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 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: June 18, 1974
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03645

Full Text

VOL. LXXI, No. 172 Tuesday, June 18, 1974. Price: 20 Cents


Blueprint







for the






Sonesta


THE 400-ROOM
Sonesta Beach Hotel's
operation will, if its sale to
Wardair goes through, be
completely revamped to
cater exclusively to the
growing inclusive tour
charter (ITC) travel
market, The Tribune
confirmed today.
But this does not mean that
Sonesta will be trying to
survive on the "rock-bottom"
type of tourist ITCs are
associated with in the public
mind, a spokesman said.
A press release was issued
yesterday by Jack Armstrong
and Roger Doswell, both vice
presidents and directors of
Hotel Management
(Worldwide) Limited, the
company that will manage the
Sonesta for Wardair if the sale
goes through. Mr. Armstrong
will be general manager and
Mr. Doswell will be executive
assistant manager for
operations, planning, research
and analysis.
The press release was issued
in response to "a number of
rumours an', misi'nfornred
statements" which might give
rise to "gross raistndetstand-
hngs."
The release never made it
clear what rumours or
statements were being referred
to, but in a telephone interview
this morning Mr. Doswell said
it was felt that there was a
general view that Wardair's
proposed ITC operation means
"the rock-bottom of the
market, but it doesn't."
He said there had been
concern, as the press release
put it, that "very low rates
could be detrimental to the
image of any vacation
destination while also bringing
into disrepute the image of the
ITC market."
But Sonesta's rates, he said,
would, under Wardair run up
to $50-$60 a day MAP double
occupancy in the winter. "We
wouldn't be underselling other
people in the industry," Mr.
Doswell said. "In fact, we
would be selling at higher rates
than many of the hotels do
now."
The press release had said
that Wardair "believes in
quality and exploiting a market
which would certainly include
many people from the
professions such as doctors and
lawyers.
"The whole trend in world
tourism is towards group versus
individual travel, and this does
not imply 'cheapening' but
merely giving good value for
money. Those destinations that
include some facilities to
exploit this growing and
increasingly prosperous market
will surely be those to sustain
themselves in the face of
competition from other areas
in the world only now opening
up to tourism."
The press release went on:
"Should the sale of the
Sonesta Beach Hotel be
consummated, the hotel would
be put in shape physically, well
maintained and properly
equipped. It would be made a
livelier and more exciting hotel
at which to stay and, although
service would be modified, this
in no way would be prejudicial
to the satisfaction of guests
who would be paying a
reasonable and fair rate for the
quality of the hotel.
Superfluous service would be


MODERN FURNITURE
FOR MODERN
PEOPLE


eliminated and more
appropriate services intro-
duced."
Mr. Doswell said this
morning it was "premature" to
specify the services what would
be eliminated or to comment
on reports that room service
was one of those slated for the
axe.
The "more appropriate
services" to be introduced, he
said, would include a "much
more active social
programme," aimed at meeting
the needs of guests in the areas
of leisure activities, recreation
and entertainment.
The press release added that
"it is true that staff reductions
are envisaged, but
communication on this matter
is being maintained with both
the government and the
Bahamas Hotel and Catering
Workers Union."
Mr Doswell confirmed to
The Tribune that the
re-organisation of Sonesta's
operation would cost approx-
imately 100" employees their
jobs.
"The aim," the press release
said "is to reverse the
downward trend of the hotel
aid4 to' finally ahie it in a
sound business and financial


basis thus safeguarding the
stability of the future of the
operation as well as removing
the insecurity that must be felt
by many employees."
Mr. Armstrong and Mr
Doswell in their press release
also criticised the current
Sonesta management for selling
to package groups "for rates as
low as $9 per person per day
per room plus $6 per person
per day for breakfast and
dinner ... while it is commonly
known that the hotel has
experienced heavy losses since
opening.
Such low rates, they said,
could be "detrimental" to a
vacation destination's immage.
Industry sources said,
however, that Sonesta's lowest
group rate was $9 per day
double occupancy but a single
guest would have to pay the
full $18 In addition it was
learned that only 100 of
Sonesta's rooms operate for
group business; the other 297
are offered at regular rates
averaging $24 $35 double
during the summer.
The two executives
emphasised that "Wardair has
every condifence in the future
of tourism in Nassau and
particularly Cable Beach


Hotels slap on



$1 a day



for energy


THE BAHAMAS Hotel
Association has announced
that an energy surcharge of
$1 per paying guest per day is
to be added to all room rates
beginning June 30.
On December 15 however,
the surcharge will be reflected
in the revised winter
rates
The decision to pass
escalating energy costs on to
guests follows from what one
hotelier described recently as
"appalling increases" in
electricity rates.
As a result of higher fuel
costs to the Bahamas
Electricity Corporation
(BEC) has found it necessary
to impose two surcharges in
the past six months.
Hotels are now paying 3
cents per unit on the average
base rate of 4.25 cents.
Hoteliers estimated that
the utility price hike would
add a further $1.40 per room
per night to existing rates for
small hotels while the larger
hotels faced increases of at
least $2 per room per night.
It was predicted at the
time of BEC's latest surcharge
announcement in April that
hotels would have no
alternative but to increase
room rates, despite
government efforts to
maintain the present price
structure.


Utility rates for New
Providence hotels are
reportedly three times higher
than those in Miami.
According to the
Dayton-Keenan report on the
local hotel industry, the
utility cost per room per day
in Florida is $1.36 while
those in the Caribbean are
$2.07, in Puerto Rico $2.59
and in Hawaii $1.03. The cost
per day in the Bahamas is
$3.35.
In announcing the
surcharge the Hotel
Association also issued a
reminder that a service charge
was instituted for all hotels
here in May.
The charge is 15 per cent
for sit-down table service and
10 percent for bar and buffet
service.
Some of the more
exclusive hotels have had a
mandatory system for several
years, but this is the first time
that the system has been
applied through out the
Bahamas.
A spokesman for the BHA
said that the new system has
eliminated confusion over
gratuities, especially among
European visitors who are
accustomed to service charges
being included in the b-11. The
system, he added, was
"working well."


THE LONG-DEVELOPING
split between the Public
Services Union EPSU and its
BaTelCo branch became final
today with registration of the
new, branch-sponsored
Bahamas Communications and
Public Officers Union (CPOU).
Officials of the new union
collected the union's certificate
of registration this morning
from Registrar of Trade Unions
Lambert L. W. Parker.
The registration of the new
union came little more than a
year after friction began to
develop between employees of
the Bahamas Telecommunica-
tions Corporation and the


leaders of the PSU, of which
they were members through
the PSU BaTelCo branch.
CPOU president Willamae
Bridgewater told The tribune:
"This union was formed
because, as we saw it, it was
impossible for us to continue
as a true union under the
present leadership of the PSU.
"The only way we could
serve our people was to get
our own union and operate it
along lines of trade unionism
rather than along political
lines
The PSU leadership is
accused of being too
pro-government to effectively


p


Croupier

awarded

$4,370
PARADISE Island croupier
John Penn has been awarded
$4,370 by the Bahamas
Supreme Court in his suit
against Paradise Enterprises
Ltd.
Mr. Penn filed an action last
month claiming he was owed
that amount for work
performed at the casino on
Sunday, days off, holidays
and in excess of a 48-hour
work week.
The claim was brought
under Sections 5, 6 and 7 of
part II of the 1970 Fair Labour
Standards Act, which states
that the working week is to bhe
48 hours.
Anyone who works over
that time is to be paid double
time on Sundays and holidays
and time-and-a-half on other
days.
Mr. Penn was awarded
judgment yesterday after
Paradise Enterprises failed to
'pdit in an appearance.
Mr. Penn was represented in
his suit by attorney Randol
Fawkes who described the
action as a test case which
wouiu n an- e t


would nave an effe
position of othi
dealers.
Mr. Fawkes said
has served a letter o
Enterprises Ltd. a
overtime pay be com
the remaining 96
from commenceme
Fair Labour Standi
1970.
The suit by
followed his dismissal
of eight other deale
May. They were
offered two weeks
pay, holiday pay an
home.
Although they
contract, with
Enterprises, the deal
they were owed ovi
overtime pay under
Mr. Fawkes atti
have the matter set
Industrial Relations

Hamilto

funeral
FUNERAL ser
Thomas Herbert Ha
who died on June
held Sunday at 2:
Kingdom Hall o
Witnesses on Quako
Born at New No
Mr. Hamilton car
Bahamas over 50 ye
lived on Soldier a
Hill Road.
lie is survived b
Commerlita; three
Carmeta Taylo
Duncanson and FI
six sisters, Saverlita
Uilda, Julia and
brothers, Rev. Lloyd
and Deacon Thoma
and 14 grandchildren


Two jailed in

stowaway case
TWO MEN, arrested and charged with aiding and
abetting stowaways were sentenced to one month in prison
each when they were convicted in the lower court today.
Haitian Jean Paul and Argentinian Horacio Romeio, both
seamen aboard the m.v. Marcella II were accused of hiding
seven Haitians aboard the freighter at Potters Cay Dock
between June 8 and 9.
The seven Haitians, Montfort Gelin, Jean Louis
Alexandre. Pierre Francois, Rene Plymouth, Atnagrace
Destin. Marie Paul Eugene and Marie Louis Charles testified
to paying the two men $400 each to be taken to Miami,
Florida.
Paul and Romeio had pleaded not guilty when charged in
the magistrates' court last week.
The Haitians also said that Romeio pretended to be the
captain of the Marcella II.
Paul was also ordered to pay back $71 compensation and
remanded in custody with Romeio for deportation upon
completion of their sentences.
The seven Haitians were cautioned by Magistrate
Osadebay.



Two on poaching


charge


fined $9,000


ect on thin A visiting Miami plastics
er casino manufacturer and a
Cuban-American fisherman
today he were separately charged in the
on Paradise lower court today with
asking that poaching in Bahamian waters
niputed for on Friday and Saturday.
croupiers They were fined amounts
dnt of the totalling $ .000 with
rads Act in alternative prison terms.
Maurice Wright Hart Jr.,
Mr. Penn plastics manufacturer of 714
al and that Anastasia Avenue, Coral
rs in early Gables, Fla., pleaded guilty
reportedly when charged this morning. He
severance was represented by attorney
d their fare Hubert Ingraham.
Police accused him of
catching crawfish near Riding
had no Rocks on Saturday.
aradisme Also charged was Capt.
ers claimed Sanchez Narciso, 25 South
er Act$70,000 West South River Drive, Miami,
thempted to Fla. Three other members of
erpted the his boat, the "Eneida," Felis
tied by the Aboresco, 4th St. South West
Board Miami and Anastorino Milian,
also of Miami. were discharged
In after police withdrew charges
upon Narciso's conviction.
Attorney Ingraham told the
court that Hart was cruising in
vices for the Bahamas. lie and his family
amilton 68, and friends were here for a
16 will be short visit and had they
30 p.m. at registered at a port of entry,
f Jehovah the charge of poaching would
o Street. not have been brought against
rth Caicos. them.
ne to the lie said he wished to inform
ars ago and the court that the fish caught,
nd Baillou 14 crawfish and. two scalefish,
were for their own con-
y his wife, sumption and not for export.
daughters, Their boat, "The Delight,"
r, Helen was not equipped with cold
cxie Jones: storage or any other equipment
, Ula, Idclla to store seafood in larg
Annie; two quantities. The fish were
d Hamilton, caught while Hart and the
as Hamilton other members of his party
b a. were cruising.


branch split


represent public employees in
disputes with the government
The new union is expected
to attempt to end the PSU's
monopoly on unionism within
the civil service.
Mrs. Bridgewater said the
CPOU constitution opens its
membership to anyone
"regularly employed" in the
field of communications, in
any public corporation, any
government department or
agency or "in any capacity in
the public service of the
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas."
However. she said the CPOU
has no immediate plans for an


active membership drive
outside BaTelCo. but "if
people feel they can get better
representation with us we will
welcome them Anyone is
invited to join the union."
The CPOU will hold a
meeting shortly, and anyone
interested in joining will be
welcome, she said.
Speculation that the
BaTelCo branch would break
away from the PSU was
confirmed in January this year.
when workers filed an
application for registration of
the CPOU
The Labour Ministry did not
respond to the application


He was fined $3.000 or six
months by Chief Magistrate
Hercules.
Hart's boat was boarded
about 200 feet west of Riding
Rock, Insp. Hugh Burke told
the court. lie said that A.S.P.
Leon Smith and Ch. Insp. E.
Munroe spotted the defendant
while on patrol aboard the
police launch "Acklins."
They arrested Hart after
interviewing him, he said.
Chief Magistrate Hercules
fined Narciso $6.000 or nine
months for poaching in the
area of Brown's Cay on Friday
around 6:30 p.m.
Narciso, the captain of the
"Eneida," pleaded guilty to the
charge. Police accused him of
having taken 1,206 pounds of
scalefish in Bahamian waters.
Narciso told the court that
he was fishing here "in order to
buy food to sustain ourselves."

Action talks
THF PEOPLE'S Positive
Action Committee has
scheduled a series of meetings
"throughout the constituencies
of New Providence and the Out
Islands' to speak on "the
current issues" of the cost of
living, unemployment, poor
housing and sanitation,
utilities, social and economic
injustices and corruption.
PPAC secretary Alfred
Butlei said the first meeting
will be held tonight at 8.30 on
Kemp Road just off Wulff
Road. The meeting was
originally scheduled for last
night but was postponed
because of bad weather.
lie said that "as far as
possible" meetings would be
held in various areas "at least
twice a week."


until March, when minor
amendments to the CPOU
constitution to conform with
the Industrial Relations Act
were requested.
The amendments were
made, and CPOU officials were
notified about ten days ago
that the Ministry was ready to
register the new union. The
officials today paid the
registration fee and collected
the CPOU's certificate of
registration.
Mrs. Bridgewater told The
Tribune the CPOU would be
applying "shortly" for
recognition by BaTelCo as sole


PILOT RAPS


REPORT ON


LANDING
A SPECULATIVE report last week by the morning paper that
a Bahamasair BAC 1-11 jet aircraft was brought in for an
unnecessary and deliberate one-engine landing in March was


Mary's Coffeehouse, the brainchild of Mrs. Ilonka Roker, is now housed in new quarters
adjoining St. Benedict's Hall, West Hill Street, thanks to the generosity of the West Nassau
Rotary Club., The Coffeehouse provides warm meals for needy old people. The club has
provided, in addition to the building, a kitchen and lavatory facilities. Mrs. Roker and Bishop
Paul Leonard Hagarty (centre) accepted the new facility on behalf of the Catholic Diocese.
Right is Nassau representative Celophas Adderley and to his right West Nassau Rotary president
James Hayek.


"irresponsible" by the pilot

Death of Mr
Harry Wells


today branded as "untrue" and
involved.
Capt. Garth Massey,
dismissed by Bahamasair in
early April, wrote a Letter to
the Editor to counter part of a
June 14 report in the Guardian
that centred on former
Bahamasair general manager
Max Healey's $2.9 million suit
against the airline.
The section Mr. Massey took
exception to read:
"Meanwhile, this journal has
learned that two pilots who
were involved in a one-engine
landing at Nassau International
Airport last March in the midst
of a pilots' salary dispute, have
been fired by the national
carrier.
"Reports indicate that when
the aircraft was checked out no
malfunction was found, leading
to speculation that the BAC
1-11 had been deliberately put
down on one engine because
Prime Minister Lynden
Pindling and Mrs. Pindling were
on board."
Mr. Massey, who was the
pilot on the March 30
Freeport-Nassau flight, said in
his letter that during the
approach to the airport for the
landing "the right engine began
a series of very loud bangs
(compressor stall).
"The loud bangs indicated
that something was wrong.
Standard operating procedure
under such circumstances calls
for immediate shutdown of the
affected engine," he said.
This was done, and the jet
landed safely.
A detailed report was
submitted to airline
authorities, he continued, and
"at no time has the crew been
called on to amplify this
report and no criticism of our
actions has ever been made."
He added that the engine in
question had "a history of
unexplained bangs," and in
fact was never again used in
passenger service. The engine
was replaced as soon as
possible, and no passengers
were again carried until that
was done, he said.
He also countered the
Guardian's suggestion that
both he and the co-pilot on the
Fight were terminated because
of the incident.
In the first place, he said,
the co-pilot was never fired.
Secondly, his own letter of
dismissal cited "continued
operating losses" as the reason
for the firing.

Bowe not ill

CONTRARY to reports
circulating in Nassau today,
Works Minister Simeon Bowe
is not ill in Miami.
The Tribune,. was
swamped with calls this
morning that Mr. Bowe had
become seriously ill yesterday
and was flown by emergency
flight to Miami for medical
treatment.
A reliable source said
however that Mr. Bowe was
present at a PLP
parliamentary meeting until
after midnight last night.
This morning when a call
was placed to the Minister's
office his secretary said he
had just left to attend the
regular Tuesday Cabinet
meeting.


bargaining agent for the
corporation's 1,000 employees.
The existing PSU-BaTelCo
work contract would be
honoured, she added, until it
expires in June next year or
until the CPOU is recognized
as bargaining agent, whichever
occurs earlier.


The officers of the new
union are Mrs. Bridgewater,
president, Vance Major, vie.
president, Earl Bowleg,
secretary-general, Elton
Pickstock, assistant secretary,
Chauneey W. Tyneu II, tem-
asrer, and George W. Burr ,
asitant treasurer.


Union and BaTelCo


becomes final


Ulr Na rtuaurn
l DDRESS SYT'I-S bu whNuands
I mglet.reithpompkiomt el Behomes A r pea"gsneelons ..within the Baha.., Nassau and.Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


p


MR. HARRY WELLS 44
(pictured) of Johnson Road
Estates, died suddenly from a
heart attack at his home on
Saturday at 9:45 p.m.
He is survived by his wife,
Cloran Wells; four children,
Carolyn 17, Sandra 14,
Andrew 12 and Perry 9: his
father Virginius Wells; five
brothers and three sisters
Funeral services will be
held at St. George's Church
Thursday at 4 p.m. Canon
Collingwood Cooper will
officiate Interment will
follow in St. Margaret's
Cemetery.

'Cheaper'

rental

cars used

RENTAL cars instead of
taxi-cabs were used to
transport delegates attending
the recent Caribbean Health
Ministers' Conference at the
Britannia Beach Hotel because
they were cheaper, a Health
Ministry spokesman said today
The spokesman was
explaining the use of rental
cars because "questions have
been raised in some quarters
regarding the method used for
transporting" the foreign
delegates.
The spokesman said the
Ministry, as host of the
conference, was supposed to
provide all transportation and
there were only two ways to
do it: by using taxis, or by the
rental on a daily basis of a
limited number of self-drive
cars.
The spokesman went on.
"When estimates of cost for
providing transportation by
both methods was obtained, it
was discovered that the rate foi
transporting delegates by
taxi-cabs from the
International Airport to the
Britannia Beach Hotel and
from the hotel to the airport.
and transportation to one
official function, exceeded the
cost of the rental of a limited
number of self-drive cars foi
use on a fuH-time basis for the
duration of the conference."
Self-drive cars were
therefore used instead of taxis.
The spokesman added that
"to assist the Ministry in
keeping transportation within
the budgetary allocation, a
number of civic-minded
individuals made their cars
available for use in transporting
delegates."

CORRECTION
IT WAS incorrectly stated in
last night's Tribune that one of
the directors of General
Bahamian Companies was Mr.
George A. Smith. This should
have read George A. Smythe.
Mr. Smythe is not to be
confused with the
representative for Rolleville
and Transport Minister Mr.
George A. Smith.


. '-" W '6 A, .

















NIXON INVITES


HUSSEIN TO


WASHINGTON


RECORD

CANADIAN

ELECTION

ENTRY
OTTAWA A record
number of candidates entered
the campaign for Canada's
general election July 8 before
the nominations closed last
| night.

S pushed the total past the 1972
mark of 1,117 candidates. The
official total was not available,
but an unofficial report said
1,210 persons entered the race.
Electoral officials said the
two major parties, Prime
Minister Pierre Elliott
Trudeau's Liberals and the
progressive Conservatives led
by Robert Stanfield, had both
entered candidates for all 264
seats in the House of
Commons.
The new Democratic Party,
which kept Trudeau's minority
government in office for 19
months, is contesting all but
two seats.
The number of candidates
from the Social Credit Party,
the only other faction with any
significant number of seats,
was still uncertain because of
doubts over the validity of
some of its nominations.
Unofficial reports put the
number of candidates from
other groups, including
Independents and Communists,
at a record 268.
Another all-time high was
set by the 135 women
candidates, almost double the
71 who ran in 1972.
Trudeau faces five
challengers for his seat three
from the other main parties
plus an independent and a
Marxist-Leninist. (AP)


Rome
Paris
London
Berlin
Amsterdam
Brussels
Madrid
Moscow
Stockholm
New York
San Francisco
Los Angeles
Chicago
Miami
Toronto
Vancouver


MIN I MAX
64 75 variable
54 66 cloudy
52 70 cloudy
55 70 cloudy
55 28 overcast
48 64 clear
55 79 cloudy
55 64 overcast
61 70 sunny
66 79 cloudy
55 64 cloudy
61 79 clear
59 63 cloudy
73 88 rain
57 70 cloudy
55 70 clear


Riot death: Jenkins won't


LONDON Home Secretary Roy Jenkins
refused yesterday to ban fascist and racialist
demonstrations but indicated he would
support moves for an independent public
inquiry into a riot in which a student died.
Socialist lawmaker Sydney Bidwell, who
was at the riot scene in London, accused police
of acting with "great ferocity." h
Violence erupted when leftwing
demonstrators tried to break through a police
cordon to prevent the rightwing National
Front from holding a meeting to protest a
government amnesty for illegal immigrants,
most of them coloured.
According to police figures, 39 policemen
and six demonstrators were injured in the


ban demos


melee. Five of the 54 persons arrested
appeared in court Monday and were remanded
on bail on various charges of assault.
Jenkins told Parliament that London's
Commissioner of Police had informed him he
would "welcome an independent inquiry into
everything that took place."
He refused demands by Bidwell for a ban on
demonstrations by "fascists and racialists"
saying it would be difficult to enforce and at
the same time maintain the British right ot ree
speech. (AP)


Queen gets mass


LO
police
massi
to gu
from
attack
the


security guai

)NDON British major summer offensive by the
e today launched a Irish Republican Army in
ve security operation England.
iard Queen Elizabeth Police officials told The
possible terrorist Times of London they believed
possit othe blitz would be aimed
ks at the opening of primarily at Government
four-day Royal building and political figures.


meeting at A
racecourse 30 miles


scot
from


London.
The Queen and other
members of the Royal
Family were to drive down the
course's mile-long straight
stretch in front of the crowded
stands as is the tradition.
Senior Scotland Yard
officials fear the bombing of
historic Westminister Hall
yesterday may be the start of a


Sources said the IRA's
provisional wing, the branch
that is fighting a guerilla war in
Northern Ireland, is believed to
have stockpiled explosives in
preparation for a new terrorist
offensive.
Detectives questioned
dozens of workmen, many of
them transient Irishmen, in
their search for the terrorist
who planted the 20-pound


Marooned!


Four tell of


ordeal on reef


BALLINA, Australia -
Two men and two women
who spent 52 days marooned
on a remote coral reef said
they lived on food from their
wrecked yacht and sea water
they distilled over driftwood
fires.
The trawler Ata rescued
the quartet five days ago
the Middleton reef, 350 miles
from the Australian coast.
Their 38-foot yacht Sospan
Fach foundered and capsized
on the reef during a
1,280-mile voyage from New
Zealand.


Rescued were the Welsh
skipper Irfon Nicholas, 38,
Australians Peter Lind-
enmayer, 18, and Christine
Braham, 23 and Geraldine
Yorke, 23, of New Zealand.
Nicholas had got the crew
together by advertising.
Miss Braham, a former
schoolteacher, said the crew
lived aboard the rusting hulk
of a Japanese fishing boat, an
earlier victim of the reef.
"After the yacht went
aground, we got some food
together and walked across
the reef at low tide to the
fishing boat." she said.
"It was a derelict mess but
it gave us some protection
from the weather.
"There was wood on the
reef and we made fires to boil
and distill seawater.
"We got about a pint a day
and this was supplemented
with rainwater that we
managed to collect.
"We had some tins of food
and we did some fishing.
"We didn't think we'd ever
get off the reef. Until the Ata
showed up we didn't see a
single ship."
The Ata went to the area
in an effort to shelter from a
gale.
"We were lucky they
spotted us" said Miss Braham.
"We signalled them with a
piece of broken mirror."
Nicholas said he quarreled
with his crew on April 9, two
days after they left New
Zealand, and after that they
rarely spoke to him.
"I had to get aggressive and
to swear to stay in
command," he said.
"I was glad when we were
rescued so I would have
someone to talk to at last."
(AP)


" /or.ia Air A nm

A College preparatory school for boys announces that its representative well 4
S interview interested parents and students for admission to Florida Air Academy for
4 the Summer School & Camp and Fall Term Enrolment.


4: Will hold intefiaws in Freeport at the Internationasi Hotel on Tuesday, Ju<. 18ti "
and Wednesday, June 19th. Call the International Hotel and leave a message for him
49 to call you upon his arrival for an appointment. t
S Will hold interviews in Nassau at the Nassau Beach Hotel on Thursday, June 20th, .
Friday, June 21st Saturday, June 22nd. Call the Nassau Beach Hotel and leave a
message for him to call you upon his arrival for an appointment. 4
SUMMER SCHOOL & CAMP -
Grades T-8 Ft.Lauderdale, Fla. July 1 to Aug. 9 9
Grades 9-12 Melbourne, Fla. July 1 to Aug 16 4

4 Grades 48 Ft. a.auaeruale, rla. Sept.7, 1974- May 30, 1975
Grades 9-12 Melbourne, Fla. Sept. 8, 1974 June 6, 1975

CagT 15 & up Melbourne, Fla.
ags 15 & up Melbourne, Fla. 'P


rd

bomb that exploded during the
rush hour Monday morning in
the palace of Westminister, the
home of the British parliament.
The bomb destroyed a
quarter of the 897-year-old
Westminister Hall, one of
Britain's most historic
buildings; injured 11 persons
and started a gas fire that did
extensive damage in an office
annex.
Police believe that the
bomber may have posed as a
workman. An underground
garage is being built in the area,
and security was reported to
have been relaxed for the
workmen.
Meanwhile in Northern
Ireland, a 30-year-old
policeman was killed when a
parcel he found in an alley in
Lurgan, 25 miles southeast of
Belfast, exploded in his face.
Terrorists also hijacked two
cars, loaded them with bombs
and held a woman passenger
from each hostage, while the
drivers were forced to take the
bombs to their destination.
One explosion wrecked a
tavern owned by a Protestant
near the border with the
republic, and the car blew up
outside the police station in
Ballymena, a Protestant town
north of Belfast. No casualties
were reported.
Security forces blamed the
bombings on the IRA.


AMMAN President Nixon
has invited Jordan's King
Hussein to Washington for
more talks on an Arab-Israeli
peace. He also promised a
special U.S. effort to help
Jordan economically and said
America would play a strong
role in maintaining Jordan's
military strength.
The statements came in a
joint announcement by Nixon
and Hussein at the end of their
talks in Amman.
Nixon ends his Middle East
tour today and flies to the
Azores, where he will meet
with Portuguese Presi-
dent Antonio de Spinoza.
Meanwhile, Israel was today
still uncertain whether
President Nixon's nucelar
energy deal with Egypt could
lead to the Arabs developing
atomic weapons, Premier
Yizahak Rabin disclosed.
But the government felt
"assured" of long-term military
aid for Israel, he said.
Rabin and Nixon announced
in a joint communique that
negotiations would begin soon
on arms supplies, but Rabin
declined to give details and said
these were "classified in-
formation."
Informed Israeli sources,
however, said Nixon had
outlined an arms deal that
would run for the next five
years or more, with more than
one billion dollars a year in
loans, grants and credits -
most of it for weaponry.
Rabin called a news
conference just three and a half
hours after Nixon left israel for
Jordan, his first since he


replaced Golda Meir as Premier
last month.
Summing up Nixon's 25
hours in the Jewish state,
Rabin said it had strengthened
Israel's essential ties with the
United States, and he gave
dollars and cents details to
underline Nixon's past support.
Israel has received $4.5
billion in American aid since
Nixon took office, and 4
billion of it was spent on arms,
he said.
Referring to Israel's need for
constant defence, Rabin said
American freindship and
support "is one of the dearest
assets Israel has, and it must be
built up, nurtured and
strengthened."
But he made clear that his
government was still wary of
the U.S. nuclear deal with
Cairo, despite assurances by
Nixon and Secretary of State
Henry Kissinger.
Rabin said he had appointed
two unidentified specialists -
"Qualified professional" to
advise him on whether reactors
for Egypt could lead to Arab
nuclear weapons.
"Until I hear their opinion, I
will say no more on this
subject," he told corres-
pondents.


Impeachment p robe

enters last week

WASHINGTON The U.S. House of Representatives judiciary
committee has entered the final week of examining evidence in its
impeachment inquiry, still undecided about what comes next.
Questions concerning the calling of witnesses, President
Nixon's defence argument and the public release of evidence are
being put off until the evidence is all in.
Chairman Peter W. Rodino
hopes that all evidence will
have been gathered by
Thursday or Friday. He is
planning to devote the
following week to the
unresolved questions.
The committee returned to
the Watergate cover-up in
closed session today,
concentrating on the way the
special Watergate prosecutor's
office was established.
The committee is pursuing
its inquiry in chronological
order and the firing of Special
Prosecutor Archibald Cox last
Oct. 20 will just about wind up >4
the Watergate phase.
All that will be left then is
an examination of Nixon's
income tax payments for
1969-72, with the emphasis on
his deduction of $576,000 for
papers given to the United
States, and a st-dy of the
secret bombing of Cambodia in
1969-70.
Meanwhile, former
Presidential lawyer Herbert W.
Kalmbach was sentenced
Monday to 6 to 18 months in
prison and fined $10,000 for
violating election laws.
Kalmbach had pleaded
guilty to tw, charges -
bartering an am-
oassadorship for a $100,000
campaign contribution and a
technical campaign violation.
And, Atty. Gen. William B.
Saxbe said in a public
television interview that Nixon
acted improperly when he told
former *op aides about
corndlential Watergate grand
jury information.
Transcripts of White House
conversations show that Nixon
passed on information
obtaiend from Assistant Atty.
Gen. Henry E. Petersen to H.
R. Haldeman and John D.
Ehrlichman.
The Republican members of
the House Committee met
Monday and agreed to seek
assurances that James D. St.
Clair, Nixon's chief
impeachment counsel, will be
given full opportunity to
respond to the evidence.
St. Clair has been present
since the hearings t pan May 9
but has not yet had a chance to
my anything.


THE TRIBUNE I Tuesday,.June 18,1974.











THE TRIBUNE - Tuesday, June 18, 1974.


Uht rjribuit
Nuwu s ADWrUS JUaA= IN VuMA MACmI
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Pub Umer/Editor 1903 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
PublMher/Editor 1917.1972
Contributing Editor 1972.
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publiser/Editor 1972-
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Tuesday, June 18,1974.


I EDITORIAL


Change and decay


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
SAN FRANCISCO, May 5: Another thing my daughter, Mrs.
Carron, gave me just before I left the office for the airport on
Friday was a letter addressed to me personally. It had been
hand-delivered at the office.
It was marked "Personal" and so I won't reveal the name of
the sender but its contents are worthy of discussion in this
column because it is another example of ingratitude and, once
again, is an indication of how quickly-people forget.

"Knowing how much you thought of the Friends of the
Bahamas organization, you probably feel, as I do, that it is a pity
that the present members of the Camera Club have seen fit to
drop 'F.O.B.' from their name," my correspondent wrote.
"My husband was one of the founder-members, along with Dr.
Cleveland Eneas, Scottie Weir and Ray Lightbourn, and it was the
only club of the original six or seven, still in existence.
"No doubt they will continue to use the cups donated by Mrs.
Edith Lofthouse, Mr. H. Philpot, Sir Dudley Russell and other
Directors of the F.O.B.!
"Times change, I suppose!"
I- * ****
Enclosed with this note was a clipping from a Newsletter of
The Camera Club which read: "NEW NAME at the meeting on
25th February Club Members voted for a new name. So ... our
Club is to longer Tihe i.O.B. Camera Club and by a narrow
-Mrgin of ,otes will now be called The Camera Club."
I tus is another example of how new elements in old
organizations in the Bahamas ... and all over the world today ...
are trying to blot out all association with the past which, in many
cases, marked a step taken by liberal people in the community to
open up the floodgates of freedom to forces that accepted all
they had to give and thenrr swept them into discard.

The Friends of the Bahamas organization was launched ... at
what may be described s 'the turn of the tide" in the life of the
Bahamian people by wealthy resident-tourists who felt that
the time had come to broaden the base of the island's society to
embrace responsible coloured people into activities from which
they had been excluded by long-established reactionary forces in
our society.
At the time the organization was formed its leaders in the
resident-tourist colony stated that they had adopted the name
"Friends Of The Bahamas Club" as an expression of the gratitude
they felt for the privilege of living in our blessed sunshine islands
and, hopefully, as a means of opening opportunities for
self-expression to all Bahamians who aspired to improve their
minds and broaden their human contacts.
As my correspondent recalls, six or seven clubs were formed
under the umbrella of the parent organization. These clubs
covered just about every branch of social activity in Nassau and,
for the first time, white and black people were brought together
in a way that had not been possible in the past.
These clubs did -an enormous amount of good. Unfortunately,
as the pattern of life has changed under new political influences,
all the clubs have disappeared with the exception of The Camera
Club which, while it bore the name "F.O.B.", was the last link in
a pioneer movement that contributed to a healthy change of
mental attitude among many of our people. It provided one of
the enduring bridges into the future.
Another of the bridges created at that time was the Bahamas
Democratic League (B.D.L.) which I formed. This was the first
time that white and black people sat down together as equals in
an effort to provide another bridge over which the races might
hopefully march arm in arm into the future.
Both these organizations provided a new experience for
coloured people in the island. I was pleased one day when a
coloured member of my B.D.L. thanked me for what I had done.
He told me that for the first time he was making white friends
... he was really surprised and pleased to find how wonderful his
new friends were. He said I had opened for him a new window on
life.
I need hardly tell you that extremist elements in the U.B.P.
and the P.L.P. ... from their separate corners ... succeeded in
wiping out the B.D.L. which, it might be said, was "ahead of the
times"


But encouraging progress continued to be made in human
relationships in the colony after I succeeded in breaking down
racial barriers in the colony with a resolution pressed through the
Legislature in January 1956.
Unfortunately, this healthy development in human relations
disappeared overnight and racial discrimination was set in
reverse when the P.L.P. took over the government of the islands
in 1967.
Where the eeds of love and fellowship had been planted in the
minds and hearts of our people ... all the healthy growth was
plowed under and in its place were planted seeds of hatred and
revenge far more bitter and destructive than anything experienced
in my lifetime in the islands.

It is difficult to measure the destructive influences exercised by
this new force in our society. I think its most definite impact was
shown by young black Catholic Priests in the islands.

An extraordinary thing happened to these men. It is really
almost unbelievable the change that the P.L.P. victory brought
into their hearts. Racial emotions moved in and ... if Christ ever
really had a place in their hearts ... He was uprooted and cast
aside, almost overnight by the forces of Black Power.
Up to the eve of the P.L.P. victory all these men posed as good
U.B.P. supporters.'
fhe morning after the P.L.P. victory one of these jmen was
over-the-hill reminiscing about how'he and the P.M. had grown up
together in Grants Town and how they had been schoolmates. He
wanted it known that he was "one of the boys".
Another of these men a man who had had spectacular
success as a Christian leader in the Diocese of Nassau was


EDITOR The Tribune.
On Monday evening of this
week, a resident of our country
took his dog for a walk in his
garden and that simple exercise
ended for him four and a half
hours later somewhere along
soldier Road stuffed in the
back trunk of his own car. The
intent of this letter is not to
dramatize the crime rate in our
country, but rather to muse on
the fact that simple things
which were once a part of our
community and our very
existence when attempted now
become a matter of life and
death. When we look at all the
events of criminal nature
happening in our country
today, our first tendency is to
blame some one and the most
logical culprit is government.
It is true that whatever
transpires in a country,
whether it is good or bad
reflects on the government of
the day, and what's happening
now is no exception to the
rule. This type of person who
goes around with a sawed off
shotgun, stealing cars and
robbing people are not
domesticated Bahamians.
By this I mean the persons
involved are not ones with
family responsibilities and as
far as I am concerned, their
actions have nothing to do
with our economic situation.
Of course one could argue
facetiously that because of our
economic condition, smokers
of grass cannot find ready cash
to support their habits and
because their once flourishing
dope market has dried up our


Stop the hoodlums wrecking our


young hoodlums are now
turning to other potential
sources of income.
The point I'm trying to
make here is that this type of
person will never do an honest
day's work because the rewards
for unlawful pursuits are much
more regarding and less
strenous. Therefore govern-
ment shouldn't be saddled with
the blame for him.
What brought on this
discussion was my reading in
our local dialies that a Hanslip
Memorial Scholarship Fund
was established to assist needy
Bahamian children, and the
family of the deceased
requested that instead of
flowers, donations be sent to
this fund.
The name of the deceased
suggests that she was an
expatriate and probably white
but what is more important,
two Bahamian youths were
responsible for her death but
her family sun made a request
that would benefit Bahamian
children.
I was really touched by this
gesture of turning the other
cheek especially since many of
us tend to castigate a whole
people because of the place of
one's birth or policies of his
government rather than dealing
with the matter at hand or
persons involved.
As a community we were
fortunate that there was only
one fatality during the


unfortunate incident, as the
gentleman who was stuck in
the trunk of his own small car
for approximately four and a
half hours is no small man
himself and as I mentioned
before, but for the grace of
God the fatality count could
have been greater.
When it comes to the
welfare of my country and its
people, my political affiliations
are secondary, and I see no
reason why we should allow a
few hoodlums to wreck our
country by- murdering our
citizens and visitors.
I have been associated with
the police as a reservist for
approximately nine years and I
have an idea of the difficult
and trying conditions in which
they operate at times and if
there is an agency of
government that needs the
public help it is the police.
One thing the police don't
need is adverse publicity nor,
does this country but if the
present trend continues some
kind of warning must be given
to our visitors. It would be
much better for us to give
them a warning than for them
to find out the hard way.
,There is a problem at the
Emerald Beach Hotel. What it
is I don't know and I'm not


Thanks from Chicago


EDITOR, The Tribune,
I just had to write, having
been in your lovely country
for the second time and
having fallen in love with it
more and more. My husband
says that next year it will be
Rome, but after having come
back here again I think he
feels as I do next year it
will be Nassau again.
We have met so many
beautiful brothers and sisters
during our first vacation, and
this time, it was pure joy!
My husband and I just have
to acknowledge some of the
many people who made us
feel at home.
First is Vandyke Boyd, the
bartender at Dirty Dick's
during the day (we have the
same nickname Boobio,
who is a wonderful guy. Next


there's the band at Dirty
Dick's, Lord Cody and The
Coralites. We met two years
ago and Lord Cody is still
doing his singing. I brought
one of his albums home with
me.
Then there's Bernard and
Dick, two of the most
talented guys we've met.
I could go on and on, but I
think it would really take up
too much space. I don't want
to forget the Fish Net and
Cleotha, the waitress, who
gave such wonderful service
and delicious food.
There's also Three Queens
Restaurant and their Hottie
Patties and all the other
places we went, too
numerous to name.
Again my husband and I


thank everyone for the most
beautiful time of our lives.
Last but not least, there's the
Pilot House, Lena the maid
and George behind the desk.
Mr. & Mrs. TROY TANKEY
6548 So, Hermitage,
Chicago, 111. 60636.




MODERNISTIC U
SAW N [) PH.SU aP RiY

I , V ,, ,)k i t)( I O w [


going to elaborate at this stage
but all my life I've watched the
Bahamian people being used by
one faction or the other, or
Bahamian and foreigner alike.
and always to the detriment of
the Bahamian people
themselves.
I could be sympathetic to
the management of the hotel.
because I don't think any
business should be forced to
operate at a loss But then
again I am wondering if the
management is using the
Bahamian workers at that hotel
in a cat and mouse game with


country


government. Management in
giving it's reason for
discharging 166 of it's
employees mentioned that
Paradise Island have a casino,
and the Cable Beach area needs
a convention centre and a place
for gourmet dining.
Now why the needs of
future amenities should have a
bearing on the discharge of
approximately 166 workers I
don't know. To me it appears
that government is being
blackmailed and as far as I'm
concerned no government
should be blackmailed
regardless.
As I said I'm only basing my
expressions on what has been


--- :-.':
. .. -_ .I : w ,



I--;-- 4AP-
sd I.

., -,




a rotaties
overimeA wfibNOR
at JA twies.t w
situatih1it d e o .
action or laCk 0 acta4": .,.
I'm not th ins 0 of t
situation at all) or may be lt '
something beyond '.d -
controL My one Ooncetfi ti .
I hate to tse fmy fll
Bahatians used as a patn Isa
game of high fnang, bedesiu
it is a foregone condulOa wi.A
will be the lo.n.
AUDLEY HU.li
June 14.1974.


. ....' Junela 1. .1 7. .


Daughter gets Picasso cash


THE ELDEST of Pablo
Picasso's three illegitimate
children has won a share of the
late painter's $100 million
estate.
A French Appeals Court
yesterday officially recognized


Maia Widmaier as Picasso's
daughter.

Courts have already
recognized the claims of the
painter's two other illegitimate
children. (AP)


perhaps my son Bernard's closest friend in the Bahamas. They
had been students together at St. John's University in Minnesota.
He was in Bernard's house at least once a week for dinner ... and
he was always a welcome guest whenever he felt he wanted an
evening away from the Monastery.
Believe it or not, Bernard and his wife haven't seen this
"friend" from the day of the P.L.P. victory!
Both these men, whom I had boosted and backed in The
Tribune as the possible future leaders of the church in the
Bahamas, later declared publicly that I a Knight Commander of
the Order of St. Gregory had no place in their church.
Almost immediately a crusade was started among these men to
take over from the American Priests who had given their lives to
laying sound foundations for the Catholic Church in the
Bahamas. The native Priests tried to drive these men out because
they wanted to take over control of the Diocese immediately.
Behind closed doors Bishop Leonard was given a difficult time.
I became one of their principal targets. They charged that I was
exercising too much influence in the church.
The Bishop and I were good friends. We still are. But there was
no truth in the suggestion that I was exercising any influence in
shaping the policy of the church.
It is true that, with the support of my friend, Sir George
Roberts, a liberal Methodist, I had succeeded in breaking down
barriers that had discriminated severely against the church and
Catholics in the Bahamas, but I refused to interfere in church
affairs.
In the same way that I would not allow any Bishop or Priest to
interfere in policies I set in The Tribune, I refrained from any
active participation in church affairs. I have never held any office
in the church. In any movement in which I may have taken part it
was always in the role of a follower ... never as a leader.
Because of this propaganda the Bishop and I without any
consultation have simply avoided each oiher for the past
several years of P.L.P. rule..
But fortunately for the church, there was no room in the house
of God for racial hatred. The church suffered some setbacks as a
result of these men's activities but they destroyed themselves. All
of them except one have disappeared from the clergy and
returned to the world where as events have proved they
really belonged all along.
The fine old Priests who have given their lives to the service of
the Bahamian people, have held the fabric of the church
securely together ... and now another young group of Bahamian
candidates are being prepared for the Priesthood, hopefully in
more fertile spiritual soil.

And now ... another step in the direction of wiping out a
healthy link with the past has been taken with this decision to
wipe out all public record of the Friends of the Bahamas Club.
This is unfortunate ... but, just another unhealthy "sign of the
times ".

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
Beware of false prophets, which come to you in sheep's
clothing, but inwardly they are ravening wolves. ST.
MATTHEW 7:15.


ENTER NOW!!


TRIBUNE


/ MAURAS


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can choose from our wide range of samples in the
privacy of your own home. Contact Nathaniel
Edgecorr.be for an estimate at no obligation.
I1


CLONARIS'KUTE KIDDY


MARKET ST. DR. ESFAKIS BUILDING
TELEPHONE 24264
ASSORTED STYLES OF BOYS'AND
GIRLS' SHOES, INFANT TO LARGE SIZES
ASSORTED STYLES OF BOYS'AND GIRLS'
SANDALS, INFANT TO LARGE SIZES
CLOGS, ASSORTED STYLES. SIZES 27 -41
BOYS' SHIRTS, SHORT AND LONG
SLEEVES, ASSORTED STYLES, SIZES
AND COLOURS.
BOYS' AND GIRLS' CHRISTENING SETS
OF ASSORTED STYLES. L


Madeira Street Shopping Centre
P.O. Box 5790
Tel. -2-2868


SALE!
5.000 Pairs of Pants
Elephant, Bells, aggies,
Jeans & Low Rise Dashikis,
Inscence. Oils & Beads.
Bring this AD & Kef $5.00 discount
"n ALL PANTS.


PRINCE GEORGE ARCADE


RUAAMAS


Restaurant and Lounge '/
Now Serving Lunch from II. 00a.m. 'til 5:00 p.m.
Daily Specials ONLY $1.95
Bahamian Dishes
*American Dishes
Sea Food
* Sandwiches
* And your I avourite Cocktail ...
ONLY $1.00


PLENTY OF FREE PARKING


Manager
F'ric,dly Big
A I Co lie


Serving Dinner 5 p.m. Til 1 a.m.
Phone 32077 Fast Bay at the Foot of Bridge
SNASSAU'S LIVELIEST LATE NIGHT SPOT
OPEN EVERY NIGHT
A PLACE P'd FoE RSSERVATIONS CALL
To CO 2-1808 ,,, CASUAL
FOR FUN 2. nooR, PRINCE GeORGe NOst
J SaAY STREET
*oanci t BOX IOX N 97, NASSAU, BAHAMAS


Gibson




IORAN S REFRIGERATORS



aMd ir Conditionihg
Phone 57268

All Appliancesr
Refrigerators Ar Cond er
Stoves Air Conditioners
Freezers Ice Makers
Washers Water Coolers
D)ishWashers

SALE & SERVICE
FACTORY TRAINED MECHANICS
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ild atii Catwlts Slitai
BAY STREET


OPEN 11 AM TO 5 AM


THI PLACE FOR DRINKING, DANCING
AND LOTS OP UN
LUNCH-0NNEI-ATI SNACKS
TNHE ANl 1I ON! OF T IN ST
\ 9LICATIlSSN MENU
COMPLETELY All CONDITIONIU
DOWNTiMOW MONLY GOIJMUIT


TAKE-OUT PIZZA -


BAY STREET
PHONE 2-2657. 2.4252. 2.2559


S., distributed by


MOUNT ROYAL AVE.
PHONE MOW
P.O. Box 8316


DRESSING A BETTER BAHAMIANI


fre w s~w *as ms se* wfles' a f


SAQQ


Smtn u yaw, bawoom with our martin M towel
For a liM asN 3.25 per mwel on nweeklym IItra s tl w 1nu ea, i
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No Isq will You hMa to wAup w wih op mi wela i ethlud o
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FARRINGTON ROAD PHONE 35548 24406


LORANDOS REFRIGERATION
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Sales & Service
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c 0' a




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14cu. ft. REFRIGERATOR
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Bay St. Phone 24842


TheYOUNGCESS
MA.tETT I.ANtW AYDST ET
MU# I ZH iM 1 A 1MM la nAS IIfI L

Spring Summer 1974
STYLES O.N:
WEDIn'i GOWN. SRIIeSMAiO GOMW I MMO oP NtONOS OM M
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SERtVICE AND 1E MOST IMPORTANT OUR VE AT
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jai IBRIDiASMAID MATERIALS


NO EXPLANATION IMCESAMYA
PinW May ui01py1, 10n0 tise Boni
that- owi"iioi 11 mtiNon usak (for
owcntimavorary man,
Displaying simple farm id
oNMsoIidIHeMx, House of Churdwil Ltd.
mn*i alhm',ia, ow to b pind I
thn Balenne Anaidly EwapEan in
I. iV, ynt tediddly Birwa, ian U


i oust


Service


4 4
.0 ~ -


*PW
94-


ztjo










THE TRIBUNE .--- Tuesday,June 18,1974.


NOTICE
NOTICE Is hereby given that EMMAJANE ROSETTA
ROLLE of Sweeting Road, South Beach, Nassau is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 18th day of
June 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002,
Nassau.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that DIEUSUEL VEDRINE of
Lifebuoy Street, Nassau is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas and that any
-$erson who knows any reason why naturalisation should
riot be granted should send a written and tsined statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 18th day of
June 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002,
Nassau.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ELROY WESLEY
McKENZIE of South Beach, Fox Hill is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 11th day of
June 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002,
Nassau, Bahamas.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that JOSEPH MARCEL
ALCEGARLRE of P. 0. Box F1970, Bass Lane, Freeport
Grand Bahama is applying to the Minister responsible tor
Nationality and Citizenship, for naturalisation as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why naturalisation should not be granted should
send a written and signed statement of the fact% within
twenty-eight days from the 18th day of June 1974 to The
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs P.O. Box N3002, Nassau.



NOTICE
NOTICE Is hereby given that SINCLAIR COICOU of P.O.
Box F-2550, Freeport, Grand Bahama is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalisation as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalisation should
why naturalisation should not be granted should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 18th day of June 1974 to The
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002, Nassau.
V.-d


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that PIERRE JOSEPH of Marsh
Harbour, Abaco is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship for naturalisation as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
naturalisationn should not be granted should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 18th day of June 1974 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, Ministry of
Home Affairs, P.O. Box N-3002, Nassau.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that THOMAS EMMANUEL of
Gregory Town, Eleuthera is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalisation a6 a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalization should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 11th day of
June. 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs P. 0. Box N-3002,
Nassau.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that LEVINGSTON RAYMONVIL
of Gregory Town, Eleuthera, Bahamas is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalisation as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalisaton should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 11th day of
June 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. O. Box N-3002,
Nassau.


NOTICE


NOTICE is hereby given that MR. WINSTON OTHINIEL
SEYMOUR of Raymond Road, Nassau, Bahamas is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration should not be granted should send a written
'end signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 11th day of June 1974 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, Ministry of
Home Affairs, P. O. Bok N-3002, Nassau.


By JIM ALBERSE
NEW YORK Black militancy.
Black rage. Black separation. Black
crime. For years, these have been
catchwords which discomfited and
even chilled white Americans, for
the words imply an alien and
hostile race scarcely at home in a
land where it has lived for some
350 years. But there's another
phrase which may well become
more familiar in the 1970s: Black
middle class.
According to a cover story in
TIME magazine, beneath the more
dramatic and widely reported
clashes and confrontations, a


Blacks achieve the great American dream


way for the past decade.
With little fanfare, without the
rest of the society quite realizing it,
more and more blacks are achieving
the American dream of lifting
themselves into -the middle class.
They have become as well heeled,
well housed, and well educated as
their white counterparts.
Many have just arrived in the
middle class, some are barely
hanging on, some may lose their
grip but by any reasonable
standard, most appear to be there
to stav


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They have shown that, reports of
its demise to the contrary, upward
mobility still operates in America.
To be black in the U.S. is no
longer to be necessarily subor-
dinate. The national effort to
give blacks a more equitable share
of the nation's goods and benefits
has had results uneven results,
but undeniable.
Increasingly, blacks are seen in
offices of corporations and banks,
in classrooms of elite colleges, in
officers' clubs, affluent suburbs,
theaters, tourist haunts.


Says the chairman of the
sociology department of New
Orleans' predominantly black
Dillard University: "Being black
and qualified is the most valuable
commodity in American society."
As they have climbed the ladder,
middle-class blacks have learned to
live more easily with whites -
whether they like them or not. The
best thing they can do for racial
relations, many feel, is to do well.
"Success is the best revenge," says
the owner of a large black
emnlovment aeencv in New York


City. But as middle-class blacks
have prospered, a gap has opened
between them and the black
underclass that remains mired in
poverty and despair.
The nation's 24 million blacks -
about I111 of the population are
split into three groups of roughly
equal size. Almost one-third have
family incomes of $10,000 or more
and enjoy many of the amenities of
middle-class status.
Another one-third, earning
between $4,500 and $10,000, are
either on the lower edges of the


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middle class or stand a.lair chance
of lifting themselves, into it.
Beneath them lies the one4hkrd of
black America which struggles by
on less than $4,500 1 year and
makes up the troubled underlas..
It's beyond dispute that the
black middle class will continue to
grow, but its rate of growth will
depend on the state of tho
economy and the degree of
commitment by white America to
make room. The impact that the
black middle class will have on the
rest of American society is more
open to question.


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Women like this quick start-
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5 cu. ft. $73.40


Fromop $

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same as pictured.


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CANS
10 gal. Galvanized
Reg. $7.25
Now *3"
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Reg. $11.56


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NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DEBORAH LILLYPA'
WILSON of Karl Road, Nassau, Bahamas is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that-any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 11th day of
June 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002,
Nassau.


4 -


:|
.. =P"







S. ..'
-. -, a- :


Mll


m
m










6 THE TRIBUNE ..- Tuesday, June 18,1974


NASSAU 'PILOT'
CLUB LAUNCHED
The business and professional women of the Bahamas have
been challenged by Senate president Dr. Doris Johnson to discard
their complacency and become active and positive participants in
building the new Bahamian nation.


"If ever there was a time
th.;t the Bahamas needs the
support and effort of dedicated
women it is now," Dr. Johnson
told members of the
newly-formed Nassau branch
of Pilot International at their
installation ceremonies at the
Sonesta Beach Hotel June 11.
SAs a representative of
government and an outstanding
woman leader, Dr. Johnson
was invited to present the new
business and professional
women's service club with its
Bahamian flag which will join
j the flags of six other naitons in
' which Pilot International is
represented.
;* Alluding to Pilot's aim of
service to the community, Dr.
S Johnson said research had
shown that 75 percent of the
country's wage earners were
earning below $4,000 a year,
"which is a big number in our
country," she declared.
continuedd the Senator:
"People in the low income
group need your en-
couragement and support.
As a Pilot you need to look in
their direction because of the
crying need that exists in this
country.
Should invite you," she
said. "to consider what you as
a group can do to alleviate the
plight of 75 per cent of our
people. At this time in our
history all of us are searching
for some form of
identification. I would


Photo Three Star Studios

McDonald,
DIF1N\E MARY McDonald,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Peter
McDonald of Highland Park,
Nassau became the bride of Mr.
Philip Kemp in a candle-light
ceremony held at the Chapel of
Love on April 20, 1974 at 7
p m.
[he Rev. Denis Magnus
pert horned the double-ring
ceremony Mr (Gary Roberts
was the solosist and Mr. Philip
Cash was the organist.
( given in marriage by her
father the bride wore a
candlelight gown of silk
organ/a with French lace and
pearls She carried a bouquet
of N yellow roses.
Ihe Bride's mother wore a
tull-length gown of rose silk
1hittfon and Mrs Marie Langer,
mother of the groom, wore a
lull length gown of aqua
chlt f on
\irs Alice Cash, who served
as ma.tron of hlonour, wore a
',ill c i;Lrii gown of blue
organ/a with matching picture
hat and carried a bouquet of
yellow and white roses and
carnat ions
The best man was Mr.
I arl Johnson and the ushers
were Mr Andrew Kemp, son
the groom and Mr. William
Cash, cousin of the bride.
A reception was held


seriously question that that
place can be found without the
active and positive part-
icipation of the women of this
country."
The Nassau club is the first
Caribbean area branch to be
established by Pilot, one of the
five international service
organizations for business and
professional women.
Officers installed were: Mrs.
Barbi Hoefling, president;
Mrs. Veronica Adderley,
vice-president; Mrs. Cora
Carey, secretary and Miss
Lorraine Onderdonk, treasurer.
Directors are Mrs. Gwen Kelly,
Mrs. Nicki Kelly and Mrs.
Sylvia Cole-Tierney.
Mrs. Mary Ruth Hauser,
outgoing president of Pilot
International, presented the
Pilot Club of Nassau with its
charter and membership pins,
and also accepted the
Bahamas flag from Dr.
Johnson for transmission to
Pilot International head"
quarters in Macon, Georgia.
Mrs. Maggie Datch, District
4 extension chairman presided
at the dinner meeting and
installed the new officers in a
simple candlelight ceremony.
The Club's Code of Ethics
were read by Mrs. Isabella
Souers, a member of the Pilot
Club of Miami Shores, and the
invocation was offered by Mrs.
Alice Smith, past president of
the Pilot Club of Miami Shores.


Kemp wed

immediately following the
ceremony by the pool of the
Nassau Yacht, club, during
which Mr. Newton Higgs and
Mr. Godfrey Kelly gave the
toast to the bride.
Out-of-town guests included
Capt. and Mrs. Harold Albury,
Mr. and Mrs Stanley Kemp,
Miss Geraldine Kemp and Mrs.
Sydney Albury all of Harbour
Island, Mr. and Mrs. Neulon
Albury and Tammy and Mrs.
William Russell, Jr. of
Freeport. Mrs. Frank Russell of
Marsh Harbour and Mr. and
Mrs. BR. Staley, Jr. ar.d
children of Miami, Florida.
The newlyweds left Nrassau
for a four-week honeymoon in
the Exuma Cays.
Before the wedding
ceremony, the dedication of
the "Chapel of Love" which is
owned by the groom, and
located on Palmdale Avenue
and Bradley Street took place.
The introduction, invocation
and reading from the scriptures
was given by the Rev. Denis
Magnus and an address was given
by the the Rt. Rev. Michael H.
Eldon, Bishop of Nassau and
the Bahamas. Mr. Gary Roberts
sang "Bless This Chapel"
accompanied by Mr. William
Malone on the organ.


Mr. and M. Philip Kemp.


Pilot Club International
president Mrs. Mary Ruth
Hauser, left, with Mrs. Barbi
Hoefling, first president of
the Pilot Club of Nassau. Mrs.
Hauser was in Nassau to
present the new club with its
charter. The Pilot Club of
Nassau Is the first Caribbean
area branch to be established
by Pilot International.

Photo: Three Star Studios.


The Most


-T

ON THE WATERFRONT
E. Bay St. at. William St.
TELEPHONE 5-4641
Sittings by appo...tment please,
at your convenience


When it comes to insurance

it's Dominion for Life


...in Nassau

call William Bastian 2-3843


STHE DOMINION LIFE ASSURANCE COMPANY


Goombay Summer is a good time for all of us.

Dancing in the streets. Activities throughout the

Bahamas.

We at Royal Bank always get into the swing of

Goombay Summer. It's a uniquely Bahamian way

of involving ourselves in the Bahamas.


Why don't you get involved this summer? And

who knows? You may see your Helpful Banker


Meet 'crying need' of poor,- women's group urged


IRA









THE TRIBUNE - Tuesday, June 18, 1974.


Journalism graduates


The very exciting New
York City Group, currently
famous for their hit record,
"I'm doing' fine now", will
begin an engagement in the
Bahamia Club of the King's
Inn & Golf Club, on Tuesday,
June 18. The engagement will
last through July 7 and will
star this exciting eleven piece
Group in two shows nightly.


The Group sings everything
that is "in", from the lowest
blues through spirituals and
right up through pop to the
heaviest kind of music. The
four singers have been
performing together for the
past few years, and have a
new hit out: "Make me twice
the Man".


Napolean
0


Seven students from the C. R. Walker Technical College WilU
received certificates in Journalism last Friday. Three
received specialized certificates with distinction and four scholarshipl
were presented with certificates stating that they had taken i r r
the course and were successful. A three-year scholarship to
Bradford Hanna graduated at the top of the class and Aquinas Collepg has been won
Spencer Poitier and Peter Bowleg were the recipients of by Napoleon Johnson in the
distinction awards. St. Bede's Church and school
Certificates were presented to the graduates by Mark raffle held last week. Mr.
Bethel, -publisher of the Nassau Guardian, which, with Johnson won with ticket
other media, judged the exam results of the students, number 0573.
Pictured at the presentation, are, seated from left: Second prize, a three-year
Immaculata Hamilton, Neil Cleare, Ruthmae Hope and scholarship to Bishop Leonard'
Winifred Williams, standing from left: Mr. Hanna, Mr. Junior High, was won by Percy
Bethel, Mrs. Susan Wallace, Mrs. Connie Crowther, course Moss of Gaol Alley with ticket
tutor, Mr. Poitier and Mr. Bowleg. number 1207.
Third prize went to


035W0. S' g,-ia s ohw..
uchernl hit t h.ide's.
The foetth p"a, a $100 ift
eutifate morn Quasty
Market, Was WO by Mim
Smith VAd ticket number
1395.
prils at It. Bed's rtoary by
producing their ticket.
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CAREER


OPPORTUNITY

Bank of Montreal (Bahamas & Caribbean)
Limited
invites applications for the position of



ACCOUNTANT
The position, in a medium size Nassau Branch,
involves the overall day to day supervision of
staff and branch operations. We are looking for a
mature individual with proven experience who
has the ability and drive to qualify for higher
management positions.
Interested candidates should forward detailed
resumes in complete confidence to the Personnel
Officer, P. O. Box N-7118, Nassau, Bahamas.









THE TRIBUNE .* Tuesday, .Jusm 1974.


SIX-YEAR-OLD Alfred Poitier has
won the first prize Ford Sports Capri in
the Rotary Clubs raffle. The raffle was in
aid of the Centre for the Deaf. From left
are: Mrs. Poitier, Philip's mother; Harry
Scates, chairman of the raffle committee;
Philip, seated; Bill Farquharson, president
of the Nassau Rotary Club; Euril Gibson.


Alfred, 6, wins a car


sales representative for ABC Motors; Mrs.
Doreen Cropper, president of the Inner
Wheel Club: Jim Hayek, president of the
West Nassau Rotary Club: Miss Hazel


Buggs, principal of the Deat Centre;
George McLeod, president of East Nassau
Rotary Club and Carolyn Morrison, sales
representative for ABC Motors.


'" -; " .. .. . ,

'-...



Wives of Caribbean Health Ministers who were in Nassau attending a conference were hosted last Thursday by Mrs. Loftus
Roker, wife of Bahamas Health Minister on a trip to North Andros. The group is shown seeing an expt rimental rice patch at
the $10 million farming project at North Andros. The group travelled to Andros in the morning and returned the same
afternoon.
- -


US student jobs harder to get


WASHIINGT;ON Foreign
students studying in the United
States who plan to earn money
during the summer vacation by
working at part-time jobs will
find that work permits may be
harder to obtain this year, the
United States UFmbassy has
announced.
The reason is a tight iob
market which is giving
preference to American


youths. particularly those from
minority groups. and to
military veterans who served in
Vietnam.
This situation, explained a
spokeswoman for the U.S.
Immnigration and Nat-
urali/at ion Service, does
not mean that foreign students
will not be able to find
employment this summer.
What has changed, she said, is


the procedure which foreign
students must observe to get
work permits.
In past years, foreign
students who wished to work
part-time could request such
permission from the school
officials where they were
studying. These officials were
authorized by the Immigration
Service to make case-by-case
decisions.
This year, however, because
there is a shortage of summer
employment opportunities for
young people, the Immigration
Service has retracted from
school officials the authority
to grant permission, and will
itself review students' applica-
tions.
The major criteria in
granting permission will be
financial need. The spokes-
woman for the Immigration
Service emphasized that in no
way is this a move to deny
work permits to foreign
students. Rather, it is an effort
to insure that only those
students with the greatest
financial need to work during
the summer will get
permission.
The Immigration Service
official said the Agency, in
consultation 'with the
Department of Commerce's
Manpower Agency and the
Department of State, deter-
mines the job outlook
situation each year. Last
summer, she said, around
18,000 foreign students were
granted part-time work permits
by school officials.


TIDES


High 6:38 a.m. and 7:05
p.m.
Low 12:36 a.m. and 12:32
p.m.


She may be family,

but three's a crowd

By Abigail Van Buren
1M4 I ClcMe T"Wam-N. Y. News SM., tae.
DEAR ABBY: I think my new husband [age 39] has
more than a fatherly interest in my daughter. Lisa is 22. I
am 45, but I look about 35.
It all started when I invited Lisa to come along on our
honeymoon to make her feel like "one of the family." She
is my only child and we've always been very close. She has
been away at college, but now that she's graduated she is
home, living with us.
Shortly after our honeymoon trip, my husband started
taking Lisa out for lunch and buying her new clothes. Then
I noticed that Lisa had lost interest in friends her own age.
Maybe it's just my imagination, but I've seen some of the
looks that have passed between them and I think something
is going on.
I don't want to make a fool of myself, but I'd like to
clear the air. I don't even know how to bring up the
subject. Should I question her? Or him? What if all of this
is just in my mind? NOT SURE
DEAR NOT: If you're not sure, don't question anybody.
Keep your eyes open. If there Is something to your suspi-
cions, it will come out. In the meantime, you might ask
Lisa if she ever considered having her own pad. Three's a
crowd.
DEAR ABBY: This will probably throw you. My husband
is the best! He's a good provider, we have a nice home, he
loves our kids, and spends his time and money on the house
and family. The problem is MY frustrations. Our sexual
relationship has dwindled to practically nothing.
He gives me the usual goodbye and hello kisses, but
they're completely without feeling. He never really holds
me, or caresses me. He kisses me like I was his sister.
Should the honeymoon be over after 12 years? Maybe
I'm oversexed, but I don't think so. I'd be happy with a
once-a-week treat, but it doesn't happen. I'm no sex-bomb,
so don't suggest I meet him at the door in a see-through
apron.
I mentioned a counselor once, but he couldn't understand
why he needed one. Sometimes I'm so frustrated I could
scream. I don't want to hurt his masculine ego. Must I
learn to live with this, or is there a solution?
FRUSTRATED
DEAR FRUSTRATED: Don't worry about hurting Iis
masculine ego. Tell him what you've told me. But also ask
him if he thinks you're doing your part in the "treat"
department.
DEAR ABBY: I met a man four months ago and I fell
-but hard. He guessed my age to be "about 65," but I am
72. I guessed his age to be "about 70," but I really don't
know how old he is. He acts crazy about me and is giving
me a rush. There are a lot of younger women after him
and I am afraid if I tell him my right age I will lose him.
If we should ever go for a marriage license do I have to
give my right age? Please help me, Abby. I want this man.
He makes me feel like sweet 16. IN LOVE IN L. A.
DEAR IN: Forget about age. Yours and his. And don't
mention it unless he does. Then it's truth and consequences.
DEAR ABBY: I've heard of compulsive gamblers, com-
pulsive talkers and compulsive overeaters, but is there
such a thing as a compulsive worker? I think I'm one.
LOVES TO WORK
DEAR LOVES: To borrow a phrase from the philosophi-
cal James B. Goetz, "It's only work if you'd rather be
doing something else."
For Abby's new booklet, "What Tees-Agers Want to
Know," send SI to Abigail Van BMan, 132 Lasky Dr., Bev-
erly Hills, Cal. 9212.
Hate to write letters? Send $1 to Abigail Van Bure,
132 Lasky Dr., Beverly Hills, Cal. 212 for Abby's booklet,
"How to Write Letters for All Oeeaslen."
Problems? You'll feel better If yos get it off your best.
For a personal reply, write to ABBY: Box No. 37*, L.A..
Calif. M Enese tamped, self-addressed envelope.
please.


V


NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DAPHNE HIBBERT of Mt.
Rose Ave. Nassau, Bahamas is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration should not be granted"
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 11th day of June 1974
to The Minister responsible for Nationality and-Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002, Nassau.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that WONG 01 PING of East Bay
Street is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration should not be granted should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 11th day of June 1971 to The
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002, Nassau,
Bahamas.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ENOCH CECELIA HASTY of
Bluff, Eleuthera, Bahamas, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalisation as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalisation should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 18th day of
June 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship Ministry of Home Affairs P. 0. Box N-3002,
Nassau.

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STARTS SAT JUNE 15 TO 22


-GREA SAVINGS -











I TRIBUNE ... Tuesday, June 18, 1974.


Electricity price to drop



says Marsh Harbour chief


As of June 15 the price of
electricity is due to go down
substantially, according to
harshh Harbour power & Light
Company president, Philip
Ferrar.
This reduction is due to the
rangee in the price of fuel plus
he continuing efforts of this
utility company to furnish
better service at lower cost.
Marsh Harbour Power &
Light Co., a division of the
Abaco Electric Company, has
added an oil tanker barge to its
equipment thus saving the
consumers more money.
Recent developments are the
cost expensive underwater
mewer transmission system in


upen 3ou nuws start o: .u
CHILDREN UNDER 12 FREE!
See 2 features late as 10:20
FINAL NITE! *
_"W" at8: P& 12:05
Ni 4 L A CKL GR L;1. 0. 20 1


LBCP* Presents I VVK T w
SShe's. tX o cut it.or cut out.

fa...%iull. g rl.

RetawMt Temporarily closed


all the Bahamas. Man-O-War
Cay was turned on by power
from Marsh Harbour on
Wednesday June 5. In this case,
the power is a bulk supply to
the Abaco Power & Light Co.
owned and operated by Marcel
and Richie Albury of
Man-O-War Cay.
APLC is supplying poier to
all of Man-O-War and Dickey's
Cay.
By the end of June it is
expected that Elbow Cay will
be receiving power, and it is
predicted that there will be
150 to 200 new accounts
supplied by Marsh Harbour
Power & Light through this
underwater system.
The cable to Man-O-War Cay
and Hopetown through sub
stations at the Ferry boat
crossing, Poince's Rock and the
Parrot Cays comprises ten
miles of underwater cable. The
Man-O-War branch carries
4,160 volts while the line to
Hopetown carries 13,000 volts.
A valuable side effect of this


II


system is that two aids to
navigation have been added to
Abaco waters. The sub-stations
at Poince's Rock and North
Parrot Cay will be lighted and
turn on automatically at
sundown to stay lighted until
sunrise.
On July 2 Marsh Harbour
Power & Light established
another plant at Sandy Point at
the southwest tip of Great
Abaco. This is operated by at
Sandy Point engineer named
Maurice Bain. The installation,
consisting of two General
Motors 671 Diesel-driven
generators and one General
Motors 1271 has been
operating continuously
without shut down.
The street lighting at
Sandy Point uses the latest
design of mercury vapour
lamps. Spacing of street
lighting in all the settlements is


around 150' in crowded areas
to 200' elsewhere. At this
writing, the plans for' the
Elbow Cay lights are not
complete but it is expected
they will also employ the
highly efficient mercury
vapour lamps.
Engineering and design in
these Abaco power plants is
sophisticated. Instead of an
industrial-appearing eyesore in
the midst of pleasant
settlements, the plants are built
to resemble the architecture of
their surroundings. This is
admirable town planning and
environmental concern.
The main power plant at
Marsh Harbour puts out a
capability of two megawatts of
electricity and is supplying not
only Marsh Harbour, but also
Dundas Town, Murphy Town
and Man-O-War Cay.


Concorde: Pay


now, fly later?


Trrr


* onilftta
AND -9:55
GREMmITIMIm aMlEN

id*P7.?.-TM


NOW THRU THURSDAY
matinee 2:00 & 4:45, Evening 9:00-'Phone 2-1004, 2-10045

"ONE OF THE BEST ADVENTURE
MOVIES OF THE YEAR:'
-Nen sami ISecv






PMMSe Tr e E iKor AtIO TISTS CI
Reservations not claimed by 8:45 will be sold.
STARTS FRIDAY June 21
7 AANOMYAWAIDS-* --*9TPICTum

ROBOMr MW
A GFOAGR(NOG M HILRAN

TECHNICOOR A UNIVERSAL PICTURE g



Wednesday thru Friday Wednesday thru Friday
Matinee Starts at 2:15 Continuous Showings *
Evening 8:30 from 3:00
"CAT O' NINE TAILS" PG. "VOODOO BLACK
James Franciscus, EXORCIST" PG.
KarPLUS Fernando Sancho, Eva Leon

"WRESTLING PLUS
QUEEN" PG. "FRIENDS OF I
Vivian Vachon, EDDIE COYLE" R.
Cowboy Bill Watts Robert Mitchum, Peter Boylel
'Phone 2-2534 No one under 18 admitted.


STARTS WEDNESDAY
Matinee Continuous from 2:00
Evening 8:30-'Phone 3-4666

g aI


LONDON British Airways wants the government to
give it a development contract to fly Concorde supersonic
jets in scheduled service, effectively insulating the airline
against any financial risk.
British Airways's chairman, David Nicolson, said there
were still many uncertainties about the aircraft and that
"we can't write a prospectus about its operating results."
Among the factors still to be resolved, he cited the level
of fares to be charged, the overflying rights and what he
called "the longevity of an aircraft with a skin temperature
of 258 degrees Fahrenheit being thrashed back and forth in
scheduled airline service."
Nicolson sees the aircraft as a development project and
feels that flying it for a year or two under a development
contract would be appropriate.
Because of the number of variables, British Airways has
already estimated that the financial impact on the airline of
flying Concorde could range from a profit improvement of
$14 million per annum to a loss of profits of as much as
$75 million.
More recently the airline has made it clear although
this is disputed by the manufacturers that the latest
estimate of operating the five Concordes it has Ordered
suggests there will be substantial loss of profits.
When the airline ordered Concorde in May 1972, the
then Aerospace Minister, Michael Heseltine, told the
Commons that he was providing $450 million in new
capital for British Airways adding that in the light of the
airline's operations generally and conditions prevailing in air
transport he would "take steps to ensure that the Board
maintains a sound financial performance."
While this was generally accepted as meaning that the
government would protect the state airline from any losses
involved in flying Concorde, Nicolson dearly feels there is
ambiguity here which needs clearing up particularly in view
of the subsequent deterioration in British Airways's profit
prospects.
What clearly worries him is that the government might
interpret a modest profit as "sound financial performance"
and deny the airline further financial help.
"Our market situation is not the same and we are looking
a bit closer at what Heseltine said," says Nicolson.
Now his view is that while British Airways still wants to
pioneer supersonic travel, the airline should fly Concorde
for a year or possibly more and after examining the results
agree to some form of compensation with the government
if necessary.
Nicolson clearly feels less optimistic about British
Airways flying Coacorde than he did a year ago when he
talked of the great benefits Concorde would bring.
While believing that Concordes could cream off business
travellers from non-supersonic airlines, he is also concerned
that it will also cream off such traffic from British
Airways's existing fleet. "Then we would be flying in two
seroplanes those who would have flown in one," he says.
Recently one of his senior colleagues dismissed the
range-payload improvement in Concorde, announced by the
British Aircraft Corporation at the end of April, as "not
significant," arguing at the same time that "the risk is so
great no responsible board could accept it without
underwriting."
But Nicolson's statement appears to be the first direct
reference to a development contract.
If a contract is awarded and until the results of the trial
flying are known, it will obviously make it harder to sell
Concorde to airlines without state backing.
Co I 74Bv The ay Times London).

Denise Sparkes (26), a
member of (he ousting
association ,., Great Jritain
believed to be the first woman
to engage in jousting
tournaments since the Middle
Ages, preparing for an event


Charles Kentsley, 73

LONDON With white
smoke pluming over the
gardens and orchards of
England's secluded Rother
Valley, the Kent and East
Sussex Railway is chugging
again. On a busy weekend,
more than 2,000 passengers
flock through Tenterden Town
station to board antiquated
railway carriages for a 75-cent,
40-minute trip into the past.
Closed by British Railways
in 1961, the line engineered at
the beginning of the century to
serve isolated rural
communities is one of 28
railroads throughout Britain
now being operated under
private or preservation society
ownership to keep alive an
itegral part of the country's
history.
Railroad enthusiasts of all
ages and from all walks of life
devote their spare time to
clearing and restoring
overgrown tracks, renovating
derelict bridges, stations,
crossings, signal boxes, sheds
ap4 refurbishing old steam
locomotives and rolling stock.
Cheerfully they .pay society
subscriptions and all their own
expenses.
The Tenteraen Railway
Company .is the latest of 19
preservation societies now
dependent on the public to
perpetuate redundant lines.
With nine of the 10 miles of


3 walks past Bodiam, the engine that pulled the Hop Picker's Special, 1


Chug or lug,


Britons


love railways


the original 21-mile track it
bought from British Rail lor
$150,000 still to he cleared
and restored, it faces six more
years of toil, sweat and
fund-raising.
Costs so tar oft more than
$175,000, including $13,750
for the purchase ot steam
locomotives and rolling stock,
have been largely met by a
mortgage from British Rail and
loans, and donations and
subscriptions from its 1.000
members. It is hoped that
debts will be wiped out hy the
income from passenger fares
and services. The present
mile of track was approved by
a government inspector early
this year, and a timetable of
trips was triumphantly affixed
to Tenterden's 64-year-old
station. At an official opening
a bottle of champagne was
smashed against the iron flanks
of Bodiam, a sturdy little
"Terrier" class locomotive 102
years old.
To the younger generation,


the steam railroad is an
eye-opener. To the older
passengers the round trip via
Rolvenden is an exercise in
nostalgia along the single track
that once took country folk to
market.
For 7 3-year-old Charlie
Kentsley, the company's
caretaker, who lives near the
engine shed, the sight, sound
and smell of steam-engines has
meant a new lease of life. He
started work on the railroad at
the age of 14, but retired in
1947.
"When I tested out Bodiam
for the man who was thinking
of buying it, it was a thrill I
can't explain," he said. "A
steam locomotive was
something alive to its driver:
you knew by instinct if
something was wrong. I don't
want to be rude, but to us a
diesel engine is nothing more
than a glorified tram "
How far the success story of
the Kent and East Sussex
Railway will encourage similar


02 years ago in England.

ventures is a question troubling
some preservationists.
'There is a danger of the
preservation bubble bursting,"
says Michael Crew secretary of
the Association of Railway
Preservation Societites. "A
mushrooming of societies,
seeking to preserve sections of
track in their own localities,
would mean the jam being
spread too thinly, with projects
failing from lack of funds and
volunteer labour."
Mr. Crew mentions as
symptomatic of the current
"railwaymania" the soaring
prices of steam engines that
have survived the scrapyard.
It is now cheaper to buy
engines overseas, and the
smoke drifting over some
preserved lines now comes
from engines that have seen
their heyday in Norway,
Germany, France, Denmark
and the West Indies.
But Mr. Crew sees no lack of
enthusiasm for steam in the
future.
"Boys don't want to be
engine-drivers nowadays' but
the sight of a steam engine can
be a new thrill to them," he
says. "It's the rarity value that
counts. People would lose
interest if there were puffs of
smoke on every other
horizon.
Copyright, 1974, by The Sunday
Times London.


Computers find some British kinks


LONDON "Our most
interesting finding to date is
that going to a single-sex
boarding school makes you
two and a bit times more likely
to become a practising
homosexual than if you go to a
mixed day school.
"Other early results show
that the permissive society
hasn't yet quite arrived: 30 per
cent of women, for instance,
have ptt-r marital sexual
experience with their "future
mate only, while one-fifth of


both sexes are still virgin at
marriage.
"Although 43 per cent of
men and 31 per cent of women
regularly use porn in their
sex-lives, which could signal
permissiveness, more than 50
per cent say they are entirely
faithful and only 16 per cent
believe marriage is. old-
fasntoneu and should be
abolished
One-ifth of our sample has
tried some form of group sex,
while a further 45 per cent say


they'd like to ..."
The statistics flow like
grapeshot amid the haze of
cigarette smoke as Jane
Firbank, psychology student at
Birkbeck College London,
analyzes the first computer
results of her grand scale
survey of British sex-life.
"One in two women and
three out of four men say they
would like more sex than they
are getting, while one in ten
women and one in 50 men are
having more sex than they


want.
Miss Firbank's conclusions
are appearing in Forum
magazine, nearly 4,000 of
whose readers filled in the
1 46-item questionnaire
compiled by Michael Schofield,
former research director of the
Central Council for Health
Education, and Maurice Yaffe,
a' psychologist at London's
Maudsley Hospital.
Forum staff grandly hail
their survey as "Brtain's
answer to America's Kineey


Report."
The Forum readership
tuinea out tO0 e pre-
dominantly sober, middle class
and highly educated which
makes obscenity convictions
"all the more galling," say the
publishers.
Herself 30 and divorced,
Jane Firbank didn't filn a
of her own quettenafths.
Why Mot? O wI" oR a
much too otdm a v
C.ppet I ', *at
mi, P7&es, fteMM -


A4^^---ll*--


!i













__U___. THE TRIBUNE - Tuesday, June 18, 1974.


REAL ESTATE


II


C14589
BUY A LOT
In EASTWOOD or
WINTON MEADOWS
Call Frank Carey
at 27667 or 24815
FRANK CAREY
REAL ESTATE
Box N4764
Bay & Deveaux Streets
C14912
FOR SALE
Lot South Beach Estates. Size
60 x 110. Lot No. 18 BL 13
Price $3,500.00. Call George
Damlanos 22305, 22307.
C 14914
3 BEDROOM residence with
adjacent fruit orchard lot.
Situated in Blair Estate. Fully
furnished with independent
water system. Double garage
and roof patio. Easy access to
schools. Further information
call 2-1741/2 or 7-4105.
C14891
SAN SOUCI: 3 bedroom, 2
baths, family room and
separate dining room, Owner
willing seller. $58,000.
CARMICHAEL ROAD:
Desirable property available at
reasonable price. Property
includes nearly ten acres with
attractive well-built
two-bedroom, one bath
residence and two-car carport,
about 15 wells, city water and
electricity, stand-by generator,
fruit trees, etc. Additional
acres under lease extending to
Corrie Sound. $80,000.
Furnished.
RIDGEWAY OFF EAST BAY:
3 bedrooms. 2 baths. Most
attractively furnished and in
top condition $75,000.
H. G. CHRISTIE LTD.
Phone 21041/2/3/4.
C14945
HIGH VISTA LOT T-9 105' x
80'. Paid $7,200 Call and make
an offer. Telephone 32559
after 6 p.m.

YEAR'S BEST BLUY
Landscaped, fenced-lot, 120' x
90' ... $9.000.
3-bedroom, 21/h bath house;
living, dinirg, TV-rooms,
garage, storage, etc. ..
... $40,000.
Swimming-pool, patios
playhouse ... $10,000.
Completely furnished,
includes:
Fridge, cooker, washer, TV
beds, pots $10,000.
$69,000.
All only $55,000!!! NO
AGENTS PLEASE.
Tel. 42980 after 1 p.m. P. 0.
Box ES 6015
C14773
START building your house
anytime at YAMACRAW
BEACH ESTATES. 70 x 100
lots. From $5800. Only $75
down. Beach and lake rights.
Tel: 4-1141 or 2-4148 or
2-3027 Morley & O'Brien Real
Estate (BREA Brokers).


I FOR RENT
C14/b2
CCTTAGES and apartments
monthly airconditioned,
fully furnished, maid service
available. Lovely garden and
swimming pool. Telephone
31297 31093
C14735
LARGE spacious 3 be rooms
(all airconditioned) 3 bath
fully furnished, hilltop house
Ddnottage Estate. Must see to
appreciate. $700 per month
including light and water.
Telephone 2-3713, 5-9322 or
3-1671
C14909
2 BEDROOM 1 bath
apartment, fully furnished and
ready for occupancy. Situated
in Winton Highway. Prices vary
from $350 to $375 per month.
Phonne 2-1631.

3 bedroom, 2 bath house fully
furnished, Stapledon Gardens.
Phone 5-6168 after 6:00 p.m.
or anytime weekends.

C 14934
SHOPS AND OFFICES
FOR RENT
Modern airconditioned office
and store space available in
busy shopping area. Telephone
and ample parking. Rental fees
will appeal to the business man
with a future. Call 23010.

CARS FOR SALE
C14918


1968 HILLMAN 4-door.
Excellent running condition.
$850.
1972 Honda Moped. $125. Call
3-1156.
C14928
'69 FORD MUSTANG, radio
A/C. 6 cylinder, power steering
and brakes. $2,100 Cash.
Phone 4-1227
C14952
1971 FORD MAVERICK A-1
condition, brand new paint
job, Insured for whole year.
Quick sale $2,250. After 5 and
Saturday call 53661 before
5 call 34270.
C14890
1971 TRIUMPH SPITFIRE.
Convertible 30,000 miles,
excellent condition. $1,30C
(O.N.O.). Phone 28730 from
9-5 p.m.


CRAFT SIPLES


IN MEMORIAL


HELP WANTED


I I TRADE SERVICES


. ..,, I .


C14767
NOW In stock at Bahamiar,
Paint Supply, Bay Street:-
* Decoupage
e Clear Cast
* Candle Craft
* Tissue Craft
Phone 2-2386. 2-2898.

SCHOOLS
C14772
LEWIS AUTO SCHOOL
Learn to drive with confidence.
Phone 59805 between 7 and
8:30 p.m. or 3-5084 anytime


FOR SALE

C 14892
1COLUMBIA Mini-bike 4 hp
engine. Good condition. Phone
41326.

C14877
3 BOLSTERS, ONE GRILL,
65 CHAIRS, ONE OVEN and
TOP BURNER, miscellaneous
equipment. Phone Al or Jerry
at the tiridge Inn, Phone 32077.
32077.

C14883
HOUSEFUL of furniture for
sale. Owner leaving colony.
Phone 35729.
C14943
MISCELLANEOUS FOOD
STORE EQUIPMENT
IMeat Hooks, Wrapping-
Machines, Meat Lugs,
Preparation Racks, Band Saws,
Refrigerated Cases, Aluminium
Awnings etc. Call Gerald
Fryers, c/o City Markets
2 2901.

C14922
WHY SHOULDN'T YOUR son
or daughter stand high in his
class?
Give him the 20-volume
NEW AGE
ENCYCLOPEDIA
Call 2-1228, Mon-Fri 9-5 for
details on our modest down
payment, low monthly terms.

C14954
OWNER LEAVING
LAST CHANCE!
Lovely Spanish Style Green 4
piece sectional. Call 32641 or
55060 anytime.
C14957
"ELNA" Sewing Machine. Call
28008. After 5 call 52075.

C14965
2 BURNER OIL Stove -
$27.00
2 Burner Hot Plate $15.00
Hollywood Bed $95.00
10 Piece Bedroom Set -
$295.00
D & R. FURNITURE
Market Street South
Phone 22637.

ENTERTAINMENT

C14336

SETTLER'S PUB t INN
Beaumont Arcade, Bay Street
Telephone 5-9739
TWO BANDS NIGHTLY
TheTW q. G i., L
The Electric Circle
OPEN TILL 4.00 a.m.


MARINE SUPPLIES

Cl11894
1969 31 ft. CHRIS-CRAFT
Commander, sleeps six, private
shower, two 230 h.p. engines
with less than 200 hours.
'Kitchenette, good condition
Call 24267, 54011.
C14947
SAILBOAT, 9 ft. Whaler
Squall, unsinkable. Ideal for
young teenager with little used
4 h.p. Johnson outboard. $400
O.N.O. Phone 3-4274.
C14894
MINI FISH BOAT, good
condition. Call Harding's
2-3067 after 6 p.m. 5-5704.
C14969
22 foot Boat 160 H.P.
Mercruiser inboard, outboard
Both rebuilt. Sleeps 2. Top
condition. $4000 O.N.O. Call
anytime 31642.
C14910
7 HP Outbaord Motor, extra
long shaft, heavy duty
propeller, just overhauled. See
Capt. Key at Royal Nassau
Sailing Club.



C14946
WANT TO LEARN
LADY WISHES TO LEARN
ARABIC. TELEPHONE
3-1313.


CLASSIFIED ADVS.

BRING
RESULTS FAST


TO PLACE

YOUR ADV.
TELEPHONE

2-1986


C14966


IN loving memory of our dear
mother and grandmother
Pearline Seymoure who passed
away June 18, 1970.
Earth has lost its looks of
gladness
Heaven seems to us more
bright
Since the spirit of our dear
loved mother
Took its happy homeward
flight
How we long to cross that river
Long to rest upon its shores
Where we'll see and know and
love her
With a love forever more.
Left to mourn: Her daughter,
Vernetta Armbrister, twelve
grandchildren and six great
grandchildren.
C14973


44
IN loving memory of our dear
mother, MIRIAM E. BUTLER,
who departed this life June
18th 1972.
Her life was a blessing to her
family, friends and
neighbours.
All the way my Saviour leads
me;
0 the fullness of His love!
Perfect rest to me is promised
In my Father's house above;
When I wake to life immortal,
Wing my flight to realms of
day,.
This my song through endless
ages,
Jesus lead me all the way.
THE FAMILY.


HELP WANTED

C14872
SECRETARY
PROFESSIONAL FIRM
REQUIRE FIRST CLASS
SECRETARY. APPLICANTS
MUST HAVE AT LEAST
FIVE YEARS EXPERIENCE
AND BE CAPABLE OF
TAKING SHORTHAND AT
100 WORDS PER MINUTE
AND TYPING AT 60 WORDS
PER MINUTE. PLEASE SEND
WRITTEN RESUME TO
PEAT, MARWICK,
MITCHELL & CO., P. 0. BOX
N123, NASSAU, BAHAMAS.
C 14944
SECRETARY
Competent Secretary required.
Must have several years
experience and excellent
typing and shorthand speeds.
Good salary paid to suitable
applicant. Please send written
resume of experience and
qualifications tou Sir Robert
McAlpine & Sons (Bahamas
Ltd., P.O. Box N-3919.

C14951
DRESSMAKER with at least
five years experience. Phone
413 1 -9 a.m. -5 p.m.
C14895
ATTRACTIVE, pleasant young
woman, personable, 20-35
years of age to work full or
part time demonstrating
health drinks and toiletry
products in supermarkets and
drug stores. Driving licence
essential, own transportation
desirable. Please write
DEMONSTRATOR, P. 0. Box
N236, Nassau, giving details of
age, job experience, telephone
number and photo.

C14807
LEADING Car Dealer in
Nassau requires a director of
training to train employees in
back shop. Applicant must
have at least 10 years
experience and be able to
initiate company training
programmes for existing and
future models of vehicles.
Please apply in writing, giving
background and references to
P. 0. Box N-3006, Nassau.
C14932
SALES MANAGER needed to
operate office supply and
business forms outlet in
Freeport. MUST have SOME
experience Only Bahamians
and Belongers need to apply.
Address reply giving full
resume to: OFFICE
MANAGER, P. 0. Box
ES6218, Nassau, Bahamas.
C1493 1
WANTED Bahamian Gardener.
Apply 24420 9 a.m. 5 p.m.
weekdays.


C14941 I
Live in maid to care for
children and do housework.
Tel. 5-4996.
C14949
BANK OF MONTREAL
(BAHAMAS & CARIBBEAN)
LIMITED has the following job
vacancy -
CONSUMER LOANS CLLRK
The individual should have
some experience with
consumer loan procedures and
be able to assist management
with interviewing applicants,
conducting credit checks and
obtaining proper
documentation. Interested
persons may telephone Mrs. B.
Knowles at 21690 to arrange
an interview.

C14958
Live in Handyman/Gardener to
do cooking and all domestic
work. $60.00 per week.
Telephone 41177.
C 14885
LIVE in maid to care for 2
small children ages 2 and 4.
Must love animals. $55 per
week. Write Mrs. O'Brien, P. 0.
Box N235. Nassau.
C14950
REQUIRED: Greek and
French Pastry Chef at least 5
years experience with
references. Write P. 0. Box
N-3669, Nassau.
C14937
LIVE-IN MAID TO TAKE
CARE OF ELDERLY LADY.
Phone 5-1959, 9 a.m. to 5
p.m., or 5-4079 after 6 p.m.
C14959
FEMALE Farm Worker to
work on hog farm. Telephone
3-1004, Mackey, P. 0. Box
N1276.
C14961
TREASURE CAY has a
vacancy for an architect.
Successful candidate must
meet the following
requirements:-
1). Must hold a degree in
architecture from a recognized
school.
2). Must be a member of an
internationally recognized
Institute of Architecture.
3). Must have had a minimum
of 4 years experience.
4). Candidate will be involved
mainly in the administration of
building projects currently in
progress.
PLEASE REPLY TO:
TREASURE CAY LIMITED
Attn. Harry Hall P. 0. Box
N-3229 Nassau, Bahamas.
C14968
TWO Farm workers. Salary:
$40 per week. Apply: Edward
Cleare, P. 0. Box N-3112,
Nassau.

C14967
TWO Farm workers. Salary:
$40 per week. Apply: Charles
Gibson, P. 0. Box N-3112,
Nassau.

C14964
TWO FARM-HELPfPH.
Contact Harry Allen, corner
Market St. and Father Calnan
Road. Phone 3-5179.

C14972
WANTED IMMEDIATELY
Experienced MILLINER
AND DESIGNER. Telephone
3-4117 from 9 a.m. to 7:30
p.m.
C 14970
CABINET MAKERS to work,
build furniture etc. Good
standard of work and
experience required.
APPRENTICES
Young Boys ages 13-17
interested in making a career in
Cabinet Making. Call
COMMONWEALTH
FURNITURE 31120.

TRADE SERVICES
C14761

Pinder's Cuitoua
Brokersge LUd.
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU BAHAMAS
P. O. BOX N3714
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
M DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING


STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
PSECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
Phone: 2-3795, 2-3796
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 7-7434
FREE ESTIMATES

C14759
BACKHOE FOR HIRE
Need a septic tank or trenching
done?
Call
CARL G. TRECO
CONTRACTORS LTD. 2-4996
nr 5-R725


C14765
MASTER TECHNICIANS
LTD., Mackey Street, your
Whirlpool distributor offers
refrigerators, washers, dryers,;
compactors, freezers, ice!
makers, air conditioners and,
garbage disposers.With full
warranty on every home
appliance we sell. Service done:
by factory trained mechanics J
Telephone 23713, 5-9322.
C14/b6
FOR YOUR BUILDING
NEEDS AND CRANE HIRE...
see: ISLAND BUILDERS
LIMITED P. 0. Box 6285 ES
Phone 3-1671 3-1672.


U 1


HELP W WTED
C14960
SYNTEX CORPORATION
HAS THE FOLLOWING
VACANCY:-
CHEMICAL TECHNICIAN
Applicant must have previous
experience in chemical
laboratory work and De able
to carry out routine analysis
and calculate analytical results
and physical constants.
Previous experience in acid and
base titrations, thin layer paper
and gas chromatography.
Applicants should apply in
person to Syntex Corporation,
West Sunrise Highway or write
to P. 0. Box F-2430, Freeport,
Bahamas.
C15249
ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT to Manager,
Resale Department of large real
estate company. Must be
capable of handling customers'
inquiries, making decisions and
carrying out all administrative
duties in absence of Manager.
Several years experience in
similar position and
stenographic and typing skills
essential.
Apply to: Intercontinental
Realty Ltd., P. 0. Box F-260,
Freeport. Telephone 373-3020.


I TRADE SERVICES I


L(14/bz
T. V. ANTENNAS
Boosters for homes,
apartments and hotels
SALES AND SERVICES
Call 5-9404
;WORLD 01- MUSIC
Mackey Street

C14913
BAHAMAS UPHOLSTERY
Adderley's Addition
Rebuilding, Repairing,
Refinishing
17 years experience
FREE ESTIMATES
Ralph Brown 3-4263.
5-9368


HELP MNTED5
C15251
EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT
INNKEEPER: One (1)
Executive Assistant Innkeeper.
Must have hotel experience,
must have worked in large
hotel before. Must be able to
assist in various departments
and training. Must have full
experience of all phases of
entire hotel.
For the above please apply to
the Personnel Department
Holiday Inn of Lucayan Beach,
P. 0. Box F-760, Freeport,
Grand Bahama, Bahamas.
Phone 373-1333. Ext. 28.
C15248
A DMI NISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT to the Treasurer
of Intercontinental Realty Ltd.
Must be able to handle
ad ministrative duties in
connection with detailed
accounting procedures,
financial and statistical reports
and tabulations. This position
also requires excellent
secretarial skills with great
accuracy in mathematics as
well as a substantial knowledge
of real estate business.
Telephone 373-3020 or write
to P. 0. Box F-260, Freeport.


IELP WANTED


C15252
QUALIFIED. CHEMIST,
PLANT MANAGER foi
leading Bahamian distillery.
Must have at least 10 years
experience in all fields of the
distilling operation.
BOTTLING LINE WORKERS
(Female), part time, must have
experience. Bahamians Only
need apply.
TOOL AND DIEMAKER,
must have knowledge of
operating bottling machinery,
electrical, automotive and
air-conditioning repairs and
installations.
Apply in person or write to:
Todhunter Mitchell & Co.,
Ltd., P. 0. Box F-2444,
Queens Highway, Freeport.
C15250
Freeport Utility has opening
for a CORPORATE CHIEF
ENGINEER with overall
responsibility for the design
ana construction of all inside
and. outside telephone plant
facilities. The job function
includes secondary res-
ponsibility in plant
maintenance. At least 10 years
experience in North American
telephone engineering required.
Emphasis on COE and PABX
engineering desired.
Send resume and salary
requirements to: General
Manager, Grand Bahama
Telephone Company Ltd., Post
Office Box F-2478, Freepcrt,
Grand Bahama, Bahamas.
[e dd[m1:[ill :& -


!1


HELP WANTED


C15247
Freeport Taxi Co., Ltd.
requires a CAB DISPATCHER
At least five years experience
as well as Accounting, ability
for calculation of driver's trip
sheetss.
C15255
ASSISTANT FIELD
SUPERINTENDENT
He is directly responsible to
the Field Superintendent. Must
co-ordinate the job of all
supervisors and foremen and be
directly responsible for the
execution of the job in terms
of the specifications of the
Contract. He must check all
technical problems and provide
solutions according to the
contract procedures with or
without consultation with the
Field Superintendent. A
knowledge of English, Italian
and Spanish together with 3 to
10 years experience is essential.
Only Bahamians need apply in
writing to: Saipem, S.p.A.
(Bahamas Branch), P. 0. Box
F-2471, Freeport, Bahamas.



ANNOUNCEMENTS
C14764 SHAWNEE
Daily Service between West
Palm Beach and West End. For
Reservations call The Grand
Bahama Hotel (Ext. 5).


"It was much more peaceful around here when they
simply refused to speak to each other. "


if* I "* .*


CLASSIFIED


CLASSFED ADVS. BRING RESULTS -FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV TELEPHONE 21986 EXT. 5


GRAND BAHAMA


CLASSIFIED


SECTION


--I


I i ii '


- I


L.












4E TRIBUNE Tuesday, June 18, 17


I demand an honest answer. Do you employees have
deliberate plan to drive me out of my mind?'


SKNDW WT NEW S6 'I KINMA UKE rr,ITOO."
U'DLLIK SOWELL' 1'
HEATHCLIFF
?."- IS


CROSSWORD
PUZZLE
ACROSS 26. Transportation:
1. Cotton bundle abbr.
5. Electric 27. Arabic
current letter
7. Field 29. Type measure
11. Radiate 30. Churchill's
12. Word of choice successor
13. Unspun linen 32. Herb eve
14 Short note 34. Deny
15. Third largest 38. Cosmic cycle !
planet 39. Communists
17. Japanese fan 40. Tariff
18. Roster 41. Cheat
19. Snaffle 43. Gentle breeze
20. Nomad 44. Tissue
22. Observe 45. Note of the
23. Chaps scale
24. Blood type 46. Periphery


Algerian
seaport
Syllable of
hesitation
Billfold
contents


DOWN
1. Subordinate
2 Spanish girl
friend
3. Silver -.--
4. French season
5. Contributors
6 Candia
7. Astern
8. Card suit
9 Grace's
husband
10. British
academy
16. Processions
- 18. Fox
21. Owing
25. Implore
27, Holiday
28. Declared
S 30 Make precious
31. Essence
33. Infirm
35. Pretty girl
- 36. European
siskin
37. Tests
42. Girl's
nickname
43. German
o composer

Floating


11


S74. C=^d ,I|


No 7.4.1 by TIM McKAV
Across
L. Knergy conservation. (3. 4)
7.Depoited. (4)
7. Cook bread. (4)
9. Decide to do the Job. (9)
it. Donkey. (31
13. Severe. (9)
14. Rip. (4)


Chess
By LEONARD BARDEN











(see)
A brilliant move iri this
position by Ray Keene of Clap-
ham (White, to play) against
Juan Bellon of Spain helped
England to the West European
championship in Minorca this
month. What should White play
-and can you spot the main
variations if Black makes the
most obvious reply ?
No par times-but reckon
yourself county standard or
better if you find the essentials
of the solution In under 10
minutes.
SOLUTION NO. 9996 -

Chess Solution
1 B-951 sacrifices a knight for
a winning attack. If .
PxKt; 2 BxP ch, K-RI; 3
QxKtP, PxP ch; 4 xP, Q-Q7
ch; 5 K-Ktl and Black can't
stop Q-R7 mate. If here 3 . .
Q-B4; 4 QxQ. Bx Q; S PxP
(threatening RxB), B-Kt5; 6
BxR RxB; 7 Kt-B7 ch fol-
lowed by 8 Kt x P and White's
rook and four pawns will beat
Black's two bishops.
Bellon tried declining the
knight by 1 . B-K3; but 2
BxB, PxB; 3 QxP still gave
Keene a winning game.


Bell-42


P.ftw s~


t oe on reing until t rohe another of my gadgets," he chuckles. "What
W tab go on rising until it reaches oouthnk of it7 "Oh. it's splendidI"
Oftnd then it stops .See there are do you think of it? Oh its splendid I
undre tn it ato h" see, t regor. ares Rupert as the good things are passed
t Of ro for everyone. And look at round. "' And with your hot air blowing ill
Pl O the invert., has., gien. uI' the time it just like the. middle of summer I"
u-* tStIW a re ing at the f dst the(Another Adventure on Monday)
o- fand, isling at their delight. AL
h e t tshe t able. -T is 5Just.


16. Vision. (5)
19. slow creature. (5)
21. Mr Lincoln. (3)
'. Carp. (3)
23. Place. (4)
'4 Unvaryinx temperature. (4.
Down
1. Mole puoits (anax.). (9)
t. Far.-reachinx AmerIcan farm-
land. (4-5)
3. Karly rden. (4)
4. Musl"cI animals? (4)
5 Order. (5)
6 Confectionery. (9)
8 Wave about. (8)
10. Resultsof
Perhaps AP
11.. ealIonn A
.3)
1I. shower
(4)
I swallow fN
Is. d. (4) i 5
to. Remain
p r one S JUR S
(3) 1 r ONat'rSe's uo iion



Winning

Bridge
y VICTOR MOLiO
Bridge s, no oubt, t ellUxir
of youth sought after by the
ancient alchemflst8. At no other
game have the grandchildren to
tow So often to their grand-
ents Starring the hand
below is B. Jay Becker, one of
America's eadn writers and
laers, who cele ed his 70th
hdy last month.
Dealer South: EIW Vul
North
AK4
87 5 3
1043
QJ 8 i6
West East
AllJ10 6 98752

South
SAK 9 IS
Seuth West North East
1 14 2 Pan
ai Pass 4
West led the V4 and followed
with another trump, when, at
trick two he came ti with the
4.A. ecer, who was South,
roseed to theJQ, threw a dia-
mond on the and played out
the clubs. West refused to ruff,
so when Becker ran out of clubs,
heut him In with a trump.
e a spade would present
declarer with a ruff and discard
West had to attack diamonds.
Slipping trom grace, he began
with the OA, a card which
couldn't gain whatevw the dis-
tribution. The 02, allowing East
to finesse against dummy would
havi broken the contract. As it
His fomd rputation, in-
ducing a palpable error from a
younger, overawed opponent, had
yielded the extra ik. t is
often the way.


(- CARROLL RIGHTER'S

p4 HORnESC(PE
from the Carroll Rightr Insitku
GENERAL TENDENCIES: The day starts out
with much vitality, so a good start can carry
over throughout the afternoon when confusing influences
could cause indecision and vacillation if permitted to become
part of your thinking.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) Keep appointments and do
necessary things early. Plan how to circumvent any obstacles
that might arise in the p.m. Stay poised.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) The early part of the day is
best for handling important money matters. If doubtful,
consult an expert about a course of action.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Put new plan to work to
make your personal desires a reality. Improve health and
appearance. Do those things that make you happy.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) In solitude, make
new plans for the future. Then show others you want to please
them. Any advice you get confidentially should not be
divulged.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Join with good friends to gain
mutual objectives easily. Plan just how you want conditions to
be in the days ahead.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Get into important career
activities. Don't forget to handle some credit affair, or you
have trouble in p.m. Avoid a bad influence.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Choose the best of fine new
ideas and push these. Get needed information from right
source, or from one of different background and then use it
wisely.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Keep promises in exact
detail. Discuss that matter with mate in a.m. Take no chances
with one who talks too much.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) You can come to a
real meeting of minds with associate who has been contentious
lately. Meet the expectations of bigwigs.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) Get work done early.
Plan time for health improvement. Do nothing that can in any
way get you off the beam. Show intelligence in all you do.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Plan early with pals the
recreations you want to enjoy after work. First take care of
errands for mate. Avoid costly errors.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Be consciefitious in handling
home affairs now. Know what is expected of you and please
others. Restore lagging energies in p.m. with rest.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY ... he or she will have
many exceptional abilities and can handle emergencies in a
clever and lightning-fast manner, so slant the education along
such lines, whether politics, the police force, big business, etc.
A fertile mind that likes to delve into everything, so be sure to
teach early to tackle one task at a time and complete it before
going on to another.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD


THIS SMUPGE OF PAINT YOU
OBSERVE ON MY FRNGER.
CAME FROM THIS
PAINTING .,- ANP
SAT MOST...





5L


(-W ,-,am
wordl oef
R G fou'ar retter.
or thme m n
you make
from the
P etter shown
here? In
making a
word, each
N I P w*% In
word t onliy. ah
letter and timNI must JIe t
least one lht-4eter wlrd la ein
list. No pl iis no forela words.
no on.ro aaaees. TODAVY'
T)AaUB: 14 w ,ds 4_ ;
, E .or i. iwry t Wood ; e .
eroellenS Jtlun tosmeow.
VTURAY'IA'I OIOLUTION:

aes t tA j lea 0tel Wa

E^IS^SSOt. al i I I


Saunders & Overga


TA
r's
ICE











wd











RE!
Ed


74.


-U


7Jhe Gomw [page7-



REX MORGAN, M.D. Dal Curs
HAVING OU ADMIT iYOU KNOW, THERE WERE TIME THERE TEt ARE TI S
THAT YOU'RE WORRIED WHEN I WAS BEGiNNING BE ANOTH ER It1 N FEEL N 'D
ABOUT JUNE MAKES ME TNINX TO DOUBT IT / REASON BE ER CHANGE
THAT YOU MAY BE HUMAN I JUST HOPE THATOTO
il AFTJALL IT'S NOT BECAUSE
YUMIGHT LOSE
A GooD NURE


< ed







JUDGE PARKER Paul Nichols
MR. SECK? I'M HOW DO YOU DO... PLEAoE, T DOWN! rSOME, MS
H UAABBEY SPENCERY D,,
AEoEE EXPERIENCE IN
MAINTENANCE
ATRK?








AA



APARTMENT 3-G By Alex Kotakyf


'I
S.


















I.
I'













12 THE TRIBUNE ---Tuesday, June 18,1974.


Fourteen

for junior

play-off

FOURTEEN juniors are
slated to compete in the
Bahamas Golf Association's
junior championship to be
contested over 36 holes
beginning Saturday morning at
the South Ocean golf course.
The second round will be
played on Sunday.
Commencing at 8:30 on
both days, the winner of this
event will, in addition to
becoming the new champion,
will be awarded a three-week
stay at the Arnold Plainer Golf
Academy in Vermont, U.S.A.
from August 4th to 24th.
All junior golfers are invited
to participate, but only B.G.A.
members will be eligible to win
the coveted title, and in
addition, the winner of the trip
to the Academy must be a
Bahamian.
As the defending champ
Vernon Lockhart has since
graduated to the senior ranks,
the competition this year is
expected to be tighter. Last
year, Lockhart virtually
dominated the match, winning
by more than ten strokes.
Runner up Eric Gibson Jr.
Michael Rolle, Rory Higgs and
brothers Dwayne and Therone
Hepburn all of whom have
been playing good golf are
expected to be in the running.

Students for

chess battle
FOURTEEN students drawn
irom seven New Providence
high schools will compete in
the inter-scholastic chess
championships which began
Saturday afternoon (3:00) in
the library of C. C. Sweeting
High
They will be competing for
the coveted Finco Floating
Trophy.
It is expected that these
seven schools, each of which
has an organized chess club,
will form the nucleus of the
Junior Chess Congress to be
established in the schools.
Once this body is organized,
the school chess champion will
in future years represent the
Bahamas in the International
World Chess Championship
which is held every two years.
The following is the list of
entrants for the round-robin
affair: Trevor Archer & Marcia
Seymour (G.H.S.), Kenneth
Ingraham & Wayne Scott
(Aquinas), William Wong &
Ronnie Norton (Oueen's),
Carlos Garcia & Chris Esfakis
(St. Andrew's), Craig Pyfrom &
Antoinette Seymour (St.
John's), Jerry Moxey & Euwen
Collins (Bailey High), Copeland
Moxey & Granville Collie
(Sweeting High).

Indians win
GLOUCESTER Captain
Ajit Wadekar scored a sparkling
76 not out today and led the
Indian cricket tourists to a five
wickets win over
Qloucestershire.
Yesterday, Viv Richards, a
22-year-old batting discovery
from Antigua, scored his
second century of the season
with some hurricane hitting for
Somerset against Yorkshire.
Richards revived the
tottering Somerset scoreline
with a mighty 100 in 154
minutes. It included four sixes
and 12 fours.
Scores:
Yorkshire 274 for seven and 1
for nine; Somerset 259 (76 overs).
The Oval: Hampshire 303 for
eight dec and 56 for three; Surrey
182
Swansea: Glamorgan 350 for
seven and 96 for four.
Northamptonshire 262 for eight.
Ilford: Essex 359 for eight and
114 for four. Middlesex 271 for
five.
Tunbridge Wells: Kent 282 .and
80 for six; Sussex 234.
Leicester: Nottinghamshire 214
for nine. Leicestershire 179 for
two.


Edgabaston: Worcestershire 292
and 73 for four; Warwickshire 241.

MODERNISTIC





GAW MlaUPR


FRANKFURT Haiti defender Ernest
Jean-Joseph has become the first player
in World Cup history to be banned from
the soccer championships because he
admittedly took a prohibited drug.
The World Cup organizing committee
announced today Jean-Joseph had been
"found guilty of doping on the occasion
of the Haiti-Italy match in Munich" last
Sate"dlav
The committee said a doping test


revealed that JeanJoseph took a
substance containing phenylmetrazin
prior to the hard fought match, won by
Italy 3-1.
In Munich, Jean-Joseph contended he
had received a "lot of pills' from his
physician in Port-au-Prince for treatment
of asthma.
But Prof. Gottfried Schoenholzer,
Swiss head of the FIFA doping
commission for the World Cup, told the


West Germans


crust

HAMBURG World Cup
favourites West Germany
convincingly beat underdogs
Australia in Hamburg this
afternoon.
At the kickoff Hamburg's
62,000 capacity Volkspark
Stadium was a sellout. The sky
was overcast and the pitch
damp after earlier heavy rain.
Before the game Australia
made one change in its lineup
but West German coach
Helmut Schoen announced his
lineup would be unchanged
from the side that beat Chile
1-0
The West German lineup:
Sepp Maier, Berni Vogts,
Hans Schwarzenbeck, Franz
Beckenbauer, Paul Breitner,
Ulrich Hoeness, Bernhard
Cullmann, Wolfgang Overath,
Jurgen Grabowski, Gerd
Mueller, Josef Heynckes.
Schoen delayed naming his
five substitutes but has said
they will include real Madrid
star Guenter Netzer.
Australia's one change was
to bring in Ernie Campbell for
injured striker John Warren.
Australia's team: Jack
Reilly, Doug Utjesenovic,
Peter Wilson, Manfred
Schaeffer, Colin Curran, Ray
Richards, Jim Rooney, Jim
Mackay, Ernie Campbell,
Adrian Alston, Branko
Buljevic.
Overath sent West Germany


Aussies


West Germany 3 Australia 0


Today's games: Australia v
West Germany, Yugoslavia v
Zaire, Brazil v Scotland, Chile v
East Germany.

into the lead with a rising shot
from the edge of the penalty
box in the 12th minute.
West Germany monopolized
the early play, but Mueller
twice missed chances inside the
penalty area. On the second
occasion he shot weakly at the
goalkeeper after he and
Beckenbauer had taken the ball
through the middle.
Schaeffer was glad to head
away for a corner as Mueller
and Grabowski stood waiting
in front of goal for a cross
from the right wing.
The second goald went to
Cullman. It came from a
perfect pass from Vogts on the
right wing which caught the
Australian defence badly out
of position.
Peter Wilson made a
magnificent clearance on the
line in the 29th minute,
kicking away a shot from
Mueller which appeared to
have him beaten.
The Germans seemed in
complete command.
There was no let-up for the
Australians. Vogts fired in a


BABA summer camp


THE BAHAMAS Amateur
Basketball Association, in
expansion of their recreational
programmes, will this year
stage a summer camp at the St.
Augustine's College campus
commencing July 15.
This camp will be open to
both girls and boys between
the ages of eight and fourteen
years. All applicants must
produce documentary proof of
age upon application. The
projected number of
participants in this four-week
camp has been set at 100.

The specific object of this
camp will be refined by the
executive committee of the
B.A.B.A. However, it it
tentatively felt that the camp
should offer itself as a form of
wholesome recreation, provide
for teaching of fundamentals in
various sports with special
emphasis on all aspects of
basketball, and, expose the
participants to the philosophy
of building better citizens
through involvenemt in sports.
Activities offered through
the programme include
swimming, volleyball, tennis,
softball, dancing, educational
games, hiking, archery and
basketball. It is hoped that
teaching aids such as films and
slides will also be used.
S.A.C.'s campus has been
chosen as the venue of this
project, the reason being the
many facilities that are
available. Transportation will
be provided by utilizing
S.A.C.'s school bus. Lunch
service will also be available at
a minimal cost to campers.


A tentative list of
counsellors for this camp
include Fred "Papa" Smith,
John Todd, David Patton,
Martin Lundy (Director),
Sharon Storr, Carl Minns,
Claudius Anderson, Charlie
Robbins, Elaine Thompson
(A.F. Adderley High), Denise
Whylly, (SA.C.) and D.
Seymour (A. F. Adderley).
With entrance fee being $10
per person, all those interested
may contact B.A.B.A.'s first
vice president Whitney Rolle
(27425), Chris Roberts
(28477) or any other executive
of the B.A.B.A. They may also
write through P. 0. Box
N1567.


Seven teams including three
from the Family Islands have
entered the Bahamas Amateur
Basketball Association's second
annual independence tourna-
ment which commences on
July 4 at the A. F. Adderley
Gym.
Participating teams are the
Nassau League All-Stars, the
Collegians, the Bimini
All-Stars, the Eleuthera
All-Stars, the Paradise League
All-Stars. the Grand Bahama
All-Stars and a visiting Florida
All-Stars.


Khan d4
CARDIFF Star batsman
Majid Hkan may play after all
for the Pakistan cricket team
that tours England later this
year.
Khan said he would
continue playing for


tremendous shot from the right
but goalkeeper Reilly got in
the way of it and knocked it
up over the bar.
Curran had the Asutralians'
best chance in the 41st minute.
He broke alone deep into the
German penalty area. Maier
rushed out and fell on the ball
at Curran's feet five yards from
goal before the Australian
could get in a shot.
Mueller had still another
chance in the 45th minute. He
flashed in a header from a
leftwing corner taken by
Hoeness and Reilly made a
good save a yard in front of
goal.
Mueller finally clicked in the
54th minute to make it 3-0
with a deflected header at the
near post from a leftwing
corner by Hoeness.
The shot caught Reilly
coming off his line and went
into the net over his left
shoulder.
Hoeness had a chance a
minute later after a pass from
Grabowski on the wing but his
four-yard header flashed just
over the bar.
In the 55th minute
Australia's Mackay was shown
the yellow warning card. He
handled, then argued with the
referee when a free-kick was
given.
It was the first warning of
the game.


Dear Sports Fan,
The song of "The Boston Blackie
appreciation night" is over, but
the melody lingers on. Some of
Boston's appreciative well wishers
have come forth with financial,
vocal and moral tributes, others
have made themselves somewhat
conspicuous by their absence.
As co-ordinator of the fund
raising drive to secure a substantial
retirement purse for Blackie, I must
admit that while contributory
response from the sporting public
has been and continues to be
encouraging, it nonetheless falls
well within the realm of
disappointment. Hundreds of
letters requesting contributions
were sent to persons from all walks
of life, but only a mere handful
returned bearing gifts.
For those who would till like to
donate but have not done so for
any reason, we are extending the
closing time until the end of June.
So far funds collected total less
than half of our target figure of
$3,000. In these times of inflation,
the above sum is not exorbitant,
especially when one considers the
many thousands of sports fans, who
helped over twenty five years to
make the legend of Boston Blackie
a reality.
Cheques made payable to
Leonard Miller can be sent via P.O.
Box N865. Cash can be given
directly to Boston or by contacting
.the undersigned via phone number
24842, on or before the June 30th
closing date for further solicitations.
In closing we give sincere thanks
to those who have already
contributed, those who will do so
shortly and also those in the vast
majority who are willing but
somehow unable to do jo at this
time.


Very truly yours,
WILFRED COAKLEY.
oubt
Glamorgan the English
county team he captains --
because he would earn 800
pounds, or $2,020 more that
way.
Majid was expected to play a
major part in Pakistan's
challenge this year.


Model boat regatta


A FLEET of 50 boats took
part in the second Exuma
Model Boat Regatta Saturday.
Choppy seas made it
difficult for the smaller models
to hold a straight course or
avoid capsizing.
Results: -
Class A (Models 80cms or more
overall).
I. Super Fly I-rank McKenzle


Stuart Manor(Awarded the Hugh
Cottis Trophy)
2 Diamond Head Livingstone
Gray Williams Town
3 Lady Bird H. Smith Stuart
Manor
Class B. (Models under 80cms
overall).
1. Lady Muriel Cyril Morley
George Town (Awarded Wmin.
Johnson Jnr. Trophy)
2 Flying Bird N. Ferguson Stuart
Manor


3 The Blizzard Maxwell Rolle
Rolle Town
Following the class races a Mini
- Great Ocean Race for all boats
was sailed for the Wm. Johnson Jnr.
Trophy.
1. Super Fly Franklyn McKenzie
Stuart Manor
2. Honey Hush L. Forbes
Williams Town
3 Diamond Head L. Gray
Williams Town.


Associated Press that phenylmetrazin was
generally prescribed as a diet drug. In
addition to checking appetite, he mid, it
also had a stimulating effect.
Although, under FIFA rules, an entire
team can be banned from the World Cup
in case of deliberate doping, Prof.
Schoenholzer said it was his personal
opinion that FIFA's disciplinary action
would not go beyond the explosion of
Jean-Joseph.


-


CRUIJFF'S

THE NEW

KING
"I'LL PLAY four more
years. Then you can count me
out", says Johan Cruijff,
captain of the Dutch World
Cup squad and most likely
successor to the throne "Pele"
reigned for years as king of
soccer.
Cruijff could rightly claim
that title if he keeps on
performing in this World Cup
tournament as he did in
Saturday's group three match
against Uruguay.
Holland, playing in the
tournament for the first time
in 36 years, beat the tough
Latin Americans 2-0 and
Cruijff was the main architect
of this important victory.
Although listed as a centre
forward, he operated mostly
from the midfield.
Twice he stormed through
himself, brilliantly avoiding
rough tackles in his move
through the Uruguayan
defence.
The first time his header hit
the bar and rebounded for an
on-rushing teammate to bang
home, but the referee whistled
for hands.
Only minutes later he beat
starring goalie Mazurkiewicz
from an almost impossible
position, but this time the goal
was disallowed for dangerous
play.


Audley helps youth
LIQUOR MERCHANT Audley Kemp is out to help the
youth and the community. "If you intend to do good, and
the children's intention is good, then only good will be
derived." he said.
Mr. Kemp who was a key player on the Police Wanderers
cricket team, has this year sponsored two more teams in the
New Providence Softball Association series. They are
Melroso Ginger a men's team, and Melroso Sherry a
ladies' team.
In baseball, Mr. Kemp sponsors pennant contenders
Schlitz Beer and in basketball, he has Schlitz and Pabst.
Melroso Ginger play Taylor Trucking in the first game
tonight (7 o'clock) at the John F. Kennedy Park. 1he
Blazers play Heinken Stars in the second game at 9 30.
Pictured above is Mr Kemp (right) presenting the
softball uniforms to Ronnie Major ( left) manager of the
teams, and Shirline Dean a player.
Mr. Kemp is the exclusive importer and distributor of
Melroso Wines.


Conteh retains title

Top: Britain's lifht-heavy-weight champion John Conteh
keeping challenger Chris Finnegan at distance during their
recent match at Wembley's Empire Pool, London. Conteh
retained his British, Commonwealth and European titles
when the referee stopped their contest in the sixth round
after Finnegan had sustained injuries to his head and left
eye. Plans are now being prepared for Conteh to challenge
America's Bob Foster for the world title.
Above: Britain's Kevin Finnegan (right) avoids a left jab
from Jean-Claude Bouttier of France during the 15-round
contest when he won the European middleweight title from
the Frenchman on a unanimous points decision The new
champion with only 23 previous contests against
Bouttier's 69 combined aggression with a classic English
style to outbox and outpunch his opponent.
His varied punches included a long left jab, while he was
quick to slip his right over Bouttier's guard at every
opportunity. The Frenchman battled hard, but elusive
Finnegan countered with speed or punching at close
quarters.
This Decisive victory made it a 'double' for Britain, for
on the same programme London's John H. Stracey
overwhelmed Roger Menetrey to win the European
welterweight crown.


Haitian banned for taking drug


I coaching, or playing are asked
o contact Whitney Rolle.


r BOXERS

TO FIGHT

FLORIDA

AMATEURS
THE AMATEUR Boxing
Association of the Bahamas is
going ahead with plans for two
matches against Floridian
amateurs, and competition in
the first world boxing
championships to be held in
Cuba.
The Florida boxers will
travel to Nassau for a July 5
tournament and the local
fighters will then make a trip
to Florida for a return
matchup on July 26.
The July 5 affair will be the
A.B.A.B.s second annual
independence tournament.
A.B.A.B. president Fred
Sturrup said Saturday that the
two outings against Florida will
serve to give the local boxers
adequate competition prior to
the world championships. The
championships are slated for
August 17-30 in Havana.
Cuban boxing officials have
indicated an interest to seeing
silver medalist Nathanial
Knowles meet their ace
Alejandro Montoya. A possible
meeting between the two was
hampered by a severe shoulder
sprain suffered by Knowles
during the semi-final round of
boxing in the XII Central
American and Caribbean
Games.
The injury forced Knowles
to default in the final and
Montoya was awarded the gold
medal.
At a meeting of the
A.B A.B. last week, it was
decided to stage eliminations
for representatives against
Florida and also for the
championships.
They will be held on June
28 and 29 at the Nassau
Stadium. All interested clubs
and boxers are requested to file
entries with the Association no
later than June 21 by
contacting secretary Fred Higgs
at 51058, 31982,or Sturrup at
the Nassau Stadium (23882).
If a boxer fails to show up
for his bout, it will mean
automatic default.
Up to June 28, all boxers
may continue training with
their respective clubs.
However, following the
eliminations, all boxers will be
required to work out at the
A.B.A.B. central gym the
National Stadium under the
guidance of National Coach
Bert Perry,

Washed out
YIESTERDAY'S deluge left
the diamond at the Queen
Elizabeth Sports Centre a
miniature pond forcing
cancellation of last night's
Bahamas Baseball Association's
action pack double header.
Weather permitting. Schlitz
Beer take on Carroll's in the
,first game Wednesday night (7
o'clock), and Heineken Stars
play Citibank Chargers in the
9:30 contest.
Last night, Citibank were
slated to meet Jet Set in the
first game, and the
unpredictable St. Bernards
going against Heineken Stars in
the second game.
BOXING TOURNEY
THE AMATEUR heavy
weight champion Nevil Sands
has entered Y Boxing
Tournament on Friday June
21.
Other YMCA boxers are in
full swing of preparation for
this exhibition event: Seniors
under the guidance of
Oswald Archer and the Junior
Club under Rom Tyminski.
FOOTBALL PRACTICE
HEINEKEN PROS football
team hold practice sessions
Tuesday and Thursdays at 6
p.mn. and Saturdays at I p.m. at
St. Augustine's College
grounds. Persons interested in


ROYAL MAIL REGULAR FREIGHT THE PACIFIC STEAM
SERVICE FROM

LINES LIMITED U.K. TO NASSAU NAVIGATION CO.

For information contact the agents

R.H.CURRY &Co.,Ltd.

PHONE 2-8683 2-8686 P. U. BOX N8168 BAY STREET


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MRS ANNIE ESTELLE
SEYMOUR of Raymond Road, Nassau. Bahamas is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration should not be granted should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 12th day of June 1974 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, Ministry of
Home Affairs, P. O. Box N-3002, Nassau.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ORTHNIEL HOPE SMITH of,
P. 0. Box N-3698, Nassau, Bahamas formerly Grand Turks,
Turks Island. is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for Registration/Naturalisation
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why Registration/Naturalisation should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 11th day of
June 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002,
Nassau.