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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03578
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: March 27, 1974
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03578

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A REMINDER TO
CUSTOMERS
PLEASE COLLECT YOUR REPAIRED
ITEMS IMMEDIATELY!!

I COR ROSETTA f -
teDUDLEY S MT ROYAL AVE.

(Registered with Postmaster of Bahamas for postage


Sritburnt


concessions within the


Bahamas) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


The long, long wait gets a little longer- GAC to
I- ~~_I_ I


Nassau to



London...



in 8 hours


BRIIl SH AIRWAYS will
provide non-stop flights to and
from London when the airline
merger between BOAC and
Bl.A takes effect April 1.
T he introduction of the
Boeing 707-330( on this route
has made this ... il.k and
reduces the flight time to
London to 8 hours.
This aircraft will also
provide mn-flight entertainment
of latest i 111 vies a nd
six-channel stereo ladio.
Non -stop flights between
Nassau and i.ondon operate
daily ex cept Iiuesday and
Thursday
Freeport retains the Supei
VC 10 with a light every
Monday and Thursday to
London via Bermuda.


There will also he five flights
a week from Nassau to
Kingston with two of them
calling at Montego Bay.
Commenting on these new
s c hiedules Mike Keemar,
Bahamas manager for British
Airways said they reflect the
growing need for non-stop
service between major points.
"The visitor to the Bahamas
can now board a British
Airways jet in London in the
morning and be in Nassau
shortly after lunch. it's
like gaining an extra half day
on your holiday. Our late
evening departures mean the
passenger gets a full day in
Nassau followed by an
undisturbed night before
reaching London"


Taxi union





'warned of


bus


plans'


A 15-YI.AR a\i ',etc ran a.!scrtcd today's that tlhe ovelrn ,ent was justified iII
moving to introdlice a bus service from the airport and that the taxi union had
atttple I'warnin)' \l whait was comti ng but rctLised to act.
Mr. Oswald Bernard, whio (iii lthe business in1 It69, cited a number of examples to show the
reluctance over the years of the taxi unio to accept any innovations, inJludine a bus service.


"About one-and-a-half years
before the jitneys started, anid
before a lot of Bahamians cen


knew what a jitneyl
union mermciber,
Tucker got tip in
meeting to point i
was time the tunioin
thin k about
transportation
Bahamian people."


nmeantl, a
Cleophas
a general
)ut that it
started to
c h c fa i
for thIie


According to Mr. Bernard,
Mr. Tucker went on record at
that time as recommending the
union acquire some Jitnleys
immediately.
"I am not asliamed to adiiti
that I was one of those who
voted against Mr. Tucke r's
proposal,"' Mr. Bernard toldt
Fhe Tribune yesterday.
The jitne's Cwer ini troduced
to Nassau by other operators
but they didn't bother the taxis.
Mr Bernard said. Not long
after that the taxi union
decided to poll its imebihers on
the feasibility t group t)
insurance.
unionn ducities were then SIi a
tonth tor a 50 poiind bernrit.
We went teo l)ioiniiiI L ite'
Insurance svherc Mr. (tlnc'ent
Maynard was then cne of the
agents. ais wa's Mr. Idisin Deal.
Ihey cainte and talked to its at
another general iectinig alnd
presented ai ver good case tfor
wh'' we should tlaC this
insurance.
"We i would hiL-t' gotten
3,900 pounds coeiagc t tor te
small anounit o 1 '/4 a nuonth
at tihe ,time." Mi Beriaird said
he told the union (liiat lie was
paying 4 poutnids a mntontlih oit
his own for I 200 pouinids
coverLge, hut the ien ihebrship
voted down t lie group
insurance schlenlI.
When the Pt P canIeC to
power in 1967 irepresenatives
of tie tiniol went twice to see
then Minister ('ecil Wallace
Whitfield about different
minatters concerning the taxi
union. The question oft i bus
service was brought up each
time. Mr. Bernard said.
Former Transport Minister
Warrentf Levarity and Formier
Tourismi Minister Arthur
Foulkes twice addressed the
union and on bhothi occasions
the question of a cheap form
of transportation fromi the
airport was discussed.
Mr. Bernard said that Dr.
Doris Johnson, when Minister
of Transport, twice addressed
the union at a general meeting


By NICKI KELLY


and stressed the need for a
chei per Iorm iof transportation

froni the airport, particularly
for people from the Famil)
Idlan ds.
I fic present Toutrisi
Min i -, 'icrlement Maynard had
,llso .addressed the union on the
isstiue as did Prime Minister
Lyin en Pindling
"W'e went to see the Prime
Minis ter twice to talk about
trans portation with the advent
of the jumbo jets," \r.
Bern irtl said.
"I today, he continued, it
appe -rs as if the PLP is doing
the taxi drivers an injustice.
This is far from the truth,
T lie drivers had all kinds, of
diffe rent reasons why we
shoul dn'l have a bus service At
one point I was the general
scnre tary and I stressed thec
inpo rnance to M having a che.iper
tforin of transportation.
"I asked then how wiin\"
thnes had they used piihliiec
biiscs in oliami which cost 50
cents against $5 or S i tor a
tai rI d i' "
Ac,,oiding to Mr. Bernard
the ii' ill president iof the unliIn
.ippoi rtli'd a committee to look
11in11 b uses, particularly for the
airport t 'They went so tiar as
to gc" t brochitires bihut Ijust
dilly-i i allied and didn't do
anythii ng more about it." Mr.
Berna rfd declared.
No he said. people \cier
conipl dining about the high
prices ctarged by taxis fromn
the airport and in mainr11
insltin ..-es this wsas very true
On numIerous occasions
drivers were now cormingr to
hin Lanil complaining about
what the government s\as
trying to do to them. "I tell
them they can't possibly be
talking to me because I was
the on e who stood tip in the
imeetin gsand told them to start
with oune bus."
Mr. Bernard said the
govern timent had recognized the
introduction of buses as
inevitable and had approached
the tax i union as the people in
the hest position to handle the
prohle rnr
For seven years however the
whole thing had been left
hanging, he charged. "They felt
the o-wernment would always


protect threm biut there AIe
realities the people must flae
Manr of the people wh'sit
came to Nassau particulaiII
from the Out Islands, could
manage the airfare and si rite
ready cash left over but could
not afford S5 or $6 for tai\i
fare" Mr. Bernard pointed outri
Others who fell into thi,
category were visiting student,,
he added
Put plain and simnpl, Mr
Be r n a r d rn a i n t ai n ce t
transportation costs iIn the
Bahamas were too in'rh
) r iver i s have t h i s
pic-in the-sky attitude I tih
don't understand that thle\ .ilI

Declared the foircier l,i\.
driver "I do not s iit't '
with taxi drivers because tlie\
certainly had amiple time anud
available funds to get btise,' ,i
the rodd "
Mr. Bernard is r), I%
employed with a leadi',te Ihtil
onr ('ale Beach A asked si\ tlic
had ifiuit the taxi business t
said lie had let ea use it I
became boring
The last place tine hi
worked was lairad ise .min
There he had s'it c,,ict'd 1i.1\i
drivers it'nor' clustloltrs, \ilho
had no luggage in taoin mit
those who did became tlie.\
knew it meant a tare to Ihie
airport.
"You wouldn't beClitsc the
mad scramble then '" M'si
Bernard declared lIhe smet
thing would happen \hcen a
call on the taxi phone a cl ai
through. If it was a short haul
on one wanted to take it.
Ini an effort to keep t)iol
operators out of the hotels thc
taxi men had arrangenieits |
with individual hotels to telerj
sightseeing services

Mr. Max Healey
IN LAST NIGHT'S Tribune
reference was made to tihe
salary paid Mr. Max fleale.,
former general manager of
Bahanmasair. The story said that
board chairman William Allen
had confirmed the figure of
$50,000 with allowances.
"What I said was that it
could have been that amount
or any other," Mr. Allen
explained today.


ALMOST 13,000 vehicles
S* nearly half the island's
total are still not registered
for 1974. a Road Traffic
Authority spokesman said

This indicates that despite
a new system designed to
reduce waiting time, the
March 31 deadline will still
find some 10,000 vehicles
unlicensed, as happened
last year.
e Of the island's estimated
o 30,000 vehicles, over 17,000
were registered up to this
I ,morning, the spokesman said.
There are only two days left
The Fort Charlotte Road
Traffic Headquarters is
licensing all public service
vehicles and licence plates
with an "NP" prefix.
Motorcycles and licence
plates with no prefix are
being licensed at the Fox
/ 1 Hill Library. The Blue Hill
Road Police Station is the
site for licensing of trucks
and vehicles with an "N"
prefix.


make

$17m

refunds
GA( CORPOR.ATION. the
giant I'liiida land-deelopmente
coirnparn hls agreed to retunir
some S I 7 million in land and
dollar retiund,, t)o ohl, us.,ids of
land btuc ers
(GA '( gre ed lthe
elInbulirse'l nelt inn a .')-page
,onesen i order slihini ted to the
Federal I rade commission n
S' .' ii an Fi C investigation.
I he order, in addition to
requiring refunds to buyers of
undeveloped land who had
defaulted on land contracts,
stipulates that the company
clearly disclose in contracts the
uncertainty of the future value
of the lar'n and the dil'ti,:!;!t\
in reselhirn t.
G AC will also ha Le
discontinue mirnsrepresenting
tile qualities. characteristics or
state of present or planned
development of their land and
in king other mnisrepresenta-
tions
GCAC' Corporation are the
developers of C('ape Eleuthera
at PowCell', Point. South
I leuthera

CHICKEN
Gladstone Farn's will make
its first uir shipment ot frozen
chickens to the Famnily Islands
tomorrow when a speical
charter flight will take three
tons to Loing Island and
(Georgetow n. I xtina
Such shipri-ents are normally
made by mail boat


- M O -V E
-A B hmmm




W PiA f-


r?


IWR 0 1 r : it
A NEW car rental firm. wholly-owned by
Mr Aaron (Kiki) Knowles Sr., has been
established with the Nassau Beach Hotel as its
base.
Kiki's Rentals Ltd. opened for business last
week with a fleet of 30 dodge ears. including
18 Dodge Avengers, six Dodge Darts and four
Dodge Coronets.
The company is under the management ol
Mr. Knowles' son Valentine.
Born iat Governor's arbour Eleuthera, Mr
Knowles, 53, came to Nassau at the age of
seven-and-a-half, and gained his first business
experience from shining shoes and selling
papers while attending school.
tie joined Central Garage in 1946 as a
Wnechanic's helper, but later advanced to the
position of parts clerk. He was promoted to
the position of parts manager, a position which
he held for ten years from 1955 to 1965
before being promoted to credit manager of
Castor Ltd., a hire purchase company which
was a subsidiary of Central Garage Ltd.
When Castor Ltd. was sold in 1967 to New
Providence Leasing, one of the agreements was
tha t Mr. Knowles went along with the
accounts department of the firm for a period
of one year.


cy "


He however remained with New Providence
Leasing for five years before that firm
purchased Central Garage Ltd. Mr. Knowles
was in turn appointed managing director of
Central Garage, a position which he currently
holds
The financing for Kiki's Rentals was
provided by a loan from Citibank.
Pictured: Mr Aaron (Kiki) Knowles (right),
owner of Kiki's Rentals Limited, is shown
accepting delivery of his fleet of Dodge cars
from Mr. Kendal Kajor, sales manager of
Central Garage, who are the agents for Dodge
cars.
Inset (bottom left) Mr. Knowles is pictured
with Mr. Robert Renson. Citibank's assistant
manager, credit and marketing. Citibank
financed the new venture.
Inset (bottom right) Mr. Knowles is seen
being congratulated by Mr. George Myers,
General Manager of Nassau Beach Hotel, where
the new firm operates from.


Pictured second from
Knowles, manager of
second from right is
receptionist secretary.


Methodist Bishop arrives


BISIIOI' Roe C. Nichols. a
p rom nIi en t M e t hodist
clergynian. arrived in Nassau
yesterday from Pittsburgh,
PenC 1 s1 Isania. Bishop Nichols
was invited here by the United
Methodist Church ini the
bahanmas and was accompanied
by his wife.
The Bishop will speak at an
Icuinencial Service tonight at
Wesley Methodist Church at 8
p.m. lie s\ill also speak at the
Southern Recreation Grcunds
on Tuesday, April 2 at 8 p.m.
Yesterday the Bishop made
a courtesy call on the


Governor-General, Sir Milo
Butler, and this morning he
called on Prime Minister
Lynden Pindling and at the
U.S. Embassy.
Lynden Pindling and at the
U.S. Embassy.
At the Embassy he met with
Deputy Chief of Mission, Miss
Rozanne' Ridgway and
tomorrow morning he will call
on Ambassador Ronald 1.
Spiers at 10.30 a.m.
While here Bishop and Mrs.
Nichols will stay with Rev.
Fdwin Taylor, chairman of the


Methodist Church in the
Bahamas, and they will leave
Nassau on Wednesday, April 3.
Bishop Nichols heads 1,050
churches with 272,000
members


BRITAIN'S ('hiricclhri ol
the I xchCue r I his Budget
stateme nt \ esterd a
announced a big ctharigi' in
police over income earned
abroad. This is- likely to have
repercussions iI thlie Bahauas
and other non-sterling arcas.
Rejecting import controls
Mr. Denis Healeaey announced a
tightening of Britain's
exchange' control regulations in
a way that would ensure that
nearly all British investment
abroad would be financed bv
private borrowing abroad.
Mr. Hlleale also announced a
tightening of the rules
governing sales of portfolio
investment owned b IUK
residents in tihe overseas
sterling area. These measures.
Mr. Ileale. told the British
House of 'Conmmons, are
expected to benefit the British
balance of pay ments to the
tune of it least 300 million
pounds and possible more.
In dealing within foreign
income. Mi. Healey said that in
general, the remittance basis
will cease ito appl. to earnings
of UK residents from overseas
eL'nployneiints, trades and
protfessions. Instead, lax will be
.ssssesed tin QO percent oft the
nCircoie arising tiom the
overseas source. Ten L percent
dedlicttion is iII rectgnitio n ot
the special importance of this
income to lthe lUK and of the
expenses incurred in earning it,
said M Ileale'.
A similar rule is also to
apply to overseas pensions.
And the C'hancellor said that
foreigners working temporarily
in Fingland for non-resident
employers will be charged tax
on halt their earnings.
The basic rate of income tax
was raised by the Chancellor
by three pence in the pound.
Other main tax changes.
Vat: rate confirmed at 10
percent. I extension of ero
rating to certain health and
safety equipment. Standard
rate extended to confectionary
(sweets), soft drinks and ice
e Alcohol total duty
^ ^. _ -,


S--- ",AT- -
EDWllIFmIMI
(Nassau Store Only)
SEE
no WARIFOUSL SIN
NOW IN FULL SWING
adYOUSAVE


raised by 20 pence on bottle oif
spirits, an average otf 10 pence
on bottle of wine and beer
increased an average of one
penny a pint.
Oils standard rate of
VAT ( 10 p.c.) extended to
petrol and other road fuels
from April 1.
Tobacco total duty
raised by average of 5 pence on
a pack.
Gaming Off-course
betting duty raised from 6 to
7': percent.
GLovernment intends to
introduce ai an annual wealth tax
on the rich, and a Green Paper
is to be published this summer.
A tax on lifetime gifts
(falling on the donor) is to be
introduced in the Second
Finance Bill, but will be
back-da.ted to Budget day.
Company tax has been
increased to 52 percent and
stamp duty raised from I to 2
percent on conveyances and
transfers with improved relicts
for conveyances of real
property personal tax.
labour's budget sent the
I ondon Stock Market plunging
to an I I-year low Wednesday.
But thle pound sterling
strengthened in international
money markets. Sterling rose
by moire than one US cent to a
four-nionth high in Liondoii ofit
$2.38X05 At one point tie
Financial ltimes Index of 30
leading inLdustrials was down
13.3 points at 279.9 its
lowest since Jan. 1963.
See story in Page 2.

Minister

to speak

AGRI('CULTIUR and
Fisheries Minister Anthony
Roberts is to be the keynote
speaker tomorrow night at the
awards banquelCt of tire
Bahanmas Agricultural and
Livestock Farmers' Associat:oin
at the Sheraton British
Colonial Hotel.
Sources said Mr. Roberts
was expected to outline his
ministry's policies and
programmes for the year.
At the banquet a number of
awards will be presented
Mr. Carlton Francis,
chairman of the Bahamas
I)evelopment Corporation, is
to receive a special President's
Award from BLAFA president
('lenient Pinder for his efforts
to improve the lot of small
Bahamnian farmers.


I II I


Bank with



B Barclays


Lowe new Revenue Secretary
MR. JAMES RIZPAH Lowe. formerly Under Secretary
in the Ministry of Finance, has been promoted to fi!l the
entirely new post of Secretary of Revenue within the same
ministry, a Government Information Service press release
said today.
The appointment was seen as a move to centralise the
Ministry's control over and supervision of revenue
collection, and, sources said, the creation of the new post
was recommended by International Monetary Fund
advisors.
The appointment took effect on January 1.
It is believed that Mr. Lowe's new post will primarily bc
Concerned with the introduction of a business and
professional tax that has been mooted by government.



Budget may send


shock waves


-- -


left is Mr. Valentine
Kiki's Rentals, and
Miss Brenda Rolle,


/
fP ''-


VOL. LXXI, No. 105 Wednesday, March 27,1974. Price: 20 Cents


Cb,


I


-v




























1~'














-DEAN 'KEPT


APPROACH


FROM NIXON'


Chamber pot

for Anne
BRITAIN'S Princess Anne
received an historic chaiiimberr
pot from the regiment of
which she i hlonoi;irt,
commander
The light-hearted interlude
took place on the second dli,
of hel three-dai \i sit tis the
IHerford-bhased reiLi il en il
(;erniiany
The gift is a 1 op i ot a siIcer
chamber pot which oinei
belonged to \apsoltn
Bonaparte's brother Kn ;
Joseph of Spain iA\P)

Streakers

beware
FOREIGNERS caught
streaking in Kenya will be
deported in the nude, Ken an
vice president Daniel IMoi.
said today.
Last weekend Europeans
streaked twice in public
places in Kenya.
Moi said any streaker will
be arrested in the nude and
put on the first available
aircraft to his country ost
origin. ( AP)


Aid halted

B R I 1 A \ S I i
goverim ent today, stti peJ 5 ',d
aid to C hil ",, tlif' '.I Ol
nuiht.ar govcrnm ,eint i \l'i


LONDON Terrorists
bombs rocked a British arnmy
base in Northern England
yesterday and killed a man in
Northern Ireland.
The dead man was hit h\ a
blast from a parked car in
Belfast's Springfield Road, a


KAMPALA The playing of a force loyal to the Ugandan chief and
recording of Tennessee Ernie Ford his three-year-old regime.
singing "Onward Christian Soldiers" The dissidents were not sure why
was the signal for a nationwide the provinces failed to react, but they
iilihtuv uprising last Sunday against suspected communications trouble,
President Idi Amnin, anti-Amin poor military tactics by the rebels and
Ugandans report. Amin's escape from an assassination
The recording was played over attempt.
Radio Uganda, but the revolt in the The recording of the Christian
provinces never happened, and about hymn was broadcast when the rebels
200 rebel troops in Kampala were left briefly took over the station.
in hopeless battle with a far larger Resentment against Amin, a Moslem,




Healey calls for



sacrifices


BRI 11SII (hIutccllor of the
1-\ hcI uier l)'n ls leal' in his
Bud'gct csttrday called on the
liiaioLitS 5, I lthe British people
ts ti so)it ti I rIsili s, l, secure a
tillndt ,l nti l chanI t e t cou(Itrse,
,,t thi' c 'C( litiiM
lie I ll a picked IHouse ofI
(.' 'iitttons that th s l iimn diate
.t'.k ot tlh io\einss ii eIt. that
hi is bi.t i it it' 1sc ,nl\ i tit c'
s\'c eks \..s t so t ris tt the
5iit ii cil ii;. t'i in lf tio n iand
i i p i i \ c !h e' l ,eal 'n o t

1! I ( hbint v'li r spelled oul
I,' I I l l o l ll plc s O

I ll]st p1 'ssil'lcI uss' ot
.1 \ n .iblh i iiinp' 5s'er ints


I i' ". h T .. lit. II
l l. ic 't sii t t it :lc'1 i
i ',' s t S J ,I llc" Ht eC e

11 re uss't'.tl s it 5 se'se
i l i sLt.! G il 5 .


\V \Sill\(;I()N John S
Shitier Iormer head sot the
S d c r a I \ X I a t I o n
\ n I n I t I k o n b1 Illed
hliItrs s w List all crash onl
hnui .in 'lrtr ratheli than failure
to ,irret a I idoor Litich oni their
I10 1 intlbok le' involved
\ 1 t i i t lt re porters
I c"sdj\, I .'lctr .t S 'llte atviatlon
li <10 iin ''tt e' opened hseaitings
1its' il' I'.irA s. I riiL disaster
c.1 lict l iis ii, onthi Shatter
L t Ie n .I c li I s iii d- I t7 2
>i e it a.iegiaist osldcrinig thie
Strongest possible act ion to
mnaike suLIe cargo door,- on all
1)( 1 us closely propetil
le cited ist'llllonl \ brought
out at lhtl heairnng thla a mian
.w It I u lIsl n l r ead. tihe
inlstr 'tiotns on hl \\ to close
the door apitt.nclitl didn't doi


stronghold ot the Irish
Republican \rin
Police believe hlie car was
abandoned uwhen terrorists
spotted an arinn roadblock

T hlie i c lln was not
unmedialelv mined He was


MILADY
Collins Avenue 5th Terrace Centreville Phone 2-8197


FINAL CLOSE OUT SALE
Sat. March 30th

WHOLESALE PRICE FOR STORE KEEPERS


LADIES DRESSES SIZE 3 to 12
LADIES BLOUSES ALL SIZES
LADIES SLACKS, SKIRTS
LADIES SHORTS & PANT SETS
LADIES FORMAL DRESSES


There is ,o be substantial
increased spending by
govemment on housing and
food subsidies, which will he
offset by increases in direct
and indirect taxation.
including increases in the
contributions which employers
and employees make to
national insurance.
Old age pensions have been
substantially increased from
SI to '24 for single persons,
and from S32 to S38.40 per
week for married couples.
Here are to be big price
hikes to reduce deficits and the
need for government subsidies
for the coal and electricity
industries. British Railways and
the Post Office. FIcctricity
rates will go tip 30 percent, and
as much again for coal prices.
British Steel Corporation will
raise prices b\ an average of 25
pcicncrt, it was said.
Meanwhile a relatively minor
saving will be further cuts in


so properly, causing it to blow
off in flight and resulting in
explosive depressunzation.
"I suppose you can't make
an airplane idiot-proof,."
Shaffer said lie quickly added
that the remark didn't refer to
that particular person. But
again, later, he said the plane
went down because the door
Wasn't shut properly.
Officials of the National
Safety Transportation Board
testtlied that one of the first
pieces that left the plane was
the cargo door.
While no cause has been
officially determined, the
safety officials said, experts
believe that the plane crashed
when depressurization buckled
the aircraft floor, damaging


the 983rd to die in almost
five years of Northern Ireland
violence and the 52nd this
year.

The bombs in Britain were
aimed at the headquarters of
an army bomb disposal unit
with a long record of service
in Northern Ireland.



Arabs 'pi


bomb ca

W A S 1 I N (, I 0) N
(ol'iutinist Jack Anderson says
intelligence reports indicate
Sthat the militant Irish
Republican Arnly has obtained
troin Arab sources Soviet
shoulder-fired missiles for
shooting down British
helicopters
In his column. ',nderson


Half-day Closing for Inventory

Please note that


Bethell Robertson & Co.Ltd

WAREHOUSE

ON INDEPENDENCE DRIVE


WILL CLOSE

NOON, FRIDAY, MARCH 29TH

FOR STOCKTAKING

AND WILL OPEN AS USUAL ON MONDAY MORNING.


WE REGRET ANY INCONVENIENCE
CAUSED OUR CUSTOMERS


has grown among Christian troops
since a recent visit to Uganda by
Libyan President Moammar Khadafy.
a militant Moslem.
Some reports said up to 500 persons
have been killed in the fighting and in
a purge of the armed forces that began
Monday.
Ugandan sources said revenge
squads killed a number of suspected
rebel soldiers by shooting them in
the knees, then dousing them with


defence spending to the tune
of 55 million pounds.
The Chancellor also hoped
for some benefit from UK's
renegotiation of Common
Market entry. "Every million
pounds we can save in this field
will help us in many ways,"
said Mr. Healey.
He also said he intended to
introduce another budget later
this year.

Market plunges
LONDON The British
stock market plunged to an
11 -year low today in the
wake of a budget from the
new Labour Government that
will increase taxes on the
rich.
The Financial Times index
of 30 leading industrials
plummeted 13.3 points to
279.9. It was the lowest level
for this key index since the
average hit 279.6 on Jan. 28.
1963. (AP)


critical controls going to the
rudder. In the resulting crash
346 persons were killed.
The DC10 had not
undergone one of the key
modifications on the door
latch that Shaffer and the FAA
had suggested in mid-1972
after a. similar incident
involving a DCI10 that left the
Detroit airport, said C. 0.
Miller, director of the board's
Bureau of Aviation.
At that time, the DC 10
involved in the Paris crash was
still on the production line at
McDonnell Douglas, the
manufacturer. It was
eventually purchased by
Turkish Air Lines, owner at the
time of the Paris crash.


The only casualty was a
canteen manageress cut by
flying glass.

Other bombs in Beltast
burned out the city's biggest
bookshop, on Anne Street.
The owners are Ireland's main
wholesale distributors of
books and newspapers. (AP)


art of


mpaign'

also said Arab terrorists are
believed to have helped the
IRA set off bombs in the
London area during the past
few months.
He said the disclosures were
contained in a U.S. intelligence
report obtained by
Congressman John Murphy and
turned over to Congressman
Harley Staggers, chairman of
the House of Representatives
interstate and foreign
commerce committee.
According to Anderson, the
intelligence report said the
30-pound Strella SA-7 missiles
were "originally smuggled into
Belgium in Libyan diplomatic
pounches. Libya has publicly
stated its support of the IRA as
a revolutionary movement."
The columnist quoted the
report as saying:
"British Intelligence (has)
stated there is 'firm evidence'
that Arab terrorists are
working with the Irish
Republican Army and are part
of the bombing campaign
which has plagued London in
recent months.
"British officials have also
received intelligence reports
that the Russian-built SA-7
missiles are in the hands of the
IRA in Northern Ireland.
Sources indicate they are for
use against British helicopters
along the border between
Ireland and those countries
under UK control."
Anderson said the Strella
missiles, with range of almost
three miles are designed to
home in on the heat from jet
engines. (AP)


coup bid

gasoline and setting them afire.
Radio Uganda said a key figure in
the revolt, a Lt. Col. Elly, who had
been governor of West Buganda
Province, fled the country. Reliable
sources said he was in Zaire.
"The situation throughout Uganda
is normal.," Amin told a diplomatic
reception. "I am free. I have no
problem."
These other details of the weekend
fighting emerged from Ugandans who
have been reliable sources in the past:


NIW YORK Ousted
White House counsel John
DI)an III testified vestleida
that lihe concealed troi
President Nixon an approach
io a Cabinet member on behalf
I~~~~~~~~ Iff,--,Atft:,,111 N


r


counsel, spent Amore thlii twos,
hours in Sirica's offict e going
over each item in the satchel.
Also present was Peter
Kriendler of thli special
prosecutor's office
Four guards frori the federal
protective service appeared at

FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157


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o1 it iormi Atty, itell. JL LLL
The rebels used a tank to Mitchell. who was tini
-BREZHNEV -- break open the armourv at scitutinv bh a grand ju,y.
the headquarters of the The defence referred
fA L S OF Malire mechanized battalion Dean's earlier testimonuiill
CAL S OFF but failed to follow up their seeking to damage
advantage. Instead of credibility as a witness agai
MEETING immediately seizing key Mitchell and onetI
points iSn Kanimpala. they tried C('oneiiireice Secrvtars Mlai
MOSCOW G(eneiiraI to free allies in Makindye I. StaIns at then crilil
Sec retary Leonid Brehnev ;military prison, onspiracs trial.
cancelled a morning meeting Troops were sent to kill fii prior testinion. I)D
with U.S. Secretary of State Amin at his command post "aid Mitchell asked hlinl tilo
Henry Kissinger today and ,on Koloo Hill buti he was sOlie L' olill a iiilist
convoked an emergency sessionill b hI as Nes auKinst
of the Politburo. spending the night at a house i"ltlaira "" N wc\ York gl,
iWhile the sources report the nea:rby Mackenie Valk' utiry through the then Atlor
While the sources rumedporing residential disric ne r. Richard
this said they presuntedslhe The rebel contmander. Kiendiitnslt
unusual gathering of Soviet B Charles A rube. tol Ilil i st g
leadership had something to do Brig. Charges Arube. told l'niide qul'stolnng. 1)
with the Kissinger Brezhne\ Malire rebels tha Ain was sil h i s t lit n ,it
talks, they were unable dead; their discovery that lie M\ltchell's c-LILiiI'I llt t
talks linthey were unable was still alive helped the bout tli rt' cincc
unwilling to specify what eolhapse of the resoIt. K ci ni1st
issue was under discussion |fsllat I IIi
among the top (I mnen in ll th Arube was killed when Retelnng loI the tirst t
rulingConmmunist Party. soldiers loyal to Amiin broke I tl pei White s'
The Politburo. over which in on him and shot him as lie 5C L tIlts 11 \Iits
Brezhnev presides, usually was waiting for reports of the -
meets on Thursdays, and thie battle. Radio Uganda claimed isd i11
scheduling of the Kissinger isil he committed suicide. li t s 'i st
appeared to have taken that ha Mr Mitchell called'
appeared to have tk cI n thlti A rube inta I bav e started iii ii .i is'c li ti ) ICi
into account. The Secretai of the ti hnv before e was K lend tiedst to
State was supposed to leutin before le was Kl C ;Iniien st'
State was supposed th o ci\ e fully ready because he felt A Not ithe lattc ipairt
MoscowThrsobable ornusitiong himself in increasing danger. Q Yout ilevei Iniltiolled
The osuld rohav e promptesl ti Thirt-five officers were lthe lP'isidcnt nI\ r'est lls
thPolitburo sldsson were stred the killed a few weeks ago after Mr Mitchell th,it \<,t. pc
Politburo session were strIiiscgis Attii got aind if aniotlier tii 1 h is ],til. iii
arm control or the NlIdl' p A Pmin got ind of anotherr O* little clult 311
Fast. (AP)

Grand jury report handed over
WASHIN(;TON Ilie tilhe iudge's ch.iitmibers tmoniitlis hlas coniplelted tlturno,'i oli
House Judiciary ('Committee' bc eli DI) iA alndt lenneIr grand )i i t \I report .i
yesterday received the federal tCemergie il adtl h scored lthe acco'iipalvnx i e i lntiisciai
grand jury's report on Piesiedi ii cI Li ntill e Is l I 'ers d i ti e 1 a itlS' I i tlal prioci sIs s liCti
N ix on's alleged role in si ltel ot evtilence o m' tiiil Ie ippl)ro\iniiatel t\,wo liLtious si
Watergate. cLultiousee e i en !i itm w5d .'I ,L
After giving the report andi j l)Dor biouhgli Sir a .i letter noted "
satchel filled with evitlence iL i Lr, ltII c illt 't' c hailrt ll;n in lihe ItiLgc dJl ineitld I t,
lawyers. U.S. district jtidgsie Pe tiL \v ROdlt n I)-\ ,111n\ moCe Abouttl ile stitai le'
John J. Sirica told nelwsmen shich autlhori/ed Doar aIid .\
'They've got everything the .lentiner to recessive h il i t 1en1il
grand jury turned over to me "i' ,i iehalft oI the colnltmiittee HIld p killi
Sirica also read a bihne Sirnca who had described the I Holdup kll
statement which concluded 'sot- iis'lerlial ais focutisiig oi l the
far as the cournti s ('lliceL'ti'd p1 eslt' it atnd 'bearing Ion KI\(;SION Si\ gunitl
the transaction is concludiI ed matter s w hin h lhe prn dsisgutise ,iis Ls Liliers repoi ll
John Doar, chief coitnsc tlor jturisdictiion ot the 'commlii itlee killed one' \ sitiOli dth \l wotll
the impeachment i in inquir\ lnd in its current" sai inquny, sa in ai notther in ,: holds
Albert Jenner, min ority his staitelenl t that 'tihe court Kingslont


A: No. I did not.
Q- In tact. the terni m inuk \j
grand jury were \V'it words ti
the pieside.nt?.
A I hat is cotrccl
Q: You dld LI tI attriu b .
those words to .John MitCehl-l
did l ?
A.I'd I hie to look it th:
tai nscriipt tI tell Ioul.
Q I'he words runaw.\,
igranld iur\ are ou()Ir ,'words
t hat i oriectL disIplyiiii .
traitsLI Ip1)
\ I hes wor Is i nire I. mI woi,
in this Iransi,,rip't
I l iiiuniT a.il.,o lii ,L 11to
that lDean hal.s adnl tlcd iit ,
c'lhri es in iLlitiLion t o th
A\ ,, bicik in I L 7
,tlt hopes otI a ligtI sL eiT ..
in 'ttiirn loI Iir ll hi testit' im-s
agl.inist \Mit1I'hell andi St,'nis an.!
other tori'ti r l ot\er t niniL nt
\ ioai', t lhei n IIICIII:-:
n iitionld \ ight l( Ii n
its-it CISA ;.iII hull I II ti11 t"
l Is I )Lld d hoetti
(0 You c'\p) 't tol
l c'sst it h ,n1t r iv ent in tills 5'.,H
\ ill bIe hrouiht l to ti
iil init Lon oL \5 a tl\e er u ti''
n tiiI c'i 's \ mit W uIi alns itne '
\ I would hope so
0) ILtis \ oi been tol hi
\ \o' I havc notL
II, he J\" Ios,-c\t l
I I )c.i I ,Ipcnlicd \ ltll ,i
it!i'i iipl i+t p iincl h hol 's ii ;

m J \l ,-l;,'l! ipairti tp oi ;-
i rlnd ii I.t
, I in .ic I, 't R o I I t I \st ,,

Cancer fight

11 11 i S S n t li, pII 1

1p1il C I' I l lI till I ,I liti t .
k l I 1 S i 1 1 t t .I .s ,I ilI l k
I t i r i its ll 'on i 5 i it .
a the.1 iiL- h ti rni sion e tlil
a'cs i I Hight Li rtns i Lancie
1 !it ll bc r 1 it ii L C II .. e I


P I ji' 11 I i rii t L i!
t llte I billion :
S ttis I ti t il





McAIIister Hotel,
IM) NI ()\ N MI \ A 1



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Double $11
Triple $13
Quadruple $16

Home of the
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IF YOU SEE YOURSELF IN THIS HAPPY GROUP PICTURE. CLIP IT OUT AND BRING IT
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Hymn signal launched Uganda (


'Human error' caused crash


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Bunt I *\ires
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BLASTS ROCK BRITISH ARMY BASE


LOTS OF
LOTS OF
LOTS OF
LOTS OF
LOTS OF


I


NOTICE


The Tribune - Wednesday, March 27, 1974


,I _NOW I


- __ _ ___


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Ilhe
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The Tribune - Wednesday, March 27, 3 )74.


1hp ribunp
NULUUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. IL I)UPtUCI, Publisher/Editor 1903 1914
SIR F 1 IINN. D)UPUCH, ()..F., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Publisher/Editor 1917.-1972
Contributing Editor 1972 -
EILFF+ N IDUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972.
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.


EDITORIAL


The ways of nature
I 171


By ETIIFNNE: DUPUC('I
ACCORDING to an editorial in The Miami Herald south
Florida may be faced with a guava problem this year ... because
of a shortage of wasps!
"Nature, unimpeachable, is to blame for the uncertainty,"
wrote The Herald editor. "Evcrything is confused and off
schedule. The weather got too warm too fast, or rather never got
cold enough, long enough.
"In the false spring of January the fruit trees blossomed. Now
they bear green fruit which soon will begin to ripen. Hordes of
truit flies, also being processed on early schedule, will be ready to
pounce on the soft yellow halls."'
Thie question is now whether Opius lonttgicandatus will also
come out in tline to offset attacks on the fruit by fruit flies.
Opius is a species of stingless wasp that reduces the number of
the flies by laying its eggs on top of eggs laid by the fly As a
result the eggs of the flies are not hatched.
The wasps are bred in a laboratory. They are scheduled to
come out on tt0 imeal time .. which mnay be too late to save the
guava crop.
"The wasp amri. still incubating," writes The Herald, "may be
released too late in the biological battle Chemical spraying has
become an inoperative piiicedurc.'

It is amia/inp huI, little attention we pas to things by which we
are surioulnde(l.
Guavas are so common n the Bahamas that no one stops to
take a look at the lowly guava in the backyard.
But it is an imuorlant item of food and it has economic value
in IFlorida where the canning mil fruit is a major industry.
The guava was iipmui taut enough to rate an editorial in T7he
Herald.
The I//crald c\psess-d the ltea thai "t his year's guava crop may
nevel makc it I ,,ijll', jai or pie plate That would he deprivation
real and tragilc.

TI is is an example out what happens when anything in nature is
thrown outi l b Ilance.'.
This wholc problem lhas been produced by the fact that the
weather in Holli da got tfoo wain toom soorn. I have spent the
winter in ('Coal ;able. I can 't say that there has been a single
cold day in this area. Thcie have been a few cool evenings, one
really cold but the weather has beetin more pleasant than
otherwise.
The thing that has tlii rown everything out of balance is that
while the flies arc a product of nature and their appearance
follows the weatlitec pattern, the wasps are produced in a
laboratory that is int adjustable to the eccentricities of nature

There can bIe ollier reasons foi crop failure too. The greatest
factor in this connection is the abscnice of care and attention.
We see this iinhapp, condition in our farm at Camnperdowni this
summer At the heiieht of this development ... when labour was
available i. lhe\ icldl f tlthe land was fabulous.
Because ol the ,loveinient's immigration policy we have been
obliged to depend on inaturei to do the job without much if anyr
labour help.
In spite 'f iicn-lect the orchaLd continued to produce a large
crop every \ear- Tlieic was ;a tune when we took gifts of crocus
sacks of fruit ti the anmfurl\ Homes for children n and to other
public institutions. There wasn' a C('hristinas that we \vwee unable
to distribute gifts m ot'luit among ou I friends.
This Christmas there wasn't a single mature fruit of any kind in
our orchard in which we hiad just about every type of fruit tree
that grows in the tropics.
In the past there wasn't a single month of the year when some
fruit was ilnot mat during in our orchard.
There wasn't ainlm g li i te orcliaid for ('Christmas ... anid, as
far as I can see now. there won't be anythIing in the orchard for
the rest of the y cea ... and this will probably be true of next year
and in future years as well.
I anm not complaining. It doesn't matter any more because we
will spend so lit le time in the island in the future that it is no
longer really important beyond the pleasure we experienced in
walking through an orchard at blossom time and later when the
trees were laden with ripenning fruit of different colours.

"What's happened to the tfui"'', John Chaplin who is living inl
our cottage at t'amperdown asked tie recently. "Last year this
time the trees were laden. uris year there is no yield."
I have written this fact to emphasize what happens when
anything iin nature gets off balance ... and also what happens in a
country whiet laboiur is not available to work with nature in
extracting maxinti iiibenefits fiom mother earth.

Needless to say .. it doesn't help the land to bloom when
Prime Minister Pindling says there are ten thousand jobs in the
islands that Bahamians will no hlonge take.

FOOTNOTE TO lISTORY: The morning newspaper in Nassau
has reported that I have bought an apartment in Grand C('ayman.
This is not true. I have not bought anything in that island.
It would be true to say thal I have thought about it. I have
even talked about it. But I haven't done it. One of lthe reasons is
that I have so many commitments in different parts of the world
for this year that I won't be in anrty one spot fol any period of
time.
To begin with, I have six speaking engagements in different
parts of Florida during the next two months when the subject of
my talk will be the relations between the Bahamas and the U.S.
during the 18th and 19th centuries, and the early years of this
century.
I plan to go to Japan and Marihand China in May with the
International Press Institute, later in the year to Malaya and other
parts of the East with the Commonwealth Press Union, to the
West Indies with the Caribbean Press Association and to
Venezuela with the Inter American Press Association.


In addition I want to visit friends in England and I must go
to Portugal this suntmmer. In addition I must try to go to Exuma
io see what is happening to my property there.
One of my friends recently asked me where I was living these
ilys.
I really don't know myself. All I know is that my wife and I
thoroughly enjoy ourselves wherever any new day may find us.

A little while ago I was in my apartment in Coral Gables


10 10LE-E ,0R


EDITOR, The Tribune,
Would you please allow me a
little space in your valuable
paper.
In Mr. Charles Sealy letter to
the Editor on March 18, 1974,
he stated some very important
facts relative to the hotel
industry. Several seminars are
being conducted both in
,Freeport and New Providence
in regards to attitude of
workers in the hotel industry, I
can forsee no immediate
change in some of the workers
attitudes until such time as
some of the employers and
managers change their attitude
of victimnisation and unfair
practices.
To add to Mr. Sealy's letter,
I am a former civil servant and
worked in the department of
labour for several years, as an
assistant labour officer, my
duties were to assist applicants
in proper registration for
employment, interview same,
refer applicants to job
vacancies that they were best
capable of performing, carry
out labour inspections relative
to working conditions for
employees, investigate labour
complaints reported to the
department, settle minor
disputes fairly and justly
bet ween em pl o y ers and
employees
In July 1973, I tendered nmy
resignation with the Ministry of
Labour. in order to accept the
position of personnel director
of 1loliday Inn Hotel.
Freeport. Prior to my
appointment, I was interviewed
by NHoliday Inns university
professor, also the company
district director who both
endorsed the general mana-
ger's selection.
On November 14, 1973, I
was called into the Resident
Inkeeper's office and handed
an undated letter of
termination signed by Horace
Bullard. lHe then asked me
when could he receive the keys
for the Personnel Department I
told him as soon as I got mv
belongings out, this was about
3:30 p.m. lie wanted the keys
before 5 p.m. I did not see any
necessity in claiming my keys
so quickly when in fact he
already had a set of keys for
the office and also the files.
plus miy secretary had a set of
keys in her possession.
I took the matter to the
Ministry of Labour, Freeport.
A meeting was called that same
afternoon, present were Horace
Bullard, resident Inkeeper,
C.H. Turnquest, Deputy Chief
Industrial Officer and myself
The Deputy C. 1. 0. outlined
my complaint which I stated
was unjustifiable dismissal
The Resident Inkeeper
stated that the only reason
they were terminating my
services is because they don't
need a Personnel Director any
longer even though they
admitted there was nothing
wrong with imy work.
I told the Deputy C( 1. 0
that I don't see how some
people can maliciously and
unjustly prevent me from
feeding my children and they
still feed theirs. Mr Bullard


reading a recently published biography of inmy late friend loid
Beaverbrook. My wife was watching a TV programmne.
My attention was arrested by someone onl the TV using the
word Di-Gel.
I looked up and found thai it was an advertisement for a
product that, it is claimed, relieves indigestion.
I don't know if this word has any special meaning fir this
product.
The last time I heard it used was a half century ago during m,
first visit to Inagua for my first election canipaign.
Di-Gel was the name of a Haitian obeah ai an. Hie had been
dead a long time but many people believed that his spirt still
roamed about the island. They said he reappeared in different
uforirs.
I was told some fabulous stories about this my thical 'ielme.
I was walking in the bush at the island with an Inaguan on(e day
when a big dog popped out of the bush.
"Di-Gel". I laughed.
My friend went ashen. He quickened his steps and didn't speak
again until we were out in the clear.
"Man, you mustn't joke 'bout Di-Gel. That might have been
him. Next thing we knowed we would have been in Haiti
Anybody cross Di-Gel used to disappear. They say he turned to
an eagle at night and fly his victims to the bush in Haiti."

Ever since I heard that word on the TV nearly six hours ago I
have been trying to remember the name of mny Inagua friend who
told me these stories. It has just come to the surface of memory.
His name was James Montell. He is dead now but he has a son.
Gerald, living in Nassau or Grand Bahama.

THOUGHTS FOR TODAY
When I would beget content and increase confidence in the
power and wisdom and providence of Almighty God, I will walk
the meadows by some gliding stream, and there contemplate the
lilies that take no care, and those very many other little living
creatures that are not only created, but fed (man knows not how)
by the goodness of the God of Nature, and therefore trust in
Him. IZAAK WALTON

The plant is an animal confined in a wooden case: and Nature,
like Sycorax, holds thousands of "delicate Ariels" imprisoned in
every oak. She is jealous of letting us know this: and among the
higher and more conspicuous forms of plants reveals it only by
such obscure manifestations as the shrinking of the Sensitive
Plant, the sudden clash of the Dionea, or still more slightly, by
the phenomena of the cyclosis. HUXLEY


said I was making a threat
towards him. The meeting was
joined after no solution was
forthwith.
Around 7 p.m. two
policemen along with the Hot 'I
Director of Security came to
my apartment demanding that
I turn over to them the keys
for the personnel department,
they demanded that I go along
with them to the personnel
department collect my
personal belongings and give
them the keys. While collecting
my belongings Iforace Bullard
telephoned from the marine
lounge where he was drinking
asking it they got the keys yet
and it there was any trouble.
he also asked for one of the
policemen to coni' down to
the marine lounge. The officer
went on his return to the
personnel office Hie told mei
that Mr. Bullard told him that I
threatened him. I asked the
Officer what was the threat,
and when was it made lie
replied he did not know. I
considered the policeman
completely incompetent and
biased b not collecting proper
in formation b e t o re
approaching mer
On Sunday evening the
following week around 7:30
p.n I was again visited by two
policemen who said they cailme
to w arn ine not to molest Mr
Bullard. They said hlie called
themin and told them I
threatened hinm asked them
when was this threat made, and
what was the substance. Thev
said sometime this week. I told
them it wa s not true and that
since niy return Ironm Nassau I
,1id :Vit even set loot in tihe
hote'. One o th!.' policeman
sui I ciuid have called b\
phone. I asked them to leave
and not to come back. Would
you ever think ai policeman
would he so low as to suggest
po,^,liij.. for something to
happen when the\ should have
gotten their information fronr
their 'im ian.iii.ii '.
After almost two months
the Deputy C.1.0. made a
ruling in the matter of
terminating without a just
cause, and recommended that
since Mr Roker was not
dismissed for cause, and in
view of the fact that his
services were terminated ONI
WFEK after lie. in his capacity
as personnel director sent a
memo to all department heads
suggesting that they re-examine
their policy on hiring staff, and
try to hire as many Bahamians
wherever possible, because the
Government of the Bahamas
are committed to the people ol
the Bahamas. and they should
be given an opportunity to
make their contribution to
their country
There were very good
reasons for that memo and
there are still good reasons
Management stated that
they are eliminating the
position of personnel director
because of financial reasons.
That was the most unfair


the Ministry canriot tell
Iranagement \vhat position tor
'tiirlnate or ihal position to
keep, but in keeping with good
indu.,trial relations Mr. Roker
should be littered a position
comparable to that of hi.,
former positions
Now that vo tihave the facts
\.iu be the iudgc

JOHN A. T. ROKER
P 0 Box 1552, Freeport.


Be a BIG WINNER...Enter the


GRAND PRIZE






CUTLASS
Complete with 50 H.P.
Johnson or Evinrude Motor
(Valued at $4.220)
The luxury ous inten. of this
maqgmfiient ORLANLUO Li PPL R isthe
result of bi iilla t stvIng It has
anodied metal iame t vthi tempe ced
shatter proof glass, trill ', ;(lio seats
The hull is tmrne te'std .mnd votll give
you outstanding perfou.inan)( There is
no finer boat afloat oin their mcle
Made by a firm with over 20 years
e xper ience That's ORL.ANDO
CLIPPER! What a boat
__^ _


IThe name means Perfor
speed, trolling speed eco
you want ii an outboa
mid range size with s
JOHNSON 50 with loo
with less fuel. Johnson,
days of fuel crisis.


MAURA LUMBER CO
PHONE 24001 -
P.O. Box N-8177


MAURA LUMBER CO., LTD.













--d
S ... *.,






















?173on NEWSPAPER
romance in outboard motors. Top
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rd motor. If you want a motor of
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p charging for more Horse-Power
the one you really need in these VAILABLE



THE TRIBUNE


OFFICE

THIS WEEK!
MANY LTD.
.. .. .. .


,NASSAU


Alleges victimization by hotel


HOO FUN0




YOU'LL LOVE OUR
TERRIFIC EASTER SPECIAL

3Happy Pictures $1
in Brilliant Colour ...
-, on the waterfront at Edst
.CD)( CD.c" s Bay St. & William St. -
o..... : Phone 5-4641


I


(.I'


L


---r-- ------ ---


statement ever told. but yet
they expect the Government
and people to buy it. My
former secretary is still at work
in the same position. All of the
non-Bahamians are still in their
positions, but because they
tind a Bahamian who intends
to do what is right and stick to
principles ignoring colour or
nationality and deal strictly
with right and wrong, justice
and injustice tlhe are saying
they don't rneed a personnel
director.

During the eight years
lloliday I nn operated in
Freeport there ha:, Alv.' ,;s been
a personnel director to dt;al
with personnel.
This hole is considered the
second largest hotel in
Freeport eimplo1ing between
fo ti r to tiCe hundred
emplo ees. and it would he
most deceiving for aniy hone to
agree that a iompa'ny, that si/e
canriol afford or d qualified tfull-tile p rsonnel
director, who is impartial and
just whlch I ailm sile cannot
be said of many. this is why
the) have so many problems.
N)W we uoline to another
point in Mr Seal\ s I rtcr ,where
he sid so1le employers on(Ily
project uniqualitied Balhamians
as show pieces and those who
are qualified and would not
allow themselves to be used
against their intelligence are
either fired for no just cause or
the, are pressured oult.
Since the episode Iu.lli:i-
pressure has been brought on
me. (an you imagine a
personnel director olt 11y hotel
or company being demoted Ito
a warehouse associate
supervisor where their' ire now
two superiisors to speivi.e
one staff ?
Mani ot 0 Ilmy employ iient
.agreement privileges winch
fomned a part ot 'ii salary %
hae been reduced. Under the
Labour laws ot this country. I
believe this is a breacii of
contract, and 1 will deal with
that at another time in another
place.
I n. conclusi o n t he
management of Holiday Inn. in
ifry opinion, did not obey the
ruling handed down by tile
Minister of Labour in this case.
The ruling was and still is.









The Tribune - Wednesday, March 27, 1974


Masau portion

Control Qentrt
TELEPHONE 2-3237 5th TERRACE, CENTREVILLE


OPEN 'TIL 4 P.M.


SATURDAYS!


MEATS

FISH

POULTRY
IN 10 LB.
CONTAINERS


HOMEOWNERS... BUY WHOLESALE


SPECIALS FOR THIS WEEKEND


10 Ibs. PORK CHOPS (American) S12.00 ($1.20per lb.)
10 Ibs. BONELESS (Canadian) CHUCK S13.75 ($1.37per lb.)
10 lbs.MUTTON Sin5n (1 fl.05 nor lh I


Approx 5 lbs. U.S. CHOICE BONELESS STRIP STEAKS (15s.oo ($3.00per lb.)
10 lbs. LAMB SHOULDER CHOPS s 990o (99Cper Ib.)


10 Ibs. PIG FEET


$3.25


FRESH SHRIMP
FRYING FISH (Bahamian)


$2.90 perlb.
lb. 680


I ~ U


PIGS FEET


BOLOGNA Sliced

FRESH MUTTON


lb. 35C

lb. 99C

lb. $1.10


LEAN STEWING BEEF Ib. $1.40


LEAN SALT BEEF

ASST. MEATS

SHEEP TONGUE


BOILED HAM

PORK CHOPS


DANISH SPARE RIBS Ib.


lb. $1.20


3 Ib. $1.50

lb. 85C

lb. $1.65


Campbell's Vegetable Soup4 tins
Robin Hood Flour 5 lbs.
Blanco Bleach gallons
Jewel Shortening 3 Ibs.
Watermaid Rice 5 Ibs.
Cana Corn on Cob 4 ears
Three Stars Corned Beef 12 oz.
Libby's Sweet Peas 303
Potatoes 5 Ibs.
Irish Spring Soap (bath) 3 for
Hatuey Malt Tonic 6 bottles
Sawyers Pigeon Peas large
Hellman's Mayonnaise Quart
Ajax All Purpose Cleanser 28 oz.


lb. $1.29


89C


Native Kiln Charcoal
Native Tomatoes lb.
Native Onions 3 Ibs.
Native Sweet Peppers each
Champion Tomatoes No. 2 tin
Champion Tomato Paste
Champion Pigeon Peas
Pinesol Cleanser 21 oz.
Pinesol Bathroom Cleanser


HIH{ LEY S TREE IF


$1.29
25c
69c
15c
46c
42c
39c
42c
$1.10


"BAHAMIAN WEEK" I
- - - - - - I


Gladstone Farm.
CUT UP FRYERS


Native FRESH PORK LEGS


all other cuts


U.S. CHOICE
CHUCK ROAST


lb. 89C

lb. $1.29
lb. $1.10


lb. $1.49


U.S. CHOICE
CHUCK STEAK lb. $1.59
m m m m m m m-m m m


U_


- Eli


MADEIRA FOOD STORE
PHONE 24524 P. O. BOX 6143
CUT-RITE


WAX PAPER


KARO SYRUP DARK

ZEST SOAP BATH SIZE


COMET CLEANSER (Plastic Cont.)
SKIPPY
PEANUT BUTTER


MUELLERS MACARONI


JOY LIQUID


DANISH SPARE RIBS


50C

550


16 oz.


Bar 40C


17 oz.


12 oz.

16oz.

22 oz.


400

89C

70C

95


lb. $1.15


SPECIALS FOR MARCH 28th to 31st.

Centreville Food Market


6th Terrace East


P.O. Box 5714 Phone 5-8106
Store Hours Monday to Thursday 8 a.m. 8:30 p.m.


Fri. & Sat. 8 a.m. 9 p.m.


SAWYER'S PIGEON PEAS Large 2 cans for 79c.
SARALEE POUND CAKE $1.29
FRESH FLORIDA CITRUS PUNCH 1/2 Gals. $1.15
CARROTS Cello Pack 25c.
CABBAGES lb. 22c.
GRAPEFRUIT 5lb. Bags $1.15
GREEN GIANT GREEN PEAS 15 OZ. 2 cans 81c.
BL ^ "O BLEACH Gallons 99c.
tfff^ /. ". r


Sun. 8 a.m. 10 a.m.


U.S. CHOICE
TOP ROUND STEAK
U.S. CHOICE


Ib. $2.19


BOTTOM ROUND ROAST Ib. $2.09
U.S. CHOICE


SIRLOIN TIP ROAST
U.S. CHOICE
T-BONE STEAK
U.S. CHOICE
PORTER HOUSE
BAHAMIAN GROWN
FRESH NATIVE PORK


IRISH
SPRING SOAP
h Size 3 for 9-c


Ib. $2.29

lb. $2.29


Ib. $2.29


(ALL b. 1.25
CUTS) lb. $1.25


AJAX CLEANSER
21oz. 2 for 79c.


COLD POWER DETERGENT
Giant Size


KEN-L-RATION
DOG FOOD
16oz. can
2 for 59c


99c. U


HARDING' S
FOOD MARKET
P.O. Box 5290 ES Phone 2-3067


p


99c
$1.15
99c
$1.35
$1.99
85c
$1.33
45c
99c
99c
$1.49
39c
$1.59
89c


NATIVE FRESH PORK


UI-_


Im I m mmmmmi m mm m mm m m m m mm.


Regular or Lime


^ Colgate.
Toothbrush (45c)
CHILD'S each


I -


- --I-- `~II~


I


IIL __ Ir___ I


I I-_r~_ I


;a


99c.


I


0
- r4i&










The Tribune - Wednesday, March 27, 1974.
S -, r-lignli


ABACO: Three films about
sea life will be shown in various
settlements of Abaco within
the next week.
The films, provided by the
International Oceanographic
Foundation, will be shown at
Marsh Harbour Theatre on
Friday, at 7:30 p.m. at
Man-O-War Cay schoolhouse
on Saturday 8 p.m. and
at Cedar Harbour, Foxtown,
Cooper's Town, Crown Haven
and Green Turtle Cay during


TO OUR CUSTOMERS
SORRY


PINDER'S FOOD MARKET ;
MONTROSE AVENUE PHONE 24030

OPEN SUNDAY MORNING 8 10 A.M.

| bllp \


F resh Native Tomatoes lb.
Robinhood Flour 51bs.
Nescafe 8oz.'s
Phosferine Tonic Wine Quarts
Red Rose Tea Bags 48's
A.B. Sauce
Kraft Dinner'
Campbell's Vegetable Soup
Jim Dandy Grits 51bs.
Mahatma Rice 3lbs.
Ivory Liquid Giant Size


S Libby's
Unsweetened Pineapple Juice


46 ozs. 69c.


' (Super) $1.29
Colgate ToothPaste


FRESH NATIVE

CHICKENS WHOLE
U.S. CHOICE

T-BONE STEAK
U.S. CHOICE

PORTERHOUSE
U.S. CHOICE

SHOULDER ROAST
U.S. CHOICE

ROUND STEAK
U.S. CHOICE
SIRLOIN TIP ROAST
U.S. CHOICE

MINUTE STEAK


FRESH GROUND HAMBURGER


SPARE RIBS


lb. 85C


lb. $2.69


lb. $2.69


lb. $1.29


lb. $2.09


lb. $2.49


lb. $2.59


lb. $1.19


lb. 990


Libby's
Spaghetti &
Meat Balls
15 ozs.
2 for $1.09












Punch
Detergent
Giant Size
75c.


JOHN


S. GEORGE &


Sat., April 6 & Sun.,April7
10a.m. 6 p.m.


CO. LTD.

WILL BE CLOSED FOR
STOCKTAKING
APRIL 1 st.


I


the week of April 1.
The programme will include
"Back from Extinction: The
Southern Sea Otter," a story of
the otter, its history, life cycle,
food habits and long range
prospects. The "Sea Turtle",
filmed on Martin County Beach
and at the House of Refuge
Museum, Fla., shows the life
cycle of the Loggerhead turtle,
mating, eggs laid any young
hatched. "Animals that Live in
the Water" is of primary
interest to teenagers.
Th.e film presentations have
been arranged by groups
interested in conservation,
including the Rotary Club of
Abaco, the Abaco Business-
men's Association, and the
Abaco Conservation Society
After paying their expenses
the promoters of the third
annual Abaco Fishing
Tournament, to be held off
Abaco from April 22 to 25,
will turn all remaining funds
over to the Abaco
Conservation Society.

Mrs Hearst
'losing hope'
SAN FRANCISCO -- A $2
million food giveaway designed
to win release of Patricia
Hearst went broke today, and
her mother said she is
"beginning to lose hope" that
her kidnapped daughter will be
returned safely.
Randolph Hearst and his
wife were in New York City
for a meeting of the board of
directors of the Hearst Corp.
"You try to keep your
spirits up, but now I'm finally
beginning to lose hope," Mrs.
Hearst said in an interview with
the New York Post. "I can't
think of any way out of it for
Patty now."
A $2 million food giveaway
financed by Hearst funds
ended with depletion of the
money. (AP)


FOR


JOBS


AVAILABLE AT YOUR FAVOURITE FOOD STORE
DISTRIBUTORS THROUGHOUT THE BAHAMAS
THE GENERAL AGENCY LTh
PATTON STREET.PALMDALE PHONE 2 1561


throughout the day

at work and play


,


JUST ARRIVED!

AT NASSAU'S NEWEST PET SHOP


PROTECTION DOGS

FOR YOUR HOME
& PROPERTY


tDOBERMAN A

PINSCHERS LE. ..

*GERMAN

SHEPHERDS "

PURE BREIE'D &
.I K. C RI'(;ISTI'RRI ,




NASSAU GARDEN & PET SUPPLY
Located opposite ST. THOMAS MOORE SCHOOL MONTROSE AVE.
TELEPHONE 2-4259- BOX 6235


THh VITAL ROLF of the
Bahamas National Trust is
becoming increasingly apparent
to the public as more and more
people are forced to become
aware of the need to protect
and control the environment,
as a matter of survival, Trust
president Oris Russell said this
week.
In his report at last week's
annual general meeting Mr.
Russell described 1973 as an
important year for the Trust.
"It may be described as the
year of awareness." he said.
The Bahamian public had
likewise become aware of the
vital role the Trust was
performing in assisting to
protect the environment of this
still beautiful part of the
world, Mr. Russell observed.
He pointed out however that
expenditure for the year
exceeded income by nearly
$10,000. "This is not a happy
situation. It does however put
us all on notice that we must
exert greater effort during the
coming year to increase the
membership of the trust as well
as try to raise additional funds
on behalf of the Trust."
During the year the Trust's
educational programme made a
number of nature films
available to Nassau schools as
well as to service clubs and
various church groups.
"As a result of these shows
new members have been
recruited and much goodwill
earned for the Trust," Mr
Russell said. "It is gratifying to
report," he added, "that the
students of certain public
schools made donations to the
Trust as a result of the tilm
shows."
Through the assistance of the
Ministry of Agriculture and
Fisheries staff the Trust had
been able to extend its nature
film shows to certain Out
Islands during the year.
"These shows were so
gratefully received by the
inhabitants that it is sincerely
hoped that this programme can
be increased during the coming
year,' Mr. Russell said.
The Trust sponsored
National Audubc Society
Wildlife Film series were shown
to capacity audiences it all
times. Mr. Russelel sad it was
gratifying that the public's
appreciation of these films had
increased so much since last
year.
Flamingo Day, which has
now been declared by


Zal is the best antiseptic
for my patients I think


and of course I always

disinfect my home with Zal


PME ANTISEPTIC DISINFECTANT

Distributed throughout the Bahamas by

THE GENERAL AGENCY LIMITED
P. 0. Box 5276 Nassau


I,


a
a





S
*
I


'Dii


NOTICE


CONVENTION PLANNING Preparations for Thursday's
first annual general convention of the National Youth Congress
have been finalised, including a special talent display on Saturday
night at 9 p.m. Members of the N.Y.C. convention committee
are shown in a pre-convention meeting. They are (from I. to r.)
Clarissa Cox; Sidney Saunders; Lee Josey; Felix Rolle; Kirkwood
Seymour; Greta Brown, Melvin Seymour, Beatrice Moxey,
Ezekial Munnings, Philip Major and Geoffrey Saunders.
Also included in the convention is a special religious service to
be held at the Nassau Botanical Gardens on Sunday, March 31
between 3 and 4 p.m. The sessions are open to the public.


National Trust reports

a 'year of awareness'


(~i


Sea life film

shows at Abaco


govern'n .. be the annual
Conservation Day, also drew
excellent public response. The
Trust's programme for the day
drew a capacity crowd to the
Sheraton British Colonial
Hotel.
The Trust has within its care
several national parks,
probably the most beautiful of
which is the Exuma Cays Land
and Sea Park.
"The establishment of this
park alone, in my opinion,
justifies the existence of the
Bahamas National Trust during
the past 15 years," Mr. Russell
said.
He observed that every year
more and more Bahamians and
visitors were enjoying the
beautiful amenities of this area.
Among its other activities
the Trust seeks to protect the
flamingo, the Bahamian Hutia
and Iguana, the white-crowned
pigeon and the green turtle.
Christmas 1973 was a record
year for the sale of Christmas
cards by the Trust, according
to the president. He said
17,232 cards were purchased
by members and the general
public.


FASH ION SHOW
Under the distinguished patronage of
Mrs. Iy'nden 0. Pindling Mrs. Timothy Gibson
Mrs. Earl Thompson
The Fort Charlotte Branch of the PLP
presents for your entertainment
a Fashion Show & Hair Styling Contest
Performing will be
Joe Karates Terrific Talent School
Kupert & The Rolling Coins ',onnie & The Ramblers
Sunday Mar. 31st -3p.m.
Ronnies' Rebel Room Ancr age Hotel
Tickets available at Young Asheraun Boutique;
Princess Boutique; Fashion Boutique
This space donated by Mortimer's Candy Kitchen


-r


$ 20
$1.09
$2.19
$2.49
61c.
2 for 49c.
2 for 89c.
4 for 89c.
94c.
$1.39
87c.


u- I
U .


. . . , I1 [1 IIIII III I ~ i . .. . . ... .. . . .. .. . .. . . . . . .. . . .... iIJ i .. . .. ...


a


I I I


.......... -


E "Fm mnw s






The Tribune
6


T


SPECIALS FOR THE WEEK MARCH 28th, THROUGH MARCH 31st, 1974


P W W W W WW


~ww


w w w


U.S. CHOICE
SHOULDER STEAK
U.S. CHOICE
RIB STEAK
U.S. CHOICE
GROUND CHUCK


DANISH CHOICE
SLAB BACON


^ [ 4 ' 4. 1 I,4N l
', I I .u , Ip e t o lr fe'
I 111 1 Palil kol 4, J ,4i i
Ind' Id ; dl'l Ii It h I d t I ,. l
h \4 *ii ,' .4 ,,\,'. r4 4r4 ii l .itk -
4',4I. . .. ,'t \l4 4. 4 ill .-
ili l'14t li'4 r a ,- '( l Hlk,.c
1 1 '\ I j L" L t[I I ll'4 'i 4 ,4L1 .' U
Page 7. Col. 8


BAHAMIAN GROWN
YAMS
BAHAMIAN GROWN
CABBAGE GREEN
BAHAMIAN GROWN
EDDIES
BAHAMIAN GROWN
TOMATOES


FLORIDA
CARROTS
RED DELICIOUS
APPLES


PER LB 39

PER LB 190

PER LB 390

PERLB 250


1-LB BAG 2/490

3-LB BAG $1.4


BU BAZEHTEN S I


BUY BAHAMIAN
BORDENS ICE CREAM
CONCH FRITTERS


BIRDSEYE FRENCH
FRY POTATOES
MRS. SMITH
APPLE PIES
COUNTY KIST
PEAS & CARROTS
COUNTY KIST
GREEN PEAS


2 GALLS. $1.49
12-oz $1.29


2-lbBAG 950
26-oz $1.45


20-oz
20-oz


69
69S


PER LB

PER LB

PER LB

PER LB


p1.79

12.29

1.49

'1.09


r


$4


II
B A A M A C O E1 0 9


1


MEAT DEPARTMENT


BU AHMA
BLNC BeL EACiH]

G a Io




BU AHMA
B.B
TOMATO
J U C 4 i m 9


REGAL $129
MALT TONIC 6-Pack 0


i II I


I


=moor


J ", '.i


IM









~~-~4esdaY, March 27, 1974. 7


CAN HELP

'ALL STORES NOW OPEN ON SLIPPED
SUNDAY... INCLUDING OUR DISC

MACKEY &MADEIRA STREET SUFFERERS


SSTORE, 7:A.M.-1: A.M.
immmmmmmmmmm


KAHN SLICED

BACON

KAHN BEEF

SALAMI


KAHN CHOPPED HAM



KAHN SLICED CHICKEN


1-lb.


8-oz.


8-oz.


3-oz.


.950 -


1.19



.790


I FliMOUGREYSL VSI


PACE
HOT SAUCE -WHILE THEY LAST
SKIPPY
PEANUT BUTTER CREAMY
MUELLERS
MEDIUM & WIDE NOODLES
KRAFT ITALIAN DRESSING
VEG ALL MIXED VEGETABLES
SUNSWEET PITTED PRUNES


PRUF SPRAY STARCH
CHIFFON LIQUID
DOLE SLICED PINEAPPLE
REALEMON JUICE


w w w


PP57


CHEF BOY-AR-DEE
SPAGHETTI WITH MEAT BALLS
HOLLYWOOD DIET COLA
KRAFT BARBECUE SAUCE

KRAFT 1000 ISLAND DRESSING


KIMBIES TODDLER


8-oz


12-oz


16-oz
16-oz
16-oz 2/


12-oz
22-oz
22-oz
20-oz
32-oz

15-oz


194

794

69t
894
794 A

854


754
69$
594
894

594


12-oz 6/994


18-oz

8-oz


594

654


DAYTIME


BUY BAHAMIAN


BORDERS MILK


'2 GALLS.


890


FAMILY FARE SLICED

AMER. CHEESE 1,oz$1.25
KRAFT

ORANGE JUICEGALL.$1.59
DANICA BRAND

BUTTER 'b 2/790


w a


three-fourths of the cases, they
report, both the rupture and
the pain were relieved.
ORANGES
From Page 6
pinch of pepper in a blender.
Cover and turn the motor on
low. Remove the cover and
slowly add a cup of hot but
not browned melted butter in a
steady stream. After the butter
has been added, turn off the
blender and stir in a teaspoon
of grated orange rind and half a
cup of orange juice.
And finally, two deserts.
Peel six large oranges, separate
them into sections and remove
the pith, seeds and membranes.
Arrange them in a glass bowl in
alternate layers with three
tablespoons fine brown sugar,
two tablespoons chopped
toasted almonds. On the top
layer, sprinkle half a cup of
grated coconut and a
tablespoon toasted chopped
almonds.
Arrange four seeded, peeled
oranges cut in sections in a
flameproof serving dish. Add a
quarter cup of sugar. Sprinkle
the oranges with three
tablespoons of triple sec and
let them stand overnight. Cook
the oranges over low heat or in
a 250 degree oven until the
juice comes to a boil. Remove
the dish from the heat and
drain off the hot juices,
reserving them. Let the oranges
and juice cool slightly. Beat
two eggs lightly with two egg
yolks and a third of a cup of
heavy cream. Stir in a quarter
cup of sugar and the juices.


Im


By Jim Alberse
f PAPAIN, an enzyme derived
From the papaya plant, is a
familiar item to most
housewives. Sold in grocery
stores as meat tenderizer, it can
make even the toughest cuts
easy to chew. Now papain is
moving from the kitchen into
the operating room. At
hospitals in Boston and
Chicago, doctors are using the
extract (known medically as
chymopapain) to tenderize
slipped spinal discs, a
treatment which relieves pain
and spares many patients from
) surgery.
Spinal discs, cushionlike
pads which separate the
vertebrae, are composed of
tough, cartilaginous fibres
filled with water and a protein
called "ground substance."
When surrounding tissues tear,
the disc bulges, or slips, out of
its normal position, causing
pain in the back and, when it
pushes against the sciatic nerve,
in the legs.
According to the aching
backs at TIME magazine, most
slipped discs can be treated
successfully by the prescription
of bed rest or aspirin or other
painkillers. If the pain persists,
doctors frequently perform a
laminectomy, a delicate
surgical procedure in which the
disc is removed from between
two vertebrae, which are then
fused together. In many cases,
though, chymopapain may
now provide an alternative to
surgery. When the enzyme is
injected into a disc, it breaks
down the ground substance,
enabling it and the water to
escape and be absorbed by the
body. That causes the disc to
shrink back into place, thus
easing the pressure on the
surrounding nerves.
Doctors have found that the
treatment works best on young
patients with badly herniated
discs and severe sciatica which
has not responded to
traditional treatment. They
have also found, though, that
chymopapain produces severe
allergic reactions in about 1%
of patients, and therefore must
be administered under general
anaesthetic at a hospital, where
doctors can deal promptly with
any adverse reaction.
The still experimental
enzyme treatment has not yet
been approved by the Food
and Drug Administration for
widespread application. Thus
use of the substance is
restricted to certain medical
centres which are still
investigating its efficacy and
safety. But those who have
used chymopapain for slipped
discs have uniformly reported
good results. For example, at
Massachusetts General
Hospital, which recently
opened a clinic to treat back
problems, Drs. James
Huddleston and Robert Boyd
have injected chymopapain
into 250 slipped-disc sufferers
over the past 21/2 years. In


, m




-I


ENZYME


*ta
0 ( A





S.
(- w
BUY BHAMIA
SAWYER'
BLACKEE PEA


*BUYBHMA
SAWYER'
GUAVAJELL


8-oz.


wIWIWIw


./


I
U.S. CHOICE^^~ ii

H CK ROAST Per lb


Swlw lw w 1-w


TETLEY'S
ICE TEA MIX
Ind.


KRA FT
MAYONNAISE
32-oz.



$1*29.
mk .&


I ADWC EATS IS^


7


,-.i4esday, March 27, 1974.


"-,I-L


DIYDLGT


0







The Tribune- - Wednesday, March 27, 1974.


rvERE ?SHn


WHOLE
FRYERS


MAXWELL HOUSE
INSTANT COFFEE


10-OZ.
JAR


L W-I TURKEY
Sto 14-LBU. AVG.


1 1 .


ASTOR
SHORTENING


L. 8


LUB.
CN


Vr


L65


FRYER QUARTERS ................ L 89
PORTERHOUSE OR
T-BONE STEAK ..................... L 2.79
SIRLOIN TIP ROAST ............. 2.49
WD SMOKED
PICNIC HAMS ........................LB .89
WINSOR BACON ............... .... 89


CUT UP FRYERS..


LB .79


FULL CUT
ROUND STEAK 99



SIRLOIN STEAK LB 2.59
W-D
GROUND BEEF ....................... LB 99
W-O ALL MEAT OR
DINNER FRANKS .................LB 1.19
W-O
BOLOGNA ...................1.29


SEVERCANE


5
BAG


EVERCANE SUGAR

61 19


IRISH SPRING
SOAP BATH SIZE


BAYGON INSECT BOMB


HATCHET BAY WHITE MILK


5-OZ.
BARS


14-0Z.
CAN


6-PACK REGAL MALT TONIC


GALLON


!i iii


HATCHET BAY


ARROW
DETERGENT


H CHOCOLATE MILK


HALF
GALLON


LIBBYS POTTED MEAT


3-OZ.
CANS


THRIFTY MAID RICE


5
LU.
BAG


I 3 2 oz AnMW KING SIZE PINK
LIQUID DETERGENT
'^^^ ^i- ^^
-i^^i /iiiN^B^


ROBIN HOOD FLOUR


HATCOETIAY
ICE 0R11

F39


S


OOLGATE
SUPER SIZE TOOTHPASTE


B-Z.
TIBE


II


i~IN 1:i :i


A


I11


I :
I


SIla


NIIAL


u-- .--- E1B


HALF
GALLON


M%


II>

()'Uk )01- N I '4


r!


LB.


I1


T r- ,,.,i '_i .


~p~


PJOODPROW
iSO Ubb# LWO
V#LSo5W,3g


[
P*^

.1:11








The Tribune - Wednesday, March 27, 1974.


WERE SHo


P


OR LIBBYS


16ILl
1AZS
CARS


SUI O1R HALVES
P"MuI


PRICES Imm


W IIlT UNE I 3RI1U4W.
MAR61 26, TAM SUDAY MARH 31, 1974.


FROM OlkASUR PROD 10].UCE n


TOMATOES


w" TS THIIFTMMEm
1T9MATOSAUCESPAGRETTI


16-OZ.
SALI


88',
161-8.


ASTOR FRUIT COCKTAIL


ORANGES

BAG


TANGERINES9 FOR .99
3-LB .AU
ONIONS .... 89


YENT VUE 1-LB. BAG
POTATOES ..........................
5-LB. MS
APPLES 1............. I


Tirifyt.


FLORIDA
|APEFRU'
JUICE
46-2.
^^ UARS


ORAI E J~IE 9N
MAPEFRIT JUICE


69<


KERRY UU OLD E

P %-LB.
IPKGS.


VGETAB LES
V EGETAB LE
9b; I I .1 aOl
nowr s


MIXED
VEGETABLES


WINN DIXIE AMERICAN
SLICED CHEESE


THRIFTY MAI
CHICKE HlOULE,
CHICKEN WITH RICE
I ORCREAM F OICER SMUP

I 19%a4z


LARGE SWEET PEAS


Im
1S4L99',


WOR LUIBTS
WHOLE KERHEL CORN


"Z.


BArAMIA OICR FRITTERS


FREMa STYLE
GREEN BEANS


6 S


ZoE


111,:1 1


S1:


a UTSW
20-Sz. C
BZT, S
hB. OI


T -B^ COTTAGE ONEESE

HALF GALLON SUNNY DELIGHT
PU N ..............................14
FRO O IJ'IUR FROZ N FOD M 01]5 ]DI ma-1


~~~r(j~iAj


E- (Akr 0


11I I. PK1. MNTE'S CHICKEN, TURKEY, MEAT LOAF
ass sALMN
TVW IMES ........................79
242. IMMA PRtY AG VEGETATE UREEN BEANS,
GREEN PKASU A
MIXED VE METABLES ......76


PORK MA BEANS

*^


SARA LEE
*OCOLATE AH WALNIT


CUT HU Sum ETS


11


a


! ii


9 I


IUT COCKTA


w


kli


IIII


II


'39


ThriSk











The Tribune - Wednesday, March 27, 1974.


fTr ,I
E tr in tr


Now Ajax Cleanser changes from white to
blue as its active ingredients go to work to clean
your sink.


,,l,,r urirl Sir Mih HuhBer a.id I adv Butler hosted A number tof outsiatding Baptist leaders
E . t. .1 t w ihalia i. iptit 1isslionar\ iand -.ducatlio al participated im last week's Bahama,s H.iptist Mi\sis tnars and
S, ,. i rc ptin :t (,,ernment H use saturday evening, du.iati,.nur ( nm enltimon ihich net at St Jhrn Iaptist Church,
l r: Lt t the hll' illifp Rahlingu .an sanlt recording elitee Stree, I rIoni left ar: the Re% 1 rniesr Brovi Southern
S i., t, i. r \. I iHut ht i i Jdirec tor o pubic relations the flaptist Missit, the Re\ \Mr. ('artl lth Rev. I arle I rancis
P 1 tr T ci pr. iieii f rtt Rei % timuel ftulchrmk. hist,rian the Re. ir n A r.n second -iepresient: the Rev
lirit p t i r u Mil,. H titt lh I Re IT Mihael Sytin tei Hut. cuh so Jr diri ttr r it pihi< rcl t rins; il ie Re\. Dwilt
L I .laI itlV thRe 1 lr W. \ l Prant second tarke. Situterni Hipli t Missin. tie R \ian, Johnlsn. Inmber
c IT. f. l, oun. ,dt i .ilr. Behel B.ptlst t e ecxtr ti\ hoard. the Re\c lheodore Ilrlin ,. member of lithe
Ai-. St'mithiu d i e-preidenI. lr ee.tire Kl,,ird iand theil Re. (harls Sntiders. Salem aptit
r. l,. l a i r i.i t urer iand the ke\ I arki I rlin .is Churu h ris


Available
at your
favourite
food store.


Distributors throughout


the Bahamas


THE GENERAL AGENCY LTI
PATTON STREET-PALMOALE o PHONE 2-1551


Golden Hinde sails again


1-i


It i l
50:\:


NOTICE
Bahamas Bus & Truck Co. Ltd.
PARTS and SERVICE DEPARTMENT
WILL BE CLOSED ON
FRIDAY 29TH & SATURDAY 30TH MARCH
FOR INVENTORY
WILL REOPEN 1ST APRIL
SALES DEPARTMENT WILL BE OPEN AS USUAL








Salem


*refreshes


+ naturally!

Natural Menthol is hs .
nSt t Je n ; !mn 0
Si l n ;, -







SL I:


Extra
long


Treasure

island


MANIi k The return
hoilte It the Japanese *\rmy
siaegler. licutt Onoda Hfiroci.
t1 ter Iliding t1t for 29 s ,eal,l it
the Pillippines jungle has
-iirred up iew speculation
.;boql aolithter survival it the
t, I Ih.iAt ended in 1945 tihe
priistent Ihlef that a vaist
,mm, k, d itI looted gold and
si'.vi c left hidden in the
I-liJ,| I t the retreating
1 is kown as C (;n.
a i sitl !r,'asure, after the
i :i It.ic Japalese com -
-tlci ho surrendered to the
."i, .in i, Septenmber, 1. 45,
a t ; e ae r-o ng.
ii l ctd -l_-isand resistance. The
t ,tie ir e is ,aid to include gold
aind sliver bars plundered by
Y ,1 i ,1 h 1 I hailand .
iquint !iie- oit 1 Filipino silver
S'os and 1i solid gold Buddha
1 S il;0 BLIIma worth, it is said.
iimv m ttillins of dollars in all.
Iamjinashitai himself, known
,I- "the tiger of Malaya" after
his routine it tihe British there,
,tlcannot help the treasure-seek-
ers He was hanged as a war
Br citsome people are now
tipe tilatin. that Lieut. tHiroo
Might kinow, something, the,
ic theory that the reason
hi dira\cd Its sliticltdcr Ilor soi
I ng c,., ',. ,|i t l i he vWas
Siordered in 45 wI protect
ottine il tihe hiidden treasurci e on
Stuling Isl.and
I hie 1 ,l 'o ciernic meant
ceritamli ehelin.'i s hatir t reassure
m' ii e ist In Ii!s- 2 an arinil
t1.i k !force under a m nlill as
S ,i si s u rt e I he
painh Cth'- oorce works, on
ti.:ts tICrom l al policc and
i-slcd nts cciio ittari happett ti
p ri a 'dig" It alsi keeps .i
t, h '.atc('h on Japianese g tups
l11it tregin arl fat it t he
I'hA. l !p i 1 a tl % ar r .i .
,. e5'10ihl i lookiilt ilo wai dead
; ialIl ,i ito st .itgglcirs hik,
Ino .a P'hitlpptiLes oftietils
II the J apanese irc real,
\ lurh-placed tPhilpIP inesc
ij said rl c rccenll t lhat somiie
it h J Japanese treasite- hiint
i ,';. ai.r\ 'iiaps nade ill the last
d s o it he wat'ar. I he tteasurei
hi; Is t ou gII was 1 rIed ait I
i iliiher Iti skies. oi'e i t ttlh"
| l ,,i likc s pl sace rulhl sceem
It, b t he icra ariollid Baguioi
( Its \i rtoler L l-tir/tl. shiere
Sli.iasl itlt anidd his I forces
citetie d. lihree scars alo a
i k s tiiitnh i n Ht agutitt
iemiplaiined to police that he
hiad been robbed ot two items
lhitI he had dug uip in the
i oll ti I tains: a t w,1 o- Iioo .
seienin ch tall golden Buddha
and a Samurai sword.
In Manila, the Philippines
task force has uncovered what
is believed to be part of the
ml .nashita treasure a hoard
ot yi n aind gold concealed in
pots. Ihe pots had boobytraps
embedded in the sides which
exploded when a Filipino tried
to break them.
More treasure has been
found inside a tunnel complex
dug into the mountain near
Baguio, and under churches.
The task force is pinning its
hopes on the expeditions
which arrive from Japat, One

task force to the main part of
the treasure. Unless, of course.
someone has found it long ago
and said nothing.
Copyright, 1974, The Sunday
Times, London.


DOLLY MADISON'S

SPRING SALE DAYS--NOW IN FULL SWING


1I


THIS SALE AT NASSAU STORE ONLY


-1!


HUNDREDS & HUNDREDS OF UNADVERTISED SPECIALS IN STORE & WAREHOUSE!!


10 ( ) 1 )' 5r.intiin Bedlroom Sets SALE
nl ilud Is i I )' s,,'cr. Mirror., C'hest Night
Stl. iFui I uJ. \jtiress ; Hou $Spring. $44900
)DM-2; R ,!. ; 5().(). YOU SAVE Cash
$201.00 Cash
We deliver


I ON I ,\u s Bliu Vect 5-piece Living SALE
Rootm .t 1clJii,- 5, H. tl i -i illi. taili)rd < cl ushioNn Ot n
SolI Jd t n. lly upholsteredI chairs. $89500
I'l E. ( i i ,il-( ss (Cocktail and Lamp Cash
I .l "l, ( ,I[ S!![ 1: I We' C a
Rcgln1 p 'I .YOU SAVE $426.00 Wedeliver



liit led l lion. if ( oloiurfui hlaidniade lhrow SALE
Rius ()riIg il priced 1 20(.00.J A really 50%
c\eeltionatdl piruhas- our inss ... your rain. YOU 0
SAVE OFF
Cash & Carry


2 ONLY -pc Spanisli Dining Room Sets. SALE
Includes: () Oil D ninr I Iable, Four .Chiairs. Buffet 4 5 *
au1d GlissC(ih1i1 oIp $ $49500
17()(4 -(4-5 1 H03 (96) Cash
Regular price 5700.00 YOU SAVE $205.00 We deliver



I Our Spring SInrpiuent of Upholstere- Furniture has
just arrived and will he on display during this sale.
Every Living Room set received in 1973 will be
marked down tor immediate sale. Come on over
and see ... and you will be pleasantly surprised!'


5 ONLY! Lovely 3-piece Living Room group. SALE
Includes Full Sofa and two Arm Chairs. fully
upholstered in lovely stain-resistant decorator $47500
fabric. This is truly an exceptional buy.
DMI-8907 Regular price $700.00. YOU SAVE Cash
$225.00 We deliver


50 Miscellaneous Lamp Tables, Night Stands and SALE
Cocktail Tables. Some scratched or dented. To be $35o
sold at cost and below. Regular price up to 3sP
S110.00. YOU SAVE... Cash

Carry

I ONLY! Decorator Design 5-piece Dinette. SALE
Beautifully Crafted. Oval Mica-topped extension
table together with 4 elegant fur-covered Clam $49A00
Shell Swivel Chairs. Designed for the modern V
home. Louis No. 4400-490 Regular price $715.00. Cash
YOU SAVE $225.00 We deliver



NOW READ THIS! During the sale ONLY ... you 10% -
may take 10% off any Lamp..Drape, Statue, Centre v
Piece. Mirror, Painting, Gift Item Accessory in the OFF
Store. YOU SAVE ...


Dolly Madison Furnfture
Manufacturers and Purveyors of
Fine Furniture since 1912.
MACKEY ST. NASSAU Phone 2-3236


I I


I-


I


III I l I I I [


M9


-- --


-


I


SBELIEVET

OR NOT\

sprin


I


\ ;















The Tribune - Wednesday, March 27, 1974.


The building Bishop




celebrates 50 years




in the priesthood


IT IS A IIL" 11L 1 pink home on ParkLattc Roadl in the vicinity of Kemp Road
that is St. Mitgairel's Rectoiy and is hoine to lthe Rector and his charming wife,
Bishop iand Mrs. lDonald Kn it.. ....
l :t Momhda. March .25ih. Bishop Kni lc vebtc i histcd Ins, 50th Anniversary of Ordination to
;l' pricsth uild.


I his mania is an almat/inig
i,'llbinl tiin ot gr ntlit ] ."
:ppiaelit inner pcr'ie .iland
Irct ndolcii m energ mi ,ind ililit%
T I!!el ih I witih a practi alla
ool-proo mem iii o !or p)[lc,!)
vents and dales ah e ati
-itople


ind a hall hst veck. 1omicliiVes
Iilstand i1 ,C. -oII i totIi -s \ lI ,II..
wnd s iIoetin s itllitg, h N l'' dt
us the lhi,'(.i\ o, his h]c. \ 'lc .
he didn't seem to disiili, iihe'
ntervousness o) ni;itan\a pe iplc
who ctann t stIland li st s tilt l ill
one place


lic held me and tti iuple o! Wihat 3i B hop who ]h I:,,
!I;:s ioVnger Colleagti 1n IhT BisIhop'N an.il ,it
,pcllbound for over anll hour sLi phis tteatcd \nHiignIa 1,I
NitXtccn and A; Ihall .ais. and
j ii t'wh ise ( ithedI 55 hli h t id

lar! ii.'5i h his p, t + h t .'
la- t i ,i f1 t lhl, par i iw 1k
: W(qW rld t n ( b i m! I!, III thill
humibl et 'ettilI'. mai.de I I e'iesi As1
NOW SHOWING gracious h\ his \if c as Wwi tche
AT 7 & 1030Bishop's iniansc
AT 7 & 10:30 Just t,n h Im ,. do t he

"THE BLACK SIX" \ i, i k h I c 'it t! z ,",it the
pa t mI it% d! ,
MERCURY MORRIS .iii,/i,! \... vg ,lniost .
CARL FLLEP Il, kN s it hIit i .'I hIc dmin." it
GENE WASHINGTON Im nIInItl,,, utw"n
Doiinald Knowles as h,,n
AND AT 8:50 in lils 4th, I R' I t,


S7 Oattei5nded thle Bo1 s ( entral.
Sch| l and tI mI tist bhe a tnrbltc
jt- h)h 1i the Innate intelhlgenil
oIl I)n t ld Knowl c.i and lthe
CALVIN LOCKHART schIIIl \ steCtl i NAdsSau in
th os daS N that late (iII tlhi
S\ lL in All Ibttaitned aI t inst
Scl.iN dg i' in Theoitg i at

But it Sta not i direct pmth
Irmn thBe 'i (c.Itrail ScthI l
[ 1)u rh ,m U nll pr ct n nlal d


K 1t \ s tddl l Itte nt in
NOW SHOWING nit ctIct it' hiIt ionic' iNt
At 7 & 10:50 ,wk ,"I sta Iticd lt N, I


BLIND ti ',% IIt ne the Auitl
A( )To ct u nt o i t h e i l t e N l nei
MAN '1H""wa' od tart.ir
re ailed the 11c h,,! v1j with an
....lli.t'...n lelts a' 1 1ilc' uNCd I,} 1o2 l
h 1 titng Bl-Nhop iio-he
8:50 K"Kn ,wicsc, every man s ithict
LIlnti \Oil tind out othcr\lsv.'"

(P.G.) 1th ,ui' KIIi n, Cs l' t tI, tlh

ii i t ; t'', it oIic peiod acted ai s C(hie
uiclk R'ca tled quite a


resaurantemporarilY I
i cosedfor repairs


STARTS THURSDAY
EMatinee 2:30 & 4:45, Evening 8:30--'Phone 2-1004, 2-1005I
NOMINATE H) FOR 0 A('AI)I MY AWARDS'










W 1. r0 w -n...wan W
|I STREISANDI 4 1
8REDFORD t |
TOGETHERI










Now thru Friday Now thru Frida





Chuck Dloani ita Moore Cliff RoL-ertson.


PLUS Geraldine "ace
i "SITTING TARGET" R P'_)/S
SOliverReed, Jill St. Johnd by MENT 15 INLOODl P.


E '',* I'" iS lIdi GuI Madison
Phone first 2-2o53e4 irt d b .i ,nes



Matinee Costarttinuous from 1:45, Eve5 Continuousg 830





'Phone 3-4666

ThyW 0thOr*O wn
I kind ofM o an game.


T11=rE --I.

A TOUGHGUY5
SA fN rWmoui Rteana in

Isaac Venture Fred I
Hayes Williamson
Plus! "ACE HIGH" PG.
".'^ "W1 W 2.'lI~ .) __


K- SLIEARED


promotion", Bishop Knowles
commented.
Two of his closest friends in
those days, he said, were Mr.
Addington Johnson (now
Canon & Rector of St.
Matthew's) and Mr. Sydney
Eldon (the late father of our
present Bishop). During this
period encouraged by his priest
Canon A. tlorner (then Rector
of St. Matthews) his friends the
i young man recognized that he
had a vocation.
fle attended night classes
with a Father Crotts, the then
Rector of St. Anne's, Foxhill
and mi those days without cars
I oxhill was a long way away.
tihe s oung inian with a
So)cation for the priesthood
swoutld walk tor ride a bicycle to
St Anne's Rectory where he
was intrioduled to [Latin and
(i eek
Canton lHorner. hi-, friend
alnd recloir o his church St.
altlcs. obtained the nimone)
toi him to he sent to I ngland
I hle I rained as ;i prices
I n J tiul 1 )I 1 the
t w eni\ one leail-old youngIg
man wtent to I igliand to attend
St. IPiul"'s ('olege Burgh near
Skcgness inticolishirc. After
11iial nculatlinll!-g he took the
)tDurhnam liccni tiate in i helohg
and ihe' then wcnt on to Durhamt
Sni\eisilt troin which hi e
e iCici l oith aI t list class
1 ''ii''s.i i' 'cgic' in I hIotlog' .
In l 1'.23 )Onaid Knwoles
was inidc a Deacon Ait a:ll
Saints, Margaret Street,
I ondolil Inigland.
lit' ias Ain I idepcndi nt in
I li i sense th.il he w is not
i"l''.t'ncl I jl dltcee lie sias
oinsidcrittg gointig to IndIia
\ hen Bishop Roscow Shedden
'd I lc I Bha, ,as asked I l (o

i )iIcon I)inald Knowiles
iii home anitd toiI March
I.ti. 1I '24 at St Mar\'s lie
was ordained a ptlICst b\
Bishop Roscow Shedden.
I lhe Rev. Donald Knowle,,
was then sent to \lndros to
-c r\ c under tlhe laIv
Ai.lchdea.coni Wcbb. In '1)24
1and 1 1() 5 htI c ls tAo Il ne ien
cov,.cr'd tihe lalgcsl island 111i th-
Baha.imas to which lthe i ilc
('Clairencc Bain tus I to ictcil
pictiuIesquch as "tlh- at 'rlc t
continent ito the West". But
thil "g'eat contlinent" lihad o
roads connecting settlements in
those' das allthouth this didn't
sCeeIm to phase the Rev
Knowlcs "I'mn a Ifairt food
sailor", lie said philosopl hicallt
in tact there was just oinel
timetc lie as sea sick icThre wasi
a dead sponge ion ( d11 ck aild it
was blowi tng a sot'isl 'it'l
On ilit stubtject of i'spo ges
Bi-hop Kno\ilcs recalled a \isit
ol Bishop Slhedden to Andros,
antitd the all welt onto flie
"Miud" and Bishop Kino wles
recalled vi\idll\ fill yeas laterC
tihe "'inhol. scenil ol the dead

In' I 1)25 Ilhe Re\ D)onald
Knowlcs was sent to \cklin.ts ,o
build a; church "I'd never built
a church i ni life t". hcl


( \


reinarked.
This new parish included
Long ('ay (rooked Island and
Inagua as well as Acklins
"It took me nine days to get
to Inagua' Bishop Knowles
recalled.
SEven today the newly
dubbed "Family Islands" are
quite isolated.
Nearly fifty years ago the
isolation was even more
critical.
Bishop Ktnowsles recalled
that they had to take a boy ill
with typhoid from Inagua to
Haiti to see a doctor.
There were no doctors in these
islands and Ilaiti was both the
nearest and quickest place to
obtain the services of a doctor.
But Iather Knoswles covered
his circuit and ended up with
building three churches instead
ot the assigned one.
ended up with building three
chtirches instead of the
assigned ''le.
"Duringi a Saturday night
the hurricane was on its .. the
church was falling down (and)
I had to run to rescue the
books and vestmlents". Bishop
Knowles recalled.
For ten years the Rev.
Donald Knowles staved in this
huge parish, ministering,
tra\uelng and building.
"I learned to build myself",
he told me. adding so that
lhe e w would be no
S ii i i l i iit li i l' tbeha I
'.1 11te that 1w
didn't do all the actual work
himself that his parishioners
helped hitm.
Bill1he did do d lot of the
acti I luiboii i hi telf I lie
,ichks ,it all Saints, ('bhuclt
,,11' ti parllcular welc hI ,
specill asstumned assigli i l
II ir iL, church in (rooked
Island Ihe Reverend Donald
Knowles had to get the lumber
from I ong ('a\ to ('rooked
Island. There was no boat iat
(rooked Island big enough to
Csari t le w ioodi so I aithel
Kno\wles used his 1 iw
boat \t strain ppinig the
lumber on l it took hm11111 all da\
to tcri\ himself to Crooked
Island Ih cn. iecn he 1n iVcd
Ihc people had to cam it on
th heads' "a md in hen hands
hih 1 11 n1ilLs to the Chinich


Ihesc churches.
co "sect' a lted b\ h
Shedd cn in l I : .
Btsidels ihuulhliii it.'
utncic'ntfl l. On one occ
I, II 1 u lthI thli e I
w til'e u ssing Iheli
B sanks,. all ,n board Ct'\Ls
Rc DI),nald Knowles\


(1'


II.









-2;.;"-7.,^^


PROCESSION outside the Cathedral in Nassau C
January 25th, 1953 immediately following t
Consecration of Bishop Donald Knowles.
From left to right are Bishop Donald Knowles, Al
Knight, then-Archbishop of the West Indies and Fath
Foster Pestaina, now an Archdeacon at Freeport.


Bishop Sheddon ate thrracuida
and all suffered ( f in
poisoning Bishop Shedden and
the Rev. Donald Knowles took
the hb at iIn saIlt cI b
themselves to Turks Island.
Hie and the Bishtlp `iwere also
shipwrecked in a t iwo-inastcd
schooner, to ivoniai "Just as
we hoisted the s.ils tI1 ,ii,
cane \doi on is", Bishop
Knowles recalled. The hull was
broken andt "'w had to lower
the sails and get to shite by
dinghies .. we lost cI-'rv Ithing
we had more or eIss,"
This in iidcint \\.is perhaps
typ a'pl l ( f the n1 t 1 ure of
tragedy. and imcd\ in the
tough litc in thl c da -,s Withle
ashore on lite Plana ('x, "
Bishop Sheddcn put on hiis
mitre and walked on ith headih
in shorts inl an .ittempth t iidr
it out. The captain Mi l.ailor.
lost his life when he ditedt l o
s'cc what lt could save froiin
the bowels of the ship
lie isas ivcer scctn ,al',ail
In St. \Iai l i, 's I ( Ihunrclih
to-day there is i plaque ini
niemIort r oft t ihis schnone,
captain.
Ilnm iediatel :itci this irai'ic
incident Bishop Shl'ldd.n
IC siglLd and w.ni hoi e o'
I ngland.
But I'tlhCr Kinowles sta 'd
on, t'oi this iwas his hoiec
In iq3 hie mniltcu Miss
Carolyn Knowles InoI rela ini! i
ict sta eid i\\ th is li t palih unt!l
Januiar 1935 and built ti\o
more .ihurchc.;
In J.nuait 10 3 5 ic \\s .as N-i it
to I lutlhcia and pl.ic(d i n
tchit'c I t1 St Mait li N t i ii c.
\ l'ni\ni ls BlIhl i leie .liohn 1h,"
ctiplcr', ide! solu \\ as bh

i I I. i l. iuttonai l Kit lit
ii itt I'- l iii II liIn iii. Its
Bisliup Kin \\lc,, icca!lts !,
"ini alt \ clhius clt - frtomI ie p ople n kok,, k
So und L l \ hl1 h ] ,,s n ,
| r[ C do i all IIl H n l 'I \ i 'll ,i
I \ i\i i nc iii dI I.' l n t i. i tlilii '
on a i olluntal. b.ih s-. 1h l ,I ll il
bih iuir 1l id i !lic th R, k SmiJ
[ i tic i 1 t pll i f ut Ii ll -1

I I s ti t i l t l t he Ch i 'l !,h i i .
Lu tii d c a,,i .II l i !,t ;


t! "51tO t J" imllit i,. It' llt
jIsi t l),l lild K)II I jcs i.,'





I u l Rul ctm it St i Rit mn St
I i m dik.ci Is mit(I ti s sit: sI



l iml s ti I l.I I t' iuAt LuI' I d' itI ,I '.
*i u A ltllult 1 s B' i hi 'u t ,i s ,.,
St l 11isl.oI !, o ti llf, ,! n i. ,, 1 ,I .



R diin t i 'l. lcd 'lh S lt I -
w i c i lhe has n.l *
hl orne In t.i d1i!.11 i.'
t Nci id .il Ill liii, ih. t ti I t
t t, Sl 1 att c1 .s hu l.i s ,l :


S i c til I. l I is I'
li h c l 0 B I l






O' i phri i stil Sl e \ i t l
s nim plI \ holdihi ,s i\] c- ,n 1 ill
lh tl ot a dan.l hall n" k .ii

n I ,in.\ I tlii ut n u i. in i u ;ic .l ,iu l
s lh ,s to Re\ D)onald know cs
S bill a mn .i\ehs tAdul1 i 'utr ai oi















t Saba. E usitattis and hall oi' SIt.
SMartins anid the French Islan

SBishop KnowIles said "what
on we noticed in particular about
he Antigua was that it was
completely inhabited s with
an villages all through ... not like
ier Nassau."
Antigua is also full of


...by Daphne Wallace Whitfield I


history. Bishop Knowles told
me. and the names of many of
the villages reflect this: I english
Harbour e.g. where Clarence
louse still stands once the
home of the Duke of Clarence
later William IV.
The state of education in
Antigua in the 1950's far
surpassed that in Nassau
Bishop Knowles said They had
titir high schools and the
Bishops were the ex-officio
Chairmen of the Grammar and
Girls' High Schools.
In fact Bishop Knowles
pointed out that he was longer
in Antigua than any one other
place sixteen and a half
years.
"During the time (in
Antigua) I assisted in several
Consecrations including Bishop
Markham's" and as the reader
by now can guessii. "I built the
nelW bishop's lodge (in
Antigua) "
In 1969 Bishop Knowles
returacd to Nassau. assisted
Canon Cooper and from 1970
ttntil the present day is Rector
of St. Margaret's Church.
Kenip Road
I asked Bishop Knowles
about the changing philosophy
of the Church over the past
tilts years.
1cumincnicalism has become a
closeri aitiitS. Bishop Knowles
said, ,itd described the now
I tremendously rapprochement'
between the churches.
lie ll, .t J f this by
explaining that lien he was
consecrated Bishop Hagarty
couldn't attend and yet when
th lie Queen and Duke of
tditnburgh visited Antigua the
Duke told Bishop Knowles "I
liha never in mni life before sat
ne'r Rolmlan itnuns in all
A\ngicaiin ('huich. One of the
first things Bishop Knowles did
on his return to Nassau was to
preach at St. Francis Xavier's
cathedral l the Catholic
Cathedral here.
lie summed tip the change as
"a great deal of togetherness
i tiiclih wouldn't have been
thought t before" and a
grealci "participation of laity
in par titclar."
I also asked him whether the
\ untlh of to-day related to the
( huich hic didn't think that
lack itl relations was the
problem but that poor church
,tlli'lt.iincc to-idai by the
onlih ins "partly due to
Sutndai s in ,', secularised."
InI respons-e t ;i question by
it n)t1 the role of the ('Church
Hl 0opi Knouv, ls replied:
"Ihe Chttrch should he the
S'ni, enIc tit bhoth colnl unlll ltk
.ind p,'tlitic-I. I don't think the
liii. l h cil opt oill of its
t. Ni-,ibltlit o to gtidic the
tihnki in ,i tlust and right
A.\i. lo, e ticr he iidc it
1h. hiilcTl'i ciar that "I donI't
imk thiC ( hIuih should ii.',?
i t- itll 111an\ particular


I'.1 t,
On I iointen being ordained
ihlo the Mlnistry he said: "I
thlnk it has problems but as
7-' I ,tf 'our congregation arce
Sttwomen I cannot see that inI
ce rt ain i i u cumstanccs the\
shuildn not he si w ordained)".
IIc liter specified the
I oi Ie ai, s bei ng
, hll'-bearinti .
Bishop Knowles also spoke
'V{l wmn as himg "natuirallk
ti ultut lgiotis, ti ri' willing to
mi.ikc' sact ii. e than the meni .
IIc des..i bed Ithe imissiI
iti'\ taking place at St
liargaret's as one of personall
01ntact' and said that "tlhc
women IC t it nulre so than the

"W l' i hlutt i' i I swonlcn)l w


SEEN AT THE PRIME MINISTER'S BIRTHDAY BALL
held at the King's Inn, Freeport are, left to right, Sen. Dr.
Doris Johnson, Prime Minister Lynden Pindling, and Mrs.
Rhonda Johnson, of Freeport, who made a presentation to
the Prime Minister. Mr. Pindling was 44 on March 22.
Photo: Roland Rose.


from
a re
stall.
Kenda
Fair


CADET CRAIG B. SILVER

wouldn't have ia Church." he
said.

"A DAY in far Ulind 'is the
theme for tha F.N.M. Fair to
be held on Saturday March 30.
at Windsor Park.
In keeping with this theme
two major features of the Fair
will be a parade of Disney
characters: Donald Duck,
Mickey Mouse. chipmunks etc.
which are being imported
especially for the fair, and the
Choo-choo (toy .train I ride
around the grounds of Windsor
Park complete with train
station and train conductor
A.ll the booths will be
decorated according to the
theme and have nursery rhyme
motifs.
Some examples of the stalls,
Mrs. Barbara Lightbourne, one
of the committee ladies told
me are. Queen of Hlearts Home
Cookery. Raggedy \Ann'
(C and\ Store, Blackbhcard 's
Treasure Hlunt, P'unch andt
Judy 's Punch Board and the
Bar is to be tnainld (clic/
tiumpty Dumtpts
There will hb tatilitics tor
children to be photographed
with these movie char.acters,.
So. whatever \out political
affiliations it sounds like a
great day out for the kids.
Mrs. eight boiurnre also told
me that a numibcr Iti Out
Isl.ind constituencies are
participate ing Fish is comthing
from Bimini, t. i tr ll
Sweetings ('av. ,cgCetablcs I!otl
I h llmpson I' \u i. ploduct c


TWO BAHAMIAN ARTISTS Max Taylor and Eddie
Minnis are currently exhibiting their works at the Lyford
Cay Art Gallery. The exhibitions is for a week and close
March 29. Pictured at a reception during the opening are
(left to right) Max Taylor, Mrs. Taylor, Mrs. Dorothy
Lithiby, owner of the gallery, Mrs. Cheryl Minnis, Mrs.
Kirkland Todd and artist Eddie Minnis. Photo: Lorenzo
Lockhart.


I leutherat
having
F.N M..
l Isaacs.,


i and Freeport
their own
Leader. Mr.
is opening the


The Dolphin Swimming
Club completed a successful
swinti-a-thon. twelve miles
round Paradise Island, to raise
funds ior their I aster meet in
Jamaica.
What 's more it was
completed in three and a half
hours. There was an amazingly
wide range of age groups
among the swimmers the
youngest was four years old
and the eldest was over 2 1!
Congratulations Dolphins,
who also acknowledge their
appreciation to their sponsors
to whom proper gratitude will
be paid by listing them when
all the dollars and cents have
been collected.

Cephus Lodge No. 14 A.F.
& A.M. Ways and Means
Conunitti e are sponsoring a
night of entertainment to-night
from 9.30 p.min. until the wee
hours at the Kings and Knights
Club, West Bay Street.
Kings, Knights. Masons and
E astern Stars will all get
together to have fun, dance,
watch two big shows and at the
same time raise funds for their
building programme.
Tickets arc $2.00 and S2.50
at the door.


Cadet Craig B. Silver, son
of Mr. and Mrs. Douglas R.
Silvera of Sea Gate Lane,
Freeport, has been named as a
Radford Star cadet at Admiral
Farragut Academy, St.
Petersburg. Florida.
The Radford Star is a five
pointed gold star worn on the
uniform of cadets who achieve
this distinction.
Cadet Silvera, an eleventh
grader at the Academy won
this award for excellence in all
areas of academic, athletic and
extra curricular activities.
( adedst named as Radford Star
cadets are granted extra liberty
,is an additional privilege.


Rebels

hold town
ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia
Rebels continued today to
hold the town of Asmara and
a group of military officers
told Ethiopians the armed
forces would protect civilians
from mass killing.
The statement broadcast
by the government radio in
Addis Ababa was the first
direct mention of possible
large-scale violence in
Ethiopia's second civil crisis
in a month.
Addis Ababa .in Ethiopia's
second civil crisis in a month.
The radio did not
comment on the statement
attributed to officers of tank,
anti-aircraft and army
aviation units.
"The armed forces will
always protect the people
from the horrors of mass
killing," it said in English and
Amharic languages.
Mutinous soldiers virtually
cut off Asmara, the second
city. from the outside world
for the second day. The
airport was closed and traffic
was screened at roadblocks
around the town.
Life in Addis Ababa went
on normally.
The rebels, calling
themselves the "Armed
Forces of the North,"
broadcast six demands over
Asmara Radio, including
military trials for top civilian
and military personnel


* ~ --I


BISHOP DONALD KNOWLES
...golden jubilee this week


BH^^TOWN and AROUND^


F


i


0


I











12 The Tribune - Wednesday, March 27, 1974.


iHow changed name


I
LecolV)cS


bloody
-I


Dezi & ee.'


ARRIVED TODAY: Orbita
from London; Grand Turk
from Miami; Joma from
Jacksonville
SAILED TODAY: Grand
Turk for Miami; Joma for
Jacksonville
ARRIVING TOMORROW:
None
SAILING TOMORROW:
Bahama Star, Emerald Seas,
Bahama Star for Miami
TIDES
High 10.40 a.m. and 11.12
p.m.
Low 4.36 a.m. and 4.37
p.m.


mess


WEATHER
Wind: East-south-easterly 10
to 18 m.p.h. 4
Weather: Fair tonight, sunny
and warm tomorrow
Sea: Slight
Temp: Min. tonight 70
Max. tomorrow 84

SUN
Rises 6.07 a.m.
Sets 6.24 p.m.

MOON
Rises 8.25 a.m.
Sets 10.19 p.m.


PBy Abigail Van Buren
W.: by Ch"I"TcagI Trib4-N. Y. New Siyt., tlc.
S, ABBY. will not surprise you to learn that my
aun i has been called to your column in which you
3a'..- . ',-r espormnnt who quotes me at length. [It deals
wr I he ,:hat man is the only animal that blushes-or
-1 is t K
D:-| 0 u .oac the amusing (act that I was given a new
: t' a.ge ;:'-...r was called "David Elton Fine-

Faithfully,
DAVED ELTON TRUEBLOOD
Earlham College, Richmond, Ind.
A 4 1 i. t iNOT FINEI BLOOD: The scholar
i. ir -t r : cw sent me your brilliant quotation did not
fiti it very anmuain, and I don't blame him. He had your
iaer right aind so did I How your blood became "fine"
ron r- b:affles 'me. The transformation no doubt oc-
e conmpqming room, causing my own blood
Shic; -,: positive"-I ti boil briefly when I saw the
S to bth you and Arthur Prince.

&Uo A;f:BY T'hanks to you, we have made provisions
; ... our eyes. kidneys and pituitary glands. But
w: ct e done dX ut r-:,',er-ing the thousands of dollars
r a t ed i0n crowns, bridges, inlays, etc.? At today's
Sn setn:, too wasteful to be buried or cremated
c t . '.' a.ur mniuths
1A)ADEL. IN THOUSAND OAKS
': l'm.n.r F'? s. kidneys and pituitary glands are
1-' vi 'it value a. the recipients, but few people have
i in their mouths to justify leaving it to their
Sis tine- and skill-not the cost of the
:u'i.dt s uo t he dental bills.]


Lt ;"erig th letter from the 16-year-old
So ae herself for marriage. You
S :; r n: r '".1 and I'd like to know what is so
'I v -, ; -ourself for marriage. A guy is ex-
r- : 'a" and have some experience
S... ,i- sa-me'what of an accepted thing in
tt ....t abtou the girl he gets this experience
17r 2'w. :a'ered a "lose" girl, looked down upon.
S- dut kv to admit it or not, with puberty
S ing sex drive in girls, too. This is a
S tion Why must we suffer the frus-
: fr society's sake? Remember, though,
d ; not condoning illegitimate preg-
nan: ; : :n ways of prevention. I also am not
:oce of sex with just anyone either. I'm
tak .ut r. ,-,! of a full. satisfactory relation-
i .;,r a, a guy who love each other.
A ir ui probably be far fewer frustrations on
P'"-'+:- : f urri and the guy if the girl didn't hold
n a ,- made long before she really knew


A NORMAL GIRL


S : .... 3b years old. 5 foot 9.
.~b., be- '.. 'i.,tiful idaughi'- from my
'I i i- nth-old son from my present
S,.:,. is a very handsome 26-year-old man
i:cs' 'v way I am.
'h: r I can't love myself the way I am. I
:! ht problem. I love my husband
S ant to lose him-just the weight.
About the operation where
your stomach to lose weight? I am
no i n Ia, heard it can be done. SERIOUS
: Ask y ur doctor and let him make
c n --, h in Aill But remember, unless
- i'i it till do no good to treat the


S i : letter start looking around
u'riiich 'is Sir. No Sir, a man can


o 7tm 1? f ee! better if you get it off your chest
For a persnca repiy, write to ABBY: Box No. 700, L.A.
Calif. A ; Enclose stamped, self-addressed envelope

F-P Vy' bookiet, "How to Have a Lovely Weddiag,"
end i to Abigail Van Buren, 132 Lasky Dr., Beverly Hills
Cal. 9021
Hae- writ,. liettere? Send $1 to Abigail Van Bure,
2!- Li'.r r -bverly Hills. Cal. 90212, for Abby's booklet)
"How Le-~irs for All Occasiems."


JN M CONORlNG BOOKS THEY'RE ALWAYS SM IUGA./


,,-,



CHILDREN BENEFIT
FROM ZNS SHOW The
11973 ZNS Staff Benefit Show
"Yes, We Can Can" was a
tremendous success and the
total net proceeds were divided
equally between The Crippled
Children's Committee and The
Children's Emergency Hostel.
Each Organization received a
cheque for $1,540 which,
co-incidentally, is one of the
broadcasting frequencies of
Radio Bahamas. Shown above
are Miss Thelma Deveaux, right,
Traffic Supervisor of Radio
Bahamas, making the
presentation to Dean William
Granger for the Hostel, and
Greg Lampkin, Production
Assistant, handing over the
cheque to Mrs. Shirley Oakes
Butler, Chairman of the
C rippled Children's
Committee.


When it comes to insurance

it's Dominion for Life


... in Nassau

call Nat Dorsett 2-3843


Planned Savings


with the Commerce.Together


we'll make beautiful things happen.


There's always something beautiful
worth saving for. The day you become
engaged, for example. Whatever the occasion,
you'll find that Planned Savings can work for
you.
Each payday, why not put part of What you
earn into a Commerce Savings Account?


Soon, you'll have saved the money you need
for that special occasion. We help your
money grow by adding interest regularly.
That's why we say, "You and the Commerce.
Together we're both stronger".





CANADIAN IMPERIAL
BANK OF COMMERCE


You and the Commerce.

Together we're both stronger.


___NK K,-.---SME AR A-


WE NASSAU
WI D M CHRISTIAN
SDOM ACADEMY



TWO SIDES OF THE SAME COIN
At NASSAU CHRISTIAN SCHOOLS
we care for the whole coin. Our rates our
academics, our christian training is all the same.
We even give a DISCQUNT for more than one
child if they are in either school.
Coins are like lives, you can only spend them
once.
We see to it that they are spent wisely.
Come Join Our Coin Collections...
WEE WISDOM NASSAU CHRISTIAN ACADEMY
Collins Ave. Old Trail at Soldier
Phone 2-1586 ENROLL TODAY Phone 3-2641


____ ___


THE L .ICI r1iPJI LIFE : UP V'-E :iP ry ] ci


--~-










The Tribune - Wednesday, March 27, 1974.


I


NOW IN STOCK



ELECTRIC FOOT & HAND OPERATED

Cor. Christie & Dowdeswell Sts. Phoe 21197
Cor. Christie & Dowdeswell Sts. 9 Phone 2-1197


Our Service and Parts
Departments will be


CLOSED FOR INVENTORY

from the close of business
Wednesday, March 27th
to Monday morning, April 1st, 1974.

SALES DEPARTMENT and
TEXACO SERVICE STATION
will remain open as usual


8IM MOTORS

(Collins : Avenue


Gospel

Bells

broadcast


ceremony
Till (IR(I0 \1) BRI \KINl.
ceremony of the Gospel Bells
Broadcast studio building took
place Sunday at 3:30 p.m. at
its site on the corner of Mt.
Royal Avenue and Talbot
Street.
During the ceremony Pastor
Ed. Allen spoke about the
broadcast.
"The Gospel Bells is a local
radio gospel broadcast which
heaims its programme
specifically to nations of the
Caribbean and Central and
South America through the
facilities of Trans-World Radio,
a powerful radio station
located in :i .n ii ,. Nether-
!inds. Antilles, he said.
"'The progranine can be
heard throughout the Bahama
Islands and the eastern coast of
North America, including
(anada.
"It's purpose is to carry out
the command of our Lord, as
stated in the (;reat Commission
he gave. 'Go ye into ai the
world and preach the gospel'.
We look upon the Gospel Bells
as being a spiritiil ambassador
of the Bahamas to the nations
ol the western hemisphere "
Li\angelist Rex Major. the
principal speaker, spoke on the
subject "(;od and colniuni-


Shown at the ground-breaking are from left to right: Evangelists Ed Alien,. oPx Majo;
Cecil Cartwright, Toni Roberts and Dansbury Hudson.


cations." "God has a message
he wants to communicate to
man and he is using several
media to do it with,"
Evangelist Major said. "These
are the media God is using:
C'reat ion, Conscience,
Circumstances, and Christ his
son.
Evangelist Major elaborated
on these points to a very
attentive audience, Pastor


Allen said.
During the ceremony the
Gospel Bells Choir sang seveCail
selections and the (Chuch lIt
God Crusader Brass bandi
under the direction ot Re.
Ilubert Pinder provided musit.
They played while I oangcli1
Tom Roberts and Re\ \:tit,
performed the ground -br cai i
ceremony.
Mr. Dlavid .\rthulr, (hi


I i i Iii lR i II )
, dlo


P


The Anglican Church
Women of St. Mary's,
Virginia Street, held their
tenth anniversary service on
Wednesday, March 13. A
reception followed at the
schoolroom.
Pictured taking part in the


GUEST SPEAKER
MR. GRAEME BOLITHO.
president of Sales Results Ltd.,
a food consultancy firm, will
be the guest speaker at the
Nassau Kiwanis luncheon 12.30
p.m. tomorrow at the
Shera ton-British Colonial
Hotel.
Mr. Bolitho will speak on
the effectiveness of increasing
food sales at the supermarkets.
BASEBALL
ST MICHAEL'S Dodgers
and Heineken Stars, both
undefeated, battle for first
place in the junior league of
the Bahamas Baseball
Association series in the
featured match tonight


service are left to riehi M'rs.
Pearl Cox, Mrs \,iiaiic
Rodgers, Mi :,
Cartwright I Pr csideii 1t
A.C.W.. St. Mar 's ), li'N
Alice Jord:in,. \1. Idri,' R'kiid
and Mrs. Alice linker h'lit',
PHILIP SYMOM\ IT


Gas trains.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that JUNE BARR of Cable Beach
New Providence is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas and that any person who knows any reason
why registration should not be granted should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 20th day of March 1974 to The
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3009 Nassau.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that FRANCIS CAMPBELL of
Peter Street, P. 0. Box 403, Nassau, Bahamas is applying to
The Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 27th day of
March 1974, to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs P. 0. Box
N 3002, Nassau.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ARTHUR RIGBY (ALIAS
JOHN RIGBY) of Kemp Road, Pitt Alley near Masonic
Temple is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration should not be granted should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within
wenty-eight days from the 27th day of March 1974 to The
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship
y of Home Affairs P. 0. Box N 3002 Nassau.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ALRIC ARLINGTON
JOH NSON of East Shirley Street, Nassau is applying to the
sisterer responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalisation as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalisation should
be granted should send a written and signed statement
',he facts within twenty-eight days from the 27th day of
S.rch 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs P. O. Box N-3002,
Nassau.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MRS. OLIVE MAY GREEN
of P. O. Box N4903, Nassau Nahamas is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
pet son who knows any reason why registratition should i.ot
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 20th day of
March, 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizqeship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box
N-3002, Nassau.
U


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HOTEL
DINING AND
COCKTAIL LOUNGE


Located on Fowler Street
South. 27 modern
air-conditioned rooms
with private bath. Special
room rates $8.50, $10.50,
$12.50 per day.
Specializing in a variety of
native dishes ... come and
dine -- lunch, dinner or
have a drink in our
modern cocktail lounge.


EDD BURROWS
PROP/MGR.


HAPPY HOUR EVERY WEDNESDAY FROM 7--8
P.M. DRINKS ARE REDUCED! HOURS: FROM
S11 A.M. 2 A.M. PHONE 28302 or 36458.


_

MR. WENZI- tI Ihtht. ,
for the Bahamas G.is D\i sioni 1i it .. -
over the operation of a valve miaitn.ltd ;if H:1 ii .ti Clifton terminal with Mr I i, im ,ttie ) is, uoniti.t .ind
Mr. Frank Bethel (right), bel.o.- l.- \in.,-. o
training assignment himself.
Mr. Lightbourne, of Wallace Road, has 17 years
experience with Bahamas Gas. and he left for Jamaica on
March 20 to spend some months studying the Shell LPGas
operation in that country, to help him br-:iden hiis
knowledge and experience Mr L.ig tlhu'.i- hi also)
attended Shell Courses in Venemuela m3d Trolt !d,
Messrs. Davis and R-t-. i1
on training later ti 1 \
course at the Florida <,
Orlando, from whence another Bahamas ina. .... ..
Mr. Arthur Rolle, successfully graduated in December last
year.


Now there's a
Howard Johnson's Motor Lodge
Just 60 seconds from
Walt Disney World.
So from now on, no one's going to get your family
any closer to the mouse than we can. And we've got
S. erything: Heated pool. Separate children's pool &
playground (children under 12 free in parent's room).
Putting green. Shuffleboard. Complete game &
billiards room. Cocktail lounge. Restaurant. Color TV,
double beds & double vanities in every room.
Beautifully landscaped courtyards & fountains.
Free parking. Transportation available to and from
Walt Disney World. Plus we're close to the Kennedy
Space Center. Cypress Gardens. Daytona Beach.
Seaworld. And Tampa's Busch Gardens.
For reservations call your travel agent, or your
nearest Howard Johnson's Motor Lodge.
I toward Johnson's Motor Lodge -Main Gate Disney World
U.S. 192 & S.R. 545 (1 mile west of Walt Disney
World Entrance), Kissimmee. Fla. Phone (305)
846-3500. Robert Alwine, General Manager.
Developed & operated by Continental Services Corporation,
Miami, Florida. Charles Schlakman, Executive Vice President/
Operations, Phone (305) 445-2493.
,aI IL

0 'FAluHR EL M^^^^^^^^^^III^^


DON'T MISS THIS !




A dollar, that's all you pay for anything at
Nassau Jets football team raffle and dance.

This big event will take place at the
Gleneagles' Hotel, Thursday 28th March at
8:30 p.m. Admission is a dollar, any drink
that you want will cost only a dollar and
there are 12 chances of winning a super prize
in the big raffle. Dance all night to the
vibrating sounds of the Biosis Now.


Come on out have some great fun, who else
gives you so much these days for a dollar?


NASSAU JETS Li

FOOTBALL TEAM ,

RAFFLE

DRAW AT NASSAU JETS TEAM DANCE

Thursday 28th March, 1974

This advertisement compliments of Wm. Brewer Co. Ltd.


Iol


_I ~_ _


M


------ --- --- -----


---c~


! ,i i V


Hi















Ali can




beat




Foreman




--Norton

.\R.\( \S minutess after G(eorge IForeman had beaten
Ken Noiton in the second round to retain his heavy weight
boring championship, Norton predicted that Muhanimmad
Alilan beat the champ
Foreman smashed Norton to the canvas with a series ot
savage punches and halted the !,i ii. i- r a the two-miniute
mark Ot thee soni d round ot their schedule 15-round bout
las-t ntght
I ars \ in thl se cond round, -oreinian unleashed a seri.,s it
ombinilihons to he head that knocked Norton onto the
lower strand cI 'he ropes
Reterce J mnJ t 'i Rondeau signalled ,1 knockdown i
although Norton hadn't hit the floor Norton took a
mandatory. eight couiit Ihen I oreman moll'i ed in with a
barrage that dIose \"orton to the ropes
The referee stepped between the fighters when Norton
appeared to get entangled int tle ropes and lie said later he
riled thai. too., a knockdow n
Foreman aL t back kin ag iin ith a fldiit\ of blows to
the head that dropped Norton fiat on his back
IThe t! il. .' beat the count uo! i1 but Ronde,'ti ruled
he could not o1nt[I u
I lie eas vi tory paved the way lor I oreman to tight All
inI a match thai could bring both lighters S5 million apiece.
I he bout already has been annouiinced for late Septembet
;i the \trt.i r atiAton o /afire
"Ai cat bet cathim'" aid Norton, who tough two
close'bouts with All. winning one and losing one t \li is a
classic boxer ,(eorge Foretin is a devasdatlint puntlher
1 he fight betw en re an i tI a and AI will eI a
1: ,, i; ... I l 1 spe:taculal aind the greatest spoitl-. show
oc the c rntur promoters predicted.
"I' will be a return home for these two great
representatives o! their race" said tDon Kingi ot 'lecla nd.
whto amile tip wth the extravagant idec: e plant a
miotrth-long \l io-.\ntericaiit celebration "
\lt wa s at the ringside last night as a telesistin
ommttentator and was isiblTy tIpressed
"That man is dangerous Ali said. already buldindng tip
the t. et fight "I am a better boxer billt lie is go
!:ghter
\ lot ot I-uropean mon e a'd somItt e I uLropeartn bia.t a-te
being thrown into the Zaire \venltitCe I APl

Wild Joe grapples on


WILD JOE GOOSE was
after the Grappler's
championship trophy tor
years. Now he has won it. "I
don't expect to lose it any
sooner," hlie assured.
Both wrestlers clash in
tomorrow night's featured
event at the liouse of
Champions (formerly the

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p.m weekdays


Birdland Arena).
MAls on tap for tomorrow
will be a Texas Death match
between the Nasty Gunman
and sharp shooting Super
Plus.
The Gunman will then
team up with Little Sneaky
Bugs in a lour man tag match
against Speedy Chris Rolle
and newcomer The Gaitor.
In another tag teain match,
Joe Goose and his partner
The Fuse will try to avenge
their defeat to the Grappler
and the Iron Man Destroyer.



IONI)ON Re'sults of last
night' socceT gLT:',
I N( I 1Slt I I \I I, I
Noilnghaiml i I(rctii 2 rli, m ill (i
C.irlton 4 i 1
H | I I S irt r'1sl',, *i
I'lnlm h iuth 0 Her l, r !
tiiiclsi,,tn -
ti irnlslc \ i ( tillihn .ii 1
[lur o 0 Scuntlih rp'c i
Nrtliarmptloni i 3( ticsi r


COLONELS MUST WAIT FOR NEW MEETING


lITHE KFNTUCKY Colonels' hopes
of having their seven suspended
players reinstated and retaining their
197 3-'74 championship taken away by
the Bahamas Amateur Basketball
Association dropped last night when a
meeting called by the B.A.B.A. to
discuss the matter was postponed
because a quorum could not be
attained.
Of the 23-member clubs
constituting the basketball association
only six were represented. Seventy-five
percent is needed to form a quorum.
The president of the B.A.B.A. Mr.
V\ince Ferguson, said another meeting
will be called.
In a letter to the Colonels
organization last week, the B.A.B.A.
said that players Anthony Bostwick,


the








one


Dave Wood, Keith Smith and John
Martin because of their participation
in the current Bahamas Baseball
Association series have violated the
rules governing amateurism. Thus.
they were ineligible to compete in
amateur basketball.
It is understood that the B.A.B.A.
will take action against other
basketball players competing in the
current B.B.A. series.
A spokesman for the Kentucky
Colonels informed the Tribune that
depending on the course last night's
meeting would have taken thy
intended to seek reinstatement of the
above mentioned players and three
others effected by the amateur ruling
last year.


During that time, the B.A.B.A.
suspended the Colonels' head coach
Wenty Ford and players Roosevelt
Turner and Eddie Ford. Nassau League
pennant winners Becks Cougars were
also effected in that they lose their
head coach Fred "Papa" Smith and
key player Jason Moxey.
That athletes violated their amateur
status by competing in baseball came
to light earlier this month when three
prominent high school athletes were
banned from participating in
inter school sports by the
inter-scholastic association.
On checking with the president of
the Bahamas Olympic Association, it
was pointed out that baseball allowed
former professionals to compete


-Albury, Demeritte,


Saunders,


Sands, named


BAHAMAS' Central
American and Caribbean
all-star player Margaret Albury
and leading setter for the men's
national squad Joseph De-
meritte have been nominated
by the Bahamas Volleyball
Federation for the Balhaltas
Federation of Amateur Sports'
sportswomnan/sportman of the
year award.
The B.F.A.S. will present
the most outstanding athletes
of 1973 with the Pritme
Minister's trophies Saturdtiy
night at the Sonesta Beach
Hotel during their second
,Iannu al aw ard presentation.
Bahamas track star Tomnti
Robinson. former iMajor
Leaguer Andre Rodgers and
American m01 nrplc star Jesse
Owens will be the guests ol
honour.
Albur.i who also captains
thie ladies national squad was
last year named the most
valuable player 'oil.,,M ig the
I english Speaking and
Caribbean t ouLrnaIment inI
Trinidad.
Besides being a key plaici
on the Paradise Bees
championship trcaI in tlhe
regular v\olle hall scnes, Albui\
is also a pitcher tfoir ladies
softball chain ps Ithe Bla/eis
She wen thli igh the pli t oIls
without an, losses.
Alburi is also a memtiber of
the AI I). Warriors ladies
basketball team.


Demeritte was described as a
most outstanding player in the
mten's series and playoffs
leading the Wardrobe Stars to
t heir fourth consecutive
championship.
Ite also played all
outstanding role in the
internal tional tourna ments
including the iccenllr ended
Central American and
( Caribbean ( aities.

Burnice Sands and Rosie
Saunders have been nominated
iby the Bahamas Bowling
associationl for the Bahamas
Federation ol \nateur Sports
sportsnian sportswoman oif (he
\car award.t
Sandts who captains the City
Market bowling tealci averaged
a N17 last year taking tlop
honoursti, in that ctegor. IHeIc
Also wont ti'he bwler of tlihe
year tournament and rolled the
second highest set of 695.
Sands' high gamc oft 268
went towards his being selected
the most improved how ler ot
the Plla/a league for 1973.
Saunders last year \was
Si t ito i ch c d in her
plcrt rniances Besides leading
ill howlecrs with her 160(
,average, sic.' ,wion the ladies
div ision o the hou r oft the
ycar tournament, howled tlhe
highest set of 563 and the
highest gane iof 21 5.
Saunders this year continue
to make her presence telt


Second

golf

trial

at the

weekend

THE NEW Providence
Division of the Bahamas Golf
Association stages its second
international trial event on
Saturday and Sunday
mornings (8 a.m.) at the
Paradise Island golf course.
The B.G.A. has decided
that this year the
international teams to the
Hoerman Cup in Barbados
and the World Championships
in Malaysia will be selected
from the top 24 golfers 12
from the N.P.D. and 12 from
the Grand Bahama Division.
Each division will stage
five medal events (each over
36 holes), and golfers will
count their best three scores
of the five events. The 12
lowest total scores will be the
12 golfers to represent their
division.
Following the naming of
the 24 golfers, a 72 hole
playoff final will ensue during
the first week in August. 36
holes to be played in New
Providence and 36 holes in
Grand Bahama.
The finals will determine
four of the six Hoerman Cup
team, and the entire Senior
and World Championship
teatis
Players are reminded to
make arrangements for cart
drivers as all trial events will
be walked. The remainder of
the trial events will be No 3
at South Ocean on April 27
and 28 No. 4 at Lytford Cay
on May 25 and 26: and No. 5
at Paradise Island on June 29
and 30.
The following is the result
of the first N.P .D trial event
held at South Ocean: V.
Prosa 154, J. D)uncombe
156, Z. Stubbs 158. M.
Taylor 158. F. Gibson
161, R. Slatter 161. V.
Lockhart 161,. Mason
163, P. Terilli 164. C.
Poitier 164, B. Smith
165, W. Horton 166.


Butler

address
M R A R I I N ; I 0 N
BL TLI R. president of the
Bahamas 1O nitpic Association
and Mr li\ ingstone ('oakley,
Minister of EIducation and
('Culture \ will give the key
address tomorrow during the
opening ot tthe itnter-sctolastlic
track and field meet ( 30
a 111.

Defending champs, St.
Augustine's College will put
their title on the table





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aact iye


Pro-Am


"TtHE SL'UCCFSS of last
December's hastily put
together South Ocean
International Pro Ailm has
encouraged us tio set uip
another for November 18-23,"
says Ted Maude, golf director
at Nassau's South Ocean Golf
Club.
"We're going to assemble the
finest field of golf pros ever
seen in Nassau," Ted declares.
"Last year on very short
notice we put together 20
teams. We got a lot of
encouragement from the
response and comments from
both the professionals and the
amateurs concerning the super
layout of the golf course and
the facilities of the hotel.
"We're confident now that
by giving the pros adequate
time to fit this tournament
into their personal schedule,
they can put together suitable
teams.
"And we feel that by
increasing the prize money we
will attract an even more
prestigious field than last
year s.
The 2nd Annual South
Ocean International
Invitational Pro-Aml Golf
Tournatient will be sponsored
by the Bahamas Ministry of
Tourism and conducted in
conjunction with the Bahamas
Professional Golf Association
(BPGA).
The field will consist of 40
teams, each with one pro and
three amateurs. Play will be 54
holes, 4-ball best-ball.
There will be $10,000 in
prize money with 40 money
prizes for pros. Amateurs will
compete for $4,000 in
merchandise prizes.
For the first two rounds, the
pros will play with their


currently which was in contravention
with amateurism

The amateur ruling, Mr. Arlington
Butler said, states that once an athlete
has become a professional he will
always be of that status. Should an
amateur compete against a
professional, then that amateur loses
his status.
The B.B.A. recently reinstated their
former professionals those who
stopped playing professionally for one
or more seasons.
The Tribune was informed
yesterday that there will be no
champion for the B.A.B.A.'s 1973-'74
series


160 golfers expected


for

$7,500

contest
F REEI'ORI The Bahama
Reef Golf and Country Club
will host the 2nd annual
Bahamas International Pro-Am
(;olf tournament May 2-5.
The $7,500 tournament,
co-sponsored b\ the Bahamas
Ministry of Tlourism, Bahamas
P ro f e s s i o n a I G olfe rs
Association and the Bahaima
Reef iGolf and C('ountry Club.
provides an opportunity for
Ba hai ian. A meric anc and
C'ianadian professional and
amateur golfers to get
acquainted, discuss mutual
problems and to work closer
together, for tlte i, provemente
and promotion of golf in the
Bahamias
The 54-h11ol event is miadet
up of teams of lour pla ers.
onlle profit I essional anid three
amateurs. I eailns are drawn
from two hats. lonie for the pros
and anothci tor the atiatceurs
I f a in e in he r c t t Ih e
partici patting pro's club is
dra, n. it is replaced in I the hat
bh this method the teamlts
are well nti\ed
Opening da\ of tile event,
\la\ 2 is a practice round,
tollwved by three da s cl
tournament play The pri/e
Money isc divided, gi ing
Ss.OO to tile professionals and
S2 .5 0 to the winning
amateurs,
A ull t field tOf r0 golfers
40 proi essionals and 120)
amiatcteurs, iVs cxpecled. Last


Jim King, La Gorce
Country Club in Miami, last
years winning professional
will be back to the
International Pro-Aim
Tournament to defend his
title.
year's champion, Jinm King,
professional at La (;orce
('Countrt ( Club inI Mi an l.
Florida, will ie back to defend
his title.
As filty per cent of the tiild
will bhe rom abroad., there is a
limited openiing for local
players. \imateurs vilth an IS
or below handicap, attCested h
a professional or association,
are requested toi submit their
entries earl ,is it \ill he on a
first come basis. April I0 is thle
closing date for all entries
lThe entry fee ohfSi0 includes
four days greens tees and cart.
two cocktail parties, an awards
banquet following the last day
of pla, andit a personalized
ovve rnite kit. coitiontrIing
valuable gilt tens.


Jubils takes cup


Jockey Antho
locked J ubils
nine ltirlings \est
the Mae's Biauit
Race at Ilobbir
track.
I hat ic t o
Satinders" second
week and his thirc
Bernadette G;ib
the Charlesy (ibsi
Cup and not Judi
as reported 5 ester
Results:
IIRSI RACI
1. Clint (41
$10.40. $ .10. 52. 5
2. Rickee lickee
55.40. 2.45
3. Lad. {'leo I
$2.25.
S'O NI iR .\l
1 .ad Rolle (o)
S5.05, 3 ..5. S2 i )
2. L ad\ I ci ks
$S 1 1 70, I 1 O
.1 Strictl\ (7)
$3.40
Dail Douhle (4 6
I first uirnella (f6
Iri R1 ) {..A('I'
1. I ast Hope (9)
$6.40, $3.80. 52.40
2. Aquarius (6)
$12.20, $4 .1,
3. Ama/ingly (.
$2.30


)Iiy Saunders Second Quinellai (69) ',71 00
S2 03 ov er IOUtIR I 't'RAl 5 I uriiigs
"i. Poetrv In Motion (3) 1,
terday to win lain $2.so. $2 3S. S2.lo
V Salon Cljip 2. Sea l ur\ (1 ) 1) 'atel
Horse race So10i5.S 3 35.
3. Rango 'Is Itnage (5) J. Horton
$2 30
irs marked Ihird )uinella (1 3) S .9 20
I within one I 11 II RAC'I t ) Iuriongs
d overall. i Jubil (I1 ) Ant tSaundiiers
"i ,presented S5S. $,S6 00. S 3 1 iS
2 1i aniet ta Dialt (5 I'
On Stud tarm Newbold $10.60. $4.15.
ith Cartwright 3 Magna De (ra (6) J. HIorton
day 4 .30
I fourth Quinella (1 5) S34.00
SIXIH RACI' I urhings
Ant Saunders i. F our V's (I) A. Saunders
0 $4.30, 54 35, $5 55
(8) R. Hewitt 2. Boston Rose (2) J lHorton
$2.1-5, $2 75
7) B, Hain 31. tgl (8) 1 llain $4 )5S
I fifth i)uinella (1 2) 53.3 5
5 I urlongs Sl1 VNIII RAcI 6 I urhlings
S serlr\\ell t I. w io ltHunter (7) it l e wis
S .30. 54.10,. 3.80
(S) 1 Haini 2. IHawie 's iDina (2) b
McNeil $7 85. s5.05
A Sauinders 3. Added Sugar(4) Ji Hortmo
3.55ss
5) $27 .5 Sixth Quinella (2 7) $75 30.
s) $ 33 20 I(;H I IRAIt 6 I urlongs
4V' t urlongs 1. Stiletto (3) N Sweetlng
A Saunders $2.q5. $2.90, $2.70.
2. Jackie (4) J Sweeting
\1. Bro n $3.05, $2.40.
3. l.ads Stella (9) (; Hain
3) S. McNeil $3.25
Seventh Quinella (3 4) $1 1.75.


TED MADE
Confident


team-mate amateurs. For the
final round, pros will play with
pros and amateurs with
amateurs.
"Early as this is, we have
good news already," Ted
concluded. "Defending
champion Dale Welker of Ft.
Lauderdale, Fla. tells me he
will compete next November,
as will U.S. tour star Lee Elder,
who placed second here at
South Ocean in our December
12-15, 1973 pro-am."


INK -,


Top field for


second


South Ocean


C


DISTRIBUTED BY


lIE

IIUMI IlRElWER


*!AUYII I.


DOAN"S
KIDNEY AND BLADDER


Distributed by:
Thompson Drug Co Ltd,
Box 6027, Centreville, Nassau.


i


I -W