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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03675
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: July 24, 1974
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03675

Full Text




















wor td .- bli


.ribunu


. h. Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


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OL. LXX1, No. 201 Wednesday, July 24,1974 Price: 20 Cents
Ir .. I 11 ii' 'e t ii


Pindling bill:-


newspaper


misinformedd'


THE BLUE FOX restaurant
in San Francisco, where Prime
Minister L. O. Pindling
entertained a party of ten on
June 8, "had misinformed" the
San Francisco Examiner's
social columnist "as to the
number of people in Mr.
Pindling's party and the
resultant price of the dinner."
This information was sent to
The Tribune by Mr. Thomas
Eastham, Executive Editor of
the Examiner. Mr. Albert
Morch, the Examiner's social
columnist, is on vacation. I
Under the heading: "We're
sorry..." the Examiner wrote in
its July 17 edition:
"In the Albert Morch
column of June 14, it was
reported that the Hon. Lynden
O. Pindling, Prime Minister of
the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas, received a dinner tab
at the Blue Fox Restaurant in
San Francisco of $694.35 for a
party of five. Now it appears
this information was incorrect.
The restaurant's management
informs us the sum was
$264.35, including tax and tip,
for a party of ten.
"The Examiner regrets the
error."
The Examiner's denial
referred to sociaicolumnist
Morch's comments in that
paper's edition of Junm 14.
Alleged Mr. Morch in his
column: *
"To offer another dislay of
carefree generosity, we cite the
scene at the, Blie Pbg
- L :c&L-cur t on ..p ... ttening.
"Thare, surrounded by five
security men inside and four
more (with walkie-talkies)
outside was the Hon. Lynden
O. Pindling, prime minister of
the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas, dining with a party
of five none of them security
people.
"Pindling's dinner tab came
to $694.35, including the
three bottles of Chateau
Lafitte Rothschild at $140 per
bottle. And do his constituents
at home know about this? Or
care?"
Morch's allegations were
sent to The Tribune and were
referred to in a Tribune
editorial of June 25.
On July 3 eight days later
Mr. Pindling called a press
conference to deny Morch's
allegations and to brand
Tribune contributing editor Sir
Etienne Dupuch "a chronic
political lar" for reprinting
them in his own column in The
Tribune.
At that conference Mr.
Pindling produced a
typewritten bill from the
restaurant made out, not to


himself, but to Mr. Richard R.
Foreman of the Ministry of
Tourism, Los Angeles. The bill
showed that instead of the
alleged three bottles of wine at
$140 per bottle, Mr. Pindling's
party had one $11 bottle and a
$2.75 half bottle of wine.
In reply to Mr. Pindling Sir
Etienne emphasized that he
reprinted Morch's story in his
June 25 column as an alleged.
report.
"From the very outset I
want to say that I' accept Mr.
Pindling's statement (on July
3) as being the truth," wrote
Sir Etienne.
However Sir Etienne wanted
to be reassured that "since the
bill is made out to a
department of the Bahamas
Government, it is presumed
that this will be charged to Mr.
Pindling's entertaining
allowance provided by the
Legislature."
Mr. Pindling's annual salary
is $30,536 in addition to which
there is an entertainment
allowance of $13,430.
In the interest of truth and
fairplay, Sir Etienne wrote to
the Editor of the Examiner
urging him to investigate
further the allegations made in
his newspaper. As the
columnist is on vacation and
the editor *as out of town the
executive editor carried out his
own investigations. He found
that the restaurant, the Blue
Fox, had "misinformed" their
writer.
The i'tbane is taking the
earliest opportunity to bring
this information to its readers,
but we are continuing
our investigations because it is
difficult to understand why a
restaurant would want to give
out wrong information in the
first instance. It is even more
inconceivable that a columnist
would want to publish a false
report unless at the time he
believed it to be true.
The Examiner's executive
editor makes it clear in his
letter to this newspaper that
his staff member was acting in
good faith at the time of
publication. He was
"misinformed". It is now up to
us to find out why he was
"misinformed."
We regret the republication
of the Examiner's error.
However, we do think that an
explanation should be made to
the Bahamian public as to why
Mr. Pindling's entertaining bill
was sent to the Ministry of
Tourism. It is understood that
the procedure was that a
matter such as this would be
handled through the Cabinet
Office in Nassau.


BAHAMAS TOURISM EVERYONE'S BUSINESS, SAYS ATKINSON


BASIL ATKINSON
It doesn't just happen


TOURISM in the Bahamas was the business
of every Bahamian, tourism director Basil
Atkinson charged yesterday.
"What some of us don't realize is that
tourism just does not happen. It must be made
to happen.- It is not just the business of the
Ministry of Tourism and the hoteliers, airlines,
tour operators, nightclub owners and taxi-cab
drivers. In this community, more than any
other, with 70 percent of the gross national
product coming from tourism, it is everyone's
business.
"And because it is important to the future
welfare of the nation, it is something which
should not be fair game for anyone to abuse or
kick around like a political football. It is not a
subject for political point-scoring and there is
too much to be done to take time off for
skirmishing."
Speaking at the Rotary Club of Nassau


By ELLISTON RAHMING
weekly luncheon, the eloquent Australian,
who was at one time president of the
International Union of Official Travel
Organizations, said that tourism is something
people tend to take for granted because they
have grown used to it ad because they believe
that whether they like it or not, tourists will
continue to come to the Bahamas and that
tourism will continue a the bread and butter
industry ensuring the country's social and
economic progress.
He assured those who were of that opinion
that "In tourism you are dealing with human
beings. It is a people business and every person
is different with his own likes and dislikes, his
own pet whims and aversions." He said further
that resort areas go in and out of fashion not
so much because of the quality of the hotel


Maynard silent


ovei
TOURISM MINISTER
Clement Maynard was
challenged in the House
today to explain the
government's policy on
the hotel industry in view
of certain conflicting
statements made recently
concerning the economic
viability of this sector.
"This is a matter which


hotels

By NICKI KELLY


affects the lifeblood of the
country," declared Deve-
lopment Corporation chairman
Carlton Francis as he took the
floor on the adjournment
motion to discuss what he
considered a matter of national
o-t ,;ce'rn


It had been anticipa


Death of Mr


Joseph Hanna


MR. JOSEPH Albert
Hanna, father of Deputy
Prime Minister Arthur Hanna,
died yesterday at his home in
York Street after an illness of
several months.
Mr. Hanna was born in
Nassau on August 6, 1901,
the son of Mr. and Mrs.
George Hanna, of Nassau.
Educated in the then
Board of Education Schools
in Nassau, Mr. Hanna joined
the Imperial Lighthouse
Service and saw many years
of service as a lightkeeper on
light stations throughout the
Bahamas, retiring in 1953.
He also served as a
Superintendent of Stores at
the Imperial Lighthouse
Service headquarters in
Nassau.
Mr. Hanna was a prolific
writer and wrote regularly for
The Nassau Herald, a P.L.P.
organ.
In paying tribute to Mr.
Hanna today, Mr. Cyril


Hotel union meets Sonesta boss


HOTEL union officials have
been able to meet with
management of the financially
troubled Sonest Beach Hotel,
but have not been able to meet
with Finance Minister Arthur
Hanna.
Union president David
Knowles told The Tribune
today that he and other
officials had met with Sonesta
manager Bob Souers on
Saturdayand had been told
that "the bank" believed to
be the Royal Bank of Canada
- bad called the manager and
told him not to cancel his
bookings at the hotel.
Mr. Souers also told the
union about management's
efforts to keep the hotel open.
Leisure Time Limited,
owners of the 400-oom hotel
on Cable Beach, served notice
on the Sonesta's 430




SONE WEEK ONLY
UP TO 40% OFF


Namu Only


employees last Thursday that
the hotel would close on
August 3 unless its sale to a
new buyer -- whom it did not
name could be successfully
negotiated in time.

"The big question facing us
is what will happen to those
400 employees if the hotel has
to close," said Mr. Knowles.
The union leaders felt
government might consider
offering some relief to the
financially plagued hotel over
the cost of its electricity
services which were claimed
to be coating $120 per room
per month."
"This was why we want to
see Mr. Hanna," said Mr.
Knowles. "We feel that if the
government can offer some
relief on electricity and
telephone coats over the
suunmer months it will make it
possible for the hotel to
continue operating until the
more profitable months."
But Mr. Knowles said that
the union has not been able to
see Mr. Hanna.
The Tribune reported from
usually reliable sources


yesterday that Tourism
Minister Clement Maynard was
expected to make "a major
policy statement" in the House
of Assembly today, when it
was confidently expected he
may announce plans for
Government to take over the
Sonesta Beach Hotel.
The Tribune revealed on
June 16 that purchase by the
Government of the Sonesta
was part of a plan to build a
multi-million dollar convention
centre complex on Cable Beach
in hopes of revitalizing the
several hotels along the strip.
Other Cable Beach hotels
reportedly in financial
difficulties are the Hyatt
Emerald Beach Hotel and the
Halcyon Balmoral Beach Hotel.

The Emerald Beach has
closed half its rooms and laid
off 150 employees.

Mr. Knowles is to meet with
Sonesta staff later today to
report latest developments and
to try and win assurance from
management that even in the
event of the Sonesta sale
present hotel employees will be
secure in their jobs. No such
assurance has been given by
management so far.


Stevenson, the former
of The Herald had this
"Mr. Hanna has made
contribution to
Progressive Liberal
through the medium
vitriolic columns or
burning political issues
day. He was a fearless
and he lived to see mi
the principles he adv
become a reality."
In his later days Mr.
became a regular letter
to The Tribune.
The deceased, who Y
many years a member
well-known Eastern Ba
by his uncle, the la
Robert Hanna, r
completed a manuscrip
book covering his expe
and life as a lightkeepe
the Imperial Ligh
Service. His family pl
have it published in th
future.
Mr. Hanna is survive
his wife and seven ch
the Hon. Arthur D. 1
Deputy Prime Ministe
Minister of Finance:
Joyce Allen, a reg
nurse in Philadelphia
Barbara Pierre, Direct
Immigration; Mrs. Y
Williams, a secretary
Carson Lawson K
Sawyer and Knowles
Keva Lawrence, of
Ministry of Tourism, an
Joan Clark, of
Immigration Departmen
Mr. Patrick Joseph Ha
Police Officer in New
City.
Mr. Patrick Hanna an
Joyce Allen will arr
Nassau in time to
funeral services at
Heart Church, of which
deceased was a member
p.m. Friday. Intermen
be made in the
cemetery.
ROSE THOMPSON
ROSE LILLIAN Tho
84 of Alice Stree
yesterday at the
Margaret Hospital.
She is survived b
brother, T. E.
Thompson, and one
Hilda.
Funeral services we
this afternoon at St. Ma
church and were condu
Canon Addington J
assisted by Bishop
Knowles. Burial was
church cemetery.


Mr. Maynard would make a
statement to the House today
concerning reports that
government proposed
becoming involved in the
ownership of the Sonesta
Beach lotel in an effort to
stave off closure of the


ited that financially troubled hotel.
No reference was made to
the issue until Mr. Francis
brought the matter to the floor
S s ,lfe ,HI-Iouse prepared to
adjouwrlat 1 p.m. -, *&*
The Coporation chairman's
remarks did not elicit a
response from the Minister of
editor Tourism or any other member.
to say:
a great Pointing out that the
the president of the Hotel
Party Association, the Ministry of
of his Tourism itself and the director
n the of Tourism had all commented
of the on the hotel industry in the
writer past few days, Mr. Francis
any of observed that some of these
located reports appeared to be
conflicting, "although those
Hanna who have spoken should have
writer done so with some semblance
of authority."
was for A banner headline in one of
of the the papers referring to a speech
nd, led by the president of the Hotel
te Mr. Association referred to the
recently hotel industry facing "massive
,t for a closures unless some stringent
riences measure were taken," Mr.
er with Francis said.
house "I consider the Hotel
ans to Association to be an important
he near segment of the economy, and
an Association which has
red by available to it all significant
ildren: data affecting the industry," he
Hanna, added.
er and Following the address by
; Mrs. Hotel Association president
istered Anders Wiberg, the Ministry of
; Mrs. Tourism came out with a
tor of statement and referred to Mr.
'vonne Wiberg's comments as "scare
with talk."
lonaris "It would appear," Mr.
; Mrs. Francis said, "that in that
fthe respect the Hotel Association
id Mrs. and the Ministry are in direct
the conflict on the question."
nt, and He would have expected
nna, a that with the Minister of
York Tourism in the House
something might have been
ad Mrs. said by him "and no doubt he
ive in will tell us what he thinks the
attend position in the country is at
Sacred the present time," the
ch the Corporation chairman noted.
r, at 5 Following the statement
it will from the Ministry of Tourism,
church a statement was made
yesterday by the director of
DIES Tourism, who called for a
unified national approach to-
>mpson, tourism.
t died Mr. Francis observed that as
Princess he read what the director had
to say, he didn't seem to be
by one echoing the Ministry's reply to
'Bertie" the president of the Hotel
sister, Association.
"But he said sufficient
re held things in his report to make us
itthew's fully aware and concerned that
cted by all might not be well in the
ohnson hotel industry.
Donald While all this was going on,
in the he heard a reference to a voice
that had been "politically ill-


ent for some time" to the
extent that 430 workers at a
hotel were given a pre-dated
notice of dismissal which
contained, "if one read it
carefully," a "well-concealed
threat to the government."
Since therefore tourism as a
part of our economy would be
with us for a long time to
come, and since it seemed to
be riddled with problems, then
it was time for us to take
serious and immediate steps to
alter a particular trend if such a
trend existed, Mr. Francis said.
Furthermore, the director of
Tourism had maea certam
points, he said, which touched
on policy. "It is for the
Minister to say what that direct
policy is," Mr. Francis
declared.
And he continued: "It may
be well for government to
consider whether it was not
time for it to take a significant
part in the operation of the
hotels or whether to continue
to depend on the mercies of
those "who would appear to
hold us up to ransom."
If it was the government's
intention to enter into the
hotel business as had been
alleged in the press, this was
also a matter that the
government would have to
consider carefully.
"But if the government
intends to become a buyer
then there are some serious
questions which government
must direct to itself if, in the
opinion of the president of the
Hotel Association the hotels
are losing fast, and it was not
automatic, as the director of
Tourism has said, that the
tourists will come."
Mr. Francis urged that the
government turn its attention
to developing the Family
Islands as resorts. "I think that
we should begin to look there
very speedily, if only because
the two principal areas of
revenue earning at the moment
are Nassau and Freeport."
It was necessary, he said, to
draw off some of the
population pressure on Nassau.
"We should go out and actively
encourage those family units
capable of running
establishments and so spread
the dollar, franc or mark."
Family island representatives
would like to see some
"positive and swift action,"
Mr. Francis declared.
He said he appreciated that
government might not yet be
ready to make an
announcement as to what it
intended to do and it might
have to be given time to
consider the emergency
situation that had "come upon
us in the last few days," but
this was a matter for serious
concern.
The tourism director and the
Prime Minister before him, had
spoken of the need to keep
most of the dollars in the
country. This was also tied up
with the question of
agriculture.


--Boy,


bedroom or the cost "but largely because of
the way guests are received and treated."
Mr Atkinson, who described tourism as "a
highly competitive international business v",
for fickle and fussy people seeking a cl
from their daily routinee" said that because
there are more than one hundred other
countries competing in the tourist industry,
care should be shown for our customers
(tourists) from their first point of interest or
sale until their eventual return home.
"It we take the tourist for granted and don't
give him the attention he deserves," he said,
"then he becomes a critic and, as we all know,
bad word-of-mouth publicity is the most
damaging of all."
Admitting that there were some warning
signs of public indifference or apathy which
we should heed he declared, "The message I
have for you today is this:


9-


drowns

in pool


MICHAEL HINSEY, 9,
(pictured), of Farrington
Road, reportedly drowned in
the swimming pool of the
Teacher's Training College,
Oakes Field on Monday at
approximately 7 p.m. ,
Michael, who would not
swim, apparently fell Il the
pool whilp ni with a
friend. '4" W*. .
He is survived by his
parents, Mr. and Mrs.
Kenneth Hinsey of
Farrington Road, two sisters,
Sandra, 6, and Sharon 3.
Funeral services for the
youth will be held on Sunday
at 5 p.m. at Bethell Baptist
Church, Meeting Street.
Burial will be made in the
church cemetery.

HASHISH

FOUND

IN TIN,

TRIAL TOLD
CHIEF DEFENCE attorney
Hon. Eugene Dupuch, Q.C.,
arguing the case for six seamen
charged with having
$15-million worth of hashish
aboard the broken down "Sea
Trader" freighter on April 12,
today proceeded with a
submission that the
prosecution has no case against
five of the men.
Mr. Dupuch, countering a
claim made by Solicitor
General T. Langton Hilton that
there was joint complicity, said
he was "perplexed" at the
prosecution's suggestion that
of all the millions of people in
Africa, the six accused loaded
the 50 bags onto the freighter.
The six, Capt. Terry H.
Daniels, 35; cook Eddie
Edwards, 25; chief engineer
Louis Tomiselli, 23; first
engineer Richard Bennett, 28;
second engineer Arnold
Zuckerman, 41; and Jack
Kubatz, 27, sat silent in the
prisoners dock as the hearing
continued in its third day.
All have pleaded not guilty
to being involved and are being
represented by Mr. Dupuch
and attorney Keith M.
Duncombe in the case before
Acting Supreme Court Chief
Justice James Smith.
Mr. Dupuch also said there
was no evidence supporting an
abetment or conspiracy against
any of the men at Little
Sturrup Cay nor was there any
evidence to support a charge of
possession against Edwards,
Bennett, Zuckerman and
Kubatz.
And there is only peripheral
evidence against Capt. Daniels
on the charge of possession, he
said.
Daniels was the occupant ofe
a cabin where a biscuit tin with
four cakes of hashish wa
found, the protection stated.


To enter a
united national
towards tourism:


plea for a
approach


a To realize that because
we -.. have been extremely
successful at it (as a t ry
and as a people) in t ast
that it will not just go on
automatically holding good
for the future:
To realize that we have
to work at it continually with
professional direction and
planning to be able to adapt
ourselves to changes required
by our present markets:
To realize that tourism
has the potential to continue
as our major industry for
many years, but we must do
more to develop attractions,
foods and local products that
are indigenous, different and
appealing:
To encourage tourists to
visit different Family Islands
during their stay to
appreciate the contrasting
beauties and particular the
attraction f the sea."
/... pressing hope, the, ,
iwtoerism 9aitoO hf.^i1
believe that the problems the
B#hamas had been
confronted w~ih in tourism
over the past yeir or two
"were fairly temporary and
although the problems were
universal, the Bahamas
weathered those periods
reasonable well."
He hastened to say,
however, that without
community support and
understanding, if there is
neglect of our attractions, if
our facilities don't measure
up, if public utilities are
unreliable, if attitudes to
visitors are wrong, if we don't
keep the place clean and tidy
"then we will also go down
hill."
A former journalist, Mr.
Atkinson said God has been
good to the Bahamas. "He
created idyllic islands and a
beautiful, clear, irridescent
sea in an ideal climate only a
few score miles from the
world's greatest tourist -
source market. "What more
could man wish for? Do we
appreciate what we have? Do
we know what we have?" he
queried.
Pointing a finger at
Ministry of Tourism's
projection programme, Mr
Atkinson said that the
Ministry's approach in 1974
can be summarized in three
words: Value, Innovation and
Ecology.
On the subject of value he
said, "In spite of rampant
inflation everywhere, ac-
comodation facilities in the
Bahamas have managed to
maintain very competitive
rates
From an innovative stand
point "We have packaged the
Bahamas into a series of
"Playround Holidays' and
have provided a brochure that
gives all the details on the
holidays," he said.


In terms of ecology he said
that tourists want to vacation
in an unspoilt and unpolkated
environment. "The clean,
clear look of the Bahamas is a
maior appeal."


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-Haldeman 'almost the other president'


ITALIANS

STRIKE
ROM Millions of Italian
workers struck nationwide
today to protest a tax increase
package proposed by the
government. The package is
alned at fighting mounting
inflation and Italy's worst
postwar economic crisis.
The strike was to last
from a minimum of three to a
maximum of 24 hours,
dlpc ending on the categories.


Rome was
antd trams f(
Theatres, sonm
offices, shops
closed through
period of three
Pcronncl at
were idled
disrupting air tr
About 2,
struction wor
nationwide fo


Rome
I'Hris
I rliii,
, i I, rTd:lll
lrussvi'
MiadritI
Moscow
Stockho lm
New, York
Sain I rancisco
I s ASnelcs
( uhicago
Miami
Tlokyo
I't ii' Kon
Iluin sAir,'-,
Monitrcil
11,T1()11
I Is.iII
chrani
Scomld
Iangkok
"1 iipei
Vanciiouver
Itsiccumgtum


without buses
,r threat hours.
Sfactories, state
and banks were
hout Italy for a
e to four hours.
Italy's airports
for six hours,
traffic.
500,000 con-
kers are striking
r 24 hours. (AP)


I
MIN I MAX
63 79 sunny
SS5 70 rail
SS 63 raini
57 73 clIdy
54 SS showers
48 66 "ovcrcst
66 88 sunnIy
64 84 clk-'r
61 73 chilJdy
64 80 cloudy
54 70 clear
70 N9 cloudy
62 66 ck)utly
74 91 cloudy
70 82 rain
78 84 cludy
33 49 clear
60 75 clear
76 88 clear
60 8O clear
64 78 cloudy
72 88 sunny
75 ')5 cluar
68 86 cloudy
81 82 cloudy
77 9S sunny
55 73 clcar


C aramanlis


back in


triumph

NEW YORK Constantine Caramanlis was sworn in as
Premier of Greece early today, apparently ending seven years of
military dictatorship for the country that gave the world
democracy.
There was also a change of presidents in the rebel Greek
Cypriot regime on Cyprus. A supporter of ousted President
Makarios was named, and in New York Makarios said he expected
to return to the presidency in a few weeks.
Hundreds of thousands of jubilant Greeks thronged the
streets of Athens, dancing, singing, hugging and kissing, after the
announcement that "the armed forces have decided to tr:ns:fer
power to a civilian government" headed by Caramsnlis, the elder
statesman of Greek democracy and a self-exile in Paris for 11
an i years.
B rit i Caramanlis, 67, told a
cheering crowd at the Athens
w earned airport early this morning: "I
know that the Greek people in
ATHENS -- A pro-govern: difficult moments are united,
ment Greek paper threatened and together I hope we will he
Britain Tuesday with "an eye able to construct a new
for an eye and a tooth for a democracy."
tooth" for allegedly helping Chanting "no mockery, true
the Turks invade Cyprus. democracy," cheering crowds
The editorial was signed by lined his route into the city,
Savvas Constantoupoulos, and he went at once to a
editor of the Daily Eleftheros meeting at the Parliament
Kosmos. building with the leaders of the
It claimed that Britain military dictatorship, civilian
"offered every possible help politicians who have been in
to the illegal and criminal limbo for the past seven years,
operation of Ankara against and two foreign ambassadors,
Cyprus," and that the British Henry Tasca of the United
bases on the island "were States and Robin Hooper of
placed at the disposal of the Britain.
Turkish aggressors." The conference lasted for
The allegation came a day two hours and then
after a mob attacked the Caramanlis, presumably
British Embassy in Athens, satisfied that the military
stoning the building and leaders would return to the
causing damage estimated at barracks and give him a free
more than $100,000 by hand, wassworn in.
British sources. The government radio said
The embassy attack Caramanlis would announce his
followed an earlier charge by cabinet later today.


Greek radio over the weekend
that British helicopters had
taken part in the Turkish
invasion of Cyprus.
These allegations were
vehemently denied by
Britain.


The military regime's
decision to call on Caramanlis
came after widespread
international condemnation of
the coup on Cyprus, for which
Athens was generally blamed:
the successful Turkish invasion
of the island, and the failure of
the Greek regime to give any
military support to its Greek
Cypriot wards against the
invaders.
Evacuation of foreigners
continued from British bases in
Dhckelia and Akrotiri, in
southern Cyprus. The bases
were reported jammed with
refugees, and British forces
were taking them to waiting
ships.
The British government had
hoped to open negotiations in
Geneva to day between the
Greeks and Turks to arrange
for a peace agreement, in-
cluding the restoration of
constitutional rule to Cyprus.
But a U.N. spokesman in New
York said he understood that
the change in the Greek
government would delay the
meeting.


CYPRUS

PEACE

TALKS

DELAYED
GENEVA The Cyprus
peace talks between Britain,
(reece and Turkey have been
delayed at the request of
Greece to enable the new
government to select members
of its delegation, a British
government spokesman said
today.
'he conference was to have
begun today to discuss the
future of Cyprus.
Britain, Greece and Turkey
are signators of a 1959 treaty
which in 1960 established
Cyprus as a republic. Under the
treaty all three nations are
obligated to ensure the
Mediterranean island's inde-
pendence.
The United States will be
represented by William B.
Buffum, assistant Secretary of
State for International
Organization Affairs, but it was
still unclear whether he would
be a full participant ,.r just an
o observer.
Meanwhile. Secretary of
State Henry Kissinger said
today the United States
"welcomes the return of
civilian government" in Greece
and Cyprus.
He made his remark to
newsmen after a two hour
breakfast meeting to brief
members of the U.S. Senate
Foreign Relations Committee
on developments in Greece.
Kissinger said that the
United States "expects to have
close and friendly relationships
with the new government in
(reece. which is composed of
friends of ours."
Senator Hubert Humphrey,
1)emocrat-Minnesota, said that
although many problems
remain "on balance I would
say the Secretary (of State)
was encouraged up to now that
the developments have been
constructive." (Al')


WASHINGTON The
House Judiciary Committee
today released testimony by
Alexander Butterfield, the
former White House aide who
first revealed publily the
existence of Presidential
tapes.
In his testimony before the
impeachment inquiry.
Butterfield described the
White House role of H.R.
Haldeman as that of "the
alter ego' and" almost the
other President." Butterfield
added: "I can't stress that
enough."
Butterfield was the first of
nine witnesses who testified
before the judiciary
committee. Part of his
testimony was devoted to a
catalogue of often petty
details of White House
housekeeping -- such as


"whether or not the curtains
were closed or open," that he
said drew the President's
attention.
Butterfield, now head of
the Federal Aviation
Administration, spent nearly
nine hours testifying in closed
session, during which time he
described in detail the
President's work habits and
his relationships to his staff.
He made it clear that the
closest staff man to the
President was his staff chief,
Haldeman.
In Butterfield's words:
"Haldeman was his right-hand
man. He counted so heavily
on Haldeman's presence, on
Haldeman being at the other
end of telephone within reach
when he buzzed."
At one point, committee
associate Counsel Albert


Jenner asked:
"During all your time at
the White House, Mr.
Butterfield, and to the extent
of your personal knowledge,
no guessing, was there ever
any occasion that came to
your knowledge of Mr.
Haldeman withholding any
information from the
President?"
Butterfield replied: "No,
sir, never."
Later presidential lawyer
James St. Clair asked
Butterfield:
"But you really are not in
a position to speak with any
degree of personal
observation as to what Mr.
Haldeman said or didn't say
to the President, isn't that
right?"


Impeachment: Nixon


takes new blow


WASHINGTON -President
Nixon's hopes of avoiding
impeachment have suffered a
setback on the eve of the
House Judiciary Committee's
historic debate today.
Rep. Lawrence J. lloinii a
conservative and one of tliho
comniittee Republicans counted
on to oppose inipeacliiiiint.
announced last nig.h Ilie
supports impeachment i i Ii
decision touched off open ilk
of impeachment iin I
Republican cloak room.
The debate hoi-!:.s thi
evening and will be shlnwn hi)
on ABC-TV. A \o I onl
whether to Ic~o()ltIeII 'ild
impeachment is cxpl'ted 1'
lI:iday or Saturday.
lioga n's an noun 'liiiel1 t
triggered a prediction hI~ one
(()l' member that as mni as


Disc jockey expelled
PORTUGAI. Rear Admn. Rosa (outinho has tbeeni
appointed President of the military junta created to mopct.iie
in the territory of Angola, it was announced todav.
Adm. Coutinho will replace (en. Silvino Silve io
Marqucs, who has been Governor-General in Angola.
It was not immediately known what will he (;ei.
Marques's future in the military-led Iorluugese gov Irnent
lie was named Governor-General in Angola only last June
11.
Meanwhile, the first case of explosion has been reported
in .uanda, following the government's warning that people
who refuse to be integrated with the armed forces
movement in Angola would not he permitted to stay in lie
territory.

The armed forces movement issued a conllniiiuniqtue
announcing the expulsion of Fernando Norberto de (,Castr1,
a leading disc jockey and radio producer.
D)e Castro was detained by the militia police shortly a.ter
his programme Tuesday. Authrotics accused himi of
broadcasting reports "contrary to the spirit of Ithe
programme of the armed forces movement, and nothing
but ideological aggressions," the communique said. ( Al')


WASHINGTON BLAST


WASHINGTON A bomb
exploded outside the offices of
a French military mission
causing substantial damage,
police said.
There were no reports of
injuries, according to fire and
police officials.
The blast just before 10 p.m.
edt blew out nearly all the
front windows of the
four-storey white brick
building which houses the
materiel French military
mission.
The mission is in charge of


French purchases
military hardware.


of U.S.


Inspector Richard Ft. Tilley
of the Metropolitan Police
Department said a bomb was
placed either in front of the
door to the building or in front
of its basement windows. lie
s-aid the blast caused
substantial damage inside.
Police had no idea what kind
of bomb was involved, what
the motive for the bombing
was or who did it, Tilley said.
The FBI sent agents to the
scene.

Jet bomb

scare
MANCHESTER. England
A jet carrying 85
passengers from Belfast to
London made an emergency
landing Tuesday after a bomb
warning, airline officials said.
The officials said a "device"
was found aboard the
aircraft.
The jet. a Trident of the
state-owned British Airways.
was diverted to Manchester
about 200 miles north of
London. The passengers
escaped through the
emergency chute.
Police said the diversion
came "as a result of
information received."
There was no immediate
explanation from the airline
whether the device found was
a bomb. For the pat five
years Belfast has been
battered by guerilla bombers
of the outlawed Irish
Republican Army who are
trying to break Northern
Ireland's link with Britain and
unite it with the Irish
Republic. (AP)


seven of thie 17 ioimIr iti e .'
ReIpuMbicans nmj\ end Iup
caillinlr lii Nixon's inlpacach
ni nIt.
t li i it himis lf saiid hlic
expected cig hti RepohlIIns Ito
vit i iiiil.m achciiienl All 2 1
I r). 1i1cts, .in h.lmcucd readl
to 1 ti Ie h' I t I l, 11 liti .

A nioth li i (OP() l' ilni u w\lh
1.11i e h i sji e e|lcid iihmiit 40
Rep IeuMhn s to voIe for
S iii ; c'.hliii' r d.iise l his
- e ii. -:0 :! .t, HIl ian's


i i ii l im ,


C. mlIndidmte. for
S\l J liiit. said at


i i i mIC
d. i mn inm cited


ii I.


should be removed from office.
Ilogan said he had entered
the impeachment proceedings
with three considerations:
"The allegations had to be
impeachable of'fences with
proof of criminality proven
hevond a shadow of a doubt.
"1 he evidence convinces me
that in\ President has lied
tepCatedly, deceiving public
officialss and the American
people. said Ilogan, a political
conservative and former IFB
d'cent.
Addressing a main argument
raised by Nixon defenders, that
inipeachmnent would weaken
the Presidency, Hogan said:
"In my view if we do not
impeach the President after all
thail he has done, we would he
\veakening the Presidency even
illm re.


Butterfield answered: "i
would tend to disagree with
you. I think I was in probably
the best possible position.
However, I do agree with you
that I didn't actually ob-
serve."
Butterfield served as
deputy assistant to the
President from Nixon's first
day in office until March 14
1973. Among his duties was
insuring the smooth opera-
tion of the President's day.
(AP)

PARTIES MERGE
ST. JOHNS Two political
parties have merged in St. John
in the Caribbean.
A joint statement said that
the Socialist Antigua Labour
Party (ALP) headed by former
premier Vere Bird and the
Antigua Peoples Party had
agreed 'to come together and
operate from a common base.'
One of the purposes of the
union would bhe to challenge
the progress of the Labour
Movement (PLM) headed by
Premier George Walter in the
I 967 general election.
according to the statement.
(AP)
. s .." ,, ::.^ - .


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2 ___________ ___ ______________ __ _THE TRIBUNE Wednesday, JuTy 24. t974


aanmnnniB


-- --- __











THE TRIBUNE -- Wednesday, July 24, 1974 3


Uhbe rtbunr
NULLam An=DCTr JUvaa IN VRBA MACIum
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, PublWber/Edltor 1903. 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
PubllMer/Edltor 1917-1972
Cotrtibu rft Etor 1973.
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.S., B.A., LL.B.,
PublbM r/dEditor 1972.
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532,2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Wednesday, July 24, 1974


By ETIENNE DUPUCHI
IOKYO, MAY 20 I have not written anything since the
formal sessions of the conference ended in Kyoto four days ago.
Since then we have been on a post-assembly tour that has taken
us over a wide area of this island kingdom by ship, bus and plane.
Tonight the meeting ended in a brilliant banquet in the
Imperial Hotel which is perhaps the most magnificent hotel in
this city. located just across the street from the entrance to the
grounds of tthe Imperial Palace.
I have not written anything during this period because it has
been a time of almost continuous movement ... early morning
statIs, days filled with seeing new places, meeting new people,
and evenings spent in various fli:rs of entertainment that only
the Oriental mind can create. It is all very different and, because
it is different, it is interesting.
1 his is our t!;icd visit to Japan but I his time we have seen more
of the island and its people than on our previous visits. And we
leave it tomorrow, still without really understanding tlie real
truth behind tie exterior o(' a people who bow and smile all the
tiiei and provide a forint of service Ihat gives one tlie feeling lihal
their only concern in life is to make youl happy :nd'l coim~!':i;able.
IButl somlihow one finds it difficult to escape Iroti Ihlie imeimory
of the Ireachery and atrocities coimilted by this nation during
lhi Secottnd World War. Among our delegates is ani Australian who
was a prisoner of tlie Japanese and did lite terrible Burm1a
I oad march in which two-thirds of tlie men died from ianmine,
'xpomliteI and exhaustion.
I lth sutiiled and bowed beliore tie war. lThey had a peace
mission smiling and bowing in Washington at lhe very nmomentc
thal their Icet aid planes were striking a treacherous blow at
!tUcle Sami in Peail Harbour.
And so lone becomes painfully conscious of what might happen
to western society were the West crushed or taken over by
inlitration by the godless Communists or by the East, with
its tiultiplicity of gods, all of them of terrible mien. There is
ii ollhin i soft about these people.
S ()m Il1-year-old grandson Grahaim turns on the TV whenever
he [els a chance. He cannot understand what is being said none
if us can biut all the prograimmes see im to be filled with terror
provided by demtonical characters.

lit one of miy early articles on this lour I told you tlhal,on the
recoimenidation of liarl I". T. Smith, Mayor of Paln Beach who
was U.S. Ambassador to Cuba at the time of tlle Castro takeover,
I iou(lhit along Mario Lito's book "Dagger In Thie Heart ...
Amlitcan Policy Failures in (Cuba" but I have had so many other
ilihins li read in the few leisure moments I have had on this trip.
that I aii only now starting seriously it read this book. Until now
I had iwad only the foreword.
I cali tell yoii thai tlie opening chaplers record a faintastic tale
of litc cntision and inddecisioin in Washington ihatl has been
largely responsible for creating the Irighlening silualion that
exists in tihe world today.
I think during this nmeting thal Anieritans are only now
waking upi Ii tlie grinm truth of America's insecure position in tlie
world. Some io the delegates understood before, ol course, buil
now tihe fceliing uf ulntLtainly anid insecurity scenes to be
widespread.
I get the feeling that most of these people are now beginning to
realize that America is rich ... but not necessarily the richest
nation in tie world. And thal America is powerful but that there
are forces building up in ihe world Ihat could snuff lier out ii a
second with another Pearl ilarbour attack by new weapons of
swill amid total destruction.

I In the Ioreword to) his book Mario la/o presents a learned
discussion on historical background ... going back into centuries
ol little ... that inakes the average Latin American an animal Ihal
if is not easy to understand ... any more than it is easy to
understand the metal processes of our people in the Baiauimas
today.

Much of it is based on tihe type tf power structure that was
brought to this part of the world by Spanish and Portuguese
conquerors and planted in the minds of the people they governed
.t. their beliefs and their attitude towards government and labour
have been shaped after this fashion. Much of it revolves around
the religious beliefs and practices of these people.
"The fabled contquistadors trinity," wrote Lazo, "was gold.
gkry and God, but lie scorned ordinary labour to accompltsll
these ends."
I will now quote another passage from this foreword that
should have some significance for Bahamian readers ... a bit ihat
should help them to better understand the enigma that is
reflected in life in the Bahamas today ... one that is a
long-established product of the Latin's environment but which
should not exist in an area like the Bahamas.
"The conqueror and coklonier of Latin America," wrote Lao,.
"'came to the new world to enrich himself quickly, not to
undertake enterprises tlhat required patient effort.
"Foresight is not a characteristic of the Spaniard. He utilized
tfic Indians and then the Negroes to do the work he would not do
~liself.
'"Until very recently, in consequence, the youth of Latin
America for the most part chose university studies leading to
degrees in the field of letters and tih hunlanilies.
"There is a great lack of engineers and cchlnicians in Latin
America, but an overabundarce of" lkauyers, many of whom are
ijle. Fidel Castro was a lawt'yer without clients one of lanyl
Ilmulitical activists with legal training.
"In the millennial Iradillon of heir rCel'allhIcrs. who looked Ito
the caliphs alnd kings ior Icrdeishlip. the I.lin Aniericans seek and
admire strong political figures.
"This has produced what is commonly known as tIhe candillo.
af leader, who is followed less for his ideas than because oJ his
charismatic personalityl. This has been a serious deterrent to civic
development, of course, but the concept is deeply rooted in


history."
Further on he wrote: "True, in the early nineteenth century
the ideals of the American and French revolutions did reach Latin
America through the leaders of the independence movements
there, but the masses 'ieed in a political vacuum and were
completely unprepared for political freedom. The South
American countries have had constitutions for well over a century
and a half, hut constitutional government and democracy are not
the .snw thing."

Does any of this ring a bell in your experience in the Bahamas
today?
But now I must get away from Latin America and its possible
.imilarities with the mentality of our people in the Bahamas and
return to the Eastern mind ... and what makes it tick.
** * * *
The character of a people is shaped by their physical
surroundings and by their daily experiences because out of these
conditions spring the things they believe, the way they think.
An interesting fact about human experience ts ihst, as far back
as one can go, people have believed in gods and another life
beyond the grave ... except now for the Communist belief only in
"matter" ... the things you can see. touch and smell and that,
while man cannot create anti control life ... not yet anyway ... he
can make himself the supreme master of the material world by
which he is surrounded and of which he is a part.
This is why there are so many religions in the world. The
character of a people is moulded largely by the god or gods -
in which they believe and their individual and collective approach
to the service of their particular deity.
What do the Japanese people believe? What are their gods like?
For one thing, until the end of the Second World War their
Emperor was considered a god, and there are many people who
still worship the power of beautiful Mount Fujiami. the largest
mountain in Japan that is capable of spreading terror far and wide
when it erupts to spread its destructive lava in a demonstration of
terror that ... in the Japanese mind ... only a god would be
capable of doing.
Nothing is more complex than the nultiphlcil\ of gods that
people have worshipped down through the centuries.
It is a subject thai even great scholars have not been ;;ble to
fathom ... and I am certainly not a scholar. But we are all
endowed with an instinctive understanding otl laclors that
combine to produce a certain result in human emniolins.

These people have a tnullipliciy of gods ... and, as lai ;is I can
understand it all lhey are gods of terror and lear. I liei Icmples
are all decorated wilh fantastically ugly. devilishli i iure to
protectl Iihe I'rom evil spirits. There is no suggestion of
gcitleness, kindness. or love in their places of worship. As a result
these people don't seem to have any fixed belies.
A young Japanese went so I r as to say that they never say a
definite "yes" or "no" to anything. There is no such tliing as
"sin" in their lives. "Sin" is replaced by "shame" indl. since tllcre
is no way of removing the. sait a of "slhatle" wlhen i culs too
deeply. it leads to suicide. lhat is why. lie said,. Ile suiKld rale int
lapan is among the highest inll he world.
In this connetiOln. it youth eu\atiit'ne societies in Witich Ithe
suicide rate is high you will li:id even in ('Clislatn cotttiiitutililes
that thei people have lost tlotchl will a god rgo tlldess and
hope. A person who ends his o w:. life is a person who finds
himself at the end of the line withomi hope or any anchor in 1a life
beyond the grave.

There seems to be two principal religions in Japan.
The oldest is Shinloism which seems to wotshilp nature,
ancestry and national heroes.
Shinloism goes so far hack in history thal it seems that no one
knows its origin. There are hundreds and thousands of Shinto
shrines here. The people seem to hold these places in reverence
but in all the time I have been here I have seen only one iprson
standing up in an attitude of quiet prayer. The place '-' ": crowded
with visitors ... Japanese and foreigners alike ... but no
worshippers. How and when do these people worship the
great multiplicity of gods embraced in Shintoisim?
I can't provide the answer.
There is no founder ... no book selling orth rules, a code ot
behaviour, to follow.
Shinloismi was described t.) me as a religion of this lilc. 'h1lltc
believe that this is ti;e best life. Any future life will be Iar
worse. Ali ,o i il is intended that this life should he lived to the
fullest. The gods of Shinloism serve only to protect Ihrte
followers front tle evil spirits by which they are surrounded.
The other important religion here is Buddhism which was
founded in the Fast in the sixth century B.C. Buddhism has a
founder and a book if rules. But there doesn't seemt to be a single
Buddha. These people cannot accept the idea of a single god
bhe'-::se human problems are sio numllerous that they citnnot
conceive of a single god capable of taking care of Iall their needs.
And so there appears to be a Buddha lor every sitl:!1tion.
Unlike Shintoism that only promises a worse life beyond lihe
grave, Buddhislm believes in reincarnation of thlie i ain spirit.
Because we are all a part of nature we might conic back as a grass
patch. A cow cats the grass. human beings drink Ilheir milk. eat
their meat and so. over a period of time, by a long and intricate
process of evolution we tmay become a tmeimber of the lower
order or relturl in the human form.
This, of course, may be an over-simplification of a nlost
di!'fiP.c'! abstract t subject that only those born and raised in this
kind of faith may hope to have a glimmering of understanding.
There are also hundreds thousands of Buddhist temples
here. And we were shown some of lile oldest adld nlost famous of
them wit I a feeling of pride by our .lapanesc guides. One of these
places lhas the distinction of being the oldest wooden building in
the world. IErcctcd of hardwoods in the fifth century A.I)., it is
still in perfect condition.


Unlike Buddhist temples in other places I have visited Ilihee
were no worshippers ... no one was at these places burning
candles and incense sticks ... no priests were in evidence ,an.ywh\lii
... and we were ot required to remllove otll slics \hienl \s
entered these supposedly sacred places BHutl sill one hlas i ce
feeling that these people are deeply conscious oil Ih l rclthlm'os
and are greatly influei,,"d by their llachi .itgs. w\v l e\t. ir ilth\ nI.\
be.
A cynical young Japanese. put il this i way it ie: 1 '1t0 sNlltOllni h
born in the Shinto style because the Ifle \'e now li\e is the good
life ... you are attracted by the 'hristian 'orm of m11.11.ie
because it has merit ... but when yot die you should le hbtied Iin
the Buddhist style because Buddhism holds otul some hope ol a
future life, however slim and indefinite it might be.
I commennted to an Indian in our group tlie factIl IhaIt Ihere
didn't seem to be any Buddhist priests around ... no w\o shippers
... and people were allowed to enter a Buddhist tetilec wiilhout
removing their shoes.
Indians are mostly of the Hindu faith but in ithe part of the
country he came front there were many Buddhists.
He explained it by saying that there are Conformists and
Nonconformists in Buddhism like Catholicism and Protestantism
in the Christian religion. The Japanese form of worship is like
Protestantism in Christianity. This Indian happened to be a
Christian.
.Se*S**
I can understand how difficult it must be for a Japanese to
accept the Christian religion which in itself has many confusing
Page 5 Col.l


A NOTE TO
T'HIl EDITOR continues to
receive letters for publication
that are not accompanied by
a covering letter to The
Editor revealing the name of
the sender. These letters will
not be published.
One of these letters is
about Mr Edmund Moxey
who received the plaudits of
the crowd when he joined
with the People's Democratic
Action committeee demons-
trating against Prime Minister
Pindling.
They named him 'Muscle
and Guts' Moxcy and carried
him on their shoulders on
Bay Street.
Now a letter writer says
that "all those who lifted Mr
Moxey regret they didn't
drop him on his tail" because
"he is a political parasite."
The letter writer signed
himself "Godfather of Black
Village."

A letter signed "Anony-
mous" takes issue with Ira
Carwright who wrote a letter in
The Tribune oil July 15th
praising Ite Pl1.P government.

A third signed "Bahantian
Voter" points out the
inconsistency of the Prime
Minister in urging the people
to work harder for small
hcenetils while "llhe PEP
government and their cohorts
are the nation'I; tios!
outstanding eIxunples of tlie
new breed hig sptndlers."

JAZZ CLASS
RON WAI.KI R, clchrated
AItmericani cloreogralpher and
dlantc instructot)r, will cotlndu l
a la// class on Mont \l.i, J Iuly 2i )
at (:.0) p.11 at Ithc Nassau
Civic HBillel School. Shirley
lIc \I l il iii l'ea i Oi A\ guil st
.i ; previonll y :1IlII)o iIl. t' t l.
M r W aI Ik cl is ,,
(lio coi plhe' r lol i tlic I c
( 1l1 ,i1 'l I lh ';i i% Il:! ,Il:sr
Island

ARCHITECTS
I hic monthly scoilln;ir of tihe
Instil ul'e oI Bahamian
urchltecls. scheduled lor
toiiorrow at thile ('. R. Walker
Technical college will he
postponed until August i,
coinlmencing at 7.30 p.m.


READERS


IN. STOCK


AIR CONDITIONERS


WASHING MACHINES


REFRIGERATORS


FREEZERS


AT


THEf GENIL HI

Centrevill -Phone


2-1960 -2-8844


ENTER NOW!!



TRIBUNE / MAURAS


CROSSWORD PUZZLE CONTEST


WIN


FAMILY SLANDS

WE LOWEYOU I

Special consideration given to aN
Picture-making needs of Out -land customs.



"The Beautiful Bahamian Studio"
on the Waterfront
At East Bay & William Sts.
Box ES 6125-- Nassau Phone 5-4641


_ __ ~__







d __THE TRIBUNE -. Wdnfady,July 24ig


S.alyOo
tive,$I


HARDING' S
FOOD MARKET


P.O. Box 5290 ES


PORK CHOPS

SPARE RIBS
SPARE RIBS


SPARE RIBS

LAMB SHOULDER
FRENCH MUTTON

BOLOGNA WHOLE
BOLOGNA SLICED
FRESH PORK


Phone 2-3067


NEW ZEALAND ROUND STEAK


Ib. $1.75


SALT BEEF


lb. $1.25 P1'S FEET


5 s


I.


5 Ibs.


$5.50 STEW BEEF


i

t. 95t,
Ib. 350
5 Is $6.90


89C LAMB SHOULDER WHOLE 90C


$4.30


lb.


99C


lb. $1.10


85C


Ib.
5 Ibs.


SPECIALS FOR JULY 25TH TO 28TH


U.S. CHOICE
CHUK ROAST
U.S. CHOICE
CHUCK STEAK


U.S. CHOICE
SHOULDER ROAST
U.S. CHOICE
SM MIDB STEAK
FRESH
| ~i Fr


990
$4.50


LB. 99C
LB. $1.29


Tide King Size
Ivory Liquid King Size
Vegetole Shortening 3 Ibs.
Uncle Ben's Rice 10 Ibs.
Hellmann's Mayonnaise Qts.
Campbell's Vegetable Soup 3 Tins
Delsey Bathroom Tissues 2 rolls
Armour Star Corned Beef 12 ozs.
Irish Spring Soap 3 Bars
Hall's Tonic Wine Qts.
Mahatma Rice 10 Ibs.
Libby's Sweet Peas large 2 Tins
Pepsi Cans 5 for


$1.99
$1.30
$155
$4.45
$1.59
89c
55c
$1.59(
99c
$1.99
$4.49
90c
99c
1


W~D


I--
Centreville

Food Market
6th Terrace East P.O. Box 5714 Phone 5-8"106
Store Hours Monday to Thursday 8 a.m. 8:30 p.-
Fri. & Sat. 8 a.w. 9 p.m.
Sun. 8 a.m. 10 3.m.


PAMPERS DAYTIME 30's $2.99
CAMPBELL'S POR BEANS 16 OZ. CAN 44C
AIAX BETEENT GIANT SIZE NC
O.K. FLOOR 5 LBS. BAGS $1.25
UNCLE BEN'S RICE 5 LBS. PKG. $2.19
BLANC BLEACH GAL. 99C
PLUMROSE LNCEN NEAT 12 oz. CAN $1.25
LB 1.1USE ESTANT COFFEE 10OZ. JAR $2.19
DELMONTE GEEN LIMA BEANS 17 oz. 49
LB. $139 DELMONTE MRTLEn EARS LARGE 89t
LB FRESH IIE IIA S LB. BAGS $1.25
LB. lWo TROPICANA ''g/Lf i e su
RIS tq^ Aij i31_ S.I


I- _______________________________________________


v -- -- v
pmIImmmimmimmmmmmmmmmi
PINDER'S FOOD MARKET
. MONTROSE AVENUE PHONE 2-4030
I OPEN SUNDAmmmmG 8m-10 A.M.
I OPEN SUNDAYMORNING 8 10 A.M.
immmim immmmmmmmmimmmm


HAMBURGER
PORK CHOPS
SPARE RIBS


LB. 99
LB. $1.29
LB. 994


N-W ZEALAND SLICED
LAMB SHOULDER LB.


WHOLECHICKENS


CUT UP
CHICKENS
89 LB.


AJAX DETERGENT
KING
$1.99


CITADEL
CORNED BEEF


LB.


PALMOLIVE
SOAP BATH


991t
85 -_


5 FOR


954


I


4
4


eI


PALMOLIVE
LIQUID GIANT 89

I
-----------l i


El



I


DELMONTE
SEEDLESS RAISINS soz, 99
CHAMPION
PIEON PEAS ,oz. 3 for 79O
MAXWELL HOUSE
CFEE REGULAR GRIND 1LB TIN $1.49
RAID HOUSE & GARDEN
BUG KILLER 13AozS $1.29


BLANCO BLEACH
CELEBRITY
LUNCHEON MEAT
SCOTT
TISSUE TOILET PAPER

MAHATNA RICE


QTS.


12 OZ.


SINGLE2 for


350

59
59


5 LBS.


12OZ. $1.33


4


I


I


rraw


II PALMOLIVE I


---- F7 ~ ~ ~ -r


SPI~E


- ~ -- -- ---, -- --


I


An


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, - -


- -"---`- ~ -- --


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- -~- -- - ~i -c.~ i ~- I:


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'''


















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$2.35


Adk, AI



















From Page 3
anl conflicting aspects.
1 commented to a (atholic riendil ol tmine in Hawaii that it is a
pity that Christian ppc)les ar'; not united in a single faillh.
5How is that possible?" eh asked. "Some Christians believe it is
a sin to dance or smoke or take a drink )r to in any way,
acknowledge tlat we aie all creallines of nature, while other
Christian i iiths believe that we may do all these things in
moderation because Jesus ( list showed by His miracle at the
marriage feast when he made wine, Ihat lie intends us to get some
enjoyment out of this lile. And so we too are confused and
confronted with many conflicts which, in most cases.
unfortunately, are resolved on the basis o( the individual's
covcenian,;e at the time.
There are very few Christians in Japan, of course, but I was
interested to see that at a mttas I attended in a small town
yesterday morning, the Priest a clharming young Japanese with
a saintly face and gentle manner came to the altar in carpet
slippers and the worshiplpers came in stocking feet. I promptly
removed my shoes too and left the church holding them in my
hand.
There were only two westerners at Ihis mass. The other was an


internationally famous woman editor from Malta who told me
about this 6 a.m. mass and invited me to accompany her. My
wife, who is not a Catholic, did not accompany me. She stayed
behind at the hotel packing our baggage in preparation for the
day's journey to another town. Graham was worn out from the
previous day's activities and so we let him sleep.
Now understand this clearly. I am not trying to be critical of
the Japanese people. On the contrary, I love the Oriental peoples,
especially Chinese women. I think they are charming.
But the harder I try to fathom their mental processes and
motivations the less I understand what it is all about.
The only thing I seem to understand is Rudyard Kipling's
appraisal -of the gulf that divides the Eastern and Western minds
when he wrote:
"East is East and West is West
And never the twain shall meet."

But with the progress made .in transportation and
communications in recent years it is no longer possible to
separate people in different pockets.
People now flow like rivers from all directions ... they meet ...
they mix. But do they can the blend?
This is a question that only the future can answer.
*** *******
A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
I dipt into the future, far as human eye could see
Saw the vision of the world, and all the wonder that would be.
-TENNYSON.


NASSAU PORTION CONTROL CENTRE
5TH TERRACE CENTREVILLE PHONE 23237 Ext. 6
....mm -m i i mm m m mm m m m m mm.... ....... ...... .. ........... ... ... **= =


10 LBS. U.S. CHOICE PORK CHOP ENDS........$950 -


95 PER L?.


10 LBS U.S. CHOICE PORK CHOPS ............. $12.00 $1.20 PER LB.


10 LBS. DANISH PRIME SPARE RIBS.................$8.50


85 c PER LP.


5 LBS. "X-LEAN" U.S. CHOICE PURE GROUND BEEF $5.25 $1.05 PER LB.


10 HALF CHICKENS......................


5 LBS U.S. CHOICE BONELESS SIRLOIN STEAK $10.00 $2.00 PER LB.
5 LBS. U.S. CHOICE T-BONE AND

PORTERHOUSE STEAKS $12.00 ,
6 L3S. "DON's PRIZE"
BEEF PATTIES 48/2 o. $6.50 g 0
U.S. CHOICE
STRIP STEAKS 5LBS. $16.00 j i

FRESH JACKS 5 LBS. $3.50


NOW OPENi MAIN PLANT
SIFOWtiL STJREEff, t SNASSAU STADIUM '
i~ ~~~~a Now ll Il ul it ti l


Special Offer


Colgate !


If


convention in Atlanta, Georgia recently.
spread their wingsBahaas tiliate for the first


NINI- MEMBERS of the
Bahamas Secretaries Associa-
tion, an affiliate of the
National Secretaries Associa-
tion (International) recently
returned from the NSA's 29th
annual convention held in
Atlanta Georgia. This
year's Convention Theme was
"Spread Your Wings" and was
selected to present a personal


challenge to each of the
secretaries attending the
Convention.
A conclave of 2.002
registrants from each of the 50
states, the Provinces of Canada,
Puerto Rico and affiliated
Associations and members
from Australia. Bahamas.
Jamaica, Panama, Barbados
and Aruba converged on


Atlanta tor the four-daN tim' we'e "'very impressed


convention, which included
educational seminars, open
house for meeting new friends
and greeting old ones, bylaws.
exhibits of products and
services of interest to the
secretary, committee anI
department meetings and an
installation banquet to top off
the convention on Saturday.
SMenmbers attending from the


with the degree of
professionalism exhibited at'all
ties during the convention"
. and expressed pleasure "at
being affiliated with such an
outstanding organi/at ion."
It is the hope of the
Baha.mas affiliate to one day
play lost to such a convention
in the Commnonwealth of the
Bahamas. spokesman said.


SHARON DUPUCH, now training in Las Vegas,
practises her acrobatic skill on stage at Le Cabaref


BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS
CORPORATION


ACCOUNTANT


The Corporation is seeking a Bahamian to fill a
challenging position in its Accounts Department.
Applicants should hold an acceptable professional
accounting qualification and should have several
years experience in the preparation of accounting
information for Corporate Management.
The Corporation offers attractive salary scales,
an excellent fringe benefit program,"including f
non contributing pension plan and a
comprehensive medical insurance scheme.
This is an excellent opportunity for the
successful candidate to work with an expanding
Corporation employing modern computerized
management accounting systems.
Full details of career to date should be forwarded
not later than 31st July, 1974 to:


Mr. M. S.A. Turner
Asst. General Manager/L. & P.A.
BaTelCo
Nassau, Bahamas


so, she will he the youngest
Bahamian ever to perform in a
Le Cabaret Revue.

































r S H E .. ..... .T I .MR1







AT THE...





~ ~~ ~~ . 1. 4"
;j . .-- ':~ ."


FOR SHARON DUPU(H. a
young Bahamian creative-dance
artiste, the opportunity to
develop more expertise abroad
in ballet. jazz and acrobatic
routines came only recently.
Invited by the Rudas
theatrical Organisation to
participate in their Las Vegas
summer training programme,
Miss Dupuch is now also on
stage there with the Rtidas
Broadway revue at the
Fropicana Hotel.
Fifteen-year-old Sharon
Dupuch started on the road to
professionalism two years ago
at Paradise Island Limited's
)ancing Academy. She was
recommended to attend the
class sessions in Las Vegas by
Candy Keuntsler, the
Academy's co-ordinator and a
lead acrobatic dancer in casinoo
de Paradis productions by
Tibor Rudas at L Cabaret
Theatre.
Due to return to Nassau
early September, Miss Dupuch,
a student at St. Augustine's
College, has already been asked
to join the cast of Le ('abret's
current show. 1,001 Bahamian
Nights. II she does decide to do

Fire wrecks
truck
FIRF officials reported that
there were only two fires over
the past 24 hours. one involved
a truck and the other a car.
At approximately 11:41
a.m. yesterday truck number
T-bhl4 was completely
destroyed by fire in Prince
(harles Avenue.
It is believed that the fire
was caused by a faulty
electrical circuit.
At the time of the blaze, the
truck, owned by Ray Wells,
was being driven by Charles
Capron.
A 199) Javelin number 478
owned by Keith Ellis and
driven by Pat Rolle was
extensively damaged by fire.
The incident took place on
School Lane off Baillou Hill
Road at about 4:33 pm.


Bahamian talent in Las Vegas


----TI


--- - --~-----~,_~ ___ _


---


--r --- r: C - -


gww


From


. ...$10,00









6 THE TRIBUNE --Waftieday, July T4, 1974


I I


By Abigail Van Buren
S19r4 I CNMce Trilbe-N. Y. Nes SaL., I .


DEAR ABBY: Is it true that some women are just not
cut out to be mothers?
Unfortunately, because of inadequate birth control
methods, I find myself stuck with two kids. Before I had
them, I had a job I really enjoyed, and I was free to come
and go as I pleased without being at the mercy of
baby-sitters.
My husband and I are drifting apart. He still has all the
freedom he wants, but I can't go with him. A lot of
resentment has been building up inside of me these past
four years. Sometimes I actually hate my children for
robbing me of my carefree life.
You would think that any normal mother would love her
children dearly, but if I had only one wish, it would be that I
had been born sterile.
Wouldn't it be nice if all the women in the world who want
kids and can't have them could change places with those
women (myself included) who don't want kids and could


CROSSWORD
PUZZLE
ACROSS
C30. Take back
1. Spire ornament 32. Attractive
4. Flounder 34. Hauls into
7. Canary's home court
11. Kidney bean 35. Three-toed
12. Midianite king sloth
13. Eskers 36. Spotlight
14. Behalf 37. Nobleman
16. UN member 40. Seconded


c s i o ? ve


p NI IL

AL
y AR
LEN R IVE

R V S ~ - ----


YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE
3. Roadhouse
4. Stands up to
5. Eager
6. Trifle
7. Nullify
8. Quadruped
9. Highway sign
S 10. Stray
- 15. Gruyere
18. Tomahawk
19. Lantern
20. Moslem prince
21. Leg joint
22. Observe
23. Unwritten
- 24. Food staple
25. Makes edging
27. Attempt
31. Yam
33. Palm lily
36. Rose's
husband
37. Salamander
3 38. Turkish caliph
- 39. Herb of grace
40. Impersonation
-41. Both
42. Bitter vetch
2" 43. Stain


44. Chimney pipe SOLUTION OF
45. Intelligence
agency DOWN
46. Crooked
47. Rank 1. Flow back
48. Kennedy 2. American
49. Simple sugar author


L / I-


GRAND OPENING


OFF


LADYBIRD CHILDREN'S CLOTHES

Men's OLEG CASSINI SLACKS

Dress and Sport Shirts
Ties, Sport Jackets, Suits

*VOLARE SHOES*


ItI


Introducing Our New



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CRYSTAL AND CHINA

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Bay St. Nassau ONLY


J


-------- I-------- -1___,_,, V


17. Halfway
18. Article
19. Delibes opera
22. Extract
26 Pardon
28. Silkworm
29. Countenance


WE'RE NOT JUST TALKING ABOUT

BEATING THE COST OF LIVING..

WE'RE DOING SOMETHING ABOUT ITI


--------


I


--r 'L---2--- -~----L- -C C- --i---C- --


dmmpL.


re liMS e :lJ


- ~- -~- -- -I


- ------ -- -,_, --


- _---


i --


- ,4 Oam- mb


r


Wishes she'd been born
sterile
have a dozen?
I'm not a child abuser, but I still resent my children I'm
not writing for advice because nobody Oan help me. It's just
something Ill have to live with. After all, it's not their fault
that they were born. It's mine.
If there were a book entitled "How to Learn to Love
Unwanted Children" it would be just what I need.
NAMELESS IN GA.
DEAR NAMELESS: You are not alone, but most
mothers who share your feelings would not adnit (even to
themselves) that they feel that way. It would make them
feel too guilty.
Your letter makes an excellent case for birth control.
Every child deserves to be a wanted child. You can't
possibly feel this way without communicating your
resentment to your children. (You may not abuse them
physically, but you are depriving them--emotionally.)
To quote the late Lord Brain: "When, wherever you live
in the world, you can have children only when you wish,
that will be a revolution with more far-reaching effects on
the pattern of human culture than the discovery of atomic
energy."
DEAIt ABBY: Our daughter was recently married at a
lovely church wedding. It was her first marriage, but Billy
had been married briefly before. (The marriage was
annulled.)
The bride and groom received a beautiful sterling silver
tray from Billy's aunt and uncle. The following card was
enclosed: "This tray is not monogrammed, but if you are
married a year from now, and you take it to Hudson's
jewelry store, they will monogram it for you free of charge.
Love,
Aunt Peggy and Uncle Clifford"
Well, Abby, what do you make of that?
INDIGNANT MOTHER
DEAR INDIG: It's a pretty good bet that Aunt Peggy
and Uncle Clifford sent Billy a wedding gift for his first time
around, and because it was monogrammed, it was
unreturnable. And they wanted to make sure history didn't
repeat itself. (It's practical, but poor taste.)
DEAR ABBY: In reference to that Ph.D who claimed he
had traveled all over the world and had been in the company
of ambassadors, etc., and that he didn't know what
R.S.V.P. meant: Everybody knows it means "Rented suits
very proper.
C. FELTON: ALHAMBRA. CAL.
Problems? You'll feel better if you get it off your chest.
For a personal reply, write to ABBY: Box No. 69700, L.A.,
Calif. 90069. Enclosed stamped, self-addressed envelope,
please.


JI(


t33








THE TRIBUNE -- Wedneday. July 24. 197


* . .
~~ftO tb~d*...


PALMOLIVE
GREEN FACIAL SIZE
SIAP


rUns"


OLY 1174
W4- oWm BEEF




w o.


*w1u

mm


MW iUEALM
LAMS MOSi8 ER UA


AJAX BETERSENT
W1ANT SIZE


LB


,1


rlscA-


W.D. BEEF PATTIES
3LL PKG. 2.39
W-I SMEE PINs MIe M


L79
LO.


muW SNRTUUll


W- 5-9 LB. AVG
TURIEYS ................. ........... LB .79
W-O ALL MEAT
LO NA B.......................... .99A
MELLOW CRISP
S ...................... .......
W OLEF RS ..................


K AS L.................... 1.09
SRAST ............. 1.39
RIB RGST m 2.09
S STEAK .......................... 2.19
am II
'ARE IB S ........................ .


0oCT" LIOE LCLO4-

B3


ARMOUR STAR
ORNEB IEEF


03W-06. TV SINER
TURKEY, SALISBURY,
A VEAL _


100. OP. P B Rs EYE
RSUI SPEARS........... 98
looz.mU. rISEE r
i VEGETABLES ......2 F. .2


STOKELY
WHOLE KERNEL 0ORN


IW I.


CAN


4


( 's/Iu Pu


9


26 02.
10 02. PI. IHOILWAY NOVSE W/CIEESE
BAK-A-TATA ............6..


KAFT AMERICAN SLICED CHEESE
YEUOW WIWTE PIMENTO


99'


.1/i


LB CUPRlIS FILBERT GOLDE
SOFT MAR ARIN ................7


MRS. SMITIfS APPLE
BUTO. APPLE A
PIMPK* USTAR PI1


OUT? DAIRV DETRPICAL


TROlPIAL
ORAME DRINKS




GAI!8


FAMILY NAPKIS


1I sT.


ROBIN NOE FLOUR


LIBBY
FRUIT COCKTAIL


RED RAPES


PEACHES


MAXWELL NOUSE INSTANT
COFFEE


1629 (
iSAN~So


994. L.


u.S


....99#


LIBBY TROPICAL
FRUIT PUNCH.


59


L. 49$


list


tflT


HEIM2 BAU. BUMS
^


UN


*1.~


V ~i- S7


S1


41.


k 4


II


49 OZ
BOX'


I


ANATMA RICE


BAS
W-IR


12 O2.
iAN


2 LB.
PKO.


12 2.
PKI.


Ubb,>
Ub6
(lb.
roo-S
~c,sa


490


LB.


IqTATm

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I a


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in~r


P Ii


2 32 O.
Ola Jw


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THE TRIBUNE


MANGO
TIME
AGAIN
MANGOES are still in
abundance at the produce
exchanges. The season doesn't
last too long so make the best
of them while they last.
This mango dessert can be
served with ice cream or just
by itself. Peel three pounds
ripe mangoes and cut the pulp
into thick slices. In a saucepan,
put one and a quarter cup
sugar and half a tablespoon of
lemon juice. Add the mangoes
and cook stirring until the
sugar has dissolved. Cover the
pot and simmer over very low
heat for an hour. Transfer the
fruit to a serving bowl with a
slotted spoon. Add a cup of
whipping cream to the sauce in
the pot and boil over high heat
until the sauce has thickened.
Let the sauce cool for about
five minutes and pour it over
the mangoes. Serve it with a
dollop of ice cream or as a
dessert on its own.
Mango ice is made in the
freezer ice trays. Scoop the
pulp from three large mangoes
and put it through the food
mill or puree it in a blender.
Add a third of a cup of sugar in
a saucepan with a cup and a
half of water. Boil for five
minutes. Let the syrup cool
and stir it into the mango
puree. Pour the mixture into
the ice trays and place in the
freezer. Stir every half hour for
three hours.
Mango ice cream, always a
favourite, is made the same
way as mango ice. You will
need two cups of mango pulp.
Simmer half a cup of sugar and
half a cup of water for five
minutes. Let the syrup cool.
Add the mango pulp and a
quarter cup of lime juice. Mix
well. Whip a cup of heavy
cream until very stiff. Fold the
cream into the mango mixture
and pour into ice trays Freeze
for three hours.
A very attractive mango
mold also calls for two cups of
pureed mango pulp. In a
saucepan, sprinkle an envelope
of gelatin on a third of a cup
cold water. Heat, stirring, over
low heat until the gelatir has
dissolved. Let it cool. Combine
the mango pulp with half a cup
of sugar, a tablespoon lime
juice and add the gelatin. Stir
well. Whip a cup of heavy
cream until very stiff and blend
thoroughly with the mango
mixture. Pour into a chilled
mold and chill until set.
Unmold onto a serving plate
and garnish with slices of
mango.
Another cold mango dessert
calls for a cup of mashed
mango pulp. Add a cup of
apple juice to the pulp and a
little sugar. Chill for half an
hour. Beat well and fold in two
cups of whipped heavy cream
and a little nutmeg. Chill for
several hours.
Mango turnovers are easy to
make with commercial puff
pastry from the supermarket.
Roll out the pastry on a
floured board and cut into four
inch circles. Place a few slices
of mango on half of each
circle. Dot with butter and
sprinkle with sugar. Fold the
pastry over the fruit and seal
the edges by brushing with
water. Brush the turnovers
with mixed egg yolk and water
and chill for half an hour. Bake
the turnovers at 425 degrees
for 10 minutes, then reduce
the heat to 325 degrees and
continue the cooking until the
crust is golden brown. Sprinkle
with icing sugar and serve with
whipped cream.
Mango custard begins with
three cups of mashed or pureed
mango pulp mixed with a


tablespoon of lime juice and a
teaspoon of arrowroot. Beat
four eggs with half a cup of
sugar until thick. Fold gently
into the puree. Pour the
mixture into a casserole and
bake it at 350 degrees for half
an hour. Sprinkle the top with
a little cinnamon.
This mango sauce goes well
with meats. Chop three cups of
mango pulp. Add a cup of
water to the mango meat in a
saucepan and cook covered
until soft. Add a cup of sugar
and an eighth of a teaspoon
each of ginger and cinnamon.
Cok uncovered for 10 minute
aggP a Awo an
t ancwe W s rs


4


. *


r VEGETOLE S
SHORTENING
a 3 Ibs.


SAVE 24c


pett


CHAMPION,
BRAND _
TOMATO PASTE
4 10 oz.


tCIMIO lt


Pltw
IROM Fr-E~r


GLADSTONE FARMS GOOD FOR B.B.Q.
CHICKE QUARTERS


AnAmrltuNr
BRAND
PIGEON
SAVE 18c PE
l 20 oz.


SELECTED SLICED
BEEF UVER


6. 85C


lb. $1.25


NESTEA
1.7 oz.


/b


LIBBYS

RIT COCKTAIL
303

55,
SAVE10c


SAWYERS
GREEN
LIMA BEANS
_ 303


MIRACLE

WHIPPED MARGARINE


1.S 693
SAVE 32c


BORDEN

GALLON

MILK


SAVE 12c


U.S. CHOICE
CHUCK STEAK


U.S. CHOICE
SHOULDER EAST


LIMACOL


16 oz.


SAVE 20c


I. $1.39


Ib. $1.19


MUTTON


BOILED HAM
CENTRE CUT LEAN
DANISH PORK CS


ROSS

TENDER PEAS


WE VALUE
YOUR
BUSINESS


MANY
THANKS


10 oz


814


MINUTE MAID

LEMONADE


12 oz.


a


FOR 99


FOR


br I -,_L 1-li- U-


T


MAXWELL

HOUSE COFFEE
6 oz.



SAVE 30c


FERROL
COMPOUND


SAVE 26c


MOTTS
APPLE JUICE
QTS


794
SAVE 12c


MORTONS MINI

DONUTS SUGAR

AND SPICE


Unclh UNCLE BENS
CONVERTED
.RIC 10 bs.


l_ -JT^ '


THOMAS

ENGLISH

MUFFINS

8 oz.


A-D 17
ANTISEPTIC
DEODORIZER 8 oz.



SAVE 14c y


,w


'I









pw


0*


Williams er
frc joinait .
action ,aanmt
rich nations


GIA SWEET

PEACHES


*


t.


Ia 99C DANISH

I. S1.65 POMK LO ms AST
US. CHOICE
S Ib. $1.49 BOTTo ROUND


FIG
NEWTONS
1 Ib.


9S
SAVE 20c


A!


CARNATIO

CREAM
LARGE


FOR


ROIN HOOD

FLOUR


5


Ib. S1.39


HOREL BACON
-BLACK LABEL


NATIVE CROWN
Ib. $2.15 FRESH PORK ALL CUTS


PLUMROSE
CORNED BEEF
12 oz.



h. SAVE 1Oc


FOX'S
GLACIER MINTS
10 oz.


99


lb. $1.29


lb. $1.19


SLIVER
CAT FO4D
ALL FLAVORS
6'Y oz.

3 FOR


PUNCH


GIANT SIZ


69t


r HEItZ 1
BABY FOOD
STRAINED


I ii I


FOR


PAMPERS

OVERNIGHT
12's


SAVE 16c


PAMPERS
DAYTIME
30's


SAVE 30c


PAMPERS
TODDLER
12's


MORTON
SALT
26 oz.


SAVE 20c


FOR88


ORANGES

q


BAGS
BAGS


RAW PEANUTS


wr


LIMES


6


FOR 89


TO ASSIST YOU
WE WELCOME
YOUR MEAT ORDERS
BY TELEPHONE -
PLEASE DIAL
31897
FOR ADVANCE SERVICE
WELCOME


CELERY

JUMBO

STALKS
EACH .




d CABBAGEE
fIinr^ N I^"


lb.


HELLMANS


SSAVE 6c


Bni

BONUS CHE[UE
PURCHASE S 25 00 34" k SONUS CiQI
1 53500 44" ms0tuW ICHN
11 4500 54M 1 5 53$MSCNIO I
i, 1 5SO6400 SklM llON S
s 500 ^74" S6U USmIcu
S1 7500 s 14s IMd IRS
5 5I "" "" 'I*aCw


II SI
II 5\
IT MOES'l
IT


1500 M0d
95 00 124
7500 I fI
o00 o m


sk m etimo
I I"sMCNUI
t M4MMKCNt|
I 2 MMUNm I


M- 4W- 4OP- AV- 4W- AM


Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania,
Nigeria, Ghana, Sierra Leon,
Gambia, Zambia, Malawi,
Botswana, Leotho, Swaziland,
S Sudan, Liberia, Jamaica,
Trinidad and Tobago, Guyana,
S Barbados, the BRhameu N ."i,
'Tona and Wertar imd, ,..
1ES Ethiopia, Gua- m es
Nuts Grenada an ACP ii
BUIs did not asnd repra~dj R
IES Tuesday.
Bee Wili mm tIA.
DuP IS Pri Me i is'h, it li
Ms. K.K.T. Mao(PL .:.,
utss Three BuropaI .I,
uts ministers ate lgp.d: 1
..us Suvagoaurguo Fe i, Op.
u Guldbeg of 1)nmia.
Fitgea of


Ad I


49


d -d Im -.WW -m m A -MW -NOW


7A


w


By Shirley Christian
KINGSTON, JAMAICA -
Prime Minister Eri Williamif .
Trinidad and Tobago told
delegates of 41 African,
Caribbean and Pacific countries
Tuesday that joint action is th
way to improve the Third
World's economic dealing with
rich countries
Williams cited the success of
the oil producing countries in
raising -prices, the new
organization of countries
producing bauxite, the
emerging organization of
copper producers and various
regional economic blocs.
The Prime Minister opened
four days of meetings to
consider trade and aid
relationships between the
European Common Market and
the 41 countries, most of them
former British and French
colonies that have had
preferential trade rights in ,
those markets.
The developing countries,
know as the ACP Group, will
meet privately for two days,
then be joined Thursday and
Friday by delegates of the nine
European countries.
'"Our conference," said
Williams, "convenes in a
climate of confusion,
dislocation, tension and
economic realignment in the
entire world which probably
has no parallel in modern
history.
"Every country ... finds
itself confronted with serious
and ever increasing shortages
and the increased cost of
energy, the effect on
developing countries in
particular of the imported
inflation from the developed
countries, and resulting from
S all of these, and overshadowing
them, the balance of payment
problem."
Williams said there has been
no significant progress in some
crucial areas in the negotiations
between the ACP and the
Common Market, for which
this is the fourth session in tih
A'st year.
-"One such area," he sWid, "Is
our proposals on commodity
prices and our terms of trade,
based on our legitimate and
inevitable concern with the
stabilization of prices, the
guaranteeing of export
earnings, and the increased
prices we have been paying for
products of the developed
countries.
"Another such area is the
freeing of trade outlets for
primary and manufactured
goods.
"A third area is access to the
(European) community of
agricultural products on which
the majority of our countries
are heavily dependent."
He said agricultural products
account for 90 per cent of ACP
exports to the Common
Market countries and that any
limit of access of those
products would be a very
serious matter.
He added that the problem
is worsened by the'"apparent
reluctance" of the Common
Market to undertake measures
to stimulate the transfer of
industry and technology to
developing countries df
favourable terms.
Williams also expressed
concern about the amount and
1- terms of development aid from
Europe. He said developing
countries want not only more
aid but also the right to.
participate in the operation
and administration of the
Funds.
ACP countries participating
in the conference are
Mauritania, Mall, Senegal,
S Upper Volta, Ivory Coast,
Togo, Dahomey, Niger, Chad,
Cameroon, Gabon, Central
Africa Republic, Congo, Zaire,
'Rwanda, Burundi, Somalia,
Mauritus, Madagascar.


---**--






THE TRIBUNE Wldnesday, July 24,1974
i


BAHAMIAN
SUPERMARKETS
If it's value you really want,
you really want Super Vauel


SPECIALS FOR THE WEEK JULY 25th. THROUGH JULY 28th, 1974.


U.S. CHOICE


SIRLOU
STEAK


Per Ib.


BAHAMIAN
GROWN


WHOLE
FRYERS
Per Ib.


ii SANDICH IMq:A TS


Carolina Prize
SLICED MCO


Oscar Mayer
ALL MEAT WIENERS
1.lb.


Oscar Mayer
PURE BEEF FRANKS
1-lb

S1.19


OSCAR MAYER
SALAMI FOR BEER
OSCAR MAYER
BRAUNSCHWEIGER


8-oz


8-oz


894


2/994


Kraft
ORAE ICE
'Y2-Gall


Kraft
AMERICAN CHEESE SLICES
12-oz.


1.29


Bordens
MILK
Y2-Gall

89C


I IT


PHILADELPHIA
CREAM CHEESE


FRESH PEACHES
Per Ib.

490


RED PLUMS
Per Ib.

65C


*e T


WHITE PTATIES
5.lb.

LO 9


CELERY
Each

450


(


S


4iv


CAPIO 49


1


1%


8-oz


~v S


654


monj


I


A "


MCC
"r 'C


~ow rl~rf~ I
"~-s n.--~-CILC~


*


kr


r -L







HE TRIBUNE --Wednesday, July 24. 1974


TmAAUIDOK AT SE

LOWE FOOD PICIES.


V^ BAHAMIAN
SUPERMARKETS
If it's value you really want,
you really want SuperWul


SPECIALS FOR THE WEEK JULY 25th. THROUGH JULY 28th, 1974.
---- H.. U


U.S. CHOICE
Boneless
TOP ROUND
STEAK
Per Ib.


BAHAMIAN
GROWN
CUTUP
FRYERS
Per Ib.


EIA TI D [I T


U.S. Choice
PORTERHOUSE STEAK
Per Ib.

2.49


U.S. Choice
SIRLOIN TIP ROAST
Per lb.

s2.29


U.S. Choice
ROUND ROAST
Per lb.

$2.19


:41


U.S. CHOICE
T.BONE STEAK
S DANISH CHOICE
SLAB BACON
NEW ZEALAND
GOAT MEAT


Royalton
GROUND BEEF
Per Ib.


Dewfresh
PORK SAUSAGES
Per Ib.


99C


MCKENZIE
WHOLE KERNELCORN
MORTONS
JELLY DONUTS


DEWFRESH
BEEF SAUSAGES


QUAKER
OATMEAL CEREAL WITH DATES
KRAFT
MINIATURE MARSHMALLOWS
ARMOUR
S POTTED MEAT
KRAFT
RUSSIAN DRESSING
DIXIE
SaCUP REFILLS ooct
HUNTLEY & ALMER
CREAM CRACKERS
OCTAGON
LIQUID


10-oz
14-oz


1-lb


16-oz


890

2/75#


994 To ~

894


$1.19
2/854
3/99,


10%-oz
3-oz
8-oz
5-oz
7-oz
48oz


594
994


2/89,
9.,


Per Ib

Per Ib

Per Ib


$2.49


794

994


4iT


*1*6


I12


*T


--


:1


~s~-~


I:


r:


:,r 0





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CHARLES *L t I,1.i of
ert d Lagiange Haiti is applyingg to the Minister responsible
tot Nationality and Ctrenship, for naturalhittion as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why naturahiation should not be q anted should
send a written and signed statement o' the facts within
twenty-eight days frorn the 17th day ft Jiuly '! 74 to The
Minister responsible for 'Nationaitty- 'and LI.tienship,
Ministry of Home Affairs. P Box N 3002. Nasau.





NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby ii;n that CL1F OH1D GCORGE
HIGGINS ofi ' I i i Pa k Nassau, is Jiptlyin to the
V, r espu~ nsibile fo N 'i.naihty' ard Lititzenrship. for
registiation as a citifirni uf -The [i.ahamaa a d tl t any
person who knows a.it re,.:r.-o ,viiv r- iwtir it'on should not
be granted should se a wiitt.n 'ad .i i i ;statrmenrt of
the fajts wvvithin twenty Ciiti dyI iit:' 1 /th day of
July 1'74 to Thr Minrte r'iu fb!c ,i NJtionality and
C ',.., ,. i Ministry of Hion, ,ffii-. P 0 Box N-3002,
Nassau.



NOTICE

NOTICL is heeby qiven that PHI! IP f ORf1l S :. Yeliuwi
Ekd ri Garden- i app viy'iri 'o t i '.'Mr i;ta l ; r .r: ', blr i forr
Njtior'aitv a'-d C lit i :r hip, fi i i'u :'r. as.1 ctizen
of The (.ahair., and thi ny pr ., . knroivs a y
rii-ofi w ihy r alI ajtr. Iuit hltjlo l i;-i h b i td .h in-d
asend J w. ttei nd i Siyr' i 't:f 1i faU-t within
tw-e ty-a iqht d.iay fry o thi 17th S div of 1u71 i9/4 to The
Mi:ir ter responsible ft, N tuin liv ,nr Cit, -uZnship,
Ministry of Horme A ff.mis. PO. B. H N-300. N.as-,u.,





NOTICE
NOTICE i. hereby oiven that MA'P '. '- JO1, PHI'l of
Cameron Street. N~Ij..Iau is app!yi! 1 ihe M irolter
responsible for Nationaity and ( i i -ip,. f1or
naturalisationl as a c tizen of Tih .. hjt any
pers n who knio s. any tie,& u'- .;vtiy 1:.l, !:i ot .! ) iuultd
not b. oradited should tsend a wi itte+ Jri .;i e- j taifldcienfr
of the fact, within twenty efiht days f r1, : thio I 7th day of
.luly 1974 to The MiniF'~ ter i ,ispon,'It, ',ui ('I,.tcalhtllit and
C i:lietiitr ; i. hfViH, trAi f ii.i' i f, ,: ( C P .x N 302,
Na




NOTICE
NOTICL is heieby giveI, that i[)NiNIl- t i HtU i So; Pine
Dalhb Grand Bahama is appilyiiu t the 'Vhir.i i'.punsitle
f'i Natiunahliy and Citi r Irr li, I fr ; ,,i t..ir citi/ren
of The tiahat a's, a nd tiolr any rp!r1 .A vhi"( h,aovas irany
region wvhy ieqostrationn lho -ii n rot he it artituo Irh .ld seId a
wr itteot and ,oalon d stafniC'rtet of ih 'iatt. e.ithfi:
twenty-eight days Itom thr 1/th day u of Jtl, 19;/l 1;r The
Minister responsiblh fori Natiaonity arld C riitL-ip
Ministry of Home Affairs. P. 0 Box N-300', Nassau,
Batia rias.




NOTICE

NOW YOU CAN EARN EXTRA CASH











NOTICb is heieby given talit GROV[NOH W! iLIANE! if
ThGRorpsorl Lait- N,:isat., tahamas *.i atfyirr'i It^ thfb
Milynstir reip,.h.sible ,su Natr'Nality ro'id Li'.--nr ,ip, lr
egis nl i iron as r i. ttiz,' r T ia : a (lah itn ,r d 4 mh. a ';y
pei snr wlh knrtows ay a reaos who y rneistatri. IiioJft no)
be grated should scrnd a wr iter aniid s inc ed e ,tat in t of
the factn s with,: t c tisy-ieigh t h Jfy front, the 1 /ih day uf
July, 19741 tho Tht. ir lHtrt 7i4 o i Tibhi io Ni t ronal ity adl!
CitizeoNtship. Mrntiy r I t Aln Afan. P 0. It'o N 3002,
Nas aNl.





NOTICE
NOTICF is ,hiirt.y Iivci ( thiit ONIF WilSHIlN(GTl(-ij
GRANt of ida St CoLOi!; Grsv, N,i.. ",.i Ba.jl,,t.aI r,
arpplyiny ;ut thf Mil iai r 11si-itj'i b r"i N.t, .,,i rlily ,ird
anrd that ainy p fr;son whi k ril'. ,l;ia y acjsri wily
registratitirf htuit i ,f, ntI l ,I lni rid '. ,cii. WlIetten
a d signed g e staitt ii t r it thi faict:, vr 'lrihr twe t ., e lt .lr days
froir the 1 7th da oft July I'.t1I to T hi !ri'r.i ,t, i 0 rtrponsiblt e
for Nationalit arind Citrizcnshfir. Mirnitry oi f t,..l'; in, ,irs,
P. 0 BoX N-3002, Nassau.


NOTICE
NOTICt is hereby gicv. tihatf, JOSrF! Wil I i'M f IRiNCIS
of Gibbs Coinei, Feigusonr Y;d Nass ., ;.lhllrnus i
applying to the MinIstfi tci:l' rbile i o), NatJi;.ilty and
(.ili., 'I .irp fo0 iregisitr oin a ,. r t. on oif t11, Iahama.', rrd
that any person who krou, jw aiy reason whly rijititiliaton
should not be granted ihul l ,cd j written ailrnd .i i .d
statement of the fac ts wvithii twenty+cight days tiom the
17th day of July 1974 to Trhe Miristcr respo'nsible for
Nationality and Citizenshtp, rMinistry of IIr, noe Atfairs, P.
O. Box N-3002, Nassau.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that NELSON DAV\ISofL Sunlight
Village Nassau, Bahtamas is applying to the Minister
responsible for "' ijiiat and Citizenship, for
naturalisationi as a citizen of The Bahamai. and that any
person who knows arny'leason why natuialisation should
not be granted should send a written and srirned statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 17th day of
July 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship. Ministry of Home Affairs, P. O. Box N-3002,
Nassau.


________________________________E


Tynes- Stuart wedding


1MARG AR r Ann Stuart,
;oiinge-,l daughter of the
late Carl and Sybil Stuart of
Centreville, was married to
(;regory Gary Tynes, son of
Mr. and Mrs. ('haunTy Tynes
of Rolle Avenue, on June 22
at St. Mathew's Church.
I lic double ring ceremony was
performed by Canon
Addington Johnson, assisted
lby his brother Audley


Johnson.
The bride, who was given
away by her uncle, Mr.
Gordon Jones, wore a full
length empire style dress
with a high neckline, full
sleeves, made out of organza
and trimmed with Venetian
lace. Her matching mantilla
veil flowed to the floor and
her bouquet was of pink and
white roses.


;1t ^- AI


MR. MRS.GREGORYTYNES
MR. & MRS. GREGORY TYNES


Lesley Stuart, sister of the
bride, served as maid of
honour and Phyllis Stuart,
another sister along with
Lynn Fox, Pamela Jones,
Dianne Jones and Janis
Henfield acted as
bridesmaids.
Michelle Johnson, niece of the
bride, served as a junior
bridesmaid and April Martin,
niece of the groom, was the
flower girl. They wore bright
yellow long dresses with
matching hats and bouquets
of yellow and blue
chrysanthemums.
Kirkland Tynes. brother of the
groom was bestman.
Groomsmen were, Vaughan
Tynes. brother of the
groom, i'red Ramsey,
Andrew Barnett, David
Moree, Tony Stuart, brother
of the bride, Michael
Johnson, nephew of the
bride and Marty Knowles,
nephew of the groom. was
the ring-bearer;
A reception was held at the
home of Mr. and Mrs.
Gordon Jones of Tynam
Avenue.
Out-of-town guests were, Miss
Sally Sharp, Australia; Mr.
Stuart Hall, Freeport, Grand
Bahama; Mrs. Shelia Martin,
sister of the groom,
Freeport, Grand Bahama
and Mrs. Judy Johnson
another sister of the bride
from Marsh Harbour, Abaco.
After a honeymoon trip to
Orlando, Florida, the couple
took up residence in
Palmdale.


ARRIVED TODAY:
Bermuda, Tropic Flyer
SAILED TODAY: Bermuda,
Tropic Flyer
SAILING TOMORROW:
Bahamas Star. Flavia, Emerald
Seas and Oceanic
TIDES
High: 11:40 a.m. and 12:36


thunderstorms during the early
part of the evening or morning.
Wind: Variable F-12 m.p.h.
Sea: Smooth to slight
Max: 89 and Min: 73
Humidity: 59 percent
Bar Press: 30.03

SUN


BALPA OFFICERS
A NEW executive committee
of the Bahamas Islands Airlines
Pilots Association was elected
renntly for 1974/75.
elected president is Captain
Craig Flowers, secretary
Captain Sylvester Rollins and
treasurer Captain Raymond
Carroll. Committee members
are Captain Kcnneth Sweeting
and First Officer George
Pearce


Commerce Term Deposits



We'll show you a sure way to



make more profit on your money.


Maybe you never looked at it this way.
But the interest a bank pays on your savings,
is profit coming to you. So the higher the interest
rate, the greater your profit.
Which is what our Term Deposit service
is about. It works like this: you deposit $1000
or more with us, for an agreed term. It may be
3 months, 6 months, a year, or longer.
We pay you interest according to the
sum deposited, and the period it remains
in the bank.


Call it a higher form of savings, if you like.
The fact is, you earn higher interest than you
would on regular savings. So you make more profit
on your money.
Talk to your Commerce branch manager
about your own personal Term Deposit.
It's profitable.




CANADIAN IMPERIAL
BANK OF COMMERCE


You and the Commerce.


Together we're both stronger.


I I


I


17 THE TRIBUNE --- Wdnesday,July 24, 1974











THE TRIBUNE --- Wednesday. July 24, 1974


Pilots

dinner


rLa.ei: p.m. knows Start 5:3(J
CHILDREN UNDER 1 I2 RFI' I
See 2 features late as 10:50
Now thru Thurs. *
"LET DIE" :30 & 12:40
"HARRY" at 10-50 ONLY U


S&li United Artists

RESTAURANT CLOSE D
,FORRENOVATION.


TOURISM Minister
Clement Maynard and Mrs.
Maynard (centre) were
special guests of the
Pilot Club of Nassau at the
'Share Pilot" dinner
Pilot" dinner hosted by
the local club for more
than 150 visiting members
of the International at the
Sonesta Beach Hotel
Saturday evening. The
arrival of the Pilots
followed, their inter-
national convention in
Miami Beach, attended by
delegates from Japan,
England, France, Canada,
Bermuda and the United
States.


EAIRIBR MAIBARET
and at 10:10
"SAVAGE" (R.)
No One Under 18 Admitted





STheblos


!!AV 3 I


The lns

bu getitawtoWith
Foster Giaront
This year Foster Grant ha
mote gret-looking sun
glasses than ever before Ant
most of them feature polta
ited tenses tO protect your
eyes from elletaed glare tsn
nt iace to knoW yOU don t ha
to pesn up Foster Grant styl-
ng to get gennune polartZed
protection,


Available at ALL
leading stores.
Wholesale Agents:

THOMPSON DRUG
COMPANY LIMITED.
P. O. Box 6027 Ph 2-2351
Nassau, Bahamas
j,


New CAA

member


HAVING completed the
examinations of the
Corporation of Accountants
and Auditors, Mr. Louis
Sawyer, (pictured) son of Mr.
& Mrs. William Sawyer, has
been admitted an associate
member of the Corporation of
Accoufttants auditorsrs.
A graduate of St.
Augustine's College, Nassau.
Sawyer was trained in
accountancy at the bahamas
School of Commerce. He is
accountant of the Cable Beach
branch of the Canadian
Imperial Bank of Commerce.


dr -
A summer school
programme started at
Sandilands School is offering


math, English, art and
physical education. The
programme which was
organized with the help of
Mr. Lionel Davis, M.P. for
Fox Hill has other teachers
working with the children.
They include Mr. Jerry
Oldham, teacher at Fox
Town and Van Oldham,
teacher at Crown Haven, both
at Abaco; Mr. Frank
Edgecombe, headteacher in
charge of the summer
programme; Miriam Roker,
teacher at L. W. Young; Mr.
Sammy Bain, teacher at S. C.
McPherson and Sharon Moss,
a teacher. The group along
with the teachers and Mr.
Davis is shown in the top
photo. The students
participating in one of the
activities are pictured in the
bottom photo. Movies are
shown every Saturday at
Sandilands School at 3 p.m.
Photo: Fred Maura


ACCOUNTANCY
EXAMINATIONS
The students passed in the
various stages of rthe
Corporation of Accountants
and Auditors examinations
held in Nassau on 7th of June
past:-
a Stage 1:- Charles Wellington
Lewis (Distinction)' Barry
S -;: Roberts, Richard Eldon
(Distinction), Michael Duggan
(Distinction), John Newton
Sawyer (Distinction), Anglla
de los Angeles Fox
(Distinction), Deserie Burrows,
William Malone, Gerald Guy
Pinder (Distinction)
Stage :2:- Yvonne Knowles
(Distinction), Christopher
Darville (Distinction)
Stage 3:- Valerie Ann
Clarke, Samuel Emmanuel
Glinton.
Stage 4:- Louis Sawyer.
The students were trained at
the Bahamas School of
Commerce, and the
examinations were conducted
by messrs. Gordon Wilde and
Wilf6rd Moon.

FOR 3 in1
LAWN SERVICE

TRPEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157


BRAND NEW


BAMA LOUNGE

4.SS.I/ HARBOUR CLUB EASTBAYST.


STARTINGFRIDAY 26th JULY


THE SWINGINGEST, SWEETEST SOUNDS OF


RANDY &tTE REVOLUTIONS

Cocktails start at 7p.m.-'till the wee wee hours.


CLOSED MONDAYS


FROM


Model No. 257


Model NO. 1 i/.
PRICED AT ONLY


PRICED AT ONLY...


'16800


PALMDALE I


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REAL ESTATE


II


C16149
BUILD ANYTIME. 70 x 100
lots. YAMACPAW BEACH
ESTATES. $75 deposit. From
$80 month. Private beach and
lake. No interest charges. Tel:
41141 any day or night or
2-4148.
MORLEY & O'BRIEN REAL
ESTATE (BREA BROKERS)

C16043
FOUR BEDROOM 2 storey
duplex apartment Sunlight
Village. Monthly rental $400.
Asking $45,000.00. Call
3-5779 ak for Corrine Brown.

C16067
BUY A LOT
IN SAN ANDROS
ALMOST 1/3 ACRE
$35 down. $35 per month. Call
or visit
FRANK CAREY
Real Estate
P.O. Box N-4764

Bay and Deveaux Streets
Telephone 27667-2-1815

C16141
UNFURNISHED semi hilltop 4
bedroom 2 bath
airconditioned house in Shirley
Park Avenue. $43,000.
Cleared corner lot in Highland
Park. 150' x 110' $10,000
value for only $8,500. By
owner. Phone 28293 34527.


C161
ONE
$9.Q(
Robe


FOR SALE
98
Lot Highland Park only
)0.00 Net. Call Mr
rrts 2-8437.


C16215
2 BEDROOM, 2 bath
condominium. Harbour Mews.
$500 per month.
3 BEDROOM, 2 bath house.
Garden Hill Estates. $300 per
month. Telephone 22680.
FOR ALL YOUR RENTAL
ENQUIRIES CONTACT
McPHERSON AND BROWN
REAL ESTATE. Phone 22680.

1 6200
1 iREE BEDROOM
unfurnished house, centratill
located. Call 5-4347 after 8


p.m.
-- ---------
C16229
Large Lot Sea Breeze Estate
Price $6,300.00 Terms
Available.
1 Residential and 1
Commercial Lot Little Hyde
Park $4,500.00 and $5,500.00
Respectively.
Lots over 6,000 sq ft. New
Subdivision Bernard Road
$400.00 down 5 years to pay.
Lots available In Glenistonr
Gardens at reasonable Prices.
A Few choice Lots left tr
Golden Gate low down
payment and easy monthly
instalrrments.
Several nice lots in tl.ir


Estates.
Large lot on Soldier Road njar
Village Road
2 Commercial lots in Palmdale
Corner lot in Enqgerston
$6,500.00
For information on any of the
above or on any type of Real
Estate that you require (all
Bill's Real Estate 23921


FOR SALE. RENT

C15961
3 bedroom 2 bith house,
unfurnished. Rlair Estate,.
Phone 3-2095.


FOR RENT

C15921
LOVELY 2 (cdruonr
a irconditioned apditmetr,
Dundas Court, Pyfinom'
Addition, M'stei T V aitenria
and laundry r ooim facilities
enclosed paikingq ,rea. Foi
information call 3-4953 or
5-4258.

C16194
IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY. 2
bedroom apartment Walking
distance to town, air
conditioned, basically
furnished. $250.00 per month.
EFFICIENCY APARTMENTS.
Close to town, air conditioned,
basically furnished. $150.00
per month.
Call BERT L. ROBERTS LTD.
Telephone: 2-3177.

C15917
2 BEDROOM 1 bath
apartment, fully furnished and
ready for occupancy. Situated
In Winton Highway. Prices vary
from $350 to $375 per month.
Phone 2-1631.

C15919
COTTAGES and apartments
monthly airconditioned, fully
furnished, maid service
available. Lovely garden and
swimming pool. Telephone
31297,31093.

C15882
TWO 2 bedroom apartments.
fully furnished. Centreville.
Ring Mr. Pritchard at 58134.


C16056
EAUTIFULLY furnished one
Iedrom apartments. Nice
l rt area. For further
irrtlon call 42128 or
anytime.


FOR RENT


C16156
ONF and TWO Bedroom
apartments partly furnished.
Telephone 31401

C16096
HARBOUR iMFWS Two
Ibedr:'-i.'s two baths tastefully
fui i 1 hed, centrally
an condr tioned, private patio,
use of pool anid beach. PHONE
/7508 or 21126-9.


Cl 2.?
3 bedroom, 2 bath, newly
constructed home, good
location. Ready for occupancy
fi rst week August.
$300 00monrth excluding
utilities. Phone 5-5879 or
3-2396.

PUBLIC AUCTION
C16000
HARRY i). MALONE will sell
at his premises on Albury
SLane, situate five (5) doors
from Shi ley Street, South on
tle tight hand side on the 26th
day of July 1914 at 12 o'clock,
I,'on the "..ll.. -l l ijp property:
All that piece parcel or lot
or land situate in the
Western District of the said
Island of New Providence
having the number Eihteern
(18) in fi'ock number Three
(3) Ii 1 plan of the said
Subdivi-l,. called and
known as "Greater
Chippirigham" which said
plan is exhibited in the
Registmid Office of Hilltop
[)evelop -rent Company
Limited in the said city )of
Nassau Lhe said piece parcel
or lut if larid being bounded
on the North by a Road
Reservation Thirty (30) feet
wide ar(t nl ilnrng thereon
Seventy-three (73) feet arnd
Three tenths (3/10) of a
foot on the East by land
')i formerly the
pi,'p, tv if the Estale of trhe
liii t h aile', Liotta anti
r tinr Iig thereorn One
hrindlrd feet (100) arid Two
h, ir-udri Is (2 '100) of a
i;;,t ,'; h!it. Soiith by lot
numntiei Orne (1) in the said
Block and running therco'i
Seventy Twenty-nine hundredths
(29/100) of a foot and on
the West by lot numnler
Seventeen (17) in the sa!d
Block anrd running thereon
One hurndred (100) feet."
Mortgage slated 2t-;t Atugust,
1967 I awrence Char les
Laing to rlrlie e Cou poratio)
of Bahama-- Liimited
Recorded ti Voluilw 1172
pages 351 to 3')8
This sale is subit t to a reserve
price and to th,- riqht for the
AucJtionei r i,'y petrl o on
his- behalf to !,.A up i to that
price
"I-ims'l ; 10 r')f 1 )!' p 'o hase
pite u t tIt ti,. ,r ii ,j and
rl) l)anri U i rni,-'l- i f
Dated 24th d.iy .i .liit, 19/4
A.t)
H/\RRY [j. M/LONE
Pil!,- A!'ni tiloiei-i

Cl b997
HfARRY D. RiMAt ONE will sell
at his l)remises ,i1 Albur y Larie
situated five (') tdoorur lror
Shitl('y Street, -,iuhh (on lthe
ic(lht hatid sid *' ,:, th, i'lth day
of July 1974 .i! 1' o't Iti k
n1(i ) Itir ioi i iiyj I ip(r y
ALl THAT 1 i ti pi .-ii l ,r
lot itl land tein-i!t l oit
NuimbeC TiWo tHuIndrd iclnd
Fifty-sevi: n (2'-/) ri the
Plan of firll UitoI Visiioni
c(alld anrl n-i.; n as
"Snshinrite Part' Ertate"
beiirg filed n theI Criwn
Lanrd', Oft irf of ilit ( e loiiny
in the said (.ity (of N,sau ias
Numbeci iiur HI dient'd and
Seventv-thi ie (473) N P. the
said piec- p.irel ,i lot of
laud hei el qianitrd arnd
( irvcyed bt)y way of
mort ltr}jrr I ii<)] ortirlided (ji
the So1tifh by Ji Roa d
Tw-ienty- i fv (2') f r.ef t vid
M the said Pltir r arid running
theieun Fifty (0)) fr!it on
th: Wesrt by Lot Numberbi
Two IH u ndi ed a nd
F ifty- eljht (258) un tlie said
Plan and running threr-;:
Eighty-four and -rvt. Teniths
(84.5) feet (o the North b,
Lot Nm'rnher Two Hunld,lod
and S xty (260) onr the said
Plan and running thereon
Fitty (50 00) feet and on
the East by Lot Numlberr
Two unrdred and F ifty-sit
(256) on the said Plan arnd
running thcreoin FEiht y-foui
anrd Five Tenths (84.5)

Mortgage uj.'d 15th October,
1964 Alira Edgecoonibe to
Fi nice Cor pItr ation of
Bdhamas Ltmiin-d.
Recorded in Volume 811 at
pages 248 to 255
The se se s subject to a reserve
pricP and to the right tor the
Aurctioneer or any person on
his behalf to bid up tof that
price.


Terms: 10% of the purchase
price at the time of sale and
balance on completion.
Dated this 24th day of June
1974 A.D.
HARRY D. Malonc
Public Auctione.i


C15999
HARRY D. MALONE will sell
at his premises on Albury Lane
situated five (5) doors from
Shirley Street, South on the


I PUBLIC AUCTION


SECTION


SI


right hand side on the 26th day
of July. 1974 at 12 o'clock
noon the following property:-
ALL THAT piece parcel or
lot of land situate in the
Southern District of the
Island of New Providence in
the Subdivision called and
known as "Kennedy's
Subdivision" laid out
According to the plan
thereof prepared by R
Warren & Associates Limited
and recorded in the Registry
of Records in the City of
Nassau in Volume 1083 at
page 499 beiQg Lot Number
One Hundred and Eighty-six
(186)).
Mortgage dated 25th February
19/0 Rodney Rolle to
Finance Corporation of
Bahamas Limited.
Recorded in Volume 1624 at
pages 586 to 593.
The sale is subject to a reserve
price and to the right for the
Auctioneer or any person on
his behalf to bid up to that
prce.
Terms: 10% of the purchase
price at the time of sale and
balance on completion.
Dated this 24th day of June
1974 A.D.
HARRY D. MALONE
Public Auctioneet

C16001
HARRY D. MALONE will sell
at his premises on Albury
Lane, situate five (5) doors
from Shirley Street, South on
the right hand side on the 26th
day of July 1974 at 12 o'clock
noon the following property:-
ALL THAT piece parcel or
lot of land situate in the
Subdivision called and
known as South Heach
Estates in the Southern
District of the said Island of
New Providence having the
number Six (6) in Block
number Three (3) in a plan
of the said Subdivision filed
in the Crown Lands Office
of the Colony in the said
City of Nassau and having
the Number 519 N.P. in the
said office the said lot of
land having such position
boundaries shape marks and
dimensions as are shown on
the diagram or plan attached
to an Indenture of
Conveyance dated the 3rd
day of June, A.D. 1969 and
made between Nassau Beach
Company, Limited of the
one part and the said Ivan
Hamilton Munroe of the
other part and now of
record in the said Registry
of Records in Volume 1454
at pages 566 to 571 and is
delineated on that part of
the said diagram or plan
which is coloured pink.
Mortgage dated 11th
September, 1969 Ivan
Hamilton Munroe and Emily
Albertha Munroe to Finance
Corporation of Bahamas
Limited Recorded in Book
1516 at pages 49 to 57.
This sale is subject to a reserve
price and to the right for the
Auctioneer or any person on
his behalf to bid up to that
rice.
Terms: 10% of the purchase
price at the time of sale and
balance on completion.
Dated this 24th day of June
1974 A.D.
HARRY D. MALONE
Public Auctioneer


C15996
HARRY D. MALONE will sell
at his premises on Albury Lane
situated five (5) doors from
Shirley Street, South on the
right hand side on the 26th day
of July 1974 at 12 o'clock
noon the following property:-

ALL THAT lot of land
situate in the Southern
District of the Island of New
Providence in the
Subdivision called
Kennedy's Subdivision laid
out according to the plan
thereof prepared by R.
Warren & Associates Limited
and recorded in the Registry
of Records in Volume 1083
at page 499 being Lot
Number Two Hundred and
Eighty-two (282) of the said
Subdivision.
Mortgage dated 1st day of
April, 1969 Dencil Egbert
Hanna to Finance Corporation
of Bahamas Limited.
Recorded in Volume 1427 at
pages 289 to 295.
The sale is subject to a reserve
price and to the right for the
Auctioneer or any person on
his behalf to bid up to that
price.
Terms: 10% of the purchase
price at the time of sale and
balance on completion.
Dated this 24th day of June
1974 A.D.
HARRY D. MALONE
Public Auctioneer

S FOR SALE
C16176
FOR SALE
OFFICE FURNITURE
1 Office Desk, 2 Drawer Filing
Cabinet, and matching chai-
$140.00 3-5729.


C16187
1 Phillips stereo. cassette
player with two 14xl0m
speakers. I Phillips portable
stereo record player, Call
74155 after 5. p.m.


I


FOR SALE


IIl


C16196
GENERAL ELECTRIC Solid
state stereo with radio.
Furniture piece. Call 31003.

C16166
1973 YAMAHA 100 c.c. Good
working condition. Licence,
insurance. Asking $500.
Contact Charles Cartwright
5-1771.

C16199
One VELVET FRENCH
PROVINCIAL LIVING ROOM
Set Only $450. Call Mrs. Cole
2-8437.

C16195
GENERAL ELECTRIC
General Electric room
air-conditioners are on special
this week at Central Furniture
600C BTU with heat cycle
special 16% offer Was
$355.00
Now $299.00 and other sizes
from 5,000 to 19,000 BTU
General Furniture *Appliance.
Now with two branches to
serve you.
East Bay Street & Wulff Road
Family Island orders delivered
to mail boat.

C16203
R.C.A. VICTOR T.V. in
perfect condition. $125.00
Phone 57379.

C16209
MINI BIKE 2 years old.
Excellent condition. Owner
leaving. Phone 41326.

C 16204
FOX FUR Shoulder cape.
$30.00 Phone 53739

C16205
VACUUM CLEANER. Good
condition. $25.00 CAll 53739

C16212
1 Completely hand done
Spanish Desk
1 Hand carved end table made
in Spain
1 High chair
1 Gilded framed mirror
1 Combination curio cabinet
and writing desk
2 Cane floor lamps
2 Danish Walnut cushioned
contemporary chairs
I Clothing Valet
1 Swivel rocker in need of
upholstering
1 Bedroom Lamp (white)
1 Farmed original oil
painting-scenic
1 Brand new Soldering Iron
1 Battery operated Megaphone
1 Portable typewriter
I electric desk top Calculator
1 Battery/electric desk top
calculator
1 Metal Secretarial desk
1 Large Desk
1 Combination Cooler
Refrigerator
For information call 23921 or
42856.

I CARS FOR SALE
C16186
V.W. DUNE BUGGY as is ind
parts. Hi performance. 1300cc
engine ... Call 74155, 5 to F
p.m.
C16197
ONE 1973 FURY III (new)
only $6,900.00 Call Mr.
Roberts 2-8437


C16211
1965 DODGE DART in good
condition. 6 cylinder
a u t o m a t ic, radio,
airconditioned. Power steering.
Phone 77876.

C16218
1970 Firebird 350 w/air cond.,
radio, tape $3500.00 1970
Dodge Dart w/air cond., radio.
$2450.00 Telephone 2-3137.

CRAFT SUPLE ]

C15914
NOW in stock at Bahamian
'Paint Supply, Bay Street.
* Decoupage
e Clear Cast
* Candle Craft
* Tissue Craft
Phone 2-2386, 2-2898

HEALTH 0 FOOD

C15950
FOR the very best in Exercise
Equipment, Natural Health
Food and Vitamins, visit
Wong's Health Food Store,
Mackey Street.
Exercise Equipment Sales
and Rentals.


MARINE SUPPLIES

C11894
1969 31 ft. CHRIS-CRAFT
Commander. sleeps six, private
shower, two 230 h.p. engines
with less than 200 hours.
Kitchenette, good condition.
Call 24267, 54011.


ENTERTAINMENT


C14336 -
SETTLER'S PUB & INN
Beaumont Arcade, Bay Street
Telephone 5-9739
TWO BANDS NIGHTLY
* The Nassauvians
* The Electric Circle
OPEN TILL 4.00 a.m.


BOOYBUIDING


C16214
IF YOU WANT TO bf:LOI't
A Champion Wriihtlifte.r
A Physique St.i
An Outstanding Athlete
or just train to stave in h1upe,
visit us
at WONG'S HEALTH C'LtJb,
Mackey Street.
FREE TRIAL
Natural Foods and m r l
equipment on sale.

SUMMER CAMP

C16210






Children's Summer (..1, p
August llth 31 t
on beautiful Par ,l',- 'i,,:i!
secluded Spirit!, fl Atino .!-': L I ,
Director: l-hubeit Fi.rlr i ,
Nassau Civic Ball'i
Yoga Retreat
Phone 5-5902 ri o '.I 5

WANT TOLEARN

C1G188
WANTED: LADY I 0 i t .
nodernr, Cdsual dari(i::i;
Iddies. Phone 34240

SCHOOLS

C15884
LEWIS AUTO S(CHO)lI
Leair ton (f h ir r i i 'i
Phone 5980-', !t..
1*:30 p. rim. 0 '

C16180
Nassau Civic I',W!i'
SUMMER S( It 1: 1


I






6 weeks .lrly '.'i '
31st.
Acrobati(s ai. ii '-
Primitive. VYoa,
For iInf ri mlri ,r1 ,
5-2353.
Auditions- r r !n , r,,
July 29th 11 -, I l ,
6.30 p.m.
Guest 1 i m :
WAI KFR I
Chorcrir i,t i i i ,
Show, Pi.r i ln I i, .:

LOST
C l ); .':>
Strlay'd( .
A vetimir -
pot ak .. ,
'T h i.rlul)n .l r '., i : '
i!5 1. K t .\ ,.,
2-24 .,, i f ', i ,


WANTS TO BUY

SCRAP ME1 A.
br i d S !. .
alu nill ml ll '. ,


w ires, a ( <' :.i,. t,
bdtte n .o lIli: ''i
for Albel biin,
UP


WE PIt i,


HELP WANTED

C16104
WATCHIMA l /N IflJ':.".''..;
Ba hain ia w .''; n .
GIBSON'S '-'r.Y & lf ,'i-:- i
SHOP, Cilrim irl lt- 0d i)i,'. -
0 Mobile.

C10124
WANTED M ,n i 'ii W i',ir .l' '
age 21 w ilh l, r -,n ,.. f .;i. - I
train is i ,
Salesmen/vwomn n f.ii- pin
28928.


C16105
BODY AND I LNI)f
Apply Gibson',s Hodt
Shop. Dial 0 Mobili

C15381


R M&A'.
& t, n ,,i

i -


JOB TITLE: G1 r-i I',I
FOREMAN 'A -..;.
QUARRY
MINIMUM EDUCATION
Good basii, .i' t'
Experieorini in t i.
excavating and mi u: ii.'n u. ", I,...'
material handling
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3
years.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Supervise actrvrtie- :i a
limestone qIuarl y ,and LcI ,irl
including; loading of liitt'.f-i' ,L
into 30 ton trucks, thauirli to
crusher, operation of
hammermill crusher, conveyirn
crushed limestone and adnd to
storage silos by belt corv'yor
to maintain necessary slurry
stock, loading crusher aI id
gypsum from .str kp lf e t1-r I
conveyor to tir i'
storage silos andil '. i ',ii i I .
supervision of tiie yar' l i' .
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personrnr
Department, Bahama C(rmnllnt
Company, P. O. Bo- ; 10i,
Freepor t, Gi and LIanijn:


THE TRIBUNE --- Wednesday, July 24,1974

. .. .


CL ASSiFIED


ADVS. BRING RESULTS-FAST


TO PLACE YOUR ADV. TELEPHONE 21986 ET. 5


IEP H~lWANTEOli I



. ......, !- *


t i. s o i '~ -

" I ,




SI I ':
in}, l # -


i 7 r -1 1 -------.--r


S, e : ';. 1, :is andt hotels
, '-- I '- AND J[ LRVICE
I .:i h q 404.
: .:nI 11 Of MUSIC
k T I i -k lrce.


-. 'I'


S I 1 fl r i 'r i S


BY


ill ; 21M6 tXI. 5

IlPtr ',t 2 ill PeilllNt 'I"

.7' SAY"t'iP A NEY


i Ai. ;', ,r i' .'(_A'I AWNINGS
2 5A N1
'. .'- S PY Cl MEANING

I CrL t


I.,~- - .. 4U- ~


1.1 Li .: U N nA 'n


- m- -


fi'rt ,.1i-4'- 5,


F l (n!1Si :i,


GARDEN & P. iPPt i L,



t\ ,, +i i ,, i I. I .
rI- 1l L I I Ir
FOR THE ACTION


S ; n A




j' ; ,, ,+ i t i ':j
IAF





- in . .
I---- i -- l--ac- trrr~-l



S I -Mt ni


I r I i
-

S -; I ." i ,-

T :OiiiS



I --
S RAVEL


i.... fk u.. i _llJ
; ; '- iR

j iL-K IJ'


-: i

s-f-UvJWRIrr REPAIR
+ + t' h I I li)-I1

nUPHOLSTF RING
i !-' i. 1 7 1

5IIIrI II ~""I


__, I


L Shop Nassau Merchants

For Business And Services

__


_ iINK-SMEA


fr sY1i i, MACHtINF S
i'.' 1 i ,-lND RP PAIRS
I'.! /.Mult URNI TURE
r Ii',PANY


I (. ir;x N4818,
t ... :ir .i-tll t ,rind Christie Streets
i '. :;l;,,v 11" /. 23 152.

i 2 ,?,' -


IALPH BROWN
J.;?',3 bq BG{S
4iAHAM'i UPHOLSTERY
Ailt0 I :y Adi edition.
H I u !i Idu i(J. Repairing,

/ y ,l-l Ir-'xp'P IPence.
I RI[ I FTIMATFS

NOTICE


lt I OLL.OWiING LOT
i)WNf R; AT Yarttuiaw Bparh
,tit' it l ainlredls of
oi. r,. unless a
i~ .idtiil i 'Inii-fnt t% made by
-; nd f tul IJ/lih1 lic4the lot
-illl In l t' ) bd k on tie
IrII i 1 et icli in ,,ll e..
i NO NAMr
i I loi r(i e C.jri wright
-i nr!d 'i V'lt (m ira Pennerrman
! 5 Wo'ifdaifl aind Maud McCoy
I'ji CS"iny dad /iona Monclur
(')ii I'eoty Gilbert
:'b2 Milt ilnr Sturr
I191) Julitarn Htigqgs



GRAND


BAHAMA


ANNOUNCEMENTS

ii lA''Nt I
Daily Sarvice between Wet
Palm Beach and West End. For
tservations call The GranJ
ihama Hotel (Ext. 5).


{ HELP WANTED

RESORT ACCOMMODATION
ANALYST ,t least ten ye.rrs in
tire mnrad!ljgni ent field ot
tilii rir HRecognized courses in
toi it deivlorpnlent degree in
b riVAS1'ii as administration or

.Ii.;l,: P. J. 0 ox I 2945,


U 15385

MAID w.Jiit-d to take care of
t!:hl. .~r ildt in in Pind.rs Point
,oil t to do dr'-stic work. A
fi,- it.l work week at $25.00

Apply Mrs. Neville Pinder, P.O.
)ox F1-1547, Freeport.


( 15383
HYDROPONIC GARDENER
10 years schooling, 5 years
experience with hydro
operation, filling tank,
handling acid. fertilizer, general
(ledtning annd maintenance.
HYDROPONIC FOREMAN -
T1-chnical schooling, 5 years
-r periert in, complete Master of
Mnitil Chimnistry, tank
solutimnn analysis.
Apply: Grand Bahama
Institute of Hydroponics, Box
F 1239, Fret-port, Grand
RBa haa.



RED r


CLASSIFIED


--- ----


HELP WANTED TRADE SERVICES

. .. } *) 891
S:., i t i d(o ,i,"., 1 MASTER TECHNICIANS LTD
Si- r Mackey Street

YOUR WHIRLPOOL
DISTRIBUTOR OFFERS:-
S JS YOUl'(; Rpfrigcrators, Washers, Dryers,
SCompactols Freezers, Ice
. i' ;,.-,ir ,.-. wi aki mkors, Air Conditioners and
o, Av ' . '- ,;, ,-r igqe Disposers.
S : W 'vith full warranty on every
:" ~!! o i t ihonr e appliance we sell.

vice done by factory trained
inechanics Telephone 23713,
S iri r i. li:e 9322

:, b..k C 15888
:.. *.',,oi..*d i BACKHOE FOR HIRE
S, , J,-'.u Need a septic tank or trenching
: r .. controls done?
:' i ,ad Call: CARL G. TRECO
.'d CONTRACTORS LTD.
2-19'i) or '-8725


Si" P YOUR BUll DING
,I l f' I l NIr C(PANrF HIRE ...

,,i li. i i. AN)D HLf i !-ERS LIMITED
S' ;" x U h': 85 ES
ni .,, t, 3 1 72


T V. NTIF NNMAS
l r .. i In homes,


- i- .-- ---Cx


I


I


I


I


I


i


I











THE TRIBUNE --Wednesdy, July 24,1974
------------------------------------ --- ---------------------------__----------------I


GRA BAHAMA


CLASSIFIED

IP MT HE[LP WANTED
C15381
MB TITLE: GENERAL C15382
FOREMAN YARD AND OIL MEASUREMENT
QUARRY SUPERVISOR
MINIMUM EDUCATION: Applications are invited from
Good basic education. suitably qualified persons for
Experience in quarry the position of Oil
excavating and mining and raw Measurement Supervisor.
material handling. Applicants should have had
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3-5 several years experience at a
years. supervisory level in the
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES: quantity and quality inspection
Supervise activities of a and documentation of bulk oil
limestone quarry and crusher cargoes. Some experience in
including; loading of limestone storage tank and metering
into 30 ton trucks, hauling to equipment calibrations is also
crusher, operation of required.
hammermill crusher, conveying Please apply, together with full
crushed limestone and sand to details of experience and
storage silos by belt conveyor qualifications, to: E. W.
to maintain necessary slurry Saybolt & Co. S.A., P. O. Box
stock, loading crusher and F-2049, Freeport, Grand
gypsum from stockpile to belt Bahama.
conveyor to transport to
storage silos and overall general C16060
supervision of the yard crew.
INTERESTED APPLICANT FASHION COORDINATOR
CONTACT: Personnel This person must De
Department, Bahama Cement responsible for the complete
Company, P. O. Box F-100, coordination of all our Fashion
Freeport, Grand Bahama. shows, which entails the
contact between the
convention group heads and
C15384 the different hotel executives
Live-in MAID, complete which are directly in charge of
household duties, including these groups, the
baby sitting. Bahamian commentation of all shows,
preferred, age 25 to 30. and the coordination of all
Phone Freeport 352-8816 or merchandise. Applications with
373-1897. references should be forwarded
to Evelyn of Lucaya Limited,
P. O. Box F-2462, Freeport,
Grand Bahama, Bahamas.


CROSSWORD

PUZZLE
ACROSS 22. Cuckoopint
1. Diamond 23. West Point
4. Fourposter 27. Sorrow
7. Waste 29. Soft cheese
allowance 30 Chart
11. Yale 31. Alerts
12. Overseas 32. Bowling place
address 35. Crude rubber


13. Type of
sandwich
14. Unmusical bird
16. Pause
17. Arrow poison
18. Roman building
19. Dromedary
21. Marsh elder


36. Booty
37.Seeker
40. Weed
41. de France
42. Man's name
43. Ill-repute
44. Average
45. Rumen


29 atin AP Newsfo


MI ANt

L
A N ES R IA
EN F. RA T
APjT~jY .HAILEIS
A

RLMA Isle AT Y
FIR TE SE


SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE
DOWN 3. Least
4. Jewish roll
1. Acquire 5. Fencing sword
2. Guido's 6. Bumblebee
highest note 7. Shabby
,, 8. Cattail
9. Gaelic
10. Babies
S15. Wind speed
16 indicator
18.Kava
19. Station wagon
20 Common verb
M 21. Chill
2- 2 23. Horned viper
24. Capricious
S9 25. Burmese
prince
26. I do
28. Sunbeam
31. Adam's ale
32. Choir voice
S39 33. Cargo
234. Monk parrot
35. Chinese wax
E 37. Postal code
38. Caleb's son
oture. 7-26 39. Bounder


CARROLL RIGHTER'S

HOROSCOPE
from the Carroll Rightr Institute
GENERAL TENDENCIES: You are now gve
a chance to talk over with associates your
feelings about a joint project you have in mind. Discuss all
aspects of your plan so you can easily come to a new accord as
to the best methods to be used.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) Meet with associates early in
the day and find out what is expected of you. Also, make sure
your ideas are clearly understood.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) You want to accomplish a
great deal, but first check with co-workers or you could be
doing the wrong thing. Keep your health up.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Plan those hobbies for the
coming weekend so that you can enjoy them more. Take mate
out to recreation that can be mutually enjoyed.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Make sure
conditions at home are improved by helping to increase
harmony there. Use good judgment in dealing with kin.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Ideal day for enjoying the
company of individuals you really like. You can also gain the
information you need to make your life fuller.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Plan how to make your home
more charming as well as operative. Save time for one who has
a problem in which you can be helpful
LIBRA (Sept 23 to Oct 22) Ideal day to go out socially and
make your presence felt. Show others that you are a fine
conversationalist. Take health treatments.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Make sure you handle your
routines in a tactful way. The evening is particularly fine for
the romantic side of life.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 1) Plan to be with
friends you most enjoy at the activities that are mutally
pleasing. Take more interest in current events.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) You have to use
diplomacy now in dealing with higher-ups or you could get
into trouble. Gain prestige through civic work.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Study facts and figures of
a promising project in which you are interested. Try to deepen
friendship of a new acquaintance.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Plan a better way to handle
those responsibilities you have taken on. Show more affection
for mate and increase harmony.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY... he or she will be
one of those delightful young people who understands both
sides of any issue and would do well in psychiatric work, labor
organizations, and especially the law. Teach early in life to
become independent and not to be so possessive where the
romantic side of life is concerned.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


%o. 7.186 . hr 'TIM MN(cKA
Across
I. lIrinier of aood fortune ?
(.. 4)
6. Different looks. (6)
9. It is of help to people lost
in difficult reglons. (5. 4)
II. Feline. (3)
I'N. No longer playing cricket.
(3)
13. uraln. (3)


14. Weather feature. (4. 1)
18. Cornish river. (3)
19. Possess. (3)
20. sings. (5)
21. Old musical Instrument. (4)
2'. Plaything. (3)
23. Quick shootlnl. (3.. 4)
Down
I. Break for meal. (3. 4)
?. Start of the show. (7. )
3. Gear. (3)
4. Not at home. (4)
SUnusual. (4)
fi. Former 'ortuguese enclave
in India. (3)
Mixed the playing cards. (H)
8. Short walk. (6)
1I). Na arrow
age. 6)1
I1. C o u rse
t 1 r ii
p I a net.
IF. Wo 4-
land
deIyn.
(.3)
16. Si it,)
I1 .$Ueiher.
(3) YeLerdlly. *oiaIOu


SComk Pa


REX MORGAN M.D Dal Curtis
HE WAS SEEN YES---SOMEONE TOWL MD HE ItME ME--BUT I
RECENTLY ATTEND D T4 IE SHOWI1---EY'RE
WHEN W'VE HEAD THE GOVERNOR IN F ILIC A VERYATTRHE CS WMAN NEow.
FOR DINNER IN THE PAST WE'VE WITH A WAS WITH HIM AND
INVITED A DINNER PARTNER WOMAN, 4HIS t4UGI4TER/
FOR HIM I BUT THIS 15 TIE WASN'T HE
FIRST TIME HE'S ASkED TO i
RING SOMEONE / *










JUDGE PARKER Paul Nichols
COME IN YOU NOTICE ANYTHING NOT EXACTLY! IF YOU'D SEEN THE WAY HE SLEW
THOUGHT YOU'D LIKE AND TELL ME, STRANGE ABOUT HIM? HE WAS SORT UP AT HOWARD AND ME, IT
TO KNOW WHAT I FOUND WALTER OF QUIET! WOULDN'T TAKE YOU LONG TO
MAINTENANCE MAN, EW KNOW HE WAS 3UST RELEASED
MAINTENANCE MANRLY! FROM STATE HOSPITAL!
BEVERLY.!



s 7- 24







STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD Saunders & Overgard
MARBURY BEING
WEARING THESE, YOU'D A RECLUSE MADE
LOOK JUST LIKE THE IT EASY FOR YOU!
"MARBURY I MET IN VERYFEW PEOPLE --.
THE GALLERY WOULD ISS
HIM.

FIGURED
PUT THESE / THEN YOU AND NO.' YOUWE GOT
ONAND PASS XXYOUR LADY FRIEND IT ALL WRONG.
FOR HIM, IF FOLKS PROBABLY POISNED W DIDN
DIDN'T GET TOO CLOJ./ HIS COFFEE AND; KILL MIM/





APARTMENT 3-G a Aleo Kotxkl


I R T


HOW many
f0our letters
or more can
you make
e from the
F letters shown
here In
making a
word. each
1111111be used once
only. E ach
word musF contain Ihe large


Chess


Wh::e mates *in two moves
against any defence (by J. C.
Radley). "Ente. :.Aned me fcr
45 minutes." wzote cne scCver
when today's problem first
appeared, half a cen:u:y back.
But the par tLine fc-r rejer
!olvers should be 10-16 minutes.



Chess Solution
I P-B3. If 1 . Ktx R; 2
Q-K2, or i/ Kt--8; 2 Q-B4,
or t R-K4; 2 Kt-B2, or if
P-B6; 2 R-Q4. or if RxP; 2
Q R. or if Kx R; 2 B xR.


Rupert and the Wooden Horse-19


This le my writing machine, Rupert. Just
watch." ngo remove the sheet of paper
from fhie ladgt. "I'll write only one of the
ines and e mnehine will do the rest." When
th pW is ready he puts it back In its slot
an fddle with the knobs and levers. There
t A rttlng sound and Rupert gasps as the
paper apeas from another slot. now covered


in words. Why. t's making copies of that
line you wroteI" cries the little bear So
you see what I mean." smiles Bingo. "Lines
don't bother me I" Laughing at his chum's
idea. Rupert follows him back to the main
room. "Hey, whore's that wooden horse ?"
says Bingo suddenly.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


letter, and there must be at
leas tone eiht-letter wordt n the
lit. No plurIls; no foreln words
no proper nales. TODAY'9
TARGET: 23 word, good;
:30 word overy good; : words
excellent. Solution tomorrow.
YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION :
Kitati eusin int le losea Ide
lens lesson le ewuon leu lne
lionelonrw lonile i ee lone lone
ness no noise ow OILINESS
els in sine sloe sole solen.


EEP MOMERND ON
WORLD EVENTS
KEEP ABREAST OF
THE LOCAL SCENE


TAKE

THE
TRIBsUE


THE BAHAMA I
L EADINO AEMI


Winning

Bridge
By VICTOR MOLLO
THE goulash flnds Uttle favour
outside Pranae, but it's still
popular in Paris. Without shuff-
ig the pack, the cards are dealt
three, then four at a tie and
freak distributions abound, as
here:
Dealer North: E/W Vul.
North
4 A 10 9 8 2
A Q9 6 2

south w
i J 10 7 3
X KJ4 0
SJS S 2 t
Wet Nrth Eat South
2 2NT 3V 2z
Past's 2MT Is
East's I NT to conventional,
showing a two.sulter In the u-
minors. West leads the 08. How
should South play?
There a ar to be 13 tricks:
the two b ao and 11 tricks
on a cromef. And yt they
may quic s shrink fo ft
Southt s careless. Be should ask
himself: Why did West, who
must be shorter In clubs than
In diamond, lead the 08 The
likelst explanation is that he
has no club, and If so the
cross-ruff won't work. West will
ruff the 4A and lead a trump.
West East
KQJ 7543 -
8 7 219764
The solution I =ul
On the 08 d
dumm's # iA i Nw he W t. a
ifK wlst tithe
Ox will be Lukot-Wsmu ialctL


Vi


HOW COULP MY FATHER
HAVE FOUND ME "THREE
MO4INTHS AGO" WHEN
- HE'S BEEN
PEAP FOR
YEAR ARS?//


I.


-- 1 I


e'


r


:D. , ---















































BAHAMAS heavyweight
champion Bob Freeze will be
out for revenge when he meets
his two-time conqueror Tony
Greene of Miami Beach in a
main event on August 5 at the
Nassau Stadium.
In their first contest, on the
Elisha Obed/Vincente Medina
card in February at the Miami
Beach Auditorium, Freeze
dropped a unanimous decision.
In their return match, Freeze
E came off the canvas in the first
round and fought a strong
l e eight rounder only to lose the
close decision.
Since that time, Freeze, now
under the tutelage of retired
champ Boston Blackie has
turned over a new leaf. His
fortune soared up on May 31
when the Andros boxer upset
light heavyweight champ Baby
Boy Rolle to win the
heavyweight crown.
In his latest effort, Freeze
showed tremendous improve-
ment stopping ring veteran Carl
Baker in four rounds.
"Bob is bigger and obviously
stronger than he was before
teaming up with Boston,"
promoter Wilfred Coakley
S .noted. He along with Chris
.. Malakius will be promoting the
show. "Boston has added much
'E discipline to his style. He has
Good balance whichmakes him
hit harder."
Coakley however expects a


CITIBANK Chargers and
Schlitz Beer meet tonight
eight o'clock at Queen
Elizabeth Sports Centre in
the first step towards the big
game which will decide
Bahamas Baseball playoffs
champions of 1974.
There are many questions
to be answered within the
three game series.
A test of whether
Citibank's pitching staff is


1-


DISTRIBUTED BY


11




~i~ll.


Jim and Beryl


Stop players


tough match. "Green is young
and strong. Bob must be ready
if he expects to avenge his
defeat."
Green who is managed by
Moe Fleischer Obed's trainer
- turned professional two
years ago after a bright
amateur career. He has 12 wins
against one loss as compared to
Freeze's 10 wins against one
loss as compared to Freeze's 10
wins and three losses. Both
Freeze and Green lost to Lee
Royster.
BAHAMIAN heavyweight
Wendell Newton, eighth
ranked in the British
Commonwealth takes on
Jamaica's heavyweight champ
Oliver Wright in a ten rounder
August 16 at the Nassau
Stadium.
Newton who has matched
world rated fighters as Oscar
Bonavena and Ron Lyle
returns to the local scene after
one year's absence. In his last
two fights here he stopped
James Summerville and Willie
Price.
Wright is a former Olympic
star. He turned professional
two years ago on Miami Beach,
and ran off eight straight
victories before losing to
Vincente Rondon.
Among his victories are
Bobby Lloyd, Johnny Hudgins
and Raoul Garacito of Puerto
Rico.


able to hold Schlitz's hitting
tribe will have most fans
gripped until the series is
completed.
For the first time during
the championship playoffs
BBA will give a "Most
Valuable Player" award for
the contest. The award is
donated by Mr. Arlington
Butler speaker for the House
of Assembly.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MINNIS PIERRE of c/o P. O.
Box N-4705, Carmichael Road Nassau, Bahamas is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
naturalisation should not be granted should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 18th day of July 1974 to The Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs,
P. O. Box N-3002, Nassau.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that WILLIAM WINSTON PRATT
of Crooked Island St. N.P BHS is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration should not be granted
should send a written and signed statement of the farts
within twenty-eight days from the 24th day of July 1974
to The Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs, P.O. Box N.3002, Nassau.


MAJOR UPSETS continue
to dominate the Bahamas
Chess Federation's Summer
Open. In last night's fourth
round, 14-year-old Michael
Ferrer of Government High
School stopped Bahamas
Olympic representative
Anthony Rolle in 49 moves.
Ferrer who did not enter the
inter-scholastic championship
played a Philido defence -
considered by most B.C.S.
experts to be an old and
forgotten line and certainly a
line that is rarely seen in
tournament play.
Rolle, assuming the attack
from the break pressed Ferrer
relentlessly. However, he later
gave up a bishop for a pawn, an
advantage which Ferrer refuted
with a series of checks.
Meanwhile, 20-year-old Elias
Antonas utilized 27 moves to
beat Gonzalo Bolisay to remain
the only undefeated player in
the series. Antonas, who won
the Bahamas Championship in
1972, did not defend it last
year.
Bolisay who also went
into last night's round
undefeated did not play his
opening too strongly. When he
castled, Antonas started a
king-side attack forcing Bolisay
to expose his king.
Current Bahamas Champ
Caswell Thompson stopped
Rodger Wooldridge to win his
third in four played. His sole
loss went to Antonas in the
third round.
Thompson who holds third
place in the tournament started
last night's play trying to
counter Petrosian's Variation
of the Queen's Gambit. He
equalized at move 12.
At move 14, Thompson
captured a poison pawn and
lost a bishop as a result.
Nevertheless, the local
champ fought back hard and
threatened to win Wooldridge's
queen after running his king'
the back rank. He countered
by attacking with his knights
which held commanding
positions at the centre of the
board.
Wooldridge blundered by
trying to capture Thompson's
bishop. Two moves later,
Thompson had him
checkmated from which there
was no escape.
Kenneth Adderley secured a
third place tie by defeating
Calvin Cooper in 46 moves to
win his third in four played. He
lost to Bolisay last week.
"But I had the game won,"


Adderley lamented. "I got
carried away because I was
thinking about Antonas."
Adderley figured that he had
the match won on the 22nd
move when Bolisay was about
to resign. Adderley who had
won a rook had eight pawns
against Bolisay's six. He was
about to eat another pawn or
Bolisay's rook. Adderley took
the pawn and left his back row
open for acheckmate.
Last night, Adderley got his
revenge after a hard fought
match. "I know that Cooper
was a strong player and I had
to win to keep in the running,"
said the Olympic repre-
sentative.
Cooper, trying the Reti
Opening which Antoinette
Seymour used to upset Kirk
Ingraham, ran headlong into
Adderley's Pirc Defence which
he perfected in Nice, France
during the Olympics.
The game burst wide open
on the eighth move when
Adderley won a pawn and on
the following move he
captured one of Cooper's
Knignts tree and clear. From
then on, it was a matter of
applying the pressure.
Adderley who is president of
the B.C.F. announced that the
Bahamas Junior Championship
will be contested next month.
In other matches played last
night P. Kemp bt A. Bannister;
W. Wong bt G. Collie; Ken
Ingraham bt J. Moxey; J.
Adderley bt A. Seymour.
Thursday's pairings: E. Antonas
v J. Adderley; C. Thompson v G.
Bolisay; K. Adderley v W. Wong; M.
Ferrer v G. Collie; C. Cooper v. A.
Rolle; A. Bannister v Ken
Ingraham; Kirk Ingraham v
Iavoussis; W. Seymour v J. Moxey;
P. Kemp v N. Pestaina; and R.
Wooldridge v A. Seymour.


National League romp in


JIM DUNCOMBE (right)
and Beryl Higgs (left) were
named the Bahamas Golf
Association's most
outstanding male and female
players during the
Independence Sports Week.
Along with other M.V.P.'s,
they will receive their awards
on Friday during a cocktail
party. The awards will be
presented by the Minister of
Education and Culture
Livingstone Coakley.
Independence Sports Week
was coordinated by the
Bahamas Confederation of
Amateur Sports on behalf of
the M.O.E.
The three tournaments
contested during the period
July 4 to 14 were taken into
consideration Duncombe won
by a squaker over Fred Higgs


Keep fit with

DeWitt's Pills


with the strong action
against BACKACHE
and MUSCLE PAINS


NATIONAL LEAGUE


East


as they both won an event
and finished down the line in
the third.
Higgs won the first
competition with a
three-over-par 75 while
Duncombe fired an 80. In the
second event, Duncombe won
a sudden death playoff after
carding identical 75's with
lan Masson. In that
tournament Higgs shot a 78.
In the final event which
was a stableford tournament,
Duncombe totalled 31 points
with a score of 80 to Higgs'
29 and a score of 85.
In the ladies division, there
was again a thin line between
Beryl Higgs and Eileen Dean
as they both finished with
identical scores. In the final
event, Higgs was victorious by
two shots, and that made the
difference.


W L Pet.
49 46 .516
46 49 .484
45 48 .84
45 49 .479
41 52 .441
40 52 .435


again
Pittsburgh Steve Garvey
of the Los Angeles Dodgers
wasn't about to be stopped
by an ear infection, or
American League pitching, in
the 45th all-star game.
The 25-year-old first
baseman, his face visibly
swollen, slapped a single and
a double, driving in one run
and scoring another in the
National League's 7-2
triumph last night.
For Garvey playing in
the game was the realization
of a childhood dream. And
his selection as the contest's
most valubale player made
the night complete.
The National League
victory, made easy as five
pitchers held the American
League to just four hits, was
the llth in the last 12
classics. Once trailing in the
series 12-4, the NL now owns
a 26-18 edge over-all, with
one tie on the record.
Ken Brett of the Pittsburgh
Pirates, the only member of
the host club to make the
squad, got credit for the
victory, while Boston Red
Sox right-hander Luis Tiant
took the loss.
Reggie Smith of the St.
Louis Cardinals hit the game's
only home run in the seventh
inning, a solo shot that
pushed the National League
lead to 5-2.
The Nationals scored two
more runs in the eighth to
complete the rout and hand
the Americans their third
straight loss. (AP)

THE TEAM of Minnis and
Walkine won the weekly whist
series held on Tuesday at St.
Francis Parish Hall, scoring 56
points.
Tailing behind by one point
was the team of Cambridge and
Johnson


Be the man

you want to be!
and be
the man
they want
to see! f \


COMMONWEALTH OF
THE BAHAMAS ISLANDS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Equity Side


.649
.592
.526
.505
.459
426


PCT
.526
.521
.516
.505
.495
.474
..573
.521
.500
.490
.485
.398


1974
No. 23


IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles Act 1969.
AND

IN THE MATTER of ALL THAT tract of land
containing Twenty-four and Ninety-three
(24.93) acres and situate Sandilands Allotments
in the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence and bounded on the North by a
Road Reservation Twenty (20) feet wide and on
the East by land the property of OBADIAH
BRICE on the South by land the property of D.
Tinker and lots Fifty (50) Fifty-one (51) and
Fifty-two (52) of the said Sandilands Allotments
on the West by land the property of Chrcsual
Fernander.


AND


IN THE MATTER OF THE Petition of KING
NIXON.

NOTICE OF PETITION

NOTICE is hereby given that KING NIXON of
the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence (hereinafter called "the Petitioner") is
applying to the Supreme Court to have their title
to the land hereinafter described investigated under
Section 3 of the said Act, and the nature and
extent thereof determined and declared in a
Certificate of Title to be granted by the said Court
in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.
ALL THAT tract of land containing
Twenty-four and Ninety-three hundredths (24.93)
acres and situate Sandilands Allotments in the
Eastern District of the island of New Providence
and bounded on the North by a Road Reservation
Twenty (20) feet wide and on the East by land the
property of OBADIAH BRICE on the South by
land the property of D. Tinker and lots Fifty (50)
Fifty-one (51) and Fifty-two (52) of the said
Sandilands Allotments on the West by land the
property of Chresual Fernander more or less which
said tract of land is more particularly described and
delineated on plans or diagrams filed herewith.

COPIES of the said plan may be inspected
during normal office hours at the following places:
(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court, Public
Square in the City of Nassau.
(b) The Chambers of DAVID C. BETHELL
situate in the Bernard Sunley Building,
Rawson Square, Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having
dower or any adverse claim or a claim not
recognized in the Petition shall on or before the
Eighteenth day of September 1974 file in the
Supreme Court in the City of Nassau aforesaid and
serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a
Statement of his claim in the prescribed form,
verified by an affidavit to be filed therewith.
Failure of any such person to file and serve a
Statement of his claim bn or before the said
Eighteenth day of September 1974 will operate as
a bar to such claim.


DAVID C. BETHELL,
Chambers,
Bernard Sunley Building,
Rawson Square,
Bay Street,
Ngssau, Bahamas.

Attorney for the Petitioner.


Deposit and other bank
accounts $ 4,781
Loan account 1,357,742
Sundry debtors and
pre-payments 1.335
Liabilities and customers for
engagements, as per contra 12,424,724

DEDUCT: LIABILITIES
Sundry creditors 52,500
Engagements on account
of customers, as per contra 12,424,723


REPRESENTING: CAPITAL AND RESERVES

SHARE CAPITAL
Authorised, issued and fully paid
1,000,000 Shares of Bah. $1.00
each = Bah. $1,000,000
REVENUE RESERVE as per
Profit and Loss Account


Note: Bahamian Dollars have been converted
the United States Dollars.
ALOIS JURT ZENON PAPAI
Director Director


$13.788,581




12,477,223
$ 1,311,358


1,000,000

311,358
$1,311,358
at par with


DOPOULOS


REPORT OF THE AUDITORS TO THE SHAREHOLDERS OF
BAHAMAS OVERSEAS BANK LIMITED
In our opinion the attached balance sheet dated 31st
December, 1973 and the profit and loss account for the
year ended 31st December, 1973 give a true and fair view
of the company's affairs at 31st December, 1973 and the
profit for the year ended on that date.


25th June, 1974
Nassau, Bahamas


Bainbridge Caldwcll Ingram & Co.
Chartered Accountants


Philadelphia
St. Louis
Montreal
Pittsburgh
Chicago
New York
West
Los Angeles
Cincinnati
Houston
Atlanta
San Francisco
San Diego

East
Boston
Baltimore
Cleveland
New. York
Milwaukee
Detroit
West
Oakland
Chicago
Kansas City
Texas
Minnesota
California


BOB OUT FOR REVENGE


the


AMERICAN LEAGUE


-Now Rolle



falls to



young star

By Gladstone Thurston


Playoff tonight


BAHAMAS OVERSEAS BANK LIMITED
(Incorporated under the Laws of
the Commonwealth ot the Bahama Islands)
BALANCE SHEET 31st DECEMBER, 1973
(Expressed in United States Currency)
ASSETS


NOR! We are not closing

THE BAMA RESTAURANT
in The Nassau Harbour Club! l
JUANITA ROBERTS NOEL SEYMOUR
Hostess Manager
ES Our airconditioning is now working fine I


SUNDAY BUFFET 12 noon 3 p.m. $4.40 including tip.

LUNCHEON SPECIALS 12 noon 3:30 p.m.
Boiled Fish, Grits, Johnny Cake: Lobster Salad; Chicken Soue: Grouper Fingers. Peas & Rice, Stewed Fish &
Johnny Cake (Fridays).

DINNER SPECIALS 6p.m. midnight

Turtle Pot Pie; Fillet of Red Snapper. Amondine; Broiled Grouper in White Wine Sauce: Lobster Stuffed in
the Shell; Cracked Conch, Home-made Desserts like: Hot Guava Duff with Rum Sauce, Rice & Raisin
Pudding; Cheese Cake; Hot Apple Pie topped with Melted (heese. phone 31771
phone 3177i


THE TRIBUNE Wedrdy, July 24, 1974


I