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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03690
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: August 13, 1974
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03690

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........ .... Nassau and aham A I. Leading Nowspaper


FOUR
CHARGED
IN

STORR
CASE
FOUR PERSONS were
arrested last Friday and
charged yesterday with
harbouring and receiving
money which Victor Storr
allegedly stole from the
People's Penny Savings Bank
and the Canadian Imperial
Bank of Commerce.
Charged were: Mark Sands,
James Bannister,. Hilda Mae
Dawkins (alias Moss) 'and
Wesley Moncur.
Mark Sands, 28, and a
resident of Lewis Street was
Charged with housebreaking,
stealing, receiving, possession
of unlicensed sawed-off
shotgun, harbouring a criminal,
receiving from People's Penny
Savings Bank and the Canadian
Imperial .ank of Commerce
James Bannister, 20, of Fritt
Road off Boyd Road, was
charged with receiving money
Bank of Conmmerce. -
Hilda Mae Dawkfns (alas
Moss) was charged with
harbouring a criminal and
receiving money from the
Canadian Imperial Bank of
Commerce.
Wesley Moncur was charged
with receiving money,
reportedly stolen from the
Canadian Imperial Bank of
Commerce.
All were remanded in
custody.

BANQUET
THE members of St.
Joseph's Parish will hold an
appreciation banquet to
honour Sisters' Mary Patricia
Russell, O.S.B. and Mary
Benedict Pratt O.S.B., at the
Sheraton British Colonial Hotel
on August 19.
One of the highlights of this
eve nt, will include a
performance by St. Joseph's
Dance Group. All proceeds will
go towards St. Joseph's School
funds.

PURSE FOUND
A LADY'S beaded change
purse was found on Montagui
Bay, south of the Royal Nassau
Sailing Club.
Nassau is inscribed on the
purse which contains a package
of chewing gum, 50 cents and a
bottle of Chanel No. 19.
The owner may reclaim the
purse in person at The Tribune.

TV GUEST
TOURISM Minister Clement
Maynard was a guest on New
York's top-rated television
interview show "Midday"
today.
Mr. Maynard was
interviewed by programme n
host Judy Licht during the one
and a half-hour live show on
WNEW-TV.
Other guests on the show
scheduled to appear were New
York Major Abraham Beame.
movie stars Elizabeth Ashley
and Keir Dulea and comedian
Pat Cooper.
During Mr. Maynard's brief
New York trip he will give a
reception for leaders of the
Black Elks who were on
convention here.


14


the


T WO CONVICTS
yesterday won at least a
14-day, delay in their
execution for murder, less
than 24 hours before 'tlhe
were to have been handed.
'The delay was ordered by the
Supreme Court, which has also
given the convicts' attorneys
permission to apply to the
Court tor a ruling on a
fundamental issue: does a
Bahamianr citizen have a right
to petition his sovereign, the
Queen?
Th i.r' appears r-
confrontation between the
Executive and Judicial branches
of the nation's government.
Wendel Leroy Burrows and
Philip Humes were to have
been hanged early this
morning. Mr. Justice Maxwell
Thompson ordered the
execution delayed at 2:30 p.m.
Monday, after a half-hour
meeting in chambers with their


A PERSONAL letter with
purportedly "significant"
contents has been sent to
Governor-General Sir Milo
B. Butler, sources say, by
one of the two murder
convicts whose scheduled
execution this morning was
delayed by a court order.
It was not known
whether Wendell "Red"
Burrows. 25, or Philip


days to beat


gallows



By MIKE LOTHIAN


attorneys David C. Sethell and
L.P.J. Trenchard.
The stay of execution
followed a blunt refusal by
Governor-General Sir Milo B.
Butler to forward a petition for
royal clemency to the Queen.
Sir Milo simultaneously refused
to stay the execution pending a
reply from the Queen.
The Governor General's
refusal to forward the petition
to the Queen was based on a
K ling by Attorney General,
tail L. Adderlcy.
Sir Milo's August 10 letter,
signed by his acting secretary,
Jeanette Roberts, advised
Humes' and Burrows'
attorneys:
"The Attorney General has
ruled that it would not be
constitutionally correct for the
Bahamas Government to
forward to the Queen any
petition, and that in effect (as


in the United Kingdom) the
decision of the Minister who
advises on the exercise of the
prerogative is final. This
opinion has been accepted by
the Minister of Home Affairs,
who has advised His Excellency
accordingly."
As a result, "His Excellency
regrets that he is unable to
forward. any petition to Hcr
Majesty or to accede to your
petition for a stay of
" xecul on."
Home Affairs Minister
Darrell E. Rolle late last month
announced that the Advisory
Committee on the Prerogative
of Mercy had found no
grounds on which it could
properly alter the death
sentences facing Humes and
Burrows. Sir Milo subsequently
signed death warrants effective
today.


Mr. Bethell and Mr.
Trenchard were given 14 days'
within which to file their
application for a ruling and to
serve a summons on the
Attorney General requiring
him to make an appearance
before court.
The summons had not been
served up to noon today, but,
subject to its service, a hearing
of arguments has been
tentatively scheduled for 9:30
a.m. Aug. 26. The hearing is
expected to be closed to the
public.,.


In effectc, the Executive
branch through the Attorney
General is asserting that even
though the power to exercise
mercy is delegated by the
Queen under, the Constitution
to the Governor General, there
is no recourse to the Queen
herself, the original source of
the power, once the
Governor-General has made an
order on the advice of the
Home Affairs Minister, who in
turn consults with the
Advisory Committee.
The assertion in the
Aticrney General's ruling that
it would be constitutionally
incorrect to forward any
petition to the Queen for
consideration suggests that in
the Executive's view the citizen
has no right to appeal directly
to his sovereign.
Buin ows' and Humes'
attorneys are, in effect, asking
the Supreme Court to rule that
the IExecutive has no authority
to prevent their clients from
petitioning the Queen.
Tne court's stay of
execution remains in force
either until 14 days have
passed if the attorneys fail to
file the suit or until the
court makes a final ruling in
the natter if the suit does
proceed within 14 days.
In effect, the attorneys have
won at least several additional
weeks of life for their clients.
Whatever decision is reached
by Mr. Justice Thompson
could be appealed by either
side to the Bahamas Court of
App, Ils and the Appeals Court
ruling could conceivably he
appc.iled to the Judicial
Committee of the Privy
(.Oiicil in London


"Polka" Humes 21, was the
author of the reported
letter. Its contents were not
known.
Sir Milo's acting
secretary, Jeanette Roberts.
referred Tribune queries on
the letter to Home Affairs
Ministry permanent
secretary Arthur Barnett.
When asked whether such
a letter had reached the


Governor-General, Mr.
Barnett's initial reaction
was, "Why do you want to
know this?"
He then said he had no
comment on the matter.
Initial reports said the
letter was given to "a
priest" for delivery to
Government House. This
could not be confirmed.


ted Friday are the firsi to leave the Bahamas under the amnesty programme. 111e I executive is hampered
Sit present by the absence of
Food deadline Attorney General Paul
blAdd tlewho bis off the island
ixhaeved to be in Caracas


B A II A M I AN tI o o d for all brands other than,, those One Commission office!
iierchants have until 5 30 p m. specified, and in some cases the declined comment, and
tomorrow to apply to the all brands controlled price may Commission chairman Nevile
Prices Commission to have be considerably .lower than Adderley could not be reached.
unspecified brands of ierLhans could afford to sell
breadbasket items sold in their at. However it is thought the
store added to the Price deadline may be connected
Control List. It is not known why the with Commission plans to
If the brands are not 5130 p.m. Wednesday deadline possibly conduct monthly
specified, their prices will be has been set for filing of reviews of the Price Control
limited to the low price listed applications. List.


Mexico letters
ALL CHILDREN under 18 In a press statement the Commissioner who should
years of age travelling to Consulate said that when verify them as the legal parents
Mexico with teachers or travelling with one parent, a of the children on the letter of
guardians must be in possession notarised letter of permission permission", the. Consulate
of a letter of per.missien from from the other parent is also said.
both parents and such letter required. "All such letters must also
"must be notarised", the. "When Minors have their be certified by the M@*elte
Mexican Consulate announced parents in the out islands the Consulate," the release said.
here today. parents should go before the This Jdone free of elulre.


Veneu~.'la.


ROBBERS

ATTACK

WOMAN

IN HOTEL

RAID



It0


Squad car

wrecked
ONE of the new Ford
Maverick police cars was
wrecked Monday
afternoon in a crash at the -'
intersection of Madeira
Street and Mount Royal
Avenue in Centreville.
There were no Injuries.
Police said the collialion
occurred at 3.25 when
police car N7661 driven
y Constable 753 Johnson
collided, with Mustang >.
number 788 driven by
Everette Ingraham of
Robinson Road. -
Picture: RICKEY WELLS. '... .


-Jury out



in $15m



drug trial

By SIDNEY DORSETT r


.5jp.
* ;.


JURORS deciding the case of six Amerian.
seamen charged with being in possession of
$15 million worth of hashish at Little Sturrup
Cay on April 12 were still deliberating up to
press time this afternoon.
The jury, headed by Mr. E. Wallace, retired \
at I p.m. following the summation of the case Jack Kubat.
by Mr. Justice James Smith.
Jointly charged are "Sea Trader" captain
Terry H. Daniels: Eddie Edwards. Louis
Tomiselli, Richard Bennett, Arnold
Zuckerman and Jack Kubatz.
They are represented by attorney Eugene
Dupuch, Q.C. who yesterday gave his final
argument to the jury. Assisting in the defence Lous Tomiseli
is Mr. Keith Duncombe.
Police accuse the men of having the hashish
aboard the 150-foot freighter on a voyage t
from Ceuta, Spain, to the United States.
They were towed into the Bahamas after
their vessel became disabled, however, and
arrested at Little Sturrup Cay following a
Customs inspection.
Five of the men deny knowledge of the Richard Bennett
hashish, however, third accused, Louis Bnnett
Tomiselli has openly admitted being
responsible for the drugs.
The judge, counselling the men, also
informed them of certain inferences they were
able to draw from prosecution evidence, led by '
the Solicitor General, Mr. T. Langton Hilton.
Possession could be established if all fifty r
bags of hashish were on the boat with the o
knowledge of all accused, he said. They were ArnoldZuckerman
also able to ask what was the reason for the six
men making the voyage to Spain, he said.
He said that one of the infe .'nces was that
the object of the crew was ostensibly to
charter the vessel but some person not before
the court and one of the accused decided to
use the voyage to gain something on the side. Ndle Gdibwda
The sikwere armstod shortly
after beift towed into the
s to go anchorage off Little Sturrup
S t Cay by the U.S. Coast Guard
cutter "Gallatin", under
command of Capt. C. B.
rth Hathaway.
Police lnsp. Wilton Strachan,
deal in charge of investigations and
officers executing the search of
Academic the freighter testified during
the samc ton."c the trial of removing 50 bags of
qualifications." hashish from the boat.
In July however, the Jurors examining the
Commission's Chairman hashish; kept locked in the
informed the teachers union C.I.D. store-room found one of
along with the Bahamas Public the bags missing, however, and
Services Union and the no account of its disappearance
Bahamas Transport has been given.


TWO UNARMED robbers
held up the Parthenon Hotel
on West Street north and
escaped with a small amount
of money along with some
other contents of a small safe.
The hotel's genera!
manageress., Mrs. B. M.
Bailey, (pictured) told The
Tribune that two black men
walked up to the entrance of
the hotel's lobby at
approximately 11 p.m.
Sunday and ordered Evelyn
Higgs, a front desk clerk who
wes carrying chairs from the
patio to the lobby at the
time, to give them the money
"or we will kill you".
One of the robbers then
gripped the clerk around the
neck, Mrs. Bailey said, and
forced her around the front
desk where the safe was
located and ordered her to
open it.
After emptying the safe of
a small sum of money, which
belonged to the hotel, some
German money, six German
passports, six airline tickets
and some jewellery which
all belonged to hotel guests -
the robbers made their
get-away through the main
lobby door to the hotel.
The police are investigating
the incident, but so far no
arrests have been made.



Teacher


back-w


no pay

MINISTRY of Education
and Culture teachers will
return to their jobs in
Government schools in
-September without the
approval of the Salary Review
Commission to a new salary
scale proposed by the Bahamas
Union of Teachers.
This was revealed today by
Enoch Backford, President of
the Teachers Union. According
to Mr. Backford: 'There have
been no new developments
with regards to salary
negotiations between the
Salary Commission and the
Union."
fie said, however, that he
will ask Agriculture and
Fisheries Minister Anthony
Roberts. who heads the
Commission, to resume talks
with the union within the next
three weeks.
It is Mr. Backford's hope
that as a result of the talks,
Government will allocate some
funds in its 1975 budget for an
increase in pay for the
teachers.
The B.t'.l. c\ecuttle
submitted a new professional
salary. wal' to the Commission
in Nocnmber last year. The
new scale it adopted by the
Commission would have
ensured an increase in pay for
the teachers which, in the
union's view. would have
"placed the salary of teachers
on par with the salary of
other Public Servants holding


Hotels in resort complex


THlE OPERATIONS of the
three Freeport hotels run by
Princess Hotels International
are being.c.onsolidated into a
complete resort complex under
the overall name of
Princessland, PHI president
Walter Sommers has
announced.
The King's Inn and Golf
Club and the International
Hotel and Tennis Club, both
owned and operated by
Princess, have beet brought
together under the m.w.nme,
Bahamas Pri ce .Hptel Golf,
Beach andTeathekClub.
JoininI the Babeaif


PrincesS to storm what will be
marketed as Princessland will
be the Xanadu Princess Hotel,
recently sold to Howard
Hughes' Summa Corporation
but still operated by Princess
Hotels International..
A press release said
"Princessland comprises a
unique variety and
accommodations including
private villas, deluxe suites and
beautifully decorated
tropical-style bedrooms. There
is also a mile4long prin te
beach, .two 18-hole i A
championed ,t go,
three swirmflng 4 12


tennis courts, complete yacht
club fAcilities."
The consolidation ianvvesM
considerate renovatlUo, im h
of, which b .asl&aWre *,
completed Fleas a lt.
tennis ooaplexw are ao We
drawit.oa .-d.
"I1n rest
consolMdtio," .
declare 4 "j.e.a
enhaneft t e
individu V/



C


The missing bag is the
subject of a supposed police
investigation, referred to by
the judge when commenting on
the exhibit in the trial.

Capt. Daniels, charged
separately with having a biscuit'
tin containing several cakes of
hashish inside his medicine
cabinet has also denied the-
accusation.
PASSPORT MAN TO
VISIT FREEPORT
AN OFFICER of the
Passport Office.in Nassau is to
visit Freeport, Grand Bahama
on Thursday and Friday this
week to help citizens with
passport matters.
He will be available at the
commissioner's office in he
Sun Alliance Building between
9 a.m. and 5.30 p.m. each day.

CUB SCOUTS
THE CUB Scouts of Mary
Star of the Sea, Freeport will
receive their merit badges and
bronze arrows during the 5.30
p.m. mass. After the mass
refshments will be served and
a handicraft and Indian show
will be presented by the cubs.

SECRETARIES MTIT
Their BaW.hal le.
Association wISA6r""-1e
meeting at a


A-
* 1"


TA ST. &


Agricultural Distributive and
Allied Workers Union that
be cause of the
economic conditions in the
country, Government
employees would only receive
an increase in their cost of
living allowance from $312 per
annum to $552 per annum
with effect from July 1.
The three unions viewed
Government's decision as a
"gross insult" and called
Government's action a
unilateral one.
About 600 members of the
B.UT. staged a support
demonstration in front of the
Cot mission Chairman's office
in June .-b"hile the union
executive members were
around the salary negotiating
table.
When the former union
president Leonard Archer
learned of Government's
decision, to add only a
"meager" increase to the
teachers salary he charged: It
is the union's hope that
Government will be prepared
to accept the same kind of
unilateral actions by the
teachers as was decided upon
and carried out by the
government."


'Convict sent Sir Milo letter'


The first group of Haitian nationals who voluntarily surrendered for repatriation are shown
above as they board a jet which took them back to their native land. The 75 who were


repairia


iMEARED


' NTIuedy, Ayug t3 17. 4 1 1i7e4


;WA'3?!S^iBB-/<****=****~t3


VOL.LXXI, .'


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MOVE FAILS


TO REVIVE


CYPRUS TALKS


STA ND

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,ipp,> ('d! lI\ l 1^ic ,n ill t tc'v.


Ford sets out his objectivesI


THESES are the highlights of President
Ford's address to a joint session of
Congress last night:
INFLATION: Declaring that inflation
was public enemy No. 1. Ford pledge to
drive for a balanced budget and to
convene a domestic summit meeting to
Jevise an economic policy.
FOREIGN RFLATVrONS: Ford
reassured the Soviet Union and China
that he intends to continue former
President Richard Nixot'n policies toward


this year.

President Ford made only one direct
reference to Richard Nixon in his address
to Congress and the nation, and that was
in reference to foreign policy.
"Over the past five and a half years, in
Congress and as Vice President, I have
fully supported the outstanding foreign
policy of President Nixon. This I intend
to continue." he said.


Congress praise for 'war


on


XX V.1111 iN I'
lit1 'Ott I It N iti
I::
itt. I, I
It I Ii t Il.~ 'I


noi' iC i l' o ill l l ,ll oicc'
Ne!~'lS, I t t e ,


\ i 1)\ liti i.iI 111 m king aI


I 'it. t ( l d' itll '
f I A m t
, ( ii .' \ i I ti i ,l il e

, d ,,i : -,< ,; ,n; : . a l i i i | )e n tlc iil en

,, io n'i.-l 1< c' IRp u I li al :, in
adt!hh


I d n i ', r l IcI ICd dil di cII lly
o i!ih .V.ji ri'Ar.lt.' diil butt
i'pl ', J tiitll lhiI adli-iin i.ist. 1, ion
\S il! ', i Aolcialc illegal wire
1i .tip 'I.t. litgguilgm s oi l retAk-mns.
in i I made il clear that
iI'i. i.fl ttI I is the co ntllry's
i lt'i r one tibiil t leicIl andI
il. -.'i '. l kitop 1il n; l gt inr his

(t,nrircs lhais nae lc clear it
\'. lcAi'n :c i i J lihiiiyi ploopl with
'cri lnt l'-rd But lt many
n!infc'rs .i that even though
t Iy Uke his style, he imalriage
li l he roMck unless progress is
ii Al in lighting inflation.
lord' two new economic
ilnmhtivCs recreating the Cost
t l.iv' g Co(t incil aind calling
ai;i cooinic siiunlsu it meeting
riceCivcd widespread if
"'ineo\hat inditional applause
,I icr the new litesident's
- 1111 -. .


Good old

plain music
1SHI.N(,]TON (0erald
I oi]l ri I t, i t, l h presidtr.ncy
has Iiii llli l .a thiinge in tIhe


Stlcictv orchi ll. i leader
HoNwllard Devro.n -i I hc'll
l)!:iv *"'You Gottii He A\
loothall Htero." Frifi night
iw,- tlitc ltur-dinulm! i dlincin l'
,il I t I iist i !It -l diinni r
hotleitd )by iord .1 tormner
loolball player.
D)evron also is IlIinking
aboul l ittectII Mr-,. Betty
I ord,. a fonim: cheerleader,
with tI the trains of
iBel l vCotd.i"
In addition triends of thi
F- ord cli idrcn and young


them.
DEFENCE: He affirmed his support
for a strong military posture, saying a
strong defence is the surest way to peace.
WATERGATE: In an oblique reference
to the Watergate scandals, Ford said there
will be no illegal tappings,
eavesdropping, buggings or break-ins by
his administration.
HEALTH: He urged Congress to enact
ia comprehensive health insurance plan


THE Folies-Bergere, the
Paris theatrical landmark
;where bare breasts were
displayed long before the era
of permissiveness, has been
sold by the founding family
to the owner of a string of
cabarets.
eN AIR Mali Ilyushin-18
jetliner, en route from
Jeddah. Saudi Arabia, to
Bimoko, Mali, crashed in the
Upper Volta killing 47
persons.

A GROWING number of
teenaged Indian girls in
Britain are committing
suicide or running away from
home rather than be forced
into marriages arranged by
their parents, a London
official said.

A UNION leader vowed
today that no flights will
leave Perth for London until
Foreign Minister Don Willesee
determines personally that
18-year-old Soviet violinist
Georgy Ermolenko has
voluntarily decided not to
defect.
PALESTINIAN guerrillas
were reported today to have
begun a total pullout from
the capital town of
"Fatahland" in south
Lebanon.

HUBERT Humphrey's
former press secretary.
Norman Sherman, pleaded
guilty Monday to aiding and
abetting illegal corporate
donations from the milk
producers, a spokesman for
the Watergate special
prosecution force said.

CHRISTIAN Fouchet, 63,
a minister for six years under
President Charles de Gaulle,
died of a heart attack Sunday
night in Geneva.

TWO YOUTHS were killed
in a scuffle with police
Monday as a strike paralyzed
the commercial districts of
Santo Domingo.

FEDERAL agents said
they had broken a six-man
ring which smuggled $1.5
million worth of cocaine into
the U.S. from Colombia in
the cages of deadly snakes.

A FEDERAL jury
convicted a New Yorker and
a Chilean Monday night of
conspiring to smuggle up to
$10.5 million worth of heroin


Nude stars out in the cold


SNI0DON Actors and
.ct cesses who hare all in sex
movies got the cold shoulder
from Flquity. Britain's actors
union. \Monday.
Vanessa Redgrave who once
stripped lor a nude scene in the
movie "Blowup" eight years
ago, championed a move to
allow striptease dancers, nude
photo models and skin flick
artists to become members of
the tinion.
But the outspoken actress
and leftwing revolutionary,
who has frequently clashed
with F11uity 's more
conservative leadership, was
outvoted at a special meeting
in a London theatre.
Actor Roy Maxwell, an
IEquity organizer in the North
of F ngland. said: "Performers
sonic of then might be, but


not in a theatrical sense.
"Some degree of acrobatic
skill and endurance might well
be exhibited by skin flick
performers, but the range of
artistic expression displayed b'
a gyrating buttock is somewhat
limited."
However, Equity did agree
to campaign to improve
conditions for performers in
British clubs and cabaret spots.
(AP)


D-Mass., said Ford's accession
to the presidency and the tone
of his speech marks the end of
Watergate as a political issue on
which D)emocrats can
successfully draw.
"It's a whole new ball
galne," Kennedy said. "I think
there's an entirely new
at mosphe re for political
dialogue on the issues that
count,1 especially the
economy."
The fact that it was Ford
standing at the podium of the
I louse of Representatives
instead of the just resigned
President Nixon appeared to
please most of his former
colleagues.
"He was the Jerry Ford we
all know, a warm human being
despite the aura of his high
office," said House Democratic


leader 'Ihomas P. O'Neil Jr.. o:
Massachusetts.
"I hIere's a great sense in this
hall tonight of wishing him
well and cooperating."
Kennedy said.
"It looks as though we're
moving from an era of
confrontation to one of
cooperation." said Sen. Lloyd
Bcntsen. D-Tex. Hugh Scott
who earlier had said his job had
not been fun for two years and
that he hoped it soon would be
again. "I think we're off to a
fiesta of friendly forays."
Scott quipped.
But many Democrats and
some Republicans said that
when Ford refines his stands
on issues, he will get the the
opposition he expects on many
of them.


I'm sorry, says Nixon

BALTIMORE Former President Richard Nixon
telephoned his former aide Herbert G. Klein on Monday
to apologize for making derogatory comments about him,
the Baltimore Sun said today.
Nixon's derogatory remarks about the competence of his
former White House director of communications were
contained in tape recordings made in Nixon's office six
days after the Watergate break-in.
Nixon referred to Klein as "not having his head screwed
on. He just sort of blubbers around ... sits there with eggs
on his face ... he's just not our guy at all."
According to The Sun story, Klein, a Nixon supporter
for 30 years, said Nixon opened Monday's conversation
with him by saying: "Have you got your head screwed on


people from the diplomatic aitrtss, today?" Nixon then laughed,
"ixon released three new community have been invited House and Senate members, Nixon added he had "pro
irans ripts last week showmt for the after-dinner daticing. however, had nothing but other people," Klein said.
he% authorized an :t, lempitlp This is in marked contrast praise for Ford's candor. "It was one of those thin
.te1 thCe -1Bl away from Nixon to the formal entertainment Sen Edward M. Kennedy. and I apologize for any embai
re-election mlornel that that wasi tn after-dinner
,iltu.dI tlie \\.Xterite staple during fornerPresident A *
bitikni kRichard Nixons years in thei B ritain I m oves on 0
While lHouti.s.
\ tN.i'isn, is d u i i Ford pi fers "plain. good LO\)OiN Britain's Varley told a news
h11' tc intil ict lh I f 'tt !! '. old-tahioned dance music," L i ( I o vC r nI m e n t conference that the state
rathLu' tIIiii i t o tli tits i :l. sidt Dei ro ., who has played nlllniiuitnced iinailonali/ation would take over "a limited
slhouitl insltIitdl itthtu; i/ foI six otllher presidents. pI l'n Monda.\ to speed the number of sites" to produce
plrntin ,i lar..' iiti)l) i l liThe i rst state dinner ilow ot Not lhi Sea oil vital to the giant concrete drilling
copilit', tl Ihe repoil. pcili.ips lioours King Hussein of I het' couiltry's economy, platforms needed to tap North
50,000 ( AP)I Jordan. I energy Secretary I.ric Sea oil.


Klein said.
obably said worse things about

igs I said anid I didn't mean it
rrassment."


il sites


NOTICE
> NOTICE is hereby aiven that ALEXANDER TUCKER of
Crooked Island Street N.P. is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration should not be granted
should snd a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 13th day of August
1Q74 to The Miniqtpr .......;imf- i-- * .. _


Varley mentioned neither and cocaine into the United Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002,
the number of sites nor their States from South America in Nassau.
location. But government antique picture frames. I
sources said the complusory Reportsf.rom AP
purchase of land for five such ....
sites was envisaged, and all are
in Scotland.
Some of these sites are
believed to be on the sparsely
populated northwest Soiotish
coast which environmentalists
are seeking to preserve as an
area of great natural beauty
C aton. sera ut onstare virtually
certain to press the goplernmen
to choose sites closer to s


a very good compromise-
eti ween the competing
interests of the economists and
the enviro.nmentaliosts
He stressed the limited
number of sites would t
maximize their ase ind avoid a,.
proliferation of building plantsall
on the Scottish coast t
Both sides ofthe dispute
had compelling arguments
On the economy p side, mlL ic on lll
Britain is staking its future
prosperity on its ablit to sealed in slim cassettes:
produce 3 million barrels of oil
a day from the North Sea by
1980. an output the site of
Libya's osewts
But to do thit Britain must
have the drilling platforms
produced on time Production
delays have already put the Just slip them In the Philips cassette recorder, push a button and listen. Greatl
schedule for extracting North Over 10000 titles More than 130 labels. Musicassettes can't scratch, can't
Sea oil at least one year behind collect dILP
at a cost of some 750 million
pounds $1 8 billion This Come and listen to
figure alone represents about Muica ttl PHILIPS
60 per cent of Britain's foreign
trade loss last year of $3.1
Furthermore each drilling
platform costs ui to $144
million to build arbd install in
the North Sea Britain believes
80 such platforms worth some
Sl1 5s billion are needed Ifth e I N S
Britain can't build them fast
enough at home. the contracts
will go abroad. I API )Co a itn
FEG perpACteIt fBSTEso

ROYt&L.MIL REGULAR TH EE


LIKES LIMITED U.K. TO NASSAU


R .b.lIIoarRRYn & Co,Ltd.d


PHONE 2.8683 2-8686 P. U. BOX N8168 BAY STREET


GENEVA An attempt to
resuscitate e the deadlocked
Cyprus peace talks apparently
failed today with the
cancellation of a scheduled
ministerial meeting that was to
hear Turkey's "final
compromise" offer on the
political fuwtre of the troubled
island,
(;lafcos ('lerides, Greek
(ypriot President of Cyprus,
told reporters there might be a
meeting on Wednesday.
Official (reek sources said
British t-oreigh Minister James
Callaghan had proposed a
48-iour recess am! t hat this
had Ii 'cn accepted by Greece.

Turkish I-oreign Minister
Turan liness told reporters
ipon leaving the (hcneva
United Nations headquarters:
"1k don't think I will come
back "
('allaghn ,laer confirmed to
,i news 'liii h llt li e proposed an
inleirupliii n o I tihe ltlks for.


inflation' speech


"36 or 48 hours to give the
parties time for reflexion."
fie said he hoped a formal
meeting Tuesday afternoon
would be able to agree on the
recess.
A spokesman for the
Turkish delegation told the
press that Turkey was strictly
opposed to a new "cooling
off" period. "We do not have
patience," he said. "We want a
decision today."

There was some indications,
however that (unes was in
touch with Ankara where
Prime Minister Bulent l1cevit
said Greece had until 21:00
HMT Tuesday to respond to
the Turkish proposal for the
political future of the island
rep'lib!ic.

It envisages a geographic
division of Cyprus into
autonomous Greek-speaking
and Turkish-speaking
cantons under a federal system.


THE TRIBUNE --- Tuesday. August 13, 1974


m 1 ...


( ,














THE TRIBUNE ---- Tuesday, August 13, 1974 3


Pindling didn't fool you


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
I WAS in George Town, Grand Cayman when I read about the
government buying three hotels in Cable Beach.
Now I am back in Nassau for a few days. I have read all about
it in The Tribune. And I must say that I found the report of the
debate on the transaction in the House of Assembly revealing ...
and slightly amusing too.
I was particularly interested in Minister of Works Simeon
Bowe's defence of honesty of employees at the hotels. He, more
than anyone else, should know how honest our people are. But he
missed a point. I feel that he could have appropriately ended his
outburst by saying to any member of the opposition who might
have doubted his sincerity: "If you boys don't like what I say
you can put it in your pipe and smoke it!"

I understand that many people were surprised ... and upset too
... when during the debate in the House on the purchase of the
hotels the government gave the strong impression that they were
socialist.
When Mr. Cyril Fountain pressed them to answer whether they
were socialists or not the reply from the front bench was: "Well.
what you think?" And, observed Mr. Arthur Foulkes in his
Tribune article of August 3, "to see the alleged moderate Mr. '
Pindling sitting at thethead in full tune with it all."
Whatever anyone might say about Prime Minister Pindling, no
one can accuse him of fooling the Bahamian people or anyone
else who might have interests in the islands.
In the first few weeks after the P.L.P. took over the
government of the country, Mr. Pindling made the party's
intentions clear.
In one of his first speeches over ZNS he declared that his
government intended to change the complexion of Bay Street.
They certainly tried to do this but in the process succeeded
only in giving the country the gift of Dr. Crdz, and Vesco and Le
Blanc.
A couple of weeks after his broadcast speech over ZNS Mr.
Pindling addressed a Negro university in the U.S. He told ihe
students that ... now that his party had control of the government
... they must get control of the economy of the islands.
Surely you will remember that the P.L.P. also pledged to
honour contracts and agreements made by the U.B.P. government
but, not long after they became comfortably established in the
driver's seat Mr. Pindling gave the licencees ... the investors ... in
Freeport an ultimatum. He told them that they must either
surrender the advantages they enjoyed under the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement "or else."
"Bend or break" was the choice he gave them.
The men who created and built this magic city couldn't believe
that he would do anything so reckless and politically
dishonourable. They resisted him because they thought they had
British justice on their side ... and he "broke" them without
benefit of the popular conceptim of British justice! Now he sits
smugly back while his front benchers leave no doubt in anyone's
mind that they are socialists.

The hotels cost $18.9 million. The government financed the
deal with a loan of $20 million from the Bank of Nova Scotia.
People are naturally asking the reason for the extra million dollars
plus. But this is an idle question. Haven't you learned yet that
there must always be a little extra in the pot?
-This, of course, is sound P.LP. business.
**************
What the government have now done is just the first step
towards introducing Socialist principles and practices to the
administration of these islands ... all of which probably means
that members of his Square Deal Club will gradually take over the
economy of the nation.
There are two ways of doing this. Dictator governments come
right out in the open and expropriate any industry or business
enterprise they want to control. The second method is by
applying pressures in the right places.
Well, Mr. Pindling is not yet a full-fledged dictator although it
would now appear that he is moving fast in that direction. And so
it had to be done by the second method which was to use the
government's immigration powers to make it difficult for business
enterprises to operate efficiently. This is what has happened to
the hotels ... and that is why their owners were glad to get out of
the country.
Remember ... this was also the experience of Bahamas Airways.
But the government will probably find this time that they have
"bitten off more than they can chew." The chances are the
country will end up with a bad case of economic indigestion.
Apart from all the other possibilities of the situation, this
much is certain ... both labour and government will find
themselves in a bind.
As long as the hotels were controlled by private enterprise.
labour could bring pressure on their employers and, with the
backing of government, hold them up for ransom. Now they are
going to find bargaining with government "another kettle of
fish." Already they know how little sympathy and help to expect
from the Ministry of Labour.
On the other hand, government will be unable to effect
economies without having a head-on collision with labour. They
won't be able to reduce staff ... and now they probably will have
to find soft jobs at bloated salaries in "we hotel" for
inexperienced members of the Square Deal Club.

Socialist governments move by progressive stages. They take a
piece at a time. The next step the government is likely to take
will be to introduce income tax.
True, Mr. Pindling has repeatedly assured investors that he will
not introduce income tax. But, as I pointed out recently, in one
of his speeches Backbencher Cadwell Armbrister declared that
income tax is now unavoidable. The government said nothing to
discount Mr. Armbrister's prediction. And so this could well be


taken as "a straw in the wind."
What the hell difference does it make anyway!
Mr. Pindling also promised to respect the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement ... but he didn't.
In any event, the situation is different now. Mr. Pindling made
his promise on income tax when his government posed as a
normal democracy. Now that it is a Socialist, state ... that's
something different. And so, if it needs to be-done, it has to be
done. Hey'
Now the secret is out investors will know what they are dealing
with ... and exactly what to expect in the nature .
It's the same story in all Socialist states. Trinidad has already
started a plan for local people to gai: control of the banks.
Jamaica is also moving in this direction. And I have no doubt that
the Bahamas will fal~1g line.
Then the insurance companies may be high up on the list.
Incidentally, what has becomn-. of the government's big insurance
plan ... can't they get it off the ground?
I have no doubt that the time will come when newspapers will
come under the hammer. But The 7"ihune will not be caught
napping. We have seen what has happened in other countries and
that is why I have done what I have done. Readers of this column
know what I have done but they won't really understand the
wisdom of my decisions until the axe falls.

You will recall that a couple of years ago I arranged to sell The
Wibune and get completely out of the picture.
The government blocked the sale by making it impossible
under immigration restrictions for foreigners to operate this
newspaper.


A band of real pioneers


EDITOR, The Tribune.
Well Ah read in d' paper
where d' gub'ment do it ag'in.-
Dey start school t' learn d'
young peoples how t' farm.
Now das a good t'ing y'
know, an' Ah only hope dey
could-a make it work, 'cause
while d' young peoples dem
learnin' how t' farm gub'ment
might-a pick up coupl-a ideas
deyself. Next t'ing dey might-a
learn how t' grow money tree,
'cause wid d' kind-a investment
dey making' nowadays, dey. go'
need a orchard o' dis kind-a
fruit 'bout eighteen months
from now. Yinna pray for rain.
Anyhow, d' school get off t'
a flyin' start. Ah read where
'bout fifty young farmers jine
up an' sometimes many as
eleven does show up for class.
Sometimes even d' instructor
does come, too, Ah understand .
Farmin' is only takin'a chance,
anyhow, so 't ain't no use t' be
all dat particular.


One t'ing Ah like 'bout dese
new farmer, dough. Dey mean
t' make money out-a farmin',
Yes, suh. Dey ain't go' be
stupid like dey Out Islun'
cousin, waiting' till dem cabbage
an' tomato come an' send 'em
in t' d' Exchange on slack. Not
dem, bullah. Dey want dey pay
now, while class goin' on.
While grass growing' farmer
starvin'. Dey see all dem fat cat
getting' fatter while d' nashun
still building What good for d'
cat good for d' kitten. Dey
want scholarship t' dignify d'
calling' an' t' buy glove and
Jergen lotion t' take care o' d'
wear-an'-tear on dey han's.
When y' get send t'd' Famb'ly
Islun' wid certificate say y' is
Agriculture Instructor, y' doan
want people looking' at y' han'
all bark up an' bruise up
grubbin' rock an' stump.
Anudder good t'ing dis new
school could-a do, d' stan'-by


My reason for wanting to get out of the newspaper business
was that I dreaded the unpleasant job of having to daily point out
to a blind and deaf people that their confidence had been
betrayed ... and that the country was headed straight for hell with
a one-way ticket.
Many people wondered why the government should have
blocked the sale. They felt that the government should have been
glad to be rid of me.
There could have been only one reason for their action. They
felt ... and probably still feel ... that they would be able to box
me in. This would give them great satisfaction, I am sure, but it's
a great game and I can tell you now that we won't lose it.

The reason that people get caught by new dictator
governments is that they don't take these men seriously.
In this connection, let me remind you again that the provisions
of the Emergency Powers Act the government recently railroaded
through the Legislature gives them power to take over any
enterprise in the islands.

With our type of economy nothing could have seemed more
ridiculous than the three statements made by Mr. Pindling: (1)
That his government would change the complexion of Bay Street;
(2) That they would take over the economy; and (3) that the
people of Freeport must bend to the government's wishes or he
would break them.
But he meant it and he has done it ... regardless of the
consequences to the Bahamian people and the blow it was bound
to be to the reputation of thy country in the eyes of the outside
world.
****************
All dictators make statements that seem ridiculous to the
normal mind. And so they are able to carry out their intentions
by gradual stages because of public indifference.
Everyone is amazed by the fact that we in The Tribune have
never been caught by decisions of dictators. This is so because we
recognize that these people are not just ordinary folk. They have
"way out" ideas with little or no regard for what people
ordinarily believe to be fair and just. And so we believe what they
say and take measures to meet the impact when it comes.
You will remember that when Hitler was barnstorming across
Europe people in Britain and the U.S. just could not believe that
he would be so mad as to force the nations into another global
conflict.
I believed him and spent a couple of years preparing for "the
day." My plans for taking care of my family were completed on a
Wednesday. The war came four days later on Sunday. I believe I
am correct in saying that I was one of the few people in the free
world who were ready for the impact of another world war.

My advice to readers of this column is never to discount the
intentions of people like Mr. Pindling and Minister of Finance
Arthur Hanna. However reckless their statements might sound ...
they don't joke.
This has been the experience of history and certainly the
Pindling government is no exception to the rule.

As I told you early in this article ... it's no use grumbling now.
Mr. Pindling told you what he intended to do. You didn't take
him seriously.
I advised you that he intended to do what he said but you
didn't heed my warning.
Now he is doing it ... and that's all there is to it.
******************


FOOTNOTE TO HISTORY: On August 4th. Jamaica celebrated
its 12th anniversary of independence.
Leaders in the nation sent messages of congratulations to the
government and voiced their feelings about the past achievements
and future prospects of the island as an independent nation.
All the world knows that the government and people of
Jamaica are faced with many problems and so a man must be a
supreme optimist if he is able to see a silver lining to the dark
cloud that now settles low over the nation.
Perhaps the most interesting message came from the Most Rev.
Samuel Carter, Roman Catholic Archbishop of Kingston.
The Most Reverend gentleman declared that "despite
difficulties, hardships and escalating problems of great magnitude.
it cannot be denied that Jamaica, within 12 short years as an
independent nation, has made tremendous progress.
"This fact was forcefidly brought home to me when, this
morning, while conducting a children's service, I spoke about the
National Pledge. One youngster, to nmy amazement, was able to
recite from memory and with great feeling the entire National
Pledge.
"When I asked him how old he was, he said twelve years. He
*was a child born in independent Jamaica and with a fresh outlook
and great faith in this country.
"Perhaps the older ones among us should learn the national
pledge and strive to make a reality of pledging the love and
loyalty of our hearts, the wisdom and courage of our minds, the
strength and vigour of our bodies, to the service of our
f fellow-citizens as we stand up for justice, brotherhood and
Peacee"
And that is all!
Amazing progress... what?

I have clipped this bit out of The Gleaner and will take it to
Nassau with me because I am sure that when Mrs. Eileen Carron,
Editor of The Tribune, reads it she will look at me and ask:
"Daddy. ambyou sure this is all?"
And 111 say: "Cross my heart and hope to die, honey ... that is
all."

THOUGHTS FOR TODAY
There's method to his madness.-

Forewarned is forearmed.-


Prime Minister could-a set date
now for d' Bahamas t' feed
itself. When Ah look at d'
picture in d' paper, dis new
school, Ah say: "Now das a
band o' real pioneers. 't ain't
no hot August sun go' scare
dem. All dem Johnny in d' Out
Islun' like t' run under d' cool
tree better watch out, 'Cause
dem Israeli ain't get no time
here."
But Ah like d' spirit. Yeah.
man. Das a real tough industry
dey getting' into. D' New York
Stock Exchange ain't get a
t'ing on it. All y' could-a hear:
"D' market down!" D' New
York Stock Exchange an' d'
Bahamas Produce Exchange
does work on d' same
principle: d' market ain't get
up now for 'bout eighty-seven
rounds.
Somebody ought-a give dese
young farmer coupl-a tips. Ah
wonder if dey would-a listen if
Ah do dis here?
First, while d' Obeah Man in
Nassau, get him t' learn y' how
t' dance d' rain dance. Once y'
could-a make rain, das 'bout
ninety-six per cent o' y'
certificate done cover right
dere. less'n y' could-a do dis,
erryt'in else y' learn ain't
count. When y' learn how t'
dance dis step y' could-a make
so much-a money jiggin' for
dem farmer in North Elootra y'
ain't get no need t' study 'bout
farmin' no more. Den y'
could-a set up office on Bay
Street an' hang-up sign, say:
' 'Weather-makers
Incorpulated" we rain
anywhere.
Once y' done get d' rain
straighten out, y' could-a take
a short course in psychology.
Y' go' need dis when all dem
crops start coming' after all dem
good season, an'errybody start
fullin' up d' Produce Exchange
till d' man haddy station guard
round d' door an' put ZNS on
full-time warning' farmer doan
bring nothing' else 'cause d' gate
can't close now. When y' ain't
get pay for six weeks for what
y' carry dere das when y'


psychology omin' in. when y'
want grab tire wrench an'
broke in somebody head.
Farmin' does call for plenty
patience.
Next t'ing, y' go' haddy
learn t' economize, like d'
Prime Minis'ei trying' t' tell y'.
Ah mean, y' can't expect t' sell
y' tomato t' d' Ambassador
Hotel today for ten cents a
pound den go out dere
tomorrow night t' buy 'em back
at forty cents a slice. 't ain't no
rich farmer in d' Bahamas. If 't
is big money y' looking' for, y'
gotta try get in d' Square Deal,
somehow, while dem fellow
talking' millions.
One nex' piece Ah could-a
tell y' 'bout but Ah ain't want
scare y' too bad. If Ah did talk
'bout it, it would-a be 'bout
hard work. But Ah know Ah
could-a 'ford t' leave da one
alone, 'Cause y' go' find out
'bout it soon 'nuff. Das when
y' go know for sure if y' go' be
'farmer or not.
Ah wish y' well, an' Ah only
hope y' gub'ment doan get let
down too hard. Some o' dese
New Bahamian get funny idea
'bout how dey s'pose t' make
livin'. Anyway, y' could-a
always count on falling' back on
d' new hotel complex if d'
goin' get too tough. D' pickin's
ought-a be pretty good out
dere.
Send muh one good
watermelon.
COUSIN ZEPH


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ALTON BAILEY of Charlton
Street. Ridqeland Park, Nassau Bahamas is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement n
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 13th day of
August 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, Ministry of Home affairs P.O. Box N3002,
Nassau.





Someone they can Thustl


.1. -~


"Trust in the LORD with all thine heart and lean
not unto thine own understanding" .... Prov. 3:s

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A i i A F) f i i I
Di,triboted if' the bahar-,js by Hethell Hobtrtcon & (()


E CLOl


THE TRIBUNE Tuesday August 13 1974
THE TRIBUNE --- Tuesday, August 13, 1974


3





THE TRIBUNE Tuesday, August 13,1


SPECIALS


Be Smart 6 Thrifty t


John's Dept. StoreO PP I G A Slogans put on


Transfers and
wording of
your choice
Many to choose from
Come in and visit us


Large assortment of
Ladies' shoes &
Back-to-School shoes.


FOR MEN beautiful assortment of
CUBAN JACKETS & Sport Shirts
in Cotton.


Tel. 22868


ADVICE
You go to a doctor when you are sick
To a Restaurant for food
To a Lawyer for legal advice
But you go to
MODERNISTIC GARDENS
For advice on Garden & Pet Care


U-


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at
TAMARIND SWITCH


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CRACKED CONCH & CHICKEN 'N BAG
OUR SPECIALTY
TAMARIND SWITCH
TAKE AWAY
Next door to Truth & Soul, Collins Ave.


Pie -M q Simar
SALE!
5.000 Pair'sof PIants
Elephant, HBells. Buaggies.
Jeans & Low Rise )ashikis,
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Bring this AD & set $5i Ol dm. (Iot
n AlL. PANTS.


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4to 14
r'F' r- Girls Slips, Briefs,
1 Knee High Socks. /
Boys Polyester Lang &
Short pants 1
Boys' Polyester & Cotton
long & short pants
Boys'oSH I eRTS
S White, Yellow, Blue /


"C INDOOR & OUTDOOR PLANTS
New Shipment of
Seedlings

COME TO TODAY FOR A FABULOUS
SELECTION AT LOW PRICES!
ALSO
OUR PET DEPARTMENT OFFERS
NEW ARRIVALS OF


* Parakeets
Rabbits
Doves & Pigeons
Fresh water Fish


LEES CARPET CRAFT LIMITED
"PINK SALE"
"" OVER 300 SQUARE YARDS OF SAG.
COMMERCIAL AND PLUSH STYLE CARPETING -
-MS ALL 0

REGULAR RETAIL PRICES RANGE FROM $13J0
S, ",-" to 819.0
*.'? E THEOE 0000 ARE ALL TOP QUALITY NOT
S'.' SECONDS OR IMPERFECT8. AND CAN BE USED
,.- eOTH IN THE HOME OR IN THE OFFICE.
SALE ENDS AUGUST 17th 0 PLEASE HURRY.
. $9 THIS OFFER GOOD FOR CAM ONLY AND GQOOD
*' "*r,^-~l WILL BE SOLO ON A FIRlST COME FIRST SERVED



CAPET CRAFT1P.
TELEPHONE 3. 1993
f'v -**HI.= oTo~tT


"Ports of Call"
Located in THE BERNARD SUNLEY ARCADE
P.O. Box N-505 Ph. 5-8243


CLONARIS'KUTE KIDDY
Market Strtone block off Bay Street Telephone


24264.


1 Boys and girls school shoes assorted
styles and sizes.
S 2. Boys and girls sandals assorted styles
and sizes.
3. Boys polyester pants short and long -
assorted colours and sizes.
4. Boys and girls pants sets assorted styles
and sizes.
For savings shop at
CLONARIS'KUTE KIDDY
MARKET ST. -- OR. ESFAKIS BUILDING TELEPHONE 24264


T.V. SALE


19" PORTABLE
BLACK & WHITE TV
FROM $245.00
ANTENNA &
BOOSTER
COMPLETE $175.00


Limited time only Buy wke they last!

CARTUIEI SIET & SOD
Bay Street Phone 24350 57268


NASSAU GOES BIG FOR

VINYLBUMPER STICKERS
^ CANAODIANt MPERiACLm
BANK OF COMMERCE GOT A MESSAGE
TO GET ACROSS?

TELL IT [A FCOMM WE DON'T
TO THE WEEK IMPORT
WORLD WE
ON BUMPER MANU-
STICKERS A F AW FACTURE
ARAWK ART
BOX N-1470 MULTI GRAPHICS PH. 2-3709

r7 t NASSAU'S LIVELIEST LATE NIGHT SPOT
i 7 OPEN EVERY NIGHT
A PLACE Poe aRIseVApIONs CALL
TO GO 2-1808 ..,.S. CAS
FOR FUN noon. mremc omoe HOTEL
SNAY AAMA
*f"='"lI BIOX N,. NASSAU.BAHAMAs


OPEN 11 AM TO SAM


THE PLACE FOR DRINKING. DANCING
AND LOTS Or FUN
LUNCH.DINNER.LATE SNACKS
THE BAND IS ONE OF THE BEST
DELICATESSEN MENU
COMPLETELY AIR CONDITIONED
DOWNTOWN'S ONLY GOURMET
ITALIAN & AEBfn R& h be IIS..


TAKE-OUT PIZZA *


Konica Autoreflex T
Bring this coupon and get 5% DISCOUNT


1.8 Lens
(plus CASE)
$229.50


r -'** M 9ONICA


1.4 lens
(Plus CASE)
$259.Y 50S -



BAY STREET


MODERNISTIC
*ARDEN & PET SUPPLY
Madeira Shopping Centre


Madeira Street Shopping Centre
P.O. Box 5790 Tel. -2-2868


TH RBUE-- usa, uut I3 g


r V I


ADE


"DJ


t.
1












THE TRIBUNE .-- Tuesday, August 13, 1974


Russian debunks


longevity cult


as myth in USSR


By Jim Alberse
THE DEATH of one Shirali
Muslimov last year at the
reported age of 168 was a blow
to the village of Barzavu, in the
Soviet Caucasus. It ended the
role of the mountain hamlet as
a tourist attraction. But his
death still left thousands of
alleged super centenarians in
the Soviet Union vying for the
attention of gerontologists and
tourists.
Now the Methuselah legend
which has flourished for years
in the U.S.S.R. is about to be
debunked, and by no less an
authority than the eminent
Russian-born biologist and
student of aging, Zhores A.
Medvedev. Exilled and working
in London, Medvedev, a
youngish 48, has written an
article for a forthcoming issue
of Gerontologist magazine in
which he systematically
destroys the myth of the
supercentenarians, no, only in
the Soviet Union but also in
Kashmir and Ecitador
Interviewed by TIME
magazine, Medvedev said: "The
.. trouble is that many scientists
have taken for granted that
these old people are telling the
truth, and then they try to find
some reasons to explain their
supposed longevity." The
result, he added, is "pseudo
science" based on largely
falsified data. Not one of the
500 people in the Caucasus
claiming to be from 120 to 165
years old has been able to
produce valid birth records.
Neither has any of the
superannuated Kashmirians or
Ecuadorians.
Moreover, says Medvedev,
when about 40 medical,
psychological and biochemical
tests were run in 1972 on
reputed centenarians in the
U.S.S.R., a commission of
gerontologists was surprised
by what they called the
"paradoxical" finding that the
functions and metabolism of
the oldsters were the same as
those of people about 60 years
old. Proven centenarians in the
West, says Medvedev, exhibit a
degeneration appropriate to
their age.
The fact is that no man or
woman with a verifiable birth
record is known to have lived
longer than 113 years. As one
actuary points out, assertions
of extreme longevity orginate
mainly in remote,
underdeveloped regions among
illiterate peoples whose only
evidence of age is their own
:laim, possibly supported by
Sm interested relative. In the
J.S.S.R.. and only there, has
longevity been elevated to a
state-supported cult, for social
and political, rather than
medical, reasons.
The cult's prominence in the
province of Georgia was
fostered by Georgia-born Josef
Stalin, who apparently began
to hope, at around age 70, that
longevity might rub off on
him.
Medvedev's explanation for
the longevity cult in Russia is
this: during World War I and
subsequent civil warfare,
hundreds of thousands of-


red Today: Bahama
Emerald Seas, Flavia,
c and Maxim Gorki.
d Today: Rotterdam
uthward
ving Tomorrow: Tropic

d Tomorrow: Oronsay


: 4:01 a.m. and 4:38
Low: 9:58 a.m. and
p.m.
WEATHER
ght and Tomorrow:
periods tonight. Sunny
tomorrow: A few
showers are likely.
Smooth to slight
: Light and variable
Tomorrow variable
p.h.


89 Min: 75
idity: 62 percent Bar
30.03


ise: 5:43 a.m.
Set: 6:46 p.m.


2:06 a.m.
4:04 .m.


: Arriv
-. Star,
Oceanic
Saile
and Soi
Arrim
Flyer
Saile
TIDES
High
. p.m. !
S 10:58 p
'-THE V
Tonig
"Cloudy
riods
S.fiMunder
^ Sea:S
:, Wind
: tonight.
,8-14 m.
; TEMP
Max.

Press: "
: SUN


SM
SMOO~
Rise:
Set: 4


Ik :4


draft dodgers got themselves
false papers which greatly
exaggerated their ages. There is
one authenticated case of a
man who was lionized in the
Soviet press as having reached
the age of 128, then exposed as
being only 78. In the U.S.S.R.
as elsewhere, it would appear,
there is no fountain of youth.


Wins J&B

RollsRoyce
MRS. Margaret French of
Village Green, a company
secretary at Higgs and
Johnson law firm, is the
winner of the 1961 Silver
Cloud Rolls Royce raffled by
J&B, the famous scotch
whiskey distributed by
Bahamas Blenders.
The raffle took place
Friday night at Ronnie's
Rebel Room.
Miss Mary Kelly, of VIP
public relations, is shown left
announcing the winner,
chosen by visitor Minerva
Jasper from Chicago, while
Norman Rolle, assistant
advertising manager for
Bahamas Blenders looks on.


-I


distributed by
THE GENERAL AGENCY LIMITED
Patton Street Palmdale
P.O. Box M.S. 5276 Nassau Telephpnp 2-1551
I I I I


-.- - - - - - -


777, IL


". .: :' U. '.:. ... ... h .a ^ ..... ilk :/...... fS..' :-^ . .. . ^ k .|ij:.>.' . uj:: ., i m K ^ ^ ^^ . *.: *"

..SSALr mow.. .. C.C i. .li. '.:.:.. tt.

^ ..' ' /' '" '* '"^ ^-- -:: ^ . *. ' ------ *











THM RWUNE .- Tumldy, August 13, 1974


No holiday for conchs Oct. 12 !-

JUST outside Freeport, the residents of a tiny fishing village named McLean's Town are getting ready for a big event on their aoeial
calendar the Third Annual Conch-Cracking Contest.


Open to anyone who is able to wield a hammer, the
contest, although eight weeks away, has already started to
drum up the usual island flavour and fervour that goes
along with local sporting competitions.
A conch cracking competition means exactly what it says
cracking a shell containing the sea mollusk pronounced
"Konk."
A shell is taken from a pile and the pointed part of the
shell is cracked with a hammer. A knife is then inserted into
the opening to cut the shellfish's "anchor," which is then
easily pulled from its shell and cleaned.
The big contest is planned for October 12, which is
celebrated as Discovery Day in the Bahamas.
The organizers of the conch-cracking contest include a
government school teacher and an architect from the Grand
Bahama Port Authority, the body that planned and
developed Freeport into a modem tourist mecca.
The planners intend to invite television cameramen from
Florida to come over to do a bit of coverage.
Peter Barret, an English-born architect who has written a
book on Grand Bahama Island, believes that conch-cracking
can become a unique sport in the Bahamas.
"In the not-too-distant future, it can become the next
popular sporting event to the famous Family Island
Regatta," Barret said.
The Family Island Regatta is held each Spring for island
work boats at Elizabeth Harbour, Exuma.
The other person helping to publicize the event is the
current conch-cracking champion, John Reckley.
Conch, cooked in any fashion, is a Bahamian delicacy. It
pops up in one form or another in all of Freeport's haute
cuisine restaurants.
But on October 12, visitors watching the contest will not
have to go far to sample the Bahamian conch dishes.
On-the-spot conch cookery will include conch salad, conch
fritters and cracked conch.
And, to top it off, native bands will play a popular tune
called "Conch Ain't Got No Bone."


sir)


."


Grand Bahama's conch cracking champion will be named onl *
October 12 when a conch cracking contest takes place at McLean's
Town, a fishing village outside Freeport. To many Bahamian
fishermen, conch cracking is child's play, as demonstrated in the
photograph. Bahamas Tourist News Bureau photo by Howard Glass.


Family Islands: no red tape


YOU can always tell a Nassauvian who has
just returned from a pleasant vacation
in the Family Islands: in one hand he carries
his suitcase and in the other he holds a box
bursting at the seams with fresh fruits and
vegetables and an assortment of goodies.
Bahamians vacationing outside the
Commonwealth soon find that the novelty
of suitcases full of brand label goods wears
off, of course, when faced with customs
levies.
Not so for Family Islands vacationers.
There are no worries such as forms to fill out
and inspection of luggage.
Nassauvians returning from the Family


Islands get to keep everything intact including .
the warm memories of a carefree, relaxed
time amidst friends and relatives.
Such were the experiences of Mr. and Mrs.
George Cox who took a four-day holiday
recently in South Eleuthera and had "the
best time ever." The Cox family resides in
Dan Nottage Estates.
Said Mrs. Cox: "We truly had a good time
... it was like returning home (Mrs. Cox's
mother was born in Eleuthera). People I
hadn't seen in 10 years remembered me,
came up and hugged me. They were
sincerely happy to see us and to talk about
the baby."
The Coxes stayed at
Tranquility Bay Club, which is
managed by John Schaffer,
who spent several years in
hotels in Nassau. They had lots
of fun, good food and were
pleased with the large and
attractive suite the manager
accorded them after learning BETTER JOINTS
that they were accompanied by
their young son. IN AN effort to improve
"John was very helpful and the standard of cable jointid
welcomed us enthusiastically on the underground
she said. "He likes to see distribution net-work, th
people from Nassau to catch Bahamas Electricit:
up on the news in the city. Corporation has engaged th
;shes There were no formalities." services of Mr. Stanley
ishe The couple rented a car (the Cooper, a jointing instructor
cost is slightly higher in the from the North Western
Family Islands) during the four Electricity Board of England
days and toured almost the Mr. Cooper will be with th
entire island. Corporation for about there
"People were so happy to months, during which time h
[N see us, and everyone had will conduct refresher course
something to give us. We for BEC's nine high voltage
couldn't refuse and they were and extra high voltage
embrarassed if we offered jointers. During the course
money in return," she said. the finer points relating ti
"We tasted so many cakes, the more modern jointing
pineapple, sugar apple and the techniques involving
like. The car was full evr" day aluminum and othe
of goodies." materials, will be examined
They have plans to return to Pictured above during one o
Eleuthera soon, and to visit the sessions are, from lef
other Family Islands. Cedric Mott, David Pratt, Mr
The Family Islands are being Cooer and Franklyn Stuart
promoted by the Ministry of David Pratt s cutting
Tourism, the Out Islands Hotel sheeting away from the cable
Association and Bahamasair Bahamas Information
in conjunction with th Services Photo by Wendel
in conjunction with the
Domestic Tourism campaign Cleare.
now in effect until October 31.
The campaign is designed to
acquaint Bahamian residents
with the attractiveness of the FOR 3 in 1
islands as alternative vacation LAWN SERVICE
destinations. Discount rates of FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
20 per cent off summer hotel PEST CONTROL
rates and rount-trip airline T
fares are offered as incentives. TROPICAL 2-2167


SOMETHING NEW THIS YEAR
.- at -

Nassau Christian Academy
Old Trail Cemetery at Soldier Road

3YRS. Old Nursery
4 Ts. O Kderart
LOW COST* PROVEN RESULTS
CONVENIENT LOCATION
DAY CARE -- from 1:00 5:30 p.m.

WEE WISDOM No.2
ALSO OFFERING
5 KINDERGARTEN THRU GRADE 9
Enrollment being accepted

Nassau Christian Academy
CALL TODAY: 2041


quace?
Up in mas went yem
Allaye Pat at MoMday%'
Children's Goombay FahtMs
Show, despite the obiMus
protata from aethe
model Donshme Stecmms,
right. 'Twas al in homday it,
however, as the
Nassau/Paradise Ialiad
Promotion Board and the
Ministry of ToulO once
more co-qponsored the
weekly fashion affa, thi
time at the Iritania Beach
Hotel. The two adult models
are, of course regular Tread
Bender barnellChipman and
Leon Lorenzo,
Photo By Howrd Gmass.


Taxi driver wins

San Andros T.V
T.V. WINNIR John Henry WilMia of Okra Hill
became another redptnt of a San Andrea prize when he
parked Ida ted-eba on Bay Street Monday morning. The
San Andres I*tUema, about hi daiy chore of distributing
hundreds of prices, noted that Mr. Wilims in addition to
wearing a Sig Andros button had one of the bright red and
blue So Anodre blaiW ltds en his car. Obviously
elated whei t bet tie good Aewe, Mr. Willans told the
prizema that he bad dwsa" wanted a televikon mat. "And i
guess today was jut my hucky day." Shown with him is
Anne JohMae, SM h Aadrot local des representative.

Now Ajx Ch f from white to
blu Ifts active inInldits np to work to clean
your sink.


*.'c.- ,'*,


I i


*I


CIO









THE TRIBUNE -- Tuesday, August 13, 1974
7i


He's not happy with
note-happy woman


By Abigail Van Buren
* 1M 4r CMGCM TIousN". Y. wNe. S w ., iacK.


DEAR ABBY: My wife is a wonderful woman and I
appreciate her many good qualities, but she has one fault
that drives me to distraction. When she wants to remind me
of something, she doesn't TELL me, she writes me a note!
It's not as if we weren't together half the time. When I
get to the office, I find a note in my pocket: "Don't forget to
gas up your car, and please pay. the electric bill."
At breakfast, she had a note stuck under the toaster:
"Get a haircut today, please."
Yesterday, she taped a note to my bathroom mirror: "Are
you going to do something about your mother's birthday,
which is next Sunday? Or should I?"
How can I get the message across to this note-happy
woman that she has a voice to talk with, and I have ears to
hear with, and I wish she would communicate with me
VERBALLY? Thanks.
BUGGED IN EUGENE

DEAR BUGGED: Use your voice to get the message to
heo ears. (On second thought, since she's so note-happy,
write her a note.)
DEAR ABBY: What do you do with a husband who
wants to have his cake and eat it, too?
HIS WIFE
DEAR WIFE: If you're smart, you'll bake him TWO
cakes. One to eat, and one to have.
DEAR ABBY: Regarding Animal Lovers: When our four
children asked fora dog, we explained that many children in
th4 world go to sleep hungry every night. It was decided
th4t for the cost of maintaining a dog we could join
FOSTER PARENTS PLAN, INC., a national organization
that helps poverty-stricken children the world over. For $16
per month, we are able to assist a family in South America
with medical aid, food and housing. But most important of
all, this plan has enabled a foster child to attend school-a
gret benefit in a land where there is high illiteracy.
We get regular reports on "our family," and all the
children agree it really is more worthwhile than adding
another dog to our suburban neighborhood.
PEOPLE FIRST (ANIMALS NEXT)
DEAR PEOPLE FIRST: Many readers will remark:
"We have plenty of disadvantaged in the United
Sttes--how about looking *feroW own rst?" That's the
qu slon I put to PLAN,'.J. M *.....* .
Their reply: "PLAN selects the neediest from those
countries not yet able to assist their own poor. Since North
America does not fall into this category, PLAN doesn't
operate in the U.S.A. or Canada.
"We are presently in Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, Colombia,
Haiti, Peru, Korea, Vietnam and the Philippines. PLAN
originated 35 years ago to help war orphans. For more
inOrmation, write to PLAN, Box 400, Warwick, Rhode
Island 02886"
Problems? You'll feel better if you get it off your chest.
Fo, a personal reply, write to ABBY: Box No. 69700, L.A.,
C&Xf. 90069. Enclose stamped, self-addressed envelope,
Vor Abby's new booklet, "What Teen-agers Want to
Kuiw," send $S to Abigail Van Buren, 132 Lasky Dr.,
Beeriy Hills, Cal. 90121.


S. K in Fo ne o c ts. 7 4. Worw rikS t r.*
"You're the first employee I've had who has made and
lost a good first impression in one short meeting."

CROSSWORD A
PUZZLEr IH



roine 37. Belgian TEA TAR
11. mounted river


39. Collide
40. College
buildings
42. Norm
44.Exchange
premium
45. Argue
46. New York
basketball


SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE


4. Harangue
5.Renounce
6. Preserves
7. Oleoresin
8. Prongs
9. Mine entrance
10. Tree
12. Postpone
16. Castle defense
19. Bird of peace
21. Pitfall
23. Sly
26. Dressage
maneuver
.Z8. Assistant
minister
29. Reflection
30. Harmless
31. Chinese
magnolia
32. Kind of
orange
33 Account entry
34 Face with
masonry
38. Midianite king
41. Mayday
43. Tatter


ST. JOHN'S GROUP

ON MEXICO TRIP


A GROUP of 23 St. John's
College Spanish Club students
recently spent an enjoyable
week in Mexico City on a
cultural and educational trip.
Chaperoned by their Spanish
teacher Miss Alma Hutcheson
and their English teacher, Mrs.
Shelagh Strachan, the group
left on a Pan Am Mexico
Bonanza 7-day trip, via Eastern
Airlines. "There are no Pan Am
flights from here," said Miss
a Hutcheson.
The trip was part of a school
exercise to facilitate the ability
of the students to speak and
work with the Spanish
language. "It was a very
enjoyable trip, and we hope to
go to another Spanish speaking
area next year." said Miss


Hutcheson.
While in Mexico City they
visited all the sights, went to a
bull-fight, visited the Floating
Gardens and the pyramids.
Shown planeside from left:
Miss Alms Hutcheson, Brenda
Adderley, Karen Johnson,
Lynda Quant, Sharry Marshall,
Zoe Miller, Karen Bain, Shelly
Wallace, Kimberley Cartwright,
Lynda Smith, Patricia Sands,
Cecilia Strachan, Paula Bourne,
Karin Joseph, Cyprian
Strachan, Sandra Carey, Nan
Sawyer, Marie King, Arnetta
Sands, Craig Delancey, Jerrine
Isaacs, Mrs. Shelagh. Strachan
Owen Bethel (head boy) and
Mr. Chet Benjamin, marketing
manager in Nassau for Pan
American.


PROTECTION

WEEK AT



AAMAN LUMBER COMPANY
Phone 3-4191


PROTECTION FROM BURGLARS

1. LOCKS WEISER & RUSSWIN 12% OFF

2. ENTRANCE DOORS 1%" DESIGNED 10% OFF

3. BARREL BOLTS HOOKS AND EYES

4. INDOOR AUTOtIGHHT CONTROL Model LLl2 $6.25
.... A welcome light for your return home ....

5. OUTDOOR DUSK/DAWN LIHT CONTROL Model 6LL5 $8.45
.... Photoelectric eye controls lighting for night use...


PROTECTION FROM THE ELEMENTS
(Inside Protection tool! !)


1. BPS and BERGER PAINTS


CAULKING COMPOUND PUTTY

FRY ROOF CEMENT

2. WELDWOOD WOODLIFE AND STAIN


PROTECTION FROM HURRICANES

1. PLYWOOD AND MASONITE FOR STORM SHUTTERS

2. LUMBER FOR STORM BATTENS

3. HAMMERS NAILS SAWS ROCKWELL POWER TOOLS

SPECIAL: PLYWOOD 5/8 sheathing 4' x 8'

Regular Price $14.35 THIS WEEK ONLY $ 12.50 Per Sheet



PROTECTION FROM FIRE

1. SUPER SENSOR I PLUG-IN BUZZER Model SA11 $15.20

2. SUPER SENSOR II PLUG-IN BUZZER Model SA10 $14.25
BUZZER SOUNDS WARNING FOR FIRE PROTECTION
IDEAL FOR CHILDREN'S ROOM KITCHEN BEDROOM WORKSHOP


WULFF ROAD


OPEN DAILY TIL 5 p.m.


PLENTY OF CONVENIENT PARKING


"COME SEE US


- YOU'LL LIKE WHAT YOU SAVE"


iii'..


47. Floor Fr.
DOWN


11,


N""4







v- .. . *i ,


(Tje following article was written by Mrs. Nicola
9en8lw, wife of Robin Benbow, deputy director of
RoyW t Banking in Nassau. She recently spent a week in
ina0te and Ihft recalls her memories of a memorable stay.
Hte article was Inspired by a desire to encourage more
Bahameans to visit the Out istlnds).

SAFARI TO INAGUA
By NICOLA BENBOW


AFTER 52 YEARS in
Nassau Miss Albertha Granger
decided to return to her native
Inagua, and asked me if I
would like to accompany her
to see one of the Out Islands.
Several people wondered why
after 18 months in Nassau I
should visit the furthest island,
but I was delighted to be
included, having listened to Sir
Mileo Butler's remarks on
Flamingo Day last year, when
he said "You don't know the
Bahamas until you have seen
the Flamingos on Inagua."
Mrs. Granger, aged 94, had
also told me fascinating stories
of the old days on the island,
so I did not need much
persuading to go.
We arrived in Inagua on
Monday, July 29, travelling
with Inaguans going home to
celebrate the centenary
celebrations of The Inagua
Union Society, which was first
formed 100 years ago by a
small band of Christian people.
On arrival we discovered
that all our luggage had been
left behind in Nassau, and may
not arrive until a week later -
the day we were due to leave
but after consultations with
the Captain, Bahamasair
representative, Cleveland
Palatius, and the local Police,
all of whom were most helpful
and understanding, we decided
to stay and hope for the best.
Our hostess, Mrs. Amy
Mullings, her cousin Inez, their
husbands, and Leon Ford, who
owns and runs The Inagua Inn,
just fell over backwards to
welcome us and make us feel at
home. They rushed to the only
store, Bertram Ingram's
Sundries, where they sell
everything from a toothbrush
to a camera to a pants suit with
friendliness which has to be
seen to be believed; even I felt
like a long lost relative.
No words can describe the
sincerity of these people: We
were given daywear, nightwear
toiletries in fact everything
needed until our cases arrived
24 hours later., ndeed, when it
was time to leave and we tried
to return them, we were told
'They are yours'.
Our first meal in
Mrs. Mulling's house was an
English one, as she did not
know my tastes; steak and
vegetables, but after that first
day, I lived like a Bahamian,
peas, and rice, market fish,
shad fish, conch, macaroni
cheese pudding, home baked
bread every day, often cooked
at 4 a.m. to be fresh; and
home-made waffles for
breakfast. I have never eaten
better in any hotel.
We lived in a separate two
bedroom apartment with toilet
en suite all spotlessly clean and
I cannot wait to return.
Leon Ford's Inagua Inn was
just opposite and we were
invited for 'A Highball' as he
called it, at 6 p.m. each
S evening. His speciality a
S Dubonnet & Sprite. These
people do not drink very much
but try to produce anything to
suit their visitors.
.. Leon makes hamburgers any
hour of the day and his Inn is
S delightful and with also that
S special Inaguan welcome.
S He covered hundreds of
Smiles every day with us and 10
Children which we adopted for
;the week. We went out to see a
- different spot every day, had
;beach picnics at Bremmers
Beach, owned by the Salt
Mining company, the 2nd
largest in the world, which
provides work for all the
islanders.
One day we visited the plant
and were allowed to take our
'Family' which included Leo
,Fawkes and several others from
SNassau, to lunch in the firm's
canteen.
' ^ Another day we visited
North West Point. where I sas
the old church of St
Bartholomew and fell in love
with it and the beach nearby
Mannie Sweetlng the warden


for that area was resting when
we arrived but got up to
welcome us with fruit and
coconuts cut from the tree
while we waited, he had never
seem me 'before in his life, but
put his arms out and said 'They
call me sweetie you do the
S We were given bicycles to
take our daily exercise and
cycled all around Mathew
Town daily visiting dwellings
S whtre people lived who knew
MrWt Granger. Everywhere we
at the l ame warm welcome:
Ssu o venaS we had dinner at
'TI s with Mr. Ford, but it
" a g e. p p d by Gladys, one of
gSohWsoitsrs in inagua.
i' isx41ber myself, we
. .' -.


conversations abouL children.
as future citizens
On Friday the.\ decided to
start the celebrations for ithe
centenary, these people make
their own entertainment and
how good it is; the\ don't need
drugs or alcohol: by 6 o'. luck
that evening there were three
rush huts built on the village
green and the band was heard
rehearsing
At 8 p.m We went over to
see everyone dancing under the
full moon even down to the
tiniest people: this nation was
certainly born to dance; I have
never seen such a happy
family. The sound of the band
could be heard all over town
long after I was in bed. Ihe
other sounds I remember, are
the donkey, who said
Good-night at 1:30 a.m. each
morning and the Cockadoodle
doo, who said Good-morning
at 4 a.m. without fail: no
clocks are necessary there.
Saturday was the day we
had arranged with the Warden
Samuel Nixon to visit the
Flamingos. We arose at 5.30
a.m. and had a lovely drive out
for many miles watching the
sun rise over the ocean, saw
flamingos in their natural
surroundings and some most
beautiful clouds, reflecting
pink from chemicals used in
the salt mining project and
lovely -eflectlons from the
birds. I have brought back two
oil paintings to remember my
visit, yet to be completed.
We had dinner out with
Gladys and Mabel at their
home on Saturday, and were
joined later by Leon Ford,
always our taxi driver
whenever owe stepped out,
more very tasty Bahamian
dishes.
On Sunday we took
Communion at St. Phillips and
enjoyed Canon Lane's sermon
the theme 'Do good :lin,:
don't just talk about them.' the
singing from that small church
was from the heart, and I loved
the Lord's Prayer to a quick
folklore tune so much that I
borrowed the mttsicto take a
copy. It really was a swinging
service in every way.
After lunch we went to take
photographs of the Parade:
boys who had been swimming
with us playing the Drums.
Girls Brigade, all the Mothers
so smart in their new white
dresses and hats and the Old
brigade bringing up the rear
with the. Bahamian flag held
high; these people are marching
forward, onward, upward
together if any are: I have sonime
lovely photographs of them.
Then to the hall to hear
speeches, Theo Farquarhson
aged 83 very young in spirit
and everything that is good
held my attention for his
complete talk, every word
worth hearing; this was
followed by other speakers, so
many names I cannot
remember: after which we had
a sumptuous, meal of spare ribs
& salad prepared by
Mrs. Mullings. in spite of her
six house guests.
We reached home exhausted
six hours later, after attending
a wedding of one of the
islanders, to which everyone
was invited; the church
overflowed with guests: then
all the cars drove off hooting
miadly.
The door of Amy \ullh,-.'
house is never locked and is
often opened by friends
dropping in to see how things
are, everybody here is
concerned with everybody else
in a special caring way, because
it comes from the heart.
One elderly citizen paused at
the door 'Peace to this house'
she mui rmured quietly, the
words were not meant for ntv
ears. but so pleased 1 overheard
her request to the Lord.
Last hut not leasi Roger
I ,rd brother i,, t h ;r
repi .ceniatlne atrm ed for fli<
week-end, a natural 'imn_. li1
drose us around to wee other
va.iant lots & dwellings sa ing
"lhis was Dan Sargent's place


& this here Sam \M,rtinter.
Abrahamn MNI ihajl Moses
Ingrain's. Hlen Wilding.
Joseph Russell & Old Man
Julius Farrass 'gee when he wa:
snoring you could hear it all
over Mathe To\mnI '
One inhabitant who wanted
to come to the Inn was
barefoot and Leon asked w here
are your shoes, he replied God
gave me no shoes when I was
born.
Somehow I felt these people
had their sense of values right;
and I am eager to return to
their island.
To band was playing as we
left on Monday arid all the.
people we had met were there
.to wave usoff!!


TO CELEBRATE the start of his. second year in office, His Excellency the
Governor-Goneral, Sir Milo Butler. on August 1 invited Parliamentarians, foreign
dignitaries permanent secretariess and department heads to a reception at Government
House Shown with him here (from left) are Mr. Oris Russell, permanent secretary,
Ministry of Eterna.l Affairs, and Mr. Robert Hathaway, Acting High Commissioner for
Canada whc. serves the Bahamas from his base in Kingston. Jamaica. Photo: Roland Rose.


ii.
~ f~s,
~'i. .4,'.


Mayor C


MIAMI BEACH Mayor,
Chuck Hall, w)b owm epd
.Uked s .th e Baib' s, ^ O:
^ SatssNt at the tp u356,
MOMa Hall d id of6 ttrt
condittkon. And it was learned
over the week-end that he
suffered from a chronic
.rheu attic heart disease that
was Uaftown even to his close
associates.
An autopsy revealed that the
Mayor's heart was scarred and.
enlarged, probably due to a
childhood bout with rheumatic
fever, Dr. Peter Lardizabal,
assistant Dade County
medical examiner said Sunday.
He .said a type of heart
attack due to the disease took
Hal's life Saturday.
Hall's wife of 28 years, the
former Jacqueline Cavallier,
had been paralyzed in a freak
accident in the couple's Miami
Beach home last month and
remains hospitalized in serious
condition.
Mayor Hall had kept a vigil
at her bedside until earlier this
month when he was called
away to New Hampshire to be


MAYOR CHUCK HALL
with his elderly father who
suffered a stroke.
Born Chrales F. Beebe in
Charlotte, N.C. on Jan. 2. 1918
Hall took the name of a
wealthy stepfather. He
graduated from Northwestern
University in 1940 with a
languages degree and taught at
the varsity after World War HI
service in the South Pacific as a
US Navy lieutenant.
He came to Miami in 1947
and was elected first mayor of
metropolitan Miami in 1964.


annouased he w ats
run for Metro.,Maw .tr w.
Funmi leurvime for por
Hall wre held today at
Beach Auditotafm.
CORRECTION
IT IS regretted than nor
was made in the
describing the C
Conspiracy presetly apafig
nightly in Loews' Padlse
Island Trade Winds Lout .
It was incorrectly st44d 1in
the release received by The
Tribune the group was
appearing .every day except
Monday. They vwl, the
contrary, be phiWyf M'ndays
and will continue to welcome
audiences every alght f the
week through August at'10:40
and 12:50 p.m.


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An "


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" U THE TRIBUNE -- Tuesday. Auaust 13 1974


y -
Robin Pomery presents a
C cely Hall.


MR. HERBERT YOUNG MR. H.WHYLLY

Barclays birthday
FIRST BIRTHDAY July 19 saw one year since
Barclays opened the doors of its new building on Bay
Street. To commemorate this, the Barclays Staff Activities
Committee organised a party for staff members at Gambier
House, Farrington Road on August 3.
Seen receiving long service awards, presented by Robin
Pomeroy of Barclays Bank on behalf ot the Staff Activities
Committee are: Mrs. Cicely Hall, 26 years service; Mr.
Herbert Young, 26 years service and Mr. H. Whylly, 24
years service.


NOW SHOWING THRU 111Il'RSI) Y
Matinee 2:30 & 4:50, Evening 9:00-'Phone 2-1004, 2-10050
The most fascinating
murder mystery in years.

S.., .BURT LANCASTER



SUSAN CLARK
CAMERON MITCHELL
Reservations not claimed by 8:45 wili be sold.



Wednesday thru Friday Wednesday thru Friday
Matinee Starts at 2;30 Continuous Showings
Evening 8:30 from 3:00
"THE RATS "MISS MELODY
ARE COMING" PG. JONES" PG.
Hope Stansbury, Philomena Nowlin,
Jackie Skarvellis Ron Warden
PLUS PLUS
"THE MAN WITH "THIS IS A HIJACK" PG.
2 HEADS" PG. Neville Brand,


'Phone 2-2534


Adam Roarke


Body links museums


A COMMONWEALTH
Association of Museums has
been formed to promote
co-operation among museums
in Commonwealth countries.
The establishment of the
Association has been made
possible by support from the
Commonwealth Foundation,
set up by Commonwealth
heads of Government in 1965
to foster professional activity
and links in the Common-
wealth.
The Associaiton was
inaugurated at a meeting,
attended by 47 representatives


from Commonwealth
museums, held recently in
Copenhagen at the time of the
Conference of the
International Congress of
Museums.
The meeting adopted an
interim constitution and
elected an Executive Council
which will draw up a
programme of activities.
The Association is expected
to undertake a survey of
museum training facilities and
to encourage visits for liaison
and training purposes.
The Association is


the seventeenth Common-
wealthwide professional body
to be supported by the
Commonwealth Foundation.
The Foundation's Trustees
have agreed to make a grant of
11,015 to the Association for
its activities in the first
eighteen months.
An earlier Foundation award
of 8,000 had enabled members
of a Commonwealth-wide
Working Party to be present in
Copenhagen to prepare the
interim constitution presented
to the inaugural meeting.


FORTY MEMBERS OF
THE Bahamas Institution of
Professional Engineers spent
Friday July 26, and Saturday
July 27, in Grand Bahama as
euest of Burmah Oil (Bahamas)
Ltd., the Grand Bahama Port
Authority and BORCO.
While in Grand Bahama, the
engineers were treated by their
hosts to tours of various
facilities in the Grand Bahama
petroleum industry, and to
various social functions. Thirty
members of the Bahamas
Institution of Professional
Engineers left Nassau by
Bahamasair and were joined in
Freeport by another 10
members o.n Friday morning.
First on the agenda, after
arriving in Freeport, was a
luncheon sponsored by
BORCO, at the King's Inn
hotel, where the BIPE
members stayed while in
Freeport. The Bahamians
employed among the technical
staff of BORCO were
introduced to the members of
BIPE at the luncheon.
In his welcoming remarks,
Mr. A.H. Gardner, president of
BORCO, reviewed the activities
and future plans of the $300m
facility. Mr. Gardner also
discussed their manpower
requirements, their efforts to
obtain Bahamian engineers and
technicians, and their com-
mitment to the integrity of the
environment of the Bahamas.
Mr. Gardner indicated that
BORCO donates to qualified
Bahamians, with no strings
attached, six scholarships for
technical university education
in any field of their choice
each calendar year. Candidates
are selected with the assistance
of the Ministry of Education.
In addition to these
scholarships, there are from
tune to time, special
scholarships to train personnel
for BORCO's specific needs.
Presently, BORCO has 131
people in various training
program mes.
In an effort to answer a
question from one of the
engineers on just how many
engineers BORCO now needs
Mr. Gardner facetiously replied
that they could take on the 40
BIPF members at the
luncheon. Mr. Gardner and his
staff also briefed the BIPE
members on the techniques for
dealing with oil spills. This
procedure is one of physical
containment and bio-chemical
treatment.
The president of BIPE. Mr.
Paul HIanna, indicated that
BIPI would be happy to assist
BORCO in locating suitably
qualified students to take
advantage of the scholarship
plan. In his remarks at the
luncheon, Mr. Hanna went on
to point out the mutual
interest BIPF and BORCO
shared in the engineering
profession in the Bahamas,
remarking that in addition to
the offering of annual
university scholarships,
BORCO could help in
encouraging engineering in the
country not only by employing


engineers on their staff, but
also by retaining Bahamian
consultants in their respective
expertise when such
opportunities arise.
Following the luncheon, the
BIPE members boarded a
double decker bus for the tour
of the BORCO refinery.
It was learned that the
refinery processed 500,000
barrels of crude oil each day,
arriving at the various products
of crude oil, LP gas, fuel oil,
asphalt, etc. The BIPE
members boarded the Tug,
"Lisa Guidry", powered by
two 2200 hp diesel engines for
a ride to the jetty where the oil
bearing tankers and super
tankers will tie up to expel
their cargo.
Returning from the tour of
the refinery to the King's Inn
hotel, the engineers were guests
of the Grand Bahama Port
Authority at a cocktail party
to which heads of firms in the
business community of
Freeport, engineers and
non-engineers were invited.
The president of the Port
Authority, Mr. Robert Ball,
who welcomed BIPE to
Freeport, was introduced by
Mr. Douglas Silvera, who is a
member of BIPE and
vice-president and director of
the Port Authority. Mr Michael
Moss, 2nd vice-president of
BIPE, made a few remarks on
BIPE membership, inviting
engineers in Freeport to join
the organization. The president
of BIPE, Mr. Paul Hanna, took
the opportunity to thank
BORCO, the Port Authority,
and Burmah Oil for their
hospitality and enthusiasm in
participating in this visit of the
members of BIPE to Grand
Bahama, and expressed the
hope that BIPE, the Port
Authority, and the oil refinery
& Burmah Oil would work
closely together to encourage
the engineering profession in
the Bahamas.
On Saturday, at 9 a.m., the
BIPE engineers departed
Freeport by bus to tour the
Burmah Oil Trans-shipment
Terminal at South Riding
Point, 30 miles east of
Freeport. The engineers were
transported by a ferry to the
1600 ft. long jetty 4000 ft. off
shore.
With the assistance of ropes.
the members swung to the
platform of the sea island stairs
and climbed five storeys to the
massive loading platform, 100'
x 200' made from 60,000
cubic feet of concrete and
steel, where the mechanical
plant, pumps, piping
manifolds, loading arms and
fire extinguishing apparatus are
located.
Through two 36" steel
pipes, crude oil is pumped to
three IA million and five -4
million barrel tanks on shore
and back to smaller tankers.
After spending more than an
hour viewing the mechanical
plant on the loading platform.
the group ascended another
four storeys to the air
conditioned control room and


then to the roof 100 ft. above
the water. From this control
room, the technicians will be
able by remote control, to
connect the loading arms to
the tankers and control the
flow of oil to each tank on
shore and back to the smaller
tankers which will transport
the oil to the U.S. mainland.
Returning ashore, the
engineers were treated to a
lunch of roast beef and pork"
chops, french bread, milk with
ice-cream and cake for dessert.
After lunch, the group climbed
to the top of one of the
750,000 barrel of oil tanks,
290 ft. dia x 60 ft. high and
spent about 20 minutes at the
top discussing various points of
interest about the tank.
The tour of the Burmah
facilities was conducted by Mr.
Durward Archer, a Bahamian
mechanical engineer who has
been working in the oil
industry for the past 20 years
with Esso in its world wide
operations. His last assignment
with Esso before returning
home to join Burmah Oil
(Bahamas) Ltd., was in
Singapore.
had been wanting to return
home but as was the case with
many other professional
engineers with highly
specialized experience, the
opportunity to practise their
skills here in the Bahamas was
not available until recently. Mr.
Archer is the general manager
of the S55 million dollar Crude
Oil Trans-shipment Terminal
From the appearance of
things in Freeport, there will
be a demand for hundreds of
professional engineers and
scientists in Grand Bahama.
The oil industry in Grand
Bahama will also require
thousands of technicians.
The Engineers paid a brief
visit to T-(Com's test facility
which is near the Burmah Oil
Terminal. In the very near
future, BIPE will be sponsoring
a lecture by the T-Com
technical engineering staff at
which the details of the T-Com
system wil be discussed. Being
aware of the wide interest of
this subject, this lecture will be
open to the public.
Visits such as this are part of
BIPE's regular programme of
activities for the benefit of its
members.
The first of the aims and
objects of BIPE is to further
the engineering profession.
This profession is still not
clearly understood in the
Bahamas. In spite of vital
engineering works, the
construction and operation,
and maintenance .of which is
impossible without
professional engineers, the
significance and contribution
of professional engineers in the
Bahamas is overlooked. If the
necessary industries for which
the Bahamas seems suitable are
to prosper, the profession of
engineering must assume its
due status so that it will be
able to attract the interest of
high school students to enter
the profession.


0


I/


INTERCONTINENTAL Realty Limited has been training another group of young people into
the intricacies of the land sales business. This group has just successfully completed their
training and are on the staff of the outside sales department. Standing left to right: Violet
Dixon, Kingsley Lenden. Asst. Manager Dudley Thompson, Ardeta Williams. Eugene Davis. Bert
Duncanson. Front row left to right: Henrietta Carey, Ivy Smith, Albertha Thompson. Coralee
Percentie. Frederica Hunt and Nettemae Williamson.


G ROBERT Ranson left)
and Bernard G Albury right I
have been appointed senior
assistant managers at First
National City Bank in Nassau
The appointments take effect
July of this year

Mr Ranson has been with
Citibank ever since it began
operations in the Bahamas in
December. 1959. After only
seven months with the bank


ROLl Nil IS[ N director
Sunlight i 3liiiiiis l[.mi 'ted
has an noun e d the
appointment of Mrs I rmina
(irant-Smith I pkicttur.l I as%
manager ettective 1 July 1974.
Originally from Nassau,
where in 1963 she received the
Queen's Certificate and Badge
of Honour for outstanding
social work in the Bahamas.
since 1968 Mrs. Grant-Smith
has resided in Freeport where
she continues to be active in
community work.
She is currently on the
Board of Directors of the
Y.M.C.A. of Grand Bahama,
the Grand Bahama Civic Arts
Guild, the Grand Bahama
Association for Manpower
Training and Development.
Freeport High School, a Vestry
Member of Christ the King
Anglican Church and an
Associate Member of both the
Canadian Woman's Club and
the American Women's Club

Professionally. Mrs.
Grant-Smith has enjoyed a long
and distinguished career. After
many years as a highly
respected career womar, in
Nassau. Mrs. Gr: nt Smith has
held in Freeport the senior
positions of Assistant Director
of Training and Bahamian
P!acement Supervisor in the
Personnel Department of The
Grand Bahama Port Authority
Limited and Legal Liaison
Manager for the Land
Registration departmentt of
The Grand Bahama
Development Company.
Most recently, Mrs.
(rant-Smith held the position
of Executive Director of the
Freeport Lucaya Real Estate
Board
By moving to the
challenging position of
manager. Sunflight (Bahamas)


at that time, he was
appointed auditor in 1960.
Following that. his other
promotions in the bank
included assistant accountant
in March. 1962; pro-manager
in October, 1966: accountant
in June. 1967; and assistant
manager in May. 1969. Mr.
Ranson is married with five
children.
Bernard G. Albury came to


Limited, in which she will be
ultimately responsible for the


First National in April. 1962.
and after three years he was
promoted to the position of
official auditor in January of
1965. Next he was promoted
to assistant accountant in
May. 1966. and to
pro-manager in March. 1969
A Bahamian whom the
bank describes as "competent
and efficient. Mr. Albury is
presently away studying on a
banking course in Mexico.


satisfication of some 36.00(1
tourists projected tso send I1
million in Freeport in the
1974,.75 Winter Season. Mrs
Grant-Smith has tulfilled her
long standing goal to become
actively involved in tourism.

In honour of her
appointment, Sunflight
(Bahamas) Limited held a
Cocktail Party on the Poolside
Terrace of the International
Hotel Golf and Tennis Club for
Mrs. Grant-Smith's many
business associates, friends and
new staff, all of whom
indicated the popularity of the
selection.


1974 FORD F-350 for

STAKE TRUCK Only $86030


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ft. stake body, heavy-duty front
and rear shocks and springs.


Financing available


Centreville


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Plenty of scope for



engineers at BORCO


New senior assistant managers


Top spot for Freeport woman


GEORGE "SONNY"
BETHEL

Sales Representative


p-s


We are pleased to announce the appointment of Mr.
Sonny Bethel as Sales Representative.

Born at Cherokee Sound, Abaco 26 years ago, Mr. Bethel
was educated in Abaco public schools. After moving to
Nassau, he was in turn employed by Bahamian Lumber &
Building Supplies Ltd. for 4 years and by Maura Lumber
Co. Ltd. for 6 years.
He is a graduate of the Dale Carnegie and Goals
International courses.
Although new to the automotive business, Sonny Bethel
brings to ABC Motors 10 years of successful service to
Bahamian customers, and a warm, cheerful personality
which is bound to win friends for him in his new calling.
Come in and meet him!

EimiMOTORS

Centreviflte Phone 2-1031


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THE TRIBUNE -- Tuesday, August 13, 1974


CLASSIFIED


SECTION


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS -FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV. TELEPHONE 21988 EXT. 5


REAL ESTATE
C6i 296
INCOMPLETE TWO-STOREY
building for sale. Built for.
apartment upstairs, and store
downstairs. Cost $7,800.
Phone 55081.
C 16388
PRIVATE PARTY SELLS
LAND


BUY WITHOUT A
MIDDLE MAN
CASH OR BANK LOAN
PHONE 53910

C16067
BUY A LOT
IN SAN ANDROS
ALMOST 1/3 ACRE
$35 down, $35 per month. Cail
or visit
FRANK CAREY
Real Estate
P.O. Box N-4764

Bay and Deveaux Streets
Telephone 27667-248! 5

C16331
2 acres CABLE BEACH, Zoned
Commercial. In heart of area
proposed for convention and
hotel centre. 180 feet frontage
on West Bay Street. Buy now
before price increases.
$125,000. Make an offer!
45 Acres, PRIME
INDUSTRIAL COMMERCIAL
LAND, opposite Public Works
Bldg, Interfield Rd. Serious
inquiries only. Chester
Thompson, phone 24777,
evenings, 42035.

C16412
LARGE Lot on West Bay
Street 100 by 300 feet
Reasonable price. Also
Commercial lot Bay Street near
town. Easy Finance available.
8 acres prime Hilltop West Bay
Street, suitable for Apartments
or Condominium.
For information call Bill's Real
Estate 23921.


C16356
FOR SALE
SOUTH BEACH ON THE
WATERFRONT. 150 feet on
Water with beach and 522 feet
depth-two houses-one
furnished was $45.000 00
now Owner will take
$33,000.00. Ideal Country
Life.
OUT WEST on Water with
POOL, PATIO, gorgeous views,
good swimming. Secluded
location-three bedrooms 3
baths, gorgeous views,
furnished and decorated inn
good taste. Was asking
$175,000.00 Now only
$140,000.00.
OUT EAST -- semi-hilltop-
views of Sea, Rights to beach
has three bedrooms 2 baths,
furnished, separate dining.
sitting. Fruited rear patio
Only $70,000.00 was
$78,000.00. Immnediat,
occupancy.
OUT WEST houses from
$35,000.00 and up with bea(h
rights.
SHIRLEY PARK iuurI
bedrooms 2 baths, enclosed
grounds unfurnished
fruited. Was $48,000.00 comer
see and make us an offer.
HARMONY HILL charminig
old Bahamian style housi' 3
bedrooms 2 baths, plus one
bedroom 2nd stuiey qaige
apartment enclosed grourni',
fruited all this for unly
$65,000.00. Walking disltace
to school and shopping and
beach. See anytime
TUCKERWAY 3 bedihnoms
2 baths, furnished orily
$45,000.00
HIGHLAND PARK AREA 2
lots, fruited and cultivated plus'
4 bedroom newly built hous(i
furnished in good taste ideal
for the Executive type fan, ly
Live in the West where the
Action is taking place PIn .
uper inquiry.
GET THE BEST ;) ALL
WITH THE BEST Our
numbers are 22305, 22 307
22033, 41197 evenings"
DAMIANOS, THE ACTION
REALTORS.

FOR SALE OR RENT
C16370
4 bedroom 2 b.itht oor I
unfurnished semn i.hill', i
airconditioned house. ILa.J
yard, centrally located i,
Shirlev Park Av.niue i
$43,000-$350 ($525b ent
furnished). Phone 28293
34527.

9FOR RENT
C 16399
2 bedroom apartment (duplex)
Highland Park. (unfurnished)
Call 42223, 54944.
C 16277
STORE ON MACKEY
STREET SOUTH., In good
business location. Suitable for
shop or office. Phone 28086
C16289
ONE THREE BEDROOM.
two bath, airconditioned
furnished home, Queen'.
Road, Nassau East. Phone
5-4684 or 2-3750.
C16136
LOVELY 2 bedroom
airconditioned apartment,
Dundas Court, Pyfrom's
Addition, Master T.V. antenna
and laundry room facilities
enclosed parking area. For
information call 3-4953 or
5-4258.


FOR RENT


II


C 16293
COLONIAL MANOR
APARTMENTS. Collins Ave.,
2nd. Terrace. Furnished, 1
bedroom, airconditioned
apartments with swimming
pool and laundry facilities.
ALSO Large furnished two
bedroom town house. Same
location. Phone 28808,
between 10 a.m. I p.m.


C16386
LARGE 2 bedroom apartment.,
aircond itioned, furnished.
$280 per month.
Phone 58134
C 16379
2 bedroom apartment, Winton
Highway, fully furnished,
balcony with excellent views.
All utilities included. $350 per
month. Phone 21631.

C16414
Charming houses, nicely
furnished 2 bedrooms, 2
bathrooms Cable Beach,
pool, and sea, airconditioned.
Phone 7-7530.
C16119
CO TTAGES and
APARTMENTS monthly
airconditioned, furly furnished,
maid service available. Lovely
garden and swimming pool.
Telephone 31297, 31093.
C 16400
THREE furnished rooms with
modern conveniences and gas
stoves on Christie Street east
side, laundromat in yard
Rooms $16, $20 and $25 per
week. Phone 5-4811.
C16389
COLLINS AVENUE. I
bedroom furnished apartment.
Air co nditioned. Private
entrance and Parking. T.V.
cable hook-up. $210 per
month including water. Phone
2-1741-2 business hours.


C16358
IMMEDIATE occupancy
Efficiency apartment close to
to w n a i r c o l fit ownedd
basically furnished. $150,000
per month. Call Bert L.
Roberts Ltd. Telephone
2-3177.
C It130
Scriven's Villa's
Air -conditioned efficiency
apartments with kitchenette
directly on a lovely beach in
beautiful Eleuthera. For
further information call 51748
or 56901. In Eleuthera call Mr.
Hansen Bethel South
Palmetto Point.
Rates: Up to two people
$16.00 a day Discount: weekly
rental 10% and monthly 15%.

FOR SALE
C16403
55 HI P Johnson Outboard
Motor in good condition. Price
H$600. Phone 34099.

Cl 6395
14000 BTU airconditionor, in
good condition. No reasonable
offer refused. Phone 54628 or
28245.
C 16390
ONE ijirq dining room suite.,
tains aind side board $700
2 IgrC1 Settees $150 each.
Nassau B.v(-le n Cormpany
28511.
C 10350
MACKEY ST DLPARTMFNT
STORP[
M A C f K Y ST. AND
PALM)[)ALE AVE Opposite
Bar 20 Corner Telephone

i) sount Storewide.
Sonic item., 50% off.
STORt tOURS: Monday
fniclaV ,.id Sat. 8 a.m. to 8
p i T-( day. Wednesday and
tihn:sajy 8 .0r )to 6 p.m.

Siit que Port/Starboard
Ships I !!I|)r (i oeiector's items)
$5O 0,
1 ',9 Pontiac GTO A/C dill
[povwei Ail condition $2,800
3 [Rc't r-uda Cedar Wood
l'l .asio al tables $200
Pine,vo (I ,tndardaird lanimp

id (10 (Ii0 0 A e


P1f9 TIUT11)M 136, white
i, n .. 'l i- shelves

Por '.irl rvpe'vr'ter
,.i(0 3
I Spit Ruat Portahle Oven

PaJintnrtj each $20.00
3 Small shelves $15.00
1 Philips Reel to Reel
Taperecorder $120.00
All reasonable offers
con ,idered.
Call 56451 ask for Apt. 221 or
223.

CARS FOR SALE
C16374
1969 TRIUMPH 1360, white
with red interior.
Telephone 34375.

C 6 397
MUST SELL
1973 Avenger, low mileage,
reliable for years to come.
$1800. Coral Harbour Gas
Stafiron 77014 Mr. O'Brien.


C16330
ONE
CALL
condition.
Telephone
Rock Sour


1972 DODGE
ENGER. A-1
$400.00 O.N.O.
Aubrey Kemp,
nd Eleuthera.


FOR SALE


C16352

MOTOR CENTRE LIMITED
USED CAR SPECIAL
"EXECUTIVE
DEMONSTRATORS"
1974 CHEVY IMPALA
Automatic Trans, Air Cond,
Radio, Heater, Power Brake,
Power Steering, Power
Windows, White Wall Tyres.
White With Brown Vinyl Top.
Low Mileage. AT ONLY
$7600.00.
1974 CHEVY MALIBU.
Automatic Trans, Air Cond,
Radio, Heater, P/S, P/B, W/W,
Tyres, With Very Low Mileage.
AT ONLY $6400.00.

1973 BUICK CENTURY.
Automatic Trans, Air Cond,
Radio, Heater, P/B. P/S, W/W
Tyres. Blue with Blue Vinyl
Top. AT THE LOW PRICE OF
$5900.00
1973 CHEVY MALIBU.
Automatic Trans, Console
Shift, Radio, W/W Tyres
Bucket Seats AT ONLY
$4990.00
1972 AUSTIN MAXI 1750 5
DOOR SEDAN. Radio, 5
Speed Trans. AT ONLY
$1950.00
1971 TOYOTA COROLA.
Standard Trans, Radio, Air
Cond. WTM Tyres. New Paint
Work AT ONLY $2400.00

1972 MORRIS 1300.
Automatic Trans, Radio. New
Paint Work AT ONLY
$1775 00
1971 JAVELIN SST.
Automatic Trans, Power
Steering. Radio, Safe
Command Bi .ke, Bucket Seats,
W/W Wide 'rack Tyres, Tape
Deck. AT ONLY $2900.00
1969 TOYOTA CORONA.
Automatic Trans, Radio, W/W
Tyres. AT ONLY $600.00
MOTOR CENTRE LIMITED
THOMPSON BLVD.
PHONE 56739.
P. O. BOX N-3741


C 16351
NEW PROVIDENCE LEASING
LIMITED ARE HAVING A
BIG USED CAR SALE FROM
AUGUST 6th THROUGH
AUGUST 14th. PRICES
HAVE BEEN SLASHED TO
THE LOWEST.
THIS IS THE BIGGEST SALE
WE HAVE YET AND IN
ORDER TO HELP YOU
GET THAT USED CAR JUST
CHECK THE VERY LOW
DOWN-PAYMENTS...
FINANCING AND
INSURANCE ARRANGED
ON THE SPOT. PART
EXCHANGES CONSIDERED .
OON'T MISS THIS BIG
CLEARANCE SALE..............

1973 FORD 3/4 TON TRUCK
IN TOP SHAPE NEW
ENGINE PRICE $4.250.00
Down-Payment $900.00
1971 FORD LTD. Price
$2,950.00 Down-Payment
$800.00
1971 FORD MUSTANG -
MACH 1 Price $4,250.00
Down-Payment $900.00
1969 HILLMAN SUNBEAM
Price $950.00 Down-Payment
$300.00
1971 CHEVY VEGA --Choice
of Two Price $2,350.00
Down-Payment $600.00
1974 FORD CAPRI Price
$1,750.00 Down-Payment
$450.00
1970 FORD ESCORT Price
$1,350.00 Down-Payment
$300.00
1971 VOLKSWAGEN 1300-
Excellen.t Shape Price
$2,550.00 Down-Payment
$700.00
1970 FORD MAVERICK -
Automatic, Air-conditioned
Price $2,550.00 Down-
Payment $700.00
1969 FORD FALCON Price
$1,275.00 Down-Payment
$300.00
1969 HILLMAN Station
Wagon Price $1,200.00
Down-Payment $300.00
1973 COMMER BUS -
Passenger Vehicle Price
$3,450.00 Down-Payment
$850.00
1970 CHEVY IMPALA Price
$1,750.00 Down-Payment
$450.00
1973 PONTIAC VENTURA IN
TIP TOP SHAPE Price
$5,250.00 Down-Payment
$1,000.00
1971 FORD MAVERICK Price
$2,950.00 Down-Payment
$600.00
1971 TRIUMPH 1300 Price
$1,400.00 Down-Payment
$400.00
1972 CHEVY VEGA Price
$3,450.00 Down-Payment
$800.00
1971 PLYMOUTH DUSTER
Price $2,850.00 Down-
Payment $600.00
1972 FORD MUSTANG --
Air-conditioned Price $3,950
Down-Payment $800.00
WE HAVE OTHER CARS
FOR CASH WHICH YOU CAN
CHOOSE FROM.

COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT
1972 COMMER TIPPER
TRUCK -- READY TO GO TO
WORK Price $5,250.00
Down-Payment $1,000.00
THIS VEHICLE CAN BE
SEEN AT MOTOR CENTRE
LTD., THOMPSON
BOULEVARD, NASSAU.


CARS FOR SALE


II


C 16334
"LIMOUSINE"
'73 CADILLAC, Black. Black
vinyl top. All extras. "Private"
one owner. Chauffeur driven
Always parked indoors. New
wide white wall tires, spare
never used. Call Miami
305-576-6076 from 6 to 9 p.m.

C16404
1973 PLYMOUTH FURY,
loaded with extra features.
$6,500 will take trade in.
Phone 28293-34527.


CRAFT SUPPLIES

C16138
NOW in stock at Bahamian
Paint Supply, Bay Street:
Decoupage
Clear Cast
Candle Craft
Tissue Craft
Phone 2-2386, 2-2898.


SMAINE SUPPLIES

C16336
17' BOSTON WHALER with
125 h.p. Very good condition.
Phone 28271, 9-5. $2900.00.

C16362
28ft. Twin Screw Cabin Cruiser
Fly Bridge with dual controls,
airconditioned cabin. Excellent
shape $9.000 O.N.O. Please
call 23211.-days 34243
nights. Ask for Mr. Bruce.

C11894
1969 31 ft. CHRIS-CRAFT
Commander. sleeps six, private
shower, two 230 h.p. engines
with less than 200 hours.
Kitchenette, good condition.
Call 24267, 54011.


C16396
22 NORTH American. 160
H.P. Mercruiser, new engine,
stern drive rebuilt. Sleeps 2.
Excellent condition. $3500
O.N.O. One engine rebuilt 160
H.P. Mercruiser Chevy. $700
O.N.O. Call 31642.

MUST SELL:
C16398
17 foot fibreglass sport boat,
$1800, dependable 40 HP
Johnson completely new paint
and engine overhaul, with
trailer. See at Coral Harbour
Gas Station. 77014 Mr.
O'Brien.


ANNOUNCEMENTS

C16376
PLAY GOLF at Blue Hill Golf
Course. Par 3 nine holes for
only $2.50 Juniors $1.50.
Driving Range 2 tennis courts,
2 squash courts, table tennis.
Pool tables. Open from 8 a.m.
till midnight. Pro Ken
Lockhart on hand ai all times
for golf lessons. Call 36333.

C16241
FEES


NASSAU C
SCHOOLS FIt
FEES DUE AUG
($5.00 late fee
after August 5th)


H RISTIAN
RST TERM
UST 1st.
is applicable


Office Hours
9 a.m. 12 noon
Phone 32641 P. 0. Box N3923


LOST

C 16408
WHITE, long haired, female
cat, vicinity Nassau Harbour
Club. Reward. 3-1222.

C16343
LOST in Highland Park area a
small light brown female dog,
white stripe down nose.
Wearing orown leather collar.
Very nervous will run away
from people. Called "PLP".
Anyone having seen this dog
please phone 42037.


H EALTH FOOD

SC16115
EXERCISE EQUIPMENT -
SALES AND RENTALS For
the very best in Exercise
Equipment, Natural Health
Food and Vitamins, visit
Wong's Health Food Store,
Mackey Street.


SCHOOLS

LEWIS AUTO SCHOOL
C16114
Learn to drive with confidence.
Phone 59805 between 7 and
8:30 a.m. or after 6 p.m. or
3-5084 anytime.

C16413
SAVE on clothing for yourself
and your family. LEARN TO
SEW with and without
patterns.
Competent Instructors!
Simplified lessons
Enroll NOW for next term.
Registration daily, Mon. -
Sat., 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
D'ELEGANT SCHOOL OF
FASHION AND
DRESSMAKING.
Corner East Shirley and Fowler
Streets. Telephone 53223.


SCHOOLS II


C16360
WEE WISDOM
Collins Avenue
Nassau's finest Prep
3 year old Nursery 4 and 5
year old Kindergarten
Low Tuition
Supervised Play
Quality Teaching Programme
e Phonics
e Reading
Call: 32641 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
daily

I POSITION WANTED
C 16340
EXPERIENCED AND FULLY
QUALIFIED Bahamian
Locksmith requires position
with established commercial or
industrial organisation. Call
57620, any time.

I ELPWANTED
C16322
WANTED: One Labourer. For
further information, Please
phone 24495. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
C 16385
FIVE farm labourers-male. $39
per week. Contact Mr. Wilfred
Beneby 57612.

C 16383
Part-time tutor for 15 year old
girl studying for G.C.E. "0"
levels. 3-1313.
C16126
WANTED IMMEDIATELY
Experienced Offset Pressman,
40 hours per week. good
working conditions. APPLY
BAHAMAS PRINTING, Oakes
Field.
C16401
SOME one to live on 412/ acres
of land rent free, good farming
land arrangements could be
made for farming about a mile
above Fort Montagu back of
Graham Acres road lead to it.
Phone 5-4811.

C16391
AMBITIOUS and hard working
Bahamian between 21-26 years
required as male management
trainee. Two years business
experience preferred. All
applications in own
handwriting to Adv. C16391,
c/o The Tribune, P. 0. Box
N-3207, Nassau.


ALARMS/SECURITY
l.owe's Alarm Services I'h. 3-2042

ANTENNAS
Island TV 'li. 2.2618

AUTOMOTIVE
LucasBa Itteries
I1av Stredt (;arage P'h. 2-2434
fraiiisiiiissionii R pairs
Shell Action Slatin Ph. 5 2000

BOOKSTORE
I ie (hristia.i Iook
Shli1p I'h. S 8744

BUSINESS FORMS
I xcutiliv
l'rinllrs P'h. 2-4267/5-4011

KITCHEN CABINETS
('"l niiin ei it h
I uriniltr l'e. .-1120

CAMERAS
John ull IPh. 2-42S2/3

DOWNTOWN PARKING
1M1nihlnv R;ile ilS
I'lion. 2-47274d.iI ) 7-7387(nile)

ENTERTAINMENT
Atidit Visiial & I.ovir,
I .in & I quip. Service I'h. 2-2157

FLORISTS
slaid I lorist I'. 2-2702/5-5419

GARDEN & PET SUPPLIES
Mhodernstici ardentni & I'e-
MadJera Shotppintg Plaia I'h. 2-2868
Nassau (;.ardoi & l'el
M.onrosle Avn-i P l'h. 2-4259
HUHHICANE AWNINGS
John S. (;Gee I'h. 2-8421/6


HELP WANTED


C16361
ELECTRICAL STORE ROOM
CLERK. Must be able to drive.
Only experienced persons need
apply. Telephone 3-6644 or
write: William's Electric Ltd.,
P. O. Box N1151, Nassau.

C 16380
AIR CONDITIONING
Mechanic experienced in
servicing and maintenance of
all types and sizes of
equipment. Must have own
hand tools, valid driver's
licence. Ability to diagnose and
repair without supervision and
the desire to advance and
improve skills. Salary and
benefits according to ability
and open for negotiation.
Bahamians only need apply.
Call Hill York Limited. 24074
for interview appointment.


C16329
I INTERNATIONAL
COMPANY REQUIRES
SALES REPRESENTATIVE
IN NASSAU AND
FREEPORT. FULL OR PART
TIME.
/rite GB PUBLISHERS INC.,
P. 0. BOX 234, KINGSTON
11, Jamaica, WEST INDIES.

C16407
MANAGER required to assume
complete responsibility for
busy restaurant, catering for
evening as well as day time
trade, specializing in
continental cuisine. Applicant
should be qualified in all
aspects of restaurant
management. Write to P. 0.
Box F-2588, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.
C 16406
DESIGNER AND
DRAFTSMAN, with 5 to 10
years practical experience in
Designing, University Degree in
Fine Arts and Industrial
Design required. References
essential. For appointment
telephone Mosko's United
Construction Co., Ltd. at
22825 or 22826.

C16411
LIVE-IN maid to care for blind
lady. $15 per week. Write to:
Adv. C16411, c/o The Tribune,
P. 0. Box N3207, Nassau.


LAUNDRY&DRY CLEANING
New Oriental L.undry I'h. 2-4403

MEN'S WEAR
I ashiomnetet Ltd. I'h. 2-2376/7

OPTICIANS
Optical Services Lid. Ph. 2-3910/1

PAPER
Oir'mercial aperr I lous IPh. 5-9731
PRINTING
Wnit\ P'riniiig lli. S-4506
I r.utisc
P'rinter I'h. 2-4267/5-401 I

RUBBER STAMPS
Wongl's iilhhr Slainiis I'h. -4sOt,
Irlte Trihii, I'h. 2-1986

SPORTS GOODS
(ihiiiiiii Spor'ts I.a3 d I'h. 2-1862

TRAVEL
I'laytlours Ph'l. 2-2931/7
. II. Cir Prr7 2I. 2-8681/7

TRUCKING

Trucking & Landsaupr Ih. S-9574

Conch salad I rucking
Box 5654 IPh. 2-4726/3 1562 ..

TV REPAIRS
Channel I Iletronics Lid.l'h. 3-5478

TYPEWRITER REPAIR


Junior lellhel


I'h. S-1044


UPHOLSTERING
" ddie' t lphols trriin Ph. 5.9713


FOR TOU MTIU IO11WNT




Shop Nassau Merchants

For Business -And Services


I I l~u~


I I TRADE SERVICES


C16333
LANDSCAPING and for all
your gardening, needs -
mowing, trimming, hedging,
tree felling and clearing. Call
5-7810, LAWNS AND
HEDGES.

C16133
FOR YOUR BUILDING
NEEDS AND CRANE HIRE ...
see:-
ISLAND BUILDERS
LIMITED
P. 0. Box 6285 ES
Phone 3-1671 -3-1672
C16134
BACKHOE FOR HIRE
Need a septic tank or trenching
done?
Call
CARL G. TRECO"
CONTRACTORS LTD.,
2-4996 or 5-8725


C16137
SHAWNEE
Dally Service between West
Palm Beach and West End. For
reservations call The Grand
Bahama Hotel (Ext. 5).


ZI ELPF NOTED

C 15438
SERVICE MANAGER 5
years experience.
SECRETARY/BOOKKEEPER
5 years experience in car
rental business.
DRIVER must also take on
other duties where needed.
Apply to: Budget Rent-a-Car,
P. 0. Box F-1802, Freeport.

C15432
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY -
TECHNICAL TRANSLATOR
Must be able to speak and
write English and Italian
fluently and translate both
languages. An excellent
knowledge of good office
procedures and the ability to
work independently and
responsibly are essential.
Only Bahamians need apply in
writing to: SAIPEM, S.p.A.,
Bahamas Branch P. 0. Box
F-2471 Freeport, Bahamas.


C15435
Experienced live-in MAID, age
35, to care for 5 children,
$25.00 per week.
GENERAL MAID for yard
cleaning, house cleaning plus
other duties.
Eliza Ferguson, Eight Mile
Rock.

C15423
PETROLEUM INSPECTORS
Applications are invited from
Petroleum Inspectors with
several years experience in the
quantity and quality inspection
of bulk oil cargoes. Applicants
should also have some
e x p erience in the
documentation of bulk oil
cargoes and storage tank and
metering equipment
calibrations.
Please apply. together with full
details of experience and
qualifications to: E. W. Saybolt
& Co., S.A.., P. 0. Box F-2049,
F.eeport, Grand Bahama.

C15433
NIGHT STEWARD: One (1)
Night Steward. Must be able to
take charge of entire kitchen.
Must have at least two (2)
years experience as Night
Steward. Must be willing to
work long hours if necessary
Must keep garbage areas clean.
LAUNDRY SUPERVISOR:
One (1) Laundry Supervisor.
Must be able to train in all
phases of the Laundry
Department. Must have worked
in Laundry for at least two (2)
years.
LIVE-IN MAID: One (1)
Live-in- Maid. To care for small
child and other household
duties. Please contact Miss
Stubbs at 373-1333, Ext. 23
or 80.
MUSICIAN/STEEL
DRUMMER: One (1)
Musician/Steel Drummer.
Performing applicants talents
on the steel drum and
additional percussion
instruments. Must have at least
5 to 6 years experience n steel
drum and other percussion
instruments.
PUBLIC RELATION/ENTER.
TAINMENT CO-ORDINA-
TOR: One (1) Public
Relation/Entertainment
Co-ordinator. Works closely
with Sales Director and Music
Director. Must have three (3)
years experience dealing with
entertainment booking
agencies and wholesale and
retail travel agencies. Must have
supervisor administrative
ability.
For the above please apply to
the Personnel Office, Holiday
Inn of Lucayan Beach, P. 0.
Box F-760, Freeport, Grand
Bahama, BAHAMAS. Phone
373-1333, Ext. 28.


TRADE SERVICES


C16127
MASTER TECHNICIANS LTD
Mackey Street
YOUR WHIRLPOOL
DISTRIBUTORS OFFER:'
Refrigerators, Washers, Dryers.
Compactors, Freezers, Ice
Makers, Air Conditioners and
Garbage Disposers. With full'
warranty on every home
appliance we sell.
Service done by factory trained
mechanics. Telephone 23713,
59322.

C 16112
SEWING MACHINE PARTS
AND REPAIRS
ISLAND FURNITURE
COMPANY
P. O. Box N4818, Nassau
Dowdeswell and Christie
Streets
Telephone 21197, 231,52.


C15425

PROTECTIVE COATING
SUPERINTENDENT -
Administer and control total
contractual effort in the
mixing and application of
epozy, inorganic, urethane and
related exotic coatings,
including contract
administration, direction of
supervision and labour,
maintenance of equipment,
interpretation of specifications,
material and quality control
and maintenance of
construction schedule.
PROTECTION COATING
SUPERVISOR Co-ordinate
and direct the mixing and
application of epoxy,
inorganic, urethane and related
exotic coatings to technical
specifications.
Approximately 6 months
employment. Applicants
should have at least 5-10 years
experience in similar jobs
Including application of
protective coatings in the oil
and chemical industry.
Written application only
including experience resume
and salary history to: OLIVER
B. CANNON & SON, INC., c/o
P. 0. Box F-2452, Freeport,
G.B.I..

C 15439
PILOT & AIRCRAFT
MECHANIC: Company Pilot
and must also be able to repair
and maintain Company
Airplane and Jet Aircraft,
mainly starters and generators.
Must have at least 10 years
experience. Must have
commercial instrument rating
and a minimum of 5,000
hours. .Police record, health
certificate and letters of
reference required.

GOLF DIRECTOR: To run
and operate the Golf. Shop.
Stocking and retailing golf
equipment and clothing and
arranging tournaments. 10-12'
years experience necessary and
should be a member of Golfers
Association. Must be able to
give golf lessons when
necessary. Police record, health
certificate and letters of
reference required.
I interested persons apply:
GRAND BAHAMA HOTEL,
WEST END, GRAND
BAHAMA, Personnel Office
between the hours of 9:00 a.m.
and 3:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday. Mailing
Address: 158 Port Road, West
Palm Beach, Fla. 33404, Elon
Martin, Jr., Personnel Director.

C15428
GARDENERS: Willing to work
outdoors in all kinds of
weather; dig graves and holes
for trees; prepare plant beds-
weed, cut grass; handle-
insecticides, fertilizers and
herbicides. Collect and remove
trash, all duties related to
commercial landscape
maintenance.
NURSERYMAN (HORTI-
CULTURAL):- To plan
and operate new installation of
container grown plant material,
- shade house, mist beds, etc...
Complete knowledge of
propagation technique for
plant material suitable to the
Bahamas. Instruct maintenance
crews in all duties related to
landscape maintenance, -
application of insecticides,
fertilizers and herbicides,
verticutting, verification and
maintenance of turf. Provide
written estimates to customers
and supervise landscape
construction on job site.
MANAGER/MANAGERESS:
To assume full responsibility
for all business administration
for Landscape Nursery, answer
correspondence, buildings and
all accounting procedures
through monthly financial
statement. Horticultural
background necessary.
Apply: Lucaya Nursery &
Landscaping, Ltd., P. O. Box
F-252, Freeport, Grand
Bahama. Yellow Pine & Forest
Ave..,


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11
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IT(HE TRIBUNE --- Tuesday, August 13, 197


HAMA

HELP WANTED
C15437
(1) GARDENER: able to do
some landscaping and trench
around pipe 4-5 years
experience. Mechanical
Engineering, Poplar Crescent,
P. O. Box F-1536, Freeport.

C15436
CHEF: to specialize in
European dishes and
MAITRE 'D: must be able to
prepare menu for Dinner
Room.
Minimum 5 years experience in
domestic work, also able to
speak German and French.
Apply: Personnel Manager,
Patrick Kemp, Schooner
AIestaurant, Box F-709,
Freeport. (352-6969).


lllyou believe nobody
In reads small ads ...1
I W ybu'rewrong. YOU j,
I! reading this aren't youf.
I Call 2-276 for
I information on sm. or
latrge dlsplay ads.


-1----- ---I-
I Good news for readers of

SSTAY ALIVE
I LONGER!
The complete book
now available!
Lelord Kordel's popular book
"Stay Alive Longer" is now
availbie to readers of this
news,,iper. Only a very small
part of its 220 pages was
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I you have been enjoying. The
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at The Tribune offices
Shirley & Deveaux Streets
at $1.50 per copy. Add 25c
for postage.

---------


" I T'ATS WHAT% CALL. A TOSSED AS4D..


CARROLL RIGHTER'S




GENERAL TENDENCIES: You now have an
unusually good day to put your points ae
successfully to pin support. Good also for improving
surroundings.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) Making new arrangssnents o
you get problems handled properly is wise. Contact relativ
who can be helpful. Read in p.m.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Plan how to have greater
prosperity so you don't have to.worry and struggle so hard.
You are thinking in a practical vein now and can accomplish
much.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Reach the right decisions
where your personal aims are concerned and then go after
them like an arrow. Plan time for the social side of life.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Look at the
different aspects of whatever is of concern to you and gain the
advice of experts so you know exactly what to do. Show mate
devotion.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Come to a better understanding
with good friends. Make that aim of yours a hobby and it
becomes easy and a pleasure. Avoid a know-It-al.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept 22) Try to gain the favor of one
who can extend the favors you need, but make sure to
understand what is being suggested to you.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Study that new outlet that
appeals so much to you before you Jump into it. Plan trip now
to avoid difficulties later on. Do something nice for mate.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) You have assumed
obligations that are best discharged right now if you are to
gain benefit from them. Have understanding discussion with
mate in pjm.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Find out what a
dynamic partner expects of you and then cooperate for
mutually fine results. Make peace with one who opposes you.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) Schedule your activities
and time wisely to avoid confusion with all you have to do.
Shop for right clothing. Do not permit others to waste your
time.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Plan some time for the
amusements you like with individuals you admire and have a
good time. Much happiness with mate in p.m.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Try to please family more by
making your home more charming and comfortable. Bring
your friends home and entertain them there. Check
statements.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY... he or she can
easily gain own desires and aims because of the ability to talk
and can put views and ideas across to others and really impress
them. Slant the education along lines of selling or whatever is
of a pioneering or inventive nature.

1I -, Chess


No 7.5)03 by TIM McKAV
Arros
I Rode tours anass). (5. 4)
7. one kind of key. (3t)
9. Say five a.m. (t. 4)
t11. Devon river. (3)
12 Parliament provides them.
(4)
14 ureen. possibly (6. Xt
1). Carry. 14)
s18. Chess piece. (3)
0. rtlngu into UHe. (8)
2. )ebtahible. (4)
13. Thread. (5)
14. Writer. J3)
'.. Annoys in a petty way I)
Down
I Remains of a forest giant.
(4-4)
-. Order. ()
3. Exclusively. (4)
4. Feature of t dlabursh. (.. 4)
5. French coin. (3I
6. Makes a mistake. (4)
S Full-sklrted dress. (4)
H. Monster lake. (4. 4)
10. arni crop. (3)
13. 8 e rep.

(4)
N Part of a l
building.
(5)
9. C o nil0.
M i. t11rt of
the foot.
(3) veaerftc.'d %.11111011U


Rupert and the Wooden Horse-35


The Imps show no surprise when the little
bear has told his story. "You may think the
horse is behaving strangely," says one, "but
its probably made of restless wood." Rupert
declares he has never heard of such a thing.
t"Of course you haven't," says the tiny person.
SOnly we Imps know about matters of that
kind." Meanwhile two of his friends have


spread out the shawl and are admiring the
pattern. "What pretty flowers," one of the
imps calls out. "Just like those we grow !"
It belongs to Rosalie," explains Rupert. She
was lucky, it was the only one In the shop.
I'd hoped to buy it as a present for myMummy,
but I was just too late."
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


Rupert and the Wooden Horse-36
..O rI..*UMM 11


*e ehawl is handed back to Rupert, then he
it told to wait while the Imps talk quietly
" themeelves. Before long one. of them
I the group and beckons Rupert toward
ti hollow of a large tree. "SOouwant a
aleetly like that for your Mmy." he
s. "w must e what our weaver can
do." l4He Stts into the hollow tree and when


Rupert peers through the opening he notes
another Imp sitting at a weaving lom. "
you any more work for me?, y thet I
person to Ruplrt' guide. I've flnishe all
my jobs. Evelthing's ready. the new curtain
and bedspreads and the tableoth."
ALL RIGHTS RESIRVED


Podgaet-Zhuravlev. Leningrad
1974. Whlte (to move) forced a
win by an attacking idea which
often recurs in play. Can you
find It ? Solution credit only if
you find the correct follow-up to
Wh ite's first move.
Par times: 10 seconds, chess
master; 20 seconds, expert; 1
minute county layer; 2 min-
utes, club standard; 5 minutes.
average; 15 minutes, novice.
dLiMTM"RO; 45 -
I Kt-Q7! QxKt, 2 QxP ch,
Q-Kt2; 3 QxP c. K--R1: 4
-.BSt (no credit i t you
intended 4 R-B7? which fails
to 4 ... Q-Kt4t), R-KB1; 5
R-R5 ch. Q--R2: 6 RxQ ch
and Black resaime a few moves
later.

Bridge
we aeLI, tauaH
Bvatc. one of te tars of the
lucje PFrench tenm in the
recent wormid championSip, in
Veniace. "All our oppoMMt prlay
like super, super hmns L
wha the New andr. Roy
Kerr. did to my CotnertI"

A 7
y A J 952
964Q10
Wedt Et
KJ 4 2
03 108 5



73
AKi
Seuth North
2 NT 3
3 NT NT
t NT
By any standard, the slam was
an eiezAlyl t onpOe.
IKrr.Wa6t; as the Q to
which decluer. Jeau1 Michel
Boulanger, payed low. Most ex-
perts would have one the same.
conceding the inevitable lower to
WInnt he nea t dinamn de-
clarer woureel off ten wiers.
and discarng before dummy.
West couldn't kem a diamond
pod two spades. Delarer's 461
er dummy's 9S would eon Ote
twelfth t iok.
Intmead of autlnuilng dia-
monds, however, Roy Kerr
switched to-4he 1
After an us trance,
Boulener dendd that no man
would Dare the au y, at trick
two, in a dam, to lead away
from the 4
UP wenui #4A and down
came the curtain ...


E Ntefl

01C .
emam
lasgs
E RaRaing a


wew" eMut O 6




em* a elf m"m -im "*-
lota Iem NHA300fl ema sub


REX MORGAN, M.D.
SCAN I HELP WE'LL BE HAVING
JUE / tYOU WITH THE DINNER IN THE
COME IN, MRS DINNER ? RECREATION ROOM
IODGE NTHE ROOF / DO
YOU WANT TO HELP












JUDGE PARKER


STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD

M CGRATH HAS WHEN MY BACK WAS
6IVEN/A LURID, TURNED HE STRUCK MY
ACCOUNT OF, ARM WITH THE POKER, GRABBED
ART THIEF H6 GUN AND





JUST


Dal Curtis


Paul Nichols


Saunders & Overgard


74












12 THE TRIBUNE -.- Tuesday, August 13, 1974


Radio

men

too

sound


for

Press


/Vi h
I (l i ),4I I II i ;i ,
Rh rl'ie eilli'l. /NS i\ bi i
t15 h i i i +n 1 I v !. ,i ; !,.












SIl.. > t. l lc R' IS lli;l



l .... l ",; + V| i, lr l '..]. ti i-+.


'I Il 1 d


Ii
XI
1,1
1,1.,,i.


HOW LITTLE ZAIRE IS GETTING READY FOR THE BIG RUMBLE-IN-THE-JUNGLE


KINSH \S \ .aure l.et
s1 i l-
an\iety o ,itn i iht 'i|at
C noretiti' bi-vond st'op
x& u iFr in ( iitIen t1, a IiV a
S ia . a i t* l i .c ,ti ,ii c.'
me I1e in !'i .ii...' lt

S iI i I P l ii tilt'III,

t 'I' rr is
t' e P til!!E i ll .isiiut atid
I, i 'li.:s-i \ I lili airport tonii
!.l- ol-,; l il'' *.[I 5i fl
i It+{ `' ii 1.!( I i i. '. i 'io te l
v; r u t ilii. .1 a r ar>d \
i < t i ned by the
oxetrnnicnt mi and its fleet ol




BEES


102 rental cars is long booked

So what if there's only a
single satellite telephone
channel now operative
towards the United States?
Who cares if the rainy season
begins on Sept. 15 the way it
did last year, and what's the
big deal if there's no hot
water in the latrines in the
Kinshasa University dorms
where 4,222 beds are being
readied for the fight mob
from abroad?
Why should Citizen Mamba
Shako worry? He'll sleep it


BUZZ


home, he'll eat at home. And
he's on the card himself in a
preliminary bout.
But Mamba Shako refuses
to be concerned for a good
reason: Everyone here knows
Zaire has made the
organization of the fight a
matter of national pride and a
national priority, a crash
method for demonstrating its
competence to the world and
effacing the old image of
chaos that accompanied the
country when it was newly
independent and called the
Congo.
Under these circumstances.


TO.


it seems entirely reasonable
that by mid-September the
one telephone channel will be
72 as promised, that more
than 100 new luxury buses
will have arrived from Europe
to transport visitors in the
city, that hot water will flow,
and that hundreds of pleasant
villas will be opened to house
guests in the city.
The fight's chief
coordinator, citizen Bula
Mandungu citizen has
replaced mister as a form of
address in Zaire under an
"authenticity" programme --
told a reporter: "Fear


TITLE


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iIn r.t antI

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I; . \1 n i i e\ s\ i" n ni'


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C: o a il i l , t I'


















accomnpanied llie .il niniKL
along wil1h p ients ol f le
swinmme'rs Oin Saturda l. e
Swim Meet closed with a
Parade of ouL s be for e the
.it" 'i 'iii. < i* lt. I. i ,:i


I iV ,:


"' '

Picture. RICKE.Y wI'FI.S
':..P,,I Bees from left (standing) Eula-mae Smith, Elsine Thompson, Wendy Jackman, Jennifer
o.)," ftoch) (kneeling) Margaret Albury (captain), Diedre Johnson, Claudia Ferguson, Winsome


II' .21


Jets downed in


5-set thriller


a., ...n \\ ho, though
1 ]. is I h on the
S, i' support
, ".m I *!i '- i ',.\ for lier sound


II

'i


i.t- iij.itc Oswald Moore
." : 'ti .l hr.'id! being off to
.k o! pl.cti which they
'i.l 'no T dline Ior some weeks
C' .e 11not use to that." hli
S'.,I e\cliliheless. "where girls
O. \o le l ll is concerned.
i'.',,,lis Islind Club is great."
1:i pie gtilne interview, Jets
S. Nor.main (Ciay figured
t th' Ir Jist playing the
S.'.. ld hlie arrived them
S |. .iii h 'Whiat w e expect to
S1 . siid, 'is to do the
'.-. 1 nd make as few

SI \\ l seemed as it
I '. h l p.jn \\itould have worked


~'55
,s' ,.~ 1t1

fli
'Its


The Jets in (lie tirst set 1ei.sed a
three poitl set back and held
the BIee., to lnst o(ine poin
enroutil e 1 ,10 itgL tie lead hI
one
Wendy Jackman. \'.'-..ic
l)avidson and Albury who were
mainly responsible for the Bees
first set le,,d weaved a strong
offence that piloted them
ahead by thice points in ithe
second set
'I hey weie coimtendably
assisted b\ hitter L:utlan-mae
Smith and defender ('Claudia
IFergutson, the combination of
which mo\ei d them to 1 a
comloriable 10 3 lead.
Somehow. the Bee's still
were not quite the teal they
portira ed in regular s asonll
play. 11isques played lIaIoc
with their game Mloreover.


Ihey gave ('eestine Wilson too
many overpasses which she
thundered away in the Bees
court.
Taking a 2-1 lead going into
the fourth set. the Jets fought
hard and stionei for- the win
that would have given them the
championship for the first time
in three years.
(;athermg their moimeUiinltm
the Bees pioVed fornidiable
The score tied and the lead
changed hands inany times
before Davidson went to the
line and served the Bees to
their much needed victory.
Paradise took no time to
show their true potential in the
final set Davidson continued
from the line with sizzling
deliveries many of which were
unreturnable Those that came
were picked up by the defence
The Jets were afforded six
more points before bowing outt
on Albury's service.
The Stars' first set was
probably their hardest. But,.
the Police expended ,a lot of
energy within that period


Players

tribute to

Sir Alf

Mr. Harold Wilson, the
British Prime Minister,
presenting a gold-plated
replica of the World Cup to
Sir Alt Ramsey (right) the
former England soccer
manager, when he attended a
testimonial dinner given in his
honour at the Cafe Royal in
London recently.
England won the World
Cup under his leadership in
1966 when they beat West
Germany by 4-2 in the final
at Wembley stadium.
In the centre of the picture
is Sir Stanley Rous. who was
President of the Federation
of International Football
Associations from 1961 until
this year.
Many players, including
the entire 1966 cup winning
team, club chairmen and
managers, referees, officials
and fans were among the 500
guests who gathered to pay
tribute to the former England
manager.
BASEBALL RESULTS
I),troil r. K:iasvio% Cit\ I
Mhiltsauke t .' lIt'sas I
t .ilh'oiriiia 4. Iost on 2
Oakland 3. New York 2
I' tikidelphlii 4. San I raitcis.o I
New\ York 3. ILos Angeles I
Pittsburgh 7. ('iinci niti 4
St. I otiis 6. S;inI liegp 55.


S'.. 1





IIi
.- - '. -., .


nothing. Everything is
progressing on schedule."
The best visible evidence
that he is right is at the May
22 soccer stadium, the scene
of the fight. where 400
workers arrive at dawn and
work until nightfall every
day.
Most of its old shell has
been recast in concrete and
new floodlight towers are
being up up.
The chief project engineer.
Tuambilangana Koni, lists
the actual capacity at 62,800
- 48.800 backless grandstand


seats. 8,000 more comfortable
grandstand seats, and 6.000
ringside seats spread over thne
soccer field.
Both All and Foreman will
have big dressing rooms, each
larger than the space set aside
for the press, which is
expected to number about
500.
If it rains, too bad. The
ring will be covered, but not
the seats.
There are some fears
though that an African
cloudburst could so drench
thlie minedia's electronic


KEYBOARD



TAKE A



GAME LEAD

By (,Glidstion I hiirston


( A IT ll R Pailt ICientil
from four tunes ait b.i scoa i cd
two and knocked in t'.'o lines
with three singles last night
leading Keyhoard .0tingm,: to i
7-5 victory oi ver ( -,' 1.'.,I
Things and a full ram i i' in
the Malestic I e q'!Ie ot I
N.P.S.A. series
Going tlhe sei' n tin .t',
route and picking tip the \sin
was strong right handed I .- i
Bethel who stiUck t: .I \.
though lie 'ave uip l 'iln' l
Bethel over 1 11 '
Hlagler Inn Buti ; i ,
.hitless shutout.
In taking thei tle l i
six played. ( k. i( \-' 'tI
into to1 0rl1h ptla c a lji' d ,i ',
Stroinl third place I >. .i
Stars 13 2) who art picc-dl
b\ I lectow n (Ii.'" '.
Kec board haI \v i '
their six.
I on\, Sand'. \xi < 'i i .* 'it
eight hittu struck i
walked f r t in ke thi !.
l oppingt. (C ke'. l' .' '. :is
catcher (harles MN.ck.'\ hi.
scored twiso ns Ja d kn ,'LI. k,
in two with his :.- .' n l -,
I outi ol the park h n1 i ,
lCi 1 'ieId h:.ni P i
I tigene- M u\1 ll .in t lii
iase mnliia l \ itc ( .0 1 *
ha"\ C 1 \1 I N I' T 1,.: I

knocked n ti'l ; i i

( pien 1 Ia ,c l- .' ti 'hi. t
tIil li .i I)cm I 'i11,. v,:. .1 ,!
pitched to ,csiond i;i \..i

I F a r r i n s '. lt o I \ \ | v i 1 '!- \ ,t "
erri 1I hirdii tO h. . .
thRol e d t'i i t I ,1'. I 1 "

tr Iar e he ] I iI d



through on T -h \ !_i [ ii. tii
Bernice Sands ,and .il it sto
Donnie Lee o t: tilk th,i ti
good. Sands' sick i ie ,'ied
Del)c eritte with the lcad nl tli!t
Lee's base hit brought liiiii
i .. ,


t ; nt i i i;! .in e tro
'. ts ,i I t etlluc'i tie and
v c. i Ildh i 1,r tltir'v (' tartoll il
ilihe c,\en I i, 1 i s .' "cored
ir I i i i D aryl

H :;t i l h lj -l i~'.. tl ilt




\ : r 11"


S t. I i. I

i l .


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ii


I 2' t It 'i li' l liIu cltt




;l. .i. t 'I !St .ig t n 'lie

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:,+ t l',~ tc th

L t 1 f it '< ail li


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I:' : 1t ; t ],l 'n ,- i-'
I: ; 1 i P I


ii: n i,. l









'i lo


''I '

Xli I .'~ Ii (iii


/
/~4d


'l ,ini, '/( ,i 5i ) lI 1 .S
Left fielder Tony Carey scores Coke's first run in the
bottom of the second innings off Nigel Claike's bases
loaded bunt.


Underwood

spins

Pakistan

to brink


of defeat
LONDON England
offspinner Derek Underwood
spun Pakistan towards defeat
on a rain affected surface at
Lord's yesterday after the
visitors had complained
bitterly about the condition of
the pitch.
Pakistan were all out in their
second innings for 226, a slim
lead of only 86. At the close
England were on 27 for no
wicket
Underwood, tormentor-in-
chief, shattered Pakistan's
hopes with figures of eight
wickets for 51 runs off 34.5
overs. le also took five wickets
for 20 in the first innings.
Sumarized score: Pakistan
130 for nine declared
(Underwood five for 20 and
226 (Underwood eight for 51,
Mushtang Monhammed 76).
England 270 and 27 for no
wicket.
A row blew up before play
over water which had seeped
under the covers protecting the
pitch. There was heavy rain
during the break since
Saturday and play only started
at 1115 1 ST with an extra
hour scheduled.
Pakistan manager Omar
Kureishi lashed out in a
stat emen t at the
"incompetence" of officials
responsible for protecting the
pitch
"I have officially protested
to the MCC over an appalling
show of negligence and
incompetence in not covering
the wicket adequately."
Kureishi said.
"'We consider it extremely
tuntair to be called upon to
play on a wicket which, to all
appearances. has changed its
inherent character,"
An MCC spokesman said his
S staff did everything possible.
"The weight of the water was
more than could be coped with
by any precautions." he said.
Meanwhile, Geoff Boycott
hit the 81 st century of his
career Monday as Yorkshire
scored 253 for three against
Sussex at IHeadingley.
Boycott, out of favour with
the I ngland selectors since a
recent loss of form, cracked
back into contention with a
i hard-hitting 1 7.
titSummari/ed scores:
A\t ihadingleg : Yorkshiire 253
I r three (innings closed) (G.
uBos,,ti 117): Susse\x 16 for five
174 o %ers)(.I.I). More\ 57)
At ('li'ltenhaiiir tloucestershire
282 (99 Iovers) R.B. Nichols 68: B.
S'tead tour for .13) anid seven for
ie. Nottingihanmshire 172 (47 4
overs) (IM.A. t;raveney eight for
85).
At Burton on Irent: (;lamorgan
't) (44.2 Overs) (A. Ward seven for
42) Derbyshire 100 (49.5 overs)
M A.I Willianms four for 35)
A t \ I I i n ngb o r o u g it
' I Northiiniptonsliire 201 for serve i
d dec. (93.2 overs) (A Iait 64). lIsse\
4) for two (2') overs)
I\t I.eicester: i.eicestershire 16(
I tor nine dec. (182 overs) ((;. .
i Johison live or 51 Kentl 123 lor
six (58 overs) ((; W Johnison 66).
At I dghbaslotn: W'Varwickislhire 254
tor eight dec. (71 overs) (i. IK.
ardoimni 79 not out) Surrey 1t) for
three.
AiAt Worcester: Worceslershire
126 (53 1 overs) (H. RIt. Moselet
hour for 30) and 72 (A. A. Jones six
tor 37) Somerset 99 (42.2 overis)
(N. affordord lour for 43)and 22 for

PACERS IN


ROI)DNFY Farquharson
scored a game high of 25
points 'leading Chippingham
Pacers to a 62-58 victory over
the Jammers in last night's
Gambier United Youth
basketball tournament.
Forward Carl Rolle and
guard Charles Deveaux each
scored 19 points as Bahamas
Industrial Gas stopped Golden
Isles Slars 61-55 in the first
game. Charles Albury scored
26 for Golden Isles.


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