<%BANNER%>
PRIVATE ITEM
Digitization of this item is currently in progress.
The Tribune.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03651
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: June 25, 1974
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03651

Full Text













Iritbuttn


mwrsr
SYLVANIA
Black Whit.
TELEVISION
r1. "nl '- -Ikw
CO I. M TTA ST a Ir. OYvAL Avg.
M.UX no-moUm Ss3,Mg/I-!


agserdwth Postmater of Bottoma *or posage esemseeas within heBama. Nassau and BaL almaf sl &6 an eJaAJ ng ewspapXUjer --o
VOL. LXXI, No. 178 Tuesday, June 25, 1974. Pries: 20 Cents


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
PONTIUS PILATE Arthur Hanna has publicly admitted that
too many men in the P.L.P. have been holding their palms out to
be greased.
Earlier I had named him Little Caesar ... or Nero ... for his
harsh immigration policies. But on making this admission he
washed his hands clean of the dirt with which he accused that the
hands of the P.L.P. stalwarts were soiled. Now he is appropriately
named Pontius Pilate.
I wonder if I might remind this little man of the passage in the
Bible in which Jesus challenged a hostile crowd who were jeering
a prostitute and threatening to stone her to death by saying to
them "he that is without sin among you, let him cast the first
stone"
And the crowd hung their heads and melted away.
Taking bribes is a grave political sin. Paying bribes is also a
grievous fault of which his government is now being accused. But
there are other political faults too, such as being an Immigration
Simon Legree or a Pontius Pilate or a Nero.
Since Mr. Hanna made this charge against some of his own
political associates I have been told of an affair that may be
shattering. I have been promised the information ... not
immediately ... but soon.
When I get it I will give it to Mr. Hanna and see whether he
would like to announce it before I expose it in this column.


IEf rtAbun
EIITMiLt


Going

In the House of Assembly tomorrow Mr. 1
(Ind. Clarence Town) will ask the Prime Min
House of the total number of overseas and Oi
by himself in 1970 through 1973 for which t
... and whether he was accompanied by anyo
were paid by the government.
I don't know what kind of answer he is lil
questions because government is not answerin
these days, but I have a bit of information tl
Bahamian people at this time when tl
are unemployed and unable to feed their child
********
There are other places in the world where
feeling the pinch ... and so it is not sur
extravagance by Prime Minister Pindling she
discussed by Albert March in his column in
Examiner on Friday, June 14.


down,down, down

Michael ightbourn Here is one of the stories he told:
sister to inform the "To offer another display of carefree generosity, we cite the
ut Island trips made scene at the Blue Fox restaurant on a recent evening.
he government paid "There, surrounded by five security men inside and four more
)ne whose expenses (with walkie-talkies) outside was the Hon. Lynden O. Pindling,
Prime Minister of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, dining
kely to get to these with a party of five ... none of whom were security people.
ig pointed questions "Pinding's dinner tab came to $694.35, including the three
hat may interest the bottles of Chateau Lafitte Rothschild at $140 per bottle. And do
thousands of them his constituents at home know about this? Or care?"
iren. ********
Recently I printed a rumour in this column that Mrs. Pindling
poor people are also had taken her hairdresser with her when she ... accompanied by
prising that alleged the Prime Minister ... went to Tokyo to Christen a ship.
nuld be the subject This seemed such an absurd thing to do, especially at this time
ithe San Francisco when there are so many unemployed people in the islands, that I
said I didn't believe it. But I published the story because I felt


that I should bring it in the open so that the government's Offler
of Information could spike it if it were untrue.
I have not heard anything from the Officer of Information but
I have had numerous phone calls from reliable people who have
told me that this was true ... not only true on this occasion. but
that she takes this good lady with her wherever she goes.
What's more, one informant said that there was a second
stringer on this trip ... a woman from the Ministry of Tourism.
Perhaps Tourism Minister Clement Maynard can say whether
this is true or not ... and why?
But perhaps the most amazing news of the seven years reign of
the P.L.P. government is the revelation through a court record
arising out of a suit connected with the company that is filing
"Salty" in Nassau.
According to the court record it is claimed that the
government has been paying $1,500 a month to the film
company to ensure that "no material harmful to the image of the
Bahamas or politically prejudicial is included in any of the
"Salty" television episodes!
If this is true ... then this is a new twist in the corrupt practices
of which the P.L.P. government is being accused by an aroused
people today.
It might also be asked ... what kind of people are running this
TV operation?
A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
Those whom the gods would destroy they first make mad.


I p


Adderley





hits back


over


wor powers

THE EMERGENCY Powers Act tabled in the House last week "virtually follows
word for word" a law that was in force under the colonial administration for almost
35 years. Attorney General Paul L. Adderley declared late Monday.
The Attorney General was countering mushrooming criticism of the proposed legislation from


several quarters, including the
Conunmmittee.
Mr. Adderley asserted that
the only difference between
the 1939 Emergency Powers
Order in Council and the
proposed Emergency Powers
Act is "that the 1939 Order
makes provision for the
deportation and exclusion of
persons from the Bahamas,
whereas the new bill only
makes provision for the
deportation and exclusion of
persons who are not citizens of
the Bahamas."
It is "inconceivable," Mr.
Adderley said, "that the
opposition and sections ot the
news media could display stch
hysterical ignorance of what
the law is now and of the
government's responsibility to
propose the re-enactment of
existing legislation that is of
vital national importance as
well as a Constitutional
necessity."
Explaining the need for the
Emergency Powers Bill. Mr.
Adderley said "no responsible
government could afford to be
without the power to be able
to protect the lives and
property of its citizens when-
ever a National IEmergency
arises."
lie pointed out that the
government since July 10,
1973 could declare a State of
Emergency under the 1939
Order in Council. Prior to July
10, 1973 this power was vested

PPAC:

THE POINT in issue today is
not whether a responsible
government needs emergency
powers, but whether the
present government is
responsible, the People's
Positive Action committeee
declared in a press release
today.
The PPA('. quick to react to
a government statement late




SEE
3-PIECE BAR
ONLY $190.00
DMI 8908 (Nasuu Only)
K- ===S1WfI


Free National Movement and the People's Positive Action

By MIKE LOTHIAN


in the Government of the
Bahamas.
"Those who are now
opposing the new legislation
never raised a single objection
to such powers being exercised
by a British Colonial Governor,
'"ith less Constitutional
safeguards than exist under the
present Constitution," he said.
Under The Imergencv
Powers Order in Council. 1939
if the Governor-General is
satisfied that a public
emergency exists, he may by
Proclamation declare a State of
Emergency which shall remain
in force until the Governor-
General, acting upon the advice
of the Prime Minister revokes
it.
The Bahamas Independence
Order, 1973, provides that The
Emergency Powers Order in
Council shall remain in force
until July 10, 1974. The reason
for the Constitutional
extension, Mr. Adderley said,
was to give Parliament the time
to enact legislation to replace
the Order.
The Emergency Powers
Order in Council. 1939 was
extended by the British
government to over 40
dependent territories and, since
the end of World War II. the
Constitutions of Common-
wealth countries which were
former British Colonies have

Is Govern
yesterday replying to critics of
the Emergency Powers Act (see
story this page). agreed that
the Constitution already
provides for the use of
emergency powers by the
government
"However, the bill as
introduced to Parliament on
Wednesday does not spell out
wlat conditions constitute an
emergency. The terms of
reference are too broad, and
judging from past performnanct'
II should not he left to the
judgement of the present
bunglers to determine what
constitutes an emncrgenc%

rhe PPAC said the police
can adequately handle any civil
disturbance. "We see no reason
for government wanting to
exercise the wide and sweeping
powers that can be exercised if


included provisions for the
exercise of emergency powers.
The Independence Constitu-
tion provides specifically for
the use of emergency powers
by the government and The
Emergency Powers Bill, now
before the Legislature merely
says how these Constitutional
powers may be exercised, Mr.
Adderley said.
The existing Constitution
contains provisions imposing a
limitation of 14 days on a
Proclamation of Emergency
unless it is extended, by a
Resolution passed by both
Houses of Parliament, for not
longer than six months.
"People need to under-
stand." Mr. Adderley
continued, "that the
Emergency Powers Bill is
essentially precautionary and
gives the government power to
suspend only certain
Constitutional provisions and
then only in very special
circumstances which may exist
in times of national
emergency."
Mr. Adderley said that at the
Constitutional Conference in
London in 1972 there was
absolutely no disagreement
over the inclusion of the
Article which provided for the
emergency powers: in fact, the
1973 constitutionn was
unanimously agreed to by all
parties at the conferencee .


ment respo
the present I emergency Powers
Act is entered on the statute
books, other than to suppress
opposing forces of the
government.
"The Emergency Powers Act
can be termed an unjust law
because it takes away the right
of the individual or group of
individuals to act and speak
oul "
Coiunterung a government
assertion that no one e'ver
complained about similar
provisions in the hands ol the
Iorner colonial administrat ion.
Ihe PPAl( declared
"Because the former
government had the right to
suppress or take awa) tlhe
people's God-given rights is no
reason for the present
government to demand the
same. in as much as it has


Man,37

charged

with

shooting
A 37-YEAR-OLD Sea
Breeze Estates man, taken
into custody for questioning
in connection with last
Wednesday's shooting of
William "Bill" McWeeney was
yesterday charged with
attempted murder.
Former labourer Garth
Curry, who listed his
occupation asa "life under-
writer" was also charged with
causing material damage and
possession of an unlicensed
revolver.
Curry pleaded not guilty
on the second charge of
causing $80 worth of damage
to Pearl Cox's Guest House,
30 Augusta Street, where
the shooting allegedly took
place.
Chief Magistrate Wilton
Hercules remanded Curry in
jail until July 29 when
preliminary inquiry hearings
are expected to begin.
McWeeney, a former
Queen's College High School
student remains hospitalized
in critical condition following
his admission early Wednes-
day morning. He was
described by hospital
authorities as "very ill".

Boy dies in

road crash
DWIGHT THOMPSON,
aged I1, of Clark Lane,
became Nassau's IIth traffic
fatality yesterday, after he
was involved in a trailer
accident at the intersection of
Mackey and Shirley Street.
Reports stated that Dwight
and Bernard Skett, 13, of
residents of Hillside Estate,
were riding a bicycle at
approximately 10:15 a.m.
when they were involved in
the accident with a trailer
driven by Hazain Bootle of
Ida Street.
Both youths were taken to
hospital, where Dwight. a
passenger on the bicycle, was
reported to have died at 2
p.m. Skeet, who suffered a
fractured leg, was treated and
discharged.
Dwight's parents are John
and Theodora Thompson. He
had six sisters and two
brothers.
Nassau recorded its tenth
traffic fatality on June 20,
when Floyd Reckley. II,
died


nsible?
preached against the oppressive
policies and practices of the
former government".
As the present government
came to power on promises to
make things better for the
people. "why the need to have
this iniquitous piece of
legislation imposed on the
people?"
The PPAC said the
go.ernmneni had "pui heasy
loads on the backs of the
people. and now are afraid of
what Ihe people may do
"\ll ot ts. can and will be
adversely affected by such an
enormlouIs amount of power in
the hands. of men of
questionable ability "
The Com:nittee plans to
ltage a protest demonstration
outside the House of Assembly
Tomorrow. when the
Controversial bill is scheduled
for debate.


Energy crisis 'benefits Bahamas'


"THE ENERGY crisis in the United
States has had a beneficial impact in some
respects" on the Bahamas, an American
business daily says.
The New York Journal of
Commerce said in a recent issue that
"Freeport has emerged as the nearest
superport to the United States and the
only such facility on the Atlantic
seaboard.
"Its deepwater port can handle
supertankers of over 350,000 tons from
the Mideast and Venezuela. This has led
to the doubling of the BORCO refinery
and terminal at Freeport, which supplies
low sulfur oil to electric generating plants


all along the U.S. mainland."
The paper notes that "a huge
trans-shipment terminal 32 miles cast of
Freeport is being built by Burmah Oil.
Supertankers will transship their cargo
here for delivery in smaller tankers to
U.S. ports. Burmah eventually will build a
refinery here.
"A third trans-shipment terminal and
tank farm will be built ten miles east of
the Burmah plant, it has just been
announced by Atlantic Terminal and
Tanker Services of Geneva, Switzerland.
This is expected to cost eighty to one
hundred million dollars. Here too a
refinery will eventually be added."


POACHING ELEVEN


FINED $30,000


ELEVEN Cuban-Americans
were yesterday ordered to pay
fines amounting to $30,000
when they Plleaded guilty in
the lower court to poaching
charges following their
apprehension by the police
marine division Saturday.
The incident, involving three
fishing boats, is the third to
have come before the courts
within the past two weeks.
All of the men are residents
of the Miami Cuban com-
munity.
Seven of them L-apt.
Barredo Fabio, Rafael Garcia.
Serbando Navia. Capt. Jesus F.
Perez, Mario Perez, and Capt.
Jose Etal Rodriques and Evelio
Gonzales apprehended
separately claimed through
their attorney, J. Ilenry
Bostwick that their fishing
expedition was "only a
pleasure trip."
The magistrate commented
that it was a rather common
excuse which he had heard
before.
Also charged and fined were
Capt. Rafael Torres, Hlector
Torres, Ebelio Rodriques and
Onelio Eduardo Gitierres.
The men were arrested by
officers aboard the police
launches Eleuthera and Acklins


while on patrol around
Brown's and Rum Cays.
When caught. the men were
still fishing with their lines
overboard. Together they had
taken over 380 pounds of fresh
scalefish.
Mr. Bostwick said the men
were not fishing "for
commercial purposes" and that
the area they were caught in
was a "well-known fishing
spot."
It was unfortunate that they
had not registered at a port of
entry because, had they done
so, they would not have been
charged, he said.
lie also claimed that theirs
was not a case where they had
come here to catch and board
fish for profit.
A request for time to check
criminal files on one of the
men whose "face looks very
familiar" was refused police
prosecutor Insp. Hlugh Burke.
The man, a captain of one of
the boats, claimed that he had
never appeared in a Bahamian
court when questioned by
Chief Magistrate Hercules.
Mr.l ercules said he did not
think that the law allowed any
exceptions as to whether the
accused were fishing for
pleasure or otherwise.


He fined each of the
captains $4,000 with an
alternative six months sentence
and the crewmen $2,000 each
or four months.
Earlier this year, 16 Cuban
fishermen, arrested at Long
Island and charged before
Magistrate Emmanuel
Osadebay were fined $2,500
altogether.
Police took one week in
arresting the men.
On January 26, five
Cuban-Americans arrested
when caught poaching near Cat
Cay were ordered to pay fines
amounting to $11,500.

ARCHITECT TO
ADDRESS CONSUMERS
The C('onsumer Protection
Association of the Bahamas
will hold its monthly meeting
Thursday, at 8 p.m. at T. A.
Thompson Primary School,
formerly Western Senior
School, Blue lHill Road and
Meeting Street.
Mr. Donald Cartwright,
R.I.B.A., Architect of Donald
(artwright and Associates will
speak on the topic "The
consumer, the Architect and
the builder."
Ihe meeting is open to the
public.


Hotels crisis could


flare up overseas


TIlE HOTILS crisis sparked
by the minerald Beach
controversy appears to have
evaporated on the local scene,
but it might flare up overseas
through the actions of foreign
unions sympathetic to the
cause of the Bahamas lHotel
and Catering Workers Union.
liitel Union president David
Knowels conceded today that
the union faced defeat in the
dispute because dcemnonstra-
tions have been blocked on
police instructions that
unionists cannot gather even
on the roadside opposite the
Emerald Beach's West Bay
Street property, and because
"the government is not
prepared to apply the kind of
pressure we want them to
apply."
But. he said. he hiad
telephone conversjtion this
morning with an oflitial of the
International Union of I ood
(IUF), an organisation with
millions of members thia the
Ilotel Union has been on good
terms with for some time.
The IUF spokesman, he said.
promised to see what could be
done to help the hotel union,
by contacting unions involved
in the operations of Hyatt


Intcrnatifinal Ilotels, the
corporation that manages the
375-room Inmerald Beach.
The I emerald Beach closed
180 of its rooms and fired 164
of its workers on June 10 in a
hid to cut summer season
losses that had run into the
millions in recent years.
The union, faced with
proposals from a number of
other hotels for the reduction
of stuff, alleged that there was
an organised plan by hotels to
pressure government into
approving Ihe gambling casino
and convention centre in the
('able Beach area they need to
compete effectively with the
Paradise Island resort.
IFarly demonstrations ended
after two days when 14
unoniIsit5. Including secre
iar. -geneial Bobhh Glinton
and trustee Bob Gardiner
arrested lor respassing
On June 14 Labuiii
Minisler ('lilford L Darling. in
an apparent admission that his
Ministry could not deal with
the dispute. referred the
problem to Prime Minister
Lynden O. Pindling.
Mr. Pindling met with the
union on the samnl day, dnd


with the IHotel IImployers
Association on Sunday, June
16, and again with the union
the following week.
Mr. Knowles said Mr.
Pindling reported .at ihe last
meeting with t(he union that
the Association agreed that
dismissals was a departure frrnom
the usual method of econo-
mising in slow periods, but
denied there was an organised
move to pressure the
government on the casino
issue.
Mr. Knowles said Mr.
Pindling reported the
Association was "evasive"
when asked whether the
Emerald Beach's action had the
Association's blessing.
The union leader s.iid the
union had argued th'tI as
government speni millions of
dollars every \dcr t promote
luurnin and II'e hotels, the
goiverninent wasj in a position
ou "suggest in strong tcrms"
that the I merald Beach
reconsider its action.
Government disagreed, he
said. on grounds that investor
confidence could he damaged
hy such interference with free
enterprise.


The Journal of Commerce adds t.
"tourism has been gradually recovering
from a dip in the curly 1970s. Bookings
for the summer are good and may even
exceed those of last winter ... tourism is a
year-round business, accounting for 70
per cent of Bahamian national income.
But on Grand Bahama the capital
intensive industries, including oil refining,
cement and pharmaceuticals, provide
balance."
And also "as a tax haven the Bahamas
offer many incentives to investors. These
incentives have led to the rapid growth of
Grand Bahama."


Batelco

toll

centres

planned
By Efiston Rahming
THIE GENERAL manager of
Batelco, Mr. A. E. Curling, said
today that fundamental plans
have been formulated by the
Corporation "to develop toll
centres in New Providence.
Grand Bahama, Abaco, Andros
and I:leuthera."
The toll centre in Eleuthera
to be commissioned August 3
will be installed at Governor's
flarbour and will serve
customers in Rock Sound and
Harbour Island.
The entire toll operation in
Eleuthera will be concentrated
through Governor's Htarbour
with all out going calls being
handled by operators at
Governor's Harbour. Cus-
tomers in Nassau and North
America will be able to dial
friends and associates at
Governor's Harbour, Harbour
Island and Rock Sound
directly without the aid of the
operators, but the opposite is
not feasible, Mr. Curling said.
The initial line capacity
respectively of the three offices
at Eleuthera are Governor's
11arbour-600, Harbour
Island-400, and Rock
Sound-300. Hopefully, 200
customers will be connected to
the Governor's Ilarbour office
on commissioning: 200 to the
office at Harbour Island and
100 to the office at Rock
Sound.
"Those in the Ilcuthera area
who wish to take advantage of
the new system should file
applications with the Batelco
office in their area," Mr.
(urling said.
According to Mr. Curling,
"The first switch centre in the
Family Islands was installed at
Light Mile Rock, Grand
Bahama in 1972 and activated
in January 1973."

CORRECTION
CIIAR LOTTE Street
Securities and Charlotte louse.
which houses Bahamas
Commonwealth Bank are not
owned by General Bahamnin
Companies as was stated in
Saturday's Tribune.
Both arc owned by other
alliates within the Bahanma
Commonwealth Bank group.


ACIII~ I h I l dC LUII di N ~


; -





i
5*
* ':' .^-t


(Im


chp










THE TRIBUNE - Tuesday, June 25, 1974.


Art theft


STORMS

LASH

FLORIDA

COAST

MIAMI A tropical
depression heading toward
I lorida has about fizzled out.
')ut a new disturbance caused
some flooding and beach
icosion along the state's Gulf
Coast. the National Hurricane
Centre reported.
"You can just forget about
'it depression, it's losing it's
identity," hurricane forecaster
Joe Pelissier said. "But we've
iIot a low now that's moving
over Florida accompanied by
plenty ot rain and winds to
about 35 m.p.h."
Pelissier said the low had
caused abnormally high tides
which damaged some boats and
flooded streets from Cedar Key
south to Naples.
At the same time. a late
season cold front moved over
tie Florida panhandle. causing
additional thundershowers, he
said.
Small craft around the
Ilorida coast from Cedar Key
,nd )Daytona Beach south were
alr ned to exercise caution.
I'ellssier said the depression,
located about 650 miles
southwest of Key West in the
(;ulf of Mexico, had highest
winds of only 30 m.p.h. and
would be absorbed by the
other weather systems.
earlier, winds gusted to 45
In.p.h.


Aliens
itome
Paris
1. 411 '' im
lBerlin
A insltcrtl; ll
nlr ussels
Mad rid
kl,)~lt'hh
si>. ivlii, lin
New Yrok
San I'rancisco
Iis Angeles
Chicagio
Miamii
I kyi.
lltig Kong
Illutil s Aires
hI,r, -I-
Monlre il
I.I1S lull
Kin'
I ehi.i
Sevul


MIN I-
70)
63
57
52
52
64
SO
57
61
54
601
51
68
53
78
64
75
44
Sio
73
50
54
54
72
6 1
77
710
so


MAX
84 clear
82 sunny
72 clear
70 overcast
77 lair
75 sunny
66 overcast
79 rain
70 sunny
64 cloudy
NO cloudy
57 clear
93 clear
58 clear
85 rain
79 clutludl
82 overcast
59) clear
73 cloud v
K6 clear
11i rain
80l clear
64 .louud
E8 clear
82 clear
93.1 L tiih
8(4 clotl
67 lear


ai k
qgo


woman


is jail

DUBLIN Dr. Bridget Rose
Dugdalc, a millionaire's
daughter turned self-slyled
freedom fighter, was sentenced
to nine years imprisonment
today in connection with the
theft of some S20 million
worth of' paintings.
Miss Dugdale, 33. a
former university lecturer, told
Dublin's Special Criminal
Court she pleaded "proudly
and incorruptibly guilty" to
receiving 19 paintings stolen in
April from diamond magnate
Sir Alfred Beit.
The woman was the only
person arrested so far in
connection with the theft of
the paintings some of the
world's best-known art trea-
sures from Sir Alfred's
mansion at Blessington, near
Dublin. Four men believed to
have assisted in the theft are
still at large.
All of the paintings werc
recovered when Miss Dugdale
was arrested at a remote
cottage near the small fishing
village of (landore on Ireland's
southwest coast May 4.
Police said then that some of
the paintings were concealed in
the cottage and others in the
trunk of a car. They were not
damaged.


led


Miss Dugdale, I'nglish
daughter of an executll' ,sith
the Lloyds insurance gioup.
had left her teaching post at
London University and taken
up the cause (f the Irish
Republican Army, fighting to
drive Britain out of Northern
Ireland and unite it with the
Irish Republic. (APt

Ice-cold thieves
LOS AN ;F. FS
Onlookers stole icecreaim,
candy and money from a
catering van while its
5 5-year-o ld owner lay
unconscious nearby from a
savage beating by a gang ot
youths, police said.
Officers said the ice cream
vendor. Victorino Parades, died
last night.
Detective Robert McVey
said Parades was assaulted
twice by two to four youths
when he got out of his van to
help a customer. lhe youth-
fled after the beating.
He said Parades fell back
into his van and was lying there
unconscious when more tthan
two dozen persons from the
Jordan Downs housing project
descended on the van and
cleaned it out. (AP)


'Commandos staged

resort attack'


DAMASCUS The
Palestinian guerilla leadership
claimed today the attack on
the Israeli seaside resort of
Nahariya was staged by
Israeli-based Arab commandos.
A statement by the
guerilla-controlled Palestine
News Agency WAFA denied
Israeli claims that the attackers
came from Lebanon by boat.
It described the operation as
a "quick retaliation" for Israeli
air raids on five- Palestinian
refugee camps in South
Lebanon last week.
Thirty-two Palestinians and
two Lebanese were killed in
the air strikes by official
counts.
The statement was
attributed to the "military
spokesman of the Palestinian
revolution," a term usuaii)
used for announcements by the
office of top guerrilla leader
Yasser Arafat.
The statement did not
specify any guerilla group as
responsible lor the operation.


Treasured

Family Pictures

WE CAN DO A
WONDERFUL JOB OF
REPHOTOGRAPHING THEM
FOR YOU.

C) CS
on the waterfront at East
Bay & William Streets.
TELEPHONE 5-4641


but said the attackers belonged
to the "Martyr Ka.mal W\ian
Squad."
Adwan belonged to Arafat's
Al Fatah, the largest but most
moderate guerilla organization.
He was among three senior
guerilla leaders killed in their
Beirut apartments by an Israeli
commando raid in April 1973
(AP)


No sex

please,

we're

cup fans

MUNICH The World
Cup has been a sexual
disaster, an unexpected
groundswell of abstinence
that has dumbfounded
obedient little Nina, Marie
the-dominat ing-lady-in4ea-
ther, and the 14 "charmante
hostessen" at the Hotel Je
T'Aime.
All those Scots waving red
and yellow flags, those
Argentines pounding drums,
the Haitians blowing cavalry
charges through sugar cane
horns apparently so
exhausted themselves at the
matches that they have been
going right home to bed -
alone.
"I am thinking a great deal
about this and this is the only
logical explanation," said
Vicky, a young woman who
proposed her services to
World Cup guests through a
newspaper ad.
"I don't want to comment
on soccer fans' virility, but I
do much better when there's
a chiropodist convention in
town," she said.
Vicky thought she was
being clever just before the
cup opened June 13 when she
wrote an ad for an
afternoon newspaper that
read: "Student with charm
and a lot of time offers novel
attention. Drinks free, world
cup colour-TV service."
But no one seems to have
paid much attention to Vicky
or the 227 others who
advertised that day, calling
themselves Mongolian
supermodels, Indonesian
massage queens, energetic
Indian squaws. stress
specialists, tolerant Danes, or
in the case of Thomas or
Norbert, discreet friendship
boys exclusively for men.
Prostitution is legal in
Germany and in some cities
the municipal councils have a
direct hand in running
bordellos. (AP)


Space lab

launched
MOSCOW The Soviet
Union today launched a new
space laboratory Salyut 3
just two day. before President
Nixon is due here on an official
visit.
There was no. indication, in
the official Soviet News agency
Tass's announcement of the
new space shot, whether Salyut
3 would later be manned.
Salyut,l, sent aloft three
years ago, had been manned,
but three cosmonauts who
stayed aboard for 23 days
perished on their return to
earth. Salyut 2 was sent up a
year ago, but did not take
aboard a crew, apparently
because it became crippled.
Nixon is due in Moscow
Thursday. It appeared obvious
that the new launch had been
timed to draw attention to the
Soviet space programme during
Nixon's visit.
America's team of
astronauts who are scheduled
to join the Russians in a joint
space mission next year arrived
here Sunday for a new working
session with their Soviet
counterparts. (AP)


Bush terrorists shoot


nurse in head


ADDIS ABABA -I can't
go on. I can't go on." gasped
the 54-year-old IDutch nurse.
and a guerilla kidnapper knelt
down and shot hei iln 11h head.
That was the terrifying scene
recounted by Deborah 1)or,/-
bach. a pregnant missionary
nurse from II ccli oold. New
Jersey, when she icaclld thce
first minutes of her 26 days as
a hostage of tI e I niican
Liberation Fro nl.
Mrs. I)orlthach, 24. and lir0
colleague Miss Anna Slick-
werda were sCl/ed Mai /
from n thcI .\ A in lcIt i "i
I'vangelichal Mission hospital atl
(;hinda.
The hospital is in anl a.ea lt
the northern I thliopia pIkinmce
of I'rilrea Ilat is pa t \
controlled by the I I I \\shich
has been fighting fo I rilirean
iindpendenciic 'to )Ia de t-
cade. The A1\ i can muiI I1 tse'
was released Saltuidal i lli h
Red Sea port of Masawva afler a


four-day camel ride, and
doctors said she and her
unborn baby appeared
unharmed.
Mrs. D)ortbach told her
story Monday to police in
Asmara. the Fritrean capital.
after two days in seclusion
withi her missionary husband
Karl.
Police did not disclose
details of her account, and
American consular officials
said they had not talked with
her.
She told her friends
however, that she watched as a
guerilla killed Miss Stickwerda
minutes after their abduction.
It e Iutch woman had
lingered behind the group as it
rushed through the I-ritrean
bush. unable to keep up with
Mrs )ort/bach and their
captors antd hampered by a
slih e that repeatedly fell off.
,he said.
Miss Stickwerda was shot


when she failed to heed the
guerillas' warnings to hurry and
said she could not continue.
Mrs. Dortzbach said.
A helicopter, piloted by
Canadian Grant Wyatt on a
mission to rescue, two
Canadians and three Americans
held by the I: .I. was
overhead.
Wyatt landed the chiopper,
and the guerillas captured him
and look the copter. Wyatt has
since been released, but the
others remain in the custody of
the lILF.
Mrs. Dori/bach informed
missionary officials I hat thlc
guerillas sent their apologies for
killing Miss Stickwerda, calling
it a "tactical mistake."

Mrs. )ort/bach's friends said
she told them she lived on
goat's milk and spicy meals
during her captivity except for
a small box of food relayed by
villagers acting as inter-
micdiaries between the FI.I
and missionary officials.
She said her drinking water
was boiled as a precaution
against cholera. which had
broken out in the province,
Ihe I)ort/bachs were
expected to leave I thiopia in a
lew days for the IUniled States.
heir plans were uncertain, but
friends described them as
ded icat ed to serving in
I thoipia and likely to return to
this country after visiting
relatives al home.
Ihe A mericans still held by
the I LI: are John W. Rogers
and William ('yce. nemploiyees
of Tenneco O)l (Co. of
Iflouson. Tex.. and Motla
Pauiel, ia gcochlmist with Ihe
I lhippian Ministr\ of Mines.
I lie ('Canadian are ('lilf
James. a geologist from
Walkerton. Ont.. and Don
Wederfort. a helicopter pilot
from Calgary. Alta. (AP)


-_UK carries out


nuclear blast


LONDON Britain has
carried out an underground
nuclear test to maintain the
effectiveness of its nuclear
deterrent, Prime Minister
Harold Wilson said.
The test almost certainly
was carried out in America.
and was the fourth conducted
by a nuclear nation this spring.
Socialist William Roberts
reflected the uneasiness in
Wilson's own party when he
told the British leader the test
"will be a matter of sadness for
millions of ordinary people
throughout the world who
were looking to a British
Labour government to give a
lead in world disarmament."
Wilson told the House of
Commons the blast took place
a few weeks ago, but did not
say where. But the Atomic
F energy (Commiission in
Washington said a joint
U.S.-British underground
nuclear weapons test was
conducted several weeks ago at
the U.S.nuclear test site in
Nevada.
A spokesman said there was
no other place the test could
have been conducted because
Britain has no known
underground testing site of its
own.
Since 1962 the two
countries have conducted four
announced joint tests at the
site, tie spokesman added.
Under questioning from
angry lawmakers of his own
Labour Party. Wilson indicated
the device tested was
comparatively small.
lie said it was "not in the
remotest degree anywhere near
the lowest possible threshold"


of power which might be
forbidden as a result of
Soviet-American negotiations
in Moscow this week that
might lead to a ban on
underground testing.
He said the test was
conducted within the
framework of the 1963 partial
Test Ban Treaty and the 1968
non-proliferation treaty.
Many left-wing lawmakers
want Britain to renounce its
nuclear weapons altogether.
The Labour government
showed its diplomatic
displeasure when France and
China exploded nuclear devices
in the atomsphere a week ago
and when India set off its
first-ever nuclear explosion


underground May 18.
Wilson's statement


was


greeted with silence from
Labour benches but with
cheers from the opposition
Conservatives. Their leader.
former Prime Minister Edward
Heath, said the test was
"clearly in the national
interest."
Wilson said the test
apparently was successful. He
stressed that Britain does not
intend to carry out any more
tests until it has completed a
major review of all defence
commitments.
Britain's nuclear weapons
consist primarily of Polaris
submarines fitted with nuclear
warheads. They are "un-
equivocally committed to the
North Atlantic alliance,"
Wilson said.
Wilson replied it was a
matter of regret that "these
ghastly weapons" still existed.
(AP)


Bast said: "le wants this
story to come out. Hle was
quite emphatic telling that this
was his sole reason for pleading
guilty: to enable him to go
before congressional com-
mittees and bring it out before
the American people."
('olson told Bast that Nixon
"is convinced the ('IA is in this
up to their eyeballs." Bast's
account was published
yesterday by the Washington
Post and the Washington
Star-News and confirmed later
by the Associated Press

Colson. scheduled to start
his prison term July 8, could
not be reached for
confirmation.
Bast said he had two
conversations with ('olson in-
his home last month but had
not taken the former Nixon,
aide as a client.

lie said: "I have no way of
knowing if everything Colson,
told me is the truth. In no way
am I associating myself with
his statements."
IN A
SU MRHANRA

i WU VR9,G

Cl
1,I l i t I t I I_ "1 !ij, Il m


SIR LOUIS Gluckstein (centre), president of the Royal Albert Hall' London, with Mr.
William Timym and his bronze bust of Sir Malcolm Sargent, conductor, after the recent
presentation of the bust at the Royal Albert Hall. It is now on permanent exhibition there.
Mr. Timym was a regular concertgoer at Sir Malcolm's promenade seasons and based his work
on about 80 photographs of the late conductor.
I=mo


,NIXON

THINKS

CIA

INVOLVED

IN RAID'
WASHINGTON A private
dete.:tive says Charles W.
Colson told him President
Nixon is convinced the Central
Intelligence Agency helped
carry out the Daniel Ellsberg
psychiatrist burglary and knew
in advance of the Watergate
break-in.
Richard L. Bast said ('olson.
a former special counsel to the
'resident, saw "a total
conspiracy by not only the
CIA but the Pentagon as well
to take over the President by
being able to exercise undue
influence
Bast said ('olson told him he
pleaded guilty to charges of
obstruction of justice so that
he could tell his story to
irvesiigators.
After he pleaded guilty to
the charge that last Friday
brought him a sentence of
one-to-three years in prison,
Colson said he took the step to
have the "ability to tell
everything I know about the
Watergate and Watergate-
related matters."


What will he be?


Perhaps a doctor or a lawyer, or
something else worthwhile. But can you
afford it?

From June 1 to September I The
Bahamas Pioneer Insurance Cc. will
write you a back-to-school policy which
will insure that when your child reaches
age 18, you can afford to send him to
college. Plus each year on August 15 you
collect a bonus to help out during those
years before he's ready for college.
Call the Pioneer man at 5-7468. He'll
help you make certain your child
becomes what you want him to be.


THE BAHAMAS

PIONEER

INSURANCE

COMPANY


LIMITED .

WE'RE BAHAMIAN. '- l
WE UNDERSTAND JUST A LITTLE
BIT BETTER.


ROYAL MAIL REGULARFREHT THE PACIFICSTEAM

LINES LIMITED U.K.TONASSAU NAVIGATION CO

For information contact the aglnts

R.H.CURRY &Co.,Ltd.
PHONE 2-8683 2-8686 P. U. BOX N8168 BAY STREET


-Ii


-
:4
~57


Es~'` `~


.











THE TRIBUNE ... Tue-day; June 25. 1974.


USt Urtbunt
NuumUs A meinct Jouana IN VamaA MAGcm
Being Bound To SwearTo TThe Dogas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, PubUlMr/ldior 1903. 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Pubitear/Editor 1917.1972
Contributlq Editor 1972.
EtLEEN DUPUCH CARRONM.Se., B.A., LL.B.,
Publi*er/Editor 1973.
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 24532,2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Tuesday, June 25, 1974.
i i


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
IT didn't require very much intelligence to see where the
country was headed when the P.L.P. took over the government
just over seven short years ago.
From the very start it was clear that all the priorities ... all the
values ... of these men were so wrong that it was bound to be
reflected in the character of the people.
Seven years ago the Bahamian people were among the gentlest,
friendliest most prosperous, most law-abiding, most honest
people in the world. They had a high sense of responsibility and
they displayed an admirable loyalty to their employers.
This is nothing new for me to say. I have said this often in this
column.
Look around you in the country today and see what you have.
I know that there are still very many fine Bahamians in the
islands. It is possible that even a majority of them are still first
class citizens, even though they were misguded politically. But
events during the period of P.L.P. control have spawned an
element that has given a new ... and an ugly ... image to the
Bahamas, both at home and abroad.

From the very beginning their approach to government was
wrong. They tied up with Mike McLaney in a desperate bid for
power.
For a time after they won the election McLaney strutted
around this place like a peacock in full feather. He claimed that
Mr. Pindling and his crowd had promised him a casino licence in
exchange for his financial support But when the McLaney
relationship with the party was disclosed in the Gambling
Commission Enquiry ... and the Commission branded him as an
undesirable character ... the party paid their indebtedness to him
... they denied the promise of a casino licence ... and packed him
out of the country.
**********
It can now be easily understood how these men could get tied
up with a character like McLaney because it has since been clearly
demonstrated that from the outset all their priorities ... and all
their values ... were wrong.
The P.L.P. victory gave the people a sense of power that they
had never experienced before. From a friendly, lovable,
reasonably contented people, almost overnight most of them
became hostile ... and some of them showed vicious tendencies.
In the beginning this change in character was encouraged by the
government.
In everything ... and in every way .., the government has been
infantile in its approach to governing a democratic country. Had
they been mature in their outlook they would have realized
immediately that their first responsibility was to build the
character of the people ... not to destroy it with visions of easy
money.
Although they had been involved with McLaney, their pitch in
condemning the former government was that the leaders in the
U.B.P. were corrupt and abused their power.
The P.L.P. should have set an example in their own lives to
justify their condemnation of the U.B.P. They should have set
out to strengthen and reinforce the fine character of the
Bahamian people.
But from the very start it was clear that their souls were eaten
up by hatred and envy and that they were interested in both
revenge for imagined grievances and the acquisition of material
possessions.
Now let us review briefly some of the things that happened in
the government to lay the foundation for the change we see in
our people today.
Mr. Pindling declared in one of his first speeches that his
government intended to change the complexion of Bay Street.
The implications in this statement were clear.
He told a Negro university in the U.S. that, having gained
political power, they must now gain economic power. Here again
the implications were clear.
He declared that it was his intention to make some black
millionaires. How do you "make" a poor man a millionaire? Once
again the implications were clear.
It is impossible to achieve any of these objectives in the short
space of a few years by methods that are ordinarily considered
honest.
He then made his famous ... or should I say infamous? ...
"bend or break" speech at Freeport. And when Freeport refused
to bend because the investors felt that they had justice on their
side, the government proceeded to defy all the established
principles of what had always been accepted as British justice.
They amended the law, thereby repudiating a solemn contract.
sanctified by law ... a law which they had earlier promised to
respect.
Mr. Tasker Watkins, V.C.. Q.C., one of the leading
constitutional lawyers in England ... now a Judge in one of the
higher courts ... warned them that the action they planned was
highly irregular and could be achieved only by a callous abuse of"
power. They disregarded this warning.
When a group of people at Freelxrt refused to hand over
land they had sold to foreign interests because they felt that they
would be protected by their black government. lite foreign group
appealed to Mr. Pindling. His reply to them was that these people
had guns and could shoot straight!
In Exunla and in Cat Island ssmle of the people complained
to the government about land decisions made by the Supreme
Court. They did nothing to uphold the dignity of a court
decision. Indeed, Mr. Justice Scarr, who presided inl the Cat Island
case and had since gone into private practice with the law firn ot
McKinney. Bancroft and Hughes. had to leave the Bahamas
because Immigration, headed by the Hon. Arllhur Hanna. clfused
to renew his work permit. It is believed by many people th.ll this
was punishment for having given a judgment in favtlul of the
Christies.
Labour was just about gelling firmly established in ihe
islands when the P.L.P. took over.
One of the government's early mistakes was to make a deal


EDITOR. The Tribune.

I should like to give the
Ministry of Tourism and
Bahamasair a few words of
unsolicited advice. I am not in
the very least concerned with
embarrassing the Minister or
any other individuals.
My advice is that the
Bahamas should not be too
ambitious about its national
airline. An airline is a highly
specialized and competitive
field and this country cannot
afford too rapid expansion
until it has competently
mastered what it already has.
Make do with qualified
technicians, be they white,


EDITOR, The Tribune,
Kindly allow me space in
your columns to air my
feelings regarding the
Immigrations policy on illegal
immigrants, (more so
Haitians).
It is known and rightly
said, that a Haitian is a kind
person and this has been
exhibited where Bahamian
women bear these outcasts
(in the eyes of the
Immigration), children.
They go to the extreme to
support these children by
paying school fees, clothing
them and now that the cost
of living has skyrocketed,
they even feed them.
What more can one expect
of a man who has travelled


Sentences cut
B EI RUT Sudanese
President (aafar Numeiry
reduced to seven years the life
sentences against eight Black
September guerillas, sentenced
tor the murder of the U.S.
Ambassador to Khartoum and
two other diplomats, the
Middle Fast News Agency
reported Monday. (AP)


Advice on Bahamasair


yellow or black, the only
prerequisite being that they
can do mte job. the trained
Bahamian technician must
learn that training never ceases.
If one has any intelligence at


all. one is always learning. That
attitude is not ai present with
us.
Bahamasair adnlinstration
has often been corplltely
inefficient (with the odd
exception), evasive and
incapable of discipline stall
and the political under-currents
that ripple through the lower
grades of workers make the
work of fihe q(ualitfid s;tal
impossible. Some ,, o ke!-
sworer the) would get ld of a
certain qlualifictl si-ttcr thel\
did


miles in search of better
conditions? You can rest
assured that the Bahamian
man will try every trick to
shy fro,' this responsibility.
Think of the little ones Mr.
Minister, Our Lord said.
"Unless grown ups become
like them, the kingdom is
beyond their reach." Mr.
Editor, Haitians are human
beings, but it is quite evident
that they are treated like
animals.
They are always willing to
work, and resent the urge to
steal. But the opposite holds
true of a Bahamian. The
numerous robberies on our
streets today are the work of
our own Bahamians. One is
free to pass in a Haitian


UN soldiers

killed
FOUR AUSI RIAN soldiers
of the U.N. buffer force were
killed by a mine explosion on
the G;olan llicihls, a U.N.


for two Belgian tugs because they didn't want to give the contract
to a Bahamian firm of white men. This mistake cost the people's
Treasury a pile of money.
At this time they tried to bring in a group of Belgian shipping
agents to control the docks. This was clearly aimed at t giving long
established white Bahamian shipping agents out of business. But
The Tribune exposed this arrangement and it fell through.
But what did not fall through at thai time was an action by the
Stevedoring Union. They signed a contract with Bahamian
shipping agents ... and then refused to honour it because of tihe
entry on the scene of the Belgian group from whom they
expected to get a better deal.
Randol Fawkes, who was an Indepenldent Labour member of
tile House of Assembly, was one of two men who made it
possible for the P.L.P. to take over the government when the
1967 general election ended with a tie vote. He gave Mr. Pindling
the one vote majority he needed to gain control .:! the
government.
Mr. Fawkes was made Labour Minister in the new government
as a reward for swinging into the P.L.P. ranks.
It was Mr. Fawkes who had organized Labour Unionismn in the
Bahamas. Several people had tried to do this efclore him but they
had failed. Mr. Fawkes went to New York and studied labour
Unionisn from the ground up ... and so lie knew what lie was
doing when he launched his labour movement in the Bahamas.
He soon became the Labour Czar in Nassau and for a time lie
was the most powerful challenge to the old U.B.P. government In
order to take the Labour Ministry he had to relinquish his
leadership of labour. Having done this he could never gain control
again.
Whatever else Mr. Fawkes may be, he was jealous of the
honour of a labour contract. tie told the mien that they could nio
walk out ont heir contract. But by now there were other political
influences at work in the party. The men were encouraged to
defy Mr. Fawkes' ruling. When this happened, Mr. Fawkes handed
the problem over to Mr. Pindling.
As you know, the men were allowed to break their contract.
From that day Mr. Fawkes became a marked man in tlie P.L.P.
books. He was dropped from the Ministry of Labour and has
since been hounded out of politics.
Mr. Fawkes was so elated when he was inade Minister of
Labour by Mr. Pindling that he declared jubilantly that he was on
top of the world.
I warned him not to shout too soon because one day lie might
find himself down in the valley ... and that is where his "friends"
in the government have put him.
* * *. r
So many things have happened to destroy the character of our
people under P.L.P. rule that it is impossible to crowd them all in
the space of a single article. I will continue this review toiorrrow.
And then I will go on to discuss how tile U.B.P.. tlie investors
and the people themselves have all contributed in some way
towards helping to bring about the decay that is causing concerll
in the islands today.

FOOTNOTE TO HISTORY: I am ieliably informed that, as a
result of the horrible crime in which Mrs. Gillian Hanslip. a
pregnant English St. Andrew's School teacher was killed on lhe
road near Gamibier Village, four teachers at St. Andrew's have
tendered their resignatioiu., and will be returning to Britain.
Two British teachers who were lecturing at governillent schools
will also be leaving the island within the next onthll.
While on tlhe subject of teachers ... the government music be
very short of money.
I am told that they sent a man to England to recruit 200
teachers. Soon alter lie arrived their e received a tlelegiam
instrliuiicing him to reduce the number to fifty!
*** **** **
The Priest who conducted the mlenlorial service tor Mrs. (iilli.n
Hanslip described this as a case of niurder.
it might have been iar worse. The men \eire startilig to llmolesi
her ... and their intentions were clear ... when thev weei
frightened by a passing car.
At this point Mrs. Hanslip and her familyil escaped in llleir car.
But thlie mci puisued thllem. It Ias i hei Ihai the iitl a.idemil
'rIppened.
SuLel there nusl be somIeone in thie islandd s\ho knows tlie
gloup responsible for these hold-ups. II is shocking ihlii no one
seems prepared to give the pohlce a lead to lie cin miials
* * * aI* * *
A THOLIGHT FOR TODAY
A falling empiie. haslens il; decay COWP'IR


neighbourhood w without the
fear of bei"g molested. bu at
high noon Bahamians sit on
the walls, and one thinks
twice before one ventures to
pass nearby. Somebody,
please help these people.
Prayers are being offered for
them, and I am sure the Good
Lord will hear these prayers:
for lie is the helper of the
oppressed.
Mr. Editor, one final
question, wfien the foreigners
are gone whom niust Ihce
children turn to for help
when their Bahamian nlothers
are unemployed? Not the
Government, not the
Bahamian men Tlie result,
choose, starvation and
eventually, death.
A CONCERN ED MOi'tHER


sp kesmiian said tdia,.
I l Upok.S- ina.illi (
Powetll m nd: t I he i iici nt d
occutiired as l )oops of h1 i : 1.
dis nilg',i;lii'l )O hsb i e lis I o ce-













rUmii -ml mem)rg I% I :':1 1 amitl o l ii
(I'NDOIt t' is imut l(l liu, iiO
the tlr a. i 'l'P

US-China

relations

\\ \S 11 \(; | ) I s
Sc c r -'lN ot li I 'ii

!h I l *u l I, ',,: "

comnitled lo ( CO Iu, l i'
noinuialv/infg wl jo'i ;lan tni
the pace is ilnot si ining' down.

At Ithe same tim he t old a
news conli I'e1nce hlit ha.s no
i inliedhitc plans Io viil! ('l i;ia
bill Ilal he had bhcen niaking
t 1ps llthere iblioi inc' iclt
ci; I. ( \ ')


At Bahanmasair the tail wags
the dog, not unnaturally to the
detriment of the public. I hus
with everyone suspecting
everyone else, and self-interest
so otten coming first. the
atmosphere in the airline is.
most unpleasant It is hardly
surprising that so man) people
would do anything to avoid it
Bahamasair should he run as
a self-contained unit hby the
professional manager tIhe
Minister, of louiism and the
Board ot D)irectors should
content their selves; with
establishing lnot iadmii iisterini'
policy
M adv e tor tlih
impr i I\ em 'iiI l it li.i u Isai .
II iinediatel dI smims,
amn oine no liatlil hitiow wecll
(ualitied khIo la I ,a illtI
disohr\ s aln od(,l( r e(;c sone
discipline in tile stali lih
ail line at pieseni is scaucel litl
to e a'il llcc l ah I. ;1w, 111i
iici national l I lyI"


intiodi ii niN i Icoi:.
adm inis 1 t ti Il. I o ; iiI



tic n lo s11tl t 1 1 N.









Ih l iTic I., !i: )!ii
S S ii i lr I it l i e

lNi t Io I ls i N iler Ifi ,iid

l I ll k a l ii l in. 'h 1
ailu 1'I l ci; s'I' l ii \ il l i I .icit

1 o b h ailit l i1 i\l!! i 1.1,


ippnI i I i

, 1i i '.NiJ I i hI, X ie
Batiani.idsi \ ii la t to h nlI< ()






b hcha : v li I: til he (iI

si t|il nis l t k j io n g .i i h is
ALEXANDER II. BROW
B a li I s t l.II C I ? Ill1
"O'lolitiolls.'


M|.in~ tii'rr 1., nitl i 1 ,1 !i tl i t I J L|

.l l li', lsiHI \\ lll [Ht .l ;P lll\c 3 Ct



opporltini \ knocking ati. s

ALEXANDER I1. BROWN


EDITOR. The Tribune,


Many of our leaders have
been saying how important
agriculture is to the
development of our
economy. Recently they have
been talking very often.
Mr. Coakley and Mr.
Francis have been trying to
guide school leaves into jobs
in Agriculture and Farming.
Mr Hanna has been asking us
to set a date by which we will
be able to feed ourselves with
the basic toods.
ThIe P.M has also had his
little say on tle tialter, but it
IS soiimewhlat tunny that the
maln now in charge of the
Agriciitlture Ministry has very
little to say on the matter.
Mayb e ie is an lionesl man
and lie hates to mnlake empty
Promises Mfiybe he is quietly
working on a lew things in
itle d.ari Or milavse he s isust


another lazy Agriculture
Minister (except for Cal
Francis) who is willing to sit
back and let his little old
Ministry continue to move
down Nothing Street.
The farmers are tired of
nothing sir. Mr. Agricutrme
Minister, it is time for you to
stand up lke a man and fight.
like hell so that farming
would mean something and
not nothing in the future. Sir,
the farmers of this country, I
can assure you, are ready to
do our best to help our new
nation but we need more
than pretty speeches from
politicians.
Sir, will you do your part
so that we farmers can do our
part and feed this nation
from our own fields.
JAMES ROLLE
Montell Heights
June 16, 1974


MlllllCLIP AND SAVElInInIl

I Bahamasair I
ioo
is 'conveliencOO

Nassau to Freeport...

7 times daily. i

7Freeport I

I to Nassau, too!
LEAVE ARRIVE FLIGHT LEAVE ARRIVE
S NASSAU FRELPORT INFO. FREEPORT NASSAU
S1 7 30am 8 00am 30 JET 8:30am 9:00am 8.
> 4 30 am 10 15dil 32 JP l:00pm :45pm 9.
< 3 il.0am )Il:45arn. 32AJP 1:15pm 2:00pm 10.
vr 4 2 45imn 3:30pm 34 JP 3:45pm 4:30pm 11.
C 5 4:55pm 5 40pm 30 JP 6:00pm 6:45pm 12.
Z 6 7l05pm 7:50pm 38A JP 8:15pm 9:00pm 13.
<. / t Ibpm 800pm 38 JP 8:30pm 9:15pm 14.

ILa d r now, flights

to )South Caicos!
LEAVE ARRIVE FLIGHT LEAVE ARRIVE
NASSAU S CAICOS INFO. SCAICOS NASSAU DAY
I Sp e 801 JP 3:30pm 5:35pm Mo. >
2 12: 0pOn 3Oi0m. 803 JP 3:50pm 5:55pm Th.
S 'Slirli luil I 1'974 f( one\ \-, .
Sit) fm m ri : trilars Z

You can believe it!


Bahamasair r
For reservations call:
Nassa7 7-851 ; Freeport 352-8341; Miami 526-5680
411 II~ 1 111 111 1


.4


'I ..~


Food for thought


Think of the little ones


- 111


FA


I









TIf TRIBUNE -. Tuesday, June 25. 1974


SPECIALS


The way men A e
dress in the '-V -'.
company of
women often tells t .
how they feel about ~X..I. "'
those women:'
A nman Iny u ,'lothc to tell a woma, things he wouldn't ay abour hm .wilf
That h' powerful. t lender luccssrul Of advenlnrou
IIOUSI- OF CHURCHILL LTD has rhe most ecxprr ie ills of the stuln
(aberdn-. Imens and all other contcmporar styles So II you re the man
who desnl'l want to talk akbou hlmt lif vist
?|ouot Ot tCurcbill Itb.
NASSAU FINEST M IENS OU
Itim AR* /IP 0 Ik N -JMI/NM. l

LUNCHEON SPECIAL!
WEDNESDAY JUNE 26th.

Crab Rice
with STEW BEEF & POTATO SALAD
served only at ...

The TAMARIND SWITCH
COLLINS AVE., NEXT DOOR TO TRUTH & SOUL
Also: PEAS & RICE with STEAMED CHICKEN
STEAMED CONCH
STEAMED PORK CHOPS
Every morning! BOILED FISH & JOHNNY CAKE



G retest

SELECTIONS
For all your Pet and Garden needs

Plenty of Parking, wide variety and GOOD
PRICES, making us your one STOP Garden
and Pet Supply in Nassau.


M())ENISII Madeira Street Shopping Centre
A (;R\I)EEN `u(
S P.. Box 5790
Tel. -2-2868


fri-5EM11 mSIU
SALE!
.OOO IPairs iof 'unt.s
I lellpha t. Bells. Ha gics.
Je.nsii & I.nw Risc ID)shiki.s.
science Oils & H.' d..
' rinl tlis in q( vrt .5. o0 i o/it, ,IIt
!.: A.1. IPA Irs.


U U _


Call friendly Big "Al Collie", Manager to assist you with
reception. The Bridge Inn will provide all your wedding catering
the cake with the exception of the "Bride and Groom".


Catering to parties of 50 or more.
We also cater for:
E UFFETS RECEPTIONS
a t ANQUETS GRADUATIONS


CLONARIS'KUTE KIDDY
MARKET ST.--DR. ESFAKIS BUILDING
TELEPHONE 24264

ASSORTED STYLES OF BOYS' AND
GIRLS' SHOES, INFANT TO LARGE SIZES
ASSORTED STYLES OF BOYS' AND GIRLS'
SANDALS, INFANT TO LARGE SIZES


CLOGS, ASSORTED STYLES. SIZES 27
BOYS' SHIRTS, SHORT AND LONG
SLEEVES, ASSORTED STYLES, SIZES
AND COLOURS.
BOYS' AND GIRLS' CHRISTENING SETS
OF ASSORTED STYLES.


r
. "
' ^


TIME IS MOEY!
Take advantage of that
One-Day-Service here!
Your eyes examined and *l
get your glasses the same
day.
Try the New Miracle Lens that becomes a sunglass in the
sun. Call today for an appointment: 2-3910


Optical service td .
British Colonial Arcade


e's

CARPET CRAf LTD.
TELEPHONE:3-1993.
EAST "rONRLEY STREET
CARPETS
All Top Quality many styles -
shags, plushes, patterned, two level
loop, commercial. May we suggest
that until you have seen our line of
carpets, do not buy. We can bring our
samples to your home and supply you
.with an estimate at no cost. This
includes over twelve years of
experience in both residential and
commercial installations.
Contact Nathaniel Edgecombe for


IT'S BIGGER
AND BETTER
THAN EVER
SEE FOR YOURSELF-CHARLOTTE ST. NORTH


For some people
... Having to lug soiled
garments to a cleaner can be
very inconvenient. Thats why
"ORIENTAL" has its Home
Delivery Service ... where we
say "you don't have to come
to Us, we will come to You."
Call us today to arrange a
regular delivery service at
your house or office.


OPEN MON. THRU SAT. 95pm.
BEAUMONT ARCADE PHONE 2-2648
BEUMON ARA P.O. BOX 4184 NASSAU, BAHAMAS


BRtIDG

Restaurant and Lounge


Now S'erring l.int'h jrom 11: )00 a.m.
Daily Specials ONLY $1.95
SBahmannln Dishes
*AIme'riln Dishesi
0 Sea I ..i l
* Saiiidso ilie-,
P ALd tour I FtritE (P ktil ..
ON I Y S1.0o0
PLENTY OF FREE PARKING


-til 5. D0 /l.i







I < t ',,


Serving Dinner 5 p.m. Til 1 a.m.
I'hlin 32077 I ist lay a t tlheI I io o l l t llid 'e



PaIL &P/)


51nTAULAN BOTTEGA

PRINCE GEORGE ARCADE

aoei.6' &4 flen6 27ahwn4
DRESSES SIMWEAR
SWEATERS HANDBAGS
COSTUME JEWELLERY FROM ITALY


)bn sullU


BAY STREET EAST OF RAWSON SQUARE
PHONE 2-2657, 2-4252, 2-2559


Konica AutoreflexT
Bring this coupon and get 5% DISCOUNT


1.8 Lens
(plus CASE)
$229.50


-f .-'L. KONICA


1.4 lens
(plus CASE)
$259.50


AY STREETull
BAY STREET


distributed by
W IAII amUANIY
MOUNT ROYAL AVE.
. i PHONE 56089
.. P.O. Box 8316
S"" ..


PHONE 2-4406-7-8 S/S or 2-2352 M/S


LEAKS HEFERATORS


PhoM 57268
All Appliances
IRefrigecrators I) s
Stoves Air (miidiliinier
I rccr.'rs lIe Matl,'rs
Wasl u'rs \\ itrr ( iiulcr,
I)ishWa.tsl ers
SALE & SERVICE
FACTORY TRAINED MECHANICS
E SHOWROOM-




S The YOUNG MISS
'tI MARKET ST. NEARaAY STREET
-/ $CIAL IV lIUM UI S FIE NOT IDAN/IFUL
,' WE WtU-NEU L #MIPRSE NTS

Spring and Summer 1974
S I TY LEI ON:.
SL \ %E ; I ol I % r,(S% II) (K.OM LLI. \0 F %I IIS1 III I I)R \ M4 SU1 T 9I PU% BOY SLITS FORMN1I %HII% \II (ltOir1%i 0
IOI+HER Of THE HRIIk tW1s F fftRH Ifkt ,o t I tRIIi NI 11
COE SEE 4ND COMPiAR OUR OMFAUTIFL S4tN1 itR St'I LERk
SREIVKES AND TIHE m os I IPOr(l\ tni tOU riPIi ltLn S 1
THE YOU'NGMi S m lTO % EVERy \Wt WEI t (H PLI LERtl r FRItI
[Y EVENIE 'tTO T7l'ST I nD Re(OWMt"I) l, O ') Ht Rs


NIV EI 1 PATERANSOF
: WWEU HBRIDES8MAID MATERIALS


II


I r- I `


I


-41


i


j


I I


k i


A*4 OCilftal










THE TRIBUNE Tuesday, June 25, 1974.


I.*


'I; '


Large selection of

ELECTRIC FANS
(8" 20")

10% OFF (thisweekonly)


-~iR~e~iaj~ii


ICE CREAM FREEZERS
Hand 4Qt. 6Qt. 8 Qt.
Electric 4 Qt. 6 Qt.


KELLER STYROFOAM ICE BUCKETS
SPECIAL THIS WEEK 37' c(R. Price 50sc)

PICNIC JUGS (100 ounce) SPECIAL $3.40 (Re. Price S3..5)' 00
COOLERS 60 Qt. SPECIAL $32.29 (Reg. Price s37r.s)
40 Qt. SPECIAL $21.99 (R.p Price s25.9s)



CHILDREN'S WIDE ANGLE SWIM MASKS
f SPECIAL $1.43 (Reg. Price 1.75)


also PATIO FURNITURE PATIO UMBRELLAS -
PICNIC TABLES


5855.
Fourth prize winner was S.
G. Sands. York Street with
ticket number 6542 and
Matthew Roberts. Fox Hill was
the winner of the fifth prize
with ticket number 5065.-
Rico Glinton, Tyler Street
with ticket number 5240 was
the sixth prize winner, while
Mary Thompson of Fox Hill,
with ticket number 4727 was
the winner of the seventh
prize.

Youth Day

THll YOUNG People's
Department of the Assembly
of God. Iaith Fahernacle in
Rock Sound Ileuthera will
celebrate "Youth Day" Sunday
June 30.
The schedule of services are
as follows: Sunday School
9:45 a.in.: Morning Worship
Service 11:00 a.m. 4:30 p.m. a
special Youth Day programnme
will be held. Youth groups
from various churches within
the Rock Sound area will
participate.
I evening I vangelistic Service
convenes at 8:00 p.m. The
Rev. Simeon Hall, associate
pastor of St. Paul's Baptist
churchh Bias St. Nassau. will
deliver the morning and
evening messages.



\rrivcd toda) Bahama Star,
I iierald Seas. Flavia from
\i.iin (),caniL. Atlantic
( ime Irom New York: rropic
I l.l Irom West Palm Beach.
\ i r iing tomorrow:
Seoniardo da Vinci from New
Noik
TIDES
High 12 24 a m. and 1.03
1


p nm
Low b.l
p n


By Abigail Van Buren
Oe Im W Chiam TfllmI-. Y. News Sln., IN.
DEAR ABBY: My 62-year-old mother who was recently
widowed, has taken to running around with men. BShe oed
some kind of "Senior Swingers Club." Her men friads
have been seen by her neighbors and they have begun to
talk.
I just can't understand what's come over my mother. She
picks up men at the grocery store, at bingo, and at other
social events.
She used to be a devoted Christian wife and mother, and
my children adore their "Nana," but now she's disgracing
our family. I spoke to her about this, and she said she
figured she may not be around too many more years, and
she wants to enjoy what's left of her life. Isn't this type of
activity bad for a woman her age?
I need some advice on how to handle this.
DESPERATE IN FORT PIERCE, FLA.
DEAR DESPERATE: A woman who has been a devoted
Christian wife and mother doesn't become less of a Christi-
an because she makes new friends and enjoys socializing.
It could keep her young and healthy for many. years. You
are not "disgraced." A person can disgrace only himself.
Mother is probably innocent of any wrongdoing, but some
neighbors love to talk.

DEAR ABBY: I work days, so about six months ago I
hired a nice middle-aged woman I'll call "Emma" to
come in and look after my children.
The other day I noticed a long-distance call on my phone
bill which neither my husband nor I had made, so I phoned
Emma and asked her if she had made it. I stressed that I
didn't mind if she had, I only wanted to know if there was
a mistake on my bill [It was less than $4.]
Emma said she knew nothing about, it, so I called the
telephone company and they took if off my bill. No prob-
lem.
Early the next morning, Emma's husband called to tell
me that Emma was so upset over my "insulting accusa-
tion" that she couldn't work for me anymore!
Fortunately, I was able to replace her with no trauma to
my children and very little inconvenience to myself, but I
want to know if I did the wrong thing in questioning Emma.
CONCERNED
DEAR CONCERNED: If you're telling it like it was, you
had every right to ask her, and she should not have regarded
your question as "an insulting accusation."

Barbara wins raffle


EARN FULL PAY WHILE

(AP)
it pays to slvcializc. And IBM will pay you while y.ou
train to become a Customer Engineer. It's your cham-ic
to get started in one ofl' today's fast-growing areas of
Electronics.

As a Customer Engineer. you'll install and maintain the
latest IBM Data Processing Equipment. It's a demanding
job. one requiring inlclligenLc and skill. You'll receive
continuous training to update your knowledge.

It' you h:,ve what it takes, you can be promoted to a
position of even greater responsibility in this challenging
Iield of information handling and control.

What do you need to gel stlarqd? Mechanical uptitlde,
knowledge of electronics; and Iwo years of ochnical
school or equivalent experience. CUionser Engineer,
Trainee sought fur Fre pbrt Branch Office. Bahamians
only need apply.

Why not begin your specialization today? For rmort
information call or write to:
CE MANAGER
IBM Bahamas Limited
PM. B. 6400
Nuaiu.tahanma
Phone 132-3j14. sbm.. .m 5.a-751 1CjFmah..aI


ad I. and 7 18


WEATHER
Wind South to south-
south-\estI 15 to 20 m.p.h.
Weather Generally fair
isolated showers likely
Sea Slight to moderate
Temp: Min. tonight 72
Max tomorrow 89
SUN
Rises 5 22 a..
Sets 7 03 p in.


COME SEE US


www .- ~,- -


IO


I4 'Ei


YOU'LL LIKE WHAT YOU SAVE


111'


"-' I" ~


Mother's run "I


around with .ei

DEAR ABbY: Ow g g
city. Nonas of a .iarn
but many of themi
andsentga.. .. *gR.ft :
Our eIn mat -U
behalf of baNO Mummif IVW i9
and rolativm Wa sent
My daughter Amd lir h rdi IA
ponsibility to write aSll to a.m*
His Dad and I [an iMgate of
was a nice ge re on otr mt I it

DEAR PUZZLED: I t .
the notes, but It's ao t
THEIRS.

DEAR ABBY! Wh .Is l Ufi3 .
boss answers the pVyd : s ye:- ilid
street to the bW for I' wh .
Abby. I know my lUfla wisiAd ~dligo
o'clock in the rhomln bA- that's tW WiF I al
I found out that Os b tells hl all l Mf 11001 1
call and ask to tlk to dtair husbaUs. W5oi5q4 -,
husband calls and am s for hits 51, hea I
smart alecky answer. Cdn you lIeIa le Ik fill
are started between taLftlw eouPte' ver th~ N
be you think te boabUtie ril
ble betwenrenh




ever.]

CONFIDENPTIAL TO DIXIE: The way to get a eboy is t
make him a little jfaleas. The way to bese him b1 to AsW .
him a little more jealous.

Problems? You'll feel better if you get it off yar hest.
For a personal rply, wrte t ABBY: Box No U. L.A i
Calif. SWM6. lo* t etalued, self-addresMsd envtl ge
please.
Hate to write letters? Send I to Abigail Va BUr.
132 Lasky DW., Beverly HUil, Cal. 112t for Abby's bee M
"Hew to Write Letters for All Oeeasl0ss."
Fwr Abby's now heeot "What ec-.Agtrs 'iVWi t
Kaw," .a,- n $s Ablgal VYr fni 3 Lt B.. BI
erly Hb111 Cal. t"W.


. N


~.;~


;S~12E
7y~









" 'S _l_ __


THE KIWANIS Club of
Cable Beach is preparing a
playground for the chd rea
of the St. Bede's Plirh
School, and an excellent
turnout of members recently
cleaned the yard area,
removed stones, spread 20
loads of fill and then graded
and seeded the area.
Obviously happy in their
work are (left to right) Clem
Pinder, George Clarke,
Audley Humes. Butch Carey
(Mr. Carey is a member of the
Fort Montagu Club who
volunteered to "lend a
hand"). Henry Burrows.
Duncan Rapier. Giles Wells,
Bruce Newbold, George
Peterson and Henderson
Williams.
Fill was donated by
Paradise Island Limited and
the dump trucks used for
transport to the site by
Oceanic Construction.


The Brett
This is the fifth
AS WORLD WAR 11 drew to
a close (1944-45), the U.S.
emerged as the mightiest of
nations, with fabulous wealth,
immense productivity, and the
strongest and most respected
world currency.
Consequently, when a
gathering of the major nations
was arranged at Bretton Woods
(New Hampshire), in Oct-
ober 1944 to discuss
international currency
stabilization, the American
dollar was accorded top billing!
It was agreed that:
The dollar would be the


ton Woods agreement
in a series of articles on gold by DON HODGE


standard currency unit by
which all other currency values
were to be set. and
other nations covenanted
to maintain the values of their
currencies within a hand or
range no % ider than I per cent
above or helow the figures,
expressed in .American cents,
that represented their parity;
and to use either gold, or
currencies ultimalcly con-
vertible into gold, as their
national reserves.
I he IUnited States promised
to maintain the value of the
dollars t all times. hy agreeing


Best taste



on the island.


II


Howgood iti

in the Super King Size


IS...


0 1973 R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.


to buy or sell gold at $35 an
ounce to or from any central
hank (member of IMF), "for
legitimate monetary purposes".
This arrangement not only
established gold as the
international anchor, but
authenticated a gold reserve
system, whereby nations would
calculate their total currency
reserves in gold, and in their
ownership of other negotiable
currencies of IMF members.
The Bretton Woods
agreement worked reasonably
well for some 26 years for the
118 member Nations but the
United States was steadily
piling up hugh balance of
payments deficits each year
creating a drain on it's gold
reserves.
Major nations co-operated to
take the pressure off the S--.
The U.S. sold government
bonds to foreign nations and a
general informal agreement not
to convert dollars into gold was
reached.
The climax came in August
of 1971 and with it the
unofficial end of the Bretton
Woods agreement. The U.S.
Government reported a huge
deficit of $23.2 billion for
fiscal year ended 6/30/71:
unemployment was close- to
corporate liquidity was
near an all time low, and
industrial production in June.
197 I, was lowest in months.
Worst of all, there was
evidence that, in 1971, for the
first time since 1893, the U.S.
would hb importing more than
they exported. These solemn
stat istics provided solid
evidence that the American
economy was skidding, and the
dollar depreciating.
Corroboration of the:
downspin was found in
dwindling gold reserves -
about 510 billion on August 1,
1971 against total foreign
claims, then above $48 billion!
No wonder there was a
crisis! A stop gap solution was
offered in the programme of
President Nixon, flashed to the
world on August 15, 1971.
What were these. remedies
preferred? (I1) A wage-price
lree/e. (2) a Il/r import
surcharge. (3) rescinding the
7':' excise tax on motor cars.
(4) institution of investment
tax credits and advancing the
date for individual tax
deductions, and (5) an
embargo on gold.
During the week of August
16. 1971 the U.S. Dollar was.
allowed to "float" in a
con fusing multiple relationship
with the mark, the franc, the
pound, the guilder and the yen.
causing nothing hut uncer-
tainty and anguish to anyone
endeavouring to market
products overseas.
New bomb
group
I) ItBI.IN A new
Protestant group has warned it
will retaliate in the Irish
Republic for bombings by the
Irish Republican Army in the
north.
The group, calling itself the
Young Militants Association,
claimed responsibility for car
bombings


Come back to the Family Islands this summer.
The endless beaches. The silver moon. The
whispering sea.
And there's never been a better time than
now. For Bahamasair and the Bahama Out
Islands Association have put together a Lovers
Holiday to many of our Family Islands.
From now until October 31st, you'll get 20%
off on your round-trip airfare and 20% off
on your hotel rate. To qualify, you have to be a
Bahamian or a resident of the Bahamas and
in love.
For airline reservations, phone Bahamasair
in Nassau at 7-8511 and in Freeport at 352-8341.
For hotel reservations, phone in Nassau 2-8383.
For brochures on the Family Islands and
specific hotels, stop by one of the Ministry of
Tourism's Information Centres.
There's a Lovers Holiday for all these Family
Islands:
Abaco
Elbow Cay Club, Hope Town
Green Turtle Club, Green Turtle Cay
Guana Harbour Club, Great Guana Cay
Hope Town Harbour Lodge, Hope Town
Lofty Fig Villas, Marsh Harbour
Treasure Cay Beach Hotel & Villas,
Treasure Cay
Andros
Andros Beach Hotel & Villas, Nicholls Town
Bannister Guest House, Mangrove Cay
Las Palmas Hotel, Driggs Hill
San Andros Hotel, San Andros
Small Hope Bay Lodge, Fresh Creek
Bimini
Bimini Big Game Fishing Club, North Bimini
Bimini Islands Yacht Club, South Bimini


Eleuthera
Arawak Cove Club, Gregory Town
Buccaneer Club, Governor's Harbour
Cape Eleuthera Resort and Yacht Club,
Cape Eleuthera
Current Club, Current
Hatchet Bay Yacht Club, Hatchet Bay
Potlatch Club, Governor's Harbour
Rainbow Inn, Governor's Harbour
Rogue's Cove Club, South Palmetto Point
Sea Raider Cottages, Current
Tranquillity Bay Club, Governor's Harbour

Exunma
Bahama Sound Beach Club, Bahama Sound
Hotel Peace & Plenty, George Town
Marshall's Guest House, George Town
Out Island Inn, George Town
Pieces of Eight, George Town
Pretty Molly Bay Club, Little Exuma

Great Harbour Cay
Great Harbour Club
Sugar Beach Club


Harbour Island
Coral Sands Hotel
Romora Bay Club

Long Island
Stella Maris Inn, Stella Maris

San Salvador
Riding Rock Inn, Cockburn Town
Sea View Villas, Cockburn Town

Spanish Wells
Roberts Harbour Club
Spanish Isle Resort


Bahamasair

& Bahama Out Islands Association
This dvwrtuseme*t sponsored bythe Mhiitry totburtn\, the Out lIand Amssocion nd hhaasaar.


I .


-- -


~~----~-.--+
I;. -












Kreiser kids-
are tops
The hig!het academic
averages at the N. -,au
Christian Academys adiird
programme went to the
Kreiser children Joanna
Jonathan and Danny.
pictured left Their parents.
the Rev. and Mrs. Fred
Kreiser, joined them on the
platform last Thursday.
Robert.W. Baylor Is at left.
John P Ramsey. business
manager of Nassau Christian
Academy and Mrs. Ramsey, a
teacher at the school.
pictured below left are
presented with a farewell gift
by school administrator
Robert W. Baylor (right) With
him is the Rev. Howard Mills.
Mr. Ramsey returns to the
home office of Baptist
International Miiainn.


Now thru Friday
Matinee Starts at 2:15
Evening 8:30
"THE HONG KONG
CONNECTION" PG.

PLUS
"THAT MAN BOLT" PG.


Fred Williamson,
Teresa Graves
'Phone 2-2534


EMIT RWR9U5
MT DIRECTOR
little Con.fidenc. -
7L / ROBERT
NIN/ REDFORD
IBERT SHSAW
A GEORGE ROY HILL FILM
rHE STING"
EORGE ROVHILL TONY BILL MICHAEL
rC.Wlo.o* AUWINRSAicTrut i aO
SES A CC:PTI:ID!
1:1) iY 8: I WI I Il. S01.1).
I
Wednesday thru Friday
Continuous Showings
from 3:00
"WRESTLING QUEEN"PG.
Vivian Vachon,
Cowboy Bill Waits
PLUS
"HOMBRE"PG
Paul Newman,
Diane Cilento



WEDNESDAY
om 1:30, Evening 8:30


)penlls 7.: S10; Shi) s art 8- 30 p .n
See 2 lealtu'r. laUc' as I0. I,
Final Nite:
( 1 v. ( I S :i 0o & I ri..
"JI!)(,I ROY II \N" 10.50
\',N Onew der Is *Itdhiltted
Eastwood
Magnum
Force
PANAVISION' TECHNICOLOR' From Warqer Bros
r A Wa ner Communications Company


CHASE HELPS

EMPLOYEES' CLUB
Employees from the Chase Manhattan Bank have been
presented with a cheque from the bank to help them
establish their own Toastmasters for Achievement Club.
From left to right are: Mr. Henry Laney, general manager
of Chase Manhattan: Mrs. Marina Dames: president of the
club: Francelia Bosfield educational vice president: Sonia
Brooks, secretary and Theodore Levarity, treasurer.







i j1 i-I
8, 0 PI 1 l


HIII E Bahamas Amusements


vice rresioent a& eneral w IIanage
Commonwealth Industrial Bank Ltd. a

COMMONWEALTH INDUSTRIAL BANK LTD.
Palmdale Freeport Bay Street
opp. City Market Churchill Square at Dunmore Lane reaui riest
Ph. 2-1421 Ph. 352-8307 Ph. 2-1154





FROM SINGER!







Model No. 257





IP


Model No. 177C
PRICED AT ONLY 13000


PRICED AT ONLY...

$16800


recognizes G.B. union
The Grand Bahama branch Hurie Bodie, second fro
of the Hotel and Catering right, secretary Leo Dougl
Workers Union is expected to r eight, and Baharm
begin negotiations soon for a Amusements vice preside
contract covering the 120 Albert Miller.left
employees of Bahamas The agreement, which li
Amusements Limited, down a procedure designed
following the signing solve employees' grievance
Wednesday of an agreement without their mushrooms
recognizing the union as into an industrial dispu
bargaining agent for those covers dining room, cofi
workers, shop, bar, kitchen a
Bahamas Amusements is maintenance staff.
d operator of Freeport's El Witnessing the sign
Casino. Signing the Wednesday was Freep
recognition agreement in the industrial relations officer
Labour Ministry's Freeport H. Turnquest, second fri
offices were branch chairman left.


'Non-history' sells 25,000 copies


"Discovery of a Nation," the
"non-history of the Bahamas"
by public relations executive
Michael A. Symonette,
recorded over "two thousand
copies in sales during May" a
spokesman for the publishers,
Management Communication
Service announced today.
The sleek publication was
first released on Independence
Day,July 10. 1973.
Since then over 25,000
copies have been sold,
according to the spokesman.
Mr. Symonette is also the
publisher of The Bahamas


Iiin ilL jl Digest
edition l The
re'rre'd lto Ihe
editorIlJI .11 "d
business and
monthly letter."


The June h1
Miami Herald
Digest in its
sprightly new
investment


ARTS SHOW


Hl-. ANNUAL Ministry of
Education and Culture
Children's Arts and Crafts
Exhibition will be held today
through June 30 at Jumbey
Village on Balliou Hill Road.
The opening ceremony begins
at 5 p.m.


NOW APPIARINS


FREE SPIRIT
Showtimes Nightly: 10:40 and 12:40 p.m.
Make the evening complete with a germat
dinner in the Imperial DIniq Ream. Dinwr
from 6:30 p.m. to 9:3 p.m.


'.3 f~r


THE TRIBUNE ... Tuesday, June 25 1974.


I
I
I
I
I
I
I

I

I
I
I
1

I

I

I


I


PDR1-i m
mm -E

UWR 1,1',"' FUM"'

ki711-
rv


i-T- I i ~L1-~-r --C-- 1 --~ ~-;


I WLFFlRD. m


--











THE TRIBUNE - Tu~sy, J-ea 25, 1974.


'a


E ESTATE


II


FU RENT


I I CARS FOR SALE


I I MARINE SUPPLIES


IN MENMRI


IN MMEIAUM


II


KLW =ATEN


il


a, iIII- -


C14891
SAN SOUCI: 3 bedroom, 2
baths, family room and
separate dining room, Owner
willing seller. $58,000.
CARMICHAEL ROAD;
Desirable property available at
reasonable price. Property
includes nearly ten acres with
attractive well-built
two-bedroom, one bath
residence and two-car carport,
about 15 wells, city water and
electricity, stand-by generator,
fruit trees, etc. Additional
acres under lease extending to
Corrie Sound. $80,000.
Furnished.
RIDGEWAY OFF EAST bAY:
3 bedrooms. 2 baths. Most
attractively furnished and in
top condition $75,000.
H. G. CHRISTIE LTD.
SPhone 21041/2/3/4.

C14985
TWO lots Highland Park 80 x
140 feet $9,500.00 each 10%
down balance in three years at
$266.00 monthly. Call Bill's
Real Estate 23921.
Cl15797
1. BEAUTI FUL LANDSCAPED
4 bedroom 2 bathroom half
acre of land. Air-conditioned in
Blair Estate $59,000.00.
2. Blair Estate 3 bedroom
house fully furnished 1/2 acre
lot $59.000.00.

3. Beautiful 3 bedroom 21/2
bathroom landscaped
airconditioned in Highland
Park. $68,000.00.
4. Grove, West Bay 4
bedroom 2 bathroom home
fully furnished plus 2 self
contained a apartments
overlooking Bay $85,000.00.
b. Sans Souci Lot 100x110l
$6,000.00.

6. Imperial Park 3 bedroom 2
bath house fully furnished
beautiful ii ndsca ped
$39.000.00.

7. Beautiful 4 bedroom 3 bath
lully furni-hed aircr'nditioned
with kidney shape 'wimr;ng
pool and large patio in Blair
Estate.

,8. Nicholls Town Aridros -
WResidential and Business
properties for sale. Price on
application.

9. C-nttreville 3 bedroom 2
bathroom on large lot Partly
furnished $44,000.00.

10. West Bay Street the Ciove
2 large lots price open to
offers.
CALL DOUGLAS CAREY
AND
C.A. CHRISTIE
REAL ESTATE CO.
Phone 52953.

C15808
LX T RA LARGE LOTS SEA
BREEZE AREA 70 x 550.
$400 down. $152 month. Also,
50 x 260 $300 down. $105
month. Tel: 4-1141 any day or
night or 2-3027
MORLEY & O'BRIEN REAL
ESTATE.


S FORRENT


C15776
NASSAU H t LLC
TOWERS
Swimming pool, s
laundry facilities, 1
apartment. 1
apartment, fully
Contact 78421-2.
77065.


REST

un terrace


1 -bedroom
3-bedroom
furnished,
Evenings


C15794
FURNISHED 2 bedroom
apartment consisting of
living-dining room, kitchen and
bathroom. Twynam Avenue.
Telephone 5-8185
( ;/i34
LOVELY 2 bedrorrom
airconditioned apaitrient,
Dundas Couit, Pyfi mi's
Addition, Mastei T.V.ant'nna
and laundi" ioorn facilties
enclosed parking aiea. Foi
information call 3-4953 or

C 14909
2 BEDROOM 1 bath
apartment, fully furnished and
ready for occupancy. Situated
si Winton Highway. Prices vary
from $350 to $375 per month.
Phone 2-1631.
C15779
ATTRACTIVELY tarnished
efficiency. Centreville. Water
included. Private parking.
$170.00 per month. Phone
2-1741/2 business hours.
C14/b2
CCTTAGES and 'p.itmcnt,
montthly -- aii conditioned
fully furnished, maid seivicc
available. Lovely garden and
swimming pool. Telephone
31297.31091
C14735
LARGE spacious 3 bedtor..r
t(ail airconditioned) 3 Iath
fully furnished, hilltop house
6Dnottage Estate. Must see to
appreciate. $700 pei rronth
including light and water.
Telephone 2-3713, 5-9322 or
3.1R71.


C15822
Beautiful Furnished Bedroom,
Kitchen Facilities, Large
Lounge. 2 Blocks west British
Colonial, 1 block from Beach.
Single persons only. Call
5-3208.
C15820
6th August 16 October
Furnished 3 bedroom, 2
bathroom house, Waterloo
Road off Village Road $400
per month or $120 per week.
Maid available. Telephone
22089 day 31473 evening.

FORSLEORRENT

C15806
LARGE 3 bedroom 2
bathroom fully furnished
house in Montagu area, very
quiet road, five minutes walk
to public beach, 3/4 acre
property with many fruit trees.
Only $66,000 if you deal with
owner direct. Also available
for yearly rent $600 a month.
Call 24416 (office hours).

CARS FOR SALE
C15793
ABC MOTORS
Budget-priced, A-I used Best
3est value for your money.
1973 GRAND TORINO
SPOR13, 2-door, auto. trans,
air, radio $4,500
1974 MORRIS MARINA auto.
trans., radio $3,500
1974 PINTO, 3-door runabout,
standard, radiio $4,900
1973 DODGE PICKUP
TRUCK $3,300
1973 PONTIAC VENTURA
2-door, auto. trans., radio air
$3,900
1972 FORD TORINO, 4-door,
auto. trans., air, radio $4.500
1972 TOYOTA 1100 c.c.,
stand,-rd $1,200
1971 VOLKSWAGEN 1300.
auto. trans. $1,900.


1971 FORD CAPRI,
trans. $850.


auto.


PICKUP TRUCK $2,400
1970 FORD LTD, air, auto,
trans. $2,750

1970 VOLKSWAGEN
fastbackk $1.900
1970 VA'.IXHALL VICTOR
STATION WAGON, 4-door,
standard $800
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA $650
SUNBEAM HUNTER, auto.
1970 FORD TORINO' 2-door,
auto. trans., air, radio $2,400
1971 CHEVHOLET PICKUP
TRUCK $2.400


1971 SUNREAM HUNTER
auto. tr.ins., $1,200


1969 FORD
ESTATE $1.200
1969 CHEV
WAGON $1.000


CORTINA

STATION


1969 FIAT STATION
WAGON, staiidard $350
1969 VAUXHALL VIVA,
standard $400


1973 CHEV NOVA,
trans..air $4,800


auto


1967 FORD FAIRLANE 50C
$800

ABC MOTORS
Collins Avenue
phone 2-1031
OPEN MONDAY TO FRIDAY
8a.m. to 6 p.m.
SATURDAY 8:00 a.m. to 5 p.r
C15772
1973 MATADOR. BEST
OFFER Phone 4-3091, after 7
p.m
C15792
SPECIAL 1971 "Firebird 350"
Al condition, radio, tape,
excellent condition, $3950.
Telephone 23137.
C 14984
1968 DODGE DART, standard
shift, white, excellent
condition, $1,000. Call 35729
anytime.
C15764
1970 VAUXHAII VIVA
ESTATE. 30,000 miles $700.
Regular Servicing. Phone
78789 (evening) 42622 (day).
C14975

TEACHER LEAVING
'69 CAMARO 2 door hardtop
standard transmission.
Excellent condition. $1650.
Call 53644.
C15759
1968 PLYMOUTH
BARRACUDA convertible.
automatic transmission, power
steering, radio. $1.600. O.N.G
Phone 42.193.

C15757
1970 MORRIS 1300 ESTATE
- $600. Call Mr. Page -
24276.


1 I


C 15800
1970 MOKE 35,000 miles.
Excellent condition. New
paint. $1,000.00. O.N.O.
Phone 41164.

FOU SALE

C14965
2 BURNER OIL Stove -
$27.00
2 Burner Hot Plate $15.00
Hollywood Bed $95.00
10 Piece Bedroom Set -
$295.00
D & R. FURNITURE
Market Street South
Phone 22637.
C15791
1 MOTOR CYCLE, Harley
Davidson. Phone 31824.
C14983
HOUSEFUL of furniture for
sale. Owner leaving colony.
Phone 35729.
C15816
MACKEY STREET
DEPARTMENT STORE
Palmdale Avenue and
Mackey Street
Opposite Bar 20 Corner
10% DISCOUNT STOREWIDE
Store Hours: Monday, Friday
and Saturday 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Tuesday, Wednesday and
Thursday 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

CRAFT SUPPLIES

C14767
NOW In stock at Bahamian
Paint Supply, Bay Street:-
Decoupage
Clear Cast
Candle Craft
Tissue Craft
Phone 2-2386. 2-2898.

SCHOOLS \
C14772
LEWIS AUTO SCHOOL
LU:arn to drive with confid'c,.'r.
Phone 59805 between 7 and
8:30 p.m. :)t 3-5084 anytime.
C15774
POPEYE KINDERGARTEN
Most reliable daycare centre
Children from 6 weeks to 5
years
7 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily

Jerome Avenue, Pyfrom's
Addition
Phone 5-9903.



C15782
IF you have young cniiai'r
this announcement is especially
for you. With the purchase o'
one fifteen volume set o
childcraft (The How and Why
Library By World Book) you
will receive absolutely free an
eight valume set of children's
classics. If you have older
children and purchase a 22
volume set of World Book
Encyclopedia you will receive a
World Atlas absolutely free.
Contact your local distributor
C. W. SANDS ENTERPRISES
LTD., P. 0. Box 5449 E. S.
Nassau or Telephone 23921.

ENTERTAINMENT

C14336

SETTLER'S PUB & INN
Beaumont Arcade, Bay Street
Telephone 5-9739
TWO BANDS NIGHTLY
The Nassauvians
The Electric Circle
OPEN TILL 4.00 a.m.

C15787
BLUE HILL GOLF CLUB
Golf: Adults $2.50 and Juniors
$1.50 per day.
DRIVE RANGE. TENNIS
AND SQUASH
From 8:00 a.m. to Midnight
7 days per week Tel: 3-6333.

PETS FOR SALE

C15795
2 black Labrador Male Puppies
S9 weeks. $150 each. Phone
5-8185.


ANNOUNCEMENTS

C15818


BAHAMAS OBEDIENCE
TRAINING SCHOOL
Registration for Summer
Session
July 16th -6 p.m.
Back of O'Brien Engineering
off Thompson Boulevard. For
more information call 3-140S
or 3-1303.


C 1194
1969 31 ft. CHRIS-CRAFT
Commander. sleeps six, priv. te
shower, two 230 h.p. *irni >ea
with less than 200 hours.
Kitchenette, good conditi ..
Call 24267, 540.1 .
C15766
NEW 31 ft. boat, well
constructed, locally built.
$3,750.00. To view call 2-2868
days.
C14969
22 foot Boat 160 H.P.
Mercruiser inboard, outboard
- Both rebuilt. Sleeps 2. Top
condition. $4000 O.N.O -"
anytime 31642.
C15788
HOUSEBOAT
66 ft. Concrete hull, bedroom,
living room and kitchenette,
two bathrooms, sundeck,
central air condition,
beautifully furnished. $20,000
or nearest offer. Also 21 ft 155
Buick in-outboard hurricane
hull. Ship to shore. Al
condition $2800. Phone
/7550 or 7777-6
C15752
1971 28 foot Flybridge
Bertram with twin 215 h.p.
Mercruisers in excellent
condition and well equipped
and also with Dual Control.
31731 (day).
C15813
14 ft. SEAGULL. Phone
2-2861, Ext. 343 from 6.30
d.m. to 2.30 p.m. ask for Mrs.
Mary Adderley.
C15819
MUST SELL 12 ft. Sailboat
and trailer. Come see and make
offer. Teleph.-ne 3-1554 -
2 2612.
C15767
28 ft. twin screw Cabin
Cruiser, fly bridge with dual
controls, air-conditioned cabin.
Excellent shape. $9,000 --
O.N.O.. Please call 2-3211
days, 3-4243 nights. Ask for
Mr. Bruce.

I- LOST

C15814
REWARD
For information leading to the
recovery of "SPIDER", a black
half-labrador male pupov.
white spot under neck, wearing
tan collar. Missing from Oakes
Field Saturday. Phone 5-8553.
C15786
$1,000.00 WILL BE
OFFERED FOR
INFORMATION GIVEN TO
OURSELVES OR THE
POLICE FOR THE
RECOVERY OF TWO
L A i FiS PLATINUM
BAGUETTE DIAMOND
RINGS VALUED AT $6,500
and $1,000, THE PROPERTY
OF A. PARKHURST AND F.
GRIFFIN LOST AT
HOLIDAY INN, PARADISE
ISLAND, 8th JANUARY,
1974.
AUTOMOBILE ADJUSTERS
LIMITED P. 0. Box N-1960.

CARD OF THANKS
C15811


k
THE relatives of the late
VEDA MOSS wish to record
their thanks to the following
during their recent
bereavement:-
Doctors and Nurses of the
Female Medical Ward, Pastor
and members of Providence
Baptist Church and all who
officiated at the service.
The many friends who sent
floral tributes and cards of
condolences, Mr. Sweeting and
staff of Commonwealth
Funeral Home for the very
kind and sympathetic service.
Daughters: Emmerline Allan
,nd Rebecca Bodie.
Sister: EUNICE DARLING.
I DAOSTInU WAUm


II


C 15804


In lovinq memoryof ofur dear
nephew, Andrew L. Grant who
departed this life June 18th,
1974, in New York City.
We love you dearly but God
loves you more.
Left to mourn, a wife, 4 sons,
4 brothers, 2 sisters, 5 aunts,
Mrs. Gladys Thomas, Mrs.
Aileen Wilson, Mrs. Beatrice
Nicholas, Mrs. Ailean McQuay,
Miss Lillian Grant 1 Grand
Aunt, Mrs. Beatrice Huyler, 1
uncle, Mr. Charles Grant,
nieces and nephews, and a host
ot other relatives.

HELP WANTED

C14997
VACANCY exists with
International Company dealing
in sales and service of business
machines for Stockroom
Clerk / Administrative
Assistance. Duties would
include responsibility for
day-to-day operation of
stockroom and dispatching
servicemen to different jobs.
Experience in stockroom
procedures involving control
helpful but not essential.
Please apply in writing giving
background and references to
PMB 6400, Nassau.
C 14986
WANTED IMMEDIATELY
Experienced Offset Pressman,
40 hours per week, good
working conditions. Apply
BAHAMAS PRINTING, Oakes


Field.





BUSINESS 6 PRO


DIRECT

Save Tin







bi [ hI Ikklinctny


2


SSAVE iM E U SAE


ANTENNAS
slidd TV 2-2618

AUTOfWOT IVE
Lucas Batteries
Ray Street Garage 2-2434

BOOKSTORE
-The Christian Book
Shop 5.8744,

BUSINESS FORMS
Executive
Printers 2-4267/5-4011
KITCHEN CABINETS
Commonwealth
Furniture 31120

CAMERAS
.ohn Bull :!.4252/3

ENTERTAINMENT
;-,vies
-:!m & Equip. Service 2-2157

FLORISTS
ISLAND FLORIST 2-2702-
5-5419
GARDEN &
PET SUPPLIEb
Modernistic Garden Pe".
Ma deira Shop Plaza 2-2868
,%a:sau Garden & Pet
Maoitrose Avenue 2-4259


Nev
Lau


F..s


Opt
I. dI


Con
P3p


We
Exe
Prin


Woi


Cha


C15828


IN Loving memory of my dear
husband Bishop William R.
Franks who departed this life
June 25th 1963.

When darkness veils his lovely
face
I rest on his unchanging grace
In every high and stormy gale
My anchor holds within the
veil
On the Christ the solid rock I
stand
All other ground is sinking
sand

Sadly missed by his wife Mrs.
Marion J. Franks, one adopted
daughter, 5 grandchildren and
other relatives and friends.

I NELP mNTED
C15775
YARDWORKER
Man 30-40 years of age to care
for grounds and general
yardwork. Must have at least 5
years experience and
knowledge of general grounds
care. For appointment, phone
77673 between 9 a.m. 4
p.m.
C15758
BAHAMIAN wanted to weed
a,id keep yards clean.
Telephone 3-4953.
C 15789
FARM HELPER. Phone -
5191-9
(evenings) 36700 (mornings).


FESSIONAL


C15284
JOB TITLE: (THREE)J
WELDERS
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education. Must be
a certified welder.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Must be a certified welder
capable of performing
hor izontal, vertical and
overhead welding, brazing and
cutting of any material using
gas and electric welding
equipment.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
C15273
JOB TITLE: OPERATIONS
FOREMEN

MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3-5
years. Training and experience
in cement manufacturing
process.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES;
Supervise single-turn activities
of cement making operations
necessary to produce slurry
clinker and finished cement of
the type quantity and quality
required to meet customer
requirements and shipping
schedules.

INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
. 15802
'WANTED: Tailor to work in
tailor shop. Bahamian
preferred. Call Percy Ford.
34946.
C15803
MAID WANTED. Call evenings
32531.
C 15796
LIVE In Maid to work with
family of six children. Apply
to: P. 0. Box 4546.
CLI 2u
JOB TITLE: ERECTION
SUPER INTI NDENT
MINIM'JhiM EDUCATION:
Good basic education. Must be
able to read blvepririts.


MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
O RY 5-10 years.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Supervise the construction and
e erection of modifications to
buildings and equipment in
Cement plant.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Froannrt ( ranri Raharma
Cl15281
Cl 21E EXT. JOB TITLE: CHIEF CHEMIST
& INSPECTOR
llN PraliMMl MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: At
REY chemistry experience.
LDUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
LAUNDRY Co-ordinate and supervise the
DRY CLEAN INJC quality control procedures
ranging from selection and
blending of raw materials
SO 2ie440tal through the manufacturing
dry 2-4-03 process to the final inspection
and testing of cement prior to
MEN'S WFAiR release for shipping.
i Ltd 7 INTERESTED APPLICANT
hrioa.teaLtd. .i'7, CONTACT: Personnel
OPTICIANS Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100, "
ical Service Freeport, Grand Bahama.
". 2-"'"; : C15785
PAPER WANTED Student Teacher
Classical, Modern Ballet. Twice
mmercial weekly for Girls' Industrial
per hF;o. 5-9731 School. Must have 5-7 years

PRINTING training. Salary. 4.1375 Miss
Pratt.
long's Printing 5-4506 C15283
cutive JOB TITLE: POWERHOUSE
iters 2-4267/5-4011 FOREMAN
RUBBER STAMPS MINIMUM EDUCATION:
RUBBER STAMPS Good basic education.
ng's Rubber Stamp 5-4506 Knowledge of Power Plant
electronic and pneumatic
SPORTS >000DS controls.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3-5
mpion Spor, Land 2-1862 years.


TRAVEL
neivt,,'ir7 2 2 /7
R.H. Curry & Co.,2-868 1/7
TV REPAIRS
Channel Electronics Ltd.
3-5478
TRUCKING


C v4981 nFIARwARE JOHNSON'S TRUCKING
C 14981 HARDWARE & LANDSCAPE 5S-574
INTELLIGENT, attractive 4; .ohn S. George 2-8421/ TYPEwRiTER REPAIR
year old American woman,R REPAIR
seeking position ds JUNIOR BETHEL 5-1044
book-keeper credit manager or To Advertise !n
any office work. 20 years This Directory UWHOLSTERI \i
experience. Have police CALL 2-2768 Eddie's Upholstering 5-9713.
certificate, health certificate m m
and letters of reference, write 1a .
P. O. BoxN-8721. FOR TMI E MN M WANT

you believe nobody
ybu're wrong. You a-e mmm m-mm --mm -m -mmm
reading this aren't you?h Nasau Merchants
n r hn g I NaYo M rchants
information on small or For Businss And Services


DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Supervise on a swing shift
basis, turn activities, including
operations and maintenance of
Power Plant personnel engaged
in the generation of electrical
power for the operations of the
Cement Plant.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


ELP WANTED


C15282
JOB TITLE: MOBILE
EQUIPMENT REPAIRMAN
LEADER
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Directs and plans work of
'workmen as required to
inspect, test, adjust- dismantle
and replace unit assemblies or
parts and make complete
repairs to gasoline or diese
powered equipment.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
C15784
FOUR GARDENERS. Salary
$50.00 $60.00 per week.
Depending on ability. Apply in
person BERT L. ROBERTS
LTD., Roberts Building, East
Street. Tel: 23177.
C15810
WANTED Accountant and
Sales Analyst, at least 5 years
accounting experience.
Bahamians only need apply in
own handwriting to: P. O. Box
F-2442, Freeport, Grand
Bahama. Attn. Mr. A. Pride.
C15809
ADMINISTRATIVE
TRAINEE required, age 25-30,
university degree preferable,
for involvement in all aspects
petroleum marketing and
distribution. Good career
prospects. Please apply in
writing, with resume and
references, to P. 0. Box
N-4807. Nassau.
C15807
GARDENER FARMER. Hours
8:00 a.m. 5:30 p.m. $12 a
day. Phone 42080 after 6 p.m.
TWO dependable janitors
needed to maintain school
grounds and facilities year
round. Call 3-2641.

C15790
GARDENER, Handyman to do
general gardening and odd jobs.
Phone 22181.
C15805
GARDENER CARETAKER
wanted to work in garden and
take care of house. Must sleep
in and have five years
experience in gardening. Salary
$50 a week clear references
necessary. Write P. 0. Box
N8194.
C 15825
FARMER to work on farm in
Carmichael Road. Telephone
35812,. Mr. Green, P. 0. Box
N-1567.
C15815
MANAGE R a nc
MANAGERESS required for
small out island resort.
Manager should have
experience in similar type of
projects and be capable of day
to day maintenance of
generators and other
equipment. Manageress to take
full responsibility for efficient
running of restaurant and all
housekeeping staff. Apply in
'writing, with copy of resume,
to HAWKS NEST CLUB, P. O.
Box N-3919, Nassau.
C15801
TWO. dependable janitors
needed to maintain school
grounds and facilities year
round. Call 3-2641.

C15827
FARM HELPER wanted.
Telephone 3-5550, William V.
Eneas.


C15812
3 FARM WORKERS to weed
and clean chicken houses.
Phone 41239 or Rocky Farms.
C15826
FARMER to work on farm in
Seabreeze. Telephone 3-5812
Mr. Green P. 0. Box N 1567.

FTRAE SERVICES

T. V. ANTENNAS
Boosters for homes,
apartments and hotels
SALES AND SERVICES
Call 5-9404
W'ORLDO LI- iiUSl(4
'Airkev Str 'r't
.-147/59
BACKHOE FOR HIRE
Need a septic tank or trenching
done? Call
CAR I G. TRECC
CONTRACTORS LTD. 2-499
or 5-4R7?5


CORRECTION
Miss CHERYL LOWE who is to he married to
Mr. PERRY COOKE on July 6th, 1974, has
NOT chosen her Wedding China from Solomon's
Mines.

Solomon's Mines aupologise for any
inconvenience caused by the error that was
advertised in the Bridal Choice on July 24th.


Come by Classified Counter at The Trbune or call 2-1986 Ext. 5 i Nassau,352 -6608 in Freeport from 9a.m. to 5pm. Mon. to .FrL. Sat. 9a.m. to 1p.ii.


I UM h\i Ynh


..... [- nilH! i ,n nl.









THE TORI ... Tuesday, June 25, 1974.


V


TAT K SERVIS



IJ rage Ltd.
Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU BAHAMAS
P. O. BOX N3714
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
. DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
PSECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER:
OR JACK CASH
Phone: 2-3795, 2-3796
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 7-7434
FREE ESTIMATES
C14765
MASTER TECHNICIANS
LTD., Mackey Street, your
Whirlpool distributor offers
refrigerators, washers, dryers;
compactors, freezers, ice;
makers, air conditioners and
garbage disposers.With full
warranty on every home
appliance we sell. Service done;
by factory trained mechanicsJ
Telephone 23713, 5-9322.


C15
JOB
EQU
LEA
MIN
Gooi
MIN
5-10
OUT
Dire(
work
inspe
and
parts
to g
equi
INTI
CO
Dep,
Cort
Free
C15
JOB


TIM[ SERVICES
i*&6 11L 1


3-4263 5-9368
BAHAMAS UPHOLSTERY
Adderley's Addition
Rebuilding, Repairing,
Refinishing
17 years experience
FREE ESTIMATES

C14841h
C.W. (BILL) PEMBERTON
FOR
INSURANCE
Life, Fire, Hurricane,
Motor, etc.
Telephone 52539
Malton House
P. O. Box N1014
Collins Avenue.
C14/6)b
FOR YOUR BUILDING
NEEDS AND CRANE HIRE...
see: ISLAND BUILDERS
LIMITED P. 0. Box 6285 ES
Phone 3-1671 3-1672.


GRAND BAHAMA

ELP WANTED HELP WANTED
282 C15273
TITLE: MOBILE JOB TITLE: OPERATIONS
JIPMENT REPAIRMAN FOREMEN
DER
IiMUM EDUCATION: MINIMUM EDUCATION:
d basic education. Good basic education.
IIMUM EXPERIENCE: MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3-5
years. years. Training and experience
*IES/RESPONSIBILITIES: in cement manufacturing
cts and plans work of process.
kmen as required to DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
ect, test, adjust, dismdntle Supervise single-turn activities
replace unit assemblies or of cement making operations
sand Makecomplete repairs necessary to produce slurry
gasoline or diesel powered clinker and finished cement of
pment. the type quantity and quality
ERESTED APPLICANT required to meet customer
NTACT: Personnel requirements and shipping
artment, Bahama Cement schedules.
npany, P. 0. Box F-100, INTERESTED APPLICANT
oort. Grand Bahama. CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
283 Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
I TITLE: POWERHOUSE Freeport, Grand Bahama.


FOREMAN
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education.
Knowledge of Power Plant
electronic and pneumatic
controls.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3-5
years.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Supervise on a swing shift
basis, turn activities, including
operations and maintenance of
Power Plant personnel engaged
in the generation of electrical
power for the operations of the
Cement Plant.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C15281
JOB TITLE: CHIEF CHEMIST
& INSPECTOR
MINIMUM EDUCATION
Good basic education.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: At
least 5 years cement plant
chemistry experience.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Co-ordinate and supervise the
quality control procedures
ranging from selection and
blending of raw materials
through the manufacturing
process to the final inspection
and testing of cement prior to
release for shipping.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
C15287
PIPEFITTER FOREMAN
Four (4) industrial pipefitter
foremen required for heavy
industrial mechanical work.
Able to handle welding and
pipefitting crews of 12 men.
Experience must include at
least five (5) years in
supervisory position, ability to
read blueprints and lay out
piping work and be familiar
with all aspects of mechanical
construction.
Send resume to: Westhemeco
Ltd., P. O. Box F-2550,
Freeport, Phone 373-4684 or
contact Mr. Rick Penn, P. 0.
Box F-2533, Phone 373-1735.

C15289
POULTRY
To work on farm. Contact the
Island Market Pinder's Point
Grand Bahama, Box F27


H wHrLa of

o gu *make
fr atI tIh p
wa ,lk tile
wreeL. etI
letter ma *
bI used onece
only. aI'li
1moss, ootan the Irgre
4 ote ai and tWre must Ihe l'i


C15284
JOB TITLE: (THREE)
WELDERS
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education. Must be
a certified welder.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Must be a certified welder
capable of performing
horizontal, vertical and
overhead welding, br.:zing and
cutting of any material using
gas and electric welding
equipment.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C15280
JOB TITLE: ERECTION
SUPERINTENDENT
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education. Must be
able to read blueprints.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Supervise the construction and
erection of modifications to
buildings and equipment in
Cement plant.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box TF-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C15285
MALE or FEMALE to work on
farm, take care of children.
$30.00 per week, Bahamian
preferred.
Contact Mr. E. Jones, West
End, Grand Bahama Island.


C15253
ONE GREENSMAN TO LOOK
AFTER BASEBALL FIELD.
PHONE FREEPO-RT
373-2117.
C15254
ONE UTILITY MAN, TWO
DISHWASHERS WANTED.
OCEAN ONE RESTAURANT.
PHONE 373-3033.

AMONCEMENT

C14764 SHAWNEE
Daily Service between West
Palm Beach and West End. For
Reservations call The Grand
Bahama Hotel (Ext. 5).


leIal one elilhl-rlIter ntirdl In the
list. No pluriall: nol forgiit torr&:
nil pnIrt isiier. '[IAt '
TI KHIET : I1 uIrail, good:
Ill word,. rery good ; '.4 sords.
rt'wlle l. ii lollI imlifrrnl.
IE'TENDI) tSS tl.1:TION :
.All) MpI) ).ul i irll lImply lair
i p iar lIly" *illp llnply iIly
mallr maill marl mar l) 1111ll
myall Poil pall 111ll.41 pI it% ili .m)
pally pll pillar pit pli. plli
prin i I ,l illI I prlml. rill
rill" rill.


CARROLL RIGHTER'S


from tbe CoerM 0t0 IDIOtm

GENERAL TENDENCIES: A day to put all of
your affaksain order. o you will be able to
venture forth and handle the important events coming up.
Make your surroundings spotless and gain the respet of allies.
Speak with increased confidence.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) If you are not careful with
regular task you could get into trouble. Take the health
treatments that will give you more vitality.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Don't attempt to push your
personal views on others, especially where amusements are
concerned. Avoid one who is impatient.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Jumping from one activity to
another could be upsetting now so keep a steady pace. Make
certain not to criticize others now.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Buy appliances
and other articles needed in the home. ,Obtain data thit will
simplify your daily work. Be constructive.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Plan how to cut down on
expenses so you have abundance in the future. Go to the right
sources for the information you will need.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Know what 'it is that you
desire of a personal nature and then make the moves that are
wise. Get rid of whatever is obsolete.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Obtain the data you need to
make a new project work more effectively. Show associates
that you are practical. Relax tonight.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Think out a plan that
requires the cooperation of trusted associates. Avoid the social
at this time. Take health treatments.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Engaging in civic
affairs at this time will bring excellent benefits. Stop
procrastinating about paying an important bill.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) You have not completed
a course of action for several days and this is a good day to do
just that. Add to present knowledge.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Know what your position
is with an associate before making any future plans. Your
intuition is not good now so be careful.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Consulting with associates is
fine provided you do so in a constructive way. Any prejudicial
remarks could prove destructive.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY ... he or she will be
one who needs to be guided early in life and should be taught
to persevere in one direction instead of jumping from one
thing to another.


Bridge
Ta h wsf%= M what
the French aptly call the
coup de l'agoie. Declaerer is
Claude Rodgue. The occasion to
the Anglo-Israel match nlst
year's European Champmonship
In Ostend. On the result of the
hand will depend the outcome of
the match.
Dealer North: E/W Vul.
North
J 103
SA J 108 2
West East
8K 8 5 3 Q 10 4
A K Q 10 3 J 8 6
KQ7 5 2
6 8
West North East South
- Pass Pass 14

West leads the and
switches to a trump, ducked by
East. How can South conjure
up nine tricks ?
Wn ricIn his hand, Rod-
rfue a diamond, taking
West's OK with dummy's OA,
East won the next diamond
trick and gave his partner a
diamond ruff. Now came the 4A.
The defence had taken three
tricks. Claude ruffed, cashed his
VA and ruffed a heart in
dummy. The stage was set for
the coup de I'agonie.
On two good diamonds in
dummy Claude could throw two
losing hearts. So East had to
ruff. Over rufmng, Rodriue
ruffed a heart with dummy's last
trum and led another diamond.
or not East ruffed with
his A Rodrigue would shed a
heat nd make his contract.


r p i i-~






No. 7.462 . by TIM McKAY
I. Scraps rot (snag.). (6. 3)
8. Den. (4)
I., One In tile family. (4. 5)
12. Amount of a bet. (5)
13. Resign. (5. 4)
1. Make a noise like a car, (4)
18. eono.ilsig. (48)


Chess
01 LMIAfta IARSPD




I.u j


a&0fl


An optimistic U.S. promoter is
trying to stage match with
world champion Bobby isher
giving dts of rook for kn1jht to
me USSe's woman world cham.
pion Nona Oaprlndubvll. In
today's diagmm from a women's
tournament In Belgrade. Nona
(White. to move) has sacrificed
a rook for the attack, but her
opponent Verocl threatens
Q--Ktit mate. What should
White play ?
Par times: 10 seconds. chess
master; 30 seconds, chess expert:
2 minutes. county player; 4 min-
utes. club standard; 7 minutes.
average: 20 minutes, novice.
Solutm n: Page U
Chess Solution
Nona drew bc% rpetual check
with Q-Kt4 ch andQ-Kt7 ch.
missing a win by 4 itxP ch '
PxR; 2 P-Kt4 ch,. K-R5:
Q-K7 oh. Q-KtE: 4 P-Ktj
mate. A setback lot Women's
Lib--b't I would put monem on
Nona to beat Fischer at the odds
quoted





2S. In what Dlace? (.1)
. South American race. (4)
24. Huarts. (5)
.1. Take a look (4)
Down
I. Tardy. (4)
1. utensils. (4)
3. It may he gixantlc. these
days. (3. 6)
4. Change direction. yachtinn.
Vi. Vetorian ranhion. (9)
Spending money. (9)
.qRuestrlanlsm. t(1
1 u. Outheoses. (5)
I Pull suddenly. 4
I Entertainments.
sense
13 L a d I"es
with

t n. A naer.
10. 1 ae e d.
(a)
21 (HIat sll. ,r,,EM ,
(3) )'iaterodn'., xI,,I04ni


"MAYBE IF I TURN 1E EUTIE WHmEL 7 wAY,
SHE'LL START /WKIN' teS MAAIN.


REX MORGAN, M.D. DiO Clow.


.1 g, AVER R REALIZED ACET T


A KAUrFUL FLWER/










JUDGE PARKER Paul Nichols
I 'rM NOr TA RANUI I THOUGHT THS D0TD YOU m IL LrrT A MPw
OKAY...r'LL MER EAY... 16 WERE I AMKED JUTIN g CK? IU A
PICK YOU UP AT SEVEN 0ON'T WAIT! BECK TO WA06IT!u o -OUw i oD !
U mARY!W N THE m W HIM
9tLL.I CALT











A PA RTMENT 3- G a le x o


STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD


Saundrs & Overgard


-1


"p


A R


L L











THE TRIBUNE.. Tuesday, June 25, 1974.


Saints could set



pace next season


ST. BERNARD'S will not be able to win the pennant this
season but they can decide who will. And with the type of ball
they are playing now, the Saints are bound to be contenders next
season.
In increasing their spate of winning rallies to four in a row, the
Saints last night clobbered Heineken Stars 1540 moving into sole
possession of eighth place in the Bahamas Baseball Association
league. ByGadtneT-,rto
The Stars who did cross the By Gladstone Thurston
plate for three runs in the sixth
inning had those tallies and rounded the corners on
nullified. Lead off batter and Smith's two base throwing
pinch hitter Harold Whyte, error. Smith's error was an
coming into the game for the attempted pick off of Rudy
first time failed to report to Levarity.
the official scorer Robert A pass ball, a wild pitch and
Sumner or plate umpire Amos the second of Smith's four
Saunders. errors plated four more St.
That would not have made a Bernard's runs in the following
big difference anyway. The frame.
Stars' defence was far too Lynden who legged out a
faulty to stop the young St. bunt to Carroll was followed
Bernard's squad. The Stars by Wood who was hit by a
committed nine errors. The pitch. Bethel then lobbed a fly
Saints had two. ball into left field. Stan Smith
On offence, the Saints were missed the catch, cramming the
on their game. They clipped corners.
losing hurler Barry Carroll for It was then catcher Panzy
11 hits while giving up only Johnson let his first pass ball
three. Second baseman Claude go. Carroll followed that with a
Lynden topped that category wilder and St. Bernard's on the
going four for five from the score board read 3-0, Clarke's
plate. He scored three and grounder to Smith was.fielded
knocked in one. well, but again, the throw was
Left fielder Cedric Johnson off target as two more runs
collected two hits from his scored.
three at bats and scored two. From then on, frustration
Right fielder Hugh Bethel seemed to set in on the
scored three and Dave Wood Heineken dugout. This
and catcher Everette Neely climaxed in a sixth innings
added two each. controversy. l)encil Clarke
Keith Ford worked the whose rbi minutes earlier drove
seven inning route confidently. in Bethel for the Saints seventh
At no time he was in any real run moved to third safely on
trouble. Except for the Stars' Johnson's single.
three nullified runs, Ford kept That play was close. The
his opponents scoreless on Stars figured the batter was
three hits over five innings, out. They ramped and raved
Left hand centre fielder and aruged the play, but to no
Kermit Graham collected two avail. Carroll even left the
hits, but they were harmless, mound and walked into the
Ronald Smith got the other dugout.
and that did not come to any After the umpire had called
use. "play ball" numerous times.
Johnson scored the Saint's the match resumed and St
first run in the top of the Beranrds who were untouched
second. Having been issued a by the misunderstanding went
base on balls, he stole second on to win their 11th game.


Del Jane lead


pennant race


THE PRELIMINARY
round of the Bahamas
B baseball Association's
pennant race began last night
with Del Jane's right hander
Kirk Smith predicting an
outright win.
The only team that may
upset their hopes are second
place Schlitz Beer, and they
have to first pass through
third place Citibank chargers
tonight. Becks Bees meet
Carroll's in the first game at 7
o'clock.
"We have a better chance
than anyone else," said Kirk
whose fast ball no one in the
league has yet teamed. "The
pressure is on Schlitz. They
have to win all their games
and I don't think they have
the pitching staff to do it."
Del Jane's one and a half
game lead will come under
attack tomorrow when they
play Schlitz in what could be
the decider. Heineken Stars
meet Carroll's in the first
game.
The brewers star hurler
Henry Williams sees these last
games of the 1974 series as


being easy for no team.
Nevertheless, "if we win
tomorrow night, we will win
the pennant, undoubtedly,"
he said last night watching Jet
Set down the Chargers.
Schlitz is on an I I game
winning streak, has five left
to play and are tied with Del
Jane eight each in the loss
column. In games against
each other, Del Jane leads
2-1.
Schlitz has used Williams a
lot this year. His 15-3 record
shows his valuableness.
Satisfied with his
performance, "if anybody in
the league had done better
than me, it would not have
been more than one man --
Kirk Smith," he said. "He
had an exceptional season."
Williams respects Smith
but is confident that he and
Schlitz can beat Del Jane.
Kirk on the other hand is
sharp as usual. Of Del Jane's
26 wins, he got 13. struck out
116 and of 107 innings he
walked only 21 batters. He
credits such good stats to his
being in shape.


Picture: MARGARET GUILLA UME
St. Bernard's Tyrone Cargill prepares to slide in under
the tag being applied by third baseman Phillip Saunders'


Jet Set halt


the


Ch


LESLIE JOHNSON'S infield
hit keyed Jet Set's three run
splurge in the sixth inning to
coast a 9-8 victory over
Citibank Chargers in the
night-cap of a twin bill played
last night at the Queen
ili/abeth Sports Centre.
Under threatening clouds
the B a I a in as Ba se ball
Association was able to
complete a double header as
St. Bernards crumpled
Ileineken Stars and Citibank
fell further behind league
leading Del Jane Saints.
Down by a two-run deficit
and fresh from a five-run fifth
inning attack the Setters tallied
for more runs in the sixth
inning.
John Dean led off the sixth
and reached first base safely
when third baseman Paul
l)emeritte cut in front the
short stop man to pick up the
ground ball but Deineritte
could not handle the hard
grounder.
Winston Sweeting walked,
then Richard Brooks laced a
single to left field to drive in
Dean.
At this point manager Rick
Albury obviated Starter
Frankie Sweeting for Michael
Moss who struck out the first
hatter he encountered.
Lester Gardiner faced Moss
and successfully claimed first
base on a error to full the sacks
then Sidney McKinney walked
for the Setters to notch the
score 8-8 as Sweeting trotted
home. r
Left fielder Leslie Johnson
came to the plate and quickly
fell behind I ball 2 strikes to
Moss. Moss after shaking off a
few signs flashed by catcher
Sidney Outten tried to blow a
last ball past Johnson who laid
back and chopped the pitch up
the middle to plate Brooks
with the winning tally.
Jet Set used a trio of twirlers
to hold the Chargers under
their shoes. Winning hurler
Richard Brooks struck out
designated hitter Bernard
Burrows to start off Citibank's
seventh inning then Cot Outten
and Demeritte to bounce out
respectively after he had
walked pinch hitter Basil Hlall


-Golf Bahamas


venue

switch
THE NEW PROVIDENCE
Division of the Bahamas Golf
Association announced today
that the final international trial
event which was slated for the
Paradise Island course on
Saturday and Sunday has now
been resisted at the South
Ocean golf course.
Tournament Chairman Fred
Higgs explained that the
Committee decided earlier in
the year that all trial events
would be played down or as
the ball lies. "So far, we have
been able to achieve this, but
in some cases, to the detriment
of the golfers."
He added that recently, the
Committee played the Paradise
course, and the decision and
unanimous agreement was that
the ball could not be played
down owing to the present
condition of the fairways,
therefore the event should be
resisted.
The final ladies trial event
which will be contested on
Sunday was also rescheduled
for South Ocean.
Standings: J. Duncombe -
474, V. Prosa 480, R. Slatter
- 482, E. Gibson 490, V.
Lockhart 492, Z. Stubbs -
494, M. Taylor 496, B.
Smith 497, I1. Masson 497,
D. Joss 504, R. Dumont -
508, P. Terilli 513, R.
Turnquest 513, R. Velton -
513, F. Higgs 516, C. Poitier
- 516, J. Moree 522, D.
Butler 523.
Ladies scores: B. Higgs
195, M. Chappelle 202, L.
McKenzie 203, S. Solomon
207, E. Dean 213, E.
Bainton 213, R. Bolstad -
215, G. Smith 216, N.
Mackey -216, F. Whitten -
232, M. Eneas 282.

Tennis results
RESULTS from the tennis
at Balmoral and Sheraton
British Colonial Hotels.
Men singles on Saturday: Roy
Munnings defeated Timothy Barrett
6-8, 6-3 and 8-6; N. Williams
whopped Kent Thompson 6-0, 6-0;
Charles Carter got by Tex Lunn 6-2
and 6-3; Joseph F-ord beat
Humphrey Brown 6-1 and 6-2;
Adrian Zuivine beat Mickey Lester
6-1 and 6-0; and Joey Ford Jr. out
lasted Philip Major 6-0 and 6-4.
Sunday's results:
Roy Munnings coasted a 64, 6-4
win over Rudy Allene; Risk Briley
lost the first set to M. Roker 3-6
and came hack to win 6.3, 6-3;
Charles Cater beat N. Williams 6-2,
and 6-3.


Kodes wins


WIMBLEDON Defending
champion Jan Kodes and
top-seeded John Newcombe
opened the two-week
Wimbledon tennis
championships Monday on a
triumphant note.
Kodes, the No. 6 seed
playing on center-court, beat
Sherwood Stewart of the
United States, 6-3, 6-4, 9-7 and
Newcombe, making his first
appearance at Wimbledon since
he won his third title in 1971,
ousted Georges Goven of
France 6-3, 6-2, 8-6.
Results:
Billie Jean King, U.S. beat Kathy
May. ULI.S. 6-1; 6-1; Ivonne
(ioolagong, Australia, heat Mrs.
Marijke Schaar, Netherlands. 6-1
6-1: J immy Connors, U.S. beat Ove
Bengtsson, Sweden,. 6-1, 7-9, 6-2,
6-4; Kerry llarris, Australia, beat
Lindsey Bcavan, Britain. 6-2, 6-1;
Belt ('uypers, South Africa, beat
('hristine C'olman, Britain 6-1. 6-2:
Rosemary Casals, U.S. beat Penny
Moor. Britain, 6-2, 6-1: Francois
Jauffret, France heat Milan


NOW SAD HAITI SACK THEIR TEAM COACH


HAITI'S se mi-comic,
semi-tragic, entry int.) World
Cup soccer was completed
Monday with the dismissal of
team coach Antoine Tassy. the
man who chose to sleep rather
than answer a middle of the
night phone call from President
for life Jean-Claud-" Duvalier.
Tassy's problems involved
more than disregarding the
phone call from Haiti's
super-fan in Port au Prince. His
team was shaken by a doping
scandal that turned into an
alleged kidnapping case now
under investigation by the
Munich police.
On Thursday night, hours
before he decided not to
answer the latest Duvalier call,
Tassy allowed dope scandal
player Jean-Joseph to return to
the team's dormitory at
Gruenwald when he should


have been with the resident
Tonton Macoutes, he;'d-d by
Maj. Acedius St. Louis, at a
Munich hotel.
Tontons came to fetch
Jean-Joseph. Karl Renner, the
German dormitory manager,
has told the Munich police the
player was beaten and dragged
away.
A World Cup hostess, Maria
Harmelak, has also gone to the
police to report that
Jean-Joseph called her four
times during the night,
sometimes crying and once
saying, "I know what they're
going to do to me once I get


Pakistanis


LONDON Pakistan cricket
captain Intikab Alam struck
five sixes and two fours as the
touring side scraped home for
an exciting five run win against
Somerset yesterday.
Intikab's 43 and 59 by
Shafiq Ahmed highlighted a
fast scoring Pakistan second
innings of 223 for five. Alam
then declared to leave


back."
The next day the Haitians
denied the kidnapping report
and fired Renner.

SUNDAY'S second round
match between Argentina and
Brazil in Hannover makes
soccer history. The two Latin
American giants have never
before clashed in 44 years of
World Cup campaigning.
POLAND is winning
matches but losing citizens. At
least three supporters have
defected and sought political
asylum in Germany.
HOLLAND S reward for
winning a second-round place:
a visit from wives and girl
friends. The Dutch Football
Federation rented 15 extra
rooms in the team's hotel to
accommodate the girls.


West German players, after
weeks of Monkish seclusion.
have been allowed to see their
girls too but only to hold
hands.
WEST GERMAN sports
writers nominated Enver Marie
of Yugoslavia as the tourn-
ament's best goalkeeper.

Lead intg scorers:
Andrezej S/armanch, Poland 5.
:;reegorz Lato, Poland 4, Johnny
Rep. Netherlands 3, Dusan Bajevic.
Yugoslavia 3, Kazimierz Deyna,
Poland 2, Johnny Nee-
skens, Netherlands 2, Ralf
Fdstroem, Sweden 2. Joe Jordan,
Scotland 2, Rene Houseman,
Argentina 2. Hector Ya/alde,
Argentina 2, Emmanuel Sanon,
Haiti 2
Tomorrow games: Holland v
Argentina, Brazil v Fast Germany,
West Germany v Yugoslavia,
Sweden v Poland.


just pip Somerset


Somerset a target of 320 to
win in 295 minutes.
Somerset gamely went after
the runs, with Graham Burgess
scoring 90.
Rath: Pakistan 31 for six
declared and 223 for five declared
(Shafit Ahmed 59. Intikah Alam
43) Somerset 215 and 314 (Nasir
Malik five for 86). Pakistan won by
five runs.
Middlesborough: Yorkshire 116


and 144. Middlesex 204 and 60 for
two. Middlesex won by eight
wickets.
Portsmouth: Leicestershire 247
for nine and 52 for one. Hampshirer
294 (Barry Richards 89. Graham
Mckenzie four for 74).
Old Trafford: Essex 332 for nine
and 53 for two. Lancashire 300 for
eight declared.
Colwyn Bay: G(lamorgan 253 for
eight and 173 for two: Sussex 315
for six.


Worcester: Gloucestershire 188
and 196.Worcestershire 218 (Ron
Headley 104) and nought for no
wicket.
Trent Bridge: Kent 236 (John
Shepherd 79) and 123 for three;
Nottinghamshire 227.
Edgbaston: Warwickshire 322
and 204 for four. Derbyshire 202
(Laurence Rowe 73).
Northampton: Northampton-
shire 180 and 113 for seven. Surrey
253 for eight.


Holocek, stateless, 1-6, 4-6, 6-4,
8-6, 6-4; Brian Gottfried, U.S. beat
Ray Moore, South Africa 6-3, 4-6,
7-5, 2-6, 10-8; Steve Krulevitz, U.S.
beat Bob Kreiss, U.S. 6-3, 3-6, 7-5,
4-6, 6-4; Jose Higueras, Spain, beat
Antonio Zugarelli, Italy, 4-6, 6-2,
6-3, 4-6, 6-1.
Arthur Ashe, U.S. beat Hans
Kary, Austria, 6-4, 6-2, 6-4; Julie
Heldman, U.S. heat Laurie Ileming,
U.S. 6-3, 6-0; Jean Baptiste
Chanfreau, France, beat Butch
Seewagen, U.S. 9-8, S-7, 9-8, 1-6,
9-7.


voted

into

chess

body
THE BAHAMAS was
officially voted a member of
the World Chess Organization
Monday at the first plenary
session of the 50th general
assembly of the Federation
Internationales Des Eschecs.
Other countries admitted
were the British Virgin Islands,
Surinam, Zaire, Algeria and
Jordan.
Speaking on behalf of the
new member, Bahamas Chess
president Kenneth Adderley
assured the delegates that the
new countries were happy to
be affiliated with the World
Organization and that the
Bahamas, although it was one
of the smallest nations in the
world will make its
contribution to foster good
relations between countries in
the field of chess with the hope
that all nations would live
together in peaceful
co-existence.
The Bahamas is further
being considered as the site of
one of two major tournaments
of the Pan American Countries,
pending support from local
hoteliers, and will definitely
get one tournament in 1975.
At the time the Bahamas
was being admitted as a new
member, a resolution
introduced by Morocco and
signed by nineteen countries
including Russia, Jordan,
Argentina, West Germany and
Cuba was circulated to the 80
delegates calling for the
expulsion of South Africa and
Rodesia from International
competition until the racial
discrimination practiced in that
country was abolished.
Cuba, in an amendment,
proposed suspension instead of
expulsion, even though it was
felt that the situation would
not be changed for a long time.
Delegates were expected to
vote on that subject today.
Four countries walked out
of the Olympics because of
South Africa's participation.
The Bahamas play Rhodesia on
Friday.
After four rounds of play in
group E, Rodesia is first and
the Bahamas eighth. The scores
are Rhodesia 12, Iraq 12,
Netherlands Antilles 11/,
Trinidad 8A2, Cyprus 8'/2, Japan
8, Algeria 6 and the Bahamas

The Bahamas' points were
scored by Elias Antonas and
Kenneth Adderley. The team is
expected to return early next
month.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that THEOPHILUS FRITZ of East
Street, Nassau is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalisation
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration naturalisationn should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 25th day of
June 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002,
Nassau.




AMAS RiACG CM MISSION

NOTICE
June 19th. 1974.

All Owners. Trainers and any other persons who
have stallions that are used for stud purposes are
required to submit their stud books to The
Commission Office NO LATER THAN JULY
10TH./74.
Also, ALL FOALS THAT HAVE DROPPED IN
1974 must be REGISTERED BY THE SAME
DATE.
Failure to abide by the above can result in such
foals not being eligible for registration to race and
the covers made by such stallions will not be
recognized.
OWNERS OF THOROUGHBRED STALLIONS
AND MARES are required to present such
registration papers to The Commission Office.
A REMINDER, all stallions used for stud purposes
and brood mares must be registered with The
Commission.
This is most important, the co-operation of all
concerned is strongly recommended.
WILL THE FOLLOWING PERSONS PLEASE
REPORT to The Commission Office as soon as
possible: Dudley Lewis. John Bain, Gary Bain,
Alfred Gibbs, James Sweeting, Nelson Sweeting.
Cyril Bullard, Michael Brown, Ashwood Hall,
Cornell Seymour. Patrick Sands and Joseph
Horton, this to do with a proposed training
programme.
BAHAMAS RACING COMMISSION


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that LALETiA BETISTE of Eaut
Street, Nassau is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration should not be granted should send a
written and t inad statement of the facts within
twenty eight days from the 25th day of June 1974 to The
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs, P. O. Box N-3002, Nassau.




NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MAUD IONE WEEKS of
P.O. Box F-75, Freeport, Grand Bahama is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 25th day of
June 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002,
Nassau.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MITCHEL FOSTER of
Market Street North is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalisation as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who Knows any reason why naturalization should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 25th day of
June 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home' Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002,
Nassau.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that SINCLAIR COICOU of P.O.
Box F-2550, Freeport, Grand Bahama is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalisation as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that aun
person who knows any reason why naturalisation should
why naturalisation should not be granted should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within'
twenty-eight days from the 18th day of June 1974 to The
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002, Nassau.




NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JACK MICHEL FOSTER of
Hospital Lane North is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for naturalisation as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why naturalisation should not be granted should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 25th day of June 1974 to The
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002, Nassau.





NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that JOSEPH MARCEL
ALCEGARLRE of P. 0. Box F1970, Bass Lane, Freeport
Grand Bahama is applying to the Minister responsible tor
Nationality and Citizenship, for naturalisation as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why naturalisation should not be granted should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 18th day of June 1974 to The
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs P.O. Box N3002, Nassau.




NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ENOCH CECELIA HASTY of
Bluff, Eleuthera, Bahamas, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalisation as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalisation should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 18th day of
June 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship Ministry of Home Affairs P. O. Box N-3002,
Nassau.




NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that PIERRE JOSEPH of Marsh
Harbour, Abaco is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship for naturalisation as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
naturalisationn should not be granted should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 18th day of June 1974 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, Ministry of
Home Affairs, P.O. Box N-3002, Nassau.


I-


NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that EMMAJANE ROSETTA
ROLLE of Sweeting Road, South Beach, Nassau is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 18th day of
June 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002.
Nassau.


NOTICE


NOTICE is hereby g91" that DIEUSUEL VEDRINE of
Lifebuoy Street, Nassau is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalisation as a citizen of The Bahamas and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalisation should
not be granted should send a written 4nd signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 18th day of
June 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002,
Nassau.


I


argers

to climaxed the contest.
Citibank held a one run lead
after the first frame but saw
Jet Set tie the scored in the
bottom of the second frame.
Lloyd Bowleg and Kendal
Monroe got things started for
Citibank in the top of the third
when they singled to occupy
the corners.
With one out Sammy
Johnson singled to drive across
two runs. Burrows bounced
out and Sammy Glover reached
first when he lashed a single to
right field.
A wild pitch enabled
Johnson to score and Glover
stole second and third then
scored on a throwing error by
the catcher for the Chargers to
take 5-1 lead.
The Chargers collected two
more runs in the fourth and
one in the sixth inning. Frankie
Sweeting took the loss for
Citibank Chargers.

BBA Standing (-our top teams)
W L 6;B GI
Del Jane 26 8 ;
Schliti Beer 22 8 2
(Citibank 22 10 3
Bimini 17 9 S !1


I
s
s














C

Ll


d
it


I