<%BANNER%> MARKET'
BASKET
POTATO
SEASON
IT'S STILL the potato
season at the Potter's < )
Produce Exchange Really, it
is always potato season but
take advantage of the local!}
grown variety while you can.
Here is j variation on baked
potatoes Halve six baked
potatoes and scoop out the
pulp Mash the pulp well or
puree it in a blender. Add si\
tablespoons butter, one and a
quarter cup ol cheese Sauce, a
cup of chopped spinach, s.iii
and neper and a little nutmeg.
Mix well and spoon it back
into the shells. Sprinkle with
grated cheese and brown the
potatoes under the broiler.
Fry potatoes with bread
crumbs. Dice two pounds
potatoes and parboil them in
boilinp, salted water for five
minutes. Drain and dry the
potatoes and saute them in
butter until they are golden
brown. Stir in half a cup oi
bread crumbs and cook stirring
occasionally until the potatoes
are tender and the bread
crumbs are brown.
Lemon juice can be added
to potatoes. Cook Iwo pounds
of potatoes until tender Dram
and slice while still hot Place
in a saucepan with half a cup
of melted butter Add salt and
pepper and little chopped
parsley. Simmer lor live
minutes. Squeeze the juice ol a
lemon over the slices and serve
.1! once.
Or boil six potatoes,
unpeeled, whith three chopped
stalks of celery, three chopped
green onions and a handful of
chopped parsley When the
potatoes are tender, drain them
and return the vegetables to
the saucepan. Add a quarter
pound of butter and a cup of
chopped green onion tops. Mix
well crushing the potatoes
slightly during the mixing.
For puffed baked potatoes,
halve six baked potatoes and
scoop out the pulp Puree the
pulp or mash it very well and
add hall a cup of scalded light
cream with salt and pepper 10
taste and a little nutmeg. Heat
six egg yolks and add to the
potatoes with a third of a cup
finely chopped parsley. Beat
four egg whites with a little salt
until they are stiff and fold a
quarter of them into the
potato mixture. Pile the
potato over the remaining egg
white and told them in Heap
the mixture into the reserved
shells and hake al 400 degress
for 15 minutes or until the
tops are browned.
A potato sourtle is an e.is>
way to get around humdrum
.potato dishes Combine mo
cups thick mashed potatoes
with hall a cup ol light cream,
a teaspoon salt and a little
nutmeg. Place in a saucepan
and cook over low heat until
they are \er> hot Remove the
pan from the heal and stir in
two tablespoons of Parmesan
cheese or grated Swiss cheese
Add three egg yolks, .me al .1
time heat well after each
addition Set the mixture cool,
fold in tour stiffl) beaten ege.
whites. Pill a buttered muffle
dish or deep casserole to
three-quarters loll ami bake al
375 degress fbi 35 minutes oi
until puffed and slightly
browned.
******
Combine potatoes and
carrots Cook separately a
pound of carrots and lour large
potatoes. Drain and pul them
separately through .1 food
chopper or sieve. Combine the
vegetable purees anil beal in a
cup of light cream, an egg solk
and a quarter pound of
softened butter Season with a
teaspoon ol prepared mustard
and salt and pepper In [.isle
Heat genlh beating well
******
Here is a simple potato
casserole Peel and slice tWO
pounds potatoes Scald a cup
of milk with a few onion slices
Strain the milk and add it to
the potatoes with a beaten egg
and a little grated nutmeg salt
and pepper Place 111 a casserole
nibbed with a split clove of
garlic Sprinkle the lop with
grated cheese and dot with
butter Bake al <50 for 45
minutes or until the potatoes
arc soft.
Finally, add tuna fish to
mashed potatoes Sounds awful
but it's really very good. Halve
six baked potatoes and scoop
out the pulp. Mash it well with
two hard cooked eggs Add a
quarter cup each of thick
tomato puree and well mashed
tuna fish in oil Add salt and
pepper to taste. Fill the shells
and sprinkle each with crumbs
soaked in melted butter Heat
the potatoes at 375 degrees 101
15 minutes. !ust before
serving sprinkle with chopped
dill.
POWER COLD POWER
V JIB MTERGENT
King size
The Tribune -.. y,
"SUPER VALUE FOOD STORES L]
ad
Super Value, East Street Celebrates its 3rd. year of Service
SPECIALS FOR THE WEEK MAY 2ND, THROUGH MAY 5TH, 1974.
U.S. CHOICE
TOP ROUND STEAK Per .b $2.29
U.S. CHOICE
ROUND ROAST Peilh $2.19
BAHAMIAN GROWN
Per lb.
U.S. CHOICE
SIRLOIN STEAK
U.S. CHOICE
PORTERHOUSE STEAK
U.S. CHOICE
T. BONE STEAK
20-oz.
CHAMPION
WHOLE TOMATOES
EATWELL
GRATED TUNA 7oz
U.S. CHOICE
SIRLOIN TIP ROAST
BAHAMIAN GROWN
PORK LEGS
BAHAMIAN GROWN
PORK all other cuts
HATCHET BAY
SPRING ROASTERS Per lb
LYKES
VIENNA SAUSAGES 4-oz.
Per lb $2.39
Per lb $2.59
Per lb $259
J K
I .N
52.39
FROZEN FOOD TREATS
STOUFFER RAISIN
MRS. PAUL'S
BORDENS
LIBBY'S
FRUIT FLOATS
STRAWBERRY
PEACH-RASPBERRY
ORANGE/PINEAPPLE >
9%oz
TEA CAKE ,2,41.39 FISH STICKS .41.09
McKENZIE
WHOLE KERNEL CORN 690
McKENZIE -'. T
MIXED VEGETABLES 850
ICE CREAM , $1.39
GARDEN FRESH PRODUCE T*
[FLORIDA
ORANGES 10 for 990
CELERY 2 for 650
RED DELICIOUS
APPLES * $1.59
LIBBY'S
WHOLE KERNEL
CORN
16-oz Cans


diy M.y 1,1974
e \o the area with All other Super Value Stores joining the Celebration.
BALLOONS
FOR KIDS
SPECIALS FOR THE WEEK MAY 2ND, THROUGH MAY 5TH, 1974.
-Aiank Ljoul
!
awi layal fyu&uli a*id Guiiom&ii fin
i/te awitumed iuppad you kave Cfiu&t
ui.

Miyie Mono/fen
East Street
ACCOMPANIED BY A
PARENT OR GUARDIAN
DANISH PRIME
SPARE RIBS
Per lb.
SANDWICH MEATS
OSCAR MAYER
ALL MEAT WIENERS
OSCAR MAYER
PURE BEEF FRANKS
OSCAR MAYER
SALAMI FOR BEER
OSCAR MAYER
LUNCHEON MEAT
$1.39
$1.39
990
890
WAGNER GRAPE & ORANGE
FRUrT DRINKS 32o,
HUNTS
TOMATO KETCHUP *<,,
CALGON
BUBBLE BATH ie
DUPONT SPONGES n
LIBBVS
GREEN PEAS te
IRISH
SPRING SOAP bath
LIBBVS
FRUfT COCKTAIL ,8
CHINA FOAM
PLASTIC PLATES
CHINA FOAM PLASTIC __^
BREAD Si BUTTER PLATES
CHINA FOAM PLASTIC
PLATES (TINTWHITEI
PLASTIC BUCKETS
KRAFT 7H-OI
MACARONI & CHEESE DINNER
TOMATO PASTE n
CANA
CORN ON COB 4E
FAMILY FARE
DISH LIQUID 32o,
ULTRA BRITE COOL MINT
TOOTH PASTE large
TEFLON
FRY PAN
DAIRY DELIGHTS
DANICA BRAND
BUTTER
iLICED
AMERICAN CHEESE
FAMILY FARE SLICED
ORANGE JUICE
ORANGE JUICE
LARGE EGGS
(ALL BRANDS)
DOZEN
2/790
$1.25
$1.59
790
950
SUPERMARKETS
If it's value you really want,
you really want SuperValuel
MAY DAY
MESSAGE
From Page 3
these things and should not
bear the burden of others," the
union leader told his workers.
I he time has come to
identify who is to blame and
the workers are not the
culprits It is also irresponsible
to make out that because
workers pursue their rights for
a decent wage, investment will
flee, when they (the investors)
have a few places in the world
like the Bahamas
"Investment has fled before,
but it was not instigated by
workers. Let us speak the
truth, Merchants are not
content to keep prices down,
so workers should not be
harassed into keeping their
wages stagnant either.
Matters needing immediate
attention are, Mr. Williams
said:
(1) the economy,
(2) our territorial security
and integrity from poachers
and illegal immigrants,
(3) our imprecise
international posture,
(4) bringing the "good life"
to the poor people,
(5) making the Bahamas a
more democratic place where
the best interests of the people
must prevail over those of a
select few,
(6) tempering the political
system so that our political
institutions, ministers and civil
servants respond to the
people's needs. such as
unemployment, the cost of
living, housing, free medical
care for the porr, free
education for all, Out Island
development, etc.
The rising expectations of
the working classes bring on
rising demands for "more," Mr.
Williams said.
The swells and waves of
protest shall never cease
because a few fat cats want less
noise but because justice has
finally come to us. which is not
now the case The fight will go
on so long as one person is
unjustly treated and there will
be no let up at all.
"But the people must learn
to positivitely identify their
oppressors numbered among
whom arc the black brothers
who sell dope, pay small wages
and otherwise degrade their
black brothers. The black
politician has a heavy burden
of guilt, because he has not
produced justice.
"The black politician needs
to explain how mtujs freedom
is there in moving from one
kind of white control to
another, where the only
difference is that the new
white master is invisible and he
gives his orders through the
black politician
"Those black politicians
who have the guts to stand up
for justice are quickly silenced
for "rocking the boat." We may
not be able to yet accuse our
black politicians of selling out,
but they are sure taking long to
do what they promised.
"BWC feels very
disappointed that the goals of
1%7 seem more far away
than ever before and are being
neglected for the fast buck.
Have we forgotten that those
of us who have reached the top
must now let the ladder down
for the remainder to climb up
too?
"This May Day finds the
Bahamas Government guilty as
any Russian dictatorship in
refusing even to hold an
election among workers of
Radio Bahamas (ZNS) and
Bahamasair (the flag carrier),
so that the workers may
choose the Engineering and
General Union as their
Bargaining Agent In this and
other matters, the Bahamas
Government is an enemy of
democracy in lending support
to the suppression of the free
will of workers, simply for
political reasons This great
crime against democracy and
freedom must never be allowed
to be forgotten and Clifford
Darling stands condemned.
"Unions are to be free
agents of the workers but the
right to strike is not
guaranteed, because the Hotel
Workers were denied this. The
Airline Pilots were treated like
upstarts. We cannot laugh at
the people of Haiti or Cuba,
whose freedoms are not
plentiful."
SHIPPING
ARRIVED TODAY: Jomi
from Jacksonville; Grand Turk
from Miami
ARRIVING TOMORROW:
Tropic Flyer from West Palm
Beach
SAILING TOMORROW:
Oceanic for New York;
Bahama Star, F.merald Seas,
Flavia for Miami
WEATHER
Wind: North-easterly 6 to 16
m.p.h.
Weather: Fair
Sea: Slight


PRIVATE ITEM
Digitization of this item is currently in progress.
The Tribune.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03606
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: May 1, 1974
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03606

Full Text





*J~ ...A4..
44
#4,.


tIN- ~


, i ,'.q . / ,.'- .


... 4: .- r:





'**' *]- At- lr "


have already been declared
"crime problem areas."
On Mar. 28 a *Gun Cqptre ,
Act"' was passed by Jamaica's
P 'i ind it "gives police
0 anyone

ailnlll ll h .
illegally. A suspect i,
"indefinite detention,' accu ii
ing to the law," AP reports.
A five-man review board can
recommend release. \
"Immediately after
Parliament passed the two
bills," Mr. Sutherland reports,
"opposition members walked
out of the House of
Representatives in protest. The
Jamaica Bar Association
reacted sharply, claiming the
public, had not had sufficient
time to study the laws, and at
.least one prominent attorney
resigned his practice.


"Commonwealth Carl
ifltyn, I an ap

Me action dit a mee
Guyana last weekend."


parnl .
emsed
ting in


id "scores have been
sincee the new laws
d." There have been
.(I. ns collected with the
help of the searches; 15,695
rounds of ammunition have
been turned in or confiscated.
The two laws were sparked
by a crime wave that hit its
peak in mid-March with the
murders, without apparent
motive, of two prominent
Jamaincans.
Philanthropist and business-
man Leo Henry, 40, was
gunned down in a
Kingston parking lot on Mar.


by. AM





a panls
Rao of
top as de


A* a of isr oftila- c e
that have .Lath1orit
parfculiarly oconserned, 3
Sutherland said, are murd ,r,
possession qf drugs and
possession of Iredts.
One police official said the
number of murders 'Is up
drastically," over the last 12
months, but was unable to
provide police records to
demonstrate the trend.
Many Jamaicans believe the
murders, guns and drugs are
linked. Several private pilots,
mostly Americans, have been
arrested for carrying drugs. A
package of six pistols was
dropped from an unidentified
plane in the northeast sector of
Jamaica on April 20.


I


fRaw;:


A RECENT SURVEY
Neted for Bride's
revealed that the
wa2 the most

i ::llflmya l.,








A d lf-W.ll r fT :m il' ,

tet at
6a


abiet the yoesw travel
market in the next ive to 10
years?


travel," says Miss Vickery.
(Bride's has been assessing the
tastes of the young American
market for 42 years.)
The prime things that
young people look for when
choosing -p destInation are:


L ^ fH


MARCIA VICKERY
Was they wan
privacy and atmnephse, prits
of locstI and tae" or
things to do and se., th at
order.
HIMoneyflSa, ade mid,
muaHy tdy loeqr L mo'st
vtoa. mTklrt s peat say
on to two seek ad eight
p ser m atSy two or more
wek. Mot tay 9.1 dAy on
their hboyamon.
They are year-round
travelers prefer Octobe
Su the top soait. Other
honeymoon meat. ire:
Agust, JD, November as
Trndob aot -n oceslon
but a wy of life for yn
Speeo, a .M y t feel at home
ladmed mslme," 1ays Mls

F' W UVUcwy. *


S" .




Jmai~ca


A NASSAU RESIDENt is among
people taken intop custody in Jamaica
following the cent passage of laws
giving police sweeping powers of search
and arrest without 'warrant and
indefinite detention of- suspects, the
Associated re seprts.
t iwuay fw' from Kingston by AP's
Lowel It wa reported that. the
owNI,.Ma crime, hawf been
ibel i Jamaica's labour
the Jamaeic Bar
S nr t ilNk i-0ia condeqaeod by a


among tho:a *oadyarpsted'"
unr the w a were"
"T orD gp w ik "a .9oer
Jamaica ueldent fpw lvift In
NaMsa. t.
He as-- arrested t
Kingston's mI tel, aldd u
with Joseph It I
Florida, for alleged possession
J mnia ', ( 'rime Supression
Ed on March 20
"Aul t-mhi..i arc ellIpowc l, I t
designate sections of Jamaica
as crime problem areas," Mr.
Sutherland reported. "Once
that is done, police can enter
any home and arret any
suspect without an arrest
warrant."
An earlier AP report said
that within the designated
areas "police have full
authority to search any person,
enter any bufldkg, arrest or
detain any persons on
reasonable uslclon that they
have committed or are about
to commit any crime, and to
impose curfew."
Kingston and Montego. Bay


r^j^


BAHAMAS Goomb.rt
S umer wwi have that extra
caltoral touks this year.
In addition to the regular
Bahamian folklore show, native
dancing and displays, vistinag
dance troupes frog the
Caribbean will entertain
vidtors.
This was told W reo
presentauves of the travel
industry by Bahamas Minister
of Tourism Clement Maynard
as advance promotion for
Bahamas Goombay Summer
'74 wal switched into pear in
North America.
Speaking at a luncheon at the
Sky Gardens of the San Moritz
Hotel, New York, Mr. Maynard|
said that among the famed
entertainers invited to perform
at Goombay Summer activities
were the Yolanda Moreno
Troupe from Caracas; the
Benguine Ensemble from
Martinique; the Merengue
Dance Troupe from the
Dominican Republic and a
steel band group from
Trinidad.
"So, to the travellers of thE
world, Goombay Summer
continues to be an exciting
prospect for a vacation," Mr.
Maynard said.
"I believe that what the
Bahamas has to offer a traveller
is more than that offered by
other island destinations.
"We have proximity only
50. miles off the coast of
Florida. We have beauty -
endless beaches, pastel villages,
and 700 Out Islands. We have
gliaspur wa-- casinos, aoa
cabarets .
, 'e have friendly people .
with a dash of wit andt bit of
sophistication, who aware
of the importance r tourism
The Minister toldoiw travel
agents that two sma hotels, El
Greco and Waterloo Lodge,
were opening this spring in
Nassau.
He also spoke about the
planned extension to the
Freeport International Airport
and the extensive remodelling
of the Nassau International
Airport's departure area, so as
to allow all flights to the U.S.,
both scheduled and chartered
to be pre-cleared."
Bahamas Goombay Summer
starts June 1 and ends August
31.


TV system 'could launch host of industries'


By MIKE LOTHIAN
ISLE TELBVIDEO
INTERNATIONAL'S $4.5
million FORBSAT anteaae
system in the Bahamas was
seen yesterday as the potential
launching pad for a hot of
local industries nd
revenueapvrces by FORSAT
co-nventor a rd Mi board
chairman Albert H. Bleew.
The FORSSAT proposal
e ags the use of UHF
(ultra-high frequency) radio
waves for high quality
retransmIdIon of soventdanael
colour televilem along a
Un-"N* baloe syatm
throughout th Bahamas and,
eventually, the entire
Caibbean.
IT1 has KinMd .o
Bahamian ata qq.W A
patent for the T
system, and fo x" u'tet
licenes to operate o4 g-9
loaly.. ,
The company hasm It n
have the New P widesnce
system operatiesal oge year
after licences we grat s aad
that the Bahamian teral
network, cl. ag 1l 'As
islands, n ,a be ,,qoins, 4
months Jatr.





~- ma


programming and two
independent Florida stations.
iTi foresees the sixth channel
being used for ZNS-Television,
and the seventh becoming
operational as a Caribbean
network, after a total of 40
antennae-carrying balloons
have been sent aloft to
eventually link 1,500 miles of
the Caribbean archipelao from
the Bahamaf in the north to
Trinidad in the south.
He pointed out that while
.there are 20 million potential
television viewers in the
Caribbean, only a small
-number presently have
television sets, largely because
they would not be able to pick
P may propammes.
* That would change,
however, when the FORBSAT
Pan-Caribbean network became
operational. He said television
t could be assemble in the
Balamas. with porbuilt-in
amioMovrtes for export to the
Caribbean. '
That work, added to the
initial demand for techno-
k~ik4 knoswledgaM o dc by
the .es.. of the hhata


t L II W "'B



A. T~^rt*^ *^- ^T*-'^ --' H -h^BB-
^;^j^ ft.1^ ifx-'BHH~e~u w"Wi^ Ww .1*


live broadcasts of such sporting
events as the Frazier-Foreman
heavyweight championship
bout in Jamaica. The facilities
for the live broadcast are not
now available, he said, but the
FORBSAT Pan-American
network would make them
possible.
In a lively question-aeadn-
swer period that'followea Mr. -
Beiser's address, one point
came up that is believed to
have been bothering a number
of Bahamians.
Public relations executive
Michael Symonette asked
whether fTi really felt there
was a market here for the
FORMSAT system, as the
miclrverter would cost $.18.S
and thea lal weekly "kays"
that make the microvertr
opeMtioMt will cost an added
$5.95J each week.
Mr. SBoiPy, co-inmtvtor of
the system 12ft Mr. Beler and
president of T answered for
Mr. Beiser:
"We has 54.5 mullen that
says we ae re there is a
market," he qppped,


S-ttl uaiileN fOt


of Graid
EleIthesa,
Lea Isid
s oald


Each of the three basic
components of the system -
the balloon, the transceivers
and the stabilizer are already
in use in various applications,
but they have never before
been put together on one
system.
Strobe-lights of 1,000-
candlepower each visible
even In bright daylbAht -
will be placed at 100-foot
intervals on the lines tethering
the balloons to the ground to
virtually eliminate the danger
of aircraft striking either the
baloon or the tethers.
RED CROSS RECORD
THE BAHAMAS Red Cross
has raised a record $76,669.65
from fund-raising events held
dWng the first quarter of
1974, a Red Cross spokesman
ooafirmed today.
The Society's annual fair
d $31,889.23. The car
raf dw S24,670.62; the
annual appeal 213,259.80 and
the Red Cross Ball $6,850.
Among the big money
winners at the fair We:
hoopa, putth AfM.M .1,
plats, a4 5

boo, &


ten, n aet th..is






Ua ML MahOe
S.s ah a kaA lHM'6fus slb


* 0- -' .NN. .IS




a.r'n"wi-i.
~~~~~rantt n AI


a'w' -,f'. . =-

p + "

3+ie-


t then '




the o th. o .,h.0

The -




the other osa he ohe ha




hmforad iR ,a
Hegu Imit to hi aaA*l -. 1l

stopped. Whe he 4-
colleague apr--. a*
The drilome m i.,
wereqursted toa the .
absence.
Mr.He saw them use W:
Mr. Bird weeasM H
Britannia Bea@*
all of the0men u) 4 S tc.
a red car 2"y thfCat
manuface!,







then ad neM of 0epee
him fort a o ad t lto.
Hegf itto bmt ,j e
drove some dane a or a


requested a6 .
Butfive, he
colleague wrale n a.s
and beaten.
He saw them use sglblA
appearng to be a swum
Mr. Bird h afqtId. s
ao of thke men'
Mr. Wt Ir nl


Fort Maon ead theai

After bhating him he




t find it Atise
proeoe but I otbseted
appewed to be a 1l0 Ahe
numbers six and adm se what
may have been a tiM- or a
five, he said.
The trial continue,


BC 'to speak


out again


HAVING made a "realistic"
appraisal of itself, the Bahamas
Christian Council has
concluded that it should be
"courageous and speak out as a
force in the community against
wrong," outgoing president Dr.
R. E. Cooper stated in his.
report for the year.
The Council met last night
and elected the Rev. Bdwin L.
Taylor to succeed the Rev. Dr.
Cooper, who earlier indtpated
he would not seek re-election.
Last November, following
its poorly attended
Thanksgiving service at the
Southern Recreation Ground,
the Council "took a realistic
look at itself, Dr. Cooper said.
"It was felt that hnle the
Bahamas Christian Council bhad
as one of its objectives the
bringing of the churches closer
together, the Council should be
courageous and speak out as a
force in the community against
wrong, and at the same time
seek avenues of joint action
which oduld not be done by
the individual churches
aparately."'
The Counac however was
limited by *aaes m evqn
though it had ashy Itas, Dr.
Cooper said. t the Council
would oontimM to .ow its
interest ab ivt active
. cooperation for every good and
worthwhile project the
sfMUit hlSmi. ''


st wrong'

During the year Dr. Cooper
again asked the Cancil to
reflect on its dkrectL, Some
of the suggestions by
members were that e of
the Co uncil buktae
counsellors for scho* -t
Council become involhgdlO,
whole moral issue te.,
alcohol and sex
seminars and the
of youth groups. *-
Calling for thd it t
Bahamian youth w i.ft
the priority Hit of


Further it ws aq t%
closer relations be t h
with the Metal
Association on these abats.


BOAT POUND
THE missing 42-ft .R.r
cruiser Chablis with .
persons aboard ws lo td ,.
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Guard, BASRA eporta.

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14. Paul Fitz-Ritson, 30, who
promoted the George
Pfeman-Joe Frazier title bout
in Jamaica in January last year,
was ambushed amd murdered
by gunmen outside a friend's
Ibbean home in Montego Bay on Mar.
.s..., 16."


man


ON"


YsUR YoVVt*. siteem
tria for the 19
obbery of two hniah
diploawt, fra out Uldlg
for tmeabeoa expediton of
eer, atterey
Algernan Ailea told a Supreme
Court Jay today.
Mr. Ceo Owen StPp and
Mr. Cteophir St. Job ird
had their statement sad to
beer alled to
.appear by the doecatios.
eikdr di-th" atic duties
would Mot alow them time tc
return fbr the trial, Mr. Allen
said.
Pilar to his opening
remarks, Justice Samuel
Graham remanded a fifth
accused, 18-year-old Mark
Bowe. on East Street waiter in
custody for sentencing pending
a-probstion report. Bowe, now
represented by counsel,
pleaded guilty.
Ex-rp.ison warden Terrence
"CIW Brown, 22, David
"Muno Boy" Munninpgs, 16,
Tom Michael Jones, 21,
of Dumping Ground Corner and
Kirk T"mpson, 17 of East
Street *we pleaded not guilty.
BroMn, who the prosecution
credit with "starting the ball
rolling' for police in their
investigations, is represented
by tiorney Henry Bostwick.
Attorney Allen, opening the
prosecution's case maid he
would lead evidence to show
that the accused were "out
looking for trouble that night
and left on an expedition of
terpo."
I ls fkst witness, .Theodore
I laM eMOW of .,1W.
Been Inett"l a
confrontation between "Jones
and his gang" on September 18
at a park near the corner of
Kemp Road and Shirley Street.
Finlayson told the court bhe
saw Jones and some of his
group drive off in a red


a, mre -


^
L^


I












2 The Tribunt Wadanday, May 1, 1974


'MIRACLE'

OF THE

END TO

SMALLPOX
GENEVA Speaking of a
"miracle," the head of the
World Health Organization
predicted that smallpox,
mankind's most dreaded killer
disease, will be eradicated next
year.
In spite of a recent upsurge
on the Indian subcontinent,
WHO director general Dr.
Halfdan Mahler of Denmark
announced at a news
conference he is confident that
1975 will see the "last new
case of smallpox in the world."
He thus confirmed
optimistic progress reports
from a worldwide campaign
launched in 1967 against the
disease that killed more people
in the past 3,000 years than all
wars put together, according to
health historians.
Dedicated health workers
throughout the world and a
simple needle of which a
dozen cost less than ten U.S.
cents are credited with
achieving what Dr. Mahler
called the "first miracle of
public health."
lie conceded that "certain
tasks have still to be
accomplished" in several
countries of which he named
Bangladesh, Pakistan, and
Ethiopia.
But he reiterated it was
expected eradication would be
complete next year even in
such traditional problem areas.
lie made plain his
confidence was not shaken by
a seeming setback last year
because of epidemics in India,
Pakistan -and Bangladesh.
The world total of new cases
soared from 65,000 in 1972 to
130,000 in 1973. When the
campaign started seven years
ago, the total had been 2.5
million. (AP)

Gold move
LONDON The editor of
the Times today advocated a
return to the gold standard,
tying world currencies to the
metal, as the only sound
method of halting rampant
international inflation.


Impeachment so

I USED


probers get




set for



next round

WASHINGTON President Nixon is looking to the American
people for vindication in Watergate, while impeachment
investigators of the House of Representatives meet tonight to
decide their next move in the quest for White House evidence.
A majority of the House Judiciary Committee was reportedly
dissatisfied with the edited White House transcripts the President
delivered Tuesday in lieu of tapes of 42 presidential
conversations.
The panel's democratic majority planned to stop short of a
demand for enforcement of the subpoena in favour of seeking
bipartisan support for a statement declaring Nixon had failed to


comply with it.
It was clear from the time
Nixon disclosed his transcript
plan Monday night that the
support he sought was beyond
the capitol; that his goal was to
persuade the American public
that he had no advance
knowledge of the Watergate
break-in or the cover-up and
that he was providing
investigators with the full story
of his role.
But, even as the transcripts
were delivered to the
committee, the president's
lawyers were making plans to
go to court to seek to quash a
subpoena of '-necial Watergate
prosecuotr Leon Jaworski.
Jaworski is seeking tapes and
documents relating to 64
presidential conversations he
says are needed as evidence for
prosecution and defence in the
forhtcoming Watergate
cover-up trial.
In addition, the judiciary
committee has requested, by
letter, still other tapes covering
the Watergate cover-up, the
ITT antitrust settlement and
Nixon campaign contributions
from the dairy industry.
For all the 1,308 blue-bound
pages of presidential
transcripts, uncertainties
remained about what the
President knew, and when, and
what he intended to be done.
It was, as Nixon's lawyers and
the President himself had said,
a document marked by
ambiguities.
But the transcripts also
created a picture of a president
feeling increasingly embattled
and frustrated by a scandal, the
disclosure of which he
considered inevitable but
which he hoped to control.


Sometimes

I want

to quit

-Nixon
WASHINGTON
Frustrated by the Watergate
affair and angry over press
reports concerning it,
President Nixon once said: "I
sometimes feel like resigning"
and letting Vice President
Spiro Agnew be president for
a while."
"He'd love it," Nixon said.
According to transcripts of
taped conversations released
by the White House, the
remarks were made on April
27, 1973, in Nixon's oval
office, with Deputy Atty.
Gen. Henry Petersen and
White House press Secretary
Ronald L. Ziegler present.
In transcribing the White
House tapes, secretaries
found portions that could not
be heard or understood, in
which case they typed
parent hetically (unintell-
igible) or (inaudible).
In some cases such remarks
make strange reading,
especially in the conversation
of Ziegler, a man noted for
his convoluted, complicated
syntax.
As in:
Ziegler: I talked to Dean
and to Moore this morning in
terms of whether or not we
say anything (unintelligible)
to the grand jury. (AP)


'Hush money' talks


HUSH MONEY proved one
of the most ambiguous areas in
the Nixon transcripts despite
the contention of the
President's lawyers that it
clearly stands out that "the
president rejected the payment
of $120,000 or any other sum
to (E. Howard) Hunt or other
Watergate defendants."
Dean and Nixon discussed
Hunt's demands for money
March 2 1. And as the president
has contended, he told Dean it
would require not only money,
which could be raised, but an
offer of executive clemency.
Dean: "That's right. It may
further involve you in a way
you should not be involved in
this."
Nixon: "No It is wrong
that's for sure."
But later, Nixon referred to


his belief that Hunt "might
blow the whistle and his price
is pretty high, but at least we
can buy the time on that ..."
Still later, Dean, referring to
the seven Watergate defen-
dants, said, "They're going to
stonewall it, as it now stands.
Excepting Hunt. That's why
his threat."
Haldeman: "It's Hunt
opportunity."
Nixon: "That's why for
your immediate things you
have no choice but to come up
with the $120,000, or
whatever it is. Right?"
Dean: "That's right."
Nixon: "Would you agree
that that's the prime thing that
you damn well better get that
done?"
De.n: "Obviously he ought
to be given some signal


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anyway
Nixon: "(expletive deleted),
get it. In a way that who is
going to talk to him? Colson?
He is the ))ne who is supposed
to know hii'.'"
A month la'er, on April 17,
Nixon, iHaldeman and
Ehrlichman tried to recall the
details of the hush money
discussion.
Nixon: "But you remember
the conversation?"
Haldeman: "Yes sir."
Nixon: "I didn't tell him to
go get the money, did I?"
Haldeman: "No."
Nixon: "You didn't either,
did you'?"
Haldeman: "Absolutely
not."


ON PATTY,

SAYS

HEARST


OAKLAND A Brazilian
manual on political kidnapping
was found in an Oakland
apartment thought to have
been a hideout of the
Symbionese Liberation Army
after Patricia Hearst was
abducted, the San Francisco
Chronicle reports.
The Chronicle said in a story
in Wednesday's editions that
Oakland police found the
document, the "Minimanual of
the Urban Guerrilla," Feb. 18.
Miss Hearst was kidnapped
Feb. 4.
The paper said police did
not disclose the discovery in
hopes that SLA members
might return to the abandoned
Victorian-style structure. a
block away from City Hall.
That plan was discarded
when Atty. Gen. William B.
Saxbe announced April 2 that
federal authorities had gained
possession of a terrorist
kidnapping manual and that
the "Hearst thing was
conducted right by the book."
Meanwhile, Miss Hearst's
father says he's not optimistic
his daughter will be released by
the SLA, despite a request by
an imprisoned SLA founder
that she be freed.
Randolph A. Hearst said he
believes the SLA has exercised
some form of "mind control"
on Miss Hearst.
"Naturally, I hope she's
released safely, but they've
stated they aren't going to
release her and she's stated that
she's not going to leave, so at
the moment, I'm not very
optimistic of the fact that they
will turn her loose," he said.
Miss Hearst has said in SLA
messages that she was staying
with her captors and called her
father a "corporate liar"' and a
"pig."
"I think she's ha'ff mind
control used on her," said
Hearst, president and editor of
the San Francisco Exantiner.
(AP)


SAN FRANCISCO Two
persons were arrested early
today in the Zebra case in
which 12 persons have been
killed and another six wounded
in the last five months, police
said.
Lt. William O'Connor said
J.C. Simon and Larry Green
were arrested "and booked for


CECI. WALLACE
MANAGER


Dealers cited market belief
of an early upward revaluation
of the West German mark as
the main cause for the dollar's
weakness.
The Watergate affair and
feared U.S. foreign trade
deficits were additional factors,
dealers said.
In London, the pound
sterling jumped more than one
cent to S2.4450, its highest
level since October 26, but in
late dealings dropped back to
$2.4250.
In Frankfurt, the dollar
improved to 2.4525 marks
compared with 2.4470 earlier.
In Paris, the dollar moved up
two and a half centimes at the
opening of business to 4.8750
French francs and improved to
4.8975 in late dealings.
In Zurich, it took 2.9095
Swiss francs to buy one dollar
in opening deals. Near the end
of the day the rate had gone up
to 2.93 francs. (AP)


murder and other charges. The
investigation is continuing and
there is a possibility of other
arrests." (AP)


Commons quiz for Wilson over


secretary Marcia controversy


LONDON A long-simmering
controversy surrounding Prime Minister
Harold Wilson's political secretary
surfaced in the House of Commons
yesterday.
Under questioning from an opposition
Conservative lawmaker, Wilson
categorically denied that state despatch
boxes had been delivered, during his
1964-1970 term of office, to the home of
Mrs. Marcia Williams while she was
sharing an apartment with a British
political newsman.
Wilson told Conservative ex-Minister
John Peyton who had raised the matter:
"You must be hard up for information if
you rely on Private Eye. The story is
entirely untrue."
Private Eye is a satirical fortnightly.


Wilson's reference to it related to an
article in its April 19 issue which said
boxes of official papers had been
delivered to Mrs. Williams' apartment
while she was sharing it with the British
political correspondent. Sometimes, the
journal added, the boxes were taken in by
him.
Peyton had asked Wilson about
"allegations that red boxes in Mr.
Wilson's administration received
somewhat odd circulation." He made no
mention of Private Eye in his question to
Wilson.
It came as a surprise to many
lawmakers. "Red boxes" is the British
term for containers carrying state papers.
When Wilson himself referred to the
magazine, he inevitably drew attention to


Police seek mystery

witness after art raid


DUBLIN Irish police
today sought a mystery witness
who disturbed the five armed
raiders who pulled off the
biggest robbery in history at
the weekend.
Informants said the gang was
disturbed as they tried to cut a
one-inch thick telephone cable.
The raiders apparently fled
into the darkness, leaving the
cable intact.
Police, sources said, believe
the witness could provide the


first real break in their
investigation.
The raiders plundered 19
masterpieces, including a Goya,
a Vermeer and a Reubens. The
loot was valued at 8.5 million
pounds, or 20.4 million dollars,
by Ireland's National Gallery.
Detectives drew a blank
Tuesday after searching a
Galway hotel where an
anonymous tipster, a man with
an Irish accent who telephoned
from London, claimed the


paintings were hidden.
He also claimed the
100,000-pounds, or
240,000-dollar, reward posted
by a London firm of loss
adjustors.
None of the raiders wore
masks and police have
assembled pictures of two of
them.
Fingerprints taken from
three cars apparently used by
the gang in their getaway have
not produced a lead and a
massive house-to-house search
near where one of the cars was
found abandoned has also
turned up nothing.
Police are convinced the
paintings have not been
smuggled out of the land as
they kept a tight watch at all
sea and air ports.
The motive for the robbery
is still not clear, but police
believe the thieves will make a
ransom demand soon. (AP)


an article which contained other
allegations that have been the subject of
speculation and gossip among politicians
and newsmen for years.
No British national newspapers have
referred in direct detail to the material
published by Private Eye. Nor have any
legislators raised it in Parliament.
It is an unwritten rule in British public
life to avoid intrusions into the privacy of
citizens however important or
unimportant they may be.
Mrs. Williams a divorcee has
worked with Wilson since 1956. She has
been at the centre of controversy before.
A former Labour Minister, Lord Wigg, in
his memoirs charged she wielded undue
influence in the affairs of the 1964.70
Labour Government.


In recent weeks a
profitable land reclamation
deal in which she and
relatives participated was
defended in the Commons by
Wilson.
During his last term as
Prime Minister Wilson
invariably included Mrs.
Williams in the teams of
officials and advisers
accompanying him on foreign
missions.
She has given an account
of some of her experiences in
a book entitled Inside 10
Downing Street.
When Wilson saw
Communist Party Secretary
General Leonid Brezhnev in
Moscow in 1966 he took with
him one Foreign Office
diplomat and Mrs. Williams.
In another House of
Commons development.
Speaker Selwyn Lloyd barred
lawmakers calls for an
emergency debate on the
association of Wilson's
deputy, Edward Short, with a
former colleague jailed last
week for corruption.
Short, leader of the
Commons, acknowledged
publicly Tuesday he had
received 250 pounds $600
from T. Dan Smith,


LOURENCO MARQUES,
Mozambique Hundreds of
political prisoners were
released from Portuguese
colonial jails here today.
Military and civil police and
black and white bystanders
watched as the first political
detainees released in
Mozambique since the military
takenover in Lisbon last
Thursday trickled out of
Machava and Ponta Mahone
prisons on opposite sides of the
city.
"You must believe that I am
very happy," said one


*


middle-aged bespectacled man.
He said he had been a male
nurse before being jailed two
years ago.
More than 500 were freed
from behind the 20-foot-high
walls of Machava, witnesses
said. A lesser number was
reported released from Ponta
Mahone.
Some of the those freed
walked away from the prisons
in silence carrying parcels
containing their personal
possessions. Others climbed
aboard buses hired to carry
them to downtown Lourenco
Marques.
There was no official
estimate of how many of the
2,000 inmates of Machava, 10
kilometers from the capital,
and the 600 or 700 persons
held at Ponta Mahone, were
being detained for political
reasons.
Most of the inmates were
black, but about 20 whites
were understood to have been
held at Machava as political
prisoners.
Lourenco Marques was quiet.:
May Day was being celebrated
as a holiday here for the first
time in 47 years.(AP)


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Dollar rallies but

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LONDON The U.S. dollar rallied against Europe's major
currencies after reaching a six-month low Tuesday but remained
unsettled.


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The Tribune Wednesday, May 1, 19743
3


She rt ribunt
NULuus ADDICTS JUARE IN VERBA MA' ITr
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH. Publisher/Editor 1903. 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Publisher/Editor 1917-1972
Contributing Editor 1972 -
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972 -
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 24532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Wednesday, May 1, 1974


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
BY ONE of those strange coincidences of timing in human
experience less than an hour after the air waves carried the story
of Patricia Hearst's betrayal of her parents' love to the far corners
of the earth, I sat down to witness the TV presentation of the
story of another tragic event in the history of our times ... a far
more serious affair because it was more than the betrayal of a
family, it was also the betrayal of the peoples of the greatest
Empire in history by a young king who was born and reared to
preside over sweeps of land and ocean, embracing into its
boundaries just about every race of people inhabiting the earth at
that time.
It was an empire so vast that it was correctly said that the sun
never set on all its boundaries at the same time.

The presentation of that story interested me because I knew
this king. I worked with him in various capacities for five years
and could measure the weaknesses in his character that caused
him to behave in such an extraordinary manner that it is difficult
for the ordinary human mind to understand and impossible for
anyone to satisfactorily explain the decision he made.
This man born to high estate had a defeat in his character
which supports my claim that there can be no true freedom for
any man unless his actions are motivated by a high sense of duty
and his behaviour restrained by a will capable of self-discipline.
Were Shakespeare alive today he would spin a romance around
the abject failure of King Edward VIII greater even than that
of Antony and Cleopatra because he gave up all to marry the
woman he loved ... a twice-divorced woman who captured his
heart and stunned all his senses.
But the real hero of the events in that tragic period when ... for
the love of a woman ... the young king was prepared to jeopardize
the only really stable royal dynasty left in the world ... was his
mother Queen Mary who rose above love of her son to perform
her duty to the throne ... and to the Empire ... in such a queenly
manner that placed royalty on a high pedestal for all to see,
_ aspect and admire. Her noble example was perpetuated in her
second son Albert who mounted the throne as George VI, and on
George's daughter, our present Queen Elizabeth II.


Greer Garson turned in a magnificent performance as the
Queen Mother. Equally magnificent was Peter Barkworkh in the
role of Edward.
I never met Queen Mary ... indeed I never saw her in real life.
But I did know the abdicated king who, as the Duke of Windsor,
was governor of the Bahamas for hive years.
It's really amazing how much Barkworkh was like the real
Edward, Duke of Windsor, in the flesh.
Facially and physically he looked like Windsor. More
remarkable still is the fact that he talked like him and his
movements and mannerisms were strikingly similar.
It was a great performance.


This picture brought back memories, most of them not
particularly pleasant, of my association with this prince because
he nursed deep-seated prejudices in his nature that he made no
effort to conceal.
I devote a whole chapter in my book The Tribune Story to my
relations with this wasted life. There are many more stories that I
could tell ... but I will tell you just one story today because it
leads into a finale that is both interesting and sad.


When America entered the war the tourist business, which was
the colony's main source of support, collapsed overnight. It was
feared that we would all be faced with starvation within six
months.
With such a prospect in view thee was only one course open to
the government and that was to revert to a farming economy by
which the people would at least be able to feed themselves from
the products of the land and the sea.
The government decided to act speedily to promote such an
economy.


The Duke appointed a committee to organize this great
transformation. A delicate problem arose as to who should head
this committee Sir Kenneth Solomon or the lion. George
Murhpy who were both outstanding figures of the period. The
Duke resolved this dilemma by himself taking the chairmanship.
Both R. T. Symonette and I were invited-to serve on this
committee but at that time we were both considered outcasts by
the Government House erovd. But I suppose we could hardly be
overlooked in such an organization because both R. T. Symonette
and I were engaged at the time in major operations that
commanded the attention of people, both here and abroad.
The work I was doing on the War Materials Committee, for
example, had attracted the favourable attention of the War
Cabinet in London and aroused interest both in Washington and
Ottawa. In addition I had created a successful farm of my own as
a war-time measure.
R. T. Symonette was not only active in shipping but it was his
shipyards that would later build trawlers for the Royal Navy
through an arrangement negotiated with the Admiralty by my
War Materials Committee.
In addition both R. T. Symonette and I were members of the
House of Assembly.


I have told you before that although I had created the War
Materials organization and built it into a spectacularly successful
operation, the Duke found it difficult to accept me as its
chairman. He felt I should step out of the picture and hand it
over to someone more acceptable to him. But thanks to the
loyalty of my committee and especially Godfrey Higgs his


prejudices were ignored.


I tell in my book how this man, trained to be King-Emperor of
the greatest Empire in history, lacked the kind of training and
experience needed for the administration of the type of
constitution established in the islands at that time.
This man not only lacked the training and experience needed
for this job ... more than anything else, he lacked tact to the
point of unrefined rudeness.


The committee established two experimental farms at the
western end of New Providence. Young farmers were brought in
from the Out Islands for training at these farms. After they had
completed their course of training they were to be sent back to
their island communities to be leaders among their people.
The two farms were on the same back road leading to Clifton
but they were miles apart. The farthest one was just about
opposite Clifton Pier.


One day the Duke arranged for the entire committee to visit
these farms together. We gathered in Government House grounds
where several cars were waiting. The Duke assigned each member
of the committee to the car in which h. was to travel to the
farms. He went with Sir Kenneth Solomon.
When we set out from Government House the drivers of the
cars were instructed to proceed to the farthest farm at Clifton for
a meeting. All the cars went to the prearranged rendezvous except
that of the Duke.
After we had waited for a long time a car drove up. The Duke.
had decided to stop at the first farm but he had sent for certain
members of the committee whom he named. When the car drove
off R. T. Symonette and I were left standing alone and
unwanted.
We went out on Clifton Pier and waited there for a very long
time. Finally the Duke and all the other members of the
committee drove up in their cars. Without a w.brd of excuse or
explanation and without ever reporting what had taken place
we were invited to get in a car. This time we drove with the Duke
an honour which His Royal Highness probably thought was
enough balm for our insulted pride. And we were brought back to
town.


You may ask why we didn't phone for a car from town and
leave the spot. In the first place there was no phone in the area
and, secondly, because of gasoline rationing transportation was
not easy to arrange.
But I will confess that, even to this day, I despise myself for
not having had the courage to walk back to town.
Anyway, I didn't ... and that's not an essential part of the story
anyway.

Now let us get back to the TV picture.
At the height of the tragedy at the peak of her grief Queen
Mary moaned: "What is going to happen to him now!"
Speaking directly to her rebellious son in a vain effort to save
him from disaster, the Queen reproached the young king. "You
will never understand what you did to the Empire."
These were prophetic words.


At that time the young men in noble families in England were
in a rebellious mood. Many of them were members of the group
known as the Cliveden Set, a name given them because they met
at Cliveden, the ancient home of Lady Nancy Astor, an American
woman who had married an English nobleman. She became the
first woman to sit in the House of Commons. This woman was a
tartar.
Members of the Cliveden Set openly declared that they would
refuse to fight in the event of another war. Similar resolutions
were being passed by students of Oxford and Cambridge who
were drawn from the nation's leading families.
When Hitler later barnstormed across Europe he expressed
contempt for Britain. He didn't believe that the British people
had the guts for war. He described them contemptuously as a
decadent race.
But he was wrong. The British people had the guts for war.
When war came the young men of the Cliveden Set and of the
universities were among the first to rush to the battlements.
These were the young men who helped to win in the air over
London the critical Battle of Britain, the first real turning point
in favour of the Allies in the opening days of this global conflict.
But there was no place for this young prince in these glorious
events. By his own decision he had condemned himself to a life of
drift and complete waste.
As soon as the war ended the Windsors left the Bahamas with
almost indecent haste.
Still young ... this unfortunate prince hoped that there was still
a useful tole for him to play in the Empire on which he had
turned his back for the hand of a woman.
But alas, the moment he made his abdication speech, in which
he sacrificed all that was precious to human society, to requite an
emotion of personal love ... the doors of life quietly closed
behind him.

As the years passed the Duke paid several visits to Nassau. The
Duchess who realized that she was not really ever accepted here.
returned for a very short visit in 1968. I suppose I helped to give
her that feeling because I didn't fail to criticize them whenever I
felt that they want wrong ... which was often.
I never saw him on these visits but our photographers got
pictures of him ... and these pictures revealed, through lines in his
face, the inroads of time and, particularly, a pitiful haunted look
in his eyes ... the look of a man who seemed always to be hoping
for something that never came.
4i * *| *| *


On his last visit to Nassau Sir Ralph Grey (later Lord Grey. the
last Governor General of Northern Ireland) was Governor of the
colony. Both R. T. Symonette and I had been created Knights by
Her Majesty the Queen and we had won many other laurels.
The Governor gave a small dinner party for the Duke at which
Sir Roland and I were the principal guests. I was curious and so I
accepted the invitation. During the evening the Governor
whispered confidentially in my car that he wanted to give the
Duke a chance to meet his old friends in Nassau. I was too polite
to disabuse his mind.

That night I looked into the face of an old. a sick. a broken
man with a haunted look in his eyes ... and I felt sorry for him.
I felt particularly sorry for him because this was a man born to
the highest position in the whole world who had. by his own
folly, sunk into nothingness.
. And in that moment I knew that both Sir Roland and I were
his superiors because we had, by our own efforts, risen to the
highest level of service and achievement that our island society
afforded its sons.

And so ... as I have said on many occasions in this column ...
and repeat with emphasis today ... there can be no freedom for a
man or a nation that is not motivated by a high sense of duty and
is endowed with a will that is capable of stern self-discipline.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
Despise not any man, and do not spurn anything; for there is
no man that has not his hour, nor is there anything that has not
its place. RABBI BEN AZAI


BW's MAY DAY MESSAGE


Ailing economy


disturbs workers

THE AILING ECONOMY of the Bahamas is causing concern
to all workers who are faced with a rising cost of living, stagnant
wages and unemployment. Labour Leader Dudley Williams
declared Tuesday on the anniversary of May Day.


"High prices in the
international market are
matched with higher prices at
home and have caused
economic strangulation for all
Bahamians." Mr. Williams said.
Businesses are closing and
throwing hundreds out of work
"and the people's stewards are
behaving as if nothing has
happened," he declared.
Continued Mr. Williams:
"The security of the nation is
not e-:tirely secure and crime is
at anrt all-time high. Perhaps if
the 'abour force were not idle
crime would not be so high.
Arming the police is only a
short term answer: creating
jobs is the only sure cure tor
crime."
May Day. he said, is the
international day of solidarity
for the workers of the world,
and although "May D)ay" in
the Bahamas was celebrated on
Labour Day. the real day ought
not to pass unheralded.
Today, as last year, the
workers of the Bahamas have
not yet seen the promised land
which 1967 was supposed to
bring to the Black masses" Mr
Williams said. "The decline of
the economy has not yet
ceased entirely and the
attendant evils are still witli us
In addition to them. we have
international stagflation which
robs us all of prosperity even
though we may be among the
fortunate few to get more
money.
Recently, workers were
exhorted to reduce their
demands for justice from
employers, because "things
were bad." This is poor advice
which can only come from 'fat
cats" whose paws are grea.scd
Who made things so bad.' Did
we cause the energy crisis') Did
we cause price and profits
inflation? Did we push up the


cost of living? )Did wt kiill the
economy? \ We did none of
Page 9. Col. 8


Mother's Day

GIFTS

A
















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* MANICURE SETS


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TOASTLRS
HAIR DRYERS
VACUUM CLEANERS
BLENDERS
HAIR SETTERS
PERCOLATORS


I.


* ELECTRIC KETTLES




.-


I


Available At


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The luxurious interior of this
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Made by a firm with over 20 yea s
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matched gearing!
And options you never even dreamed about. "No motor so
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I SM,

FOR KIDDIE FUN &
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"PHOTO FUN HOUSE"
IS THE BEST THING WE'VE
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t ON THE WATERFRONT
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Sittings by appointment please, at your convenience
i l


NEWSPAPER

COPIES

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GpH--ga-te,









I .


Ill


MORTONS CHICKEN, TURKEY, SALISBURY AND
MEAT LOAF TV DINNERS


6 ModIon


11-OZ.
PKG.


THRIFTY MAID
SUGAR


AR GREEN GIAI
CORN ON COB


PKG.


13-OZ. SARA LEE FRESH ALL FLAVORS
FROZEN CAKES .... 1.15


5 LB BAG INTERSTATE CRINKLE CUT
POTATOES 1.5.......


'fIFGo's
r0 I&60c T
j ^iK^


24-OZ. PKG. DIXIE
MIX VEGETABLES ............... 75


WHITE GOLD
EVAPORATED MILK


148Z.8/
CANS


Sc
/


SPRY SHORTENING


SUNNY DELIGHT PUNCH


B AND B TOMATO PASTE


lo-OZ. 99
CANS


HALF
GALLON


CAMPBELLS
VEGETABLE SOUP


VAN CAMPS
PORK AND BEANS


I
1/2-LB.
PKG.


DIXIE WINN
AMERICAN SLICED
CHEESE


SUMMER COUNTY MARGARINE


'9


1-LB.
PKG. 1


WINCARNIS TONIC WINE'


BUY BAHAMIAN GROWN ONIONS


BAG ORANGES
8LBS. 1 I


16-OZ. 9
CANS


VA CAP'/! STOKELYS
LE KO--O" WHOLE KERNEL
.DENOl OR CREAM STYLE
CORN


16-OZ.
CANS


(~


TNRIFTY MAID "
PINEAPPLE GRAPEFRUIT,
ORAsNGE, GRAPE APPLE ON
FLORIDA PUNCH DRINKS


46-02.
CANS


ONIONS 5LBS.
ONIONS 10LBS.
TANGERINES
GRAPEFRUITS


79c
L.49
8/99C
3/794


RED&GODEN D. APPLES
13/2.09


urIT


CAAGES 194C L


W T:lj:3J1r


... STOKELYS
FRUIT fW KTAIL


16-02.
CANS


REGAL
MALT TONIC


6-PACK


LOM NII .C

MAHATMA RICE .


SLB.
BAG


3
LB.
CAN


Oft


V


103/-OZ.
CANS


720 ML
QUARTS
BOTTLE


.~ 0
-*\ 1 "'


r~Q


_te


* ^',


S


I


C


I*


SAMERICAN


~zl~E$~Bae


Li'IIJt"-111'







The Tribune Wednesday, May 1, 1974


VALUES


towhet y appetite


Mahatma Rice 10 Ibs
MilkMaid Condensed Milk
Campbells Pork and Beans 16 oz.
Purity Flour 5 Ibs.
Chum Dog ,Food
Hellmanns Mayonnaise 32 ozs.
Olivano Oil 48 ozs.
Citadel Corned Beef 12 czs.


$4.50
32c
43c
$1.18
25c
$1.43
$2.30
$1.19


Sawyer's Pigeon Peas
No. 2 38c
Nutrament Liquid Food
12 ozs. 59c U.S. CHOICE
FRESH BEEF ROAST lb. $1.7
GROUND U.S. CHOICE
BEEF PORK LOIN ROAST lb. $1.
IL tl IC


SHMILEY STREEt


ONDENSFD
MILK


II RDING' S


001)D MARKET


P O Box 5290 ES


Phone 2-3067


/ DANISH SPARE RIBS
lb. 89C
MAPLE LEAF BOLOGNA Islicedl
lb. 99C
PORK CHOPS 11. $1.29


lb. $1.15
lb. $1.20
lb. 99C
lb. $1.01


5


25


,^Ju. >i.'' I TULIP MINI SPARE RIBS
lb. 89C
FRESH CUT UP CHICKENS
lb 850
'


MAPLE LEAF WIENERS


SPARE RIBS

PIG'S FEET


$1.29 pkt.


5 1bs. $425

10 Ibs. $3.40


LEAN STEWING BEEF
PORK CHOPS 10 Ibs. $12.00
FRESH MUTTON 10 Ibs. $10.00
LEAN STEWING BEEF 10 Ibs. $13.00
I-


Mahatma Rice 5 Ibs.
Robin Hood Flour 5 Ibs.
Campbell's Vegetable Soup (4 tins)
Coke (12 oz. tins) 4 tins
Fab Detergent (King Size)
Hellmanns Mayonnaise
Colgate Toothpaste (Medium)
Libby's Grapefruit Juice 6 oz. 6 pack
Libby's Sliced Beets (303) 3 tins
Ajax All Purpose Cleanser 28 ozs.
Libby's Fruit Float (all flavours) 9% oz.
Celebrity Luncheon Meat 12 oz.
Olivano Oil (Gallon)
Aunt Jemima Grits 5 Ibs.
Blanco Bleach (gallon)


$2.29
$1.10
99c
89c
$1.59
$1.59
57c
$1.08
99c
99c
59c
69c
$5.75
99c
99c


Libby's Unsweetened Pineapple Juice 46 ozs.74c
Champion Tomato Paste (Small) 2 for 49c
Delsey Toilet Tissue (Double) 54-
-Robin Hood Flour 5 Ibs. $1.09
Ajax Detergent (Giant) $1.25
Coffee Mate 6 ozs. 77c
Sawyer's Pigeon Peas (303) 2 for 89
Kraft Dinners 2 for 89c
Water Maid Rice 10 Ibs. $3.89
Success Rice
Bu One at regular Price Get one FREE


U.S. CHOICE
T-BONE STEAK


U.S. CHOICE
PORTERHOUSE STEAK


U.S. CHOICE
ROUND STEAK


US. CHOICE CHUCK ROAST


HAMBURGER

SPARE RIBS


_ U


PINDER'S FOOD MARKET
Phone 24030............Montrose Avenue
Good from May 2nd to 5th
OPEN SUNDAY MORNING 8 10 a.m.
Smml mD mGem mml i-i. mm ml -Kmli----


lb. $2J9

Ib $2J9

lb. $1.99

lb. $1.19

Ib. $1.15

lb. 95C


Hatchet Bay -
WHOLE CHICKENS


NEW ZEALAND
I AND IBUAIII NrB


IUIULULK


-LAMPD


3-4 LBS lb. 75


(sliced or whole)


Ib. 99C


S. CHOICE
HUCK STEAK b. $1.39
J.S. CHOICE
CHUCK ROAST
$129 b.


U.S. CHOICE
SHOULDER ROAST
$1.49 lb.


U.S. CHOICE
SHOULDER STEAK
s1.I .


Centreville

Food Market
6th Terrace East P.O. Box 5714 Phone 5-8106
SPECIALS FOR MAY 2nd. TO 5th.
Store Hours Monday to Thursday 8 a.m. 8:30 p.m.
Fri. & Sat. 8 a.m. 9 p.m. Sun. 8 a.m. 10 a.m.


I it|llfl"
Cow and Gate Evaporated Milk (large cans)
Sawyers Pigeon Peas (Large Cans) 2 for
Crisco Shortening 3 Ib can
Mahatma Rice (10 lb Bag)
Ajax Detergent (Giant Size)
Blanco Bleach (% Gallon)
Green Giant Corn Niblets (12 oz can) 2 for
Franco American Spaghetti &
Meat Balls (15 oz. Cans)
Fresh Juice Oranges (5 Ib Bags)
Red Delicious Apples (3 Ib Bag)
Cello Carrots pkg.
Kraft Fresh Orange Juice (% Gallon)


3 for 89c
89c
$1.98
$4.95
99c
69c
79c


59c
$1.19
$1.39
25c
$1.69


I


FRESH PORK
FRESH MUTTON
LAMB SHOULDER
LEAN SALT BEEF


NASSAU PORTION CONTROL

Phone 23237 Ext.6 CENTRE 5th Terrace CeAtreville
WHEK END SPECIALS
31bs. BREADED GROUPER FINGERS. $6.00 (2.00per lb.)
4 BAKED CRAB BACKS ...... $5.00
3 lbs. DEVEINED SHRIMPS ...... $900 (3.00 perlb.)
51lbs.TURTLE MEAT ..... .$6.50 (p1.30 per lb.
51bs. SKINNED CONCH $5.00($1.00perlb.)
10lbs. UNSKINNED CONCH ...... $7.00 ( 70perlbJ
HERE'S SOME EXAMPLES OF YOUR SAVINGS ON OUR REGULAR PRICES!
TOP CHOICE MEATS AND POULTRY
61lbs. HOT DOGS -$6.25 101ba US.PORKCHOPS -$11.00
10l1bs PIGS FEET $3.50 10lbs. PORK CHOP ENDS $10.00
10lbs. MUTTON -$10.50 10lbs. TURKEY WINGS $7.80
BOLOGNA -89' per lb 101bs. T. DRUMSTICKS -$7.80

5Ibs. US.DA. TOP CHOICE STRIP STEAKS -$150


U


I
U


I,


m MMEW


I~FCIEWIIYI I


I









The Tribune .. Wednesday, May 1, 1974













A1meA% IprI


Gas, food, cloth


es .


yes, San Andros real estate too!


But, you can still get in on the ground floor.


TODAY at original opening

But you must act now.


prices.


CALL NOW!
SAN ANDROS (BAHAMAS) LTD.
Norfolk House (3rd Floor)
Frederick St., Nassau
Phone 5-1515 or 5-1516
FRANK C. CAREY REAL ESTATE
Bay & Deveaux Streets
Nassau
Phone 2-7667
GROSHAM PROPERTY LTD.
107 Shirley St.
Nassau
Phone 2-7662


BERKLEY FERGUSON REAL ESTATE
Berwin House on Frederick St.
Nassau
Phone 2.4913
TY SAUNDERS REAL ESTATE LTD.
Norfolk House, Frederick St.
Nassau
Phone 2-4818
BILL'S REAL ESTATE AGENCY LTD.
Shirley St.
Nassau
Phone 2-3921
McDEIGAN & ASSOCIATES INVESTMENTS LTD.
Bernard Sunley Building on Bay St., Nassau
Phone 2-4284
MAXWELL WOODSIDE LTD.
Corner of Bias and Blue Hill Road
Nassau
Phone 3-5632


BRAYNEN & KNOWLES REAL ESTATE LTD.
British Colonial Hotel Arcade
Bay Street, Nassau
Phone 2-1886
COSMOPOLITAN REALTY
King's Court, Bay Street
Nassau
Phone 5-7477

TENANT & COOPER REAL ESTATE
1 st National City Bank Bldg.
Freeport
Phone 352-7841
Or Your OWN Broker


San Andr.s Is for LPyvers... and smart Investere, to.-










9 The Tribune..


"SUPER VALUE FOOD STORES L


FO1ATU

SEASON
IT'S STILL the potato
season at the Potter's Cay
Produce Exchange. Really, it
is always potato season but
take advantage of the locally
grown variety while you can.
Here is a variation on baked
potatoes. Halve six baked
potatoes and scoop out the
pulp. Mash the pulp well or
puree it in a blender. Add six
tablespoons butter, one and a
quarter cup of cheese sauce, a
cup of chopped spinach, salt
and peper and a little nutmeg.
Mix well and spoon it back
into the shells. Sprinkle with
grated cheese and brown the
potatoes under the broiler.
Fry potatoes with bread
crumbs. Dice two pounds
potatoes and parboil them in
boiling, salted water .for five
minutes. Drain and dry the
potatoes and saute them in
butter until they are golden
brown. Stir in half a cup of
bread crumbs and cook stirring
occasionally until the potatoes
arc tender and the bread
crumbs are brown.
Lemon juice can be added
to potatoes. Cook two pounds
of potatoes until tender. Drain
and slice while still hot. Place
in a saucepan with half a cup
of melted butter. Add salt and
pepper and little chopped
parsley. Simmer for five
minutes. Squeeze the juice of a
lemon over the slices and serve
at once.
Or boil six potatoes,
unpeeled, with three chopped
stalks of celery, three chopped
green onions and a handful of
chopped parsley. When the
potatoes are tender, drain them
and return the vegetables to
the saucepan. Add a quarter
pound of butter and a cup of
chopped green onion tops. Mix
well crushing the potatoes
slightly during the mixing.
For puffed baked potatoes,
halve six baked potatoes and
scoop out the pulp. Puree the
pulp or mash it very well and
add half a cup of scalded light
cream with salt and pepper to
taste and a little nutmeg. Beat
six egg yolks and add to the
potatoes with a third of a cup
finely chopped parsley. Beat
four egg whites with a little salt
until they are stiff and fold a
quarter of them into the
potato mixture. Pile the
potato over the remaining egg
white and fold them in. Heap
the mixture into the reserved
shells and bake at 400 degress
for 15 minutes or until the
tops are browned.
********
A potato souttle is an easy
way to get around humdrum
,potato dishes. Combine two
cups thick mashed potatoes
with half a cup of light cream.
a teaspoon salt and a little
nutmeg. Place in a saucepan
and cook over low heat until
they are very hot. Remove the
pan from the heat and stir in
two tablespoons of Parmesan
cheese or grated Swiss cheese.
Add three egg yolks, one at a
time beat well after each
addition. Set the mixture cool.
Fold in four stiffly beaten egg
whites. Fill a buttered souffle
dish or deep casserole to
three-quarters full and bake at
375 degress for 35 minutes or
until puffed and slightly
browned.
Combine potatoes and
carrots. Cook separately a
pound of carrots and four large
potatoes. Drain and put them
separately through a food
chopper or sieve. ('ombmne the
vegetable purees and beat in a
cup of light cream, an egg yolk
and a quarter pound of
softened butter. Season with a
teaspoon of prepared mustard
and salt and pepper to taste.
Heat gently, beating well.
Here is a simple potato
casserole. Peel and slice two
pounds potatoes. Scald a cup
of milk with a few onion slices.


Strain the milk and add it to
the potatoes with a beaten egg
and a little grated nutmeg salt
and pepper. Place in a casserole
rubbed with a split clove of
garlic. Sprinkle the top with
grated cheese and dot with
butter Bake at 350 for 45
minutes or until the potatoes
are soft.
Finally, add tuna fish to
mashed potatoes. Sounds awful
but it's really very good. Halve
six baked potatoes and scoop
out the pulp. Mash it well with
two hard cooked eggs. Add a
quarter cup each of thick
tomato puree and well mashed
tuna fish in oil. Add salt and
pepper to taste. Fill the shells
and sprinkle each with crumbs
soaked in melted butter. Heat
the potatoes at 375 degrees for
15 minutes. Just before
serving, sprinkle with chopped
dill.


Super Value, East Street Celebrates itt 3rd. year of Service oa


THE
SBAHAMIAN
SUPERMARKETS
If it's value you really want,
you really want Super Valuel


JAW
"Oft


*


WHOLE F SPer Ib.


20>_______TIo z .*"^


CBHAM IONl^iT

W HO^^^^^^^^^^^LE TOMATOES^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^BH^^B~iBBB


R


FLORhDA V1 ,

ORANGES 10 for


CELERY 2 for
RED DELICIOUS .

APPLES ..a $1 ii


ORCHID
^^^^^RICE ^^


5mlbBa


PEPI-OL
12oz Cn


FROZEN FOOD TREATS


- 1 M _W .3 _M. -








. y. May 1,1974


S La NO. I ANNIVERSARY SALE"


area with All other Super Value Stores joining the Celebration.


j1fl||BALLOONS
SF3J FOR KIDS

ACCOMPANIED BY A
PARENT OR GUARDIAN


SPECIALS FOR THE WEEK MAY 2ND y t H~H MAY 5TH, 1974.
S


DANISH PRIME



Sm RIBSm Per lb.


OSCAR MAYER
ALL MEAT WIENERS
OSCAR MAYER
PURE BEEF FRANKS
OSCAR MAYER
SALAMI FOR BEER
OSOAR MAYER
LUNCHEON MEAT


1-lb

1-lb

8-oz

8-oz


$1.39

$1.39

990


89C


IE


FRUIT DRINKS 32 594 BROAD&BUTTER F.LAS 3/9f9
HUNTS CHINA FOAM PLASTIC
TOMATO KETCHUP =. 99* PLATES (TINT WHITE) 79$
CALGON
BUBBLE BATH ,s $1.09 PLASTIC BUCKETS 89
DUPONT SPONGES 4's 2/79 MACARONI & CHEESE DINNER 2/85$
LIBBYS B.B.
GREEN PEAS ma 2/89s TOMATO PASTE lo.o 2/894
IRISH CANA
SPRING SOAP BATH 2/794 CORN ON COB 4Ears 79
LIBBYS FAMILY FARE
FRUIT COCKTAIL ,o. 59* DISH LIQUID M. 59
CHINA FOAM ULTRA BRITE COOL MINT
PLASTIC PLATES 2/894 TOOTH PASTE LARGE 89
jRY PAN $2.39




B ,STi7
LAUNDRY BAETS 13~i


WAIRY 'LI


DANICA BRAND


4*


BUTTER


FAMILY FARE SLICED
AMERICAN CHEESE


KRAFT
ORANGE JUICE

ORANGE JUICE


1-oz


12-0z


2/790

$1125


64-oz $1.59


32-oz


L(ALL BRANDS)
LiAt. I.W DOpzN


790

950


W THE
V'" BAHAMIAN
SUPERMARKETS
I it's value you really want,
you really want Super Valuel


m anlk d!
NW l44 a uwi idQ~ue.


to the suppression of the free
will of workers, simply for
political reasons. This great.
crime against democracy and
freedom must never be allowed
to be forgotten and Clifford
Darling stands condemned.
"Unions are to be free
agents of the workers but the
right to strike is not
guaranteed, because the Hotel
Workers were denied this. The
Airline Pilots were treated like
upstarts. We cannot laugh at
the people of Haiti or Cuba,
whose freedoms are not
plentiful."
SHIPPING
ARRIVED TODAY: Joma
from Jacksonville; Grand Turk
from Miami
ARRIVING TOMORROW:
Tropic Flyer from West Palm
Beach
SAILING TOMORROW:
Oceanic for New York;
Bahama Star, Emerald Seas,
Flavia for Miami
WEATHER
Wind: North-eastrly 6 to 16
am.P ,
Weather Fair .
l--- Sea:SMlgkt


. 4


&2afo4/ tpiat hiiwe "


Aes amwtiuiod
a&.


Siaed
&A~ad ^en on

East Street


--------- --- -O ~l ~


e o the


VE'GETOL


SADWCHM


KELLOGG'S
CORN FLAKES
8-oz.



2/,0,79C


IFRM ORGRCRYSELE


a5,=I_" w'


~I~


F MAY DAY
MESSAGE
From Page 3
these things and should not
bear the burden of others," the
union leader told his workers
The time has come to
identify who is to blame and
the workers are not the
culprits. It is also irresponsible
to make out that because
workers pursue their rights for
a decent wage, investment will
flee, when they (the investors)
have a few places in the world
like the Bahamas.
"Investment has fled before,
but it was not instigated by
workers. Let us speak the
truth. Merchants are not
content to keep prices down,
so workers should not be
harassed into keeping their
wages stagnant either.
Matters needing immediate
attention are, Mr. Williams
said:
(1) the economy,
(2) our territorial security
and integrity from poachers
and illegal immigrants,
(3) our imprecise
international posture,
(4) bringing the "good life"
to the poor people,
(5) making the Bahamas a
more democratic place where
the best interests of the people
must prevail over those of a
select few,
(6) tempering the political
system so that our political
institutions, ministers and civil
servants respond to the
people's ne eds, such as
unemployment, the cost of
living, housing, free medical
care for the porr, free
education for all, Out Island
development, etc.
The rising expectations of
the working classes bring on
rising demands for "more," Mr.
Williams said.
The swells and waves of
protest shall never cease
because a few fat cats want less
noise but because justice has
finally come to us, which is not
now the case. The fight will go
on so long as one person is
unjustly treated and there will
be no let up at all.
"But the people must learn
to positivitely identify their
oppressors numbered among
whom are the black brothers
who sell dope, pay small wages
.and otherwise degrade their
black brothers. The 'lagqk,
politician has a heavy burden
of guilt, because he has not.
produced justice.
"The black politician needs
to explain how much freedom
is there in moving from one
kind of white control to
another, where the only
difference is that the new
white master is invisible and he
gives his orders through the
black politician.
"Those black politicians
who have the guts to stand up
for justice are quickly silenced
for "rocking the boat." We may
not be able to yet accuse our
black politicians of selling out,
but they are sure taking long to
do what they promised.
"BWC feels very
disappointed that the goals of
1967 seem more far away
than ever before and are being
neglected for the fast buck.
Have we forgotten that those
of us who have reached the top
must now let the ladder down
for the remainder to climb up
too?
"This May Day finds the
Bahamas Government guilty as
any Russian dictatorship in
refusing even to hold an
election among workers of
Radio Bahamas (ZNS) and
Bahamasair (the flag carrier),
so that the workers may
choose the Engineering and
General Union as their
Bargaining Agent. In this and
other matters, the Bahamas
Government is an enemy of
democracy in lending support














By Abigail Van Buren
0 tM 1 dtV emm-N. V. e.m Sl ym. InC.
DEAR ABBY: My brother left his wife and five children
and got a divorce. My close friend subsequently divorced
her husband A soon came out that my brother and my
friend had been seeing each other for a few years before
their divorces. They are presently living together and plan
to be married soon. I hope they will find the happiness to-
OFFICIAL NOTICE
RE: BLUE VISTA HOTEL.
Blue Vista Hotel Limited wishes it to be known that
Mr. Nick Bullit is no longer employed by the Blue
Vista Hotel nor is he associated with the Company
in any way whatsoever.

Thk hlttsr.. with LIFE
^ POWER LIFE
SPECIAL FOR MAY
PRICED from $28 up
IAIMAS AWYTE MIAPU EllV
CRAWFORD ST. Opposite Bahamas Water Supply
P.O. Box N-1225 Phone 5-2005

NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that IDA REBECCA WALKINE of
Street West From Robinson Rcad is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 24th day of
April 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N3002,
Nassau.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that AUBREY WALKINE of
South Caicos now residing at Mathew Town Inagua is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration should not be granted should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 24th day of April 1974 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citiens6tlp, Ministry of
'Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N3002, Nassau.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that GAVIN S. UPTON of Winton
Highway, Nassau is applvina to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration should not be granted should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 24th day of April 1974 to The
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs, P. O. Box N-3002, Nassau.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that LOUIS EDWARD
DUNCANSON of Yellow Elder Gardens, Nassau is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship
for registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 1st day of May
1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality arid
Citizenship Ministry of Home Affairs, P. O. Box N-3002,
Nassau.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ELIDIEU TILUSMA of
Crooked Island Street, Nassau is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalisation as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalisation should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 1st day of
May 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. O. Box N-3002,
Nassau.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that LOUISTAL DESSONCAIRE
of Hampton Street, Nassau is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalisation as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalisation should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 1st day of
May 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002,
Nassau.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that BRENETTA WILLIAMS of
Lightbourn Avenue, Farrington Road is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 1st day of May
1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box-N-3002,
Nassau.


Two divorces catch

her in the middle
gather they lacked in their former marriages, but there is
I have always been very .to my brother's wife, and
adore the children. My If t says that his ex-wile is o'
longer a part of the famd, and that f I want to see hi'
children I should do so illd he has them for visitation.
Brother says that if his e.-wife is Invited to any family
gatherings, he and his wVt4o-be wil not come.
I don't want to have to choose whom to Invite to y
home for a family affair, but I am told that since al,
brother is closer to me than his ex-wife, he should not have
to stay away. During the holidays, I invited everyone and
left the decision up to those who wanted to come, but there
was side-choosing and ill feelings, so I cancelled the party.
My own children are being denied associating with their
cousins, and remaining neutral is not easy. Please help.
IN THE MIDDLe.
DEAR IN: Your brother divorced his wife, yeou didn't, so
don't let him dictate whem you shaD have In your home.
Ask everyone you want, and If Brother doesn't waat to
come, let him stay away.
DEAR ABBY: Several of us have a question to which we
have been unable to find an answer.
When a married man is invited to be the guest speaker
for a women's club [business or social], what about his
wife?
The affair is usually held in the evening at a motel or
hotel beginning with a dinner. What is the speaker's wife
supposed to do? Sit home and eat alone while her husband
is 4eing fussed over by a bunch of women?
I feel that if a club can't afford two meals, they should
get their speakers from the membership.
Also, what if the meeting is out of town over a weekend?
Don't you think the speaker's wife should be Invited too?
Pleas set us straight on this. A CLUB DIVIDED
DEAR CLUB: It Is customary when Invitinag a speaker to
let him know that his wife is welcome, too. If this courtesy
is omitted and the speaker wants his wife to be included,
he should say so. Weekends? Absolutely-if the budget per-
mits.


10 The Tribune Wedneday, May 1, 1974
_o *a . .1


PRESENT FOR P.M. --
Members of the Kiwanis Club
of Kingston, Jamaica were in
Nassau last Thursday and
presented a gift to Mr. Rodney
Bain for Prime Minister
Lyndon 0. Pindling from
Jamaican Prime Minister
Michael Manley. The group is
pictured above at the Cabinet
Office making the
presentation. From left to right
are Mr. Karl McDonnough, Mr.
Robert Blackwood, Dr.
Cleveland Eneas, Mr. Milton
Weller, President of the
Kingston Kiwanis Club, Mr.
Rodney Bain and Mr. Errol
Leach.


youwantto be!
and be the man
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Keep fit with
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with the strong action
against BACKACHE
and MUSCLE PAINS
i __


Soon, you'll have saved the money you need
for that special occasion. We help your
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That's why we say, "You and the Commerce.
Together we're both stronger".



CANADIAN IMPERIAL
BANK OF COMMERCE


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Each payday, why not put part of what you
earn into a Commerce Savings Account?


You and the Commerce.
Together we're both stronger.


I







The Tribune -- Wednesday May 1, 1974
d* *
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LIBBY'S VIENNA SAUSAGES 5.. .550
LUBBY'S WHOLE KERNEL CORN m 2/.89l
LBBY'S GRAPEFRUIT JUICE 46. .694
KEN-L-RATION DOG FOOD .. 3/.990
DELSEY TOLETIBSSUE21 .550
DANISH SARDINES 3-i/4o.
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PHOSFERENE TONMC WINETS $2.09


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The Tribune Wednesday, May 1, 1974


ENDS 36 YEARS WffH 'THE ROYAL'
FROM MENTAL
Arithmetic To Computers, courteous manner has recipient of an abundance of
from a one bank town to a brought her a host of good wishes from the many
'major international banking compliments and many members of staff, past and
centre these are only two friends among colleagues and present who attended.
of the many changes which customers alike, was recently Our photograph shows
took place during Flossie guest of honour at the Miss Carey, standing beside
Carey's 36 years with the Royal'a annual dinner dance Mr. Minard as she listened to
Royal Bank of Canada which where a presentation was Willie Young, a pensioner of
came to an end recently on made to her by Mr. C.W. the Royal, who paid her a
her retirement. Minard, the bank's district few of the compliments we
Flossie, whose pleasant, manager. She also was the mentioned.

May procession at Mary Star


ON Sunday, May 5, the Right
Rev. Msgr. John Finger
Vicar General of the diocese,
will preach the sermon at
the conclusion of the annual
May procession in honour of
the Blessed Virgin Mary at
Mary Star of the Sea


Catholic church. The
procession will begin at 5
p.m.
Flags of the various countries
represented in the parish will
be carried, along with an
Icon of Our Lady of
Czestochowa. The process--


ion will take the following
route through the streets:
from the church'- to
Tamarind Street, east to
East Beach Drive, south to
the front of the school
where the annual symbolic
crowning of the state of Our
Lady will take place.
The statute will be
crowned by the May Queen,
Laura Groom. Her
attendants will be Michele
Crombleholme, Yvonne
Harvey, Lucy Knowles,
Molly Larson, Lisa
McGillion, Heather Bennett,
Kelly Bahl, Diane Ewen,
Lauretta Garzilli, Allison
Hoffstead, Wendy Kearney
Elizabeth Kuzmin, Linda
Adderley, Maria Souza,
Elvire Calizaire, LaVerne
Harvey, Brenda Penn, Anne
Stewart, Charlene Sweeting,
Valeria Callagari.
The following will be page
boys: Peter Leslie, Andre
Napier and Kevin Kemp.
The flower girls will be
Cheryl Amondsen, Glynis
Armbrister, Naticia Bain,
Dana Baine, Julie Bouchard,
Carla Ferguson, Monique
Joseph, Mary MacMann,
Jennifer Sale, Linda Simard,
Tracey Versele, Theresa
Wilson, Leonara Kerr, and
Marina Mooney.
The procession will then
proceed to the church where
the sermon, followed by
benediction of the Most
Blessed Sacrament, will be
given. The usual 6:30
evening mass will then be
celebrated by Father
Cornelius Osendorf, O.S.B.
O.B.E.


AUTAN


Personal


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AUTAN


Communications is to be
introduced at the Mona
Campus of the University of
the West Indies starting in
October this year.
The University Grants
Committee at its meeting last
Saturday agreed to proposals
for the introduction of the
training programme which is to
be financed by the
Government of Jamaica. This
financing will include capital
for building and some
equipment as well as recurrent
expenditure.
Other assistance will be
provided by a German
Foundation the Friedrich-
Ebert-Stiftung which has
agreed to assist with the
establishment of a Caribbean
Media Centre on the Mona
Campus. This centre will serve
as the Communications media
teaching and training unit of
the University and will also
include a production unit.
It is also the understanding
that the media in the region
will be contributing financially
to the programme.
The programme in Mass
Communication will start with
a one-year diploma course
which will involve both theory
and practice. Admission to the
course will be open to
graduates with the appropriate
background and also to
experienced media personnel.
Training in Mass Com-
municatioas at the UWI
had been proposed from as far
back as 1969, and UNESCO
has provided some assistance
since 1972 by assigning an
expert in communications
training as part of the regional
projects in Mass Com-
munications. Further sup-
port for the idea came at
the October 1972 Heads of
Government conference where
a resolution was adopted that
efforts be made to accelerate
the introduction of training
programmes in the field of
journalism and mass
communications. Support for
the introduction of training has
also come from the Caribbean
Media Administrators and the
Caribbean Broadcasting Union.
In July last year a
conference sponsored by the
Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung was
held in Kingston to discuss the
establishment of a Caribbean
Media Centre. Those attending
this conference included,
representatives of the Media
from the Caribbean, the UWI,
some Governmehts, the
Caribbean Congress of Labour,
the Regional Secretariat and
UNESCO.
The Conference adopted a
resolution which urged the
UWI to carry further the
discussions which had earlier
been initiated with the
Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung and to
approach the Governments,
media and other regional and
international bodies for further
financial assistance to
complement that which had
been offered by the F.E.S.
with a view to achieving the
early implementation of the
project. Other organizations
have since indicated a
willingness to provide
assistance and with the
guaranteed funding of the
Jamaica government and the
assistance of the F.E.S. it will
now be possible for the
University to introduce the
teaching programme in
October 1974.
TIDES
High 3:18 a.m. and 3:50
p.m.
Low 9:24 a.m. and 10:06


ABBEY
IIITEBNATIONAL

FUND








$8.54
Offered Price
as of
Friday, April 26th, 1974


Governor General Sir Milo Butler and Lady Butler held a ree
Wednesday for the 76th Annual Anglican Synod. Pictured at the
Collingwood Cooper and Canon Collingwood Cooper; (second ro
Lady Butler; Mrs. Donald Knowles, Bishop Donald Knowles,
Chancellor of the Nassau and the Bahamas Diocese; (back row) Ai
Sen. Gerald Cash, Vice Chancellor of the Diocese.


caption at Government House
reception are (front row) Mrs.
w) Bishop Eldon, Sir Milo and
, and Mr. Orville Turnquest,
rchdeacon Foster Pestaina and

11 R IX


RELEASED BY 1
2Of m, .ENWYFOXBYEDE UK"
SNo One Under 18 AmSutted


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staring CLARICE TAYLOR -LEONARD JACKSON 'a""ed"a"
Reservations Not Claimed By 8:15 Will Be Sold


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Il Matinee starts at 1:45 Continuous Showings
Evening 8:30 from 3:00
"COOL BREEZE" R. "EL DORADO" G.
* Thalmus.Rasulala, John Wayne,
Judy Pace Robert Mitchum
plus Plus
* "THE MOONSHINE "TRUE GRIT G.
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W A R PJ o h n W a y n e ,
No one under 18 admitted. Glen Campbell
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1AS


GOVERNOR'S HALL,
SHERATON BRITISH COOI)NIAL HOTEL
MONDAY. MAY 6th THROUGH SATURDAY. MAY llth
AT 8:30 P.M.
SEATS RESERVED $3.50 UNRESERVED $2.50
BOX OFFICE OPENS THI RSDAY, MAY 2nd
AF TRADE WINDS 1,Q11 R STORE (Next to Savoy Theatre)
TEL. 22431 io 10 .m.- 4 p.m.)


I I II I in I II II


^uq


I











'he Tribune -- Wednesday, May 1, 1974


IYellowbirds seminar open


to all service groups

A VERY DISTINGUISHED VISITOR FROM CANADA, due in town on Sunday, will be Mrs.
Egmont L. Frankel, C.C. (Companion of the Order of Canada), Chairman of the Canadian Cancer
Society and Chairman of the Auxiliary of the Princess Margaret Hospital Lodge in Toronto.
Mrs. Frankel will be heading a delegation of Canadian Hospital Volunteers to take part in a
seminar for the Yellowbirds of Nassau to be held Tuesday and Wednesday of next week.
: On Monday the Canadian Stones", the home of Mrs. Karlyn Shepherd.
delegation will pay courtesy Yellowbird director, Mrs. Ruth
calls on the Governor General Smith, from 8 p.m. onwards. THE Bahamas Humane
(nd Lady Butler, the Minister Entertainment will be Society's Chippinghamr
bf Health, Hon. Loftus Roker provided by the Chamber headquarters will be the scene
ind Prime Minister Pindling. Singers under the direction of for pets galore (in addition tc
"-:The theme of the seminar, Mrs Kayla Lockhart Edwards; the regulars) at 1 p.m. on
t"a be held at the I.O.D.E. Hall, the Lucayan Choral under the Sunday, May 5th.
Shirly Street, is "Plant an idea direction of Miss Veronica This date marks a first ar
aid watch. it grow." Morning Roach; "The Groupe," an "All Pet Show" for children
sgesions will be from ten to Instrumental group; Mrs. Susan between the ages of one and
,mid-day (lunch will be served) Wallace will recite some of her 18.
'agd evening sessions from 5.30 poetry; Mrs. Pandora Gibson Pets that may be entered
fo 7 p.m. will do a Bahamian skit and include horses, ponies, donkies
. The Canadian delegation is Mr. Clement Bethel will give a sheep, goats, pigs, dogs, cats
flying down at its own piano recital, rabbits, hamsters, guinea pigs
expense. This is the first Mrs. Frankel was very mice, ducks, geese, pigeons
seminar to be held by the helpful in the formative years doves, parrots, parakeets
Yellowbirds who are opening it of the Bahamas Auxiliary. She canaries and other caged birds
to other voluntary and service has written a book related to Snakes may also be entered
bodies in Nassau. There will be Hospital Volunteer work but not pisonous ones!
no charge for attendance at the entitled: "Three Cheers for The only pets excluded ar
semianar. Volunteers"' which was fish, insects and puppies tha
The Yellowbirds annual published in Canada. have not had their shots.
general meeting will be held at During her sojourn in Nassau The "All Pet Show" is the
the Physiotherapy Department Mrs. Frankel will be staying brainchild of the Society'
of the Hospital at 5 p.m. Mrs. with Mrs. Roger Jones, a President Mrs. Betty Kenninl
Frankel will be the guest founding member of the and is being co-ordinated an(
speaker and election of officers Yellowbirds, and Mrs. Jones' organized by animal lover Lady
will be held. Mrs. Jack mother will host the other five Greta Oakes. The show is beinl
Shepherd will vacate the delegates, held as part of the society'
presidency which she has held The committee in charge of educational programme tc
for two years (no President can the visit are Mrs Iris Bonamy, encourage children in the care
serve for more than two years). Mrs. Taylor Gates, Mrs. Phyllis of animals and to help fund thi
The week of work will end Hamilton, Mrs. Lolita Jackson, society.
up on Thursday evening with Mrs. Pat Johnson, Mrs. Roger Pets may be entered at the
B a hamian food and Jones, Mrs. Toni Peterson and gate so there is no entry form
entertainment held at "Coral to worry about.
FOR 3 in 1 Animals will be judged oi
LAWN SERVICE such things as condition
grooming, tameness and looks
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE cleanliness and colour am
PEST CONTROL GARDEN& judges will include members o
TROPICAL 2-2157 PL'r suPy the Humane Society Staff, Mr
and Mrs. Eugene Dupuch. Mrs


We deeply regret that as of April 30th, 1974,
our Credit Ledger will be closed.
The future operation will be Cash & Carry or
C.O.D..
Your patronage is highly appreciated. We
tried to be pleasing in the past...we solemnly
pledge to be more pleasing in the future with
Better Service and Prices.
Schools who order should inquire about
arrangements Fublishers may allow.
We sincerely ask your tolerance and
understanding.
Sincerely,
John L. Nixon, Manager

NIXON'S BOOK STORE
Tel. 3-6328 Blue Hill Road, Nassau P.O. Box 2179 GT.


TOFWN7iK;H H5


e
I











I









f
5,
e

e




s





r.





S.


MRS. EGMONT L.
FRANKEL, C.C., heads
Canadian delegation to
Yellowbirds seminar in
Nassau.
Dorothy Wordsell and Mr.
Mike Darville and others.

THE annual flower show of
the Carver Garden Club, held
at Government High School on
Sunday afternoon, was an
affair with a flare.
The theme of the show
"World News" featured such
classes as "Watergate the
missing tapes" ("a ,air-t deal of
ingenuity" was put into these
entrants, Mrs. Grace Isaacs told
me), "Air Pollution," the
"Energy Crisis", "Northern
Ireland, Irish Catholics and
Protestants", "Women's Lib"
and the "Royal Wedding".
Mrs. Hazel Moore captured
both the creativity and
tri-colour awards and Mrs.
Stella Knowles won the best
entrant.
Mrs. Mary Sweetnam and
Mrs. Gillian Bain received the
awards in the Irish class. Mrs.
Norma Allan won the Women's
Lib class with a pink gladiolus
cradling birth control pills in a
gravy boat!
Mrs. Irwin Knowles won the
prize for the best horticultural
exhibit with a glorious yellow
begonia.
The stage was a perfect


-MA


MR. AND MRS. HAROLD CURRY celebrated their
Golden Wedding Anniversary on Sunday.


setting for a flower show man
credit for his creativity Il
"awarded" to Messrs Mel Doty
and Jim Whitehead.

For those interested in
seeing the Nassau Amateur
Operatic Society's production
of "Viva Mexico" (Saturday
May 11 to Saturday May 18)
the Box Office will open at the
Maura Lumber Company, Bay
Street on Saturday, May 4 and
block bookings at reduced
prices will be available for
Monday, May 13 and Tuesday,
May 14 if booked in advance.
There were many
disappointed would-be patrons
of the Society's last production
"The Sound of Music" who
found the box office sold out
quite early. So, to be safe,
book early.
This is an ambitious
production with an overall cast
of about 50 and an orchestra
of about 25 musicians.
Brian Brown is the producer
assisted by Michael
Stewart; Owen Leary, the
musical director and John
Rosevear the choral director.
The leading cast are:-
Ramon a Mexican, Robin
Hood type bandit leader,
played by Bill Pinder, probably
most remembered for his
portrayal of Tevye in "Fiddler
on the Roof."
Raquelita Ramon's
fiancee played by Yonette
Thorgrimsson, a newcomer
from Guyana who made her
debut with the Society as
Sister Sophia in "The Sound of
Music."
Mama Inez Ramon's
mother played by Betty
Fisher who played Katisha in
"The Mikado", the Society's
first production in 1959, and
who said she most enjoyed her
role of Bloddy Mary in "South
Pacific" in 1967.
The Senator-played by
Sidney Brown, a founder
member of the Society and its
President for 1973/74.
Lucille, his daughter, played
by Helen Smith who was last
seen as Valencienne in the
Society's production of "The
Merry Widow."
Pablo and Pepe, comedy
4 team, members of Ramon's
. gang, played by Dudley Pinder
and Hugh Glynn respectively
A (see picture on this page).
b The Aztec Princess sung
by well-known Bahamian
soprano, Gwedolyn McDeigan
in her first leading role with
the Society. Gwen joined the
chorus in 1972 for "Fiddler on
the Roof".
Bernardo a young and
earnest police sergeant sung by
John Rosevear, one of the
Society's leading tenors since
"Oklahoma" in 1964.
Lopez Chief of Police -
played by Jimmy McMullen, a
newcomer to the Society.
Mendoza Mexican
revolutionary played by
Andrew Capitman newly
arrived in Nassau from the
U.S.A.

Mr. and Mrs. Harold
(Alrena) Curry celebrated their
50th Wedding Anniversary on
Sunday, April 28 by renewing
their marraige vows at a special
mass celebrated by Monsignor
John Finger assisted by
Monsignor Preston Moss and
Deacon Peter Rahming, at St.
Francis Xavier's Cathedral.
Mr. Andrew Randolph
Curry, headmaster of Aquinas
College and organist at S1.
Francis, played the organ.
The church was packed for
the occasion.
Luncheon followed at Mr.
Andrew Curry's home in
Stapledon Gardens attended by
about 400 guests. The couple
received well over 100 Golden
Wedding Anniversary gifts.
Mr. and Mrs. Curry have
three other children Garth
Curry and Mrs. Jackie Malcolm
and Mrs. Eloise Brown.
Denise Mortimer, the
daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Lester Mortimer Sr., a student


"j, 1.4












It 1 113

MRS. HAZEL Moore pictured with her winning tri-colour award. On the left is Mrs.
Pearl Cox, president of the Carver Garden Club and chairman of the flower show, and on
the right is Mrs. Grace Isaacs. Photo: Philip Symonette.


MR. ORIS RUSSELL,
Permanent Secretary in the
Ministry of External Affairs,
presents Mrs. Stella Knowles
with the trophy for the best
entry in the Carver Garden
Club Show held at
Government High School on
Sunday afternoon. Photo:
Philip Symonette.
at Clark College in Atlanta,
Georgia, has recently become a
member of Alpha Kappa Mu
Honour Society.
Denise has also been elected
Treasurer of that society which
to become a member, a student
must have maintained a 3.3
average or better out of a
possible 4.0 with no less than
70 credit hours. Denise has a
3.6 average.
She attended the Alpha
Kappa Mu National
Convention held at Kentucky
State University in Louisville,
Kentucky.
This young Bahamian is
majoring in Physical Education
with emphasis on coaching,
sports administration and
teaching physical education to
handicapped children.

Barbara Lightbourne, a
student at Luther College,
Decorah, Iowa, is a member of
the cast of "Riders to the Sea."
a one-act Irish folk drama, by
J.M. Synge with music
arranged by R. Vaughn
Williams to be presented this
week by the College Opera
Work-shop at their local
theatre.

The Girl Guides will be
holding a fair on Saturday May
4 from 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the
Girl Guide Headquarters on
West Bay Street.
There will be eighteen stalls
with all the usual attractions
including teas, homemade ice
cream and a craft stall.
The highlight of the
afternoon will be the
Popularity Contest at which
the most popular Brownie, the
most popular girl guide and the
most popular ranger will be
crowned.


MRS. HAZEL MOORE's winning entrant in the
creativity award. Photo: Philip Symonette


JUNIOR MEMBERS of the Bahamas Humane Society at
the society's headquarters in Chippingham with animals.
The scene at the "All Pet Show" next Sunday Is anticipated
to be cram full of unusual pets and their junior owners.


FOR ALL YOUR

PET SUPPLIES

IT'S



MONTROSE AVENUE TELEPHONE 2-4259


Active



people
drink k














JUICES












SUbbyo
Ubby



NECTARS*




-4.



AVAILABLE AT YOUR FAVOURITE FOOD STORE

DISTRIBUTED BY



THE GENERAL AGENCY LIMITED
PATTON STREETPALMDALE PHONE 21551


SOME PEOPLE ARE BORNi STREAKERS --others
have it thrust upon them Pablo and Pepe assist Senator T.
K. 'Vindrs to take off his clothes In a hilarious scene from
the Nasau Amateur Operatic Society's production of "Viva
Mexico".


...by Daphne Wallace Whitfiel


Irr -s


I---


0. Agobbb.,











The Tribune * Wednesday, May 1, 1974


REAL ESTATE


C14320
Large lot Adelaide Beach.
Phone 41298 day or nite

C14390
MUST SELL
Lot 100 x 100. Situate Nassau
Village $5,500 or nearest offer
Acres at $8,500,00 per acre or
nearest offer. Situate Malcolm
Allotment with fruit trees. Call
24068.

C14314
SHOPPING CENTRE Out
West. Established income.
Reduced for quick sale.
120,000 sq. ft. of Grounds
opposite Joe & Berlin. Ideal for
Shopping Centre only
$125,000.00.

C14312
10 FURNISHED
APARTMENTS.
Walking distance of City. 90%
occupancy year round. Was
$150,000.00 now reduced to
$135,000.00. Income approx.
$18,000.00 per year.
DIAL DAMIANOS 22033,
41197.
C14313
WELL established 12 unit 2
storey building catering to
Tourist -- with swimming pool,
coffee shop, and manager's
quarters greatly reduced and
finance to suitable purchaser
Views of Sea.
DIAL DAMIANOS 22033,
41197.
C14399
HOME Prospect Ridge on Golf
Course. Nearly 2 acres. 2
storey. 3h bedrooms, 3
bathrooms, large living and
dining room, enclosed patio,
enclosed porch, 2 large paved
terraces. Great for entertaining
large numbers. Maid's quarters.
Own well water. Reduced to
$115,000 firm unfurnished.
Telephone: 2-4148 or 2-3027
Morley & O'Brien Real Estate
(BREA Brokers).

C14387
BLAIR ESTATES, Eastern
district 3 bedroom 2 bath
hbuse, living room, dining
r6om, maid's quarters, double
garage, large kitchen and
pantry, patio and roof patio.
Double lot, fruit Orchard. Own
water supply, view by
appointment. Phone 2-1741-2
business hours.

C14340
PREFER TO BUILD YOUR
OWN HOUSE?
YAMACRAW BEACH
ESTATES is ready
$75 down. Easy terms. No
interest.
Beach rights.
Tel. 41141 or 24148 or 2-3027
Morley & O'Brien Rea! Estate
(BREA Brokers)
-14-, 15
C'445
4],'.00 sq. feet (400 by 110)
MAIN road Prince Charles at
Entrance of SEABREEZE. Was
$45,000.00 reduced to
$30,000.00 Dial Damianos
22033. 41197.
C14414
HARMONY HILL have
house with unusually large
rooms, separate dining and
sitting, patio, enclosed
ground car porte neatly
kept rental established.
Asking $48,000.00. Rental
income $6,600.00. See Dial
22033,41197.

PUBLIC AUCTION
C14377
HARRY D. MALONE will sell
at the Mobile Unit, Oakes Field
on Thursday May 2nd 1974 at
10 a.m. MOTOR CARS,
MOTOR SCOOTERS AND
BICYCLES.
Harry D. Malone
Public Auctioneer.


WANTS TO RENT
C14384
ENGLISH family requires
three bedroom house.
Preferably unfurnished or
partly furnished. Call 31651.



C14381
APARTMENT for rent
.Richville Estate, $145.00 per
month, phone 3-5930.


C14376
1 3 BEDROOM 1 bath
apartment Pinedale. $220.
Utilities included. Call 2-3032
(days) 5-7948 (nights).

C14333
NASSAU HILLCREST
TOWERS


Swimming pool, sun terrace
1 bedroom apartment, fully
furnished. $250 per month.
Contact 7-8421 or 2. Evening
7-7065.
C14386
SHOPS AND OFFICES
FOR RENT
Modem airconditioned office
and store space available in
busy shopping area, telephone
and ample parking. Rental fees
will appeal to the businessman
with a future. Phone 41301.


T I I-


FOR RENT


C14342
1 BEDROOM furnished
apartment upstairs over the
Buccaneer Club. For
information call 5-4616.

C14345
TWO, Furnished and
airconditioned, 1-bedroom
apartments, Contreville, Ring
5-8679, ask for Mr. Pritchard.

C14401
NEW ATTRACTIVELY
furnished two-bedroom
apartment, Stapledon Gardens.
Telephone 31804 evenings.

C14355
COTTAGES and apartments
monthly airconditioned,
fully furnished, maid service
available. Lovely garden and
swimming pool. Telephone
31297, 31093.

C14407
SHOPS AND OFFICES FOR
RENT
Modern airconditioned office
and store space available in
busy shopping area, telephone
and ample parking. Rental fees
will appeal to the businessman
with a future. Phone 41301.

C14421

near Scott Street, Large area
$165 month. Call 53208 after
5 p.m.

FOR SALE
C14302
AIR CONDITIONER 18,000
BTU. As new. For details
phone 32359 after 11 a.m.

C14319
REMNANT SALE
Nixon's Upholstery Service,
Bernard Road. Phone 41298.

C14368
SANSUI 4 CHANNEL
RECEIVER, Q.R. 500
WATTS, TAPE MONITOR
SOURCE, PLAYBACK
$495.00 Phone 6-8 p.m
5-7317.

C14338
SPECIAL SALE
on
WEDDING GOWNS
FROM $75 AND UP.
THE MPUNG MISS
Market Street near
Bay. Phone 2-3365.
C14410
AIRCONDITIONED private
room in shared house near
bridge. Available immediately.
Call 5-8765.
C14409
1969 Volkswagen automatic
perfect condition.
Admiral 19" with stand 2
months old. $225.00. Call
78048.
C14418
MOTOROLA Mobile car radio
telephone 6 months old.
TV Antenna booster.
$130.00 Phone 35478
CHANNEL ELECTRONICS
LTD.

C14405
PATIO SALE
Household items -- Clothes -
Toys
Electric Frying Pan $15.00
12 String Guitar $70.00
Rela xacizor Exercising
Machine $100.00
Oster Dog Clippers $10.00
Salon Type Hair
Dryer $30.00
Patio Table $30.00
Rollaway Bed $40.00
Saturday, May 4th, 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. Prospect Ridge
Condominiums, Apt. 11,
Sanford Drive. Telephone
3-4746. Marshall.

C14326

SALE


-erald 13/60 Body Panels
Grilles- Doors, Etc.
GT6 MK II Panels Doors-
Bonnets. Etc.
Spitfire MK II Panels Doors
Bonnets etc."
NOW IS THE TIME TO


REPLACE ANY DAMAGED
PANELS AT A FRACTION
OF NORMAL COST.

SAVE 50% OR HuE
TERMS CASH NO RETURNS
NASSAU MOTOR
COMPANY LTD.
SHIRLEY ST.









USE

Che ribunr
CLASSIFIED
ADVTS.


CARS FOR SALE


C14403
1968 CHEVY Impala,
airconditioned, radio and tape.
Tel. 42066.


C14354
1972 VOLKSWAGEN
Sedans excellent
edition, radio, W/W
low mileage. Finance
insurance available.
36611-2-3-4.


1300
con-
tyres,
and
Call


C14411
MOTOR CENTRE LTD
THOMPSON BOULEVARD
PHONE 56739
AT MOTOR CENTRE WE
HAVE THE USED CAR FOR
YOU
1974 DODGE CHALLENGER
Brown with white vinyl top &
White Trim. Air Cond, Radio,
Power Steering, Power Brake,
Maq Wheels & Wide oval tyres.
AT ONLY S9 a00 $6250.00
1973 DATSUN 240Z LIME
GREEN WITH BLACK TRIM.
Reclining Bucket Seats,
Automatic Console Shift,
Radio, Black Radial Tyres. AT
ONLY $5R00aQ$5900.00
1973 DODGE DART WHITE
WITH BLACK VINYL TOP.
Radio, Air Condition,
Automatic Transmission,
Power Steering, W/W Tyres.
AT ONLY $40*aQ0 $4400.00
1973 PONTIAC VENTURA II
GREEN & WHITE. Automatic
Trans. Power Steerinq, W/W
Tyres, Power Brakes, AT
ONI Y S988.0 $3500.00
1972 CHEVY VEGA GREY
WITH BLACK TRIM. Radio,
W/W Tyres, Automatic Trans.
AT ONLY $aefi0 $2500.00
1972 PONTIAC VENTURA II
BROWN WITH BLACK TRIM.
Air Cond. Power Steering,
Power Brake, Radio, W/W
Tyres. AT ONLY $*5EL00
$3.s500.00
1972 TRIUMPH 2500 P.I.
WHITE WITH BLUE TRIM. R.
H. D. Radio, 4 Speed Standard
Trans, W/W Tyres. AT ONLY
$3-25,0D $2500.00
1972V/W 1300 BUG RED
WITH WHITE TRIM. Radio,
Standard Trans. W/W Tvres.
AT ONLY $820*0 $2000.00
1971 A. M. C. JAVELIN SST
WHITE WITH BLACK TRIM.
Automatic Trans, Radio.
Power Steering, Tape Console,
Shift Bucket Seats. AT ONI Y
$3860,00 $2950.00
1971 MINI CLUBMAN
ESTATE BLUE WITH BLUE
TRIM. Automatic Trans, W/W
Tyres. AT ONLY iW01,4t 0
$1200.00
1970 HILLMAN HUNTER
GOLD WITH BLACK TRIM.
Automatic Trans. AT ONLY
$9000 $825.00
1970 V/W 1300 BUG BLUE
WITH RED TRIM. AT ONLY
$1k4M,00 $1350.00
1969 CHEVY IMPALA
GREEN WITH BLACK VINYL
TOP & BLACK TRIM 6
Cylinder, Radio, Power
Steering, Power Brake. AT
ONLY $~15I~ 00 $1850.00
1969 V/W 1300 BUG BLUE
WITH RED TRIM. AT ONLY
$4*tQ.00 $1250.00
1969 MERCURY COUGAR
BLUE WITH WHITE TRIM.
Automatic Trans, Radio, Air
Cond, Power Steering, Power
Brake, W/W Tyres. AT ONLY
$Z0J,00 $1500.00
1969 FORD MUSTANG RED
WITH BLACK TRIM. Radio,
Automatic Trans, W/W Tyres,
Power Steering, Power Brake.
AT ONLY $630-0 $1200.00
1969 CADILLAC
FLEETWOOD BLACK WITH
BLACK TRIM. Air Cond
Radio, Power Brake, Power
Steering, Automatic Trans,
W/W Tyres, Power Windows &
Power Lock. AT ONLY
$32.0M)0 $2490.00
THIS WEEK SPECIAL
1969 DODGE DART
$g250.00 $1950.00
1968 SUNBEAN RAPIER
$1i-26000 $1060.00
FINANCING AVAILABLE

CRAFT SUPPLIES |
C14357
NOW in stock at Bahamian
Paint Supply, Bay Street:-
* Decoupage
* Clear Cast
Candle Craft
Tissue Craft
Phone 2-2386, 2-2898.

MARINE SUPPLIES


C11894
1969 31 ft. CHRIS-CRAFT
Commander. Sleeps six, private
shower, two 230 h.p. engines
with less than 200 hours.
Kitchenette, good condition
Call 24267, 54011.

C14404
14 ft. Aluminium Boat with
new 3 h.p. Evinrude engine
$500.00. Also, 40 h.p. new
Evinrude engine, electric and


I ma
nual. Phone .


SECTION


SSCOOLS


C14406
PIANO & VOICE LESSONS
New York Trained: Sing
with the ease of talking.
Adults, you can learn to play
the piano in easy lessons. Call
2-1300.
C14356
LEWIS AUTO SCHOOL
Learn to drive with confidence
Phone 59805 between 7 and
8:30 a.m. or after 6 p.m. or
35084 anytime.

C14269
THE best care for your pri
school age children provided ,
reasonable rates.
BEST CARE NURSERY
Weekdays 8:00 a.m.to 5:30 p.mr
Miss C. M. Brown, Manageress.

ENTERTAINMENT
C14315
AQUINAS COLLEGE
PRESENTS


"The Music Man"
Directed by Andrew Curry
at
Garfunkel Auditorium
8:30 p.m.
May 3rd, 4th, 5th
Tickets priced at $2.00
obtainable from the students
of the college.

C14336
SETTLER'S PUB & INN
Beaumont Arcade, Bay Street
Telephone 5-9739
TWO BANDS NIGHTLY
The Nassauvians
The Electric Circle
OPEN TILL 4:00 a.m.

IN EMORIAM

C14413


IN MEMORY OF David
Wallace, now feared lost at sea.
He left Gambier Village with
three of his friends on 13th
January 1974 in a 16'
outboard motor boat on a
fishing trip to return the same
afternoon, they have not been
seen or heard of since.
Sadly missed by mother Mrs.
Vera Wallace of Stapledon
Gardens, five sisters Mrs.
Perline Williams, Mrs. Betty
Laing, Mrs. Joyce Thompson,
Mrs. Alma Davis and Mrs. Sanir
Sears and one brother Vance
Wallace.

S ANNOUNCEMENTS
C14063
JUST ARRIVED
NEW SHIPMENT
Polyester double knit 60-62
inches wide; also Jersey
material variety of colours.
custom made dresses for ladies
and children.
YOUR ONE STOP SHOP
FOR ALL SCHOOL
CHILDREN UNIFORMS
Also Polyester double knit
material for men all colours
MODERNISTIC DRY GOODS
Opposte Wulff Road Theatre
Telephone 3-4580



C14402
UNION NOTICE
THE ANNUAL GENERAL
MEETING OF THE
BAHAMAS HOTEL &
CATERING WORKERS
UNION WILL BE HELD ON
SUNDAY MAY 26, 1974 AT
TAXICO UNION HALL,
WULFF ROAD AT 9:00 P.M.
ONLY FINANCIAL
MEMBERS WILL BE
ALLOWED TO TAKE PART

SIGNED: BOBBY GLINTON
GENERAL SECRETARY

C14385
THERE will be a General
Meeting of the Nassau
Outboard Club at Brown's
Boat Basin on Thursday the
2nd May at 5:30 p.m. to elect
new officers for 1974.


HELP WANTED
C14398
ONE experienced farmer. Only
Bahamians need apply. $30 per
week. Telephone 4-2289


I I I !


C14359
CREDIT ASSISTANTS
FOR
INTERNATIONAL BANK
MALE OR FEMALE
CREDIT ASSISTANTS


S l


I TRADE SERVICES


C14344
MASTER TECHNICIANS
LTD., Mackey Street, your
Whirlpool distributor offers
refrigerators, washers, dryers,
compactors, freezers, ice
makers, air conditioners and
garbage disposers. With full
warranty on every home
appliance we sell. Service done
by factory trained mechanics.
Telephone 23713, 5-9322.

C14351
T. V. ANTENNAS
Boosters for homes
apartments and hotels
SALES AND SERVICES
Ca!' 5-9404
WORLD OF MUSIC
Mackey Street
Next to Frank's Place
TRADE SERVICES


BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES-
C14367
EARN UP TO $50,000
Yearly...selling Valve-o-Ma
Tri-Ply Surgical St
' Cookware direct to I
Homeowner by perso
demonstration. We require
distributor capable
recruiting and train
salespeople for The Bahamr
Stock investment only.
sales literature and train
r supplied. Reply to: A
C-14367, c/o The Tribune,
0. Box N-3207, Nass
Bahamas.

L HELP WANTED
C14272
STUDENTS 15 to 17 years (
with artistic ability needed
summer job employme
References from art teact
required. Call 5-1347 after
D.m. for interview.

C14325
TWO MILLINERS with fivE
ten year experience
Dressmaking, Designing <
Millinery work.
If interested, call 351
Pedican's Variety Store. Conr
of Milton and Market Stri
between the hours of 9 a.
and 7 p.m. daily.


FOR C15110
INTERNATIONAL BANK GARDENER/GENERAL
MALE OR FEMALE HANDYMAN REQUIRED BY
Must have following CAPTAIN'S CHARTHOUSE-
qualifications: FREEPORT. DUTIES
1. University graduate NECESSITATE ABILITY TO
preferably with degree in MAINTAIN LANDSCAPING
accounting, business AND WILLINGNESS TO
administration economics or ASSIST IN DISHWASHING
finance, or AND GENERAL CLEANING
2. Good high school record BAHAMIANS ONLY NEED
with minimum of four "0" APPLY TO BASS BAHAMAS
levels including English and LIMITED, c/o PUB ON THE
Maths, or MALL LIMITED, Box F-331,
3. Minimum of three years FREEPORT, BAHAMAS.


banking experience preferably
in International Dept.
4. Under 30 years of age.
Applicant will receive
indoctrination in various
banking departments before
being assigned specific duties
and responsibilities in Credit
Department Starting salary
commensurate with
educational background and/or
experience. Attractive fringe
benefits.
Only Bahamian applicants with
above qualifications need
apply. Please send complete
information to G. C. Carroll,
Vice President, World Banking
Corporation Limited, P. 0.
Box N-100. Nassau.

C14417
AUTO PARTS COUNTER-
MAN. Must have had at least
three years experience in auto
parts business. Salary
commensurate with
experience. Must be sober,
honest and reliablee. Attractive
fringe benefits. References
required. Phone Mr. Godwin
Wright at 2-1031-5 for
appointment.

C14416
YOUNG lady wanted tor
wholesale office ,-leasant
appearance. Typing essential.
Write for interview P. 0. Box
5429 ES.
C14339
PHOTOGRAPHIC and
Lithographic Technical
Consultant. Apply in writing to
P. 0. Box N-226, Nassau,
Bahamas.

TRADE SERVICES
C14353
PImder' Customs

Brokerage Ltd.
Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU BAHAMAS
P. 0. Box N3714
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACTT LYMAN PINDER:
OR JACK CASH
Phone: 2-3795, 2-3796
2-3797, 22798
Airport 7-7434
FREE ESTIMATES
C 14400
LANDSCAPING and for all
your gardening needs,
trimming, hedging, pruning and
tree felling. Call 5-7810.
LAWNS AND HEDGES.


',


- -.. .-LI


MASS


I HELP WANTED


I -


*


", ,,


Th














5
i


iC15106
REQUIRED: IMMEDIATELY
FOR CAPTAIN'S
CHARTHOUSE. CHEF TO
TAKE CHARGE OF
KITCHEN SPECIALIZING IN
'GRILLED FOODS THE
SMAN CHOSEN FOR THIS
JOB WILL REQUIRE
SPECIALIZED KNOWLEDGE
ION BUTCHERY PLUS
PROVEN EXPERIENCE AS A
GRILL COOK. A HIGH
SSALARY AND GOOD
CONDITIONS ARE
OFFERED FOR THIS POST.
APPLY TO BASS BAHAMAS
LIMITED, PUB ON THE
MALL, BOX F-331,
IFREEPORT, BAHAMAS.
REQUIRED: FOR THE PUB
ON THE MALL LIMITED,
FREEPORT, BAHAMAS. A
SUPERIOR COOK TO ACT
AS SECOND CHEF/NIGHT
COOK. EXCELLENT WAGES
AND CONDITIONS ARE
OFFERED FOR-THIS POST.
APPLY PUB ON THE MALL
LIMITED, BOX F-331.
FREEPORT, BAHAMAS.
* ----------


C15105
GENERAL
SUPERINTENDENT
Applicant must have thorough
knowledge of Explosives and a
complete background in all
phases of Heavy Construction,
specialising in Manatowac 4600
Dragline Operations. Duties
include Project Management
and overall Construction
Supervision of Civil Works. Ten
years minimum experience in
supervisory capacity required.
Call 373-1046 Mr.
Hanshumaker for an interview
of write to LBI Excavation and
Engineering Ltd., P. 0. Box
F-306, Freeport, Bahamas.

C 14395
Job Title GENERAL
REPAIRMEN
Minimum Education Good'
basic education.
Minimum Experience 5-10
years.
Duties/Responsibilities
Inspects, repairs, replaces,
installs, adjusts, and maintains
all mechanical equipment in a
cement manufacturing plant.
Interested applicants contact
Personnel Department, Bahama
Cement Company, P. 0. Box
SF-100, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.


REAL ESTATE
SC15072
LOTS LOTS- LOTS- LOTS
OWN A PIECE OF FREEPORT
We have lots of lots,
Residential, Commercial,
SWaterfront, all around
Freeport, Lucaya, Close in -
Ready for building, SELECT
FROM $2000 UP, Low down
Payment Easy terms.
SACRIFICED
Because owners have changed
plans, deaths, divorces or
repossessions J S.R. REAL
ESTATE, Freeport's First
Licensee, No. 5 Savoy
Building, Pioneer Way, Box
F-93, Freeport, 352-8811.



S *.


I LN hriNMIth '


> SAVE' TIE SAVE MEY <


MEN'S BOYS' WEAR
ANTENNAS

Island TV 2-2618 The Wardrobe 5-5599

AUTOMOTIVE MEN'S WEAR
Lucas Batteries Fashionette Ltd. 2-2376/7
Bay Street Garage 2-2434
BOOKSTORE MUSIC
The Christian Book Shop Cody's Records 2.8500
5-874 OPTICIANS
BUJSINESS FORMS Optical Service Ltd. 2.3910/1
Executive
Prirters 2-4267/5-4011 PAPER
CABINET MAKERS Commercial Paper
Commonwealth
Furniture 31120 PRINTING
C Wong's Printing A.4bUb
CAMERAS
Executive
John Bull ?-4252/3 Printers 2-4267/5-4011

ENTERTAINMENT RADIO & T.V. SALES
Movies Carter's Records 2-4711
Film & Equip. Service2-2157 R U B R S A P
RUBBER STAMPS
GARDEN & PET Wong's Rubber Stamp
SUPPLIES Co. 5-4506
Modernistic Garden -SPORTS GOODS
& Pet 2-2868
Nassau Garden & Pet Champion Sport Land 2-1862
Montrose Avenue 2-4259 TRAVEL
Playtours 2-2931/7
HA RDWARE R.H. Curry & Co., 2-8681/7
John S. George 2-8421/6 TV REPAIRS

HOUSE PLANS Channel Electronics Ltd.
Evangelos G. Zervos 2-4128, 3-547
LAUNDRY UPHOLSTERING
DRY CLEANING
-1 EddLe's2Upholstering 5-9713
New Oriental Laundry 2-4406
IF -7* -* -..---------.. .


~-FOR---TU-TION ,O~,WANT


1lyou believe nobody ,
|* reads small ads ...
l you're wrong. You are m-mmmmlmmmmmmmml l mm
reading this aren't you? Shop Nassau Merchants
ICaell 2-2768 for
Information on small or For Business And Services
large display ads.


CLASSIFIED


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TO PLACE YOUR ADV.--TELEPHONE 21986 EXT 5


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BUSINESS PROFESSIONAL


DIRECTORY

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I11 I ih II litiR Il 21Ui EXT.


2 LIu hriMlt '1


---- ~I I -,~--.-~- ;__l--C._ _. _7X--R* --~~1(1 I______~ -_I ____~~__C~_ n j_____l __


I


I I I! r I N


GRAND I



CLASS


ANNOUNCEMENTS
C14366
SHAWNEE
Daily Service between West
Palm Beach and West End. For
Reservations call The Grand
Bahama Hotel (Ex. 5).

HELP WANTED -


--j


C14374 I C15109
SOUTHERN PAINTINiG SNAM PROGETTI S.P.A.
SERVICE |I(Bahamas Branch) requires the
SERVICE -services of a DRAFTING
Specialising in spraying house SPECIALIST for its project at
roofs, furniture, stipple the Bahamas Oil Refining
finishings, appliances. Company Site. Applicant mus'
Telephone 5-1919 (days) have at least five (5) year
3-6700 (nights). experience in preparing
drawings and designs for the
laying of underground
C 14358 electrical cables in Refineries
SEWING MACHINE PARTS and Petrochemical plarts. Only
AND REPAIRS Bahamians need apply in
ISLAND FURNITURE .writing to: Personnel
IL MPANY Administrator, SNAM
COMPANY PROGETTI S.P.A. P. 0. Box
P. O. Box N4818, Nassau F-2405, Freeport, Grand
Dowdeswell and Christie Bahama.
Streets
Telephone 21197, 23152. C15120
I N S U R A N C E
ACCOUNTANT Required for
ll-n-n-llm ll Insurance Company's Bahamas
Branch Office. Position
involves responsibility for
|AH A M A preparing and maintaining
Branch Accounts, Supervising
Bookkeepers and Cashiers,
preparation of Budget,
Budgetary Control, Corporate
Planning and Statistical
Analysis as required by Head
Office in London. Appliants
should have at least five years
HELP WANTED Accounting experience with
Insurance background and in
C14397TLE INDUSTRIAL addition to having 'G.C.E.'
JOB TITLE INDUSTRIAL Ordinary Level Subjects in
ELECTRICIANS I Mathematics and English
Minimum Education Good should have made progress
basic education, towards a professional
Minimum Experience 5 years Accounting or Corporate
experience, preferably in Secretarial Qualification.
cement plant or similar Salary will be commensurate
industry. I with qualifications, experience
Duties/Responsibilities -1and previous positions held,
Inspect, repair, install and wire but will not bc less than
all electrical apparatus, devices $10,000 per annum.
and circuits of any voltage ini Applications marked "Private
cement plant or assigned area. land Con fidential"
Interested applicants contact should be in own handwriting
Personnel Department, Bahama and addressed to:- The
Cement Company, P. 0. Box Manager, Sun Alliance &
F-100, Freeport, Grand London Insurance Group, P. O.
Bahama. Box F-26, Freeport, Bahamas.
U -


4
1




m3i


m


--A


I!


J
















S CARROLL RIGHTER'S

jHOIERuCOPEI
from the Carroll Rihter Instwitute REX MORGAN- M.D.
GENERAL TENDENCIES: Trying to get a new
point of view that can make you more
successful is the main beneficial influence in your chart today. WON L /
Be open-minded to changes It is necessary you have a proper MI SALE SAYS TIAT
perspective to gain present influences. Sc ,, I.


ARIES (Mar 21 to Apr. 19) Look to a very sensible
individual who can assist you to get your particular duties
handled more intelligently. Relax at home tonight.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Discuss with associates how
to add to present productivity Show others that your are a
dependable person Take health treatments.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Seek the aid of an influential
person so that you can become more successful in business and
personal affairs. Strive for happiness.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) A new slant on an
old theme can be the way to become more successful now. Go
to a new area where more bounty is possible.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Making new arrangements with
the aid of a trusted friend can be the key to greater success
now. Show that you are a fine citizen.

VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept 22) Be more willing to make
changes now Some new approach to health problems can be
beneficial. New ideas can lead to advancement.
LIBRA (Sept 23 to Oct 22) You know exactly how to
handle a certain situation, so don't permit any prejudices to
deter you from doing so Use your intuition.
SCORPIO (Oct 23 to Nov. 21) Ideal day to listen with care
to what an associate has to say. You have fine opportunities to
get ahead, so make the most of them.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec 21) Delving into work
that awaits you can be helpful in gaining your material needs
for the time being. Be more affectionate.
CAPRICORN (Dec 22 to Jan. 20) Discuss your financial
position with a business expert Make appointments early for
the happiness you desire in your spare time.

AQUARIUS (Jan 21 to Feb 19) Show caution when
dealing with those at home as well as those in the outside
world. Be sure to handle routine affairs wisely.

PISCES (Feb 20 to Mar. 20) Investigating how to become
more successful brings you the right answers now. Handle
communication matters wisely at this time.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY he or she will have
a practical and idealistic nature. Be sure to give the finest
education you can and then there is no limit to what can be
accomplished here. Ideal chart for whatever has to do with the
spiritual professions Taking part in group affairs is very good
for your gregarious progeny.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


JUDGE PARKER

IF HIS CONFESSION WILL hOW ABOUT
FREE KARL, I'M NOT MY TAKING
INTERESTED IN WHY YOU TO
STRAND'S DECIDED 7-.DINNER,
reTALK!^^. SAM?^7


.~. "- " "


3sW Coc PS,


Dal Curtis


Paul Nichols


APARTMENT 3-G B Ale Kotzl ky

TELL LU ANN THAT I'P LIKE A m THEY'RE GETTING A
RAINCHECK ON THE CLP OF LITTLE UNJLy DOWN
THAT CALL WAS COFFEE, PRO A W
NEEDSFME!SOM E RCCALLEP FOR MORE
NEEDS ME! SOMEH POLICE HELP!
WOMEN ARE PICKET-
ING THE OFFICE
AN I THE HOTEL! E
MOVIN' IN


Saunders & Overgard


Chess
By LEONARD GARDEN


"There's an old saying 'CURIOSITY...' "


CROSSWORD
PUZZLE
ACROSS 28. Ship's cabin
1. Territories 30. Etna's
6. Slump outpourings
9. Against 31. Digit
11. Essence 32. Round hand
13. Interpose 34. Killer whale
14. Business 36. American
transactions humorist
16. Fictitious name 37. White lie
17. Victory sign 40. Toss S
19. Chigger 42. Domain
20. Cassia leaves 44. Blood fluids
22. Land measure 45. Jeweled crowns
23. Kind of board 46. Lamprey
26. Sea duck 47. Top of a wave


OL


AP Newsfoatures


UTION F YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE


DOWN
1. Greedy
2. Western city
3. Gaelic


5-3


4. Enzyme
5. Washington's
profession
6. Mayday
7. Human frailty
8. Slingshot
victim
10. British
submachine gun
12. Imperfect
paper
15. Prophets
18. Half ems
20. Theater sign
21. Conventional
23. Bar legally
24. New Zealand
aborigines
25. Office holder
27. Simple sugar
90 Nanitiua nrefiv


33. Russian veto
315. Field
37. Dismiss
38. Cleopatra's
lady-in-waiting
39. Finest
Good King"
44. Equality


White mates in two moves,
against any defence (by Krlsh-
,namurthy and arayanan).
White mates by a key move
'whih iAs elegant but whAch may
leap to the eye of expert
scAvers.
Par times: 1 minute, problem
master; 3 minutes, problem
expert; 7 minutes, good: 12
mutes, average; 25 m lutes,
novice.

Chess Solution
I B-K4 (threat 2 Q--QS). I/
I . R.xB: 2 Q-Q6, or if
P xB; 2 R-- -KtS, or if Kt(B7)
x B; 2 Kt---Q3, or if Kt(KtKS)
xB; 2 P--Q4, or if KxB; 2
R-K3.







Hi l words of
V 0I rofu r letters
Sor more canl
S you uiake
S, f r o i m the
C T letters Iliown
I -- ] here In
making a
S I I Iword. each
I R letter m a y
yfe used once
word must contain the large
letter, and there must lie at
least one eliht-letter word In the
list No plurals; no foreign words;
no proper naies. TODAY'S
TAROET : %3 Word s, good.
27 words, very good ; 33 words.
excellent. Solllt on tomorrow.
VYSTKRIAAY'S SOLUTION
Adit ANTIIIOIDY halt bandit
hant baton boat hotany dainty
dint doat dolt Into iota obtain
tahld tain tidy tily toad tondy
toby today tody


Rupert and the Floating Bell-1


One morning Rupert calls for his chum
Gregory, hoping the little guineapig will loin
him for a game on the Common. You've just
missed him." says Mrs. Guineapig, when she
answers Rupert's knock. He went out a few
minutes ago." "Did he ay where he was
going ? asks Rupert. Wll, he took a book
with Mm," replies Gregory's Mummy. "He


amid he was going to read In the open air.
though I told him It wasn't really warm enough
for that." Thanking Mrs. Guineapig.
sets off to hunt for his pal. He Is s lrtlng the
village when he ses Qrgory with Freddy and
Perdy the two foxes. "I hope they're not
teasing him," murmurs fupert
ALL RIGHTS RENfuVE


Bridge

Nerth
S975
QAKQ
SK32
K J 962
West East
SA1Q10 4 2 A J 8 6 3
710 2 983
J 9 6 3 Q 55

0 J 7 654
0 A 10 8 7 4
A 4
orth South
1NT(16/18) 31

West leads the A and
switches to a trump. How should
South play?
The diamonds can be set up
by ing twice in dummy, but
then IMs would live to make
his 09. A good guess will bring
in four club tricks, but by itself
that will not raise the total to
twelve.
The answer lies In a dummy
reversal- ruff in ln the hand
which s 'los trumpet and
drawing trumps from dummy,
which, as in this case, Is shorter.
At trick three, declare ruffs
a spade, crosses to the VK and
rufs a second spade. Next he
plays the 4A and & K, noting
the drop of the 10. He con-
tinues with the 4J, and if Est
doesn't cover, he has to guess.
If he guesses well, he runs the
4J, ruffs the next club, and
crossing to the OK, draws the
last trump. His twelve tricks
will be : dummy's 9 A KQ;
three ruffs in his hand- two
spades and a club; two diamonds
and four clubs.






I L
~-r r--- -




f,_+- --





Ni. .41. I.v TIl MKAI



II. Failed to take a iphie rit
the qiietie. (3. 2. 4)
12. Soar. (3)
13. Popular savoy noDera. (3. i)
Il. IrMlh 'lan. (41
17. Feline. (3)
18. Make triiniuplant noises. (4)
20. Join (1) i Trained (4)
22. Afthiist. (4|
23. Klverllde olantl 4l
24 English alream. (4)
Down
I STraps rot fanai.). (11. .)
2. Having a proilemi I mire.
(2. 3. 4)
3. Hard. (ill 4. .oaked. (.M)
a. Worship. (li fl. Change. 44i
7. Oil well in mood trimn. (iii
I %partnment. (4i
10.I nquirv
t entqs.



Ce lIS.
I5&
1.1. e asw.
44)
Ie


SThe Tribune ... Wednesday, May 1, 1974

8. ,:


"EirHR rrU FOR RUFF...OR SOMEODY
IS AWFUL MADp *


SSTEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD


' i1 r4 s W T I
i e
go ii _i
r-3 4- 9


- "- I -! -
/ 0 I 1_


Py


~1-1--t


4E94EEE


Par time 30 min.


I


r


. .g tIVO kFVllX


P 0"+LI


----


&W.,


F4 ze


Ia I ,


I 9-













16 The Tribune - W enaday, May 1, 1974


By Gladstone Thurston

THE BAHAMAS Amateur
Basketball Association, aware that the
rapid expansion of basketball was for
many reasons confined to New
Providence only is launching a new
project called Family Island National
Development (FIND).
This programme which is based on
the same principles as similar projects
that have proved successful and
beneficial to those involved in other
countries was unveiled last week by
B.A.B.A. first vice president Whitney
Rolle.
The project he described will be a
joint effort by the executive of
B.A.B.A., Government and member


RAMSEY


SIK ALI
'Replaced'


England soccer manager
Sir Alf Ramsey, architect
of his country's World Cup
win in 1966, was fired
today.
An announcement by the
ruling English Football
Association said its executive
committee unanimously
recommended Ramsey should
be "replaced."
It said Joe Mercer, respected
general manager of First
Division club Coventry, had
agreed to take over in a
caretaker capacity.
The decision, which ended
a I l-yeam"&'g by the
autrocratic Ramsey, was the
end of the era.
Ramsey's style of defensive
play which won England the
World Cup was copied in many
countries.
Ramsey, 54, had been under
widespread criticism since
October when England failed
to qualify for the World Cup
finals in West Germany.
Ramsey, knighted by the
Queen after leading England to
that 1966 triumph, was due to
have his four-year contract
renewed next month.
He was the first England
squad manager to be given
overall control of the national
team.


A SPECIAL Bahamian sloop
race for the Championship of
the Bahamas is planned for
next year, Prime Minister
Lynden Pindling disclosed at
the trophy presentations at the
Family Islands Regatta in
George Town, Exuma over the
weekend.
Mr. Pindling said that the
main idea was to form


clubs of B.A.B.A.
"The overall picture in the Family
Islands at present is confusing in that
the basic fundamentals in all aspects of
basketball needs to be explored by
both B.A.B.A. and the Ministry of
Education and Culture," he added.
"Improving facilities, coaches and
officiating as well as creating interest
in Basketball are but few of the areas
that need attention."
In 1966 when the B.A.B.A. was
revived it was one of their major
objectives at that time to develop
a broad base of basketball talent from
which groups to represent the country
might be chosen.


AXED


E End of an


era as


Mercer is


told to


take charge


Of the 113 international
games the team has played
under his command, it has lost
only 17 and drawn 27.
Meanwhile, the Brazilian
Sports Confederation has rmad.
up the list of World Cup
players to the Federation of
International Football
Association (FIFA), leaving
out the names of "King" Pele
and midfielder Gerson
The final 22-player list will
be delivered eight days before
the World Cup finals start on
June 13 in Munich.
The 40 players included on
the list sent to the FIFA, the
governing bqdy 9f the world
soccer, were:
Goalkeepers: Leao, Wendell,
Renato, Zecao and Valdir
Peres.
Defenders: Ze Maria,
Nelinho, Toninho, Moises,
Miguel, Luis Pereira, Piazza,
Alfredo, Marco Antoino,
Marinho, Mario Ulibarri,
Eurico and Gilberto.
Midfielders: Clodoaldo,
Carbone, Paulo Cesar
Carpegiani, Paulo Cezar Lima;
Rivellino, Ze Carlos, Ademir
Da Guia and Direceu Lopes.
Forwards: Zequi nha,
Jairzinho, Waldomiro,
Mirandinha, Dirceu, Edu,
Leivinha, Cesar, Eneas,
Vaguinho, Palhinha, Ramon,


Manfrini and Romeu.
Brazilian soccer selection
will try to regain the
confidence of the local fans
when it faces Austria in an
exhibition match at Morumbi
Stadium Sao Paulo today.
The seventh of a series of 12
the Brazilians will play in
preparations for' the World
Cup, the game is regarded as
the most important so far,
because of Austrai's traditional
offensive power.
The Brazilian press has been
very critical of their world
champion team, accusing
officials of playing against only
weak foreign teams which
insist upon playing on defence,
without really testing ,Brazil's
own defensive line.
In their previous preparation
matches, the Brazilians won
four and tied two. But in
general their performances
were considered very
disappointing.
Sunday, the Brazilians
played to an upset scoreless
draw against Greece at Rio's
Maracana, leading critics to
demand urgent measures to be
taken by the members of the
technical committee, especially
by coach Mario Zagallo, who
has been harshly criticized for
changing players from game to
game. (AP)


syndicates from all the leading
Family Islands, headed by a
leader of the community. He
said he promised to get a
syndicate together for Andros.
The syndicates will be
responsible for raising
sufficient money to build a
boat representing their islands.
"These boats will be designed
and built at the respective
islands if possible," said Mr.
Pindling, "but permission will
be granted to do otherwise if
necessary."
These Bahamian sloops will
race against champions of the
other islands who will be


Attempts have been made to
promote post-school basketball.
Evidence of this was last year's
independence tournament in which
both Grand Bahama and Bimini
participated.

However, situations like chaos in
the administration of Family Islands
association and strong winds during
basketball season have curtailed
further development of basketball.
The goals of FIND are to foster
mutual understanding, education and
progress through sharing expertise,
combining talents, mobilizing new
energies, skills and resources to meet


THE YOUNGEST receiver
ever to olay with the New
York Jets football team is
probably young Ted Smith,
14-month old son of Ted, Sr.
and Mary Alice Smith of the
Nassau/Paradise Island
Promotion Board. It all took
place on the beach at the
Halcyon Balmoral Hotel
recently when five of the


RECORDS

MAY GO

AT SWIM

MEET
THE THIRD annual
Bahamas National swimming
championships will be held at
St. Andrew's pool beginning
May 10 at 4:00 p.m. and
continuing through May 12.
Saturday's events begin at
9:30 a.m. and Sunday's at
2:00 p.m.
"There should be some
great swimming with many
records broken," an Aquatics
Association release said.
Deadline for entry is this
Saturday.
Included in the changes for
this year's competition will
be the introduction of a six
years and under age group.
Their races will be over 25
metres.
The eight and under age
groups will all be 50 metre
events and the nine and 10
groups will have a 200
individual medley instead of
the usual 100 metres.
All competitors will receive
a certificate of participation.
The first three winners will
receive medals and the fourth
through sixth place finalists
will receive ribbons. Heat
winners will also receive
ribbons.
To complete the awards,
the high point winners in
each age group both boys
and girls will be presented
with a trophy.
The Nationals is open to all
Bahamian swimmers whether
they belong to a club or not.
Residents with a six month
period are eligible to
participate.
Entry forms are available
at all schools, swim clubs or
may be picked up from John
Cash at the Tribune.


determined by "run-off races"
beforehand. And one boat only
will represent each island or
group of islands.
"This special race will be
called 'The Bahamian Cup' race
and will be held prior to the
Family Island Regatta next
year," said the Prime Minister.
After this race all the boats will
then compete again in the
regular regatta.

Captain Durward Knowles,
Commodore of the Family
Islands Regatta Committee,
will be co-ordinating the plans
for the Bahamian Cup race. He
said he hoped the race would
be able to achieve certain goals
revive the boat building
industry create jobs for ship
builders and sailmakers, bring
out new ideas in design, and
give new skippers and crew an
opportunity to race but above
all. he said, he hoped that the
boats would be the result of a
community effort.
It was hoped that groups
from Spanish Wells, Eleuthera,
Abaco, Freeport and the other
islands that do hot at present
participate in the Regatta,
would get together and build a
boat to represent their islands
for this championship of the
Bahamas race, he said.


fundamental basketball and human
needs, Mr. Role explained.
Each club will be assigned an itand
or area to be develop, in accordance
with the goals of the project. Actual
projects and activities will be
determined by the needs -and
requirements of the area or island.
The executives of B.A.B.A. will
serve each member-club involved in
the programme. They will promote
FIND, make arrangements for and
financially support travel, help
conduct workshops and meetings and
assist in the organization and
strengthening of member-club
committees.


Receiving

Jets' many superstars agreed
to pose for pictures to be
used by the Promotion Board
in its various overseas
publicity activities. The
footballers and their wives
spent four days in Nassau and
Paradise Island recently.
Pictured on the line above in


CLINICS under the
sponsorship of-B.A.B.A. began
last night at the A.F. Adderley..
gym and are expected to run
until May 3.
Conducting the clinics are
Dr. Bill Alheim, Mr. Glenn
Wilkes and Mr. Robert E.
(Bob) Davies.
Dr. Alheim is an author of
two books and several articles
on basketball. He has won the
Conference Championship 6
times while establishing a
207-73 won-lost record with
Miami Dade Community


young
hiking position are, from left:
John Schmidt, passing the
"ball" to Ted; and Randy
Rasmussin, ready to catch
both Ted and the ball should
either fumble. Looking on; in
the meantime, are, from left:
John Elliot, Pete Perreault
and Ralph Baker.


$7,500 at stake


in Pro-Am


golf tourney


FREEPORT The 2nd
Annual International Pro-Am
Invitational Golf Tournament,
will be played at the Bahama
Reef Golf and Country Club
tomorrow through Sunday.
The $7,500 tournament,
co-sponsored by the Bahamas
Ministry of Tourism, Bahamas
Professional Golfers Asso-
ciation and Bahama Reef
Golf and Country Club,
provides an opportunity for
Bahamian, American and
Canadian professional and
amateur golfers to get
acquainted, discuss mutual
problems and thus improve golf
in the Bahamas.
"The support from local
golfers, community leaders and
patrons of the sport has been
most gratifying this year. We
have 23 Gold Sponsors
compared to only 15 in 1973's
tournament. Their assistance is
invaluable in assuring the
success of the event,"
committee chairman, Ben Platt
stated.
Early professional entries
include, Jim King, winner of
the 1973 International
Pro-Am, back to defend his
title. Several professionals from
the Florida area have entered
and entrants from upper New
York State, Ontario and
Quebec are expected in the
next few days.
From the local links scene
will be professionals Howard
Archer, Bahama Reef C. C.;
Bobby Rose and Jason Haugh,
Lucayan and Shannon C. C.;
Percy Major, Barry Sands, John
Meikle and Ken Johnson,
King's Inn and Golf Club; Max
Atherden, Grand Bahama
Hotel and Country Club and
Roy Bowe, Paradise Island
Hotel and Golf Club.
Forty earlybird amateurs are
entered and another 85 are
anticipated before the closing
entry date.
Opening day of the event,
May 2nd, is a practice round,
followed by three days (54
holes) of tournament play.
The prize money of $7,500,
giving winning professionals
$5,000 and winning amateurs
$2,500 in gifts, will be awarded
Sunday evening following the
last day to play at the Awards
Dinner at Lucayan Beach
Hotel's Regency Room. On


hand to make the awards will
be the Bahamas Minister of
Tourism, The Honorable
Clement T. Maynard.
Platt reports the tournament
will receive television coverage
from Channel 4 and radio
coverage from Orlando
stations.
The $60 entry fee includes
four day's greens fees and cart
rental, cocktail parties, the
awards banquet, a personalized
overnight kit, containing
valuable gift items and a
souvenir tournament book.
VOLLEYBALL


THE following were elected
at the annual meeting of the
Bahamas Volleyball
Federation:
President elected Dr.
Norman R. Gay; 1st vice
president elected Mr.
Oswald Moore Abbey
International executive, 2nd
vice president Mr. Caswell
Thompson M. 0. E. teacher
at C. H. Reeves; 3rd vice
president Mr. Thomas Grant
- M. 0. E. P. E. teacher at C.
C. Sweeting.
Treasurer elected Mr.
Paul Clarke Accountant.
Secretary elected Miss
Beryl Jasper Executive
Secretary at Royal Bank. Asst.
Secretary elected Miss
Margaret Cilbuz Sports
woman of the year, employee
of Chase Manhattan.
The annual presentation of
awards will be held May 6
(8:00 p.m.) at the Rebel Room
Anchorage Hotel.


College whom he coaches.
Mr. Wilkes conducts a
basketball camp for players of
all ages. He has conducted
clinics in Portugal and
Columbia and. has written three
books and numerous articles
on the game of basketball.
Mr. Bob Davies is former
star of the Rochester Royals of
the National Basketball
Association. During his
ten-year career with the
Royals, Davies, generally
recognized as one of
professional basketball's great
"little-men" (he was 6'l "), was
named Al-Star Pro seven times
and captained Rochester for
four campaigns. Bob was
inducted into the Pennsylvania
All Sports Hall of Fame in
1968. He is now the Advisory
and Sales Representative for
Converse.
The clinics basically held for
the benefits of coaches are
based on how to teach
individuals or teams the basic
fundamentals of basketball.
Dr. Alheim elaborated on
how to teach youngster the
lay-ups, jump shot and free
throw. A film was shown on
how a-jump shot, free throw
and lay-ups should be shot.
Mr. Davies and Mr. Wilkes
talkedd about passing and
dribbling the basketball.
The clinic will continue
tonight and Friday with
basketball fans being able to see
Becks Cougars and Strachan
Africans in an exhibition game
against Miami Dade
Community College on Friday
and Saturday beginning 9:00
p.m.

Aaron

belts

no 720


NEW YORK Henry Aaron
celebrated his return to St.
Louis, site of the first home
run of his illustrious career,
by belting No. 720 in a losing
cause last night as the Cards
defeated the Atlanta Braves
7-2.
Aaron receive a standing
ovation during special
ceremonies preceding the
game, at which he received a
plaque from St. Louis Hall of
Famer Stan Musial.
Aaron hit his first home run
on April 23, 1954 in St. Louis
off Vic Raschi. Tuesday he
ripped No. 720 off Lynn
McGlothen in the seventh


inning.
But the Cards collected 13
hits while Atlanta could
manage just six off McGlothen.
Lou Brock had a two-run
homer in the eighth for St.
Louis.
Elsewhere in the National
League, run-scoring singles by
John Edwards and Mick
Celleher in the eight inning
carried the Houston Astros
past the Chicago Cubs 4-2,
Derrel Thomas' runscoring
double lifted the San Diego
Padres past the Montreal Expos
2-1, Mike Schmidt doubled
home one run and scored the
eventual game-winning tally in
the ninth as the Philadelphia
Phillies edged the San
Francisco Giants 6-5, and the
New York Mets ended the Los
Angeles Dodgers' seven-game
winning streak with an 8-7
victory on John Milner's
two-run ninth inning double.
In American League action,
Nolan Vyan allowed six hits
and seven walks but struck out
15 in pitching the California
Angels to a 16-6 win over the
Boston Red Sox. (AP)
INDIANS STRUGGLE
TAUNTON The Indian
cricket tourists batted first in
their game against Somerset
today and struggled most of
the day on a green pitch to
score 175 all out.
The Indians lost the toss and
were put in by veteran
Somerset captain Brian Close.


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