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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03608
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: May 3, 1974
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03608

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EDUoLEts BAM -

NOW IN STOCK:

Evclusive mEXUMA
From: aEXUMA".
istered with Postmaster of Bahamas. for postage concesions within the Bahamas) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


-&ie.


OF


VOL. LXXI, No. 139


Friday, May 3, 1974


Price: 20 Cents


I-


Canadian group blackmailing Bmahmas


A GROUP OF CANADIANS is
attempting to blackmail the Bahamas into
abolishing the death penalty, The Tribune
has learned.
A group calling itself "Christians for
the Abolition of Capital Punishment,"
based in Toronto, has printed and
distributed 100,000 copies of a circular
urging "all Christian abolitionists to
refrain from intended vacation travel to
the Bahamas until the death penalty is
abolished."
The circular adds: "We believe that the
Bahamas should abolish the death penalty
as capital punishment is not a Christian
act. We believe that all Christian
abolitionists should protest against the
continued use of capital punishment in
the Bahamas."


The "Christians for the Abolition of
Capital Punishment" describe themselves
in the circular only as "laymen from a
number of Christian churches."
It is not know in what parts of the
world the circulars have been distributed.
A Bahamian Member of Parliament who
received one passed it on to The Tribune.
It carried the footnote: "init. release:
May 1974 100,000."
A five-year suspension of the death
penalty in Canada ended about six
months ago, when debate centred on
whether to re-instate capital punishment
or extend the suspension. The suspension
was finally extended indefinitely.
The abolitionist movement in Canada
was spearheaded by a group of lawyers in


the Canadian Parliament.
No one in the Bahamas has actually
hanged since the mid-1960s. Although
there has been rising incidence of murders
- for which the automatic penalty is
death most convicts have won appeals,
reprieves and commutations of their
sentences to life imprisonment. Other
cases are still being appealed.
If the circulars have any significant
effect on Canadian travel to the Bahamas
it could have serious implications for the
tourist industry.
Canadians have in recent years been
accounting for an ever-larger percentage
of the total visitor count.
Last year the number of Canadians
visiting the Bahamas was up more than 20
percent over the 1972 figure.


Bandits use
columnm,
| And one of
for services perfl
ces liked chickens a
ked a bird or twoout
t want to pay the sna
/ introduced the mqy





Night raids


To boost

UK trade


MR. PETER F. Newman
(pictured) has been appointed
commercial secretary to the
British High Commission to
replace Mr. Ray Duggan
whose five-year tour of duty
p, in the BahamaJo pPided^,,
Mr. Newman, 52, has been
posted in London for the past
three-and-a-half years where
he was attached to the
political shipping desk of the
Foreign Office.
Prior to that (1966,1970)
he spent four years in
To' onto assisting in the
British government's tra('
promotion to expand its
North American dollar
market.
British WeeK in Toronto,
staged during that time, was
the largest trade promotion
of that kind ever undertaken
by Britian.
"I am now back in trade
promotion which I like better
than any other area in the
diplomatic service," Mr.
Newman commented.
He said his duties in the
Bahamas would be directed
to increasing British imports
which have been declining
steadily for the past five
years.
In 1969 British exports to
the Bahamas totalled 13
million pounds. Last year this
figure had dropped to 8
million pounds, nearly all of
it representing a fall-off in
machinery.
"There is great scope for
development projects here
and this is where we hope
Britain can participate in
providing equipment," Mr.
Newman said.
With the diplomatic service
since 1947, Mr. Newman has
served in a wide-ranging
number of posts.
His first assignment shortly
after his marriage that year
was Shanghai. He was later
sent to Rome, followed by
Vienna, Laos, Lima, Istanbul
and Canada.
Mr. Newman and his wife
Pau'lt arrived in Nassau over
the Easter period. Something
of a "boating nut," as he puts
it, he is looking forward to
visiting the Family Islands.


DARING ARMED BANDITS who forced a motorist to relinquish his car to them
last night held up several business places in a bold venture that also included a
shot-gun attack on a Wulff Road snack stand operator.
And police officers, seeking to determine the identities of the two men, aimed with a shot-gun
in their stolen mustard coloured Chevrolet Malibu are also trying to establish the whereabouts of
the lone gunman who yesterday robbed the Robinson Road Barclay's Bank of $3,050.


Reports stated that the
"Hutch on Wulff Road" snack
stand, the Shell Central Service
Station, East Shirley Street and
--*the -Shell Se'asl-'Station at.
West Bay Street, opposite
Saunders Beach were all held
up and robbed last night by
two armed men.
"Slick" Newbold, operator
of the Wulff Road snack stand
held up by two men, was also
shot at by one of the robbers
described as "young guys
between 20 and 22 years."
Newbold, reports said, was
inside this snaci ,.'and at the
time when th< men approached
the service ., ,dow.
One of me men jumped
through the window and began
to rifle the cash register's
drawer, taking out all the
money it contained before
leaping through the window
again, a Wulff Road man said.
The shooting occurred when
Mr. Newbold went outside the
snack-stand and saw the second
man on the southern side of
the building.
"Apparently they believed
he was going to chase them and
they ran through the House of
Labour yard and through the
alley on the western side of it
where they had their car
parked."
But before they ran away,
one of the men fired a shot at
Mr. Newbold who ducked,
escaping any injury, he said.
The man, who lives about
fifty feet away from the snack
stand also said that "Mr.
Newbold has been held up
more than once this year. The
situation might be different if
there were some policemen on
beat around here. They patrol
the area but only in a bus and
those gangsters and theives can
always see them and come out
when they go by."
Night attendant at the
Shirley Street Shell Central
Service Station, Mr. Garfield
Burrows and his assistant, only
identified as Reginald, were
also robbed by two men of
$36.05 last night.
Last night's robbery follows
one which netted two thieves
$186 on Wednesday night
when they also held up the
station.


By SIDNEY DORSETT

Mr. Burrows said today that
the robbery occurred" between
1:15 a.m. and 1:20 a.m. while
he was inside the station with
Reginald and another young
boy.
"I saw when a yellow
Chevrolet car pulled inside the
yard ... I was playing my guitar
at the time. I thought they had
come in for some water but
when I looked up one of them
was coming toward the door
with a gun. He was slim and
another short, stout fellow was
behind him. The short, stout
fellow asked him if the gun was
cranked and took it from him.
He told the tall one to come in
and he would cover him.'
Mr. Burrows said they did
not have anything to say at all
but once the stout robber with
the gun threatened to shoot
Reginald if he moved.
Also held up sometime after
I a.m. this morning was the
West Bay Street Shell service
station. A report said that the
men were driving "a mustard
coloured" car.
The men pulled into the
station and ordered the night
attendant to serve them some
gas. When he went to collect
from them, they pointed a gun
at him and said he should
empty his pockets, reports
said.
Reports linked the robbers
to the persons responsible for
beating up a white Bahamian
resident last night and ordering
him from his car which they
took.
Police were not able to be
contacted in connection with
the report. Neither has the
identity of the motorist been
established.
The robberies follow the
hold-up of the Robinson Road
Barclay's Bank branch by an
armed robber around 11:30
a.m. yesterday. Police said that
$3,050 dollars in Bahamian
and American currency was
taken by the man who made
his escape on foot.
Authorities have ruled out
the possible connection
between a white car which was
also parked outside the bank


Truck overturns, 2 rushed to PMH


TWO MEN were rushed to
the Princess Margaret Hospital
this morning after they were



SEE
DAT MEAN
OL' MAN
SMILE


injured in a traffic accident at
the corner of Christie and
Dowdeswell Streets.
The two were in a 1969
Honda mini-truck, T5763,
owned by Tinker's paint and
Wallpaper Suipplies, when it
overturned. The driver was
identified as Wildred Carrn, and
the passenger as a Haitian
national named Andre.
Reports indicate that a
Taylor Industries truck,
T7243,- being driven east on


Dowdeswell by Arthur
Thompson, stopped to weit for
on-coming traffic to pass
before turning south into
Christie.
The Tinker's truck also
moving east, behind the Taylor
truck, reportedly could not
stop in time, had to swerve
around the larger vehicle, and
overturned when it tried to
turn into Christie.
Initial reports that a
pedestrian was hit by the
mini-truck were unfounded.


yesterday.
The hold-up of bank
employees Greg Williams and
Steve Bonamy marks the
second time the branch has
been robbed.
Authorities said that "the
men were inside the bank
yesterday when the robber,
dressed in a blue windbreaker
and blue trousers entered. He
was dark and also had a
mustache and appeared
between 19 and 22. "After
presenting a three dollar note
to one of the men inside the
bank, he pulled out a hand-gun
from inside his windbreaker
and ordered him to hand over
all of the money.
"The other man who was
inside the bank, and not even
aware of what was taking place
at the time, was told to pull
out the telephone. When he
hesitated, the robber went over
to his desk and yanked it out
himself, severing com-
munication. He then ran out of
the bank in an easterly
direction," police reported.
HOME DESTROYED
A 5-room wooden building
was completely destroyed by
fire on Palm Beach Avenue last
night at 9.30


Lo
a

I


Captain Terry Daniels (right) and chief engineer Louis Crewmen John Kubatz and Eddie Edwards.
Thomiselli evade camera.-I

6 accused committed


in $15m. drug haul
SIX AMERICANS, arrested and charged with having 3,700
pounds of hashish, were committed for trial in the Supreme
Court by Chief Magistrate Wilton Hercules at a preliminary
hearing which ended Thursday. "
The six are being represented by attorney Keith Duncombe,
who yesterday protested the inhumane treatment given them
by police officers at the Central Police Station whom he
accused of refusing to feed them.
He also told the hearing yesterday that the men were not
allowed to be given food which had been taken them by
friends and went hungry throughout the afternoon.
The accused Captain of the disabled "Sea Trader"
freighter, Terry Daniels, 35. of Brooklyn N.Y., Chief Engineer
Louis Thomiselli, 23, Brooklyn: First Engineer Richard W
Bennett, 28, Ithaca, N.Y.: Second Engineer Arnold
Zuckerman, 41, Union City, N.J.: and crewmen Eddie
Edwards. 25, New Orleans, and John Kubatz, 27, of New
Jersey are pleading not guilty.
Fifty burlap bags of hashish were seized by Bahamian
authorities in a joint exercise with U.S. Drug Enforcement
Administration officers on April 12. The drug has a street Second engineer Arnold Zuckerman and first engineer
value of $15.5 million. Richard Bennett. (photos: PHILIP SYMONETTE
The six have been refused bail


'Wrong system that leaves



children short of food'


SUBSIDIZED food
programmes for those who
cannot afford it is the answer
to today's spiralling food costs,
Cat Island M.P. and BEC
chairman Oscar Johnson
declared last night.
But food, he said, is only
one facet of the cost of living
problem, and the solution lies
in changing the whole
economic system in the
Bahamas.
Mr. Johnson was guest
speaker at a meeting of the
Consumer Protection
Association at Uriah McPhee
Primary School on Kemp
Road.
Mr. Johnson asserted that
for average Bahamians, earning
between $60 and $90 a week,
"the cost of living in this
country is beyond them. If
they have mortgage payments
to meet and children to feed


M.P SEEKS

SUBSIDIZED
FOOD PLAN

By MIKE LOTHIAN

and other incidentals, they are
drowning, they are finished,
they are in trouble."
But the problem transcends
what merchants do, he said.
"It goes to the core of the
economic system in this
country. When you really talk
about a solution you have to
stop chipping away at the
branches and go to the roots of
the problem, and they are in
the economic system itself.
"There is something wrong
with any economic system that
allows children to be short of
food."


Nine fired croupiers file


complaint against casino


NINE PARADISE ISLAND
CROUPIERS, allegedly fired
without explanation, filed a
complaint with the Ministry of
Labour yesterday, claiming
they were wrongfully dismissed
and are due overtime pay
under the 1970 Fair Labour
Standards Act.
Eight of the dealers were
reportedly given the option on
April 23 of either resigning or
being fired. The ninth received
a letter from Mr. Robert
Peloquin, president of Intertel,
the company responsible for
casino security, informing him
that effective April 24 he was
being relieved of all duties as a
employee of the Paradise
Island casino.
The croupier, Tyrone K.
Feldman, was told that if he
had any questions, or wished
to discuss the matter, Mr.
Peloquin could be contacted at
the Washington, D.C. office of
Intertel.
Four of the croupiers have
been with the Paradise Island
casino almost from its
inception.
Mr. Feldman was engaged
December 1968. Ginulo
Santillo, his brother Michelle
Santillo and Nicola Faio were
hired in January 1969.
Three others, Roberto


By Nicki Kelly

Tedesehi, Benito Raho and
Lucio Bergamin were taken on
in January 1972; John Penn in
August 1972 and David Harris
in November of that year.
Mr. Paul Shealy in charge of
casino security, could not be
reached today for comment.
It is understood however
that the nine croupiers, who
have been working a seven-day
week, sought a meeting with
management to discuss certain
conditions surrounding their
employment.
Their dismissals followed
shortly after. They were
reportedly offered two weeks
severance pay, holiday pay and
their fare home. The men have
taken legal advice and filed


notice of a dispute under
Section 67 (3) of the Industrial
Relations Act.
Although they have no
contract with Paradise
Enterprises, operators of the
casino, they are claiming
overtime pay under Sections 5
and 7 of the 1970 Fair Labour
Standards Act which states
that the working week is to be
48 hours.
Anyone who works over
that time is to be paid double
time on Sundays and holidays
and time-and-a half on other
days.
With the filing of a dispute
with the Ministry of Labour,
the Ministry is now required
under the Industrial Relations
Act to bring both parties
together in the presence of a
Ministry representative to try
and settle the matter.


LONG-TIME NASSAU RESIDENT DIES


MR. DONALD McLeod
Fisher, formerly of Chesire,
England, and for the past 32
years a resident of Nassau, died
at his daughter's home Friday
morning following a long
illness.
Mr. Fisher came to Nuanu
with the RAF in 1942 and
after the war made his home
here.


He is survived by his wife
Mary, three children and four
grandchildren. Fune,-cl services
will be held at the graveside at
Ebenezer Cemetery tomorrow
at 5 p.m.

The Rev. E. Stuart
Cameron, minister of St.
Andrew's Presbyterian Church,
will officiate.


lHe said he has "always
advocated that no one should
have to go to bed hungry.
"To achieve that you may
have to advocate radical
changes in the economic
system. There are certain pool
people for whom the basic
necessities of life '."ill have to
be subsidized "
fie pointed out that both
medicine and education are
nationalised and subsidized by
Government, and he wondered
why there were some who
baulk at nationalising and
subsidizing food.
"Whlhere food is concerned,"
he declared, "nationalise it. It
is a drastic step, but I rather
that than see children starving
or women turning to harlotry
to feed their children."
lie felt that land sales, too,
were a part of the cost of living
problem.
lie pointed out that while
poor Bahamians struggled to
keep up payments on "a little
piece of scrub land," there
were West Indian policemen
who used to walk Farm Road
wearing tennis shoes, the only
shoes they had, and who today
"have Crown Land grants that
have been conservatively
estimated at between $400,000
and $500,000."
In addition, he said, the man
in charge of Crown Lands is an
expatriate, who was appointed
on the recommendation of his
expatriate predecessor "whose
wife has no less than 15 grants
of Crown Land, your land, my
land."
Coming to a favourite
subject of his, Mr. Johnson said
the Pinewood Garden
development is Crown Land
"recently granted to (Alexis)
Nihon and transferred to
(Robert) Petry and Nihon
made more than $2 million on
the deal."
And when poor Bahamians
were unable to meet payments
for property, he went on, they
were unable to recover any of
the payments they had already
made.
"We don't have any
consumer protection law,
period. So you have no
grounds to stand on in court
when you want a refund."
Mr. Johnson also charged
that it was "unfair" that
citizens should have to form an
organisation to try to protect
the consumer, because "the
black man in 1967 took a firm
decision on who he wanted to
protect him, and he elected tihe
PLP to do that."


CENTRAL

BANK

ARCHITECTS

RESIGN
RUTOWSKI Bradford &
Partners, .'arnaican architects
for the Bahamas Central
Bank, have resigned from the
project.
Mr. T. Baswell Donaldson,
Montetary Authority
chairman, confirmed the
resignation but said that it
would "in no way" affect
completion of the new
building. The reason for the
firm's withdrawal was not
disclosed, although it's
believed it was due to a
difference of opinion
between the architects and
consultants.
The Central Bank was
designed by Rutowski
Bradford & Partners in
association with the Nassau
architectural firm of Donald
Cartwright and Robert
Stokes.
Also associated with the
design are George Cox,
structural engineers and A.B.
Dean Associates, mechanical
and electrical engineers.
Cartwright and Stokes have
been responsible for on site
supervision of the
construction and are
continuing in this capacity.
Mr. Donaldson explained
that as the project has been a
joint one from the beginning,
the local associates are
carrying on as they have
been, the only difference
being that they now have a
direct contract with the
Monetary Authority.
Rutowski Bradford &
Partners were responsible for
the design of the Jamaica
Central Bank. They also did
the design for the Nassau Post
Office and Star Plaza.
MEDICAL FUND
A FUND has been started at
the Royal Bank of Canada,
Mackey Street branch, to aid
Donald "Peco" Roberts, son of
former Registrar General N.
Clyde Roberts.
Donald is undergoing major
medical treatment in Miami
and is in very serious
condition.
Persons may send
contributions to "The Donald
Roberts Meicai d f es -.
P. O. W I7


sa.


16 "'". r ,.
I i .\-8 H r -
-.





I


Deputy leader Short von't quit over cash gift


The

world]


Edith Irving

on parole


ZURICH Edith Irving
(pictured) was paroled from a
Swiss prison today after
serving 16 months of a
two-year jail term she
received for her part in the
$650,000 Howard Hughes
autobiography hoax
engineered by her writer
husband, Clifford Irving.
The Swiss-born blonde was
freed from the Hindelbank
women's prison south of here
and immediately went by car
to Zurich.
Looking healthy but
nervous, she was in the
company of a Zurich
businessman and art gallery
owner who said they were
preparing an exhibition of her
paintings, including some of
the 40 canvases she did in
prison.
Her lawyer Peter Widmer
said she once helped disarm a
fellow inmate who attacked a
guard with a knife. Mrs.
Irving was freed almost three
months after her husband was
paroled from a U.S. federal
prison. He had been
sentenced to 2 Y% years.
She was convicted in
March 1972 after she
admitted depositing the
$650,000 in checks from
McGraw Hill Publishing Co.
into several Swiss bank
accounts, using a false
passport and signing the
checks as "H." for Helga -
"R. Hughes." The checks had
been given her husband as
fees for the billionaire
recluse.
At her trial, Mrs. Irving
said her only motive in
helping her husband was to
save her marriage threatened
by his affair with Danish
singer Nina van Pallandt. (AP)


Athens
Rome
Paris
London
Berlin
Amsterdam
Madrid
Moscow
Stockholm
New York
San Francisco
Los Angeles
Chicago
Miami


MIN F MAX
57 68 cloudy
52 63 cloudy
43 54 overcast
45 52 cloudy
46 63 fair
45 61 overcast
41 59 cloudy
52 68 rain
36 52 sunny
43 64 rain
46 57 clear
57 72 cloudy
46 66 rain
70 81 clear


LONDON The deputy leader of
Britain's Labour Government resisted
pressures to quit office Thursday in a
political storm over his old links with a
businessman jailed for corruption.
Edward Short, backed by Prime
Minister Harold Wilson, served notice
he intends soldiering as Leader of the
House of Commons despite the
controversy inside and outside of
Parliament, which prides itself on the
integrity of its members.
The effect of Short's stand-pat
posture was to postpone efforts by
opposition Conservatives to probe
deeply into how and why he came to


,c,.pt money 11 years ago from T.
Dan Smith.
Smith was one of several
businessmen and public officials found
guilty in northeast England recently of
taking or offering bribes in return for
lush contracts.
Public confidence in the probity of
local and central government officials
lately has been shaken by disclosures
of wheeling and dealing on a big scale.
The Wilson government already has
announced a royal commission is to
investigate corruption.
The Conservatives held their fire
when they heard that Short means to


stay where he is. None of them
apparently questions the honour or
honesty of Labour's deputy leader,
who has the reputation of a straight
dealer.
But there seemed little doubt some
of them thought they could make
considerable political mileage out of
the affair.
The British Broadcasting
Corporation, which first disclosed
Smith had made a payment to Short,
apologized for not giving him advance
notice of the charge. This is normal
practice among British media when
they publish material detrimental to


Dawn swoop



MASS RAIDS BY IRISH POLICE

IN BID TO TRACE MASTERPIECES

DUBLIN Irish police swooped at breakfast time on every hotel and rooming
house in the Republic today in the biggest security operation ever carried out in this
island nation. They were searching for a gang of five that carried out a
multi-million-dollar art robbery last Friday and also for wanted members of the
outlawed Irish Republican Army.


Kissinger


flies in


to Syria


DAMASCUS U.S.
Secretary of State Henry
Kissinger flew to Syria today
after 10 hours of talks with
Israeli leaders.
A senior American official
said he "can see the shape of
agreement" on disengagement
of forces in the Golan Heights.
The official told newsmen
on Kissinger's plane that the
American Secretary was trying
to apply the principles of the
Suez canal disengagement to
the Golan Heights.
But he conceded that
Kissinger faced a much more
difficult problem for several
reasons among them Israeli
settlements in the occupied
area and a higher degree of
"emotionalism."
The American, who
remained unnamed under the
briefing rules, stoutly denied
any suggestion that Kissinger is
trying to impose a plan of his
own.
He insisted the Secretary is
not carrying "even 10 per cent
of a plan."
But having talked with the
Israelis, this official told
newsmen that "we now have
enough elements' to gain a
decision from the Syrians.
Kissinger was met at the
Damascus airport by Foreign
Minister Abdul Halim
Khaddam and immediately
went to talk with Syrian


President Hafez Assad.
As if to underscore the
urgency of his mission, Syrian
and Israeli gunners traded
artillery fire in the Golan
Heights and the thuds were
clearly heard in the Syrian
capital all morning.
Kissinger intended to take
up with the Syrians the main
points that both U.S. and
Israeli officials said have to be
settled.
These are the positioning of
disengagement lines, setting up
a buffer zone, how it is to be
manned and the firepower that
will be permitted on the two
side of the line
After a brief detour
Saturday morning to
Alexandria, to confer again
with Egyptian President Anwar
Sadat, the Secretary will fly
back to Israel with Syria's
response. It will be taken up at
a Cabinet meeting Sunday.
(AP)

UK Yes

LONDON Britain's
Labour government has
recognized the junta led by
Gen. Antonio Spinola as the
legal rulers of Portugal. (AP)


Thousands of policemen
were involved in the
coordinated raids. Guests and
staffs of hotels were
questioned and shown
photographs or drawings of
wanted men and women.
There was no immediate
announcement of results of the
search nor whether any arrests
were made.
Officials said the raids were
planned six days ago after the
theft of 19 masterpieces from
the home of British millionaire
Sir Alfred Beit in Blessington
near Dublin by a gang of four
men and a French-speaking
woman.
The entire operation was
directed from the special police
headquarters set up near Beit's
home after the robbery.
The primary objective,
authorities said, was
information about the art
thieves. But each constable was
supplied with photographs of
wanted members of the IRA.
* Biet, meanwhile, vowed .no
dea!with the art thieves and
declared: "I will not be
intimidated by them."
Yesterday, a mystery man
called an Irish newspaper and
threatened to burn three of the
19 paintings stolen unless a
reward offer of a quarter
million dollars is withdrawn.
The caller, who telephoned
his threat to the Evening Press
in Dublin, said he was a
member of "the section" that
stole the masterpieces from the
home of Sir Alfred Beit last
weekend.
The paintings, including a
Vermeer, a Goya and three
Rubens, were estimated to be
worth more than $20 million.
A London firm of loss
adjusters later offered the
reward of 100.000 pounds


UK PRESS PROBE


LONDON The Labour
Government as announced
the appointment of a Royal
Commission to investigate the
freedom and economics of
Britain's financially ailing
press.
Prime Minister Harold
Wilson, who recently
denounced some newspapers
for what he called slur
campaigns against him, angrily
denied the commission was a
means to gag the press.
The setting up of the
commission follows the recent
closure of the Scottish Daily
Express, with the loss of nearly
2,000 jobs, and reports that at
least one national paper and
one London evening paper are
in financial trouble.
Although most British


national newspapers enjoy
large circulations, very few of
them are making any money.
They are plagued by
perennial labour troubles, high
newsprint costs and falling
advertising revenue.
A majority support the
Conservative Party.
Voicing Tory suspicion of
the move, Conservative
opposition leader Edward
Heath asked: "What is the real
purpose of a royal commission
at this time on this matter?"
He noted there have been
deep investigations of the press
in the recent past. Action was
needed. Heath warned that by
the time the commission
published its findings some
newspapers would already have
gone out of business. (AP)


The pill

keeps

us going,

says

top cop

Daphne
LONDON Britain's top
woman cop says "thank
goodness for the pill" because
it's a prime weapon in
keeping Scotland Yard's
female contingent up to
strength.
Cdr. Daphne Skillern, 46
and unmarried, took over this
week as Britain's highest
ranking woman police officer.
Her responsibilities include
the careers of London's 650
female officers, and part of
the problem is the capital's
20,000 bobbies.
"To put it bluntly, the
men and women in the police
force are very good physical
specimens and it would be
surprising if they did not find
each other attractive," Cdr.
Skillern told a news
conference.
In pre-pill days, marriage
usually meant a quick end to
a woman police officer's
career as motherhood took
over.
"Now, thanks to the pill,
one can plan one's family and
those women who want to
can work for some years after
marriage," Cdr. Skillern said.
She is also eager to see
married women coming back
to the force after raising their
families.
"They would be useful for
dealing with teenage
youngsters," the commander
said. She says she finds it
difficult to talk to
adolescents because she has
no children of her own.
As a commander, Miss
Skillern is now only two
rungs from the top of
London's police hierarchy.
Only assistant commissioners
and the Commissioner
himself, Sir Robert Mark,
outrank her.
But she does not see
herself as potentially the
capital's first woman
commissioner.
"It's taken me 25 tears to
get this far, and I don't think
I could wait another 25
years," she said.
Her predecessor as
commander was Mrs. Shirley
Becke, the first woman to
reach the rank.
Mrs. Becke retired Monday
after 33 years in uniform.
When she started London had
100 policewomen handling
only a limited range of cases
such as shoplifting, sexual
offences and occasionally
larceny provided the
offence had been committed
in a women's lavatory.
Now the force is
completely integrated, and a
young policeman on the beat
can find himself taking orders
from a woman sergeant -
even to the point of marrying
her. (AP)


Help for Blacks could backfire


JOHANNESBURG The British
conditions in South Africa by forcing
British-owned companies to pay wages at 50
per cent above accepted poverty levels could
be self-defeating, the South African Press
Association reported quoting "top
spokesmen" in British-owned companies.
The spokesmen said higher wages would
force companies to cut back employment at a
time when the number of job seekers outstrips
job openings. Tens of thousands of workers
would be dismissed as a consequence.


"Guidelines" for British companies
operating in South Africa were announced in
London Wednesday by Trade Minister Peter
Shore.
His announcement followed a government
commission of inquiry into the wages and
conditions offered by British compaines in
South Africa, stemming from critical press
reports in tritain.
Some spokesmen were confused as to which
poverty level the British government was
referring to as at least three are used here.


an individual.
In the Commons, Short announced
the Labour government soon will
sound out all lawmakers on a plan to
set up a register of their outside
interests.
The idea is that every
parliamentarian would be expected to
list all such interests. Journalists who
cover parliamentary proceedings
would also be affected.
When the views of lawmakers
become known the Labour
government then wouid formulate an
overall plan which would be submitted
to a free, non-party vote. (AP)


A PERTOLEUM engineer
has been accused in Houston
of castrating his 13-year-old
son by exposing him to
radioactive material.
PRINCESS Margaret
arrived in New York with her
husband, Lord Snowdon, en
route to Lexington,
Kentucky, where they plan to
attend Saturday's running of
the Kentucky derby.

THE "Star of South
Africa," a pearshaped
diamond of 47.7 carats, was
sold at auction in Geneva for
$543,000.

QUEEN ALIA gave birth
to a girl and King Hussein of
Jordan named her Princess
Taya after his aunt.

A FOUR MILLION dollar


offer for
kidnapped
Patricia
tonight.

FOUR
killed in
blast that
bar.


the return of
newspaper heiress
Hearst expires


PEOPLE were
a terrorist bomb
wrecked a Belfast
Reports from AP


ZEBRA MURDERS:


FOUR MEN


ARE FREED


SAN FRANCISCO- Four
of seven men arrested in
connection with a wave of
"Zebra" murders here have
been freed for lack of evidence,
police say.
Police Sergeant William
Kearny identified those freed
last night as Thomas Manney,
31, a star football player at San
Francisco State University in
the early 1960s; Clarence
Jamerson, 37: Dwight Stallings,
28; and Edgar Burton, 22.
They had been booked for
investigation of conspiracy to
commit murder.
Kearny said the four were
released because it became
evident "during the course of
the investigation that no
further procedures against
them are feasible at this time."
He said chief of inspectors
Charles Barca planned a news
conference on the matter
today.
But formal murder and
other charges had been filed
against the ee other men
still in c carry C.
Green, 22 and
Manuel
They aro
before a
The new
disclosed as
Alioto was
Washington, D.
with U.S. Atty.
B. Saxbe on his theory at an
o ganization called "Death
Angels" was linked to some 80
killings in California.
Alioto says those 80 killings
include 12 murders in a
six -month period
here in a case San Francisco
police have code-named
"Zebra" after a communica-
tions channel. Six other


Kidnap oilman: I


never gave up hope

.HILTON HEAD ISLAND, whether he saw other kidnap
S.C. Oil executive Victor victims.
Samuelson, who was freed "I don't want to answer
Monday after being held 144 that," he said several times
days by Marxist guerillas in when asked for details ot his
Argentina, said today he confinement.
"never gave up hope" he would He said his diet was
be released. "sufficient meat and
He was released 49 days after vegetables and so on a
Exxon Corp. paid a record beverage, occasionally a piece
$14.2 million in ransom. of fruit for dessert."
"I gave myself instructions He said he passed the time
to stay calm and don't panic," by reading newspapers and
Samuelson told a news books provided by his captors
conference, his first since his and was occasionally allowed
release. to listen to radio broadcasts.
He said he was kept in Doodling and exercising within
virtual solitary confinement by the limits of space available
his captors but was not also helped pass the hours, he
mistreated. said. (AP)
But Samuelson repeatedly
refused to give details of his
captivity, saying he hadn't had
time to put his thoughts into
perspective.
"1 want to know myself
what I think," said Samuelson,
who is recuperating from his
ordeal at this resort with his
wife and three children.
Samuelson, 37, was an
executive for Esso-Argentina, a
subsidiary of Exxon Corp. in
Cordoba, Argentina, when he
was taken captive by the
Leftist People's Revoluntion-
ary Army ERP on Dec. 6.
He was released Monday.
Samuelson said the day he
was captured a group of armed
men came into the company
club where he was lunching
with other businessmen and
rushed him into a waiting car.
He said he was released in a
similar fashion.
Samuelson would not say
where he was held, how many
people were holding him or _-


persons were wounded.
All of the "Zebra" victims
were white. They were shot
down in apparent unprovoked
attacks by young blacks.
Green was charged in
connection with a case not
listed by police as part of the
"Zebra" file, the Oct. 20
kidnapping and decapitation
of Mrs. Quita Hague, 28. Also
charged in that case was Jesse
Lee Cooks, now serving a life
sentence for murder.
Green and Cooks are
charged with conspiracy to
commit murder, murder,
kidnapping, armed robbery and
assault with a deadly weapon,
Chief Assistant District Atty.
Walter Giubbini said.
Police say Mrs. Hague was
beheaded with a machete-like
weapon and her husband,
Richard, 30, savagely beaten
and slashed in the attack. They
were forced into a white van as
they walked near their
Telegraph Hill home, police
said.
Moore and Simon are
accused of shooting down Jane
Holley on Jan. 28 as she
removed clothes from a washer
Lat a downtown laundromat and
*laying Alario Bertuccio, 81,
kh gunfire as he walked
e from work on Dec. 20.
R6 ieralso is charged with
i| Terry White, 15. and
Ward Anderson, 18, at a San
Francisco bus stop on April 14.
Both teen-agers survived.

Streaker in
disguise
VIRGINIA BEACH. Virginia
Police saw through a
streaker's disguise and charged
the 17-year-old boy with
burglary in the buff.
Police said they caught him
running naked through a
residential area early and at
first charged him only with.
indecent exposure.
Hie told police he was just
streaking, but since a burglary,
had occurred in the same
neighborhood earlier in the
week police asked him about
it.
They said the boy told them
he had figured if someone
surprised him in a house they
would be so astonished he
could make his getaway, and if
police saw him they would
think he was just another
streaker. (AP)


When it comes to insurance

it's Dominion for Life


... in Nassau

call Nat Dorsett 2-3843



THE DOMINION LIFE ASSURANCE COMPANY


II S S SHUHIBH~il^^^^^^^^
BANUC AN


3N.


I


I!


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 1974
Supreme Court No.138
Equity Side
IN THE MATTER OF FAIRBORN
CORPORATION LIMITED
AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES
ACT (CHAPTER 184)

By an Order made by the Honourable Mr.
Justice Maxwell James Thompson in the above
matter dated the 20th day of March A.D. 1974, on
the petition of Shirley Oakes Butler and Oakes
Holding Company Inc. IT WAS ORDERED that
Fairborn Corporation Limited be wound up by the
Court. under the provisions of The Companies Act
(Chapter 184) AND that Robert Newton Slatter of
Thorne, Gunn & Co., Bitco Building, Bank Lane in
the City of Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas be
appointed Official Liquidator of the Company
AND IT WAS FURTHER ORDERED that the
Court doth sanction the official Liquidator to do all
or any of the things which he shall have power to
do pursuant to the provisions of Section 95 of The
Companies Act (Chapter 184).

McKINNEY, BANCROFT & HUGHES
Attorneys For Robert Newton
Slatter the Official Liquidator
of Fairborn Corporation Limited.


I


I


___ _~__~ ___ __ ___ _~_~ __ __ --- -- --


SThe Tribune - Friday, May 2,1974


.lr


-- -- ---- --- -~-------~- - -~ -- -- -, ------ -- --


--~1 C


1


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asn


rMu~i~c'~dt~'~C











The Tribune ... Friday, May 2. 1974


EDlrORIAL

Field day in black heaven


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
"POWER corrupts, absolute power tends to corrupt
absolutely," is a line often quoted from the writings of Lord
Acton, a famed English public figure whose life spanned the 19th
century (1834-1902).
"Kings may learn from him (Napoleon Bonaparte)," wrote
Charles Phillips, "that their safest study, as well as their noblest,
is the interest of the people; the people are taught by him that
there is no despotism so stupendous against which they have no
recourse; and to those who could rise upon the ruins of both, he
is a living lesson, that if ambition can raise them from the lowest
station, it can also prostrate them from the highest."
Probably one of the saddest things in life is to see a man ...
risen from low estate ... throwing his weight around like "a bull in
a china shop" in an environment he never expected to enjoy.

Power does more than corrupt men of small minds.
It is an eating sore ... it is like a cancer that goes on steadily
gnawing away at a man's vitals until it finally destroys him and
spreads misery and insecurity among all those who may lay in his
path.
It is like the story of the mongoose in Jamaica.
I don't like snakes. I think a snake is the only creature in all
God's creation that I can say I really dislike. I suppose there are
many others that I wouldn't like if I came in contact with them.
But I have always been conscious of a snake ... and of the fact
that I don't like it.
But God created the snake and, more and more, scientists are
learning that every tiny grain of sand has its place and purpose in
God's creation.
The snake is a friend of the farmer. He feeds on rodents and
other pests that destroy the farmer's crops.
But, as I have told you many times in this column, nothing in
life is free. There is a price on everything. And one of the prices
the farmers in Jamaica had to pay for services performed by
snakes in the island was that snakes liked chickens and eggs for
dessert and they sometimes sneaked a bird or two out of a coop.
The farmers in Jamaica didn't want to pay the snakes this price
for their services and so they introduced the mongoose to the
island.
The mongoose is a small animal ... it looks like a big rat. But no
snake, however big and venomous, is a match for the tiny
mongoose. The mongoose is too swift for a snake. He is always
out of reach when the snake strikes. He waits his chance and
finally he strikes ... he sinks his sharp teeth intq the snake's
throat. And there the battle ends.
The mongoose was happy in Jamaica as long as there were
snakes to feed on. But they soon rid the island of its snakes. And
then they had to find something else to feed on ... to destroy.
They found chicken meat, eggs, corn and other farm products
a pleasing substitute for snake meat. Soon the mongoose became
a far greater menace in Jamaica than the snake ever was ... and
there is no way of removing or even controlling this pest.
Power is like the mongoose ... it is a cancer in a small man's
soul ... and it must go on forever finding something on which to
feed until it finally destroys its victim.

I often think of the story of the mongoose in Jamaica in
relation to the power structure that has been built up in the
Bahamas by the P.L.P. government and their minions in the
Square Deal Club who feed on the fat of the people to whom
they promised to bring a new freedom.
Instead the people find themselves carrying the yoke of a new
and insidious form of slavery from which like the farmer
and the mongoose in Jamaica there seems to be no escape.
**C*****
Let us take a quick run down on the new life pattern that has
unfolded in our islands under this government.
There were a lot of things for their viciousness to feed on when
they first came to power.
Let's list just a few of the things that were in easy reach of this
government when it first came to power just over seven years ago.
The Bay Street Boys. They with all their background of
experience in government and politics had to go. They have
been wiped out ot public affairs.
*" The Haitians, whose labour was indispensable to an
expanding economy, were another popular target. These black
men were hunted down with dogs in the bush by black men.
They were treated like wild animals by men who talked glibly out
of both sides of their mouths about the African brotherhood.
Now this labour has been reduced to such a point that it is
demanding a premium price for its services.
Englishmen, West Indians and particularly Jamaicans --
who helped to put these men in power, were another target: They
had to go.
The foreign investor, who was "the goose that laid the golden
eggs" was seen as a parasite. He had to make way for the
Bahamian who had nothing with which to fill the place. The
Magic City of Freeport became their biggest target. And tourists
were to be treated like intruders instead of as welcome guests.
Turks Islanders were driven from the side of Bahamian
families that they had raised in the islands because their
Bahamian wives had displeased some spiteful little politician.
****e***
Now all the easy targets have been removed the power
structure like the devil moves on to new feeding grounds,
"seeking whomsoever it might devour".
The government has trumpeted the fact that it has made
education the main objective of its administration.
Education tops the list of appropriations in the annual budget.
Thousands of young children are now coming out of schools
every year, confident in the promise that there will be a fat job
waiting for them .. only to find that their mongoose politicians
have destroyed the golden goose.
Recently teachers in the Out Islands complained about the
inefficient manner in which their facilities were being served by
the Ministry of Works in Nassau.
This offended the conceit of the mighty Minister, Simeon


Bowe, who publicly declared that vengeance would be brought
down on their impudent heads.
A young woman in Fox Hill trained for the post of Librarian
in the village. Her husband was the Opposition candidate for the
district in the last election. The M.P.'s brother is chairman of the
library committee. She has been removed and replaced with a
Jamaincan!
This is the government that requires business men in the
Bahamas to employ Bahamians, regardless of whethe;they qualify
for a job or not.
A young Bahamian woman went to the U.S. at her own
expense and trained as a dietician. She won many laurels during
her stay in that big country. But the whole object of her training
was :that she should serve her country. She returned to Nassau
and took a post at the Princess Margaret Hospital.
This young woman felt the need to write a letter to this
newspaper in self-defence. This action of a free Bahamian
displeased Loftus Roler, the mighty Minister of Health. She was
rooted out and thrown on the garbage heap of unwanted things.
Apd her place too was filled by a Jamaicanl
Tbia young woman has been refused the right to write a letter
to the press in her own defence but it's all rlght for Forelgn


Minister Paul Adderley to write a "damn fool" article in The
Miami Herald.
Hail Bahamianization. Hail freedom.
A doctor at the Princess Margaret Hospital received a letter
from a member of the House of Assembly about an incident that
took place at the hospital. There was no suggestion that he
replied to the letter. But he has been warned by the mighty
Minister bf Health that he is "in a whole lot of trouble".
All of which reminds me of the nursery rhyme:
Little cat, little cat
Where have you been?
I've been to London to see the Queen.
Little cat, little cat what saw you there?
I saw a little mouse under a chair.
Even a stray cat can look at a queen but a doctor at the
Princess Margaret Hospitr' is "in a whole lot of trouble" because
a member of the House oe Assembly decides to write him a letter!
And finally let us recall one of the great events of
Independence Day in the Bahamas.
The black people in the Bahamas seemed to feel that they had
moved into hog heaven when blood-and-thunder politician Milo
Butler was elevated to the position of Governor-General of the
Bahar as and Her Majesty the Queen conferred on him the high
dignity of a Knight Grand Cross of the Most Excellent Order of
St. Michael and St. George.
I suppos, this emotion reached its highest expression when my
dear old friend Mamie Worrell jubilantly kissed the Great One in
public and got her picture in the newspapers as one of the
outstanding events of this occasion.
I suppose the government must have realized that the Great
One needed a prop in his job ... and so the Hon. Gerald Cash was
appointed Deputy Governor.
It is reasonable that a qualified man should be the Great One's
assistant in this job.
And, of course, the Great One must have the finest black
secretary available. I don't suppose they come better than
Beverley Wallace Whitfield, younger daughter of Mamie Worrell
whose joy overflowed on Independence Day in a kiss for the
Great One.
And so this highly trained Bahamian with experience in
Nassau, the U.S., and England was seconded from the
Education Department to the Secretariat at Government House.
Now she has been trampled in the dust. No reason has been
given for this rash action. The story is being kept a deep, dark
secret. And so I have not asked any questions.

And now, for just a few shots at random.
The government is putting buses at the airport. In this action
the mongoose is feeding on its best friends ... the taxi men who
put them in power!
The water problem grows and grows. The Opposition in the
House tried to get a committee in the hope that they might lend
their experience in helping to solve this problem.
But the Minister of Works, Simeon Bowe, regarded this motion
as an affront to his wisdom, garnered while counting bolts and
screws in the stock department of B.O.A.C.
The motion was rejected. Now the water situation has moved
from serious to critical!
Dope especially marijuana has become a serious threat
to the lives of youth in the Bahamas.
The Opposition in the House moved for a committee to study
this problem in the hope that they might share in any effort that
is being made all over the world to control this evil.
There were practically told to mind their own business and to
keep their cotton-picking-fingers out of the affairs of the
Bahamian people.
This problem continues to grow and spread ... and so evil
marches on, like the devil, "seeking whomsoever he might
devour".

FOOTNOTE TO HISTORY: Before I flew from Nassau for
Japan today I left 33 articles with the Editor to fill this column
for the next five and a half weeks.
Anything could happen these days on a long trip like this and
so it gives me some satisfaction in knowing that I will be going
into the homes of my readers and talking with them for the next
few weeks.
Needless to say, I have been disappointed in the public
performance of a majority of my country folk but despite this I
want to say that I love you all. It's been a joy to know you.
The last two articles I wrote concerned the tourist meetings
held in Nassau last week and the "wordy" address made by the
Rev. Dr. R. E. Cooper when he handed over the presidency of the
Bahamas Christian Council to the Rev. Edwin Taylor, who will
have to work under the handicap of being a non-Bahamian. He
should not have been placed in this invidious position.
In the tourist discussion I recall a conversation I had with a
friend recently when she told me of a beach on the coast of
Kenya that is a quarter mile wide and stretches for an unbroken
length of three miles.
I have visited Kenya but I didn't see this beach as this area is
only now being opened up to tourist development.
In connection with the wordy declaration of Dr. R. E. Cooper,
I might remind him of the old saying that "actions speak louder
than words".
Here are a few quotations from early literature that express the
same thought.
JOHN FLETCHER, who lived 1579 1623 wrote: "Deeds not
words speak me".
WALTER de LaTRANE (1873) wrote:
And still would remain
My wit to try -
My worn reeds broken,
The dark tarn dry,
ALL WORDS FORGOTTEN -
Thou Lord and I.
PHILIP MASSENGER (1874) wrote: "All words and no


EDITOR, The Tribune,
I notice with interest the
headline "Govt. Drafting Plans
for National Service" in
the paper. May I therefore put
forward my own ideas?
To get Bahamian youth on
development programmes the
work must be voluntary: the
whiff of conscription will kill
the idea. There should be pay
comparable with that in other
occupations. The work should
be intrinsically worth while,
and explicitly educative:
linked, just as apprenticeship
is, with further education. It
should niot be seen as a rescue
operation, but as an initiation
into a new skill or trade with a
growing importance.
To achieve this goal of
making the Bahamas
self-sufficient the Government
ought to look at the idea of
establishing a Community
Industry.
The answer I offer, and
believe to be appropriate, is a
real answer to our problems
including the one of
unemployed youths. It is not
based on short-term planning
in terms of social educational
programmes as an alternative
to work. but a true answer in
that it would provide these
young people with genuine and
valuable work, which could if
mounted with an appropriate
educational programme,
provide high status
opportunities never previously
offered.
It is not the offer of a
charitable handout, but the
opportunity of a valuable role
in society, and this is the only

FREEPORT TRIP
A senior official from the
Ministry of Home Affairs will
visit Freeport, Grand Bahama
tomorrow to hold discussions
with persons who have
queries in connection with
nationality and citizenship
matters. He will be located in
the Government adminis-
trative Office, Sun
Alliance Building, Pioneers
Way, Freeport from 9:30 a.m.
to 1 p.m. and from 2:30 p.m.
to 5:30 p.m.


reasonable answer for society
to provide.
I do not believe the scheme
should be exclusively within
the agricultural and
environmental improvement
field, but should include an
increase in the ancillary help
available in the social services,
both statutory and voluntary,
in housing renovation schemes,
in hospitals and other parts of
the health service, and in a
variety of other outlets.
I an anxious to underline
that this proposal should be in
no way confused with schemes
of voluntary community
service, I am advocating the
recognition of a new 'industry
of community work', which
like any other industry would
pay rates and in which would
emerge a careers structure.
The scheme should certainly
help as regards the boredom of
unemployed youths found all
day on Bay Street and would
also reduce crime.
The scheme though will only
work if it does not involve
conscription. Conscription will
only lead to emigration of our
most scandalously wasted asset
- YOUTH
LOCAL EDUCATIONIST.


NO TO CONSCRIPTION


Just Arrived







BAHAMIAN


MARINE FLAGS PAI amD!Ian
ALL SIZES %Aw PALMDALE


performance".
And the late Hon. W. C. B. Johnson, Speaker of the House of
Assembly, often chided hypocrisy with these words: "Paper will
stand still and let you write anything on it".
And if I may dare to mention a saying of local gamblers at a
crap game while discussing the Christian Council: "Put yer money
ware yer mout dere".
I have put these articles on the bottom of the pile.
What the people of the Bahamas want from the Christian
Council is deeds, not words. This fact was shown by the small
crowd this body of supposed leaders in the islands attracted at its
Thanksgiving service in November.
The Bahamian people clearly were asking themselves the
question: "Thanksgiving for what?"
I hope that when I return to Nassau -- if I do that I will see
deeds by the Council that will make me feel I should tear it up.
Time is on my side ... I can always wait;

THOUGHTS FOR TODAY
Too bad ... too sad ... too late. DUPUCH

A people get the kind of government they deserve. -
ANONYMOUS

It is better to follow even the shadow of the best than to
remain content with the worst.- "ENRY VAN DYKE in The
Other Wise Man and quoted in Benjamin E. Mays' Bor To Rebel.
Mays is a distinguished Negro American educator, President of
Morehouse University.


-- -I


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it's

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-Morm,


91









4 The Tribune Friday,~May 2 T


THIS EXTERIOR
SHOT OF PALMDALE
FURNITURE COMPANY
shows from the right the
frontage on Mackey
Street, the long frontage
on Rosette Street
including on the left the
new westward extension
to this two-storey store,
with G.R. Sweetings seen
far left.


*


MR. GENE CHEA, (at
right) a veteran of fifteen
years in the furniture business
in the Bahamas, and owner
and manager of Patmdale
Furniture Company. (AND
BELOW) A view of part of
the showroom at Palmdale
Furniture Company. Photos:
Toogoods Photography.


Srn


.5
* S -


Growing up...on furniture


PALMDALE Furniture
Store owned by Mr. Gene Chea
has grown over the years.
It began as a small concern
by Bar 20 Corner 15 years ago.
Ten years ago it moved to its
present spacious location on
the corner of Mackey and
Rosetta Streets.
Recently Palmdale Furniture
Store has expanded Westwards
and this huge two-storey
building now stretches from
Mackey Street. where it has a
large frontage, along Rosetta
Street, right up to G.R.
Sweeting.
Mr. Gene Chea, who besides
being the owner is also the
manager and buyer of Palmdale
Furniture Store, after fifteen
years in the furniture business
in the Bahamas, is a good judge
of the Bahamian market.
"I try to get the right type
of furniture that the majority
of people here need," he said.
To do this Mr. Chea travels
to furniture factories and
furniture shows all over the
United States.
Hie buys from High Point,
South Carolina, Chicago, Hong
Kong and England.
Palmdale Furniture protects


its customers by buying all the
good brand names: Bassett,
Vanns, Thompson, Berkline
etc.
From Hong Kong comes
rattan furniture and raw iron
patio furniture.
Living room suites come in
all styles and fabrics for a wide
range of tastes and
pocketbooks.
For those who like regal
luxury in their homes or at
least in their living rooms -
there are rich velvetty-uphol-
stered sectionals in red or red
and beige with ornate lamps to
match.
For those who want to live a
worry-free housekeeping
existence there are vinyl
covered suites one 3-piece
set sells for $350.00.
There are hundreds of vinyl
covered loungers including that
ultimate in relaxing indulgence


- the Berkline recliner ($230).
Need an extra bed in your
loving living room without
spoiling its appearance? A
Hide-Away Bed sofa (for $305)
which looks every inch a small
good looking sofa rather than a
bed is your answer.
Accessories for your living
room include foot rests (in
vinyl or fabric) and lamps and
lamps galore including many of
the ceiling to floor type.
Palmdale Furniture also
boasts a wide range of dining
room suites (in brand names)
and a large variety of dinette
tables and chairs.
There are bedroom suites for
all the bedrooms in your home.
Beds come in king, queen,
twin, bunk and junior sizes
(including of course cribs).
Then Palmdale Furniture
also stocks all your bed linens
- pillows, pillowcases, sheets
etc. in both white and
decorator colours.


F.or floor coverings there are
linoleum and carpetting; for an
entertainment centre or corner
there are upholstered bars and
bar stools; for Baby (besides
cribs) there are bassinets,
prams, strollers, playpens and
baby furniture and there are
appliances for the home:
washing machines, cookers,
fridges etc.
Outdoor living, for which
the Bahamas is so eminently
suited, is not neglected. There
is garden furniture in plastic,
cast iron and redwood.
For something extra special
there are swinging canopied
love-seats or, for the patio or
garden room, a cast iron
upholstered 6 piece set -- 3
tables, 2 chairs and a sofa
($417) or a 6 piece rattan set
for $650.
Palmdale Furniture Store
can now boast of being one of
the biggest, if not the biggest.
furniture store in Nassau and
thus can offer an extremely
wide range of merchandise
Mr. Chea can also help his
customers arrange credit
facilities and, of course, his
merchandise can be bought
"on time."


,** :,


*L lS


",,
- 4 .


K


ALL APPLIANCES...................15% OFF

POLE LAMPS AND TABLE LAMPS all 30%OFF

OUTDOOR FURNITURE BY LLOYDS.... 40% OFF

PORTABLE BARS.... ....... 25% OFF

GYM SETS..................... 30% OFF

WROUGH IRON FURNITURE...... 40%OFF

EXTRA SPECIAL! ON:
COLEMAN
BEDROOM FURNITURE ONLY ..... 40% OFF..


7


SPECIALS!




BEDROOM AND DINING ROOM FURNITURE BY BASSETT.

BERKLINE RECLINERS, SECTIONALS, 3-PCS. LIVING ROOM SETS,

JUVENILE FURNITURE, 20% OFF J


RATTAN
FURNITURE
40% OFF


A"'AI:
-> ,dll1


COLOURS: WALLNUT


AND
- AVOCADO.
4


1- ^ jff:


. .-


II


PALMDA FNITRE IAN


corner: ROSETTA AND MACKEY STREETS


HO SH L -BEUY FAHO S -A 0TN -
0O


STARTS

SATURDAY


MAY


4TO1l


pir


- ---


* ,


i l.


t'"


P. O. BOX N-186 PHONE 23703.4












se Tribune -.. Friday, May 2, 1974


Ii


Cory Brothers Shipping
Europe House
World Trade Centre
London El 9AB
England


Charles Le Borgne
97 Av. Des Champs-Elysees
Paris 75008, France.


Local Agent UNITED SHIPPING COMPANY LIMITED
Beaumont House


P. O. Box 4005,


Phones 21340-3


BANTAD'S

FIFTH

ANNIVERSARY
A BANQUET to mark the
fifth anniversary of the
Bahamas Association for
tManpower Training and
Development will be held on
May 11 in the Pineapple
Room of the Nassau Beach
Hotel and the executive
committee is busy making
plans for the event.
The programme includes
buffet, door prizes and
dancing and special guest
speaker Mr. Rex Nettleford,
director of the Extra Mural
Department of the University
of West Indies, who will give
an address on "The Relevance
of Manpower Training and
Development to Nation
Building."
Committee members
shown are, seated, left to
right: Sidney Wallace, T.V.
Arnett, Inez Barnett, Dawn
Davies, and, standing, left to
right: Gwen Lawrence,
Albertha Williams, Bernard
Godwin and Connie Joseph.


STAR DEPARTMENT
manager to states for
training: C. K. Sands, Jr.,
Supervisor of the Star
Insurance Co. Ltd.'s
Underwriting and Data
Processing Department, has
left Nassau for Jacksonville,
Fla. where he will undergo
training as a guest-observer in
the Claims Department of the
Independent Life & Accident
Insurance Company. Mr.
Sands will study primarily
American methods of
adjusting health, accident and
disability insurance claims.
The Independent Life &
Accident Co. is similar to Star
Insurance in the scope and
nature of policies each offers.


CELEBRATING their 17th
annual conference last
weekend at Paradise Island
Hotel and Villas were 500 New
Jersey Rotarians and their
families, comprising Rotary
International District 749
(Bergen, Passaic and Hudson
Counties).
"The Nassau turnout is one
of the most remarkable
outpourings of Rotarians for a
district conference in many
years and is considered a
personal tribute to the
popularity of the district
governor, Mr. Anthony H.
Purpuse and the hospitable
reputation of the Bahamian


EDITOR, The Tribune,
Man, y' dunno how things
go' turn out in dis life, das why
y' ought be careful how y'
talk. Ah 'member when all dem
politishun usta come
campaign all y' could-a hear:
"Why yinna doan prepear
y'selft' take ya rightful place in
ass great nashun? Job down in
Nassau gone t' bed. D' country
cryin' out for ya service!"
Well, after dat all y' could-a
see people prepearin' t' take
job in town. Errybody packin'
up t' go t' Nassau t' be bank
manager an' t' take o'er d'
Emeral Beach and Paradise
Islun' dem. Only people stayin'
is islun' scrub like me an' Ba,
Dookie an' jes nuff d' udder
rest t' bait up candidate when
electionn come back next time.
So, all dese people from d'
islun' flockin' in t' Nassau. Dey
slippin' in erry day from
Jamaica and erry night 'bout
anudder nine dozen Hashun
cor crawlin' outta crab hole.
ZNS braggin' 'bout "dis great
metropolis we get", d'
ministrie o' tourism say les
start war dance on Bay Street
bait up more o' dem
inexpensive tourist. Errybody
doin' all dey could-a t'ink
'bout t' get more people jam
up in Nassau.
All of a sudden
BRAM!!! D. minister issue
proclomation, say d' water
gone! Startin' as of
day-before-yestiddy y' better
bigger what part y' want wash,
'cause 'tain't nuff water t' take
bath all o'er. Dis schedule t'
las' four week. By dat time, we
could-a say wedder t' make it
short story or serial, t' be
continue next month.
When Br Dookie tell muh
'bout dis, Ah feel a solem
feelmn' come o'er muh. Ah feel
like dem old-time prophet did
feel when big idea getting' in
dey head. Ah tell Br Dookie,
Ah say: "Y' know sum'pin,
history starting' o'er again Dis
exactlyy what happen before
Br Dookie say: "Whacha
mean?"
Ah say: "Y' member d'
time dem Jews did start chain'
Moses when he tell 'em he
know where milk an' honey y'
could-a scoop it up like spring
tide in October?"
"Das right," Br Dookie say
"dey ain't much as tink 'bout
askin' how y' go get dere "
"Well," Ah say, dey ain't no
sooner get under way 'an first
t'ing y' hear: 'Br Moses, all d'
water gone. Where d' next
water hole?' 'Fore Moses
could-a turn roun', all d' union
out on strike an' a hundred an'
sevent-nine t'ousan' people
gang up front o' he house
hollerin' 'We want water! We
want water!'"
Dis time. Br Moses getting'
cheese off good an' proper He
call he stan'-by prime minister
Joshua, he say: "See if y'
could-a find muh one big rock
t' smite? If Ah can't get
sum'pin t' lick, Ah go haddy
take dis stick an' go out dere
buss open some o' dem
ignoramus head."
Br Dookie eye light up. He
say: "Hey, das what happen
here l Das d' same t'ing we do
an' now, d' people hollerin' in
Nassau for water too.
Brrybody looking' t' Moses for


people," said Jack Rosen, the
conference co-chairman
A total of 44 out of the 48
clubs in district 749 of Rotary
International were represented
at the meetings which lasted
for four days. A banquet and
presentation of awards
ceremony highlighted the
various meetings and social
events.
During the conference
Rotarians agreed unanimously
that one of the major projects
their district would undertake
during the coming year would
be the purchase of a mobile
unit for the Bergen
Community Regional Blood


water. Man, das history right
o'er, hey? Ah dunno what
Moses go' do. He ain't got no
rock t' smite, but he could a
find plenty hard head."
Yeah, man dese dry times
we ketchin' now. Ah read
where all dem people come
from Acklins t' d' promise lan'
had meeting Missa Bain say
'tain't jess rain drought 't
Acklins, dey get economic
drought besides.
Well, das sum'pin now. Ah
wonder who could-a 'member
when all dem PLP prophet usta
tell dem poor Acklins people
say: "Yinna vote for d' PLP an'
good time go' bury ya alive
Firs' t'ing 'y go haddy do. go t'
Nassau an' get Missa Robjohns
dem draw y' up plan for bigger
barn, 'cause dese little chicken
coop y' get can't t'ink 'bout
holding' all d' blessin' go' buss
down on y' head like
waterspout."
Ah feel real bad for Missa
Bain an' dem poor people
down Acklins, but Ah gotta
tell 'em d' drought ain't only
cover Acklins, it all o'er. Dis
economic drought is cause by a
cold front in d' investment
climate movin' down from
Canada and d' States an' ain't
no better wedder in sight far as
radar could-a see. D' for 'cast
for Acklins an' all d' islun' is:
"Continue cool an' dry wid a
large volume o' hot air rising'
o'er Nassau an' heavy showers
falling' in d' vicinity o' d'
Square Deal."
Ah dunno what yinna
Nassau folk go do. Erry year d'
water getim' lesser wid all dese
drought an' d' populashun
getting' bigger wid d' Goombay
Summer. Stead o' y' had d'
gredlates' air line in d' world, y'
had d' greatest' rainwater
cistern in d' world, y' might-d
make it If only dey could-a
find some way t trap all d' hot
air gubment politishun does
ventilate, y' could d evaporate
d' Exuma Sound an' get all d'
fresh water y' want.
Time like dis. Ah glad Ali
living' where fresh water
can't done Ah got muh
shower all rig up, wid oil drum
an' force pump an' when Ah
dry d' tank, Ah could always
full it up again, if Ah feel dat
way. Ah could only say if it
get too bad an' it get too itchy
Doctor Learn does sell some
good powder
One good ting 'bout it all: y'
can't pay for what y'doan use?
Or could d'
COUSIN ZEPH
Eleuthera,
April 24, 1974


Centre.
Distinguished Rotarians
a tending this year's
conference included: Mr.
Purpuse, Governor of District
749, Rotary International; Mr.
William C. Carter, 1973-1974
President of Rotary Internat-
ional and Mr. Gerald R. Wooll,
Director and Treasurer, Rotary
International. Other district
749 officers in attendance
were: Mr. Carmine L. Torsiello.
Governor-nominee for
1974-1975; Mr. Raymond
Wells, Governor-nominee for
1975-1976; Mr. John Oepple,
District Secretary; Mr. John
Hartman, District Treasurer;
Mr. Vincent P. McCorry, Chief
Governor's Representative and
Mr. Rosen, Conference


"CARIBBEAN EXPRESS"
"HERMES


AMONG the dignitaries
attending the 17th annual
Convention of District 749 of
Rotary International at the
Paradise Island Hotel and
Villas from April 25 to 28,
were: Mr. Harry G. Scates,
Administrative Advisor for the
Nassau and Abaco Rotary
Clubs; Mr. Anthony H.
Purpuse, Governor of District
749; Senator, the Hon.
Gerald Cash, an East Nassau
Rotarian and Mr. Gerald R.
Wooll, the Director and
Treasurer of Rotary
International. More than 500
members of District 749
attended the four-day
conference.

*


co-chairman.


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NOTICE TO HOLDERS OF

SAVINGS ASSURANCE PLAN POLICIES:

ANCHOR UNIT TRUST PRICES


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OFFERED PRICE ........ $1.10
BID ................... $1.03
YIELD ................. 2.85%


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THE PACIFIC STEAM NAVIGATION CO.
DUE FRCIORT.


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Due Freeport
9th, MAY
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-** *^ A A- .












The Tribune - Friday, May 2, 1973


1p;










Fear for safety stops


Good Samaritan acts
By Abigail Van Buren
6 1974 IW ChKic Tribune-N. Y. Niew Srnd Inc
DEAR ABBY: Can you or anyone in your vast reading
audience provide a solution to a problem which saddens
me? Because of the frightening increase of crime, in order
to protect myself, must I now refuse to lend a helping hand
to a brother or sister in apparent need of help' If I am
driving along the road and see a car stalled by the road-
side, and a woman tries to flag me down, must I ignore her
plight and keep going because I fear it might be a trap to
rob me? Or if a stranger, apparently hysterical, rings my
doorbell and asks to use my phone to call the police and
ambulance to report an accident, must I say: "Sorry, no,"
because he might be trying to set me up for a holdup or
kidnapping?
I have always felt that I was my brother's keeper. Not
anymore. I and millions of others await your reply.
TAKING NO CHANCES
DEAR TAKING: If someone tries to flag you down on the
road, keep going. But stop at the first telephone and report
it to the police or highway patrol. Under no circumstances
should you open your door to a strange man, woman or
child. Don't ignore them. Offer to make a call and summon
help.
DEAR ABBY: My father wants to get a motorcycle. My
mother and I [his only daughter I think he wants the fun of
being a teen-ager again, but he claims a motorcycle is the
answer to the gas shortage. I am more afraid of his getting
hurt than anything else He's 47 and has to drive 40 miles
on the freeway every day to get to work and back. My
brothers are on his side, and my mom and I are against it.
This is causing a lot of arguments in our house. How do
you feel about a man Dad's age buying a motorcycle when
he's never ridden one before in his life? CONCERNED
DEAR CONCERNED: Same as you, but your father is an
adult and must be aware of the dangers as well as the
advantages. You've spoken your mind. now be quiet. And
for heaven's sake, if he should get into an accident, resist
the urge to say: "I told you so."

DEAR ABBY: How can I open up my son's eyes to
something before it's too late?
Sonny is 28, and he's marrying Sally, a 26-year-old widow
with a child. Sally was married at 20, and had a baby at
21, and her husband was killed in an accident when she
was 22.
Because Sally was orphaned young, she never knew her
mother, so she became very close to her mother-in-law.
After Sally's husband was killed, she and the baby moved
in with the in-laws and they've lived there ever since.
I have told my son that since it isn't proper for a widow
to have a gala wedding, he should insist on a small quiet
ceremony with none of Sally's in-laws present, but he said
whatever Sally wanted was all right with him. Well, Sally
is having all her first husband's family, and I'm afraid
with all the memories of their dead son they will turn the
wedding into a funeral.
I don't want to be a meddling mother-in-law, but I want
my son to realize that unless Sally breaks those strong ties
with her past, their marriage doesn't stand a chance. So
how should I do it? TOUCHY SUBJECT
DEAR TOUCHY: If you don't want to be a meddling
mother-in-law, the advice from here is--don't meddle.
DEAR ABBY: At a banquet recently, I was being intro-
duced to my husband's boss and employees when a secre-
tary piped up, "Your hair is very pretty. Or is that a wig?"
[It was]. There was total silence while everyone waited for
my reply. Having been put on the spot, I had to tell the
truth, but I don't know when I've been so humiliated.
Another time, I was asked by a woman I hardly knew:
"Those aren't your real eyelashes, are they?" [They
weren't.]
I have witnessed nervy questions being asked of others.
For example: "How much did that cost?" Also: "How
come you never had any children?"
Are people getting less considerate of others? I have
never noticed such bad manners before Please tell people
to cut it out! PLEASE DON'T ASK
DEAR PLEASE: Rude, thoughtless and presumptuous
people always have been with us, but no one is compelled
to answer a question he doesn't want to answer. An appro-
priate response is, "I don't think it's any of your business."
And don't hang around for a rebuttal.
DEAR ABBY: What do you think about this new streak-
ing craze? SAN DIEGO SUE
DEAR SUE: I think it's overbaring.
For Abby's new booklet, "What Teen-Agers Want to
Know," send 51 to Abigail Van Buren. 132 Lasky Dr., Bev-
erly Hills, Cal. W212.


FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZERE FUNGICIDE
PET St PLY PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that RAYMOND TELLUSMA -
known as PHILIP JOHNSON of Ridgeland Park West is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for naturalisation as a citizen of The Bahamas,
arid that any person who knows any reason why
naturalisation should not be granted should sent a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 3rd day of May 1974 to The Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs
P.O. Box N3002, Nassau.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that JAMES ALEXANDER TODD
of Cunningham Lane, Nassau, New Providence is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for naturalisation as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalisation should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 27th day of
April 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Ctt:enshlp, Ministry of Home Affairs P. 0. Box N-3002,
Nasmu.


American Friends give car to Red Cross

THE AMERICAN FRIENDS OF BAHAMAS FOUNDATION, Inc. have donated a
Morris Marina station wagon to the Bahamas Red Cross for use In its local programme.-
Photo shows Mrs. Kirkland W. Todd, a director of the Foundation and member of its
Grant's Committee, handing the keys to the car to Mrs. Lottie Tynes, Red Cross Director.
Col. M. Oakley Bidwell, vice-president of the Foundation looks on, The presentation took
place at Red Cross Headquarters, Dowdeswell Street.


Who says you can't ount ?


I SAY so. No, let me amend
that slightly. I say you won't
count, not when you're playing
bridge, if you're like most of
the players I know. You either
can't see the necessity, or you
can't be bothered, or you lose
track of your totals too
quickly, and you abandon the
whole exercise as being too
much trouble. Does any of that
apply to you? If so, read on. If
not, kindly accept my
congratulations, but read on
anyway.
When you are playing a hand
of bridge from the declarer's
seat, you never have to count
beyond 13, and that is so
simple that it is practically
automatic. Even so, to many
players, that little piece of
mental activity is a tiresome
chore, to be performed only
when it is remembered, and
then only grudgingly. But
when it comes to counting in
two suits at the same time,
almost 99 players out of every
hundred give up before they
start, so formidable and so
wearying appears the task.
Is it really all that difficult?
Of course not. Could you do it?
Of course you could, and there
are many hands on which you
should, as witness this example
below:


A 109864
A 1094
63


Q7 5 2
765
AO 10
Q94


KJ
3
9872
J 108765


3
KQJ82
KJ 54
A3 2

North opens 1 Spade, and
after he has supported Hearts,
South then goes on to game, so
let us watch South in 4 Hearts,
as he gets the lead of the 7 of
Hearts from West, and dummy
appears.
He counts his tricks. 5 in
trumps, the Ace and King of
Clubs and the Ace of Spades.
That comes to 8. So ruff a
couple of losers in dummy, and
chalk up 120 for 4 Hearts
made.
Having got as far as that,
South takes the first trick with
dummy's 9 and leads a
Diamond to his Jack and
West's Queen. West sends back
another trump. Again winning
in dummy, South leads a
second Diamond, and his King
is taken by West's Ace. And
now yet a third trump comes
back.
Declarer takes this with
dummy's Ace, plays off the
King of Clubs and the Ace of
Spades, and returns to hand by
ruffing a Spade. Now he leads a
small Diamond and trumps it


LISTENING
REMINDER

Bahamas

Youth Evangelism

Fellowship
invites you to listen to the
dramatic gospel program
"UNSHACKLED" produced
by Pacific Garden Mission in
Chicago and presented on
Z.N.S. 2 each Sunday
morning at 7:a.m. Address
Inquires and comments to
B.Y.E.F. Box 3139 Nassau.


with dummy's last ti
late he realises that
and dummy now loo
with two tricks area
10986
none
none
none


There is no
declarer can now av(
of his last Diamon
small Club, so he
down amid mu
sympathy from h
smug noises from ti
and his own grum
finding the Dial
perverse.


rump. Too hand, so South cashes his Ace
t his hand of Clubs and ruffs, the small
k like this, Club in dummy. Now he uses
dy lost: the Ace of trumps to draw the
last trump, and knowing for
certain that all the trumps have
none gone, and furthermore that
K dummy's last two Spades are
5 the only ones left plays the
A 3 10 and 9 of Spades. He finally
gives up just one Diamond
way that trick, making two overtricks.
oid the loss Admittedly, this line of play
id and his is inherently superior to the one
goes one chosen by the first South, but
.rmurs of the important thing is that it
is partner, really depends on being able to
he defence, bear in mind just two little sets
bles about of figures: the number of
monds so trumps gone, and the number.
of Sapdes. Armed with that
.. simple but vital information,


NOW Lalt is not an
abominably bad way to play
the hand, and it must be
admitted that, South was a
little unlucky to find both the
Diamond honours on his left.
But he could have given
himself a much better chance,
had he tried to do something
with his partner's Spades, even
though in the process he would
have had to do a little extra
counting. Is that way the
losing line made so much
appeal? We don't know, but we
can guess.
Here, however, is another
South with the same hand, the
same dummy, the same cards
in defence, and the same
opening lead. He goes through
the same motions, and comes
to the conclusion that the line
followed by his predecessor
will give him a good chance;
but that trump lead worries
him, so he pursues a different
line.
Forseeing the need to keep
his low trumps, South takes
the opening lead with the King,
and says to himself: 4 trumps
gone. He then plays to the Ace
of Spades, and ruffs a Spade
with his Queen. Whereupon he
says to himself: 5 trumps and 7
Spades.
Crossing to dummy's King
of Clubs, another Spade is lead,
and ruffed with the Jack. 6
Trumps and 9 Spades gone.
Now the 2 of trumps is led to
dummy's 9, and another Spade
is ruffed in hand with the 8.
And South murmurs to
himself, 10 trumps and 11
Spades.
This is now the position all
round the table, and although
South doesn't know about ,he
distribution of the Clubs and
Diamonds, neither does he
care, because having
remembered to count Ahe
trumps and Spades, he knows
what he needs to know, which
is:
109
A 10
63
none


none
6
AQ 10
Q9


South easily makes his
contract. And so could you,
couldn't you? Of course you
could!
R.C.


THE BAIIAMAS
MOTHERS' Club has launched
a public appeal for help in
choosing the Mother of the
Year to be honoured at their
special Mother's Day
programme to be held Sunday,
May 12 at the Southern
Recreation Grounds
The Mother nominated must
have raised all her own children
to be good citizens, as well as
being a help to others and a
person involved in community
work.
The Club is also asking for
nominations to find the oldest
mother to honour. A
presentation will also be made
to the youngest mother with
the most children
Last year's Mother of the
Year was Mrs. Nellie Williams,
a resident of West and
Wellington Streets and a
mother of eight.
Those wishing to send in
nominations are asked to
forward them to either Mrs. U.


Bahamas Red

Cross Week
THE BAHAMAS Red Cross
will be showing two films at
Government House on Monday
night as a part of the "Bahamas
Red Cross Week," which begins
Sunday, May 5 and ends
Saturday, May 11.
The organization's theme for
1974 is "Give Blood, Save
Life" and the films shown will
be in keeping with this theme.
The two films shown on
Monday will begin at 6:30 p.m.
The first is Blood is Red All
Over the World and the second
is Bandhutta, which is about
relief work carried out last year
in Bangladesh by the League of
Red Cross Society.
The League sent the films to
the Bahamas Red Cross as gifts
for the film showing.
The next night, Tuesday, the
Red Cross will hold its annual
general meeting in the
ballroom of Government
House at 6 p.m.


J. Mortimer or Mrs. Bessie
Colebrooke.
Last year's oldest mother
was Mrs. Susan Rahming of
Black "Point. Andros. She was
110 years old and would have


CROSSWORD
PUZZLE
ACROSS 34. Division of
time
1. Spied 35. Cloth strainer
4. Criticized 37. About
8. Blue grass 39. Priority
11. Self-image 45. Diamond State
12. Circle of light 47. Age
13. Cover 48. Chopping tool
14. Robot play 49. Goddess of
15. Monogram discord
17. Usury 50. Estop
19. And: iLat 51. Jinx
20. Capital 52. Charter
23. Twitching 53. Wise bird
26. Famous uncle DOWN
29. Dispatched
30. Mite 1. Helot


32. Gro


SO


been 111 on June 5 but she
passed away recently.
All churches and
organizations are being invited
to take part in the Sunday
services.


I







I

ul N YESDAY'S PUZZLE


none
none
KJ 54
A3


The lead is in the Solth
LUNCH-SUPPER SALE
THE congregation of Holy-
Spirit church, Chippingham
will hold a lucheon-supper sale
and Bazaar on Friday May 31
in the schoolroom and the park.
The bazaar will be held
under the patronage of Mr.
Earl Thompson, MP for the
district, and Mrs. Thompson.
and will be opened by as.
Shirley Oakes Butler at 4
Lucheon begins at 12 noon A,
raffle will also be held. -


Mother of Year to be


honoured on May 12


Ite Bhttny... ithk UFK

S POWER LIFE
SPECIAL FOR MAY
PRICED from $28 up

IANIwIAIAiE P, ANAHNI[II
CRAWFORD ST. Opposite Bahamas Wa+er Supply
P.O. Box N-1225 Phone 5-2005


~Bll ~Dgr~










-"I

7


S-..


The Tribune. -. Friday, May 2, 1974


Getting set for Goombay


IT'S COMING again --
Bahamas Goombay Summer.
The three-month festival of fun
starts this year on June 1 and
will run until August 31.
Goombay Summer which
has derived its name from the
music of the 700 islands of the
Bahamas is designed to expose
the visitor to Bahamian
culture, crafts and general way
of life.
Introduced in 1971 in an
attempt to attract visitors to
these shores during the
traditionally slow summer
months, -the festival surpassed
alL expectations and it has since
developed into a cultural
institution.
Last year it was another
success, with more than
425,000 people visiting the
Bahamas during June, July and
August.
This year will see a refined
version of the festival. But the
concept which made it popular
will remain the same.
The weekly events of
Goombay Summer '74 have
been carefully arranged to
ensure that visitors have
something, to see and do every
; d--4ay of the week.
r r


'a---i


Sunday is observed here as
a day of worship. And the
Ministry of Tourism, with the
cooperation of the Bahamas
Christian Council, has devised a
church programme called
'Attend Church Services with a
Bahamian Family'. The
programme gives visiting
families the opportunity of
going to church with a
Bahamian family and
afterwards, if they so desire,
dine with that family at home
- thus experiencing an aspect
of Bahamian culture first hand.
9 On Mondays at noon-time,
lovely Bahamian girls will
model colourful Bahamian
print fabrics around swimming
pools of hotels and at buffet
luncheons. These shows rotate
among the leading hotels in
Nassau. The fashions are
supplied by local merchants
and there are on-the-spot sale
of garments. Fashion shows in
Freeport, on the island of
Grand Bahama, are also
noon-time affairs. Later on in
the evening, there is a
Goombay Moonlight Cruise.
This new Goombay feature
takes place from 9:00 10:30
n m Visithrs are taken on a


cruise along picturesque Nassau
'Harbour feasting on
Bahamian delicacies, while
listening to live Goombay
music.
On Tuesdays, the Nassau
and Paradise Island Promotion
Board hosts beach parties for
hotel guests at Cable Beach and
Paradise Island Beach.
Refreshments are served and
there is live entertainment and
plenty of water sports and
games. Then from 9 10 p.m.,
guest artists from the
Caribbean and United States of
America join Bahamian
entertainers in concert at the
'Goombay Pavilion of the Arts'
an entirely new feature this
year.
Wednesday have been set
aside for the marching
minstrels of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force The
Royal Bahamas Police Band.
They perform on Bay Street
from 8:30 9:30 p.m.
Sporting immaculate starchy
white tunics, white spiked
helmets, adorned with flaming
red puggarees, the uniformed
cops afford camera toting
tourists to these shows a
pageantry of colour. The band


THE NASSAU AMATEUR O ATIC SOCIETY
WILL PRESENT




"IV MEXICO"
at the
"DUNIDAS CIVIC CENTRE"
Saturday, llth May to Saturday, 18th May, 1974,
excluding Sunday, 12th May. Curtain Time: 8.30 p.m.
every performance.



Saturday, May 11th only. Children under 16 years admitted half-price.

Monday, May 13th will be a Benefit Performance for the Bahamas Paraplegic
Association.

Block bookings can be reserved in advance (12 seats for the price of 10) for
Monday, May 13th and Tuesday, May 14th.

Box Office Now open at the Maura Lumber Company, Bay Street, on
Saturday, May 4th. Telephone: 2-4001 for reservations.


=uONE&.


HERALDING Bahamas
Goombay Summer with festive
balloons at the Henry Davis
Travel Industry Trade Show In
New York is Bob Burke,
Nassau/Paradise Island Promotion
Board director of travel agency
sales. With him (from left):
Andrew Neiberp, Delta Airlines,
N.Y.; Elizabeth Ocakay and Ina
Herraro of Travel Sepcialists,
N.Y.; Gerry Tinlin, Nassau Beach
Hotel; Dennis Hickman Mayfair
Hotel; and Ron Overend, Flagler
Inn.
The multi-city presentation,
featuring more than 100
exhibitors, was seen by thousands
of influential travel agents and
other industry personnel.
Following two days in New York
the show was given In Hartford,
Conn.; Framingham, Mss.;
Philadelphia; Pa; N.J. Hauppauge,
L.L:.apd Port Chester, N.Y.


performs in the International
Bazaar in Freeport each
Thrusday evening at 8:30 p.m.
On Thursdays Bahamian
folklore groups, wearing
colourful costumes depicting
various eras of Bahamian
history take to the stage in
performances in Nassau. And
visitors will see a show similar
to the one put on for Prince
Charles, heir to the British
throne, when he visited the
Bahamas for last year's
independence celebrations.
a On Fridays, Bay Street -
Nassau's main thoroughfare -
is blocked off to vehicular
traffic from 6:30 12:30 p.m.
to allow local musicians and
jump-in dancers to perform
and parade in their colourful
costumes. It is one of the most
rousing sights of Goombay
Summer.
On Saturdays there is a
heavy schedule of events. At
10 a.m., Government House is
the scene of much activity as
large crowds converge on the
dovemrnor-eneral's residence
to watch the colourful
Changing of the Guard
ceremony by the police band.
This adds a bit of British
tradition to the summer
festival. The event is a
bi-monthly affair and takes
place this Goombay Summer
on: June 1, 15 and 29; July 13
and 27; and August 10 and 24.
The 13-week people-to-
people programme will kick off
with a grand Goombay
Summer Ball on June 1.
CANADIAN AGM
The Canddian Women's Club
of Nassau will hold their
annual general meeting
Monday at the Nassau Harbour
Club. Lunch will follow
immediately after the business
Aidikemf


Its good
tobe


says

Ritchie
MR. RITCHIE DELA-
MORE, who made his
debut at Paradise Island on
Wednesday night, told The
Tribune about his
engagement in an exclusive
interview Tuesday afternoon
at the Nassau Harbour Club.
The interview was
suggested by Sir Etienne
Dupuch, who met Mr.
Delamore on a flight to
Nassau from Miami. Mr.
Delamore had been returning
home via Miami from Detroit.
Mr. Delamore, who says he
has been in show business
about 20 years, will be
appearing for the next three
to four weeks at the Trade
Winds Lounge and Bar,
Loew's Hotel.
He told The Tribune that
Instead of mostly calypsos,
his show will vary to include
more American, Latin
American and Jewis songs. He
said he sings in four languages
Spanish Italian, Yiddish
and English.
He told The Tribune that
"wherever I am in the world,
I will always do calypso. No
matter which part of the
world I go to, I always get
more applause when I do
calypsos." He emphasised
that on stage he will be doing
"The Delamore Thing";
which is what his fans now
call it.


Ritchie Delamore at the Nassau Harbour (


Mr. Delamore said that
since this engagement has been
his debut at Paradise Island,
he has been working very
hard at rehearsals. "I want
Bahamians to always
remember this show," he
said.
Mr. Delamore told The
Tribune that each member of
his S-piece band, "Del Rios",
writes his own music and he
hopes that during their
present engagement they will
play some of their original
songs.
He said the band members
may seem a bit young, but
once they picked up their
instruments, they sounded
like a 20-piece band.
He said they have a
recording date coming up in a
month or two in Florida with
a Chicago-based company.


Players plan


drama festival


THE NEW Heritage Players,
a one-year-old group presently
numbering 25, plans a Bahamas
'iNational Drama Festival for
the middle of next month.
The group is to invite
dramatic theatres and groups in
New Providence and the
Family Islands to take part in
the festival.
The N.H.P. performed
throughout New Providence
during "Mental Health Week"
in its drive to aid charities.
The group will soon be
touring various parts of New
Providence to "take the theatre
to the people".
The group's main object is
to educate as many young
children as possible drama -
therefore affording them first
preference for stage work in
the event that the Bahamas
develops a national theatre or
television or some sort of other
dramatic entertainment. N.H.P.
now range in ages from 7-18
years.
The N.H.P. seek the
co-operation of parents to get
children "off the streets" and
into some place where they can
enjoy "free live entertain-
ment".


If these children have
nothing to do after school on
Monday, Wednesday and
Thursday evenings, the N.H.P.
invites them to their theatre on
Hay Street for meetings which
begin at 7 p.m. and end at 9
p.m.
They will be able to take
part in plays and skits and be
taught the basic histrionics in
the theatre.




NOTICE


BAHAMAS YOUTH
EVANGELISM FELLOW-
SHIP invites you to see
"FACE THE MUSIC" a
special gospel film to be
shown on Saturday May 4th,
at Kingsway Academy
Bernard Road at 8 p.m.
admission is free and
everyone is invited. PLEASE
COME AND BRING A
FRIEND.


NEW!
GARDENING SHOP
Fertilizers *Tools Seeds
Indoor & Outdoor Plants
and much more !!

HAmU GAR DEN PT SUPPLY
MONTROSE AVENUE TELEPHONE 2-4259





SNOW STOCKS

ELECTRIC, FOOT & HAND OPERATED


Car. Christie 1 Dowdeswell Sts. Phone 2-1197




FOR KIDDIE FUN &
SENSATIONAL PICTURES
"PHOTO FUN HOUSE"
IS THE BEST THING WE'VE
DONE YET!


ON THE WATERFRONT
E.TMy St.-at. WUikem.St.

Sittnp by appfatient pleas@, at your convenience


After his engagement at
the Trade Winds, Mr.
Delamore hopes to do a show
at another hotel in Nassau.
The past three years he has
been doing shows in Chicago,
Washington, Las Vegas and
Detroit. Hesignedfor Playboy
Clubs and Holiday Inn hotels.
Mr. Delamore said he has
travelled and would now like


Cub

to stay home for a while and
settle down. He added: "I am
very, very happy to be
home."
I _W


NUW SHIUWINU! L 8& 11:15





MAND AT 9:45NEE 21 4:4



20th CENTURY FOX ByS E LIDE f
No One Under 18 Admitted
















SATURDAY MATINEE ONLY
MATINEE 2:15 & 4:45

"FRIENDLY PERSUASION"
Starring
GARY COOPER DOROTHY McGUIRE
NOW SHOWING
Except Sat. Matinee, Evening 9:00-'Phone 2-1004, 2-1005
Sunday Matinee 3:00 & 4:55, Evening 9:00



I TE BLACK EYE. I.
Starring
FRED WILLIAMSON ROSEMARY FORSYTHE.



Saturday Matinee Only Saturday Only
Matinee starts at 2:15 Continuous Showings
"TERROR IN C otnou w n
THE JUNGLE" G. from 3:00
Robert Burns, Fawn Silver
PLUS "AN ELEPHANT
"FANTASTIC VOYAGE" G. CALLED SLOWLY" G.


SStarts Saturday Night 8:30
Sunday Matinee starts at 1:45
Evening 8:30
"PAT GARRETT & BILLY
* THE KID" R.
James Coburn, Jason Robards
PLUS
"THE MAN OUTSIDE" PG.
No one under 18 admitted.
'Phone 2-2534


Bill Travers,
Virginia McKenna
PLUS
"ACE HIGH" PG.
Eli Wallach,
Terence Hill
PLUS Late Feature
Saturday night.


SATURDAY MATINEE ONLY
MATINEE STARTS AT 1:45
"RETURN OF COUNT YORGA"
Starring
ROBERT QUARRY MARIETTE HARTLEY
Plus "BATMAN"
NOW SHOWING
Except Sat. Matinee, Evening 8:30-'Phone 3-4616
Sunday Continuous from 4:15
Now Strokes%
Maw Tridral I


w echn Una pd an


They work so well together:
Your home air conditioner


and


SUN-STOP glare conditioner!

SUN-STOP banishes heat, fade, glare. New
magic invisible plastic coating for window
glass for home, office, industry. Clear or
tinted. Guaranteed 3 years. Low cost. Phone
or write for free estimate, free demonstra-
tion, today.


- .
::' "1













The Tribune - Friday, May 2, 1974




REAL ESTATE FOR RENT CARS FOR SALE E I I TI 1 CELA TE. TAD SR ING RE SVS


RSAE ESTATE SOR RENT CARS FOR SAL E M i M S,, ENTEITAIMENT KELP WANTED ~ TRADE SERVICES I I TRVICES


C14320
Large lot Adelaide Beach.
Phone 41298 day or nite
C14399
HOME Prospect Ridge on Golf
Course. Nearly 2 acres. 2
storey. 3 bedrooms, 3
bathrooms, large living and
dining room, enclosed patio,
enclosed porch, 2 large paved
terraces. Great for entertaining
large numbers. Maid's quarters.
Own well water. Reduced to
$115,000 firm unfurnished.
Telephone: 2-4148 or 2-3027
Morley & O'Brien Real Estate
(BREA Brokers).
C14414
HARMONY HILL have
house with unusually large
rooms, separate dining and
sitting, patio, enclosed
grounds, car porte neatly
kept rental established.
Asking $48,000.00. Rental
income $6,600.00. See Dial
'033,41197.
C 14415
41,000 sq. feet (400 by 110)
MAIN road Prince Charles at
Entrance of SEABREEZE. Was
$45,000.00 reduced to
$30,000.00. Dial Damianos
22033. 41197.
C14341
THIS Saturday or Sunday drive
through YAMACRAW BEACH
ESTATES. Salesman on duty
from 12 to 6 at MODEL
HOUSE. Deposit only $75 and
easy payments.
Tel: 4-1141 or 2-3027 or
24148
Morley & O'Brien Real Estate
(BREA Brokers).

C14387
BLAIR ESTATES, Eastern
'district 3 bedroom 2 bath
house, living room, dining
room, maid's quarters, double
garage, large kitchen and
pantry, patio and roof patio.
* Double lot, fruit Orchard. Own
water supply, view by
appointment. Phone 2-1741-2
business hours.

C14471
ATTRACTIVE Fully
furnished, three bedroom, two
bath home in large landscaped
lot in Buen Retiro. 75%
mortgage available. Phone
5-3177 (evenings).

C14470
CLEARED corner lot in
Highland Park 150' x 110'
$10,000 value for only $8,500.
Phone 28293 34527.

PUBLIC AUCTION
C14391
KIRK S. HINSEY will sell at
the Parking Lot east of the
Harbour Moon Hotel, Bay
Street, at 12 noon on the 10th
day of May 1974 the following
property:
"ALL THOSE pieces parcels
or lots of land situate in the
vicinity of the Baillou Hills
being a portion of the
Baillou Hill Estates
Subdivision and comprising
Lots Fifteen (15) and Eleven
(11) of Section number One
(1) and bounded as follows
on the NORTH partly by
-ot Fourteen (14) in
Section number One (1) of
the said subdivision and
partly by Lot Thirteen (13)
of Section Number One (1)
of the said Subdivision and
partly by Lot Ten (10) of
Section Number One (1) of
the said Subdivision and
running thereon One
running thereon One
hundred and Ninety-five and
Sixty-three hundredths
(195.63) feet more or less
on the EAST by Baillou Hill
Road and running thereon
Sixty-s-five and Seventy
hundredths (65.70) feet on
the SOUTH partly by Lot
Twelve (12) in Section
Number One (1) of the said
Subdivision and partly by
Lot Sixteen (16) of Section
Number One (1) of the said
Subdivision and running
thereon jointly One hundred
and Seventy-one and Ten
hundredths (171.10) feet
and on the West by a public
road Thirty (30) feet wide
and running thereon In a
series of curves
Seventy-three and Fifty-six
hundredths (73.56) feet."


Mortgage dated 25th August,
1967 Wilshire Rahming &
Dolly Louise Lightbourne TO
Finance Corporation of
Bahamas Limited.
Recorded in Book 1172 at
pages 409 to 417.
The sale is subject to a reserve
price and to the right for the
Auctioneer or any person on
his behalf to bid up to that
price.
Terms: 10% of the purchase
price at the time of sale and
balance on completion.
DATED: 18th day of April
A.D. 1974.-
KIRK S. HINSEY
Public Auctioneer

W TS TO RENT
C1438A
ENGLISH family requires
three bedroom house.
Preferably unfurnished or
partly furnished. Call 31651.


C14381
APAR I MENT for rent
Richville Estate, $145.00 per
month, phone 3-5930.

C14386
SHOPS AND OFFICES
FOR RENT
Modern airconditioned office
and store space available in
busy shopping area, telephone
and ample parking. Rental fees
will appeal to the businessman
with a future. Phone 41301.
C14355
COTTAGES and apartments
monthly airconditioned,
fully furnished, maid service
available. Lovely garden and
swimming pool. Telephone
31297, 31093.

C14401
NEW ATTRACTIVELY
furnished two-bedroom
apartment, Stapledon Gardens.
Telephone 31804 evenings.

C14407
SHOPS AND OFFICES FOR
RENT
Modern airconditioned office
and store space available in
busy shopping area, telephone
and ample parking. Rental fees
will appeal to the businessman
with a future. Phone 41301.

C14345
TWO, Furnished and
airconditioned, 1-bedroom
apartments, Contreville, Ring
5-8679, ask for Mr. Pritchard.

C14421
3 BED 2 bath Johnson Road
near Scott Street, Large area
$165 month. Call 53208 after
5 p.m.

C14476
NEW luxurious 2 bedroom
apartment fully furnished,
magnificent views. Winton
Highway. Phone 2-1631.

C14478
NASSAU HILLCREST
TOWERS
Swimming pool, sun terrace
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, 3
bedroom apartments.
Contact 7-8421 or 2. Evenings
7-7065.

1 FOR SAE
C 14368
SANSUt '4 CHANNEL
RECEIVER, Q.R. 500
WATTS, TAPE MONITOR
SOURCE, PLAYBACK -
$495.00 Phone 6-8 p.m
5-7317.

C14338
SPECIAL SALE
on
WEDDING GOWNS
FROM $75 AND UP.
THE YOUNG MISS
Market Street near
Bay. Phone 2-3365.

C14409
1969 Volkswagen automatic
- perfect condition .
Admiral 19" with stand 2
months old. $225.00. Call
78048.

:14405
PATIO SALE
Household items Clothes -
Toys
Electric Frying Pan $15.00
12 String Guitar $70.00
Relaxacizor Exercising
Machine $100.00
Oster Dog Clippers $10.00
Salon Type Hair
Dryer $30.00
Patio Table $30.00
Rollaway Bed $40.00
Saturday, May 4th, 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. Prospect Ridge
Condominiums, Apt. 11,
Sanford Drive. Telephone
3-4746. Marshall.


C14465
SPECIAL SALE
DOUBLE KNIT POLYESTER
50 different colours
$4.50 per yard
THE YOUNG MISS
Market S!reet near Bay.
Telephone 23365

C14479
PENTAX F1.4 Lens strobe
flash. Excellent condition.
Must sell. Call 24173, ask for
Chuck.

C14481
METAL detector non-porous
and ore detecting meters.
Deluxe Model. Two heads
included for coin and treasure
detecting. Call between 8-5
p.m. 2-4173, ask for Mike.

C 14464
SPECIAL SALLY
WEDDING GOWN, complete
with plastic covering, and
including:- Headpiece (50
styles to choose from), veil,
formal slip, long line bra,
girdle, bridal garter, bouquet of
'flowers, panty hose or stay up
stockings and a pair of shoes.
ALL FOR ONLY $175
New arrival of bridesmaids
material starting at $3.50 per
yard.
We sew bridesmaids gowns for
$25.00
THE YOUNG MISS, Market
Street near Bay. Telephone
2-3365.


C14403
,1968 CHEVY Impala,
airconditioned, radio and tape.
Tel. 42066.

C14354
1972 VOLKSWAGEN 1300
Sedans Axcellent con-
dition, radio, W/W tyres,
low mileage. Finance and
insurance available. Call
36611-2-3-4.

C14480
DODGE 2 door hardtop, radio
A.T. low mileage.* Excellent
condition. Must sell. Asking
$4400. Call 24173 between 8
and 5 p.m., ask for Mike.


C14411
MOTOR CENTRE LTD
THOMPSON BOULEVARD
PHONE 56739
AT MOTOR CENTRE WE
HAVE THE USED CAR FOR
YOU
1974 DODGE CHALLENGER
Brown with white vinyl top &
White Trim. Air Cond, Radio,
Power Steering, Power Brake,
Mag Wheels & Wide oval tyres.
AT ONLY erao00o $6250.00
1973 DATSUN 240Z LIME
GREEN WITH BLACK TRIM.
Reclining Bucket Seats,
Automatic Console Shift,
Radio, Black Radial Tvres. AT,
ONLY 5($0.$5900.00
1973 DODGE DART WHITE
WITH BLACK VINYL TOP.
Radio, Air Condition,
Automatic Transmission,
Power Steering, W/W Tyres.
AT ONLY $4904s 0 $4400.00
1973 PONTIAC VENTURA II
GREEN & WHITE. Automatic
Trans. Power Steerinq. W/W
Tyres, Power Brakes, AT
nNI Y S98180 $3500.00
1972 CHEVY VEGA GREY
WITH BLACK TRIM. Radio,
W/W Tyres, Automatic Trans.
AT ONLY $ .0 $2500.00
1972 PONTIAC VENTURA II
BROWN WITH BLACK TRIM.
Air Cond. Power Steering,'
Power Brake, Radio, W/W
Tyres. AT ONLY $25O.00
$33500.00
1972 TRIUMPH 2500 P.I.
WHITE WITH BLUE TRIM. R.
H. D. Radio, 4 Speed Standard
Trans, W/W Tyres. AT ONLY
$3 ~0D $2500.00
1972V/W 1300 BUG RED
WITH WHITE TRIM. Radio,
Standard Trans. W/W Tvres.
AT ONLY $a01J000 $2000.00
1971 A. M. C. JAVELIN SST
WHITE WITH BLACK TRIM.
Automatic Trans, Radio.
Power Steering, Tape Console,
Shift Bucket Seats. AT ONI Y
$3098,00 $2950.00
1971 MINI CLUBMAN
ESTATE BLUE WITH BLUE
TRIM. Automatic Trans, W/W
Tyres. AT ONLY Pt804
$1200.00
1970 HILLMAN HUNTER
GOLD WITH BLACK TRIM.
Automatic Trans. AT ONLY
$ 9000 $825.00
1970 V/W 1300 BUG BLUE
WITH RED TRIM. AT ONLY
$SHa R0 $1350.00
1969 CHEVY IMPALA
GREEN WITH BLACK VINYL
TOP & BLACK TRIM 6
Cyl inder, Radio, Power
Steering, Power Brake. AT
ONLY $+,5.00 $1850.00
1969 V/W 1300 BUG BLUE
WITH RED TRIM. AT ONLY
$*4tG000 $1250.00
1969 MERCURY COUGAR
BLUE WITH WHITE TRIM.
Automatic Trans, Radio, Air
'ond, Power Steering, Power
Irake, W/W Tyres. AT ONLY
A,444 $1500.00
969 FORD MUSTANG RED
VITH BLACK TRIM. Radio,
Automatic Trans, W/W Tyres,
Power Steering, Power Brake.
AT ONLY $40"00 $1200.00
1969 CADILLAC
FLEETWOOD BLACK WITH
BLACK TRIM. Air Cond.
Radio, Power Brake,, Power
W/W Tyres, Power Windows &
Power Lock. AT ONLY
$3X0X $2490.00
THIS WEEK SPECIAL
1969 DODGE DART
90.00 $1950.00
1968 SUNBEAN RAPIER
$1g60.00 $1060.00
FINANCING AVAILABLE



C14283

A"k


3 year old 50' steel hull vessel.
British registered. Built in
Holland. Powered by two 671
GM Diesels, Ideal for fishing or
conversion to Island Cruising.
Call David Lowe, Treasurt Cay,
Abaco, 150 days, 156 nights.


C11894
1969 31 ft. CHRIS-CRAfT
Commander. Sleeps six, private
shower, two 230 h.p. engines
with less than 200 hours.
Kitchenette, good. condition
Call 24267, 54011.

C14477
BOAT FOR SALE, 20 ft with
ship to shore, 70 H.P. motor
with auxiliary motor. Must sell,
asking $3,900. See at Shell
Dock, East Bay or call 24173
between 8-5 p.m.


C14473

YACHTS and BOATS LTD.

CHRIS-CRAFT
CONCORDE
IRWIN SAIL YACHTS
WESTERLY SAILBOATS

AVON INFLATABLES
SEAGULL OUTBOARDS

27 foot Thunderbird sport
fisherman with flvbridqe. Has
twin 215 h.p. Mercruiser V-8
on in/outboard drives. Sleeps 4
with head and galley. Boat has
many extras including, Bimini
top, all covers, radio and more.
See it at our dock. $14,000.00

32 foot Sloop of fibreglass.
Built in 1966 this boat is in
exceptional condition, Sleeps 5
and has diesel auxiliary. Sail
customers, this boat must be
seen to appreciate. The
equipment is too much to list.
Ask us about this boat.
$29,000.00 asking.

A NEW BOAT
The all new Chris Craft
fibreglass Tournament
Fisherman. This consul type
comes complete. A 200 h.p.
Chris engine inboard give a
good turn of speed but will
troll all day. All equipment
standard, ready to go. Would
you believe $11,000.00 Duty
paid in Nassau?
AT THE DIVE SHOP

New from Switzerland the
famous "Benther 500" diving
watch't by Aquastar. The most
in professional dive watcbes.
Also 4two other models In
men's watches and a ladies'
dive watch, elegant style, but
still practical.
Summer afloat... We stock
three different types of Lilo
rafts, all with hand inflators.

PLEASE NOTE Our new
bathing suits have really caught
on. Come ih and select yours
while we have a large choice.
Men's and ladies' nylon suits,
men's "jams" all in super
colours. All at Nassau's most
complete Dive Shop the SHOP
WITH THE DIVE FLAG
AWNING.

P. O. Box N1658
Telephone 24869

ANNOUNCEMENTS
C14063
JUST ARRIVED
NEW SHIPMENT
Polyester double knit 60-62
inches wide; also Jersey
-naterial variety of colours,
custom made dresses for ladies
and children.
YOUR ONE STOP SHOP
FOR ALL SCHOOL
CHILDREN UNIFORMS
Also Polyester double knft
material for men all colours
MODERNISTIC DRY GOODS
Opposite Wulff Road Theatre
Telephone 3-4580



C14315
AQUINAS COLLEGE
PRESENTS







I






"The Music Man"
Directed by Andrew Curry
at
Garfunkel Auditorium
8:30 p.m.
May 3rd, 4th, Sth
Tickets priced at $2.00
obtainable from the students
of the college.

C14336


SETTLER'S PUB & INN
Beaumont Arcade, Bay Street
Telephone 5-9739
TWO BANDS NIGHTLY
* The Nsseuvians
* The Electri Circle
OPEN TILL 4:00 a.m.


C14467
THE NASSAU PLAYERS
present
A COMEDY BY NEIL SIMON


May 6th to 11th
Governor's Hall
Sheraton British Colonial Hotel
8:30 n.m.
Box office at The Trade Winds
Liquor Store
on Bay Street, 2-2431

CRAFT SUPPLIES
C14357
NOW in stock at Bahamian
Paint Supply, Bay Street:-
Decoupage
Clear Cast
e Candle Craft
e Tissue Craft
Phone 2-2386, 2-2898.

BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES--.
C14367
EARN UP TO $50,000
Yearly...selling Valve-o-Matic
Tri-Ply Surgical Steel
Cookware direct to the
homeowner by personal
demonstration. We require a
distributor capable of
recruiting and training
salespeople for The Bahamas.
Stock investment only. All
sales literature and training
supplied. Reply to: Adv.
C-14367, c/o The Tribune, P.
0. Box N-3207, Nassau,
Bahamas. &

I INO
C14475
GOODS LEFT OVER 30
DAYS WILL BE SOLD.
NASSAU BICYCLE
COMPANY LIMITED.

SCHOOLS
C14406
PIANO & VOICE LESSONS.
New York Trained: Sing
with the ease of talking.
Adults, you can learn to play
the piano in easy lessons. Call
2-1300.
C14356
LEWIS AUTO SCHOOL
Learn to drive with confidence.
Phone 59805 between 7 and
8:30 a.m. or after 6 p.m. or
35084 anytime.

WANTED

C14420
WANTED: USED
REFRIGERATORS, GOOD
CONDITION, NEEDED IN A
HURRY. PLEASE CALL
3-1881.

POSITION WANTED
C14419
YOUNG LADY Bahamian -
with commercial experience
and Stage 2 professional
Boo k-keeping and
Accountancy seeks position
with progressive firzp Please
write "Book-keeper, P. 0. Box
N-3404, Nassau, Bahamas.

HELP WANTED
C14272
STUDENTS 15 to 17 years old
with artistic ability needed for
summer job employment.
References from art teacher
required. Call 5-1347 after 6
p.m. for interview.

C14417
AUTO PARTS COUNTER-
MAN. Must have had at least
three years experience in auto
parts business. Salary
commensurate with
experience. Must be sober,
honest and reliable. Attractive
fringe benefits. References
required. Phone Mr. Godwin
Wright at 2-1031-5 for
appointment.

C14468
ENGINEER required with
Bachelor of Science in
electrical or mechanical
Engineering or equivalent with
at least 5 years practical
experience. Please call 3-6211.

SC14474

BUSINESS


EQUIPMENT

FOR SALE

Varitypers (2) and Headliner'
with fonts. Century World
Enterprises Inc., 8101
Biscayne Blvd., Miami,
Florida 33138.


C14339
PHOTOGRAPHIC and
Lithographic Technical
Consultant. Apply in writing to
P. 0. Box N-226, Nassau,
Bahamas.

C14466
LYFORD CAY SECURITY
GUARDS night shift work.
Men 25-45 with police training
or related experience definite
asset. Call 7-4211 or 2 for
interview.
C14416
YOUNG lady wanted for
wholesale office. Pleasant
appearance. Typing essential.
Write for interview P. 0. Box
5429 ES.
-C14359
CREDIT ASSISTANTS
FOR
INTERNATIONAL BANK
MALE OR FEMALE
CREDIT ASSISTANTS
FOR
INTERNATIONAL BANK
MALE OR FEMALE
Must have following
qualifications:
1. University graduate
preferably with degree in
accounting, business
administration economics or
finance, or
2. Good high school record
with minimum of four "0"
levels including English and
Maths, or
3. Minimum of three years
banking experience preferably
in International Dept.
4. Under 30 years of age.
Applicant will receive
indoctrination in various
banking departments before
being assigned specific duties
and responsibilities in Credit
Department Starting salary
commensurate with
educational background and/or
experience. Attractive fringe
benefits.
Only Bahamian applicants with
above qualifications need
apply. Please send complete
information to G. C. Carroll,
Vice President, World Banking
Corporation Limited, P. 0.
Box N-100. Nassau.

C14469
The services are required of a
gardener and handyman who is
knowledgeable at cleaning and
chemically treating swimming
pools. Services required for
half-days only, Monday
through Saturday. Bahamians
only need apply. Applicants
may phc 2-1071, between
the hours of 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.

C 14408
WANTED. Certified NAUI &
PADI Scuba Instructor to take
over position of Director of
Water Sports and
Entertainment. Duties will
comprise of: Administration of
all water sports programmes,
holding beginners and
advanced scuba courses,
directing and actively
supervising all maintenance.
German language preferred.
Write: Stella Maris Marina &
Yacht Club, P. 0. Stella Maris,
Long Island.

C 14346
STUDENTS
International firm ot chartered
accountants requires students
in their Nassau Office.
Applicants should be
considering a career in
accounting leading to
an A.C.C.A. Degree The
successful applicants will have
at least 5 "0" levels, including
English and Maths. Preference
will be given to those
applicants having an additional
2 "A" levels.
Please send resume of
qualifications, experience in
public accounting, if any, and
salary expected to: Touche
Ross & Co., Chartered
Accountants, P. O. Box
N7526, Nassau.

TRADE SERVICES
C14353
Pimdef'e Customs

brokerage Ltd.
Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING. STORAGE


& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACTT LYMAN FVNDER
OR JACK CASH
Phone: 2-3795, 2-3796
2-3797, 22798
Airport 7-7434
FREE ESTIMATES


C14314
SOUTHERN PAINTING
SERVICE
Specialising in spraying house
roofs, furniture, stipple
i .-. ishings, appliances.
Telephone 5-1919 (days)
3-6700 (nights).


C14351
T. V. ANTENNAS
Boosters for homes
apartments and hotels
SALES AND SERVICES
Call 5-9404
WORLD OF MUSIC
Mackey Street
Next to Frank's Place
TRADE SERVICES

C14358
SEWING MACHINE PARTS
AND REPAIRS
ISLAND FURNITURE
COMPANY
P. O. Box N4818, Nassau
Dowdeswell. and Christie
Str a'ts
Telephone 21197, 23152.


C14344
MASTER TECHNICIANS
LTD., Mackey Street, your
Whirlpool distributor offers
refrigerators, washers, dryers,
compactors, freezers, ice
makers, air conditioners and
garbage disposers. With full
warranty on every home
appliance we sell. Service done
by factory trained mechanics.
Telephone 23713, 5-9322.

C 14400
LANDSCAPING and for all
your gardening needs,
trimming, hedging, pruning and
tree felling. Call 5,7810.
LAWNS AND HEDGES.
C14423
WINDOW & DOOR
SPECIALISTS
Repairs on all types of
aluminium windows and doors.
Phone 54460, 23723.


GRAND BAHAMA



CLASSIFIED

II FIEIMT TEL. 352-1I


REAL ESTATE HELP WANTED
C15072 C14397
LOTS LOTS- LOTS- LOTS JOB TITLE INDUSTRIAL
OWN A PIECE OF FREEPORT ELECTRICIANS
We have lots of lots, Minimum Education -- Goc
Residential, Commercial, basic education.
Waterfront, all around Minimum Experience 5 yea
Freeport, Lucaya, Close in experience, preferably
Ready for building, SELECT cement plant or simil
FROM $2000 UP, Low down industry.
payment Easy terms. Duties/Responsibilities
payment Easy terms. Inspect, repair, install and wii
SACRIFICED all electrical apparatus, device
Because owners have changed and circuits of any voltage
plans, deaths, divorces or cement plant or assigned area
repossessions J.S.R. REAL Interested applicants contal
ESTATE, Freeport's First Personnel Department, Baharr
Licensee, No. 5 Savoy Cement Company, P. 0. Bo
Building, Pioneer Way, Box F-100, Freeport, Gran
F-93, Freeport, 352-8811. Bahama.

ANNOUNCEMENTS _you believe nobod'
C14366 reads small ads
SHAWNEE you're wrong. You anr
Daily Service between West reading thisaren't you
Palm Beach and West End. For if oat ion26608 s fo
Reservations call The Grand r t on small ods.
Bahama Hotel (Ex. 5). re dilay ads.






BUSINESS PROFESSIONAL ,


DIRECTORY

Save Time







b Ill tHb I llS tiri t Mi21M EXT. 5


NL

od

rs
in
ar

re
es
in
a.
ct
la
x
d


y


r


ANTENNAS
Island TV 2-2618
AUTOMOTIVE
Lucas Batteries
Bay Street Garage 2-2434

BOOKSTORE
The Christian Book
Shop 5.8744

BUSINESS FORMS
Executive
Printers 2-4267/5-4011

CABINET MAKERS
Commonwealth
Furniture 31120

CAMERAS
John Bull 2-4252/3

ENTERTAINMENT
Movies
Film & Equip. Service 2-2157

GARDEN & PET
SUPPLIES
Modernistic Garden
Pet 2-2868
Nassau Garden & Pet
Montrose Avenue 2-4259
HARDWARE


- -


LAUNDRY
DRY CLEANING
New Oriental
Laundry 2-4406
MEN'S WEAR
Fashionette Ltd. 2-2376/7

OPTICIANS


Optical Service


Ltd. 2-3910/1

PAPER
Commercial Paper
House 5-9731

PRINTING
Wong's Printing 5-4506

RUBBER STAMPS
Wong's Rubber Stamp
Co. 5-4506

SPOcTS GOODS
Champion Sport Land
2-1862

'TRAVEL
Playtours 2-2931/7
R.H. Curry & Co., 2-8681/7

TV REPAIRS

Channel Electronics Ltd.


John S. Geroge 2-8421/6 3-5478

HOUSE PLANS I UPHOLSTERING
EvangelosG. Zervos 2-4128 Eddie's Upholsterj 5-9713
U I TIEYCT"1I WNT




Shop Nassau Med rchnts
For Business And Services


> SAVE'TlME SAVE HONEY


_ __ ----- --


po


- IL-E-I-~ -


I


.


I


I


i




1


I


C14395
Job Title GENERAL
REPAI RMEN.
Minimum Education Good
basic education.
Minimum Experience 5-10
years.
Duties/Responsibilities --
Inspects, repairs, replaces,
installs, adjusts, and maintains
all mechanical equipment in a
cement manufacturing plant.
Interested applicants contact
Personnel Department, Bahama
Cement Company, P. 0. Box
F-100, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.
C15125
PASTRY CHEF: To supervise
and direct sweet good
Department of commercial
bakery.
At least three years previous
experience in a similar
operation. Must have Master
Certificate. Bahamian only,
need apply: Grand Bahama
Bakery Ltd., P. 0. Box F-797,
Freeport, G.B.
C15126
'1 SAUCIER; Three (3) years
experience as Saucier in first
class hotels or restaurants.
Responsible for preparation of
all Sauces and Soups required
for Gourmet Menu. Good
references, Police Certificate
and Health Certificate.
Applicants should apply to:
The Personnel Department,
Bahamas Amusements Limited
-- (El Casino) International
Bazaar, P. 0. Box F-787,
Freeport, Grand Bahama,
Bahamas.
C15132
Job Title STRUCTURAL
STEEL ERECTOR Minimum
Education -- Good basic
education. Qualified in steel
construction.
Minimum Experience 5 10
years. Duties/Responsibilities
Work on structural steel
erection during modifications
of buildings and equipment in
cement plant. Interested
Applicant Contact: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


IELP WNTED _j
C15106
REQUIRED: IMMEDIATELY
FOR CAPTAIN'S
CHARTHOUSE. CHEF TO
IAKE CHARGE OF
KITCHEN SPECIALIZING IN
GRILLED FOODS THE
MAN CHOSEN FOR THIS
JOB WILL REQUIRE
SPECIALIZED KNOWLEDGE
ON BUTCHERY PLUS
PROVEN EXPERIENCE AS A
GRILL COOK. A HIGH
SALARY AND GOOD
CONDITIONS ARE
OFFERED FOR THIS POST.
APPLY TO BASS BAHAMAS
LIMITED, PUB ON THE
MALL, BOX F-331,
FREEPORT, BAHAMAS.
REQUIRED: FOR THE PUB
ON THE MALL LIMITED,
FREEPORT, BAHAMAS. A
SUPERIOR COOK TO ACT
AS SECOND CHEF/NIGHT
COOK. EXCELLENT WAGES
AND CONDITIONS ARE
OFFERED FOR THIS POST.
APPLY PUB ON THE MALL
LIMITED, BOX F-331,
FREEPORT, BAHAMAS.


The Tribune - Friday, May 2. 1974


GRAND BAHAMA

CLASSIFIED

11 Rw m_. Wm


Rupert and the Floating Bell-2


By the time Rupert reaches the foxes Gregory burst Into roar of laughter. "Oh, ha, ha, ho I
has left them and strolled ahead by himself. He's so ey to take in I gasps Ferdy. He
Freddy and Ferdy are grinning broadly as asked if we knew a nice warm spot where he
though enoying a huge joke. "What do you could read his book." "Yeu, sa. he, heel
find so funny asks Rupert. "Have you And we told him to go to the woods because
been playing tricks on Gregory ?" Now t a ll the fire there would keep him warm. See?
the little uineapig has gone, the two foxee Fire- R I Ho. ho, ho I He believed us, tool
can contain themselves no longer and they
Rupert and the Floating Bell-8


'Rupert tells the foxes they should find somne- thing to show you." Rupet nan es mise friend
thing better to do than play a rather mean trick has a pet on a lead. "Where did you
-on little Gregory. But Freddy and Ferdy that?" exclalue fhdte at t
merely scoff and turnm away. "I'll eatch up oreature' horned hG, .il,. lf hide.
,wi Qfor end explain It's just a joke. "W-wht Isit?" 'haid ent pelaly
thinks Rupert. Just then Pong-Ping hurr* from NMrle." rpls P -Pg.a "'s a a
towards him along another path. HI, wait for rhino. I've named it O1.
me I" calls out the little p9ke. I'e some- ALL aMINeTAI RtVE


I


REX MORGAN, M.D.


Dal Curts


CARROLL FIGHTERS



^ GENERAL TENDENCIES: One of your bhost
S days in a long while to get together with those
individuals whom you wish to be connected with in the future.
Discuss and figure out a new way to be more successful. Be as
social as you wish. Enjoy others.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) Find out what is expected of
you by associates. Use direct approach for best results. Patch
up any quarrel you've had with others.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Show your fine talent for
making your surroundings more attractive and impress others.
Go out and buy that new outfit you like
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Perfect day for enjoying the
recreations you like the most and in the company of good
friends. Put your creative talent to work.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Take the initiative
and make home matters more harmonious by expressing
goodwill. Bring cheerful persons into your home.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Cooperating more with loyal
associates is wise now. Make your routines more productive
and keep busy. Avoid one who likes to bicker.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept 22) Think out how to become
more affluent by sensible and practical methods. Build up
your strength so that you can accomplish more.
LIBRA (Sept 23 to Oct. 22) You are charming, warm and
magnetic and can make a fine impression on others today.
Engage in outside activities this evening.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Ideal day to collect
important data you will need for the future. Give more
thought to the romantic side of your life. Be wise.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Contacting a clever
friend and getting the information you need is good now. A
new acquaintance should be cultivated.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) You can now build a
more worthwhile position for yourself in the business world. A
civic affair can help your public image
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) You are so highly inspired
with ideas that you hardly know which to follow, Stick to the
point when talking with others.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Your intuitive faculties are
working on a high level so use them now to best advantage.
Make this a delightful night with mate.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY . he or she will have
a great deal of magnetism and could get spoiled by others, so
teach early in life to work for whatever is desired and then this
becomes a most successful chart.


HELP WANTED
C15129
ACCOUNTING SUPERVI-
SOR: One (1) Accounting
Supervisor. Must be able to
supervise Accounting Front
Office Personnel, that is, Night
Audit, Front Office Cashiers
and Food and Beverage
Cashiers. Set up and maintain
various control systems,
maintain Training Programmes
for Night Audit, Front Office
Cashiers, and Food and
Beverage Cashiers. Handle
guest account complaints and
make credit adjustments when
necessary. Work as a liaison
between the Accounting Front
Office Personnel and the
Accounting Back Office
Personnel.
Work as a Night Auditor, Front
Office Cashier or Food and
Beverage Cashier when
necessary.
EXPERIENCE: As an Audit
Clerk, Accounting Officer,
Credit Manager, Food and
Beverage Control and Front
Office Operation. Operates
NCR 5100, 5200, 4200, 3300
and class IV series machines.
High School education, and
holds certificate in
''PROFESSIONAL
ACCOUNTANCY''
"INTRODUCTION TO
FUNDAMENTAL
ACCOUNTING SYSTEMS"
"EXECUTIVE MANAGE-
MENT" "MANAGEMENT BY
OBJECTIVES" "FOOD AND
BEVERAGE PURCHASING"
AND "FOOD AND
BEVERAGE CONTROLS."
For the above please apply to
the Personnel Office, Holiday
Inn of Lucayan Beach, P. 0.
Box F-760, Freeport, Grand
Bahama, Bahamas
C15128
ASSISTANT PASTRY CHEF:
One (1) Assistant Pastry Chef.
Must be able to run a Pastry
Shop on his own. Must have
knowledge of French Pastry,
Assorted Pies, Gourmet
Desserts. Must be able to make
outstanding decorative cakes -
wedding cakes etc. Must have
two (2) years experience..
For the above please apply to
the Personnel Office, Holiday
Inn of Lucayan Beach, P.-O.
Box F-760, Freeport, Grand
Bahama, Bahamas.
C15131
ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE
'CLERK: Must have worked as
a Front Office Cashier in
Hotels for at least two (2)
years. Must be completely
familiar with Front of the
House Operation. Must be
experienced in NCR 4200 and
NCR 3300 Operator. Also
must be familiar with Travel
Agents, Conventions, Master
Accounts and Credit Card
Accounts Receivable.
For the above please apply to
the Personnel Office, Holiday
Inn of Lucayan Beach, P. 0.
Box F-760, Freeport, Grand
Bahama, Bahamas.
Ab ,


STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD


White mates in three moves,
gains t amy defence (by Dr W.
Speadann). T 5oda proMe.n
oinaly. appeal ader a
beadi "Basy to aolve"-but
deufl the mn a setting, the
key move is far from obvious,
par times: 1 minute, -
master; 3 minutes, problem
expert; 10 minutes, go ; 15
minutes average; 30 nuts,
novice.
60LUTIiLON No 9957 -
Chess Solution
1 B-RS. If I . K-R2 2
K-'B5, KxB (or K-Ktl; 3 4-
Kt?); 3 Q-R8 mate. If 1 .
K-Ktl; 2 K-Q6, K-R2; 3
Q-Kt7 mate. TrIps for solvers
are 1 K-B5 ch K-Kt11 or
I K--- oh? K-aRI


U mOW many
n wordm of
f o r letters
or more can
you make
from the
letters shown
lere? In
makln a
word, each
letter may
be used once
n11ly. lach
word must contain the large
letter, ano there must be at
least one eight-letter word in the
list. No pinratls; no foreign word:
no proper nane. TODAVS
lAR(Br : 30 words, good;
'1 words. very good; 4 words.
excellent lutlon on Saturday.
VbiSTitRUAV's LU'TION :
Holm holt hoot into lion loin
loom loon loot ioth lotion moll
MONOLITH month moon moon-
lit moot moth motion mnill ollo
omut onto toll tool loon


No. 7.417 by TIM McKAV
Acresn
f. The iad. 3)
4. 11% IValL (I)
u. Auieelate. (p
10. e'e. F4
it n q.lmb. 4 )
12. 0 twer.i (4)mineral.5)
1. *. 9I. Title. (3)
2t. Roh le. (1)
a. Rodent. (a)
24. IUthe Ierreel shape and
sawe. !, )
6. Orab a handful. (,. s)
St. Rub out. (A5
U. own'y. (4)
Down
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Bridge
-By Vl@O9JMOLLO
Dealer North : Love Al
North
o J 2
K 4Q 10
K 4

North South
I& 10
2 3NT
West leads the V8. How
should South play? And how
should he play In SNT ?
ANALYSIS: Let's take ONT frat.
Clearly, each er overbid a
little. Perhapsouth forced with
20, rebiddincg 3NT over 34.
North, with a fraction to spare,
ventured 4NT and South took a
rosy view, attaching too much
importance, perhaps, to hi club
fit.
It's a poor contra and South
needs luck. The K must be
right and the suit must break
- or ast must have the bare
4J. So South fnesses the 6Q
and hopes. erentin
Things are ery diterent In
3NT. Now South needs only
four club tricks, but fearing a
spade switch, he dare not let
East in. He begins, therefore,
by layng down the A, Intend-
Ing, nothing happens, to play
up to the 4& later. He guards
against this distribution.
West Bast
A Q$3 1098765
887654 4 32
07 2 09805
J 6 5 K
In 3NT, South makes twelve
tricks. In ONT, playing correctly,
hb goes x down I


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APARTMENT 3-G By Alex Kotzsky

I'LL NOW, SWEETHEART YOU SHOULD SEE? IT PROVES YOU'LL SE
IT'SA IT INTERVIEW TO A WOMAN! SHE HUNG UP THAT'S ALL
WOMAN AS REPORTERS, WOMEN ON ME! SHEES!
EOMART ARE BIASEDP NON
WOULP OBJECTIVE,


-- -- L-


Chess
My 1LtW4IRO IARDIMN


Saunders & Overgard


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The Tribune -- Friday, May 2, 1974


WRESTLING

GUNGE REMATCHES

Saftday May 4th.

MATINEE 2 p.m.

CHILDREN 50C
TEENAGERS $1.00
ALL OTHERS $2.00


'House of

CHAMPIONS'
(formerly Birdland)
Mt. Royal & Carew

3 Single Matches

1 Trophy Match

-Plus-

Semi-final

4 Man Tag-Team


MAIN EVENT
CHAMPION TROPHY
MATCH
4 Man Tag-Team


MR. GOOSE'S
PRIDE & JOY
WILD JOE GOOSE

CHILDRENunde 500
TEENAGERS $1.00
ALL OTHERS $2.00







the BIG One

will he there!

Wm you?
Distributed by
Wm. Brewer Co. Ltd.
Nats '


DEFENDING senior girls
champs C. C. Sweeting High
took less than 25 minutes to
dispose of Government High
15-9, 15-5 yesterday, winning
their third game in succession
this season and extending their
unbeaten run to 12.
Unmatched in their class last
season when they became the
first Government school to win
the inter-scholastic volleyball
championship, Sweeting High
returned this year just as viable
a force and favoured to break
the record set by St.
Ausustine's College and Prince
Williams High.
Coached by Bahamas
national squad's official Tom
Grant, Sweeting High in their
first two outings stopped A. F.
Adderley and St. John's in
three sets compiling a total of
86 points and giving away 50.
Playing on their own home
court in 'Volleyball City'
yesterday, Government High
seemed to be the least of their
worries. In the first set of the
best of three, Sweeting High
easily overcame a 4-1 deficit in
topping G.H.S.
Olivia Mortimer contributed


a two point opening service for
G.H.S. that had C. C. trailing
by three points four
revolutions later. Hermine
Thompson brought them one
behind which was good enough
for team captain Laverne
Jackman whose low hard
deliveries saw no return.
A Government High time
out apparently break her
momentum though she
contributed two more points
giving Sweeting High a strong
10-4 lead.
With Judymae Miller,
Deborah Foster and Erica
Jackman joining in on defence
C. C. once again stopped a
five-point G.lI.S. rally before
winning by six points.
Erica opened the second set
with a two point service.
Thompson followed placing
Sweeting High ahead 8-1.
Government High made
various changes in their
defence, but none was able to
stop Sweeting High. They
moved ahead 11-1 and cruised
on to their shut out victory.

Queen's College senior girls
captured their first in three


played yesterday defeating R.
M. Bailey High 15-9 and 15-10
in Eastern Division volleyball
action.
Gaining much needed
experience from their straight
sets loss to Eastern Division
champs St. Augustine's College
and contenders Aquinas
College Aces, Queen's trailing
9-7 fought back gamely to win
their first set of the season.
Bailey High took the initial
lead on service by Wendy
Williams. However, Donna
Darville and Della Symonette
combined on offence bringing
Queen's to a short-lived 6-3
command.
Brenda Knowles and
Donna Nelson added to
Bailey's 9-7 comeback only to
fall victims to the much
underrated Queen's College.
Bailey High returned a
determined crew in the second
set dissolving a six point deficit
tying the score at 13 all. A
twisting serve from Darville
was neatly flicked by Denise
McKay but Florence Knowles
was unable to spike the point
as Queen's moved ahead by
one.


Bailey High put up quite a
fight and service changed hands
several times before Queen's
eased out as winners.

Aquinas College senior girls
yesterday won their second
consecutive out of four played
stomping L. W. Young High
15-9 and 15-13 at Garfunkel
Auditorium.
Though the first set was
fairly easy for the Aces, they
had to come from a 10 point
deficit in the second set. Debbi
Stubbs along with Jan
Mortimer and Agatha Joyce
assured Aquinas of victory.

In other inter-scholastic
volleyball action yesterday, L.
W. Young junior boys took
their third loss in seven played
with a 2-1 set back to D. W.
Davis.
Their victories included St.
Augustine's College, R. M.
Bailey and C. H. Reeves.
Senior boys action resumes
on Monday as follows: A. F.
Adderley vs Prince Williams;
Government High vs Sweeting
High; R. M. Bailey vs Queen's:
and L. W. Young vs Aquinas.


.Ij~M


4 -.. ^ V mi a.lKP :,,-W "* r.^w w ^
CREW MEMBERS aboard the Ragged Island sloop Good
News, haul on the anchor rope and raise the mainsail at the
start of the final race of the 21st annual Family Island
Regatta. Good News won the first two of three races on
corrected time, and took the final race on elapsed time to
break a five-year domination of the regatta by the Staniel
Cay sloop, Tida Wave. Good News skipper, Capt. Ed Moxey
was named outstanding skipper following the three day
racing spree.
Right: Nimble footwork is required in setting the jib sail
on the Farmer's Cay Bird, the first aluminum-masted sloop
to ever sail in the Regatta. The modern spar didn't help
much. The boat finished last in her class.

Greenidge rescues

Hampshire


* .4 LONDON Gordon
SGreenidge, 23-year-old
batsman from Barbados hit
120 for Hampshire Thursday at
Lord's,
Hampshire, the reigning
English champions, suffered
early disasters and at one point
were 81 for 4 in reply to the
Middlesex score of 300 for 4
declared. The pitch was fresh
after overnight rain and posed
problems for the batsmen.
But Greenidge, who opens
with South African Barry
Richards, stood firm during
this difficult spell and then
*"' .:* ; opened out with a wide range
Z' .,of scoring strokes. He batted 3
fiours 20 minutes and hit two
sixes and 15 fours.
,6j At Cambridge. Yorkshire 300 for
6 declared. C'ambridge University
SI 10 and 67for 2.


'Gulf fund
event


A SEVEN-MAN team from the Bahamas is to take part
in the 21st Chess Olympics to held in Nice, France next
month. This is the first time that the Bahamas is being
represented.
The players Caswell Thompson, Kenneth Adderley,
Philip Kemp, Elias Antonas, Selwyn Ramcharan, Kirk
Ingraham and Anthony Rolle are all members of the
Bahamas Chess Federation.
The Federation is presently soliciting funds to assist in
sending the team to France. Donations may be sent to P. 0.
Box 6154.
From left are: Kirk Ingraham; Ken Adderley, Federation
president; Selwyn Ramcharan; Caswell Thompson, team
captain and Anthony Rolle. Missing are Elias Antonas and
Philip Kemp.


THE NEW Providence
Division of the Bahamas Golf
Association announced today
that they are placing their
organization fully behind the
fund raising event for
Bahamian Pro Audnel Clarke
which is slated for the South
Ocean Golf course on May 11.
The N.P.D. urges its
members to support this
tournament and function. A
divisional spokesman said: "Its
'his kind of venture that starts
the ball rolling.
"We need as many qualified
Bahamian professionals as we
can get, for it's these persons
that we depend on to help our
amateur organization and
upcoming juniors." Clarke he
said has been in particular a
tremendous help to the junior
programme.
The event is co-spo;,sored by
Pepsi-Cc,la and Bahamas
Beverages. There are 24 awards
to be won.


At Taunton. Indians 175.
Somerset 249 (Tom Cartwright 68.
Prasanna 4 for 59).
At Oxford. Warwickshire beat
Oxford University b, 235 runs
Warwickshire 221 for 4 declared
and 108 for 9) declared. Oxford
University 1 10 (David Brown 4 for
6) and 84 (Bob Willis 4 for 9,
Brown 4 for 26).
At Lord's. Middlesex 300 for 4
declared and 116 for 3. Hampshire
233 (Gordon Greenidge 120).
At Nottingham. Essex 261 and
143 for 6. Nottinghansh:re 204.
At Derby. Derbyshire 295 for 7
declared and 96 for 1. Sussex 218
(Phil Russell 5 for 75).


Sweeting High




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L-A-.


By Gladstone Thurston


-Supermac--

the man

to fear

at

Wembley

LONDON Malcolm
Macdonald, Newcastle's
hard-shooting striker, is the
man all Liverpool soccer fans
will fear in the English cup
final at Wembley tomorrow.
Liverpool lost the league
title to Leeds United. Now
they hope to make up for it
by winning, the cup. But
MacDonald stands in their
way.

William Hill, one of
Britain's leading bookies,
made McDonald favourite to
score the first goal in the
match. They offered odds of
7 to 2 against McDonald,
with 9 to 2 against
Liverpool's Kevin Keegan.
Macdonald scored both
goals in Newcastle's 2-0 win
over Burnley in the
semi-finals.
Jimmy Adamson, the
Burnley manager who is
among those tipped to
succeed Sir Alf Ramsey as
England team bosa,
commented: "It was
MacDonald who beat us in
that semi-final. He's fantastic,
a menace all the time."
Liverpool also has a squad
of dangerous goalscorerv.
Besides Keegan, there are
John Toshack and Steve
Heighway.
But many critics think that
if MacDonald hits form at
Wembley, he can outshoot
them all.
Newcastle had a golden
period in the early fifties and
won the cup three times in
1951, 1952. and 1955. But
they have not reached the
final since.
Liverpool last won the cup
in 1971, and eight of its
winning team are still playing.
Newcastle manager Joe
Harvey said: "I am looking
forward to a really
entertaining game. But
Wembley can do funny things
to footballers.
"Some players dry up.
Others start like a shot from a
gun. It is something unique. I
have been to Wembley three
times as a player or a coach,
and it is something you never
really get used to." (AP)

DEL JANE
BID FOR No. 7
DEL JANE try for seven wins
in-a-row tonight when they
meet Becks Bees (7 p.m.) in
the feature game of a schedule
double header. In the nightcap
Heinekens play Citibank
(9.30).
On Saturday Carrolls will go
to Bimini for a pair with the
Marlins and Freeport comes to
Nassau for two games with Jet
Set.
Schlitz will host St. Bernards
on Saturday and plays
Heinekens Sunday.


1973, showed great tower in
overcondAg a skilful Michael
Wilson 9-3, 9-1 in an
interesting match of
contrasting styles.
In addition to winning their
trophies all finalists will be
given free coaching by one of
the Nassau club's leading
players.
Picture shows Alan Bates,
donor of the trophies,
presenting the girls cup to
Rhonda Grant.


BRIGGS GOES THROUGH


PETER BRIGGS, fifth
ranked in the United States
defeated Alan Winner 9-0, 9-1
and 9-2 yesterday in the first
round of a squash tournament
between New York and New
Providence at the Blue Hill
courts.
Also going through to the
second round which begins this
evening were Dr. Blair Sadler
and John Stunman both of
New York. Sadler defeated
Nassau's Peter Higgs 3-1.
Stunman stopped Tony
Lancaster 3-2.
The semi-finals wil be played
on Saturday afternoon, the
finals on Sunday morning.
Results from yesterday's
first round: Bob Montgomery


bt Richard Freeman 3-0, Blair
Sadler bt Peter Higgs 3-1, Keith
Parker bt Geof Botz 3-1, Eric
Wilkinson bt John Leather S'-2,
John Stunman bt Tony
Lancaster 3-2, Ivern Davis bt
Sandy Rose, 3-0, and Peter
Briggs bt Allan Winner 3-0.
First round losers with the
exception of Tony Lancaster
who suffered a hand injury join
Peter Perry, Roger Holdom,
Graham Tyers, John Way, Van
Johnson, Dennis Lightbourne,
Tony Hepburn and David
Thurlow all of Nassau in a "B"
tournament which begins at 7
o'clock this evening.
This morning Eddie
Bostwick beat Frank Blatz
(NY), 3-0.


THE BAHAMAS Amateur
Basketball Association winds
up its coaching clinics tonight
with an exhibition game
against Florida AAU Stars, 9
o'clock at the A.F.Adderley
Gym.
persons wishing to attain
certification under B.A.B.A.
will sit a test at 7 o'clock
followed by a film on
progressive basketball.
Tonight's game will pit
Nassau League champs Becks
Cougars against the Stars.
Paradise League pennant
winners Strachan's Auto will
test their strength in the
second game tomorrow night.
Preceding the Saturday's
contest will be a preliminary
contest between the Nassau
League junior champs and the
Paradise League junior champs.
Coach Fred "Papa" Smith's
defensive team might find
themselves in the same
situation they were in during
the N.L./P.L. all-star game. The
Bahamians will be up against
eight players, the shortest of
which stands five-feet-ten.
The tallest is six-foot-six
centre Warren Davis of Kansas
State University. Besides being
an excellent jumper and
rebounder, he is the most
valuable player in College
all-star game and has made the
all-conference team for the
past two years.


Backing him up at forward
will be Bahamas' own Carter
Lightbourn who at six-feet-five
will be another force to
contend with on the boards.
He played his college
basketball at Miami Dade
Junior and Palm Beach
Athletic University.
Also in the forward position
will be six-foot-five Steve
Brady who made the all-star
Junior College team and led
Miami Dade Junior College to a
seventh national ranking in
1968. He is a Biscayne College
graduate, the school which he
led in rebounding and field
goal percentage.
Others on the team include
Ron Perry, six-feet-three, a
long range jump shooter, Steve
Chubin six-foot-four forward/
guard. Lou Hayes,
six-foot-three forward and
Dick Clark a six-foot-three
guard.
The team is coached by Dick
First. He is credited with
coaching more Florida amateur
championship teams than any
other man. He is also a fast
dribbler and passer.


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Rhonda wins again


THE THIRD annual junior
squash championships were
played at the Blue Hill courts
on Saturday.
The standard of play showed
a marked improvement over
previous years and there were
hard fought matches before
Rhonda Grant managed to gain
her third successive girls
championship. Miss Grant
narrowly defeated Carol
Albury 9-7, 10-8 in the finals.
In the boys event Feron
Bethel, a quarter finalist in


Coaching clinics


lDllllEYll6


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******* *- ... ^^^...,..-- ------- ------r..--- ---- -.-----Vol##------------------- k*Ak.. ...


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