm
alive. A widow needs everything any other normal woman
needs, but she can't call up her friends and ask them for
anything.
Please print this, Abby. Maybe someone who has made
this offer to some widow somewhere will see it and pick up
the phone and ask her what she needs. Thanks for listening.
YOUR FRIEND THE WIDOW
DEAR FRIEND: Consider it done. If this awakens some
of your sleeping friends, let me know.
DEAR ABBY: I hate showers! I am 27 years old, and
didn't use to feel this way, but enough is enough. Lately I
have been invited to showers for girls I hardly know, some
of whom I haven't seen since I got out of high school.
Opening presents in front of everyone' to publicize how
"generous" (or "cheap") the doners are rubs me the wrong
way.
I was married (two years ago) and refused when my
friends offered to have a shower for me. I had a planned
elopement and didn't soak one person for a present.
I have been told that if you're invited to a shower, you
must send a gift whether you come or not. How does one
courteously reply to a nervy shower invitation for someone
she hasn't seen in nine years?
Please answer in your column, Abby. I'm sure I'm not the
only one with this problem. SICK OF SHOWERS
DEAR SICK: There is no "law" which compels you to
send a gift if you decline a shower invitation. Simply
decline, and don't feel obligated to give a present to
someone you "hardly know" or haven't seen in nine years.
DEAR ABBY: I am 22, single and fairly attractive. I
don't have to elaborate on how difficult it is for a young lady
to find a respectable, intelligent, employed, single man
these days.
The problem is, I seem to have found one, but he is seeing
another girl.
He has dated me a few times, but I feel so guilty about
the other girl. Abby, I don't want to be the cause of their
breaking up.
Should I continue to see him? Or should I drop the whole
thing before it get started? LOST


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THE TRIBUNE --Saturday, August 17, 1974



Follow up on offers to

the widow

DEARLOST:Ifhewantstoebreak i ths eoaglrl,
theirs couldn't be much of a love match Sine you d i t
deliberately set out to lure him& awy, thr o nO rees to
feel guilty. If you wait for a man wwho b-Sot see0 anyo,
you could wait a long time.
CONFIDENTIAL TO "SICK OF ALL THAT SEX IN 2
YOUR COLUMN": Sorry, but lately, every other letter
that lands on my desk has to do with sex. I invite people to "
write to me about their problem, and these are their .
problems.
Problems? You'll feel better if you get it off your chest.
For a personal reply, write to ABBY: BoxNo. 69700, L.A.,
Calif. 90069. Enclose stamped, self-addressed envelope,
please. W
For Abby's new booklet, "What Teen-agers Want to
Know," send $1 to Abigail Van Buren, 132 Lasky Dr.,
Beverly Hills, Cal. 90121.


F


!


L.


I


-1


AM 8-band


I










THE TRIBUNE -- Saturday, August 17, 1974


COMMONWEALTH OF
THE BAHAMA ISLANDS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Equity Side


IN THE MATTER of The
1959.
AND


1974
No. 21


Quieting Titles Act


IN THE MATTER OF THAT tract of land
situate in Sandilands Allotments in the Eastern
District of the Island of New Providence and
containing Twenty (20) acres and bounded on
the North by a Road Reservation and running
thereon One Thousand Three hundred and
Twenty-one and IForty-three hundredths
(1321.43) feet on the East by land the property
of the Baham, G government t and running
lhe.nr,, Si\ hundred and Sixty-three and
I ipht!y lour hundredths (0663.84) feet on the
South by land in possession of J. Pinder and
land in possession of One B. Edward and land in
possession of Eugene Stubbs and running
thereon One Thousand Three hundred and
Twenty-one and Forty-three hundredths
(1321.43) and on the West by land the property
of Theophilus Mortimer and running thereon Six
- Hundred and Sixty-six and Twenty hundredths
(66(0 .20) feet.
ANi)
IN THEll MATI'FR OF 'he Petition of JOHN
MOSS


NOTICE OF PETITION


NOTICE is hereby given that JOHN MOSS of the
Eastern District of the Island of New Providence,
Farmer (hereinafter called "the Petitioner") is
applying to t he Supreme Court to have their title
to the land hereinafter described investigated under
Section 3 of said Act, and the nature and extent
thereof determined and declared in a Certificate of
Title to be granted by the said Court in accordance
with the provisions of the said Act.
ALL THAT tract of land situate in Sandialnds
allotments in the Eastern District of the Island of
New Providence and containing Twenty (20) acres
and bounded on ilthe North by a Road Reservation
and running thereon One Thousand Three Hundred
and Twenty-one and Forty-three hundredths
(1321.43) feet on the Fast by land the property of
the Bahamas (Government and running thereon Six
hundred and Sixty-three and Eighty-four
hundredths (663.84) feet on the South by land in
possession of J. Pinder and land in possession of
One B. Edward and land in possession of Eugene
Stubbs and running thereon One T'housand Three
hundred and Twenty-one and Forty-three
hundredths (1321.43) and on the West by land the
property of Theophilus Mortimer and running
thereon Six Hundred and Sixty-six and Twenty
hundredths (660.20) feet which said tract of land
is more i particularly described and delineated on
plans or diagrams filed herewith.
(COPIlS of the said plan may be inspected during
normal office hours at lie following places:
(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court. Public
Square in the City of Nassau.
(b) The Cihambers of' DAVID ('. BETIHILL
situate in the Bernard Sunley Building.
Rawson Square. Bay Street Nassau, Bahamas.
NOTICE is hereby given the any person having
dower or any adverse claim or a claim not
recognized in the Petition shall on or before the
Eighteen dl. of September 1974 file in tlle
Supre ('in Cottul i lltile C(ii y of Nassatu aforesaitl ati
ser\c oil tlie Pelltmioner or Ilhe undersigned a
statement of his claim in thie prescribed form
verified b .111 an fid.itrs i to e fled lhc w.-ili i.
Failure ol an. ,tdlt person to file and serve a
statemenil of Ill"' claim on or before the said
Fightlcn dti of September 1974 will operate as a
bar to ,uich c.laim..
DAVID ('. BET-il: LL.
('hambers.
Bernard Suniley Btilding.
Rawson Square.
Bay Street.
Nassatu. Builamanas.


Altorn, y for the Petitioner.


A YOUNG Bahamian-born
journalist, who for the past
four years has served as head
of the New York bureau of
Jet magazine, has been
granted a National Magazine
Award Fellowship for a year's
study at Columbia
University's Graduate School
of Journalism.
The young journalist, M.
Cordell Thompson (pictured)
was awarded the grant by the
American Society of
Magazine Editors for
outstanding achievement in
the role of magazine
communication. The award is
for one year's study at the
school.
For his field of study, Mr.
Thompson has chosen the
area of international
communication, its role in
international relations; the
role of communications in
national development,
differences in the availability
and patterns of com-
munications in representative
countries, and the problems
in the flow of international
communications.
Mr. Thompson started his
career in Journalism in
Nassau as a trainee with The
Nassau Guardian. In 1968, he
joined Johnson Publishing
Company in Chicago, Illinois,
as an associate editor on Jet
magazine, and two years later
was appointed New York
editor of Jet magazine. His
career has carried him on
major political and cultural
assignments throughout the
United States, as well as
assignments in Africa, the
Caribbean, and South East
Asia, covering the American
involvement in Vietnam.
Mr. Thompson, 30, is the
son of Mr. Lionel Thompson
and Mrs. Enid Terrell of Blue
Hill Road, Nassau. He is
married to the former Miss
Mzazi Sharaki of Belize,
Honduras, and they have one
daughter, Kai.


i


Hanging
comment
EDITOR, The Tribune,
I was interested to read a
letter in your paper of 12/8/74
in which Miss Marion Bethel
deplored the fact that two men
were sentenced to be hanged. I
wonder if Miss Bethel would be
good enough to explain what is
meant by the passage in
scripture "who sheds man's
blood by man shall his blood
be shed."
WILBERT N. ROBERTS
Nassau,
17th August, 1974.

White witch
EDITOR, The Tribune,
Having read your Editoral
on July 31st, as I have for the
past 12 years, I felt I must
write you and ask you to look
further into the Legend of the
"White Witch of Rose Hall", I
assume this is the story you so
hurriedly passed over and the
estate you mentioned was
located on the North shore a
few miles tast of Montego
Bay? It is too interesting to
just mention and not explain in
detail. I understand Rose Hall
is being rebuilt and has become
a tourist attraction in just
few years. I first heard the tale
when 1 was a lad working in
tobacco fields in the
Connecticut River Valley of
Massachusettes. At that time
Jamaican workers were hired in
summer to work the fields. My
wife and I visited Jamaica in
1I % .ond after 20 years the
tale was so bright i n my mind
that it was one ol hlie first
(ILiestlons I asked when we
went out into the country Our
driver took us to Rose H;ll and
spun the tale for us again and
after 20 years it hadn't
changed one iota.
Any Jamaican over 40 could
lell you the tal': a id I would be
interested in reading still
another version in your column
to see if it compared as my
first two did.
E. A. PHILLIPS.
U.S Missile Base.
P.O. Box 1210
Freeport, G;rand Bahama.
It's a gory tale that could
not be repeated In The
Trihwie for young readers.
We realest that you et a copy
of the book--Ed.)


Bahamas journalist

wins study award


ofund trougnout iThe Biahnamas but
is now found only on Great Abaco
and Great Inagua. It is rigidly
protected by law in the sanctuaries
of The Bahamas National Trust.


A SPECIAL issui of tour
postage s t a rI pn to
co memorate tane 15th
anniversary of the founding of
the Bahamas National Tru-t
will be released on Tuesday.
September 3 The National
Trust has been granted the
exclusive right to sell first-day
covers for this issue. Covers
will be available for 25c a piece
starting Monday at the Trust's
offices in Star Plaza. Mackey
Street, and at the entrance to


ROSEATE SPOONBILL
(Ajaia ajaja)
The beautiful roseate spoonbill
rivals the Bahamian flamingo in the
brilliance of its plumage. Its
spatulate bill and bare green head
make it looktlike a creature from
hlmas A aM T, colonies placing its crude stick nests
'ti a nt Win tropical mangroves. It occurs
WHITECROWNED PIGEON primarily in the southern Bahamas.
(Columbia leucocephala)
This handsome pigeon is the
favourite game bird of The
Bahamas and its welfare is under
strict management by the
Government. They nest in colonie>b
on small cays, which are protected
at all tims and feed in the tropical
hardwood forests of the larger
Islands, sometimes making long
over water flights to and from their
feeding grounds. The slate grey 14
pigeon with Its gleaming whiten.&thlvuMerMHAMAS ,rLm
crown is only found in the northern
West Indies. WHITE-TAILED TROPICBIRD
(Phaethon lepturus)
The "Bosun-Bird" as it is
sometimes called in The Bahamas
spends most of its life at sea coming
ashore only to breed in crevices in
I rocky cliffs. The Exuma Cays Land
S and Sea Park is a favourite nesting
lIocality as are other islands
throughout the archipelago
Tropicbirds feed on squid and
flying fish, catching them by
jlmaking spectacular dives from high
s'.L Ir.wi w N i',,,n the air. Tropicbirds were
probably the birds that Columbus
followed to his first landfall in the
BAHAMAS PARROT new world on San Salvador
(Amazona leucocephala bahamense) W M'-
This handsome parrot was once
friuiiu iihrti#uheiiuuThIio Qhr~c hit+ aOU


the General Post Office, Fast
Hill Street
The stamps will be sold at
the General Post Office on and
alter issue date in sojvenii
sheets of lour, each sheet
consisting of a 13c, a 14c, a
21L and .i 36c stamp.
Individual btamps are also
available.
The issue consists of
alt ract i t rue-colour
lithorgraph olf four native
Bahamian birds, all presently


1 i. Of it


Special stamp issue for National T:


.jsf gjoing abroad to Lchoo fior we fiRst time(f

..or i you're a recod C4 O m"f.

.hen contact

LYNDA CRAWLEY or
ELLISTON RAHMING

at he 5ri bune as soon as poda .

PLEASE CALL 21986 or 21990.
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6THE TRIBUNE .-. Saturday, August 17, 1974


AT SHAN House Opening
(1. to r.) Hon. Clement T.
Maynard, Mrs. Levi H.
Gibson, E. P. Taylor,
Geoffrey G. Brown, Mr.
Gibson, Lady Butler, H. E.
the Governor General, Bishop
Donald R. Knowles and
Bishop Michael Eldon.



Fashion

show for

civil

servants
IN DEFERERCE to the
scores of public servants who
have been following the
Goombay Fashion Shows
every Monday afternoon, this
Monday's show, scheduled to
be held at the Paradise Island
Hotel & Villas, will be held in
their honour, a spokesman
said today.
Co-sponsored by the
Ministry of Tourism and the
Nassau/Paradise Island
Promotion Board, the show,
featuring the Trend Benders,
gets underway at 1 p.m., with
luncheon served from 12.30
p.m.
Many of the hundreds who
attend the weekly shows
during Bahamas Goombay
Summer work for the various
Ministries in Nassau, and
these have been singled out
for special honour on
Monday, a spokesman said.


*


Shan House opened by HE,



dedicated by Lord Bishop


SHAN HOUSE, the new office building on
Christie Street between Bay and Dowdeswell
Streets built by Mr. & Mrs. Levi Gibson to
serve as head-quarters for Levi H. Gibson &
Associates, real estate brokers, was officially
opened Thursday evening by H.E. the Governor
General and Lady Butler.
After Sir Milo cut a red ribbon stretched
across the main entrance, the building was
blessed by the Rt. Rev. Michael Eldon, Lord
Bishop of Nassau and the Bahamas, assisted by
Bishop Donald R. Knowles.
A brief address was delivered by Geoffrey G.
Brown, president of the Bahamas Real Estate
Association, of which Mr. Gibson is vice
president. Mr. Brown pointed out that the
name "Shan House" was derived from an old
family name of Mrs. Gibson's forebears, several
of whom had lived on the site of the new
building or in a large residence next door on the
corner of Christie and Dowdeswell.


Tracing Mr. Gibson's progress from his
birthplace in Simms, Long Island to his joining
H.G. Christie Real Estate as an office boy, Mr.
Brown said that the mutual affection that
existed between the late Sir Harold Christie and
Levi Gibson was well known. Mr. Brown
concluded by saying "The usual thing to say at
a time like this is to wish Levi Gibson success.
That doesn't make sense in this case because
Levi Gibson IS a success already, as anyone can
see!"
Over 200 guests attended the reception
which followed, including Hon. Clement T.
Maynard, Sir Roland and Lady Symonette, Sir
Etienne and Lady Dupuch, E.P. Taylor, C.D.
Russell, Geoffrey A. D. Johnstone and
numerous prominent members of the real estate,
finanical and legal communities, as well as a
number of senior civil servants and friends and
relatives of the Gibson family.


Success of nation depends


on family unity: churchman


By ELLISTON RAHMING

THE FAMILY is a national
unit upon which the failure or
success of a nation is
dependent "I know that there
are problems in every family
because no two persons are the
same; but, together they
should move to their final
destiny which is membership in
the eternal family of God."
This was said Tuesday nieht
by the Rector of St. Georges


NOTICE
NOTICE Is hereby given that MARVIN BASIL of Pinders
Point, Grand Bahama is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for naturalisation as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why naturalisation should not be granted should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within]
twenty-eight days from the 17th day of August 1974 to
The Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002, Nassau.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MINOCAL JOSEPH of
Pinders Point, Grand Bahama is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalisation as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalisation should
not be granted shonitd %end a written and sinned statement
of the facts with twenty-eight days from the 17th day of
August 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box
N-3002, Nassau.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ZALIE JOSEPH of Pinders
Point Grand Bahamas is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalisation as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalisation should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-elght days from the 17th day of
August 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box
N-3002, Nassau.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that SYLVESTER SMITH of P.O.
Sox 2083, Nassau, Bahamas. is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship. for
naturalisation as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalisation should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
.of the facts within twenty4-eight days from the 17th day of
Ausut 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizen$0, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. O. Box
02 M" 4. I .


Church, Canon Collingwood
Cooper as he addressed the
weekly meeting of the Fort
Montagu Kiwanis Club at the
Holiday Inn Hotel.
Speaking on the topic,
"Family Life," the sub-dean of
Christ Church Cathedral said
that most families who end up
"on the rocks" got there
because of one or all of the
following: excessive social
activities, disloyalty, waste of
income, neglect of duty, sexual
neglect or inability and
mistreatment.
"The results of a broken
home," he continued, "are one
or all of the following: children
suffer for lack of food,
clothing, education and
guidance," He said that
children who are the products
of a broken home usually seek
and find bad company, have no
one to correct them and end
up as criminals.
Canon Cooper told
Kiwanians that in the home,
characters are formed for the
future and that the lessons and
actions in childhood are
normally taken into adulthood.
"The family life prepares for


A PASSENGER train
running from Charleroi to
Antwerp derailed Thursday
and police said 20 passengers
were killed and many others
linared.
No other details were
immediately obtainable -
rescue workers sieved through
the wreckage of the train.


community life and the
qualities of cooperation,
respect, discipline, honesty and
purity should be manifested by
the parents of today if
the parents of tomorrow are
going to be the kind of citizens
the Bahamas needs," he said.
He condemned the
evolutionary theory that the
fundamental difference
between man and monkey is
that a monkey lives in trees
and man lives in homes. To
him, there is "quite a
difference."
Canon Cooper said that
marriage partners must forgive
and understand each other.
"Kindness, consideration
and compromise along with
mutual help, social
companionship and devotion
must be demonstrated at all
times," he said.
He urged the male audience
to have faith in God "to whom
you must account for your
dignified calling as a father and
a husband."
"Mend your ways, agree
with each other, live in peace
and the God of love and peace
will be with you," he said.


RUSSIA has altered the
orbital position of its Salyut
3 space station that has flown
unmanned above the Earth
since two cosmonauts
completed a 14-day mission
aboard her last month. TASS
reported Friday.
The new orbit put the
25-ton craft into a position
almost indentical to the one
ued when the cosmonauts
docked their Soyzu 14
transport ship to it July 5.


Minister
By E. RAHMMIN
"WHEN others began leaving
the country, you built an
expansion to your store," was
the praise given Mr. Gene,Cbea
Thursday by a government
Minister at the official
ceremony celebrating the
expansion of Palmdale
Furniture Store at Rosetta and
Mackey Streets.
Transport Minister George
Smith who represented the
Prime Minister at the opening,
said that Mr. Chea stood as a
"very positive example," of
what Bahamians can be if they
make a right decision and
humble themselves enough
during their youth to wash
bottles and obey their fathers.
His reference was to Mr.
Chea's arrival in the Bahamas
at three years old. His father
operated a restaurant on East
St. and he (Gene) worked with
his father as a dishwasher for
many years.
"Mr. Chea has always been
more Bahamian than most
Bahamians a friend and
patriarch of the Bahamas," he
said.
A number of officials,
* including the Governor General
and Lady Butler, who declared
the new section of the store
open, attended the ceremony.
Among them were: Leader of
the Opposition, Kendal Isaacs,
Senator Orville Turnquest, Sir
Roland and Lady Symonette,
Franklyn Wilson M.P. who
served as emcee, and Mr.
Joseph Ford M.P.
Sir Roland said the Chea
family had upheld dignity in
this country. "I have profound
respect for Mr. Chea and he
and I will carry on if we are the
only business men to do so,"
Sir Roland said.
Mr. Chea built the first
section of his store in 1964
when the Mackey St. area, for
the most part, was bush. It had
now become necessary to
expand the store to increase
the display area and storage
space.
Construction of the new
section began in September of
last year and was completed in
April at a total cost of
$175,000.


BEAUTY


CULTURE
DEGREE
MRS. PAULA Gibson
Newbold received her
Associate Doctorate's Degree
in beauty culture and
cosmetology in Louisville,
Kentucky at a convention of
cosmetologists held at the
Gault House on August 4.
Mrs. Newbold was one of 35
beauty culturists receiving this
degree and her student, Miss
Clarita Moss, was one of 68 to
receive her Bachelor of Science
Degree in this field.
The degrees were awarded
by the National Institute of
Cosmetology, a division of the
National Beauty Culturists
League. Inc. of America, which
was incorporated in 1920 in
Washington, D.C. Presentation
of the award was made by the
National President, Dr. Katy E.
Whickam and the Dead, Mrs.
Mary Moss.
Mrs. Newbold also received a
certificate from the Kentucky
State University, Frankfurt,
Kentucky for participating, in
the National Institute of
Cosmetology seminar in
management principles,
marketing problems and
personnel administration. The
instructors in this seminar were
Dr. Danny H. Pogue and Mr.
William E. Goeltz.
During her stay in Louisville,
Mrs. Newbold attended
workshop classes held at
Kentucky State University.
This seminar, held for school
owners and teachers, was
conducted by Mr. Arnold
deMllo and Mrs. Ruth
Valentine and the subjects
studied were lesson planning,
public speaking and salon
managcinent.


GOVERNOR-GENERAL Sir Milo Butler and Lady Butler had a tight schedule on Thursday,
returning from an official visit to Abaco, Sir Milo was called on to open a new real estate firm and,
not long after, Lady Caroline did ribbon-cutting duties at the opening of the addition to Palmdale
Furniture on Rosetta Street. Pictured in the ribbon-cutting ceremony are, from left, Palmdale
Furniture owner Gene Chea, Mrs. Chea, Lady Caroline, Sir Roland Symontte. Transport Minister
George Smith, Sir Milo and Grant's Town M.P. Franklyn Wilson.
Pictured at the opening in top picture from left: Pastor Robert Huggins, Mr. Smith, Sir Milo,
Conrad Knowles, German Consul Henry Kaufmann, Lady Butler and Fox Hill M.P. Lionel Davis.
(PHOTO: Jeffrey Thompson.)


ANGLICAN

CATECHIST

ASSOCIATION
THE DIOCESAN Catechist
Association was formed at the
first annual conference of
Catechists of the Anglican
Church, which opened Monday
at Chirst Church Cathedral
with a High Mass celebrated at
8 p.m. by the Rt. Rev. Michael
Eldon, Bishop of Nassau and
the Bahamas. The service was
broadcast over radio
station ZNS.
Elected as officers of the
Association were Mr. Sidney
Burrows (Governor's Harbour,.
Eleuthera), president; Mr. Ivan
McPhee (Nicolls Town,
Andros), vice president; Mr. V.
B. Darville (Christ the King,
Nassau), secretary; Senator Ira
Curry (Rolleville, Exuma),
treasurer; Mr. John Marshall
(George Town, Exuma),
council member.
Conference sessions were
held at Holy Cross Parish Hall
on Tuesday and Wednesday
and were presided over by the
Bishop and Dean William
Granger.
Lectures were given by
Bishop Donald Knowles on
"Conducting of Services"; by
Dean Granger on the "Role of
the Catechist" and "The
Sunday School"; Canon C. W.
Cooper on "Sermon
Preparation"; Rev. Glendon
Brant on 'The Sacrements";
Canon John Pugh on 'The
Bible"; Rev. Fr. Turnquest on
"Evangelism" and Bishop
Eldon on "Finance and
Organization."
Group discussions led to the
formation of resolutions,
recommendations and the
creation of the Catechist
Association.


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NASSAU,. RAHAMAS


MR. ARLINGTON L.
Miller (pictured) has entered
the election for the.
presidency of the Bahamas
Public Services Union and
promises union members
"young and vibrant
leadership."
A union member since
1961 and a customs officer.
Mr Miller thinks that with his
experience in public life, he is
capable of getting the union's
message across to
Government "without fear or
favour" always placing the
members' interest in the
forefront.
Victor "Doc" Rolle has
also announced that be will 1
oppose the incumbent .
president Thaddeus Darling in
the election of BPS LI
officers on August 19


Built when others left us, says


I ....


smow


1
i

s
I
(

I
s
I

\
I
(













































































-












THE TRIBUNE .- Saturday, Amu


SHIRLEY ST. THEATRE
NOW showing thru litoks) has appoint
Thursday, THUNDERBOLT Bliack Sheriff under
AND LIGHTFOOT matinees plodding of h,% tricky
at 2:30 and 4:45, Evening -:;imp iHedley
9:00. No one under 18 will Kmn.1n). The hope is tl
be admitted. v,. II hiing, jhout
bStIts Friday, Blazing lt, iih:-n Rock Ridge
Saddles matinees at 3:00 and hce cittiens out Then i
5:00, evening 9:00, No one ,Il be sold to ihe rajilr
under 18 will be admitted. hiiuc profit.
BLAZING SADDLES: Bat I ur her ggravi
working his way out. Slated ', m l :dy l ipr i, vitll
the hangman's noose, he cai ns ', edy impoai .ti
a reprieve by agreeing to hCkn iing peacs u gatd
Sheriff of Ridge Rock, a wild is lcke:is dCruned
Western town that don't ) hii S l (t I)n .ld int
figure to build his Il. Burt tonis a friends
expectancy. the often-jailed Jim
Governor Lepetomane (Mel "\idci), once Icared
1 1.. ... .


you believe Aobody
S reaus small ads ...
Sybu're wrong. You ae I
reading this aren't you'
Call 2-2768 for
information on small o
targe display ads.


I BLACK CREAM
"THAT MAN BOLT"


ed the
er the
aide-de
(H avey
fhat Bart
enough
e to run
the land
oad at a

e Bart's
ask of
rt (Slim
to bring
o town.
hip with
(Gene
as the


W: 'a Kid, now just the
wh'O liko on hooze. With Jim off
tlihe s;uc, they jointly take on
larg.iit's gang. That bad bunch
inI' tdcs mad Mungo (Alex
K,!,i.,. and sexy singer Lily
V- siitupp (Maddeline Kahn),
a I cuonic temptress who just
If,'! l%,wci Bart's guard by
iv.o. her girdle.
HIt. eventually wins the
+id-i-'n. c of his towns-people
.,iii c hsist them in a royal
S v., Iith Taggart's bunch.
1 lit their way to victory
k. % 1 ], but not before
,' i : ti tugh one of the
,;i.'- pie-tilling fracases ever

i c -llines ai mountain of
S' i ke. Tarzan and
Sih. orty dancing dolls
i l it le r.
l n, cleaned up Ridge
I nd hi ving brought the
\,. m. i i n ie its maddest
S.. i 'c i Bart and Jim hop
ii., J ,1 lit g black limousine
ii l e i )t into the sunset.


WULFF
.

ROAD
Now showing thru
Tuesday. THREE THE
HARD WAY plus BUCK
SAND THE PREACHER
Sunday showings continuous
from 4:30. Monday and
Tuesday matinee continuous
. from 1:45 Parentaldiscretion
is advised.
MA FIA: "Mafia is a
suspenseful. high tension
drama exposing the insidious
operation% ol the international
7.crime syndicate min blocking a
murder investigation.


UNROMANTIC MOMENT: No love spat this. Claudia Cardinate
is actually undergoing questioning regarding a crime syndicate
murder by police investigator Franco Nero in this scene from
American International's action-suspense drama, "Mafia,"

SAVOY THEATRE
Saturday night 8:30, thru companion Theodore Bikel
Tuesday, THE CHINESE save Suzy Kendall from being
MECHANIC plus THE drowned. A hooker, she was
MANDRIN MAGICIAN thrown in the water by William
Sunday thru Tuesday matinee Smith and Robert Phillips, who
starts at 2:15, evening 8:30. had been using her to rob and
Plus late feature Tuesday kill wealthy men.
night. Kendall won't level with
Wednesday thru Friday, Taylor, who falls for her.
SHAMUS plus DARKER Smith learns that Taylor
THAN AMBER matinee recovered the barbell used to
starts at 2:15, evening 8:30. weigh her down and kills James
Plus late feature Friday night. Booth in an effort to find him.
SHAMUS: Brooklyn Returning to her apartment,
dective Burt Reynolds lives so Kendall is killed by Phillips in a
hit and run accident.
Investigating, Taylor is almost
j murdered by Phillips, but kills
him instead.
Fromn maid Janet
MacLachlan, Taylor learns that
Smith is headed for Nassau
with Ahna Capri filling in for
Kendall.


MEL BROOKS (center) p ys the girl-hungry Governor in
hi& new comedy film for Warner Bros., "Blazing Saddles,"
opening at the Shirley St. Theatre. Harvey Korman is His
Honor's aide as Robyn Hilton waits for that dictation.
brooks directed the wild Western from a screenplay he
wrote with Norman Steinberg, Andrew Bergman, Richard
Pryor and Alan Uger. Michael Hertzherg produced.


NOW IlRI I I'RSDI)AY
Matinee 2:30 & 4.45,
Evening 9:00 Phone 2 1004, 2-1005
HE HAS EXACTLY
SEVEN MINUTES














Reservations not cla med by 8:45 wil be sold.



Now thru Tuesday S"day thru Tuesday
Evening 8:30 from 500
Monday Continuous

"THE CHINESF from 3 00
MECHANIC" PG.UCK
BarryChan "I UANA" PG. 1
Glhenn Saxon, Mei Chen
PLU 1
"THE MANDARINBO


MAGICIAN" PG. "MONSTER OF I
Larry LIGHTFOOT Bruce Ma PIDRAS BLANCAS" PG.


'Phone 2-2534 All Star Cast I
Matinee starts at 2:15 Sunday C4:30Phone 346tinuous66










Monday Matinee Continuous from 1 45 Evening830
y hGleW Saxon, MeiChen










I PLU PLUL













HE MANDARIN
MAGICIAN" PG. -MONSTER OF














U'Phone 2-2534 A IStar Cast



ESundaCon T fm APoneU3-4666PU






114"p


shabbily he uses a pool table
for a bed, whcih makes his love
life interesting.
File's offered $10,000 by rich
eccentric Ron Weyand to
recover some stolen diamonds.
Larry Block, a character with a
computer-like mind for sports,
turns up clues.
Health club bouncer Beeson
Carroll leads Reynolds to Alex
Wilson, president of an export
company. Gourment- syndicate
head Georgia Tozzi provides
further information. Wilson's
sister Dyan Cannon hires
Reynolds to find out what
he's up to and the detective
discovers an arsenal.
Although beaten up and
pursued by thugs, Reynolds
takes comfort in an affair with
Cannon. After Block's murder.
Reynolds learns that Lt. Col.
John Ryan is involved in a
scheme to sell army surplus.
Ryan is also killed and
Wilson dies before Reynolds
gets the goods on Weyand, who
was after a code book.
DARKER THAN AMBER:
In the Florida Keys, Rod
Taylor and his fishing


TOP POPS
NIW YORK "Feel like making'
Iose" by Roberta Flack climbed
into the number one position
Thursday among best selling single
pop records in the United States. It
was third a week ago.
"The night Chicago died" by
Paper Lace slipped from the top to
second place, while Paul' Anka's
"You're having my baby" soared
into third, up from seventh fast
week in the Cash Box magazine
chart.
Elton John's "Don't let the sun
go down on me" toppled from
second to fourth.
Three newcomers made their
way into the top ten this week -
"Tell me something good" by
Rufus up front 14th to 8th; "1 shot
the sheriff" by Eric Clapton, up
from 12th to 9th; and "Callon me '
by Chicago, up from I I th to I10th.
The top ten, as rated by Cash
Box, with last week's position in
brackets:
1. (3) Feel like miakin' love -
Roberts Mack (Atlantic).
2. (I) The night Chicago died -
Paper Lace (Mercury).
3. (7) (You're) having my baby
Paul Anka (UA).
4.(2. ) Don'ttet the sun o down
on me FTton John (MCA).
5. (5) Sideshow Blue Magic
(Atco).
6. (9) Takin' care of business -
Backtman-Turner overdrive
(Mercury).
7. () Please come to Boston -
Dave loins (Kpic).
8. (i4) Tell me something good
Rifus (ABC).
9. (12) I shot the sheriff Eric
Clapto o (RSO).
10. (11) Call on me Chicago
(Columbla).


By The Associated Press
TODAY is SATURDAY.
AUGUST 17th, the 229th day of
1974. There are 136 days left in the
year.
ill(liti.ll;TS in history on this
d(late:
I 973 Soviet Union
successfully launches missiles \with
multiple warheads that can be
directed to separate targets,.
acc rding. to tiUS. Secretair of
Defense.
|1 69 Dr. l'hilip llIairer9g.
world's longest surviving lieart
transplant patient to date, dies in
(Caetlown. South Africa. HIurricane
staIns into Ut.S. ;ulf Co st taking
eventual toll of 300 lives in lise
states.
1964 Greece withdraws unit
from NAIt): tCongolese I'remilicr
Moise TIshonlihe appeals to tit
African nations to help put dt\on
reliellion in thile Congo.
1963 L-err bhoat sinks in I ,it
China seas off Okinawia. leaving I 2 S
persons dead or missing.
1952 Chinese delegation under
('hiuen -Lai arrives in Moscow-.
1945 Dutch refuse to,
recongni/e independent Indonesia
republic; provisional -renchl
President Charles de (Gaulle
communttes death sentence of
collaborator Henri l'etain to lite
imprisonment.
1943 Allied forcess gain
complete control in Sicily.
1940 ( ernman announces
total blockade of Britain during
World War I'wo.
1920 Romiania loins
Yugoslavia and t('ech.sloikia. i
an alliance which becoinmes riple


A conspiracy of silence,
subterfuge and distortion
begins when a crowded bus
comes to a sudden halt. The
body of a dying man, who
immediately' dies from gun
shot wounds, blocks the road.
Questioned by a police
sergeant, each one on the bus,
including the driver, in turn,
denies seeing anything. They
were looking the other way. So
at the very outset, the police
have no witness who saw the
corpse.
More Mafia intrigues
follow. A bank president is
dismissed on the basis of bogus
construction loans, according
to the papers and is completely
discredited and is relieved of
his duties in disgrace.
The common gossip now
centres on the new police
captain who has just arrived.
It's reported that he is a family
man. And that's good, because
it is the logical consideration of
the crime syndicate that "it's a
lot easier to make a family man
mind his own business."


I flAYi


In t2 Blritain sends note to
restrain (tin.a from sending
inilitarN expedition to Tibet.
1M79 I rench Panama Ctanal
coliptins is formed under
I erdinand de I.esseps.
I i I5 Napoleon Bonaparte
arrives at St. Helena to which lie
has been hanislied.
17I ? 1 rederick thile (reat of
Prussi.i dies, is succeeded hy
-rederiek I illiam II.
I7 5 Bllritishi fleet riider
kdiuiral Boscawen defeats Irench
off Ca pe St. Vincent in W\est Indies.
1743 / Peace of \bio between
Russia and Sweden, which cedes
south I inland to Russia as far as
lthie Kiulnen River.
I(A48 Oliver "riomwell defeats
RI'. lists under ithe Duke o
Ham.iilton at Battle of I'reston in
I il0 and.
1577 Peace of Bergerac ends
si\(hi war of religion in I rance.
\ hlire' t\ Huguenots secure
impor tanit concessions for
exercising their religion.
I 5 10 Pedro Navarro. iha\ing
taken Algiers and Tripoli for Spain.
is killed in inibush in North Africa.
I OIAY 'S BIRTHDAYS: Joseph
Dohrovsky, l'/ech philologist
( 1753-1829): Wiltieni Carey,
I english pioneer missionary
( 17(I,- 1834); Maurice Barres.
I renclh author ( 1 26-1923): Da)aid
Crockett. ;.S. pioneer
( 1786 -1836); Mac West, U.S.
actress-entertainer ( I M93 ).
I11()ttlll I)OR IO DAY: 'Art
iti\ make suit of clothes, hut
nature must produce a man"
Da\id Hume. Scottish philosopher
( 17 1 1 -177(6).


The Piesident of the Straw
Vendors Union, Mrs. Diana
Thompson, was yesterday
presented with a cheque for
$1,000 by Mr. Aubry Clarke,
an executive of Roberts Straw
Works. The donation was made
to the union's fire relief fund
for the 82 straw workers who
lost their merchandise in the
fire that destroyed the historic
Public Market building last
July.
"In the past the straw
vendors have been good
customers of ours and we felt
that it was only fitting that we
help them in their hour of
need," a spokesman for the
straw works company said.
Also present for yesterday's
ceremony was the union's
secretary, Mrs. Kathleen
Scriven-Gibson and Miss
Eleanor Johnson, manager of
Roberts straw Works.
Last week the Bahamas
Government paid the straw
vendors $40,000 compensation
for persons who suffered loses
from the fire.
During recent weeks a
number of groups including the
Gospel Bells Choir and the
Progressive Liberal Party
Women's Association have
shown concern for the
livelihood of the Bahamian
straw workers and have made
contributions to their fire relief
fund.
Picture above shows:
President of the Straw Vendors
Union, Mrs. Diana Thompson,
right, receiving a cheque for
$1,000 from Mr. Aubry Clarke,
an executive of Roberts Straw
Works. Looking on are: Miss
IFleanor Johnson, second from
left, and Mrs. Kathleen
Scriven-Gibson, Secretary of
the Straw Vendors Union.


COPRECTION
IT IS regretted than an error
was made in the review
describing the Canadian
Conspiracy presently appearing
nightly in Loews Paradise
Island Trade Winds Lounge.
It was incorrectly stated the
group was appearing every
day except Monday. They will,
on the contrary, be playing
tonight and will continue to
welcome audiences every night
of the week through August at
10:40 p.m. and 12:50 a.m.


Fishing without a Fishline?

BUSINESSMEN ARE ALWAYS FISHING
FOR CUSTOMERS.
A GOOD BAIT IS PHOTOGRAPHY BY




"The Beautiful Bahamian Studio"
on the Waterfront
At East Bay & William Str.
Box ES 6125- Nassau Phone 5-4641


Exciting things are


happening at the


fabulous Trade Winds

Bar& Lounge

PARADISE ISLAND


NOW APPEARING,







Showtimes Nightly: 10:40 and -1 ,40 P.m
Make the evening complete wfi W
dinner in the Imperial Dninig bllmmi *
from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
-,."
i-'1""g-idfc 't^


! j


GIFT FOR STRAW WORKERS


Bahamas Telecommunications Corporation
P. O. BOX N-3048 NASSAU BAHAMAS



NOTICE



1975


TELEPHONE DIRECTORY


The Bahamas I'clccomimunications Corporation wishes to inform the
public that the closing date for the acceptance of WHITE PAGE LISTINGS in
the 1975 Telephone Directory will be 30th September, 1974.


A form for your listings can be found in your current Telephone Directory
immediately following the White Page Listings. Please complete the form
ONLY if a change or additional listings are required and return as early as
possible to:-


BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CORPORATION
ATTENTION: COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT
P.O. BOX N3048
THOMPSON BOULEVARD
OAKES FIELD
NASSAU, BAHAMAS


In connection with YELLOW PAGE ADVERTISING, Agents of the
Corporation will conduct their annual sales campaign throughout the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas, beginning Monday August 19th, and
throughout September 13th. During this period they will canvass all local
business firms for advertising matter.
A. E. CURLING
GENERAL MANAGER


gust 17, 1974










8 THE TRIBUNE --. Saturday, August 17, 1974





CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS-FAST
CLA SSIFIED S C I N 1I EPWNE

REAESTATE REAESTATE FOR SALE FOOD I INEIM NELPW NT 8 TR sE s

C 27 C C1642703 C161 C64. .. ..-I C1 6 Ci 4 C16444C 4 ,,,603C1
,,h r C16115 k;l / C 161.26_ ... .. .. C64'34
05rIf*%Ff-J'I TIAlI M i n ; of.rnm ) IP I Jo }hnson........ .. --..,c I j .-I IkftA f'%lA'B "V-


l"ltrn-n-i 1AL iot. In 1 rylrlm
Estates on main road adjoining
commercial area. For
information phone '22201 -
Malone.

C16420
OUT EAST 100 on Bay
Street East by 241 ft. Depth -
only $18,000.00. See any time.
Dial Nick Damianos 22033,
evenings 41197.
C16450
MUST SELL: Corner Lot
Seabreeze, Section 1 100 x
100 ft. $7,000 or nearest offer.
Telephone 2-4350 or 3-5238
after 6.

C16419
SEABREEZE 3 bedrooms 3
baths expensively furnished
in immaculate condition. 100 x
100 fruited. Only $50,000.00.
Finance available to eligible
Purchaser. See any time. For
action dial 22033, 22307,
evening 41197.
C16412
LARGE Lot on West Bay
Street 100 by 300 feet
Reasonable price. Also
Commercial lot Bay Street near
town. Easy Finance available.
8 acres prime Hilltop West Bay
Street, suitable for Apartments
or Condominium.
For information call Bill's Real
Estate 23921.

C16453
WHEN you can't find the lot
you want we will! (Vz acre)
lots $6,500 near Soldier Road.
Lots 50 x 100. $3,000 and
$2,500 near Gleniston and
Seebreeze Subdivision. Cash
5% off. Terms offered.

We have listings on
subdivisions such as Golden
Gates II, Winton Meadows I &
II and Blair, Willard Heights
Subdivision, Great Exuma i/4
acre lot overlooking ocean
$3,000 and up.

Further listings are solicited.

Call or see us FERGUSON &
CLARKE REAL ESTATE,
Norfolk House, 3rd Floor,
Frederick Street. Telephone
59361.

C16118
PRIVATE BEACH AND
LAKE. Spacious lots, 70 x
100. $75 DEPOSIT. NO
INTEREST CHARGES.
Salesman on duty
YAMACRAW BEACH
ESTATES. Model House every
Saturday and Sunday, 12 to 6.
Tel: 4-1141 any day or night
or 2-4148. MORLEY &
O'BRIEN REAL ESTATE
(BREA BROKERSi.

C 16388
PRIVATE PARTY SELLS
LAND
BUY WITHOUT A
MIDDLE MAN
CASH OR BANK LOAN
PHONE 53910

C16457
NASSAU HOME SITES
FOR SALE EASY TERMS
SOME AS LOW AS $100 DOWN
AND $87 PER MONTH IN
* Belle Air Estates 60 x 100

* Colony Village 70 x 100
e Golden Gates Add. 60 z 100
* Regency Park 50 x 100
* Stapledon Gardens 80 x 120
* Winton Meadows 80 x 100
e Winton Heights 125 x 125
* The Grove West Bay St. 100
x 200
GROSHAM PROPERTY
LIMITED
107 Shirley Street
Phone 2-7662 or 2-8966.


C16459

HOSPITAL LANE

2-Bedroom 1-Bath unfurnished
stucco house with small shop
in front Lot 81 x 110 -
priced for quick sale at
$11,000 easy financing
terms.
KOOL AIR 2-Bedroom
1-Bath unfurnished house only
$15,000 ...
a VILLAGE ROAD furnished
cottage on corner lot 90 x 200
with lots of beautiful bearing
fruit trees completely
enclosed priced for quick
sale at $32,000.-.
OFF PARKGATE ROAD
immaculate 2-Bedroom 1-Bath
furnished house with small
cottage on 50 x 100 Lot -
many bearing fruit trees -
completely enclosed priced
for quick sale at $22,000.-.
BOYD SUBDIVISION 5-Unit
furnished Efficiency excellent
Income $40,000.-.
e PALMDALE 3-Bedroom
I k6-Bath house with large
recreation room, beautifully
furnished, including washing
machine, dryer and many extra
features $45,000.-.
* STAPLEDON GARDENS -
choice of 3 & 4 Bedroom
Homes, some fully furnished,
from $40,000.-. to $55,000.-.
GROSHAM PROPERTY
LIMITED
107 Shirley Street
Phone 27662 -28966
Niplt Phone -42166


SACRIFICE
MUST SELL
The following Lots in
Little Hyde Park
South Beach Estates
Winton Estates
Call evenings and week-ends
No. 4-2166.

C16155
FOR SALE
OFF VILLAGE ROAD
INCOME PRODUCING
PROPERTY
4 bedroom 3 bath furnished
home along with TWO
APARTMENTS on lot 110 x
200 with lots of extras. Ideal as
dwelling for company
executives. Phone 31403.

FOR SALE OR RENT

C15450
3 bedroom, 1 bath private
home, fully furnished for i nt
or sale, Oakes Field, Nassaiu
Call Freeport 352-6268.



C 16432
NEWLY decorated, furnished
house, two airconditionedc
bedrooms, one bath, in Buenr
Retire. I lephone 3-1518 o0i
5-3266.
C16430
TWO BEDROOM
FURNISHED aircondrliuned
house available immediately.
Phone Wallace 596'50 01
42765.


C16422
2 BEDROOM 2 bath
oceanview apartment. T.V.
antenna a, no children, no pets
Telephone 78141 or 77655b.

C16400
THREE furnished rooms with
modern conveniences and gas
stoves on Christie Street cast
side, laundromat in yar d
Rooms $16, $20 anid $2) pci
week. Phone 5-4811

C16414
Charming house', niLe'ly
furnished 2 bedrooms, ;'
bathrooms Cable Bea(i,
pool, and sea, aircondition,'d
Phone 7-7530.

C16379
2 bedroom apartment. Winton
Highway, fully fu nished.
balcony with excellent views
All utilities included. $350 p)er
month. Phone 21631!.

C16119
COTTAGES and
APARTMENTS monthly
airconditioned, fully furnished,
maid service available. Lovely
garden and swimming pool.
Telephone 31297, 31093.

C16136
LOVELY 1 anrid ? bediooii
a ir conditioned apa r tnwntf.
Dundas Court, Pvftom's
Addition, Master T V. antennae
and laundry room facilities
enclosed parking area. For
information call 3 496)3 or
5-4258.
C16429
THREE BEDROOMS, TWO
BATHS, modern newly
redecorated house, East Street
South main roach' (South
Beach), on yearly lease
unfurnished, good location,i
airconditioners, siit small
professional family. Telephone-
owner 36334 or 22433.
C16418
THREE bedroom upstairs
apartment a few minutes to
down town, t rid a minute'
walk to Palmdale Shoppincj
Centre. Located on Mountt
Royal Avenue just south of
Madeirs Street, Shirley eightt,.
For further information phone
21338.

C16448
ONE unfurnished ard oni,
furnished 2 bediu(om
apartment, located Pr sIor
Lane. Ft. Finrcastle Cill


5-2695.
C 16445
SMALL grocery shop
Eastern Road.
Furnished efficiency apartment
-- Rosetta Street. Phone
42036.

C 16464
PROSPECT RIDGE 2
bedroom apartment 2
bathrooms. Large living aind
dining rooms with veiandahi
Beautiful sea view with quiet
grounds and private pool
$425. Call 3-4730.


FOR SALE

C16452
PATIO SALE Household
goods, books, records, set of
golf clubs, original oil
paintings, wine decanters and
other objects d'art. Phone
57308 or 58020.

C16441
PIONEER 747 Receiver
PL-12D Turntable 4 DB1
Speaker Systems containing
12"/5"/30/" speakers in each
box. $1,200 cash. Pnone
3-2701.


Motor in good condition. Price
B$600. Phone 34099.

C16395
14000 BTU airconditioner, in
good condition. No reasonable
offer refused. Phone 54628 or
28245.
C 16466
LARPGE metal awning 9'51/2"
lung by 7'6" wide. Excellent
condition $150. Telephone
b-8134.

S16463
V A C K E Y S T REET
DEPARTMENT STORE
MACKLY STREET AND
PALMDALE AVENUE,
oppo ite Bai 20 Corner.
I telephone 52398
Thousands of Items 25% off
Thousands of Itemrns 50% off.
STORE HOURS: Monday --
Friday and Saturday 8 a.m. to
8 p in. Tuesday, Wednesday
anid Thursday 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.


CARS FOR SALE
( 16397
MUST SELL.
1973 Avenger, low mileage,
rilirable for yeais to come.
$1800 Coral Harbour Gas
Station 77014 Mr. O'Brien.

C 16334
"L I.,iijSiNE"
'73 CADILLAC, Black. Black
vinyl t.p. All extras. "Private"
one owner Chauffeur driven
Always parked indoors. New
wide white wall tires, spare
never used. Call Miami
305 -576 6076 from 6 to 9 p.m.

C 16454
19/1 Cheviolet Vega Sedan,
factou y aii heater, sadio,
iu .'L, V i I tt icu ing Cuood
( ,it 1. $1800.00 Call
A!i.), ; i ,-i Mu.lliriqs, b-3872,
6 3 u .I TI 5 p. m .,
Muluiay F' iiay.

CRAFT SUPPLIES


NOW irn ltork at Bahami-an
Paint Supply. Bay Street:
Decoup aqe
Clear' C,>t
Candle Crall t
TF ..e ra lft
Phoni- 2 238f.. 22898.


MARINE SUPPLIES 1


. C.H 5 -L
Ib h.p


S. i rti amn 25,. twin
'it insr'. Phone


(. 16.1 .3
' (? RI RA'. i AMPF R
I''i 6 I P '',i' i i sers
Pfef Ig1 1itO' 'i t1 i shore,
, t ( it. t conditionn .
Philontc i tl .w,,t' iid 7 p.m .


28 ,.oo
28 tti:


' Irtit i'r Sports


I isher n.iii T win M(i(
2 I to pm or

frLoa -/ ; ; !) i .t : t :)1

18 irun';itl1s uj:J
A l i ,' .il' ct a l,-

fr'o m~ .*" f)!:i 'O i( 'I p m


C 636?
28tt. Tvwin Sciew Cabin Cruiser
Fly BRidge with ,.lilal controls,
aun midtio)necl (.abir. Excellent
,l ' I(i O N.O. Please
ll : i d y 34243

F. lir u 1 -
1K)1 11 ft. CIIRIS-CRAFT
Couinamndei 'Ileps six, private
sliow ii I vo( 230 h.p. engines
with 11 -1. than 200 hours.
Kdit( h ti ,tte,. qood condition.
C ll ? 2, 67, i4il ]

MPJST SELL:

I / fout fibieglass sport boat,
41800, dependable 40 HP
lhotmismnii completely new paint
,in1d engine overhaul, with
S itiiln S'-'e at Coral Harbour
Gas Station. 77014 Mr.
O'Bi nen.

(C 6 1 3t)
PAC- I MAKF R 44 ft.
Luxu iious, Ciiising Yacht.
Phone 323/1I
C16423
22 NORTH Ameirican 160
I .P. Merritise, new engine,
stem n dive iobuilt, Sleeps 2.
F excellent condition. $3500.
O.N .O.
One engine rebuilt 160 H.P.
Mercruisei Chevy. $700 O.N.O.
Call 31642

C 16460
ONE 19 ft Chris Craft Lanzer
185 h.p. engine, excellent
condition $3,500. Phone
5-7170 after 6 p.m.
C16455
1967 27 ft. Fibieglass Chris
Craft twin 185 hlp. sleeps.
our depth finder, radio, one
engine and transmission, new.
A steal at $11,000. Owner
must sell. Call 23775 ask for
Fieddy.


tAEiR Ibt. .LUIPMENT -
SALES AND RENTALS For
the very best in Exercise
Equipment, Natural Health
Food and Vitamins, visit
Wong's Health Food Store,
Mackey Street.


I ANNOUNCEMENTS
C16376
PLAY GOLF at Blue Hill Golf
Course. Par 3 nine holes for
only $2.50 Juniors $1.50.
Driving Range 2 tennis courts,
2 squash courts, table tennis.
Pool tables. Open from 8 a.m.
till midnight. Pro Ken
Lockhart on hand at all times
for golf lessons. Call 36333.
C16417
THE BAHAMAS GOSPEL
MISSION KINDERGARTEN
will reopen on September 2nd
1974 at 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Ages 2V12 to 5 years.
Previous rates have been
reduced. Please call 21338 for
rates and reservation or call at
Mission Office.


SCHOOLS

C16114
LEWIS AUTO SCHOOL
Learn to drive with confidence.
Phone 59805 between 7 and
8:30 a.m. or after 6 p.m. or
3-5034 anytime.
C16413
SAVE on clothing for yourself
and your family. LEARN TO
SEW with and without
patterns.
Competent Instructors!
Simplified lessons
Enroll NOW for next term.
Registration daily, Mon. -
Sat., 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
D'ELEGANT SCHOOL OF
F A SH IO N AND
DRESSMAKING.
Corner East Shirley and Fowler
Streets. Telephone 53223.


C16360
WEE WISDOM
Collins Avenue
Nassau's finest Prep
3 year old Nursery -- 4 and 5
year old Kindergarten
Low Tuition
e Supervised Play
Quality Teaching Programme
Phonics
Reading
Office Hours
9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
or call
32641 or 21586


TOUR GUIDE

C16120
FOR SALE
$864.60
16 Days in Europe
Luxembourg Switzerland -
Austria Italy Lichenstein'
Monaco France
INCLUDES:
Round trip air fare
First class hotels with private
bath.
Land transportation by
deluxe air conditioned
motorcoach with tour director.
Complete sightseeing Tours
in each city.
Continental breakfast
throughout, and most dinners
with win.
All tips and taxes (except
airport taxes).
Plus other special features.
For further information
contact-
R. H. CURRY Co. LTD. Phone
28681-7 Bay and Charlotte
Streets.


NICEZ

C16369
The Bahamas Transport,
Agricultural. Distributive, &
Allied Workers Trade Union
will hold its Annual General
Meeting 10th September,
1974. at the House of Labour,
Wulff Road, at 7:30 p.m. At
this meeting an election of
officers will take place. All
financial members are asked to
be present.
Signed,
MAXWELL N. TAYLOR
General Secretary


TAKE HOME
THE TRIBUNE


/4w\1~


C16107
WOLSEY HALL
FHE OXFORD CORRESPONDENCE COLLEGE
'Whatever the quialnihalon -ou "ant -


* guaranicc ct1 iimiin unil n oii pass
souircanin. Iioniai rno' esaii c rSi
Alln oiini.1andlinleold of sin.ce'n For
earimpie l '"- ( of %ol.cn Hall Siudents
siing:i f'i B honours degrees have
pa.w.d inlhelanl 7 cear,
o ier 7! \earofrevniience'reitirlingin
ihe moesi cti.ienti ni ern nwihods of
Pioill icniching hi airninl f required.
Prtonal nnl0o1n lIo nice \our precise
reqrircnmentn
SLon fees pa.JNte i hinrtalnint,
prepare ror a uccsl'ul fulfture
i rfle lor a Free prospectus no:
SWOI mL)ALOXfOm 011B l


IN Loving memory of our dear
daughter MARRENA
TAYLOR, who departed this
life August 17th 1971.
Jesus loves me this I know
For the Bible tells me so,
Little ones to him belong,
They are weak
But he is strong.
Left to mourn: Mother, father,
six sisters, two brothers and a
host of relatives.
Signed: Bertram Taylor

C16440


In loving memory of ESTHER
GAY, who departed August
17th 1973.
Life is a continuous process.
Death is but the shadow cast
by earthiness.

Sadly missed by husband, sons
daughter, grandchildren,
sisters, brothers and a host-of
relatives and friends.


I HELP WANTED
C16433
LIVE in handyman-Gardener.
$50 weekly. Phone 22188 or 9.


WANII.U IMMEI.U I AEL T
Experienced Offset Pressman,
40 hours per week, good
working conditions. APPLY
BAHAMAS PRINTING, Oakes
Field.
C16401
SOME one to live on 4'/2 acres
of land rent free, good farming
land arrangements could be
made for farming about a mile
above Fort Montagu back of
Graham Acres road lead to it.
Phone 5-4811.

C 16380
AIR CONDITIONING
Mechanic experienced in
servicing and maintenance of
all types and sizes of
equipment. Must have own
hand tools, valid driver's
licence. Ability to diagnose and
repair without supervision and
the desire to advance and
improve skills. Salary and
benefits according to ability
and open for negotiation.
Bahamians only need apply.
Call Hill York Limited. 24074
for interview appointment.

C16435
BAHAMIAN experienced in
box spring moulding and
finishing. Willing to work 50
hours per week. Please apply
by telephone, Imperial
Mattress Co. 5-9727 or P.O.
Box 6273 E.S., Nassau.
C16425
LIVE in Nurse maid wanted to
clean the house, do the
laundry, serve the table and
supervise eleven year old boy.
Must have at least five years
references. Salary $35. a week.
Write P. O. Box N8194.


MOVING?

For expert Packing and
Forwarding by Sea or
Air. Contact E. H.
MUNDY & Co.
(NASSAU) LTD. P. 0.
Box N1893, Nassau,
Phone 2-4511.


APPROVED PASSENGER
RIGHTS


VEHICLE-E.PViC.-- wRiTrn
(MALE) ABC MOTORS LTD.
Mus! have these qualities:
Thoiough knowledge of all
phases of automotive repair
and maintenance; sober.
ambitious; pleasing personality;
legible handwriting. Paid
holidays, uniforms and many
other fringe benefits. Call Mr.
Williams at 2-1031.

C16391
AMBITIOUS and hard working
Bahamian between 21-26 years
required as male management
trainee. Two years business
experience preferred. All
applications in own
handwriting to Adv. C16391,
c/o The Tribune, P. O.. Box
N-3207, Nassau.
C 16361
ELECTRICAL STORE ROOM
CLERK. Must be able to drive.
Only experienced persons need
apply. Telephone 3-6644 or
write: William's Electric Ltd.,
P. O. Box N1151, Nassau.

C 16426
LIVE in Cook wanted. Must do
some cleaning too. Must be
single and have at least five
years references. Salary $35 a
week. Write P. 0. Box N8194.

C 16442
One farm worker to weed
grass. Lazy one need not apply.
Phone 3-6930.

C16447
BAHAMIAN GIRL interested
in learning type setting. Must be
willing to soil hands. Apply
Erlin L. Smith, The Printer
Mackey Street. Phone 2-8787.

C 16449
34 MALE Poultry Farm
labourers required. Please
contact Gladstone Farms Ltd.,
Gladstone Road, phone 3-4850
for personal interview.

C16462
WANTED LIVE IN
GARDENER/HANDY-MAN.
Call Mrs. Baxter 34154

C16461
JUNIOR k/ils) EXECUTIVE
SECRETARIES We are looking
for Junior and Executive
Secretaries to work for a go-
ahead publishing company.
Expe ienced persons please
apple y D UPUC H
PUBLICATIONS 3-5666
between 9.30 and 5.

C16465
MARINE MECHANIC with 10
years experience in diesel, gas
and inboard and outboard
engines Electi cal experience
also needed. W ite Mi Edwin
Albury, Edwin's Boat Yard,
Man-O-War Cay, Abaco.

C1 64 5'
HANDY-MAN wanted
bahjrmian preferred. Weeding
yaids, house ,ark, cleaning
cars. Telephone 54947.
Bradley St. or P. 0. Box 23
Nassau.


TRADE SERVICES

C16112
SEWING MACHINE PARTS
AND REPAIRS
ISLAND FURNITURE
COMPANY
P. O. Box N4818, Nassau
Dowdeswell and Christie
Streets
Telephone 21197, 23152.

C16333
LANDSCAPING and for all
your gardening needs
mowing, trimming, hedging,
tree felling and clearing. Call
5-7810, LAWNS AND
EDGES.

C16134
BACKHOE FOR HIRE
Need a septic tank or trenching
done?
Call
CARL G. TRECO
CONTRACTORS LTD,,
2-4996 or 5-8725

C16133
FOR YOUR BUILDING
NEEDS AND CRANE HIRE...


see:-
iSLAND BUILD
LIMITED
P. 0. Box 6285 ES
Phone 3-1671 3-1672


RS I


RALPH BROWN
34263 59368
BAHAMAS UPHOLSTERY
Adderley's Addition.
Rebuilding, Repairing,
Refinishing.
17 years experience.
FREE ESTIMATES

C16127
MASTER TECHNICIANS LTD
Mackey Street
YOUR WHIRLPOOL
DISTRIBUTORS OFFER:
Refriepr-tors, Washers, Dryers.
Compactors, Freezers, ice
Makers, Air Conditioners and
Garbage Disposers. With full
warranty on every home
appliance we sell.
Service done by factory trained
mechanics. Telephone 23713,
59322.

C16121
TRAVELLING?
For efficient friendly
advice on Woridwide
DestinatLons by Airline or
Steamships. Contact
MUNDY TOURS at
2-4512.



APPROVED CARGU
RIGHTS







BAHAMA


FOR SALE

C15441
BEAUTY SHOP for sale.
Excellent location. Apply: P.
0. Box F-190, Freeport, Grand
Bahama


ANNOUNCEMENTS
C16137
SHAWNEE
Daily Service between West
Palm Bedch and West End. For
reservations call The Grand
Bahama Hotel (Ext. 5).

HELP WANTED

C 15446
WANTED
(FOUR) REAL ESTATE
SALESMEN Must have at least
three to five years experience
in realty business Must be top
closer and ha'ie substantial
knowledge of all sales
techniques particularly the
'Hospitality Suite' type of
closing.
Apply to: Intercontinental
Realty Ltd. P. 0. Box F-260,
Freeport, Telephone:
373-3020.


C 15449
WANTED
DIRECTOR OF SALES
ADMINISTRATION Must be
able to apply all Local, State
and Federal Laws to contracts
Df United States and Foreign
Citizens, on purchase of
Freeport/Lucaya properties.
Must supervise banking
transactions with respect to
contracts. Must also supervise
contract processing and lot
control staff.
Apply to: Intercontinental
Realty, P.' 0. Box 1O-260,
Freeport, Telephone 373-3020.
3/3-3020.
C15448 ..
WANTED
Intercontinental Realty
requires a SALES MANAGER
with at least five years
experience in real estate with
special emphasis on land sales.
Ability to supervise training
programme and large sales
staff.
Apply to: P. 0. Box F-260,
Freeport, Telephone:
373-3020.


C16443

OFFICE Manager required


for


The Tribune -Freepert.




Applicant must have business experience,
including basic typing. References required.
Apply in first instance to Mrs. Malone, The
Tribune, Freeport. Telephone 352-608.
Bahamian status required.


mi ser s


offers
3621 1
34569


ALARMS/SECURITY
Lowr's Alarm Services I'h. 3-2042
ANTENNAS
Island TV l'hl. 2-2618
AUTOMOTIVE
Michael ,st, '
Il dlvy ,.1 iirs I'lh. 32544
Lucuas ILI. lr1 t's
Iayv Siretcl G;.ar;agc Ih. 2-2434
rrai'sisliseiss ;il cpairs'
Shell Actiona Slatonm IPh. 5-2000
BOOKSTORE
Thlie (hristiain lIook
Shop I'll. S-H744

BUSINESS FORMS
I xecutive
Priiters I'll. 2-4267/5-4011

KITCHEN CABINETS
C' II1nimm\ci lla
I 0rriilurv I'll. 3-11 20

CAMERAS
John hull I'Ph. 2-4252/3

DOWNTOWN PARKING
Momllhlv Rat.e SIS
I'hllri. 2-4727(doi) 7-7387(nile)

ENTERTAINMENT
Audio Visoal & Movivs
Film" & I quip. Service I'Ph. 2-215$7

FLORISTS
Island IFlorisl I'll. 2-2702/5-5419

GARDEN & PET SUPPLIES
Moderndiii (arlrden & I'1
Madtira Shopping I'Ia/a P'h.2-2868
Nassau (.ardei & I'l
Mieilrre ,Avriiw I'h. 2-4259
HURRICANE AWNINGS
John S. (eorge PIh. 2-8421/6
g,- -i--i-m--im mm


11. ~


LAUNDRY&DRY CLEANING
New Oriental Laiudry I'Ph. 2-4403

MEN'S WEAR
Iiaslhiinelle Ltd. Ph. 2-2376/7

OPTICIANS
()ptial Services Ltd. I'h. 2-3910/1

PAPER
('mrmierciail I'perrllousc I'll. 5-9731

PRINTING
Won1 ',l'ri0finig0 I'lh. 5-4506
I SC:clitiv ............
Priiters I'h. 2-4267/S-401 I

RUBBER STAMPS
Won' s R.ihehhr Staillis ,I'll. S-4S06
Tl riune Pii. 2-19016

SPORTS GOODS
('hallipionls Sportivs I.iild Pli. 2-. 862

TRAVEL
I'lPytours I'h. 2-2931/7
K. 1. Cirr 'C'. l'h. .2-8681/7

TRUCKING

TruckinK & Landscalpr I'h. 5-9574
Conch salad Trucking
Utk' 5654 Ph. 2-4726/3-1562 .

TV REPAIRS
Cihainrnl 1- Ictlr(oiics Ltd.l'h. 3-5478

TYPEWRITER REPAIR
Junior Hliel I'h. 5-1044

UPHOLSTERING
iddie's tlph ,lsterfilln Ph. 5-9713
1BImagggeaemlesllii


WI'


Dy
BUSINESS PROFESSIONAL




Save Time I



sE0-



hkIthI1 intl11 M021IEXIS

IHM ?_2lhtuiP


> Su IE INAVE IIIN


LPOR TN UTION I WAIT




Sh Nassau Merchants
For Business And Services


r


I Is-"Nom I .-- --- -"- -,- -1 - M


I IL


I -


I













17.1974


GRAND BAHAMA I fLP WTE


C5451CONSTRUCTION
U SUPERINTENDENT


MAID to care for
n and other household
contact Mrs. Madlin
West End, Grand
1a.





contact: Ernest C.
n, Livingstone Drive,
ort, Grand Bahama.


nT & AIRCRAFT
HANIC: Company Pilot
ust also be able to repair
maintain Company
ane and Jet Aircraft,
ly starters and generators.
have at least 10 years
rience. Must have
nercial instrument rating
a minimum of 5,000
s. Police record, health
ficate and letters of
ence required.
F DIRECTOR: To run
operate the Golf. Shop.
king and retailing golf
pment and clothing and
aging tournaments. 10-12
s experience necessary and
Id be a member of Golfers
ciation. Must be able to
golf lessons when
ssary. Police record, health
ficate and letters of
ence required.
rested persons apply:
ND BAHAMA HOTEL,
ST END, GRAND
IAMA, Personnel Office
veen the hours of 9:00 a.m.
3:00 p.m., Monday
>ugh Friday. Mailing
Iress: 158 Port Road, West
n Beach, Fla. 33404, Elon
tin, Jr., Personnel Director.


TODAY:
Domburgh,
Flavia and


C15454
FOOD & BEVERAGE
DIRECTOR: One (1) Food &
Beverage Director. Will be In
charge of all Food & Beverage
Operations. Must be
experienced in Food &
Beverage Operations in a
500-room hotel. Knowledge of
departmentalized hotel
accounting. Knowledge of
personnel administration,
purchasing, cost accounting,
banquet sales and set-ups.
Complete knowledge of all
food and beverage products as
to recognized sizes,
specifications, quality ind
standards. Ability to train aid
develop all food and beverag9s
mid-management personnel
Recognized hotel training
preferred.
ASSISTANT FOOD &
BEVERAGE DIRECTOR: One
(1) Assistant Food & Beverage
Director. Must be fully
experienced in Food &
Beverage Operation, payroll.
analysis, menu planning, dining
room design, cost accounting,
labour relations, convention
procedures and co-ordination.
Operational knowledge fo all
standard food and beverage
equipment. Ability to train and
develop all food and beverage
mid-management personnel.
Recognized hotel and
certificates preferred.
ELECTRICIAN: One (1)
Electrician. Qualified
electrician required, preferably
with some knowledge of hotel
work. Must be able to work
without supervision and be
capable of acting as deputy for
head electrician.
For all of the above please
apply to the Personnel Office,
Holiday Inn of Lucayan Beach,
P. 0. Box F-760, Freeport,
Grand Bahama, BAHAMAS.


SHIPPING


SAILING TOMORROW:
Angeliana Lauro and Song of
Norway.


Domburgn ARRIVING TOMORROW:
TODA Y: Angeliana Lauro and Song of
Norway


1: 6:57 a.m. and 7:23

v: 10:42 a.m. and 1:01


SUN
Rise: 5:43 a.m.
Set: 6:46 p.m.
MOON
Rise: 5:28 a.m.
Set: 6:32 p.m.


Applicants must be High
School Graduates with
knowledge of maintenance
procedures to care for
buildings. Applicants are
required to have a minimum of
10 years experience in
Construction work.
Apply to: Colonial Research
Institute East Atlantic Drive
and Nansen Avenue P. 0. Box
F-40, Freeport, Grand Bahama.
C15447
WANTED
REAL ESTATE EXECUTIVE
required to be in charge of
sales registration, customer
service and resales in Miami
and Freeport. Must be
experienced and know-
ledgeable in all phases of real
estate profession. Must have
held similar managerial
positions. Must be able to
travel.
Apply to: Intercontinental
Realty, P. 0. Box F-260,
Freeport, Telephone:
373-3020.


from Page 4
a Biblical basis for this
concept. For, the Mosiac law
does teach "an eye for an eye
and a tooth for a tooth". This
is, however, an Old Testament
notion.
In the teaching of Christ as
promulgated in the Sermon on
the Mount, however, the idea
of retaliation is not
encouraged. Man is not to take
into his own hands revenge
upon others. Final vengeance is
in the hands of the Almighty
according to St. Paul. (Rom.
12:19).
There are those who on
humanitarian rather than
religious grounds oppose
capital punishment. On the
other hand, the protection of
society from criminals cannot
be ignored. So, it is on the
basis of retribution alone that
capital punishment can be
justified.
From the point of view of
Christian ethics, "retribution"
is certainly not the best ground
for inflicting punishment.
Supremely, its purpose is to
reform the individual. For its
concern is for the salvation of
the body as well as the soul.
Our ideal should be the
abolition of capital


ELP WANTED

C15444
Live-in MAID to care for two
small children and other
household duties. Please
contact Mrs. -Knowles at
Freeport-352-6497.

C15452
Bahamas Princess requires a
CONVENTION SERVICES
CO-ORDINATOR who will be
responsible for handling travel
agency sales, handling travel
agents, convention groups and
handling guest complaints.
Must be able to plan" and
schedule activities for groups.
Must be capable of assisting the
Director of Sales and the
overseas offices both in house
activities and overseas
promotiodhs. Must have
previous stateside experience,
particularly in handling travel
agents and wholesalers, at least
one year. Clean police
certificate and good references
absolutely essential.
Interested applicants apply to
Bahamas Princess Personnel
Office, P. 0. Box F-207,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


punishment, or if not its
abolition, it should be resorted
to only in very extreme cases
of what in Shakesperian
language may be described as
"murder most foul". No
matter how wicked the
criminal it is always most tragic
when the death penalty has to
be used. Let us strive to create
a society in which it will not be
necessary!


-
Good news for readers of

STAY ALIVE

LONGER!
The complete book
now available!
Lelord Kordel's popular book
"Stay Alive Longer" is now
available to readers of this
I newspaper. Only a very small
part of its 220 pages was
used in the series of articles
I you have been enjoying. The
| complete book contains so
much more. Copies available
Sat The Tribune offices
I Shiley & Deveaux Streets
at $1.50 per copy. Add 25c
for postage.

-, -" -
| //.*.*,1/,,1 .1 H ,, _J


Tribune Comics Page


AND TEN WE 4AVE
TO TRAVEL 20 MILE.6
TO GT BACK HOMKI


9TrN-TO10 MY Y H)IEA
KITTY PURR. /\. HIM. j


LEAVES OF THE WHEN FRI0HTENED FROM THE
OEST OOR NET, THE A.LT ES A SHORT
DISTANCE AWAY AND TRIES TO
p aOISTRACT THE INTRUIeR

Irt v^ "".*l^J


h


THE E66


NWm
NEW


-... .~ ~4


eTOPPHEP.





Young Maria (14)





leads the way


YOULNG MARIA de la Guardia of Santo Domingo toured the challenging South
Okean with a round of 77 yesterday taking a 10-stroke lead in the gross and a 16
stroke lead ihn the net division of the Caribbean Metal Products tournament being


pi vyed there.


.-,'-


PAULINE LAMAN
.. Jamaican one-step


Baseba


. LCad"l


Boston
Clevela
at timo'
Neks Nor
Milwauk
( tkItaI,


Minncsf-,
( l i rn


l I hie A,sociatcd Pre'ss
AMIt RIl'AN L.IAii I-:
I ASi
\ 1. l'(Ct
65 53. .'5 I
nd 59 5( 13
re 60 5S .SO
irk St 60 492
kce S6 63 471
S19 Sl .s575
62 S? .530
(O0 ) s504
61 6b) .504
ota Si A 2 .4B3
Iia 48 72 .400


I I R1i \N 'S i ,ASI S
N\o ri ,rk 4-2, thih, ',! 8-4,
hi;,ton, 3. Minn,.sota 2
't ,-\ s 77. Cleveland 3
latiltiti r 1 I, Kansas Cit 0
Calitorniai 7, Milwaukee 3
lDetrm i Oakland 3
SA'I t'R.I) AY'S -5 GAMI-S
'lcvxas (Hargan 9-7) at ('lexveland (J.
I'PrrN 1 2 ). 1 p.m.
(hicai-,c, (JoIhns,)n 4-1) atNew Yurk
(Mci)tvweIt 1- 51. 2 p.ml.
Minn si, ti lt;.l;/ 5-6) at Hi)stoin
NMr'i o-), 2 pI.m.
i)ltrix (I1 i x: 13)x 7-1 t3) it il.and
S A-hh it. t 4-3). 4 30 p.tn.
l s.itx ss ('it I Sphttorf'f 2-1 2 i at
Haltiit re x Ir' tf .tiri 4- A 7 0 p.u.i ,
nMit' itikce t llhiorn 7-10) a!
'a.ili if rni.i t aI j eslcr 21-7) I O i p.l .
SiNDAY I :'S;A,\li- S
\,a, s t t l I.' l.ni. p.n .
!)itrii t .1 it ikla nild, 1 : 30 ', .i.
k in t.it\ at i .I lti'in rt'. 2 pln.
hli,-.; at t N'-. "t N rk, 2 p .ll
\litl -i' i o li sBix'toni, 2 pmi.
'.lilx :'iikci it ('alil'xrnia. 5 p.m .
NA I h A[-I 1.1A(; '1
I AS 1
S I i( i ( i
St.1 'li, 63 57 .525
I'hilta.llphia I i SS 15 3 I :
P'it thurrh l t>i 5') <04 2; :
\intrc.il 5 i 61 .47-4 (
N ", S-x)rik 52 (.;3 .452 <+<
l. (il..c.,) -' ) 67 422 2
I os Ain:cl 4 7- '4 i'3U
I itt-innl i l i +4i xi 2 4
\tli l 1 5 "34 1 i 1i
lii. li''' till s 50il" 1 4'
S:In r mi.i'L,, 54 .b .45 |
xill tic' x, 4~ 73 3'2 2,s',
I KIl!l5-NY' (S AiI S
*l lhil.d lcllpi, ixt li Itit 3t
Nc\ Y t)rkx 2. 'ifln,t 1 titli
ilts!tniurtIh ". ) ,- .\n 'i-,Ics 2
li lm \n S, tix ini'x iilt',I i
t i I Ig x i 't, xix I
s lM 1) \Y 'S I\ItS
l ,', \li . '- x 'l.e's rr niii li Ii i t i i
P 'liirli I R I I tl ), I 2' pi .i it
S~i Ihcr,, ( i llin =r A-1 1 it !h v, .t...
(i li lltiill | I t i ; I' .in .
NC'xN 'i ,Ill t'arkl-Tr 4- It() :'( i ill t itI
( lillit i ix n 1- I I i 7 In.i4 S
,I tl I rii t-i- t A {I .l C ll tIi 1-3 l
i'tllt iiIlipl.i I m 'iri I' tI It 'i
-slitS Ilt itA r i tl i- i l In
lhiixtit' tn ( I l i't r ,i it ,ontrr.l
9i *" -1 t i. n5 lr.r1 .
Sli'Nt i t, 'S (, \\II h
| lx.o, .\iiix hi x l itt!sl'xurii 1 3?1


' f4i.
Sin litx n xx x ihtixxx 2 I lii+
S.ini I r.in, i 1 St i .ui, 2: !5
I'huladellr h+u :.I \liu ,t,.i 2.1, p ,i..
Nct YSIl. .11 i 'm n ini i i. 2 1 it!.
li ]iu ,,iin i t i lrr ,. 2 t p nm .

Stockton leads
% i I H I I I I l i I) ,
iON\N (' Ii I I)a,' Stho ktin,
wtilla +'+ J s ih 3 ma p lttinig
iu x. i,' xj i i lx t i, trx k c lead
\ t ili :11, xhx11'r M. tstxlxt p.'r a1 r fS
I riJ:mn lthe so u. I rund tl l thei
S200.005 t U Sait iin a Ir (;reitfr
Slartfolirdl Open II titiIurnatnieit
St".i kt'ini'5 tx\x rottllid txtl I t
I Ito. a dis antx 12 uun.ter par on t he
trIun lx 6i.' 5 rdl 5'I W therlie lield
S'tiunlltrv Clul t oirse. wa tl he best
w h'r ole sicire t litO w enr on th1 e pro
t,,-nit I itl11 i i t i r I I ,rI n i r



nl' ^ ,I In J 1 i



ru.r r o l r |.
r,,, i . n i d. i ir. 11 hr ui nr
l n, I t-, 11 i, i, r it.r l.r Inle
I .11 Illx I r x

% 1 .1 h ,it ', , 1 i ..'
i )ln l. t ,1 x i -1 t r, I,,- d it ,t i


halIxnir. txw, e' i i ,x, t rev.I nx xI



frtmpxn J it l will i n;i :I nt Uas
%welfl p stt ined al I I


With virtually everything going for her, the 14-year-old
Dominican junior champ parred seven holes on the front nine for
37. She took bogies on the first and fifth, both of which are par
fives.
Though Maria took bogies on the 13th, 14th and 18th holes.
she played good controlled gold carding 40 on the back nine.
Thursday, she took the lead with a nine-over-par 81.


Playing with a nine
handicap, Maria in the net
division leads Beryl Higgs of
the Bahamas who holds a slim
two stroke lead over Puerto
Rican Tati Shapiro. The latter
holds second place in the gross
with a 168 followed by Jean
Dunn, also of the Bahamas.
"I feel I have a very good
chance of winning the
individual gross award if I am
able to shoot about 80
tomorrow," said Maria
confidently. "But the main
thing is the team effort and I
hope as a team we can
improve." Santo Domingo is
fourth in the gross and fifth in
the net.
Meanwhile, defending
champs Jamaica put together a
much improved gross total of
354 to lead second place
Puerto Rico by 20 strokes in
the team standings. Puerto
Rico's four best scores
yesterday totalled 364.
Riding in fourth spot is the
Bahama whose 761 places


Tigerettes

roar to win


ALICE WELLS limited
Becks Raiders to four hits and
short stop Vanria Darling
knocked ill two runs from her
tv'o of three plate appearances
leading the Roaring Tigerettes
to an 11-4 victory and fifth
place in the Arawak League.
Backed by top defence,
Wells struck out four and
walked six enroute to her
second victory of the season.
She lost to third place St.
Bernard's.
"Although winning the game
in grand style, 1 was not
pleased with miy pitching, said
Wells, a former starter on
Aquinas Aces squad. "1 pitched
nmuch better during my last
outing." That was when the
Tigerettes stopped the Police
Stars 7-2.
Runs by left fielder Clorita
Cargill and first sacer Gloria
Walker gave Becks a brief 3-2
lead after three innings of play.
Becks' final run was scored in
the top of the fifth by Linda
(;aitor. On with a base on balls,
she stole second and moved all
tlie way home on short stop
Varia Darling's error.
ltow\ever, by that time, it
was pretty hopeless for the
Raiders. The Tigerettes
crammed nine runs in the
fourth and lilth innings putting
the game out of reach.
"Our lealn has great
deletnsix- nd offensive players,
but we jutst could not put it
togelher.- noted catcher
(,eneieve McOQueen. She
contrihluted two hits from her
three times at bat, a pair of
stolen bases and six put outs.
"We were playing shaky ball
games"
Charged with the loss wa';
Colleen lThompson who gave
up 12 hits, walked two and
sMiuck out otie.
lite 'I lgrVettes. having
finished their first hall of the
s.ie-s with a two and four
record lnow dwell in tihe
league's tillth spot three and a
hall gaties behind league
le.didg ieCl Jane Oueens.


By GLADSTONE THURSTON

them six strokes ahead of
Santo Domingo. Captained by
Beryl Higgs and led by ladies
champ Jean Dunn, the
Bahamas hold top spot in the
net division, 10 strokes ahead
of Puerto Rico's second place
652.
GROSS STANDINGS
following two rounds: Jamaica
- 722, Puerto Rico 742,
Bahamas 761, Santo
Domingo 767, St Thomas
859, St. Croix 851.
Guantanimo Bay 856.
NET STANDINGS:
Bahamas 0. 642. Puerto Rico
652, Santo Domingo 655,
Jamaica 657, St. Croix
697, Guantanimo Bay 716,
St. Thomas 716.
INDIVIDUAL GROSS:
Maria de la Guardia 158,
Tati Shapiro 168, Jean Dunn
- 175, Pauline Laman 177.
The final round of the
tournament was played today.
Awards presentation is slated
for the South Ocean tonight.


Ken Rodgers'

perfect play

LEFT fielder Ken Rodgers
in a perfect night at the plate
collected four hits including a
two run homer, backing up
Max Sweeting's five hit. five
strikeout performance as
Bahamas Customs clottbered
lHeincken Stars, 9-2 to move
within two games ot league
leading Keyboard Lounge.
Going the whole game tor
his third win in as mania
innings game, hi kept
Heineken scoreless for five
innings.
The Stars broke Customs'
shutout bid in the bottom of
the third on Michael Maiir'. in
the park homer. Their final
tally came I rom A\nioine
(Glover's sixth innings rbi single
that scored Lorento lIockiharl.
Runs by Charlie McKinncey
and Charlie Moss in the first
frame placed ('ustonis in the
lead for keeps. lHaving
wandered through threc
scoreless frames, they picked
up one more in the hith, two
in the sixth and Ifie ii the
seventh.

Fort iFincastle plai SI.
Michael's Dodgers andl Paadiste
casino o play B.lI( in
tomorrow's New Provildence
Softball Association act ion.


MARIA DE LA GUARDIAN
gives her putt that extra push
at the 10th qgoen. At left
watching play i, Jamaica's
Pauline Laman. Maxia shot a
77 yestet day tco iep her lead
in the irdIVid1ual gross
division o( the CMP
tournament. Ma'ia this
afternoon tihot a round of 86
thus making suie of winning
the individual gross award


BAHAMf- AS' A lve, medaist
Nathaniel Kr vno:'vi annouted
last night he will te entering
the pro rank:, "in lHie vety near
future."
"I hope to h" mot'ete a(tti' as
a pro flian I wa in the ar.tilexir
rank',." h- -' id itc iqi xj iir
to th 'i/ei,;e{ N-'ef .ti ',)i ,-i
Wright bout. IMiowles, recently
suspended by the A.B.A.B.,
pointed ott th,.etr .-,as no htpe
for arI'at-u- buI- - s ioq as
matters cotithiued the way
they were.


lltur it h:ts ii-n
'il\J S ,t -

'x -
MA x LS
I.ecr
I an


I1
A.

li


x'h t-x I '





SI.v r I




11,hitx I \



MA.IVSI-IT i(MI


1 l ',


lx

II \tIiF
ii
Ii


t,g*
I I' ,
N|


fIvtlIx,'I +-

Sll 'it I% d
I 1 i.'i lxr,
> .1 | I n1! 1 .

I ia.,lr In

IMPERI AL!1' ,N
'raadr, (





I r I t .
S t lii ,l
ltar l, IH +
" e r , + ,, +,


1 ,1



4 I'
i '


CENTRE FIELDER CHARLIE McKINNEY crosses the plate for tIrurtou'.' t ,. li. tip
of the first on a three base fielding error on left fielder Walter Rand.


Newton all


(Photo: Rickey Wells)



the wa y,


but fans not happy


BAHAMIAN HEAVY-
coming off 15 months layoff,
tantalized Jamaica's Oliver
Wright for 10 easy-going
rounds last night taking a
unanimous decision in the
featured bout at the Nassau
Stadium.
Noticeably not in his usual
strapping form, Newton
effectively employed his good
left jab in keeping the tactical
Jamaican at bay. Wright took
his fifth loss of 20 ring
appearances since turning pro
18 months ago.
though the match was
splattered with boos and
appeals for more action, the
decision was well received.
Judges Harry Smith gave
Ne"wtii eight rounds and drew
two; Ken McDeigan gave


MIDDLEWEIGHT Kid
Barr .blocks a left to the jaw
from K. 0. Grant but
prepares to follow through
with his own.

LEEDS LOSE

OPENER
STOKL, ENGLAND Leeds
Prnited, defending English soccer
i harlpiUns, made a disastrous start
t,,the tnew season Saturday as
Sitke City humbled them 3-0 and
exposed serious weaknesses in their
deellce.
All three goals were scored in the
second halt. But from the start the
Leedis defence looked shaky under
pressure.
Leeds tans could hardly have
expected their team to be at its
best. Two stars, Norman Htunter
ansd Allan Clarke, were under
suspension. Next week the captain,
Bill Bremner. starts a two-game
: 'uspensiot and the pressures will he
-\en heavier.
SMlan I udson, former Chelsea
star, set up Stoke's first goal in the
49)th minute. lHe collected the hall
i midfield, got 'hlie l.eeds defence
runiniis th wrong way and slipped
the hall throt-gh ior Iohn Mahoney
ito itimnter it home troin 25 yards.
N axsnitng gapt in Leeds' derence
lidi tu Stoke' otlhr two goals in
ilie closing mi,.'!tcs.
With five minutes to go, Jimmy
(,recnhotft was left completely
unimarked 18 yards out and made it
2 -0. I wv) minutes later Hudson ran
40 xards, with no Leeds player
attempting t, tackle him, and set
up the chance for John Ritchie to
,hooit the third goal. (Al')
SOCCER RESULTS
I lNiS LFA(.1A<,;11-.
Division I
Hirmtingani 0 Middleshrough 3
Iurtrlev 1 \o lverhampton 2
( lihlsea 0 ('arlisle 2
I vertoin 0 Derht 0
I eicesler 0 Arsenal 1
I iuton I I ivcrpool 2
Ma.chusiter ('its 4 West Hamn 0
N-\cx ast t A Cotventrv 2
Shelildti I' 1 Queen;'s l'ark I
St.ke t'iil 3 I needs 0
I 'tt tilihai 0 Ipswich I
Division 2
Holton 3 ortsmouth 0
Hitistil Rovers 0 Notl Is Count 0
tardiffl 2 ()\lord I
'1ill\all I sunderland 4
Nxxr\ici 2 Hnlackpool I
Nntirlgiharin 0 Iristol mity 0
)ldhlami 2 Sheffield Wed. I
Orient 0 Manchester United 2
Southampton 3 ull ('ity 3
West Bromwich 0 I ulrhari I
York City I Aston Villa I
DIVISION 3
lirrillton I Crystal l'alace 0
(iilcheister 1 \\ il..-rd I
(;illiitt halri 2 55.rlix l 2
(irimrnxh I Blackburn 2
l alilta 2 charlton 2
irelord 2 Aldershot 0
Hilddrstield I 'eterborough 2
PIreston 1 Plymouth 0
Southend I Chesterfield I
Swindon 0 Bury 2
Iranmere 0 Bournemouth I
Wrexham 2 Port Vale 2
s(t i()T ISH LI .It 'ILl Ul
\irdrie 0 St Mirten I
Allua 0 I alkirk I
-\rbrualh 2 Clyde 0
\Sr Uniled 0 MNithrrwell 3
$i.rv kk 0 0 ureen of South 0
IJrc, ni 0 I torfar 0
t. -Ilk I Dunde Unitled 0
t hel.bank Slirling Albion I
Dundee 0 Raltgerrs 2
D)unifermlmn I Aberdeen I
I art I ife 2 Cuwdenh lih I
I ast Stirling I Albion Rovers 2
Hamltlon I Railh Rover 0
Iihernian 4 St. Johnstune 0
Mirlun 0 Hlearli 5
I'ariik Thistle I Dumbartun 2
Queen's Park 0 Kilmarnock 2
Slenhousemuir 2 'leadowbank I


By GLADSTONE THURSTON


Wright two, Newton five and
drew three, Les Davis saw
Newton ahead in six, Wright in
two and two drawn.
Thie Bahamian, who in his
last appearance here knocked
out James Summerville, is
scheduled to go against
heavyweight Jack O'Halloran
in California within two weeks.
Wright, Jamaica's
representative in the last
Olympics found his opponent
cagey last night. Newton's
three-inch reach advantage
kept snapping in his face.
These blows were difficult to
evade and so, most of his
attacks ended in clinches giving
referee George Wilmore lots of
work to do.
Fans could not quite see the
necessity of so many
action-less rounds which
consisted mostly of holdings.
Some even charged that the
fight was fixed, "Fight y' all,
fight," fans streamed
impatiently.
Both fighters were warned
of infringements that included
hitting on the break, butting,
and not breaking on the
command. Wilmore even
threatened to disqualify them
both.
"Everytime he threw a
punch, he went down so low, "
said Newton drawing his hand
waist high across his body.
When Wright tried to return to
his natural stance, his head
would lock securely under
Newton's left arm. "If he had
kept his head up, it would have
been a different fight."
Wright figured Newton was a
good athlete. "He should have
been in track and field
instead," he said. "You should
have stood up and fight like a
man and stop hugging me like a
woman," he shouted to
Newton during a verbal battle
in the dressing room.
Though he amditted defeat,
Wright did not think it was as
bad as the judges indicated.
"If they had seen it any other
way, it would have been a
draw."
Neither boxer took chances


with each other over the fiist
two rounds resulting in most
attackss ending in ties. It va.s
dull.
Wright was the aggressor. a
pattern he took at the cost of a
few jabs. However, with the
exception of a few
combinations, the third and
fourth were a repeat of the
first two.
Action picked up a hib
going into the eighth round
when both fihilets exchanged
a flurry of punches. This too
fizzled into meaningless play
ending with Wright kneeling on
the canvas with Newton',
hands resting on hins should,-.
The final bell was met with
dissatisfaction. Fans even
started walking out hc ore thli
final decision was made.


Middleweight sensation Kid
Barr battered K.O. Grant .-:* ,
submission in 1 .25 i theN ,i;
round leaving no doubt as i,.
who is the better boxer.
Their fir t outing, ea I.i." !
year, ended in a diM\t.tit
verdict with Barr taking tii
decision.
Entering the ring at 154
pounds, Barr took the initiative
from the fourth round dishing
out left jabs that had Grant
defenceless. Both fighters
engaged in a toe to toe Battle
in the fifth that ended ",ith
Grant showing signs ol
weakness.
C 'tiir.gz;oul\ hie went into
the sixth, but a stinging right
to the head took all he had,.
Barr then followed through
victorious with combinations.
Unable to take any more,
Grant turned his back o n hi-
foe signalling the end.

CUP SKIPPERS

NEW POR1, R Skippc
were named Wednesday for lhe
aluminum Mariner and tint
wooden Valiant in the final
U.S. trials on Rhode IslIanl
Sound for the Sept ItI
America's Cup races
Dennis Conner will i.nl
Mariner and Ted Turner will
sail Valiant during th-
competition, which will begin
Thursday and end by Sept. 3.


WENDELL NEWTON shoots a blind left in warding off
an attack from Jamaica's Oliver Wright. Newton took a
unanimous decision. (Photo: Vincent Vaughan).



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ELVELYN CELESI
PALMER of First Street The Grove Nassau Bahamas
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for naturalisation as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
naturalisation should not be granted should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 10th day of August 1974 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, Ministry of
Home Affairs. P. 0. Box N-3002, Nassau.






NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that NATHAN ANTONIO
PALMER of First Street --The Grove Nassau -- Bahamas
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for naturalisation as a citizen of The Bahamas.
and that any person who knows any reason why
naturalisation should not be granted should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 10th day of August 1974 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, Ministry nof
Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002. Nassau.


3m


THE TRIBUNE -- Saturday, August 17, 1974


10


Imen's oftbal











THE TRIBUNE --- Saturday, August 17, 1974

rem [9 a i Mi
F Ii


OKi.9 F*&M* e "- ai-. b. .1974. Wod ilkt ru .-
"I constantly have this nagging thought in the back of
my mind of what I would have done if I HADN'T
inherited ten million bucks"


"TWINKLE,TWINKLE,
UTTLE STAR .... "


SHE TALKS TO 1RDSITRE;S
FOWERS... AN/ II


4GAME CALEP ON ACCOUNTOFCJHEWP(PBALLW "


CARROLL RIGHTER'S

HOHROSCCE
from the Caroll RightWr lstitut
GENERAL TENDENCIES: In spite of thing,
inactive aspects usual with the waning Moon,
there are so very many planetary positions that are zooming
that you would be wise to take advantage of them and decide
what you want in the days ahead, and then start right in to put
these important plans in action.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) Ideal day to get at the
amusements that most please you today and have a delightful
time. Put creative ideas in action quickly.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Put new life into new
interests you started, but which have reached a stalemate.
Entertain at home in p.m., and have more harmony there that
way, too.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Contact experts who can help
you make the progress you desire in the future. Good day for
contacting others and getting good results.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) You can add
much to your practical possessions today if you get busy early
and act skillfully. Don't waste time with time-wasters.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) You are warm and vibrant and
others gravitate toward you easily, making you the center of
attention. Watch temper, though.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Get the right answers to
puzzling situations. Take no chances with one who lacks a
conscience. Study facts to know where you are headed and
you succeed.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) You understand how to get
along more ideally with others. Out to the social and make
interesting new friends. Know what a new ally desires of you.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Start some new plan where
your career is concerned for fine future results. Bring your
finest talents to the attention of higher-ups and gain their
support.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) You can expand now,
either by taking a trip, making new allies, or whatever, so
figure out which. Make right decision about new partner.
Guard health.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) Waste no time in going
after your aims. Your romantic attachment is in a fine mood
and you can have a wonderful time together now. Avoid
troublemaker.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Contact the one you want
as a partner and state your views and aims, come to a fine
understanding. Meet opposition with a smile and kind word.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Gain the approval of associates
and make your work more efficient and profitable now. Buy
attractive clothes. Meet friends during spare time.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY ... he or she will have
fine and novel ideas and should be given the best education
possible at the right schools, since there is every evidence of
fame in this chart, which can occur if the parents plan
properly for such early in life.

L I=o000


THE Make You Very CROSS-word. The one with no numbers
and, except for the first in each section, no order to the clues.
ONE HINT by compiler TIM McKAY : Search out the eight-letter
words-they will help you with others. Solution on Monday
.. .... enuine. (4)
Town near London. (5)
Nm- Loving touch. (4)
Stag coin (anag) s8)
a- m- Old stager. ()
Finishes. (4)
-- - Clues Down
Tough and ready theatricals.
- ---- (9)
Public transports (t)
i - - Items. (6)
Tropical plant made into
container. (5)
Man from CalIfornia. (9)
Encounters. (5)
n----sh workman. t4)

Stare.
Clues Across PIped fuel.
Used to check speed attempts (
(4-5) MMak0e the
Pushes under water. (9) w i n e
African country. (7) r e K d y. I
Corrodes. (5) (6)
Used In building. (4) Tasty bites.
Indicate. (5) (8) -Verarda'8 saoiione


-TAGE


-I- 3(Ce Comic Pa Me


DVy mnrDI.Ati mn Dal Curtis


JUDGE PARKER


Paul Nichols


APARTMENT 3-G By Alex Kotsky


STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD
IE E S IE 'i"HE AND THE GIRL FINALLY CAVED/N A
0 SOWHEN THE HOUSEKEEPER L S A ADMITTED HED BEEN /MPERSONATIA
SHOWED ME THIS WI& AND FALSE ofAS URY, / T THEY 5At/ I BEARD SHE'D FOUND IN MGRATHS' DIED O/MATLIA'
ROOM, I ACCUSED HIM OF o,'
MURDERING


CROSSWORD
PUZZLE
ACROSS


1. Protect
4 Urial
7. Model
11. Miami Indian
12. Conquered
13 Poisonous
tree
14 Belgian river
15. Knack
16. Cauterize
17. Farm crop
19. Borden's
cow
20. Glamour
?2 "Exodus"
hero


23. Gentle breeze
24 Talk over
28. Stigmatized
30. Arrow
poison
31. Revolver
32. Feat
33. Foreign
36 Baseball's
Willie
37. Lugosi
38. Chum
39. Flying saucer
42. Undisguised
43 Pipe joint
44. Roman bronze


HOW many
n words of
four letters
or more can
you make
f r o m the
H L letters shown
here? In
making a
word, each
letter m ay
be used once
only. Each
word must contain the large
letter, and there must be at
least one eight-letter word In the


SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'WAM PUZZLE






1 Boring tool
4 Congregate

47 ivium 6. Termite
SAl 8. Musical work
6 8 BeverageL
VEVE BS TRESS











20. Calloway
ENE ScANTA
SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE
1 Boring tool

alcove 3. Eye makeup

46 24Work at 5. ornuckroompia
47 Lixivium 6. JapanTermite
S7. Notoriety
32. 8 Musicalwork
3 35 M 9 isfWraparoundes
3610 Serfh
S18. Beverage
19 Fodder plant
20. Ealloway
S 820 421. SUri's father
22 Succor
6 n 24. Workroom
26 25 Extraordinary
To 26. Japanese coin


33.Eban
34. Vault
~ 35, Misfortunes
36. Shopping

40. Elf
gatur -- 20 41 Simple sugar


Chess


White mates in two moves.
against ;inY defence by J. C.
Radley m.
Par tines: 2 minutes, problem
master: 3 minutes, problem
expert; 5 minutes, good: 10
minutes, average: 20 minutes.
novice.


SOLUTION NO 48 -
Chess solution
SQ--QKtS. If I K. Kt 2
Q KB4. or if K-B6; 2 Q-QKt2.


rr. .N r-3e0m


Par time 26 min. AP ewsf eaLr.
Rupert and the Wooden Horse-40


list. No plurals; no foreign words;
no proper names. TODAY'S
TAROET: 18i words, good;
21 words, very good : 26 words
excellent. Solu lton tomorrow.
SATURDAY'S SOLUTION:
Alee case caste castle cattle
cease celt cleat case easel east
elate elect else estate lace lacet
late lease least leat leet lest
sale sate scale seal seat sect
seel -select sett settle slate sleet
state stale state steal steel
tale taste teal tease teasel teat
TELECAST test.


Winning

Bridge
My VI0TOlfMOLLO
Dealer South: Love All
North
AK Q

K72
South
S109 8 4 2
OAK
J 10
South North
24
West leads the 4. Declarer
plays low from dummy and East
wins with the 4A. The 05 comes
back.
How should South play?
ANALYSIS: Declarer has ten
top tricks-If the trumps break
3-2. Even if they don't, he will
still get home f the hearts are
3-3.
There Is no need, however, to
run the risk of bad breaks in
either suit. After one raund of
tr an, ad one only, declarer
lead the OK, GA and a
third heat. Now he will be in a
position to ruff a heart in
dummy for his tenth trIck if the
Eat-West hands are:
West East
S J 8 2 76
J 8 J10943
8 84 A 9 8 5 3
Such was the actual dibtribu-
tion.
Th.s quiz is based on a feature
in the new magazine, The Popu-
Albert Dormer invites the
reader to tackle the problems
which faced c:mpt.tors n this
year's Life Masters Ohamolon-
ship, won by Martin Hoffman
t arPPLV a o M thon
UendobbW.I.i64 8


"There, little bear. now you know that trees
do talk I" The Imp moves away from the
Sap;lng. You can make the seed test on
that wooden horse." I shan't need this
speaking-tube." Rupert points out. tThe
he as will talk to me without I ..Ah that's
dilffren," replies the Imp. The horeod
doesn't know why I's rest!88. Cnly It wood


can tell us that." The other Imps keep the
toy horse steady with soothing words while
Rupe.t begins the test. "Just fix the pad to
it." says his guide. You needn't wind the
tube round it." Rupert does as he is told
and, using the mouthpiece, he asks: 'Little
horse, what was It you really wanted to e% ?
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


Saunders & Overgard


I











THE TRIBUNE -..-. Saturday, August 17, 1974


Be a BIG WINNER


... Enter the


CLUES ACROSS:


1. Circus owner, being interviewed on TV, might say that wild
animals are best ---------- young.
4. Such a return from a tennis player could give his opponent
nu'chance.
6. A little girl will feel safe crossing the street with her hand --.
in her father's firm grip.
8. Stupefy.
10. Color
11. Birds often twitter as they ---- about in the bush.
12. Conjunction.
14. Repair
16. Small ---------- of cotton wool are likely to help to comfort
blistered heels.
17. A sensitive old man might be amused to be so described,
having been a rake in his youth.
19. The .-- in the kitchen of a large, well-run restaurant is
sometimes beyond belief.
20. Mature
21. If thought stupid, will arouse much hostility.

CLUES DOWN:
2. After examining a table closely before an auction, furniture
dealer may well discover that its surface is ---.-
3. Hints.
4. Not understanding, when spoken to by some ----------, would
peeve a friendly person touring Europe.
5. A red ...--. bird should be easy to identify with a
birdwatcher's handbook.
6. Sovereign
7. Misplaced confidence in his ----- could lead to tourist in Cairo
venturing too far off beaten track.
9. Haughty, spoiled child of rich parents might address servants
in a very ---------- way.
12. Good parents usually -------.- to their children never to lie to
them.
13. After enjoyable sighseeing trips in hired cab, elderly couple
may well scarcely remember ---------- later, being forgetful.
15. If his weekly average is four, a car salesman will be surprised
in some weeks to sell ----.
18. The director of a movie from a good book that creates a big
-------- is likely to be an imaginative person.
19. Trophy.
(SEE PAGE 4 FOR LAST WEEK'S SOLUTION)

KEY WORDS-
THIS LIST CONTAINS, AMONG OTHERS
STHE CORRECT WORDS FOR
I THIS WEEK'S TRIBUNE CROSSWORD PUZZLE


AGED
AND
APPEAL
APPEAR
BOLD
CAUGHT
CHESTED
CLAMPED
CLASPED
CLATTER


CLUTTER
COLD
CRANK
CRESTED
CROWN
CUP
DOPE
DRIVER
DRIVES
GLAZED
GRAZED


GUIDE
GUILE
HOP
LADS
LADY
LOB
LOW
MEND
NINE
NONE
PADS


POP
PRANK
PRIG
PRIM
STAR
STIR
TAUGHT
TINT
TIPS
WADS


PRIZE


........,
.fgyy" '--.


-up---

7-


W .' -


!WVIN


A BEAUTIFUL







CHALLENGER
COMPLETE WITH 70 H.P.
JOHNSON or EVINRUDE MOTOR
AND GATOR TRAILER
TOTAL VALUE $6,039.00


TOTAL VALUE $6,039.o0
drea lw i


/-RULES


1. Solve The Tribune Prize Crossword Puzzle
as you would any crossword puzzle. This is
a contest based on skill. Determine from
each clue the word that best fits the clue
definition. Remember there is only one
answer that is the best word to fit the clue
Only answers exactly matching the
solution will be judged correct
2. The decision of the judges will be final and
all contestants taking part must agree to
accept that decision as a condition of
entry. In fairness to all, The Tribune will
not discuss the contest by letter or
telephone with any contestant. All entries


become the property of The Tribune
3, A correct solution will be published by
The Tribune each Saturday after the
puzzle appears. The puzzle will be
published in Saturday's edition only.
4. After you have filled in every blank space
in the puzzle, clip it out and send it or
deliver it to The Tribune Prize Crossword
Puzzle, P 0. Box N3207, Nassau (or The
Tribune, Prize Crossword Puzzle. Kipling
Building, P. 0. Box F485, Freeport). All
entries must be received at the offices of
The Tribune not later than 12 noon on
Thursday following publication of the


CRUISE IN THIE SUN


The luxurious interior of this
magnificentORLANDO CLIPPER isthe
result of brilliant styling. It has
anodized metal frame with tempered
shatter-proof glass, full reclining seats.
The hull is time tested and will give


crossword puzzle Entries received after
this time will not be accepted. This
newspaper is not responsible for any
entries lost or delayed in the mail.
5. A contestant may submit any number of
entries, provided the entry forms printed
in this newspaper are used
6. Do not erase or write over your entries.
Any entries containing erasures or
write-oveis will not be judged. Illegible
entries will not be accepted.
7 The contest is open to everyone except
employees of The Tribune and members of
their immediate families, and employees of


t i i f a l


Sin a Clipper Challengei


ORLANDO
CLIPPER

CHALLENGER


you outstanding performance. There is
no finer boat afloat for the money.
Made by a firm with over 20 years
experience. That's ORLANDO
CLIPPER! What a boat!!


Maira Lumber Company limited and
members of their immediate families,
8. The winner of The Tribune Prize
Crossword Puzzle will win a brand new
Orlando Clipper Challenger de luxe model boat
with a 70 h.p Johnson or Evinrude engine
(retail value $5559 at Maura Lumber
Company). In the event of a tie the
winners will receive Tribune vouchers to
the value of their cash share of the boat
prize encashable for goods of that value at
Maura Lumber Company.


11


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~ - ~-- ma.



NN.,,-


EE VINRUDE
The outboard motor that's built f(,
everyone. It's right at home with
the jet fun set as well as the
commercial fisherman. EVINRUDE
70, the motor that's built for work
or play. IT FEATURES:
Fire power breakerless CD
electronic ignition Power pilot,
power shift with positive
mechanical follow through New
pre-set tilt lock Pressure backed
piston rings Pulse tuned exhaust *
Automatic pressure temperature
controlled cooling Power port
loop-charged engine a Computer
matched gearing!
And options you never even
dreamed about. "No motor so little
ever did so much."


MAURA LUMBER COMPANY LTD
PHONE 24001 -24101
P.O. Box N-81 77, NASSAU


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CROSSWORD NO.29


N am e ........................................ ....
P O B ox .. . ... .. ... . .... .. .. . .. .. .. . .
T elephore . . . ... ................. .....
Street Address .... ............ ......................


I 411
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