<%BANNER%>
PRIVATE ITEM
Digitization of this item is currently in progress.
The Tribune.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03612
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: May 8, 1974
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03612

Full Text




Ii )


ASAs COLLECT 0tUit REPA1R6
iTIMS IMMCUATELYII .

"V"1^^ C a
BuiMTT ^


.iered thPeetmaster of ahamas. for pse ooesa. within the B.h.... Nassau and B hama Islands Leading Newspaper
VOL. LXXI, No. 139 WedinMday, May 6, 1974. Price: 20Cnts


search


THE BODIES are recovered from the sea off
Paradise Island to,.aY, u Igingb ine vqown death toll to 17 after the at tempt by
dozens of refugees to laid here early yestegj '.4 -,
More. than 60 Haitiks-e.ther jumped into the water fri tltr 40-foot sloop to swim ashore or
landed on Paradise and subsequently tried to swim from ,e to ~ew rovidence or neighboring
Atholl Island. Exactly whatha p ed has not yet been est' ished.
When the refugees got into'.
the water, a number of the By MIKE LOTHIAN
was apparently trapped by th
very strong current flowing trnUte -shorts or Underwear Island's northeast shore, a
through The Narrows between | Aaplice e.ntinued heir few hundred yards away from
Paradise and Atholl and searching the 1ater, other the Narrows. Shortly
drowned. 0 'pols -A d migratAn officers afterwards, police said, a
Police spotted the first body -onttnW the. sweeps across number of Haitians was seen
at about noon yesterday. It ra4ae was brought ashore at 'tians w1f landed there. V^en the police Marine
R ayshore Marina at 1 p.m. lUp to sundl n yesterday 28 Division arrived on the scene
Thle launch San Salvador men and four omen had been the sloop was found
_j, .ocked at Bayshore at about.A taken juto custody During the abandoned and aground pRn
S m with -*t:, A of 13 HaitAI..L night an! ear:, morni'hg a-,som-anne-eks near where it was
corpses. A fifteenth body was further -seven men and five first sighted. It was refloated
recovered at about five o'clock. women were, found, totalling and .towed into Nassau
All of those bodies were with the drowning victims, 61 Harbour. It was today
found in the area of the of the sloop's passengers anchored and, because of the
Narrows almost oi the centre accounted for. heavy rain this morning
of a major tourist attraction, Sloops of that size and even -flooded and aground on a
the Sea Gardens. served by smaller have been known to sandbar just north of the
glass-bottom boats. carry well over 100 refugees; former Pan American building
At about 9:30 this morning on East Bay Street and just
another body was fished out of The glass-bottom boat west of the Malcolm Park sand
the water near the Narrows. "Paradise Queen" sighted depot. Within the past 18
Another was picked up almost the body of an 18th months, more than 400
under the Paradise Island ua-,.:_ n.t:.. :. i Haitians have fled to the


bridge.
At noon today, when the
San Salvador left Bayshore to
continue the search in the area
no further bodies had been
found.
The search today was
severely hampered by heavy
rain and police mariners
expected the rain would return
when the tide fell at about 3
p.m.
Some persons felt there was
likely to be more bodies found.
More were thought likely to be
recovered when the bodies
float to the surface, usually
about 48 hours after drowning.
All the dead found so far
have been men, most of them
clad only in shirts and bathing


water off a beach near the
eastern end of Paradise
Island late this afternoon.
one 30-foot vessel was once
seized with 114 Haitians
aboard.
So far neither police nor
immigration spokesmen have
been able to give estimates of
the total number of Haitians
aboard Tuesday's sloop.
The only person who would
know for sure is the vessel's
captain, and, even if he is
among those captured so far he
has not yet been identified.
Police reports indicate that
the sloop was first sighted
between 6:30 and 7 a.m.
Tuesday, just off Paradise


United States. Some of those
reportedly have come through
the Bahamas.
The largely illiterate
collection of men, women and
children has appealed for
political asylum. The U.S.
immigration service has
rejected the pleas, saying the
Haitians tied for economic
reasons rather than seeking
political asylum. Most of the
men have been jailed pending
U.S. immigration action.
Neal Sonnett, a Miami
attorney representing about
350 Haitian refugees, said the
deaths in the Bahamas "are a
tragic example of what these
people will go through to try
to reach freedom."


Force 'needs 40


more cars'


THE POLICE Force needs
40 more police cars in order to
give the best protection to all
areas of New Providence it was
revealed today by Mr.
Franklyn Wilson, M.P., at a
press conference at the
Sheraton British Colonial
Hotel
The conference was called
by the Police Appreciation
Committee of which Mr. Wilson'
is chairman.
Asked if Government was
unable to supply the 28 cars
his committee is seeking public
support for. Mr Wilson said


ENY MAKE Flmh
SEE
BEAUTY FOR YOU
FROM 16'
DOLLY FACTORIES
and YOU SAVE! I


the force now had 12 cars on
order, but the 28 they are
trying to raise funds for were
in addition to that 12.
Police Commissioner
Salathiel Thompson felt the
public could expect
improvement in the service of
the force if it had the
additional cars needed, said Mr.
Wilson. He said the
.Commissioner told the
committee the police would
then be able to answer any call
received within five minutes.
On April 25, the Free
National Movement slammed
the announcement of the drive
by Mr. Wilson, a P.L.P.
Member of Parliament. and felt
that "it is something near
scandalous for Government to
find itself in the position where
a direct appeal has to be made
to the public for funds to buy
equipment which the Police
Force should have."
In an editorial on Monday,
Sir Etienne Dupuch thought it
commendable that private


citizens are prepared to
co-operate in the maintenance
of law and order to the extent
that they are prepared to put
up their own money for this
purpose.
"But." he continued, "this is
an unhealthy condition that
should not be encouraged, so I
am not surprised the
Opposition lodged a protest
against this proposal. But I
don't think they emphasized
sufficiently the real objection
to such a movement.
"The Opposition rightly
pointed out that this was a
responsibility of the
government and not of private
citizens," Sir Etienne said.
"But the most important
point," said Sir Etienne, "is
that no public department -
and this is particularly true of
the Judiciary and the Police -
should ever be placed under
obligation to any individual or
group in a community. This Is
particularly true in a small
nation like the Bahamas."


Picture: PHILIP SYMONETTE
The sloop on which the Haitians were travelling

$131,000 FOR

POLICE BOATS


THE GOVERNMENT last year paid out $131,334 to
provision, fuel, repair and insure the four police boats,
Prime Minister Lynden Pindling told the House today.
At the request of Clarence Town representative Michael
Lightbourn (Ind.), the Prime Minister supplied an itemized
breakdown covering the years 1971 through 1973.
The four police boats were commissioned in March
1971. In that year provisions cost $4,557.10. Last year this
figure had risen to $13,166.38 from $9,084.54 in 1972.
Fuel costs moved up from $23,824.82 in 1971 tc
$18,931.07 in 1972 to $16,153.36 in 1973.
Spare parts ran to $29,638 in 1971, then down to
$20,237.85 in 1972 and up again to $23,131.71 last year
Service repairs were $6,693.05 in 1971, $12,854.78 in
1972 and $16,984.16 in 1973.
Storage was $200 in 1971; $10,864.48 in 1972 anc
$9,583.16 in 1973.
Insurance accounted for the largest expenditure of the
three years. In 1971 coverage cost $61,162.09. In 1972 the
figure was $54,743.80 and in 1973 $52,317.50.
The Prime Minister refused however to answer Mr
Lightbourn's questions regarding the number of hours each
day that the boats have spent on patrol at more than 10
miles from New Providence during 1972 and 1973.


Police chief


flies to US


COMMISSIONER of Police
Salathiel Thompson, left
Nassau for consultation with
top law enforcement officials
in the United States yesterday.
The trip is sponsored unmer
the U.S. Fulbright-Hays
programme to encourage
exchanges of views between
distinguished visitors to the
U.S. and U.S. officials.
Commissioner Thompsor
will spend about three weeks in
the United States.
He will discuss a variety of
technological and adminis-
trative issues with police chiefs
and other high-ranking law
enforcement officials from
around the U.S.. as well as with
experts in the field of
fire-fighting and mobile unit
management.
The Commissioner was seen
off at Nassau International
Airport by U.S. Ambassador
Ronald I. Spiers and
Embassy Officirt Wilflit R.
Salisbury and Lieutenant
Commander Joseph J.


D'Amato.
Ambassador Spiers said
"given the close ties betw
our two countries, inclu
their geographical proximn
there have been mr
opportunities for cooper
between the Royal Baha
Police Force and U.S.
enforcement agencies.
"I hope that the n
three weeks will provide
opportunity for maintain
and investigating
possibilities for even cl
cooperation between us."


MIAMI The Internal
Revenue Service has begun a
new examination of the bank
records of President Nixon's
fried Chprle G. "Bebe"
Rean, e Miami Herald
sait ltefy.
The marqpape quoted
source dole to the probe as


-Raider

knocks

out

school

head
LEWIS MORGAN,
appointed headmaster of St.
Andrew's School on April 16,
was knocked unconscious by
an unknown assailant in the
school grounds last Saturday
night.
He received a cut to his
face and had to be taken to
hospital for stitches.
Last Saturday the school
ladies committee held a
dinner-dance at the school to
raise money for school funds.
It was after the function was
over that Mr. Morgan was
"making his rounds"
checking on the buildings.
"I was turning round a
dark corner by the bridge
when 'wham' I was knocked
out and when I came to I
found Dr. Jason McCarroll,
who fortunately was still on
the scene, attending to me."
Mr. Morgan said Dr.
McCarroll rushed him to the
hospital "where he stitched
me up." He received a nasty
cut under the lip on his chin.
Mr. Morgan was not able to
see his assailant or assailants.
His wallet was not taken
from him and he could only
surmise that his attacker
probably thought he was
carrying "the take" from the
dinner-dance to the
administration building to
lock it up. Mr. Morgan had no
money on him.
The headmaster hopes to be
,back at schootshortly.


SHOBEK


BREAKS


SILENCE
AMERICAN songwriter Michiah Shobek broke his vow of
silence today to answer "not guilty" to a charge of murdering an
Ocean City, New York, certified accountant at Yamacraw Beach
on January 18.
Shobek, arrested in January,
is charged with the murder of
Mr. Irvin Bernstien, 44, who
was found dead at Yamacraw
Beach with numerous stab
wounds in the chest and
abdomen.
Prosecution attorneys
opening the case against the
1 9-year-old Milwaukee, o


Wisconsin, youth were
interrupted by defence counsel
Randol F. Fawkes who
prefaced a request to the bench
asking "that the accused's
handcuffs be removed."
The request met with
objections from the
prosecution, conducted by
Crown Counsel Janet
Bostwick. Chief Justice
Leonard Knowles however
acceded to the defence.
Mrs. Bostwick is being
assisted by Mr. Pericles Maillis.
In her preliminary address,
she told the court that "the
allegation in this case is that on
the 18th day of January,
Michiah Shobek murdered an
American visitor, Irvin
Bernstien by stabbing him
several times."
She told the all-male jury,
headed by Mr. Earl Bowleg,
that the prosecution intends to
lead evidence that will prove
three points: "That death was
caused intentionally and by
unlawful harm and that it was
Shobek who caused that
-death."


Rolle refuses

crime figures


HOME AFFAIRS Minister
Darrell Rolle today refused to
supply a House member with
statistics on the crime situation
in the Bahamas.
Questions involving crimes
of violence, housebreaking and
burglary were put by Mr.
Norman Solomon (FNM St.
George's).
Mr. Solomon wanted to
know how many of these
crimes had been committed
during the six month period
ending January 31, 1974; for
the two six month periods of
1972, and the first six months
of 1973.
In addition the member
wanted to know how many of
these crimes had been
prosecuted, how many were
still under investigation and


whether reports alleging that
some CID men or officers were
recently or are still working
seven days a week, 12 hours a
day, was-true or false.
"In general CID officers
work regular hours as
prescribed," Mr. Rolle replied.
In practice however, it has
been the universal experience
that criminals do not respect
the clock," he added.
Consequently, although
regular office hours were
desirable, in reality there were
night shifts and gazetted
officers did work in excess of
the regular hours.
The Minister explained that
CID men and officers are not
paid overtime. They are paid a
detective allowance of $519.96
per year.


18 doctors quit


hospital


0 EIGHTEEN DOCTORS have Dr.
left the Princess Margaret Offi
Hospital in the past 18 months, Med
Health Minister Loftus Roker Siva
revealed in the House of Dr.
Assembly today. Offi
In answer to questions put Med
by Clarence Town representa- Mo*
tive Michael Lightbourn (Ind.), Dr.
Mr. Roker listed the names of Con
the 18 who left the medical Med
service since 1972. Gar
19"2. Her
Included are 13 medical Offi
that officers, one radiologist, a Med
veen senior consultant, the medical Sum
ding chief of staff and two dentists. Julit
aity, Mr. Lightbourn also asked Dr.
iany the Minister to name those Chie
tion whose contracts will not be Bail
mas renewed in 1974. But Mr. Phil
law Roker said that the Public
Service Commission is L
responsible for the renewal of
next contracts. 1
an Those named by Mr. Roker Dev
ning as having left the hospital are: will
the Dr. Richard Morgan, qua
oser Radiologist; Dr. John W. at
Thompson; Medical Officer; mot


REBOZO PROBE


saying the investigation was
expected to take about 10
days.
The IRS in Miami aid
today it would have no
comment on the reported
Investigation.
Last Oct. 31, Rabozo said


James C. Thomas, Medical
cer; Dr. Mohamed Khan,
ical Officer; Dr. K.
lingham, Medical Officer;
Harold Belizaire, Medical
cer; Dr. Richard Crawford,
tical Officer; Dr. Farouk
jammed, Medical Officer;
N. K. Agarwal, Senior
sultant; Dr. Awney Abdou,
Lical Officer; Dr. Adrienne
ner, Medical Officer; Dr.
bert Husbands, Medical
cer: Dr. Carlos Mulraine,
ical Officer; Dr. Bernardo
npio, Medical Officer; Dr.
ta Sumpio, Medical Officer;
Graeme P. Duffy, Medical
0f of Staff: Dr. Robert
ey, Dentist; Dr. 'Anthony
lip Dav:s Dentist.

UN FISH
'HE U.N. Fisheries
'elopment boat "Fregata"
be selling a further
ntity of deepwater snapper
Potters Cay tomorrow
ring.


the IRS had investigated his
Key Biacayne Bank & Trust
Co. and his participation in a
$100,000 Nixon re-election
campaign contributMon from
billionaire Row1d 1t1e1.
Reboso said the probe had
cleared him of wroadolMg.


SHOBEK
'Not guilty'
Witnesses will testify
Mr. Bernstein's arrival hei.
a Bahamasair flight 55 from
Miami on January 17.
But as to "what happened to
Bernstein after he arrived here
is contained in Shobek's
statement," she said. His body,
"nude except for his shoes and
socks," was discovered around
9:30 a.m. on January 18 by
Joseph Knowles who contacted
the police.
Investigating officers found
several articles near the body
and among them were a pair of
sun-glasses and a pen which the
prosecution alleges to have
been Shobek's, she said.
Shobek admitted to police
"that the sun-glasses and the .
pen found at the scene were
his," Mrs. Bostwick told the
court.
She also told tth court that
C.I.D. Commissioner John T.
Crawley will give evidence of
finding a pen and a pencil in
the possession of the accused
"which belonged to the
deceased".
She told the court that "a
black bag was found in .the
bushes on Paradise Island by a
security officer ... in it were
papers belonging to Bernstiein
and a driver's licence in
Shobek's name.
"His apartment at the-
Columbus Hotel was searched
and a dagger found," she
declared.
Witnesses to testify this
morning were a police
photographer, Glinton
Fernander, responsible for
pictures used during the
hearing, Princess Margaret
Hospital pathologist Dr. Joan
Read and public analyst
Rupert Watkins.
Dr. Read told the court that
she examined Bernstein's body
at the beach on January 18 and
"from the state of rigor mortis
in the body, estimated that
death took place between 3
a.m. and 5 a.m."
But she later took a test of
the "internal temperature of
the body and estimated death
occurred at about 4 a.m. or 5
a.m. She also testified of
performing an autopsy and
finding 11 wounds on
Bernstien's body.
Two of them aroused
questions by the defence and
prosecution. The second
wound examined "was a
straight edged vertical wound
one inch in width over the.
upper part of the breast bone.
It entered the chest by cutting
through the breast-bone and
the inner end of the left first
rib. It went through the aorta
and ended in the left lung. The
depth was four inches," she
said. The fifth wound at "the-
left of the left nipple ... went
across the front of the chest
horizontally and ended in the
muscle on the right side. The.
depth of this wound was ten
inches," she said.
She told defence counsel
that "tremendous force" had
to be used to cause the wound
when he asked if it would have
required "superhuman of.
frenzied force." She did not
agree with him that they were
inflicted "with lightning
rapidity" but said they were
made "one after the other."


I


- i


I


FASHION.WISE

PROM- .1 .


I


i'-~:~t'~ t~.f411


: (


'--.I~.---~-- I--c~-li.-~ -w~*r.r ,,,--.,.,~yrTrri


~ribuno


~JhP








2The T Tribune Wednesday, May 8, 197


NO MORE

TAPES,

SAYS

NIXON

House lawyer James D. St.
Clair has announced that
President Nixon has decided
not to turn over any more
Watergate tapes to the U.S.
House of Representatives
Judiciary Committee or Special
Watergate Prosecutor Leon
Jaworski.
Nixon ordered St. Clair to
proceed with his efforts to
quash Jaworski's subpoena for
more recorded presidential
conversations and carry the
legal battle to the U.S.
Supreme Court if necessary,
the attorney said.
St. Clair said also that the
president is willing to risk
constitutional confrontation
with the House Judiciary
Committee if it presses its
demands for the Watergate
evidence.
A spokesman for Jaworski
said: "We plan to continue
with our litigation."
U.S. District Judge John J.
Sirica gave a five-day extension
to St. Clair so that he and
Jaworski could try to reach
some accommodation over the
subpoenaed information.
St. Clair said that Nixon
reviewed the matter and
decided Tuesday that he was
"unwilling to make any further
adjustment."
"I do not believe it will be
an impeachable offence," St.
Clair said of Nixon's stand.
(AP)

Angels'

salute
LOWELL, Massachusetts -
A cortege of some 200
motorcycle riders from across
the United States wound its
way through Lowell as the
m, bodies of two slain Hell's
Angels were taken to their
graves.
Goerge Hartman, 28, and
Edwin Riley, 34, were found
shot to death last week in a
Florida rockpit. (AP)

SEARCH ABANDONED
A SEARCH for a university
professor at sea off the
southwest coast of the
Dominican Republic has been
abandoned, the U.S. Coast
Guard says.
The decision to stop looking
for the man, still not identified
publicly, came after a
helicopter searched most of the
day where a single-engined
plane crashed Saturday two
miles off the Dominican coast.


OTTAWA Canada today
faced the prospect of a
general election in July as the
House of Commons prepared
to vote on a motion of no
confidence in Prime Minister
Pierre Elloitt Trudeau's
minority government.
The motion was
introduced by the two main
opposition parties.
A crushing blow for
Trudeau's Liberal government
came during debate yesterday
on the 1974-75 budget when
the New Democratic Party
introduced an amendment
strengthening the no-


confidence motion
introduced by the biggest
opposition party, the
Conservatives.
It was the New Democrats'
first major break with
Trudeau, who has retained a
tenuous hold on the
government for 16 months by
using their 31 votes to give
him a majority in the
264-seat commons. Trudeau's
Liberals have 109 seats,
compared with 107 held by
the Conservatives.
The vote was expected
tonight.
The 54-year-old Prime


Minister expressed doubt that
the Socialistic New
Democrats and the
Conservatives would vote
together to oust him.
But Conservative leader
Robert Stanfield said he saw
no difficulty in supporting
the new democratic'
amendment, which
complained that the budget
introduced failed "to apply
any measures to help
pensioners or others on low
or fixed incomes, to deal with
the housing crisis and to
remove .the glaring
inequalities in the tax


Strike: mystery



donor in peace bid


BUT FLEET STREET IS HIT HARD


LONDON An anonymous
donor paid out 65,000 pounds
(156,000) today in a bid to
buy a quick end to a strike
disrupting much of British
industry.
The money was paid into
the Industrial Court. The court
then ordered the total return
of assets which it had seized
from the Amalgamated Union
of Engineering Workers.
The union's 1.2 million
members run and maintain
machinery in virtually all
sectors of British industry.
It was still too early to assess
the eventual impact of the
strike, or whether the
anonymous donation would
end it.
But the first casualty reports
were trickling in. Sporadic
walkouts of workers all over
the country had already
affected newspaper publishing,
car production and
shipbuilding.
Air and rail services and the
supply of gas, electricity, water
and oil could also be disrupted.
Employment Secretary
Michael Foot began the day
with a conference with Len
Murray, General Secretary of
the Trades Union Council
(TUC).
The TUC embraces the
engineers union and represents
some 10 million organized
workers in the United
Kingdom. There were no
details on the 30-minute
discussion.
Foot was also expected to
resume discussions with Hugh
Scanlon, chairman of the
Engineers Union.
Scanlon cast the deciding
4-3 vote Tuesday at a meeting
of the union's executive
committee that called the


strike.
The union is protesting the
seizure of 280,000 pounds
($672,000) of its assets by the
industrial relations court set up


Cqypit!
at our new quick-action copy center.

fast, economical, XEROXE
high-quality copies copy service
from your Collins Avenue
Tel. 27548-9
Important papers... p. Box N49so
class notes Nassu
bills & checks Queens Highway
tax forms Tel. 27022-3
correspondence P.O. Box F731
club notices Freeport.
inventory & order forms
legal records
medical records 10%
job applications

insurance claims
bound volumes All Copies
reference Made at Our
materials Centres Now
Try Th1s Through May
.o....n, With This Ad.


Xerox isa
registered
trademark of
Corporation.



When it comes to insurance

is Dominion for Life


... in Nassau

can George Evans 2-3843



TI 0OMNON IUFE1ASSULRNCE C&A tWY


by the former Conservative
government of Edward Heath,
ousted by the February
elections.
Harold Wilson's Labour
government has pledged to
repeal the Industrial Relations
Act that set up the court, but
says this cannot be done by a
simple, one-sentence act of
parliament, as demanded by
the engineering workers.
The sequestration of the
AUEW's funds was ordered
following the union's refusal to
pay 47,000 pounds ($ 112,800)
compensation to a farm
machinery firm. The court had
ruled the firm had lost the
money because of an AUEW
strike judged illegal.
The most dramatic effect of
the engineers' walkout so far
was the halt in publication of
most of Britain's national
newspapers.
The Times, the Financial
Times, The Guardian, the Sun,
the Daily Mirror and the
Morning Star all failed to
appear in London.
In Manchester, there was no
publication of the Daily
Mirror, the Sporting Chronicle
or the Daily Telegraph. At
Leeds the Yorkshire Post could
print only one edition.
First editions of London's
Evening Standard and Evening
News were delayed and the
engineer's union was talking of
completely shutting down all
of Fleet Street, Britain's press
centre.
"I don't think any of the
papers will come out tonight,"
said a Fleet Street branch
secretary of the AUEW. "I
think we have overcome the
problem of the Express and the
Mail and they won't be
appearing."
The Daily Express and the
Daily Mail were the only
papers which had normal press
runs overnight. The Daily
Telegraph managed to print
only 5,000 copies of its first
edition.
The Newspapers Publishers
Association (NPA) appeal to
the striking engineers to
recognize the gravity of
depriving the public of
newspapers. It added that
many of the papers already


have financial difficulties and a
prolonged strike could cause
permanent closures.
"Fleet Street has more
problems than a porcupine has
quills and could have done very
well without this problem,"
said Lord Goodman, chairman
of the NPA.
Britain's car plants said the
engineers' strike had already
halted production or probably
would during the course of the
day.
The four major companies
affected were Ford, Vauxhall,
Chrysler and British Lt. land,
which form the backbone of
Britain's export car industry.
Some shipyards in Northern
England and in Scotland were
crippled, and British Airways
flights from London's
Heathrow Airport were
expected to halt.
Five thousand engineers
were meeting at Heathrow to
discuss the strike call. Shop
stewards were certain the
engineers would support the
strike. k 6 1
This would grouW the
state-owned airline' fliihts to
Continental 0Lrdpe.4 The
airline's overseas division,
which handles flights outside
Europe, was already at a,
standstill because of an
unofficial strike by cabin staff
demanding better pay and
more hours off. (AP)

RANSOM CASH
THE FATHER of two
kidnapped children says he has
$80,000 in cash ready to pay
when he is asked for a ransom.
A 12-year-old girl and her
11-year-old brother were
abducted on a resort beach
area east of San Juan last
Sunday.
STRIKE GROUPS
HUNDREDS of transport
workers and school teachers
have joined a strike in demand
of the release of 200 political
prisoners held in La Victoria
jail outside Santo Domingo.


D'Estaing noses ahead


PARIS The first public
opinion poll published in
advance of the May 19
presidential runoff election
indicates Valery Giscard d'
Estaing will win over Francis
Mitterrand by a 51-49 per cent
margin.
The straw vote was taken


Tuesday by the French
Institute of Public Opinion and
published by the newspaper
France-Soir.
It covered 1,800 interviews
taken in 360 representative
localities in metropolitan
France. (AP)


Schmidt nominated


BONN Helmut Schmidt, a
tough Finance Minister rated as
a firm friend of the United
States, won his' party's
nomination yesterday to
succeed Chancellor Willy
Brandt.
Brandt resigned over an
espionage scandal.
While Bonn buzzed with
rumour ovwr n'--.ihle


underlying causes foi Brandt's
decision to accept personal
responsibility for a close aide's
role as a Communist East
German spy, 55-year-old
Schmidt's nomination was
approved in an emotional
session of the Social
Democratic Party's par-
liamentary caucus.
"This is not the time to
yammer," Brandt told weeping
legislators in his first public
appearance since his
resignation was announced
soon after midnight Monday.
"I am certain that our state
will have a federal government
that is firmly on the track in
14 days," Schmidt said before
breaking off a Hamburg visit to
return to Bonn soon after his
nomination.
The 60-year-old Brandt had
been chancellor for 4% years
and made normalization with
the rival German government
in East Berlin one of the chief
objectives of his ostpolitik.
CAP)


system."
The Conservative motion
said the House had lost
confidence in the
Government because its
economic plan failed "to
propose effective budgetary
machinery measures to
contain and reduce
inflation."
Despite Trudeau's refusal
to admit his government was
doomed, other Liberal leaders
held no hope.
"I don't see any way out,"
said Bryce Mackasey, a
former Cabinet Minister.
"This looks like it."
Trudeau has several


-Robbery of-

the long

distance

walkers
PERTH, Australia -
David Howson, 37, and his
17-year-old son Markan
are walking around
Australia, pulling a hand
cart and collecting money
to establish wild life
sanctuaries.
They reported that they
had covered 2,580 miles
and were on the Great
Northern Highway 500
miles north of Perth when
three men in a car stopped
alongside them.
"Are you the silly
bastards walking around
Australia?" one of the
men asked.
"Yes," Howson
answered.
The jumped out of the
car with a gun and robbed
them of $16.78, two cans
of food, a pound of
tobacco and an alarm
clock.
Then the trio drove off.
(AP)

Croc streak


STREAKER, Australia's
fastest crocodile, showed his
form today in an unauthorized
streak across Sydney airport.
As he was being unloaded from
a plane, the 10-year-old,
four-foot six-inch croc took off,
across the runway.

New township
THE JOHN Vorster
government has begun a plan
to remove thousands of
Africans from Grahamstown
and other neighboring towns
into a huge new township.


options if voted out. But he
told newsmen if the
government was defeated, he
would ask Governor-General
Jules Leger to dissolve
Commons and call a general
election.
A minimum of 58 days
must elapse between the call
and voting day, and since
elections in Canada are
traditionally held on Monday,
the most likely date would be
July 8.
The Liberal Party has been
in office since 1963, and
Trudeau has been Prime
Minister since 1968. (AP)


KISSINGER


SHUTTLES


BACK AGAIN
DAMASCUS US. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger today
flew back to Damascus with a new Israeli offer to pull back some
of its forces on the Golan Heights.
Sources here expressed doubt that President Hafez Assad's
response would be favourable, U.S. officials said for the first time
that Kissinger plans to pursue his disengagement diplomacy into
next week, suggesting success but only after prolonged


COMPTON WINS
PREMIER John Compton's
ruling United Workers Party
has scored a narrow two-seat
victory in general election in
St. Lucia.


Margaret slams


British TV men


NEW YORK Britain's
Princess Margaret says the
American press is all right but
it was those British
correspondents, especially
from television, who had give
her husband a bit of trouble
with their probing questions
about the stability of the royal
marriage.
The Princess and her
husband, Lord Snowdon on
what the British press
called d Wid ati s, ur '
of tN America went to
New rk from Philadelphia
after ending the weekend at
Loui s Kentucky, where
they Satched the 100th PRINCESS MARGARET '
running of the Kentucky 'Americans all right'
Derby.
Margaret said it was Day of
especially the British in-
dependent television cor- the dove
respondents who have been UNITED NATIONS A
giving Lord Snowdon trouble. dove iTE N A tinS A
She was speaking at a news b io m gmb6i so women
conference.- B
Last night, Princess Margaret and the mathematical symbol
visited briefly wi* the DJuk.fs for equality has been chosen as
of Windsor ath suit in the the official emblem fo
WaldorfTowNws international women's year r
,No reporters were allowed 1975.
to witness the 15-minute
meeting.
Earlier, the Princess and
Lord Snowdon visited the
ballet and were cheered by
tourists at Rockefeller Centre.
(AP)





.. Hotel -
DOWNTOWN MIAMI



SINGLE ....... 00

TWIN ................. 12.00
TRIP ................... 14.00
QUAD ................. 17.00

AMERICAN-BAHAMIAN -
:. FEDERATION


negotiating.
Syrian sources said
agreement was near on a U.S.
force to man the neutral zone
between the two armies, and it
was understood the 'only
remaining problem on this
point was terminology.
Meanwhile Syria has irnited
Arab heads of state t; an
emergency summit conference
to reassess the Mfdeast
situation, authoritative sources
said.
President Assad intends to
ask all Arab heads of state to
"throw their entire weight in
all fields behind Syria" in its
Golan Heights war of attation
with Israel, the sources said.
The invitation was sent
through Arab League
Secretary-General Mahmoud
Riad, who is now visiting Syria.
The sources said consultations
were under way to set a date
for the proposed summit.
Algiers was mentioned as the
most likely site. The last Arab
r.flifi was held there in
ovember.
A conference of Arab
foreign ministers in Tunis last
arch had scheduled a summit
rf September but authorized
n. ria to advance this date "if it
S seemed an earlier summit
necessary."
Syria's summit invitation
appears,.designed to bring more
S aeure on the United States
and perhaps win further
concessions from Israel for a
disengagement agreement in
the Golan Heights. (AP)


Philip Dorsett Gospel Bells Choir

In


"JESUS EXPLOSION '74"
includbg:


Majestic Choir
Pilgrim Brothers
Sydney Sawyer


Church of God Jr. Choir
Mark Gates
Philip Symonette


Trudeau crisis may force July election in Canada


Lhder the distinguished Patronage


of

GODS HOLY SPIRIT

The Interdenominational Christian Youth Association

Presents


The Visionaires


St. Joseph's Choir
St. Bede's Folk Group
Elizabeth Smith


Linda Bain
M.C.: Mr. John Crawley, Jr.

ki Le Cabaret Theatre ,Paradise Island

On Mothers Day, Sunday May 12th, at 8:00p.m.

Inaid of I.Y.A'sYouth DelopmnWt FRnd

Door Prizes & Bridge Toll Included Ticket $3 per person.
Can be purchased at: Thb Reef Restaurant, The Wardrobe, Helen's Shoe Store.


"Advertising Space Donated By Butler & Sands"










The Tribun .s - Wednesday, May 8, 19743


Wb7 Uritbunt
NULmus Amworu JUAm= IN Vazm MACgna
Beim Bound To Sww To The Doga Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, PubAker/Editor 1903 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Publaer/EdItor 1917-1972
Contributin Editor 1972.
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
PubMier/Edltor 1972.
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Wednesday, May 8, 1974


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
RECENTLY I wrote a series of articles on the psychology of
power ... of how power in the hands of a tyrant instils fear in the
hearts of lesser men and confers on the powerful an aura that
seems to endow them with a charmed life.
In that series I told of an experience I had in Taranto, Italy in
1918 when the 10th battalion of the B.W.I.Regiment rioted and
it seemed that the life of the Colonel was threatened by a group
of men who surrounded his tent shouting and jabbing holes in the
canvas with their bayonets.
The rioters had their bayonets almost at the throat of this man
... but at the last minute they lost their resolution because they
were afraid to touch the high and mighty person of their
commanding officer.
I told you how, after that affair, all the units in the regiment in
that area at the time were subjected to more rigid forms of
discipline ... offenders were given severe sentences and the
punishment administered in the prison camps became almost
brutal. Men tried by court were given excessively long terms of
imprisonment.
War is a game of force and men engaged in this bloody exercise
understand only brutal methods of dealing with situations.
Good soldiers never marched on soft words.

I want to make it clear from the start that I understand the
need for this attitude. Only a disciplined army has ever won
battles. In war there is no room for the weak ... and still less room
for the troublesome.
I have told you before of our first day on the desert when the
Regimental Sergeant Major -- a tough little man made it crystal
clear to us what life in an army at war meant for men who bore
arms.
He said that he had heard that there were some bad men in our
outfit. He wanted to make it clear from the start that he was
going to make good men out of them or bury them in the sands
of the Sahara.
"You can't break the British army," he warned us. "You can
-i-',f break your bleeding mothers' hearts. It doesn't cost a damn
thing to bury you ... and we don't mind doing it."
And so that was war. There was no time to devote to delicate
questions of right or wrong. The army was always right, however
wrong it might be.
It is only natural that, because of this condition, the little men
in the army sometimes suffered injustices from their superior
officers who, in some cases, became little tyrants.

In the army the chain of command was similar to the condition
that existed in Britain's colonies where the Colonial Office in
London sought guidance from the Governor on the spot. The
Governor, in his turn, sought guidance from local Councillors
drawn from a section of the community who went through life
with their heads in the clouds, their feet off the ground and their
noses at an angle as though they were smelling something bad.
The little man at the bottom of the pile becomes a mere tool.
an instrument to carry out the designs and purposes of the great
moguls at the top ... and no one knows the real truth of anything
until like a great earthquake the great mass of humanity
erupts in anger. They were like worms because they thought and
acted as individuals. They became as hungry tigers when they
learned to unite their strength.
Yes, of course, there was harsh inhumanity in the stories I told
but it was the misfortune of the men who suffered in these cases
to be caught in a chain of circumstances that destroyed their
lives. The army expression "caught in the crossfire" applies to
such cases.

I will tell you a little story to illustrate how war is a constant
battle for survival.
It is about a coloured man in the U.S. who had been
conscripted for overseas service in the last war. He had no
stomach for war.
"Sarge," he complained to his Sergeant one day, "I don't want
to go to war. I don't want to kill nobody. The Germans ain't
done me nuttin'. I don't want to fight."
"Big boy," the Sergeant consoled him, "you don't have to
fight anybody. You don't have to kill anybody. We are only
teaching you how to shoot. And when you can shoot good we
going to put you out in a field in France with a rifle in your
hands. You don't have to do nothing but lay there if that's what
you want. But on the other side of the hedge will be a German.
He will have a gun in his hands. And he can shoot good too. This
man will be shooting at you. And then it will be up to you to do
what you want to do."
That's war ... and those who are caught in the crossfire ...
whether it is on the battlefield or in camp discipline ... don't
come back-

In the case of the army the little Lance Corporal reports to the
full Corporal ... and so on right up until it finally reaches the men
in the War Office in London who have to deal with millions of
men spread over many areas, often separated by vast stretches of
land and sea.

I have told you how I earned the reputation in the Colonial
Office in London of being a rebel in the Bahamas because the
ruling group in the Bahamas at that time refused to see the need
for them to lead reform. These men had the ear of the Colonial
Office.
I have told you how Britain lost her Empire largely through
absence of contact with the little man.
And so it was in the army. The 10th battalion had a brute for a
commanding officer. This resulted in a riot in the camp. And this
gave the whole regiment a black eye in the War Office in London
... because the War Office accepted the report of the Colonel as
final.
This reputation pursued us even aboard the transport on our
way home for demobilization.


When we boarded the transport at Taranto, Italy for the trip
home we found ourselves hedged in by all manner of restrictions
on the ship. After we were at sea for a couple of days all the
restrictions were lifted.
We were told that the captain of the ship had said that he had
been warned by the War Office in London that we were a bad lot
of men who needed a heavy hand from the start. He had
transported many troops before this ... and, in his opinion, we
were the best of the lot.
And this is the way it works out at all levels in life, whether it
is in times of peace or at war ... in the army and out.
Life is a wonderful experience for men and women who have
the strength and courage to look it squarely in the face ... and
laugh at it when it frowns and with it when it smiles.

As many readers of this column will recall I worked very hard
for the Allied cause in the second world war.
Some of my friends who knew what I had suffered at the
hands of the great ones wondered at the fact that I had left my
business and was giving practically full time to the war effort.
These friends thought I should want revenge on people who,
on the surface, had apparently used me badly.
"Listen, my friend." I told one of them one day, "you seem tc
think that this is Englarid's war but you are wrong. If Hitler wins
this war the blue-eyed, flaxen-haired Englishman will merge into
Hitler's superman society in 24 hours. The Jews will be
exterminated and the dark races will be returned to slavery. This
is more MY war than England's."
All sections of the town were upset when the Duke of Windsor
left the island without even thanking my committee for the work
it had done.
"I told you so," a man chided me one day. "Englishmen are no
damned good."
This man couldn't understand how I headed an organization
that could carry on sending shipments of food to Britain long
after the war was over and until the food department in London
was finally closed down.
I just could not get it across to him that I was fighting my own
war ... not England's ... and that I did not need thanks or reward
from anyone for what I was doing. The war was over but, in spite
of anything that may have happened to mc personally, I realized
that it was important to keep Britain strong. The second phase of
the struggle was just about to begin.
On one occasion A. R. Braynen wrote a letter to The Tribune
ridiculing me for the fact that. however hard I tried to help
Britain, English officials in the colony always seemed to be
belting me down.
lie could not understand that, because of the developing world
situation ... with Hitler looming on the horizon ... that I was
battling for my own survival ... and his too

it is unfortunate that most people seem unable to look beyond
the present ... and also beyond their own personal interests.
If I allowed my thinking to be influenced by the shortcomings
of English officials serving in the island I would have lost sight of
the fact that what was happening to small people like me was not
important when weighed in the balances against the grave
situation that came in the wake of the war in which we would all
eventually become involved.
It has been well said that in such a situation a man who fails to
take the long view very often "cuts off his nose to spite his face".
********
At the present time I try to keep readers of this column
informed of events taking place in the broad outside world that
might have a chilling effect on the future of these islands if we
don't shape our course in a manner that we are constantly
conscious of the dangers that lie ahead in a great big world of
which we are a part. The fact that we are small makes our
position still more vulnerable.
We have escaped the Hitlerian threat. Now we face an equally
grave danger ... the creeping, crawling, steadily advancing march
of Communism across the face of the earth.

Look around you at the situation in formerly British colonies
in this hemisphere. Manley in Jamaica is now saying that his
island needs a Big Brother and he is exchanging students with
Cuba ... Forbes Burnham has taken Guyana into the Chinese orbit
... and from one end of the Caribbean to the other the stage is
being set for alien influences to step in the back door.
The people in these islands and in the Bahamas too are
walking backward, apparently unaware of the fact that they may
be marching blindly into a new form of slavery from which there
would be no escape.

John Donne has told us in his poem "When The Bell Tolls"
that no man can be an "island unto himself". Don't ask, he
wrote, for whom the bell tolls ... it tolls for you.
The death of every person concerns us all because the same
fate is common to all living things, whether it be the grass in the
fields or y our own flesh. And so nature itself has made brothers
of all men in this one common destiny.
The span of a man's life is too short for him to be concerned
only for himself. He should try to understand what is going on
beyond the limited boundaries of his own household ... even to
the other extremities of the earth ... because society has reached a
stage of development today where we are all playing or fighting
in the same small backyard.
I told you in this column recently that I came back to Coral
Gables on March 24th to attend a party being given by the Jewish
community here.
You might be interested to know that my wife and I were the
only Christians at this party. Apart from the couple through
whom we had worked to support hospital work in Israel no one
at this party realized that we were not Jews. Indeed, my wife was
asked to organize a chapter in her own area!


We are not Jews but we are with these people in spirit ... not
because we are against the Arabs but because we realize that
Russia is knocking loudly on the doors of the Middle East, and
the Old Bear is making the approach through Arab channels.
If Russia were to establish control in the oil bearing areas of
the Middle East before the West finds a new form of energy it
would be another step in the direction of the frightening picture
conjured up in George Orwell's book Big Brother.
I might mention that I have Arab friends in Nassau who are
very dear to me. I hope they will understand.
* * * p *
CORRECTION: On Friday it was stated in this column that
Miss Pandora McKinney "went to the U.S. at her own expense
and trained as a dietician." In fact Miss McKinney ex-dietician at
the Princess Margaret Hospital, was trained for this position on a
government scholarship.

THOUGHTS FOR TODAY
Proud man,
Drest in a little brief authority
Most ignorant of what'he is most assur'd. SHAKESPEARE


Authority forgets a dying king.

The Idylls of the King: The
Passing of Arthur., TENNYSON


ADVISORY

COMMITTEE

FORMED -LJ


THE Advisory Committee
appointed by the Financial
Community Advanced
Technical Education Trust
for Bahamians met for the
first time Monday and elected
the Hon. Donald M. Fleming
as its chairman.
W. Burnett Gray was
elected secretary to the
committee.
The other members are: T.
B. Donaldson, chairman of
the Bahamas Monetary
Authority: Baltron Bethel,
permanent secretary, Ministry
of Education and Culture;
Basil Sands, president of the
Bahamas Institute of
Chaitered Accountants:
Clyde Minard. nominated by
the clearing banks to
represent them; Ralph S.
Owers. nominated by the
trust companies to represent
them. Mr. Fleming represents
the Bankers Club.
A fund of approximately
$125,000 was raised by the
financial community headed
by the Bankers Club last year
to mark the country's
independence. The income
from the fund will be
employed in perpetuity to
pro ide scholarships to enable
deserving Bahamian students
to pursue courses of advanced
technical education abroad.
The principal responsibility
of the Advisory Committee is
to select the scholarship
winners.
Applications for the 1974
awards are now being invited
through the Ministry of
Education and should be
submitted to the Ministry by
Friday, May 17.
Our picture shows: (seated
from left) Mr. Fleming, Mr.
Donaldson, Mr. Bethel, Mr.
Sands: (standing) Mr. Owers,
Mr. Minard and Mr. (ray.


SUN
Rises 5:?i a.m.
Sets 6:43 p.m.


/


....I


GRND RIZM z 7 -u CO.,











Completer with 50 H.P. JOHNSON ---'
or FVINRUDF MOTOR & TRAILER
(valued at $4,545)

magnificent ORLANDO CLIPPER sthe
anodized metal frame with temper. ed
shatter-proof glass, full redi ng seats.
The hull is time tested and wtll gye I
youxoutstanding performance The is
no finer boat afloat foi the money
Made by a firm w th over 20 years
experience. ThatNs ORLANDOIPPER
CLIPPER! What a boat"!



- 4h'Johnson j kwo I


IThe name means Performance in outboard m"otor- Top
speed, trolling speed economy, dependabilit all the *.r.'j
you want in an outboard motor. If you want a motor of
mid rdnge size with ski motor speed. you want the
JOHNSON 50 with loop charging for more Horse Power
with less fuel. Johnson, the one you rea!v ne.ed ir his,
days of fuel crisis.


MAURA LUMBER COMPANY LTD.
PHONE 24001 -24101
P. 0. Box N.8177, NASSAU


Just Arrived!


NEW SHIPMENT OF


GLOO


COOLERS


(all sizes)


wide assortment of colours


LARGE ICE CHESTS

(ideal for boating)


THE GENERAL HARDWARE
COMPANY LIMITED
CENTREVILLE PHONE: 2-1960/2-8844


COPIES

AVAILABLE AT

gTHE TRIBUNE


OFFICE WEEK!

THIS WEEK!


-, P.


I







The Tribune - Wednesday, May 8, 1974


VALLEYDALE


PICNIC HAMS


U.S. CHOUCELAMB LEGS


Ib. 85C


lb. $1.79


DANISH PORK CHOPS Ib. $1.39
NEW ZEALAND
LAMB SHOULDER CHOPS lb. $1.10


FRESH
BROILING CHICKENS lb.


79C


Green Giant Asparagus 14 oz.
Dr. Ballard Dog Food Beef
Pine Sol Cleanser 21 oz
Cana Corn on Cob
Tasters Choice Instant
Coffee 8 oz.
Bold Detergent Giant
Libby's Cut Beets 16 oz.
Ribena Family Size
Morton Salt


98c
25c
45c
79c


$2.95
99c
32c
$1.95
19c


NASSAU PORTION CONTROL

Phone 23237 Ext.6 CENTRE 5th Terrace Centreville

WEEK END SPECIALS
5 Ibs. Turtle Steaks 6-8 oz. ($2.00 per Ib) $10.00
10 Ibs 40/4 oz. Beef Patties $10.00 10 Ibs. 80/2 oz. Beef Patties $10.00
10 Ibs. Pigs Feet (32c per Ib) $3.25 4 Baked Crab Backs $5.00

HERE'S SOME EXAMPLES OF YOUR SAVINGS ON OUR REGULAR PRICES!
All Top Choice & Prime Meats
10 Ibs. Lamb Shoulder Chops $10.50
10 Ibs. Turkey Wings -$7.80 10 Ibs. Danish Spare Ribs -$9.90
10 Ibs. Turkey Drumsticks $7.80 10 Ibs. Mutton $10.50
5 Ibs. Strip Loin Steaks _ .. $15.00 ($3.00 per lb.)
5 Ibs. Tenderloin Steaks $18.00 ($3.60 per lb.)
5 lbs. T-Bone Steaks $12.00 ($2.40 per lb.)
5 Ibs. Sirloin Steak $10.00 ($2.00 per lb.)
5 Ibs. Lamb Loin Chops - -$18.00 (Cut to Specification) $3.60 per lb.)
5 Ibs. Turtle Meat $6.50 ($1.30 per lb.)


U.S. CHOICE
TOP ROUND STEAK lb. $2.19

U.S. CHOICE
BOTTOM ROUND ROAST Ik. $2.U0

U.S. CHOICE
SIRLOIN TIP ROAST lb. $2.39


PICNIC HAMS


Centreville

Food Market
6th Terrace East P.O. Bo 57,14 PAte 5-8106
Store Hours Monday to Thursday 8 a.m. 8:30 p.m.
Fri. & Sat. 8 a.m. -9 p.m.
Sun. 8 a.m. 10 a.m.


lb. 99C


Libby's Tomato Catchup 11 oz. Bottle 47c
Libby's Chickan Stew 7% oz. Can 46c
Libby's Chickan And Dumpling 7/2 oz. Can 46c
3lanco Bleach (Gals.) $1.09
Hatuey Malt Tonic Carton $1.39
Axion Pre-soak Powder (Giant Size) 85c pkg.
Celebrity Luncheon Meat 12 oz. Can 65c
Cold Powder Detergent (Giant Size) 99c
Daytime Pampers 12's $1.55
Fresh Juice Oranges 5 lb. Bags $1.19
R3d Delicious Apples 3 lb. Bags $1.45
Fresh Florida Citrus Punch 1/2 Gals. $1.29


N


-U.


n


SHIRLEY STREET


HARDING'S STEWING BEEF Ib. $1.30
FOOD MA KEPICNIC HAMS lb. 85C
FOOD MARKET I
I PORK CNUSt 10 Ibs. $12.00
P.O. Box 5290 ES Phone 2-3067
LEAN SAtT BEEF 10 Ils. $9.00
SPARE RIBS 5 Ibs $4.25
STEWING BEEF 10 Is. $13.00
ASSORTED MEATS 5 Ibs. $2.50
iPORK CHOPS lb. $1.29
- - SPARE RIBS lb. 890
Campbell's Vegetable Soup 4 Tins 9 MAPLE LEAF BOLOGNA Sliced lb. 99C
Fab King Size $1.59
Can Sodas Assorted 12 oz. 4 Tins 89c IU.S. CHOICE ROUND STEAK Ib. $1.90
Libby's Sliced Beets 303 3 Tins 99c I
Carnation Cream Large 3 Tins 99c LEAN SALT BEEF lb. 99
Mahatma Rice 5 Ibs. $2.29
Robinhood Flour 5 Ibs. $1.10 'FRESH MUTTON Ib. $1.10
Morton Salt 2 pkgs. 42c
Jaka Ham 16 oz. $1.75 i -------- ----- --- --
Baggies Garbage Bags 30's 59c Ajax All Purpose Liquid Cleaner 28 oz. 99c
Fruit Float Assorted 10 oz. 59c Blanco Bleach Gallons 99c
Hellman's Mayonnaise Quarts $1.54 Olivano Oil Gallons $5.60


-I


LY~~-C -~-LI -I-Y~~f~bf


Ir3-rtcruM~un~*n~~.uEI\L~laCP --~-- --r -- -----~-L--.,,~-~.;- c~,~_~


WS.Y


.- /. *





;: k


The Tribune .. Whlnesday, May 8, 1974
^^>j a p-^ ,M ' ^ yw


* 0


.'" --
'^ . -*. ..
- ' '

.. ..


M -.'


3MH RI.3CE
3 LB $1.37


COM. O nmFWF A MOAUiM NMD
.O. WMX N-39 PHOME 3.2666-744


EID HAM


MELLOW CRISP BACON


S 1LB
PACKAGE


0 DR. BALLARD I
DOG FOOD cmkwe/uv


C


ROBI HOt
FLBBAG
5 LB BAG


PORTERHOUSE STEAK
SIRLOIN STEAK
FULL CUT ROUND STEAK
SIRLOIN TP ROAST
ROCK CORNISH GAME HENS 20 oz.
MAPLE LEAF WIENERS


$2.59LB
$2.35 LB
$1.99LB
$2.55 LB
$1.19LB
$1.19LB


HAMBURGER PATTIES


-IJU IN AYMAY12

GLADSTONE FARMS
WHOLE FRYERS




S65LB


GLADSTONE FARMS
CUT-UP FRYERS
BREAST/THIGHS
BACKS/NECKS
NEW ZEALAND
LAMB LOIN CHOPS
LAMB LEGS


PACKAGE OF


QUART
HELLMANN'S
MAYONNAISE


$1.39


12 oz.
THREE STAR
CORNED
BEEF


LI029


.790 LB
.99CLB
.49C LB
1.29LB
1.29LB


FOUR .79


; 6-1/2 oz.
EATWELL TUNA


8oz.
NESCAFE
COFFEE


BAYGON
22SEC CoE
22oz.


GOLDEN GRAIN
N MACARONI& CHEESE -
SDINNERL 7-1/4 oz.


13o99


ALL I OSE
5 1 BAG
POTATOES


MOTTS APPLE JUICE QUARTS
8 oz. HAWAIAN PUNCH 6 PK
VERY BERRY GRAPE OR RED
SAWYERS GREEN UMA BEANS 303
SAWYERS BLACKEYE PEAS 303
SAWYERS PIGEON PEAS 20 oz.
SAWYERS
SWHOkE TOMATOES 20 oz.
CHAMPION TOMATO PASTE 10 oz.


CAMPBELL'S 10-1/4 oz.
VEGETABLE SOUP

3 FOR 69


MINUTE MAID 12 oz.
ORANGE JUICE


.990


.85e


$1.29
2/.790
2/.790
2/.794
2/.994
2/.790


*-I 9l


ST. PAULI GIRL
MALT TONIC

6 "39


.990


2 for .790


HATCHET BAY
ICE CREAM $1.39
1/2 GALLON/ALL FLAVORS


JUMBO
CANTALOUPESe -


I LBBAG
CARROTS
S.99C


GREEN
PEPPERSVK.


IM q


JUMBO
LETTUCE

_ .5B0


4 FOR d4 FOR
LARGE FiRM
99 CCUMBERS.9


ONDESSA SA


3/5


AJAX
GIANT SIZE
DETERGENT


I ]


TOWELS
JUMBO ROLL


BI6


PUnCIAS 1 25 M 34
II 350 44H
II 145 14M
I 55600 14M

It 14IN W
II 1*500 MM


Its M01K CItE0tn
I* IS CMCNIIUS
3k BNUS CnillS
7k lNMS CiiM S

il 25 MIS ChiMS
IKMMhsMISCU
ab lullS


* .,...


SUNNY DEUGHT 1/2 GALLON
ORANGE DRINK


I BORDEN'S ALL FLAVORS
YOGURT e oz.

FROZEN FOOD


HOW)


OUVANO
COOKING OL

s4.29


I
JMU
IACE


------ ---- -i-~~;------------i


~i~


sl09








6 The Tribune *-* Wednesday. May 8. 1974


Super Vol


Oreen
l6a--- h rbn .-ededy ,17


peppers
GREEN peppers are a good
buy at the Potter's Cay
Produce Exchange these
days. They are excellent for
both salads and hot dishes.
Chicken too is a good buy
and it goes well with tomatoes
and peppers. Buy a frying
chichen cut in serving pieces
and saute the pieces in butter
in a skillet until they are
golden brown on all sides.
Sprinkle with salt and pepper.
Finely chop a small onion
and add it to the skillet. Add
three-quarters of cup of dry
white wine or Vermouth to the
pan and cook until the wine
has been reduced by half Add
three peeled, seeded and
chopped tomatoes. Seed four
green peppers and cut them
into strips.
Heat two tablespoons of
butter in a saucepan and add a
crushed clove of garlic and the
pepper strips. Satue for several
minutes and add the
pepper mixture to the chicken
pan. Cook the chicken until it
is fork tender.
For this dish, green and red
peppers are used. Soak four
large carrots, peeled, two red
and two green peppers seeded,
and two peeled cucumbers in
ice water for 10 minutes.
Cut the peppers into large
squares. Cut the carrots and
cucumbers into half-inch slices.
Combine three quarts of water
in a large kettle with a bouquet
garni of a celery stalk, four
sprigs of parsley, a bay leaf and
a sprig of thyme. Add two
tablespoons cider vinegar and
two teaspoons salt. Bring to a
boil.
Add the carrots and cook
for 10 minutes. Add the other
vegetables and boil for 10
minutes more until the
vegetables are tender but still
crisp. Drain. Serve with garlic
butter. Melt three-quarters of a
cup of butter with two crushed
cloves of garlic. Strain the
butter and mix it with the
vegetables. Add two teaspoons
lemon juice and a little salt and
P the barbecue, try grilled
grc. peppers.-. Reor. each
eft cut the top from one
or two peppers and remove the
seeds and ribs. Arrange the
peppers on the grill and let
them cook over the hot coals
until the skin is charred. Scrape
off the skin and season with
finely chopped garlic heated in
olive oil with salt, pepper and a
few drops of lemon juice.
For hot peppers, onions and
tomatoes, slice enough green
peppers removing the seeds and
ribs to make two cups. Arrange
a layer of peppers in a shallow
baking dish. Top with sliced
tomatoes.
Top the tomaotes with
sliced onions. Continue the
layers until the vegetables have
been used up. Season a quarter
cup of olive oil with one
crushed clove of garlic and aslt
and pepper. Pour over the
vegetables. Cover the dish and
bake at 350 degrees for 45
minutes.
Here are two recipes for
stuffed green peppers. For the
first, slice the tops from six
peppers of the same size.
Remove the seeds and ribs and
parboil in boiling water for five
minutes. Drain them on paper
towels.
Combine in a bowl, six slices
of white break moistened with
a little milk and squeezed dry,
a can of drained and flaked tuna
fish, half a cup of chopped
black olives, a third of a cup
olive oil, two tablespoons each
of drained capers and chopped
parsley, small minced clove of
garlic and salt and pepper. Mix
well and stuff the peppers.
Place them close together in
a baking dish and add a third
of cup of broth to the pan.
Bake at 350 degrees for half an
hour. Serve hot or cold.
For the second recipe,
prepare the peppers as in the
first recipe and set aside. In a


skillet, saute two chopped
onions and two cups of rice in
a cup of olive oil until golden.
Add two large peeled, seeded
and chopped tomatoes and
cook the mixture for five
minutes.
Add three cups of water, a
quarter cup of raisins, a quarter
cup of chopped parsley, a
teaspoon of salt, a teaspoon of
sugar and a little pepper. Cook
over moderate heat for 15
minutes or until the rice is
barely cooked.
Stuff the mixture into the
peppers. Place the peppers;
close together in a fire-proof
baking dish. Add two cups of
water to the casserole andti
rteani the dish, tightly covered
for half an hour. Transfer the
Page 7 Col.,


S THE
S BAHAMIAN
SUPERMARKETS
If it's value you really want,
you really want SuperValuel


31


I!.,.


4^c


U.S. CHOICE



CHUClK ROAST
U.S. CHOICE
SHOULDER STEAK
U.S. CHOICE
RIB STEAK
U.S. CHOICE
RIB ROAST
U.S. CHOICE
GROUND CHUCK
BAHAMIAN GROWN
WHOLE FRYERS


7,


Mothers come in all iz
they all have one gr tl
an unlimited supply if


lb.


Per Ib

Per Ib

Per Ib

Per Ib

Per Ib


$1.59

$2.19

$2.29

$1.49

694


EKITAIITI U WA I YIiI kiI IN !A1 :


BAGGIES
TRASH BAGS
AJAX CLEANER
HALO SHAMPOO
SPREE SOAP


10's


BLUE


HOUR AFTER HOUR DEODORANT


40-oz
3 -oz
BATH


7-oz


HOUR AFTER HOUR ANT-PERSPRATION


DLAUEO IEIH


HELLMANN'S


MAYONNAISE
BREAST O' CHICKEN
CHUNK LITE TUNA


.89C
q.39
.590
3/990
1.69
8-o, 1.79


GALLON


*99


QUART.


7-oz


.59C


-IRY DfIGHB


PHILADELPHIA

Cream Cheese
SUNNY DELIGHT

Oraie Punch
FAMILY FARE SLICED

American Chees


8-oz 650


64-oz $1.25


8-oz


ALL BRANDS

LIIOEEP I^OZ


850


95S


R O I HO.cODmc



All Purpos


PP -O


BUY BAHAMIAN'
SAWYER-,S
TOMATO'PASTE
10 oz-


r^ ,


REGAL
MALT TONIC\
6-Pack

$ IM29


0tb
w,




C --~~ ' /. ~-.;~ Il~;~ ~~ .':_'


1TWOTribue. -.W.o


iE.,-East Street


SPECIALS POR THE WEEK MAY STH,
THROUGH MAY 12TH, 1974.


(plet ad) ms o the West
Inde' p.st -
educateor, ietetoieas
OHM g 1ono -se0e9 wit he
tke g-ast w eake att Ia
banquet to mark the filft
analversary of the Balas"
Aodaatit fetwr Mapower
Training and Devlopmmt oa
May 11 at the Naam Beach
Hotel
Mr. Nettlferd is weB
known to the Baham q as
director of extra maual
studies and head of the Trade
Union Education Institute at
the University of the West
Indies and for his l btures and
writings on West Indian
politics, social structure and
industrial relations, He is also
a creative artist, being the
founder and current Artistic
Director of the Jamaica
National Dance Theatre
Company.


Off to
Mexico


MCKENZIE
WHOLE KERNEL CORN
MCKENZIE
GREEN PEAS
RICH
CHOCOLATE ECLAIRS
DONALD DUCK
ORANGE JUICE
JENO SNACK TRAY
BORDEN'S
ICE CREAM


10-oz

1O-oz

10-oz

6-oz
7%-oz


1/2 GALLON


2/79C

2/790


* a


2/69C
$1.49

$1.39


FRMORGOEY S


MR. BUBBLE POWDER


12-oz


HAWAIIAN
rMU PUNCH RED/GRAPE/VEIY BERRY/


.6S


6/8-2 L49


HUNTS
HUNTS KVANILLA/CHOCOLATE FUDGE/LEMON/
SNAK PAR DICED PEACHES/FRUIT CUP 4/5-oz


STAPUF SOFTNER

FORMULA 409

UQUID PLUMBER

TY-DE BOL
ALEGRE
NECTARS MANGO/PINEAPPLE
RENUZIT AI FRESHNERS


N1


iu
("7iy


' .


GALLONS


22-oz

32-oz

12-oz


6-oz
7-oz


290
'1.S9

1.09


1.15

.19

6/1.19
.Sa


-^^GARDEN ^ ;JiJ^jFRJ$1;I2;JDI


GREEN

Cabbage
FLORIDA

Grapefmrits
ANJOU

Pears


Per Ib


19


3 for 79


6 or $1.9


I'm'fs.


tmiOs


TMH
SUPERMARKETS
H it's value you really want,
you really went SuperValu


MR. STEPHEN G. KENT,
Resident vice President, First
National City Bank, recently
announced that Mr. Bernard
Albury (pictured) has been
elected by the bank to attend
an advanced credit course in
Mecixo City.
Mr. Albury, who started at
the bank back in 1962 as a
bookkeeper, has made
"tremendous progress," says
Mr. Kent and after a number of
promotions over the year was
made assistant manager in
1971.
He received his first
promotion to Official Auditor
in January 1965. In May of the
following year he became
assistant accountant of
collections, sundries, general
bookkeeping and current
accounts and in March of 1968
"he was promoted to
pro-manager of credit and
marketing.

GREEN
PEPPER
From Page 6
peppers to a serving dish and
chill.
This pepper mixture can be
served hot or cold. Saute a
sliced onion in butter in a small
sauce pan until it is
translucent. Add six peppers,
seeded and sliced, salt and
pepper to taste. a
Simmer covered for S15
minutes. Add six peeled,
seeded and coarsely chopped
tomatoes and a clove of garlic.
Simmer covered for half an
hour. Remove the clove of
garlic and correct f




liltR I


I


w* 4
*t. ,'


SANFDWI H MIAT


CLA


e1


Linus


,1


-FROZEN ODTEASEt


1-1BBYSt


d Ou


IRAINCO AMERICAN
S p
PAGHETTI
co11 li57A-07




3 91;


rEn


,-~. .. % .


sm.










The Tribune - Wednesdey, May 8, 1974


COLLEGE OF


BAHAMAS HEAD
SDR. JOHN KNOWLES,
who recently assumed the
office of Principal of the
College of the Bahamas, is
shown, left, being
congratulated by Minister of
Education and Culture
i Livingston N. Coakley.
Dr. Knowles is the son of
Bishop Donald Knowles and
Mrs. Knowles, of Long Island.
He received his formal
education in the United
Kingdom and from 1958 to
.-Ts 1960 saw service in the
British Army as an Education
E officer. Mr. Knowles
obtained his Ph. D. from the
0 University of London in
1970 That same year he was
promoted to Assistant
lI Professor and subsequently
became Chairman of the
Spanish Division of Simon
Fraser University. Photo
by Fred Maura.


Emphasis on


training island


administrators
THE HON. LIVINGSTONE COAKLEY, Miniter of Education
& Culture, officially opened the Educational Administration and
Supervision Workshop Monday at the Bahamas Teachers College.
The workshop is being held mainly for senior officers who hold
responsible positions in teaching in the Family Islands.


Taking part in the workshop
is Mr. Barry Harley of
UNESCO (United Nations
Educational. Scientific and
Cultural Organization).
The Minister noted that
strong family island
representation was intended
because up to now most of the
opportunities for training
provided by Government have
---1I


Opposite Bar 20 Phone 5-2398


GROCERY DEPT.


Carnation
CREAM


14Y2 OZS.


Lipton's
TEA BAGS 10's


Milk maid
CONDENSED MILK


MLO


Maxwell House
COFFEE


Delsey
TOILET TISSUE

Bounty
PAPER TOWELS

MAYONNAISE


:II V


Each 264


Each 15'


Each 30'


16-oz. Tins 129


12 oz. Assorted Flavour
FANTA SODAS


Native
ONIONS


Each 204


15Ilb.


NativeSOUR ORANGES 'Each 8S


Native TOMATOES


254 lb.


Native SWEET PEPPERS Each 10J


10 ozs. l.99 ----m m In-- ---- i


Twin Pack 55, )Mi Eg
Opposite Bar 20 Phone 5-2398
Roll 69 Large Parking Lot
Rol Store Hours-
Quarts 1.20 Monday Thursday 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
n Friday and Saturday 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.


from the list of United States
sugar quota recipients.
The special subcommittee of
the House Agricultures
Committee said these nations
were regarded as unreliable
sugar suppliers. (AP)
FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2167


been enjoyed by younger
officers. This was* because a
good many older and more
experienced officers did not
find it possible to leave their
families for extended periods
in New Providence or outside
the Bahamas.
Also, some who did benefit
from the Government's
programmes have attained
positions of trust and have
been asking for continuous
training in order to improve
their performance, the Minister
disclosed.
"I am concerned about
regular programmes of
inservice training for every part
of the Education service,
especially for those who have
not so far had opportunities,
and especially for officers in
the family islands," he
declared.
There were several reasons
for this concern. Many agencies
outside the Bahamas do not
consider that our geography is
one of a long string of islands,
with a thinly scattered
population, he said.
Most of our schools are
family island schools, with
their own general and
particular problems, he told
those present. "Indeed, it is
often said at headquarters, that
most of our real problems and
challenges in Education are
those of the Islands Schools."
Other reasons for the
emphasis on the Family Islands
which the workshop
symbolized are found in the
general policy guidelines in the
Education White Paper, "Focus
on the Future", he said.
Specifically, the White Paper
states the intention to equalize,
where possible, educational
and training opportunities to
citizens who reside on the
Family Islands, the Minister
pointed out.
Every year additional
centralized secondary facilities
come into operation. Instead
of 11-12, many of the pupils
enrolled in these schools are
now 14-18 years. The carricula
of these schools are changing
so as to equip the students for
jobs in their own communities,
he declared.
Many, he added, want to go
to college in Nassau or abroad
and they have to be adequately
prepared before they leave
home.
These are some of the
pressures and situations which,
makes the role of
administrators in the Islands
and in Nassau, far more
complex than it was a few
short years ago. Moreover,
these situations all change and
develop continuously, Minister.
Coakley noted.
"Greater facilities, the
complexities of growing
sophistication in the education
system and the continuous
need for innovations are also
thrust upon you.
"It is essential that
administrators in all schools
and institutions, and in all
parts of the Bahamas have
regular, on-going opportunities
to review their problems and
practices, and to up-date their
knowledge and skills; and that
some of this take place in the
fluid, life-like atmosphere of a
workshop," the Minister felt.
He thought the Educational
Administration and
Supervision Workshop
important, and hoped there
would be others.
He thanked those who
travelled to Nassau at their
own expense.
OUT OF SUGAR
WASHINGTON A House
of Representatives agriculture
sub-committee recommended
today .the elimination of the
Bahamas. Ireland and Uganda


I








The Tribune - Wednesday, M.y 8, 1974


S


PRICES ODN


RICELAND RICE


P -- W-D GROUND BEEF
- W.D. COOKED HAM a-oz. 1.39
W.D. COOKED HAM 12.oz. 1.99
RIB ROAST .................B 2.09
GLADISIUNt tAKM
WHOLE FRYERS ..................LB. .65
W.D. HICKORY BACON ......... LB.99
W-O ALL MEAT
BOLOGNA ............................. .1 19
WD0 ALL MEAT OR
DINNER FRANKS ..................L 1.0


.MAY 9, TH= SuNBAY, MAY 12, 974.
.D.TURKEYS
5 to 12 lb. avg.
.79
LkI LNOl MAK


LB.


UImH em-


I


SPRING ROASTERS
LB. .59






.D. COOK HAM 16-oz. 2.59
RIB STEAK...... .................LB2.19
DE NIM ....... ............ LB2.79
OUT FRYERS............................... 76 6
FRYER QUARTERS ......................LB. 6
T BONE OR
PORTERHOUSE STEAK ................ L2.59


SLIBBYS VIENNA SAUSAGE


G-oz
CANS


LIBBYS POTTED MEAT




IS


SOUTHERN BISCUIT FLOUR



LB.
BAG


RIFTY MAID
ICE MILK 0. ORE IDA
DINNER FRIES......
HALF ALLON w oz1. MITONS
CREAM PIES ......6


SWANSON'S
BEEF DINNER


Libbgi
Ubby |
.Ubb LIBBY SLICE ES HALVES

REACHES |



CAN 9


MAXWELL HOUSE
REGULAR, DRIP,
FINE OR ELECTRA PERK
COFFEE


Soft
Margarine
unr .^... ^


11-02.
PKo.


BEEF


WI1-LB. MRS. FILGERT'S
WHIP BOWL MARGARINE



LB.


4 EARS BIROS EYE
CORN ON COB ......85
8-01VE. ROS 2
VEGETABLES 2 FOR .69


HARVEST FRESH
ORANGE JUICE


/ STOKLEYS
tDRo GRAPE, LEMONAE
ORANGE OR FRUIT PUO
BRINKS



9 CANS 9


1LB. SUPERBRANO AMERICAN SLICED
CHEESE 1.39


STOKLEYS
CUT GREEN BEANS


ZEST BATH SIZE SOAP


BAHAMIAN GROWN


ONIONS
5-lb. .79


I

CANS


10-lb. 1.49


COLD POWDER
KING SIZE.
DETERGENT


HEAD


BAG
ORANGES .............1.............
TANGERINES ...................8 FOR .99
CARROTS................ 4 FOR
TflTj~TKjjii


BAHAMIAN GROWN
TOMATOES


.19 LB.


LIU FI"!LIl1:


Star4Kt


SKUNK LINMT TUNA


2iIm


OLIVANO OIL


,48-0Z.
BOTTLE


LB.
CAN


LETTUCE


I.W


84-02.
PKG.


i n..- .
llP.lI


Y*^


wti


tv,









10 The Triune W daeday, May 8. 1974


NOTICE
NOTICE is noieby given that I LIIFU TI LUSMA of
Crook d e Island l ,_I. N.s.. j i, appi'y rig ito the M minister
responsiblee for Natiionall i and Citizensnhp. for
riaturalisation as a cit.eon of The Bahamas, and that any
person, who knows any reason why naturalisation should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 1st day of
May 1974 to The Ministei responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002,
Nassau.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby qi:ven that LOUISTAL DESSONCAIRE
of Hampton Street. NassauSi is applying to the Minister
responsible for Natjionality and Citizenship, for
naturalis.tion ds a citizeri of rhe Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalisation should
not be grated should send a war tten and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 1st day of
May 1974 to The Minrister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of IHome Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002,
Nassau.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that IRENE DELORES HARVEY
of Cooper's Terrace, New Providence is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 8th day of May
1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affaiis, P. O. Box N-3002,
Nassau.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MARIO PORTUONDO of
Bacardi & Company Limited Plant Site, Western District of
New Providence is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for naturalisation as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why naturalisation should not be granted should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 8th day of May 1974 to The
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002, Nassau.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that EMELIKE NDUCHE
ACHARA of The Govew We ,t Bay Street is applying to The
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration as a i titen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days fror the 8th day of May
1974, to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002,
Nassau.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that HILTON ALEXANDER
HARVEY of Cooper's Terrace, New Providence is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows .my season why registration should not
be granted should seid a wiitteni and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 8th day of May
1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. O. Box N-3002,
Nassau.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that PLTLER JOHN FISHER of
Brighton Road, Perpail Tiack, West Bay Street, Nassau, N.
P. is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for naturalisation as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
naturalisation should riot re giarited should send a written
and signed statement of the far ts within twenty-eight days
from the 8th day of May 19/4 to The Minister responsible
for Nationality arnd Citizenship, Minifstry of Home Affairs,
P. O. Box N-3002, Nassau.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that BRlENETTA WILLIAMS of
Lightbourn Avenue, F niiingrjton Ro(ad is applying to the
Minister res-punsibl for Natition ity ,ind Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of The ELaihdmas, and that any
person who knows ,ny ir s';! wh\ ,rejistirS on should not
be granted should *,f rrl so wi ittin idi sirjgncd statement of
the facts within twenty -eight dfrs firui the 1st day of May
1974 to The M ir.tt-i i 'sp [ -, -li., lor Nationality and
Citizenship. M nistiv ,.f iHoirr Aiff.iL s, P. O Box N-3002,
Nassau.


QUALIFIED ACCOUNTANT

Chartered Ac,(liintiitl ,i ( rt ified Public
Accountant required loir position of Assistant to
the (;GroupM (ut roller I i iiarge group of
Comnpanics copcTin,111 I re I port. his is a newly
crcaited position cl ir rlint d,".:ctly to the Group
Controller. The successtll candidate will be
required to in\olc hir(issc ll diie-ply in all aspects of
the Group's accomiting i tt iinc'tionS. Iensuring that
procedures are properly followed. suggesting, and
if approved, impleimentnting improvements,
undertaking special studies and projects.
instructing in the (;r)oup's on the job training
programme. maintaining with managers of
operating divisions, preparation of budgets, etc.
The successful candidate will have had some years
post-qualification experience in the profession.
perferably with an international firm. Subsequent
experience in industry or commerce will be an
advantage. Experience with computerized
accounting records is a requirement. Career
opportunities are excellent.

Apply to: Personnel Department. Grand Bahama
Port Authorit% Limited. P. 0. Box F2666 or 30C
Kipling Budding. Ireeport. Grand Bahama.


Tayor's art on show at


AN exhibit of the paintilgs
of Bahamian artist Wayde
Taylor was opened at the
U.S. Embassy on Friday with
the artist in attendance.
Over 150ISO guests attended
the opening of the exhibit of
twelve of Mr. Taylor's major
paintings, together with
others of his works. .
The exhibit is titled "The
Bahamian Scene" and. all of
the paintings depict local
settings. Mr. Taylor received a
Ministry of Tourism award in
1970 for his paintings, and in


U.S. Embassy


1972 was presented with a
plaque from Prime Minister
Pindling for his contributions
to art and culture in The
Bahamas.
He has shown his work at
the Sheraton British Colonial
Hotel under the patronage of
the Prime Minister and has
also had exhibits at the
Nassau Art Gallery and other
locations.


BIBLE INSTITUTE GRADUATION


THE BAHAMAS Bible
Institute will be holding
graduation exercises tomorrow
beginning at 8 p.m. in Salem
Baptist Church on Taylor


candidates are scheduled
receive dlplomaa s oG
completion of two years
studies.


delivered by the Rev. Dr. 0. A.
Pratt, 2!d Vice President of
the Bahamas Baptist
MUsionary and Educational
Convent t- of which the


The oil and tempera
paintings on display at the
U.S. Embassy include such
works as "What's Going
On?", "Caves Beach" and
"Out West."
The exhibit is open to the
public at the Embassy on
Queen Street from,8:30 a.m.
until 5:30 p.m., Monday
through Friday, until June 1.


EXHIBITION of paintings by young Bahamian artist Wadye Taylor opened Friday at the
American Embassy in the Mosmar Building, Queen Street. Mr. Taylor has held several exhibitions
and this, his first for 1974, includes a number of recent oil paintings of island scenes and figures
and is called "The Bahamian Scene." The artist is pictured with Mrs. Ronald Spiers, wife of the
American Ambassador, during the opening reception. Bahamas Tourist News Bureau. Photo by
Lorenzo Lockhart.


A Commerce Bankplan Loan



can take the waiting out of wanting.


The way we figure it, you could
be enjoying the same things
you're working and waiting for.
A more comfortable home. A
vacation trip. A car of your own.
You name it.
And we'll come up with a
convenient way to help you do it.
A Commerce Bankplan Loan.
You just tell us how much you
need, and how much you can
repay each month.


We'll work out a plan that takes
the waiting out of wanting.
Without getting you into money
difficulties. That's why we say,
"You and the Commerce.
Together we're both stronger".




<(I
CANADIAN IMPERIAL
BANK OF COMMERCE


You and the Commerce.


Together we're both stronger.











rho Tribune .. Wednesday, May 8, 1974


TOWNandARO N


L -?


...by Daphne Wallace Whitfieid


Poet with a mission & a



painter with a passion


ARTISTS, whether
painters, poets or
actors, have always
problem.


they be
serious
had a


How to do what they want
and still eat.
In the bad old days of
semi-feudalism many artists
were freed from the "got to
eat" problem by wealthy
patrons. But some weren't.
Beethoven produced his nine
symphonies in the most
appalling poverty sometimes
even being reduced to burning
manuscripts to keep warm.
We have these patrons to
thank for much of our cultural
inheritance but if no one
patronised Beethoven it would
appear to follow that they
patronised artists whose talents
they misjudged and therefore
of whom we've never heard.
In modern Russia Soviet
artists who are approved of by
the State are looked after by
the State.
In today's consume
orientated democracies thA
artist who sells, eats ano
those that don't sell, don't eat
live on welfare (where there is
welfare) or transfer into a
commercial field.

This last week I interviewed
two young Bahamian artists
who may or may not be
appreciated in the generations
to come, who may or may not
sell during their lives, who may
stick with what they want to


4


-' environment ... I cultivated
older people who understood
me more than the people in my
peer group ... I played roles to
these older people
entertaining them ... (in this
way) I satisfied a need for
fantasy."
"-- Thus did the need to write
poetry and get into the theatre
develop.


RUPERT MISSICK
(Photo: Sam Rae.)

do or commercialism their
talents.

Rupert Missick is a
Bahamian poet and playwright.
He was born in Nassau oa
October Ist, 1947.
lie started writing poetry at
the age of 13.
lHe told me: "I was
introverted as a child and the
only way I could express
myself was by writing ... I was
interested in animals, nature.
the sea 1 was not into
people ,
"It was difficult for me to
express myself to people in my


CHARLES BURNSIDE WITH HIS PAINTINGS.
(Photo: Philip Symonette.)


Rupert went to Queen's
College in New York, switched
from a journalism course to a
creative writing class then
"split."
Rupert "did" theatre in the
East Village in New York and
on his return to the Bahamas
got a p.r. job and in May 1971
started The New Heart Theatre
on Hay Street.
"None of the (existing)
groups (in Nassau) had been
doing what I thought theatre
here should do relate to
Bahamian life."
During the eighteen months
that Rupert directed the New
Heart Theatre he produced ten
plays.
In recalling this period he
said "I had a rapport with
those kids ... I tried to get
plays they could work with ...
Most of the kids I worked with
couldn't even read a script."
One associate of Rupert's
during this period recalled that
the kids who attended the
plays as audience would be
familiar with every word of the
script having attended all the
rehearsals. There was a
tremendous rapport between
cast and audience and they all
wrote a lot of their own scripts
and made their own costumes.
The New Heart Theatre
carried their plays to the
out-islands. Rupert recalled
one time when they all had to
sleep on the tables in the parish
hall of one settlement.
Eighteen months after it
opened The New Heart Theatre
home to over sixty kids in
the area closed its doors due
to insufficient subsidization.
Rupert returned to New
York for four months, then
came back home in April of
'73, got married, worked
at Z.N.S. for a time as an
announcer-producer trainee.
His programme "Attitudes"
from midnight to dawn
afforded him the opportunity
to read his poetry over the air.
lie has published three
books of poetry "Naked
Moon," "Dick's Point," "God
Save the Queen" and a
soon-to-be published new book
of poetry "Once Upon a
Closeness."
"Once Upon a Closeness" is
a series of love poems to his
wife, Judy.

Charles Burnside is a young
Bahamian, eighteen going on
nineteen, but looks much
younger.
Yet Charles is a prolific
painter.
He began painting at 13. "I
saw an artist painting and I felt
I could do a better job than
he."
Charles never had a painting
lesson in his life. He was
encouraged by Mr. Saunders of
Just-Rite bakery, a neighbour,
who displayed them in his
shop. "A couple of artists gave
me left over things," Charles
said.
Charles paints landscapes,
seascapes. palm trees, sunsets,


THE OPENING OF THE MONTAGU STUDIOS on
Friday afternoon. From left to right: Mr. Ricou Browning
Jr., trainer; (at rear) Minister of Tourism, the Hon. Clement
T. Maynard; Minister of Transport, the Hon. George Smith;
Mrs. Jeanette Wilkinson, Casting Development; Mrs.
Pindling; the Prime Minister; Mr. Kobi Jaeger, President and
Executive Producer of Montagu TV Enterprises. And
foreground: Salty, the sealion. Photo: Fred Maura.


poincianas. He said "I was
influenced by Homer Williams.
He has the feelings of
Bahamian life."
Charles' paintings can be
seen (and bought) at Toogoods
studios and Nassau Glass.
His paintings have always
sold. He would sell his early
ones for $1 or $2. Recently he
was commissioned by the
Royal Bank of Canada to do a
painting. It took him six weeks
and he got $300 for it.
What are Charles' future
plans? He told me he would
like to go to Art School to gain
knowledge about paints and
techniques but says "I know
exactly what 1 want to do
when 1 paint. I cannot
be satisfied with my work. The
first day I am happy with it.
After that I don't like it
anymore."
But whatever happens
Charles will go on painting.
"It's something I have to be
doing," he says simply.

Mr. and Mrs. Ray Duggan
and their three young
daughters, Amanda, Emma and
Sophie leave Nassau on
Saturday for England at the
end of Ray's tour of duty in
the British Diplomatic Service
in the Bahamas.
The Duggans have been in
Nassau for four and a half
years during which time Ray
has held the positions of
Assistant Trade Commissioner,
Trade Commissioner and
Second Commercial Secretary


Andrew Capitman, a
newcomer to the Bahamas, will
appear as Mendoza, the
Revolutionary in the Nassau
Amateur Operatic Society's
production of "VIVA
MEXICO" at the Dundas Civic
Centre Saturday, May 11 to
18. The Box Office is now
open at the Maura Lumber
Company, Bay Street and
reservations can be made by
telephoning 24001.

Monday, May 13, will be a
benefit performance for the
Bahamas Paraplegic
Association and the curtain
time is 8:30 p.m.


the position he held at the
end of his tour of duty here.
The Duggans have been
posted back to England for
three years.
Ann (Mrs. Ray Duggan) has
led a very active life during the
family's four and a half years
in the Bahamas. She has:
played a very active role in
the play group for deprived
children which was held in the
grounds of Government House.
spearheaded the Bahamas
Aid for Needy Children.
put on puppet shows and
run a drama course at St.
Matthews school.
took a course in social
psychology.
joined the Bahamas Poets
and Writers Association and
helped edit and produce their
magazine "Contact".
helped conduct the Mental
Health Association's survey .n
preschool and day care centres,
and.
published, just before last
Christmas, her own story-poem
book for children "The Tale of
Emmeline Tuffin."
A week last Monday a
reception was held at the home
of the British High
Commissioner and Mrs. C. J.
[readwell at Dale House, Lake
('unningham so that their
many friends and colleagues
could say "Farewell" to the
Duggans.

"Viva Mexico," the Nassau
Amateur Operatic Society's
new production, opens

WI


FAREWELL PARTY TO
THE DUGGANS. Left to
right: Father Hartry, Mrs.
Janyne Rahming, Mr. Ray
Duggan, Mrs. C.J. Treadwell,
Senator Shad rack Morris, Mr.
C.J. Treadwell (British High
Commissioner) and Mrs.
Shadrack Morris. (Photo:
Toogoods Photography) .

Saturday night at the Dundas
Civic Centre.
One extra little comic touch
(the whole show promises to
be a big laugh) is the entrance
of the police band consisting of
four boys from the C. C.
Sweeting School band.
Tickets are on sale at the
Bay Street branch of the Maura
Lumber Company.

Nassau and Freeport will
join forces for a concert on
May 14th & 15th in Mary, Star
of the Sea Auditorium,
Freeport.
Aquinas College will repeat
their successful Nassau
production of "The Music
Man" under the direction of
Mr. Andrew Curry.
Mary, Star of the Sea, will
present "A New Tomorrow"
under the direction of Miss
Vickie Slickers.
CRUISING
MEMBERS of the Cruising
Club of America arrived in the
Hope Town, Abaco, area today
for a few days of cruising in
the waters off Abaco. There
are about 60 members in the
party.
Mr. Le Boutillier, a resident
of Hope Town, publisher of
the Yachtsman's Guide and a
member of the Cruising Club,
hosted members to lunch
today. A special dinner will be
given at the Hope Town
Harbour Lodge for them
tonight.

POST AGAIN
THE Postmaster of the
Bahamas has been informed by
the Canadian Postal
Authorities that the strike has
ended and that normal air mail
despatches to Canada should
be resumed immediately.
The resumption of
despatches began yesterday.


GARDENING SUPPLIES!

"Plants *Fertilisers "Tools

*Hanging Baskets *Pliant Pots
and much more



IASW KS N E i EISLPSHO
MONTROSE AVENUE TELEPHONE 2-425


M-05AT 1-: 0_0





-i T CO~LORBYDYEULUXE
PARENTAL GUIDANCh SUGGESTED.


Matinee 3:00 & 4:55, Evening 9:00-'Phone 2-1004, 2-1005



"THE BLACKEYE". PG.
Starring
fiRED WILLIAMSON ROSEMARY FORSYTHE
RESERVATIONS NOT CLAIMED) BY 8:45 WILL BE SOLD



Now thru Friday Now thru Friday
Matinee starts at 2:15 Continuous Showings
Evening 8:30 from 3:00
"DEAF SMITH & E
JOHNNY EARS" PG. "COOL BREEZE" R.
Anthony Quinn, Thalmus Rasulala,
Franco Nero Judy Pace
PLUS
PLUS "THE LOVE MACHINE" R.

TRADER HORN" PG. John Philip Law, -
Dyan Cannon
Phone 2-2534 No one under 8Iadmited.




Matinee ti NOW SHOWING
M'tinee Continuous from 1:30, Evening 8:30'Phone


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that VIVIEN CARRERA --
JUSTIZ of the Western District in the Island of New
Providence is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for naturalisation as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why naturalisation should not be granted should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty- eight days from the 8th day of May 1974 to The
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002, Nassau.











The Tribune ...- - Wednesday, May 8, 1974


CLASSIFIED


SECTION


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS-FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV. TELEPHONE 21988 E'"' 5


REAL ESTATE


C14320
Large lot Adelaide Beach.
Phone 41298 day or nite

C14414
HARMONY HILL have
house with unusually large
rooms, separate dining and
sitting, patio, enclosed
grounds, car porte neatly
kept -- rental established.
Asking $48,000.00. Rental
income $6,600.00. See Dial
.22033, 41197.

C14470
CLEARED corner lot in
Highland Park 150' x 110'
$10,000 value for only $8,500.
Phone 28293 34527.


C744i 5
41,;00 sq. feet (400 by 110)
MAIN road Prince Charles at
Entrance of SEABREEZE. Was
$45,000.00 reduced to
$30,000.00. Dial Damianos
22033, 41197.
C14497
EAST BAY STREET ON THE
HARBOUR Four-bedroom
house in excellent condition.
Own dock. Great buy for the
yachtsman. $250,000.00.
H. G. CHRISTIE LTD. Phone
21041/2/3/4.

C14340
PREFER TO BUILD YOUR
OWN HOUSE?
YAMACRAW BEACH
ESTATES is ready
$75 down. Easy terms. No
interest.
Beach rights.
Tel. 41141 or 24148 or 2-3027
Morley & O'Brien Real Estate
(RREA Brokers)

C14519
EASTERN DISTRICT BLAIR
ESTATE off Village Road 3
bedroom 2 bath, living room,
patio room, dining room,
maid's quarters, kitchen,
double garage, own water
supply, double lot, view by
appointment. Phone 2-1741-2
business hours.

C14520
HARMONY HILL three
bedrooms, 2 baths, plus maids
quarters, furnished in good
taste, excellent condition.
$47,000.00.
DUPLEX Little Blair
Estates. Income established,
sales price on $52,000.00.
BLAIR Three houses to
choose from good buys. See
anytome.
HILLTOP WINTON
HIGHWAY 3 bedrooms, 3
baths, plus maids quarters,
garage, storeroom, spacious
patios, gorgeous views of Sea.
Only $110,000. Beach rights.
Only $110,000. Beach rights.
2-storey house, WINTON
facing Bay Street furnished,
spacious grounds, garage maids
quarters. Has three bedrooms
plus maids quarters only
$110,000.00. With gorgeous
views, beach rights.
GOLDEN GATES three
bedrooms 2 baths, only
$33,000.00.
AN ESTATE OUT WEST
312 feet on Sandy Beach -
with four bedrooms four baths,
plus 5 bedroom Garage
Apartment affair ideal for
expansion, cottage Colony,
Condo, or small hotel. See it to
appreciate. Best swimming Out
West.
200 ft. by 880 on
WATERFRONT CABLE
BEACH $225,000.00.
Income $17,000.00. Ideal for
development. DIAL THE
ACTION NUMBERS 22305,
22033, 22307 evenings 41197.

FOR SALE OR RENT
C 14496
EXECUTIVE HOUSES
PRICES ON APPLICATION
CASCADILLA Beautiful old
Bahamian house in town
surrounded by two acres of
grounds and gardens. Three
bedrooms, three baths in main
house plus two-bedroom guest
cottage. Large living room,
dining room and patio for
entertaining. Fully furnished.
VILLAGE ROAD AREA
Large comfortable family
house with four bedrooms, 3
baths, walled-in garden and its
own water supply. Available
June 1st.
H. G. CHRISTIE LTD. Phone
21041/2/3/4.

FOR RENT
C 14483
2 BEDROOM unfurnished
apartment Centreville $200
month. Unfurnished apartment
Clifton Street. $200 month.
Phone 5-6963.

C14478
NASSAU HILLCREST
TOWERS
Swimming pool. sun terrace
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, 3
bedroom apartments.
Contact 7-8421 or 2. Evenings
7-7065.

C14355
COTTAGES and apartments


monthly alrconditioned,
fully furnished, maid service
available. Lovely garden and
swimming pool. Telephone
31297,31093.


FOR RENT


C14345
TWO, Furnished and
airconditioned, 1-bedroom
apartments, Contreville, Ring
5-8679, ask for Mr. Pritchard.
C14493
LARGE STORE, Warehouse
and parking lot in Palmdale.
Tel. 23819.
C14512
LUXURY Penthouse at
Carefree Ocean Apartments,
beautifully furnished, gorgeous
views, private beach and pool.
No children or pets. Tel:
78066 or 78141.

C14511
2 BEDROOM apartment in
new duplex building Boat
Alley, off Market Street.
Information call 5-4258.
C14526
FURNISHED HOUSE
2 bedroom 1 bath $300 per
month. Location: Winchester
Street off Montrose Avenue.
Phone 41377.

S PUBLIC AUCTION
C14391
KIRK S. HINSEY will sell at
the Parking Lot east of the
Harbour Moon Hotel, Bay
Street, at 12 noon on the 10th
day of May 1974 the following
property:
"ALL THOSE pieces parcels
or lots of land situate in the
vicinity of the Baillou Hills
being a portion of the
Baillou Hill Estates
Subdivision and comprising
Lots Fifteen (15) and Eleven
(11) of Section number One
(1) and bounded as follows
on the NORTH partly by
Lot Fourteen (14) in
Section number One (1) of
the said subdivision and
partly by Lot Thirteen (13)
of Section Number One (1)
of the said Subdivision and
partly by Lot Ten (10) -of
Section Number One (1) of
thp said Subdivision and
running thereon One
running thereon One
hundred and Ninety-five and
Sixty-three hundredths
(195.63) feet more or less
on the EAST by Baillou Hill
Road and running thereon
Sixty-s-five and Seventy
hundredths (65.70) feet on
the SOUTH partly by Lot
Twelve (12) in Section
Number One (1) of the said
Subdivision and partly by
Lot Sixteen (16) of Section
Number One (1) of the said
Subdivision and running
thereon jointly One hundred
and Seventy-one and Ten
hundredths (171.10) feet
and on the West by a public
road Thirty (30) feet wide
and running thereon in a
series s of curves
Seventy-three and Fifty-six
hundredths (73.56) feet."
Mortgage dated 25th August,
1967 Wilshire Rahming &
Dolly Louise Lightbourne TO
Finance Corporation of
Bahamas Limited.
Recorded in Book 1172 at
pages 409 to 417.
The sale is subject to a reserve
price and to the right for the
Auctioneer or any person on
his behalf to bid up to that
price.
Terms: 10% of the purchase
price at the time of sale and
balance on completion.
DATED: 18th day of April
A.D. 1974.
KIRK S. HINSEY
Public Auctioneer

FOR SALE
C14479
PENTAX F1.4 Lens strobe
flash. Excellent condition.
Must sell. Call 24173, ask for
Chuck.
C144F1
1969 Volkswagen automatic
- perfect condition.
Admirl 19" with stand 2
months old. $225.00. Call
78048.
C14518
GOING REASONABLE 1
Singer Sewinq Machine, 1 chest
of drawers, 1 Sputnic Bureau,
double bed, 1969 Beaumont.
Call Mrs. Cole 5-7685.
C14481
METAL detector non-porous
and ore detecting meters.
Deluxe Model. Two heads
included for coin and treasure


detecting. Call between 8-5
p.m. 2-4173, ask for Mike.


C14525
LEAVING THE ISLAND -
must sell New TV with
boosters $300.
Zenith Stereo $150. Other
household items. Call 41438.
C14500
EXCLUSIVE European
designers fur coat fit sizes 12
to 16. Worn once. Can be
converted into jacket at will.
For sale at reasonable price.
Call 3-4240.
C14465
SPECIAL SALE
DOUBLE KNIT POLYESTER
50 different colours
$4.50 per yard
THE YOUNG MISS,.
Market Street near Bay.
Telephone 23365


FOR SALE


C14484
Honda 175 Trail $650. Phone
7-8231 Ext. 7073 ask for
Winston.

C14499
OWNER LEAVING ISLAND
house full of furniture like new
Phone 3-5729 9 a.m. 5
p.m.

CARS FOR SALE
C14354
1972 VOLKSWAGEN 1300
Sedans excellent con-
dition, radio, W/W tyres,
low mileage. Finance and
insurance available. Call
36611-2-3-4.

C 14480
DODGE 2 door hardtop, radio
A.T. low mileage. Excellent
condition. Must sell. Asking
$4400. Call 24173 between 8
and 5 p.m., ask for Mike.

C14411
MOTOR CENTRE LTD
THOMPSON BOULEVARD
PHONE 56739
AT MOTOR CENTRE WF
HAVE THE USED CAR FOW
YOU
1974 DODGE CHALLENGER
Brown with white vinyl top &
White Trim. Air Cond, Radio,
Power Steering, Power Brake,
Maq Wheels & Wide oval tyres.
AT ONLY 1 a,00 $6250.00
1973 DATSUN 240Z LIME
GREEN WITH BLACK TRIM.
Reclining Bucket Seats,
Automatic Console Shift,
Radio, Black Radial Tyres. AT
ONLY $6afiL$5900.00
1973 DODGE DART WHITE
WITH BLACK VINYL TOP.
Radio, Air Condition,
Automatic Transmission,
Power Steering, W/W Tyres.
AT ONLY $4@:a0 $4400.00
1973 PONTIAC VENTURA II
GREEN & WHITE. Automatic
Trans, Power Steerinq, W/W
Tyres. Power Brakes, AT
nNI Y 599Je0 $3500.00
1972 CHEVY VEGA GREY
WITH BLACK TRIM. Radio,
W/W Tyres, Automatic Trans.
AT ONLY $38aO00 $2500.00
1972 PONTIAC VENTURA II
BROWN WITH BLACK TRIM.
Air Cond. Power Steering,
Power Brake, Radio, W/W
Tyres. AT ONLY $S&gLOO
$33500.00
1972 TRIUMPH 2500 P.I.
WHITE WITH BLUE TRIM. R.
H D. Radio, 4 Speed Standard
Trans, W/W Tyres. AT ONLY
$3259.0 $2500.00
1972V/W 1300 BUG RED
WITH WHITE TRIM. Radio,
Standard Trans. W/W Tvres.
AT ONLY $2;,00 $2000.00
1971 A. M. C. JAVELIN SST
WHITE WITH BLACK TRIM.
Automatic Trans. Radio.
Power Steering, Tape Console,
Shift Bucket Seats. AT ONI Y
$3aa,00 $2950.00
1971 MINI CLUBMAN
ESTATE BLUE WITH BLUE
TRIM. Automatic Trans, W/W
Tyres. AT ONLY $iO.IQ0
$1200.00
1970 HILLMAN HUNTER
GOLD WITH BLACK TRIM.
Automatic Trans. AT ONLY
$90.,00 $825.00
1970 V/W 1300 BUG BLUE
WITH RED TRIM. AT ONLY
$1O4O 0 $1350.00
1969 CHEVY IMPALA
GREEN WITH BLACK VINYL
TOP & BLACK TRIM 6
Cylinder, Radio, Power
Steering, Power Brake. AT
ONLY $HI.5<,00 $1850.00
1969 V/W 1300 BUG BLUE
WITH RED TRIM. AT ONLY
$i8Q.00 $1250.00
1969 MERCURY COUGAR
BLUE WITH WHITE TRIM.
Automatic Trans, Radio, Air
Cond, Power Steering, Power
Brake, W/W Tyres. AT ONLY
$a&<0 $1500.00
1969 FORD MUSTANG RED
WITH BLACK TRIM. Radio,
Automatic Trans, W/W Tyres,
Power Steering, Power Brake.
AT ONLY $4 4)o0 $1 200.00
1969 CADILLAC
FLEETWOOD BLACK WITH
BLACK TRIM. Air Cond.


Radio, Power Brake, Powet
Steering, Automatic Trans,
W/W Tyres, Power Windows &
Power Lock. AT ONLY
$229 .00 $2490.00
THIS WEEK SPECIAL
1969 DODGE DART
9 250.00 $1950.00
1968 SUNBEAN RAPIER
$1,LQ.00 $1060.00
FINANCING AVAILABLE


S CRAFT SUPPLIES


C14357
NOW in stock at Bahamian
Paint Supply, Bay Street:-
9 Decoupage
* Clear Cast
* Candle Craft
e Tissue Craft
Phone 2.2386, 2-2898.


ENTERTAINMENT


C 14489
THE NASSAU AMATEUR
OPERATIC SOCIETY
will present


'Iv MEXICO
AT
THE DUNDAS CIVIC
CENTRE
May 11th to 18th excluding
Sunday
Curtain time is 8:30 p.m. every
performance
The Box Office is now open at
the Maura Lumber Company
Bay Street, telephone 24001
for reservations.

C 14336
SETTLER'S PUB & INN
Beaumont Arcade, Bay Street
Telephone 5-9739
IWO BANDS NIGHTLY
The Nassauvians
The Electric Circle
OPEN TILL 4:00 a.m.


MARINE SUPPLIES
C14504
18 ft. fibreglass cabin cruiser
with 110 h.p. inboard/out-
board Volvo. $2500. or nearest
offer. Must sell. Owner leaving
island. Phone 2-4212 Donald
Russell.

C14477
BOAT FOR SALE, 20 ft with
ship to shore, 70 H.P. motor
with auxiliary motor. Must sell,
asking $3,900. See at Shell
Dock, East Bay or call 24173
between 8-5 p.m.

C11894
1969 31 ft. CHRIS-CRAFi
Commander. Sleeps six, private
shower, two 230 h.p. engines
with less than 200 hours.
Kitchenette, good condition
Call 24267, 54011.

C14521
22 ft Searay 215 OMC
Sterndrive 300 hours, galley,
head, cooler, radio, sleeps four.
Many extras. Immaculate
condition. Phone 77504.

CARD OF THANKS
C14501


THE FAMILY of the late Mrs.
Ivv Leary of Rock Sound,
Eleuthera would like to thank
everyone who sent cards,
telegrams, flowers, messages of
condolences and their kind
expressions of sympathy in their
recent bereavement. Special
thanks to Dr. Haynes, Dr.
Roberts, and Sisters and Nurses
of the Female Ward of the
Princess Margaret Hospital, also
thanks to Canon Frederick
Guild and Dr. Corpuz of Rock
Sound, Miss Lavina Sands of
Palmetto Point. The Brass
Bands from Rock Sound and
Palmetto Point.
THE FAMILY

C14515


A" '

THE FAMILY of the late Mr.
Curtis Charles Albury of
Harbour Island would like to
thank everyone who sent cards.
telegrams, flowers and
messages of condolences in
their recent bereavement.
Special thanks to the Nurses
and Doctors of the Male
Medical of the Hospital, Dr.
Kent of Harbour Island, The
Odd Fellows Brothers of St.
Stephen Lodge No. 1721 of
Harbour Island, Rev. Seymour,
Mrs. Winship and Mr. & Mrs
Phillip Grove.


CARD OF TANKS


C14516


I I


THE family of the late Percy
Rosco Darville wish to thank
their many relatives and friends
for their kind words of
sympathy and floral
contributions.
THE DARVILLE FAMILY

SCHOOLS
C14356
LEWIS AUTO SCHOOL
Learn to drive with confidence.
Phone 59805 between 7 and
8:30 a.m. or after 6 p.m. or
35084 anytime.

C 14406
PIANO & VOICE LESSONS.
New York Trained: Sing
with the ease of talking.
Adults, you can learn to play
the piano in easy lessons. Call
2-1300.

zTIzCE
C 14402
UNION NOTICE
THE ANNUAL GENERAL
MEETING OF THE
BAHAMAS HOTEL &
CATERING WORKERS
UNION WILL BE HELD ON
SUNDAY MAY 26. 1974 AT
TAXICO UNION HALL,
WULFF ROAD AT 9:00 P.M.
ONLY FINANCIAL
MEMBERS WILL BE
ALLOWED TO TAKE PART
SIGNED: BOBBY GLINTON
GENERAL SECRETARY

C14490
THE FOLLOWING LOT
OWNERS AT YAMACRAW
BEACH ESTATES ARE IN
ARREARS OF PAYMENT
AND UNLESS A
SUBSTANTIAL PAYMENT IS
MADE WITHIN 14 DAYS
THE AGREEMENT WILL BE
TERMINATED AND THE
LOT RE-SOLD:-
LOT NUMBER NAME
22 Maria Curtis for Caylene
Rolle
54 Agnes Price & Maltina
Store
57 Larry Allen
76 Bernard Albury Inagua
208 Hazel Rutherford
234 Coral McIntosh
364 William Lockhart
426 Edgar Ferguson
448 Anthony Roberts

C14491
THE FOLLOWING LOT
OWNERS AT GLENISTON
GARDENS ESTATE ARE IN
ARREARS OF PAYMENT
AND UNLESS A
SUBSTANTIAL PAYMENT IS
MADE WITHIN THE NEXT 8
DAYS THE AGPr'FMENT
WILL BE TERMIvNATED AND
THE LOT RF-SOLD:-
Lot Block Name
30 8 Stanford Clarke
29 15 George Clarke
4 29 Wilton Beach

ANNOUNCEMENTS
C 14422
COMMERCIAL
PAPER HOUSE
Has a variety of Wedding
announcement cards in stock.
Select yours now for your big
day.
5th Terrace Centreville
Phone 59731 Box N-7679.


C14505
ONE HANDYMAN needed to
live in for general cleaning.
$35.00 weekly. Honest and
reliable. Bring police
certificate. Phone 41530 ask
for Mr. Storr.

C14468
ENGINEER required with
Bachelor of Science in
electrical or mechanical
engineering or equivalent with
at least 5 years practical
experience. Please call 3-6211.

C 14488
GIRL FRIDAY. Must be able
to type and drive. Must be
alive, enthusiastic and
Versatile.
Apply Adv. C14488, c/o The
Tribune, P. 0. Box N3207,
Nassau.
C14514
WELDER with five years
experience in both Electric and
Acetylene Welding and General
Mechanic. Salary to be in the
range of $2.50 per hour with
proper equipment and tools.
Contact Urban E. Cargill at
Telephone 3-2263, Box 2083
GT, for interviews, etc.


HELP WANTED


C14502
TOP FlightTelephonist/Recep-
tionist required for Bahamian
company. Reply in writing to:
Adv. C14502, c/o The Tribune,
P. 0. Box N-3207. Nassau.


C14339
PHOTOGRAPHIC and
Lithographic Technical
Consultant. Apply in writing to
P. 0. Box N-226, Nassau
Bahamas.

TRADE SERVICES
C14353
Plader's Customs

Brokerage Ltd.
Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING. STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACTT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
Phone: 2-3795. 2-3796
2-3797, 22798
Airport 7-7434
FREE ESTIMATES


ANTENNAS
Island TV 2-2618
AUTOMOTIV
Lucas Batteries
Bay Street Garage 2-2434

BOOKSTORE
The Christian Book
Shop 5-8744

BUSINESS FORMS
Executive
Printers 2-4267/5-4011

CABINET MAKERS
Commonwealth
Furniture 31i20

CAMERAS
John Bull 2-4252/3

ENTERTAINMENT
Movies
Film & Equip. Service 2-2157
GARDEN & PET
SUPPLIES
Modernistic Garden Pet
Madeira Shop Plaza 2-2868


Nassau Garden & Pet
Montrose Avenue 2-4259
H A RD IRW A


. . = I


I I TRAE SERVICES


C14423
WINDOW & DOOR
SPECIALISTS
Repairs on all types of
aluminium windows and doors.
Phone 54460, 23723.

C14374
SOUTHERN PAINTING
SERVICE


II


TRADE SERVICES


C 14400
LANDSCAPING and for all
your gardening needs,
trimming, hedging, pruning and
tree felling. Call 5-7810.
LAWNS AND HEDGES.

C14358
SEWING MACHINE PARTS
AND REPAIRS


Specialising in spraying house ISLAND FURNITURE
roofs, furniture, stipple COMPANY
finishings, appliances. P. 0. Box N4818, Nassau
Telephone 5-1919 (days) Dowdeswell and Christie
3-6700 (nights). Streets
W. ...g.gg-Telephone 21197, 23152.



GRAND BAHAMA


i CLASSIFIED

ANNOUNCEMENTS HELP WANTED
C14366 C15127
SHAWNEE WANTED: RESIDENT
IDaily Service between West MANAGER with professional
esPalm Beach and West End. For qualifications and experience
Reservations call The Grand to direct a rather large and
SBahama Hotel (Ex. 5). hiahlv technical electrical


C15140
Mail Order Printing.
* Thermographed printing at
*lowest prices in Bahamas and
| U.S.A.
14 days delivery guaranteed.
*Washington Distributors,
Phone 348-2262 Box F-2921,
* Freeport, Grand Bahama.

HELP WANTED


C14344 |C15135
MASTER TECHNICIANS BORCO TRAINEES
LTD., Mackey Street, your REQUIRED: The Bahamas Oil
Whirlpool distributor offers Refining Company (BORCO)
refrigerators, washers, dryers, requires Trainee Laboratory'
compactors, 'f-ezers, ice Technicians (male) in its
,-akers, air conditioners and dtControlLaboratory.
garbage disposers. With full Applicants should possess
warranty on every homeG- .C.E. or equivalent
appi~ance we sell. Service done qualifications in Mathematics,
by factory trained mechanics. Physics and Chemistry, and
Telephone 23713, 5-9322. *should be interested in learning
*-modern routine analytical
C 14351 Itechniques, including chromato-
T. V. ANTENNAS graphy, spectrophotometry,
Boosters for homes and analysis by -ray.
apartments and hotels Representatives of BORCO will
SALES AND SERVICES Tbe available for career
Call 5-9404 Idiscussion at the 2nd Bahamas
WORLD OF MUSIC Science Exhibition, the A. F.
Mackey Street Adderley High School, in
Next to Frank's Place Nassau, from Sunday May 5th
TRADE SERVICES through Sunday May 12th.



"ASSWUt


BUSINESS I PROFESSIONAL


DIRECTORY

I Save Time I


BL

IPHGO


I h Ihl ~ TIW lcv


S 121 E [XI. 5

2 IM hiliHI '1:


LAUNDRY
DRY CLEANING
New Oriental
Laundry 2.4406
MEN'S WEAR
Fashionette Ltd. 2-2376/7

OPTICIANS
Optical Service


Ltd.


2-3910/1


PAPER
Commercial
Paper House 5-9731

PRINTING
Executive
Printers 2.4267/5-4011
Wong's Printing 5-4506
RUBBER STAMPS
Wong's Rubber Stamp 5-4506

SPORTS GOODS
Champion Sport Land
2-1862

TRAVEL
Playtours 2-2931/7
R.H. Curry & Co., 2-8681/7

TV REPAIRS


company. Knowledge of Italian
language, culture and
background most essential.
This is a position for a man
with highly technical and
sophisticated managerial skills.
Salary commensurate with
qualifications and experience.
Applicants with industrial
electricity background should
apply in writing to
PETROCHEMICAL I. I. Co.
Box F-343, Freeport, G.B.

C14395
Job Title GENERAL
REPAIRMEN
Minimum Education Good
basic education.
Minimum Experience 5-10
years.
Duties/Responsibilities
Inspects, repairs, replaces,
installs, adjusts, and maintains
all mechanical equipment in a
cement ma.u;fj'-.turing plant.
Interested applicants contact
Personnel Department, Bahama
Cement Company, P. 0. Box
F-100, Freoport, Grand
Bahama.

C14397
JOB TITLE INDUSTRIAL
ELECTRICIANS
Minimum Education --Good.
basic education.
Minimum Experience 5 years
experience, preferably in
cement plant or similar
industry.
Duties/Responsibilities
Inspect, repair, install and wire
all electrical apparatus, devices
and circuits of any voltage in
cement plant or assigned area.
Interested applicants contact
Personnel Department, Bahama
Cement Company, P. 0. Box
F-100, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.

C15136
BORCO TRAINEES
REQUIRED: The Bahamas Oil
Refining Company is seeking
applicants for its operator
training programme in,
SHIPPING DEPARTMENT.
Successful applicants will be
trained in all areas related to
the safe and efficient operation
of the Jetty Platforms. The
work involves handling various
types of foreign sea going
vessels. Meeting and working
with people of many
nationalities. Handling imports
and exports of crude oil,
refined products and related
documentation. Applicants
must have completed High
School and possess a minimum
qualification of High School
Diploma. Preference will be
given to mrn' between the ages
of 22 and 35 years old.
Starting salary commensurate
with education, working
background and age.
Representatives of BORCO will
be available for career
discussion at the 2nd Bahamas
Science Exhibition, the A. F.
Adderley High School, in
Nassau, from Sunday May 5th
through Sunday May 12th.


C15134
TONY BORSETTO
MECHANICAL ENGINEER-
ING has the following
vacancies: One industrial
mechanic: Be able to train
others, and able to overhaul
and repair heavy duty
equipment.
One industrial mechanic
engineer: Supervisor, able to
train others in the field. Must
be in possession of welder
operator grade 1 certifi -ite,
and must have at least 4 to 5
years experience in the Oil
Refinery field.
One mechanical engineer: Able
to train others, and be able to
retube high pressure steam
boilers, and general field
maintenance ian oil plant.
One welder fitter: Must be able
to train others, read blue
prints, be in possession of a
welder operator grade 1
certificate, be able to assemble
pipe lines up to 48" and
supervise a small crew of
welders and pipe fitters.
Apply In person to Sanfus
Kemp, General Manager, at 19
Poplar Crescent, P. 0. Box
F-1536, Freeport, Bahamas, or
call 352-5562 for appointment.


> SAVIE'IIE SAVE H EY


'n.', n, I Channel Electronics Ltd.
John S. Geroge 2-8421/6 3.5478

HOUSE PLANS UPHOLSTERING
Evangelos G. Zervos 2-4128 Eddie's Upholsterin 5-9713


mI ei Iminmem Mimem -lm


Shop Nassau MerChants
For Business And Services


- ----


i l ,


a a


--


rw


I


I


I





I


I


I


I I









The Tribune - Wednesday, May 8, 1974


HELP WANTED
C14513
FRONT OFFICE AND
RESERVATION MANAGER
required for 400 Room Hotel.
Must have previous experience
in similar position and fully
conversant with reservations
and front office procedures.
Must supervise front desk and
reservations. Handle all
correspondence and compile
reservations analyses.
Interested applicants apply to
Miss Delone Bowe, Personnel
Office, Princess Properties
International Ltd., P. 0. Box
F-2623 Freeport, Grand
Bahama enclosing references
and police certificates or
telephone 3539661 for
interview.


C14522
KING'S INN & GOLF CLUB
requires three (3) Pastry Chefs
to be responsible for making
French Pastries, assorted pies,
Souffles and Gourmet Desserts,
Chocolate, Ice and Sugar work.
Responsibilities include on the
job exposure of assistants to
types of desserts, ice carvings,
chocolate work and cake
decorating. At least 2 years
experience in hotel or first
class restaurant.
Clean police record and good
references absolutely
necessary.
Interested applicants apply to
Personnel Office, King's Inn &
Golf Club, P. 0. Box F-207,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
C14524
KING'S INN & GOLF CLUB
requires a Chief Engineer to be
responsible for the operation
of the Engineering Department
of King's Inn & Golf Club.
Reports directly to the Vice
President, must have
knowledge of Airconditioning,
Refrigeration, Carpentry,
Plumbing, Electricity, Boiler,
Pumps, Sewage Treatment
Essential. Must be fully
experienced in preventative
maintenance systems, building
maintenance and construction.
Responsible for purchase of
engineering equipment and
parts, subcontracts, annual
budgets preparation. Previous
managerial experience essential
in a large hotel complex or
engineering company essential.
Good reference and clean
police certificate absolutely
necessary.
Interested applicants apply to
Personnel Office, King's Inn &
Golf Club, P. 0. Box F-207,
Freeport. Grand Bahama.
C14523
INTERNATIONAL HOTEL
requires a Cheif Accountant to
Organize and Supervise the
daily running of the
Accounting Office, Front
Office Cashiers, Night Auditors
and Food and Beverage
Cashiers, to review and prepare
daily, monthly and other
financial and statistical reports.
To be responsible for on the
job training of night auditors,
front office staff, food and
beverage cashiering personnel,
accounting personnel
(Accounts Payable, Receivable,
and Income Auditors.)
Previous Hotel Accounts
experience necessary. Clean
police record and good
references absolutely
necessary.
Interested applicants apply to
Personnel Office, King's Inn &
Golf Club, P. 0. Box F-207,
Grand Bahama.
C15144
ASSISTANT CONTROLLER
Individual to be responsible for
day to day running of
centralized accounting
department of diversified
group of companies and
control of 20 staff.
Responsible for coordination
of input to data processing
department and interpretation
of output. Must be familiar
with international banking
procedures. Substantial
accounting experience in a
similar position is essential as is
experience in the retail land
sales industry.
Apply to: The Grand Bahama
Development Company, Ltd.
Personnel Department,
Lucayan Building, P. 0. Box
F-2666, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.
C15141
TRAMPOLI NE/P.E.
TEACHER Must have
certificate. At least 5 years of
experience preferred. If
interested, contact Sister Mary
Alice, P. 0. Box F'2418, Mary,'
Star of the Sea School,
Freeport.
-3---bik^-


HELP WANTED |
C15142
Job Title SUPERVISOR -
PURCHASING & STORES
Minimum Education College
graduate or equivalent.
Minimum Experience 5-10
years in Industrial Purchasing
& Stores functions.
Duties/Responsibilities -
Coordinate and supervise
company purchasing and
Storekeeping program.
Interested Applicant Contact -
Personnel Department, Bahama
Cement Company, P. 0. Box
F.-100, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.


C15125
PASTRY CHEF: To supervise
and direct sweet good
Department of commercial
bakery.
At least three years previous
experience in a similar
operation. Must have Master
Certificate. Bahamian only,
need apply: Grand Bahama
Bakery Ltd., P. 0. Box F-797,
Freeport, G.B.

C15143
1 MUSICIAN (BASS
GUITARIST): Must be able to
Sight Read and arrange
Professional Show Music, be
proficient on playing the BASS
GUITAR. Must have at least
three years experience, Good
References and Police
Certificate.
Applicants should apply in
person to: The Personnel
Department, Bahamas
Amusements Limited (El
Casino). International Bazaar,
P. 0. Box F-787, Freeport,
Grand Bahama, Bahamas.

C15146
Job Title -- PAYLOADER
OPERATORS
Minimum Education Good
basic education.
Minimum Experience 3-5
years.
Duties/Responsibilities -
Operates payloader to load
limestone into trucks and
charge clinker, gypsum and raw
materials into feed system.
Interested Applicant Contact -
Personnel Department, Bahama
Cement Company, P. 0. Box
F-100, Freeport, Frand
Bahama.

C15145

ELECTRICAL SUPERVISOR
Minimum of 10 years
experience in design of power
distribution systems,
installation and maintenance
thereof. Applicant will be fully
responsible for airfield lighting,
power to navigational aids,
emergency generator systems
and preparation of department
budget.
Apply to: The Grand Bahama
Development Co. Ltd.
Personnel Department,
Lucayan Building, P. 0. Box
F-2666, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.


C15124
WANTED LIVE-IN COOK.
EXPERIENCED MATURE
BAHAMIAN. APPLY WITH
REFERENCES, BAHAMA
EQUIPMENT LTD., P. 0. BOX
F-96, FREEPORT'
C15122
MAINTENANCE
SUPERINTENDENT
REQU I R ED BY
I INTERCONTINENTAL
ARTISTS GUILD LTD. TO
TAKE CHARGE OF ALL
MAINTENANCE OF ART
GALLERY. RESPONSIBILI-
T I E S INCLUDE
STRETCHING AND
FRAMING VALUABLE
PAINTINGS AND SHOULD
HAVE REASONABLE
KNOWLEDGE OF ART. IN
CHARGE OF ALL
DELIVERIES OF PAINTINGS
AND THEIR PACKAGING.
TELEPHONE PERSONNEL
DEPARTMENT 373-3020, P.
0. Box F-260, Freeport.

C15147
Job Title PROCESS
ATTENDANTS
Minimum Education Good
basic education.
Minimum Experience 2-3
years.
Duties/Responsibilities --
Patrol equipment circuit
making field adjustments or
changes as required to correct
process and equipment
problems.
Interested Applicant Contact -
Personnel Department, Bahama
Cement C.npany, P. 0. Box
F-100, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.


"Potter, now that the computer has taken over most of
your duties..."


aRAM


Rupert and the

Floating Bell- 7


" Hullo, Rupert I" Gregory smiles as Rupert
reaches his side. "I came here for a quiet
read. The foxes told me it would be warm
here, and they were right." "Warm I" cries
Rupert. But it's quite chilly today, Gregory I
Those foxes were playing a joke on you-"
Rupert stops as suddenly he feels a current
of warm air waiting across the glade. "Why,


how strange!" he exclaims. "There's a sort
of summer breeze coming this way." I told
you so," laughs Gregory. "The foxes said
it is because there are so many furs here,
but I haven't see any furs yet. All the same,
it's a jolly nice spot." He follows as Rupert
walks towards the warm air.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


CROSSWORD
PUZZLE
ACROSS 32. Icnabod's
ACROSS andfather
1. Bumpkin 34. Gear tooth
5. Heir 35. Three-
8. Paddle dimensional
11: Lease 37. Before
12. Greek letter 39. Attorney's final
13. Cruise port argument
14. Approval 44. Mediator
15. Laughable 47. Song
17. Light-headed 48. Grape S
19. Chess pieces 49. Tavern
20. Neglectful 50. Symbol of
24. Free of victory
27. Cycle 51. Fruit of
29. Toledo's lake horse-radish
30. Gen. Bradley 52. In error


LUTION TERDAY'S PUZZLE
53. Actual being 5. Trap

DOWN 6. Buckeye State
1. African lake 7. Effort


CARROLL RIGHTER'S

HOROSCOPEE
from the Carroll Rihter Institute
GENERAL TENDENCIES: An interesting
Evening. Your mood will change from a fearful
one to the assurance you can do those things you wish and be
with people who will restore your self-confidence.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) Finish work promised during
day. In p.m., get into new interesting activities. Letters can
prove disappointing early. By p.m., they turn to good fortune.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) You feel annoyed because
you have to handle boring matters in a.m., but you cheer up
later when you get the benefits therefrom.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Evening is the best time to
come to an agreement with one who is difficult during day. Do
not lose your temper with anyone.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Get unpleasant
work done, then you have fine benefits from it in p.m. Get
plenty of rest in p.m. Avoid danger of any kind.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) You get a renewal of energies late
in p.m. Get out of that despondent mood early. Enjoy
amusements after important work is done early.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) If you want to entertain
happily at home tonight, don't start a rumpus with kin during
day. If you smoke too much, cut down, or stop.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Use care shopping or when in
motion. Don't make any comments that could fire anger of
others. Then fine benefits are yours in p.m.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) You are apt to spend too
lavishly at one time and then to be a positive Scrooge the next,
so stop such extremes. Evening favors studying finances,
property matters.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) You don't feel happy
during a.m., and are apt to be sarcastic, so zip your lip for
good friendships. Work cheers you up.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) You want to break out
of your bonds violently, so take it easy and find out what the
real trouble is. Give more attention to romance in p.m.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Handle problems during
day. Wait until p.m. to be sociable with friends who are busy
before. Help a good friend who asks for assistance.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Tomorrow is better time to
talk with bigwig. Pay pressing debts. Then out for recreation.
Don't drink too heavily.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY ... he or she will be
charming, but restless and nervous early in life, so will need
much rest and may require warm milk and bedtime stories to
put to sleep. Later on in life, the nature becomes very sturdy.
Give little chores early, but make sure they are not too
difficult. Add foreign languages to the scholastic curriculum,
since there will be much travel in this lifetime. Imports and
exports are fine here.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


AQU


SPRING


home water purifier


YOU ALWAYS HAVE PURE WATER WITH YOUR
MEDI-TECH OR AQUA-SPRING
AT PENNIES PER DAY
JUST PLUG IN NO PLUMBING CONNECTION REQUIRED
GUARANTEED TO ELIMINATE ALL DANGEROUS
BACILLI, VIRUSES, CHEMICALS AND MINERALS
ENJOY THE NATURAL GOOD FLAVORS OF YOUR
FOODS AND DRINKS


2 GALLON CAPACITY

6 GALLON CAPACITY


$15" PURIFIES
2 GALLONS
$2"5" PER DAY.


M M IIRS:



PALMDALE %PHONE 28421-6 8 i .


REX MORGAN, M.D. Dal Curtis

BECAUSE WE'RE BUT WE'RE GOING YES---AND WE'LL DApPY, WHY OON'T'7RH AU
GOING TO THE SPORTS TO DINNER FIRST E ALONE THERE W KU GWE U MN TIMES W
WHY CAN'T WE ARENA, J'ANIE / TNE AT TE CUB -- WITH MIS A I' OR R I'M TMFED














JUDGE PARKER Paul Nichols
TANKS MEANWHILE, JEAN CALVIN UNAWARE THAT SAM HAS SEEN WAITING
OKAY, STRAND THE LEAVESER HOTEL SINCE EARLY MORNING
WARDEN WILL SEE
AYOU NOW!V o














APARTMENT 3-G Bya Alex Kotzsiy

J YO COUL'VE REMIND ME TO SEN HER A WHAT COLOR? WE ALWAYS 5EN REP
USED HER AS A D POZEN ROSES IN THE MORNING! ROSES, DON'T WE? AREN'T THEY
THAT MISS CUT MAN WHEN YOU SUPPOSED TO SIGNIFY LOVE?













STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMADOT____ Saunders & Overgard
THOMPSON DIP WERE FIGHTING, WHAT
A GREAT JOB WELSH! COLOR
ON YOUR i
FOREHEAD ,










STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD Saunders & Overgard

M1;5 HALE !AWFUL WEAI./ NOW WALKAHEADOFMETOMY
SPLO MY MIS5US 16 LooKIN'PLACE/...AN'DON'TTRY TO RUN,
SHE ALL AFTER HER,THOUGHOr LL HAVE ME SOME




BUT HOW DO I KNOW YOU'RE m
HER UPIN HERE ? YOUCULDO







The Heart of Juliet Jones By Stan Drake.


*


_ _~__~









The Tribne - Wednsday, May 8, 1974


OUT GO-


THE


GIRLS

But the men are still

in with a chance


BRIDGETOWN -
Defending champions Jamaica
advanced to the finals of the
Brandon Trophy men's
tournament here yesterday
with a winning 3-0 lead over
Barbados. And Trinidad's
women came from behind to
clip the Bahamas 2-1 and
earned the right to defend the
Phillips trophy in the finals in
the Commonwealth Caribbean
tennis team championships.
The Jamaicans started the
day with a 1-0 lead over
Barbados and made it 2-0 in
the morning session when
David Pratt rounded off his
unfinished match against
Gregory Adams, winning 6-2,
4-6, 6-1,7-5.
Then Richard Russell and
David Tate clinched the tie
with a straight sets win in the
doubles over Adams and Peter
Symmonds, 6-2, 9-8, 6-2.
The Jamaicans will meet the
winners of the other semifinal
encounter between the
Bahamas and Trinidad and
Tobago in the finals.
The Bahamas took the
opening singles against
Trinidad Monday and, when
fading light halted play


Tuesday the Bahamas pair of
Leo Rolle and John Antonus
were leading Trinidad's Mike
Valdez and Lan Price 3-6, 6-3,
3-1.
In women's action, the
Trinidadians fought back
superbly to clinch both singles
against the Bahamas who won
the doubles on Monday.
First Jean Merry turned
back Jane Wiberg. Then Ria
Mark had the better of a long,
hard-fought match against
Vicki Knowles, winning 7-5,
8-6.
The Barbadian girls were
aiming to emulate the
Trinidiadians in the other
semifinals.
Having dropped the doubles,
the cousins Ruby Browne and
Sandra Manning were fighting
to clinch the tie when the
matches were halted for the
day.
Miss Browne and Jamaica's
Lorna Wood were locked 6-3,
3-6, 5-5 in one match while
Mrs. Manning was leading Joni
Rowe 6-4, 3-0 in the other.
They will need to win both to
send Barbados into the finals
of the Phillips trophy for the
first time. (AP)


BARRY FARRINGTON
and Steve Norton have been
seeded numbers one and two
respectively in the Montage
Beach T.V. Studio and Club's
first annual invitational
tournament which begins at
the Montagu courts on
Saturday.
Organized by resident pro
Bradley Demeritte, the
tournament is sponsored by
executive producer Kubi
Jaeger, Gerry Hytha and
assistant producer Erich
Heindl.
The tournament will
be played over three
weekends
Pictured: Bradley Demeritte
(centre) and television producers
Erich Heindi (left) and Gerry Hytha
inspect the trophies.


Indians


Picture: RICKEY WELLS
Stephanie Knowles of St. Augustine's College scores
while Brenda Knowles looks on helplessly.


SAC hand out


new beating


ST. AUGUSTINE'S
College senior girls proved
unbeatable in volleyball again
yesterday, handily topping R.
M. Bailey High 15-7 and 15-8
winning their fourth straight
in defence of their Eastern
Division pennant.
The strong St. Augustine's
squad who are favoured to
stop C. C. Sweeting High play
Queen's College tomorrow
beginning the second half of


Knowles and Lindley


in swim test


RECORD HOLDERS Andy
Knowles and John Lindley are
among over 165 swimmers who
will compete in the Bahamas
Nationals which begin Friday
afternoon (4 o'clock) at the St.
Andrews School pool.
Being the only competitors
in the 18 years and over age
group, Knowles and Lindley
will kick off the event with the
1500 metres final. Knowles
holds that record with an
18:42.3 time.
This year, competition is
expected to be keener with the
formation of the Barracuda
Swim Club. Rona Hickman and
Sarah Tivy will be representing
that club in the girls eight years
and under in which many
records are expected to go.
They will be up against Joanna
Perry of the Dolphins.
Greg Geiselman a record
holder in the boys eight and
under will be making his debut
in the nine and ten group.
Trained by Miss Betty Cole of
the Dolphins, Greg is expected
to make his presence felt.
Sean McCartney and Michael
DeBusk of Freeport should be
his toughest test.
Eleven-year-old Tracy Jagr
will be making her final
appearance in the girls 11 and
12 age group. Out of Freeport,
Jagr was nominated as
sportswoman of the year for
her outstanding performances.
However, with sisters
Tammy and Dawn Cole in
great form her winning that
division should not be easy.


Tammy holds three records in
the nine and 10 division. Dawn
did excellent times in Jamaica
recently when she lowered her
personal record.
Hugo Ribot of Freeport,
making his debut in the 13 and
14 division is favoured to give
Donald Martinborough a run
for his money. Ribot holds
four of five records in the 11
and 12 division.
Girls 15 to 17 record holder


Jane McCorquodale is under
doctor's orders and is not
certain whether she will
compete. However, Charlotte
Knowles and Jennifer Adderley
both of the Dolphins and
Diane Holoweski will be there
competing for the high point
trophy.
The swim meet continues
through Sunday when all the
finals will be raced.


200 for golf tourney


OVER 200 golfers are
expected to participate in the
Audnel Clarke Golf
Tournament at the South
Ocean golf course beginning
10:00 a.m. Saturday.
The entry fee of $10 -
green fees and cart will go
towards defraying expenses
incurred by Bahamian pro
Audnel Clarke when he takes
on the Canadian tour later this
year.
All foursomes are asked to
contact resident pro Ted
Maude at 74117 or be at the
South Ocean by 9:30 Saturday
morning.
This event is co-sponsored
by Phillip Pinder in
conjunction with Pepsi Cola
week and 24 beautiful trophies
will be up for grabs.
The New Providence
Division of the Bahamas Golf
Association announced earlier
this week that they were
backing this event and urged all


.cs members to participate.
"We need as many qualified
Bahamian professionals as we
can get, for it is these persons
that we depend on to help our
amateur organization and
upcoming juniors," a divisional
spokesman said. "Audnel in
particular has been a
tremendous help to our junior
programme."
King Eric and his Knights
will entertain the guests and
players following the
tournament.


the inter-school volleyball
series. Aquinas Aces play R.
M. Bailey.
Playing at an easy going
pace although offensive
forward Stephanie Knowles
was not quite up to par,
S.A.C.'s key players Denise
Moss and Denise Whylly got
all the help needed from
Kaye Bastian and joy-Anne
Styles.
Pam Wilson and Jennifer
Southard filled in well on
both offence and defence
especially in the well fought
second set when Bailey High
threatened to get out of
hand.
Held to an early four point
tie, S.A.C. pulled away by
another four points when
Bailey High bounced back
forcing an eight all draw.
Bastian, Knowles and
Styles held the forward line
for Lillian Forbes' two point
service that started St.
Augustine's winning note.
Brenda Knowles and
Lenora Nixon kept R. M.
Bailey's defence together but
not strong enough to stop the
Red Machine wlo'- shut
them out for the remainder
of the route.
Things looked similar in
the first set when Bailey High
moved into a tie. Moss went
to the line and, backed by
good defence confidently
pulled S.A.C. out of danger.
Bailey High trailed -12-3
when Carol Fox served them
two more points.
Her third delivery was
broken on a Joy-Anne spike
that sent Wilson to the line
for S.A.C. She saw them to
game point. Bailey High
picked up only four more
points for the remainder of
the set.


Del Jane test


LEAGUE leading Del Jane
Saints will see their lead
increase a V/2 game or decrease a
I game when they take to the
field current second place
holders Schlitz Beer tonight in
BBA feature game starting
9:30 at the Queen Elizabeth
Sports Centre.


Team
Del Jane
Schlitz
Citibank
Becks
Bimini
Jet Set
Classic Bucks
Heinekens
St. Bernards
Carrolls


hang

SOUTHAMPTON, Stout
batting by Abid Ali and Madan
Lal saved the Indian cricket
team from threatened defeat
by Hampshire, the reigning
English champions yesterday.
India, trailing by 162 on the
first innings, lost five wickets
for 53 and were in deep
trouble. But Hampshire were
foiled by a sixth-wicket
partnership of 117 by Abid Ali
and Madan Lal, and the match
was safely drawn
Aii made 52 and Lal was 79
not out when stumps were
drawn.
The man who threatened to
demolish the Indians' second
innings was Andy Roberts, a
menacing new fast bowler from
the Leeward Islands,
With the total at 12 he struck
two quick blows, getting bose
leg before wicket and then
shattering Wadekar's stumps.
Naik fell at 37 and at the
lunch interval the Indians were
on 53 and for 3, still 109
runs behind
The afternoon began
disastrously. Without a run
being added, Bob Herman
bowled Patel and then the
speedy Roberts sent Mankad's
stumps flying.
Mankad had made 25 and
was the only one of the early
batsmen to show signs of
coping with the attack.
But then Abid Ali and
Madan Lal came together, and
Hampshire's progress was
halted.
They saw their team into the
lead before Abid Ali was
caught in the deep off Barry
Richards, South African
batting star who seldom bowls.
Enkat, 19 not out, helped
Madan Lal to bat out time.
In the morning Hampshire
had scored quickly and
Indian bowlers were mastered
except for Bishen Bedi, who
finished with six wickets for
110.
Scores: Indians 209 and 207 for
6. Hampshire 371 for 7 declared.
Drawn.
Scoreboard:
Indians: Second innings.

Arawaks


W L G Pt. hold
16 5 .762 O


6 1,/1
7 2/
6 3
8 5
9 6
9 7
12 8Vz1
12 9
15 12/


MACKEY STREET DEPARTMENT STORE
Opposite Bar 20 Phone 5-2398 :::.:


SPENCE S:


Training Pants $1.50 Pair
2-Piece Creeper Suits $3)00


Diaper Shirts


- $1.75 Each


Wash Cloths Package of 2 65C
Receiving Blankets 30x40 $2.90


Sleeveless Undershirts 50C Each

Infants Sleep Gowns $2.25

Short Sleeve Undershirts 75C


Bibs Package of 4


$2.00


MACKEY STREET DEPARTMENT STORE
Opposite Bar 20 Phone 5-2398
Large Parking Lot
Store Hours: Monday Thursday 8 a.m. to 8 p.m./ Friday and Saturday 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.


Germans
A VISITING German
Hockey team opened its series
of games with a scoreless tie
against the Arawaks Tuesday at
Haynes Oval.
The national champions
played as they had never
played before. They
completely dominated the
game and were unfortunate to
walk away with a draw.
What added to the brilliance
of the Arawaks was the great
understanding among the
players. Their ball control and
positioning made them look
like a smooth-running machine.
The Arawaks carried the
game to the Garmans who were
forced on the defensive. Goal
keeper Drenkberg had a busy
afternoon making good saves.
He wvas particularly good in
giving soccer-type kicks.
Most of the Arawaks
chances came in the first half.
Chris Sherman had one goal
disallowed and fanned on the
other. Mark Marshall and Chris
Parker also missed other
opportunities.
The second half was a near
repeat of the first as Wardy
Ford, Keith Parker Chris
Sherman and Philip Russell just
failed to put the Arawaks on
the score-board.
The Arawaks' defence
nevertheless was unyielding
and committed two errors
only. Deuber missed.his chance
to score on their second error
when he shot just wide of the
goal.
The Germans play the
Buccaneers in the second
match tomorrow evening
(5:30) at Haynes Oval.


on

G. Bose lbw B. Roberts 5
S. S. Naik lbhw*. Tavlor I
A. V. Mankad B Roberts 25.
P. B. Patel B. Herman 9
S. A. Abid Ali Jesty B. Richards 52
S. Madan Lal not out 79
S. Venkat not out 19
Extras (b2, b2, nb2) 6
Total 6 wickets 207.
Fall of wickets 1-12 2-12 3-37
4-53 5-53 6-170
Bowling:
Herman 16 3 46 1; Roberts 20 8
31 3; Taylor 14 5 24 1I;Sainsbury;
19 5 62 0; Jesty 9 2 30 O0; Richards
2 08 1.
UNDERWATER CLUB
The Bahamas Underwater
Club will hold their regular
monthly meeting in the
Victoria room in the British
Colonial Hotel tomorrow
beginning at 8:00 p.m.
The intention after the
meeting will be a film about
Chay Blythe and his single
handed round-the-world
voyage.
BASEBALL RESULTS
Chicago 3, Atlanta 2
Houston 2, Pittsburgh 1
San Francisco 4-3, New York 3-0
San Diego 5, Philadelphia 3,
13 innings
St. Louis 1, Cincinnati 0
New York 4, Texas 3, 12 innings
Chicago I, Detroit 0, 11 innings
Minnesota 3, Milwaukee 0
Cleveland 5, California 3
Baltimore 9, Oakland 3


LEFT-HAND DRIVE
A SPECIAL low gross and
runner-up trophy will be
awarded to left handed golfers
during Sunday's Father Beal
first annual tournament being
played at the Sonesta Beach
golf course.
Father Beal who is a
Catholic priest has spent many
years of his ministry in the
Bahamas. He is an enthusiastic
golfer and, being left handed is
out to encourage such golfers.
There will be however, the
usual events in the men, ladies
and juniors divisions.
The large floating trophy
will be retained by the Sonesta
Beach Golf Club but the
replica trophies will be
presented to the winners.
Tee-off time will be from
8:30 and the entry fee of $10
covers for the competition cart
and green fees.
BOXING
UNDEFEATED amateur
light heavyweight Ernest Barr
and lightweight Sammy Rolle
will be featured on Friday
night's boxing card at the
Birdland Arena.
Boxers from the Killarney
Club, Bert Perry's and Rennie
Pinder's Clubs are expected to
take part in the Amateur
Boxing Association of the
Bahamas sponsored event.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that LOUIS EDWARD
DUNCANSON of Yellow Elder Gardens, Nassau is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship
for registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 1st day of May
1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. O. Box N-3002,
Nassau.




NOW IN STOCK



ELECTRIC FOOT & HAND OPERATED


Cor. Christie & Dowdeswell Sts. Phone 2-1197



BEAUTIFULTHINGS

are found at

NASSAU ARDEN PET SUPPLIES
MONTROSE AVENUE TELEPHONE 2-4259

Puppies *Birds *Plants *Fish
and more!


r