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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03634
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: June 4, 1974
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03634

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Sritbiutp


Nassau and Bahama Islan Leading Newspaper


Tuesday, June 4, 1974.


New Providence building still declining


CONSTRUCTION in New
Providence is still declining
while in Freeport it appears
to be levelling off, building
statistics for the first quarter
of 1974 reveal.
The figures showed that
210 building permits with a
combined value of
$5,106,742 were issued in
New Providence in the first
three months of this year,
compared with the 279 worth


over $7 million issued during
the first quarter of 1973.
Housing projects
accounted for 174 of the
permits issued, 35 permits
were approved for
commercial and industrial use
and one was issued for the
public sector.
Construction was begun
during the first quarter this
year on 99 buildings worth
$3.7 million, compared with


133 starts on projects with a
combined value of $5.5
million during the
corresponding period last
year.
Building completion have
fallen in New Providence
from 78 in the first quarter
last year to 75 this year. The
value of completions has also
dropped, from $5.2 million
to $3.8 million.


Jobless to







form line






in march


By NICKI KILLY
U N E MP fO Y
workers in Nassau


form a special line in this
year's Fabour Day March
"to show the government
that many thousands of
poor people are out of


work and cannot see any
hope in sight," Bahamas
Workers Council chairman
Dudley Williams said

The annual' parade,
recognizing the labourers of
the country, will take place
Friday from Windsor Park,
though Bay Street and back
again to the park.
Mr. Williams charged that the
unemployed had been
"neglected and betrayed" by
the government and the time
had come for Labour to take a
positive stand against those
who had "caused so much
havoc among the Bahamian
people."
He said that workers must
see the "dismal failure" of the
PLP to create jobs as proof
that they never had any real
plan "to lift the Bahamian
masses out of poverty".
"The industrial capacity of
the nation is idle and our
manpowe; is non-productive
because of unemployment,"
Mr. Williams declared.
"Our business people are
becoming bankrupt 'and crime
has taken over this nation like
an evil spirit. The future of our
children demands that we
acquit ourselves like men and
women and speak up for the
good of the nation. We as a
people have been sold down
the drain and we are in slavery
all over again."


E D HOTEL JOBS
will THREAT


restriction of other freedoms
which are already in jeopardy.
Later this month Bahamiafi
unions will be given a "golden
- -- -- ;+W, t +IA fi


THE SOUTH OCEAN opportunity at tne iLu
Beach Hotel and Golf conference in Geneva to voice
Course open for just a year, their opinions of what is
is to close down 80 of its happening here, Mr. Williams
120 rooms this summer. said.
The Golf Club bar and At the same conference the
restaurant has already Brit ish Trade Union
closed, The Tribune earned, movement, comprising British
The hotel reportedly Commonwealth unions will
wa*s to lay off 56 worker, discuss problems being faced
b u4 negotiations are by affiliates.
pra~tly in progress wit4 "The 1970 Act prohibits
the Hotel and Catering Bahamian unions to have
Workers Union for possible foreign -affiliations and ihe
rotation of staff, unions have been weakened as
The South Ocean is one a result. Also unions outside
of a number of hotels which don't know what is going on
have found it economically here," charged Mr. Williams.
necessary to either shut At a later conference
down altogether or reduce sponsored in Jamaica by the
their summer operations. Caribbean Public Service Union
The Nassau Harbour Club freedom of association will be
has closed its 50 rooms. The one of th matters on the
Lucayan Beach Hotel at agenda for discussion.
Freeport is closing 100 of
its rooms and the Emerald "We intend to raise the
Beach Hotel 100. Another question of those recognition
Cable Beach Hotel is also agreements still outstanding
rumoured to be closing for with the Ministry of Labour."
the summer. Mr. Williams said. He named in
Particular Radio Bahamas and


The Labour leader called on
the Bahamian people to "vote
their oppressors out of the
House for good."
Labour Minister Clifford
Darling has been invited to
speak at the Labour rally.
According to Mr. Williams, the
1970 Industrial Relations Act
is under review and one of the
amendments being considered
is introduction of the agency
shop.
He warned, however, that
introduction of the agency
shop was no cause for rejoicing
because it would lead to the


the controversy over
Bahamasair.
The Labour Day parade will
leave Windsor Park at 9.30 a.m.
but participants are asked to be
at the park by 9 a.m. It will
follow the same route as last
year, proceeding from Wulff
Road to Collins Avenue, then
Bay Street to the Sheraton
British Colonial Hotel, over
Blue Hill Road and back to
Windsor Park.
The march will be followed
by a rally and sale. Attendants
will be at the stalls from the
start of the march, continuing
into the evening.


In Freeport, 22 building
applications worth $2.5
million were approved in the
first three months of 1974,
compared with the 21 valued
at $321,462 in the first
quarter last year.
Identical figures were
recorded in respect of
buildings started.
Four buildings worth
$19,400 were completed in
Freeport during the first


quarter this year, compared
with four buildings worth
$71,454 completed in the
first three months of 1973.
In the out islands, permits
for 31 buildings valued at
$794,628 were approved.
Construction was begun on
20 buildings worth $271,036
and completed on four
buildings worth $63,100.
Comparative figures for the
out islands were not available.


Goombay gig


Goombay Summer burst on Nassau over the weekend,
launching the start of three months of festivities for
Bahamians and visitors. Here, dancers on the patio of
Loewe's Paradise Island Hotel do the jump-in dance.

Supreme court gives

Vesco decision.


WASHINGTON The U.S.
Supreme Court declined on
Monday to review a lower
court order blocking disposal
of the assets of a company
controlled by fugitive financier
Robert L. Vesco.
The Supreme Court let stand
the U.S. Circuit Court decision
affirming a trial judge's order

Bank r


against Vesco & Co. Inc.
U.S. District judge Charles
IF. Stewart Jr. issued a
preliminary injunction last July
to prevent the Vesco
corporation from selling or
transferring its sole asset
846,380 shares of common
stock in the International
Controls Corp.

obbery:


two charged


TWO YOUTHS, arrested and
detained by police investigating
the May 21 armed robbery of
the Robinson Road Barclay's
Bank, were formally charged in
the lower court today.
Eric Pratt, a 19-year-old
Rupert Dean Lane cook and
White Court mechanic,
Anthony Armbrister, 20, were
remanded in custody until July


24 by Magistrate Emmanuel
Osadebay when preliminary
inquiries into charges will be
held.
The two are jointly charged
with robbing Barclays Bank
clerks Gregory Williams and
Anthony Newbold of $6,610
with a sawed off shotgun.
They pleaded not guilty.


By NICK KELLY
HEALTH MINISTER Loftus
Roker has challenged any
professional person at the
Princess Margaret Hospital to
say that he has interfered with
their work or any politician to
produce such proof.
Mr. Roker, subject of a no
confidence motion in the
House last week, was criticized
by the Opposition for his
disposition and "unfortunate
,inability to communicate."
These "unfortunate traits"
were probably at the bottom
of the present administration
of the Princess Margaret
Hospital, FNM Leader Kendal
Isaacs suggested.
"What has the disposition of
the Minister got to do with the
doctor's work." Mr. Roker
wanted to know.
He had never been in the


operating theatre and never
intended to go because he left
those matters entirely to the
professional staff employed for
that purpose.
The Minisjer called on
doctors, nurses or politicians to
show he had ever attempted to
interfere.
Shouted FNM representative
Cyril Tynes: "Got a tape, got a
tape!" (This was a reference to
an alleged tape of Mr. Roker,
made during the recent
hospital controversy involving
the acting chief dietician).
Mr. Roker said he did not
know where the Opposition
got its report that accreditation
would soon be taken away
from the Princess Margaret for
training interns.
"Never before has there
been a greater number of
qualified doctors and nurses in
the Ministry of Health." In
1965 the total number of
nurses in the Ministry was 252.
In 1973 the total was 553.
The government, Mr. Roker
said, had spent money training
three hospital administrators.
Two were in post and a third
was returning from Canada to
take up her appointment.
In January 1973, a headline
in the local prem had referred


to "Historic Heart Surgery at
PHM."' The operation on a
two-and-a-half-year-old girl was
the first planned operation of
its type ever performed at the
Princess Margaret.
"It was done becuase it was
felt by the Florida specialist
that the hospital possessed the
equipment and personnel to
perform the operation. I
wonder if that could have been
done in a hospital about to lose
its accreditation for intern-
ship," Mr. Roker declared.
The Minister, told by the
Opposition to disestablish the
hospital. claimed that the
health facilities at the Princess
Margaret did not recaI/e
sufficient revenue to warrant
setting up a corporation to run
it.
"It is unlike BEC or Batelco
which generate revenue
themselves on which to
operate, and they could as a
practical matter be placed
under a corporation "
The Minister said the
Princess Margaret. as presently
run, was financed 100 percent
from government funds and
the people's representatives
must therefore have control
over the use of these funds.


"I would never support
putting the hospital under a
private corporation where
government money is being
spent." he asserted.
And in reighteous tone Mr.
Roker observed that: "He who
collects from the people must
be accountable to the people "
While the Opposition has
chosen to make political
capital out of the hsopital it
was worth noting, he
continued, that Clarence Town
representative Michael Light-
bourn has asked and won
a committee in December 1'173
to consider charges brought
against the hospital. Mr. C(nl
Fountain (Long Island) who
had moved the no confidence


resolution, was also a member
of the committee.
"The committee however,
has never met. If they were
honest men they should have
met, and on the basis of that
submitted a report condemning
the Ministry or otherwise."
Mr. Roker neglected to
mention however, that
although Mr. Lightbourn won
his committee, government
members denied him the right
to send for persons and papers.
in effect neutralizing the object
of the committee.
Dealing lastly with the
extensions at the Princess
Margaret. the Minister said the
extension for the children's
ward would be ready this
month and occupied.


BIG DRUGS HAUL

A LIGHT aircraft which put down at Marsh Harbour,
Abaco Saturday was apprehended by Customs and an
estimated 1500 pounds of marijuana confiscated.
Freelance reporter Bruce Woolley told The Tribune from
Marsh Harbour today that the drug haul is believed to be
the largest ever found in the area.
A man wa taken lato custody and was to be charged this
morning.
The value of the drug on the open market Is wel over
ss$500000


- POLICE
HAD NO

RECORD

OF THEFT,

SAYS

VISITOR
TWO AMERICAN visitors
just couldn't believe what
took place on Saturday and
said they had to come and
tell The Tribune about it.
On Friday Mr. and Mrs. R.
Obermeier from St. Louis,
Missouri hired a scooter from
Paradise Island and rode into
town to do some shopping
and look around.
They wish they had never
hired the scooter, because
what happened after they had
done their shopping on Bay
Street led them into a series
of unfortunate circumstances
that took up the rest o." the
day.
Mr. Obermeier, attending a
sales manufacturer's
conference at Paradise Island
hotel with a convention
group, said he and his wife
rode over to East Street "just
to have a look around" and at
a busy intersection a
Bahamian youth watched his
wife's handbag and shopping
bag from the basket at the
back of the bike. He ran off
and Mr. Obermeier gave chase
but could not catch the thief.
When he came back to his
wife there was a crowd and
one Bahamian woman,
according to the visitor, was
shouting: "This has got to
stop. There's too much of
this going on in this town
these days."
Police arrived and
statements were given.
Mr. Obermeier asked the
vociferous woman if she
knew the young man who
snatched his wife's handbag.
"He's well known round
bere," she reportedly told
him. She reportedly gave the
name to police.
The police then told the
visitor he would have to come
to the station to fill out a full
report. He and his wife did


It took about two and a
half hours to get the three
page report written out. Mr.
Obermeier said he signed the
statement and gave it back to
the officer, commenting that
the police would probably be
able to pick up the thief
pretty quickly since they
knew who he was from the
woman at the scene.
The officer, reportedly
told him that he shouldn't
worry and that the thief
would probably be picked up
and his wife's handbag
returned by the next
morning.
The visitors left the station
feeling at least a bit better.
But the following morning
they were shattered.
They decided to come over
to Bay Street again and
purchase some of the gifts
they had lost the day before.
This time they did not come
on a scooter.
Mr. Obermeier said that as
they were passing the police
station anyway they would
call in to find out if his wife's
handbag had been returned or
the culprit arrested.
To their dismay they were
rudely received and told by
the officer in charge that
there had been no arrests
overnight and they knew
nothing about th. incident.
When Mr. Obermeier insisted
that he had made a statement
only the day before and
signed it for the officer, the
officer in charge checked
back in the police log and
could find no record of it.
Mr. Obermeier said "it was
just incredible. I couldn't
believe it. We had to come
here and tell you."

Cheryl goes
CHI RYL CARFY of Nassau
today went to Buckingham
Place to receive her Gold
Award for the Duke of
Fdinburgh Award Scheme
from the Duke himself.
She was among 790 young
people taking part m the
presentation ceremony.
To earn her award, Cheryl
had to complete the work over
a minimum period of 18
months in four of the five
sections of the scheme:
services, expeditions or
worthwhile projects, interests,
design for living or physical


Stamp out


numbers


racket --call


By MIKE LOTHIAN
THE GOVERNMENT has
been urged to introduce
legislation "without delay" to
give police the tools they need
to "stamp out" the numbers
racket.
The recommendation was
the key finding of a House
select committee whose
chairman, Marsh Harbour M.P.
Errington Watkins, reported to
the House on Wednesday.
Mr. Watkins has served
notice that he will push for
House adoption of the report
on June 19.
Other members of the
committee, appointed on
November 28 last year, are
Opposition leader Kendal G.L.
Isaacs (FNM-Fort Montagu),
Franklyn Wilson (PLP-Grants
Town), Cadwell Armbrister
(PLP-Killarney) and Kendal
Nottage (PLP-Grand Bahama).
The Committee found the
numbers racket "very prevalent
in our society" and had even
received reports that it had
reached into the schools.
"All of the reasons for this
state of affairs could not be
ascertained by the committee,"
Mr. Watkins reported. "One
powerful cause, however, is
that the police have not been
successful in having people
prosecuted, even if they
arrested persons whom they
believed to be involved in the
practice. Consequently,
operators conduct their
business with a degree of
security which is unusual for
an illegal operation."
The "degree of security"
arises, it was said, from
certainn rulings" of the courts
that have made it "very, very
diffir ltto obtain the kin4 of
evidence necessary to have a
person convicted."
The committee was advised,
he went on, that the Attorney


General's office is drafting lav,
which "are likely to deal
adequately with mqst of the'-
existing loopholes in thi law:
"However, your committee
recommends that a clause
should bt included to deal-with
buyers of numbers. If
approved, the laws would give
the police the additional tools
they noed to. operate-
effectively in ihis area."
Mr. Watkins reported that
"your committee found a
considerable -body of. opinion
in the country which supports
legalizing the numbers racket."
However, that body is a
minority, and the committee,
following interview with the
judiciary, the police ard
religious leaders,
legalization "can create s
grave consequences."
The committee asserted that
"the majority of the customers
in the long run 'loose and
consequently weaken their
purchasing power or ability to: .
save; no new or outilde imeney
is brought, into .* circliation,
since the operation is almost
entirely limited- to residents."
Socially, the committee
reported, "since no
productivity is involved it
fosters attitudes which are not
truly consistent with the spirit
of nation building;
"It helps to perpetujtp the
social state of those who are in
the already vicious cycle at the.
lower en.d 0o the
socio-economic pole;
"It frustrates' whatever
efforts might be made to bring
about .rvtcr socio-economic
equally in the country.
"It fosters a disrespect fo.
!'e force of law and authurit: ,
and'
"It fo waters parental
negligence, crime, juvenile
deliquency and prostitution."


Mrs Pindling

launches tanker


SASEBO, Japan Mrs.
Marguerite Pindling today
dedicated the 270,000-ton
tanker, Energy Progress, at the
SSK shipyard here. The Prime
Minister was at her side as she
launched the vessel with a
traditional splash of
champagne.
The Energy Progress will
join the tanker fleet of Mr. C.
Y. Tung, Hong Kong shipping
executive, who invited Mrs.
Pindling to christen the ship.
"This is a very pleasant and
proud moment for a visitor
from the Commonwealth of
the Bahamas to have travelled
these many thousands of miles
to have the honour of
dedicating this splendid
tanker," Mrs. Pindling said at
the ceremony.
"It is an auspicious moment,
also, as all of us are aware of
the urgent need for these large
carriers to transport to all
corners of the globe what has
become a very precious
commodity. The tanker I
dedicate today is a symbol of
the preeminence of the
world-renowned C. Y. Tung
Group. And it is appropriate
that we are gathered here in
Japan, a respected world leader
in ship building for many ears


and, of course, home port of a
large merchant fleet. -
"In one of my home islands,
Grand Bahama,in theinorthero
segment of our archipelago;
there is one of the world's
largest oil refineries and,
nearby, and due to comftenrce
operating soon, is a 'large
transshipment and terminalling
company. So, in all likelihood,
this fine new tanker and some
of her sister ships will
undoubtedly be in Bahamian
waters from time to time..".
Following .several dayi- of
sightseeing in Japanese cities-
and in Hong Kong, where a
reception will be held by the
governor, Sir Murray
MacLehoSe, the Pindlings will
return to Nassau on June 9;
THREE HURT
THREE PERSONS .were
taken to hospital over the
holiday weekend after traffic
accidents.
Viki Major, Denclft-Barr, and
(;regg Fowler were all listed in
fair condition.
There were four minor bush
fires.
Calling H. M. Simnon
Would Mr. f. M -
Simmons of Miami, Florida
please contact The Tribune.


Rita $ Wrecpks 25 000if haneu


FIRWE destroyed the
Rosebud Street. Chippingham,
home ol Ministry of Tourism
photographer Lorenzo D.
Lockhart today causing an
estimated $25,000 worth of
damage.

to the Palace
activity, and obtain a
residentlil qualification. She
did her work while attending
Hunmanby Hall School in
Yorkshire, Northern England.
The activities she did were:
service, Sunday School
Teaching. Ixpeditions in tlb
Peak District Mountain Range
of Britain. Interest, Cookery.
Design for Living, running a
home.
For her resleaa
Qualification Ahe
child care work ( ;
orphanage in Hull on, i
coat of Englahd. .


Firemen, alerted by auall t _"
the house at 2I.5'pS rinet .
the building engulfed inflames.
The entire contents of the
seven-roomed stone building
were destroyed in, the blaze, *
firenVwn reported: ":.
The fi Is bi ved .. hye.
started in it bedte B it i.
rear of the laou aj li. hft
said. Nobody w6qt luit h I
the lime. "
The cause of theft iSr talea
investigated. Thab ttaL g* .
contents weie "lfifi[., oI:w

deparment


RECORDS
& TAPES
COM..ROCKT1


)L. LXXI i. 161


I;

i


I've never interfered at hospital, says Roker


'ii







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Scotland,

Wales

to get

more say
LONDON The British
Government offered a series of
proposals Monday for giving
Scotland and Wales their own
parliaments but suggested that
greater autonomy could
fragment Britain financially,
economically and socially.
A government discussion
paper, based on a report by the
Royal Commission on the
Constitution, outlined seven
schemes for Scotland and
Wales to have a vastly greater
say in running their own
affairs.
The royal commission ruled
out separatism and federalism.
Broadly, the central
government in London would
retain responsibility for major
policy matters such as defence
and foreign affairs.
The regional legislatures
would have powers over health,
education, finance, trade and
cconomnic planning. The degree
of power would depend on the
type of regional government
agreed upon.
Under one plan Scotland
and Wales would be governed
by their own directly elected
,;arliaments and cabinets of
ministers.
They would make laws and
administer their areas, although
ultimate power and sovereignty
of the parliament in London
would be preserved.
This power and sovereignty,
however, would be exercised
only in exceptional
circumstances and with the
agreement of the Welsh and
Scottish legislatures.
A more modest proposal
would retain law-making power
for the London parliament but
would have locally elected
'ass umblies to promote regional
'tirticipation.
- Along with the proposals, on,
which comment waA sought
from individuals and
organizations, the government
also presented a number of
what is called "practical
problems."
These included how to
maintain present uniformity of
services, such as in health and
education, taxation and
economic organization.
Britain has been ruled by
one parliament in London
since the early 1700s. (AP)


LONDON The Britih government has
rejected demands to pull ts troops eot of
Northern Ireland and declared that only the
army was preventing saarchy in that province.
"The fact b that without the Britsh army,
the forces of law and order could not cope
with the immediate future," Merlyn Rees,
Britain's chief administrator for Northern
Ireland, told a hushd Houae of Commons.
Rees was reporting to lawmakers recalled
early from a spring holiday for an emergency


Market
LONDON British leaders
flew to Luxembourg yesterday
seeking better and fairer terms
of Common Market
membership. They set the
yearend as their unofficial
deadline for definite results.
But on the eve of Britain's
detailed presentation by
Foreign Secretary James
Callaghan, word reached
London that France and West
Germany are stffening their
opposition to a fundamental
renegotiation.
Both countries helped found
what was originally the
six-nation European Com-
munity. Britain joined along
with Ireland and Denmark in
1972.
Some members ot the
minority Labour Government
said they understand president
Valery Giscard d'Estaing and
Chancellor Helmut Schmidt
aligned their stances at the
weekend when Britain's bid for
"a fairer deal" was discussed.
The British belief is that the
French and West Germans
mean to play the talks long and
cool without regard for any
sort of deadline.
Tactically, as seen here, the
Paris-Bonn aim would be to
stall until a new British
election shows if Prime
Minister Harold Wilson's
Socialists can transform their


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Who Needs It?
Nations need it, to govern aright
Buildings need it to establish a purpose
Churches need it to reaffirm their stand
Children need it to "rightly divide
the word of truth" the Bible

DEDICATION
WHO NEEDS IT?
YOUR CHILD MORE THAN EVER
NASSAU CHRISTIAN SCHOOLS are
dedicated to providing your child with
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Not just a word, but a life style


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debate on Northern Ireland.
Demands for withdrawing British troops
have increased since a 15-day general strike
forced the resignation of the coalition
government of moderate Protestants and
Roman Catholics in the province last week.
Rees said Prime Minister Harold Wilson's
British government was "firmly against the
view that we should pull out quickly" from
Northern Ireland and "let the two
communities fight it out." (AP)


New premier Rabin



promises peace


YITZHAK RABIN, promis-
ing to work for peace
with the Arabs, replaced Golda
Meir as Premier of Israel
yesterday. The change in
leadership came as Syrian and
Israeli generals announced they
had completed plans for
disengaging their forces on the
Golin Heights.
Rabin won approval in the
Jerusalem Parliament by a vote
of 61 to 51. The balloting,
with five abstentions, was one
of the closest votes of
confidence ever registered for a
new government in Israel.
It followed almost eight
hours of debate over the
52-year-old Rabin's fragile,
peach-oriented coalition
Cabinet.
"Our policy is clear. We
prefer peace to new military


victories, stable peace, a just
peace, an honorable peace, but
not peace at any price," the
retired chief of staff and
former Ambassador to
Washington told Parliament as
it prepared to vote on his
cabinet. In Geneva the
military working group set up
by the Syrian-Israel
disengagement agreement of
last Friday announced all
essential points for its
disengagement plan had been
worked out and it will be
signed tomorrow.
A United Nations
communique, issued on behalf
of the working group, said
agreement had also been
reached "on the modalities for
the exchange of all remaining
prisoners of war and the return
of bodies."
Wounded POWs were


exchanged Saturday.
In Beirut the usually
well-informed digest of news
and opinion, The Arab World,
reported that Secretary of
State Henry Kissinger has sent
secret messages to Israel and
Syria spelling out unwritten
commitments connected with
the Golan agreement.
The journal, without stating
the source for its information,
said the commitments involved
such issues as Palestinian
guerillas, the status of
the buffer zone and satellite
reconnaissance of the
disengagement area.
The messages state that
the United States will
undertake aerial and satellite
reconnaissance of the ceasefire
lines to check on compliance
with the agreement and said
the Soviet Union might carry
out similar reconnaissance if it
wishes.
In 'Algiers the newspaper El
Moujahid said Algeria had
lifted restrictions on oil
shipments to Holland and
Denmark, the last sanctions
held over from the October
Middle East war.
The paper, official
publication of the ruling party,
said the question of oil sales to
the two countries was
discussed by oil exporting
countries during a weekend
meeting.
"The attitude of Holland has
seen a marked evolution which
justified in the eyes of Algeria
and other delegations the
lifting of the embargo toward
this nation as well as that
toward Denmark," 1l
Moujahid said.
In Cairo, Palestinian leaders
met to consider taking part in
the Arab-Israeli peace
conference in Geneva, and
informed sources said they
rejected the idea.
The informants said even
moderates, who had earlier
favoured joining the talks,
"have had second thoughts
about Geneva."


again
fragile hold in power into a
substantial and workable
parliamentary margin.
"These tactics would risk a
crisis not only in Britain but
also in the community," one
senior political authority said.

"On Jan. 1, 1975, new
processes of tariff, tax and
economic harmonization come
into force. If by then Britain
does not have its answers there
will be tremendous pressure on
the government to block those
processes. And if we do so as
we are bound by our party to
do then it will only inject grave
new difficulties into the
community."
Nevertheless Callaghan,
flanked by a second Foreign
Office Minister, Roy
Hattersley, and Trade Minister
Peter Shore, left London
resolved to argue Britain's case
in soft, even gently, style.


1974


Ulster troops to stay


Vancouver
London
Toronto
Montreal
New' York
San Francisco
Los Angeles
Chicago
Miami
Rio
Liabon
Athens
Rome
Paris
Berlin
Amsterdam
Brussels
Madrid
Moscow
Stockholm
Honolulu
Tehran


MIN F
50
52
45
54
52
o5
61
ss
77
63
64
61
63
55
46
57
44
61
s2
54
75
64


MAX
61 cloudy
70 sunny
73 clear
72 cloudy
75 le
61 cear
75 clear
81 cloudy
86 rain
75 cloudy
79 sunny
70 cloudy
81 clear
72 clear
59 cloudy
66 overcast
69 overcast
81 sunny
61 rain
56 cloudy
88 clear
75 clear


Hughes 'wouldn't phone Nixon'


LOS ANGELES A former
key aide to Howard Hughes
says the billionaire recluse
rejected offers to negotiate
personally or by telephone
with either President Nixon or
U.S. Secretary of State Henry
Kissinger on atomic testing in
Nevada.
Robert Maheu, deposed
chief of the Hughes' Nevada
operations, made the statement
during cross-examination in the
four-month trial of his $17.5
million defamation suit against
Hughes. Maheu was not asked
who made the offer of
negotiations with either Nixon
or Kissinger.
Maheu sued Hughes after a
1972 telephone press
conference in which a voice
identified as that of Hughes
sais Maheu "stole me blind."
Attorney Norbert Schlei,
representing Hughes' Summa
Corp., questioned Maheu about
whether he tried to influence
Hughes' thinking on Nevada
atomic testing, which the


billionaire opposed.
"I disagreed with the fact he
would not listen to Presidents
Johnson and Nixon and would
not even talk to Dr. Kissinger,"
Maheu said.
"I disagreed with his tactics,
such as recall movements
against two presidents of the
United States ... and payoffs to
presidents of the United
States."
Earlier, Maheu testified that
Hughes ordered him to offer
$1 million to President
Johnson to halt nuclear testing
in Nevada.
"Isn't it true that the visit to
President Johnson was (to
relay Hughes') proposal to
offer $1 million to the
government for a scientific
examination of the
consequences to human beings
... and that the proposal was
conditioned on a delay in the
testing programme?" Schlei
asked.
"The purpose of the trip was
precisely as I stated it," Maheu


replied.
Schlei said he plans to call
Nadine Henley, personal
secretary to Hughes for 20
years, when he begins to
present the defence case,
probably at the end of this
week.


CHEM)I
.,


-Onmais--

in dash

over
01W














Mr. Onassis
Sell-out threat
ATHENS The future of
Olympic Airways, the Greek
national airline, is in doubt
after a clash between its owner,
multimillionaire Aristotle
Onassis, and the Greek
government, airline sources
reported today.
The sources said the
government has refused
Onassis' terms for sale of fuel
and to loan the airline S10
million to offset its losses over
the past year.
Onassis has threatened to
sell out if his requests are not
met, the sources added.
If Onassis does pull out, the
government is prepared to find
other investors to take over
Olympic, one airline source
said.
The government is to hold a
Cabinet meeting to discuss the
situation. It has declined to
meet Onassis' representatives
and has instead asked him to
come to Athens to discuss the
problem personally. Onassis is
reportedly due here this week.
To offset his losses, the
government has proposed that
Onassis lay off employees, cut
salaries of some of his highly
paid executives and decrease
Olympic's advertising budget,
the airline source said.
Earlier this year Olympic
laid off scores of local
employees, and about 60
non-Greek pilots had their
contracts terminated. (AP)


indicators used to alow
change in the level of lqlid
used in manhutatud4i-
caprolactum, a high (flonmble
chemical used in strenatheflr'
nylon for heavy induttrial uses.
Hundred of fltena,.
policeman and. alisil
workers '- some we
breathing apparatik to guard"
against poisonous fumes -
poked through the debris.
Most of the dead were
believed to be inside the
factory's "area one," which
took the main force of the
blast. Rescue workers were
unable to get near the area
because of the wall of flames
and acrid fumes.
The blast was apparently
near .the plant's control room,
where abott 30 persons would
have been, rescue workers said.
"There was a small bang -
then a huge explosion," said
Lawrence Harry, a processor.
"Everything went as black as
hell. We were blown off our
feet and were wandering
around in a daze. One of our
friends was missing so we went
back inside to get him. There
was nothing working in the
plant. It was just a shell."


....... oy iVtrsue Plant designer Michael Shaw
workers called the worst d the wrs was "c pletel
explosion in Britain since sd the works was "completely
World War II, was officially viecked.
dered a isaste wasofficially Shaw added that the plant -
declared a disaster area. which makes a substance used
The radioactivity threat in the manufacturer of nylon --
came as firefighters said they in the manufacturer of nylon all
were getting to the heart of the employs that only a skeleton
blaze. Police reported that a crew was there on a skeleton
canister containing radioactive ekend thee the
material had exploded and
immediately sent for experts The plant is on the outskirts
with measuring instruments to of the industrial city of
check the danger. Scunthorpe in northern
A spokesman for Nypro said Lincolnshire. Many of its
the most likely source of workers come from
radioactivity would be Scunthorpe, a city of 48,000,
and drive daily to the village of

Sweet toothprice blow


WASHINGTON It cost a


keep a sweet
last year, U.S.
Department

paid a total of
for 3,921,600


lot more to
tooth happy
Commerce
figures show.
Americans
$2,192,000


pounds of chocolates, candy
bars and other confectionery
goods, the department said.*
The amount paid was 8.3
per cent above a year earlier,
largely because of inflation.
the Commerce Department
indicated. It said there was


LONDON The fie from
Britain's worst explosion since
World War II finally burned
itself out today, over 48 hours
after destroying a chemical
plant at Flixborough in
Lincolnshire.
Firemen began dampening
down operations and the
government ordered an official
inquiry into the blast which
left 29 people dead and 105
injured. Damaged was
estimated at more than $140
million.
A threat of dangerous
radioactivity had earlier forced
firefighters and rescue workers
to suspend operations at the
scene.
The disaster struck at the
Nypro (U.K.) Ltd. complex.
Flixborough is a tiny village
in eastern England.
At the height of the inferno
i vast black cloud of poisonous
fumes forced the evacuation of
20,000 persons from
neighboring towns and
villages.
The last 3,000 of these were
allowed to return to their
damaged homes in the villages
nearest to the blast.
But Flixborough itself,
dvttd h wh se


major move by the industry
to a 1-cent casady br.
However, per capital scady
conaunption dpelned. ja W
1973 for the ftf i ttk ,
.4ear to 18.7 pounds e ;
person.

FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2167


lnromiDugh, which has 310
inhabitants.
Tho sound and tremors from
the blast rumbled through the
Lincolnshire countryside. The
blast was heard as far away dS
GOrimby a major fishing port
0. miles, east of Flixborough
And it shattered hundreds of
'windows in surrounding
villages.
"All the injured seem to
come from houses badly hit by
the blast," the spokesman said'.
"There are two who are stll,
unable to tell us who they dr
because of shock."
Dozens of persons ri
surrounding villages reported
lucky escapes. One at Keadby
said he, normally has a
Saturday afternoon nap on the
living room sofa, but this
Saturday had just gone out
when the plant blew up.
Deadly slivers of glass from a
picture window hurtled
through the room, embedding
themselves like daggers in the
sofa and walls. (AP)

Heath trip

helps zoo
LONDON Former Prime
Minister Edward Heath
returned from a trip to China
yesterday to head Conservative
Party speakers in a two-day
emergency debate on Northern
Ireland in the House of
Commons.
The suntanned Tory leader
brought with him good news
for London's zoo: a gift from
the Chinese government of a
panda couple to replace
Chi-Chi who died July 22,
1972.
"I had a very good trip,"
Heath told newsmen. (AP)



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The Tribune Tuesday, June 4, 1974


Eho lritbunt
Nuv.us AmaICmU JuVRE IN VERBA MAC nW
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publilher/Editor 1903- 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Publisher/Editor 1917-1972
Contributitt Editor 1972-
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publiher/Editor 1972-
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Tuesday, June 4, 1974


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
EVERY once in a while I throw in a small war story.
This kind of story never fails to interest readers of this column
... they always ask for more.
There are two kinds of stories ... standing at the extremes of
human experience ... that seem to grip the heart strings. These are
stories about love and war.
Recently I told you a story in which I touched briefly on a
conflict of wills that took place in our battalion in the first world
war between a coloured doctor and the English colonel of the
unit.
Some of my readers have asked me what happened on that
occasion.
I wrote this story some years ago ... long enough for me to
retell it for the benefit of new readers.
********


The colonel's name was Hart but I can't recall the name of
the doctor. I think he came either from British Honduras or
British Guiana (now Guyana). I recall it as an odd sort of name
and so it never sunk into my consciousness.
As I told you in the previous story, the doctor was not happy
because he was the only coloured officer in our unit and at that
time British officers had had little or no experience with
meeting coloured men on equal terms. And so he was given the
cold shoulder in the officers' mess.
We spent the summer months on the French front and during
the winter we were taken to the south of Italy, where the weather
was mild. There we worked as stevedores on the docks.
Un one occasion we were moved into Belgium near the deadly
Ypres front. We were in a location in front of Paeschendale Ridge
where we were under almost constant bombardment from guns
located in the Ridge.
The activities of these guns puzzled the British.
One of the most dangerous spots in this war was with a heavy
_attery. It didn't take long to figure out the location of a gun
placementt and blast it to hell.
S A gunnery officer had some kind of instrument in which he
"caught the flash" of a big gun. With this instrument he could
figure out its exact location and then lay down a barrage from
our side that would quickly put the enemy gun out of action.
But somehow our guns could not silence the German cannon
that went on day after day laying down a barrage for miles
around the Ridge.
The puzzle wasn't solved until the British took this Ridge when
it was found that the Germans had the guns in the Ridge
mounted on a carriage that ran on an underground railway line.
The Ridge was spotted with pill-bozes. A gun would run along
the rail ... pop out of one of these openings ... fire a few shells ....
pop back in and move to another opening before our guns had
figured out the range. By that time the German gun was safely
underground.
The Germans were very clever ... they were always coming up
with sone new play in this deadly game.
This was one of them.
********
We were taken to this spot to speed ammunition to the heavy
guns behind the front line.
Daily ammunition trains rolled into a camouflaged area near
our camp and we had to get the trains unloaded and released
-from this danger spot as quickly as possible.

From the Ridge the Germans seemed able to see almost
everything that was happening for miles around. But somehow
they didn't locate any of the ammunition trains.
The nearest a shell fell to a train was one day we had a brief
rest spell.
Two brothers George and Harry Levy, both Jamaicans -
were in our unit. They looked like Indians. We were friends.
George and I were standing at one end of the train. Harry was
walling casually towards us from the other end of the train when
a heavy shell seemed to fall right on the spot where Harry was
walking.
In that war ... when a shell exploded it usually sent its shrapnel
flying in all directions, covering a radias of about, a hundred
yards. But there were occasions when it struck a type of ground
that could cause it to concentrate its fire in one direction.
There was a great explosion and for a moment the spot where
Harry Levy had been walking was clouded in smoke.
This looked like a direct hit. We didn't expect to find even the
pieces of Harry. But this was his lucky day. When the shell
exploded all the shrapnel was concentrated away from him.
When George and I arrived at the spot Harry was lying
motionless on the edge of a great crater that had been dug in the
ground by the explosion of the shell.
Most certainly Harry must be dead. But we were wrong. Harry
was very much alive. After a few seconds he sprang to his feet,
brushed his clothes.
"Give me a cigarette," he said to George, and he continued
to walk in the direction he was going when he was pra-praed by a
German shell and thrown to the ground.
I saw Harry in New York a few years ago ... still very much
alive and still as calm as a cucumber.
Some of our readers may remember that after my wife and I
toured the West Indies for the first time about 20 years ago we
brought a young boy from Jamaica to stay with us. That was
George's son and his name was Harry too.
His father had not done well in life. He was a steady,
hard working man but he had never landed a good job in Jamaica
where the competition is killing. We brought the boy here so that
he could attend a good school and get some experience in The
7Tibune for a couple of years.
*****ee*
Some of the very old readers of this column may remember
that a young white man strayed into Nassau in the early days of
the war. His name was Sparkman. No one seemed to know where
he came from ... he might have been anything But he was a good
looking chap. I feel that had he returned to the Bahamas after the
war he would have been taken to the bosom of the town's


EDITOR, The Tribune,
Ever so often, the P.L.P.
stretches it's tentacle and
engulfs a victim who, struggle
as he may has as much chance
of escaping as a snowball has of
existing in hell. What is so
amazing about the action of
the P.L.P. government is that
whether you be friend or foe if
you make the cardinal sin of
disagreeing with anything put
forward by them your sentence
is complete annihilation.
The controversy between
ir. Moxey and the Minister of
Tourism, started me thinking
and it brought to remembrance
a story I read in school some
time ago called "The emperor's
new clothes". As near as I can
remember the emperor was a
fairly good ruler as rulers were
in those days, but his one
obsession was clothes, and
since he had the best weavers
in the land at his disposal he
wore the finest there was to be
had and naturally he became
vain.
He ordered his chief weaver
to spin for him the finest silk
the world had ever seen from
which a suit was to be made
for him the emperor, and to
make certain no one saw this
finery beforehand, the
weaver was locked in a room
and the key was kept by the
emperor and he made periodic
visits to see how his new
clothes were progressing. Now
the weaver knew he was unable
to produce what the emperor
wanted, but knowing also the
vanity of the man he decided
to engage in a game of make
believe, and when the emperor
came on his visits he would
show him the sheer silk on his


loom, explaining that the
material was so fine one must
look close to be able to see it.
And of course the emperor
being the emperor didn't wast
to admit that his weaver could
see something that he couldn't
see so he went right along with
the Weaver admiring the
invisible material.
This dialogue went on
between them until the clothes
were finished and tried on,
then a special day was set aside
when the emperor ordered all
his subjects to see his new
clothes. As the emperor
paraded down the main street
his subjects just oh'd and sh'd
as he passed by showing off his
new finery. Then a little child
exclaimed "But mother the
emperor is naked".
Immediately there was a chain
reaction and cries of the
emperor is naked rang out
from the crowd. But it took
the innocence of a little child
to make that gathering admit
to what their eyes were
actually seeing.
There is no intent on my
part to indicate that Mr.
Moxey is an innocent babe,
because in his own words he
admitted that his party was
headed in the wrong direction
as early as 1967 and this being
the case it is my feeling that
Mr. Moxey should have acted
before. I am not going to
elaborate, but I am sure Mr.
Moxey remembers other
groups of men who realized
that their country was headed
in the wrong direction and
tried to do something about it.


government unto itself? Does it.
lie with the backbenchers who
allow themselves to be used as.
a voting machine, oft-time not
knowing what they will be
called upon to support until it
reaches the assembly? Can we
blame the official opposition
because we think they are not
fulfilling their, role? Or can we
simply blame Mr. and Mrs.
Bahamian because of our
selfish attitude, that since it
doesn't affect us personally, we
are not concerned. The
things that are happening in
our country today, we used to
read about in'the foreign press
or watched on T.V. saying it
couldn't happen here. But my
fellow Bahamians they are
happening here and if we are
going to do anything about
them we must all realize that
we are our brothers keeper.
Every so often some one
would ask, "Mr. Humes when
are you going to write another
letter?" you express yourself
so well. This may be true, so


PRAISE FOR POLICE


EDITOR, The Tribune,
Your editorial of May 20
makes no mention at all of
some of the fine work being
done by the Bahamas Police
Force such as their magnificent
efforts in trying to control the
drug traffic in these islands.
The hauls, some of them-
huge, of marijuana on the
out-islands deserves the highest
praise as do the efforts of the
Marine Police and the drug
squad in tracking down the
people involved in this hideous
traffic which would have
contributed further to the
destruction of America
through drug addiction.
Communists don't have to
work so hard when drug
runners are doing the job for
them!
The Police have a difficult
job and deserve the support of
the public and press in every
possible way. They, like the
parents of modern youth, are
battling against the tide of filth,
violence and horror which
flows endlessly from
Hollywood into the cinemas,
seemingly unchecked- and
uncensored. This source, of
subversion and incitement to
crime should be cut off
completely and the youth of


the country should be offered
an alternative to loafing on
street corners by conscription
into a Labour Corps or
Defence Corps which would
work for the betterment of the
Bahamas.
LAW AND ORDER


S.-T


I am also sure that Mr. Moxey
realized that those men were
called 'traitors'just like he, Mr.
Moxey, is being called a traitor
because he dared to speak up
with hope of reversing the
direction in which our country
is headed. I have nothing but
admiration for Mr. Moxey on
the stand he has taken, my
only concern is why it has
taken him so long to see that
his emperor is naked.
Although the present
controversy centres around
emperor Maynard and Jumbey
Village, the emperor at this
stage is fully clothed but is
trying to cover Jumbey Village
with his imaginery finery, but
Babe Moxey is having none of
this, and has voiced his
objections in no uncertain
terms.
I am sure that each of us
would like to blame someone
else for the state of affairs
confronting us today. Does the
blame fall on our ministers
who think every ministry is a


fathers.
He enlisted in one of our units and was with us in Belgium.
One morning just as one of our platoons was preparing to
march off to the railway siding the guns on the Ridge caught
the men in. their sights.
The first volley of shells fell short. The next volley went over
the spot where the men were paraded. Sergeant Sparkman was in
charge of the parade.
"Dismiss the men," someone shouted to him, "and take
cover."
"I wouldn't dismiss the parade if Jesus Christ said so,"
Sparkman shouted back defiantly.
A couple of seconds later a shell fell right in the middle of the
men, many of them were killed and wounded. A Lance Corporal
French, a Jamaican in the medical corps, was awarded the
Military Medal for bravery in moving the dead and wounded that
day.
You have heard the expression that a person has "escaped
danger by the skin of his teeth." That day a Jamaican corporal
escaped death or serious injury by the skin of his so and so.
A piece of shrapnel tore out a tunic pocket, passed down into
his trousers pocket and ripped out the whole front of his
trousers,burning his skin.
That chap did a fancy piece of running that day. I don't think
he was seen again until the next day.
Sparkman? Oh yes, I must tell you about him
When the smoke of the explosion had cleared Sparkman was
seen lying on his back on the ground.
His uniform was immaculate but his head was missing. A large
piece of shrapnel caught him in the neck just above the shoulders
and destroyed his head without trace.
When I saw my ex-service friend George Tinker in Miami
recently we talked about the events of that day.
Our camp was located behind a thick hedge of large trees. It
must have been the perfect camouflage because the German
gunners on the Ridge never located it but they peppered us when
we came out in the open.
I suppose this was as safe a spot as we could be in but for some
reason Colonel Hart decided that we should move out of tents to
some large army huts about a mile away.

You may recall that when the Germans marched on Belgium
the Belgian people opened all the flood-gates that kept the water
back from this low land. A large area of the country was flooded.
This was done in the hope that it might slow down the advance of
the enemy.
The water level around our camp was so high that when we dug
trenches into which to dodge when the area was shelled from the
Ridge, we could not go down more than three feet without
striking water. There was always about a foot of water in these
trenches. Most of us slept in the tents but some of our men
spread a waterproof sheet over a trench-board and floated in the
water all night.
The doctor inspected the area where the huts were located ...
found it flooded with water .. and condemned it as a health
hazard.
Colonel Hart wouldn't listen to him. We were ordered to move.
All day we were moving to the new location ... and all day the
tussle went on between the doctor and the colonel.
Late in the afternoon the colonel lost his nerve ... he knew that
if the men became ill and the doctor reported the cause to the
War Office in London, he would be in trouble.
Just after sunset we were ordered to return to the old camp.
We moved back under cover of darkness.

Suddenly ... late in the night ... all hell broke loose. It sounded
as though the entire Ridge had erupted. All the guns were firing
... and they were concentrating on a target abo'.t a mile away.
The bombardment was kept up for several 1 hours. And then all
was silent again.
Another day dawned on a state of complete ruin but there
were no casualties. The huts in which we were supposed to spend
the night had been completely demolished ... but we were not
there, thanks to the insistence of the coloured West Indian doctor
that that spot was not good for our health ... and he was certainly
right!
I***
The Germans on the Ridge must have watched us through
powerful binoculars while we moved into the huts during the day
... and waited until they felt we were all bedded down for the
night before launching the attack with their big guns.
I think this incident may be accurately described as one of
"the fortunes of war".
n**4***
THOUGHTS FOR TODAY
The worst sorrows in life are not in Its losses and misfortunes,
but its fears:- A.C. BENSON


Our whole social life is in essence but a long, slow striving for
the victory of justice over force:- GALSWORTHY


this is the way I make my
contribution to making this
country of ours a better place
to live in. But let's say I tried
to do so through public
speaking, now that would be a
horse of a different colour, I
may be able to make a living
out of it because I'm sure I'd
be paid to shut up it it was a
situation whereby one couldn't
get up and leave. What I am
trying to point out here is that
all of us have a contribution to
make towards the orderly
development of our country.
I It may mean attending your
party's branch or public
meetings. It may mean joining
in a public demonstration of
.some kind, but the .most
important function is that you
stand up ard be counted in the
fight for the same human rights
and dignity of which we were
supposed to have been
deprived by another segment


Admires stand taken by Moxey


Be a BIG WINNER...Enter the


















---.l ) D D 1C "laB "l-" --' -
S* -. y c.c.








CUTLASS
Complete with 50 H.P. JOHNSON
or FVINRUDE MOTOR TRAILED
(valued at $4,545)


The luxurious interior of this
magnificentORLANDO CLIPPER isthe
result of brilliant styling. It has
anodized metal frame with tempered
shatter-proof glass, full reclining seats.
The hull is time tested and will give
you outstanding performance. There is
no finer boat afloat for the money.
Made by a firm with over 20 years
experience. That's ORLANDO
CLIPPER! What a boat!!



-^UOhn90o
The name means Performance in outboard motors. Top
speed, trolling speed economy, dependability, all the things
you want in an outboard motor, If you want a motor of
mid range size with ski motor speed, you want the
JOHNSON 50 with loop charging for more Horse-Power
with less fuel. Johnson, the one you really need in these
days of fuel crisis.


MAURA LUMBER COMPANY LTD.
PHONE 24001 24101
P. O. Box N-8177, NASSAU


NEWSPAPER


COPIES

AVAILABLE AT


THE TRIBUNE


OFFICE


THIS WEEK


of our pat political life.
This is our counry, ad
although it is ald tat theM
are those who ha v aqM
their own jets in the sveat tb
have to maim qu
departure, the majority of 1s
have nowhere to o, and
things don't improve ooRn Ins
if some of us could go to
Miami we may have to walk.
AUDLEY HUNME
Chipplngham,
May 30, 1974


This Sweet

Moment....


CAPI FlEVEI IT



ON THE WATERFRONT
E. Hay St. at. William St.
TELEPHONE 5-4641
Sittings by appointment please, at your convenience
II~ll lll 1 1 1 1 II Ill I I . .


~gT~S~L;~-';c.
n
~~
.
r


I ` ----. --


Yl~a~WOB~u~r~l~r~-- sgsrsr~pll


I ~I


~JJ,









The Trbune - Tuesdey, June 4, :


SPECIALS


CLONARIS' KUTE KIDDY
MARKET ST.- DR. ESFAKIS BUILDING
TELEPHONE 24264
1) NEW SHIPMENT Of Children's
Italian Upper Leather SHOES Sizes 20-30 Just Arrived.
2) Assorted Styles and Sizes of Children's
Italian and Spanish Upper Leather SANDALS.
3) CLOGS from Germany, Italy and Brazi
in Assorted Styles and Sizes
4) BOYS' and GIRLS' PANTS SETS
Sizes 9 mths No. 7
5) SALE Of LADIES' HAND BAGS '/z PRICE
FOR SAVINGS SHOP AT CLONARIS' KUTE KIDDY


I m


r""m"


b a ^ 1,.,


olive/on your hair

distributed by


BAHAMAS DRUG AGENCY
MOUNT ROYAL AVENUE
P.O.Box 8316 PHONE 56069


What you should know about dandruff.
The skin, like all other parts of your body, is being repaired and
renewed twenty-four hours a day. As new skin cells are formed the
old ones flake off or are washed off without your being aware of it.
However, you do notice these changes on the scalp because of the
heavier oil secretion and hair growth there. Dead skin cells, trapped
by the oil and hair shafts, clump together with more oil and dirt to
form visible scales called dandruff. Everyone has this mild form of
dandruff at sometime or other, and ordinary washing takes care of
it.
How Sabol checks infectious dandruff.
Sabol not only fills the need for a combined antiseptic and cleansing
agent, but actually combines this double action in one chemical a
quarternary ammonium compound. Although Sabol looks and acts
Eke a shampoo, its multipurpose dandrolytic action:
1) kills on contact the bacteria associated with dandruff,
2) relieves itching and burning;
3) dissolves and washes away dandruff scales;
4) leaves the hair lustrous and easy-to-manage.
Mild and non-irritating to the scalp, Sabol is a sparking clear liquid.
It is not oily or greasy, nor will it discolour hair or stain clothing.
With Sabol you need no other soap or shampoo. Used regularly,
Sabol alone will rid your scalp and hair of annoying dandruff and
keep it clean.


TIME IS NElY!

Take advantage of that
One-Day-Service here!
Your eyes examined and
get your glasses the same
day.
Try the New Miracle Lens that becomes a sunglass in the
sun. Call today for an appointment: 2-3910


Oritish erColoil cde o
British Colonial Arcade


TIOS IS THE WAS A GUYI
'No Explanation Neccessary'
Put very simply, we're the
Boutique that's capturing the
fashion market for the
contemporary man.
Displaying simple form and self-
confidence. House of Churchill Ltd.
represents one of the most commanding
men's collections ever to be presented
in the Bahamas. Assuredly European
in concept, yet decidedly Bahamian
in its approach.
'THE ELEGANT"

P. OBoe Of

P. O. Box N-3706 Nassau Bahamas "A


CUSTOM MADE DRAPERIES
Our Custom Draperies are made to fit any area, large
or small. We will make suggestions on how to cover that
difficult window.
We can bring samples and advice into your own home so
that you will be sure to make the right choice.
Call MR. NATHANIF. EDGECOMBE


for free estimate.


c s. Carpet
East Shirley Street,


Guess What!


S11111


Craft tS.
Phone: 3-1993.


OPEN MONDAY FRIDAY 9:00 A \1
SATURDAYS 9:00 A.M. 12:00 P.M.


5:00 P. NM.


FOR OUR CUSTOMERS IN THE SOUTH,

WE HAVE SOME SANDALS
IN TWO COLOURS.

TAN& BROWN


TOMMY'S TEEN-AGE
Phone 34370 Wulff Road


DRESSING A BETTER BAHAMIANI

HWx rWWal S H*S91'*GeMuS.z ES ta* WtFe IEAMM L(X/S6S
6,fTS 'AMO. p* fTePS


May we help you? To Redecorate, Remodel or Renovate your home. If you are thinking of
Painting, why not think of Wallpaper; (it's better-looking and long-lasting). You have Tiles
in mind? Why not think a little about Carpeting. (Eliminates mopping completely, adds a
look and feel of comfort that resilient floor never could).


PRINCE


SRestaurant and Lounge


Now Serving Lunch from 11:00 a.m.
Daily Specials ONLY $1.95
* Bahamian Dishes
*American Dishes
* Sea Food
* Sandwiches
* And your Favourite Cocktail ...
ONLY $1.00
PLENTY OF FREE PARKING


'til 5 00 p.m.






Manager
Friendly Big
A I Cllie


Serving Dinner 5 p.m. Til 1 a.m.
Phone 32077 East Bay at the Foot of Bridge

NASSAU'S LIVELIEST LATE NIGHT SPOT
OPEN EVERY NIGHT
A PLACE ro RESERVATIONS CALL
TO G 2-1808 DRSS CASUA
FOR FUN 2 d F LOO. PRINCE oCORGE nOTEL
Jncn x BAY STRE ET
Jine ins BOX N -. NASSAU, SAHAMAS


Over twelve years experience in the decorating field will enable us to advise you on Style,
Colours and Patterns in all our products: Wall-to-Wall Carpeting, Area Rugs, Custom and
Ready-Made Draperies, Vinyl Wallcovering, Window Shades, Drapery Rods and other
accessories. Interested? Contact NATHANIEL EDGECOMBE at telephone number 3-1993
for an estimate at no obligation. You may be surprised at how much we can help you.


Carpet Crcaft t&.
S1 IAA&I DAQT FcclI


CALL 3-9I3J


OPEN i AM TO S AM


THE PLACE R mDINKING, DANCING
AN tonS a r UN
tUNCH-NOUI-LATI SNACKS -
tINM SAe a ONF o or muIT
ElcATCMN MmA iv
COMIPLaY All CONDIHNOID
DOWNTOWWS ONLY GOURMET
A*UAM A imIAa oosTAURANT


TAKI-OUT IZZA
LAANIHE rAGiTTI


Bl I DAY STREET
X PON 2.-267 9.AM5 2 .9s2


EAST
SHIRLEY
STREET
ge arvcv


Sw i wr NASSAU. m
NASSAU.


STIILEY INI S S...

"At 'ORIENTAL' we
guarantee our quality work.
If you are not satisfied you
don't pay! "That's our
guarantee to you...try us!"


Phone 2-4406/7/8 Shirley St. or 2-2352 Mackey St.
Box N938
__


RIKEDS EREHFES


Phew 5726
All Appliances
Refrigerators Dryers
Stoves Air Conditioners
Freezers Ice Makers
Washers Water Coolers
DishWashers


SALE & SERVICE
FACTORY TRAINED MECHANICS
FSORCMP
hoo fle(voylrdbt


SP
STYLI

Sm


IV"


S OLIVE ON
Your Hair

Distrlbulted by
YIert M III


MOUNT ROYAL AVE.
P. O. Box 8316 PHONE S6


e YOUNGEMSS
T 8. NEAR SAY TRET
S-uFl.mumuim nn.


ring and Summer 197

asaa s.O a SsetT
^"as uowrIRcr wl* m15 CU T wE mss ma
Mgt =O %'W N UO WM G o MAID Au cowNI m
Kr no mot o cSS 0 a" m a n wm O "a

- noN IU8MM a sOm rn mm rYan sme Ut
c me ae a r. ar in an rm -m o-as T *e
Vam "M A MUM OUSr MK0f %g*"UU rca.. j*T
eatCW -o THO itl l lyaiMt YWiDiSUil bM.II. M
INCE TO 1tUWTANDRKVC AND T*Olm

JIl_ OOMAIIFAL
*--rI l-- IIMIIOMAIOMY~nIlAU


hrm -gdlyay hu1
ni -I-kia kil
SALE!
5.000 Pairs of Pants
Elephant, Bells, Haggles,
Jeans & Low Rise Dashikis,
Inscence, Oils & Beads.
Bring this AD & get $5.00 discount
on 4LL PANTS.


------- ---~ r ------- ,~ .-, ---


I'~ai~~ 'Y II
r
~ci~"



Ptri


ee s


~~ra~t~'




. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..."''- r* *I ,'- .---?'


The Tribune- -. Tuesday, June 4, 174
-B -B.:7 uj "f7


UA WTITY HITS l SERVED
PHIII0 MOD THURSDAY JUNE 6, THRU SUNDAY JUNE 9, 1974.


BAKERITE SNORTENM


W-D GROUND BEEF


VENCATS CURRY POWDER


I COZ


LB.


WINCARRIS TONIC WINE


MII SPARE RIBS


720-ML
BOTTLE


LB


PURILRHUUSL OR
T-BONE STEAK LB 2.49
SIRLOIN STEAK L 2.39
FULL CUT
ROUND STEAK ...........1.89
SIRLOIN TIP ROAST ............
5-12.LB. WD 39
TURKEYS ...... ...... B.79
W-O SMOKED
PICNIC HAMS............................ .79
MELLOW
CRISP BACON ............... 1.29
WO ALL MEAT OR
DINNER FRANKS ....... LB .99
GLADSTONE FARM
WHOLE FRYERS ..... LB .65
CUT UP FRYERS.............. LB .79
FRYER QUARTERS .8....................
COOKED HAM ..................... LB 1.69


~Iil7J&A~OUR DAIRV DESI N 3


SOUTHERN BISCUIT FLOUR


MugJ


. son
PMawrghri


1-LB. MRS. FILBERT'S
WHIPPED BOWL MARGARINE




1-LB. SUPERBRAND
AMERICAN SANDWICH
SLICED CHEESE


HARVEST FRESH


4


ARROW COLD CUPS


80-CT. 9.
Pie.


RICELAND RICE


'S
LB.
BAG


JlMBEY PUNCH


THRIFTY MAID
PINEAPPLE GRAPEFRUIT,
ORANGE, GRAPEFRUIT
APPLE OR FLORIDA PUN4H
DRINKS


460-2.
CAlNS


Vruit]loat.


MORTON'S
APPLE AND CHERRY
PIES


.PK7


LIBBY'S STRAWBERRY,
MAND. ORANGE, RASPBERRY,
PINEAPPLE OR PEACH
FRUIT FLOAT


wI BiIii4IIy
..** *r**
"" '


'30
ow

P Z
I


GREEN GIANT PEAS,
NIBLETS CORN OR
MIXED VEGETABLES
10-02.
PKG. 5


MINUTE MAID FROZEN
REGULAR OR PINK LEMONADE



CANS


8 O. SWANSON'S
POT PIES....


2 FOR .99


9V4-OZ.
CANS


12-0. 99
CANS


VAN CAMPS
PORK AND BEANS


CAMS


BAG ORANGES
8LBs. S69


ONIONS
sus. .69C


DRIVE KIN SIZE
DETERGET


SLIMES
s6m.99C
.::IT'J" V IT


LIBBY'S
CANADA SLICED BEETS


CARROTS.... LB. 3 FOR .79
ELERY. .. HEAD .49


1r ,.
14412.
SANS


- ''


LB.
mCA


EIMCU


T hrif


COCA COLA


6nI.L
1W a
F


PIG.


uSS^
UbbV)
Ubbip~

g&T8
bLUO!A
teETl


II


'
1


dvqi O., .---i-


.'-


~la~ara~saar


W%., ^r 1
A' L











The Tribuna -* Tesday, Ju 4, 1974


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that DUDLEY JONES of Baron
Court E22 Freeport Grand Bahama is applying to the
Minister responslble for Nationality and Citizenship for
registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eiht days from the 27th dayof
May 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. O. Box N-3002,
Nasfau.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that PRINCESS JONES of Eight
Mile Rock Grand Bahama is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration should not be granted
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 27th day of May 1974
to The Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002, Nassau.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that LIVITH PEARSON
HENFIELD of Carib Road, Pyfrom's Addition, New
Providence is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration should not be granted should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 27th day of May 1974 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship
Ministry of Home Affairs P. O. Box N3002, Nassau.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that HILDA IDOLLY JENKINS of
Fortfincastle, Nassau is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration should not be granted should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 27th day of May 1974 to The
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs, P. O. Box N-3002, Nassau.





NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that SILFORD LEWIS of
Governor's Harbour, Eleuthera, Bahamas is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalisation as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalization should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 28th day of
May 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Cftlzenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. O. Box N3002,
Nassau,


Caribbean Health


Ministers meet



here next week


THE Sixth Conference of
Caribbean Health Ministers is
scheduled to meet in Namsu at
the Britannia Beach Hotel,
Paradise Island, from June 10
to 14.
The conference will be
officially opened by His
Excellency the Governor-Gene-
ral, Sir Milo B. Butler. The
opening session will be open to
the public:
The Caribbean Health
Ministers Conference comprises
delegations at ministerial level
from Antigua, Bahamas
Barbados, Bermuda, Belize,
British Virgin Islands,
Dominica, Grenada, Guyana,
Jamaica, Montserrat, St.
Kitts-Nevis-Anguilla, St. Lucia,
St. Vincent, and Trinidad and
Tobago.
The Conference has been
meeting annually since 1969.
The two universities of the
Region, the Pan American
Health Organization and the
World Health Organization will
be represented.
This year observers are
expected from various regional
organizations and countries,
including Surinam, Canada, the
United States and Venezuela.
The conference will discuss:
The establishment of a
model of health-care delivery
at two or three different places
in the Commonwealth
Caribbean Area;

Measures to reduce the cost
of drugs for the people of the
Caribbean. This has been
recognized by Ministers as a
serious problem affecting the
delivery of health care. There
was an investigation of the
problem in the first six weeks
of the year, and Ministers are
to consider the Report;
The health of mothers and
children, with special reference
to a Plan of Action for
preventing diarrhoeal disease
and malnutrition in children
under two years of age. This


Plan of Action was prepared at
a meeting of experts that was
held in St. Vincent in January.
A plan of vigilance against
disease that would foresee and
prevent outbreaks of polio,
typhojd, cholera and other
serious communicable diseases;
this plan emerged from a
Conference of Caribbean
specialists that took place in
Jamaica last month;
The reform of the Dental
Health Services. Up to now
most of the public dental
health services have been
devoted to the mass extraction
of teeth. Ministers are to
consider proposals for carrying
out more educational,
preventive and restorative work
and for the training and
employment of fairly large
numbers of Dental Assistants
for this purpose.
And finally, traffic accidents
have become a serious
community health problem in
nearly all the Caribbean
countries, because they kill and
injure large numbers of young
people. Alcohol is one of the
causes, and the treatment of
the injured requires expensive
high-quality medical services.

The Commonwealth
Caribbean Medical Research
Council has prepared proposals
for the consideration of
Ministers.
TRAWLER BACK
KINGSTON An 80-ton
fishing trawler has returned to
Kingston after experiencing
engine trouble seven weeks
ago. The captain claims the
crew was detained and
harassed by Cuban authorities
during that period. (AP)
TEACHER ROBBED
GEORGETOWN Police
are looking for four men
charged with the robbery of a
schoolmaster near Georgetown.
The men used tW* motorcycles
to escape with $3,500 of the
teacher's payroll. (AP) '' 'b


Come and GET IT !II






The Tribune Tuesday,June 4, 1974


0100


O "


I'


FRIDAY, JNE 7T IS A HOLIDAY
LABOUR DAY-STORE OPEN
THURSDAY TILL 9 PM


4


FPUCS 000 FOM
DESDAY. JIONE
YUUIliiaau iili m a


CORER OF WULFF ANID UAB I
PO, OX N-3m / P E 3-2-74i-


HORMELHAMS EG.


PIrIICHAMS


FULL CUT ROUND STEAK $1 89 L
TOP ROUND STEAK $1.99Ls
SIRLOIN STEAK $2.35Lu
SHOULDER ROAST $1.29 CHUCK STEAK $t.09
CALIFORNIA ROAST $1.19 CHUCH ROAST .97c
ROUND ROAST $2.1S9L
RUMP ROAST $2.29Le
SIRLOIN TIP ROAST $2,38&
NATIVE PORK $1.09LB
FRESH MUTTON .99c L
OSCAR MAYER BOLOGNA12 o. $1.09
OSCAR MAYER LUNCHEON MEAT oz.,.790


MAHATMA tRICE



L SLB A


SAVE 48


NEWZEALANO
LAMB SHOULDER CHOPS


99 LB


BAHAMIAN GROWN
ONIONS

3 .27'


LARGE RED OR GREEN
PEPPERS

4/m99


DANIS SPARE RIBS .870
HORMEL BACON .990


4


ROYALTON
GROUND BEEF



.99!


PINEAPPLES

,Me9


FRYER QUARTERS .850 u
RATH ROL SAUSAGE im pk .79
VALLEYDALE WENERS2 i $2.09


OUART 'q
HELLMANN'S
MAYONNAISE


SAVES


KING SIZE
r PUNCH Eg
DETERGENT


S SAVE4W


TREE TOP
ORANGE SQUASH


CUCUMBERS

4/M99


BUNCH


F sPEnsmR SIZE
COLGATE
TOOTHPASTE


3h SAVE4 40


r 10-1/4oz.
CAMPELL'S
VEGETABLE SOUP


RAINBOW FARM I/2 L. SUMMER COUNTY
EGGS MARGARINE

S88 4/88
DOZ. LARGE SAVE 36


1/2 GAL. SUNNY DEUGHT
ORANGE DRINK

SAVE 44C


HBAYENZf0 O
BABY FOOD


STRAINED


MROSEYE
BROCOLU SPEARS
10.59

*591


FROZEN FOOD


MIRDSEYE4 EARS
CORN ON COB

09!


OIL


S 48 oz.
OLIVANO
' 101


/ REGULAR
POTATOES


5". 9


ROBIN HOOD
FLOUR 5LB.BAG

$1.09
10 oz.
MAXWELL HOUSE COFFEE
HEARTLAND CEREAL i6z.
(WITH COCONUT, RAISIN OR CORN)
SCOTT TOWELS (ALL COLOURS)


PEPI COLA
OUAKER GRITS t u.


SAVE 50C
$2.09 SucED
SAVE IC WHOLE
.65 GRAPI
SAVE OC


THREE STAR 120Z.
CORNED BEEF

*i3LE 30W


) BEETS UBBYS 16OZ.


3/.99


E TOMATOES B&B20oo. 2/.99C
FRUIT JUICE usrs 46-z. .790
A% a LAi.


6/.99 DETERDENT JOY UuIDoKs BIz 1.U
.69. STARKST TUNAsououefrM. ,560
.9.U3 'SAV2me


LAYS POTATO CHPS TMNMK .99 FOX MINTS oz.


UBBYS CATCHUP 200o.


.69V BOSOIIoz.


PUCMASEt15O
1e us 3
II 1500

II ISO
II 25iM1
7l H ttM


.990
.550


.34
44M
.4 "
14MM
124M
141k
4580
aNN0


t 15t mICoS I
SImre..i:
r-LO
-N~h-


, .


$1.IB L


SAVE 265


- ... .. -A-JMU ="iVA .OW o


L~ .-. ~ .. .~ ,~-


rIir


7-1/4 6z,








The Tribune ... T


CHILDREN'S
ART &CRAFT
EXHIBITION
The Ministry of Education
and Culture Annual
Children's Art and Craft
Exhibition will take place on
Sunday June 16 and will
be officially opened at 5
p.m. at the Jumbey Village.
"In keeping with its
philosophy of educating the
whole child, the Ministry of
Education and Culture has
over the past five years
focused extensively on its
Art and Craft Curriculum.
As a result of this, many
gifted youngsters have
had the opportunity to
develop skills in the Visual
and Plastic Arts," a
spokesman said. Educators
today are aware that
education through Art is
one of the fundamentals of
modern education; the
Ministry of Education and
culture has devoted much
time and effort in holding
Annual Exhibitions of
Children's Art and Craft as it
is beneficial to both
youngsters and parents, the
latter discovering a new
dimension in their children's
educational growth, the
spokesman said.
In the schools, the young
artists, inspired by dedicated
teachers have been
extremely productive,
therefore, it is with much
enthusiasm that the Cultural
Affairs Division of the
Ministry of Education and
Culture is presenting this
Exhibition, the spokesman
said.
Of great significance in this
year's exhibit, is the
selection of at least five
pieces of art works in each
category from this
exhibition for inclusion in
the Bahamas National Art
and Craft Exhibition, which
is to be held on July 16 in
the new gallery in the
Jumbey Village. Awards for
this purpose will be made by
the Bahamas National Art
and Craft Exhibition
Committee. A final selection
of 10-20 master-pieces will
be made, and the
award-winning entries will
be sent to an international
exhibition to be staged in
1975.
The dalv schedule of visiting
hours are from 1 p.m. until
10 p.m. The Exhibition
closes on Sunday, June 23.
Circulars giving details of
this year's Ministry of
Education and Culture
Annual Children's Art and
Craft Exhibition have been
sent out to all headteachers
of Ministry of Education
and Culture Primary, Junior
and Senior High Schools and
Independent Schools in New
Providence and the Family
Islands. Heads of Art
Departments have also been
sent entry forms through
their headteachers. Works
are being received up to the
Friday, June 7 deadline.
For further information,
contact Mr. James O. Rolle,
Arts and Crafts
Co-Ordinator, Culture
Affairs Division at the
Ministry of Education and
Culture at telephone 28140,
Extension 155.
WEATHER


WEATHER:
cloudiness with
showers.


Variable
scattered


THE
BAHAMIAN
SUPERMARKETS
If it's value you really want,
you really want Super Value I


SPECIALS GOOD THRU JUNE Oth, eth, 8 h & 9th.
FRIDAY JUNE 7th HOLIDAY


LABOUR DAY


III


1O-oz.


4 I
,dl.I


ay


4e


Ubbyf,
Ubbyl
U&iB


U.S. CHOICE
SHOULDER STEAK
U.S. CHOICE
SRIB ROAST
U.S. CHOICE
; SHOULDER ROAST
U.S. CHOICE
' CHUCK STEAK
U.S. CHOICE
GROUND CHUCK
NEW ZEALAND LAMB
SSHOULDER CHOPS


Per Ib

Per Ib

Per Ib
Per lb

Per lb

Per lb

Per lb


*Ta


$1.39

$2.19


$1.29

$1.19

$1.49


99t


3/71


WINDS: SE 6-12 m.p.h.
SEA: Smooth to slight.
MINIMUM: 70
MAXIMUM: 85.


2/85C


The Admiral
says:
"Go with the
leader...
An Admirall"


See them at your
Admiral
deal's showroom


I I11Shirley Strt
P Box N.4MC
TtLEPHDONE ZnS/5


BIRDSEYE FRENCH
GREEN BEANS
BIRDSEYE MIXED
VEGETABLES


ITIT


LA CHOY CHICKEN
EGG ROLLS
BIRDSEYE
COOL WHIP


., 2/894


10-02.


6-Ooz
6~6oz


9-02.


W^~


MINUTE MAID
ORANGE JUICE


.2/854


W::


95.


" r. ir
.r :'Crl
r~ ~5.
~7. ~ai lu r : '
''
1


7/Ar


=-


39V


FOEf 00! AI'


1I1


j(


C~)JQ
i


y


" ln 0


~C/2L~Z~

~2~7~7~2~~


~~~ r/r ~ J


1~C~j ~


yy IIAII


1


^r/
F A


*Ta























r WEE/


r*


CND/


OSCAR MAYER PURE
BEEF FRANKS
CAROLINA PRIZE
SLICED BACO


SPECIALS GOOD THRU JUNE 5th, 6th & 9*h


FRIDAY, JUNE 7th HOLIDAY
LABOUR DAY


NESTEA kduNEMS E
ICETEA MIX
1/2-oz1


:i


-ljpilf;'


I;


SILVER MIST
FLOUR
10-lb.


SANDWrICH EAT


ROYALTON
, GROUND BEEF


- "-


OSCAR MAYER
COTTO SALAMI


1-lb

8-oz

1-lb

1-lb

1-lb


WYLERS 3-ozPak B.B. 46-oz.
LEMONADE MIX for 99 TOMATO JUICE


GATORADE
ORANGE
LEMON/LIME
HEINZ
HOT DOG & SWEET
RELISH 9%-oz Jars
OPEN PIT
BARBECUE
SAUCE 18-oz Jars


KAL KAN
HORSEMEAT CHICKEN STEW


DOG FOOD 14-oz


CARNATION
INSTANT
BREAKFAST


DORIC
ORANGE
PUNCH 8z 5 for


32-oz 634


$1.29


894


$1.39

$1.39


994


69t


B.B. 10-oz
TOMATO JUICE for39$
AJAX


DETERGENT


AJAX
2for 894 DISHWASHING
LIQUID


MORTIMER BRAND
59$ HEAP OF
POP CORN


Giant 99 t


Giant 894 "


694


2 for 89 JUMBEY
2 forPUNCH 12z. cans 6/99$


WISE
POTATO
6's $1.19 CHIPS 6-oz. bag


990


KRAFT SLICE
AMERICAN CHEESE
SING LFSR 39
12z $10


dvc. u


69$


990


DANICA BRAND
.BUTTER
1v..ih 3 for


HOLLAND GLORY
BABY EDAMS

2b 1I99


^ ~THE
VA BAHAMIAN
SUPERMARKETS
If it's value you really want.
you really want Super Valuel


T y,June 4, 1974


and their husbands for their
support and encouragement
during her term of office.
This was followed by the
election of the officers and
eomnittee for 1974-75. Mrs.
Eire Jones was elected
Vloe-President.
At the close of the meeting
Mrs. Coker, who is leaving the
Bahamas shortly, was
presented with a gift of two
Royal Copenhagen plates,
designed as mementos of the
Bahamas, as a token of
friendship and thanks for all
she had done for the Society.,
DELTEC DIVIDEND
z,* r j' ectars of
i erotlpnal Ltd.*f. iLt
4eclfail a regular q
dmdie l payment of 0.1
entst P share on the ordinaty
Larsi jayable September .
104, 1& holders of nro"d& at
the doie of business August
16, 1974.
Deltec International Ltd. is
engaged principal is.
investtant a"


.L.4.. .


HNI)AY.. INCLUDING OUR



I ALL STORES NOW OPEN ON
I MACK EY & MADEIRA STRF I T
STORE, 7: A.M.- 10 : A.M. I


OSCAR MAYER
ALL MEAT WIENERS


..-. A



taa7:er
Prim Minister Lynden O.
adding and Ms. Pindling will
be in Japan next week where
Mrs. Pladlng will dedicate a
270,000 ton tanker, the
Energy Progress, at the SSK
Shipyard in Sasebo on June 4.
Mrs. Pindling left Nassau
Thursday and the Prime
Minister departed Nassau
Saturday for Tokyo.
During a ten-day stay in the
Par East, Mr. and Mrs. Pindling
will have an opportunity to
gain a tourist's-eye view of
Tokyo, Nikko, Hakoni,
Fukuoka, Kyoto and Osaka.
They will also spend two days
in Hong Kong where the Prine
Minister will he received by the
(;ovemor of the Crown
(olony, His I'xcellency Sir
Murray MacLehose, K.C.M.G.,
M.B.F
The Prime Minister and Mrs.
Pindling will return from Hong
Kong to Nassau, via San
Francisco and Miami, on June
9.
The invitation to christen
the tanker was tendedd to
Mrs. Pindling by Mr. C.V
Tung, principal owner of one
of the largest diversitied HfleCL
in the world container ships.
tankers. bulk carriers and
passenger ships. The C.Y. Tung
Group has its headquarters in
Hong Kong.
CORONA
AGM;
EIRA JONES
ELECTED
THE Annual General
Meeting of the Women's
Corona Society was held
recently in the ballroom at
Government House.
Mrs. Mary Coker, outgoing
Vice-President of the Society,
reported that once again the
Women's Corona had
flourished during the past year,
and that membership now
stood at 170.
The Society had seen some
friends go, including the past
President, Lady Paul, and Lady
Bryce, a founder member of
the Society.
S The monthly meetings had
ranged from coffee mornings
and luncheons to a theatre
party and a film evening. All
were well attended and very
much enjoyed. The weekly
meetings of the group had also
betn successful, with members
improving themselves in tennis,
keep fit, bridge, craft, German,
upholstery, art and first aid.
The major project this year,
a multi-purpose bed for the
Princess Margaret Hospital, had
been ordered and was expected
to arrive at any moment.
The community had also
been assisted in the following
ways: The purchase of a yarn
cutting machine for mop
making in the Blind .School, a
donation for prescription
glasses for family island
children, a donation to the
SBahamas Council for the
Handicapped and a donation to
the Girl Guides camp site fund.
Mr. Coker also listed the
many ways in which members
r of the Society had helped the
community throughout the
- year, from cooking and
knitting to voluntary hospital
service and making tape
recordings for the blind.
Mrs. Coker expressed her
thanks to all the officers and
committee members who had
assisted her during the year.
She also thanked the members


CUT UP FRYERS 19^^^^^^^^^^^^^^


FRQM OUR GROCERY SHELVES


DAIRY DELIGHTS


4


1


~


S~i~i~


%;i


















^pDneotA6(




By Abigail Van Buren
C 1974 W 1 C~lu TribmW.N. Y. New SyW., Inc.
DEAR ABBY: My problem is a very loving husband.
That's the trouble. He's TOO loving. For example, this
morning he drove the kids to school and came back think-
ing I'd drop everything and make the bedroom scene with
him. He often waits around until all the kids are gone, then
he starts getting lovey-dovey when I should be getting my
housework done.
Will you please tell him that the time for romance is
after all the kids are asleep?
Also, he always gets ideas after bowling. Bowling wears
me out, but for him it's an afrodeeshiak [or however you
spell it]. I wouldn't mind if I could sleep the next morning,
but I have to get up to drive the car pool. Am I wrong to
complain? After all, we're not newlyweds. We've been mar-
ried for 17 years. NO BRIDE
DEAR NO BRIDE: The ideal time for romance is when
both parties are in the mood and have nothing else to do,
but unfortunately that's not always possible. I say, shoot
the ducks while they're flying-the housework will keep.
And if the situation were reversed, I'd advise a husband to
do the same.

DEAR ABBY: That answer you gave "Mad at My Hus-
band"-the gal whose husband objected to her wearing a
dress with a plunging neckline-sounded like something out
of the Dark Ages.
You said, "Some husbands don't mind if their wives dress
sexy, but if yours does--don't!"
Abby, you're dead wrong. A woman is entitled to dress
any way she chooses, and no one, including her husband,
has the right to dictate otherwise.
Would your answer have been the same if a man had
written to say that his wife objected to the way HE
dressed? BEEN THERE


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that LAMBERT EBENEZER
'ARTER of Thompson Lane New Providence Bahamas is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any p;er or who knows any reason why
registration should not be granted should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 28th day of May, 1974, to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, Ministry of
Home Affairs, P. O. Box N-3002, Nassau.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that JOHN IAN COCHRAN
CRAIG of Winton Highway Nassau N.P. is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
regi.lraj'-. as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
p-rr..,n oiip knows any reason why registration should not
'br granted should sernd a written and signed statement of
t h facts within twenty-eiqht days from the 4th day of June
1974 to The Minilter responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs P. 0. Box N-3002,
Nassau..


_________________I


Wife has other ideas


on lovey-dovey hubby

DEAR BEEN: You bet your sweet bppy! [More than me
wife wrote to complain because her husband had started
wearing his pants too tight. I advised her, "Tell yoer hs-
band that if he wants to wear the pants in the family, he
should wear 'em a little looser!"]

DEAR ABBY: I am a happy-go-lucky, 25-year-old guy
who is still shook by something that happened to me last
week.
I went, to a newsstand where they sell magazines and
paperback books. I got interested in a magazine and start-
ed to read it. I was standing there maybe 30 or 40 minutes,
reading, when the lady who works there came up and said,
"I think you've been here long enough. Either buy that
magazine or put it back and leave."
Abby, I was so embarrassed I put the magazine back in
the rack and left. A couple of people heard her, and I
really felt cheap. Aren't those magazines put out for people
to look at? I wasn't bothering anyone or making a disturb-
ance. Did that lady have the right to tell me to leave?
RED FACE
DEAR RED: Yes, but she could have done it quietly and
spared you the embarrassment. Leafing through a maga-
zine to decide whether to buy it is one thing-reading it is
something else. Magazines that have been read by half a
dozen people are fairly shopworn and not easy to sell.
DEAR ABBY: To the lady who was 30 and recently
divorced and wanted to know where to go to meet men.
Here's what I did at age 36 and newly divorced:
I called around to all the churches [all denominations]
and got information on all the religious and social gather-
ings the churches sponsored for singles in my age group.
Then I made a list and took turns visiting all the churches.
It took a lot of courage to go to so many strange groups
alone, but it paid off because at the Unitarian church I met
just the man for me. We have been happily married for 15
years. HAPPY IN HOUSTON
DEAR HAPPY: Some people go to church to pray. Oth-
ers go to pray they meet someone. To each his own.
CONFIDENTIAL TO M. P.: Look at it this way. Hyper-
tension is the price you pay for being a race horse instead
of a cow.

Hate to write letters? Send $1 to Abigail Van Buren,
132 Lasky Dr., Beverly Hills, Cal. 90212, for Abby's booklet,
"How to Write Letters for All Occasions."



ARRIVI1) T)IDAY
Bahama Star, I merald Seas.
Flavia from Miami;: ropic
Flyer from West Palm Beach.
SAIL ID OD).'Y: Tropic
llyer for West P'ilm Beach -
TIDES
Iii 7:16 a.m. and 7:35 p.tm.
l.ow 1:12 a.m. and 1:06
.SUN
SUN


Rises 5.20 a.n.
Sets 6:55 p.m.
MOON
Rises (6:58 p.m.
Sets 4 57 a.m.
Full Moon 5 10 p.m.


throughout the day

at work and play


Zal is the best antiseptic
for my patients I think


and of course I always

disinfect my home with Zal


PIE ANTISEPTIC DISINFECTANT


Distributed throughout the Bahamas by

THE GENERAL AGENCY LIMITED

P. 0. Box 5276 Nassau


ITheITI!bIneIII I TuildiyilJuneI4, IRI


BE COOL & COMFORTABLE THIS SUMMER


BUY AN


AMANA AR COITIONER








MODEL BTU PRICE
6 P-2ANM 6,000 $290.00
109-2J 9,000" $356.00
215-3N 15,300 $453.00
218-3N 18,000 $490.00
624-3J 24,000 $600.00



COOLING ONLY -
CALL US FOR PRICES ON HEAT & COOL MODELS

ALL INSTALLATION COSTS ARE EXTRA.

FACTORY GUARANTEE ON ALL UNITS.


DON'T DELAY- DO TODAY.


TAYUOR IUSTEES LIMITED.

P.O.BOX 4806 PHONE 28941-5


_0 _The Trtwas - Tuesday. June 4, 1974


- --.. -- --.. - I --- -


i


.0'L A A I jwppw_..I j'k 'm.; jj '411 J AL 7 lop k I'I


S
~ibl'I







Te Trbu ... TuedayJ, Jun4, 1974






ROUaDa mEsmroo SPECIALS i


Campbell's Pork & Beans 16 oz.
Maxwell House Instant Coffee 10 oz.
Three Star Corned Beef
. Joy Liquid
Pepsi Cola 7 Tins For
Pinesol 28 oz.
Amuri Rice 5 lb.
Native Onions 3 lb.
Milkmaid Condensed Milk
Dr. Ballard Chicken Dog Food.


43c
$2.65
$1.38
$1.25
99c
$1.29
$2.85
45c
32c
Tin 25c


U.S. SPARE RIBS Ib. $1.25

SU.S. PORK LOIN ROAST
lb. $1.29

VALLEYDALE PICNIC HAMS
lb. 750
FRESH BROILING CHICKENS
L lb. 79C


OPEN JUNE 7th. (LABOUR


U.S. CHOICE
TOP ROUND STEAK


DAY)


l. $2.15


U.S. CHOICE
BOTTOM ROUND ROAST lb. $2.09


U.S. CHOICE
SIRLOIN TIP ROAST


U.S. CHOICE
SIRLOIN STEAK


Uncle Ben's Rice 10 Ib. Pkge.
Silver Mist Flour 5 Ib. Pkge
Daytime Pampers 30's
Blanco Bleach (Gals.)
Cracker Jack 6 Pkges for
Kelloggs Corn Flakes 12 oz.
Bakerite Shortening 3 Ib. Can
Bahamian Grown Onions 3 Ib. Bags
Red Delicious Apples 3 Ib. Cello Bags
Fresh Juice Oranges 5 Ib. Bags
Fresh Florida Citrus Punch % Gals.


Centreville

Food Market
6th Terrace East P.O. Box 5714 Phone 5-8106
Store Hours Monday to Thursday 8 a.m. 8:30 p.m.


Fri. & Sat. 8 a.m.- 9 p.m.
Sun. 8 a.m. 10 a.m.


lb. $2.25

Ib. S2.39


$4.45
$1.23
$2.95
99c
85c
56c
$1.69
49c
$1.49
$1.19
$1.29


PINDER'S FOOD MARKET MAXWELL HOUSE COFFEE
Phone 2430............ Montrose Avenue (Regular Ground & Electric Prk
*-----SPECIALS 5th TO Sth'----im --mm 1*b.*tin*


OPEN SUNDAY MORNING 8 10 a.m.


U.S. CHOICE
ROUND ROAST
U.S. CHOICE
CHUCK ROAST
U.S. CHOICE
ROUND STEAK
FRESH
GROUND HAMBURGER
WHOLE CHICKENS

CUT UP FRYERS


lb. $2.29

lb. 99C

lb. $1.99

b. $1.19
lb. 89C

lb. 89C


Fresh Oranges
Robin Hood Flour
Sawyer's Pigeon Pas .
LOUISIANA HOT SAUCE


$1.05 per dozen
5 lb pkg. $1.09 pkg.
(303) 2 for 90c
6 ozs. 2 for 55c


TANG ASSORTED FLAVORS
18oz.jar $1.36
Kool Aid (Assorted Flavours) 3% ozs. 2 for 30c
Gain Meal Dog Food 5 Ib pkg. $1.80


MADEIRA FOOD STORE
I PHONE 24524 P. 0. BOX 6143


KRAFT
MACARONI DINNER
BAMA TTER
PEANUT BUTTER


JOY LIQUID


GAIN DETERGENT


BAMA
MAYONNAISE


7 oz 45C

18 oz $1.20

King Size $1.25

Giant $1.10

ots $1.30


SAWYER'S
WHOLE TOMATOES


20oz. 500

20 oz. 50U


BLUE CHEER


NASSAU PORTION CONTROL
Phone 23237 Ext6 CENTRE 5th Terrace Cetreville


61bs. $6.25


HOT DOGS

BOLOGNA


GOGGLE EYE FISH

TURTLE MEAT


CONCH


HAMBURGER


PCRK CHOPENDS


lb.85'


51b.*3.50

51b. $6.50

51b.$5.00

51bs. $500


10 lbs. '9.00


HARDING' S

FOOD MARKET


P.O. Box 5290 ES


Phone 2-3067


Pepsi 5 tins
Blanco Bleach Gallon
Punch Detergent Large 3 pkgs.
Mahatma Rice 10 Ibs.
Carnation Cream Large 3 Tins
Campbell's Veg. Soup 3 Tins
Cana Corn On Cob 4 Ears
Libby's Sweet Peas 303
Tropi-Cal-Lo Orange Drink 64 ozs.
Delsy Tissue 2 Rolls
Hellmann's Mayonnaise Qts.


99c
95c
$4.60
.99c
.89c
83c.
.45c
73c
59c.
$1.59


Onions 3 Ibs,
Potatoes 5 Ibs.
Zest Soap Large 3 Bars
Colgate Tooth Paste Large
Olivano Oil Gallon


PORK CHOPS
PICNIC NAS IWhdell
BOLOGNA Siced
SPARE RIBS
LANMB SNLIER
FRESNl TTON
LEAN STEWIC BEEF
U.S. CIOIE IINl STEAl
PORK CHPS


SPAKE MlS
STEVINI BEEF
LABI SMLIlE
SALT BEEF


78c
$1.46
.99C
7.75
$5.75


lb. $1.25
k. 75t

lb. 3
Il. 33t



10 H ti
1 I. $1.16
Si. $.3

II k. $131.4
flk. 213

1 its. $.


(I""'
--k..


SHIRLEY : .

EPS CIAL'S FOR JUNE 5th 9th I


421. LAOB Lo1 CHOPS l. SUI,
N. LAMB SHOULDER lb. 990


%Fl %a I V k till- Cr lII


W


f








The Tribune Tuesday, Jun 4, 1t74


THE FIRST STEP














L ..



*%

When baby takes his first step, it's not
too soon for you to think about his
future. And that first step towards
establishing an education fund can be
difficult. Unless you let us help you.

We'll show you how to save: so little
Billy (or Barbara!) can become a
teacher, a lawyer, a doctor, an
engineer-the career best suited to his
abilities and the development of the
Bahamas . .

Come in and talk to us.
At FinCo, we can make that first step
easy.

(You don't want the Moneybug

to eat up his future, do you?l)

FINANCE CORPORATION
OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED
TRINITY PLACE & ROBINSON ROAD
The Bahamas' Oldest and Strongest Savings
and Loan Association
P.O. BOX N3038, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, PHONE 2-4822-6


P.O. BOX F29 FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, PHONE 2-896
MEMBER OF THE RoyW ST GROUP OF COMPANIES


EXUMA

STUDENTS

VISIT

SIR MILO
SCHOOL students from
the Forest, Exuma, who are
currently in Nassau, paid a
visit to Government House
recently and were met by
Governor-General Sir Milo B.
Butler and by their
representative, the Hon.
Livingstone N. Coakley,
Minister of Education and
Culture. The group is shown
above at Government House.
Bahamas Information
Services Photo by Howard
G lass.

FAMILY PLANNING
C(STRRI!S I he St. Lucia
Planiiing Association wants to
begin a survey on family
planning on the island. An
association spokesman says
three University of West Indies
officials are now in St. Lucia
preparing the ground work for
tile survey.









ABBEY

INTERNATIONAL


Ansul


Alcoholism here


rated 'very high'



in Carib study

By Priscilla Nieves
Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas The rate of alcoholism varies
tremendously in the Caribbean, according to a psychiatric


consultant from Barbados.
The rates vary from very
high ones in the Bahamas to
what may be the lowest rate in
Jamaica, according to Dr.
Patricia Bannister, a
consultant at the Barbados
Mental Hospital.
Dr. Bannister was a speaker
at the First Annual Caribbean
Institute of Alcoholism. The
weeklong Institute was being
held at the College of the
Virgin Islands.
Dr. Bannister said Friday
that about 40 to 50 per cent of
all male patients admitted to
the mental hospital in the
Bahamas have alcohol-related
problems.
This contrasts with a rate
estimated at a fraction of one
per cent in Jamaica, she said.
Martinique is rated as high,
and Trinidad and Barbados
have low rates of Alcoholism.
The Virgin Islands is rated as
fairly high, she said.
Dr. Bannister, who is in
charge of psychiatric services in
Barbados' Queen Elizabeth
Hospital, attributed the overall
high range of alcoholism to
several factors.
She cited low self-seteem as
one factor.


Display

contest

winner
The month of April was
designated Don Q Month at
the retail stores of Bahamas
Blenders. Special merchandis-
ing emphasis was placed on
the product, including a


a


Sentry 20
Designed for heavy hazards
the SENTRY 20 pound unit
provides the extra margin of
safety necessary to combat
large, intense fires.

Designed for heavier hazards.
The SENTRY 10 pound unit
puts out more than twice as
much fire as the SENTRY 6.


Designed for light hazards.
The SENTRY 6 pound unit
makes even te most
Inexperienced operator
an effective fire fighter.


BAHAMAS INDUSTRIAL GASES LIMITED


Box N- 4688


Phone 36441/2


Sentry 6 "We Service What We Se/ll


"This seems to be the case in
the Bahamas where until
recently Bahamian men could
only be car drivers and bus
boys. If you can't manipulate
your own world, you will use
alcohol to manipulate
yourself," she said.
The cost of alcoholism has
been shown to be directly
related to the incidence of
cirrhosis of the liver or other
alcohol-related infirmities, she
said.
Prices for alcohol in the
Caribbean are quite low, she
noted.
The problem is even greater
in a country where there is
much disposable income and
the cost is low.
Dr. Bannister said there is no
problem in the Caribbean with
alcoholism in women. "Older
women usually care for the
children and younger women
work to support them," she
said. "They are discriminated
against, overworked and
frustrated but they don't have
much time and they are
usefully employed."
"In addition, a drunk
woman is more looked down
upon," Dr. Bannister said. (AP)


display contest among the
outlets. First place winner
was Robertson & Symonette
(Wines & Spirits) Ltd., in the
Out Island Traders Building.
Lawrence Burnside (left),
manager of the store, is
pictured receiving his cheque
prize from Francis Bain,
manager of Bahamas Blenders
retail outlets.


P. O. BOX N-816S


Your Authorised Chevrolet Dealer

flkau Vflo C~fmipay eJLid
"Where after-saes service Is a pleasure"
"QUA ITY and SER VICE"
SHIRLEY STREET TELEPHONE: 2-4626/7/8


; SkIywa on Mhebl
%- inl)tmis


SFor maxinum control, front wheels swivel Available exclusively on Skyway case
while rear wheels track.
Just grab the handle and it follows you anywhere
Durable nylon rollers work well on any surface-even carpet,
escalators, cement or grating.




BAY STREET NASSAU


. . ... ........... =M M .


Friday, May 31st, 1974


.__ __~__I~_ ___ __ _~___


I.










I











The Tribune ... Tuesday, Juna 4, 1974


'93


Mr and Mrs. Hns
Hans sees brother's Gro nioffd pubier
Groenhoff with publisher
Si Walter Zuei at Hanover Air
book published Show


A new book, "Groenhoff,
The Golden Years of German
Gliding" made its debut at the
Hanover (Germany) Air Show
earlier this month.
The book deals with the
achievements of the late famed


German pilot, Gunther
Groenhoff, pioneer in gliding
in the 1930's and holder of
several world records. These
years were known as the
"golden years of gliding in
Germany."
Part of the generously


I tA, a ,2J11aJma ,,


illustrated volume also deals
with Gunther's brother, Hans,
who introduced him to the
sport of gliding and who has
been prominent in aviation
throughout his colourf'il
career.
Hans Groenhoff, aviation
advisor to the Ministry of
Tourism, was present at the
show to talk to the press and
autograph copies of the book.
Mr. and Mrs. Hans
Groenhoff returned to Nassau
from their European trip this
week.


A-Sue housing



fits the bill

By Dale Saunders
The Prime thing for any person is to have his own home,
declared Prime Minister Lynden Pindling on Friday at the official
opening of the National Women's Movement's three model homes
in Yellow Elder Gardens.
This is the first time a-sue have running water and other
has been used for a housing facilities, he noted. Even if this
project and as it has been project does not get further,
successfully used for individual the idea has already been
homes, there is no reason why successful. These ladies are to
it cannot be successful with be congratulated, said the
collective homes, he said. Prime Minister. "they've done


He observed that a-sue has
been applied by taxi drivers
and straw workers for years,
and that draws (from the a-sue)
have bought cars, houses and
furniture.
The NWM's housing plan is
more than an idea, he said.
They have completed these
homes and it shows what can
be done. It appears it would
certainly fit the needs of
people in the low-income
bracket.
Many people over the years
have been trying to build


it and we haven't."

A person in the $50-a-week
rent bracket would not be
interested in this type of
house. 'This is not for you",
he said. "This is for the masses
in the country."
He felt that one of the
practical difficulties with such
a scheme is that bankers rather
deal with one loan for $50,000
than five loans for $10,000.
However, he thought the NWM
must have planned to deal with
this difficulty.
Cautioning his listeners, he
said "don't put down a
down-payment and then think
that I'm going to to finish
paying for it. Oh no! Consider
now what your position is -
the whole thing could be put
back 1,000 steps if we don't
live up too our obligations."
Fortunately, he said,
Bahamian women have a
reputation for living up to their
responsibilities. The straw
workers have accomplished
more than many other groups
in the country.
"What worries me,"
exclaimed the Prime Minister,
"is our men. If we could
manage to put down less "Big
Chief," we might be able to
meet our obligations.


CheLegend

of Boggy

Creek RE:
A TRUE STORY
ColbrbyTECoHCOR Fdlm mTECHNISCOPE
b~Ilm mimllll


U



w)~Q
'a


UPPER: Senator Dr. Doris
Johnson, leader of the
National Women's Movement.
addresses guests at the official
opening of the Movement's
a-sue financed low-cost
housing project on Blue Hill

blocks is that 'lil tast.' Don't
have too many one time."
Sen. Dr. Doris Johnson said
there are now about 400
persons in the NWM a-sue.
Women in this country have
done many things, but she
didn't think there were any
builders. There were not many
who could sit down and talk
with bankers about building
1,000 homes. "I'm sure we're
the first to do it." she said.


upens I p.m. knows start a:20
CHILDREN UNDER 12 FREE!
See 2 features late as 10:05
Final Nite! *
'MADIIOUSI:" 8:20 & 11:40
"BAT PEOPLE" 10:05 only
Vincent Price
r,- ., in the


Restaurant Temporarily closed


Road. Prime Minister Lynden
Pindling, who also spoke at
the opening, and former
premier Sir Roland
Symonette are pictured
seated at right.
LOWER: One of the
NWM's model homes.


STARTS WEDNESDAY
Matinee 3:00 & 5:00, Evening 9:00-'Phone 2-1004, 2-1

"THE CHINESE HERCULES" PG.
Starring
YANG SZE
Reservations not claimed by 8:45 will be sold.


Wednesday & Thursday
Matinee Starts at 1:15
Evening 8:30
"FRIENDS OF EDDIE
COYLE" R.
Robert Mitchum
Peter Boyle
PLUS
"A FISTFUL OF
DYNAMITE" PG.
James Coburn, Rod Steiger
No one under 18 admitted.


Now thru Thursday
Continuous Showings
from 3:00
"WILLIE DYNAMITE" R
Roscoe Orman
Diana Sands
PLUS
"HIT" R.
Billy Dee Williams
Richard Proyor
No one under 18 admitted.


NOW THRU THURSDAY
Matinee Continuous from 2:15, Evening 8:30
-'Phone 3-4666
"THE WRESTLING QUEEN" PG.
Starring
VIVIAN VACHON COWBOY BILL WATTS
Plus!
"WONDER WOMEN" PG


I[


.
.'-_- :'.
. 'v-


--


IZ~f


~8E~ ~L~:
*ID*B~S~ ~B~O~


JAL


...:..a













The Tribune - Tuesday, Jun 4, 1974


REAL ESTATE


C14794
A TWO BEDROOM stone
house equipped with electricity
and plumbing on average size
Int in Coconut Grove. Price
$16,000.00. Contact Bill's Real
Estate 23921.
C 14589
BUY A LOT
In EASTWOOD or
WINTON MEADOWS
Call Frank Carey
at 27667 or 24815
FRANK CAREY
REAL ESTATE
Box N4764
Bay & Deveaux Streets
C14713
Large hilltop split-level
residence on spacious grounds
in Eastern District, a short
walk to the sea. Three
bedrooms, two baths, living
room, separate dining room,
porch, etc., garage. Apartment
with separate entrance on
ground floor. $80,000
furnished.
Beautifully situated hilltop
residence off Village Road
together with garage
apartment. Three bedrooms,
living room, separate dining
room, study, porch, patio, etc.,
two-ar garage. Apartment
contains separate bedroom,
living-dining, etc. $65,000
furnished.
Delightful three-bedroom
sea-view apartment Cable
Beach $85,000 furnished.
H. G. CHRISTIE LTD. Phone
21041/2/3/4.
C14716
BEAUTIFUL homesite locate
in Montagu Heights off Village
Road, available for your future
home. Phone 5-8512.

C14800
3 bedroom 2 bathroom well
built home, Harmony Hill off
Village Road. Spacious living
room, separate dining room,
T.V. Room, Porch and lovely
patio. 2 car garage with
apartment above. $65,000
furnished.
3 bedroom 2 bathroom home
spacious, off Village Road
$46.000 unfurnished.
2 bedroom 2 bathroom
spacious condominium,
Prospect Ridge, swimming pool
and lovely garden. For quick
sale $30,500 furnished.
Contact: MCPHERSON &
BROWN REAL ESTATE
11 Charlotte Street
Phone 2-2680, 2-2683.
C14803
FOR SALE
Approx. 50 ACRES PRIME
PROPERTY JFK DRIVE
ripe for development.
Approx. 5 acres plus BEER
PLANT, MACHINERY, with
453 ft. frontage on JFK Drive.
Bldg Al condition with approx.
22,500 sq. feet.
ACREAGE OUT EAST -
prime development property.
Good future appreciation
BAY STREET LOCATIONS
ideal for business, shopping
centre, hotel or condominiums.
OUT EAST houses on the
waterfrontage.
HILLTOP estate with
swimming pool and 2 acres of
grounds views of sea, loaded
with fruit trees. Price upon
inquiry.
HILLTOP 2-storey could be
5 bedrooms 31/, baths,
furnished. Good income
property. Views of Sea, lights
to Sea.
HILLTOP approx. 1'i acres
gorgeous views split level
3 bedrooms 3 baths, extra
spacious sitting, separate
dining. Tiled floors hiqh
ceilings patio. Loaded with
Citrus. Only $110,000.00 We
have others Out East as
low as $60,000.00 and ,io.
Residential lots high and dry
facing Sea only $16,000.00.
OUT WEST one block from
Sandy Bear h appiox. 12,00C
sq. ft. Asking $9,999.0 Views
close t3 town and Golflinks.
hotels
VILLAGE ROAD area 3
bedooms 3 baths, plus 2 cdi
garage, furnished 100 by i60
enclosed grounds delightful
old Bahamian house. Only
$70,000.00. Othei houses as
low as $45,000.00.
DIAL DAMIANOS FOR
ACTION 22033. 22305,
22307, 41197.
C14736
FOR SALE.
ONE LOT HIGHLAND
PARK. Phone 3-4099.


C14/49
SPACIOUS three bedroom, 2
bath home Seabreeze Estates.
Tastefully furnished,
air conditioned, living and
dining area, large modern
kitchen, wall to wall carpet,
carport and laundry, 2 large
patios. Phone 4-2867 9:30 a.m.
to 10p.m. daily.
C14773
START building your house
anytime at YAMACRAW
BEACH ESTATES. 70 x 100
lots. From $5800. Only $75
down. Beach and lake rights.
Tel: 4-1141 or 2-4148 or
2-3027 Morley & O'Brien Real
Estate (BREA Brokers).

48 FOR RENT

2 BEDROOM unfurnished
house -- Chippingham Call
3-5900.


SECTION


C14725
NASSAU HILLCREST
TOWERS
Swimming pool, sun terrace.
laundry facilities, fully
furnished 1 3-bedroom
apartment. Contact /-8421 Or
2. Evening. 7-7065.
C14760
1 2-bedroom and 1 1-bedroom
apartment Centreville. Ring
5-8679, ask for Mr. Pritchard.
C14735
LARGE spacious 3 bedroc.ms
(ail aiconditioned) 3 hath
fully furnished, hilltop house
Danottage Estate. Must see to
appreciate. $700 per month
including light and water.
Telephone 2-3713, 5-9322 or
3-1671.
C14743
NEW luxurious 2 bedroom
apartment, fully furnished,
magnificent views. Winton
Highway. Phone 2-1631.
C14/b2
CCTTAGES and apartments.
monthly airconditioned,
fully furnished, maid service
available. Lovely garden and
swimming pool. Telephone
31297, 31093.


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS -FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV. TELEPHONE 21986 EXT 5


I S i 1 i i r


FOR RENT


C14718
1972 DODGE AVENGER -
$1500. Contact Dr. Keane
22861 Ext. 264.
-C14810
OWNER leaving Island.
1968 Hillman Imp. $400
O.N.O.. Road-tested. Contact
Rogers, Apt. No. 3, 3id
Terrace, Centreville, 6 p.m. -
7:30 p.m..
C14805
1970 VOLKSWAGEN MINI
BUS. Contact Mr. Lowe or Mr
'Wilson at 7-7035.


MARINE SUPPLIES
C14722
GOOD'BARGAIN
22 ft. V Boat. Sleeps 2, H.P.
160 1.0. Top condition
$4,000. Call 31642 anytime.
C14730
STAMAS, 26ft. inboard/out-
board, 2 160 h.p.
Mercruisers, 2 fishing chairs.
Ready to go. $4,000.00. Phone
3-1273 or P. O. Box 6323 E.S.
CE 11-j94
1969 31 ft. CHRIS-CRAFT
Commander. sleeps six, private
shower, two 230 h.p. engines
with less than 200 hours.
Kitchenette, good condition
Call 24267, 540; 1.

ENTERTAINMENT

C14336

SETTLER'S PUB t INN
Beaumont Arcade, Bay Street
Telephone 5-9739
TWO BANDS NIGHTLY
The Nra-....';.. ,*
The Electric Circle
OPEN TILL 4.00 d.m.


ANNOUNCEMENTS
C14721


C14734
LOVELY 2
airconditioned
Dundas Court,
Addition, Master


bedr3 om
apartment.
Pyfrom's
T.V.ant-nna


and laundry room facilities,
enclosed parking area. For
information call 3-4953 or
5-4258.
C14/bb
3 bedroom, 2 bath house, tully
furnished, Mackey Street.
Contact Car I G. Treco
Contractors. Phone 2-4996,
5-8725.
C 14802
LOVE BEACH COLONY
CLUB
Luxury two bedroom, two
bath, beach apartment on the
ocean. Fully furnished ana
equipped, airconditioned
telephone, wall to wall carpet
dishwasher, laundry facilities
maid service available. Free use
of club facilities, tennis courts
swimming pool, beach


Available for long term rental,
short term rental negotiable.
Call 7-8421-2 Evenings
7-7065.
C14812
3 bedroom 2 bath unfurnished
modern house Sunshine Park,
preferably married couple.
$280 per month. Phone 41657
after 6:00 p.m.
C14813
2 BEDROOM APARTMENT
completely furnished, Blue Hill
Road south one block south of
Soldier Road opposite
McPherson Primaly School
$235 per month. Phone
2-3287.
Lt1414
ATTRACTIVE Resident
furnished house on Breezy Hill
off Village Road 3 bedroom 2
bath large living room, separate
dining room, family room,
Breakfast room, Closed in
garden. Available now. $65C
monthly. Tel. 31273.

FOR SALE OR RENT
C14746
WINTON HIGHWAY
Large 2'., stoey modern house
designed by Ray Nathaniels.
Sea view. 3 bedrooms, maid's
quaiteis, double garage. Guest
apa tment Phone 22776,
42264.

FOR SALE ORLEASE

C 15191
3 bedroom, 2 bath house
Stapledon Gardens. Phone
5-6168 Jfter 6 p.m. or anytime
weekends

FOR SALE
C14717
DRAWING BOARDS anG
ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT
Phone 21041-2-3-4.


C14732
NUMEROUS articles for sale,
Phone 74289 or 53859 after 6
p.m.
C14766
300 Gallon Water Tank and
Plmp t') which Irte attacked-;
bedroom 2 bathroom house
separate garage/storeroom,
separate laundry on lot 100' x
100' Sears Addition Phone
41346 after 6:00 p.m.
Cl4792
BIKES FOR SALE
Two wheeler suit child 5 -
10 ears old. 4-1384.

CARS FOR SALE
C14784
1972 CADILLAC 9 passenger
Limousine $620C 6
passenger $4500. Jim Wardle,
Fort Laud0rdale Florida
305-764-0615.


C14782
1974
miles,
$5,500
3-1203


BARRACUDA, 3000
9 months guarantee.
SPhone 2-2257 -
ask for Ronnie


CARS FOR SALE


I I


C14771
DEGREE MARINE
BIOLOGIST. To supervise
Mariculture Project in Out
Islands. Bahamian preferred.
Applicant must have some
experience or training in
laboratory and field
experimental work in
Mariculture. Reply in
confidence, enclosing resume,
to S.O.A. ISAACS, P. O. Box
N1372, Nassau.
C14796
TWO CIVIL ENGINEERS
Required by Progressive
Bahamian Company. Must have
minimum of 5 years experience
in General Construction, Civil
and Building Engineering
Apply to George Mosko
telephone 22571,22825 for a!
appointment.
C14793
rDOORMAN
PINK PUSSYCAT CLUB.
EXPERIENCE PREFERRED.
MUST BE OVER 6 FEET 2
INCHES TALL. WORK
HOURS 9.30 P.M. UNTIL 4
A.M. 2 REFERENCES
R REQUIRED. CALL IN
AFTER 8 P.M. MR
RICHARn
C14798
MANAGER for Out Island
Hotel. Middle aged male or
female, at least ten years
experience. State salary
requested and experience with
full resume. Reply to: Adv.
C14798, c/o The Tribune, P.
O. Box N-3207, Nassau.

C14797
4 GRADE 1 Furniture and
Cabinet Makers required for
Mosko's Furniture, East
Shirley Street. Telephone
22825, 22571 for an
appointment.
C14809
TWO FARMEHR' to operate a
tarm and live on premises.
Must be prepared to weed and
plant crops. Tel. 2-4894.
HELP WANTED
C14807
LEADING Car Dealer in
Nassau requires a director of
training to train employees in
back shop. Applicant must
have at least 10 years
experience and be able to
initiate company training
programmes for existing and
future models of vehicles.
Please apply in writing, giving
background and references to
P. O. Box N-3006, Nassau.
C15208
JOB TITLE: GENERAL
REPAIRMAN LEADER
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years. Good cement plant
mechanical background.
OUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Direct and work in inspecting,
repairing, replacing, installing
and adjusting and maintaining
all mechanical equipment in a
major producing unit or
assigned area in a cement plant.


DUCKS DEMONSTRATE
For original adhamidn Cail
Styles, and Queen Shell Lamps.
(Armstrong Street between
Shirley and Dowdeswell Street)
Miss Shirlea Deborah Allen
demonstrates a Denim Suit
made at Ducks Demonstration.
C14728
GIFT & GREETING CENTRE
Trinity Place between Market
and Frederick Streets plaques,
banners, spaced out greetings,
books, greeting cards for all
occasions, scented candles.

SCHOOLS
C14772
LEWIS AUTO SCHOOL
Learn to drive with confidence.
Phone 59805 between 7 and
8:30 p.m. or 3-5084 anytime.

C14811
KIDDIESKOOL NURSERY
SCHOOL
Special Summer Programme
for 5 to 8 year olds Telephone
31595.

S!,UmAU I
INNG 1E
C14686


THE BRIDGF iNN
MANAGER
Friendly Big "Al Collie"
Hostess Ms. Penny Kemp
THE BRIDGE INN
NOW SERVING LUNCH
Open 11:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m
Luncheon Special $1.95


Drinks $1.00
Dinnei served 5 p.m. to
Midniqht
FREE PARKING

CRAFTSUPPLIES
C14767
NOW In stock at Bahamian
Paint Supply, Bay Street:-
* Decoupage
* Clear Cast
* Candle Craft
* Tissue Craft
Phone 2-2386. 2-2898.
you believe that
Nobody reads small ads
... you're wrong. You
are reading this aren't
you? Call 2-2768 for
Information n smill or
emr rIl disnlu adsi


LOST


I I


C14786
IMPORTANT books lost i!-
the vicinity of Lilly of the
Valley Corner. Please contact
owner. REWARD offered.


IN MEMORIAL
C14822i


In memory of VIVIAN
MAURA v~o died June 4th 1972

God saw you getting weary,
He did what he thoJght was
best,
He put his loving arms around
you,
And whispered come and rest.
THE FAMILY.

HELP WANTED
C14726
BAHAMIAN Male and Female
who can sew are needed at Joe
The Tailor, K. S. Moses & Son
Bldg. Phone 2-4865.


ANTENNAS
Island TV 2-2618

AUlOMOTIVE
Lucas Batteries
Bay Street Garage 2.2434

BOOKSTORE
The Christian Book
Shop 5-8744

BUSINESS FORMS
Executive
Printers 2-4267/5-4011
CABINET MAKERS
Commonwealth
Furniture 31120

CAMERAS
John Bull 2-4252/3

ENTERTAINMENT
Movies
Film & Equip. Service 2-2157

FLORISTS
ISLAND FLORIST 2-2102
5-5419
GARDEN &
PET SUPPLIES~
Modernistic Garden Pet
Madeira Shop Plaza 2-2868
Nassau Garden & Pet
Montrose Avenue 2-4259

HARDWARE
John S. George 2-8421/6


INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Bahama Cement
Company, Personnel
Department, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport. Grand Bahama.
C14820
U-1I-ICtL ASSITAN1
Experienced typist, shorthand
prefered with some clerical
experience. Salary $6,000 per
year. Apply in person
Wednesday June 5th to Mrs.
Symonette, American
Embassy, Queen Street.

C14824
A BOOKKEEPER/ACCOUNT.
ANT is required for a Private
Bank and Trust Company. The
candidate should be able to
assist the Treasurer in various
accounting functions. Please
wtUli ton P..B Rrx NI7 Un


HELP WANTED


C14744
PHOTOGRAPHIC and
Lithographic Technical
Consultant. Apply in writing to
P. 0. Box N-226, Nassau
Bahamas
C 14818
MAID REQUIRED. Must be
willing to work as directed. Tel
31595.

POSITION WANTED
1


C14778
RESPONSIBLE couple seeks
home or estate to caretake in
exchange for accommodations.
Husband employed but could
easily supervise if required or
arrange maintenance of house,
grounds, etc., when necessary.
References available to
interested parties. Contact:
G.E.F. Box N-854, Nassau.


I NOICE
C14795
Mr. Sidney Nee!y and Mr. P. A.
Strachan are requested tc
contact Bill's Real Estate
I telephone 23921.

TRADE SERVICES
C14761

Piader's Customs
Brokerage Ltd.


Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU BAHAMAS
P. O. BOX N3714
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
PSECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH


S TRADE SERVICES


C14 752
T. V. ANTENNAS
Boosters for homes,
apartments and hotels
SALES AND SERVICES
Call 5-9404
WORLD eO- MUSIC
Mackey Street
C14/b6
FOR YOUR BUILDING
NEEDS AND CRANE HIRE...
see: ISLAND BUILDERS
LIMITED P. 0. Box 6285 ES
Phone 3-1671 3-1672.

C14823


BAHAMAS UPHOLSTERY
Adderley's Additiol
Rebuilding, Repairing, Refinishing
17 years experience
FREE ESTIMATES
Ralph Brown 3-4263


HOUSE PAIN IIlNvt
TO HOME OWNERS
Beautify your home. Painting
inside and out. Lawn
cutting, hedging, cut down
the hush on your land.
EXCELLENT WORK FAIR


Phone: 2-3795, 2-3796 PRICES. Call
2-3797, 2-3798 ;".HAi ,, LE
Airport 7-7434 MANAGEMENT
FREE ESTIMATES Tel. 58256






BUSINESS PROFESSIONAL


DIRECTORY

Save Time



"T


PiOI

SLilst k I t llnti.

I INK NIrNMth *I6


TRADE SERVICES

C14765
MASTER TECHNICIANS
LTD., Mackey Street, your
Whii Ipool distributor offers
refrigerators, washers, dryers,
compactors, freezers, ice
mz.kers, air conditioners and
garbage disposers.With full
warranty on every home
appliance we sell. Service done,
by factory trained mechanics.
Telephone 23713, 5-9322.


C14759
BACKHOE FOR HIRE
Need a septic tank or trenching
done?
Call
CARL G. TRECO
CONTRACTORS LTD. 2-4996
or 5-8725
C1470/
LANDSCAPING AND tor all
your gardening needs mowing,
trimming., hedging, tree felling
and clearing, call 5-7810
LAWNS & HEDGES.


C14806
EDUCATION
"TRAIN FOR HIGH
SALARIED CAREERS"
Let Universal Training
Schools of Miami, Florida
show you the way:
HEAVY EQUIPMENT
OPERATORS
DIESEL MECHANIC
MOTORCYCLE
TECHNICIAN
WELDING
INSURANCE ADJUSTING
MOTEL MANAGEMENT
AIRLINE PERSONNEL
Job replacement available to
all graduate students. For full
information on how YOU can
train for any of the above
Careers, telephone Mr. G.
Kramser or Mr. M. Shefsky at
the British Colonial Hotel
322-3301 on the following
dates: Wed. June 12; Thur.
June 13 and Friday, June
14th.


LAUNDRY
DRY CLEANING


New Oriental
Laundry


2-4406


MEN'S WEAR
Fashionette Ltd. 22376/7
OPTICIANS
Optical Service
Lttd. 2-3910/1
PAPER
Commercial
Paper House 5-9731

PRINTING
Wong's Printing 5-4506
Executive
Printers 2-4267/5-4011
RUBBER STAMPS
Wong's Rubber Stamp 5-4506

SPORTS GOODS
Champion Sport Land 2-1862
TRAVEL
P!nytour: 2-2931/7
R.H. Curry & Co.,2-8681/7
TV REPAIRS
Channel Electronics Ltd.
3-5478
TRUCKING
JOHNSON'S TRUCKING
& LANDSCAPE 5-9574
TYPEWRITER REPAIR


JUNIOR BETHEL 5-1044
To Advertise In
This Drectory UPHOLSTERING
CALL 2-2768 Eddie's Upholstering 5.9713.
I imm Tmm mmI ImmmmmIm.im

SFOR TE ACsTIOu M WANT

I m I mm mm Mnm M l]
Sho-p Nassau Merchants 1


For Business And Services


ANNOUNCEMENTS
SHAWNEE.
Daily Service between West
Palm Beach and West End. For
Reservations call The Grand
Bahama Hotel (Ext. 5).


HELP WANTED
C15206
FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR
WANTED. CONTACT
FREEPORT FLYING CLUB
P. O. BOX F-950, FREEPORT.
C14808
8 MALE KITCHEN
CLEANERS Must be sober,
reliable men willing to work
removing garbage, scrubbing
and mopping. Laziness and
dodging will not be tolerated.
4 KITCHEN PORTERS --
Must be sober reliable workers.
Capable of and willing to do
occasional heavy lifting.
6 DISHWASHERS This
work entails long hours of
standing to load and unload
dishwashing machine.
6 MALE POTWASHERb -
Must be sober and reliable
men. Must be willing to clean
all pots, pans and any other
utensils.
Relative to the foregoing,
police and health certificate is
a must.
Contact Delone Bowe, P. O.
Box F-2623, Freeport, Grand
Bahama or telephone 352-9661
for an interview.
C15210
Ex perienced legal
secretary/bookkeeper, familiar
with preparation of legal
documents, company work,
etc. with speed and accuracy in
both typing and shorthand
capable of keeping complete
set of accounts and preparing
monthly and quarterly
statements.
Bahamians only need apply
Phone Freeport 352-7425 for
appointment.


HELP WANTED
C15200
ELECTRIC MOTOR ANL
ARMATURE REWINDER
Re-winding for single and
phase armatures and motors ur
to 100 H.P. 3 year:
experience -- Bahamian only
GRAND BAHAMA
ENGINEERING LTD., P. O
Box F-2, Tel. 352-6269
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C 15208
JOB TITLE: GENERAL
REPAIRMAN LEADER
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years. Good cement plant
mechanical background.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBI LITIE
Direct and work in inspecting
repairing, replacing, installing
and adjusting and maintaining
all mechanical equipment in a
major producing unit or
assigned area in a cement plant.

INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Bahama Cement
Company, Personnel
Department, P. O. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C 5209
SNAM PROGETTI S.p.A.
(Bahamas Branch) requires the
services of a MECHANICAL
ENGINEER for its project at
the Bahamas Oil Refining
Company site.
Applicant must have at least
five (5, years experience in
sup risingg the mechanical
ercrtions for Refineries, able to
p'nrform duties in accordance
t3 designs and specifications
and able to plan and schedule
'he work of Sub-Contracturs.
Only Bahamians need apply in
writing to:
Personnel Administrator
SNAM PROGETTI S.P.A. P.
Box F-2405 Freeport
Bahamas.


CLASSIFIED


GRAND BAHAMA




CLASSIFIED

IN FREEPORT

TEL. 352-6608


- CdI 1sEXT. 5

2 LI ir llIt 'U


> SAV'TIME SAVEtMi Y


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The Trkmne.. Temly, June 4,174


Af ..- ... ... .. REX MORGAN, M.D.


'TNi IN CREAM RUK RAtN OUTTA AS
W6IN FAlXTOP F1HE ROUSM.


"Another vanilla fudge."


CROSSWORD
PUZZLE
icmt 32. Cordial
flavoring
34. Land measure
1. Choose 35. Hideaway
4. Portent 36. Discourteous
8. Might 37. Pert girt
11. Kiwi 39. Form of
12. Provisions Esperanto
13. Beverage 40. Othello's
14. Tier enemy
16. Portia's 42. Blackjack
confidante 44. Mono-
18. Masterpiece saccharide
20. Filly or foal 47. Tip
21. Morning 50. Work unit
23. Ruminant 51. Leningrad's
25. Search river
28. Black 53. By birth
30. At bat 54. Existed
31. Indirectly 55 Jacob's twin


SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE
56. Acquire 6. Build
7. Roman tyrant
DOWN 8. Bone behind
the ear
1. Globe 9. Classified
2. Blue grass section
3. Flavor 10. Verily
4. About 15. Barrel
5. Human being 17. Misfortunes
ii 5 p i S 19. Grimace
21. Discordant
S i, - 22. Bill of fare
24. Wire service
26. River to the
- Baltic
27. Gambling game
S 29. News
31. Florence's
S river
33. Membership
34. Three-toed
S sloth
9 37. Aaron's brother
S 38. Totem pole
41. Vanished
S e 43. Billie Jean
44. Church bench
S - 45. Generation
-! 46. Space walk
48. Trevino
49. Asian holiday
murs. 6-6 52. Gold symbol


Hkely. Also, warly tagu to
my, even if they ar ea tle h.e atso
ARIES (MU 21 to Apr. 19) s
world today (or exeseent r ots byl
and state your dea; buan theirs.M
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 208 H W1ta tuy
wisely. Pay preying bills, and adV to i; osmt DeI 't
rely on one who thinks he is a bu i l
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Id4ka I toenod a bette
understanding with a partner who is inA d diood ad waatm
own way at aay cost. Bncowage op ieda,
MOON C ILbREN (Juae 22 to up J l) most Eibdit
at work and drive fine benefia. BtutM *p vteity. 8rbe dta
for one who is worthwhile cultivating.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Plea what is best to do that will
bring more happiness in the days id y.abhad in agy a1e a
your life. Show others you try to pieaale tam
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Ues much caution today since
you feel there is little protection around you. Try not to
argue, or you could get into real trouble. Phone a friend.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Do tactfid and you cm solve
problems with good friends. Correct any errors you might hare
made. Don't argue with mate in p.m.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Use practical sen to get rid
of pressures that bother you. Be patient with a partner who is
worried and not trying to be obnoxious.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) You arn't thinking
clearly today, so get advice of higher-up before putting plans,
ideas to work. Show others you care about their welfare.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) Kep promises. Although
you may feel restricted, it is a way to greater success in
disguise. Avoid one who bickers too much.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Don't mix in where some
pal's concern is his own affair, or you get into trouble later.
Make hay with own affairs while the sun shines.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Show kin you will do more
than is expected to assist them. Don't ask for a raise, or you
get into trouble.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY ... he or she will have
many ideas running through this fertile mind and will want to
express self while young anywhere, at any time, so teach early
to be diplomatic instead of so blunt that others resent it, or
many troubles can come into this life. Much of the lifetime
could be spent in foreign countries. Sports are fine here.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


Winning

Bridge
A~ s OR uLo
lor tre Connotiser (Keiae &
Ward 1 25) pree s the reader
with a series of tascinatng proo-
lems, aimole. cearcut. Vet nard
to sOve,
The authors are a.Ce MineAs,
writer, leahier and afdtor
Bridge Maoazine, ean Pad u
Lukac%. surely the greatest -t
single dumnvi problemnotl.
'ere are no complex coum ,
no intricate squeezes. Th reader
will quzcly grasp ere pone .
But how ftamn maw he Zlnd t
hmnelf, beor, e ooalna up the







West leads the ace ad another
e kelution? to an eunolae









Sthe OK. If declared does
West leads the A, ce ad eno uper
hear East follows once. anOW
can douth make certain ot nu
contract ?

dropping the K, ae taeion

declarer eand te a to make le
in the wrong hand.


tricrs! Try 1i. .
South Should lead to e OA,
droppig the OXK, ruff thaer O

n whitc, w not alwta
Whct defender win and
no matter how the canth TOO,
declare e aot faln to make lu
tricks! Try wt.
A adeetbon of brUlaft pOaM
ay famous International take up
the la" cpW ot the boot,
which, U101kh not always
oga s both Stimulating and
tns= uvC


M four better
or m er
i -' ou e
S E from the
i E I Nletter$ Sbown
oere? tn

he uwd once
s1l Il. E ieh
weor muet conlan til e abne
letter, nd there must be at
leoat one eltlt-letter weed In she
list No Nplurai* nofore
TAItORBr1 wre o foaD
to words. Im.od% o,
ceent. on tomorrow.
EBSTBRDAY'1 WL6T]IN :
groin fenfers isa itre e
:re!" f:f.*e .f goer
Kofnr wore rfief .Itoi inl
OFFEBRINO ogre onr oefe
nrelon re. rein rine rIng.


Chess
BY L90MARD BAROI


to








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Lt )r. This lodke ow but




earn 06%uis.j Vidg.-

Chess Solution -
1 .-rU. i ... -- ; 2 z
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we. Izf . x-Ja; 2 Q-417
ch and 3 B aates. I . .
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NO. 7.44 by TIM MlKAY

1. ef n rsrt green
9. Mar lh perhaps.
I'i: 48 wach arch .
II. A ul I )
1,. wuls s 1350~llC. l. (4, ,)
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Ort~urtI^


They work so well together.
Your home air conditioner


and


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Massas eAa ns slS9 I U II S %


PALMDALE --


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16 The Tribune Tuluday, June 4, 1974


ROYALS

MAKE IT

SIX IN

A ROW
AJ.D. ROYALS in taking a
defaulted game from the
Nassau Astros last night pushed
their winning streak to six in a
row while holding third place
in the closely contested junior
league of the Bahamas Baseball
Association.
In the first of what was
scheduled as a weekend double
header, catcher Tyrone Neilly
scored two runs and knocked
in one giving the Royals a 9-7
edge Saturday.
Led from the mound by
Donald Richards, the Royals
squashed a 5-0 setback before
taking the lead 6-5 in the
bottom of the third inning.
Centre fielder Anthony
Neilly in the fourth inning put
the game out of reach when he
connected losing pitcher
Arthur Seymour for a two run
double into centre field.
Backed by good defence, the
Royal shut out the Astros on
two hits over the remaining
three inning.
Donald Burrow who took
the win gave up six hits. He
struck out three and gave up
six walks.

*** *
Defending double champs
Becks Bees won their third in a
row defeating Curferg
Cardinals 9-8 in the final of
Saturday's double header.
Tyrone Gardiner was the
winning pitcher. Andrew Major
took the loss.
VOLLEYBALL
IN KEEPING with the
Bahamas Confederation of
Amateur Sports seasonalization
plans, beginning tomorrow
volleyball action will be played
on Wednesdays, Fridays,
Saturday and Mondays.
Tomorrow, the Wardrobe
Stars and Business Tigers clash
in a battle of the undefeated.
In the first game at 7:30,
Bahamas Commonwealth Bank
play the Ministry of Education.

SOFTBALL
PRESENTATION of awards
will be made tonight at the
John F. Kennedy Park prior to
the first game of the New
Providence Softball
Association's 1974 season.
N. P. champs the Ministry of
Works will tangle with the St.
Michael's Dodgers following
the ceremonies during which
time Mr. George Mackey M.P.,
will declare the series open.


RETIRED heavyweight champ Boston Blackie and his
protege, the newly crowned champ Bob Freeze with their
awards presented by the Caribbean Bottling Company.
Freeze won the title Friday following a split decision over
Baby Boy Rolle.


Engineer


rescues


Indians


DERBY Wicket-keeper
Farrokh Engineer hit his first
century of the English tour
yesterday as the Indian cricket
team won a grim battle for
first-innings lead over
Derbyshire.
After the Indians had lost
five wickets for 114, Engineer
and Ashok Mankad added 158
together and saw their past
Derbyshires total of 270.
The Indians declared at 285
for 7, with a lead of 15.
Engineer made 108 and
Mankad was 66 not out.
Derbyshire made 21 for no
wicket in their second innings
and will start the last day
Tuesday with a lead of six
iuns.
Tony Borrington,
Derbyshire's wicket-keeper
who was making his first-class
debut, took two magnificent
catches in the morning to get
rid of the Indians' opening
pair.
First he flew horizontally
through the air to make a catch
in front of second slip to
dismiss Solkar. Three run later
he again leaped to his right,
taking the ball inches from the
ground to end Naik's innings.
The Indians were then 36
for 2. By lunch they had
progressed to 101 for 3, losing
Gopal Bose.
After lunch fast bowler Alan
Ward rocked the Indians by
dismissing Viswanath and Patel
with successive balls. That
made it 114 for 5.
But then Mankad and
Engineer, batting in contrasting
styles, came to the Indians'
rescue. Mankad plodded along
carefully while Engineer hit
out stylishly, especially on the
leg side.
Engineer's century took 153
minutes. He hit 17 fours before
fedlBa to a catch on the Iseua


leg boundary.
It was whizz-bang stuff again
on Saturday as batsmen hit out
for victory in the one-day
Benson and Hedges cup games.
At Lords, Basil d'Oliveira
slammed 84 off 60 balls to
help Worcestershire beat
Middlesex. With one of his four
sixes he knockedVa tile off the
roof of the famous grandstand
where the figure of Father
Time looks down on the field.
At Hove, Tony Greig and
Peter Graves both hit centuries
for Sussex and together added
167 for the third wicket in
only 38 overs. Cambridge
University were the unhappy
opponents.
South African star Barry
Richards hit 67 in an hour for
Hampshire at Southampton.
Glamorgan could not contain
the onslaught and were
defeated by seven wickets.
Each side is limited to 55
overs batting in the Benson and
Hedges tournament. Sussex
rattled up the biggest total of
the day 280 for 5.
Mike Procter, South African
cricket star, hit 65 not out
Monday and saved
Gloucestershire from collapse
against Leicestershire.
Leicestershire, boosted by
an innings of 105 by Barry
Dudleston, took a first-innings
lead of five runs.
Spin howlers Ray
Illingworth and Jack
Birkenshaw then played havoc
with Gloucestershire, who lost
three wickets for 40 and ended
the day on 129 for 5. But for
the hard-hitting Procter they
would have been in a bad
plight.
Birkenshaw took three
wickets ant Illmgworth two.
The match is the only one
currently in progress in the
PInish country championship.


GARDINER PRESIDENT
VINCE GARDINER was
elected president of the Bain
Town Basketball Club
following a meeting last week.
Drexil Dean is vice
president, Phillip Rolle
secretary, Celestine Wilson
assistant secretary and John
Todd treasurer.
Members of the executive
board are Steve Pinder, Van
Delaney and Bradley Cash.
A meeting for all players is
slated for Friday afternoon (4
o'clock) at Christie Park.

BEST BALL
THE CORAL Harbour Golf
Club will hold a two-ball best
ball tournament beginning
tomorrow afternoon at
2 o'clock. There will be a $2
green fee charge.

TUNA CRISIS

FISHING CLUBS, individual
fishermen and tournament
committees in the Bahamas
and along the Atlantic coast of
the United States have
responded overwhelmingly to
the emergency Atlantic bluefin
tuna situation, initiating
immediate conservation
measures which demonstrate
their concern over the
threatened species.
For the first time since
1939, when the Cat Cay Tuna
Tournament was first held,
emphasis will be placed on
Atlantic bluefin tuna released,
rather than docked.
Eligio (Jo Jo) Del Guercio,
chairman of the tournament
committee, recently
announced that the rules for
this week's tournament have
been modified in the interest
of conservation. -
This year a scoring system
has been devised that will
penalize the angler for any fish
brought ashore unless it is
unusually large, with high
scores given for tuna released
to continue their migration
ntotth.


Prison Officers fall


behindafter bright start


By GlIdstone Thurtto
GIVEN two hours and 45
minutes to make 244 runs, the
Prison Officers fell short by 62
runs with two wickets still
standing by dose of play
ending their two-day match
against St. Agnes in a draw
Sunday at Haynes Oval.
Having taken a 63-run first
innings lead, the Saints added
181 all out 1ithe second.
Led by a team high of 47
from all rounder Garfield
Bralthwaite and 36 more from
Patrick Louison, the P.O.'s
scored at more than a run per
minute in the first hour before
time took control leaving them
at 182 for eight.
St. Agnes, for taking first
innings lead, were awarded six
points. The P.O.'s got two.
In the second innings, the
P.O.'s were successfully on top
of the bowling of openers
Alfred Ingraham and Tyrone
Wilson, the same pair that
caused their collapse on the
first day's play.
Of Ingraham's 16 overs, he
was responsible for three outs
giving up 79 runs. Wilson's 14
overs also produced three outs
for 49 runs.
However, going into the tail
end of the game, St. Agnes'
spinners seemed damaging and,
with eight wickets down and
only 174 runs on the board,
the P.O.'s slowed their game


i -
GARFIELD BRAITHWAITE
Top score
down to a mere eight runs in
the 20 minutes that remained.
Taking advantage of the
Saints' open field, openers
Louison and Ralph Kellman
carried the P.O.'s to 29 when
Kellman was caught behind
wicket. Neville Taylor joined
Louison but he lasted only two
runs.
Braitwaite and Louison
proved to be the determined
pair. They pushed the Officers
to 50 in 45 minutes and six
overs. Louison's inning ended
when Wilson shattered his
stumps with an in swinger.
As Earthlin Miller joined
Braitwaite, the P.O.'s reached
their century in one hour and
15 minutes, before that 58 run
partnership' was broken by


Marlins shatter



Saints run


on five hits. Losing pitcher
Roscoe Hall fanned five
batters, walked two and was
the victim of Bimini's six runs
on six hits.
In the top of the first inning
Del Jane quickly got on the
score board when Eddie Ford
singled to drive in Bradley
Johnson who had walked and
stole second base.
Going into the second frame
trailing by a run, the Marlins
notched the score when
Lonney Ellis doubled down the
left field line and went to third
on an error by the third
baseman John Adderly. Ellis
scored on a sacrifice fly to left
field by Lawrence Rolle.
From the first frame after
the Saints scored their lone


tally they were held in check
by Sheldon Floyd through out
the six remaining frames to
four more hits.
Held scoreless in the third,
the Marlins erupted for five
tallies in the fourth. Catcher
Oriel Rolle double was the key
hit for the five-run splurge.
Sherrick Ellis led off the
fourth with a single and
follower Basil Rolle walked.
With one out Randy Rolle
walked to load the bases.
George Weech was safe on a
miscue as Sherrick crossed the
plate with the tie breaker. Glen
Rolle got second base on a two
base error as two more tallies
scored. With Glen and Weech
on the base paths Oriel Rolle
doubled to left centre plating
the final two runs before the
Marlins were put away.
In the second game played
on Sunday Del Jane Saints
took an early lead over Bimini
Marlins on rbi's by Eddie Ford
and Edmond Moxey that
produced two runs in the top
of the first inning.
Down by a two run deficit
the Marlins came back and
knot the score 2-2 in the
bottom of the second frame.
Lonney Ellis started the
frame with a single and was
join by Lawrence who singled
to put runners on first and
second base.


CARROLLS COME


THROUGH AGAIN
CELLAR dwelling Carrolls _
Food Store recorded their
second victory in 24 played
over the weekend when they
held their own to beat
Heineken Stars 7-4 in the first
of a twinbill at the Queen
Elizabeth Sport Centre.
Glen "Flo" Saunders
received the win and Barry
Carroll was given the set
back. ATTI
In the top of the first
frame Carrolls plated two RETAIL
runs when lead off batter i WHOLE
Marshall Cooper tripled and
scored on a bunt by Edwin .
Newbold who was safe on an
error. TO
Newbold crossed the plate
with the second tally when
Short Stop Charles Moss
doubled to right field. .
In other games played over
the weekend Becks Bees took
two from the Freeport Classic
Bucks, Heineken Stars beat
Jet Set 12-9and the et Set
and Schlitz Beer game was
rained out on Monday night.
The series will continue on I
Wednesday when Citibank I
meet Carrolls in the first A
game sad Heiekens play I
leclu In the niht-cap. L
The top five teams in BBA
Standinla e: -


Del Juam
Bhll~l
chkeak
SDlants
necks


The next batter Sherrick
Ellis tripled sending Lonney
and Lawrence home with the
tying runs.
In Del Jane third John
Adderly singled with one out
and stole second and third
base.
Eddie Ford flied out but
catcher Ed. Moxey drilled
Sterling Wilkinson fast ball
over the left field fence for a
two run blast giving Del Jane a
4-2 lead.
Two singles, and a sacrifice
by Felix Barr that turned into
a two base error culminated
two runs for the Bimini Marlins
in the bottom of the fourth
frame to notch the score for
the second time.
Wardy Ford who came in for
started Billy Gilbert in the
fourth then walked Randy
Rolle interpationallv to nut
runners on tirs and second.
Glen Rolle walked to fill the


spin bowler Delray Whittaker.
Braitwaite mis-played and was
out l.b.w.
At this point the scoring
slowed considerably. Their
following three wickets fell for
34 additional runs.
Seeing this, P.O.'s skipper
Athelston Grazette and Colin
Puckerin decided to play it
safe. They stalled for time.
Prison Officers' 2nd inning.
R. Kellman, ct wkpr, b Wilson 1S
P. Loulson, b Wilson, 36
N. Taylor, run out 2
G. Braitwaite, l.b.w. Whittaker, 47
E. Miler, ct Allan bWilson 19
A. Hnds., l.h.w. Ingraham, 31
T. Ramsawak, ct and h Ingraham 12
C. Foster, ct Rutherford,
b Ingraham 6
A. Grazette, not out 8
C. Iuckerin not out 2
Bowling
0 M R W
A. ngraham 16 1 79 3
T. Wilson 14 3 49 3
G. Shannon 4 0 21 0
D. Whittaker 9 1 29 1
********
The Adventurers Cricket
Club took six points from the-
Western Following a first
inning victory. Their match
ended in a draw.
The Western's in their first
inning were all out for 109.
The Adventurers topped that
by nine runs.
William Delancy bagged four
wickets for 12 runs in six overs
for the Adventurers. Charles
Lunn Jr. took four for 38 in 14
overs for the Westerns.


sacks and Barr scored to break
the tie when Oriel Rolle was
safe on an error by Peter
Bethel.
Leading 5-4 Bimini's
manager player Glen Rolle
brought in Ace hurler Sheldon
Floyd who captured the Saints
over the two remaining frames
as the Marlins went on to score
two more tallies to win the
game 7-4.

Scores
DEL JANE


B. Johnson
J. Adderley
E. Ford
Ed. Moxey
P. Bethel
Anthony Bostwick Dh
S. Wilkinson Dh
B. Ban
B. gilbertt
A. Bowe
H. Riley
i. Wright
J. McPhee


Lions win again

CAPE TOWN The British Lions touring team kept
their unbeaten record here'Saturday when they defeated a
Western Province side 17-8 after leading 11-4 at half time.
It was a very different team and a very different game
from that of last Wednesday when the Lions had a record
97-0 win over a South Western Districts side.
Only two players fromthat team captain Willie John
McBride and the flanker Stewart McKinney were retained
for Saturday's match which was hard but ocean with no
serious injuries.
For the first 20 minutes of the first half the Lions had it
all their own way with tries by Clive Rees and Gordon
Brown. Phil Bennett took the score to 11-0 with a penalty.
Left winger Alan Ead scored a try in each half for West
Province.
Bennett added two penalty goals to the Lions score. (AP)


Won LcAl GB
24 1 -
19 a 3
19 8 3
13 6 5
17 10 5


I] *.' < -