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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03664
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: July 11, 1974
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03664

Full Text










.MSO.- -ONrFm


vnl
VOL


irtrnutt


with Potmauter of Bahama for pauawconcesion within the Bah.amas Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


SLXXI No 191


Thursday, July 11, 1 4.


uce


more,;







Pindli


MONEY does not grow
on trees, Prime Minister
Lynden Pindling reminded
Bahamians last night as he
urged them to save more
and produce more.
The Prime Minister's
20-minute broadcast over
Radio Bahamas marking the
nation's first independence
anniversary took the form of a
lecture on the "attitudes"
Bahamians needed to foster
because the Bahamas could not
rely on hand-outs nor could it
steal for a living.
",,_,,gAe wealth of the Bahamas
has to be earned by what the
Bahamian people produce.
There is no other way," he
said.
The attitudes needed to be
encouraged were those
revolving around honest, hard
work, respect for law and
order. soberness and restraint
and.investmejnt.
Mr. Pindling said income had
to be increased in the'face of a
population that was growing
by three percent each year and
inflationary spirals that push
up the cost of living 12 percent
each year.
come "uld nnnt be
mncreased by raising prices, as
the oil producing countries, for
example, have done, because
ours is a service economy.
"The thing to remember
about services is that
everything depends on
satisfying the customers who
expect good, efficient and
cheerful service at reasonable
prices.
"We have to do those things
which will make visitors want
to come to the Bahamas again
and again, and make wealthy
people want to make use of
our excellent banking facilities.
"We cannot simply increase
our prices because we are not
supplying something the world
can't do without. Oil and sugar
people must have; vacations are
something people can do
without."
Increasing income under
those circumstances, he said,
depends on the attitudes of
Bahamians.
He said the principle of
honest, hard work does not
apply only to managers,
doctors, lawyers, bankers,
businessmen, and teachers.
"We must all work at
whatever job is available. For
every Bahamian who does an
honest day's work, we increase
the income of the country by
the value of his effort: for
every Bahamian who idles or
commits a crime we have to
spend extra money which
other Bahamians have to find
in order to take care of him."
He said the nature of the
B ahamian economy still
requires the versatility of those
who drove taxes when tourism
was good and worked as
carpenters, masons or labourers
when the tourist business was
down.
"Today we have excellent
examples in the family islands
of hard-working men who are
fishermen, farmers, hotel
workers, construction workers
and merchants according to the
time of year or day and
according to the opportunities
for employment. Long
Islanders work for the
Diamond Crystal Salt
Company for a part of the
week and spend the rest of the
week farming or fishing.



SEE
BAR STOOLS
$18.00
While They Last
[ MHIBSAVE! <


Androsians fish half the year
and farm the remainder."
Another attitude he aeani
with was that of gpod
citizenship: "respect for law
and order, respect for others
and the property of others,
maintaining a society which
functions efficiently and
smoothly and. in which we and
our visitors can find pleasure,
safety and satisfaction.
"I am not suggesting that we
should be servile to anyone,
but visitors are not likely to
return or to tell their friends to
come to the Bahamas if they
are attacked, burgled and
raped, cheated and robbed in
the Bahamas," and it matters
not whether the deed is done
by a Bahamian or by a
non-Bahamian."
Soberness and restraint in
spending was the thiud attitude
he urged Bahamianslto foster.
"We tend to copy the tastes
and habits of the United States
although our economic
conditions are quite different
from theirs. As a nation we
save less than five cents out of
every dollar we earn. By
ca rpef uls adiimsting our
spending habits we might save
as much as ten cents on each
dollar, and this would make it
easier for us to keep up with
rising costs and an increasing
population."
Also, Bahamians need to
learn to fix expensive items,
like electrical equipment,
instead of throwing them out
and replacing them when a


simple fault occurs.
There was also the question
of attitudes to investment.
"The temptation to spend
on consumer items is great and
the advertisements are so
attractive. But as our nation
moves forward we now have to
choose whether we will spend
our money on pleasures which
will last for a day or whether
we will invest our money in
,such away as to increase the
real wealth of the country and
improve the social security of
all its people."
Hie said the anniversary
celebrations were deliberately
pitched at a low key "to bring
dramatically to the attention
of all Bahamians the need for
restraint and self-discipline in
order to build the better
Bahamas we have in mind."
lie pointed out that "money
spent on fireworks is quickly
consumed and the benefits are
of short duration. Money
might be spent on investment
items such as a fishing boat or
the development of a citrus
grove, an avocado orchard or a
sheep or goat farm in order to
produce more goods which
would increase the wealth of
the country and reduce
expeoiditire.
"We need to produce a little
more so that we'll need to buy
a little less from abroad."
It was to encourage
production, he said, that the
Agriculture Ministry launched
the independence tree-planting
programme.


Amnesty:



13,000



turn in


MORE THAN 13,000 illegal
immigrants turned themselves
into Bahamian authorities
during the June 5-July 3
amnesty, a Home Affairs
Ministry spokesman revealed
today.
The spokesman said 8,157
had registered in Nassau for
repatriation and 5,157 had
registered in Freeport.


Hundreds
known to
Bahamas on
the amnesty.


of others are
have left the
their own during


Together, those who have
left and those who have
registered represent well over
35 percent of the 40.000 illegal
immigrants Home Affairs
Minister Darrel .. Rolle said
were believed to be in the
country.
Illegal immigrants remaining
in the country and not
registered during the amnesty
are to be arrested and
deported. The deportation will
permanently bar them from
entering or working in -the
Bahamas.
Most of the illegal
immigrants in the Bahamas


were known to be Haitian
nationals. A breakdown by
nationality of those registered
is not yet available, however.

Those registered have been
issued identification papers so
they will not be molested now,
the amnesty has expired.
The amnesty was one of
several measures announced by
Mr. Rolle on June 5 to reduce
the illegal immigrants
population and thus relieve
pressure on the country's
health, education and law
enforcement facilities.
Haitian trading vessels of less
than 100 tons the most
prevalent form of trans-
portation for illegal immigrants
have been ordered to steer well
clear of every port in the
Bahamas except Mathew
Town. Inagua. They will be
allowed to stay at Mathew
Town only 48 hours.
As soon as the amnesty
ended the police came under
standing orders to stop. board
.:;ud sear.-h any vessel within
ihe H:.IJl.:.S suspected of
Sr.. ir illega! immigrants


Mr
47, of
home.


John Wesley Sawyer,
Blair. died today at his


Mr. Sawyer owner andti
founder of Sawyers Food"
Products. is survived by his
wife Norma: three sons,
Kenneth. Michael anti Keith.


ils mother Mrs. bJrcItl Sawyer
and Ihree sisters, l:reda Brian
of I-ngland. and Shirley
Knowles and Dolly Munro of
NJssiIu.
Funeral Arrangements will
be announced later.


-FREEPORT-

MAN

SHOT

DEAD
A 29-YEAR-OLD Freeport
man was shot and killed
yesterday by an Immigration
officer who reportedly
discovered him in the
bedroom of his home at
Grand Bahama.
Freeport police said that
the shooting took place
around 1.30 a.m.
They identified the dead
man as Edward ("Rev")
Cunningham of 57 A Nelson
Road, Freeport.
Police officers answering a
call to the home of former
police inspector B.O.E. Tynes
early yesterday, found the
man dead on the floor of the
bedroom in a pool of blood,
it was reported.
The dead man was .lown
to Nassau this morning for a
postmortem as Criminal
Investigation Department
officers took over invest-
igations.
Freeport police were
unable to say whether the
man had also been armed
when allegedly found in the
house.
Cunningham, was shot
with a .22 calibre riffle,
police say.

Start

soon

on $3m

plant
CONSTRUCTION work is
to begin in September on a $3
million, 30,000-square-foot
pipe manufacturing plant on a
ist-acre site near areeport
Harbo'w, it was announced late
Tuesday. .
A Bahamas Information
Services press release said the
construction of the plant will
result from an agreement
signed Tuesday between
Freeport Commercial and
Industrial Limited (an affiliate
of the Grand Bahama Port
Authority) and Grand Bahama
Steel and Pipe Company
Limited.
"The developers of this
project under a 'know-how'
agreement with the major
shareholders (of G.B. Steel and
Pipe) are Klockner and
Company, one of West
Germany's major industrial and
trading companies with
world-wide interests," the BIS
release said.
It is understood that
Klockner and Company have in
fact acquired a major
shareholding in G.B. Steel and
Pipe, a company that has
existed in Freeport for some
years.
The plant will produce
spiral-welded large diameter
steel pipe for export to
Western Hemisphere markets,
manly in the U.S. It is planned
to go into operation early next
year.
The BIS release said "this
agreement represents a major
step forward in the industrial
diversification of the economy
of the Bahamas, and will create
a number of new skills and
wort while jobs for
Bahamians, some of whom will
he sent to Germany tor
training prior to the opening of
the plant."
Present at Tuesday's signing
were:
Karl-Hans Seegers, chairman
of the board of G.B. Steel and
Pipe and a director of
Klockner and Company:
Wolfgang Linz. executive vice
president of G.B. Steel and
Pipe: Richard Koplow, director


of G.B. Steel and Pipe
responsible for marketing:
Robert F. Ball, president of
Freeport Commercial andti
Industrial. Major C G Bernard.
vice president and Michael
Boyce. corporate counsel ol
Freeport Commercial and
Industrial. and Captain R N
Tyminski. president and Port
I)irector of Ficeport Harbour
Company.
SKEES MASS
A REQUII-M mass for
Christopher Skees will he held
6 p.m. tomorrow at. Si
Francis Xavier's Cathedral
Young Skees died as the result
of a motorcycle accident.


Bands and crowds at Clifford Park yesterday


I 'Pitrc HOWARD GLASS


Hundreds


attend


exhibition


By LYNDA CRAWLEY


Picture: howard Glass
Prime Minister Lynden Pindling and Mrs. Pindling greet
members of the clergy at the Ft. Charlotte independence
day celebrations yesterday. From left: the Rev. Edwin
Taylor, president of the Bahamas Christian Council, the
Rev. Earle Francis and bishop Michael Eldorf.

r,


i ."


Acting British High Commissioner to the Bahamas Mr.
John Doubleday Tuesday presented to Prime Minister Mr.
Pindling a silver and gilded silver centreoiece, a qift from
the British Government to the Bahamas Governme-it to
was designed especially for the occasion by a leading
can be used as a candelabra, a flower holder or a fruit bowl.
The bowl is 15 inches in diameter and has six removable
candlesticks. The Rose Bowl which weighs 1014 pounds,
mark the first anniversary of Independence. The centrepiece
silversmith. The bowl is on display with other independence
gifts at the Jumbey Village Museum.


PRIME MINISTER Lynden
Pindling, in his address to mark .
the opening of the Bahamas
Museum and Art Gallery at
Jumbey Village, stressed the
importance of preservation and
conservation of the Bahamian
culture and way of life.
Addressing the hundreds
who attended the exhibition,
marking the Bahamas first
anniversary of Independence,
the Prime Minister said
independence marked the day
"when we established a home
to house and display our
heritage, from our early
stirring to the present time."
"In a country as small as
ours." he continued, "there is
real danger of our intrinsic
cultural identity being
swamped by alien influences
from within and without and it
becomes increasingly im-
portant that we consciously
address our attention towards
preservation and conservation
of the Bahamian culture and
way of life."
Mr. Pindling added that the
buildings of the museum will
serve as a repository for the
collection, exhibition and
study of things Bahamian at
this time in our development
and their establishment is
indicative of the fact that
Bahamian people are becoming
more conscious of their
cultural identity, more aware'
of their history, and as a result
more capable of mapping out a
sound course for future
progress.
The exhibition, which will be
on display for the next three
weeks, traces the political,
economic and sociological
landmarks in the development
of the Bahamas from the
seventeenth century to the
achievement of Independence.
In them, he said, we will see
several different aspects of life
in the Bahamas, both past and
present, and that the exhibition
will also attempt to show how
even the earliest influence has
helped to shape the destiny of
our country.
Mr. Pindling also expressed
hopes that this initial
exhibition will be the first in
the continuing series and also
that it will be able to travel
from lime to time in the
Family Islands.
Ile also emphasized that the
museum would not have been
possible were it not for the
foresight of the Ministry of


No room for rivalry,


says Taylor


WE NEED to show by our
lovc and understanding
towards one another that we
intend to build this nation up
and not to destroy it
president of The Bahamas
Christian Council the Rev.
Edwin Taylor declared
yesterday as he addressed a
crowd of over a thousand at
the national service of
thanksgiving marking the first
anniversary of independence
"This nation is beginning
to step out on the stage of
history with its big brothers
(other nations) watching
closely, and yet having those
who wait to guide its step.
But we need to remember
that this is a young nation.
and all should be seeking the


very best for the nation and
all must assist in making this
country a strong viable
nation," the Methodist
Minister said.
Mr Taylor compared the
Bahamas to a bouncing baby,
having its teething problems.
"Rivalry and vanity have no
place among us: we should
humbly reckon others better
than ourselves and look to
each other's interests and not
merely our own." he said.
"This is the message of
today. of \release to the
captives: those who are
bound by alcohol and drugs
and others who are slaves of
hate and indolence."
Mr. Taylor admonished
"Government and opposition


to let justice roll down like
water and righteousness like a
mighty stream."
Among those participating
in the early morning service
at Clifford Park were: the
Governor General. Sir Milo
Butler who read the The
Gospel: the Prime Minister,
the Hon. Lynden Pindling.
who read the second lesson:
Leader of the opposition, Mr.
Kendal lsaacs. who read the
first lesson: a combined choir
thet was conducted by Mrs.
Kayla Lockhart-Edwarda and
the Gospel Visionaires.
The crowd wau sa
entertained my muadic fr
the Royal Bahamas Polce
Band and other prominent
youth groups.


Education and Culture and all
those who played a part in the
concept of Jumbey Village and
the facilities it offers.
At the conclusion of his
address, the Prime Minister
said, "As regards this Museum,
I particular wish to mention
teachers and students, and
when the development of
Jumbey Village is completed,"
he said, "it too will be an
important landmark in our
country."
Under the auspices of the
Ministry of Education and
Culture and the National
Museum Committee, the
exhibition comprises of four
parts: "Towards Independence
Landmarks in Bahamian
History"; Independence Gifts
and Documents." "Old Nassau
and Bush Medicine" and
"Aspects of Slavery".
rhe main exhibition, whith
is "Toward Independence
Landmarks in Bahamian
History" was researched and
arranged by Elizabeth
Nathaniels, under the auspices
of the Ministry of Education
and Culture in London and
Nassau.
Photographs, original
documents, maps and
illustrations displayed, trace
the development of the
Bahamas from the seventeeth
century to the recent civil
rights movement and
achievement of independence.
It also attempts to show in a
vivid and interesting way how
even the earliest influences
have shaped the destiny of the
Bahamas, and stresses the
positive aspects of the
country's growth.
Original documents, draw-
ings and sketchings, which
were researched at the British
Museum and the Public Record
Office in London as well as in
the Nassau Public Library &
private libraries range from the
first letter written by Woodes
Rodgers to a letter from the
Stipendiary magistrate at Turks
Island. s
Maps include one of Nassau
dated 1770 which shows the
name of every family living in
the town at that time and the
first known map of the
Bahamas by Juan de la Costa
dated 1500.
The exhibition also reveals
the fact that the Bahamas had
its first Bahamian deputy
governor for two years from
1699, and that John Locke,
the great English political
philosopher, contemplated
settling in the Bahamas in
1675.
There are also independence
gifts and documents on display
The invocation for the
opening of the Museum was
given by the Rt. Rev. Michael
Eldon, Lord Bishop of Nassau
and the Bahamas, and the
opening remarks were made by
Leonard Archer, president of
the Bahamas Union of
Teachers and headmaster of
C.C. Sweeting Senior High
School.


NOW STOCK


lAUIIMN PAl I! IIT
SAY STREET PHONE 2-2S


E


AV %o 2 mit


Death of Mr. J. Sawyer


Ihp


L. .. ..


L


cirP e- 20 Casts








THE TRIBUNE - Thursday, July ,114


5--


Sinatra tour on again after press clash


Trial

told of

choking
SAN ANTONIO De-
lendant I iner Wayne IHenley
i.,il police lihe was surprised at
1'.w dilticult it was to choke
none tl) death, a detective
id i l estimonty ill the
ilouston mass un irdi s trial.
Dlcte i', t S, David
\1LIll i ; oIld i l thi statement
hi -k.id i i c!i \ ,e lion the
t lltC Il s .ilt-st lis1 August
!' l ihlisto h .
"Whlen lie killed Marty Ray
.lons. Waiyne told I.t, it was
not easy to choke simieone to
idcath like they show on IV.
"lie todllt me. 'when he killed
\liitl Jones, I had to get l)ean
,i in mid help Ile-,'" the
Asnd. Mullican
it i id o)er repeated
,h ti by dfe tnce lawyer
V.'il 1i, In ,in hour and 15
inllites. (;I i\ ob L'tlet d and
ki i led 44 times h\
d is! t Ii h. iiit t j dge Plrestoni
Ihjl.
It waiSs i l se. id day oft
\1 klllkaitl I 1heC
I r 1! n it icc' In tihe

lisi '.r.t.l. I~ i. \!i\ tiCarol
V.iiit-c it-uld tuiut a t writen
I) tii r It Illnl told of
1'roiLtll tr l .ceni l'n\ ho tilr
)ciin ( ,ill. s,. w o


lit pri ii., li
llenle, c\ ,i1


h nii' t.- x ial


jil
At ll'n

it, i lt i

H u hit i
f l: ,l


-;5itt I I
' it t I t I.


,nd iaped thlemil
I t -,cai- ld i igih
i, -l i lhe +'7
iue. (AP)


5(, s'iitt1
73 mIIIIv
1)6 hlu/
64 rliit
6( ,Iiiutd
70 i .ilii
7') I .illt
51) daliii
90 cIl-,ar
63 luc.ir
72 chutid
u14 ctloud)
7S rain
90 c.leair
70 clrir
7 t cltiilud

1l0 k Ivtar
0 1 1 nt l h l.


SYDNEY Australian unions today lifted
their bans on singer Frank Sinatra and a tour
promoter said: "The show will go on."
The agreement without a previously
demanded apology from Sinatra was reached
after a three-hour huddle between Sinatra's
lawyer, the promoters and Robert Hawke,
Australia's top labour union official and
president of the ruling Labour Party.
"It's smiles all round," said Robert
Raymond, one of the tour promoters.
"There was no apology. The unions have
really shown a lot of understanding and
deserve complimenting. They realized it got
grossly out of proportion," Raymond said.


Frank Sinatra
a polo gy
demanded after
on-stage re-
marks.


Plumbers


trial



winds up


WASHINGTON The jury
heard final arguments today in
the White House "plumbers"
trial and was expected to begin
deliberations tomorrow.
Yesterday's proceedings
included a brief appearance by
Secretary of State Henry
Kissinger and a written
statement from President
Nixon.
Both were testifying on
behalf of former White House
aide John Ehrlichman.
I hrlichman and three others
i'T charged in the break-in at
the office of Daniel Ellsberg's
psychiatrist.
And former White House
CtlIIunsel John Dean faced
intensive questioning today
when he testified before the
impeachment inquiry.
)Dean, who once served as a
lawyer to the House Judiciary
committee will be questioned
about a $75,000 payment to
convicted Watergate con-
spirator Howard Hunt.
White House attorney James
St. lair is trying to show that
lean set the payment in
motion before a crucial
meeting with President Nixon.
I wo) of St. Clair's previous
witnesses. former Attor-
ney-General John Mitchell and
I:x-Nixon campaign official
Frederick Larue, apparently
did not firmlv establish this.


Yesterday, President Nixon,
in written answers to deftence
questions, told the plumbers
case jury he never authorized
the break-in at the office of
psychiatrist Lewis Fielding.
The President's comments
came in answers to six
questions submitted by lawyers
for the defendants, including
John Ehrlichman.
The written interrogatories
were sent to the White House
Tuesday night after weeks of
negotiations between l.S.
district judge Gerhard Gesell
and attorneys in the case as to
what form they should take.
Gesell emphasized that the
submission to Nixon was a
request and not an order and
that Nixon had answered under
oath voluntarily.

Six die in
plane crash
BEIRUT Four Soviet
advisers and two Egyptian
pilots were killed Wednesday in
a plane crash near Cairo's
international airport, the
Middle Fast News agency
reported.
The plane, a Misrair Soviet
made TU-154, crashed while
on a routine training mission.
the agency said.


No details wete released on
the agreement, but it ended
two days of sensation which
began when Sinatra lashed
out at* Australia's journalists


I I


THE UNITED States secret
service has conferred its
highest award on Princess
Anne's bodyguard for his
defence when a crazed man
tries to kidnap her.
Inspector James Beaton,
was was wounded in the
kidnap attempt March 20,
received the Director's
Honour Award from Secret
service agent Chalfont at
Scotland Yard.
Beaton is the first man
outside the U.S. Secret
Service to receive the award.

A MERICAN astronauts
who have undergone three
weeks of training with Soviet
cosmonauts were returning
home today "very well
pleased," a spokesman said.
The training was for next
July's joint Apollo-Soyuz
space shot.

ONLY A week after the
United States and Soviet
Union signed an agreement to
limit underground nuclear
tests, the United States
detonated an underground
nuclear device yesterday and
the Soviet Union appeared to
have done so.

KARA KENNEDY,
14-year-old daughter of U.S.
senator Edward Kennedy,
was rushed to hospital
yesterday after crushing her
right leg.
The girl's leg was caught
between the horse-drawn
caravan in which she was
riding and a wall along a
countryside lane in County
Limerick, Ireland.


during a concert in
Melbourne Tuesday, calling
them "Bums", "parasites"
and "hookers."
The attack on journalists
was aggravated by an alleged
assault by locally hired
bodyguards on a TV crew
trying to film Sinatra leaving
his hotel Tuesday night.
First the Journalists Union,
then the Theatrical
Employees Union boycotted
Sinatra. They were soon
joined by the Musicians
Union and Airport Workers
Union who refused to refuel
his private jet or any other
aircraft for the Sinatra party.
The promoters said the
agreement meant Sinatra
would resume his concert
tour, would go ahead with a

MAN
JAILED

FOR
KILLING
WRITER
LONDON London sub-
way guard James O.Brien was
sentenced to 17 years in jail
today for the slaying of
royal biographer James Pope-
Hennessy. Two accomplices
were jailed for 15 years each.
years each.
Pope-Hennessy, 57, died
after the three men attacked
and robbed him in his London
apartment.
Prosecutor John Mathew
said O'Brien previously had
stayed at the apartment with
Pope-Hennessy and there
undoubtedly had been a
homosexual relationship.
Pope-Hennessy was known
for his biography of Queen
Elizabeth II's grandmother,
Queen Mary. The monarch
made him a Companion of the
Victorian Order for the work.
Pope-Hennessy was working
on a biography of the late Sir
Noel Coward, the British
playwright and composer, at
the time of his death.
The author was a brother of
Sir John Pope-Hennessy,
director of the British Museum.
(AP)

Divorce move
LONDON Lee Radziwill,
younger sister of Mrs. Jackie
Onassis, is being sued for
divorce by Prince Stanislas
Radziwill.
The 59-year-old Polish-born
Prince's petition was on the list
of forthcoming cases scheduled
to be heard in the High Court.
Radziwill's 41-year-old wife,
formerly actress Lee Bouvier,
married him in 1960. It was
her second marriage, his third.
They have two children. (AP)


promised network televised
"Free Show for Australia"
Sinatra had called off his
Australian tour last night
after two trade unions
demanded he apolqgize for
the on-stage remarks about
the Australian press.
The cancellation followed
a furor caused by Sinatra's
remarks at a Melbourne
concert Tuesday in which he
said women journalists were
"hookers" and "broads" and
male newsmen were
"parasites" who had never
*done an honest day's work in
-their life.
Two unions demanded an
apology Sinatra refused, and
in turn demanded that the
press apologize to him for the
treatment he has received.
One of Sinatra's aides said
the 59-year-old singer was
referring to all women
journalists when he called
them "hookers."
He said Sinatra thought
they were all "whores."
Australian television
viewers saw Sinatra shove a
TV reporter aside and swear
at him following the singer's
Tuesday concert.
Sinatra's bodyguards are
alleged to have manhandled
newsmen after the sell-out
show before 8,000 fans who
paid as much as $26 (US) a
seat.
On stage, Sinatra
reportedly said of the press:
"We who have God-given
talents say to hell with
them."
His remarks provoked the
wrath of New South Wales
Labour Party chief Neville
Wran who said: "Who the hell
does he think he is?"
Wran alleged that Sinatra
was being granted special
airport customs privileges and
was flouting Australian
highway speed limits.
He said Sinatra's party was
"making Australia seem like
some silly, little backward
country." (AP)


-SOLDIERS FIND

TOWN OF DEATH


OUDONG, Cambodia -
Government soldiers to4ay
found skeletons of about 20
troopers and civilians strewn
about this destroyed town. All
were decapitated or had
smashed skulls.
Field reports earlier said
scores of skeletons were
uncovered in and near Oudong
by soldiers who recaptured the
town 20 miles north of Phnom
Penh on Tuesday after a
bloody two-month campaign.
This once-peaceful former
royal capital, a seat of
buddhism and the burial site of
kings, was isolated and overrun
by Khmer Rouge insurgents in
the middle of March.
Most of the town's
estimated 30,000 population
was taken into the jungle, said
refugees and monks who fled
the rebels.
The escapees told of
hundreds of soldiers,
government officials and
monks being brutally murdered
by insurgents who occupied
the town. Much of the killing
took place in the jungle.
Mutilated skeletons lit-
tered the central part of
town near the destroyed
provincial office. Remains of
two decapitated women lay in
the front yard.
A few hundred yards from
the province office were the
bodies of 10 captured
government soldiers in
grotesque postures of death.
All had their heads broken


with bamboo or iron pipes that
lay nearby. at
Several Buddhist temples
and at least one Mosque had
been blown up from the inside
with plastic explosives.

Author dies
STOCKHOLM Swedish
author and Nobel Ltureate
Paer Lagerkvist died today of
complications from a brain
haemorrhage at the age of 83,
doctors said.

POPE PAUL VI, ill for the
third time this year, ancelled
his weekly public audience
yesterday because of the
recurrence of a painful knee
ailment.


McAIsllisi


DOWNTOWN MIAMI


SINGLE .............. 10.00
DOUBLE ............11.00
TWIN ................ 12.00
TRIP ............... .... 14.00
QUAD.........17.00
Home of the
AMERICAN-BAHAMIAN
FEDERATION
4'i:


--'~-1-- .;i~- I:::-~-~-~-- ---c~--I: -~--::I~~~I`------- ------------.--- i--- ~- ---~-- ~. ____~____ __--______~__ _._~_ _. ---------- _C~~---~F--I __-.I:C~;F-


S ~/


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COOKOUT

THE KEY-BOARD LOUNGE SOFTBALL
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SATURDAY, JULY 13th STARTING AT 10
a.m.


HI! I'M JUANITA


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at

STEAK& BAKE LOUNGE


Nassau Harbour Club


where you get a steak, slaw & baked potato

with a glass of wine

FOR ONLY $5.50 6 PM. TO MIDNIGHT

OPENING FRIDAY JUNE 28TH


IF YOU SEE YOURSELF IN THIS HAPPY GROUP PICTURE CLIP IOUT AND BRING IT
TO - BUTLER.& SANDS COMPANY, LTD. WAREHOUSE OFF SHIRLEY STREET JUST
BEHIND THE MOSKO BUILDING - PICK UP A FREE FIFTH OF YOUR FAVOURITE
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RLIM4 SCOTCH GIN

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THIS OFFER /S I IIlIED TO O.V\/. i 1i/PI:R PRsO -|


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[I-I II- _iImI I IIiione


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Wecither-


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LEON E. H. DUPUCH.Pubiamr/mditor 1903. 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G.,D.Litt., LL.D.
Publuher/Editor 1917-1972
Contributing Editor 1972 -
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publiser/Editor 1972 -
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768


Thursday, July 11, 1974.


By ETIENNE DUPUCH-
Kyoto, Japan, May 16 We are now in the middle of the 23rd.
Annual General Assembly of the International Press Institute.


As its name implies, this organization is truly international in
both its conception and its breadth of thought.
The 6nly other really international Press organization is the
Commonwealth Press Union which embraces members from the
former far-flung British Empire.
The Inter-American Press Association is a powerful
organization but its membership is confined to the U.S. ... not
Canada which goes with the C.P.U... Central and South America,
islands in the Caribbean and the Bahamas in the Atlantic.
. The Caribbean Press Association confines itself to press
activities in Britain's former island colonies in the western
hemisphere ... and Guyana in South America and British
Honduras in Central America.
All these organizations are principally concerned with fighting
tor the Freedom of the Press and their combined membership
Covers the free world. At this meeting the by-laws have been
intended so as to accept ... after close scrutiny ... members from
countries where freedom has been denied the press with the bold
intention of "braving the lion in its den".
- I am also a member of other press organizations but they are
thore concerned with the technical affairs of the production of a
newspaper.
The American Newspapers Publishers Association is most useful.
It holds seminars for training men in the physical production of a
newspaper and through them libel insurance can be obtained at a
(pw premium.
: When we decided to make important changes in the physical
side of The Tribune technicians from this organization came to
the island to advise on lay-out and the type of equipment we
should install. As a result we have an operation that elicits the
admiration of the publishers of major newspapers in the U.S.
Canada and Britain when they visit our offices and plant.

3 When we were considering selling The Tribune two years ago
lh)rd Thomson of Fleet flew to Nassau to take a look at it. He is
probably the owner of the largest number of newspapers -
inall and large in the world. He is one of the greatest
authorities in the world on the production of a newspaper.
: As'I have told you on many occasions in the past, he had
always wanted The Tribune and I had promised him first refusal
'f I ever decided to sell, which was an empty promise at the time
because I could not conceive of any situation that would cause
me to sell The Tribune. But when conditions arose that made me
feel that I wanted to end my activities in the Bahamas I carried
Out my promise to him. I wrote him a letter.
And he flew to Nassau to see me but he knew by that time that
the conditions that made mec want to sell also convinced him that
he didn't want to buy.
": When he came to see me he told me that he had been advised
jy.-his bankers not to touch anything in the Bahamas. But when
he saw our lay-out he was like a child with a new toy ... he was so
impressed by its efficiency that he almost bought it anyway.
-'Now I am glad he didn't because I have found a way of
colitinuing to serve the Bahamian people without having to live
bddily in an atmosphere that depresses me ... I can do it by
reinote control, which is a very satisfactory arrangement for me
because now I am able to do things that I had always wanted to
dd but had no time ... no life of my own.

,JTo give you some idea of the scope of I.P.I., members
attending this meeting come from Argentina, Australia, Austria,
the Bahamas (I am the only member from the West Indies),
Beiuim, Canada, Benmark, Finland, Germany, Greece,
Hqng Kong, Korea, Malta, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria,
Norway, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines. Sri Lanka (Ceylon), Sweden,
Taiwan. Thailand, Turkey, the United Kingdom, the United
States and Zambia.
iThe important fact about this and other organizations of
which I am a member is that we are alt banded together
because we are concerned for the welfare of each other. It is
reilly a great brotherhood.

It is also very broad and liberal in its outlook. There are no
racial biases or sex restrictions in the I.P.I.
Four years ago they elected the first woman, who was also the
fipt Asian, to serve as its president. She is a tremendous woman
w ho also organized an Asian Press Association and served as its
fiot president. She filled this office for two years with
distinction. Two years is the limit anyone can hold this office.
:When she vacated it a Nigerian was elected. He has done a
brilliant job and when he stepped down this year an American
was elected to the presidency.
;As a compliment to this African president the I.P.I. will meet
inNigeria next year when he will be the host ... and the following
ycar they will go to Pennsylvania.


,his is the third time my wife and I have visited Japan.
1)ur first visit was in 1964 after we had attended an I.P.1
neting in Turkey. This was a sad year for us. We were in Turkey
wfen we received news of the death of Lord Beaverbrook and ir
Tayo when news reached us of the death of Sir George Roberts
...,My two staunchest friends in the world ... men who had stood
by'my side in some of my most difficult periods when I was
fiY ting all the then great powers in the Bahamas to preserve the
fredom of this newspaper.
.he second time was when the I.P..l met in Osaka, near Tokyo
Tis was the year of the International Exposition.
And now here in Kyoto, which borders on Osaka. On this trip
w% flew from Hawaii to Tokyo, then by plane for an hour's fligh
to saka, and on here by taxi on an expensive hour's drive.
yhat is Kyoto?
will answer this question by quoting briefly from the address
made in opening the session on Monday by the chairman of the
Japan National Committee.



<-. ARED i


We need all the Santas we can get


hbt rtibunt
ums AmDICUS JUiAn IN VKaaa MAmva
Bound To Swear To The Dogmas OfNo Master


Cousin Zeph writes:-
Moses was sayin' he prayers
jes' fore he turn in.
"Oh, Lord, Ah manage t'
pull antidder day an' erryt'ing
still holding, (knock on wood).
"Spite o' all dat, Lord, tVings
tuff, an' people starting' t' get
obstreperous. Look like we
might-a jes get da emergencyy
Power Bill rush through in time.
,EveA d' church minister now
start preachin', say it can't be
much longer. An' Ah thought
we had all dem horse-collar
boys in d' bag.
"Ah dunno what Ah do,
Lord, t' deserve dis kind-a
treatment. Ah dunno if y' get
any han' in dis. Ah wish Ah
could-a know for sure. Ah
doan mind wres'lin wid d'
FNM an' d' udder rest o' dem
traitor, but if you coming' out
on dey side ...!
"Mind, Lord, Ah ain't sayin'
we do erryt'ing 'cordin t'
d' Sermon on d' Mount, but if
y' want see real dirty business,
why y' doan look at what d'
UBP d do in tree hundred
years? If das what it take t'
bring prosperity, Ah
would-a father pitch dinner
cost only tree hundred dollar.
"What Ah can't understand,
Lord, is, we did start off so
good. All dI million o' dollar d'
UBP did left us and errybody
get more job an' he could-a
handle. Errybody linin' up t'


"Kyoto," he said, "was the capital city of Japan and the
residence of successive emperors for 1,075 years from the year
794 when the capital was transferred to Kyoto from Nara, until
1869, the second year of the Maiji Era, when the capital was
moved to Tbkyo.
"During this period, political power changed hands many
times. It was during the closing decades of the 12th Century that
Kyoto flourished as the political center of Japan. However, even
periods when the seat of political power was elsewhere, the
Emperor and his court remained in Kyoto. Thus, Kyoto was able
to maintain its position as the cultural, artistic and religious
center of Japan. Kyoto may be called the spiritual home of the
Japanese people.
"Festivals having ancient traditions, number over 65 a year in
Kyoto and many cultural heritages, beginning with temples and
shrines, have been preserved in Kyoto. A new culture has been
added to the old and so Kyoto may be called one of the few cities
of Japan where the old and new exist. ., their in harmony.
"For this reason, Kyoto is Japan's number one tourist city,
with more than 30 million Japanese and 500,000 foreign tourists
visiting Kyoto every year."
This means that we are now in the centre of the most
interesting and important landmarks in the history of this nation.
Nara, its first capital, borders on Kyoto. We were taken there by
bus on a sightseeing tour yesterday.
** ** **
I will quote two more small bits from the opening address of
Koko Shiraishi to give you some idea of the tone and purpose of
this meeting.
"I have expressed some of my personal opinions on a number
of problems faced by press freedoms," he said, "and it is also my
belief that world-wide cooperation is necessary in solving such
problems as resources, trade and the monetary system.
"It is my hope that conferences of international newspaper
organizations, beginning with the I.P.I., as well as bi-lateral
meetings of newspapermen, will give careful study to the
problems we face in the newspaper world."
He had a great deal to say about how newspapers lose their
freedoms. Of particular interest to me was when he said ...
"because of the difficulties of operating newspapers even through
mergers, there are increasing cases of newspapers accepting
financial assistance and preferential treatment from government."
Way back, when Sir Charles Dundas, then Colonial Secretary
and Acting Governor of the colony, persuaded me that The
Tribune should become the first daily newspaper in the colony. I
told him that I didn't think Nassau could support a daily
newspaper,. Both The Tribune, and The Guardian were then
published twice-weekly on Wednesdays and Saturdays.
Mr. Dundas said that the last place at which he served in Africa
the government subsidized a daily. I told him I wouldn't accept
any help from the government but I would do legitimate business
with them.
It was then I ventured into a daily publication, the colony's
first daily publication. In a few days time I will tell you a story
about what happened during that period that may knock your
eyeballs out of your head. I have told the story before but it can
stand repeating now. Sometimes I wonder how The Tribune ever
managed to survive the pitfalls put in its path.
Of course, you all know the latest incident in which Little
Caesar Arthur Hanna declared that he was giving all the
government's business to The Guardian because The Tribune was
unfriendly to them ... and The Guardian accepted this
arrangement!
I was able to tell them all to push their business where it hurts
most and to go to hell in the bargain.
I suppose this gift of business to The Guardian was a reward
for its extraordinary behaviour in 1969 when the government
tried to muzzle and intimidate the press with proposed
amendments to the Rights and Privileges Bill and, although these
Amendments would have enslaved the Press, The Guardian sided
with the government against The Tribn'me.
It was at that time that government realized for the first time
the position this tiny newspaper in the tiny Bahamas holds in the
world press when the I.A.P.A. particularly ... and other press
t associations of which I am a member ... came to my assistance.
g Resolutions of protest were sent to the Prime Minister, the
Governor and the Speaker of the House and the President of
I.A.P.A. flew from Chili to stand by my side.
The government was wise enough to realize that, in a country
so completely dependent on external resources to survive, it
could not afford to have a fight with the world press on the
s question of press freedoms and so the amendment was modified
Sand nothing more hasm been heard of it.
Sadly, the dear old Guardian has fallen in line with all the
s oppressive measures brought against The Tribune by both past
e and present governments.
But we have survived them all ... and today we can tell them all
l to go straight, square plump to hell and fry.
** .* * *


Incidentally, life can be a pack of fun if you are not afraid to
live it fully.
***** *C*C c

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
Laugh and the World laughs with you,
Weep and you weep alone.- ELLER WHEELER WILCOX


ten' us so much-a million
more, an' all 'dem tax an' tIng.
Look like it could-a never
done. Ah can't figger out
where it all get to.
'course, Lord, Ah know
plenty o' it was t'row away.
Like da piece "bout d' garbage
trucks, an' so much-a road start
an' ain't never finish. Ah know
some o' dem boys bin kind-a
sporty wid dey idea o' handin'
out contract.. Ah 'Ah jes hear
lately 'bout some pipe, sound
like somebody calculator get
out-a kelter.
"But, on d' whole, Lord, Ah
can't see where we do too bad.
Least, not bad nuff t' haddy
ketch all dis trouble. Look like
if y' did let d' UBP keep up all
da time, y' could-a fix us up
for twenty-five, t'irty years,
anyhow. It .had t' understand'
how y' does work.
'cause, y' see, Lord, 't ain't
no joke, now. T'ings serious.
So much-a t'ousan' people
out-a job. Erry time Ah go t' d'
House now, somebody shovin'
sign in muh face. Y' know Ah
doan want t' haddy keep d'
riot squad station 'round d'
House. Only d' UBP would-a
do da kind-a t'ing. But what
Ah go' do, Lord? Ah ain't want
get mess up like Whitfield dem
da night.
"Ah know y' do a lot for us,
Lord, givin' us Independence


Erry minute count now. Lord,
'till we could' -a get Ja new
plan goin' we tell 'em gub'ment
riggin' up. Ah only hope we
could-a rig up some kind-a plan
for true, but what we go: use
for money?
'tis plenty more Ah could-a
say, Lord, but Norman
Solomon want get on d' line t'
talk t' y'. Sum'pin he find out
now he want kick up 'hout. Y'
ain't need nobody t' run
fashion store in heaven, Lord9
"Only one las' t'mg an' Ah
done Ah euess y' know we
planning' d' PLP convention dis


year. Jes t' let y' me hit.W ,
'pennin' on you, we ink a .
special t'eme dis year. It my: d es


Diplomatic

External Affairs Minister 6tl"
Paul L. Adderley, has -t ti. A
announced that the d o M
governments of the Republic y-" .'
of Colombia and The ThB. appoWllu
Commonwealth of The dpdtin l
Bahamas have decided, in at AIdbSUS@'t ,5
common agreement to ____ .0 ,


a:
y
k

k
b
d
w



1















da


BAHAMIANS


OUR COUNTRY IS IN


Serious Troubleo'

HOW? WHY?

IS THERE HOPE?


YOU KNOW THE TRUTMil


YOU FEEL THE PAINS


HEAR SOLUTIONS
FROM THE


FREE NATIONAL MOVEMENT


FRIDAY JULY 12th 8.30 p.m. I

AT THE

SOUTHERN RECREATION GROUND .

HEAR
THE LEADER, MR. KENDAL ISAACS

HEAR

THE CHAIRMAN, MR. ORVILLE TURNQUEST ..

HEAR

SENATORS HENRY BOSTWICK AND ARTHUR FOULUS :

HEAR

OF THE HOPES, FEARS, FRUSTRATIONS

AND SOLUTIONS FROM MANY 0

PROMINENT SPEAKERS IN OUR &MWI


IT


I


BUNE -- -Thursday, July 11, 1974.


.1


,1,. .7


__


n' all dat. Ah hardly want ask
' for much more. But Ah
now y' notice what happen
fid d' Commonwealth Bank.
low das a humdinger! Y'
now Ah ain't want scare muh
buddy away. Not after what he
do for all o' we. An' 'specially
where we jes save him from
Jnca' Sam couple-a weeks ago.
"What Ah want say, Lord,
is, if anything should-a happen
where he does decide t' leave,
't ain't nobody else y' could-a
t'ink 'bout y' could-a send t'
take he place? We need all d'
Santa Claws we could-a get
right now.
"An' while y' takin' care o'
dat, Lord, 't ain't nuttin' y'
could-a do 'bout dese
newspaper reporters? D'
Tribune bad 'nuff, but when a
man can't go t' California in
peace, Ah t'ink y' ought-a help
muh wrastle wid dese enemy
an' traitor. Ah ain't tell none o'
dem how, much dey should-a
pay for dey wine.
"Coupl-a things Ah want
t'ank y'for, Lord, 'case y'
tinkin Ah ungrateful for
erryt'ing.
"Ah t'ank y' 't ain't more
In one radio network in d'
Bahamas. If all d' brudder an'
sister in d' famb'ly islan' haddy
know what goin' on for
true-true, dey might-a broke up
d' iron beadstead.
"An' Ah t'ank y' cause
Independence celebration jes
round d' corner. 'long wid
Goombay Summer, we might-a
manage t' keep dese silly
people eye blind little longer.


BRANAMA




NASSAU ARBOULI CLUB
EASTBAYST.

STARTING FRIDAY 28TH JUNE

THE SWINGINGEST, SWEETEST SOUNDS OF


THE ISLANDERS

Cocktails start at 7p.m.- 'till the wee weelu. :.

CLOSED MONDAYS







4


~- - -


U.S. CHOICE
CHUCK ROAST


U.S. CHOICE
MINUTE STEAK


SjPINDER'S FOOD MARKET
lb. 99C MONTROSE AVENUE PHONE 2-4030
Immmmmm-immmamm m m=imii


Ib. $1.89


U.S. CHOICE
RIB ROAST
U.S. CHOICE
RIB STEAK


OPEN SUNDAY MORNING 8-10 A.M.
b-rn- mmumm m emm m mm m mm mm m ma


Ib. $1.99


Ib. $2.19


PICNIC HAM'S


lb. 89C


REGULAR HAM'S Whole Ib. $1.29


REGULAR HAMS Half

Native CHICKENS FRESH


Ib. $1.29


Ib. 850


Native CHICKENS Cut-up Ib. 89C


AI A -WC='


Champion TOMATO PASTE Small 2 for 49c -
PLEDGE 9'20Z. $1.29
SCOFFEEMATE6oz. 75c
B & M BROWN BREAD Tins 49c
Champion PIGEON PEAS Large 2 for 89c
BLANCO BLEACH Gals. $1.09
L Spry Vegetable PURE SHORTENING 3 lb. $1.69
4 Delsey BATHROOM TISSUE Double 55c
( Delmonte PEACHES (Sliced) 303
2for 93c
SVIM Lemon CLEANSER 18 ozs. 44c
-A & B SAUCE 2 for 49c
- -A&Bs .. 49( s


NASSAU POTION CtNTROL
Phone 23237 Ext.6 5LN 1IE 'th Trrace Cetrevlle


5bs. U.S.ChoieSRLOINSTEAK
4-91b&sILS. Choice SRIN TP ROST

51bs. UiS. ChoiceT-BONESTEAK


9-101bs. US. Choice BONELESS STRIP STEAKS


10


10lbs.


48/2oz.
lOIbs.


HALFCICKENS

PORK CHOPENDS


"Don'sPrize" BEEF PATTIES
PIGS FEET



PIGS FEET (551b.Cases) 22Cper lb.


'10.00
*2J0perlb.


'12.OO

'16.00
1000


61b. 7.00
*3D0O


I 1'1


MADEIRA FOOD STORE
PHONE 24524 P. 0. BOX 6143

Danish PORK CHOPS

lb. $1.20


Pillsbury FLOUR

Jim Dandy GRITS


51bs. $1.19

5 lbs. 90C


i


PUREX BLEACH/ Y2 Gals.
TIDE King
CHEER 20 oz.
Uncle Ben's R ICE 10 Ibs.
Niblets Whole Kernal CORN
**** ^>^ ^


65c
$1.95
50c (
$4.00 9
12 oz. 38c t
0. %-, *OWM w


PORK CHOPS
Daish SPARE RIBS
TURKEY LEGS
LAMB SHOULDER
FRESH MUTTON
New Zealand ROUND STEAK


.$1.25 HARDING


. 8 FOOD MARKET
6. 7k0 P.O. Box 5290ES Phone 2-3067


6. SLI
6. $1.10
l. $1.75


BOLOGNA Sliced 99
BOLOGNA Whole lb. 890
SALT BEEF Ib. 99C
TIDE King Size $1.99
IVORY LIQUID King $1.30
Vegetole SHORTENING $1.55
FRESH PORK 5 bs. $4.50
SPARE RIBS lOIbs. $8.50 E
STEWING BEEF I $13.0 .
PORK CHOPS 10 lbs. $11.00


I


Carnation CREAM Large 3 Tins
Libby's SWEET PEAS 303
Uncle Ben's RICE 10 Ibs.
Olivano OIL Gal.
PEPSI 5 Tins
Campbell's VEGETABLE SOUP 3 Tins
Delsey TISSUE 2 Rolls.
Armour CORNED BEEF12 oz.
Hellmann's MAYONNAISE Qts.
BLANCO LEACH Gal.
Hall's TONIC WINE Qts.
Irish Spring SOAP 3 Bars


99c
45c
$4.45
$5.75
99c
89c
55c
$1.59
$1.59
99c
$1.99
99c


99c


Centreville

Food Market
6th Terrace East P.O. Box 5714 Phone 5-8106
Store Hpurs Monday to Thursday 8 a.m. 8:30 p.m.
Fri. & Sat. 8 a.m. 9 p.m.
Sun. 8 a.m. 10 a.m.


U.S. CHOICE
CHUCK ROAST


99C lb.


U.S. CHOICE
SHOULDER ROAST $1.29 lb.


U.S. CHOICE
CHUCK STEAK


Uncle Ben's Rice 10 lb. bag.
Cracker Jack 6 for
Fresh Juice Oranges 5 lb. bag
m Fresh Kraft Orange Juice
Plumrose Corned Beef 12 oz. can
V4 e aaggp b a, y


Libby's Pineapple Juice
Family Size 950


$1.19 Ib.


U.S. CHOICE
SHOULDER STEAK $1.39 lb.


Maxwell
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Coffee
( 10(l oz. jar)
$2.19


Tide
King Size $1.89


$4.19
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85c 1
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I







THE TRIBUNE --Thursday, July 11.1974.


George W. Moore, right, Airport. Upon graduation in.
president of The Grand March, 1964 from the
Bahama Airport Company Federal Aviation admin-
Limited, has announced that istration Academy at
Austin H. Pyfrom left, has Oklahoma City, Oklahoma,
been promoted to Tower he spent four weeks on the
Ch1iif at Freeport job training at Los Angeles
International Airnort. International Airport.
Mr. Pyfrom started s an He returned to Nassau
air traffic controller in 1951 until July, 1965 when he
at Nassau International resigned to accept the


position of chief of West End
tower. Mr. Pyfrom joined the
Airport Company in May,
1967.
Other promotions within
the air traffic control
department include Mr.
Mervin Wright to Licensed
Controller and Miss Joan
Cartwrlght to Flight Service
Station Operator.


SUMMER PRINTS
STARTS TUESDAY, JULY 9 TO 20th.


BOYS' POLYESTER PANTS
Boys' Blue Jeans 20%OFF
Boys' Shirts 10% OFF
CHILDREN'S BATHING SUITS 10% OFF


CHILDREN'S DRESSES
sizes 1-14,


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Cotton, Floral Prints $2.25 per yard.
Cotton Remnants $1.65 per yard all colours
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Situated on Exuma Street, between Bahama and Cordeaux Avenues.


OPEN WEEKDAYS:- 8:30 a.m. 8:30 p.m.
Saturdays:- 8 a.m. 9 p.m.
Telephone 3-6484 P. O. Box 5178 E.S.


.Three
scholarships
givenby
financial
community
THE first three Financial
Community Scholarships have
been awarded to three young
Bahamians.
The awards to Bernadette L.
Robins, 17; Malvina M.
Cooper, 18 and Theophilus I.
Thompson 18, were made to
mark the first anniversary of
the independence of the
Bahamas.
Announcement of the
awards was made by the Hon.
bonald Fleming of the
Banker's Club and presentation
of scholarship award letters
was done by Gerald Mulrine,
general manager of Trust
Corporation of Bahamas Ltd.
The presentation took place at
the TCB offices on West Bay
Street.
Miss Robins and Miss
Cooper attended R. M. BAiley
Senior High School, Robinson
Road. Mr. Thompson was a
student at Queen's College.
He will do a three-year
course in industrial art and
hopes to be enrolled at the
Ontario College of Fine Arts,
Ontario, Canada.
Miss Robins will take up a
two-year course in medical
technology probably at
Kirkland Lake Campus,
Kirkland Lake Ontario.
Miss Cooper's course will be
two years in laboratory
technology in agriculture and
she is hoping to attend Prairie
View College, Texas.
Miss Robbins is the second
of five children. She lives with
her parents at Chruchill
Development off Soldier Road.
Miss Cooper is the fifth of
10 children and lives with her
parents at Key West Street off


- .


SCHOLARSHIP ward
letters are presented to the
first three Financial
Community Scholars. Shown
at the presentation from left
Peter Stradling, manager of
TCB's Trust Department;
Malvina Cooper, 18, the Hon.
Donald Fleming, representing
Sthe Banker's Club; Bernadette
Robins, 17 Theophilus
Thompson, 18, and Gerald
Muirine, general manager,
Trust Corporation of
Bahamas Ltd.
Robinson Road.
Mr. Thompson is the eldest
of four and lives with his
family at Imperial Park.
The three scholars were
selected from over 40
applicants by the Advisory
Committee, appointed by the
Financial Community
Advanced Technical Trust for
Bahamians (1973).
The Advisory Committee
sat under the chairmanship of
the Hon. Donald M. Fleming
who was nominated to
represent the Bankers Club.
In recommending the
awards, the Advisory
Committee attached high
priority to the technical needs
of the Bahamas. The
Committee were also highly
appreciative of the assistance
given by the Ministry of
Education.
A fund of approximately
$125,000 was raised by the
Financial Community headed
by the Bankers CLub last year
to mark the country's
independence. The income
from the fund will be
employed in perpetuity to
provide scholarships to enable
deserving Bahamian students to
pursue courses of advanced
technical education abroad.
It is hoped that further
contributions to the fund will
be received from time to time.


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4 P. 0. Box F-29, Freeport, Grand B
Offices at:
o Norfolk House Frederick St. 1
z Trinity Place & Market St. Tel. 2
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available 2
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NOTICE

This is to advise our customers and the
general public that RHODNEY.WOODSIDE is
no longer employed by Commonwealth
Industrial Bank Limited and has no authority
to act on our behalf in any capacity.
Signed,
The Management


NOTICE

BAHAMAS INSURANCE CENTRE LIMITED
&
CARIBBEAN ATLANTIC LIFE INSURANCE
COMPANY LTD.

Due to the recent fire we regret that our
telephones have been out of use. We anticipate a
temporary line very shortly and this will be 23011.

AVe are temporarily operating from the ground
floor of the same building on Dowdeswell Street
and sincerely regret any inconvenience to our
clients.


BAHAMAS OIL REF. W COMNY

WANTED
Ambitious young man age 17 to 20 years,
interested in a MARINE ENGINEERING
CAREER.
Minimum educational requirements, G.C.E.'s
in Mathematics and a Science subject.
After' serving a short term probationary
period, the successful candidate will be
required to complete a Marine Engineering
Scholarship in the U.K.
Prospective candidates should write to the
Personnel Officer, Bahamas Oil Refining
Company, P. O 0. Box F-2435, Freeport, Grand
Bahama


YOUR






to the TI

PARADI!
overlook

Pleasant serve
person
Breakfast Lun

RE
Paradise Beac
WHERE JA


AN appeal for public
support of the recently-opened
New World Theatre was
launched this week by Senator
Dr. Doris Johnson, President
of the National Women's
movement.
The Theatre, in East Street,
will be officially opened on


Come and bring a friend!
TICKET TO PARADISE


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:h Pavilion is just west of the Holiday Inn.
AMES BOND MADE THUNDERBALL


HELP US!


Saturday with a variety show
appropriately entitled "A New
Beginning", written produced
and directed by Bahamian poet
and writer Rupert Missick,
director of the theatre.
The Movement is
spearheading this move to
provide further educational
and artistic opportunities for
youngsters in the East Street
area. The owners of the former
movie theatre, Theatrical
Enterprizes Limited,, have given
a three-month rent-free lease of
the premises to the National
Women's Movement.
"We have accepted a great
challenge in this undertaking,"
Dr. Johnson commented, "but
we intend to succeed in our
endeavour to provide a creative
outlet for our young people.
The response to our efforts has
already encouraged us in our
determination to help talented
young Bahamians towards
achieving self-improvement.
The three representatives
for the area from which most
of the children come, Mr.
Franklyn Wilson, Mr. Bruce
Braynen and the Hon. Alfred


Maycock, have contributed to
renovating and cleaning up the
theatre."
Pointing out that the
building had been closed for
three years, Dr. Johnson said
that the work of renovating the
interior "would have daunted
anyone but dedicated people
like Mr. Missick and his
associates who have
whole-heartedly involved
themselves in this project."
"But we do need the
public's support to achieve
what we envision for the New
World Theatre," Dr. Johnson
added. "Contributions of
money, a 16mm movie projects
piano, building materials, paint
and other items are urgently
solicited from civic-minded
residents and corporations who
are interested in the welfare of
our youth. And, of course, we
welcome the physical
assistance of all who wish to
take part with us in this
important venture."
Information about how the
public can help The New World
Theatre can be obtained by
telephoning 52836.


ONE of New World
Theatre's activitesis k educat-
ional and entertainment film
sdows for the area's young
people.

Surrounded by an enthus-
iastic group is Rupert Nlk,
at left director of The New
World Theatre.


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'7-]


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11 p.m.


6 THE TRIBUNE Thursday, July 11, 1974.


- -- -- -- -- --


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NO UA"
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THE TRIBUNE .. .Turray. July 11.1974.


nIHTS


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KING SIZE


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SHOULDER ROAST L.................... 29 SPARE RIBS ......... 89
WO LL MEAT OR
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WD HICKORY
SHOULDER STEAK ....................LB 1.39 SWEET BACON ............LB.
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PINI HAMS LB ..........................5. L WHOLE FRYERS ...............LB.65


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SUPERMARKET
It it's value you eeal* want,
you reeay want StprVaIluel I


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SPARE RIBS
Per Lb.


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SIRLOIN STEAK
Per lb.


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Per lb $2 "


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$2.49


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THE TRIBUNE --Thurday, July 11, 1974.


S SUPERMAN
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you rmly want SupriiMu.


SPECIALS FOR THE WEEK JULY 11TH, THROUGH JULY 14TH, 1974.


VALLEYDALE
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Per Lb.


~1
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PNEWZEALAND
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SHOULDER CHOPS
Per lb.


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OSCAR MAYER
SHOKIE LINKS
12-oz

$1.25


OSCAR MAYER
COTTO SALAMI
8oz.

850C


OSCAR MAYER
ALL MEAT
BOLOGNA
8 oz.

69C


CAROLINA PRIZE
SLICED BACON
Per Ib

890


MRS. PAULS'
DEVILLED CRABS


6-oz

$1.09


OSCAR MAYER
PURE BEEF
BOLOGNA
8 oz.

690


BIRDSEYE
MIXED VEGETABLES


10-oz

2/790


BIRDSEYE
GREEN PEAS.
10-oz

2/790


WHITE
POTATOES
5 Lb. Bag

$1.15


Georgia Sweet
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490


LEMONS

5/590


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0 "THE TRIBUNE -- Thursday, July 11, 1974.
FOq


...by Daphne Wallace Whitfield


The Bahamian Museum and Art Galey was officially opened Tuesday afternoon by Prime Minister Lynden Pindling. The
museum highlights the social and political development of the Bahamas. From left: Dr. John Lunn, Mr. Cyril Fountain M.P.
for N. Long Island, Mr. CaMon Francis, chairman of the Development Corporation, and Mrs. Baltron Bethel. Photo by
Frankly Ferguson.


T ORALEE'S FASHIONS
YOU WILL FIND DRESSES
FOR ALL OCCASIONS.
PANTS & PANTSUITS
AND THE LATEST IN
BLOUSES


oomnbaySale!
CHILDREN'S DRESSES
by Dorissa.

Madeira St. Opp. John S. George
Phone 2-1744




Come and see us!


A A


Dance for Joy, a production of The New Breed Dancers
held over the weekend at Government High School featured
Marilyn Cooke and Mary Sullivan, two visiting dancers from
Toronto, Canada.


The detective behind Independence


TOWARDS Independence -
an exhibit of landmarks in
Bahamian history consisting of
photographs of original
documents, maps and
illustrations, researched in
London and Nassau was
originally intended to coincide
with Independence.
Instead the exhibition was
opened on Tuesday afternoon
in the museum at Jumbey
Village that the teachers and
children of the Bahmas helped
pay for and marks the first
anniversary of independence.
And this exhibition was well
worth waiting for.
Although Mrs Gail Saund-
ers, Government Archivist, and
Mr. Clement Bethel, Cultural
Affairs Officer in the ministry
of Education, are doing the
overall co-ordination the actual
work has been done by Mrs.
Elizabeth Nathaniels.
Liz is well known in the
community for her prolific
writing talents but in this
exhibition she displays her
lesser well known talents as an
exhibition designer.
In 1965 she designed and
mounted an architectural
exhibition sponsored by the
Kansas State Federation of Art
which was sent round
universities in the United
States.
Before coming to the
Bahamas Liz was a student of
University College, London
and the University of Perugia,
Italy.
Since then, she has taken
courses in design draftsmanship
and the arts in Nassau,
Cambridge and the University
of Guanajuato, Mexico.
Liz started work at the
British Museum and the Public
Records Office in London
researching original documents,
drawings and etchings.
"It was incredibly com-
plex," Liz told me in a recent
interview "You have to be
something of a detective."
Days and days can be spent
sifting through boxes of
documents without finding
what you looking for." This
frustration is counteracted, Liz


exhibition


explained, by finding other
fascinating things that you
weren't originally looking for.
Liz also did research in the
Nassau Public Library, the
Public Records office in Nassau
and Various private libraries in
the Bahamas.
All documents, drawings and
etchings were photographed
for mounting.
To organise her exhibition
Liz said she made monumental
lists. There are 23 placards
which trace the political and
sociological landmarks in the
development of the Bahamas
from the 17th century to the
recent civil rights movement
and achievement of indepen-
dence.
It was Liz's aim. and I think
she has succeeded spect-
acularly, to show in a vivid and
interesting way, how even the
earliest influences have helped
shaped the destiny of the
Bahamas and stress the positive
aspects of the country's
growth.
And, in London. listening to
Hansard on all the debates, Liz
felt she was living this history.
Li7 emphasises that the
history of the Bahamas is the
social history and not merely
list of Governors and the
stories of the pirates.
In spite of all the
monumental work put into this
exhibition by Li7 she is not
satisfied.
"So much more needs to be
done" and liz believes that
much untapped data that will
bring the Bahamian past alive
lie in private letters in Lnglnad
and the United States.
All the exhibits make fasci-
nating reading and viewing.
They range from the
first letter written by Woodes
Rogers after his return Irom
Nassau in 172) (Lan interesting
fact is that Woodes Rogers has
to pay for being governor r by
leasing the Bahamas at the
average rate of 120 pounds a
year) to a letter from the
Stipendiary Magistrate in the
Turks Islands deseLbing in
detail how shipwrecked
Africans released froni a
Spanish slaver in I841 were
housed and settled.
Lis's main problem with the
hundreds of maps she
unearthed was which to select
for the exhibit Ones she did
select include one of Nassau
dated 1770 which whows the
names of every family living in
the town at the tiie I man\ of
the street names and surnames
of the early inhabitants still
exist to-day) and the first
known map of the Bahamas by
Juan de la Cosa dated 1500. A
map dated 1788. after Lord
Dunmore came. shows how
Nassau expanded after the
Loyalists arrived.
The pictorial illustrations
range from blots ups of
Victorian prints showing life
100 years ago to the first
drawings made by an
Englishman in the Bahamas,
way back in 1585,
The fact that the Bahamnas
had a Bahamian deputy
Governor for two years from
1699 was one of the little
known facts that Liz
unearthed. Read sliding. the
first native Bahamian G(over-


nor, was described as a
"Mulatto".
In Exhibit 53 Liz has
written "That Elding had a
good local following was
proved without doubt in 1701
when Governor Haskett was
cracked over the head with a
pistol by the Speaker of the
House for daring to try and
arrest Elding on a charge of
Piracy! This affair stirred up a
minor rebellion of local
inhabitants who supported
their former Deputy Gover-
nor.
In doing her research Liz said
that she noticed a "hardening
of racial attitudes in the
eighteenth century It appears
that the black man had an
easier going with the early
settlers prior to the eighteenth
century.
Another little known fact
that Liz learned, and that
was of particular interest to
her, was the John Locke, the
great English political
philosopher, contemplated
settling in the Bahamas in
1675.
The exhibits besides being
fascinating are mounted on
beautiful placards. Li/ designed
them and the Ministry of
Work made them out of
masonite with the rough side
on the front on which Liz
mounted the exhibits.
Until the end of the month
this exhibition can be viewed
from 1I to 2 p.m. and from 4
to 8 p.m.
The exhibits are mounted
permanently and it would be a
pity it a permanent home was
not found for our political and
social history presented in such
a viewable form.

Cecilia Y. Knowles. daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. David Knowles
of Parkgate Road, Nassau, has
recently graduated from Miami
Springs Senior High School.
In september Cecilia will be
attending the University of
South Florida majoring in
Business Administration.

The Atnnual Nurses
Graduation Ceremony will be
held on Friday, 19 July at 8.00
p.m. in the Royal Victoria
Gardens.

The Honourable Arlington
Butler and Mrs Butler hosted a
reception at their home on
Winton Heights on Friday last.
Mr. Butler was called to the
Bahamas Bar earlier in the
week.
Bahamas I:lectricity Corpo-
ration chairman Oscar
Johnson was 42 Monday and
it's not likely he'll soon forget
the day.
Mr. Johnson received a
hurried call from the BIC main
office telling him there was
urgent business to attend to
downtown.
The chairman rushed over.
went into the office and
found... a big birthday cake
from the BEC staff. Joining in
the "Happy Birthday" singing
was wife Sylvia and their
children, who were let in on
the surprise ahead of time. The
cake said: "Happy Birthday
chairman, welcome to BEC."
Mr. Johnson has been on the


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or stored flat in drawer
Attractive walnut
woodgrain cabinet
stores knife, blade, and
cord
Always Rach for
*ECTSTHT^SW


IN honour of the first
anniversary of Bahamian
Independence, the United
States Embassy in Nassau is
presenting an exhibit titled:
"A U.S. Tribute to Bahamian
Arts anti Crafts."
The exhibit features
examples of the work of
Bahamian artists and
craftsmen in such fields as
ceramics, wood carving, straw
work, shell craft, coconut
sculpture, fabric printing,
raffia and tortoise shell
jewelry and sea glass design.
Most of the works
exhibited are on loan from
Jumbey Village, and the U.S.
Embassy hopes that the
current exhibit will stimulate
interest in indigenous
Bahamian arts and crafts such
as those permanently dis-
played there.
Featured in the Embassy
show is a collection of
ceramics featuring Bahamian
motifs made by artist Max
Taylor, as well as Junkanoo
Art by Percy Francis, in the
form of a portion of the
Egyptian float which won
first prize in last January's
Junkanoo Parade.
Also prominently
displayed is raffia jewelry by
Helen. Adderley, shell work
by Jennie Rahming and Mary
Leonard, coconut jewelry by
Bruce Hall, hand printed
fabrics by Bahama Hand
Prints, straw work by Telator
Strachan, tortoise shell
jewelry by Johnson Brothers,
pottery decoration by Dudley
Marshall and wood carvings
by John Panza, Audley Jones,
Mel Wallace and Paul Higgs.
The youngest Bahamian
artist to have work displayed
at the Embassy show is
13-year-old student Dale
Simmons, whose impression
of an African Zulu mask was
purchased by an officer of
the Embassy at the recent
exhibition of Bahamian
schoolchildren's art held at
Jumbey Village.
At the opening of the
current exhibit to the public
Monday, an Embassy
spokesman said that many
visitors to The Bahamas were
apparently not aware of the
wealth and variety of native
Bahamian handicrafts.
He said that the Embassy


exhibit was designed to
stimulate interest in
Bahamian arts and crafts by
visitors to the Embassy as
well as by local residents.
The exhibit was mounted
by the Embassy's Cultural
Affairs Officer, Diane C.
Salisbury, with the help of
Max Taylor and James Rolle
of the Education Ministry.
The show is located in the
Exhibits Gallery of the
embassy on Queen Street and
is open to the public 8:30 to
5:30 daily, Monday through
Friday, throughout the
summer.


PASSPORT PHOTOGRAPHS
Nice enough to show yurfrinds.


PHOTOGRAPHY BY


I


"The Beautiful Bahamian Studio"
on the waterfront at East Bay & William Sts.
Telephone 5-4641
res.tak b re ...


NO !! We are not closing

THE BAMA RESTAURANT
in The Nassau Harbour Clubl
JUANITA ROBER TS
Hostess


NOEL SEYMOUR
Manager


YES!! Our airconditioning is now working fine I


SUNDAY BUFFET 12 noon 3 p.m. $4.40 including tip.

LUNCHEON SPECIALS 12 noon 3:30 p.m.
Boiled Fish, Grits, Johnny Cake: Lobster Salad; Chicken Souse; Grouper Fingers, Peas & Rice, Stewed Fish &
Johnny Cake (Fridays).
DINNER SPECIALS 6 p.m. midnight
Turtle Pot Pie; Fillet of Red Snapper. Amondine; Broiled Grouper in White Wine Sauce: Lobster Stuffed in
the Shell; (Cracked Conch, Home-made Desserts Ulik;t-H, (uava Duff with Rum S uce, Rlte & Raisin
Pudding: Cheese Cake; Hot Apple Pie topped with Meloed('heese. phone 31771


GULF SHIPPING LINE LTD.
TE LE PHONE .,41 9042- P 0. Box N8932 NASSAU, BAHAMAS.


PALM
MIAMI BEACH


\ NASSAU


Routing Instructions


FOR: Rail Car Shipments
GULF SHIPPING AGENCY
Riviera Beach
Port of Palm Beach
Florida

FOR: LTL Miami Cargos
GULF SHIPPING
9353 NW South Riviera Drive
Miami Florida, 33166


We are


moulgf


Isif1974)


Riviera Beach


To:


-Port of Palm Beach


FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
Contact
"GULF SHIPPING AGENCY"
Phones 5-9041 5-9042


K-SMEARED '


I SAVYI'hB


WIR


august


I


. H


CAPITOL


------ --


We
Don't
Talk
s
e
r
v
i


K'r.


-1


....-,--









S. THE TRIBUNE - Thursday, July 11, 1974.


Stay Alive Longer!



Take Care of Your Heart- Be Alert for Its Symptoms


Be the man

youwant tobe!



By LELORD KORDEL
Number Nine of a Series
The pain struck Tom N. as he
was running to catch the bus
home. It left him short of
breath. "Must've been that ham-
burger I wolfed down," he
thought. "And on top of that,
running for the bus. Guess I'll
have to remember that I'm not
exactly a kid any more."
On the bus, he ducked into the
first empty seat and waited for
the pain in his chest to subside.
Instead, it came on again, full-
grown. Searing as though it
were a small, hot bulb, the pain
remained constant. It concen-
trated on an area no larger than a
quarter. He clutched at the
oppression, which seemed to
center four inches below his
necktie.
Suddenly there was a second
acute ball of pain, then a third
left him struggling for breath.
Everything in his body strained
toward the left side of his chest.





Intimacy


and the


married

woman.


The need to be sure
It's so important for your well-
being as a woman to feel sure
about the functioning and fresh-
ness of your body
Because douching isn't practi.
cal, or even always advisable, cau.
tiousmarried women of today rely
on Norforms feminine supposito
nes.
Positive protection two ways
Norforms do a two fold )ob most
effectively They protect you
against embarrassing problems
with their highly perfected germi
cidal formula And they protect
you against offensive odors with
their rapid deodorant action
Complete confidence
So simple and convenient, Nor
formsdissolveat normal body tern
perature to form a protective film.
Theydo not harm delicate internal
tissue
Next time ask for Norforms, an
ideal way to have the confidence
you need as a mamed woman
Sold at pharmacies in packages
of 6, 12 and 24.
Informative booklet, write to:
Norwich International
410 Park Avenue,
New York,
NY 10022 i


CROSSWORD
PUZZLE
ACROSS 24. Peacock
butterflies
1. Title of 27. Verily
address 28. Dawn goddess
4. Pigeon 29. Book of the
7. Bitter Bible
11. Water in Paris 30. Hired cab
12. Black cuckoo 32. Migrate
13. Telegram 33. Urgent
14. Normal 35. Sharpen


16. Rara -
17. Beige
18. Spry
19. Frolic
21. Sword contest
22. Stag's mate


36. Matador's
opponent
37. Hur's vehicle
40. Unwritten
41. Grease
42. Harem room
43. Shaded walk


Now his body was nothing more
than a container for that searing
rod of pain.
He tried to clutch at the pain
again with his left hand. He
couldn't. The whole arm had
become numb. He began to
knead the useless arm with his
right hand, and the pain radia-
ted from his left shoulder down
to his elbow.
At that moment Tom knew.
He was having a heart attack.
Tom turned to find that a
woman was sitting beside him.
"I-I'm very ill," he told her.
Then he gave in to the pain and
slipped away into unconscious-
ness.
He didn't wake until he felt
someone putting a small pill
under his tongue. It was a man
in white. That and the wail of
the siren told him he was in an
ambulance on his way to a hos-
pital.
Your Heart In Your Hands
Tom doubtless triggered his
heart attack with his rushing for
the bus and the food he had
eaten that day. Yet, he had re-
ceived other telltale signs: his
nervous indigestion, his sleep-
lessness, and his pallor.
"Working too hard at the
office," he would say. "Guess
I'll have to take a vacation one of
these years."
If you are overweight and feel
even slightly under par, check
up on your health.
Why not face it? Your heart is
in your hands. This is the age of
the coronary-disease epidemic.
Doctors are trying a cure-
though-prevention. But the
greater part of this job must be
done by you alone.
Who Are the Victims?
This disease is a prejudiced
killer. It stalks through our land,
striking down the hard-work-
ing, the able, the ener-
getic-males by preference.
It is a vicious killer of the
mature man-the man who is
probably near the top of his
business and who, like Tom,
prides himself on being a
healthy specimen, whose boast
is, "Never sick a day in my life."
Coronary heart disease is
characterized by a sudden,
severe pain in the heart region or
the pit of the stomach. Until
about 40 years ago, it was called
"acute indigestion." Sudden
death is not uncommon.
Today, with our faster pace of




-ow n many
to words of
S T f o u r letters
or more can
y o 11i make
fromun the
SH letters shown
h ere In
making a
L L word. each
L A letter lia y
he used once
-;only. Each
word must contain the large
letter, and there must be at
least one eight-letter word in the
lit. No i plurals; no foreign words;
no proper names. TODAY'S
TARIET : 20 words, good;
6 %,rdls. very good: 34 words.
excellent. solution tomorrow.
YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION :
Earth hare harsh hart hash
haste hate hear heart hearth
Ileat heath hers rash rasher
rather rather rehash rhea share
sharer .hear sheath thrash
THRASHER thresh trash.


Neo I FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157


8n 31 r AIL





NTL

L A V
of M


SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE
44. Unclose 3. Miraculous
45. French marshal 4. Mother-of-
DOWN pearl
5. Two-toed sloth
1. Converged 6.Zero
2. Beam 7. In the know
I3 81 1 50 8. Culture
r 9. Sweet flag
13 10. Stipo
S 15.Frosted
16 18. Purchase
- 19. Timid
20. Dessert
- 21. German article
23. Hawaiian food
-~ 2 2 25. Hockey player
Bobby
26. Everybody's
uncle
28. English river
- 29. Pitcher
31. Coral island
- 32. Slate
33. Particle
34. Persian gazelle
35. Flog
37. Murmur
38. Poem
atur 7-13 39. Scottish firth


living, it strikes not only the
older man. Men in their thirties
and forties are claimed as its vic-
tims.
Your heart is a masterpiece of
nature. It is not a delicate or fra-
gile organ, but a strong, hardy
mechanism.
Day after day, year after year,
it performs a tremendous
amount of work, never stop-
ping for even a few seconds.
This miniature pump is just
about the size of your fist.
Each day the heart pumps ap-
proximately 4,320 gallons of
blood through 60,000 miles of
blood vessels. The quantity of
blood it pumps varies from hour
to hour. Yet the heart seldom
complains. It adjusts its blood
flow to your body's needs.
No One Is Immune
Do you like to kid yourself by
thinking there's no connection
between the foods you eat and
thickened, hardened arteries?


Imagining yourself immune.
you think that "pass the pota-
toes and gravy, honey" will do
you no harm. That you can eat
all of the high starch, high fat
junk you have a mind to.
You may think that only with
advancing age is one troubled, if
one is to be troubled at all. But
did you know that there is
plenty of evidence to show that
coronary disease was found in
three-fourths of 300 young men,
averaging 22 years of age, who
were killed in battle in Viet-
nam?
The excessive starches, the
high fats-especially in com-
bination-have a good deal to
do with the yellowish, fatty
material that deposits itself in
scattered patches beneath the
slick lining of the arteries,
usually at the point where they
branch. What do you suppose
happens when these deposits
start blocking the arteries?
The heart muscle warns you


with a severe pain that is felt
beneath the breastbone, across
the upper part of the chest, or
down the left arm.
Listen to Your Heart
Disregard this warning and
you invite the real No. I killer or
crippler to enter your life.
Such lesions on your arterial
walls may slow down the circu-
lation of blood to the extent that
a clot forms at the point of
narrowing-a clot that com-
pletely stops the blood flow
feeding your heart. Your coro-
nary artery is plugged, and you
have coronary thrombosis-a
clot on the heart.
With modern treatment your
chances of survival from an in-
itial attack of coronary occlus-
ion are close to 90 percent.
Eighty to 85 percent of coron-
aries who recover from such
attacks are able to return to their
jobs and resume fairly normal
lives.


Don't you be a heart-pessi-
mist.
He's the man who continues
on his precarious way. He says,
"I've got heart trouble, but there
isn't anything I can do about it."
Listen to your heart's warn-
ing. You can increase your
chance for survival. If neces-
sary, say:
"I've got heart trouble, but
there must be something I can
do about it. Tell me what it is,


ra lr-i--h,
( bv lord ordeall All rihl, r"-.rtel
Dnirishited h% Siwt'lh Fe-;inmliirt S.iulaitr'


Keep fit with

DeW1tt's Pills







with the strong action
against BACKACHE
and MUSCLE PAINS


Goombay Summer is a good time for all of us.

Dancing in the streets. Activities throughout the

Bahamas.

We at Royal Bank always get into the swing of

Goombay Summer. It's a uniquely Bahamian way

of involving ourselves in the Bahamas.

Why don't you get involved this summer? And

who knows? You may see your Helpful Banker
*e 1


the helpful bank
Branches throughout the Bahamas


~31 LI


--











THE TRIBUNE - Thursday, July 11, 1974.


CLASSIC IED


SECTION


CL ASSIFED ADVS. BRtNG RMJLTS- FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV. TELEPHONE 2196 EXT. 5


EM ESTATE FOR RENT


CI$977
2 bt*ooms 2baths, furnished,
CAREFREE APARTMENT --
Cable Beach. Only $35,000.00
rental income$450.
CHERTSEY third
floor-furnished only
$60,000.00 presently rented.
SEVENTH FLOOR -
CAREFREE, breathtaking
views beach, pool, patio -
furnished. Come see lets make
a deal.
CONCHREST best views in
the Cable Beach Area. Facing
Sea, use of pool, patio, beach.
High & Dry on Fourth
Floor. See anytime, we have
tastefully and expansively
the key. Asking $80,000.00
rental $750.
DIAL DAMIANOS &
ASSOCIATES 22033, 22305,
22307 evenings 41197.

C15883
LOTS for sale which includes
use of private beach.
YAMACRAW BEACH
ESTATES. LOW $75 deposit.
70 x 100 lots. Tel: 4-1141 any
day or night or 2-4148.

C15991
BILL'S REAL ESTATE
AGENCY LTD. offers the
following choice property:-
Eight acres prime hilltop
property.
62 acres on Eastern Rd. ideal
for exclusive land
development.
Approximately 50,000 square
feet Bay Street property near
town ideal for offices
apartment or other commercial
use.
400 feet commerciaT Frontage
in Blair. Estate;
Choice commercial lot Shirley
Street with convenient side
entrance. Large commercial
area Palmdale comprising four
lots with over 500 ft. road
frontaae.
Five acres bordering three
roads in Oakes Field ideal for
larae sboooinq centre.
Approximately five acres near
Quality Supermarket with
commercial zoning ideal for
shopping centre to serve the
South-East area.
Other good buys in commercial
and residential properties.
Prices terms and other
information available by calling
23921 or write Box 5449
Nassau.

C16007
ENJOY COUNTRY t.IFE AT
ITS BEST Out East. Stone's
thrown from St. Andrew's
School. Three bedrooms two
baths, large modern kitchen,
separate dining, sitting-family
room. Tiled floors with some
carpeting and draperies.
Equipped with water purifier,
generator, grounds need
landscaping. Asking only
$40,000.00 for this brand new
house with $10,000.00 down,
balance $30,000.00 for 15
years at $360 per month. Less
than rental. See anytime.
RING THE ACTION
NUMBERS 22033, 22305,
22307, night 41197.

C15345
LOTS FOR SALE
Carmichael Road 75 x 100 -
$4,500 and Oakes Field 50 x
120 $6,000 Contact: Mr. A.
Saunders, Box F-1502,
Freeport. (Tel. 373-2782).

C16035
ATTRACTIVE three-bedroom
two-bath house In excellent
neighbourhood with beach
rights off Eastern Road
convenient to St. Andrew's
School.

Living room, separate dining
room, T.V. room, family room,
Bahama room, patio, kitchen,
laundry. Beautifully furnished.
Lot 100' x 125'. Asking
$85.000.

Large well-built three-bedroom
two-bath house off Village
Road hilltop convenient to
Queen's College and Montagu
Beach. Living room, Bahama
room, separate dining room,
spacious kitchen, detached
garage, maid's room and
laundry. $55,000 furnished.

Arch itect -designed
three-bedroom, two-bath
residence Cable Beach in quiet
cul-de sac with beach rights.
$55,000 furnished.
H. G. CHRISTIE LTD.
Phone 21041/2/3/4.


C16042
FOR SALE
CONCHREST. 2 bedroom 2
bath, airconditioned apartment
facing sea. Elegantly furnished.
Pool. View by appointment.
$82,000 or offer. Phone
2-1741 2-1742 business
hours.
C16043
FOUR BEDROOM 2 storey
duplex apartment Sunlight
Village. Monthly rental $400.
Asking $45,000.00. Call
3-5779 ask for Corrine Brown.

SNREIiT
C15919
COTTAGES and apartments
monthly airconditioned, fully
furnished, maid service
available. Lovely garden and
winmibng pool. Telephone
31297. 31093.


--I


C15921
LOVELY 2 bedroom
alrconditioned apartment,
Dundas Court, Pyfrom's
Addition, Mdaster T.V. antenna
and laundry room facilities,
enclosed parking area. FOr
information call 3-4953 or
5-4258.
C15882
TWO 2 bedroom apartments,
fully furnished. Cehtrevilld,
Ring Mr. Pritchard at 58134.


C15917
2 BEDROOM 1 bath
apartment, fully furnished and
ready for occupancy. Situated
in Winton Highway. Prices vary
from $350 to $375 per month.
Phone 2-1631.
C15920
LARGE spacious 3 bedrooms
(all airconditioned) 3 bath
full furnished, hilltop house,
Dannottage Estate. Must see to
appreciate. $700 per month
including light and water.
Telephone 2-3713, 5-9322 or
3-1671.
C15942
ONE THREE BEDROOM, two'
bath, airconditioned furnished
home, Queen's Road, Nassau
East. Phone 5-4684 or 2-3750.

C16038
17 HARBOUR MEWS.
Desirable Town House,'
Secluded situation with sea
view from top floor.
Attractively furnished
throughout. 2 Bedrooms,
dressing room 2 Baths WITH
ADDITIONAL SHOWER,
Private patio with use of pool
and beach. Phone 77502
before 9.30 a.m. or between
5-7 p.m.

C16041
UNFURNISHED one bedroom
apartment. $140 South Beach.
Phone 3-4241.
C16056
BEAUTIFULLY furnished one
bedroom apartments. Nice
quiet area. For further
information call 42128 or
42787 anytime.

FOR SALE OR RENT
._J
C15961
3 bedroom 2 bath house,
unfurnished. Blair Estates.
Phone 3-2095.

CARS FOR SALE

C15968
FORD CAPRI 72 blue, white
interior, very good condition,
no rust. $2,200 O.N.O. V.
McLeod 41000 Apt. 6.
C16017
1973 PINTO. Excellent
condition. Low mileage. NO
REASONABLE OFFER
REFUSED. Phone 31744 days,
42004 Nights and Weekends.
C16018
1972 FIAT 124 Station
Wagon. Excellent condition.
Phone 31744 days, 42004
nights and weekends.

C16040
FIAT 124 SPORTS COUPE
Very good condition. Call
42540.
C16053
MUST sacrifice 1969 Sports
Coupe. Excellent condition.
$1800.00 or nearest offer. Call
35625 or 58803.

C16049
'73 CHEVY VEGA
airconditioned, radio and tape,
Al condition, 10,000 miles.
Financing available'. $3,500.
Interested parties only call 8 to
5 2-4896, 2-1338 after 6 p.m.
5-2104.

FOR SALE
C15976
FOUR piece sectional couch In
brown and two armchairs in
gold. For information call
32027.

C15965
OWNER LEAVING ISLAND
furniture, bicycles and
other miscellaneous household
items Phone 3.5729.
C16032
WANT A PLACE TO LIVE?
Why buy a house when you
can cruise and live aboard a 53'
cabin cruiser. Call 28945 for
details.


MARINE SUPPLIES
C16031
22' BOAT 160 H.P.
Mercruiser, top condition
accessories included. $3.500
(O.N.O.) Pair of Cypress
Garden Skiis, grooved for
Slalom. Cost new $160.00, will


sell for $70.00.
One rebuilt Mercruiser 160
H P. engine $700.
Owner leaving Island. Call
anytime 31642.

C 6013
H.P. EVINRUDE 1971
Outboard. Plus electric
controls. Completely
overhauled. All new gearing
and power pack. $695.00
Garner Office, 21061 Home
31521


MARINE IPLIS


C11894 ",
1969 31 ft. CHRIS-CRAFT:
Commander. sleeps six, private
shower, two 230 h.p. engi ie,
:with less than 200 hours.!
'Kitchenette, good condition
Call 24267, 54011.
C16039
14 ft. BOAT, well, model 102
Seagull outboard. Phone
2-2861 ext 343 from 12 noon
to 7:45 p.m. Ask for Mary
Adderley.

C15931
YACHT "WHISTLING SWAM"
43' Matthews Sedan: Twin
Diesel Power: See at Nassau
Harbour Club: Contact Owner
Mr. S. P. Sherman, West Palm
Beach, Fla. Tel: 305-832-0784.

CRAFT SP.ES

Ci5914
NOW in stock at Bahamian
'Paint Supply, Bay Street.
Decoupage
Clear Cast
9 Candle Craft
Tissue Craft
Phone 2-2386. 2-2898

ENTERTAINMENT

C14336
SETTLER'S PUB & INN
Beaumont Arcade, Bay Street
Telephone 5-9739
TWO BANDS NIGHTLY
The Nassauvians
The Electric Circle
OPEN TILL 4.00 a.m.
C15787
BLUE HILL GOLF CLUB
Golf: Adults $2.50 and Juniors
$1.50 per day.
DRIVE RANGE, TENNIS
AND SQUASH
From 8:00 a.m. to Midnight
7 days per week -Tel: 3-6333.

HEALTH FOOD

C15950
FOR the very best in Exercise
Equipment, Natural Health
Food and Vitamins, visit
Wong's Health Food Store,
Mackey Street.
Exercise Equipment bales
and Rentals.

!I SCHOOLS I

C 15884
LEWIS AUTO SCHOOL
Learn to drive with confidence.
Phone 59805 between 7 and
8:30 p.m. or 3-5084 anytime.
C16019
Enroll now at the Nassau
Academy of Business in the
following summer classes:-
Typing with Spellna Shorthand
Bookkeeping
Switchboard
Front Desk Cashier
Night Auditing
Telex Operation
English
Mathematics
Filing
Dictaphone Typis'
Call the Nassau Acaaemy oT
Business at 24993. or come in
at Shirley Street, opposite
Collins Ave.
C15933
PIANO MUSIC LESSONS
at home
Call 31119.

AMNOCEMENT
C16026
JUST ARRIVED FROM
ENGLAND:
SBone Meal Tabl.
Acerola
Brewers Yeast Tab
Desiccated Liver Tab
Carlic Caps
Iron Formula
Kelp Tab
Lecithin Caps
Rose Hip Caps. 200 mg
Safflower Caps.
Vit. B.12 Tab. 25 mic.
Vit. B. Complex Caps.
Vit. E. Cap. 100 ius
Vit. E. 200 ius
Wheat Germ Oil Caps. 5 ius
Suntlower Seeds
Pro Vit. A Caps.
Geriatric Formula Tab.

NASSAU DRUG STORE
Mackey Street

I POSITION WANTED
C15984


BAHAMIAN SEEKS
POSITION AS HOUSEKEEP-
ER OR MAID. TOP
REFERENCES. CALL 5-2714
(10:00 to 2:00)


CARD OF TANKS
C16037
Mr. Cubebll McCoy the husband
of the late Mrs. Uleas McCoy
would like to thank the
following for their assistance
with the funeral services:-Hon.
Lionel and Mrs. Davis, Hon.
Carlton and Mrs. Francis, Mr.
& Mrs. George McKinney, The
Rev. Leroy Roker and the Rev.
Leo Cox for their kind spiritual
performance, and Mr. & Mrs.
R. Curtis of Curtis Memorial
Mortuary. The Lord bless them


Cubell McCoy.


CARD OF THANKS


I I


C16052


THE family of the late
KERMIT EDGAR SIMMS,
wish to thank the many friends
and relatives for their kind
words of sympathy and floral
arrangements during their
recent bereav ment.
SPECIAL THANKS TO:
Father Gilbert Thompson of
St. Barnabas Parish and Curtis
Memorial Mortuary.
THE BROTHERS AND
FAMILY

HELP WANTED

C15928
JOB TITLE: (THREE)
WELDERS
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education. Must be
a certified welder.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years.
5-10 years.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Must be a certified weldei
capable of performing
horizontal, vertical and
overhead welding, brazing and
cutting of any material using
gas and electric welding
equipment.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0 ox F- 100,
Freeport, Grand BAiz ma
C15922
WANTED IMMFD! I
Experienced Offset i', ', n,
40 hours per wcu.', yood
working conditions. Apply
BAHAMAS PRINTING, Oakes
Field.


HELP WANTED


I'
I


-.--


C15964
FOUR FARM LABOLPI H'..
to live on farm. Wages i,0 $.
per week. Phone 4 24 50
C15342
Full time MAID to %le in.
Must be prepared to take
complete responsibility of two
small children. Apply to Mrs.
Gwen Lockhart, 352-5815.
C16011
AN OUTI S LAND
RESORT/DEVELOPMENT
requires immediately "a
Plumbing Superintendent who
must be a registered Licensed
Master Plumber and who will
be responsible for all new
installations and maintenance
of well fields, sewage plant, lift
stations, hotel and villa
maintenance and be able to
train subordinates. Must have
at least six years general
experience in plumbing and at
least one year experience in a
supervisory capacity.
APPLY TO: "PLUMBING
SUPT.", P. 0. Box N-3229,
Nassau, N. P., Bahamas.
C 16044
ADMINISTRATIVE
SUPERINTENDENT
Applicants should be of a
marine administrative
discipline or a plant engineer
with a strong business and/or
management background
Applicants .are required to have
a rn.inimum of 10 years
experience in a Bulk Terminal,
product movement and storage
operations of a Petroleum
Refinrery, Port Administration
or Bulk Shipping facility.
The individual holding this
position will bc responsible for
the efficient management of
personnel, warehousing,
services and oil 'accountancy
functions.
Applicants should apply to P.
0. Box Y.2530. Freeport,
Crand Bohaim.,.

C 1601147
F-, I /AMIAN GARDENER and
S-i ru'li I wan ted 6 days a
w":k.. Job includes maintaining
swimming pool, garden, green
house and cleaning windows,
screens etc. References
essentiall Phone 41063.


BUSINESS PROFESSIONAL


DIRECTORY

Save Time

SHOP








>JHOE' 1IME SAVE IEY <
I*
I ~ UM4~tS ?Ujrii W

^^^gngE~g.


ALARMS/SECURITY
I iur Winis I ld.
Write: HIlo N4.272 I'lh ;21 214
lwef's Alirmi, Srvnicrl ', l'I. 1 2042
National Sec, rit) Svst. iinn,
i1~ I'll. S 7 1 '
ANTENNAS
Island TV I'l. 2 2,11

AUTOMOTIVE
LuCis Ha iteries
nay Sitreet (;arage' I'i. 2 24. '.
rraiismiissi'in Rcral:irn
Shell Action Statiiin I'lh. 2000
BOOKSTORE
Tlhe .Christi li ook
Shorp I'll. S 714

BUSINESS FORMS
I 'cuiitiv.'
I'rnmi rs 1 I'h. 2-42('7//S. 4i II
KITCHEN CABINETS
oimmonweralth
I trnititurt I' I I

CAMERAS
Jinn Hull 'll. 2 42S.2 1
DOWNTOWN PARKING
MIonihh rll H:l(, rI
I'l',ii. 2-4727(d,1, ) 7- 7.3 7(ili )

ENTERTAINMENT
Ati4iio Vistal n&l ,,i-s
uIn & I i uilp. Serve s I'll 2 21 57

FLORISTS
Is l. idI l i,rir I'l l. 2 2702/, -, 5 11)


HURRICANE AWNINGS
JoIhn S. (eorge I'h. 2-8421/6
LAUNDRY&DRY CLEANING
N \v O(rielntal l..iuiildr y 'h. 2-4403.
MEATS
l irir, MSkits
\VI,,h',lh,> l iiil i'h. 5-97! ;

MEN'S WEAR
'I shii,, Ih' Ll.d. I'l. 2-2376/7

OPTICIANS
Olpln1l A Servicrs Ll. I'll. 2-3910oil

PAPER
C(illme'rci;al Iavvio'rrll i I'll. 5-973 1
PRINTING
Ii 's Prillli rng I'll. 5-4 ()06

lih Il 2-4267/5-401 I

RUBBER STAMPS
W nli 's kiiilu r SliiIli\n I'll'S 5-4SOI,
I l I i hI un l' 2- sh

SPORTS GOODS
I'lirn mipi Sp p s I ,l1an *'i. '. .Is62

TRAVEL
I'I.. Ito rs I'lh 2 2931/7
I1. ('urT & '." I'li. 2 -Si6 /7

TV REPAIRS
C(halii I'l HectIron.s Lid.I'll. 3-5478

TRUCKING

Iruckiiig & landscap,, I'h. 5-9574

TYPEWRITER REPAIR


GARDEN & PET SUPPLIES Ilm,,r 1l, l 'Ph. 5.1044
Modmrirtic Garden&r P.
NMadeira S1pping hI'1/,Ui H'h 2-2,S,TERING
Nassau (Gardeii & PI'e
Miontriose Aveueiu I'h 2-4259 I ddc'%s llphlrsi ring Ph. 5-9713
-mm- mm"mm'm mm m-mm- m


I llmmlmm llm mmmlm lm l


Shop Nassau Merchants
For Business And Services


HELP WANTED


C 16048
MAID wanted 5/ days a v*ek.
Some cooking .aseritlal.
t. ,I- ijin only with references
.i.. Phone 41063.
C16050
BAHAMIAN MAID AND
GARDENER. live-in. No
children. Telephone 7-4159.
C15354
ASSISTANT MANAGER -.
CHINESE RESTAURANT
The incumbent of this position
works directly with the
General Manager and assumes
all responsibilities for the
restaurant during his absence.
Directly supervises and
co-ordinates all activities
within the kitchen, foodstuffs,
etc., both locally and overseas,
including Hong Kong. Must
work on a split shift basis and
is normally on duty until
closing time at midnight. A
minimum of 3 years experience
in a similar position and a
complete knowledge of
Chinese language necessary.
TWO (2) CANTONESE
COOKS Minimum of 3 years
experience in general
preparation of all types of
Cantonese food, acquired in
first class Chinese restaurant or
Hotel.
Qualified and interested
candidates may apply to: P. 0.
Box F-795, Freeport with copy
of resume.
C16030
FOLLOWING POSITIONS
AVAILABLE:
Scuba diving instructor/guide
with at least two years previous
experience required. Secretary
with hotel experience
preferred. Only Bahamians
need apply. Call Stella Maris
Inn, Long Island, or write
Stella Maris Inn, P. O. Box
105, Stella Maris, Long Island.
I &A I
|_PUBLIC AUCTION
C 15994
HARRY D. MALONE will sell
at his premises on Albury Lane
five doors from Shirley Street
on the right hand side in the
Eastern District of the Island
of New Providence on Friday
the 19th day of July A.D.
1974 at 12 o'clock noon the
following property.
ALL THOSE certain pieces
or parcels of land known as
Lots Nos. 70, 71, 72 and 73
of Block No. 3, Lots Nos. 3,
4, 5, 6, and 7 of Block No.
11, Lots Nos. 2, 3, 4. 15, 17,
18, 19, 26, 27 and 28 of
Block No. 10 and Lots Nos.
3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 and tract
"A" of Block No. 2 as laid
out by Berry Islands
Development Company
(Bahamas) Limited
containing by
admeasurement Twelve and
One hundred and Fifty-six
thousandths (12.156) of an
acre or thereabouts situate
in the Southern part of
Cistern Cay one of the
Islands in the group of
Islands known as The Berry
Islands in the
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas.
The property is being sold
under The Bank of Nova
Scotia's statutory power of sale
which ,arises by virtue of a
Supplemental Debenture dated
the 1st day of November A.D.,
1971 made between Berry
Islands Development Company
(Bahamas) Limited of the one
part and The Bank of Nova
Scotia of the other part and
now of record in the Registry
of Records in the City of
Nassau in the Island of New
Providence in Volume 1852 at
pages 103 to 111.
The sale is subject to a reserve
price and to the right for the
Auctioneer or any person on
his behalf to bid to that price.
Terms 10% of the purchase
price at the time of the sale
and the balance thereof on
completion.
Dated this 2nd day of July
1974
HARRY D. MALONE
Public Auctioneer
July 4, 11, 18
C15995
HARRY D. MALONE will sell
at his premises on Albury
Lane, situate Five (5) doors
from Shirley Street, South on
the right hand side on Friday
July 19th 1974 at 12 o'clock
noon, the following property:-


ALL THAT the Unit'
known as Apartment No. 5
on the second floor of the
block of flats comprised in
the Prospect Ridge
Condominium (formerly
known as Highland Park
Condominium) abutting the
Golf Course at Goodman
Bay in the Western District
of the Island of New
Providence in the
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas and having access
to Sandford Drive the
location shape approximate
floor area dimensions and
boundaries of which shall be
ascertained by reference to a
De c laration of
Condominium dated the
Sixteenth day of December,
A.D., 1968 and recorded in
the. Registry of Records of
the said Commonwealth in
Volume 1355 at pages 105
to 127 and the plans and


I I uMIC AMT


drawings annexed thereto
together with the parking
and dustbin space allotted
thereto AND SECONDLY
ALL THAT undivided share
equivalent to the Unit
Entitlement In the common
property of the said
Condominium comprising
3.8 per cent as shown In the
said Declaration of
Condominium.
The property is sold by
Prospect Ridge Management
Association under and by
virtue of the provisions of
Section 21 of The Law of
Property and Conveyancing
(Condominium) Act 1965 for
the purpose of enforcing a
Charge dated the 10th day of
April, A.D., 1974 and recorded
in the said Registry of Records
in Volume 2242 at pages 559
to 562 entered against the said
property In respect., of unpaid
Condominium Charges and
interest thereon due .and
payable by Atlantic and Pacific
Bank and Trust Company
Limited.
The sale is subject to a reserve
price and to the right for the
Auctioneer or any person on
his behalf to bid up to that
price.
Terms: 10% of the purchase
price at the time of sale and
balance on completion.
Dated this 2nd day of July
A.D., 1974.


HARRY D. Malone
Public Auctioneer.

C15930
HARRY D. MALONE will sell
at his premises on Albury Lane
situated Five (5) doors frqm
Shirley Street on the right
hand side on Friday July 12th
1974 at 12 o'clock noon the
following property:-
AT THAT piece parcel or lot
of land being Lot' Number
Ten (10) of the Subdivision
known as "Gardenview
Estates" situate on Bernard
Road In the Eastern District
of the Island of New
Providence which said piece
parcel or lot of land is
bounded NORTHEAST-
WARDLY by Lot Number
Eleven (11) of the said
Subdivision and running
thereon Niety and Seven-
teen hundredths
(90.17) feet SOUTHEAST-
WARDLY BY land the
property of the Estate of
Frank Kelly'y and. running
thereon Fifty (50) feet
SOUTHWESTWARDLY by
Lot Number Nine (9) of the
said Subdivision and running
thereon Ninety and
Seventeen hundredths
(90.17) feet and
NORTHWESTWARDLY by*
a road reservation Thirty-six
(36) feet wide and running
thereon Fifty (50) feet
which said piece parcel or
lot of land has such position
shape marks and dimensions
as are shown' on a plan filed
in the Reigstered Office of
Regency (Bahamas) Limited
and is demarcated on the
said plan by the Number
Ten (10).
Equitable Mortgage dated the
Thirtieth day of May, A.D,
1973 and made between
Monica Roker of the one part
of The Royal Bank of Canada
of the other part and now of
record in the Registry of
Records of the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas in Volume
2148 at pages 141 to 144.
The sale is subject to a reserve
price and to the right for the
Auctioneer or any person on
his behalf to. bid up to that
price. Terms: 10% of the
purchase price at the time of
the sale and the balance on
completion.
Dated this 25th day of June
A.D. 1974...
HARRY D. MALONE
Public Auctioneer.
C16002
HARRY D. MALONE will sell
at his premises on Albury Lane
five doors from Shirley Street
on the right hand side in the
Eastern District of the Island
of New Providence on Friday
the 19th day of July A.D.,
1974 at 12 o'clock noon the
following property:-
ALL THOSE following pieces
parcels tracts or lots of land
which are comprised in a tract
of land containing One
hundred and Nineteen and
Seventy-eight hundredths
(119.78) acres known as
Lignum Vitae Cay one of the
Islands in the group of Islands
known as The Berry Islands in
the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas and a tract of land
containing One hundred and
Fifty-two and Thirty one
hundredths (152.31) acres at
the northern end of Cistern
Cay one of the Islands in the
group of Islands known ai The
Berry Islands in the
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas:-

LIGNUM VITAE CAY
*LIGNUM VITE WEST
Lots 1 to 47 inclusive and 49
to 54 Inclusive
Lignum Vitae South
Lots 1 to 26 inclusive and 28
to 54 inclusive.
Llgnum VIte Eait
Lots 1 to 40 Inclusive and 43
to 58 inclueve.

LIgaum VItae North


SERi AUCTU

Hotel Site 708.559 squme
feet
AN park areas and roadways on
Lignem Vitae Cay.
NORTHERN END OF
CISTERN-CAY
.Block 1 Lots 1 to
Inclusive.
Block 2 Lots 1 to 7 inclusive
Block 3 Lots 1. 2. 5, 8 and
17 to 24 Inclusive.
block 4 Lots 7 and 9
Block 5 Lots I to 7 Inclusive
and 9 to 11 inclusive.
Block 6 Lots 1, 3, to 5
inclusive and 7 to 10 inclusive.
Block 7 Lots 5. 7 and 10 to
12 Inclusive.
Block 8 Lots I to 10
Inclusive and 12 to 14
inclusive.
Block 9 Lots 1, 12 to 18
inclusive and 20 to 23
inclusive.
Block 10 Lots 1 to 8
inclusive, 11 to 31 inclusive
and 33.
Block 11 Lots 2 to 5
inclusive and 7 to 16 Inclusive.


Block 12 Lots 6, 10 to 12
inclusive, 16, 10 and 22
Block 13 Lots I and 6 to 9
inclusive.
Airstrip, all park areas,
roadways and beach
reservations.
EXCEPT AND RESERVING
unto Berry Islands
Development Company
(Bahamas) Limited from the
three pieces parcels or tracts of
land hereinbefore described
ALL THOSE lots of land
shown coloured Pink of the
plan attached to the Debenture
referred to below.
The property is being sold
under The Bank of Nova
Scotia's statutory power of sale
which arises by virtue of a
Debenture dated the 5th day
of February,.A.O., 1971 made
between Berry Islands
Development Company
(Bahamas) Umited of the one
part and The Bank of Nova
Scotia of the other part and
now of record in the Registry
of Records in the City of
'Nassau in the Island of New
,Providence in Volume 1736 at
pages 53 to 68.
The sale is subject to a reserve
price and to the right for the
Auctioneer or any person on
his behalf to bid to that price.
Terms 10% of the purchase
price at the time of the sale
and the balance thereof on
completion.
Please note that the interest of
Berry Islands Development
Company (Bahamas) Limited
in the northern moiety or half
pf the said Lignum Vitae Cay is
limited to an undivided
Twenty-five Thirtieths
(25/30ths) interest in the
Fifty-nine and Eighty-nine
hundredths (59.89) acres
which comprise same.
Dated this 2nd day of July
'1974.


July 4, 1


HARRY D. MALONE
Public Auctioneer

1, 18.


I TRu SERVICES 1


RALPH BROWN
3-4263 5-9368
BAHAMAS UPHOLSTERY
Adderley's Addition
Rebuilding, Repairing,
Refinishing
17 years experience
FREE ESTIMATES

C16033
'LANDSCAPING and for all
your gardening needs -
mowing, trimming, hedging,
tree felling and clearing, call
5-7810 LAWNS & HEDGES.
C15886
C. W. (BILL) PEMBERTON
FOR: INSURANCE
Life, Fire, Hurricane,
Motor, etc.
Telephone 52539
Malton House
P.O. Box N1014
Collins Avenue.
C15891
MASTER TECHNICIANS LTD
-Mackey Street
YOUR Wk1I*fLPOOL
DISTRIBUTOR O PERS.-
Refrigerators, Washers, Dryurs,
Complctors, Freuers, Ice
Makers, Air Conditioners and
Garbage Disposers.
With full warranty en every
home appance w Misell.

Service done by factory tralae
mecnics. laphone 237*),

C159Uw
T. V. ANf Mu., ,




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14 THETRIBUNE Thureday, July 11,1974.


TRADE SERVICES
C15888
BACKHOE FOR HIRE
,Need a septic tank or trenching
done?
Call: CARL G. TRECO
CONTRACTORS LTD.
2-4996 or 5-8725.


TRADE SERVICES
Clb5887
FOR YOUR BUILDING
NEEDS AND CRANE HIRE ..
see:-
ISLAND BUILDERS LIMITED
P. 0. Box 6285 ES
Phone 3-1671 -3-1672.


GRAO) BAHAMA



CLASSIFIED

IN FREEPORT

TEL. 352-6608


S ANNOUNCEMENTS
C15913
SHAWNEE
Daily Service between West
Palm Beach and West End. For
reservations call The Grand
Bahama Hotel (Ext. 5).

HELP WANTED
C15926
JOB TITLE: OPERATIONS
FOREMEN
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3-5
years. Training and experience
in cement manufacturing
. process.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
SSupervise single-turn activities
of cement making operations
Necessary to produce slurry
clinker and finished cement of
the type quantity and quality
required to meet customer
requirements and shipping
schedules.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personni
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C15928
JOB TITLE: (THREE)
WELDERS
MINIMUM EDUCATION:'
Good basic education. Must be
a certified welder.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBI LITI ES:
Must be a certified welder
capable of performing
horizontal, vertical and
overhead welding, brazing and
cutting of any material using
gas and electric welding
equipment.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CO ,iACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
C15350
GENERAL LABOURER AND
SANITARY MAN to carry out
general labour assignments,
clean and weed industrial yard,
clean workshop, offices and
toilets.
Apply to: Grand Bahama
Engineering, Ltd., P. 0. Box
F-2, Freeport, Tel. 352-6239.
C15348
Grand Bahama Petroleum
Company, Limited seeking an
experienced statistical typist to
work in accounting
department. Responsibilities to
include: typing financial
reports, invoices and
correspondence, key-punch on
-IBM 3741 remote terminal
(will train), perform
accounting functions (will
train).
To apply: send resume or write
for application or visit our
office at The International
Credit Bank Building, 3rd
floor. P. 0. Box F-2521,
Freeport, Bahamas.
C 15346
GARDENER: To work eight
hour day, rain or shine. Dig
holes for trees and plants. Dig
graves. Prepare plant beds
weed, cut grass, handle
insecticides, rake and collect
trash on planted area. Must
have proof of previous
experience.
Apply: Lucaya Nursery &
Landscaping Ltd., Forest Ave.
and Yellow Pine St., P. 0. Box
F-252, Freeport. G.B.
C15351
Live-in MAID to care for 4
children. Must be neat in
appearance. $35.00 per week.
Phone Freeport 352-2446.

C15349
Live in MAID needed.
STelephone 352-5700, Freeport
and ask for Mrs. R. Davis.
C15355
SExperienced yard man and
welder. Own tools, Kent
vriotors, Queens Highway,
* Freeport 352-7231.


Ir


-- ----


HELP WANTED
C 16055
SYNTEX CORPORATION
HAS THE FOLLOWING
VACANCIES:
MECHANIC/MILLWRIGHT
Capable ot trouble-shooting
general plant equipment,
knowledge of principle
methods and problems
associated with the operations
of maintenance shop and
chemical plant equipment. Six
years diversified industrial
experience, essential.
PROJECT ENGINEER
Responsible for design,
specification and installation of
new plant equipment. The
successful candidate requires a
B.Sc. degree in chemical or
mechanical engineering with at
least three years practical
experience in the chemical or
related industry
OPERATIONS FOREMAN
The Operations Foreman
reports to the Operations
Supervisor. He directs the
activities of operators, enqaqed
in providing 'rvices to the
Syntex Plant. This position
requires a knowledge of
chemistry, chemical processing
methods, chemical engineering
and mechanical engineering.
Must have a miniri,u,, ,f five
years experience in chemical
mechanical or i elated
industries.
ELECTR ICIAN/INSTRUMENI
TECHNICIAN
Required for the installation,
maintenance, repairs and tests
of electrical and
instrumentation systems
associated with power
distribution, I fighting
communications, machine
tools, motor controls, heating,
ventilation, rAW conditioning,
refrigeration, steam generation
and various chemical plant
equipment and utilities. Must
have at least six years
experience in industrial,
electrical and instrumentation
work.
Applicants should apply in
person to Syntex Corporation,
West Sunrise Highway, or
write to P. O. Box F-2430,
Freeport, Bahamas.
C16054
BANK OF LONDON &
MONTREAL invite
applications from Bahamians
for the vacancy of Credit
Analyst at its Head Office in
Nassau. The person te are
looking for must have
banking experience and
working knowledge of balance
sheet analysis. A basic
understanding of Spanish is
essential. After training, the
successful candidate would be
responsible for departmental
control work requiring
accuracy, conscientiousness
and a sense of responsibility.
Future advancement is possible
depending on ability.
Write giving personal details
and experience to the
Personnel Manager, P. 0. Box
N1262, Nassau, N.P. Bahamas.
C15352
CONFECTIONER
Preparation of French pastries
for Airline Caterinq.
Preparation of all breads and
pastries used in both Airline
Catering and Restaurant. Must
have diploma from
Confectioner School and at
least 10 years experience.
Reply to: G. B. Caterers Ltd.
FPO International Airport,
Tele: 352-7391.

FOR SALE

C15353
DRILL RIG, Sterling Model A
hydraulically operated, driven
bIy Ford 6 cylinder engine,
with winch capable of lifting
5,000 Ibs., mounted on
Chevrolet truck. All in good
running condition. Duty paid.
Call Grand Bahama
Engineering, Ltd. Tel.
352-6239.


HEATHCLIFF

subsidiaries or nominees of any of the servants or
agents thereof of notice of this Order may be
dispensed with and that publication in the Nassau
Daily Tribune and in the Nassau Guardian of
notice of this Order shall be deemed good service
thereof.
FINALLY AND IT IS ORDERED that the costs
of said application be costs in the matter of said
Petitioner .
DATED this 8th day of July, 1974 BY THE
ORDER OF THE COURT


HIGGS & JOHNSON
Attorneys for
The Fund of Funds, Limited
(in Liquidation)
F.O.F. Proprietary Funds Ltd.
lOS Growth Fund. Ltd.

PATON. TOOTHE & C('O.
Attorneys for
Venture Fund (International)
N.V. (in Liquidation).


J. C. Strachan
REGISTRAR


~*oo.

0 O O*


COMMONWEALTH OF
THE BAHAMAS 1974
IN THlE SUPREME COURT No. 378
SEquity Side

IN THE MATTER OF THE BAHAMAS
COMMONWEALTH BANK LIMITED AND IN
THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES ACT
(Chapterl84))
ORDER
Take notice that by an order of Mr. Justice
Maxwell J. Thompson, dated the 8th day of July,
A.I). 1974. Personal Service of notice of the Order
in this action, was dispensed with and it was
ordered that publication in the Nassau Daily
Tribune and in the Nassau Daily Guardian of
Notices of the said Order should be deemed good
service of the same.
And further, take notice by the said order dated
the 8th day of July, A.D. 1969, it was ordered as
fo1!ows:
IT IS ORDERED THAT this Court hereby
appoint Roderick Charles Kemp and David
Anthony Jones of Peat, Marwick, Mitchell & Co. of
Sassoon House, Shirley Street, in the City of
Nassau, jointly and severally as Provisional
Liquidators of the above named Company AND
this Court doth hereby limit and restrict the
powers of the said Provisional Liquidators to the
following:
(a) to take possession of the Company's assets
and those of its subsidiary companies and to
preserve and protect the same, including but
without limiting the generality of the foregoing:
Bahamas Commonwealth Trust Corporation
Ltd.
Chancellors Trust Company Ltd.
Charlotte Street Securities. Ltd.
Grand Bahama Leasing Company Limited
New Providence Leasing Company Ltd.
Central Garage Ltd.
Motor Centre Ltd.
(b) to appoint agents and/or Special Managers in
the Bahamas and any part of the world outside the
Bahamas to take possession of the Company's
assets and those of its subsidiary companies on
their bahalf:
(c) by themselves or by their agents or Special
Managers with the leave of the Court to take such
legal action as may be necessary or desirable to
reduce such assets into their possession and to
prevent their disposition sale or any other dealing
with the same.
(d) to carry on the business of the Company, its
subsidiaries, and nominees until further Order, but
so far only as may be necessary for preserving the
aforesaid company, its subsidiaries and nominees as
going concerns.
(e) to receive and collect the debts due to the
Company, its subsidiaries and nominees.
(f) to discharge rents, salaries and other current
expenses of the Company, its subsidiaries and
nominees.
(g) to give notices to determine the employment
of Clerks, Servants and other employees and
officers or any person howsoever employed by the
Company, it subsidiaries or nominees to pay such
of the Clerks. Servants, employees and any other
person howsoever as the Provisional Liquidators
may consider necessary for the purposes of the
Company, its subsidiaries and nominees.
(h) to open Bank accounts at such Banks as may
be determined by the Provisional Liquidators for
the Company, its subsidiaries and nominees in the
Bahamas or elsewhere in the world.
(i) to initiate and enter into provisional
contracts (any of which contracts would be subject
to the approval of the Court) for the sale of the
Company, its subsidiaries and nominees as going
concerns.
(j) pursuant to Section 35 of the Central Bank
of the Bahamas Act 1974 to permit the Provisional,
Liquidators to use the Report on Examination of
Statement of Condition of Bahamas
Commonwealth Bank Limited as at 3rd July, 1973
updated to 31st March, 1974 and all working
papers connected therewith, such use to be limited
to the performance of their duties as Provisional
Liquidators.
AND IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that the
Company and its subsidiaries and nominees and
their and each of their directors, officers, servants
and agents be and are hereby restrained from
parting with or removing or dealing with or
dest-oying any of their assets and books and
records and the documents of title or other indicia
of ownership or interest thereto and therein and
that an injunction be granted to the
effect.


AND IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that the
Company and its subsidiaries and nominees and
their and each of their directors, officers, servants
and agents to comply with the provisions of the
foregoing and that an injunction be and is hereby
granted direction them and each of them to
deliver into the custody and possession of the
Provisional Liquidators or their Special Managers
or their agents as the case may be the assets of the
Company and its subsidiaries and their books and
records and the documents of title and other
indicia of ownership thereto or of interest therein.
AND IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that the
payment of the costs, charges and expenses of the
Provisional Liquidators and of their authorised
agents and attorneys be made out of the assets of
the said Bahamas Commonwealth Bank Limited
and/or its subsidiaries AND that the said
Provisional Liquidators be indemnified in all
respects as to any action which they may take
howsoever in acting as such as to any action which
they may take whosoever in acting as such
Provisional Liquidators out of the assets of the said
Bahamas Commonwealth Bank Limited.
AND IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that personal
service upon the Company or of any of its


r'









THE TRIBUNE - Thursday, July 1, 1974


ONE MOMENT IF: MONS'EURWILLSITONwTIS,.
MONSIEUR I WILL SNEAK WIM A C4ILD'S _____
[E-PORTIONmo
.o^h~ ____^e -i>^ ^I


REX MORGAN, M.D


54e ConmU P


JUDGE PARKER


Dal C


IiA





PalNMichof


HTME wAY HE WAS HEWA JUST INTERESTED WHAT
DON'T LET WALT BOTHER 'QUESTIONING ME, I IN WHERE YOU CAME v-HARM
YOU, BECK! HE'S WORKED WAS BEGINNING FROM! WHAT HARM I 1 THERE
AROUND HERE 50 LONG, HE) TO THINK THAT 16 l THERE IN IN NOT
FEELS LIKE HE OWNS HE DOES! TELLING HIM? TELLING KIM,
SPENCER FARMS! 1g HMOWARD?


Now


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~*;










THE TRIBUNE Thursday, July 11, 174.


Raymond races to cycle victory


By Kerrington Wilkinson
YOUNG AMATEUR cyclist Raymond
Morley outsprinted Lawrence Burnside
and Bertram "Cowboy" Muagrove to the
finish line at Queen Elizabeth Sports
Centre to capture the .Bahamas Cycling
second annual Independent road race
held yesterday.
"I ride just about two laps around
Nassau every day. I practise hard and
most important I read books on cyling
which helps me a lot because I have
proven it here today," said the proud
18-year-old Raymond.


I

i


4;


MARK
BAHAMAS' welter and
junior middleweight champ
Elisha Obed will taste defeat
for the first time tonight,
predicted Trinidad's champ
and third ranking British
Commonwealth contender
Carlos Mark.
"I have heard a lot about
Obed and I saw him fight
once. He's a good fighter but
not as good as the people of
the Bahamas think," said
Mark.
"I fought some of the best
fighters in the world. They
were better than those he
fought and I did better than
what he would ever do
against them.
"I expect to win by a
knockout."
Mark, who has won his last
three fights within the
distance, faces the hard
hitting Obed in a ten round
feature event tonight 8:30 at
the A.F. Adderley Gym.
Heavyweight champ Bob
Freeze tackles Carl Baker in
another bout.
Mark's manager/coach
McKeller Sandiford agreed.
"I'm not going to leave my
home a couple of thousand
miles away just to bring my
boy here to lose. I have one
intention and that is to win,"
he said.
"I am going to give the
people of Nassau an
independence present.
Tonight would be the first
time they ever see their idol
lose a fight. It would be no
disgrace. He has to lose some
time sooner or later and this
is one of the times."
The Mark camp has,a right
to boast. The 28-year-old
boxer has made a
praiseworthy impact on the
international scene. His globe
trotting has taken him to
New York, Paris, London,
parts of Central America,
Copenhagen and Australia.
His 45-14-2 record under
close scrutiny becomes very
impressive when the names of
former world welter and
middleweight champ Emile
Griffith, current W.B.C.
champ Rodrigo Valdes,
British Commonwealth title
holder Tony Mundine and
other top ranking contenders
like Bennie Briscoe and Bill
Douglas come into focus.
Obed who is undefeated in
48 performances took a draw
against Dario Hidalgo in his
last outing.

Regatta win

COMMODORE Bob Bigham,
assisted by Peg Bigham and
John Chaplin, skippered Dona
Pituca to first place in the
Bahamas Yacht Squadron's
regatta yesterday.


The event had 17 riders when
started. Six finished, with Morley the
overall winner. Burnside running second
overall and first in the professional clamss
followed by Musgrove, Boston Blackie
and Nathaniel Munroe who was
outsprinted by Boston to the tape.
The riders stayed together on Blake
Road as they swung onto J. F. Jennedy
Drive. It was then that Lawrence
Burnside made his move followed closely
by Musgrove.
With the remainder of the riders about
a mile behind, Burnside and Musgrove


continued to ride side by side with
Morley following some fifty yards
behind.
At Quarry Mission Road Morley caught
his opponents with a back speed and rode
abreast them until they were travelling on
the Western Front by Saunders Beach.
Then he tried to make his move but
Burnside and Musgrove kept going
strongly.
Among those who dropped out was
Olympian Jeff Burnside who had a flat
tyre and spilled from his bike during the
final lap.


ncrures: Margaret (uullaume
Wendy Jackman dives to save a low service during Tuesday night's all-star game. Janet Bowe
awaits the set.


Volleyballers



hit new


heights
by GLADSTONE THURSTON


Linda Davies of the
Bahama Blues bumps on
defence.

Popular

Panzy
PANZY Johnson was named
"Most Valuable Player" as the
New Providence All Stars
Softball Team shaded the
Eleuthera All Stars 3-2 in the
New Providence Softball
Association Second annual
Independent game yesterday at
J.F. Kennedy Park.
"1 feel beautiful all over," said
the smiling I'anty Johnson.
With the score notched 2 2 going
into the bottom of the fiftl inning.
relief hurler iDouglas Smith got
Carlton Robinson ;and Harold
Whyte to bounce out second to
first before Pan/i Johnson singled
sharply by the diving second
baseman.
The nleutherians threatened to
tie and score in the seventh and
final inning when lead off hatter
Wardy Cooper singled aind went to
second on Coasey IBodic sacrifice
bunt.
Kermit Graham came to the il
plate and drilled a long foul ball outi
the ball park before lie chopped a
bouncing hall to Anthon tHuyler
for an easy out.
Vanesv towlee's double in the
eight in ning scored Cheryl
Turnquest to give I)el Jane an 8-7
triumph over Super Value
Baintowners in the second contest
played at J.I .K.I'.
Vangy Bowleg was named the
game "Most Valuable I'layer", and
Mavis Bowleg who w ent the eight
innings stint took the win ias
Margaret Albury suffered the loss.


THE BAHAMAS Volleyball Federatio
time selecting their national team this yi
Tuesday night in their first annual indepe
indicative of this.
More than 60 players who comprised
all-star teams in this year's event portray
"I was proud to sit and watch the nu
who have attained the standard of voile
now," B.V.F. president Dr. Norman R
following the matches.
Himself a veteran of the game. Dr. G
standard of play has improved to the po
are not just six, but what you've got is de
Only 12 players are allowed
on a team's roster, Dr. Gay
informed. "Which 12 you're
going to carry is going to be
hard, because you've got more
than 12 good players. There
are going to be factors other
than play that's going to decide
deportment, behaviour.
attitude, coachability etc."
The offensive power of
Winsome Davidson, Wendy
Jackman, Yvonne Smith and
Margaret Albury representing
Bahama White was supreme.
With creditable defence coming
from Janet Bowe and Cora
He pburn, they defeated
Bahama Blue 15-9, 15-13. 8-15
and 15-12.
In the men's game,
six-foot-four Hubert William:
Leslie Cartwright and B.V.F.
most valuable player *Joey
Demeritte spiked with
authority probably earning
themselves a sure choice on the
national team while leading the
Blues to a 15-13, 15-10, 10-15
and 15-11 victory.
Good all around play from
Fulamae Smith. Celestine
Wilson and Hattie Moxey put
up a strong challenge for the
Blues. However, costly
indecisions on their behalf saw
them coming through but
once.
Coach Oswald Moore who
handled the Whites was
virtually at home with his
players. Basically, he had the
key players of his league
leading Paradise Island team.
All he had to do was
manipulate them in the right
order.
The Bahamas is now headed
for the World Championships
and in the first round of
eliminations they face France,
the United States of America
and Mexico.


Elder record
LEE ELDER, America's first
black golfer to play in the
Masters Tournament, put
together seven birdies and an
eagle for a super round of
nine-under-par 63 in setting a
new record at the Paradise
Island golf course Tuesday.
Playing in foursomes with
resident pro Roy Bowe,
Donald "Nine" Rolle and
Bobby Duvalle, Elder
controlled the front nine with
a five-under-par 31 before sub
parring the back nine which he
began with an eagle on the par
five, 532 yards tenth hole.
The previous record at
Paradise Island was a 64 shot
by Gary Player. Elder's
personal record is a 61.
Rolle holds the amateur
record which is a 68 shot four
years ago.


n will surely have a hard
ear. The talent displayed
endence tournament was

the two ladies and men
d a big improvement.
mber of men and women
ball play we have right
Z. Gay M.P. commented

ay was satisfied that the
int whereby "now, there
epth."


-Dad's the word



as John wins


By Gladstone Tuaston
UTILIZING sound advice
from his father/coach Barry
Farrington, young John, a
15-year-old rookie, rallied from
a one set deficit to a
commanding 4-6, 6-4, 6-2
victory over veteran Peter
Isaacs in yesterday's third
round of the George Smith
Independence Open at the
Montagu courts.
Coming off a crushing
straight sets victory over
Sonesta Beach pro Eddie
Knowles, young Farrington
yesterday overcame a temporary
lapse in his offensive attack
enroute to wearing out his
alder opponent. John plays
Phillip Russell in the quarter
finals tomorrow afternoon.
"I thought his (John's) game
was fairly soft, but he played a
very consistent game. The only
real weakness that I could
detect was on the back hand
when Peter came in to the
net," Mr. Farrington
commented following the two
hour battle.
"In most instances, John hit
the ball into the net," he
continued. "My advice to him.
was that in the given situation
he should attempt to lob the
ball high to Peter's back hand
rather than try to pass him at
the net."
This advice seemed to make
a difference to his game. He
gained confidence in view of
the fact that he rarely missed
that particular shot again.
Going into the third and
final set, John rallied to a 3-0
lead when indecisions played
hovoc with his fourth game
which he dropped. In taking
the fifth, John found new
energy and quickened the pace.
Though Isaacs won the
sixth, it was evident that he
was unable to win the battle of
endurance.
"He's much too young for
me and unless I get back into
shape again, he'll beat me any


Picture: MARGARET GUILLAUME
John Farrington stretching out.


time we play three sets," Isaacs
admitted, still trying to gather
himself.
In a way, yesterday's was
also a psychological battle. "I
was a bit upset about his
wasting time, not calling shots,
wasting energy running for a
ball. At my age you can't
afford that," he said with a
sigh. "Nevertheless, he's still a
good player and he beat me."
In warmups, Isaacs probably
noticed that John had trouble
putting away the lob shot. This
he used frequently and to his
advantage in the first set to
unlock a three all tie.
John started well using both
back anf forehand drives
accurate in taking a 2-1 edge.
That was until his attack failed
to be fruitul and the net found
most of his shots.
lsaacs' experience came
through. He picked on all of
John's weak points.


Aware that a loss would
have taken him out of the
tournament, John patched up
the deficient points in his
defence points in his defence.
He took the lead 5-4 in the
ninth game of the second set
and Isaacs trailed for the
remainder of the game.
Mr. Farrington who is an
official of the Bahamas Lawn
Tennis Association also
coaches his other son Bruce.
He sees John as being possibly
a future Brandon Cup
representative. "I see him as
developing into that calibre of
player. As he grows older hell
temper his game and learn how
to be more aggressive."
John agreed that the last
two sets were a battle of
endurance. "1 knew he was
tired in the second and third.
He tried to rush his shots and
in the last set he wasn't doing
anything."


I t


OBED

TO LOSE

TONIGHT

SAYS


ame




I


I


Bahamasair



Air Cargo Services




Bahamasair is pleased to announce its plans to inaugurate scheduled air cargo services between
Miami, Nassau and Freeport. Small consignments will be accepted for shipment on our daily BAC 1-11
flights effective July 8th, 1974.

Large shipments, including palletized cargo, will be carried on a DC 6 freighter, acquired specifically
for this service, commencing the week of Juiy 15.

Bahamasair can offer scheduled cargo service to meet the requirements of Bahamian businessmen,
hotels, shops, wholesalers, florists and other importers.

For further information, please return the coupon to:-
[ 'I--- --- ---



Cargo Manager
SBahamasair S

Nassau, Bahamas

Please contact me with further details of Bahamasair's
scheduled cargo service between Miami, Nassau and Freeport.

I am interested in: (please tick)
Shipments from Miami to: Q Nassau: Q Freeport
Shipments to Miami from: Q Nassau: 0 Freeport
Shipments to.................. From................. From ....................
Small consignments (50-500 Lbs.) Q
I Large consignments (500 Lbs. 2000 Lbs.) Q I

1 I would expect to ship/receive approximately.................................. Lbs.
I of cargo per day/week/month.
I am interested in shipping/receiving the following:-
0Q Frozen foods; 0 fresh meats; 0 other food stuffs; Q furniture;
0 building supplies; 0 clothing; 0 general cargo.

SN A M E : ...........................................................................................

ADDRESS...............................................................................

.......... ........................................................

TELEPHONE ........................................................................................