<%BANNER%> Th Tribune Tuesday, April 16, i974
The
world
tonight
,"k. sun NT Nixon, whc
has beei. lold he owes
$467,000 in back (axes and
interest, has obtained a
60-day extension of the April
IS filing date for his 1973 tax
return.
Nixon asked for the
extension because of the
possible effect of the
back-tax ruling on his 1973
return.
The US Internal Revenue
Service (the American
domestic tax collection
agency! and an American
legislsative committee on
taxation ruled April 3 that
Nixon owed back taxes for
the years 1969-72
CHRISTIAN rouchet. a
hard line follower of Gen.
Charles deGeuDe, loday said
he was withdrawing as a
candidate in the French
presidential election. 25
candidates are still in the race
for the election to be held
May 5
IVOR Bell, former Irish
Republican Anin chiel in
Belfast, outwitted his jailen
Monday and cscjped from
the top security Maze prison
lea than two months after his
capture by the British \rmy
Embarrassed prison guards
admitted the 37-year-old Bell
had changed placoa with
another man detained at the
prison and being paroled on
compassionate grounds and
walked out in his Mead
without being recognized.
SEVEN persons were dead
and thousands homeless,
Monday in weekend flooding
in the southern slate of
M ivsissippi. The floods
resulted from torrential rains
that began Friday and
continued nonstop through
Sunday, leaving more than 16
inches of water in some areas.
Reports from A P.
Golan Heights battle rages on 40-mile front
11* I he Associated I'ress
SYRI \s ( \NNON I IKl Muted the
summit of Mount Merino-:
Israeli mechanized infantry moved up tlie
slopes in halftracks to reinfi
units.
Artillery and tank fire raged along the
Hermon ridge and the length of
the 411-rmle Golan Heights cease-fire line
for the .idtli straight ,1
One Israeli soldier was killed in the
shelling and two were wounded, the
military command in Tel Avr,
A biting wind rasped .i,;.>ss the slopes
of the mountain, with
miles per hour. Armoured halftracks
carrying Israeli troops lurched up the
mountainside to reinforce three
1.000 feet below the
biblical mountains "* .000-foot summit,
Israeli in blue American
jumpsuits huddled at their positions and
scanned tl aided slopes for
its
On a clear
day. the Hermon peak commands a view
Ol the entire 300 square mile bulge
captured l>> Israel during the war. and the
Syrian s. about 23
miles i
ive tried three times to
storm one of the Israeli posts and Sunday
sparked the heaviest lighting on the
Army topples President
in bloodless Niger coup
LAGOS. NIGERIA Scores of messages
praising the army takeover in drought stricken
Niger were broadcast 1 uesday from Niger's
capital by Radio Niamey.
The broadcasts, monitored in Lagos, gave no
indication however of the whereabouts or
condition of 57-year- old President Hamani
Diori who was toppled in the apparently
bloodless coup Monda)
But according to unconfirmed reports from
Paris, Diori and his famil) are sale and have
been placed under house arrest
The coup was led In It Col Sewn Kountie,
the French-trained chief of stall ol Niger's
2,500-man arm's
Kountie seized control of the laiull<
tormer French colony Monday morning
claiming the takeover was achieved without a
shot being fired.
Kounti charged in radio broadcasts thai
Kiori. in power since France granted
independence in 1961, had mishandled Niger's
"disaslerous situation" arising from the
castastrophic six yeai old v>est *,frican drought.
The dry spell has caused widespread death
inside the vast semi-desert nation and teru ol
thousands of refugees, mostly nomads, now live
in scattered refugee camps totally dependent on
food from abroad for survival
The country's meager agricultural eccmoim
of peanuts, cotton, millet and scughinii has
suffered severe setbacks from the lingering
drought, the worst in Africa lor over a hall a
centurv
Warrant out for Patty Hearst
SAN FRANCISCO A
warrant for the arrest of
newspaper heirevs Patricia
Hearst as a material witness to
a bank robbery was issued
Monday night It says a person
appearing to be Miss Hearst
was photographed during the
robbery.
Three persons previously
associated with the terrorist
Symbionese Liberation Army-
were charged with the Monday-
morning robbery of a San
Francisco bank \ I s
magistrate set bail of $500,000
each for Miss Hearst and the
h
I
three other persons
Authorities said the
photographs inside the bank
showed the person believed to
be Miss Hearst holding a gun.
An affidavit detailing the
charges was filed with the U.S.
magistrate.
The affidavit quotes an
unnamed person who says he
does not know it Miss Hearst
was a willing participant in the
robbery which resulted in two
persons being seriously-
wounded. The FBI said in a
separate statement that if was
en'irei. possible that Miss
S7SJT
Mr. Bill Martin and Family
wish to extend a very sincere
THANK YOU to all our
Relatives and Friends from all
expressions of Sympathy
Cards Telegrams and the
numerous Flower
Arrangements received during
our recent Bereavement.
willing
I Jllles
Hearst was not
participant.
U.S. at tomes
Browning, in describing the
photographs, said "I think this
is the tirst nine in the annals ol
legal history that a kidnap
victim has showed up in the
middle of a bank robbery It
she was involved and
investigation slums that, we're
going to charge her as a bank
robber. It's clear from the
photographs she may have
been acting under dun
The 20-year-old Miss Hearst
was dragged screaming from
her Berkeley apartment Feb. 4.
SLA, a group which authorities
sa\ is mullracial, heavily armed
and consisting of about 25
persons, claimed credit for the
kidnapping, and 12 days ago
Miss Hearst said iii a tape
recording that she was joining
their ranks as an armed
comrade.
"They went out of their way
to identify her as 'Tania'
Hearst," Browning said ol the
robbers.
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BLACK LABEL
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Distributed in the Bahamas by Bethell Robertson & Co. Ltd.
\i least 15,000 refugees, most of them
Tuareg nomads from Mali, have settled in a
camp sailed (amp I a/arei just outside
tin capital.
Nicer his also been plagued for years In
Inner divisions between the country's nomadic
peoples and the settled black African farmers
who the nomads once enslaved.
Kountie also attacked Diori's government as
"selfish" and "irresponsible" and claimed il was
riddled with corruption.
The lavish messages of praise, which the
radio sod were pouring in from indiMdu.il
cm/ens and organizations, were read between
broadcasts of martial music
Such broadcasts to demonstrate "popular
support" .lie common fare in Black Africa's
coup prone nations.
While there was no official announcement on
the whereabouts of Diori, diplomatic sources m
Paris said he and Boubou llama, President of
the National Assembly, were under house
arrest
One unconfirmed report from Paris.
id Dion's vale. Hamani, had been
killed Monday during the military takeover as
she resisted arrest by soldiers
The entire staff of Nigen's eiuhas.v in
Niger's oil-rich southern neighbour.
returned to Niamey, the capital. Tuesd.n
apparentl) recalled by the new government.
There were unconfirmed reports iii Lagos
thai Libyan officials plan to visit the coup
leader for talks Tuesday night.
There has been a diplomatic-
tug of war behind the scenes m
recent months between Libya.
Nigei's northern neighbour.
and Nigeria.
Some observers believe the
quiet struggle revolves around
the possiinhis ot mi discoveries
in Niger and the question of
"hen such oil. if found, would
be piped lor refining.
Dion attempted to steer his
predominantly Moslem coun-
trv on a middle course
between Arab and Black Africa
reflecting the ethnic divisions
N [thin Niger.
U.S. oil companies are
current!) prospecting for
petroleum in Niger and
diplomatic sources say the
result of their search may be
known later this year.
The coup also raises serious
questions for France which has
invested millions of dollars in
uranium exploitation in Niger's
northern region.
But there has been no
evidence yet the new
government intends any sharp
switch in Dion's moderate
foregin policy which inlcudcd
close relations with the French
The radio reported all was
calm in Niamey and said the
army was in "full control."
There was no report of
violence during the takeover.
In the radio broadcasts,
Kounlie announced the
constitution was suspended,
the national assembly dissolved
and all political organizations
suppressed
He said a supreme council
composed of officers would be
created soon to head (he
government.
Kountie said all
international agreements taken
by the previous government
would be respected "on
condition that they take into
ae.ount the interests and
dignity of our people."
"We have lailh in the
populace Kountie said. "It
must remain calm in order that
nothing regrettable happens."
An indefinite curfew was
imposed from 7:30 p.m. to 6
a.m. which Kountie said must
be observed "to the letter." He
said the curfew would be eased
as the situation becomes
normal But. he added, "we do
not want to undertake
anything in a hurry."
Lillle is known of the
43-year-old coup leader, a
French-trained soldier who
became Chief of Staff in 1973.
The coup brings to 15 the
total number of Black African
countries south of the Sahara
under military rule.
There have been over 30
military takeovers or abrupt
changes of government in the
14 years since Britain. France
and Belgium relinquished
control of their Black African
colonies. (AP(
Golan since the October War.
Israeli jet fighter planes roared into
action for seven hours Sunday, blasting
the Syrian invaders and gun
emplacements behind enemy lines
Reports from Damascus claimed the
Syrians had set up forward command
headquarters on a section of the Hermon
still in their hands, indicating they may
make further attempts to recapture the
summit peak.
I he Israeli and Syrian defense
ministers toured the explosive Mt
Hermon Range Monday as their armies'
tanks and artillery blazed awa> at each
other along the 40-mile Golan Heights
front
^^^ The Tel Aviv command
said defense minister Mottle
Dayan visited Israeli positions
on the strategic mountain
range on the northern tip of
the front It said a Syrian
bombardment erupted during
his visit wounding two Israeli
soldiers, but that Dayan mas
unhurt
Radio Damascus said Syria's
defense minister. Mai I
Mustafa Tlas, made a quick trip
to the forward command
headquarters of Syrian forces
on the 9.000-foot snow-clad
>f Hermon.
The broadcast said Tlas
conferred with Syrian field
commanders on the pro:
the Mt. Hermon battle and
visited wounded Syrian soldiers
on their way back to
Damaa
Syria's command said,
"hitler fighting that broke out
on Mt. Hermon Sunday
continued unabated Monday.
Our forces continued to inflict
heavy losses on the enemy." It
0 details
But Damascus government
to;, ei had
captureii a few positions
beyond the Mt. Hermon truce
line The Israelis denied it
Israeli troops hold most of
the high points on the strategic
Hermon, a mountain massil
situated in Syria. Lebanon and
Israel I hese vantage points
give the Israelis an unrestricted
I Arab lands 100 miles
and more away, including
Damascus and the airports
surrounding the Syrian capital
Monday's shelling followed
the bitterest day of fighting on
the Golan Heights front since
the October Wai
Israeli fighter-bombers
Itrafing runs Sunday
against Syrian units on \lt
Hen.non and Syrian and Israeli
tanks ind artillery battled
fiercely. Syrian sasualiies in
Sunday's lighting were put at
I 5 dead and the Israelis at 17
wounded
The Israeli command named
Brig i.en Rafael I ytan to
command Israel's northern
front with both Syria and
Lebanon. He replaces Ll Gen
Mordechai Gur. who was
promoted to Chief of Staff.
I > tan. one ol Israel's first
paratroopers. headed a
divisional task force during the
October War which held back
the Syrian thrust on the Golan
Heights and later counter-
attacked to within 23 miles of
Damascus. (AP)
Lebanese appeal
to UN Council
UNITED NATIONS
Lebanon urged Monday that
the Security Council take
"appropriate and efficient
means" to stop Israel from
raiding Lebanese territory .
Foreign minister Fouad
Maffah told the 15-nation
Council that a mere
condemnation of Israel for its
retaliatory attacks Friday night
on six Lebanese villages would
be received by Israel with
"indifference and contempt."
The Lebanese foreign
minister recommended
stronger measures.
Replying. Israeli ambassador
i I cko.ih said, "it is up to
Lebanon to prevent the use ol
its territory for attacks against
Israel. II the Lebanese
government permits Lebanon
to become a lawless gangland,
it is obvious that its neighbours
will treat it as a gangland."
PIGEONS !
DOVES!
PARAKEETS!
\\SS\I t.XRDIN
|Why Nixon-
had to
let Agnew
resign
WASHINGTON A new
book on Spiro T. Agnew's tax
case says that while President
Nixon kept voicing support
for Agncw in public, White
House aides eventually met
privately with Agnew to
demand his resignation.
Nixon was particularly
worried about Agnew taking
the "impeachment track" by
aiming his case toward the
House of Representatives,
according to the book, "A
heartbeat away." being
published today by Vikini
Press.
Agnew finally made a deal
with the Justice Department,
resigned Oct. 10 and pleaded
no contest to a single charge
of income tax evasion.
The authors of the book.
Washington Post reporters
Richard M. Cohen and Jules
Wit, over, said the Agncw
impeachment option "was
fraught with ominous parallel
for the President himself.
"If Agnew could be
impeached and convicted,
then perhaps it would not be
so difficult for the
now-reluctant Congressmen
to place Nixon on the same
track and ride him out of
office.
IO, an Agnew
impeachment trial would
raise in unavoidable terms the
basic constitutional question
vexing the Watergate-plagued
President: was impeachment
the mandatory first step for a
President or Vice President
accused of crime, or could he
be indicted first in a court of
law?
Cohen and Witcover said
that the decisive incident
behind Agnew's agreeing to
resign was a meeting Sept. 10
involving the Vice President.
one of his lawyers,
presidential counsel J Fred
Buzhardt and White House
chief of staff Alexander T.
Haig
llaig. "abandoning the
White House's addiction for
circumlocution and subtlety
let Agnew have it," the
book said "The Vice
President had to resign. (AP)
Kissinger's 6 points
for a better world
UNITED NATIONS U.S. Secretary of State Hen,-. Kissinger
Monday outlined a six-point programme aimed at a more
cooperative development of the world's natural resources.
In a speech prepared for a
special session of the United
Nation's General Assembly,
Kissinger said "we meet here at
a moment when the world
economy is under severe
stress."
Pointing to the oil crisis.
shortage of food grains and
increasing global inflation,
Kissinger said the solution can
come only through a realistic,
international effort.
"The great issues of
development can no longer be
realistically perceived in terms
of confrontation between the
haves and have nots," he said
Any effort by the less
developed nations to
artificially control raw
materials "will sooner or later
produce the organization of
the potenial victims into a
counterbloc," Kissinger said in
a not-too-subtle warning.
In introducing his six points.
Kissinger also underlined his
belief that the UN. should
avoid grandiose resolutions of
principles and aim for hard
work instead
"Our goal." he said, "cannot
be reached by resolutions alone
or prescribed by rhetoric. It
must remain the subject of
constant, unremitting efforts
over the years and decades
ahead."
The six points:
Action must be taken to
insure a more equitable supply
of oil and other energy
products while keeping an
inflationary price spiral from
occurring.
For its part the United
States is willing to help
oil-producing nations broaden
their economic base as well as
sharing technology and aiding
in industrialization.
There must be an end to
the cycle of raw material
surplus and shortage. But a
cartel of raw material
producers aimed at forcing up
prices "would have serious
consequences for all
countries." Kissinger said.
. The United States proposes a
cooperativee effort to include
'"urgent international
consideration of restrictions on
incentives for the trade in
commodities "
This means.
tile

said, that there rnusl
equitable access to s:
resources as well .1
markets by the produ
To support this there should
be a body of inter,
experts working with t!
divisions of resour.
determine the future si.
natural resources, he s
There must be a better
balance between
production and population
growth.
The United States
its agricultural technology.
including a
million to $675 million this
year to aid in boosting farming
technology.
Steps must i
keep the poorer nations from
destroyed I .
shifts in the suppl,
of such raw mater 1
welcome tl,
oil producers ha>
taken towards applyi,
new surplus revenues to the
needs of the pov 1
countries
The United Nations :
as the other ind 1
nations must continue
programme to the
developed world
Science must be
and put to greater use -
"the developing nal
most fundamental problems
unemployment and h
retarj said,
There must
commitment by-
poorer nations
development of
trading system.
monetary ij
positive climate for ,
flow of resources, both
and private
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The Tribune - Tuesday, April 16, 1974
GJhr uJribunr
Nullius Addictus Jurare In Verba Macistri
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON1 II oVPlKU. Publisher/Editor 1903-1914
SIRET1ENNEDUPUCH.0 B.I K I S.< i> , ,,
PubllshrrtEdttor 191 71972
Contributing Editor 1972 -
EILEEN DUPUCH i \KRON.MSc. B.A., I I B
I'ubliiher/Editor 1972
Published Daily Monday to Saturday
Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207. Nassau. Bahamas.
EDITORIAL
Any thought to contribute?
Bv I Hi NNI Dl I'liCIl
GRAND CAYMAN, March 16. We have always attached
importance to our correspondence columns. We want our readers
to write to this newspaper because every man, however humble.
lelhing to contribute to the sum total of thought thai goes
into producing a well-balanced community.
It is unfortunate that many of the letters reaching The Tribune
are lund written and some of them not very clearly
I hue was ,i time when we had enough staff to go over these
letters and put them Into proper shape for publication. Today
tins is not easy As .i remit there are sometimes delays in
publishing a letter, and often it doesn't appear at all, for which
ire sorry.
I suggest two things. If you arc not a lucid wntei gel a friend
to put youi thoughts down on paper ... and, il possible, have your
lettei tsped before submitting it to the Editor. At least write n
clear!).
One thing I want to impress to you ... The Tribune is not
concerned whose side you write on. Just write and try to be
honest in your writing.
You will recall that for years the later I N. Russell and I were
on opp hut we entertained the highest respect even
n for each other because we both recognized that
each of us from our own point of view was being honest. And
all that matters. Honest men recognize the right of every
man to his own point of view. Intelligent disagreement often
produces fruitful results.
I have written this appeal to our readers because I have just
been reading some excellent letters in a recent issue of The Daily
>ter.
One o\ the most exasperating experiences of a newspaper
editoi is when someone comes along with a complaint or useful
I subject with which he is familiar and he
- writing about it.
Liggett that he should
the reply often is: "Oh no, you do it You can do it better than
am one
I his kind ol thing arises from the assumption that we should
iboul everything.
fins is a false assumption. The cleverest man who ever lived
ed onlj a mere grain in the vast store of human
knowledge.
But when we dig fat enough in cases of this kind we often get
this final answer: "You do it for me. You see, I don't want toget
involved."
\n\one who doesn't want to get involved is taking a first step
i surrendering to power blocs in his community precious
rights and privileges for which generations of courageous men
have fought and died.
I'here arc many subjects which can be usefully dis,
without die writer becoming involved.
Two particularly interesting letters appeared in The Gleaner
itical, the other gave some good advice on agriculture
in which I hope more and more of our people arc becoming
involved todaj
I am going to print the political letter in full because it
emphasizes the dangerous direction in which Prime Minister
Manley's leftist government is taking Britain's largest former
island colony in the Caribbean.
The letter, signed COM I RN1 Dread:
"1 note with great alarm that Jamaica is considering the
OUth exchange programme with Cuba.
"This must mean that Jamaica would send young men and
women to Cuba for a period Of tune to participate in Cuba's
youth training programmes, and Cuba would do the same by
sending young men and women to Jamaica
"I think that it should be made very clear to the Government
and the people of Jamaica that any of our youth sent to Cuba
would become the object o( intense indoctrination of
communism, subversion and revolution.
"1 et there be no misunderstanding of the educational system
in Cuba. Children arc taken over bv the state at a very young age
and are taught that communism is the greatest economic and
social system in the world and that all other doctrines,especially
democracy are opposed to communism.
"They are taught that the state is above everything, even the
famil) and that every' communist owes his greatesl allegiance to
the state.
"There is no room for any other form of teaching in the Cuban
schools and training camps to which Jamaican youths would be
assigned. Nor could the Cuban government let such an
opportunity to nuke converts pass.
"The Cuban youths Visiting Jamaica would be those which
have proven most their loyalty to the communist doctrine, for
the Cuban government could not risk the embarrassment of
defection by any of these youths.
would be allowing communists to infiltrate our youth.
And let there be no doubt of the fact that all communists dream
ol converting the entire world to then way of thinking
There must he mail) other countries in the world with good
youth training programmes which are not politically motivated."
I feel that this information about leftist trends in Jamaica
should be of interest to our leaders, especially to parents who
have children attending schools in Jamaica 01 who have plans foi
sending their children to schools in that island.
it our government may not be concerned about this trend
in out big neighbouring island to the south ... it is a situation that
needs to be watched by Bahamian parents.
The second lettei is written bv Stanley foster of Montego Bay.
He advises Jamaican farmers to plant an early crop of corn ... arid
to store the crop against the danger of a hurricane hitting the
island this summer.
He reminds Cleaner readers that the island has not been struck
by a hurricane foi -- years On the law of averages it is possible
that the island will be struck by one or moie hurricanes this yeai
This much is certain any land mass that is located within the
hurricane bell is bound to be struck sooner or later.
I he people ol British Honduras fooled themselves by believing
that the hurricane path had changed because they had not had a
blow foi over a hundred years.
tad then the) were struck by a hurricane, followed by a tidal
wave. The people were warned of the approach of the hurricane
but Uiey didn't believe it. And so they were caught completely
By Richard Pyle
WASHINGTON (AP)
Unless it should prove a
gigantic hoax, the Patricia
already has
itaell a prominent niche
alongside Lindbergh and other
famous kidnapings in the
American pantheon of crime
The abduction of th
PranciSCO newspaper heiress In
self-styled revolutionary
been called America's first
political kidnaping
voiced four [O that
government officials or other
leading citizens could become
the target of such acts, as they
have In other countries, never
materialized.
But kidnaping in its more
familiar forms remains a
common occurrence in this
country and, if available
evidence is any guide, may
be increasing in
frequency
Jusl how serious a problem
this poses for law enforcement
today is hard to determine.
Sensational kidnapings helped
the federal Bureau
investigation build its
gangbusting reputation in tin-
hut even the FBI keeps
no figures on the crime and
does not include it in its annual
uniform crime rep
I he reason lor this, sa) an
FBI officials, is that kidnaping
is not common enough to
merit statistical treatment
along with murder, armed
robbery and auto theft, and
"particularly because main
eases originally reported as
kidnapings turn out to have
been something el
Sews reports and other
records indicate, however, that
kidnaping for ransom has
become increasingly common
in the 1 nited Stales in ream
Mowing a general tailing
off during the 1940s and 1950s
that was attributed Ian
effective law enforcement.
Filej nl the Associated Puss
show more than 45 major
kidnapings for ransom
1970, in which ransoms as high
as SI million were demanded.
<>rdsalso indicate and
the I Li I says experience bears
them out that in most
was paid, the
victim ted, suspects
iptured and some 01 .ill
of the ransom mone
recovered.
In the same period, FBI
records show a total
convictions under the
kidnap law noi to mention
uncounted others in state
courts and man) cases which
wound up, as some kidnapings
do, in extortl
In 1973 there were 7 1
federal kidnap convictions, a
jump Ol in Irom the
previous year and well
the svi convictions
I liis upward trend is
puzzling foi several re
not the least of which is Ihe
fact that police
I undeniable

perhaps mure than any other
.'lie that die! nol p I
Some famous kidnap
in more recent > i
Bobby G r e e nI
nine-yeai old son ol a
City, Mo., auto dealer.
ted In 1953 and killed
although $600,000 ran-
paid. A man and a woman died
in the gas chamber.
month-old son of a Long
Island, NY., drug executive,
unprep
devastating.
A few years later the capital city of Belize was struck a second
lime again were widespread damage As a result of th
sd from the coast to the interior.
Caracas, capital city of Venezuel d a hurricane
: a hundred years. When I war, last in that city I shivered to
think of what will happen when it is
struck by a heavy storm. I he people h.c
of houses in the craziest place- Imaginabl lit of a
hurricane on that city would be disastrous.
lie have a way of forgetting. The" first big hurricane I
remember was in 1908. The next big ones hit Nassau in
three. 1928 one: and the biggest of them ill in 1929,
In the meantirm id experienced the bootleg boom in
which fortunes were quickly made. This brought on a building
boom. Many of the owners of these new buildings ignored types
of construction that former generations of Bahamians had learned
throughbittei experience to follow, ihe result
Now Stanley Foster advises Jamaica to plant an early
corn this summer as an insurance against the possibilil
hurricane striking this summer
"My advice to t\ ncerned i- I" plant immediately as
much corn as possible and to creel granaries to store the same."
advised Stanley foster.
"l'l.anted now. the crops would be reaped by August, which is
the beginning ol the hurricane season, whereas other crops such
as bananas, yams, etc would be wiped out If we were hit by a
Storm, Moreover, these crops are all perishable and could nol be
stored."
I can appreciate what Mr. foster is writing about because I was
in Jamaica in 1916 when the island was struck by a
hurricane. The banana plantations were devastated. Hundreds of
thousands of bunches of bananas must have been left to rot in the
fields m the interioi of the island.
For over two weeks alter the hurricane had passed dozens and
dozens of barge loads of bananas were taken out of Kingston
harbour and dumped at sea
In my own small way I have seen what a hurricane can do to a
banana field. I had over 200 bunches ol bananas Hearing maturity
in my farm al Camperdown during the second world wai \
hurricane struck ... not a very severe one. But it wiped out Ihe
entire dield
"Com is a very exhausting crop." wrote Stanley Foster. "It is
the most exhausting after flax. I believe, therefore good tilth and
heavy fertilizi ine qua ton to good results and this
possible on fertile level land.
"Beehives in the vicinity of the fields for proper pollination
Call also add considerably to the yield ami I do hope that a lair
percentage of the cane lands will he used for corn, which might
fill many empty bellies, and the crop rotation could help the soil.
providing proper fertilizing was done.''
I don't think many of our farmers especially In the Out
Islands are aware of the importance el bees to the production
of com.
We kept bee hives at our farm at Campe rdown and, .is ,. result,
we gol remarkable results in corn cultivation at out farm. Ihe
yield was high and the ears weie huge and "jiii.y sweet".
Ihe government should introduce bee keeping to the Out
Islands, not only as an important item of nutritious food but also
the patt bees play in pollinating certain crops
[he late Ivoi Claridge was an expert on beekeeping. He did it
as a business as a voting man. He I aught me beekeeping .
It would seem to me that the entile Caribbean area and the
Bahamas too have been spared from severe hurricanes in
years.
As I told you m earhei articles this condition is attributed to
the millions of Ions of soil that is being carried on the airways
from drought-parched lands in Africa to Ihe Caribbean. Il is
reported that there are times when the dust over the island of
Barbados almost completely blotSOUl the sun1
This dust, it is claimed, militates against conditions thai spawn
hurricanes in the Caribbean
A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
II is made clear by every procecs of logic and by the proof of
historic tact dial die wealth of a nation, the character of Its
people, die quality and permanence of its institutions are all
dependent upon sound ami sufficient agricultural foundation.
Not armies or navies or commerce or diversity of manufacture
or anything other than the farm is the anchor which will hold
through the storms of time that sweep all else away. JAM I S !
llll I
FBI says record
shows kidnapping
does not pay
kidnaped from his baby
ihe family patio in
August
was demanded but the
kidnaper panicked when he-
saw police and newsmen
around the Weinberger home
and threw the baby into bushes
along a parkway, where il
perished Angelo John
invicted of both
murder and kidnaping, died in
the electric chaii in
Adolph ( oon III 45, a
member of Ihe Denver, Colo..
kidnaped in I960
for S500.000. His cloth
found
\' slifornia
eph Corbet I
ntually was sei I
abducted from a Lake Tahoc.
I in 196
three days
following payment of
S240.000 ransom by his
' prison, two
of them for life
Barbara Jane Mackle,
daughter of a I
>per, kidnaped in
1968 for $500,000 ransom and
imprisoned for 83. terrifying
hours in a coffin-like box
Hind until discovered
vmen on a search. Gary
to life; a female accomplice
irted.
There have been
in which by mutual
agreement, the press and
broadcast media voluntarily
blacked out kidnaping
while a victim's
being negotiated I liI
say the) prefer this, even if
is nol demanded by the
kidnapers.
'The primar) consideration
is always the safety of the
victim, and publicity often
does ni
.' one FBI 0
In 147: the U.S. Supreme
Court, in a 5-4 ruling, held tile-
death penalty unconstitutional
because it had
listentl) applied
d the Lindbergh law
which carried a possible death
penalty lor harming the victim
as well as all
punishment star I
Pennsylvania recently
became the 23rd si
restore the death penalty for
contain major
Kidnaping is included in most
of the revisions
Ihe Justice Department,
meanwhile, has drafted new
legislation to reinstate a
Tropical
Exterminators
In Pesl Problems
is found to have
resulted from the conn
or attempted commission of a
kidnaping I his bill has passed
the Senati and is now in a
lloUS*1
I he new law also would do
away with the problem
when a U.S. district judge ruled
in 1967 that the Lindbergh law
was unconstitutional be,
proved that only a jury
recommend the death penalty
and therefore an
had to risk it if he
wanted a jury trial bul
he was tried by a judge or
pleaded guilty
lent Nixon, reacting to
the II.
of others which lollowed it,
told Any Gen Willi
8 that lie-
wanted the death penalty
ed for kidnape:
murder the,;
while. the
upsurge in Kidnapings has
interest in kidnap
insurance, which surged after
the Lindbergh case 42 years
ago. A Detroit area insurance
,1 last month that
m will offer kidnap
insuran, worth up to
S 500.000 and costing up to
S41MI ,
almost always a
touch of the bizarre In a
kidnaping.
In one case, the 13-year-old
son of an art gallery director
naped but set free when
authorities complied with the
abductor's demand that four
pictures of nude women be
d from an art
exhibition.

lUWliWiniMlli'i
Think about it!
Fall enrollments to be
taken May I st.
Small Classes
Spaces Limited for
September, 1974
Low Tuition
Plan Now to enroll
tar iiihiriiiuHiin cull
NASSAU CHRISTIAN
ACADEMY
32641 or 21586
*+*+e**++*+rm**tf*r*m
FOR RENT
Recently renovated 2-storey building formerly
occupied by International Bank & Trust Co., N. E.
corner Charlotte and Bay Sts. Equipped for
immediate occupancy by any financial institution,
including safe, vault, teller counters, etc. Air
conditioned. Carpeted. Details on request.
PETE MOUSIS
P. O. Box N 3669 Phone 5-2018
AINSUE&HE1LBR0N
(DISTILLERS) LTD GLASGOW
CUTLASS
Complete with 50 HP. JOHNSON
or EVINRUDE MOTOR & TRAILER
(valued at $4,545)
The luxurious interior of this
magniticentORLANDOCLIPPER isthe
result ol brilliant styling. It has
anodized metal frame with tempeied
shatter proof glass, full reclining seats.
The hull is tune tested and will give
you outstanding peiformance. There is
ti boot afloat for the money.
Made by a firm with over 20 years
experience. That's ORIANDO
CLIPPER! What a boat!!
EVINRUDE
The outboard motor that's built for everyone. It's right at
home with the jet fun set as well as the commercial
fisherman LVINRUDE 50, the motor that's built for work
01 play. IT FEATURES:
Fire power breakerless CD electronic ignition Power pilot,
power shift with positive mechanical follow through New
preset tilt lock Pressure backed piston rings Pulse tuned
exhaust Automatic pressure-temperature controlled
cooling Power port loop-charged engine Computer
matched gearing!
And options you never even dreamed about. "No motor so
little ever did so much."
tAAURA
NEWSPAPER
COPIES
AVAILABLE AT
THE TRIBUNE
OFFICE
THIS WEEK!


PRIVATE ITEM
Digitization of this item is currently in progress.
The Tribune.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03593
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: April 16, 1974
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
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Holding Location: University of Florida
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ILDUDLEY'S 4Ibr /rtbuuw
COR. ROSETTA ST. & MT. ROYAL AVE.



RECORDER BOOKS

.tistered with Postmaster of Bahamas for postage concessions within the Bahama.., Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


FL
Bahamas*


VOL. LXXI, No. I /V 9 Tuesday, April 16, 1974 Price: 20 Cents


Food, clothing & footwear up again!


RECREATION AND READING, clothing and
footwear and food and non-alcoholic drinks were the
major contributors to the 0.85 per cent increase in
living costs during February.
Figures released by the Mimstry of Statistics on
the revised retail price index for New Providence
show an increase of 1 point or 0.85 per cent in
February from 117.8 in January.
The groups that contributed the largest increases
were recreation and reading which rose by 3.94 per
cent, clothing and footwear up by 2.33 per cent and
food and non-alcoholic drinks which rose by 1.31 per
cent.
The transport group rose by 0.77 per cent during


February. The other goods and services, and health
and personal care groups fell by 1.09 per cent and
0.09 per cent respectively .
The food inded rose by 1.6 points or 1.31 per cent
from 122.3 in January to 123.9 in February. Items
recording the major price changes were: sodas, bacon,
the seasonal vegetable basket, rice. bread and fruit
juice.
The price of chicken, hami and baby food fell.
The housing index rose by 0.1 of a point or 0.09
per cent to 112.4 in February. Significant to this
increase was bed linens which rose by 0.04 of a point.
The clothing and footwear index contributed the
second highest increase to the overall index during


the month, rising by 2.8 points or 2.33 per cent from
120.0 in January to 122.8 in February.
The increased cost of women's clothing, which rose
by 0.14 of a point, topped the list of items
contributing to this rise. Other items contributing to
the rise were girls', boys' and men's clothing, which
rose by 0.07, 0.05 and 0.02 of a point respectively.
The transport index rose by 0.9 of a point o01 0.77
per cent over last month's index which stood at
116.8. This rise was mainly due to the increase in the
cost of cars, which rose by 0.08 of a point this
month.
The health and personal care index recorded a fall
of 0.1 of a point or 0.09 per cent to 114.7 in


Feb


ruary. Significant
I meuser


New US law will


protect


By NICK KELLY

THE U.S. (,\UM R\MI NT.
concerned over the intrusion of
foreign lobster 'dt .. n, has
declared the northern lobster a
creature of the continental
',helt.
bhe new legislation gives the
('Ciast Guard the enforcement
authority io now seize foreign
vessels caught destroying U.S.
lobster gear, fishing
inten;;onally for lobsters off
the northeast coast of the U.S.,
or fishing in areas where large
populations of lobster are
known to exist.
In addition to seizure of
'bhe" ves -', ..i 'ner' .:' now
liable for extensive fines for
violations.
Faced with a similar
situation in its own waters, the
Bahamas is hoping to win


approval at this year's law of
the sea conference to enforce
the archipelagic principle. The
effect of this would be to make
illegal the removal of lobster
from the continental shelf
surrounding the Bahamas.
\t present the 12-mile
fishing limit being enforced by
this country to a large extent
excludes the continental shelf.
which Bahaniians have
traditionally regarded as the
islands' boundary.
'SIlHELF' THEORY
An article on the effects of
the L.S. declaration was
carried in the March issue of
Njti( ial Fisherman.
It article points out that
i te .'t :'.lto il c.on v i': !i. .
in Geneva, Switzerland in the
1950s, held that certain types
of marine animals could be
declared "creatures of the
continental shelf "


2 kidnappers win


reduced sentences


for gun charges


SPURGEON 11\MI S. 24,
and Leroy McLean, 25,
convicted and imprisoned last
year on a charge of having two
unlicensed shot-guns had their
sentence reduced by a Iligh
Court judge who found it
''excessive and not
appropriate to the offence for
which they were charged.
Represented during their
appeal by attorney David C'.
Bethell, the two men are
presently imprisoned on


THREE CAR FIRES
THERF were three car fires
and I7 bush fires over the
weekend, thie Fire Department
reported today

OMISSION
A PORTION of Arthur
Foulkes' column T"1 o the
Point" was inadvertently
omitted Saturday That Part of
the article left out related to
the passage of two Bills which
gives the government power to
search for arms and use
bugging devices without a
court warrant.

BEACH CRUSADE
A BFACII jam with I he
Visionaires will be held at the
public beach next to the
Sheraton British Colonial Iotel
West Bay Street Saturday a; I
p.m.
The event is being sponsored
by Crossroads. and will also
include performances by
Travelling Brothers. Elizabeth
Smith, Diana Grant and Deric
Adams.

AT
T1110 AN FN10 E,
SEE
LUXURY AND
QUALITY

W aw Y=USAVE!


charges of burglary. assault
with a deadly weapon,
a t t empte d ex tor tion,
possession of firearms with
intent to commit a felony and
the kidnapping of Andrea
Spencer in Freeport last year.
However, they have also
filed ant appeal in that case
against their conviction and
seven year sentence handed
down by the Supreme Court
last September.
In a judgement delivered
April 5, Mr. Justice James
Smith allowed the appeals of
Dames and McLeean and
substituted a fine of $10 or
fourteen days imprisonment in
lieu.
Their appeals were against a
sentence of three months
imprisonment. imposed by a
Freeport Magistrate last year
lor having the two unlicensed
shotguns.
Dames and McL.ean were
arrested in connection with the
charge on February 17, last
year, after police found the
two shotguns in an apartment
which they shared.
The men had borrowed the
guns from friends, but their
licenses had expired.
On the charge of having
unlicensed firearms they both
had pleaded guilty.
The penalties for an offence
where a shotgun had been
licensed previously was a $10
fine and a caution: where it
had not previously been
licensed, a caution or a fine
between $10 to $100, the
supreme court judge noted.
"These appeals have given
me some concern," Mr. Justice
Smith said. "At the time of the
trial on February 19, 1973,
both the appellants had clean
records and were first
offenders and Dames was a
member of the Royal Bahamas
Police Force.
"The penalty usually
imposed on a first offender for
mere possession of a shotgun
after the current licence had
expired, as I have already
indicated, is a caution or fine
of $10," he said.


its lobster


('reature-of the shelf status
affords protection to species
thus categorized, because they
become the exclusive property
of the nearest nation d joining
the shelf
(It is this aspect which has
brought the Bahamas into
con flict with l Florida
fishermen, who feel they are
within their rights in fishing on
the continental shelft
But ini order to qualify for
this protective status, a species
must live in constant physical
contact with the ocean floor.
Until now, lobsters, which
sometimes escape danger by
swimming off tlie bottom for
short distances, did not qualify
as creatures of the shelf.
In 1960, U.S. vessels
harvested virtually 100 per
cent of the seafood taken off
the Northeast coast of the
II S create ure-ol-the-shelf
protection for lobsters did not
seem important.
DECIMATED)
By 1972, despite recorded
seafood landings. I'.S. vessels
harvested less than 20 per cent
of the catch taken from .the


FLIGHT CUTS

THIS MONTH
THE REDUCED flight
schedules for Bahamasair will
come into effect April 28 and
not the end of May as was
reported by the morning
paper.
An airline official said
today that there would be
certain flight reductions from
April 28, but these will be
restored on June 28 at which
time additional flights will
also be put on.
The flight reductions at
this time are a seasonal
adjustment.


Easter accidents:

15 in hospital

WIT'K \ I) traffic accidents
sent 15 persons to hospital
with injuries during the I aster
weekend. Seven of them a,e
still in hospital, Road Trat tic
Department authorities
reported this morning.
F ight other persons were
treated and discharged from
hospital reports said. The
accidents were among 19
others taking place, during the
Faster Weekend.
There were no fatalities
reported for New Providence.
Also injured were two
visitors at Paradise Island, Jack
Leisen, 30, who was involved
in an accident on Sunday at 5
p.m. and l:dward Byron, 69,
who was struck down by a taxi
on Saturday afternoon.
Leisen, a guest at Loews
Hotel is reported in fair
condition. He was injured
when his motorcycle collided
with a car being driven by
Douglas Young at the
intersection of Mackey and
Shirley Street.
Byron's condition is
"satisfactory," hospital
authorities reported. Injured at
5 p.m. Saturday while walking
along East Bay Street, Byron is
also a resident at Paradise
Island. He was struck down by
taxi number 218 driven by
Joseph Bootle, police reported.


same area.
During little more than a
decade, foreign vessels
decimated the rich haddock
stocks on Georges Banks so
badly, that many marine
biologists nominated the
species for the endangered list.
As populations of herring
and cod declined sharply, and
lobster populations began to
deteriorate as well, pressure
from domestic fishermen to
protect marine resources off
the Northeast coast of the
United States soared.
PROPOSALS
In an effort to protect the
remaining fisheries resource in
the Northwest Atlantic, many
Congressmen requested
unilateral action by the federal
government. Most legislative
proposals made to date, centre
around one of the following
concepts.
(1) The U.S. should
declare jurisdiction over all
fishing activities within 200
miles of its shores.
21 The U.S. should
declare the lobster a creature
of the shelf.
Both proposals have been
opposed by U.S. interests.
Distant water fishermen,
especially through the tuna,
lobby, have pointed out that if
the U.S. declares a 200-mile
limit it will have to recognize
similar jurisdictional limits by
other nations. This might
cripple tuna fishing operations
in certain areas.
The State Department also
opposes the 200-mile limit as it
could halt its spying activities,
The National Fisherman
claims.
AGREEMENT
Several years ago, in an
effort to avoid confrontation on
the lobster's status, the State
Department negotiated
agreements with all ot
the major fishing nations of the
Northwest Atlantic.
Each of the foreign nations
agreed that their vessels would
not fish for lobster exclusively ,
and that they would only keep
small amounts of lobster taken
as an "incidental catch" while
fishing for other species.
These compromise
agreements, although they
persisted for several years, did
little to quell the growing
resentment among U.S.
fishermen. Lobster traps, the
fixed type of gear most often
used by domestic fishermen.
were frequently raided by
foreign vessels.
NO POWER
Even when the Coast Guard
did observe trap raiding, they,
had no power of seizure and
had to refer such incidents to
the State Department. The
State Department sometimes
ignored the matter, and even
when the department did
complain to the government of
the nation involved, U.S.
fishermen were rarely
reinbursed.
In addition to destroying
U.S. gear, foreign vessels have
widely abused the concept of
incidental catches, says
National Fisherman. Domestic
fishermen widely report
foreigners for harvesting
lobster.
The U.S. Commerce
Department estimates that 16
to 22 million lbs. of lobster go
ashore in foreign ports each
year landed by foreign vessels
active in the Northwest
Atlantic.


help if necessary.


to this decrease were beauty
salons which fell by 0.02 of a
point.
For the month of February
the recreational and reading
index rose to 118.8 from 114.3
in January. thus rising by 4.5
points or 3.94 per cent in
February. Nighi clubs and
entrance fees, drinks in bars
and the cost of newspapers,
contributed 0.09, 0.07 and
0.03 of a point respecti...l. to
the increase.
The other goods and services
index fell by 1.3 points or 1.09
per cent to 117.6 this month.
School equipment which fell
by 0.07 of a point and sweet
wines which fell by 0.02 of a
point were the main
contributors to this fall.


Mrs. Beryl

Fountain dies

MRS. BERYL Fountain died
of cancer last night at 7.30
at the Princess Margaret
Hospital. Mrs. Fountain had
been in the hospital about five
weeks. Until she entered the
hospital, Mrs. Fountain held
the senior position ;f policy
checket at J. S. Johnson and
Company Ltd. She had been in
that position nine years.
She is survived by three
daughters, Lynn, Deidre and
Kim; three sons, Dennis, Neil
and Basil: three brothers, Dr.
Terry North, who is in
England, Bert North and Basil
North: and one sister, Mrs.
Irma Stanhope.
Funeral arrangements have
not yet been made.


Lady Sassoon's

brother dies

JAMES T. Barnes, eldest
brother of Lady Sassoon, died
Sunday in Kissimmee, Florida.
following a massive heart
attack six weeks ago.
Mr. Barnes, 74, was a
frequent visitor to Nassau with
his wife Ruby.
fiHe is survived by his widow .
one daughter. Mrs. Albert
Everett Amos and two
grandchildren of Lakeland,
Florida: two brothers. John G.
Barnes of Baltimore, Maryland
anid R. Frnest Barnes of
Nassau; two sisters Mrs. Mac
Barnes of Kingsport, Tennessee
and Lady Sassoon of Nassau.
Funeral services and burial
will take place this afternoon
in Kissimmee. Florida. The
family has requested that in
lieu of flowers reienibranice
donations be made to The Sir
Victor Sassoon (Bahamas)
Heart Foundation.

Cruiser missing

in the Bahamas

THF Saba Bank, a 54 ft
wooden trawler-type cruiser.
with white hull and deck niade
of teak, is still reported missing
somewhere in the Bahamas
The boat has twin diesel
engines and a flying bridge. It
is not certain when the boat
left Dinner Cay Marina in
Miami. but she was expected to
return on April I after a cruise
in the Bahamas
There are four persons on
board Cy Zentner, John
Tarquinio, Elliott Cohen, and
Raphael Kaplin.
The boat has a 13 ft. Boston
Whaler with it named the Little
S.B.
The Saba Bank is a new boat
and it is understood that it
came to the Bahamas in early
March on a shake-down cruise.
It is believed that it was going
to Long Island, Abaco or
Eleuthera. Nothing has been
heard from the boat and the
Miami Coast Guard and
BASRA are searching for it.
The boat has many safety
devices on board and should
have been able to radio for


-M.P.WANTS AGE



OF MAJORITY



REDUCED TO 18

FOUR RESOLUTIONS and a move for app.'rnminent of a
select committee are likely to lengthen what "would otherwise
have probably been a short meeting of the Hlouse ot Assembl'


tomorrow.
Opposition Leader Kendal
G.L. Isaacs (FNM-tFort
Montagu) is slated to seek
endorsement of a resolution
calling on Government
Ministers to answer a number
of outstanding questions.
including some that were asked
more than five months ago.
The resolution, if adopted
would also instruct Ministers to
answer all future questions as
soon as possible.
Mr. Isaacs will seek adoption
of the resolution on grounds
that undue in answering
questions tabled in the House
is neither in the best interest of
nor in the keeping with the
spirit of parliamentary
democracy.
Michael Lightbourn
(I nd-Clarence Town) will move
a resolution, "'that the
Government consider the
advisability of introducing a
bill to this House to reduce the
age of majority to 18 years."
Cleophas Adderley
(ind. Nassau City) is to move
a resolution asking the Finance
Minister to introduce a bill
providing a special pension for
"Cleveland H. Reeves, ani
outstandi..g Bahamian citizen,"
and. more generally, asking the
Minister to consider increasing
the pensions of all retired civil
servants


Sir Roland S'vmonette
Sind. Shirl a) is toi !t.
(Governlmnic;-: i, ;i,l;r
billing somei laini ; t d 't'ccn
('Can.uIan Ianie and \lMount Royal
Aven't iinld turning it into a
childlcen's playing field.
lI pected to spark a long
debate is a 'notion by Norman
Solomon [ NM-St. George and
Dunmore) for appointment of
a select connmmittee 'to
determine whether or lnot the
number and quality il t'h
coun ltr 's tourist-oi .
ar'enities are adequate ;,
they are inadequate, to
reconmmendatItions as to .i -o
and means by which such
inadequacies can be reclifi Jd
Also on tomioriow's .agend.i
is a motion bh Frrington
Watkins (Ind.-Marshl Harbour)
for adoption of a select
committee report on the
administration of and existing
conditions within thie RoyIal
Bahamas Police Force
The oinly bill up !I: deltt'
is one sponsored lih i sportt
Minister George A Smith.
intended to e\empt tlte
ti e iiibers o' Jiplomn-a!
missions. .'s'ih i; (t if cers anl.
e t employees. i'tinihrs of
international organris.inons and
niiembers of their fainiltes liomt
palm ent of fees ft," Iotor
vehicle ispelion nt I. it,.enSig--
fees and driers' license te,,


Mitchell denies all


No longer

Sir Milo's

secretary

MRS t B VER LY
W hitfield, (pictured)
seconded for nearly a year
as secretary to Governor
General Sir Milo Butler, is
to return to her post as
first assistant secretary in
the Ministry of IExternal
Affairs.
Mrs. Whitfield is
presently on leave, but is
expected to resume her
old duties shortly She
recently completed a
senior administrative
course in Nassau for public
servants.
There haie been reports
circulating that Mrs
Whitfield's departure from
Government tlouse was at
the request of Sir Milo
following certain personal
differences
A fo;:. .r vice-principal
of the Technical College,
Mrs. Whitfield moved to
the Ministry of External
Affairs when Oak's Field
a id Soldier R oad
c a it p i s e s w e r e
consolidated in May PI71
1Her performance ;is
Administrative secretary at
t he ('Cor umoniwealth
I- inance r M inis ters
cotl',;e'nce in Nassauu
d ring 1972 was highly'
pr-iscd by commonwealthth
Secretary-G(eneral Arnold
Sinlith.
\s result of this she
x ,, sent by the
govern silent ito undertake a
tIl er-il tionthr conference
tmsc in n Ltnildon
It i, tLlnderstood that
M\.s 'Elma Johnson is now
acting ,is secrctari to Sir




2 die in G.B.


Easter


accidents


\\ -NGLt;IIStI electrician
anld aitian womann died in
lIate!l accidents at Grand
13,ahama over the I aster
holidays weekend
Freeport police identified
fth' traffic victims as Robin
Kent. 2., a native of
Shlie\\,sbury, I ngland, and an
electrician m Freeport, and
.lule Sinuilieu, a Haitian
womnan, of EFight Mile Rock.
I'olice said they were the sixth
iand seventh Grand Bahama
tirat ic deaths for the year.
There were two traffic
fatalities recorded on the island
up Io this datle last year.
Kent. of 88A Tamarind
Drive. Freeport, drowned at
about 6 lp.m. Saturday when
car number 1 173, a 1973
Gremlin. in which he was a
passenger, ran off Lunar
Boulevard in Freeport and
plunged into more than ten
feet of water in the Running
Mn Marina channel.
William Simpson ot
Freeport. driver of the car, and
John Rohloff, also of Freeporl
and another passenger in the
car, managed to swim tc
safety
Taken from the car and
rushed to Rand Memoria.
Hospital, Kent was pronounced
dead on arrival.
Simnilieu was a passenger ir
car F. 1882, reportedly driver
by Jack Joseph of Eight Milh
Rock, when it collided with
utility pole on the main roa<
near Jones Town, at abou
1:30 a.m. Sunday.
Five Haitian nationals wen
injured in the crash and taker
to Rand Memorial Hospital.
Similieu died at the hospital
at about 3:30 a.m.


SEC case
Mitchell also denied that hi
had told ousted White HoLIus
counsel John Dean III that the
grand Muri which indicted hii-'
was "'a runaway grand jury"
andi that the prosecutors wht
questioned him were "little
bastaids "
Dlean lfad testified to that
etec in Jnt appearance as the
Iprosec'ctor's witness. Mntchell
s. id that he did mnot con-ider
the grand jury "runaway" and
that he had felt that theu
prosecutors were "polite and
seducticen"
I lie word seductine wa>
striAkcn by judge ILee G(aglhardi
after .1 prosecutor 's objection.
%lt,.hell ;lso denied Dea 's
testimony that Mitchell had
tried to get him to call th-en
-tty G(en Richard Kleimdiens:
about the grand jur' s aictuio
Milchell also denied that hlie
had talked to Donald Hotgren.
a volunteer in the Nixon ,
re-election campaign at a
dinner in Washington on March
8. 1072. Hofgren. now iAn
investment banker, tcstifie.i at
the trial that he had asked
Mitchell it' he had seen V'esco
that day and that MI. -i. 'I had
tlId him to "stay away'" from
Vesco (AP)


Prosecutor subpoenas


White House tapes


WASHINGTON Special
Watergate prosecutor Leon
Jaworski asked U.S. district
court Tuesday to issue a
subpoena for tapes of 63
conversations in the White
House.
Jaworski said he had tried
unsuccessfully to get access to
the materials through President
Nixon's Watergate lawyer
James D. St. Clair, but since he
has received no response "I feel
obligated to seek these
materials by subpoena."
He said the tapes and other
items are needed for the trial
of John N. Mitchell, H.R.
Haldeman and John D.
Ehrlichman and four other
defendants in the Watergate
cover-up.
The trial is scheduled to
begin Sept. 9.
Jaworski said his staff has
information that the materials
contain evidence relevant to
the trial.
The attachment listed 46
dates for which Jaworski asked
information.
They included:


A June 20. 1972 meeting
and two telephone
conversations between the
President and Charles W.
Colsbn, a former White House
aidO who is one of the seven
defendants.
i on June 23, 1973, three
meetings between the President
and H.R. Haldeman.
'Those two days are within
one week of the break-in of
Democratic Party headquarters
in the Watergate office
complex.
The list also includes a
number of conversations in late
March and mid-April, 1973,
already subpoenaed by the
House judiciary committee for
its impeachment inquiry.(AP)


2/











































*


I


charges in

%k YORK Former U.S
Attorney General John
Mitchelll said Monday hti was
"'absolutely riot gudlt\ of
conspiracy obstruction of
justice or perjury.
"Are you guilt\ or not
guilty" asked his lawyer. Peter
Fleming Jr.
"A-mbsolutely not guilty of
ai\ of the charges." said

the former Cabinet officer
anid ex-C.'oIllnerce Secretary
\aurice Stars have been on
trial in federal court for eight
weeks. They are accused of
trying to impede a Securities
and Exchange Commission in-
vestigation of financier Robert
Vesco in return for his secret
$200,000 cash contribution to
President Nixon's re-electonl
campaign
At the end of his direct
examination of Mitchell which
started last Wednesday before a
long holiday weekend recess,
Fleming led Mitchell through
each of the six counts of
perjury After each one wsas
read. Mitchell said that hits
testnilIny i to the gradid wlry
had been his best recollection
of the facts.


i























.RESIDENT Nixon, whe
has beet, told he owes
$467,000 in back taxes and
interest, has obtained a
60-day extension of the April
15 filing date for his 1973 tax
return.
Nixon asked for the
extension because of the
possible effect of the
back-tax ruling on his 1973
return.
The U.S. Internal Revenue
Service (the American
domestic tax collection
agency) and an Xtnerican
legislative committee on
taxation ruled April 3 that
Nixon owed back taxes for
the years 1969-72.
CHRISTIAN Fouchet, a
hard line follower of Gen.
Charles de Gjlle, today said
he was withdrawing as a
candidate in the French
presidential election. 25
candidates are still in the race
for the election to be held
May 5.
IVOR Bell, former Irish
Republican Xrinly chiet in
Belfast, outwitted his jailers
Monday> and escaped from
the top security Mlae prison
less than two months after his
capture by the British Arnsv.
Embarrassed prison guards
admitted the 37 -car-old Bell
had changed places with1
another man detained at the
prison and being paroled on
compassionate grounds and
walked out ini his stead
without being recogm/ed.
SF\ I persons were dead
and thousands homeless
Monday in weekend flooding
in the southern state of
M ississippi. The floods
resulted from torrential rains
that began Friday and
continued nonstop through
Sunday, leaving more than 16
inches of water in some areas.
Ryeprts tHirn 4 P


Golan since the October War.
Israeli jet fighter planes roared into
action for seven hours Sunday, blasting
the Syrian invaders and gun
emplacements behind enemy lines.
Reports from Damascus claimed the
Syrians had set up forward command
headquarters on a section of the Hlermon
still in their hands, indicating they may
make further attempts to recapture the
sutimmit peak.
The tsraeli and Syrian defense
ministers toured the explosive Mt.
Herinon Range Monday as their armies'
tanks and artillery blazed away at each
other along the 40-mile Golan Heights
front.


B I lie Associated Press
SYRIAN CANNON FIRI blsted the
summit of Mount Hermon I ueda. as
Israeli inechanied infantry moscd uti the
slopes in half tracks to reinforc tforw.sid
units
Artillery and tank fire raged .along the
snowy Ilermon ridge arid the h'ngth ot
the 40-mile Golan lights cea.is-tire line
for the 36thi straight da.y
Onei lsraeli soldier s jsa kil-d in tie
shellmg and two were wout'lide, three
military command in 1 \ Aviv said.
A biting wind rasped across thei' slopes
ol the mountain, with gusts up to i)
mile;, per hour Armoured hialftracks
,arryig Israeli troops lrched up the


Army topples President


in bloodless Niger coup


rock \ iiin. titaminsid-.h to reinforce three
stt.iiegic outposts'
At one post 1.000 feet below the
biblical tirontatins -.000-foot summit,
lsraelf soidriers ics -cd in blue American
ltinpsitsId, d hIdd ki ,1 their positions and
sc.inired IhIe tog-shrouded slopes for
nS\ r il iiIovCitii'iits
\'Visib:!;ti ,is poor l'uesday. On a clear
d.i ,. thie llcrn1on peak commands a view
I tt Lh enItre 00 square mile bulge
captured h\ Isriaei during the war, and the
S r)an capit.Il t Dlamascus, about 23
tnules wa\is
',riniin forces biave tried three times to
sorn one of the Israeli posts and Sunday
sparked ie heiavirest fighting on the


LAGOS. NIGERIA Scores oft messages
praising the army takeover in drought-stricken
Niger were broadcast Tuesday from Niger's
capital by Radio Niamey.
The broadcasts, monitored in Lagos, gave no
indication however of the whereabouts or
condition of 57-year- old President lialmani
Diori who was toppled in the apparently I
bloodless coup Mondas.
But according to unconfirmed reports from
Paris. Diori and his family are safe and ha\c
been placed tinder house arrest
The coup was led by Lt Col. Seini kounite.
the French-trained chiet of stall of Nigcr's
2.500-man arnis.
Kountie seized control of the landlocked
former French colony Monday mormrnig
claiming the takeover was achieved without a
shot being fired.
Kounti charged in radio broadcasts th at
kiori, in power since France granted
independence in 19o I. had mishandled Niger's
disastrouss situation" arising from the
catastrophic six-year old West African drought
Ihe dry spell has caused widespread dc.ithl
inside the vast semi-desert nation and tens it
thousands of refugees, mostly nomads, now live
in scattered refugee camps totally dependent on
food from abroad for survival.
The country's .meager agricultural ecotnotni
of peanuts, cotton, millet and sorghutim has
suffered severe setbacks from the lingering
drought, the worst in Atrica tfor over a halt a
century


Warrant out for Patty Hearst


SAN FRANCISCO .\
warrant tor the arrest of
newspaper heiress Patricia
Hearst as a material witness to
a bank robbery was issued
Monday night It says a person
appearing to be Miss Hlearst
was photographed during the
robbery.
Three persons previously
associated with the terrorist
Symbionese Liberation A\rmn
were charged with the \Monday
morning robbers of a San
Francisco bank A L S
magistrate set bail ofl 500,000
each for Miss Hearst and the


three other persons
Authorities said the
photographs inside the bank
showed the person believed to
be Miss Hearst holding a gun.
A\n affidavit detailing the
charges was filed with the U.S
magistrate.
The affidavit quotes an
unnamed person who says he
does not know if Miss Hearst
was a willing participant in the
robber which resulted in two
persons being seriously
wounded. [he FBI said in a
separate statement that if was
ent'ireiy possible that Miss


CARD Of THANKS

Mr. Bill Martin and Family
wish to extend a very sincere
THANK YOU to all our
Relatives and Friends from all
expressions of Sympathy
Cards Telegrams and the
nu mn erous Flower
Arrangements received during
our recent Bereavement.


Hearst was not a willing
participant.
I' S. at tornei James
Browning, in describing tlhe
photographs. said. "I think this
is the first time in the annals of
legal history that a kidnap
t ctim has showed up in the
middle ot a bank robbery. If
she was involved and
investigation shows that, we're
going to charge her as a bank
robber I' s clear fromni the
photographs sire mav hate
been acting under duress.'
The 20- year old Miss Hearst
was dragged screaming from
her Berkeley apartment Feb. 4.
SLA, a group which authorities
say is mntiultracial, heavily armed
and consisting of about 25
persons, claimed credit for the
kidnapping, and 12 days ago
Miss Hearst said in a tape
recording that she was joining
their ranks as an armed
comrade
"They went out of their way
to identity her as 'Tania'
Hearst," Browning ,said of the
robbers.


Golan Heights battle rages on 40-mile front


At least 15,000 refugees, most ot them
Tuareg nomads from Mali. have settled in a
refugee camp called Camp Lazaret just outside
thei capital.
Niger has also been plagued for years by
bitter divisions between the country's nomadic
peoples and the settled black African farmers
who tire nuoimads once enslaved.
Kountie also attacked Diori's government as
selfishi .ind "irresponsible" and claimed it was
riddled with corruption.
The lavish messages of praise, which the
radio s id were pouring in from individual
citi/LiIs and organizations, were read between
bro,.dcasts of martial music.
Such broadcasts to demonstrate "popular
suppotii rc common fare in Black Africa's
coutp rpr out nations.
SI luhc there was no official announcement ont
thi wheireaibouts of Diori, diplomatic sources in
P'ars s.nd lie and Boubou Hama,. President of
the \.itional Assembly, were under house
arrest
01Ii unconfirmed report from Paris,
hlio. 'ir. s.Id D)iori's wife. Hamani, had been
killed l,1 ida.i during the military takeover as
,she Itsisied Arrest by soldiers.
I InI n tire staff of Nigeri's embassy ini
Nig.ia,. Niger's oil-rich southern neighbour,
ritilinid to Niamey, the capital, Tuesday.
app.iruntll recalled by the new government.
1 lhire were unconfirmed reports in Lagos
that 1 hian officials plan to visit the coup
leader tor talks Tuesday night.


There has been a diplomatic
tug of war behind the scenes in
recent months between Libva,
Nier's northern neighbour,
and Nigeria.
Some observers believe the
quiet struggle revolves around
the possibility of oil discoveries
in Niger and the question of
where such oil, if found, would
be piped for refining.
Diori attempted to steer his
predominantly Moslem coun-
trv on a middle course
between Arab and Black Africa
reflecting the ethnic divisions
within Niger.
I'.S. oil companies are
currently prospecting for
petroleum in Niger and
diplomatic sources say the
result of their search may be
known later this year.
The coup also raises serious
questions for France which has
invested millions of dollars in
uranium exploitation in Niger's
northern region.
But there has been no
evidence yet the new
government intends any sharp
switch in Diori's moderate
foregin policy which inlcuded
close relations with the French
The radio reported all was
calm in Niamey and said the
army was in "full control."
There was no report of
violence during the takeover.
In the radio broadcasts,
Kountie announced (he
constitution was suspended,
the national assembly dissolved
and all political organizations
suppressed.
He said a supreme council
composed of officers would be
created soon to head the
government.
Kountie said all
international agreements taken
by the previous government
would be respected "on
condition that they take into
account the interests and
dignity of our people."
"We have faith in the
populace," Kountie said. "It
must remain calm in order that
nothing regrettable happens."
An indefinite curfew was
imposed from 7:30 p.m. to 6
a.m. which Kountie said must
be observed "to the letter." He
said the curfew would be eased
as the situation becomes
normal. But, he added, "we do
not want to undertake
anything in a hurry."
Little is known of the
43-year-old coup leader, a
French-trained soldier who
became Chief of Staff in 1973.
The coup brings to 15 the
total number of Black African
countries south of the Sahara
under military rule.
There have been over 30
military takeovers or abrupt
changes of government in the
14 years since Britain, France
and Belgium relinquished
control of their Black African
colonies. (AP)


The Tel Aviv command
said defense minister Moshe
Dayan visited Israeli positions
on the strategic mountain
range on the northern tip of
the front. It said a Syrian
bombardment erupted during
his visit, wounding two Israeli
soldiers, but that Dayan was
unhurt.
Radio Damascus said Syria's
defense minister, Maj. (;en.
Mustafa Tlas, made a quick trip
to the forward command
headquarters of Syrian forces
on the 9,000-foot snow-clad
slopes of Hermon.
I he broadcast said Tlas
conferred with Syrian field
commanders on the progress of
the Mt. tIhermnion battle and
visited wounded Syrian soldiers
on their way back to
lamascus.
Syria's command said.
"bitter fighting that broke out
on Mt. Hermon Sunday
continued unabated Monday.
tur forces continued to intlict
heads. losses on the enerlmy." It
gave no details.
But Damascus government
sources said Syrian forces had
capture a few positions
beyond the Mt. Ilermon truce
line The Israelis denied it.
Israeli troops hold most of
the high points on the strategic
Ilermon, a mountain massif
situated in Syria, Lebanon and
Israel These vantage points
give the Israelis an unrestricted
view of Arab lands 100 miles
and more away, including
Damascus and the airports
surrounding the Syrian capital
Monday's shelling followed
the bitterest da\ of fighting on
the Golan Heights front since
the October War.
Israeli fighter-bombers
made strafing runs Sunday
against Syrian units on Mt
Hermon and Syrian and Israeli
tanks and artillery battled
fiercely. Syrian casualties in
Sunday's fighting were put at
15 dead and the Israelis at 17
wou ended
Ihe Israeli csIio naliald ninied
Brig. ;Gen. Rlael I ytan to
commairiad r i i's northern
front with both Syria aind
Lebanon. He replaces Lt. (en.
Mordechai 1u;r. whlo was
promoted to Chief of Staff
Eytan, one of Israel's first
paratroopers, headed a
divisional task force during the
October War which held back
the Syrian thrust on the (;olan
Heights and later counter-
attacked to within 23 miles of
l)amascus. (AP)

Lebanese appeal

to UN Council
UNITFDI) NATIONS
Lebanon urged Monday that
the Security Council take
"appropriate and efficient
means" to stop Israel from
raiding Lebanese territory.
Foreign minister Fouad
Maffah told the 15-niation
Council that a mere
condemnation of Israel for its
retaliatory attacks Friday night
on six Lebanese villages would
be received by Israel with
"ir difference and contempt."
The Lebanese foreign
minister recommended
stronger measures.
Replying, Israeli ambassador
Yoscf Tekoah said, "it is up to
Lebanon to prevent the use of
its territory for attacks against
Israel. If the Lebanese
government permits Lebanon
to become a lawless gangland,
it is obvious that its neighbours
will treat it as a gangland."


-Why Nixon--

had to

let Agnew

resign
WASHINGTON A new
book on Spiro T. Agnew's tax
case says that while President
Nixon kept voicing support
for Agnew in public, White
House aides eventually met
privately with Agnew to
demand his resignation.
Nixon was particularly
worried about Agnew taking
the "impeachment track" by
aiming his case toward the
House of Representatives,
according to the book, "A
heartbeat away," being
published today by Vikint
Press.
Agnew finally made a deal
with the Justice Department,
resigned Oct. 10 and pleaded
no contest to a single charge
of income tax evasion.
The authors of the book,
Washington Post reporters
Richard M. Cohen and Jules
Witcover, said the Agnew
impeachment option "was
fraught with ominous parallel
for the President himself.
"If Agnew could be
impeached and convicted,
then perhaps it would not be
so difficult for the
now-reluctant Congressmen
to place Nixon on the same
track and ride him out of
office.
''Also, an Agnew
impeachment trial would
raise in unavoidable terms the
basic constitutional question
vexing the Watergate-plagued
President: was impeachment
the mandatory first step for a
President or Vice President
accused of crime, or could he
be indicted first in a court of
law'?
Cohen and Witcover said
that the decisive incident
behind Agnew's agreeing to
resign was a meeting Sept. 10
involving the Vice President,
one of his lawyers,
presidential counsel J. Fred
luizhardt and White House
chief of staff Alexander T.
flaig.
| Haig. "abandoning the
White House's addiction for
circumlocution and subtlety
. let Agnew have it," the
book said. "The Vice
President had to resign. (AP)


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The Tribune - Tuesday, April 16, 1974


Kissinger's 6 points


for a better world
UNITED NATIONS U.S. Secretary of State Hlenry Kismi
Monday outlined a six-point programme aimed at a :,,
cooperative development of the world's natural resources.
In a speech prepared for a commodities."
special session of the United This means, the .rc.r.
Nation's General Assembly, said, that there 1mut bf
Kissinger said "we meet here at equitable access to suppl ,,fi
a moment when the world resources as well as ae, .,,
economy is under severe markets by thie producers
stress." To support this there sh.,,id
Pointing to the oil crisis, be a body of i. r,,. ,,
shortage of food grains and experts working with the' \
increasing global inflation, divisions of resource, to
Kissinger said the solution can determine the future supply', ,
come only through a realistic, natural resources, he said
international effort. *-There must be 1 ti cr
"The great issues of balance bet ween ,,
development can no longer be production and :. .
realistically perceived in terms growth.
of confrontation between the The United States will .!,,
haves and have nots," he said. its agricultural techno:.
Any effort by the less including a raise from
developed nations to million to $b75 tnllnli -,,
artificially control raw year to aid in boosting '
materials "will sooner or later technology.
produce the organization of Steps must he tak, i
the potential victims into a keep the poorer nation,
counterbloc," Kissinger said in being destroyed by iN ,
a not-too-subtle warning, shifts in the supplies and pri,
In introducing his six points, of such raw materials as d,!
Kissinger also underlined his "We welcome thle stp,',
belief that the U.N. should oil producers have a :,
avoid grandiose resolutions of taken towards applying
principles and aim for hard new surplus revenues' .
work instead, needs of the poverty -s,:
"Our goal," he said, "cannot countries,
be reached by resolutions alone The United Nati l .
or prescribed by rhetoric. It as the other indui st
must remain the subject of nations must continue .::
constant, unremitting efforts programme to t ihe
over the years and decades developed world
ahead." Science must c
The six points: and put to greater use i
Action must be taken to "the developing iian. .
insure a more equitable supply most fundamental nprbl'-
of oil and other energy unemployment and t.i',h
products while keeping an the secretary said.
inflationary price spiral from There must be
occurring. commitment by ri .
For its part the United poorer ntin
States is willing to help development of an ,
oil-producing nations broaden trading system. a ,
their economic base as well as monetary system "n.nI
sharing technology and aiding positive climate for ti. !'
in industrialization, flow of resources, both ;
*- There must be an end to and private."
the cycle of raw material
surplus and shortage. But a
cartel of raw material
producers aimed at forcing up a
prices "would have serious &
consequences for all
countries," Kissinger said.
SThe United States proposes a
cooperative effort to include
"urgent international
consideration of restrictions on
incentives for the trade in


- ~- - -- -- -- - - -- - ---


--- -- - -- 1 - ~-- -


-- - ~-~~-~ -e 1 ~- - ---e


Calypso Strum An' Make Up Rhyme..







BLACK LABEL



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An' A Dash 0' Limtk.,
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I












The Tribune - Tuesday, April 16, 1974


Tbh p 01 ribuni
NULLIUS AoDDCTus JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of\,o Master

1 ION E. H. nDUPUCi .Publi.siher/Editor 100/ 19/4
SIR FI ENNE IDUPIJCIt,O.liE., K (' S.G., D.Litt., LI).
Publisher/Editor 191 7 1972
Co'ntributing Editor 1972 -
I ILlI N I tUPUta CARBON, M Sc..B.A., 1.I..B.,
Publisher/Editor I 972 -
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.

EDITORIAL

Any thought to contribute?


By EFTI NNI: DUPUCHt
GRAND CAYM\\N, March 16. We have always attached
importance to our correspondence columns. We want our readers
to write to this newspaper because every man, however humble,
has something to contribute to the sum total of thought that goes
into producing a well-balanced community.
It is untillfortunate that many of the letters reaching The Tribune
are hand written and some of them not very clearly.
There waas a time when we had enough staff to go over these
letters and put them into proper shape for publication. Today
tias is not easy. As a result there are sometimes delays in
puhhlshing a letter, and often it doesn't appear at all, for which
we ,ire soi r.'
I suggest two things. If you are not a lucid writer get a friend
to put iour thoughts down on paper ... and, if possible, have your
letter ty ped before submitting it to the Editor. At least write it
cleaali .

One thing I want to impress to vou ... le Tribune is not
concerned whose side you write onil. Just write and try to be
ihonest r\ our writing.
You \. ill recall that for years tlae later i N. Russell and I were
on t oppsite sides hbut we entertained the highest respect even
atf-cclion for each other because we both recognized that
e.c l at uts itaiorn our own point of view was being honest. And
this Is all that matters. lHonest men recognize the right of ever,'
ma Ito his Vwn pon t of view. Intelligent disagreement often
piodiLuces 1 riatltul results.

i ha't, \vliateai this appeal to our readers because I have just
been reading some excellent letters ill a recent issue f I'The Daily
leaner
S;qe of the ntr',it exasperating nelieinces of a newspaper
'edit' is \ I"-!a san reolne comes along wi-it a caup'aiana or useful
u ai.i:manotolin a subject willh which he is familiar and lie
ira.sl :' 'aii a as a itia'ir aboul t it.
\\ e. ',ie ges' tt'MAl i' sho U \\ ri' ;t l !ei o the nt. ,vewspapea
ia: e-ta!\ olt-'t is "'Olh no. tou do it ou anll do it better than
ain\ tiaut else."
I lis kinald ,f thing arises from the assumption that we should
know ever\V C t ltarir abt l t everything.
Ills is a false assumption. The cleverest mran wlho ever lived
possessed only a rmere grain in the vast store of humanal
knowledge.
But when we dig far enough in cases of this kind we often ,get
ill,,s final answer: "Yoiu do it for me. You see, I don't want to get
ialolved."
A onea wiho doesn't want to get involved is taking a first step
toward.:, surrendering to power blocs in his cotrunaulity precious
rig, htIs and privileges for which generations of courageous men
hase fought and died.
hliele are many subjects which can be usetfull discussed
awitlhout the writer becoining involved.
lwai particularly interesting letters appeared in The (ha'nacr
One was political, tile other gave some good advice on agn culture
in winch 1 hope more and more of our people are becoming
involved today .

I an) ,.,a111 to print the political letter in full because' it
e'rpliasites the dantgertaous dirertlio in which Prime Minister
slilnle ,'s leftist government at is taking Britain's largest former
slarald coln a11aIn the ('aribbean.
The letter. signed CONC(RNI I) read:
,I1 note with great alarmi that Jamaica is considering ithe
possibility of a youth exchange plogramme with Cuba.
'"This must mean that Jamaica would send young 2men and
women to Cuba for a period of time to participate in Cuba's
vothil training prograrmmes, and Cuba would do thie same by
sending vounlg rmen and Vwomen to Jamaica.
"I think that it should be made very clear to the (lovernmentt
and thie people of Jamaica that anyti of our youth sent to Cuba
would become the object of aitense indoctrination of
communismarit, subversion and revolution.
"let there be no misunderstanding of the educational system
in Cuba. Children are taken over by the state at a very young age
anld are taught that communismn is thie greatest economic and
social system in thie world and that all other doctrines, especially
democracy, a.re opposed to commulnism.l
'They are taught that thie state is above every thing, even tlhe
family, anid that every communist owes his greatest allegiance tot
tlie state.
"There is not roomti for any other form of teaching in thie Cuban
schools and training camps to which Jamaican youths would be
assigned. N0r could thie ('Cuban government let such ant
opporttlllity to make cotiverts pass.
"Tlie Cuban youths visiting Jamaica would be those which
have proven most their loyalty to the communist doctrine, for
the C('uban government could not risk thie embarrassment of


defection by any of these youths.
"We would be allowing communists to infiltrate our youth.
And let there be no doubt of ihe fact that all communists dream
of converting tie entire world to their way of thinking.
'lThere must be many other countries ini the world with good
youth training programmes which are not politically motivated."

I feel that this information about leftist trends in Jamaica
should be of interest to our readers, especially to parents who
have children attending schools in Jamaica or who have plans for
sending their children to schools in that island.
Even if our government may not be concerned about this trend
in our big neighboring island to the south ... it is a situation that
needs to be watched by Bahamian parents.

The second letter is written by Stanley Foster of Montego Bay.
lie advises Jamaican farmers to plant an early crop of corn ... and
to store the crop against the danger of a hurricane hitting the
island this summer.
lie reminds Gleaner readers that the island has not been struck
by a hurricane for 22 ears. On the law of averages it is possible
that the island will be struck by one or more hurricanes this year.
This much is certain ... any land mass that is located within the
hurricane belt is bound to be struck sooner or later.
The people of British Honduras fooled themselves by believing
that the hurricane path had changed because they had not had a
blow for over a hundred years.
And then they were struck by a hurricane, followed by a tidal
wave. The people were warned of the approach of the hurricane
but they didn't believe it. And so they were caught completely


By Richard Pyle
WASHINGTON (AP)
Unless it should prove a
gigantic hoax, the Patricia
Hearst case already has earned
itself a prominent niche
alongside Lindbergh and other
famous kidnapings in the
Amrrericani pantheon of crime.
The abduction of the San
Francisco newspaper heiress by
self-styled revolutionaries has
been called America's first
political kidnapping. C('oncern
voiced four years ago that
government *Hattla or other
leading citizens could become
the target of such acts, as they
have in other countries, never
maternalized.
But kidnapping in its more
familiar forms remains a
common occurrence in this
country and, if available
evidence is any guide, mar\
even he increasing tin
frequency.
Julst how serious a problems
this poses fo)r law enforcement
today is hard to determine
Sensational kidnapping helped
the l"edcraIl Bureau t )1
i invest ga I ion build iat
gaanghusting reputation in their
1930s, bhul even the FBI keeps
no figures ain the crimlle and'
does not include it in its anmillial
unaitor crime reports.
S lie reason fa, r this, says ail:
IBI officials. Is that kidnapping
is Inot Co111tmn t1enough .to
inherit statistical treatment
along with murder, armed
robbery and auto theft, and
"particul, rl because irmails
cases toltiginally reported as
kidnapings turn out to have
been som'lletlhing else'
News reports aind other
records indicate, however, that
kidnapping for rarinsom ihas
become increasingly cImmton


in the United States in recent
years following a general tailing
otf duirig the I 40s and i150I s
that was attributed largely to
effective law enforcement.
Files of the Associated Press
show more than 45 major
kadnapings for ransom since
1970, in which ransoms as high
as S1 million were demanded.
I'he records also indicate and
the FBI says experience bears
them out that n-, most cases
the r.insom was paid, the
Sit. l w%.as released, suspects
wasre captured and somte or ill
of the ras 1.n mone11t's was
recovered.
Irn the same perld. FBI
records show a total ,t 215S
convictions under the federal
kidnap law !n',) Iat ment' .aoa
uiltaoun t1ted oatheis in state
courts and minan cases which
wound uip, as statome kidna.ping,,
do, in ec\toIam ;.'I change c
In la"'3 thene were 71
federal kidnap rnvKitions, a
jump ot 3 per cent troin the
previous ear ald a ell above
the average t )I 4 cotanvictions
per year snc 'iar).
I'his upward trend is
pu/tilinr fl r several rea,sonrs.
not lIIe le..st i )l w d hiCh is t he
tact h t a1 it p liccs .la'enctIes over
the l ears ave l Ihad undea liable
success iit mi akini'r kidnalpir
perhaps tore tha ,inan other
a crime that did not p ,t .
Some fatia Mtus kidnap a.-ses's
in more recent yrir include
B o bb\ ( r ee nlea se,
nita year a-old stn a Kan,;as
('aita M ,, it t dealer.
Jibducted in l1a'at a'id killed
alih..cii S600,000( tnO1, rnsom was
p1aid A Maian and a woman died
in the gas chamber
Peter We 'narerer
rmonth-old sona a i auna
Island. N.Y.. driug executive,


:ullprepliredl. 11The daI ;aagc to prope'. a'd a' !i ie
devastating.
A few' years later the capital city of Belize was s ruck ai second
time again wee awidesircad danagIe. a\s ', recsi! a tia .se rwa
disaste!s.tw ai t\ 'Cl wIas llmoived timlll the ctoast taa thie" 1. ; ';ia a
Caracas. capital city of V\ene/uela.ias also escaped t'a lrrrcane1
for over a hundred 'ears. When I w\a, last in that citi I shivered to
lIn' o 's wham w:a l happi.'r to l!i t city :it a i ,l.,' it is
sat ick I., a heav', sito l he pe eop it.it.' It:i, ;.: ; kI, i"
of houses in tthe craziest places imagitnable the iresill o a
hIuIrrcane on that citv would be disastrous.

People have a wa\ of forgetting. The tirst hig humic'ane I
tIremembecr ,was in 1a0mt The next abg ones hit Nissau in I!')2 I
three; 1928 one; and the biggest of them 1il irn 19)21.
In thle meantime Nassau had experienced there bootleg bahoom in
which fortunes swere quickly made. This brought on a building
boom. Many of' the owners of these news buildings ignored rty pes
of construction that former generations oft Bahamians had learned
through bliter experience to follow. Tlhe aesuiltt was disastraatls.

Now Stan!ei Foster advises .laj laic,: tt' plami an earl\ crop al
corn this sumimt rs as n insualrancte against ithe potssiblity\ of
hlurricane striking this summie
"My advice lto everyone concerned a I,, plant iiinmedlaitel as
much corn as possible and Ito e'r!cct gi r iies I t' st ore thie same.
advised Stanley F"oster.
"PILanted now, the crops would be reaped by August. which ias
the beginning of' t urricanehurine season, whelrca. their crops such
as' bnanias, ams, etc. would be wiped out if twe were hit by a
storm. More ert, these crops ai, all persihable and could niot be
stored.'

I can appreciate what Mr. Foster is writing about because I was
in Jamaica in 11lt when tihe island was struck by a fierce
hurricane. The banana plantations were devastated. IHundreds of
thousands of bunches of bananas rulst have been left to rotI ill the
fields in the interior of the island.
For over two weeks alter the hiurrcane had passed dozens and
dozens oft baige loads otf bananas \\ee taken out oft Kingston
harbour and dumped at sea.
In my owna small waa I have seen what a hurricane can do to a
banana field. I had over 200( bunches of' bananas rearing maturity
in ry tfar art Camperdown du rim tile secoalt d worlt d \war. A
hurrl cane struck ... not a veC\ sever e one. But it \wiped outl ihe
entire dield.

"('orli is a very exhausting crop." wrote Stanly) hostel. "It ia
die most exhausting after flax. I believe, therefoti good tilth al e
heavy fertilizer are a sine quait non to good results and tins as i,onll
possible on fertile level land.
"Beehives in the vicinity of thle fields Ior proper pollination
call also add considerably to thle yield and I do hope that a lan
percentage otf the cane lands will be used for corn, whi,h mighi I
fill many empty bellies, and the ciop rotation could lielp the soil.
providing proper fertilizing was done."

I don't think many oal oulr t'allnners especially n ithe Out
Islands are aware of thie irpol lance of bees to tihe pitodatic" i
of corn.
We kept bee hives at our farm at C'arpcrdown and, as .; result.
we got remarkable results in corn cultivation at out farm. I it'
yield was high and the ears were large and "juicy sweet".
The government should introduce bee keeping Io the Out
Islands, not only as an important item of nutritious food but also
because of the part bees play in pollinating certain crops.
The late Ivor Claridge was an expert on bee keeping. lie did it
as a business as a young mian. lIe taught me bee-keeping.

It would seem to me that the entire Caribbean area and tlhe
Bahamas to have been spared from severe hurricanes in recent
years.
As I told you in earlier articles this condition is attributed to
tie millions of tons of soil that is being carried on the airways
from drought-parched lands in Africa to the Caribbean. It is
reported that there are times when the dust over the island of
Barbados almost completely blots out the sun!
This dust, it is claimed, militates against conditions that spawn
hurricanes in the Caribbean.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
Ii is made clear by every procees of logic and by the proof of
historic fact that the wealth of a nation, the character of its
people, thie quality and permanence of its institutions are all
dependent upon sound and sufficient agricultural foundation.
Not armies or navies or commerce or diversity of manufacture
or anything other than the farm is the anchor which will hold
through the storms of time that sweep all else away. JAMES J.
HILL.


FBI says record



shows kidnapping



does not pay


kd naped Iliomn hits bab.I
carriage On the faI-ily patio in
Augaust I1 0 i, A S.'.t(' ralns..ni
was 0et .ir.1a !' d atd h-a liia
kid1aaper p!ni ked when lie
sassw pi lite anid rane 7wsVirIr I
aroulld le t 'a ta.,l 't,. hoia e
and threw aic brht In to laisli, s
along a parkway. where it
perisLed .Angelo Johniri
Lamailati. at on it.ed i both
murder andd kiadn.ipin died ira
the electric charh in i5t.m
AdoilphI ( t rr, III 4 a
imeml ber ot [lie ienveri ('oltoa
beer tainil I. kida naped In i tL i)
foi $5()0.0(( l His clothes and
pait' a ., skele ,on were o'urnd
ln1Iaa 'aiO ilas llet \ ( Jali!olinl
prir i t'a tlia Jo' ep t'h Corbel!
Ji ''ti i ill'. waI s s :entenceC d
tv' Ira
I ',ink Si n t.ra Jr.
abdi-tecd !rr al lake Iahoe.
N .,' : a ,t I 0a! I a aItr -,
releaatd atile three d.7 s,
foiaina vng pay ment c l r aaa' 1
S240,()00 ransom by liis Wa'hlm
Three men wae'nl to prison, two
of them lor life
Barbara Jane Mackie.
daughter o' a Florida real
estate d,.'eloper. kidnapedtl i
I16 tbfor S 500,000 ransoma and
imprisoned tor 83 [errifling
tiours in a col fin-like box
underground until di'.covered
b. laWinIen onll a search. (Gary
Steven K st., 21 ,was, senirci.ed
to life. a female aicomplice
was deported


I here hia e been several
cases in which ib mulital
agreement, the press and
broadcast mcdia voluntarily
bla ,ked oit kalnaping news,
while a victim's re!t',ase \wa.I
being negotiated I l otl eials
sa' they prefer thias even i!
secrecy is not Jemanded hb Ihe
kidnapers
"he primary ctonsider'al ion
is ;alv,'a\s the satetv . a he
iactima and p i at!!c!t\y otir i
dioes not seP re the C .itse ta!
s.aletw ,' said o:w,'' BI1 t ; .'!:;
In It'172 the L' S Supreaei
courtt in a 5-4 ruling. ield thl
death penalty i lun s,,,iitutionat,!
bce a:st" ir hid btt e.
inco n.sisten tl.y applied l I li
at!ected tl:C liand c-ergih iLaa\
which carried a possible death
penalty lor harming the victian
as well as all state -apital
punishment stai ites
Pen nsi IS an rel en tr l
became the 2 e rd st'aet to
restore hie death penalty y )r
eren tain r:a alr rtata',
kidnaping is included n amost
ol the revisions
The Justice l)epart ment.
meanwhile, has draltCtl new
legislation to reinstate a



Hroi"'


possible deiati penalty it .1
death Inot i sarl that ,a '
the hustage is found to have
resulted Irori the conm 'aissiona
01 attempted commission af a
kidnapping I his bill has passed
the Senate and is now; in a
House t.acrUt irltee
lhe net.' law also would Jot
away with the problem raised
when a L' S district judge ruled
in 196' that the Lindbergh iaw
waasu constitutional because a;
proved that oni: a jur" -, ai!r'
recommend the death .11.
and aheratr.' at.a '.autsLd
person had to" r;., k it if h -
wanted a iuri trial bU m ;.a i i
he avas t:id by a nrd u; or
pleaded guilt
President Nixon, reacting to
the ilearst case and the spate
of others which tolloued it,
told Atts (Gin. Williamn B
Sax bc otN March 8 that tie
wanted the death per.alty
restored tur kidlnaper c v. ho
minrder their victims.
Meanwhile. the recent
utps'urge in kidnaplngs has
rav Acd interest in kidnap
inruramn.. wtha.h surged alter


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THIS WEEK!


the Lindblrgh c, se 42 years
ago. \ letroit area insurance
c u t'l'ive said last month that
h ', trn will oftfr kidnap
initiiaiitce policies worth up to
S500,000 and costing up to
,400 per year.
I lere is almost always a
touch ot the bizarre in a
kidnapping.
In one case, the 13-year-old
sun ol an art gallery director
was kidnapped but set free when
authorities complied with the
abductor's demand that four
pictures of nude women be
removed from an art
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COME SEE AND (0PARE OUR EALUTFUL STYLES OUR SUPER
SERVICES AND THE OST IMPORTANT OURl (OMPETTIVE PRICES AT
TWYEOUNG MISS A NAME EVERY NEWLY WEDCOUPLE LEARNS FROM
EXPERIENCE TO TRUST ANDRECOMMEND TO OTHERS

iJUUIIIIMl l! BRIDESAIOMATERIALS


i


I


11


I !







The Tribune... --Tuesday, April 16, 1974



Don't hurt hostess, avoid other guest NOW IN STOCK
the school's chances for a winning team. breast cancer. He should see a doctor about that lump in
Wh,1's your opinion, Abby? TALL CORN STATE his breast at once.
fDEARlMt^ .A CORNI: I don't want to throw you a curve, but I'mP lb U J Jl
with you s5 per cent. An athlete's hair should be short Problems? You'll feel better if you get it off your chest. ELECTRIC FOOT & HAND OPERATED
enough in front so it doesn't get into his eyes, but what For a personal reply, write to ABBY: Box No. 69700, L. A.,
goes on in the back should be his decision. Calif. 90069. Enclose stamped, self-addressed envelope, I
S ACONFIDENTIAL TO CONCERNED IN TARENTUM, For Abby's booklet, "How to Have a Lovely Wedding," Cor. Christie & Dowdeswell St.& Phone 2-1197
By Abigail Van Buren PA.: Your husband is 100 per cent wrong! Men can have sendc 1 to Abigal Van B. 90212re, 132 Lasky Dr., Beverly Hills
0 1"74 Wy Cheic TrImne-N. Y. News svWd., 0Ic.
DEAR ABBY: Here are the facts: A lady was invited to a
dinner party. While being greeted by her hostess, she saw a
guest whom she had good reason to dislike intensely. She
turned around and left immediately.
We [her friends] are divided in our opinions. Some of us
think she should have stayed and ignored the guest she
disliked. Others say she was justified in leaving.
What would you have done if you had been in that
situation? DIVIDED
DEAR DIVIDED: Offhand, out of consideration for my
hostess I'd probably have stayed and avoided the guest I
disliked. But what I would have done cannot be used as a
fair criterion. For that I would have to have walked for at
least two miles In that lady's moccasins.
DEAR ABBY: Please help settle a dispute between my
husband and me. We've been married a year, and until last
week everything was fine and dandy. Last Saturday night
we were invited to a party at some friends' house. I bought
myself a new dress for the occasion. It had a plunging
neckline, and as I am sort of bosomy, it was a little
revealing.
I thought it looked good. However when I put it on, my
husband refused to take me to the party unless I changed
to something more conservative. Well, I refused, so we
ended up staying home.
I think my husband is wrong in dictating what I should m
wear. I am young and pretty and enjoy admiring looks from
other men. Is this so wrong, Abby? I could understand my
husband's objections if I were too fat or old to wear a dress
like that.
He said he wanted to protect me from unwanted ad-
vances, and secondly, he wanted me all to himself; he
doesn't want other men to see that much of me. What do
you think of this? MAD AT MY HUSBAND
DEAR MAD: Some husbands do not object if their wives
wear revealing clothes, in which case, fine. But since your From
husband does--don't! oit yourselfFixUp your Place Pa i

DEAR ABBY: We are members of a small junior college IPANE LS ortedELNE PANELING
baseball team who are going through the same problemnFU N ITURE
thousands of high schools and colleges are going through/ x 6 4' x 8'
each year. The coach insists upon our getting our hair cut 2 T6" Book Shelves $26,75 Varis Coour
off at the ears and at the top of our collars. This is his first9Assor
year as a baseball coach, and he expects us to sacrifice our Desas pater10
hair for baseball, although this college offers no scholar- 95Desks $41.10
ships, and the team agrees that they would give 100 per 5 rawer Chest $50.95
cent at all times. We can't see how the length of our hair per panel
can make a difference in how we play.
In order for our college to play baseball we must have at
least 15 guys out, and when a coach makes such stiff
demands, it causes some guys to quit. This in turn hurts






Best taste Make Fancy designs ACCLAIM

Se is a d.O nwith the Swedish


Stand patterns PRESS INTERIOR

and 12" x 48" *$9 15 G O, ,H





[ WEAING BUCKE


oieo RV WOOD! I~! IN! RDGL 5
11-IW," KITCHEN1LOOM
CABINETSS
.,.. S,(U nits) only ,

... Low "Prices $ 4 25!












Hasotd colors DE SRK-BUFSIlNEESHSOETEC. GIANT$5

How good t is...SPADES
.. ....S ore









inthe SuperKingSize

I 1973 J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.







6 The rbMne Tueday, April 16. 1974


Gas, food,


yes,


But, you


San Andros real estate too


can still get in on the ground floor.


TODAY at original opening
But you must act now.


QUARTER ACRE LOTS



$2995


$


DOWN


per


month


CALL NOW!
SAN ANDROS (BAHAMAS) LTD.
Norfolk House (3rd Floor)
Frederick St., Nassau
Phone 5-1515 or 5-1516
FRANK C. CAREY REAL ESTATE
Bay & Deveaux Streets
Nassau
Phone 2-7667
GROSHAM PROPERTY LTD.
107 Shirley St.
Nassau
Phone 2-7662


BILL'S REAL ESTATE AGENCY LTD.
Shirley St.
Nassau
Phone 2-3921
BERKLEY FERGUSON REAL ESTATE
Berwin House on Frederick St.
Nassau
Phone 2-4913
McDEIGAN & ASSOCIATES INVESTMENTS LTD.
Bernard Sunley Building on Bay St., Nassau
Phone 2-4284
MAXWELL WOODSIDE LTD.
Coner of Bias and Blue Hill Road
Nassau
Phone 3-5632


BRAYNEN & KNOWLES REAL ESTATE LTD.
British Colonial Hotel Arcade
Bay Street, Nassau
Phone 2-1886
COSMOPOLITAN REALTY
King's Court, Bay Street
Nassau
Phone 5-7477
TENANT & COOPER REAL ESTATE
Ist National City Bank Bldg.
Freeport
Phone 352-7841
Or Your OWN Broker


San Andres is for Lqvers... and smart investors, too!


clothes...


prices.










The Tribune - Tuesday, April 16, 1974








S------
L rr1


oNj

S .+. m 7


ADDERLEY FOR


INTER


- AMERICA


TALKS IN


WASHINGTON


Keys for Mrs. Reeves


A smiling Mrs. Eve Keeves,
below, left, accepts the keys
for her bright red 1974 Dodge
Monaco car which she won on
Friday evening at a gala dance
sponsored by the Red Cross
Raffle Committee at Ronnie's
Rebel Room. Donated by Mr.


Alexis Nihon. the car was first
prize in the annual Red Cross
raffle. Mrs. Marguerite Pindling
pulled the lucky ticket. Shown
presenting the keys to Mrs
Reeves at Red Cross
Headquarters this week is Mrs
Trixi Hanna.


THE 19th NASSAU RANGERS

present

J f aZnt anad l oaskion Sow
on Friday, 19th April, 1974, at 7:00 p.m.
at
HOLY CROSS PARISH HALL
Hiqhbury Park off Soldier Road
In aid of The Bahamas Paraplegic Association &
The Bahamas Girl Guides Association
Camp Site Fund

Donation $2.50



LOOK AFTER YOUR PIROPERTY...

CALL...
BAHAMASALES

MANAGEMENT
*Land Clearing
Home Maintenance

House Painting

S* Lawn Mowing


The First Step


that new home you're
dreaming about is sometimes,
financially, the most difficult to
acquire. Especially with that moneybug
looking over your shoulder!


At FINCO we can show you how to
save. Interest on ordinary savings accounts is
6V2 per cent, and even higher rates are
available on fixed deposit accounts for 6
months or one year.

Come in and talk to us at Trinity Place
or Robinson Road.
At FINCO we make that first step easy.


(You don't want the Moneybug
to oeat up your dream house,

do you?l)

FINANCE CORPORATION
OF BANAMAS
LIMITED
TRINITY PLACE & ROBINSON ROAD
The Bahamas' Oldest and Strongest Savings
and Loan Association
P.O. gOX N3038, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, PHONE 2-4822-6
P.O. BOX F29 FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, PHONE 2-8896

MEMBER OF THE RoyWf ST GROUP OF COMPANIES


S8.59
(t t ,,d Ii .n


i


I ri.l .


. i. ,
,


'in




i t
i + , 7 ,
I < { { l "


I:X I R N \L \l I
nlimMtr r S- in!,t t' n 1
A\dderle wx ill .itlnd 1 i ti ;
of F iriitn tMinitef in
.i .h oitl,, i ) D iln \piill
17-IS t,:o nnot ni e t in'
consultation between I eu-eIII
Hf Ieniisplleie IN io ii' m i.o d
at thie 1 lal l held in \I i ( i t tii
February I I Ih ,4

I ,, iS I 1. loehi, t
H! ht nl c \ : .- :. ^ i : *!

\,illn, Mr e rge i1
lS t e r ; t : :

( 1 Dirf lc v S :i n d ,. a r t:







I i




FOR 3 in 1
Li', 3 SERVICE


TROPICAL 22157










ABBEY

INTERNATIONAL


FUND


THE 75th Session of the
Synod of the Diocese of
Nassau and the Bahamas will
be held Monday to Friday,
April 22-26, at Holy Cross
Parish Hall, Soldier Road.
I lie Synod will begin with a
Concelehrated Mass at Christ
Church cathedral l at 8 p.m.
Monday The Rt. Rev. Michael
l.ldon. Lord Bishop of Nassau
and the Bahamas, will be the
celebrant and will deliver his
Charge.
One hundred and
twenty-eight Clerical and Lay
delegates win participate in the
meetings. The delegates will
represent parishes in New
Providence, the Family Islands
and the Turks and Caicos
Islands, which are also part of
the Diocese.


'Kindness' essay winners


\meiCriCas the integral development of the
\inistc region in the fields of trade and
t1i o' ih, ir development loans in five
,1 '. 'w to ways
bl.-le. (A) Make maximum efforts
ion in to secure passage ot the
te niloinal legislation on the system of
including generalized preferences during
,oliatioits. the present session of Congress,
Ie' it was and then work with other
(ss towards countries of the hemisphere to
n solidarlity apply these preferences in the
tonlls must most beneficial manner.
to existing (B) Avoid, as far as possible,
iani must the implementation of any new
lor the measures that would restrict
1, tl,11 ia mi\ access to the United States
market.
SI SAic ol (C) Maintain, as a minimum,
\lr IHnr\ present aid levels despite
* 1e the grow ing costs.
I!I riling (Il) Cooperate throughout
'dillI that tlii region and in international
.. t itll institutions of facilitate the
1i'1; c the tlj\ oft' new concessional and
1 law conentional resources towards
r .il .in tiO se countries most affected
on h glowing energy costs.
II 'In t i i )1 \amine with others in
thi. Committee of Twenty and
fiuthier the I .\1)-\ all restrictions on
t *ln tlhe eI ntry of hemispheric
'iiuntrws to capital markets in
ii ric thi e I united States and other
'ii'' li r indutistrili/ed countries.
Ihe iForeign Ministers
1 'erign further declared:
S t,' i \ i \ lIe\ reaffirm the need
fi l itih American and
'; I tt' ai ,ll beani countries for an
,'"id1 ct -ldli\e participation of their
1, t: i nll ain international
!,' ; .i, .t .1t \ rtI' to rin .
t.i S Ist was acknowledged that the
n'i ret ti.nsfter of real resources is
S 111nd that ways to
ti.. ,i i1t utionalize transfers
that thlroigh adequate mechanism
Id,,;l he s rhoutil lie considered.
h l,'sc'l It was reaffirmed the
c\(trnal financial co-operation
1 t!l.il th i llo uld preferably be channeled
I Jid te through multilateral agencies,
r in tihe and respect the priorities
i, 1 liit .al established for each country,
without political tfs or
r Ohe conditions
1, 1ii,11. ( B i W ith respect to


Florida singers at Zion concert


A Shirk.., Is -il
- ,.+ :+ i e t, S ,, 2








Sl -0l i; !k l I i0 1 .


director ofi the Florida Baptist
Church i, Music Department.
I lise men convene several
limes each year for rehearsals
anid concerts that provide
opportunitiess for fellowship,
sharing o mutual concern,
spiritual renewal and sharing
tii ugh limusic the gospel oft
J esus Christ
Ihe musical programme will
include gospel songs. hymns
iind anthems both old and new.


Additional music will be
presented by individuals and
ensembles, including accom-
panists James D. Morrell and
Lester Williams.
The Church Music
Committee of the Bahamas
Baptist Missionary and
Educational Convention,
sponsor of these church music
specialists, cordially invites the
public to attend. There is no
admission charge.


(and who is asked to contact
the Society to collect his
prize), and Norma Russell of
Crown Haven, Abaco, who
came second in the junior
contest. All entrants wrote
essays on "why I should be
kind to animals." Judging
entries with Mrs. Bosfield were
Mr. Hugh Sands and Society


veterinarian Dr. Norman R.
Smith. PHOTO: PHILLIP
SYMONETTE.


Four of the six winners in
the Humane Society's essay
contest, held in connection
with Be Kind to Animals
Week, were recently presented
with their prizes at the Society
headquarters in Chippinglham.
Making the presentations were
Mrs. Cynthia Bosfield, one of
the contest judges, and Society
member Mr. Bernard
Thompson. Pictured from left
are Mrs. Bosfield; Layett
Russell of St. Andrews, winner
in the middle age group; Juliet
Samuels of Queen's College,
winner in the junior group;
Yvette Stuart of C. R. Walker,
who placed second in the
senior group; Yvonne Brown of
Prince Williams, winner in the
senior group; and Mr.
Thompson. Winners not
pictured were Ricky Heilbrunn
of St. Andrews, who came
second in the middle age group

"transferers of technology,"
the Foreign Ministers agreed to
promote policies facilitating
transfers of both patented and
unpatented technical know-
ledge among the respective
countries in the field of
industry as well as education,
housing, and agriculture, taking
into account conditions
prevailing in each country and
in particular the needs of the
Latin American and Caribbean
countries for introduction of
new manufactures for greater
utilization of the human and
material resources available in
each country, for increased
local technical development,
and for creation of products
for export.


NOTICE

IN THE FSTATI OF HARVEY W.
FORSTER Late of Freeport in the
Island of Grand Bahama. Deceased.


Notice is hereby given that all persons having any
claims or demands against the above named estate
are requested to send the same duly certified to the
undersigned not later than the 30th day of April
1974 after which time the assets of the deceased
will be distributed among the persons entitled
thereto having regard only to the claims of which
notice have been received.


HIGGS & JOHNSON
Attorneys for Violet E. Forster
and Bank of Nova Scotia Trust
Company (Bahamas) Limited the
Executors of the Estate.


Sessions will be held daily
from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. with
time out for garden parties at
Government House and
Addington House. In a
departure from tradition the
agenda calls for group work to
precede the plenary sessions.
The Synod will conclude
with a Mass of Thanksgiving at
St. Margaret's Church, Kemp
Road, on Friday, April 26 at 7
p.m.
The Synod is the highest
legislative authority in the
Diocese. It was first summoned
in 1870, nine years after the
establishment of the See. The
purpose is to pass regulations
by which the Diocese is
operated and to discuss and
formulate policy.


N CT!CE
NOTICE
NO,,CC YO -A ;A^- L;-, /\ CASH
by selli, n vo, uV.o :ec boat truck .
car reat s',or. c .-ehoid items,
in a Tribu*e -r ie Advc-tisement!


Anglican Synod


is next week


INK -


- L,


III


__a


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that EVA RENELLA CARTER of
Minnie St. Nassau Bahamas is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration should not be granted
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 9th day'of April 1974 to
The Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs., P. 0. Box N-3002, Nassau.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that CARLIN MAXWELL
CARTER of Mount Royal Avenue, Nassau Bahamas is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration should not be granted should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 9th day of April 1974 to The Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs,
P. O. Box N-3002, Nassau.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that HAROLD GOODHAND of
Buen Retiro Nassau Bahamas is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration should not be granted
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 8th day of April 1974 to
The Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship
Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002, Nassau.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that NAZIUS MERZIUS of Young
Street, Nassau is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for Naturalisation as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why naturalisation should not be granted shourf
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 16th day of April 1974 to The
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs P. 0. Box N3002, Nassau.













The Tribune - Tuesday, April 16, 1974


CLASSIFIED


REAL ESTATE


I I


:C141 76
ILOT iwn Bl ia i o,ir Tui kawa1
Call 2-. 041 h,,v ee 4' aid b,
4-1341 j "t t,
C 14139
D E[ 't. 1 -i r t t- ,. o ,1 ,
resident e ". i 'teVl ,t
arch te jt ,J -, -it
'I t 'i .2 '


$ :Pi~iI


'1.51,


04'


, ,


Li

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I [* . ..' ,0
C'l .1 ,0
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i41,[ -

5k *. ,* . *




( i.^ , '

$1, / ... ..

( *. [ 1 : '
$,i1 t,;


5K ".. ..
$ 3 -, '..

'1 ",* ,


REAL ESTATE


L ,4073
2 bedroom house Johnson
Terrace, fully furnished wall
to wa carpet, large patio
$30 000. -el 51905 days
4"46, aft: 6 p.m
C141 5
- O bedr wom two batn
co*tjae Fears Addition, garage
and storeroom, laundry,
S'.hadd wi'.h bearing fruit
>(ees TE RMS AVAILABLE.
,all 2 3041 between 9 and 5,
4 1346 after 6.


FOR RENT
C 14024
COTTAGr. al and apartments
fm on thiI, air conditionecd
'Lilly tin iishied, maid service
available Lovely garden and
wi1-i rn pool, Telephone
,. 0!,30
T v Furrnished and
An Londitioned, 1 -bedruoor
.ipai'r eilnts. Centreville. Ring
S3860/'. ask for Mr Pritchard


L 14 1 )t,
LAST[ RN ROAD one and
ivo bedroom apartments with
p,!tio. pool. phone, attractively
furnished Call 4-2387


i. 14 1
MODL RN attractive there
Sdri, o)im two bathroom
',j ishecd houses, available for

Si;,dte ol n sizeable landscaped
).! !"' thi' GrOVPe luSt iOff West
i'. Sr "' t, w i, with swiLmmirg
; Co( tact telephone

1 3'
3 B D ROO 0 ple >
jp)l rti 1 rile'nt Sans Souc'.
T'i'phonie 5 2398
L_ !* 4.1
5.'00 .-iinthly Picturesque 2
Ievt'l ''toni' house amid country
.t,'. ove I' .'ks western
Sbturb,. omnpl, t'ly furnished,
(lw. i, jalilable immediately,
quick acrIPss beaches, airport,
iihoppinri. Phone o'.' .er 5-7224
(0ven n) s).
C 141i9
ONE tuinishedt efficiencv o)r
h.j( h ho; l')I apartment Clifton
Sticrt. Shirley Heights. $110
pe morrlith Call 5-6963.
S14224
AVAILABLE NOW
b2 'idroom nicely furnished
h ulse' Cable Beach,
,a1 .. ... .,1, pool and sea.
Phone 7-7436.

CARS FOR SALE
14021
'./?2 VOLKSWAGEN 1300
S'(lrii,' excellent condition.
!jdi,, W W tyres, low mileage.
1 i J In < ee and i insurance
.- nljihl, a ( i a 3l36 1 1-2 3-4


S i T o'c'ta Corona A]
onihK Good buy for a
o .ivai t e C(all 52104 after
tr

( 14i 73
i')) / MGP. Good Running
Conclitioi,. $500.00 Contact L
Ci rvy, (.orn r of Marathon
f <,tj'-_ Robiirison Road.

s 1419,
1i/70 TRIUMPH G T 6
I_ ;('llent rir inq condition,
I'I1/ 13,500 miles Phone
'41 30 Munday Friday
litntm 58185 nights and


Si14194
I. tl 1 ( i ,o-'i Toyota
r.t t,) a)r i19/0 excellent
',l i. $1 .500. Phone
'"3 i/ 1l'.I/5 nights


IL









LOTi
I SI I

V DFt : i ,'

. I O N t )I 'C
APi\ l 5 .',I i .
IAI pCi(\:.1'', : P ,'1 I







NASSACL o1 '4 "2ILY
ISLANDS SU')( 'Si RANDND
RF A AMA i I ' ,' AND
fELF LiT i I I i I
45 ACRE l ', . 'i [
XUCI A. 1_ ii)! .7 IIAL




WAtIRF lii I ',
MORE'
At t I

STATE AACR \ NC \
Done 21178 ci 80932 21178
P. 0. Box N 4648
Nassau, Bahimas.
Nassau, Bahama .


14- 1 i'
/ VY MALIBU
d' I I a rc ond t ioned,
,id .It),, -, f with beige top,
S I' i. tra ns issior. power
Ir ,i ),wer brakes, radio
wi' 'o) d i condition, $3,750.
Ov ne'r leaving Telephone
,. .' day 4 11291 night.

', rI I. l4 S, WsV ,'r'd r'minri g
'''Ih o new tyres, licensed,
.,ie' ,,b. r teds body work. Best
42387 rno rings

BUSINESS
L.OPPORTUNITIES___
( 11 ]1 ,0
.f JI/,UANT for sale. Small
'.,ke o;i Good small business
'iv'i'trient Great potential.
U, ',Irist, adrid equipment
ri il;uded Call Mr. D. P 21 306
'323/
( .1()8 /
RfI STIUJRANT type business
for sale Cuorrer Shirley Street
arid Kemp Rocad Phone 31165.

WANTED

WANTF D any and all types
of sailboats and motor-bikes.
Please contact Peter John tel.
3 1881

SCHOOLS
S14000
LEWIS AUTO SCHOOL
Learn to drive with confidence.
Phone 59805 between 7 and
8:30 a.m. or atter 6 p.m. or
35084 anytime.


M INE SPPLIES I


I fee .'
etu



i t r .)" '" l


Mr Nathaniel Bertram Major
of San Deigo, California and
fornierly of Roses, Long
Island, died at his sister's
residence, Cot lett Road,
Pyfrorm'n Addition, at 8:30
a m Fridary 12th April. He is
survived by wife Molly Ann
Major, stepmother, 2 sons, 3
daughters. 14 grandchildren, 5
brothers, 8 sisters and a host of
relatives and friends.
::::: :: :::::::: :: :::::: ::::::: ..: : .::: .:: .:: ..:.::


SECTION


HELP WANTED


I I


TRADE SERVICES


C 14027

Phlder's 6st01fms

Brokerage Ltd

Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU BAHAMAS
P,0O. Box N3714
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-3796
2-3797, 2-2798
Airport- 7-7434
FREE ESTIMATES


(I j TRADE SERVICES


C14125
ACT now before the burglar
comes. Call Scriven's
Maintenance Service for your
security and maintenance
requirements. Tel. 5-1748.
C14023
FOR your building needs and
CRANE hire see:
ISLAND BUILDERS
LIMITED
P. O0. Box N-4559
Phone 31671 31672

( 14022
SEWING MACHINE
PARTS AND R' PAIRS
Island Furniture Company
P. 0. Box N 4818, Nassau
Dowdeswell and Christie Streets
Telephone 21197, 23152.

C 14197
RADIATORS
Re-cores and repairs stop by
The Nassau Repair Shop,
Mackey Street and Chesapeake
Road, or phone 24710-21716
SERVICE GUARANTEED


C14186
MUST SELL 17 ft. TRI HULL,
90 h.p. EVINRIJDE. Needs
minor repair wok. Owner
leaving, $900.00 oi nearest
offer. Phone 3-2641 or 55060
after 4 p.m.

C11894
1969 31 ft. CHRIS-CRAFT
Commander. Sleeps six, private
shower, two 230 h.p. engines
with less than 200 hours.
Kitchenette, good condition
Call 24267, 54011.

FOR SALE

C14195
WINDING UP OF- AN ES1 ATE
A beautiful processed lamb
coat with mink collar and
border. Recently appraised for
$3,200 by Fuis by Manirs of
New York arid Las Vegas.
Contact Mi Shepherd L. Key
at 28268. No reasonable offer
refused.

C14223
PANISONIC Stereo 2
speakers, AM/FM radio, record
player and cassette tape
recorder all in one $400. o.n.o.
Canon Camera twin lens $80.
Tel. 22861. Ext. 369.
C14216
A/M F 'M radio tape cassette
record player 2 speakers
Price $400. o.n.o. Apply Dr
Rogers Apt 9-3rd Terrace

CRAFT SUPPLIES

C14052
NOW in stock at Bahamiar
Paint Supply. Bay Street:
* (Clear Cast
* Decoupaqe
* Candle Craft
* Tissue Craft
Phone 2 2386.2 2898.

ENTERTAINMENT
C14159
SETTLER'S PUB & INN
Beaumont Arcade, Bay Street
Telephone 5 9739
TWO BANDS NIGHTLY
The Nassauvians
The Electric Circle
OPEN TILL 4:00 a.m.


ANNOUNCEMENTS
C 4063
JUST ARRIVED
NEW SHIPMENT
Polyester double knit 60-62
inches wide; also Jersey
material variety of colours,
custom made dresses for ladies
and children.
YOUR ON[ STOP SHOP
FOR ALL SCHOOL
CHILDREN UNIFORMS
Also Polyester double knit
material for men all colours
MODERNISTIC DRY GOODS
Opposite Wulff Road Theatre
Telephone 3-4580



C14220


C 14121
WANTED: 3 experienced
Seamstresses excellent wages
and benefits Call for interview
2 3365.
C14161
WANTED: Body and Fender
man. Contact: Gibson Body
W'oks, Carmichael Road.
C14155
EXPERIENCED bookkeeper -
typist required for real estate
and club development
company. For appointment
call 78421 or 2 or write Box
6202, Nassau.
C13945
ASSISTANT Managerrssi
required for Out Island Cottag:.
Colony and Club Responsible
for Food and Beverage
department and Hlousekeeping.
Applicant must also be able to
understudy for the Manager in
his absence. Must also have
minimum of 12 months
previous experience preferably
in the Out Islands and have
college standard of education.
Apply in writing to: Green
lu.tle Club, Green Turtle Ccy.
Ahacu
C14183
TEN waitresses needed men
or women, with references and
health certificates. Contact Mr.
Mitchell at Dirty Dicks, Bay
Street between 11:00 a rn. 3
p.m.
C14191
ONE TAILOR, must be
experienced. Please contact
Vola Carey. Apple Street from
9 to 5

C14207
An immediate vacancy exists in
the Advertising Art
Department of The Tribune.
Applicant must possess talent
in artwork, layout and
paste-up, have working
knowledge of various types and
advertising composition.
For application form and/or
appointment, see or call John
Cash, Advertising Manager, at
2-2768, between 8 a.m. & 1
p.m.
C14218
BANK OF LONDON AND
MONTREAL requires a
Departmental Head for its
Eurocurrency customers
deposit section. Candidates,
who should be Bahamians
should have previous
experience in and a sound
knowledge of the customs and
practices of the Eurocurrency
market. Knowledge of the
Spanish language would be
useful but not essential. The
successful candidate should be
prepared to travel outside the
Bahamas for training at a later
stage.
Please Write giving full details
of qualifications and
experience to the Personnel
Manager, P. O. Bov N1262,
Nassau.
C14221
HOTEL ASSISTANT
MANAGER for Out Islands.
Minimum 5 years experience.
Married; capable of handling
food, beverage and accounting.
Give full resume and starting
salary expected. Address
replies to Sunshine Inn, 3116
S. Andrews Ave.. Lauderdale,
Fla. 33316.
C14222
A POWER PLANT
ENGINEER needed for Out
Island power plant Must be
capable of line work, home
connections and general
maintenance. Send resume
along with expected starting
salary. Address all replies to
Sunshine Inn. 3116 S. Andrews
Ave., Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
33316.
3 you believe nobody
reads small ads
1 you're wrong. You are
reading this aren't you?
Call 2-2768 for
J information on small or
large display ads,


24 HOURS SERVICE


Call: The Tribune


2-1986


BUSINESS 6 PROFESSIONAL


DIRECTORY

a lISave Time


SHOP .

BY



lillst I Il ricti1f COil l219 fI. 5

1 lU hi MthrI' 211 Pll Neihl '311

iSAVETIE SAVEAW MY


ANTENNAS

Island TV


MEN'S B

2-2618 -The Wardobe


OYS'WEAR


S-559


AUTOM1 IVE MEN'S WEAR

Lu-as Batteries 2 i- Fashionette Ltd. 2-2376/7
Bay Street Garage 2-2434-,:|

S BOOKSTORE MUSIC

|The Christian Book Shop Cody's Records 2 8500
5-8744
----- i OPTICIANS
BUSINESS FORMS Opticil Service Ltd. 2-3910/1
Executive 2-4267/54011 PAPER
Printers 2-4267/5-401 1|J PAPER |


CABINET MAKERS
Commonwealth
Furniture 31120

CAMERAS
John Bull ?-4252/3

ENTERTAINMENT
Movies
Film & Equip. Service 2 2157

GARDEN & PET
| SUPPLIES
I Modernistic Garden
,5& Pet 2-2868
Nassau Garden & Pie
Montrose Avenue 2-4259

HARDWARE

John S. George 2-8421/6

HOUSE PLANS
Evangelos G. Zervos 2-4128
LAUNDRY
DRY CLEANING
New Oriental Laundry 2-4406
--------- -11- ww


SComme-rcial Paper
House


PRINTING
Wong's Printing -.4tub

Executive :
Printers '-4267/5 40 1

RADIO & T.V. SALES
Carter's Records 2-4711

RUBBER STAMPS
Wong's Rubber Stamp
Co. 5-450r.

SPORTS GOODS
Champion Sport Land 2-1862

TRAVEL
Playtours 2-293 i/7
R.H. Curry & Co., 2-8681/7

TV REPAIRS
Channel Electronics !-td.
3-5478

UPHOLSTERING


Eddie's Upholstering 5-9713


TRADE SERVICES I


C14057
MASTER TECHNICIANS
LTD., Mackey Street, your
Whirlpool distributor offer'.
refrigerators, washers, dryers,
compactor', freezers ice
makers, air conditioners ano
garbage disposers. Wili
fill warranty on every home
appliance we sell service done
by factory trained mechanics.
Telephone 23713, 5-9322.
C14001
T. V. ANTENNAS


I TRADE SERVICES


C14198
BODY WORK AND PAINT
JOBS.
For the best in quality and
service have your car resp'laytd
by The Nassau Repair Shop I
Mackey and Chesapeake
Phone 24710 21716.
F RFF ESTIMATES.



C14110
LANDSCAPING rid f, ai,
V ou r g r fde non


Boosters for homes trimming, h edging, prLinitI,
apartments and hotels tree felling and beach c ia cjg
Call 5-9404 call 57810. LAWNS AND
WORLD OF MivUSIC HEDGES. Promipt
Mackey Street reasonable and 'Id ''cletit
Next to Frank's Place seRvice.

mmmmmmm mm mm mm mmmm m

: GRAND BAHAMA


CLASSIFIED


REAL ESTATE ANNOUNCEMENTS

C15072 C15069
SHAWNEE Dailvy 5-rvce
LOTS LOTS- LOTS LOTS between West Palm Beach and
OWN A PIECE OF FREEPORT West End for Reservations call


We have lots lf lots,
Res i d ce n C orriineriail,
Water fI iont, all around
Freeport, Lucaya, Close in
Ready for building, SELECT
FROM $2000 UP, Low down
payment Easy teims.
SACRIFICED
Because owners have (hangqetd
plans, deaths, divorres or
reposseistons J.S R. REAl.
ESTATE, Freeport's First
Licensee, No. 5 Savov
Building. Pioneer Way, F Box
F-93. Freeport, 352 8811.

S HELP WANTED

C150/3
D I RECTOR OF
DEE DING/CUSTOMER
RELATIONS
Individual should posses
t h c i o fgh knowledge of
accoiinting arid (romputel
pint oii ts Ieldting to L and
Sales .agicements. Ability to
hanidl all facets ofI a Custorner
Relations Depai tmenit arid
procedures elating to the
iecoiding anld iegisti nation of
valuable documents. Individual
is expected to provide prompt
and accurate infoi rmrtion to
Executive and legal
Depa tment conceit ning
accounts. Capable of
conversing with cuJstomer s in
relation to status ci)f their
accUunts, (.community affairs
and future possibilities.
Individual is also responsible
for training Bahamians in the
Department.
Apply to: The Giand Biahima
Development (C.oimpaiy, Ltd.
PCer so rinel De pai t rm rt ,
L icayarn i, ,,,h. ,i P ,). Bo,
F-2666, Ftrepl)(rt, G and
Bahanma.
C15074
OPERATING ENGINEER -
Co-ordinate, supervise and
participate in pre-commission-
ing activities of refineiy
process nilts, including
flrIshing, testing, inspection
arid plant check-up. B.S. in
Mechanical o fChenmical
Srtigineel ing, or equivalent
Must t be jn effe( tive
conmmunni(..itor, arid have at
least 5 years start up or
operating experience with)
refinery and petrocIhernical
units. Written app l atitons
only, imc Iludi ng experience
esuirT arid salary history to
BADGER PAN AMERICAN,
INC P 0 Box F-2452,
F reepurt.

C15060
Required by 'ahrmnais Oil
Refinigt Conmpany. Guade '13'
Operatois. Applicants should
have :it least ca high school
education Must hwive at least
five (5) years ,experience in
operations of large scale
petroleum distillation or jetty
eqiuipin"rnt, and related
facilities.
Mail resume in confidence to;
Personnel Officer, P. 0. Box
F 2435, 1 ree-port, Grand
Bahama.


CONT ROL Lt. R/F FINANCIAL
MANAGER
F RE [PORT, BAHAfMAS
C o o p e r L a b o r t o i e s
I t rnatlicriaIl Ltd a
r ruIfacturng arid selling
',utb sidilaid y of a U.S.
phi.maceutLtial conipany his a
c ha I rigin op ngopening for
Cent oller/F financial Manager
in Freeport.
Responsibilities will include
maintenance of all accounting
rec o r d s i n cl u ding
manufacturing planning.
Candidates, preferably with
accounting degree, should have
approximately five to seven
years solid experience in
general accounting, cost and
financial controls. Ability to
work independently will be
important and salary will be
based on experience and
qualifications. Please send
resume and salary history, in
full confidence, to the above
company, P. 0. Box F-2529,
Freeport.


___ -ii .1


The Grand Bahama Hotel (Ex.


[HELP WANTED
C 14058
TRAIN' S %, '"N


T'', 114; i i n r .- i L I D i ,

P. du C t L 'or'. l La"; .,.
ix, p Ii ants '. i r1:i .i.
G C I osr ;i .j

tlua ti fcato's r; "1,il ,


S IPhv-I ,! () j,.


LIii i' i .


orintact the LO P( iI P,, .:
'f i eo, P 0 ', ,
T''ephoiii' o .'


SAYHOLT O h.', i,,i, ,.
foi TRAA I I i[ I.( i '
INSI'PLC To Ps pii '.
shoilLd have ijIA :I
equl ivalent i ti i ,, .
'Phys ri s irie Ii,' 11 i\
T ialrim jg i!n th. L. -i J.
quality i s n n f i jd'in,
aid dist ha flri g <, r' 4 t ,' i '4
w ill bh (II', 'M r, 1
SaW ebult & ( .,- .. f ( u ".'x
S.204n t i i" G'.rr
Uihanma
( 15071
Jot)b title, (J. I -'rN i .' I ,
G ,) h ... ,.

I p nl; ',ii ,i ,



O Li t 1 4' C s t' ,' '
It" ; tI, i ;
pIr o lil tio ll o' ( ii, ,[ :'. i
Plant k ti y k i l; h i' ii

to p te !to klle ,, t ( -l ,'
(linkofI t a coio ;;. n ,L p,.t" t.PI
i. l i b in iiilg
Inteiested1 Applit i: a i ni] i
SPersonlel Del,) t n;i 'i, F,-iti,r',
Cmventor ;t mp t ( ;p
F 100, -eep. t, Ga:.i.
alhfiarr,!
(C 150/10
SRE F POP r T Ok C ;, ( T i in;
CO iMPANY L11.1 TI 11 ,iI.
the folltim )m y ripl ..... Si
nler at)i e to a1I: ri "il 4 'I t
lhielP in t) i ; il ii pa[ii0 ,,1!
inverlto )t fj, pin i.j ,-
tvvw) wteek. One ce(I i t i !
typi g s k illa', or r i i. r,
Inela into. y iiar' J t i l tiii


Mou ihcfi nn Ai' ; ) I
xtir s 0 e i o i i ,t
irivenirt ry tupot' t ( r,- ]i p ,I
fill ttle cauait.s i t ,h ; -' r 't.u it
Vice PI.fsite d h.no ..Iv S. i 2I
yea3 7 o1 pel io rl i it 1 1i.
CO tlIIur ti)n as ,:J ll .
( x toern sI ve eXj)t i i'I i 11
,industrIal ( ,; sti UL 10
Applicant J u<,t t bell.I f i,,
est irate Iobs, ',-goY0 iatI t
contratIc ts a ( hand dl(, I .t e A t ei
ielationrs. All in lei -,.ttd t!po it
should phone Alvn:, Sw.tr. a!
352-7091, 01 wite F 2410
F eepo t.


0 C f our letters
ii llo more can
YU iM ake
From the
h E P 'e' 11
I a ia k ii t x a
R E F letter a y
he us'ed once
only., Eac-h
word must contain the large
letter, and there must he at
least one elilht-letter word In the
list. No pinrals: no foreign word%:
.o proper names. TODAY'S
TARGET: 14 words, good :
16 words, very good 19 word,
excellent. Solution tomorrow.
SATURDAY'S SOLUTION:
Axed alder aped apple dale
dapper dapple dare deal dear
drag drape earl gale gape gaped
gaper gapped gear glad glade
glare glared grade Irape grapple
GRAPPI.EI) lade eager lapped
lard larse lead leap page paged
pale paled palp paper pare
Pared peal pear pearl pedal
pedlar plea plead rage raged
rape raped rapped read real
reap regal


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS-FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV. TELEPHONE 21986 EX -


POSITION VACANT

An immediate vacancy exists in the
Advertising Art Department of The
:i: Tribune.


: Applicant must possess talent in
artwork, layout and paste-up; have
working knowledge of various types and
i:: advertising composition.


For application form and/or
appointment, see or call John Cash,
Advertising Manager, at 2-2768, between
8 a.m. & 1 p.m.


FOR THE ACTION OU 1iWANT




Shop Nassau Merchants

For Business And Services


_ __ I ~__ __~ L_ _ ___ __ __ __ _ ______ ___ C_


r--


wwwwwwwwwwww .


rib


WWAV


ONYT WRITE IT


II


t


I


5-973'


m


I


i


.. .vv~------ - -,r --












The Tribune -- Tuesday, April 16. 1974


"Yes, we still have your application for a job on hand.
We keep it here in the inactive file."


TI.S .KWW DO.ftW PI ERF.Y LW. STOW
TRIS KIO-P ASPIRIN YA HOW fT WMOWS."
WTTV? '*


Rupert and the

Ice Crackers-30


The current of air keeps Rupert as light as a
feather and he settles without the slightest
Dump on a terrace carpeted with snow. Ooo,
what a wonderful escape he cries,
scrambling to his feet It was awful while
it lasted, but Im safe now, thanks to that
wind whistle.' A tall, stately person has
appeared from one of the castle buildings and


Rupert climbs a flight of steps to reach him.
" It's King Frost," he thinks. The monarch
gazes kindly at Rupert. Little bear," he says.
SI have been watching throughout. I marked
well your courage on that wall of ice. Now
we must see how my son Jack is faring."
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


CROSSWORD

PUZZLE
ACROSS


1 Azazel
6 Ophidian
9 Theater
district
11. Italian money
13 Inanimate
14. Authorizing
note
16. Sigmoid
17. Witticism
19. Highlander
20. Scottish poet
22. Medieval
shield


26 Climaxed
28 Major or Minor
30 Small
mountain
31. Scrap
32. Uncompro-
mising
34. German no s
36. Ivy Leaguer
37. Poor actor
40. Donates
42. White whale
44. Transaction
45 Spider monkey


46. Agent
47. Baker's need
DOWN
1. Gaelic


3. Vientiane is
the capital
4. Ailing
5. Incentive
6 Clerical
vestment
7. Business
letter opening
8. Doctrine
10. Fragrance
12. Wading bird
15. Musical study
18. High explosive
20. Insect
21. Restraint
23. Beside
24. Sea nymph
25. Aborigines
27. Paronomasia
29. French season
33. Napoleon's
exile island
35. Lowest high
tide
37. Oahu dance
38. Seasons
39. Vertical pole
41. Secretive
43. Haven


CARROLL RIGHTER'S

Q SCOSCFE


GENERAL TENDENCIES: This is a day to
think out how you can operate better in the
days ahead. You are now able to easily obtain the information
that will enable you to do a better job. Correspond with
out-of-tow nets and obtain important data.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) Contacting those whose ideas
are different from yours and exchanging views is a good way
to make progress now. Be more thoughtful.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Handle responsibilities
wisely and come to a better understanding with others. Show
special courtesy tonight to the one you love.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Sitting down to talks with
associates cements better relations and brings more benefits.
One who opposed you can now be a friend.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) You have many
responsibilities now so handle them cheerfully. Take the
health treatments you need during your spare time.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Take care of entertainment
commitment, but don't spend too much money. Be sure to
pay pressing bills. Show more affection for mate.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Plan a course that associates
will agree to instead of trying to force them into doing things
your way exclusively. Relax tonight.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Stop wasting time and attend
to important business. Study how to handle routines better.
Take time for enjoying music tonight.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Think of ways to increase
your income so you need not worry about expenses in the
future Take no chances with your reputation.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Arrange your time so
that you can go after personal aims and make new plans for
the future. Improving your appearance is wise.
CAPRICORN (Dec 22 to Jan. 20) Study how to make the
pattern of your life more vibrant and then contact those who
can assist you in doing so. Show appreciation.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) See what can be done to
assist fine friends to gain their aims and get together with them
in social matters. Speak softly.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Make sure you keep promises
to others. Don't let associates deter you from doing important
work A bigwig can be helpful now.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY. . he or she will have
ideas radically different from those in own environment.
Direct education along elevated but practical lines and give
every opportunity to advance. An entirely different
philosophy of life can be found that will be the key to a
successful life. Give ethical training early in life.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


Bridge
By VICTOR MOLLO
BA TANCOE is amethftg wt=oh
it is easier to Illustrate than to
define. An example is this hand
from a recent match in the
Hubert Phillips Bowl, the 'Eng-
lish Bridge Union's champion-
ship for mixed teams.
Phck up the West hand and
fin s lead against 44:
S0987 652 01098 4Q2
est North East South
- Pass 34 34
Pass 44
Almost certainly you would
lead the 6Q. conceivably tha
#A. itther way deolarer would
wrap .p 11 tricks. OaIy a
lead o ts the contract and why
should you lead a heart?
North
10 2
SAK4 3
0 A 5 3 2
&987


West
AA3


East
4765


S98785 2 5 -
0 10 9 8 0 K 7 6
6 Q 2 4KJ 10 6543
South
4 KQJ 9 8 4
V QJ10
0 Q J4
4 A
Sitting East, when this hand
came up, was Nicola Gardener,
aged 24 and .still our youngest
Life Master. To call for a heart
lead she doubled 4 !
Having advertised a weak, un-
balanced hand, she couldn't be
expecting a penalty. Clearly her
imaginative double called for an
tmuealUJ ead.
Picking up the message, her
partner, Bob Rowlands, led a
eart and another heart when
he came in with the #A. The
OK was the setting trick.


24e Comic /%e


REX MORGAN, M.D. Dal Curtis




TO ER APA R KERNTUSY, I'LL CALL Paul NING THEREols
YOU BACK / TOO OFTEN, YOUNG 1












JUDGE PARKER Paul Nichols
SHALL I EXPECT MEANWHILE, LEFTY STRAND'S WIFE I WOULDN'T DO IT FOR NOBODY
MOW ABOUT MY YOU ABOUT SEVEN?16 S VISITED BY HIS BROTHER YOU'VE BUT YOU, MONICA! I JUST
TAKING YOU TO LEFTY TOLD ME TO WAIT A GOT TO DO DON'T LIKE HANDLING FIFTY
DINNER TOMORROW COUPLE OF DAYS AND THEN IT, ERNIE! GRAND IN CASH!
NIGHT, ABBEY? CALL WAKE/MAN'S SISTER!
I DON'T LIKE THE IDEA
MUCH CASH!











APARTMENT 3-G By Alexz Kotzky


Chess


STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD


Hennings-Korensky, Sochi 1973.
BLuak, under pressure has just
played . Kt-Q4 to try and
achieve some freeing piece swaps.
White. with doubled rocts. is
clearly on top; wrat would you
do to keep his advantage ? Strong
players shouAd be able to viua.ise
frc-m the diagrarn to the position
where Black resigned.
Par times: 20 seconds, grand-
master; 45 seconds, chess master;
2 minutes, expert; 4 minutes
county player; 10 minutes, club
standard; 20 minutes, average;
45 minutes. novice.
Chess Solution
1 P-B6! If now 1 . BxP: 2
R x R oh. B x R; 3 Q-K4
threatens mate by both 4 Q x B
ch and 4 Q xRP ch. So Black
tried I . KtxP; 2 BxKt,
PxB: 3 Q-Kt4 ch, K-R1 (if 3
. K-BI; 4 BxRP wins): 4
,)-B5, and Black resigned
because if 4 . K-Kt2; 5
Q x RP ch. K-Bl; 6 Q-R8 mate.


1W. It Is to he foIuld In the
IZ 3 orchestra. (4)
,0o Scandinavian. 45)
6 7 1 0 '1 Possessed. (5)
*. Harness Item. 14)
iC6 One P.T exercise 15. 4)
Down
4M 1. Scowl. (5, 4)
4'. Wed. (3)
S 3. Tiny child l6. 3)
S4 They live untiasei lUdM.
I clients. (4. 5)
S I 5 Mended (6)
6. A word to drive birds away
is za (4)
8 Lazy. (4)
9. Without eira for stamius
(4. 4)
10". Pennlles ;4i1
Si A.rm-or
IN. lei. (4)
No ".401 hiv TIM McKAV t I h
Across r I vmon
I Noble load tartx). (9) (3) 1
7. (iirl's nillle. (5) ".S5 O I BI
I1. A ring could Indicate there's (3) L
someone here. (2. 3. 4) t'2 W r tin
3. Weigh (13) (3)
14. Child. (3) T3 Th IL
13. Continental distance. 9) I s the H L E
I 6. Newspapers and television f I n ilh
(. ) (3) Std y'raze. 4iution
I1M. Craze. 3 : i


"Sorry, baby, you're staying home."


Saunders & Overgard


"Win a few, lose a few."


l















The Tribune - Tuesday, April 16, 1974


Chargers

By GLADSTONE THURSTON
FIFTH INNING pinch
runner Charlie Mortimer
slapped a game winning rbi
single off relief pitcher Don
Taylor in the top of the
seventh and final inning leading
Citibank Chargers to an 8-7
edge over defending champs
Becks Bees in the second game
of last night's double header at
the Qf .S.C.
going g into the decider
trailing by one run following
Becks' big five-run third
inning, Citibank sent seven
batters to the plate scoring two
runs on three hits.
Centre fielder Kendal
Munroe led off the seventh
ROSE


edge Be4

with a single off losing hurler
Gilbert Moncur. He moved
safely to second base when
second baseman Sonny Iaven
misqued a pickoff relay.
With two down designated
hitter Bernard Burrows flied
out and catcher Sidney Outten
grounded out right fielder
Keith Gomez ripped Moncur's
one ball one strike pitch deep
into centre driving in Munroe
for the game timing run.
Tony Duvalier's base on
balls set the stage for
Mortimer's game winning single
on a two ball delivery.
Third base man Fred Taylor
topped Becks offence going
two for four from the plate. lHe
scored one and knocked in
four runs. T a y lor
complimented their fifth
inning with a three run homer.
First baseman Anthony
Huyler scored two runs from
his one for two plate
appearance. lie faced the
pitcher four times and received
two walks. Short stop
Roosevelt Turner also scored
two runs from a one for three
at bat.
Winning pitcher Andre
Rodgers, having worked
himself out of the third and
fourth inning when Becks
scored all their runs, played
shutout ball for the remainder
of the game. He gave up seven
hits and struck out three.
On offence, Duvalier's bat
collected two hits from three
at bats. He collected one rbi
and one run scored. Gonez
scored three runs from his one
for three at bat.
CITIBANK nA('tIA R(IRS


L. Bowleg
A. Moss
K. Munroe
B. Burrows
S. Outten
K. G;oime/
I Duvalier
R. Rodgers
C. Mortimer
K. Smith


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Matinee 2:30 & 4:50, Evening 8:30-'Phone 2-1004, 2-1005

I Clint Eastwood i

Sis Dirty Hamy in

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Reservations not claimed by 8 15 will be sold.
i


Wednesday thru Friday Wednesday thru Friday
Matinee 2:00 & 4:35
Evening 8:30 Continuous Showings
from 3 p.m.


"THE ROBE" G. "DEEP THRUST" PG.
Angela Mao, Chang Yi
Starri f,
PLUS
RICHARD BURTON
S JEAN SIMMONS "THE SPOOK
CHASERS" G.
'Phone 2-2534






Matinee Continuous from 2:00, Evening 8:30-


es 8-7


BtCKS BEFS


R. Turner
S. Haven
A. luyler
1 Ta lor
\v. Knowles
S. Humes
J. Williams
V. Jacques
G. Moncur
1). Taylor
1The rookies of
unable to maintain


22 2 0
4 1 2 4
3 1 0 1
4 0 0 0
4 0 0 0
3 0 1 0

St. Bernards,
their winning
theirwinning


rally, dropped two games to
Freeport's Classic Bucks over the
weekend 10-9 and 4-2 in Freeport.
Backed by the two for four two
rhi stick of first baseman Lowell
Culmer, the Bucks in the first game
put together seven runs in the
second inning which held up against
the Saints determined attack.
Outfielder tugh Bethel in that
game contributed a three run
homer and an rhi triple for St.
Bernards. Rookie Claude Lynden
also hit a homer.
The combined pitching of Ossie
Foster and Roy Bethel kept the
Saints in check for the remainder of
the game.
In the second encounter, St.
Bernards were trailing by two runs
in the top of the sixth when ai
dispute ensured. The Saints
forfeited that game b% walking off
the field.
In other games played over the
weekend, entire e fielder Barry
Carroll in a three for three plate
appearance drove in five runs anid
scored one leading Heineken Stars
to a 14 2 victors over Carroll's
food Store
Centre fielder Eddie lord and
short stop Bradley Johnson
combined for four runs and three
rhi's itn Del Jane's 8-4 victory over
the Biniini Marlins on Sunday.
Ford who collected two hits
from three times at bat scored two
and knocked in one. Johnson went
t ko for four from the plate scoring
tso and knocking in twso Right
hander Kirk Smith took the win
MARATHON WINNER
BOSTON (AP) Neil Cusack. an
Irish student at East Tennessee
State College, won the 78th Boston
Marathon Monday.
Cusack is a native of Limerick.
Cusack covered the 26 miles 385
yards in 2 hours, 13 minutes, 39
seconds, the second fastest time in
tie MNtr.lth, ,"s history.


-Miamian

flees from

Knowles

BAHAMAS' Central
American and Caribbean
Games silver medalist
Nathanial Knowles captured
his fifth consecutive bout last
night taking a unanimous
decision over Miami
middleweight Eddie Ruffins
during the Amateur Boxing
Association of the Bahamas'
Faster tournament.
Making his first appearance
out of Miami, Ruffins found
the local champ a rugged
opponent to contend with and
literally fled in the final of the
three rounds so as to avoid
further punishment.
"I could have put him away
in one or two rounds," noted
Knowles who complained of a
recurrence of his arm injury.
Moreover, his right hand began
to pain him. "I had him open
but I just couldn't trust it with
injured hands."
Nevertheless, Knowles, who
was recently honoured by the
A.B A.B. for his outstanding
performance in the Central
American and Caribbean
Games in Santo Domingo, was
in command the whole route.
lie ably worked clear of
Ruffins's aggressive attack in
the first round and pounded
away at the body which took a
heavy toll on the Miamian.
Ruffins admitted after the
bout that Knowles was much
better than he thought "He
surprised me," he said.
The 20-year-old Miamian,
who is their novice champion.
found the second round even
tougher and used holding
tactics in order to wear down
Knowles, This however came
to no good and, unable to
evade Knowles' combination of
punches in the final round
took to his heels for the
remainder of that period.
National coach Bert Perry
was very pleased with Knowles'
performance. Knowles' injury
prevented Ruffins from being
stopped early in the bout.
"This guy," Perry said "was
open for right hands."
The A.B.A.B.'s next
international tournament will
take place on May 10 when
they will compete against a
team from Miami.
In other bouts last night,
Moon Ramsey Jr. decisioned
Boston Blackie Jr. Ray
Robinson decisioned Gladstone
Gibson: Sammy Rolle
decisioned Ali Torres: Oswald
Smith decisioned Doug Cleare
and Wellington Miller took a
split decision from Cyril
Minnis.


ERIC GIBSON (above left) put together scores of 78 and 79
over the weekend for a gr3nd total of 157 winning the Heineken
Second Annual Amateur Golf Tournament at the Paradise Island
Golf Course.
Pepi Terilli (right) came in second with 84-74 (158). They are
both being presented with their awards by Miss Nassau High
School, Ann-Marie Smith.
Vernal Turnquest captured the A. Flight with a 164 over the
two days. Wolly Wennick scored a 171 for second place. Godfrey
Ellis' 178 won him top honours in the B Flight while John
Gibson came in second with a 183.



Champ rider G. Bain's



fine end to season


FOUR-YEAR-old stallion
Mr. Brite with championship
jockey Gary Bain in the saddle
streaked across the finish line
in 2:43 over 1 2 furlongs
yesterday, winning the Horse
of the Year Award.
Owned by Mr. Wellington
Fer g uson, Mr. Brite
outsprinted Count Zorich and
former horse of the year Iloran
Shoran in a six furlong home
stretch dash.
Bain in yesterday's final
meet of the season captured
four firsts, two seconds andi
one third bringing his total
wins to 58.
Mr. Ferguson pointed out
that Mr. Brite recently
acquired from the United
States is the pride of his stud
farm. "lie had to prove himself
which he did beautifully,"
Ferguson said.
I following are the results of the
season's final meet
FIRST RACT 9 I uriongs
Flirt (3) G;. Barin $5.45, S3 15,.
S2.30; Miss (TO (4) Ant.
Saunders $6.45, $2.60, No Seal
Jane (1) S. McNeil $2.30.
SECOND RACE 1O Furlong gs
Secret Agent (7) (i. Serc h, rill
$36.05, $17.85, $1 1 .70. Spanish
Dancer (1) (. Bain S3.15, $2.65;
Regal Ranger (6) J. tiorton
SS.20. Dailb Double ( 3-7) $230.75.
First Quinella (1 7) SS 2.35.
THIRD RAI('t 41 Furlongs
Miss Marsha Bar ( 2 ) J, Hain
$5.25, $3.85, $2.55: Star I rek (1)
A. Sands $5.15, $385; Diamond
(8) S. McNeil S3 95. Second
Quinella (1-2) $18 20,
FOURTRtl ACt4'I 4': I'urlongs
Queen Of Hearts (9) (. Bain


CHAMPIONSHIP JOCKEY GARY BAIN ATOP HORSE OF THE YEAR Mr. Brite
pose with trainer Cecil Rolle and owner Wellington Ferguson. Miss Nassau High
School Ann-Marie Smith is shown presenting Ferguson with the owner's award. Pictured
from left are Mr. Garth Kemp, general manager of Bahamas Raceco and Mrs. Wellington
Ferguson. Mr. Nigel Ingraham, a Raceco official, stands at right.


5'
:.^


. ^:


10% CASH DISCOUNT
Authorized G. E. Service Station
General Electric, America's No.1 Major Appliance Value

GEOFFREY JONES

&. CO. LTD.

OUT ISLAND ORDERS ACCEPTED.


$6.95. $5.25. $3.90: Go Sugar (2)
t Serchwell $9.15, $8.65. Time
& Fide (6) M. Brown $6.20. Third
Oumnella (2 9) $40.00.
FlFlTH RACE 12 1 urings
Mr Brite (5) G. Bain $8.20,
$5.35, $3.40: Count Zorich (7)
A. Saunders $2.90, $2.80; Lolli Pop
(4) S. McNeil $4.75 Fourth
Quinella (5-7) $7.30.
SIX III RACE 5 Furlongs
Southern Ilame (8) N.
Sweeting 5S.65. $3.40, $3.15.
wingedd Duchess (2 ) A. Saunders
So.15. $4.25: Added Sugar (9) R.
tiewitti 58.50. Fifth Quinella (2-8)
$21.30
SI VI NTiI RA CF 41 Furlongs
('Cro,)s Ilancer (2) G. Bain
53.65. S2.50, S2.55: My Account
(5) C;. Serchellt $8.00. $6.20;
lop Secret (9) R. Hewitt $3.55.
Sixlth ,uinell;i (2-5) $12.70
I GItHAiTI RACF 4., Furlongs
Miss I'uinpkin (9) R. lHesitt
$8 60, $5.30. $3.60.Shanadoah (8)
(. Serclvsell $10.25, $7.80,
lorio (2) J. Bain $4.10. Seventh
Quin ella (8 9) $60.00
NINTHI iAC'I 41,' Furlongs
Magic Prince (5) S. McNeil
$15.80. $5.30. $3.10: Moon
Maiden (6) t;. Bain $2.70, $2.35
I luk (Girl (7) D. Carey $2.95.
Fight )umnella (5 6) $17 60.
T NTHI RA('C 9 Furlongs
Am alone (6) J. Hortoil
$125.55, $71.55, $4.80: ;Wheel Of
Fortune (9) -- S. McNeil $9.70,
$3.75; Junes Joy 11 (1) (;. Bain
$2.35. Ninth( Quinella (6-9) $91.40.
I VI INT H RA('F 6 Furlongs
Not Me (6) M. Brown $12.60,
$3.95, 53.50; Amaz.ingly (5) A.
Saunders $2.90, $2.80; Papa
D)operlas (7) I,. woodside $3.70.
Tenth Ouinella (5-6) $1 1.10.


HOCKEY DRAW
TillF President's XI in
preparation for a series against
a (;ernian teamt within the next
three weeks drew two goals
each with a select team
Saturday at IHaynes Oval.
Fphraini Jones took top
scoring honours for the
President's while Mike
Thompson and Chris Parker
scored for the select team.
The select team scored first
when Chris Parker drew
left-back Dennis Manuel to the
outside and passed on to Mike
Thompson who made no
mistake with the shot. Parker
made the score 2-0 when goal
keeper Eric Mahabir failed to
clear the ball and gave an easy
goal.
However, Jones got into the
action and opened the scoring
for the President's XI on an
assist from Thompson.
His second goal came on an
assist from Peter Skinner who
crossed the ball in front of the
goal drawing keeper Lester
Simmons towards the play.
Jones however reached the ball
first and back-handed it into
the goal with Simmons going
the other way.
Erskine Thompson, Mick
Bancroft and Chris Sherman
teamed up with Jones on the
front line, which always proved
dangerous to the select team.
However, they were unable to
capitalize on scoring
opportunities as the match
ended drawn.




Feel better

with Doans


DOAN'S
KIDNEY AND BLADDER


Distributed by
Thompson Drug Co Ltd,
Box 6027, Centreville, Nasm.


LONDON (AP) Results of
British soccer games Monday:
ENGLISH LEAGUE
Division I
Chelsea 0 Tottenham 0
Derby I Coventry 0
Ipswich 1 Queen's Park 0
Leeds 0 Sheffield United 0
Manchester U. 3 Everton 0
Newcastle 0 Norwich 0
Southampton I West Ham I
Stoke 1 Leicester 0
Wolverhampton 3 Arsenal I
Division 2
Aston Villa 0 Blackpool I
Bolton 2 Middlesbrough I
Hull City 0 Swindon I
Notts County I Cardift I
Orient 2 Portsmouth I
Sheffield Wed. I Preston 0
Division 3
Blackburn 1 Halifax I
Brighton 0 Southend 2
Charlton 2 Grimsby I
Plymouth 2 Bournemouth 0
Rochdale 2 Aldershot 2
Southport O Oldham 2
Walsall 2 Chesterfield 0
Division 4
Exeter 0 Bury 3
Gillingham 2 Bradford City 0
Lincoln 3 Doncaster 3
Northampton I Crewe 1
Peterborough 3 Barnsley 0
Swansea I Newport I
Workington 0 Mansfield 0
PLAYER WINS MASTERS
AUGUSTA, GA. (AP) Gary
Player carded a two-under far 70
for 278 total Sunday to win the
38th Masters golf tournament by
two strokes. It was the second time
the South African won the tourney.
In doing so he tamed his own
personal nemesis, the 17th hole on
the Augusta National Golf Club
course, with a birdie three.
Player arched a beautiful
nine-iron shot that nestled down six
inches from the pin and, after a
tap-in, a four- player logjam had
been broken.
Player finished two strokes up on
Dave Stockton and Tom Weiskopf,
and his 278 total duplicated a
triumph he first scored in 1961.
Player's 10-under par effort for
the tournament earned him


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ATISTRESNTS






A VIOOm OClTIO LTO MiFSl ARTISTS FIM
A NATICOMMA oCiME.RA CUI S1IA11A

and "In The Heat Of
9:00 The Nit" PG.


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Infielder Keith Smith trains his eyes on the ball during a Wilfred Brown delivery.


OPENS 6:30 Shows start 7 p.m
See 2 features late as 8 45.
FINAL 2 NITES! *
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ST. GEORGE


GO ON


SCORING


SPREE
PAUL LEMIEUX scored five
goals and Vincent Smileswith
added three more leading St.
Georges Football Club to a
12-0 victory over Dynamos in
the first round of the
championship knockout cup
series Sunday.
Playing without player/
coach Harcourt "Rip" Rolle,
the Dynamos on defence
were unable to stand up against
the constantly attacking St.
Georges. George Vetheukas
and Roscow Davies each added
two more goals for the Saints.
Because the going proved
easy for the winners, the game
was sluggish and the sparse
crowd dispersed long before
the game ended.
In the first game, which
ended the regular season play,
Brenden Gray backed by solid
Tropigas defence stopped Red
Lions 2-1.
After only three minutes of
play, Gray put Tropigas up one
on a goal that was hotly
disputed by Lions' captain Don
Maples and goalie Paul
Johnson. Johnson had
previously watched the ball
travel to the back of the net.
The Lions however missed
several key opportunities to
score in the first half notably
when Maples missed a shot
from a cross, with his left foot.
Though Gray took the
scoring honours, Randy
Rodgers did the work of
constantly tackling, tricking
and harassing his Lions
opponents which culminated in
many well-placed passes to his
forwards. These they utilized
well, but not to the point of
scoring further.
Midway in the second half
Adrian Rodgers in an attempt
to clear Brian Serville's
free-kick scored an own-goal
thus tying the score at one all.
Minutes later, Gray centred
the ball to the swiftly
advancing Tropigas star
forward Bob Elliott who
executed a brilliant diving
header which found the back
of the net giving Tropigas
victory.
Soccer playoffs continue on
Sunday at Clifford Park.