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 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: April 30, 1974
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03605

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NOW IN STOCK: 5AM

From "EXUMA" RPMa N
(RFeistered with Postmaster of Bahamas for postage concessions within the Bahamas ) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


'FL

-Shnaci
Th aaa ainlS~ are


VOL. LXXI, No. 132 Tuesday, April 30, 1974 Price: 20 Cents


Cruise ship competition 'may close down nightclubs'


By Mike Lothian
A NUMBER of major nightclubs on the
island might have to close their doors if
Government does not demonstrate its support
for local enterprise by bringing "unfair
competition" from entertainment centres
aboard cruise ships to an end.
This warning was sounded today by "King
5 Eric" Gibson of the King and Knights Club,
West Bay Street, president of the Nightclub
Operators Association.

After months of fruitless talks with Ministry
of Tourism officials, Mr. Gibson said, the
Association today delivered a letter to Prime
Minister Lynden Pindling asking him to either


deal with the problem himself or to direct the
Association to a responsible authority that
will.
Mr. Gibson revealed that operators of
several major nightclubs including one of the
island's most famous tourist oriented
establishments recently on their own
initiative wrote various Government
authorities serving notice that unless the
situation improves shortly they will have to
close.
SHOWDOWN SOON?
Mr. Gibson said the basic question to which
thq Association needs an answer is:


t"Does
t


Government consider nightclubs


necessary?"
And if Government does nothing to
demonstrate a conviction that they are
necessary, he warned, a "showdown was likely,
in which one of the contemplated actions was
concerted closure of member-clubs.
"If they need nightclubs they will have to
do something to help them survive," Mr.
Gibson declared.
He said five years ago the clubs were able to
operate despite the competition from liners
moored at Prince George Wharf, but today,
with ever-increasing labour costs, utility bills
and taxes particularly Real Property Tax
which the operators pay either directly or in
the form of increased rents "there's no way


ml-


'WE'LL KILL

YOU' THREAT

AS FOUR

WALK HOME

AFTER SHOW


n I y I 1 .11


,nt anywhere -
ir fear.
bec ',"e I


SCOTT WILCO)X


robbed


at gunpoint


By DALE SI\l'NI):RS

Sli1R'lF MI-MI BiRS of
group, pcrfitrnin',.' at the

their public relations
officer, were attacked at
gunpoint and robbed of
about S200 reportedly b\
two black Blahaliani
you th s.
The lhrce members of the
group are Robert Speegle. 37,
.uid his wife Betty, and Scott
Wilcox, 29. Mr. Wilcox' wife,
Vickey, is their public relations
officer. Thie Speegles are front
California and the Wilcox s
I om Minnlesota.
Mr. Speegle called I he
I ibune yesterday to give his
account of the incident
lie said they were walking
home after their show at the
Nassau Beach early Monday
morning. They live at Pugh
.1 ones' White Arches Guest
lHouse which is off the main
Iadl ,ihout 400 yards past the
C'Aibl' Beach Police Station.
lhey were attacked about
300 vards through the corner
after they turned oft (to the
left) about 1.30 a.m. lie said
the assailants "shoved the gun
into Scott's back and also held
it to his wife's head and
threatened that if we didn't
give them our money, they
w would kill us."
lie said Scott's wife, Vickey,
was the most upset. She
became very afraid after they
held the gun to Scott's back.
Mr. Speegle said he thought
it was a typical hold-up, and
the reason they were reporting
the incident was that they are
from the United States where
they have "seen crime get
started, then mnushroonmed
I(grow out of hand)."
'We feel that it must be
stopped by the citizenry," he
said. "If they say no. this is not
what we want, we will not
allow it. if they take strong
action, then the citizens can
stop it. They must report the
crime, and not hide it.
"The difficulty on this
island," he said, "is that it
relies on' tourism. The night
before last, (Saturday night),
we heard that two travel agents
were attacked between the
Sonesta Beach and the Nassau
Beach Hotels in front of the
Buchbinder house.. If they go
home and report that, then no
one will want to come to
AT
Wl? fIAM FMIN
SEE
BEAUTY FOR YOU
FROM 16
DOLLY FACTORIES

|ad YOU SAVE!I


iff ^i~cA


Nssau," Mr. Speegle stated.
Mr Speegle said they had
only '"just given a benefit
performance earlier that night
4' ste ', ..' Theatre.
Paradise Island, for St.
Augustine's School Band.
lie said they performed
Sunday night from 9 p.m. to
about )30 p.m. after which
they returned to the Nassau
Beach to do their usual show
which begins at 10 p.m. It was
after this show that they were
.tacked
I e also told Ihe Tribune
that they liked the young
people here, and thev see a lot
of potential talent. and also
that they work, on their own
initiative, with some of the
young people at the hotel.
The Main Street Singers have
been performing at The Talk of
The lown at the Nassau Beach
for the past two months and are
scheduled to appear for
another month.
last month four Canadians
were attacked by three youths
while walking front the Nassau
Beach ilotel to the S 'onesta
Beach for apparently\ noi
reason.
One of the Canadians, Carl
Johnston, told the The Iribune
that one of his arms was
slashed to the bone and that lihe
was hit on his shoulder.
Mrs. Johnston told 'The
Tribune that "I feel it is had
when tourists come down here
for a vacation, and are told
that the island is very friendly.
and that there is nothing to
worry about, that they can go
wherever they want and that
when something like this does
happen, they find out that it
has happened many times
before."


Ile added tIhat "then they
also find out that nothing is
really being done to prevent it
from happening to someone
else.
"I will discourage anyone I
know from coming to Nassau
because it just isn't safe," Mr.
Johnston declared.
lThere have been constant
attacks in the Cable Beach
area, especially the Sonesta
Beach-Nassau Beach strip, and
many complaints have been
made to the police. Last
November. an American
visitor, who had been coming
to the Bahamas for 20 years
bought an advertisement in
The Tribune to warn visitors of
the dangers of walking between
the Sonesta Beach and Nassau
Beach Hotels. Mr.
Morris Stirman. who bought
the advertisemnient, and his wife
were attacked in this area by
two men who had been hiding
behind the fence of the


Vesco


US ATTORNEY Paul J.
C urran (pictured) said
Monday that fugitive
financier Robert Vesco "is
not off the hook" and still
faces charges on which John
Mitchell and Maurice Stans
were acquitted Sunday.
"He is a fugitive from
justice and certainly will be
prosecuted if he should set
foot in the United States, or
move to a country from
which he can be extradited,"
Curran said.
Vesco fled the United
States when Mitchell and
Stans were indicted and the


Buchbinder property,
As a result of this incident, a
former bell captain, Oswald
Bernard. wrote The Tribune
stating that he had made an
appointment with Tourism
Minister Clement Maynard
sonime months before and
"literally begged the Minister
of Tourism to cut down the
bushes and light the path
between the Sonesta and
Nassau Beach Hotels."
Mr. Bernard said that lie
"warned that if something is
not done quickly, a loss of life
may occur. Plain as day, I said
murder would be committed in
this area."
Mr Bernard wrote that he
felt after the meeting that "he
(Mr Maynard) did not listen to
or understand a word I said.
Now we have the Stirman
incident."
Mr. Bernard wondered how
much it would have cost to do
as lie begged the Minister.


we can do it."
He added: "We are paying the way and thev
(the cruise ships) are making the money."
Because the ships are duty-free, he went on,
on-board nightclubs can sell beverages much
more cheaply than the on-shore operators can.
NEAR CRITICAL
Yet they contributed nothing to the local
economy except minimal employment ot
junkanoo groups and other native-style
entertainers, he charged.
The local nightclubs, he pointed out,
employed waiters and entertainers and gave
taxes work, and all those involved supported
families, so that a large number of Bahamians
depended on the clubs.


Fuel


crisis


hits

mail


THE
affecting
traffic to


FUEL CRISIS is
mail as well as tourist
the Bahamas.


In the past few days both
daily papers have become
aware of a noticeable drop in
the quantity of incoming mail.

When The Tribune checked
further with several banks, it
found a similar situation at
these establishments, where
normally mail is quite heavy


Calls to the airline
Nassau post office
that everything was
normally.


and the
revealed
mIloving


Postmaster General Charles
Harris pointed out however.
that mail world-wide is moving
more slowly as the result of
reduced flight schedules.

With New 'ork schedules
cut for the summer and Pani
American no longer flying
here, there has been a
commensurate drop in
incoming mail during the day

According to Mr. Harris mail
is received only twice a day
where once it used to be three
or four times.


LIGHTING

.A FOUR-YEAR research
programme into the
relationship between street
lighting and accidents is to be
undertaken under a $462.000
contract awarded by the
British Govern me not's
Transport and Road Research
Laboratory.


Asked how long it would
be before the situation
became critical enough to
justify closures. Mr. Gibson
said simply, "two years ago
the clubs have just been
trying to survive."
He said when the problem
was first raised some time ago
nightclub operators were
made to understand that the
tourism Ministry vas the
responsible authority to look
to for help.
But after months of talks
with Mr. Basil Albury of the
Ministry, he said, "they don't
seem to have any answers at
all. If something is going to
be done all we need to know
is when, but they don't make
any commitments at all. Mr.
Albury is saying give him
more time, but he's asking us
for something we don't
ha-e."
It is because ot the
Tourism Ministry's failure to
act that the operators are
appealing directly to the
Prime Minister. Mr. Gibson
said.

INSPECTION
On Friday, May 3 at 1 1.30
a.m. the Comnmissioner tof
Police. S. II. Thompson, sill
inspect the New Providence
Fire Brigade on the Police
parade gournd at Fast Street
and present trophies to tlhe
Driver and Fiieman oif the
Year.
Following the pr tintations.
the commissioner r will
commission a nIw AlTge
pumper fire engine wi ch is 'he
latest addition to tih.' fire
brigade's fleet \ shotii
demonstration ot the (I.itc
power output li 'i l 11"
appliance will also bh ii
ALUMINIUM
AN ORDER wtrth neairl\
S5 million to s'tiplp ian1
aluminium strip icld rolling
mill to Belgiuni ll is tce- W 5oil
by the Loewy Rbciis,)ii
Engineering t 'm panl ot
Poole. southern I`ngl.iind


'is not off the hook'


US has tried unsuccessfully to
extradite him from Costa
Rico and the Bahamas.
Vesco has described the
o outcome of the
Mitchell-Stans criminal
conspiracy trial as "the first
fair verdict I've heard in a
long time."
He has no desire however
to come back to the United
States
Mr. Vesco. whose secret
$200,000 contribution to
President Nixon's re-election
campaign sparked the trial, is
presently in Costa Rica.
He said he was surprised at


the verdict because he
thought the publicity would
override the legal process.
"My own view...the pretrial
publicity had been so serious
that it may override the
proper judicial process ... that
they may be properly found
guilty due to non-legal facts."
Concerning his own
situation Mr. Vesco said he
felt the publicity had been so
bad, so distorted, it would be
very difficult to get a fair
trial.
He added: "It isn't only
with the jury system you
have to protect yourself with


it's the pressure and
harassment and the
persecutions that go on."
Mr. Vesco was being
interviewed by CBS.


S Y I VIA Cole-Tierney.
Pictured) popular Radii
Bahamnas broadcaster, trawels
to the U S. to take part in a
45-day project on women in
the broadcast industry. The
project is jointly sponsored
by the ti.S. Depaltinent of
State and the tducatinmal
Foundation of tilhe American
Women in Radio adi d
I Television I ANWVR'I )
The project is designed to
I offer woIen broadcasters an
opportunity to study and
obsere American radidi aind
t t'le .Islom ) o peilttilwis M ld
tecthniltucs, and to tonsult
with lAmlerican wotnmein otf
similo.ir pre!ssiotn.ll interests
as ell s wi d colleagIues
from ot her countries.
Linphasis i- placed on tlhe-
r k t \\o;en in hriad
acting
"'I he s.to-ndil equally
impla;t lt inective o(f the
nro 'granli'pe : I, o! gis' tie
rjlinte's o n.i .. '- ;!, i n.,'i e
view ott AniiinIlan life and
culture.", spokesinan said.
I I." p" nit.'im w:Jl e will
inmhude isiit t,, educariional,
commercial .iad .u'ternrillc'ital
radio iiand tele.sion centres ini
Narious parts o, the lUnitcd
States as well is meetings
.' lth oitstt ndini figures "t,
the i'edia.
I'articipantis will travel as a
group inl Washington, I) '
New York and Los Angeles,
but will travel indiidually to
3 number of oilther cities
where each will have a
program ne an r;. ied it n
acctordan.ce with her
paltictilar needs and int e'si.
The proglradilne IMil
incJlude pa.rticipatiol in llte
A\ lR' annual :t.ion, al
I -. invention which will Ib. hlild
in Nc\i York.
Sylvia Cole-T iW'n' will
g v\'e i n t etr vic \ s a n!d
part icipate in 1 dis t issilons ill
each o the U S cities she
visits during heir .ii y Slie is
one it only five participants
selected troin Lat.ulatles
around tlihe worl


Move for

SAN JOSL. COSTA RICA
A leading opposition
legislator says lie will publicly
demand in Congress the
Immediate explosion of
fugitive American Financier
Robert L. Vesco from Costa
Rica.
National Independent
Party deputy Rafael
Valladares. who conducted a
personal investigation in
Europe on the financial
dealings of Vesco, said he will
present proof of Vesco's
mutual lunds manipulations
during a forthcoming session
of the National Assembly.
"...what I'm interested in is


I was struck with baseball bat, man tells court


Bv SIDNEY DORSETT
DENZIL "'CRUMMY"
MUNNINGS, a Hospital Lane
restaurateur was accused of
heading a nunimbers racket
operation which lie controlled
from his Li'l Mule Restaurant
when he appeared in court
Monday morning as a police
witness against two youths he
said tried to rob hinm.
Llewlyn Hanchell, 20, and
Derek Bowe, 17, East Street
denied a police charge of
assaulting Munnings on
October 10, last year, with
intent to rob him.
The two claimed thay were
trying to find out the number
of "balls" that Munnings had
in a bag which he was carrying
to his car at the time.
They wanted to dete line
whether he operated his :ket
with one hundred balls o, not
because they could never get a
win off him whenever they


bought his numbers
Munnings, heavy-set, of
medium height and dark
comniplexion, said in the witness
box that he was injured on his
thigh when Ilanchell struck
him with a baseball bat on
October 10, last year
HIT BY BATI
He was standing at the back
of his car after closing the Ll'l
Mule Restaurant on Hospital
Lane, he said.
Munnings said he was
holding a bag containing
money and papers when Bowe,
whom he knew as "T-Bone"
ordered him to "drop the bag."
lie threw the bag into the
trunk of his car and slammed it
shut. But when he turned
around, he said Hanchell struck
him on the thigh with a
baseball bat.
The assault ended when a
truck approached them,
Munnings testified. He said he


ran to the side of the street
where the truck was and the
two youths ran through a
side-street.
SHOTS FIRFII':
lHe told the court that Bowe
also fired two shots at himt
from what seemed to have
been a small gun.
Ilanchell told the court that
he and Munnings had argued
before he struck him with the
bat. He said that he never
intended robbing Munnings.
His only intention was to have
a look into the bag in order to
determine whether Munnings
had the right number of balls
for the operation.
"Man, if I was going to rob
you I would have hit you
across your head," Hanchell
said. And Bowe also
commented that "If I had a
gun I could never miss you ...
as big as you is."
Bowe, also arrested by


police last October, said that
police never charged hinm until
this year. During the testimony
of Det. Cpl Ronald Lindsay,
he accused the officer of
releasing him without
preferring a charge. And he
also asked: "Why did you let
ime go?"
NO EVIDENCE
"-Because I did not have
sufficient evidence then," the
officer said. "Do you think
you have sufficient now?"
Bowe queried. "I don't know, I
leave that to the court" the
policeman answered.
Hanchell also accused
'Lindsay of not producing the
real statement which he had
signed, but the purported
statement was ruled admissible
after a comparison was made
by the Chief Magistrate
between the accused's
signature and that on the
document.


Ilanchell's statement said
the incident occurred
sometime in October "after
dark" when he was in Hospital
Lane with Bowe near the Li'l
Mule Restaurant.
NUMBERS CHlAR(;1:
"We were standing around
until Crummy finished
throwing the ball," Hianchell's
statement read. When
Munnings came outside, Bowe
suggested they take the bag to
see if there were really one
hundred balls inside "because
whenever we buy any numbers,
they never fall."
They failed in their attempt
at getting the bag, Hanchell's
statement said.
In the witness box, he told
the court that he and Munnings
had been arguing prior to his
striking Munnings with the
baseball bat.
He had been in Munnings'


restaurant earlier that day t
purchase numbers and tic asked
to see the bag which contain
the balls but was refused.
Munnings' men made hir
leave but around 8.30 p.m
that evening when he sa'
Munnings b\ his car he again
made the request following
up with a blow to his thig
with the bat to let him kno'
he '..as serious He said h
heard a gun fire and ran of
leaving Munnings alone.
Both men were however
sentenced to two years by th
Chief Magistrate who found
them guilty of the offence.
But the magistrate als
hoped that police would tak
action on the information the
heard in court. The tw
youths, however, doubted th
would occur because they hav
heard Munnings say that h
had the protection of th
police in his operation.


Importance


of loans

is stressed

11 IMPORTANCE of
concessionary loans to finance
develop:ne: in the less
developed countries of this
region swas a .long the matters
empha,.icd :it the recently
otiiple Idl meeting of Foreign
Ministers in Washington. D)..
1 xterinal affairss Minister
Pauil! A.\ddrieN represented the
Bahar,:as at the talks.

(I f -,p cial significance to
tlii' ltuitre social and economic
d.'velopnient of tlhe Bahamas,"
11 \ddcerley said, "is the
imiporita.uiciL attached to and
rectogitiion givcii to the place
ot sciefI'e aiid technology and
sou al developjierit in lesser
desel
'The ad'ancices made and
iew techniques developed by
thle application of science and
technology is capable of
cdealing revolutionary and new
horizons ot economic
exploitation."
I lie l oreten Ministers
cpli ptasr/ed tihe importance of
humispheri.c to-operation in
the field ot cConollic
P. 'p t aini t*he
t a ish 1 1 en t of an
international system ot
otitective economic security

Recoigni/ltig the importance
oi ,techilohgy ill social and
tei.():I W',: iv i,)pinient. the
I or.'gu 't Mt ste's -igree'd to
ionscine a Working (;roup o0
govern mental representatives
io studio thli possibility of
creating a Comnli'ee OPr
Sceiti' and ithe transfer o!
li.'nology. that would have
,. its oh|IectivCi matching
scienl it i c.ipabill with
p ( t c .al .eeds. and
overcomnig '.;ot' tacle. to tilc
low,' and use of technology in
thile industrialiation process
I lie Foreign Ministers will
meet again in Buenos Aires.
\rgentina in March. I1)75


SERVICE


A Mt M ORI \l scrmlce to
24 \ :r- old Jcttvs\ Brian
h Im;)pson \i lll be held 7.3()
p.in IF idj att Sa .d.J Hicart
( tinih.
,1t I hio pnisoIn. tIlI (i t
captain n and Mrs". I conard
Shtiiipsoni, disappear' d 1 liday
while ,p'.. tii h yl i ,i f I reccport.
I e l iun ls has iqit< ited
that inistAii l cit lwi rs
donalions 1H iinr" 1. H \SRA.


expulsion

toi Vesco t, be expelled.
Co(',i ta Rita sliould no longer
be a reluge foi delinquents,"
Valladares said in an
interview with the Associated
Pres, Monday.
Vesco canme to live in Costa
Rica after lie fled the United
Slates when lie was indicted
in an investigation into fraud
charges that lie bilked 224
million dollars from mutual
funds.
Valladares said lie will
present results of his
investigation to Assembly
President Luis A. Monge.
Upon return from a recent
trip to Europe, Valladares
reported Vesco's capital in
various European nations has
been frozen. lie also said that
authorities in those countries
also are seeking him besides
o officially known requests for
d Vesco's presence in the
d United States and
Switzerland.
n Vesco's ill-fated mutual
n funds firm Investors Overseas
w Services was based in
n Switzerland.


it
.h
w

f,

er
le
d

so

*y
to
is
ve
ie
ie


U.S. government attempts
to extradite Vesco to the
United States have failed so
far. And the Costa Rican
Congress earlier this month
passed a new extradition law
which favours him.


I


*yil


op


















Wilson launches


probe into



corruption


Black mail

may be

art raid

motive
D UBLIN Political
blackmail was regarded b\
police as the must likely
motive for the theft of mIore
than S20 million worth ot
paintings from the stately
home of diamond millionaire
Sir Alfred Beit
The I'I paintings stolen ioTio
the Beit mansion outside the
little I g. of Blessington
Sunday .ire easill\ identifiable
and would be almost
impossible to sell 'ni the
international art market
\As a result of the world
wide publicity\ no art dealer
would touch them; said
international art htstonlli and
dealer Hugh Leggatt
Police therefore are w orking
on the theory, that politics is
behind the theft the biggest
recorded robbery in history.
The raiders are thought bv
police to belong either to the
outlawed Irish Repubhl,Jan
Army 1R \ or to some
little-known anarchist or
it ii let t-wing gr.ro lp
And the painttings were
insured tor bare,! one-ienlti hi
their value.
Sir Alfred told news, en !lihe
paintings were i':. r i
than S: 4 imillo' ec.
high insuiai ,e
An anniui p|'rc"F i 'o0 hlie
painting s (st bei' .,.'' ? :!
peI te lt ti heit '
Heit def ended I h: de.';. it
tinde nr!i's.eir i i; un tn'J.
sa\ inig "" 1 he\ no! r.pr.'sn

ol netiii'y Lcan ,-.i ;'p :i',.I[C m ,
foa the i ,ss r :; st b'li l^ ,i ; i ;;i
obiei ( \l i

Ex-police

chief held
B RITISII poile haae
detained a former lHong Kong
police superintendent who is
wanted in thie crown olon\ to
face co t option Ji aries


Petet (; )dbct i
Kong last Junille i'


fiuce day'


MIAMI American oilman
Victor Samuelson arrived in
the United States today after
being freed six weeks after his
company paid Marxist
Argentine guerillas a record
$18.2 million ransom.
Samuelson, flamked by
Exxon officials on his arrival
at Miami international
airport, was smiling and
appeared healthy.
"I'm very happy and I am


papei

WASHING(TON President
Nixon's 1.200 pages of edited
Watergate transcripts were
delivered to the I lHouse of
Representatives judiciary
comtili tlee itn a black station
\wagoli toda\.
I he material the president
promised to make public in his
national tele visionn address last
night was delivered just half an
hour tbet)ore the 10 a.m I
I 1400gmti deadline for the
matIerial subpoenaed by tilhe
commlilittee in its lipeachmentlc

N\lutio said. in delivering his
\Vat e rga I e transcripts.
"bhlemshes antd a all." lie
expected the \AmierIcan public
to find ini them proof of lIns
In bouncing his plans to
release lhI edited transcripts,
\Ni on sild I a1 placing inI
tr st li i thle basic fairness ot the
\iicerijan people." Ni\on i,
i ti lliLning ose the tape
recordings tlih Li'm ittICee has
;sublpoemaed. drawn' -
plainti li'ii i mocrat s and at
least ,Tic Repubicain.
MeaIinwhile Julie \I\on
I isenh iw, c 1' said thiat rilln er
\Vh1tc ho1 use co .nsetl John
Dean Ill lied ab ut iPresident
Ni\otIl iad that is hat thlie
\at1 gi 'rg ch ;iar r is all abotil.
Dcanti '" .h*iacter has not
been it1iproved h ithe adqlutittal
hb a New Yoik 1iur_ io two
l'omer Nit\on cabinet oftt icers.
Mlaurice Stains and John
\Itcheicll, of lperitir\ aind
ionspira\ chhare,, stihe said


Home again! Guerillas free record


ransom oilman Samuelson


well." he told reporters. "I
have no further comment.
I'm anxious to get back to
my family."
When asked if he would be
flying to Cleveland, his home
town, he said: "no, not right
away."
The 36-year-old Esso
Argentina executive was
whisked into a privately
chartered twin-engine aircraft
which took off minutes after


his 8:30 a.m. landing from
South America.
Exxon officials would not
disclose his destination.
Earlier today, his mother
said she did not know
whether her son would fly on
to Cleveland immediately.
Mrs. George E. Hart said
Exxon has kept Samuelson's
wife Diane and their three
children, ages 5 to 10. in
"protective custody" at an


undisclosed location in the
United States since they left
Argentina in January.
Samuelson, who had been
held 144 days by the People's
Revolutionary Army was
manager of the Exxon
subsidiary's Campana refinery
60 miles north of Buenos
Aires.
He was freed Monday in
front of the suburban Buenos
Aires home of his children's
doctor, Federico Pfister.(AP)


-STRIKING

CAR MEN

GO BACK

TO WORK

OXFORD Striking
transport workers who shut
down the huge British Leyland
car plant here have gone back
to work.
The return of the 150 plant
drivers represents a victory for
the wives of some 12,000
workers idled by the
shutdown. Last week about
200 wives organized protest
demonstrations in an attempt
to end the strike.
The drivers decided to
resume work with last night's
shift. But many said they still
backed their stop steward,
Alan Thornett, who was at the
centre of the dispute.
British Le y land's
management refused to
recogni e the militant
Thornett, a member of the
small Trotskyist Revolutionary
Party, and 3/2 week ago the
drivers staged a walkout.
Management laid off some
12,000 other workers and shut
down the plant.
The wives protested against
what they considered the
drivers' militancy and urged
management to reopen the
plant without the drivers.
Management agreed, called
back the laid-off workers and
last week resumed limited
production.
The drivers apparently
agreed to return to work
because their strike lacked the
support of the Transport
Union's regional secretary.
fie said he would
recommend official approval
only if all the transport
workers in the Oxford area
voted for it at a meeting
Tuesday night.

Sisters charged
MANCHESTER Two
sisters charged with plotting to
cause explosions were ordered
held in custody until May 9 by
Manchester City Magistrates'
court today pending further
police investigations into the
case agianst them.
The sisters, Ann Bernadette
Gillespie, 24, and Eilean
Theresa Gillespie, 21, were
arrested following a blast at a
house in Manchester which
police say was being used as a
bomb factory. (AP)


Nixon's Watergate


reimbursement
substantial nu
expenses" incurred
than 10 years.


handed over


When asked it that coiimment
meant she was saying that
Dean had lied in his
accusations about the Water-
gate cover-up and President
Nixon's role. Ntixon's
25 eair old daughter said


heatedly: tOf course, lie's 1ly ig
about my father that's what
this is all about. lie's the only
witness who has accused mir
father of anything."
Mrs. t'isenhower nuade her
cotminents in answer to


qtiestions from reporters as she
it mad e a White house
appearance on behalf of a cystic
fibrosis fund-raising campaign.
She said of the Watergate
matter. "lIe's (Nixon) as
an\ious as anyone to get this
behind him." (AP)


Milhench on new charges


ON D ON Ronald
Milhench. the real estate agent
whose deals embarrassed Prime
Minister IHarold Wilson today
faced four new charges of
forgers and theft
Milhench appeared before a
magistrate in the \Midlands
Sn d u s trial cIt 1 of
Wolkerhanmpton, where he
lives
I'he charges said that
hetwieen Sept I and ec. 5.


1973. Milhench stole a sheet oat
s t a t i onery Ir o tni a
Wolverhamilpton law firtm and
another from anll accounting
firm in nearby Biidgnotili
rhey said witih "intent to
defraud,' Milhench used thin
stationery to torge letiels
puipolting to he ifromt eacht o
the firms The documents w eie
apparently intended to lil her
Milhenctlhs propeIt) dealings
Milhench \5as chiigtd g AuI l


21 with try ing lto obtain
sd(0,0.100 frolm a national
newspaper group by criminal
decept ion.
A so cia ted Newspapers,
I td the group mentioned in
the charge, publish the Daily
IMatI. the ondon newspaper
which firstt raised the furore
over a larger oif Wilson's
signatuite and land deals
ituol\ing Ilt e Prime Minister's
sl.lt 1


Communist leader



back from exile


1.IS If ON Portuguese
(.'om niu LI I stl leader Alvaro
('Linha returned from exile
today to a rousing airport
reception and quickly made
plans to meet with junta leader
Antonio de Spinola.
Spinola met with left-wing
leaders Monday, but the two
sides tailed to agree on the
future of Portugal's African
territories.


('1iial was e' mbu'u .i J l' \
Socialist leader M tanl S ()ies
and clIeered f hundredd, ot
supporters at the entralnce Ill
the airport terminal bihlmin'

('Current restrictions on
entering the airport area
reduced the sti/e of the throng
but several hundred mlitanagedl
to get close to thle entrance.


MITTERRAND GETS NEW BACKING


bneore a anant !t<0 ins' aresi I' \RIS Il oI ;:eii Prci- iiei
was issued lie was 'i appeal at I .' r r e N\ etes ri r,
Bot Street i uliat i'l ,t ,"Hi I i n t 'rvit .e 1 i i| n TIV' i JI W eiu i
later todaN the I. ie.n I hwll. presidential caimp:i.gni .ol the
said tlrst tlien willi a nIi itoi
c tendoiset1itent ol Socialist
atl candidate I'rancois tMiterrand
andl d a scathii2g del:llI., ultio O!
Mitterrand's t1 leading
MINU N \M r.\ rihtwing opponents
Vanrmou"sr 43 55 i.ni Ile i7" year ld Inr ner
Muonreat 48 54 r.nn pi mler remembered iainllI
T wr ntii i 2' t i h .l t r
London 45 57 t.1r ,'! e iicating Irane !mm it
Nesw York oi1 ,S rain ld inad '. ar in 1 54! sill
San I r.infLis il 4 77 -1r,i v.wi 'I; 1 s ie o political litillen'e
L s Angele's 57 7 leir aliho i lie h eld li n t ministerial
Miami 81 .ir p- I sl':n c tl'he late (ei I lharles,
Buenos Air, -, <4 Ic ir dce .i ilh 11t to pi10 \ er iln


RIo

Berln
Amnserdamn
Brussels
tontg Kong
Itonolulu
Seoul
Bangkok
Taipei


q'4 drlte

S7 ri //ll

75 dlomh

95 -lear
6b sunny\


Urpia
E t ri na or


Inu an inter lew with the
I'aris Daily Combat.
S d e s- ra n c e p a r sed
\itterrand lor his inspired
g.eiersoit Ilhis courage and
the honesty of his proposals.
Mitterrand. supported by
the powerful Communist
Party., can expect 43 per cent
of the vote in the May 5
election. according to the latest
opinion poll, but not enough
to win outright election with
50 per cent
C u()ise r vatl e li naI ce e
Minister Valer. (iscad
d'l stulug is rtunniing second to


litterrand in t tie I tirsi- eat
polls and is t lipped to b ial tIe'
socialist candidates in the
second heat \la\ 1l


F he
candidate.
Delntas.
gi olin ld.


o ffli ial ( ;ia list
Jacques (Chaban-
is steadily losing


I he most recent poll,
published by the Conservative
newspaper Aurore, predicted
that 3 1 per e.-nt would support
Giscard d'lsta,.lg and only 1i7
per cent would stupplui
('thaiba Delinlas (.API
Other reports Page 6


\Irled ltoops Tixed with
lie crowd which was carrying
batters saying "Long Live the
t.tommunist Party."
In a brief statement to the
throng. ('unhal said: "At this
moment I ait very happy as are
all Portuguese with the end of
fascism and the beginning of
liberty.-"
lHe gave no indication as to
lien lie would meet Spinola,
but lie praised the armed forces
S()I oerth rowing the
government and for putting
PIortugal on what he called
"'lie road to liberty,
demLocracy and peace."
In contrast with Soares' own
arrival from exile Sunday, the
army did not arrange to bring
('unhal directly to junta
headquarters for a mineeting
with Spinola.
The Communists and
Socialists are expected to
maintain a left-wing coalition
in seeking representation in the
new government to be formed
by Spinola.
('iit al said "'Ite important
tlting loi Portugal at this
iumomient is unity." ( AP)


The Banana War squelches out


PAN\:%AMA .II 'Y I h

I atl in I \itterican handtill
pr(Ioducin nations [, emulate 1,
thie \rab ilh smqul ee/e. '('c it tt,
hlave lti/!ld outl, dacit C iu' li
rindustity smIiIes here.
Of the se\en C tirndinLri
B t Iin t rs o, rthi (e rin
B inand 1 \portiir, ( ,li lC,.
dn org n atilon -,t uip ireic last
MaNi ch tiul hiree h1l 'ave tli'


along with raising the price ofl
u\iport baiuarias to irudtis
t ril/ed aidtlltons
I he others ha\e apparently\
hakecd awaty tybIeI h' beLatej tl
internal pressures ir teais of
losing international markets.
the sources said.
I he original signers of the
ailee-tlent were ('Colomib[a,
C'osta Rica, I.cuador. Guate-
mala. Honduras. Nicaragua and


When it comes to insurance

it's Dominion for Life


... in Nassau

call William Bastian 2-3843




THE DOMINION LIFE ASSURANCE COMPANY


Panamia.
And only Costa Rica.
Hlonduras and Pananiat have
levied higher export taxes for
tbiananas which ,will raise the
price of the fruit in iUnited
States retail outlets from 16 to
20 per pound.
Ihe 110VemiClent swas started
earlier in the year by ( osta
Rican President Jose "Donll
Pepe" -Figueres. lie suggested it
as a wa\ to follow lthe example
of Arab oil producers to put
thlie squee/c on industrialized
nations.
Another problem facing
banana producing countries is
apparent opposition from the
foreign companies that market
the product.
The governments of Costa
Rica and Honduras have
reported the opposition of the
largest such company.
Standard fruit which has been
in banana production in
Central America for more than
50 years.
On Monday, industry


sources in Honduras said
Standard plans to cut down on
its shipments of bananas to the
United States to only one per
week. They said the move was
taken because of the increased
export tax.
I earlier this month, President
IF igueres in ( 'osta Rica charged
Sta datlrd was behind a
reported movement among
stevedore unions in the United
States to boycott shipments of
Central American bananas
because of the tax. The
company denied this. (AP)


LONDON Prime Minister scandal, had ties
Harold Wilson has announced a figures in Wilso
Royal Commission to study party.
sources of possible corruption John Poulson, t
in local and national charged with corru
government, scandals, had wor
The decision follows a former Conservat
corruption scandal in the Minister.
Newcastle area ot northeast Wilson said th
England where local officials reference of the in
and civil servants were be announced later
convicted of bribery in
arranging contracts for public When an
buildings, lawmaker suggest
Although a !iocal affair, the Commission wo
corruption allegations involved scandals under the
people with,' close links to replied: "A lot of
nationally pr eminent figures in been going on ui
both major p political parties and it is the des
T. Dan St ith, former leader member of this
of Newcast e City Council these stones should
jailed in the co eruption over." (AP)


Sho : I received


cash m Smith

LONDON luse of deiray expenses
Commons leade IFdward meals. accommoi
Short, deputy leal i of the telephin- .Is ove
ruling Labour Part disclosed ten years. Short
today he received n iney from having worked .i'
a local party boss )now jailed discussing cd
for six years on -orruption contracts with hi
charges but said it was in Smith, 58, K'
payment for legitimate Newcastle" aftef
.expenses. re I estate defel
The statement by S an~its other
Government Minister w- during the
latest development in poverty to
long-running bribery a amic city polit
corruption scandal which American mould.
brought the resignation of a sentenced last week
minister in the previous in what Leeds Ci
Conservative government, called "a web of
The scandal erupted during Short said in hi:
the bankruptcy hearings of he had known Smit
John Poulson. formerly one of mid-1930s and grea
lurope's leading architects him for ridding N,
Poulson was subsequently many of its slums a
jailed for five years for bribing new housing for
municipal officials to obtain citizens. Short said
construction contracts, that period Smith
Short's statement followed a received a great de.
claim by local party boss T. and help from hi
Dan Smith in ta television administrative niatte
interview that he paid Short He said Smith c
500 pounds or 1,200 dollars. 500 pounds "out o
Short denied the claim and in January 1963 as
said he received 250 pounds or Short said he did
600 dollars. Hie said this was to the offer as a reta


Worse to come-Devlin
WORCESTER, Mass Bernadette Devlin, Northern
Ireland's civil rights activist, says what might happen "in
the next five years" in Northern Ireland would be worse
than the past five years of strife that saw more than 1,000
persons killed.
Now Mrs. Michael McAliskey. the 27-year-old former
member of the British Parliament addressed an audience of
700 students at Holy Cross College Monday.
Interviewed before her address, Miss Devlin said the
so-called Sunningdale agreement "in reality is not a
workable agreement and shortly things will come to a
crunch."
In Sunningdale, England, last Dec. 9 British and Irish
leaders agreed to form a Council of Ireland to build links
between the Irish Republic and British-ruled Northern
Ireland.
Miss Devlin said the strife in Northern Ireland is not a
religious war Protestant against Catholics but a class
war poor against rich. (AP)


TPB M IAN0LUMBER CMPAN.,i
3-4191 Wulff Road


ULMTDFE PA RKING


with senior
n's Labour

he architect
option in the
ked with a
ive Cabinet

e terms of
quiry would

o position
d the Royal
uld sweep
e rug, Wilson
things have
under stones,
ire of every
house that
d be turned









on travel,
nation and
r a period of
denied ever
th Smith or
struction

as "Mr.
S massive
opment of
n industrial
1960s, rose
become a
ician in the
He was
for his part
rown Court
corruption."
s statement,
th since the,
tly admired
ewcastle of
nd building
the poorer
that during
sought and
al of advice
im in loc-Il
ers.
offered himn
t the blue"
a retainer.
not regard.
iner but as
for "a
mtuber of
over more


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2 The Tribune - Tuesday, April 30, 1974


I










The Tribune -.. Tuesday, April 30, 1974


Wbh Uribunt
Nt.uLus ADDICTS JURASE IN VERBA MAGITW
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G.,D.Litt., LL.D.
Publisher/Editor 1917-1972
Contributing Editor 1972.
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972 -
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Tuesday, April 30, 1974


EDITORIAL


A horrible thing


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
IN THIS column recently I reported a statement made by
Nelson Rockefeller, former Governor of New York, who said that
we were living in the most challenging period in the recorded
store, of the human family.
Nelson Rockefeller is one of the truly great men in America
and that means the world today because America is now the hope
of "free" men everywhere.
One of the most challenging and disturbing features of the
social revolution that has unfolded during this century is an
almost incomprehensible revolution of youth in a search for
freedom.
What they have found is not freedom. It is licence. This has
happened because of a complete breakdown of discipline
everywhere. People and especially the youth of today fail to
realize that there can be no freedom without discipline. Remove
the stabilizing influence of discipline and society is reduced to the
level of the jungle. As I said in this column a couple of days ago
... I am inclined to believe that a man may be safer in the jungles
of Africa today competing for survival with animals that are
classified as wild than in what we continue to speak of as
"civilized" society.
I look out on our society today and all I see is a jungle of
contusion in which there is very little if any security left for
anyone.
There was a time when I went anywhere alone at any time
of the night without reason for fear.
I still walk without fear ... because I refuse to be afraid of life
but, I no longer feel a sense of security.

1 ,hip. ,w of the most shocking and heart breaking cases of
.c2 miaes is the story behind the "kidnapping" of Patricia
Hearst, 20-year-old daughter of a distinguished publishing
American family, who was snatched half dressed from her
apartment by two men and a woman and carried away to some
deep, dark hiding place by a group who style themselves as the
Symbionese Liberation Army, two members of which are now
facing trial for the cold-blooded murder of a prominent citizen
because they were displeased with something he did in the
discharge of his duties.
An extraordinary fact reported by The Los Angeles Times is
that the S.LA. consists of about 12 underground people
supported by about 12 above ground sympathisers.
It is shocking to think that such a small group of people men
and women are able to pull off such a foul deed and defy the
whole machinery of law and order of a nation that regards itself
as the greatest power on earth today.

An interesting fact is that the S.L.A. are a racially mixed group
... and their targets are also drawn from both races.
The two men held for murder are white ... they shot a black
nan.
Three people were involved in the snatching of white Patricia
Hearst .. two black men and a white woman.
According to The Los Angeles Times the "kidnapping" of the
Hearst girl was intended to spark a revolution by Maoist
Guerrillas.

The demands made by the "kidnappers" of this young woman
set a new pattern. They didn't want anything for themselves,
except perhaps lenient treatment by the courts for the two men
on trial for murder.
They demanded that Patricia Hearst's father provide food for
the poor of San Francisco. Their plan called for the expenditure
of an astronomical sum of money, far beyond the capacity of any
one man to meet.
This situation revealed the fact that Randolph Hearst was not
as wealthy as it had been supposed. His father, who built up the
Hearst newspaper empire, was a financial tycoon but he left most
of his money in trusts.
In the circumstances the parents of Patricia Hearst went as far
as their financial resources allowed. And when their money ran
out ... there was dead silence from the captors of their daughter.

High-minded men and women everywhere felt that even poor
people would be so shocked by this case that they would refuse
to accept the food.
They were wrong. The poor and not so poor not only
accepted the food but they fought like wild animals to get a share
of the spoils. The first day of distribution almost ended in a riot.
Worst still ... a large quantity of the food was hijacked or
stolen from warehouses.


Still worse was the description of the case given by A. Lindlow
Kramer, Secretary of State in Olympia, Washington, who was in
charge of the distribution.
"The give-away programme," Kramer said, "was conducted in
a world of violence."
The coalition named to oversee the distribution included
whites, blacks, welfare recipients and American Indians.
Kramer commented that these people were more interested in
getting as much power for themselves from this terrible situation
than in the safe return of Patricia Hearst to her parents.
What a shocking commentary on the dark nature of supposedly
civilized mankind!

An interesting thing happened the day after the "kidnapping".
I was talking with a specialist in Miami who has many patients
from Nassau.
I said that I thought the Hearst case -was one of the most
shocking outrages of our times.
The doctor was not a bit sympathetic. He said that Patricia had
always been a rebel against the establishment. He said he
wouldn't be surprised if she were a willing part of the whole dirty
affair. A recent report on her life said that she had told her father
that no one under 80 read his newspapers any more.
I must say I was surprised -to hear him say this. He then told
me the story of this young heiress who had walked out of her
home and was living openly in an apartment with an older man.
She was only about 16 when she sought illicit freedom in the
arms of an equally undisciplined man who had no regard for the
niceties of human society ... by "niceties" I mean the little things


POST TRIAL ASSESSMENT



Watergate cases



won't be easy

WASHINGTON A New York federal court jurI has plo.ld cl
dramatic proof of what many lawyers in the special proscculoi 's
office knew all along: none of the Watergate cases is g; ni toi heb
easy.


One problem for the
prosecutors is the credibility of
their witnesses, especially John
W. Dean -
Another is the problem of
convincing a jury that
administration officials
deliberately broke the law
during the 1972 campaign.
The acquittal of former
Cabinet members Maurice It
Stans and John N. Mitchell
only underscored the jolt
received by the prosecutors a
few weeks e-irlier at the trial
of former presidential aide
Dwight L. Chapin.
The Chapin case was a much
simpler one than the
Mitchell-Stans trial. Chapin,
former appointments secretary
to President Nixon, was
indicted on four counts of
lying to a grand jury about the
political espionage activities of
Donald H. Segretti.
But the case proved more
complicated than a simple
matter of demonstrating that
what Chapin told the grand
jury wasn't true. Chapin's
lawyer. Jacob Stein, made the
point that his client may have
been mistaken in what he told
the grand jury, but it was a
case of faulty memory not
deliberate lying.
Chapin was convicted on
two of the four charges.
In the Mitchell-Stans trial,
the government failed to
convince the jury that either
Cabinet member intervened
illegally in an investigation of
the activities of financier
Robert L. Vesco, who had
contributed $200,000 to
President Nixon's re-election
campaign.
ADMISSION
Both Mitchell, the former
Attorney General, and Stans,
the former Commerce
Secretary, admitted they had
discussed the Securities and
Exchange Commission probe
of Vesco's affairs. But they
denied they ever crossed the
line separating an inquiry from
an attempt to influence the
case.
In attempting to prove they
did cross that line, the
government depended heavily
on the testimony of Dean and
G. Bradford Cook, a former
SEC counsel and later
chairman.
Both men had severe


credibility problems
Cook had admitted tiet I,.'d
three times to a gtland mr\ ianiil
also to two si mittrrssiiin'.i
connittees about tite \ I o
case.
('RFD!H Bll ItI
Dean's credibility i. has beeIn
under attack ever since lie
appeared before tie Sen'ite
Watergate committee last Jiitin'
and accused President Nixon ii
having had knowledge ot lthe
Watergate cover-up
The Wh it e IHouse
principals through Senatei
Republican leader Hugh Scott
of Pennsylvania, has s.iiul lhat
the presidential tapes showIt
that Dean lied to the' \ ilterai-.i
committee.
But any evidence thlit lDea
lied has yet to surface lihe
special prosecutor's olieI i
whihc has some of the tapes il,
question, has said the.( Io not
contradict Dean
Those tapes are certain to beI
part of the evidence introduced
at the Watergate co\ r uLt tJri.
at which Mitchell is one oi
seven defendants
Peter I leming Jr Miitchcll's
lawyer, also etTlectli\ l\
attacked Dean's credlibilt\
during the New York trial
when he brought out the 1i:.
that the former White Ilouw
counsel had pleaded guilty 1(,
obstruction of justice and W\a,
hoping his role as government
witness would help hiiii al .ml t1
prison sentence
At the cover-up trial, at l- s1
two other gtovrniiij-i
witnesses. Frederick (' C Lit.
and Jeb Stuaiti Magruioer, als,
w ill be hoping flh!'
cooperation with thei
prosecution will infIluence ilhi
sentences they receive i,
obstruction of justice chrin'
(AP)

SCHOOL FAIR
THEI annual lair of tlhe S I'
McPherson Junior tHigh Schooli
will be lield under the
patronage of Killarney \MP,
Cadwell Arnmbrister on Friday.
May 3. The fair opens at 3 p.m.
and music for dancing will be
provided from 7 p.m. onwards
by an excitg lock band.
Proceeds from thlie air will id
the school development utind.


that are supposed to lift man above the level of the brute beast.

The great periods of silence preserved by the "kidnappers" of
Patricia Hearst were finally broken after her father had exhausted
his resources in meeting the demands of the S.L.A. in the hope
that his beloved daughter might be released. lie had spent S2
million in distributing food among the poor and a further $4
million had been held in escrow until Patricia was released.
It was only then that Patricia Hearst revealed that she was in
deed and in fact a part of the whole foul act. She sent a recording
to a radio station in which she said that she had no desire to be
released from her "captors" ... that she was in fact in sympathy
with the aims of the S.L.A ... she was staying with them a1nd
would help them to achieve their goals. She described her ft1liheC s
distribution of $2 million worth of food to the poor as a take and
branded hint as a liar
Accompanying this cruel message was a snapshot of Patricia
with an automatic rifle standing in front of a banner bearing the
seven-headed cobra symbol of the S.L.A.
At the same time the S.L.A. announced that they had marked
down for death a white woman in Florida who they claim gave
information about them to the FBI and two black men for similar
"crimes" against "freedom".
We are told that there is "joy in heaven over one sinner that
repents". This is true. There is also joy in the average home on
earth when a newborn babe becomes a part of the household.
Every parent especially a mother knows the joy an infant
child brings into their lives.
While a child is still in the cradle a parent looks into the future
and dreams of the glorious experiences life holds for their
precious baby. They dream mostly of the credit the infant will
bring to their name.
A man spends his life trying to erect a bulwark that will
hopefully shield his child from some of the ugly experiences of
life. I was talking with a man a few days ago who was concerned
because he feared that, with the instability of the money market
today, trusts that he had established for his grandchildren may
not have any value when they grow up and are ready to go out
into the world.
A friend of mine has what I think is an apt description of the
mental attitude of the average youth of today. His only grievance,
says my friend, seems to be that his father has two Cadillacs
instead of a donkey cart in the garage.
** * *** ** *
There is no more shattering expenence for parents than the
callous ingratitude of a child whom they nurtured and gave the
best part of their lives from the cradle to maturity.
On the other hand, there is nothing so rewarding in human
experience for parents whose children not only measure up to
expectations but who devote their lives in an effort to making an
enduring contribution to the fabric of society. There is no greater
reward in life.
Thrice blessed are parents who can look on their child grown
to manhood or womanhood -- and thank God for the joy with
which their lives have been blessed.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
He jests at scars who never felt a wound. SHAKESPEARE


JURY DOUBT

DEAN'S

TRUTHFULNESS
NI \ 'YtlKk Itihe
tiuik'. i .II,inI Jcqu:!led J.lin N \Mitthell and
M\tiu'c 11 Stdlain s,.d Momnday
hlie itrn)rs dlubfted ttie
tIflilt lit e s jI J inhni \\ IDean
IIeI i k i\en mei It witnI ess
,it Ill' ennir nal] mnspiiac\ trial
11 t tl)I tin er cabinet t
i I I, -
S\ hil ku chia, sk. 21. a
We ,st tihctel (imiunt\ bank
tellei slid she and the other
.jurors I\\,re "i I on\Ien d M i1tchell
.ind iSti ,ild the truth when
lie\ If k tile wiliness stand in
their >i in dectnse ,it their
48-day ledeial lt il.
l).n's Lc,edibtll\ cine into
question when lie admitted hel
had pleaded guilty to a charge
of obstrlction of justice in the
Wat'ergate ,i.andal in hope of
dia\, ini;g .t lighter s lteitecc. Miss,
Kuch,irski sild "loda\ stihow
\VIc l'iesidenit (Geld R
I old sIld in a st..tement issued
b\ hi \' Vs \\isliniitlon Iflice that
tI e 11ii \ serdilict in the
\ilt hell Stis cise "says to Ime
Ilha J tihn )Dean' s redIhilit
h l-, n sevxerel\ eihded."
()iistei h\ President Nixonl
,is V liite Itluse counsel. Dean
is e\pect.'d to t lestil tor the
i)\r-tIiticiinnt t tierir trials
spaivned bh theI' 1 972
\ ;t eit igitc hbremak-in and
s.ibsiqiient cov er-lup attempt.
te ,ilso( is heralded as major
Witness sNliIild President Nixon
hle tIinpe.i hceid and lned
Mitlhell. i0., lie tI ornier
\tlI inc\ (cneiiil, m and Sl ans,
(0i. li' litCe commercee
Sec ii Ltatd' weie accused oft
perit\ andtl conspiIing tIo
impede -i Securities and
I \ hi 1 n (i I omti Ission
invest igatlion l oil iiancier
Ro) heart I \'esco's financial
empire in reItuin i ()r a secret'
.100(l,l() Vescs contribution
Ito Pr'sidentt Nixon's 1972
re-' eecl itin cmiipaIItgni
\Mi,- Kuchariski said the jury
in its 2(i hours o li l li t r. i ,-
p.ii oInIl\ scant attention to
wl i was seen as a key element
ol he go)\ erIniie.'it', case
tga t ti 'ist and Mrlit chell
thil Mitshell adet I19 calls to
IDei il n i1i11 attempt to hinder
the SI (",,s Vesco investigation.
"I hes\ nide a big thing of
it. said Miss Kucharski, a
l)emtocrat who voted for
;i) It'L Mc( ioernl for President
i I 197' "'-\\c didn't make it a
I'lg Itiligng "


NLW YORK John N
Mitchell and Maurice II St. .n
walked out of the US
courthouse in lFoley Square
Sunday and said that "It was a
very happy day "
"I don't think Mr. Stans ever
lost faith, and I didn't,"
Mitchell said at a news
conference after the two
former Cabinet colleagues were
acquitted of criminal
conspiracy, perjury and
obstruction of justice.
Smiling and puffing on the
pipe that has become his trade
mark in public life, Mitchell
went on
"Our faith was resting with a
very. very fine jury. They were
a cross-section of the people
and they were representative of
America. If there is one place I
am firmly convinced you can
get justice, it's from the
American people. I have great
faith in America and that's
why I love this country."
luring the news conference.
in a room behind the trial
courtroom, an unidentified
man stuck his head inside the
door and started to cry out
"It's because of the fascist
ruling class like you -
At that point he was
shouted down by newsmen
whom he had interrupted. He
left without continuing.
"When the indictment was
announced on May 10th a year
ago, I said I had confidence in
God and the jury system." said
Stans, whc sat next to
Mitchell. "What I said then has
been vindicated by this jury."
"We had great faith in a
man. the President, to do
everything we could to get him
elected. Everything we did in
that cause was proper and just.
"The jury's decision
established the kind of
exaggeration that has taken
place in the last 18 months. It
was not only unfair, but it did
not sell itself to the jury."
Both men bristled when
asked whether President Nixon
was aware of the $200,000
re-electi on campaign
contribution from financier
Robert L. Vesco, which was at
the heart of their criminal
prosecution.
"That's the most assinine

ROSE


lost their faith


thing in the wild said
Mitchell. "What does the
President kitow about
contributions'."
"'rhe President never had
any knowledge of the Vesco
contribution or aIny other
contribution." Starts added
The pair were asked if they
plan roles in future Republican
campaigns
"Twice around the track is
enough for any man," replied
Stans. who was Nixon's chief
fund raiser in both 1968 and
1972
"Once around is too often."
amended Mitchell, who
directed both campaigns.
Staiis said his imi,;di te
plans included "going away for
a couple of weeks with my


I wa t io v l I 5a l fIim thc
tension I hal h-rc.-.
Mitchell stiNl. "d x oui re
getting a little pcrstm' ,! ar 'n i
you? I think I'll retire to a nice
secluded place and tn myniself
a drink."












1] b, u a .1974


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The Tribune -Tuesday, April 30, 1974 5


177









By Abigail Van Buren
0 1974 by Chicag Tribsw-N. Y. News Sy., Inc.
DEAR ABBY: Ten years ago, when I married Peter, we
were both 30 years old. I recall that when he introduced me
to his mother, I said: "My, what a young-looking mother you
have!" [That's what everybody says when they first meet
her. She looks about Peter's age.]
After being in this family for ten years, I learned acciden-
tally that Peter's "mother" is not his mother at all. She is
his sister! He calls her "Mom." She is only 14 years older
than Peter. His real mother died when he was an infant,
and his sister raised him after she got married. [Peter was
two and she was 16.] Why everyone keeps this a big secret
is beyond me. It also bugs me because I'm sure everyone
wonders how come Peter has such a young-looking mother
and such an old-looking wife.
It would make me feel a lot better if their real relation-
ship were to come out. Would it be wrong for me to spill the
beans? PETER'S WIFE
DEAR WIFE: Yes. If Peter and his family prefer to keep
it a secret, keep quiet. "Mom" may not be Peter's biologi-
cal mother, but she's the only mother he has ever known,
and if it gives him [and her] pleasure to perpetuate the
illusion, don't destroy it.

DEAR ABBY: I am having a difference of opinion with
my mother. I just started dating and my mother says that
when my date comes to pick me up I should be "upstairs,
dressing," and keep him waiting about ten minutes.
I think that when my date rings the doorbell I should be
the one to answer it. My mom says that if I do, it will
m";. me look too eager. What do you say? CANDI
DEAR CANDI: I say that at the sound of the bell, come
out smiling. I once knew a girl who kept her date waiting
half an hour every time he came to pick her up because
she didn't want to appear too eager. She'd send her kid
sister to answer the door and entertain her date while he
waited. [P. S. He married the kid sister.]

DEAR ABBY: I have a pet peeve I have never seen aired
in your column. It's women who wear heavy charm brace-
lets that go "jingle jangle, clunkety clunk" in church.
This friend of mine always wears a bracelet like that,
and she insists on saving me a seat in church beside her.
She always picks two seats way down in the front and in
the middle. Every time she moves her hand, those charm
bracelets make a dreadful racket, which is annoying to
those sitting near us and embarrassing to me. [I've even
seen the organist turn around and give her a dirty look
between hymns.]
What is wrong with people like my friend? Don't they
know any better? Or don't they care? And how can I tell
her without hurting her feelings? She doesn't take criticism
very well. LIKES CHURCH-HATES BRACELETS
DEAR LIKES: If your friend Isn't aware that her brace-
lets are a source of annoyance to you and, others, do the
friendly thing and tell her. Then, if she doesn't leave the
hardware at home, find another seat as far from her as
possible.
DEAR ABBY: Here is the big argument between me and
my mother. If I am home alone, should I have to answer the
phone when it rings? I say only if I feel like it. She says I
must, regardless!
Let's assume the phone rang, and I didn't answer it. If
the call is for a member of the family who isn't home, he
or she would not be home to talk anyway, so if it's impor-
tant, the caller would call back later, right?
If the call is for me, if I chose not to answer it th..;
means I don't feel like talking, so that's my privilege, isn't
it?
That's my argument, and my mom disagrees. I see no
reason why I should have to tear myself away from what-
ever I'm doing to answer the telephone. I am tired of being a
secretary for my parents and taking messages for them
when they're out. If messages are that important to them
they should get a mechanical box that answers telephone
calls with a prerecorded message.
I am curious to know your opinion on the matter.
TIRED TEEN
DEAR TIRED: I think your mother is right. It could be
an emergency or an important message for someone in
your family. Now, get off your duff and answer the telephone
when it rings!

DEAR ABBY: In a few months we will be moving into
our new home, and I'd like to throw a question out to you,
and your readers.
We will have a swimming pool, and I want to enjoy using
it; however, I've observed other pool owners having prob-
lems with uninvited friends who overstay their welcome.
Also neighbors who get hurt if they are told: "No, not
today."
Someone suggested the flag system [when it's out, come
on over], but how do we keep the undesirables from joining
in, too?
How can we ask people nicely to leave at a certain time


Young mother really


without turning them off completely?
There it is. Am I making a mountain out of a molehill?
NEW POOL OWNER
DEAR OWNER: The flag system is the best. Who are the
"undesirables" who "might" join In, too? If you mean
strangers, ask them to leave. If they're neighbors who have
been invited by you to "come on over" when your flag is
out, when you want them to leave at a certain time make it
plain beforehand, so they wont be surprised.






pWIMPI


CONFIDENTIAL TO BARBARA G. IN WILKES BARRE,
PA.: Please send me your address. I have enough respond.
ses to my request from readers on how to square a circle
to keep you In reading material for the rest of your life.

For Abby's new booklet, "What Teen-Agers Want to
Knew," send $1 to Abigail Van Buren, 132 Lasky Dr., Bev-
ety MIs, Cal. Wl2M .


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The Tribune - Tuesday, April 30, 1974


Leftist threat turns Frenchmen


right over border


PARIS As Francois
Mitterrand, the Socialist-
Communist candidate for the
French Presidency, began a
15,000-mile election campaign
in a hired executive jet last
weekend, some anxious
Frenchmen were quietly
transferring funds and
securities out of the country as
a precaution against a victory
for Mitterrand in the
first-round ballot on May 5.
Customs and frontier guards
reported a significant increase
in the number of big black
Citroen Lars. the standard
symbol of the monied French
establishment. crossing into
West Germany, Belgium and
Holland.
What is causing utters in
France's industrial hierarchy is
the p,,-- ,t-!,o.. which looms
larger with each opinion poll,
that Mitterrand might go on
picking up votes at a rate
which Vould give him the
estimated additional million
and a half supporters he needs
for an all-out majority in the
first ballot
Only in the second ballot
two weeks later, held if none
of the candidates gets an
overall majority, would the
combined Gaullist, conser-
vative and right-wing get
a chance to unite on a single
candidate, either Giscard
D'Estaing or Jacques
Chaban-Delmas, to outvote
Mitterrand.
If any worried French
leaders of big enterprises had
ventured into a residential
quarter of Strasbourg last
week, their worst fears would
have been aroused Mr.
Mitterrand's election
barn-storming trip into the
provinces turned into a rowdy
"sit in" b% left-wing youth
groups, and Strasbourg's
university students.
[They stormed the election
platform in the Festival Palace,
the town's largest meeting hall,
and gave Mitterrand only
moderate applause for a speech
which he had c. idenilt
designed not to alarm the
middle-class voters whose
support he now needs.
I).aspite a quarter century of
experience in political
speechmaking from liberal to
left-wing, Mitterrand did not
seem to convince his
Strasbourg audience by
patriotic appeals for a "news
battle of the Marne to save the
French franc" and a
description of the crowded
discomforts for workers going
home on the Paris Metro.
Many of his listeners who
daily cross the Rhine to work
in West Germans for coveted
deutschmarks, were more
interested in his gloomy
forecast that price .nii iili-i! .in


tonight
take your co(kOal5 (CaSL--,
v ,- d rt, ang nC .2,,,6'1 j ,," ",
your stood seriously, with the r..
cooks on the island Then dan: ,
little f you wiil The Lotthous,
you re not hkely to forget the na-'
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today
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palm thronged patio


menu


Peas and Rice
and
Grouper Fingers
Native Cracked
Conch
+
Bahamian Sea-
Food Plaiter


France would reach 18 per
cent this year than in hearing
that France now holds the
Common Market record for
long hours and low wages.
Mitterrand's five-point
economic plan. which has been
worked out with the French
Communist party, includes a
$75-a-week minimum wage,
and would lower taxes on
staple goods while increasing it
on luxuries such as cars.
Mitterrand's price-holding
operation and his "Battle of
the Marne" are to be fought
with a $2,250 million loan and
a five-year plan to restructure
out-dated French firms into
modern industrial technology.
Mitterrand's aim is to win
over moderate Gaullists with a
genuine economic and social


"New Deal." He throws doubts
on the Gaullist intention or
ability to carry through their
rival "New Society" of worker
participation, for proposing
which Chaban-Delmas was
sacked from the job of Prime
Minister by President
Pompidou.
And he answers Gaullist
charges that he will be
dominated by the Communists
in the new left-wing alliance by
pointing out that it was Gen.
de Gaulle who first took the
Communists into France's
post-war government, and that
they did not dominate the
political scene then.
With an eye on the opinion
polls, Mitterrand and the
Gaullists agree on the need to
continue France's "inde-


pendent" foreign policy
although he wants to improve
France's relations with Israel.
To avoid fruitless conflict
with the overwhelmingly
Gaullist French Parliament,
Mitterrand says he will order
new elections if he becomes
President. He will also reduce
the almost royal prerogative
and massive presidential powers
set up by de Gaulle to maintain
Gaullist power against
parliamentary interference.
All three presidential
candidates promise to restore a
measure of civil liberty in
France. which under Gaullism
has degenerated into what a
French official calls a
"well-intentioned police state."
(Copyright 1974, By The
Sunday Times London)


JACQUES'--

PICTURE

OF

GLOOM
PARIS Former Premier
Jacques Chaban-Delmas, the
Gaullist candidate in the May
5 French presidential
election, today painted a
gloomy picture of what
would happen if either of his
major opponents won.
"I believe that in the
present situation I am the
choice which could avoid the
peril threatening the country
with a clash between the left
and the right," Chaban-
Delmas told a campaign news
conference.
Most recent public opinion
polls indicate Chaban-Delmas
is rapidly losing ground to
Socialist Francois Mitterrand
and Conservative Finance
Minister Valery Giscard
d'Estaing.
But Chaban-Delmas said he
was not discouraged and
would continue fighting to
the end. He said that the polls
were simply an indication of
sentiment at a given moment.
and could change before May
5.
He said he alone could
unite all Frenchmen, ranging
from the non-communist left
to the right, to carry out his
programme of social progress.
If none of the candidates
wins a majority in the first
round of voting, the two top
voter-getters are pitted in a
runoff May 19.
Current polls indicate
Mitterrand preferred by 44
per cent of the electorate,
Giscard d'Estaing by 39.2 per
cent and Chaban-Delmas 18
per cent. Nine minor
candidates split the rest. (AP)


Mitterrand and D'Estaing


bound on ahead


PARIS Francois
Mitterrand and Valery Giscard
d'Estaing bounded ahead at
the weekend in the latest
straw vote on the French
presidential election, setting
up the prospect of a clear
choice between left and right
when the final ballot is held
May 19.
A first round elimination
vote will be held May 5, with
the two top candidates going
into a runoff.
If any candidate could get
50 per cent of the
approximately 30 million votes
in the first round, he would be
elected immediately but this
seems impossible.
The public opinion poll
published Saturday by the
newspaper France Soir and the
news magazine Le Point gave
Miticeri.nd the candidate of
It I-, int[ parties, 42 per cent,
up one per cent from a week
aco.

CROSSWORD
PUZZLE
ACROSS
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8. Both
11. Domicile
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cheese
17. Dinner bell
18. Educate
19. Large bird
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ingredient
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29. Appearance


Par time 27 min.


Giscard d'Estaing, the
Finance Minister who has
strong ties with business
interests, took 31 per cent of
the votes, while former Premier
Jacques Chaban-Delmas,
endorsed by the Gaulist party.
slipped back to 18 per cent.
These results represented a 5
per cent jump for Giscard
d'Estaing in the past week and
a 5 per cent drop for
Chaban-Delmas.
As the campaign headed into
a final week before the first
round, much of the suspense
seemed to have been drained
from the battle and only a
counter-current of surprising
strength could reverse the
trends.
While the candidates
continued to criss-cross France
by executive jet over the
weekend and the airwaves were
saturated with political
speeches and comment, the big

C P C SAT
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in any way whatsoever.


surprise of the campaign has
been the declined strength of
Chaban-Delmas.
He had been nurturing ht
presidential aspirations since hie
was eased out the Premier's job
in July 1972, and announced
his candidacy even before final
tributes to the late president
Georges Pompidou were
completed.
Die-hard Gaullists promptly
pushed through the endor-
sement of their party and
Chaban-Delmas went winging
to the front among the
centerright candidates.
But he was unable to hold
his early advantage. One of the
clues came in a poll this week
on the television impact of the
candidates. Asked who had
made the best impression on
TV, 30 per cent of the sampling
replied Mitterrand, 27 per cent
Giscard d'Estaing and 15 per
cent Chaban-Delmas.
On the question of who
made the worst impression on
TV, Chaban Delmas got 14 per
cent, Mitterrand 9 per cent and
Giscard d'Estaing 4 per cent.
Foreign policy has played
only a minimal role in the
campaign. All of the main
candidates have announced
they intend to defend France's
independent stance, and that
there can be no question of
permitting the United States
any voice in Common Market
affairs.
Mitterrand has an
unwavering hard core of voters
from the Socialist Party, which
he heads, and the Communists,
with whom he is allied. His
standing in the polls has varied
little since the start, and he has


been standing calmly aside
while the other two leading
candidates carried on their ESSAY CONTES
private battle. Miss Carolyn
Giscard d'Estaing has received her prize
carefully refrained from Bahamas Cham
attacking any of his rivals. One Commerce president
burden he must bear is Farquharson on
continuing inflation. His night at the Fourt
opponents have been charging Awards Dinner he]
that he is personally Governor's Hall
responsible as finance minister Sheraton British
but the voters in the polls do Hotel. The topic oft
not seem to have endorsed this essay was What
view. means to me.


Portugal coup sends

black-white ripples


JOHANNESBURG The
confrontation between black
and white-ruled parts of Africa
promises to be irrevocably
changed by the coup in
Portugal.
A basic question, observers
were saying, was how fast the
new Lisbon regime introduces
changes in Portugal's African
territories and how quickly the
effects ripple over their
borders.
If the Portuguese reach
accommodation with insurgent
blacks in Angola and
Mozambique, white minority
ruled Rhodesia and South
Africa would find it
increasingly difficult to cope
with their own black rebels.
The geography of
south-central Africa is such
that Angola, Mozambique and
Rhodesia provide a coast-to-
coast buffer for South Africa
from black Africa.


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Rhodesia is already under
pressure from terrorists who
infiltrate the country's I
vulnerable northeast frontier
with Mozambique and Zambia.
Rebels have been fighting
for more than a decade against
Portuguese rule in Angola and
Mozambique, but neither side
has made significant headway.
Spinola has written that the
wars are ideological, not
military, and can only be 1
solved politically.
The new government will
probably have no trouble
granting independence or
greater local autonomy for
Portuguese Guinea, its other
possession. The small territory
has few natural resources and
no white settlers.
But Angola and Mozambi- *
que have rich economic
potential and settled white
minorities, and early reports
reaching Johannesburg
indicated a strong assurance
among them that whatever
happened in Lisbon there l
would be no surrender to black
rebels.
Whites hold most economic
power, but there is none of the
official racial segregation of
South Africa or the de facto
segregation in Rhodesia and
relatively little racial tension.
Economists say an
independent Angola could
prosper and become self-
sufficient. It's the world's
fourth largest coffee producer.
Oil is the No. 2 export
followed by diamonds, iron
ore, cotton, sisal, fish meal and
bananas.
Mozambique is not as rich as
Angola. Its economy is based
almost entirely on farming and
the export of cashew nuts. (AP) I
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The Tribune - Tuesday, April 30, 1974 7


IMPEACHMENT


FINISHED


Investigators ready


report for House


By JOHN BECKLER
WASHINGTON After four months of investigation
the impeachment staff of the House Judiciary
Committee is ready to start presenting the facts it has
gathered.


The presentation is
scheduled to begin May 7 after
the Committee works out final
procedures for receiving
evidence, but it could be
delayed by continued
wrangling with the White
House over additional evidence
the Committee has requested.
The facts have been
organized into five major
subject areas, each one
containing specific allegations.
They are not charges against
President Richard Nixon but
various actions the staff feels
could constitute impeachable
offenses if supported by facts.


Here are the five
areas and the
allegations involved
inquiry:


subject
specific
in the


I. Allegations concerning
domestic surveillance activities
conducted by or at the
direction of the White House:
The activities of John
Caulfield and Anthony
Ulasewicz in carrying out
surveillance and intelligence
activities allegedly at the
direction of the White House,
including the formation of the
plan for the fire bombing of
the Brookings Institution
and the plan to create a pnvate
corporation with security and
intelligence gathering
capaibilites called Operation
Sandwedge.
Formation and activities of
the special investigative unit
the "plumbers."
The 17 wiretaps instituted in
4J969, the wiretaps of various
newsmen and the wiretaps
alleged to have been conducted
by G. Gordon Liddy.
The Dita Beard incident.
including the allegation that
Liddy was responsible for her
disappearance from Washing-
ton and her secusion in a
Denver hospital, and the
report that E. Howard Hunt
interviewed her before her
public repudiation of the "Dita
Beard Memo," which indicated
the International Telephone
and Telegraph Corp. would
help pay the costs of the 1972
Republican Convention in San
Diego;
The approach to Federal
Judge Matthew Byrne during
the trial of Daniel Ellsberg to
determine if he was interested
in becoming FBI Director, the
events surrounding the
eventual disclosure to the court
of the break-in of Ellsberg's
psychiatrist's office and the
events surrounding the
disclosure of electronic
surveillance of Morton
Halperin:
The "Huston Plan" for
domestic surveillance and
intelligence gathering.
2. Allegations concerning
intelligence activities
conducted by or at the
direction of the White House
for the 1972 Presidential
election:
The employment and
supervision of Donald Segretti.
allegations concerning
campaign "dirty tricks" and
the relationship of Segretti to
E. Howard Hunt and Dwight
Chapin;
Allegations concerning the
cover-up of the activities of
Segretti:
Allegations that F. Howard
Hunt prepared forged cables
tying the Kennedy
Administration to the
assassination of President Diem
of South Vietnam;
Miscellaneous campaign
intelligence activities by the
Committee for the Re-election
of the President.
3. Allegations concerning
the Watergate break-in and
related activities, including
alleged efforts by persons in
the White House and others to
cover up such activities:
The development of the plan
to provide the re-election
committee with an intelligence-
gathering capability for the
1972 Presidential campaign:


Destruction of evidence
immediately following the
Watergate break-in of June 17,
1972;
Allegations concerning the
custody, removal and
destruction of the files in F.
Howard Hunt's safe in the
Executive Office Building and
subsequent efforts to conceal
those events';
Allegations concerning the
secret delivery of substantial
sums of money to the seven
Watergate defendants, their
attorneys, and their agents, and
alleged assurances respecting
Executive Clemency;
Allegations concerning
attempts by the White House
to involve the CIA in an
attempt to block or limit the
scope of the FBI's investigation
of the Watergate break-in;
Jeb Magruder's testimony
before the Grand Jury and at
the Watergate trial, including
the alleged decision to offer
perjured testimony;
The alleged attempts by the
White House to have the CIA
retrieve material delivered to it
by the Justice Department
after the Watergate break-in,
including a packet of
photographs containing
evidence of the break-in of
Ellsberg's psychiatrist's office;
Disclosures made during the
Senate Judiciary Committee
hearings on the confirmation
of L. Patrick Gray III as
Director of the FBI;
Watergate and aftermath,
Feb. 25. 1973 to July' 16.
1973, including the response
of various individuals after the
gradual disclosure of the scope
of Watergate.
4. The formation of the
Special Prosecutor's Office.
and the breakdown in
agreements and understandings
regarding that office.
The removal of Special
Prosecutor Archibald Cox after
his refusal to acquiesce in the
White House demands that he
desist from trying to subpoena
tapes and documents from the
White House;
White House tapes, including
an analysis of the information
that could reasonably be
expected to be contained in
the tapes originally subpoenaed
by the Special Prosecutor's
Office and a review of the
efforts to obtain those tapes,
their availability and current
status:
The apparent obliteration of
1l,. minutes of the tape
recording of Presidential
conversations on June 20,
1972.
Allegations concerning
improprieties in connection
with the personal finances of
the President:
The findings of the staff of
the Joint Committee on
Internal Revenue Taxation
relating to the President's
personal finances, including a
determination of whether there
was criminal tax fraud for
which the President was
responsible this includes
deductions claimed for a gift of
personal papers and expendi-
tures by the government on
Presidential property at Key
Biscayne and San Clemente
that the committee staff
declared to be personal
income.
5. Allegations concerning
efforts by the White House to
use executive branch agencies
for political purposes, and
alleged White House
involvement with election
campaign contributions:
Allegations that con-
tributions to support the
President's re-election
campaign were given to
purchase ambassadorships;


Allegations that in return for
a pledge of campaign
contributions the President
ordered daily import quotas to
be lowered and price support
levels to be raised:
Allegations that in return for


President Nixon... impeachable offences?


support during the 1972
Presidential campaign the
sentences of various prisoners
were commuted;
Allegations that attempts
were made by the White
house to use the Federal
Communications Commission
to control and retaliate against
media criticism;
Allegations that attempts
were made by the White House
to use the Internal Revenue
Service to harass "enemies" of
the Administration and to
prevail upon the IRS to be
lenient towards friends of the
President:
Allegations that
Administration officials caused
the Antitrust Division to
permit various mergers and
acquisitions to go unchallenged
because the participants made
campaign contributions to or
had personal or political
connections with the President:
Allegations that the White
House attempted to use the
Antitrust Division to control or
retaliate against media
criticism.


Allegations that an antitrust
suit against ITT was settled in
return for a pledge of financial
help toward the cost of
conducting the 1972
Republican National Con-
vention in San Diego and:
that perjury may have been
committed by several
Administration officials during
the Senate hearings on the
nomination of Richard G.
K leindienst as Attorney
General:
Allegations that Atty. Gen.
John N. Mitchell caused the
Antitrust Division to substitute
civil for criminal charges
against a defendant because of
a pledge of financial assistance
to the Republican Party;
Allegations that the White
House exerted influence on
various Federal agencies to
direct their efforts in such a
manner as to promote
improperly the President's
re-election;
Allegations that the White
House suppressed criminal
proceedings against certain
recipients of aid from the
Small Business Administration
for political reasons, and
allegations of favouritism in the
SBA loan programme for
persons who supported the
President's re-election
campaign;
Allegations that the White
House participated in the
solicitation or receipt of
campaign contributions made
by Robert Vesco, involved in
the criminal action in new
York against Mitchell and
Maurice Stans.
Allegations that preferential
treatment was obtained from
the Securities and Exchange
Commission. the Department
of Justice and other agencies to
certain individuals who had
given political support
In addition, the staff is


awaiting release of a Senate
Armed Services Committee
transcript of hearings on the
secret bombing of Cambodia to
determine whether that subject
should be made a part of the
presentation. (AP)


American


By Henry Brandon
Washington these days is like living in a vast court
room. In Congress the stage is being set for the crucial
impeachment vote and in the White House a visitor
quickly senses that its occupants feel as if they are
waiting in the dock. And as to the President, as one of
his advisers put it, "it is in his nature to participate
compulsively in matters affecting his survival."
It is not surprising therefore that many people here


and abroad are asking how,
this nation is governed.
Why has there been no
serious breakdown in the
functioning of the
Government, which under the
American system depends so
heavily on presidential
leadership? There is no simple
answer, except to acknowledge
first of all that the American
Government is a much more
stable institution than it is
usually given credit for.
Secondly, however deplorable
Mr. Nixon's judgement was in
the choice of his immediate
entourage, the men he selected
to run the principal
governmental departments
proved to be remarkably
felicitous.
Dr. Kissinger is widely
considered one of the greatest
Secretaries of States; James
Schlesinger, Secretary of
Defense, is a strong,
independent-minded, highly-
qualified expert in military
affairs; Secretary of the
Tresury George Shultz is an
economist in his own right and
did not need much presidential
guidance; Roy Ash, the
Director of the Office of
Budget and Management, has
proved a capable manager; and
Caspar Weinberger, the
Secretary of Health, Educa-
tion and Welfare, has churned
out some remarkable new
legislation. It is also true that
the American civil service is a
far more effective machine
than some people think.
One of the leading British
civil servants recently


under these circumstances,
developed the theory that the
civil service reacts to its
masters in sexual terms. In a
weak government or with a
weak minister it asserts its
masculinity, but when up
against strong superiors, it
reacts in a more acquiescent:
feminine way. Whether this
comparison holds in a Women's
Lib era is another matter, but
it seems to me to have a good
deal of truth to it in
Washington these days.
And thirdly, President
Nixon has been participating in
the dedision-making process
more than one might perceive
on the face of his
precocuparion with Watergate.
even though to the distress of
many insiders, he tends to
alternate between intense
involvement and abrupt
seclusion. His remoteness from
governing is nothing new. Ile
has always preferred to
delegate much of his authority
in fact too much and he
has not changed.
What has changed is that
after the forced demise of
Haldeman and Ehrlichman the
dictatorial use of power from
the center have declined and
cabinet ministers all loyal to
the President and to the cause
of government stability, have
been acting more as though
they were running their own
dukedoms.
Secretary of State Kissinger
was given an unusual latitude
by the President and by now
partly because of his success


keeps


and political shrewdness, partly
because of the decline of the
President's prestige, has
developed such personal
support in Congress and in the
country that it has given him a
power position of his own.
He, Schlesinger. Admiral
Moorer, Chairman of the Joint
Chiefs of Staff. and Director of
the CIA Colby have been
meeting for lunch every Friday
to discuss the world but
without the President.
It was also Kissinger,
Schlesinger and Admiral
Moorer who. apparently in the
absence of the President
initially decided to call for a
nuclear alert during the Middle
l'st crisis last year.
In matters of domestic
policy Roy Ash has become
the most powerful man. He is
instinctively aware that one of
his predecessors was fired by
Nixon because he demanded
too much of the President's
time. He is careful to avoid
such a mistake. But he also
admits frankly that 50 crucial
budgetary decisions since last
August were dealt with by
written communication with
the President.
In each memorandum he set
out objectively the pros and
cons and over a period of four
weeks the decisions, initialled
by thePresident, were returned


U


stability


it going


to Ash at the rate of two or
three a day. The procedure
confirms the remark of a
public official who once
referred to the methods of the
Nixon Administration has a set
of compartments connected by
memoranda.
The Nixon Administration
had produced some good and
some bad legislation, but if in
the end Congress passes a
National Health Insurance Bill,
Nixon will deserve a share of
the credit. The chances that
such a Bill will ultimately win
approval are good, for Senator
Kennedy and Congresssman
Wilbur Mills have made some
major concessions, which have
substantially narrowed the
difference between their own
and the Administration's Bill.
But to govern also means to
able to influence Congress on a
broad front. Nixon's task with
a Congress that is dominated by
the opposition was not easy
from the start and now with his
own party deserting him more
and more, it will become
almost impossible. After this
year's congressional elections he
may well be confronted with
such a Democratic majority
that Congress will have the
votes to overturn any
presidential veto.
(Copyright, 1974, The
Sunday Times, London)


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The Tribune - Tuesday, April 30, 1974


CLASSIFIED


SECTION


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bathroom attached.

Attractive Cable Beach
residence near the sea, with
beach rights, going for onln
$55,000 furnished Three
bedrooms, two baths. sparioii
living-dcning room operninrq orn
to patio, large kithenl,
laundry, ( airport
H G CHF iR TI I T
Ph(r re 1(: 4] 21 11

C 14390
MUST SELL
Lot 100 x 100. Situated N'.s.,,
Village $5,500 or nearest .,'I..i
Acres at $8,500.00 p.i .n i, .-
nearest ofter Situatf' MjiI 'l'
Allotment with fIun tni t .- i
24068.


C 14026
DAVSON'S REAL ESTA4i
CO LTD.
Certified Reil Estate Br o~er'
Phones 21178 bb408
P 0. box N- 448
Nassau, Bahari ni
Proudly presr-'
SMASHING RE AL F STA t
BARGAINSl
THROUGHOUT If I
COMMONWEAL TI
2., 3 arid 4 BEI [)i OM
HOUSE S in the I, ,ll(winqig
areas.
E ASTERN ROA!
on the water as well as onn th;
hills.
SAN SOUCI
BLAIR STATES
GLENISTON GARDF-NS
WINTON
THE GROVE (Wes,t iav),
SKYLINE HEIGHrS
NASSAU EAST
SEA BREEZE
VILLAGE ROAD
GOLDEN GATES
HIGHLAND PARK
PROSPECT Rli)GF
WESTWARD VILLAS
CONDOMINIUM
APARTMENTS
in PARADISE ISLAND
EAST BAY STREET
WEST BAY STREET
HOTELS and HOTEL SITLS,
BEACH LOTS, COMME R
CIAL LOTS, RESIDENTIAL
LOTS
ACREAGE FOR
DEVELOPMENT IN THE
NASSAU AND FAMILY
ISLANDS SUCH AS GRAND
BAHAMA LONG ISLAND,
ELEUTHERA, ABACO
45 ACRE CAY IN THE
EXUMAS WITH DEEP
WATER HARBOUR AND
MORE
CALL
DAVSON'S REAL
ESTATE AGENCY
ohone 21178 or 80932 21178
P. 0. Box N-4648
Nassal, Bahamas.


I REAL ESTATE


L. 14 39I
HiOMt flo',p't i ide on.' Gol" f
Couiw N atil' 2 j s. 2
stole 3' bt)edil m 3
bathi ir w, r. x, I l r!i q r Ia id
dini l t o, ioil 2 I ,,(ed paved

t"i'r ar s G Io' t foi e tr I'i lint r
,iitI( numbi Oeirb Ma l id .' 1 3ar tears.
O ',, well water ReduiICd to
$1 1 5.000 Ii rn untiiiitnshed.
leiteph i.e. 2 4148 o, 2 3021/
Mo Itv & 0'B nc Real EUtjt,1
(B3RE A BlnokesI)


WANTS TO RENT
C 1-13 31
t N LIS H fan iiv relcii. .s
thr ee bedi oon0 m Iouse.
i el iably urni fLu i tshid or
par tly furnishecl. Caal l 1'b].


PUBLIC AUCTION
C14377
HARRY D. MALONE will sell
at the Mubile Unit, Oakes Field
on Thursday May 2nd 19/4 at
10 a.m. MOTOR CARS,
MOTOR SCOOTL RS AND
BICYCLES
t lay D Malone
Public Auctio reer.


FOR RENT

C 14254
1 BEHDF ?OO 'V frnish 10d
apartmoelnt up al. 'rvr the
iu,.( ,nfor '.la rotu ajll ` -4f, i t


C 1 1333
NAtSSAU HILL (RE Si


TOWE RS
Swimming pool. sun terrace
I bedroom apartment, fully
furnished. $2b0 per month.
Contact 7-8421 or 2 Evening
/ 7065.

140;.'4-
( C'O TAGt S aid apartments
mnr t h I y ir onrditionec(.
full', furirhed. rnmaid service
available Lover garden and
swi min lc pool. Telephone
31297, 310'4-3

C 111 I.()
Two r u rrishod and
Air Conditioneda 1 -bedrooi
apartments, Ce ritreville. Ring
5 86 79., ask fo Mr Pritchard

C14381
APARTMLN I for rent
Richville !i tie. $145 00 per
month. fph(ie i 5r )30

C i 436
SHOPS AND OFFICES
FOR RENT
MNuidemr air o:iditi..n.ed office
arid toire ,sp.ae available in
bu'.v ',opiw'ri area. telephone
and rirmple Ij'ikirg Rental fees
Hv i appeal to the bu.i nessmanri
with .1a itur, Phof r 1301

C. 14. 96
WHiY PAY M.iORE TO bl EEPIR

,, (i l. l, r C ii i 0'


FOR SALE


SPt i i L SALI -rin veddiq
Gwr. $'ii $/5 and I.p T -
i Ph 1 r., 2 3 1.:
513318
C St 1 8
Ii OUS1 OI L rt te: j 'j.r le-
A l ,o 1 ',^ '!' ?,F"- a ,,-, -
re nrsrrarlay ira ,.-. I Cal -
| 'xr ept S trii' r dl C


r' IAL SA l ,I -, ".'. .q
C ,Gow''s n.frmn $/ ardi .;. Th,-
Youin% M,'. Market St- a iea
Haiv Phin ? ; i036)5

( 14 i 'i
REMNANT SALf
Nixron' UJphiuilstery Si.r ,cep,
Heinard Road Phole 4.11'8

( 14302
AIR ( ON1I TTIOER F 1 000
B IL A roIw For details
ph ,,rn !:': ( ,It, 1 1 ." '


cr-4 ,-

fA f lIS,
t pCUI



S) /13t/


S LC HANNI L
R 3J R b500
I API MONI OR
PL BACKAK
P .,- 6- 8 p ir


SALE

IRIMi BODY PARTS
l,-r aid 13 ,0 Rudy Panel-
rt ll Is i o is. Ett
T6(, MK II Panels Doors
Horron ts, i tI
Spiti ne MK II Panels Doors
Bur nits etl
NOW IS THE TIME TO
REPLACE ANY DAMAGED
PANELS AT A FRACTION
OF NORMAL COST.

SAVE 50% OR MOiE
TE RMS CASH NO RETURNS
NASSAU MOTOR
COMPANY LTD.
SHIRLEY ST.


FOR RENT


I I


C14252
SPECIAL SALE on Wedding
Gowns from $75 and up. The
Young Miss. Market Street near
Bay Phone 2 3365.


AS FOR SALE'

C1402l1
1972 VOLKSWAGEN 1300-
Sedans excellent condition,
radio, W/W tyres, low mileage.
Finance and insurance
available Call 36611-2-3-4.

C14403
1968 CHEVY Impala,
air conditioned, radio and tape
lel. 42066

CRAFT SUPPLIES

C14052
NOW in stock at Bahamiarn
Paint Supply, Bay Street:
. Cle.'r Cast
* Decoupage
* Candle Craft
* Tissue Craft
Phore 2-2386, 2-2898.


MARINE SUPPLIES
C14380
ONE Sunfish $500
One BMP 19 ft. motor boat
with 1972 Evinrude 100 h.p.
outboard in as new condition
and bra rd new galvanised
trailer fo, $2,500. Telephone
Peter Turner at 28711 during
office hours or 78091 at home.

C11894
1969 31 ft. CHRIS-CRAFT
Commander. Sleeps six, private
shower, two 230 h.p. engines
with less than 200 hours.
Kitchenette, good condition
Call 24267. 54011.


ENTERTAINMENT
C14365
THE NASSAU PLAYERS
PRESENT


I


NEIL SIMON'S COMEDY
May 6- 11
Governor's Hall
Sheraton British Colonial
Hotel 8:30 p.m.
Box Office Opens May 2
At the Trade Winds Liquor
Store on Bay Street, 2-2431.

C14315
AQUINAS COLLEGE
PRESENTS


"The Music Man"
Directed by Andew Currny
at
Garfunkel Auditorium
x 30 p. nr
May 3rd, 4th, 5th
Tickets priced Jt $2.00
obtainahle from the student,
of the -olieqe

I 1433b
SETTLER'S PUB & INN
B aumoint Arcade. Bay Street
Telephone 5-9739
TWO BANDS NIGHTLY
The Nassauvians
The Electric Circle
OPEN TILL 4:00 a.m.

IN MEMORIAL
C 14388
T ,- t el *" --.i i


IN loving memory of
MELVINA (NATHALIE)
KNOWLES who departed this
life April 29, 1971
Time heals they say and maybe
it does
But memories last on so does
love
Deep in our hearts you are
living yet.
We love you too dearly to ever
forget
Sadly missed by parents,
husband, six children, two
sisters and five brothers.


SCHOOLS


14000
LEWIS AUTO SCHOOL
Learn to drive with confidence.
Phone 59805 between 7 and
8:30 a.m. or after 6 p.m. or
35084 anytime.
C 14269
THE best care for your pro
school age children provide t
reasonable rates.
BEST CARE NURSERY
Weekdays 8:00 a.m.to 5:30 p.m
Miss C. M. Brown, Manaqeress.
C 14292
.ZF.GILL icw at rhe Nassau
Acoder.iy of Business in the
following classes:
Typing with Spelling
Shorthajnd
Bookkeeping
Switchboard
Front Desk Cashier
Night Auditing
Telex Operation
English
Mathematics
Filing
French
German
Spanish
Dictaphone Typist
Call the Nassau Academy of
Business today and join any cof
the abone classes. Phone
2-4993 (Located at Shirley
Street opposite Collins
Avenue.)

ANNOUNCEMENTS
C14063
JUST ARRIVED
NEW SHIPMENT
Polyester double knit 60-62
inches wide; also Jersey
material variety of colours,
custom made dresses for ladies
and children.
YOUR ONE STOP SHOP
FOR ALL SCHOOL
CHILDREN UNIFORMS
Also Polyester double knit
material for men all colours
MODERNISTIC DRY GOODS
Opposite Wulff Road Theatre
Telephone 3-4580

I N, TCE
C14385
THERE will be a General
Meeting of the Nassau
Outboard Club at Brown's
Boat Basin on Thursday the
2nd May at 5:3C p.m. to elect
new officers for 1974.
C14402
UNION NOTICE
THE ANNUAL GENERAL
MEETING OF THE
BAHAMAS HOTEL &
CATERING WORKERS
UNION WILL BE HELD ON
SUNDAY MAY 26, 1974 AT
TAXICO UNION HALL,
WULFF ROAD AT 9:00 P.M.
ONLY FINANCIAL
MEMBERS WILL BE
ALLOWED TO TAKE PART
SIGNED: BOBBY GLINTON
GENERAL SECRETARY

WANTED
C14294
Wanted for renting...all kinds
of boats for the Television
series "Salty the Sea Lion".
Telephone 3-1881.

HELP WANTED
C14329
PHOTOGRAPHIC AND
Lithographic Technical
Consultant. Apply in writing to
P. 0. Box N-226, Nassau,
Bahamas.
C14272
STUDENTS 15 to 17 years old
with artistic ability needed for
summer lob employment.
References from art teacher
required. Call 5-1347 after 6
P.m. for interview.

C14398
ONE experienced farmer. Only
Bahamians need apply. $30 per
week. Telephone 4-2289


C14359
CREDIT ASSISTANTS
FOR
INTERNATIONAL BANK
MALE OR FEMALE
CREDIT ASSISTANTS
FOR
INTERNATIONAL BANK
MALE OR FEMALE
Must have following
qualifications:
1 University graduate
preferably with degree in
accounting, business
administration economics or
finance, or
2. Good high school record
with minimum of four "0"
levels including English and
Maths, or
3. Minimum of three years
banking experience preferably
in International Dept.
4. Under 30 years of age.
Applicant will receive
indoctrination in various
banking departments before
being assigned specific duties
and responsibilities in Credit
Department Starting salary
commensurate with
educational background and/or
experience. Attractive fringe
benefits.
Only Bahamian applicants with
above qualifications need
apply. Please send complete
information to G. C. Carroll,
Vice President, World Banking
Corporation Limited, P. 0.
Box N-100. Nassau.


HELP WANTED


C14325
TWO MILLINERS with five tc
ten years experience in
Dressmaking, Designing and
Millinery work.
If interested, call 35196
Pedican's Variety Store. Corner
of Milton and Market Street
between the hours of 9 a.m
and 7 p.m. daily.

C14273
COUPLE wanted as managers
for Current Yacht and Diving
Club, Eleuthera. Must be able
to take complete charge of resort
business, and iepoit directly to
the President of the Company,
abroad. Will be responsible for
maintaining books and records,
purchasing, food and beverage
preparation and control, staff
supervision and training. Salary
negotiable depending on
experience and training, but
not less than $12,000 per
annum plus beard and room.
DIVEMASTER wanted for
Current Yacht and Diving Club,
to take complete charge ol
underwater and other aquatic
activities. Must be capable of
operating and maintaining
small boats, motors, regulators,
valves, compressors. Must train
Bahamian staff in above areas,
leading to diver certification.
Must hold at least one of
following diving certificates:
NAUI, PADI, YMCA. Salary
dependent upon experience,
but not less than $400 per
month, plus board arid room.

Reply in writing for the above
positions, giving full details of
experience and references in
first letter, to: Current Club, P.
0. Box N-88, Nassau, Bahamas

TRADE SERVICES

C14198
BODY WORK AND PAINT
JOBS.
For the best in quality ar1'
service have your car respraved
by The Nassau Repair Shop
Mackey and Chesapeake
Phone 24710 21716.
FREE ESTIMATES.


ENTERTAINMENT
M ov ies
Film & Equip. Service 2-2157

GARDEN & PET
SUPPLIES
Modernistic Garden -
& Pet 2-2868
Nassau Garden & Pet
Montrose Avenue 2-4259


HARDWARE

John S. George 2-8421/6

HOUSE PLANS

Evangelos G. Zervos 2-4128
LAUNDRY
DRY CLEANING
LNew Oriental Laundry 2-44061


I TRADE SERVICES


C14057
MASTER TECHNICIANS
LTD., Mackey Street, your
Nhirlpool distributor offers-
refrigerators, washers, dryers,
compactors, freezers iceo
makers, air conditioners anc
garbage disposers. Wi+h
fill warranty on ev.':/ home
appliance we sell service done
by factory trained mechanirs.
Telephone 23713. 5-9322.

C14374
SOUTHERN PAINTING
SERVICE
Specialising in spraying house
roofs, furniture, stipple
finishing, appliances.
Telephone 5-1919 (days)
3-6700 (nights).


C14022
SEWING MACHINE
PARTS AND R'.PAIRS
Island Furniture Company
P. 0. Box N 4818, Nassau
Dowdeswell and Christie Street;,
Telephone 21197, 23152.

C14027
Pinder's Customs

Brokerage Ltd.

Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU BAHAMAS
P. 0. Box N3714
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
-PECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-3796
2-3797, 2-2798
Airport 7-7434
FREE ESTIMATES


BOOKSTORE

The Christian Book Shop Cody's Records 8500
5-8744 OPTICIANS

RUSINEJSS FORMS Optical Service Ltd. ;'-3910,1
Executive
Prirters 2-4267/5-4011: PAPER
CABINET MAKERS 'Commrile Paper 73'
4 ABI~fc I~Honnse 5-973' ^
Commonwealth
Furniture 31120o PRINTING
Wong's Printing -.45Ub
CAMERAS
Executive I:
John Bull 2-4252/3 Printers 1-4267/5-40!1


RHAUIUO& T.V.SALES
Carter's Records .2-471


I TRADE SERVICES


TRADE SERVICES


C14001 C14023
T. V. ANTENNAS FOR your building needs anz:
Boost for home CRANE hire see:
Boosters for homes I S LAND BUILDE 11
apartments and hotels LIMITE
Call 5-9404 LIMITED
WORLD OF MUSIC P. 0. Box N-4559
Mackey Street Phone 31671 31672
Next to Frank's Place
you believe nobody C14400
*I reads small ads ... LANDSCAPING and for all
|4 you're wrong. You are your gardening needs.
reading this aren't you? trimming, hedging, pruning and
Call 2-2768 for tree felling. Call 5 7810.
/ information on small or LAWNS AND HEDGES.
large display ads.




MAND BAHAMA



_CLASSIFIED


ANNOUNCEMENTS
C 15069
SHAWNEE Dailv Servicl-
between West Palm Beach and
West End for Reservations call
IThe Grand Bahama Hotel (Ex.
5)

REAL ESTATE

IC15072
I LOTS LOTS- LOTS- LOTS
I OWN A PIECE OF FREEPORT
We have lots of lots,
Residential, Commercial,
Waterfront, all around
Freeport, Lucaya, Close in
Ready for building, SELECT
FROM $2000 UP, Low down
payment Easy terms.
SACRIFICED
Because owners have changed
plans, deaths, divorces or
repossessions J.S.R. REAL
SESTATE, Freeport's First
Licensee, No. 5 Savoy
mBucilding, Pioneer Way, Box
F-93. Freeport, 352-8811.

HELP WANTED
C15102
Job Title INDUSTRIAL
ELECTRICIANS
Minimum Education Good
basic education. Minimum
SExperience 5 years
experience preferably in
cement plant 01or similar
industry.
m Duties/Responsibilities
Inspect repair, install and wire
all electrical apparatus, devices
and circuits of any voltage in
cement plant or assigned area.
Interested Applicants Contact
Personnel Department, Bahama
Cement Company, P. 0. Box
F-100, Freeport Grand
Bahama.


C15121
ACCOUNTANT Should
possess a thorough knowledge
of international investments.
Depositing of various incomes
in many assorted currencies to
Sthe best advantage of the
company. Individual should
also have the ability to
reconcile international bank
accounts in many currencies to
books kept in Bahamian
DOLLARS, and have a
thorough knowledge of
exchange rates and interest
computations as well as current
banking service charge
schedules. Apply to: Grand
Bahama Development
Company, Personnel
Department, P. 0. Box F-2666,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


C15109
SNAM PROGETTI S.P.A.
(Bahamas Branch) requires the
services of a DRAFTING
SPECIALIST for its project at
the Bahamas Oil Refining
Company Site. Applicant must
have at least five (5) years
experience in preparing
drawings and designs for the
laying of underground
electrical cables in Refineries
and Petrochemical plants. Only
Bahamians need apply in
writing to: Personnel
Administrator, SNAM
PROGETTI S.P.A. P. 0. Box
F-2405, Freeport, Grand
B Dhama


RUBBER STAMPS | ,K
Wong's Rubber Stamp A C15110
Co. 5-4506 GARDENER/GENERAL
4 HANDYMAN REQUIRED BY
SPORTS GOODS .*CAPTAIN'S CHARTHOUSE-
jFREEPORT. DUTIES

Champion Sport Land 2-18621 NECESSITATE ABILITY TO
T MAINTAIN LANDSCAPING
TRAVEL AND WILLINGNESS TO
Playtours 22931/7 ASSIST IN DISHWASHING
R.H.Curry Co., 2-8681/7 AND GENERAL CLEANING
R.H. Curry & Co., 2.8681/7 BAHAMIANS ONLY NFF


TV REPAIRS
Channel Electronics Ltd.
3.5478


UPHOLSTERING

Eddie's Upholstering 5-9713


. APPLY TO BASS BAHAMAS
LIMITED, c/o PUB ON THE
SMALL LIMITED, Box F-331,
FREEPORT, BAHAMAS.


C15104
Job Title GENERAL
REPAIRMEN Minimum
Education Good basic
education. Minimum
Experience -- 5-10 years.
Duties/Responsibilities -
Inspects, repairs, replaces,
I installs, adjusts, and maintains
I all mechanical equipment in a
cement manufacturing plant.
Interested Applicants Contact

Cement Company, P. 0. Box
I F-100, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.
L m 'mm1 mlm mm mmmm


HELP WANTED

C15107
Gardener wanted. See Ellis F.
Rolle, Box F-2174, Freeport
Bahamas.

C15108
WANTED: A Musician
Entertainer, with 10 years
experience. Man who can play
piano and sing with his own
piano and auto drums. Apply
Indies House.

C15106
REQUIRED: IMMEDIATELY
FOR CAPTAIN'S
CHARTHOUSE. CHEF TO
TAKE CHARGE OF
KITCHEN SPECIALIZING IN
GRILLED FOODS THE
MAN CHOSEN FOR THIS
JOB WILL REQUIRE
SPECIALIZED KNOWLEDGE
ON BUTCHERY PLUS
PROVEN EXPERIENCE ASA
GRILL COOK. A HIGH
SALARY AND GOOD
CONDITIONS ARE
OFFERED FOR THIS POSTED
APPLY TO BASS BAHAMAS
LIMITED, PUB ON [HE
MALL, BOX F-331.
FREEPORT, BAHAMAS.
REQUIRED: FOR THE PUB
ON THE MALL LIMITED.
FREEPORT, BAHAMAS. A
SUPERIOR COOK TO ACT
AS SECOND CHEF/NIGHT
COOK. EXCELLENT WAGES
AND CONDITIONS ARE
OFFERED FOR THIS POST.
APPLY PUB ON THE MALL
LIMITED, BOX F-331
FREFPORT, BAHAMAS.

C15105
GENERAL
SUPERINTENDENT
Applicant must have thorough
knowledge of Explosives and a
complete background in all
phases of Heavy Construction,
specialising in Manatowac 4600
Dragline Operations. Duties
include Project Management
and overall Construction
Supervision of Civil Works. Ten
years minimum experience in
supervisory capacity required.
Call 373-1046 Mr.
Hanshumaker for an interview
of write to LBI Excavation and
Engineering Ltd., P. 0. Box
F-306, Freeport, Bahamas

C15120
I N S U R A N C E
ACCOUNTANT Required for
Insurance Company's Bahamas
Branch Office. Position
involves responsibility for
preparing and maintaining
Branch Accounts, Supervising
Bookkeepers and Cashiers,
preparation of Budget,
Budgetary Control, Corporate
Planning and Statistical
Analysis as required by Head
Office in London. Appliants
should have at least five years
Accounting experience with
Insurance background and in
addition to having 'G.C.E.'
Ordinary Level Subjects in
Mathematics and English
should have made progress
towards a professional
AccorLnting or Corporate
Secretarial Qualification.
Salary will be commensurate
with qualilic -tiuons ,-:perience
and p -ei,:;-is positions held,
but will not b liss than
$10,000 per annun.
Applications marked "Private
and Con fident al''
should be in own handwriting
and addressed to: The
Manager, Sun Alliance &
London Insurance Group, P. 0.
Box F-26, Freeport, Bahamas.













USE

bhr Gribune

CLASSIFIED

ADVTS.


BUSINESS 6 PROFESSIONAL


DIRECTORY






BY



b iIt IktkiIlrctify Call21U1EXT. 5

I [In hrlkolhr 2 n1 hr1Muili .1

SE'IM SAVE M
ANTENNAS ~ MEN'S BOYS WER


If- MEN'S BOYS'WEAR
ANTENNAS-

Island TV 2-2618 | The Wardrobe -5599 .,

AUTOMOTIVE MEN'S WEAR

Lucas Batteries |Fashionette Ltd. 2-2376/7
Day Street Garage 2-24343|4 :


" FOR THE ACTION 10YU WANT




Shop Nassau Merchants
For Business And Services


__._


__


I I


- I


-


I L I


I


- a I I


- -4 .K


1,


1 i :


I


I


IL -


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)













The Tribune - Tuesday, April 30, 1974


GRAND BAHAMA

HELP WANTED HELP WANTED

C1511l experience, including work as
WAREHOUSEKEEPER/ equipment operator in a high
GANGLEADER Responsible pressure power plant, or
for operation of the entire comparable steam ship,
warehouse. Must know evidenced by certificates of a
warehousing practices for recognized institute.


proper receipt, storage and
release of cargo. Required to
organize and direct work of
gangs.

WAREHOUSEMEN 2 Must
be able to take full charge of
documentation regarding
receipt, storage disbursement,
damage of full variety of
Cargo. Must have substantial
experience preferably in
harbour cargo warehousing.
WAREHOUSEMAN -
PETROLEUM & VEHICLE
ITEMS Receives, unloads,
stores and dispenses lubricating
oils and grease. Must maintain
inventory records of petroleum
products and tires, batteries,
accessories. Responsible for
maintaining cleanliness of
warehouse.

ENGINEMEN 2 Applicant
assist in the overhauling and
repairs fo engines. Should have
had practical experience
working with diesel engines in
a power station or on ships.
LINESMEN/GROUNDSMEN/
CLEANERS 4 Must clean
and weed out door areas and
indoor, including washrooms
and toilets. Handles ships lines
in docking and casting off.
Must be available for night
calls.
G A N G L E A D E R
STEVEDORINGG) Must have
sufficient experience as
gangleader to control gangs and
ensure safety of men and
cargo. Must know gear and
rigging. Must be able to fill in
as Winchman, Hatchwayman or
Craneman. Must accept other
duties when there is no
stevedoring.

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
To senior officer. Significant
prior experience as secretary
required. Must be fast and
accurate at shorthand, typing,
filing; able to handle visitors
and telephone calls.

STEVEDORE Must be
physically able to do heavy:
work and know rigging, hatch
operation and cargo handling.
Must accept other duties
assigned.
WAREHOUSE ATTENDANT
Requires considerable
experience in stevedoring and
warehousing. Must be able to
assume responsibility for initial
tally of incoming cargo; must
know documentation of cargo.
Required to know sorting,
stacking, safekeeping to avoid
loss or damage.

DOCK FOREMAN
(MAINTENANCE) 2
Requires experience as
carpenter, sea-wright. Seaman
experience to enable fill in as
relief coxswain on pilot boat.
Must maintain dock fenders,
boats and buildings in harbour
area. Must assist in docking and
be able to take charge of
maintenance and cleaning
gangs.
STEVEDORE-FOREMAN
Must have ability to supervise
several gangs in loading and
unloading vessels, including
fragile and dangerous cargo.
Requires extensive experience
in work and allocating men;
knowledge of rigging, wire rope
and derricks. Must know
thoroughly work of Winchman,
Hatchway men and Crane
Operators.

RADIO TELEPHONE
OPERATOR Must be able to
communicate with ships,
sending and receiving messages.
Knowledge of morse code and
ability to send and read
incoming code messages
distinct asset. Night work
required on rotating shift basis.
SHIFT ENGINEER/IN-
STRUCTOR Applicant must
have substantial experience in
high pressure steam power plant
operation and as instructor.
Will be required to train
employees in electrical and
mechanical theory and conduct
practical training on total
power plant operations. Must
qualify as Shift Engineer and
work shifts in charge of plant
operation as required.
EQUIPMENT OPERATORS-
4 Would be required to work
shift hours and is directly
responsible to the shift
engineer on duty for proper


operation of the power plant
auxiliaries. Applicant should
hold a recognized station
engineers certificate or
equivalent withvat least three
years experience in the
operation of boiler equipment,
water treatment equipment,
etc.
CONTROL ROOM
OPERATORS 2 Applicant
will be responsible for the
monitoring and control of all
equipment for the central
control room. Individual also
responsible for control and
operation of the electrical
panels, including those feeding
the 69KV transmission system.
Rotating shift position. Must
know operation of all
equipment and must have
previous training and


TECHNICIAN (MECHAN-
ICAL MAINTENANCE) 2
Assists the Supervisor
(Mechnical Maintenance) with
overhaul and repairs to the
various pieces of Steam Plant
equipment in accordance with
factory instructions and
specifications. At least five
years previous maintenance
practice and experience is
required. Able to install and
align equipment, and familiar
with tolerances and fittings.
Must hold certificates for
pressure and alloy welding for
fittings, etc. on boilers and
steam lines.
TECHNICIAN AIR CON-
DITIONING Capable of
CONDITIONING Capable of
maintenance/repair all types
from window to largest central
units. Certificate of proficiency
and significant experience
required.
WINCHMAN/STEVEDORE
Requires substantial experience
as Winchman/Crane Operator
and proven ability to operate
machinery efficiently and
safely. Must know derrick
rigging. Prior experience as
seaman or stevedore involved.
When no stevedoring work,
required to do other work as
assigned.
METER INSTALLER
Knowledge of water meter
installation required. Must be
able to assist in other work
such as on pumps. Required to
do labouring work involved as
preliminary to setting meters.
This involves digging, and
removing earth and rock.


METER READER Reading of
all meters and recording of
same in Meter Reading Book.
Should notice consumption
irregularities and notify
customers or write service
request to proper department.
HARBOUR PILOT/DOCK
SUPERINTENDENT
Applicant must possess
extensive experience and
ability in piloting vessels in and
out of Harbour Berthing and
unberthing cargo vessels up to
30,000 D.W.T. (20,000
G.R.T.). Passenger vessels up to
26,000 G.R.T. and piloting
vessels in restricted coastal
roadsteads no restrictions on
tonnage. Individual should
have working knowledge of
Meteorological and
Oceanographic instruments for
teh purpose of recording
various observations and
attending to the instruments.
Minimum certification of
competency by the board of
trade or equivalent as first
mate foreign going and
should be able to carry out the
duties of a Harbour Pilot and
Dock Superintendent in shifts
as arranged by the Harbour
Master.
INSPECTOR/COORDINATOR
For Utility Company (water).
Must be able to coordinate
with engineers and contractors
on specifications and design of
all new water plant equipment,
including pumps, controls,
mains. Required to prepare all
estimates for new construction
and order all pipe, valves,
fittings and pumps. Must
qualify to inspect and specify
maintenance of pumps and
motors and low voltage control
systems. Must prepare plans
and specifications and contract
documents for non major
projects, and prepare as built
drawings of installations. Must
m tain accurate records and'
statistics.
SERVICE STATION
SUPERVISOR Must be
qualified to instruct and train
pump attendants, to assist in
receiving cash and recording
sales, to assist in taking
inventories, to receive and keep
track of accessories brought for
repair and to work as necessary
in station forecourt.
Apply to: Personnel
Department, Grand Bahama
Port Authority, Limited, P. 0.
Box F-2666, or 30C Kipling
Building, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.


Chess
By ILEONARD BARDEN















move) about this position
recent international. What did
Benko play, and how did the
Pawr Qum: 20 aeoonda, rand-
master; 40 eaoond, a
master;; 2 milnltes, expert; 4
minutes, county player; 7
minutes, club standrl; 12
minutes, avwege; 30 minutes.
novice.


CARROLL RIGHTER'S 27 Cm j

liHOROSCOPE
from the Caroll RW h InstituREX MORGAN, M.D.
GENERAL TENDENCIES: You have the
ability now to accomplish almost anything of a HOLON PLEASE, AY
constructive nature you wish Come to a decision as to what UNE- ---TELL HER---
goals mean the most to you and then direct your productive SURE YOUR FATHER WOULD
efforts towards making it a daily routine. WANT ME TO GO TO1 THE
ICE H OW WITH.
ARIES (Mar 21 to Apr 19) Engage in activities today that T
will lead to greater abundance Close friends can be helpful in
presenting new opportunities


TAURUS (Apr 20 to May 20) Put finishing touches on any
creative ideas you now have before putting them in operation.
Plan recreation during spare time

GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Show more active devotion to
kin, otherwise they may feel neglected by your cool manner.
Do some entertaining at home tonight.

MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Try to buy in
quantity now so that you save money in the long run Go after
that advice you need from the right sources.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) An ideal day to engage in new
project that can add to your income. Consult financial expert
for advice and become highly inspired

VIRGO (Aug 22 to Sept 22) You can see very clearly how
to gain a personal aim that means much to you. A congenial
group can help you expand at this time.
LIBRA (Sept 23 to Oct 22) If you quietly get into huddles
with those from whom you want backing, you will get
excellent results Keep within your budget.

SCORPIO (Oct 23 to Nov 21) An excellent day to get
together with good friends and talk over whatever is
uppermost on your mind. Pay your bills on time.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 to Dec 21) Contacting those
bigwigs who can help further your finest talents is wise. Show
others you have exceptional ability.

CAPRICORN (Dec 22 to Jan. 20) There are many
opportunities that you can take advantage of now, so stop
wasting valuable time Relax at home this evening.

AQUARIUS (Jan 21 to Feb. 19) Use modern methods in
attending regular duties Mate is in a most receptive mood now
so take advantage of such Be charming.

PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar 20) A friend is desirous of talking
something over with you that could be of mutual benefit.
Show more cooperation Discuss the future.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY he or she will want
to be proper and precise in all activities, but teach early in life
not to be too preoccupied with such at the sacrifice of big
issues An ideal chart for laboratory work and investigations
since the mind here is a discriminating one. The spiritual will
be absorbed quickly
"The Stars impel, they do not compel What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


"I wish I had accepted his proposal before he got the
notion that marriage is going out of style."

B ridge How should declare play?
y Y MOLO Make your plan before reading
For the first time in the annals on.
of bride in the AntipodesNew Which card did you play from
Zealand have beaten Australia duamm et trick six ? fo
and will represent Zone 7 in t East
next month's world champion- A K 7 4 3 2 108 7 6 5
ship in Venice. AX 74732
In the zonal play-off t Sydney, 7 5 AK 6
Series and Smilde were formid- For the n the play is
able as ever. but the supporting H n h
cast was not of the cla shown automatic. He ruct a heart
by Australian teams in recent this unucky distribution. When
years. this unlucky dlstribution.Wnen
The last hand of the match West shows out on the second
offered an interesting lesson in round of t arump, South over-
technique.takes the Q and continues with
North diamonds, catching East's un-
finNorth essble 410.


0J 9 8
SAK J 10 5 2

4 A K Q J 9
Q 10
10 842
The unbeatable game in no
trumps was reached in one room,
but in the other, the contract
was 34.
The defence began with the
VA K, the 6A K and another


Chess Solution
1 . RxB!; 2 RxR, Kt-
Kt6 chl; 3 K-KtI (3 Q or
P x Kt fails to 3 ... Q-B8 mate.
White's bishop is pinned against
the kinq and cannot take the
queen), Q-KtS ch; 4 K-B2,
Q-B7 ch; 5 K-KI, Q-B8 ch;
6 K-B2, Q-Q7 ch; 7 KxKt,
QxR mate.


6* c


UOW many
or words of
Sour letters
A B ,or more can
-1----- you make
front the
letters shown
0O I Y I ere? In
making a
word, each It
D I N letter m a Y
be used once
only. Eachl
word must contain the large
letter, and there must be at
least one eight-letter word In the
list. No plurals;: no foreign words
no proper names. TODAY'S











-rm-- -




Across
1. North Briton. (4)
N. Backbone. (5)
7. Near the bath, doubtless.
(3)
10. Required by many shop-
keeper. (<, 4)
11. Shameful (4)
12. Prove dlfl.cult to And. (3. 6)


TARGET : 16 words, good:
20 words. very good: 24 words.
excellent. Solution tomorrow.
SATURDAY'S S OLU TION :
Afire afore after alert aloe alter
ariel earl falter fare fate fear
feat fet felt feral fe ffetal file
filet filter lire flare flea flier
floater floe floret FIA)RIATE
foliate fore lorel forte fret Irate
late leaf leat left Ilef life litre
loafer lofter loiter lore oiler
orate orfe oriel rate real refit
refloat reft retail rife rifle rite
role role tale tare teal tear teral
tier tile tiler tire toiler tore tre-
foil trifle triole.

13. Horse's gait. (4)
14. scar. (4)
15. Made a tremendous noise.
(9)
20. Royal. (3)
21. Light winds. (4)
22. Relied. (8)
Down
1. Scream. (6, 3)
2. Asset entry in bookkeeping.
(6)
3. The usual standard. (2, 7)
4. Little Edward. (3)
3. Keep fairly silent. (3. 6)
6. Stepped. (5)
7. Vale of London. (3)
8. Flower. (3)
9. Express
rude. (3)
14. Miserly.
(4
17. W a t er
o autlet.
1,. Fr ee.
19. fore. urdea .
(5) iloa'dswhloe


JUDGE PARKER


S9af


Dal Curtis


Paul Nichols


APARTMENT 3-G By Alex Kotzky


STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD


Saunders & Overgard


I


*4
.4
II
'I
*9


|jlm[erlT-IN


r


I












10~~ 30 17


Boston's

dream

begins

to come

true


RETIRED
champion of
Boston Blackie


heavyweight
the Bahamas
has a dream. a


dream that he began to
implement early last year when
he formed the Killarney
Amateur Boxing Club.
Concerned about the rising
crzme rate, Boston's main
interest is keeping the
youngsters off the streets and
out of mischief.
"Do you realize what might
have happened it I didn't
encourage my boys to take
part in sports'" he asked
concerning his last improving
a-iateurs 'That might have
been 40 or 50 dope smokers or
potential robbers.
He called upon parents to
allow their children to freely
play sports, thus giving them
something to do in their spare
tinne "Fighty percent of the
parents who go to work don't
know what their children do in
the day."
A ring veteran ot over 26
years Boston also called upon
the public on the whole to
support the various sports and i
the organizations involved.
"They don't help the Amateur
Boxing Association of the
Bahamas like the way they
should." said Boston citing the
poor turnout to the Associa-
tion's Easter Tournament.
"But they want to criticise."
Boston is different from
,-,ost trainers. Besides athletic'
form, he stresses to his pupils
manners and discipline. "This
is why my boys are so
o.f ul in most tourna-
ai r'ts. "In the master
tournament he collected three
v:ctores, from five matches.
"Being a trainer is a lot of
work because you have to
know what you are doing when
1.ou are telling the boys
so'nething.


Love
ROME With the arrest
and imprisonment last week
of 48-year-old Franco
Bettella, former 400-metres
hurdles champion and
athletics trainer at a school
near Rome, the romantic rites
of this Italian spring have
reached their climax.
Bettella's flight with
16-year-old Maurizia di
Cesare leaving behind him a
wife and seven children -
ended pathetically with his
capture at Bari railway
station, only a month after
the couple eloped.
It was a romance which


By Kerrington Wilkinson
D)EL JAN' Saints ripped
ileineken Stars 9-1 in the
nightcap of a double header
played at the Queen Eli/abeth
Sports Centre last night.
Short stop Bradley Johnson
was safe on a two base error
then advanced to third on a
wild pitch by Stan Smith.
1-dmond Moxey walked as
Anthony Bostwick grounded
out to second scoring Johnson.
Peter Bethel singled Moxey in
for Del Jane's 2 runs top of the
first.
Colin Knowles was hit by a
pitch then scored on Ronald
Smith's blistering triple to right
centre field for Heineken's I
run bottom of the first.
With two down Johnson and
Bowe singled as Moxey walked
to occupy the bases.
Bostwick picked on Stan
amith's first offering for a
single plating Johnson and
Bowe to give Dl)el Jane a 4-1
second inning lead.
Heineken could not get
anything started in the second
and third frame as Kirk Smith
kept ordinance on the hill.
Del Jane's centre fielder Joe
McPhee walked leading off the


3 is another hurdle to former track star


both excited and appalled
Italians, giving new life to the
Latin lover legend and the
stuff of stern moral argument
for anti-divorce propagand-
ists. For the latter it whipped
up support for their case in
preparation for the May 12
referendum on the
maintenance of the new
divorce law.

Although their romance
baptized by Italian
newspapers as the "Love and
Gymnastic Affair" may
have divided local public
opinion, it is doubtful if the


seat of approval would have
been bestowed on France and
Maurizia even by Nabokov's
Humbert Humbert and
Lolita.
Maurizia in training,
showing off her flashing thighs
the proudness of her breasts,
the sensuality of her full lips
and aquiline nose, must have
sent Franco into a state of
delirious excitement.
He stood it for two years,
but sadly found it necessary
to obscure his passion when
interviewed shortly before his
arrest. "I know my love for
Maurizia will force me to


hide. I am ready for any
sacrifice," he said adding
inconsequentially "she's a
great athlete and runs the
'2,000 metres in 6 minutes 50
seconds."
Statistical reminiscences of
this kind would have appalled
poor Humbert. So would
Franco's habit of taking
Maurizia on training runs
during their brief elopement.
To some this also seemed
rather un-Italian. Maurizia,
too, has shown none of the
cool indifference of Lolita.
Throwing her arms round
Franco's neck as he was being


arrested she tearfully cried
that she would wait till she
was 18 and then marry him at
all costs.
Their romance may be
doomed, however. Franco
Bettella faces charges of
"consensual removal of a
minor for lustful purposes."
And the outcome of the
divorce referendum may put
an end to, Maurizia's plans.
But the popularity of
athletics among Italy's female
population may bring some
support.
Copyright. 1974. The Sunday
Times London


I


fourth frame. lie was sacrificed
to second on a bunt by John
Adderley and scored on
Xnthony "Rake 'n Scrape"
Bowe's double down the left
field line. Bowe left the game
as he injured himself sliding
into second base.


protest by Heineken Stars in
the bottom of the fourth
inning. Manager Willie
Thompson claimed tht Del
Jane catcher Ed Moxey
meddled with his batter Phil
Saunders bat while in the act
of swinging.


walked 4, struck out 14. and
dished out 6 hits on one run
while picking up his 6th win
against 2 defeats. Stan Smith
suffered the downfall.
In the first game St. Michael
Dodgers beat Curferg Cardinals
14-4 in junior League action.


Sizzling Saints


DEL JANE ROAR THROUGH 9-1


In the bottom of the fourth BBA acti(
frame bHeineken Stars The Saints plated three more Wednesdays
threatened to score as Bolrich runs in the sixth and one in the Becks's at 7
Ellis and Ben Rolle walked seventh Set meets De
then Phil Saunders was Kirk Smith hit a batter, at Q.E.S.C.
credited with an-in-field hit to HIGH SCHOOL CHESS
fil the bases. HIGH SCHOOL CHESS
However. Kirk settled down ('OPELAND MOXEY, un- Granville
to get Ellis on a force at home defeated in 11 games, captured, points finish
plate and struck out Barry the Home Furniture Floating Clifford Thut
Carroll and Panzy Johnson to Trophy following the C. C. Bannister tie
end Heineken's big threat. Sweeting High inner school eight points
The game was put under chess championship scored six a

Debbie starts Gibson


on victory trail


IN JUNIOR GIRLS
volleyball action Monday at
R.M. Bailey, C I. Gibson beat
R.M. Bailey 15-8 and 15-10.
Wendy Wallace got the game
rolling when she served three
points for R.M. Bailey before


her short rally was broken.
Debbie Tucker went to the
line for C.I. Gibson and made
good of her service as she
reeled off 7 points before her
teammate's double foul broke
her service.


A LITTLE HELP FROM EXUMIANS ... Mrs. Beth Stuart, chairman of the Exumi Fund Raising Committee presents
Captain Durward Knowles, chairman of the Family Island Regatta Committee with a :heque for $400. The money which
represents proceeds from a cook-out held earlier this month at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Cargill of Sea Breeze Estates,
will go towards defraying some of the expenses of the regatta which opens tomorrow at Exuma. Looking on is Mrs. Jean
Wilkinson, secretary to the Exuma fund Raising Committee.


Club selection


YOU MUST
W4 T DOWOn ON
THE BALL ANP
ALLOW THE tLr
OF THE CLUB TO
0ET THE BALL
AIRBOR12 E


U


9
L s~-~


TuIS IS A M gWOPGRe-N. IF THU FLAG\
IS AT TE FRlW, YOU WILL P6ACM IT WITH U
A 9-IRCV. IF IT 1 AT THE BACK, YOU WILL








NEVER GELECT YOtUR CLUB UNTIL YOU HAVE
LOOKED CAREFULLYAT TlE PN-#PR /T"IFO V


on will continue
'hen Carroll's play
:00 p.m. and Jet
l Jane Saints 9:30


Collie with nine
led second with
rston and Ashley
d for third with
. Harry Gibson
nd a half


Beryl Eve took her turn at
the line for R.M. Bailey and
with good defence from
Jennifer Isaac and Beryl herself
in the backcourt they trailed
7-6 on service changed.
The service changed hands
frequently as C.I. Gibson led
9-8.
Joanna Jolly went to the
line and served 6 points as her
team held their grounds for a
first set 15-8 C.I. Gibson
victory.
In the second set both sides
showed superb defense as
service kept on changing at 2-2.
Beryl Eve broke the silence
as she gave R.M. Bailey a 6-2
lead with assistance coming
from Jennifer Issac and Vangy
Smith.
C.I. Gibson playing sloppy
defense saw the gay R.M.
Bailey in front 10-4 on twisting
service from Vangy Smith that
dropped in openings through
C.I. Gibson's defense.
Assistance coach David
Patton called time which
seemed to sparked his junior
team as they returned to the
court and abridged the laughter
by R.M. Bailey and their
cheerful fans.
C.I. Gibson .,abled
themselves and good volleying
carried them ahead 12-10.
From there it was easy for
Gibson as Sandra McPhee
served 3 points to give Gibson
a come from behind victory.
C.I. Gibson now stand at 6-1
their only defeat at the hands
of St. Augustine's College.
R.M. Bailey has won I and lost
1.
Houston

rockets


NEW YORK Houston,
home of the U.S. space centre,
saw Astros' slugger Lee May
Launch some rockets of his
e own Monday night.
May slammed a pair of
two-run homers in the sixth,
highlighting a nine-run inning
and a massive offensive display
of 20 hits that carried the
S Astros to a 18-2 mugging of
the Chicago Cubs.
Dave Roberts, who hurled a
seven-hitter, was the
beneficiary of all the fireworks.
In baseball's only afternoon
contest, the Cleveland Indians
edged the Minnesota Twins
3-2.
The California Angels beat
the Boston Red Sox 7-2.
T5. t eIn a west coast night game.
Sthe Los Angeles Dodgers
AIT nipped the New York Mets 8-7.
The Indians rallied for two
runs in the ninth on
run-scoring singles.
Tom McCraw knocked in
four runs with a pair of homers
and a pair of doubles to help
InoN- the California Angels snap a
fivegame losing streak.
Willie Crawford's two-run
single in the first and rbi single
in the second helped Los
Angeles to an 8-0 lead after
two innings and the Dodgers
held for their seventh straight
K.SOS victory.


DEAN GIVES

TIGERS


NEW TEETH


BAIN TOWN TIGERS
should be a force to reckon
with in the next Bahamas
Amateur Baketball Association
series. Besides having done
several renovations, coach
Drexil Dean on Saturday
secured the services of Carl
Albury and Tyrone Hamilton
both of whom were first picks
in the B.A.B.A. draft.
Coach Dean also secured
Elisha Forbes and George Brice
as protective from their junior
squad.
Top draft choice in the
Paradise League Etienne
Farquharson of Budweiser
Eagles and Keith Taylor of
John Bull went to coach
Sidney Thompson's Schlitz
Beer. He protected Phillip
Culmer and Danny Stubbs
from the juniorr..
Coach Fred "Papa" Smith of
Nassau League champs Becks
Cougars was content to just
secure Tyrone Sawyer and
Clifford Rahming from Becks
Juniors.
Strachan's Afrikans pennant
winners in the Paradise League
had to settle for Livingstone
Bain and Wellington Forbes
both of Budweiser Eagles.
Neither dethroned champs
the Kentucky Colonels nor
Pinder's Basketball Club chose
any of the 64 juniors eligible
for the draft. The Classic Pros
and the Police Royals were
absent.
The following are the
remaining juniors drafted by
the senior clubs: Dwain
Wilkinson Nangoes; Lenny
Johnson Austin Albury, Noel
Munroe and Mervin Jones
Warriors; Levonne Moxey; Ray
Rose and Phillip Turner
John Bull.
Nassau League: Basil
Longley and Gary Knowles
Supersonics; Vince Miller and
Dennis Marshall Arawaks;
Ellison Tate Reef; Cleo


BASKETBALL
CLINICS
THE BAHAMAS Amateur
Basketball Association in its
efforts to continually upgrade
local standards of
basketball in an orderly
fashion, will sponsor open
clinics in rules and coaching
techniques from tonight to
May 3. Everyone is invited to
attend.
Conducting the clinics will
be Bill Alheim of Miami Dade
Community College, Mr.
Glenn Wilkes, coach at
Stetson University, and Bob
Davies of the Converse
Company.
On Friday and Saturday
evenings at 9 p.m. the
Association's two league
champions, Beck's Cougars
and Strachan's Afrikaans,
will play two exhibition
games against Florida AAU
Stars. The Cougars will take
on the visitors on Friday
evening and Strachans Auto
on Saturday.
CROSSWORD
WINNERS
THE CROSSWORD
competition held recently to
raise funds for the Swim
Clubs visit to Freeport was
won jointly by Brandon
Burrows, Domingo House -
Nassau and Phenton
Neymour Woods Street -
Nassau.
Their tie win could not be
broken as their cheer yells
were not applicable to
.the club.
Each will therefore receive
a $ 10 five voucher
redeemable at any Island
Merchant Shop. A $5 gift
voucher for the best cheer
yell was awarded to Miss S.
Dunn P. O. Box N 1404 for
Go! Go!
Ray! Ray!
Barracudas
All the way!
Very good ones also
received were Streak,
Barracudas, Streak and
Jeepers, Creepers,
Orange Streakers!
WHIST CONTEST
THE HENRY Bowen Cup
1974 Grand Bahama Whist
Competition is planned to
start around May 17 if
enough team enters by then.
The competition is in its
fourth year. Team wishing to
enter this year should contact
the competition organizer 0.
A. Brandon at 3529811,
Franklyn Stuart 3482813 -
3529811 or Hugh Bartlett at
the Evergreen Club at Eight
Mile Rock 3483221 -
3483610.
There will also be an
individual pair championship
tournament when Grand
Bahama 1973 whist pair
champion K. Saunders and C.
Newton will defend their title
for the Sand Piper trophies
donated by Mr. Jim White.
Pairs wishing to enter the
tournament should contact
the above persons.
RICHEST TENNIS
TOURNAMENT
THE RICHEST women's
tennis tournament in
history, carrying a first prize
of $32,000 will be played in
the Los Angeles Sports Arena
Oct. 14-19.
The announcement was
made by Virginia Slims,
sponsor of the women's
circuit.

MARK WINS
CAPT. MARK Phillips and
Columbus won the three-day
Badminton Horse Trials in
England for the third time.
He had won previously on
Great Ovation in 1971 and
1972.


SYDNEY Ray Baartz,
Australian soccer star who
suffered partial paralysis after
the team's match against
Uruguay Saturday, was
reported by hospital officials
today to be comfortable but
still ill.
Baartz, 27, collapsed at
his home Sunday after being
felled by punches twice during
the match which Australia won
2-0.
The team physician said
tests on Baartz are continuing.
He said an artery in Baartz'
neck had been damaged. This
had partly stopped the flow of
blood to the brain which had
caused paralysis on Baartz left
side and blurred his vision.
"The major problem is to
ensure that blood circulation
returns to normal and remains
normal," said Dr. Corrigan. He
said Baartz is likely to remain
in hospital for 10 days and
would require therapy for his
weekend arm and leg.
Dr. Corrigan said he was
hopeful that Baartz would
make a full recovery but
doubted that the player would
be able to play in the World
Cup finals in Munich later this
year.
Baartz was not among the
22 players selected Monday
night to represent Australia in
the tourney.


if he recovered fully. The
squad members do not have to
be formally notified to the
organizers until June 4.
The Australian Soccer
Federation has not yet decided
on whether to make an official
protest about Uruguay's
violent play. (AP)



LONDON Results of last
night's British soccer games:
English League
Division 1
Stoke I Manchester United 0
Leicester 3 Norwich 0
Division 3
Grimsby 2 Watford 2
Division 4
Mansfield 2 Doncaster 0
Scottish League
Division I
Aberdeen 0 Celtic 0
Dundee 2 Rangers 3
Partick Thistle 2 Dundee Utd. I
Division 2
Airdrie 2 Montrose 0
Alloa 0 Clydebank 1
Queens Park 6 Forfar 0

FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157


rH^iHii rtiu r ki T^


Manager-coach Rale Rasic
said Baartz would be reinstated



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that STANLEY RIDDELL MOIR
of East Bay Street, Nassau is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration should not be granted
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 23rd day of April 1974
to The Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N3002, Nassau.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that DOREEN MOIR of East Bay
Street, Nassau is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration should not be granted should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 23rd day of April 1974 (o The
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N3002. Nassau.


Punched soccer


star still ill


I


MENEW-Roopm


10 The Tribune - Tuesday, April 30, 1374


,. --- ;--- -- ---- ; --- '~-- -


His victory equalled the
record set by Sheila Wilcox.
Phillips' wife, Princess
Anne, finished fourth on
Goodwill.
Runner-up was Janet
Hodgson on Larkspur and the
American Bruce Davidson
with Irish Cap third.


6A kY 11 [ A


Rahming and Michael
Colebrook Rodgers; Gentry
Charlton and Steadman Forbes
- Saints.
All the other juniors not
drafted become free agents.
However, a senior club may
retain their 'free agent' after
one year.
The emphasis of recreational
leagues shall be on relaxation
and enjoyment. This was
brought out during last week's
B.A.B.A. convention.
The league must be
recognized as recreational by
the National governing body of
basketball which in this case
is the B.A.B.A.
A 'recreational league'
should not be a chartered
organization under the
direction of an executive
board.
Emphasis should- not be
placed on publicity and
participants should be required
to furnish their own playing
apparal.
The Bahamas Amateur
Basketball Association does
not play under the constitution
of the National Collegiate
Amateur Association. Thus,
the ruling that a professional in
one sport shall be considered
an amateur in another does not
apply in the Bahamas.
The B.A.B.A.'s constitution
is drawn up in conjunction
with that of the International
Basketball Federation and the
Bahamas Olympic Association
both of which B.A.B.A. is a
member.
The basketball association
however play under N.C.A.A.
rules.
The revision of the
constitution one of the
subjects on Saturday's agenda
was motioned to June 13
when a Stancil Ferguson
headed committee will report
on proposed amendments


I


5


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