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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03572
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: March 20, 1974
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03572

Full Text







A REMINDER TO
CUSTOMERS
PLEASE COLLECT YOUR REPAIRED
ITEMS iMMEDIATELY!!

e wi Ps Ymsr COR n. ROSETTA ST
^] DUDLEY'S MT. ROYALAVE

(Registered with Postmaster of Manamas for post&#e


(r;hu


rthtiturn


concessions within the Bahamas Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


VUL. LAAI, NO.


Wednesday, March 20, 1974


I Price: 20 Cents


House attacks


By NICKI KELLY
IF THERE ARE PROBLEMS in the audit
department, a great many of them can be "laid at the
feet" of the Auditor General (Kenneth Albury), former
Finance Minister Carlton Francis advised the House
today. Mr. Francis' assessment of the auditor's
performance came in reply to allegations by St. Geroge's
representative Norman Solomon (FNM) that the auditor


and his department were
short-staffed and
were therefore unable to
perform their duties to the
best of their ability.
Evidence of this, Mr.
Solomon said, was the fact that
the 1971 audited accounts
were not made available until
December 1973.
In view of the delay, the
member today asked the House
for appointment of a
committee that would consider
the overdue presentation and
at the same time make
recommendations to
government for ways and
means of improving the overall
efficiency of the department.
"The idea is not to put the
blame on anybody but to try
and give the country an auditor
and an audit department that
can do the job," Mr. Solomon
asserted.
Observed Mr. Francis: "The
member would defeat his own
purpose if he got his
committee because if to
consider the overall acy
it would have to ind the
auditor himself and the ,id of
expertise he has."
IMPORTANCE
It seemed today that Mr.
Solomon was making out a
case for the auditor, but if the
committee was appointed, the
member might destroy his own
argument and drown his friend
instead of trying to save him.
"Government is fully aware
where the basis of the problem
lies." Mr. Francis declared.
Nevertheless he cautioned
against any interference by the
House in the prerogatives of
the Auditor, which were
guaranteed under the
Constitution.
All governments which
follow the Westminster
pattern, and this included the
Bahamas government, were
aware of the importance of the
Auditor General and the
"sacrosanct" position he held.
This position, Mr. Francis
pointed out, was as sacrosanct
as that of the Speaker of the
House.
"Because he has this special
autonomy given to him, there
are occasions when he uses
them," the member continued.
He told the House that
government had tried to assist
the auditor general in giving
him staff which it felt would
have been knowledgeable. He
had however resisted this and
in some cases refused staff
offered him.
More specifically Mr. Francis
named a young man Kemp
who was qualified to work in
the auditing department. "lie
is still there but at no time can
you get the auditor to agree
that Kemp should be
promoted," Mr. Francis
declared.
"A great deal of the
problems in the department
can be laid at the feet of the
auditor," he maintained.
The ex-Minister pointed oul
that the present auditor had
gone through the ordinary
ranks. He had been a student
teacher at Government High
School, then a headmaster for
a year and in 1947 was chief
clerk of accounts in the
Treasury.
Until last year the accounts
had been kept in colonial style,
blat at the present time
government was in the process
of'drawing up financial rules
more in keeping with those of
an Independent country.
With the country handling a
Budget of the present size and
introducing modern financial
laws, someone was needed who
could handle himself properly
and who was of a different



SEE
REAL ELEGANCE
FOR PARTICULAR
PEOPLE


audit


being short-changed and





problems


calibre from the present
auditor.
Mr. Francis noted that the
Constitution guaranteed the
independence of the auditor
and established a special
relationship between himself
and the Speaker, to whom he
was required to deliver his
report.
The member felt it would be
a dangerous precedent to
appoint committees to deal
with such matters. "In .e end
the committee mi ,-f, eat its
overall purpc, a' otid get
nowhere," he c about
Other gov"t many members
speakin,'al and t' opposed
appoint-tly of fihe committee
an-. :n I eventually
defeated.
Coin Deputy
Prime .- Arthur Hanna:
"Every -aigle Ministry believes
it can do with more people,
but more people are not
necessarily the solution. What


is needed is for the staff to be
deployed more efficiently."
In view of the fact that the
auditor general was an
independent person with
independent functions under
the Constitution, he however
did not feel that at this time
his actions could be queried.
"My recollection of the
present auditor is that he was a
primary school teacher and a
sailor," remarked Works
Minister Simeon Bowe. "If he
is as qualified an auditor as he
is a sailor then he is highly
qualified."
Mr. Bowe reminded
mer bers that only the auditor
- qualified or not could
organize his department to
make it efficient.
He said that this question of
the auditor general and late
reports had been coming up
ever year since 1957
Mr. Bowe recalled that a
Bahamian Edwin Minnis, now a


professor of Economics at an
English University, had applied
for the job of auditor and been
turned down. He was also
rejected for the post of
Treasurer. Instead, this was
given to an Englishman who
was formerly superintendent of
police.
Mr. Bowe said he was firmly
of the opinion that the auditor
general of any country should
be far more qualified than the
accountants he examined.
"Anyone insufficiently
qualified will complain because
he does not know how to
organize. To have properly
presented the report in the
proper time we should have a
properly qualified auditor who
can organize and train staff.
"I believe he (the auditor) is
working under the single
column system, and what is
confusing him now is the
double entry accounting
system now in fashion."


I-Streak-out


, i














. . "


BIKINIS? Yes. STREAK-
ING? No!
That's the message this
smiling Nassau policeman is
giving to four pretty students
on the beach here.
Streaking, the latest fad
that has taken hold on
American campuses and has
since broken out in other
parts of the world, is frowned
on in the Bahamas.
In fact, the Bahamian law
books list "streaking" as
indecent exposure, an offence
punishable by a fine or prison
sentence ... or both.
A police official said that
the influx of American
college students for the Easter
vacation is always a welcome
event.
"The boys and girls behave
themselves quite well", he
said.
"We don't mind them
showing off their bikinis on
the beaches ... but no further
than that!"
For the use of students the
Bahamas government puts
out a booklet "A student's
guide to the Bahamas" -
which lists the do's and
don't on the Bahamian
scene.
Our picture by Howard
Glass shows from left:
Cynthia MacKenzie, from
Toronto, Canada; Joan
Daneal, also from Toronto;


And that's an order


Police Constable Arthur
Rahming; Pam Hagen, from
Birmingham. Michigan and


Cheryl Graham from Grosse
Pointe Woods, Michigan.
e Streakers' corner Page 2


CID officers were "high"
yesterday not just from
closing the case on a record
$3.6 million drug haul made
two weeks ago at Little San
Salvador but also from the
aroma of marijuana given off :
when police officers burned
the drug yesterday at Oakes
Field.
Our picture by Vincent
Vaughan shows the
smouldering remains of the
record drug cache, which also
included several suitcases of
marijuana confiscated by -
police in recent cases besides p 'w-
a mattress that smugglers had .--
used to try and bring the drug A
into the Bahamas. M ,-
The bonfire is certainly the.
most expensive ever set up in ,
the Bahamas.- .


GUNMAN BLASTS




ANNE AND MARK


LONDON A man
pumped bullets into the car
of Princess Anne and Captain
Mark Philips late this
afternoon in The Mall 150
yards from Buckingham
Palace.
The couple were unhurt
but a police spokesman said
the Scotland Yard detective
guarding the 23-year-old
Princess, and her chauffeur
were hit.
The car was returning to
the palace.
A spokesman at the Palace
said that although the
Princess and her husband of
four months were unhurt
"obviously they were very
shaken."
It was the first attempt
against any member of the
British Royal Family since
the mid-1930s when a man
waved a pistol in the air as
the then Prince of Wales, who
later became King Edward
VIII, was driving down The
Mall in front of Buckingham
Palace. A policeman was
also hurt in today's shooting
although there were no
details how he became
involved.
The Palace spokesman said
a man "blocked the
chauffeur-driven royal car in
The Mall with his car. Then
he got out and fired some
shots at the car.


"Both Princess Anne and
Capt. Phillips were quite
untouched but obviously
they were very shaken."
The uniformed policeman
and the chauffeur were taken
to nearby St. George's
Hospital where a spokesman
said: "Both have got gunshot
wounds to the body."
The private Scotland Yard
bodyguard of the Princess
was taken to Westminster
Hospital where a spokesman
said he too had bullet wounds
to his body.
An eyewitness. Mrs Joan
Moore, who was walking

Scotland Yard later
arrested man. lie was not
identified.

down The Mall, a broad
avenue running from the
Palace to Trafalgar Square in
the heart of the city, said she
heard four shots.
"At first I thought it was a
car backfiring, but then a car
slowed to a halt and in no time
at all police cars were arriving
from all directions."
She told reporters she was
the manager of a nearby
hotel
"By the time I reached the
scene there were policemen
everywhere. Someone told
me Princess Anne had been in
the car that was shot at,


though I did not see her."
The Princess and her
husband were rushed to
Buckingham Palace in a
police car.
Mrs. Moore, 52, said she
saw three men "who I
understand were Princess
Anne's detectives lying on
the pavement. They appeared
to be badly hurt.
"Certainly when they were
carried into an ambulance,
they were not moving."
Hundreds of policemen
were quickly on the scene.
Some of them had tracker
dogs, apparently indicating
the assailant had escaped
capture.
At the scene, there was a
taxicab with the windscreen
shattered on the right side.
Alongside it was the empty
black royal limousine.
It bore the insignia of a
vehicle of the Queen's fleet of
cars. In front of the two cars
a white police car was parked.
Buckingham Palace said
the young couple were
returning from a private
showing of a documentary
film "Riding Towards
Freedom," in which both had
appeared.
The film was made in
Windsor Great Park in aid of
the Riding for the Disabled
Association of which Princess
Anne is patroness.


Building never put out to tender


THE government office-
building now being erected at
Oakes Field was never put out
to tender.
Instead the $1.7 million
contract was awarded to Mr.
Arnold Cargill, Works Minister
Simeon Bowe admitted today.
Mr. Norman Solomon
(FNM-St. George's) had earlier
tabled questions concerning
construction of the building.
Contrary to the member's
allegation that work on the site
had come to a stop, Mr Bowe
said that at the end of
February approximately 55
employees of Arnold Cargill


Building Enterprises Ltd. and
I employees of sub-con-
tractors were working on the
site.
The original contract price,
he said, was $1.757,t72.41.
However the quantity of work
to be carried out had since


been substantial ll increased
and the new total estimated
cost was S2.380,409. including
partitioning and finishing of
the West Wing, landscaping,
parking facilities and
professional fees which were
not included in the original
contract.


- Sirica

won t


halt


report

WASHINGTON -- U.S.
district judge John J. Sirica
refused today to hold up
transmission of a secret Grand
Jury report on President
Nixon's role in Watergate to
the House judiciary committee.
Sirica denied a request to
delay giving the House the
report until the U.S. Court of
Appeals could rule on a
petition to reverse his decision.
But Sirica did give attorneys
for former White House staff
chief H. R. Haldeman 24 hours
to ask the Appeals Court to
delay transmission of the
report.
John J Wilson. HalderrAn's
attorney, said he would ask the
Appeals Court for a stay before
the day is out. Wilson also said
he would ask the court to
restrain Sirica from sending the
report to the House before the
court reviews his decision.
Special Watergate prosecutor
Leon Jaworski opposed any
delay in sending the secret
report to the House
impeachment inquiry.
Jaworski argued that "it is
particularly important that the
President the focus of the
Grand Jury's report and
recommendation has not
opposed delivery and favours
the earliest possible resolution
of the impeachment inquiry."

Haldeman contends that the
Grand Jury had no authority
to issue its report and that if it
is sent to Congress its contents,
including material pertaining to
Ialdeman's case, would leak
out.
See story in Page 2.


Grenada to join Market


BRIDGETOWN. BAR-
BADOS Grenada will
soon join the eight-month-old
('aribbean community and
('ommon Market, Prime
Minister Eric Gairv announced


Monday in Barbados.
Gairy, in an airport
interview, said Grenada's
Parliament would be shortly
asked to approve measures
clearing the way formember-


ship in
August
Guyana
Tobago.


Caricom, founded last
by Barbados, Jamaica,
and Trinidad and


Mitchell asked me to see Vesco lawyer, Casey tells trial


by John Morganthaler
NEW YORK William Casey,
former Chairman of the
Securities and Exchange
Commission, told a jury today
that former Atty. Gen. John N.
Mitchell once asked him to see
a lawyer of financier Robert L.
Vesco, who was then under
investigation for fraud by the
SEC.
But Casey, testifying at the
conspiracy trial of Mitchell and
former Commerce Secretary
Maurice H. Stans, said Mitchell
did not tell him that a secret
$200,000 cash contribution to
President Nixon's re-election
campaign had just been
delivered from Vesco.
The two former Cabinet
officers are accused of
attempting to impede the SEC
investigation of Vesco in return
for his contribution. Vesco was
indicted with Mitchell and
Stans, but has fled the country.
The SEC eventually filed a


civil fraud suit charging Vesco
and 40 others with looting
mutual funds they controlled
of $224 million. The suit is still
pending.
The government put Casey
on the stand in an apparent
attempt to show that Mitchell
did in fact try to intervene
with the SEC on the Vesco
problem.
Casey said that Mitchell
telephoned him on April 10,
1972, and told him that Harry
Sears, a Vesco lawyer, was in
town "and could he come over
and see you."
Sears, who was Nixon's
campaign chairman in New
Jersey and former majority
leader of the New Jersey State
Senate, was also a co-defendant
with Mitchell, Stans and Vesco.
However, his case was severed
from theirs, he was granted
immunity and testified as a
prosecution witness.
Sears has testified that he
and another Vesco aide had


delivered the $200,000 to
Stans on April 10 and that he
had gone directly to Mitchell's
office, where Mitchell picked
up the telephone to call Casey.
Casey said he could not
remember that Mitchell had
ever asked him before to see
any lawyer representing a
person under investigation by
the SEC.
"Did Mr. Mitchell advise you
that Mr. Sears had just dropped
off $200,000?" asked Asst.
United States Attorney John
Wing.
"No, he did not," said
Casey.
"At that time, did you have
any knowledge of a political
,contribution by Vesco?" Wing
asked.
"No," Casey replied.
Casey left the SEC after 20
months to become an
Undersecretary of State. He
was sworn in last Thursday as
head of the Export-Import
Bank.


lie testified that he had
known Stans since the
l:isenhower administration and
met Mitchell in 1968 during
the Nixon campaign. He said
he was still friends with both
nien.
lie said that Mitchell first
talked to him about the Vesco
case around the end of 1971.
lHe said that Mitchell asked if
he was sure the case was being
conducted properly and that
there had been no harassment
of Vesco by the SEC staff.
Casey said that in his
conversation with Mitchell, "I
don't think I told him I would
do anything" about the Vesco
case. He said he met with
Mitchell later on April 6, 1972,
in Mitchell's Washington
apartment.
He said Mitchell, who had
quit as Attorney General to
head Nixon's pre-election
campaign, told him he was
considering naming Sears to
head the campaign in New


Jersey and asked Casey if he
thought Sears' connection with
Vesco could cause
embarrassment.
Casey said he told Mitchell
he felt it was up to Sears
whether there was a conflict
between his role as Vecso's
lawyer and being State
campaign chairman.
Casey said that when he met
with Sears on April 10 at the
session Mitchell arranged by
telephone, Sears complained
that the Vesco investiagtion
was dragging.
Casey said he told Sears that
he also was anxious to speed
the investigation, but Vesco
was obstructing it.
Casey said he saw Sears two
other times, once in his
Washington office and again at
the GOP convention in Miami
Beach in August. On both
occasions, he said, Sears said he
wanted to speed up the
investigation. Casey said he


told him both times it was
Vesco's lack of cooperation
that was slowing it.
TV TALK
ALBERT BIESER, chief
engineer for Isle Televideo
International, which has a TV
proposal before the Bahamas
government at the present
time, will be the speaker at the
weekly Nassau Kiwanis
luncheon tomorrow at 12:30.
His subject will be "Improved
TV viewing in the Bahamas."
As the subject is of general
public importance, the meeting
is being opened to members of
the public, a Kiwanis
spokesman said.

NOW ON
AZUREE PROMOTION
ESTEE LAUDER
GET A FREE GIFT


MADEMOISELLE


Bank with



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Wednesday, March 20, 1974


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LONDON Foreign Secretary
James Callaghan has pledged Britain's
Labour government to work for "the
fullest and most intimate cooperation"
between the European community and
the United States.
Opening a foreign affairs debate in
the House of Commons, Callaghan also
served notice that Britain will seek a
fairer sharing of the financial burden
within the nine-nation grouping. He
hoped to achieve this, he said, through
a series of parallel and coordinated
negotiations but without any
confrontation, and without undue
haste.
Callaghan repudiated with emphasis
"the view that Europe will emerge


I .\1)i1i" I tlie British governmentnt has
announced that I i. andatL Asians separated
front their tI itmlies during thie Uganda
expulsions oIt I 2 \ ill ti admitted to Britain
to join wives .nd thidren wsho have settled
here
Home Secretar\ R'. Jenkins told the
House of Commonn s that students over the age


only out of a process of struggle
against America."
The Labour government, he
affirmed, "will seek that Europe's
markets should be more open to the
world. And in terms certain to be
hailed in Washington at a time of deep
E uropean-American misunder-
standing," the socialist gravely
insisted.
"We do not agree that a Europe
which excludes the fullest and most
intimate cooperation with the U.S.A.
is a desirable objective."
Meanwhile. criticism of Tory
Leader Edward Heath continued,
The Tory party needed "genuine
leadership which I don't think they


behind the Iirst question put
to him was about Buckle',s
resignation statement
-It perhaps would h n a( t t
ot courage to resign.' Ni\.on
said "I shod Id also p(int out.,
i ow, ever. that while it might bhe
anl act ot courage to runi awas
from the lob that j ou wevre
Celected t0' dkI it also take-
c uit.iage to ..iitadil anid tight r)
what Noi thiink i- riglt andi
lhat what I intind to0 do"
His 'tateien..'i t. essc.'nIt.ili\ a
re4stateIment. drew a ,ro.utt

I ariier, wht'ien Nixon e.icihdc
li t'hotel hic was greelte.l by a
'owd ot ,e\l ral L i.sa d .
.haIntfi "Ni\n\on Nix\n. l alh.
Yah. N ah "
\t his t. i ciel. the i.icsident
.'pec'i 1 )t i t! I i tces 'Ilh ii llg
licind-'. L gi'.ng a 1tt FA.V'5't and


have now," said one Tory.
Similar views were expressed during
a British Broadcasting Corp. radio
interview by several other Tory
legislators including right wing
leader Neil Marten.
Many British newspapers agreed
with the assessment of Conservative
Party dissaffection. Left-leaning Sun
commented editorially:
"Tory moves to give Mr. Heath the
old heave-ho are ruthless but
predictable. They r.,ay also be right for
the party.

"Mr. Heath has become a liability to
his Tories ... the sooner Mr. Heath
makes wav for someone else the


responding to shouts iof
support
fHe was not confronted wiith
slgns ,.i dissent as he has been
during other recent public
appearances.
Instead, the placards hoisted
hy the greeters proclaimed
i\Ni\on All The Way," "'G;et
():i His Back" and "Hllang In
There
Another huge banner draped
in the hotel lobby read: "A
;react President ou Are, \
Yo -Yoer. You're Not" a
rclcrertce to Nixon ,
L!un!suclcessful effort to work tihl
\o- o of stai Roy Acutf last
Saturday night
When Nixon stepped from
hin ,. liin.. r earlier in the
attcrnoon at nearby thiigi .,.
\ir Force Base. he was greeted
l'> a crowd ot several hundred


Haldeman attorneys bid to


block Grand Jury report


W \Stl1\( I()N Attornccic
io; lo icicr Whit, House tci t
icf' 11I R Il.ildcenan a. sked
h.' I s Co rt ot \pp:pals
o't:! t'' M-ock t ro-nuiss on Hi
S N;d c :'c re iporl i"i

tic i t, h,.tor tihe hlou c '
;!.ipcachmiient init]im!i
aldtnan%',-s att rn eks asked
'l c I' Ir t o',rdcer I S D)istrict
Jicdgc JI htn JI Sirica tic a et, irtn
,' a Cl k 'eporl ic tiic Lrit!ic

Oikia had !wiled ."n moda',
;l;.i! th I -f called re'poun and a


.ilche i c ilied wllh ci't id ncei
shtliid bc i turned o eicr i c irhc
IHoLIs' J icld ,ia.rv (C 'O lU i llt cC.
Sirlgc.1 yi\c ic li 's i" i' c sc'
until 5 p i tid,, \ t, a'ipeiA hI-
e 'aldent ,is ol
'on e IIc liatcll i':"t iti n I and
Ni\ iIi cladipai e .iii dcs indicted
b\ the (iranc .lIir t.,ir altgedlc
trs irg 1 1 o.k the
invest igal ion oit !i Vs atcrgatc
break-int. II tle.ic.i itiinctccnl.t
ltaldetiiant p rttictc argued
thla tra.ilsllssi i' 'he i.-Atled
repic lt to the,' li1i v -1 iti iiticc


of 21 who were resident in Uganda in Augi
1972 would also be allowed into Britaini
oin a parent holding a British passport.
A Home Office spokesman said the ni
rulings affected only a few hundred L'gand
Asians. He stressed the changes did inot al
general immigration rules for foreignerss w
British wives. (AP)


i crates a risk of exposure '
before trial that cannot bec
Sutciat.iteed against.'

"Publk disclosure of the
'iendeic upon which the\ wereir
indl ictid will provoke
widesprer.id commnient in the.
tew'sI media which will not
htestitate t o evaluate for publi--
c'iclsutcictptin the alleged actLI
behind thie indict'leit ..'" the
petition c aid.
"T ihus th detendl antit s ill
stated 1 t iiietcd be cor' their
\torines are lid.


I aldeC IIcIt ',s petIc cition aIs)
noted that he does not know
ist wliha is in the Cwaled report btus
to has reason to believe that it
contains I' 'Yci evidence
fan relied tupon b the prosecutors
er to support some of the charges
ter
ith aIainst all of the defendants."
I hie petition noted that the
usual procedure in the district
ol ('ohli hbia i s that regular
grand il rI's do o iiit ssie
riepcrts other lha1t lt l tdi tiuntc'is
III dcitid g tio secd i llie
report toi t1ite Housec C ,i
Represctati\cs,. Sirca had icaid
that "lthe person oni whom the
report tioctisc's thie President oft
the IUnited State's. has not
oblieced to its releai'eI to the
committee Other persons ire
involved only '...Ir. i ,

The judge also described the
report as nonacusatori and as
"a sinplc and straightlorw ard
compilation of ingr tori i atioII
S gathered b\ lthe grand jiur\ and
S no more AP)


Soldiers

killed


A


Natural Menthol is why.
,* Salem uses only natural
menthol, not the artificial
kind. That's why Salem
never taste harsh or hot


0. '



\ '


." 4.


BI LAST S Two British
soldiers were killed in separate
shooting incidents in Noirthern
Ireland today the arimn
reported.
Both were gunned down
near the village of Glenanne in
county Armagh and their
deaths brought to nine the
number of British soldiers
killed in the strife-torn
province since the beginning of
the year. (AP)

NEW COSMOS
MOSCOW The Soviet
Union today launched Cosmos
636, an unmanned earth
satellite, the official news
agency T'ass reported
The government news
agency said the sputnik was
put into an orbit 245 miles by
104 miles.
The inclination of the
orbit was 65 degrees and its
first revolution of the planet
took 90 minutes. (AP)


and he moved through them.
campaign-style. shaking hands.
Highlights of his speech and
question-and-answer session at
the convention of the National
Association ofl Broadcasters:
Watergate: "Dragging out
Watergate drags down America,
and I want to bring it to a
conclusion."
Resignation: It might take
courage to resign, "run away
from the job." but it also takes
courage to stand and fight.
,which he said he intends to do.
House impeachment: It
should be noted that house
i mpeachinent investigators
already have been provided
with a great deal of evidence
and blanket requests for more
would prolong the
investigation and violate
presidential cciiit drentiallty,
Gasoline: It will not fe
niecessar\ ito have coIIipuiisor'.
gaiolilne rationing tie
announced an end to Sunday
service station closings and
promised additional supplies of
gasoline to redIuci lines, lie
also promised more gasoline to
industry and agriculture.
Energy legislation: "The
greatest shortage of energy is
the lack of energy on the part
of the Congress of the United
States in getting to work and
passing the legislation needed
to increase the supply of
energy."
European relations: lHe
expected differences to be
worked out but said F-uropean
nations should "'consult with
us and not work against us."
Mideast: The Mideast "is
one ot those lHash points itn the
world" and U.S policy is "not
onlr to be a friend of Israel,
but to be a friend of Israel's
neighbours -.
Food: Beef prices will
remain high this tall. but food


prices
moderate
|AXP


generally should
later in the year.


better."
Headlines in national newspapers
included "The Knives Come Out For
Heath" in the Sun, "Great Tory
Fiasco" in the Mirror. "Heath Gets
The Blame From Angry MPs" in the
Daily Mail and "Angry Tories Round
On Shadow Cabinet's Shambles" in
the Guardian.
One man tipped by the press as a
possible replacement for Heath was
Edward Cann, a former Conservative
party chairman.
Cann called for an inquest into what
happened to the Tory challenge on
Monday night, but he added: "I think
the party will rally round Mr. Heath."
(AP)


SHijack couple

NAIRBOI A man and a
woman hijacked an East
African Airways plane with
35 people aboard today and
airline sources said the couple
was reported arrested when
the plane landed in Uganda.
The hijackers, said to be a
married Ethiopian couple,
seized the plane with a pistol
during a domestic flight from
Nairobi to the coastal port of
Mombasa.
The sources said the
hijackers ordered the pilot,
Edward Penford, to fly to
Libya, stopping at Entebbe in
Uganda to refuel.
But heavily armed
Ugandan soldiers ringed the
plane soon after it touched
down at Entebbe, civil
aviation sources here said. No
injuries were reported. (AP).

Hearst ruling
MARTINEZ, California -
A judge has denied a request
for a national television
appearance by two prisoners
who claim they hlve
suggestions that could lead to
freedom for kidnapped
newspaper heiress Patricia
Hearst.
"It could create an
atmosphere that would make
it impossible for the
defendants to receive a fair
trial in California or in the
United States," said Contra
Costa County Superior Court
Judge Sam Hall. "I can't let
this happen." (AP)

Ex- newscaster
dies
BOZEMAN, Mont. -
Former NBC-TV newscaster
Chet Huntley, who retired to
Montana to develop the Big
Sky resort area, died today.


-Protest over



apartheid



night club


PRETORIA, South Africa-
U.S. Ambassador John Hurd
delivered a formal protest to
the South Afncan Government
today because a visiting U.S.
official was told to leave a
Durban night club on the
grounds he was black, an
Embassy spokesman said.

While the South African
government considered the
note it was revealed the
official, Richard Saunders. had
been involved in a second
incident at the same hotel.

Saunders, Negro editor oft
the magazine "Topic".
published by the United States
Information Service, was in the
Cascades Club at The Blue
Waters Hotel last Friday with
his wife Emily and three local
journalists.
A waiter asked the Saunders
to leave.
After protesting to hotel
manager Roger Oldham,
Saunders was told he could
remain in the club but could
not dance. The manager
explained this was in
accordance with South Africa's
Group Areas Act.

Two days later, while in the
hotel lounge with an Asian, he


was asked by a waiter to leave
The Johannesburg Rmnd
Daily Mail reported that
Saunders told the waiter: "It's
going to take a damn big
policeman to get me out."

Another waiter then
apologized for the incident and
told Saunders he could stay.

Saunders is in South Africa
J,, mpan1 ing an e\'hiihiltI. !
his photographs entitled
"Impressions of Africa."

A U.S. Embassy spokes-
man asked by the South
African Press Association if he
had diplomatic status, replied
"le is an official of the tI' S
Government who is here on
official business."

Saunders left Durban for
the Zululand University north
of Durban.

The Rand Daily Mail
reported that Saunders felt the
incident as "ironic" because lie
and his wife did not want t,
drink or dance and because i;
the club he had to sit and
watch "the sensual gyrations i,
people dancing to the sensuous
beat of flank Crawford
Roberta Flack and Isaac Ilaec
all black Americans i API


EAKERS' CORNER


HELL Hell finally
had its firs
Several re Ilell, a
hamlet of 4" id the,
saw a young maim dash down
the town's main street in the
altogether.
He ran in the nude from the
local weather station to a
restaurant, then juttiped into a
jeep and drove off.
And in Chicago. a naked
man, holding hands with two
giggling, unclothed women
streaked through the main
floor of the Chicago police
department's traffic head-
quarters.
"They were gigginT like
crazy and really moving. The
whole thing didn't last more
than 20 seconds," said
patrolman Joseph Musial, who


was alone in the 1'0 itlc,- at th1
time today.
"'It was really ., ', '
Musial said. "The two giri
we* built like something ,ou
of the Bunny Club. \, 1 saw

the guy was a pair o, whit.
sox, but to tell you the truth.
really wasn't paying too niiiuci
attention to him.'"
Does he think the breakerr
might return?
"I hope so," he said. i \Pi




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Callaghan pledges co-operation with US.


It takes courage to stand




and fight, says Nixon


R, d r HOSTONt President
,i 'n \ei' s'i n, rejecting the proposal
S c:c e .... .. i .,sness of a conservative Republican
S i, l \th that he quit the White House.
; i, :. I h 'I, .1 said last night it takes "courage
.. -. :; .;, d iile ,t to stand and fight for what you
S .. h !4. .iIticI think is right, and that's what I
intend to do."
i. !hi e rec,:g action call camet
; v : ..;.! Set i 1s l Buckle ot
-- ... , < .. .i .1 ,! ^ 1 h ,cw York
Nit' \ n repeated that his
S i -ign i cI d cripple theI
S' .ii of the president

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3 IN










Wednesday, March 20, 1974


bhrX Gribunt
NULLIUS ADDICTS JUARE IN VERBA MAGISTM
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903- 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Publisher/Editor 1917-1972
Contributing Editor 1972 -
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972 -
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.

EDITORIAL

Out of the past



By ETIENNE DUPUCH
IN THIS column yesterday I quoted a small bit from Cyril
ilamshere's history of "The British in The Caribbean".
Apart from a short bit about piracy in the chapter on piracy
and privateering in this hemisphere, no reference is made to the
Bahamas as these islands are in the Atlantic and not the
Caribbean. This book is devoted entirely to the Caribbean
islands.
For many reasons, which are not relevant to this discussion.
the Bahamas has had very little association with the Caribbean
islands. The entire development of the Bahamas has been along
different lines.
The Caribbean islands have been involved in agriculture and
industry. The Bahamas is not an agricultural country and its
whole social structure has not lent itself to industrial
development t.
Long before any of the Caribbean islands launched a
programme for light industry, the late lion. Donald McKinney
got a Bill through the legislature for the encouragement of light
industry in the Bahamas.
Several ventures were started here but they soon folded up for
the simple reason that the Bahamas lacks the first essential to the
development of this form of enterprise ... which calls for plentiful
and cheap labour.
Years later Jamaica, Barbados and Trinidad copied Mr.
McKinnev's lead in the Bahamas and they have many successful
operations in progress.

I said I wouldn't go into the resaons for the failure of light
industry in the Bahamas and here I am writing about it.
There are many reasons for the failure of many enterprises in
which the Bahamas pioneered, such as sisal and pineapples.
The islands lack an adequate supply of fresh water, a thin
and inhospitable soil, and today no cheap labour at all ... not even
Haitian labour that could be cheap if there were a large enough
supply but the government has deported most of these people
and so the few who are here are now high priced.
You will remember that the Joseph Chamberlain family's
fortune was wrecked in a sisal venture at Andros which was under
the management of his youngest son Neville who became the
Prime Minister of England and one of the architects of the fatal
Munich Agreement with Adolph Hitler which later forced his
retirement and, fortunately for the world, brought Winston
Churchill to the helm of Britain's Ship of State at the outbreak of
the second world war.
i"' You will also recall that Loyalists who came to the Bahamas
from Virginia during the American War for Independence were
ruined because their hopes were pinned on transferring their
cotton cultivations to these islands. But the sparse soil was
exhausted after the first couple of crops and a destructive weevil
completed dithe disaster.
You will also recall that the pineapple industry flourished in
the Bahamas until the ilawaiian islands obtained "slips" from our
farmers and went into competition in deep fertile soil nourished
by an abundant supply of fresh water.
I have told you repeatedly in this column that the reason for
the failure of the sisal industry in the Bahamas was both soil and
water. The soil produced dwarfed plants and there was not
enough fresh water for rhetting the leaves to produce the fibre. It
became necessary to "rhet" the leaves in brackish or salt water
which produced a dirty, discoloured fibre saturated with a
deposit of brine.
When Africa started cultivation of the sisal plant it produced a
1 fibre known on the world market as "Africa White". The sisal
Leaves were rhetted in fresh water and so they were completely
Free from brine and any other foreign matter.

It is interesting to recall that the sisal industry was introduced
to the Bahamas by Governor Sir Ambrose Shea. I don't remember
Si Ambrose. Hle was before my time. The first governor I
remember was Sir William Grey Gibson whose wife wanted to
adopt me but my mother wouldn't let me go.
Fr. C('hrysostom Schreiner, Catholic missionary to the Bahamas,
often spoke of Sir Ambrose as the ablest governor the colony had
had in his experience in the Bahamas.
I need hardly tell you that Sir Ambrose was a Roman Catholic,
a rare thing for a senior C('olonial Official in those days.
Another interesting fact is that he was a Colonial which means
that hIe must have been an unusually able man to become the
governor of a British Colony. As a Catholic and a Colonial he had
two heavy strikes against him.
I only found out that he was a Canadian from a picture I saw


on the wall of the lounge in one of the "Lady boats" ... a service
provided by the government of Canada with a fleet of specially
built passenger-cargo ships that they put into the West Indies
trade soon after the first world war to help stimulate
Canadian-West Indian relations. These ships provided a valuable
service for many years but they were finally withdrawn because
of heavy losses.
Sir Ambrose appealed in this picture as one of the Canadian
representatives at a conference in London who had signed the
document which lifted Canada from a colony of Britain to
Dominion status.

There are certain enterprises in which it is impossible to
compete without these three elements: depth of soil, an abundant
supply of fresh water, and cheap labour.
In this connection I will once again remind you that over 30
years ago the late lion. George Murphy predicted that the day
labour unionismn entered the hotel business that would be the
Beginning of the end of the industry.
I have no comment to make on this point. Just look around
yourself in the Bahamas today and form your own judgment.

For the most part, the Bahamas has thrived because of its closc
proximity to the U.S. mainland. Our fortunes have risen and
fallen with the rise and ebb of the economic tide in the U.S.
But mostly because our geographical position opened up
opportunities for the islands to capitalize on the misfortunes of
tithe U.S. and the world ... such as blockade running in the
American Civil War, wrecking before the British government
Selected a chain of lighthouses in thie islands to make navigation
1-safe and to stop the deliberate wrecking of vessels as a result of
_collusion between captains and wreckers in the islands ... and, of
_course, the "bootlegging industry" that came in the experience of


Nixon statement begs question


By HARRY FI ROSFNTHAL
WASHINGTON President
Nixon has offered three


different views of the meeting
a year ago when John W. Dlean
told him of hush money


many of us today and brought to the top a new heed of men who
completely changed the quality of men who set the social and
political standards of the colony.

Golly, I've almost written an article and I haven't yet touched
on what I meant to write when I put pen to paper.
As l said in the second paragraph of this article, the Bahamas is
not included in lHamshere's history on British activities in the
Caribbean islands.
For a full and thorough history of the Bahamas we must wait
for the publication of a history that is now being completed by
our own historian, Dr. Paul Albury. I understand that this book
will be ready for publication later this year and I have no doubt
that it will be one of the most important publications ever
compiled on the Bahamas.
And, of course, it will be reason for pride for us all that it is
the work of one of our finest citizens ... a very remarkable man in
many ways.

What I really started to write about was references in
lHamshere's history to two men who formed a part of our history
during this century and who will be remembered by many readers
of this column.
There is also a reference to another personality, Sir James
Carmichael Smyth, one-time governor of the Bahamas and later
of British Honduras. But that was a long time ago ... a very long
time ago ... and so no one remembers him. There is an interesting
book about Sir James. Hie was a very unusual man but I don't
suppose that many Bahamians have ever heard about him.
The two people many of us remember, to whom Hamshere
referred, were Sir Alan Burns and Baron Bliss.
Sir Alan Burns was the ablest Colonial Secretary in the
Bahamas during my memory of public affairs in the islands. He
was the last British Colonial official to be elected to the House of
Assembly (Western District). He became leader of the government
in the Assembly. Incidentally, he was also a Catholic.
It is amusing to recall that he and I quarrelled all the time but
that doesn't alter the fact that he was a brilliant man who was
able to outthink all of us little people in the House. Today he is
one of my warmest friends in England. He tells me lie has ever
mentioned me favourably in one of his books that will be
published after his death..
He later became Governor of British Honduras and ended his
career as Governor of the Gold Coast (now Ghana).
After retiring from the Colonial Service he became Britain's
Permanent Representative at the United Nations.
During a period when it was considered a great achievement to
become a G.C.M.G., this honour was conferred upon him by the
sovereign.
Hamshere has an interesting passage on a disastrous hurricane
and tidal wave that struck British Honduras on September 10,
1931. This was the first hurricane to strike the island in 150
years. This was followed in 1061 by Hurricane ltaltie These two
disasters resulted in the government deciding to move the capital
city of Belize from the coast fifty miles into the interior.
But the reference to Sir Alan Burns was in another connection.
Both Belize and Georgetown, the two principal cities, must have
been shacky looking towns. They had large wooden houses built
on stilts on "low-lying river banks". Governor Sir Alan Burns is
quoted as describing the golf course as a course "with more than
one hundred holes, all but nine of them made by land crabs".

But the person I wanted to write principally about today is
Baron Bliss.
Baron Bliss was an invalid. As far as I can remember he was an
Englishman with some sort of foreign title which he insisted on
using. No one seemed to know where it came from or how he got
it.
I remember him well because when lie first came to the
Bahamas he rented Bungalow Dunmore in the grounds of the
Priory from Father Chrysostom. I was Father Chrysostom's pupil
and protege at the time and it was in this connection that I got to
know about this man.
lie had an irresistible propensity for writing letters in which lie
complained about anything and everything and succeeded in
annoying Father Chrysostom in a way I had never seen him
annoyed at any other time in my association with him.
I remember one letter particularly. The Baron complained to
Father about frogs that croaked in the night. He wanted to know
what Father was going to do to stop this annoyance to him in the
bungalow.
I don't think I should print what Father said when he got that
letter!
** * *
Father was glad to see the last of him when his yacht Sea King.
which he had specially built to accommodate his infirmity.
arrived in the harbour.
I am told that his infirmity was such that it required him to
have both legs hoisted in midair while he spent his days in a
wheelchair.
Hie brought out with him a charming young English secret ry
who soon convinced Captain Eric Solomon, a gay bachelor with a
roving eye, that it was time he settled down to matrimony The
result was Roy and Norman Solomon.
Captain Solomon was an independent-thinking, rip-snorting
member of the House of Assembly for many years ... very much
like his sons became in later years.

During this time we had a C('hief Justice who was himself quite
a character. HIe was a little man who drove a Model-T Ford and
succeeded in breaking every traffic law in the book. His favourite
violation was to cut across traffic or turn his car around anywhere
in the middle of Bay Street. There was practically no motor
traffic in the island in those days. Of course the police were at rid
to touch him.
As I told you, Baron Bliss loved to write letters and the Chief
Justice loved to receive complaints from prominent citizens on
which hlie elaborated at the opening of a criminal session of the
Supreme Court.


On one occasion the Chief Justice read a letter he had received
from Baron Bliss. In this letter the Baron informnned the Chief that
when he returned to the harbour after a long cruise he found that
the moorings for his yacht at the western end of Potters Cay had
been stolen.

After all I must make this two articles.
I started out to write a short article but as memories surged
back over the years I ended up by turning out 36 pages o)
manuscript.
This story will be continued tomorrow.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
Sweet memories wafted by thy gentle gale
Oft up the tide of time I turn my sail.
To view the fairy haunts of long lost hours
Blest with far greener shades, far fresher flowers.

(This is the first verse of a beautiful poem I read over 60 years
ago. I don't remember its author. I may not have it word perfect
but I think it is correct. I wish a reader of this column would tell
me where to find this poem today.


been raised for payments tou
the defendants. with the
knowledge and approval of
persons both on the White
House staff and the re-eleLtion
o.linim!tee."
,\nd he added the point that
became the focus of the
disput1te "'1 was only told that
thl money had been used tor
ilo r'ns t lees andt tan il'
supurpo. not that it had heen
piJldl to procure silenc- troin
the reCipients," (AP)


pa., ineuts. giving rise to a
,on !inuing barrage oft
quCAt-ons
I lie ontusion ot what was
said at that meeting March 21
is compounded not only b\ the
President's statements bu! also
the versions offttered by the
other participatants. Dean andl
If R Haldeman.
It boils down to this:
W ",a tie Ptc,ldoent told that
monel being' paid to the seven
original Watergate defendants
was or illegal costs"
tOr a. i, he tldr the mnone\
w, as to hur -ilenceL','
Did he understand what lihe
wras told was a ta t. or did he
take it a,- a l' .
legal d'!es'e t funds are j
common putlr _ticu.lt'' there i.
nothuingg urlawsful ab)hu nt their
But paying hush noney is
obstruttioun t i itre a serious
r rine
in one t' l his lirst major
Watergate st a telnenltits. the
Mrosdems sail h ie learned on
March 21 about the possible
involvementt t top aides in the
Wuiergate cover-up O i e said he
began "inten'si' e new inquiries
in!o 'tAs whole anutc" iHe
reported "Itilaor develop-
rn-nts," but stid le couldn't be
specific.
Ihen came the Senate
Watergate ti.I'arn g Dean said
hi' told Nixon about money
demands being niade by the
de,'endants andl that about that
time flltdemari n uoinred the
clinversaitton
\ppa yift i In). Det'ai got his
dates wroonL He said hue
recalled it .as a meeting on
March 13. xon a'nd
Sale man said t h e
conversation was on March 21
and Haldemen said he had
listened to a tape recording and
confirmed that
Whatever th date,. Dean
claimed he told Nixon it might
cost as much as 1 million
e e'ntually it me.'t thi.
demands
hie tt'd Illn. ie a s no
pr,)hiem and he ai,',; lookIk'd
o'er at llaldenanA .d rep-ated
the s'11ame C s. e hin
testtiled
Sialdelma:i. in his Senate
testunon\ recoiled that "the
I'r ...!. .,r said therer ie is no
problem in raising a million
dli. ., we can do that, but it
would be wrong '
The President addressed the-
point tfo, the first time on i \ug
15 in a statemitnt. Hlie said he
was told only "'that funds had


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B!
S1 "^^
\--M^1'


PINDER'S FOOD MARKET I FRESH
MIONTROSI \I NM F PHONE 2-4030 CHICKEN'S WH
OPEN SUNDAY MORNING 8 -- 10 A.M. U.S. CHOICE
- m._____ mm mmm mJ ROUND ROAST


NEW ZEALAND
LAMB LEGS
NEW ZEALAND
LAMB SHOULDER
U.S. CHOICE
CHUCK ROAST
U.S. CHOICE
ROUND STEAK
HAMBURGER
IAMB LIVER
U.S. CHOICE
SIRLOIN STEAK


ROLE 6. 85C


lb. $2.19


Spry3Ibs -$1.69
b. $1.69 I Blanco Bleach quarts ..- .. 35c
I Motts Apple Juice qts. 79c
I Libby's Fruit Float Asst. Flavours 59c
I Success Rice 30c
lb. 99C I Malta Hatuey 6 pack $1.39
I Cana Corn on Cob 82c
I Champion Tomato Paste small 2 for. 49c
I Native Grapefruit 5 for- _ 99c
lb. $1.9 Fresh Tomatoes Ib .. 20c
Carnation Cream large 3 for 93c


l. $2.09
lb. $1.15
lb. $1.15

lb. $2.49


Centreville Food Market
6th TERRACE EAST PHONE 58106 P. O. Box 5714


S ORE HOURS


Monday to Thursday 8 a.m.


U.S. CHOICE
CHUCK ROAST
U.S.CHOICE
SHOULDER ROAST
U.S. CHOICE
SHOULDER STEAK


8:30 p.m.


Friday and Saturday 8 a.m.
Sunday 8 a.m.


9 p.m.
IOa.m


u. ,FU.u _____-__:... .
I U -I
9 Kelloggs Corn Flakes 8 oz. pkg. 2 for
Ib. $1.29 Tide Giant Size
Champion Tomato Paste Large 2 cans for
Robinhood Flour 5 lb. Bags
S 1 II Regal Malt Tonic Ctn.
1b. $1.49 Jewel Shortening 1 lb. pkg.
Adolphus Rice 2 Ib pkge 2 for
Champion Pigeon Peas Large 2 cans for
Lb $1.59 Purex Bleach Gals.
I. 5 I Fresh Grapefruit 5 lb. Bags
Fresh Kraft Orange Juice 1/ Gals.
I


HOMEOWNERS... BUY WHOLESALE
SPECIALS FOR THIS WEEKEND


MEATS
FISH
POULTRY
IN 10 LB.
CONTAINERS


USDA CHOICE STEAKS
SIRLOIN approx. 5 lbs. -__-_ _------- ----- -$10.00
T. BONE approx 5 lbs------------------------ $12.00
PORTERHOUSE approx. 5 Ibs.- -----------$13.00
STRIP (Boneless) approx. 5 lbs.------------- ----. $16.00
STRIP BONE-IN approx 5 Ibs. ---------- ------ $14.00
BOLOGNA 85CLB.


SHRIMP _._._....3 Ibs.


$9.00


-... .. 10 Ibs. $10.50


MUTTON.-


II


PORK CHOPS


HARDING' S


lb. $1.29 P.O. Box
LEAN STEWING BEEF lb. $1.40


FRESH MUTTON


DANISH SPARE RIBS


BEEF LIVER

PIGS FEET


PIGS BELLY
BOLOGNA SLICED


5290 ES


FOOD MARKET
Phone 2-3067


lb. $1.10

lb. 89C


II
I


BOILED HAN


Ih R ------- -
lb. 890 Punch Detergent giant .79c
I Water Maid Rice 5 1bs. $1.99
Campbell's Vegetable Soup 4 tins .99c
Ib. 35 Robinhood Flour 5 lbs. $1.15
I Potatoes 5 lbs. .99c
Ajax All Purpose Cleanser 28 oz. 89c
Ca ILibby's Sweet Peas 303 .47c
. C Libby's Cut Beets 303 3 Tins .99c
bI Jewel Shortening 3 lbs. $1.35
b Armour Corned Beef 12 oz. $1.25
Octagon Liquid large 86c
I Hatuey Maltonic 6 bottles $1.49
Ib. $165 GarbageBaggies 30 Bags .57c
S Zest Soap Large 3 Bars .99c
I Coke 5 tins .99c


SWIFT BUTTERBALL TURKEYS lb. $1.19


lb. $1.19


HORMEL HAMS Ret. WHOLE


SHI I( LE THEE I'


JO10NES DAIRY FARM REG. Hams lb. $1.19


NEW ZEALAND LAMB LEGS


lb. $1.59

Ib. 89C


TULIP MINI RIBS


FES BROILING CHICKENS lb. 850
Ribena family size $1.90
Right Guard Deodorant 7 oz. $1.49
Comet Cleanser 21 uoz. .39c
Joy Liquid king $1.10
Blue Cheer giant .99c
Kraft Oil 32 oz. $1.89
Lesueur Peas 303 .49c
Libby's Cut Beets 303 .32c
Start Orange Drink .36c
Native Red Bliss Potatoes 5 lb. $1.29 |


_Ia!5 au portion
(control (Cntrt
TELEPHONE 2 3237 5th TERRACE, CENTREVILLE
OPEN 'TIL 4 PM. SATURDAYS!


72c
99c
89c
$1.15
$1.39
48c
$2.05
79c
$1.00
$1.19
$1.59


mm


L


I


I


-1 a


Itlibens
too *-,-


MA-


I






Wednesday, March 20, 1974
Impopr-la-i~kLSP",


vi II


PRICES 6000GD


MARCH 21, TARU SUNDAY MARCH 24,1974.


SECRET SPRAY
EOSORANT

4-Z.
CAN


COMET CLEANSER


21-OZ. 9


WHOLE FRYERS


I .6S


(~i~d


8- 14 1b. AVG.--W.D.
TURKEYS lb. .99
FULL CUT
ROUND STEAK .................LB 1.99
NATIVE PORK ....................LB. .99
NATIVE PORK
LEG PORTION ............... LB 1.19
BOLOGNA ....................LB. 1.29
W-O ALL MEAT OR
DINNER FRANKS 1.29
W.D. HICKORY BACON 1.29
SIRLOIN STEAK ............. Le.2.49
T -BONE OR
PORTERHOUSE ...............LB. 2.79


DONALD DUCK
ORANGE JUICE


DAISY CHEESE



LB.8


VS COCKTAIL JUICE


SPRY SHORTENING


3
LB.
CAN


KRAFT WHITE AMERICAN
SULIED CHEESE


AMERICAN

12- Z.


NCHEER GIANT SIZE
DETERGENT


-Z 99
PI[G,


CORNED BEE THREE STAR
S-'*--g CORNED BEEF


I Fitu illn


12-4Z.
onl


1 -LB. MS. FILBERTS FAMILY BOWL
MARGARINE ..........


ROSS I
MIXED VEGETABLES


2H~ p&is 9


SWANSON'S
TURKEY AND CHICKEN
T.V. DINNERS
11 -OZ
PKG.


26OZ. PKG. MRS. SMITHS PUMPKIN
CUSTARD PIE 1......................... I09


FRIED CHICKEN


S EOTATOPT UCE LKNIRO .75


7-UP OR
REGULAR PEPSI COLA


NTMLES


WATER MAID ptr


S
LB.
BAG


F ROMO1 ~~UR mM 11] 571164 5]


STOKLEYS FRENCH STYLE
GREEN BEANS


O-7


APPLES


MAXWELL HOUSE
INSTANT COFFEE


orl


LB.
BAG


7" -
* -,b

.. -


Y LEMONS


P CHAMPION
PiEAo PEAS


p&y


LBl.


Trr


FOR


Ilr


TOMATOES


25"


CELERY
LB. PKG.
CARROTS


.39


3 FOR .79


11


RoERTSONS
JAM
. ..i I .


RIBERYTSl
STRAWBERRY JAM


1-B5


4.


0- I :1


Illl


kli


* )


s A .1 I







Wednesday,.MiA,L


OSCAR MAYER
BEEF SALAMI


OSCAR MAYER

PURE BEEF BOLOGNA
OSCAR MAYER

ALL MEAT BOLOGNA


80-Z 950(


8-OZ


8-0Z


OSCAR MAYER

SLICED BACON


790


790


-V


ONION

TIME
IT'S ONION TIMF again at
- Potter's Cay. The lowly onion
which brings tears of jos to the
cook's eyes, is probahl\ the
most versatile and often used
vegetable in the kitchen. It
adds flavour to almost all main
dishes and can be an excellent
accompaniment to a meal all
by itself.
Try hones with carrots and
vegetable dish. PJarboil si\
peeled carrots and ,i\ peeled
onions in chicken b:oth tor 15
minutes. Place the vegetables in
a baking dish In a bowl,
combine three tablespoons
butter, three tablespoons
hone, add a bit of tarragon.
Pour the mixture ouvr the
carrots and onions and season
with salt and pepper Bake at
350 for 20 minutes
Remove the vegetables trom
the oven Pour the tiukes from
the dish into a skillet and
reduce b\ about halt Add the
carrots and onions and shake
them in the pan until thi\ are
well coated with the hone\
inmixtutire
For an e kc llent luchleon
dish, have (in in pie Bakte a pie
shell blind arnd let it moil In a
skillet, saute three large i onions
sliced thinl\ iI butlter until the
rings are tender and golden.
Remove the ,unions In the
,dame skillet, cook halt a pound
of balconl cut in small pieces
until c-risp. Place the onions
and the bacon in the pie shell.
lIn a bhsl, vIotttbnlte one and a
halt ,ups ot heavy cream, three
egg olks and one whole egg,
salt and pepper Mi\ well and
pour over the onions Bake at
375 tor 30 minutes ,r tunti! the
custard is set and the top has
browned.
Ali ono 01110 saut'cCe ,s well
with chicken bieasts Poach
four skinned, onecd and halved
chicken breasts iI hall water
and halt white vine to cover.
Add an onion, a ba \ leaf a tfewc
pepp$r,..prns .akd a little salt.
Poach over low heat li 20
miInutes i()ered. ( hop two
ionls ,ers )itel nld sa&ite
until golden. Make a cup of
thi.k white sauce using the
strained poa.thing liquid. Add
the onions. Arrange the
chicken breasts on a serving
plate adrd pour oil the sauce.
(Granish swith dill or chopped
parsley
(Onioni ad thicken l e\rs
comt bined m ik' .i' excellent
pate Ihinh i J shic t ra large
ioIlons .,id lsait i0t'ii i until
golden \dd ,1 p,;i:'id of
hickcn vcrt aili '"\'. ti h .pped
g.prhiI P ,', es SiI' w !"! the
liters ire to ked S i with
sa: aitnd pCepper 'i tIhe
i \turC thritouglh lth ,n blade
o! a tood chpwi ut i ash
withI a fol k Slo\l,\ atid,! enough
port winel t taste lit h patl.
L.an be kept in a .uJ: in 'ti
retrigcu rator it r i\f e.lv i :%
'lan itled butter
Stle,k .itd n oll ns i a 'lass,
I' > .( ,Lan atI to d fl 'e d teak
Se sit. lie steak vwilr sit ,aind
Ii ppeti and lightly spuinkle it
wilth fttloi Place it in 'itling
luitier in at pan ail coo.k .it
o e ide !or 1twi, Iiinutrs \(ld
liio cui s ofu ot o itit i i';>
sme' extra utter ( oi t k '
steak on the sate si idV.' i ,iii

!he steak on a p titll r and i,\ri
it with the 'nlii's id butl iter
Sprinkle with t hIltpied pisles
f 'rEdil o l+t lllo soup calls
lor heav cream. Il n! slie
three onions anil irk i hek ni ,
butter until tenitlecr aid foiden
dd fil\e cups o iol chiil ken
brothl and cook gent!, lor hli ail
ani hour covered Stra in out lthie
tnions and puree them Returnt
thile tpuritee to the broth Season
with a little iiace nrutimeg and


salt and pepper. Bring to a boil
In a bowl lltix two egg \olks
two tablespoons Parimesan
cheese and a cup i t heav
cream i Beat well Add a little
hot soup to the cream mixture
and stir 6( gradually pour the
creani into the soup stirring
constantly Reheat the soup
but do not let it boll
This onion stew is very good
with pork Blend four
tablespoons flour with four
tablespoons melted butter in a
saucepan. Add a cup of hot
water, a little salt and pepper
and stir until thickened Add
three finely chopped onions
and a tablespoon of vinegar
Cover and cook over low heat
for an hour or until the onions
have become pureed


)MCKENZIE WHOLE
KERNEL CORN
CHEF CHOICE FRENCH

FRY POTATOES
BIRDSEYE

ORANGE JUICE


11B $1.79


18-OZ


9-OZ


12-OZ


-i




-Ji


U.S. CHOICE

PORTERHOUSE STEAK


U.S. CHOICE

T-BONE STEAK

DANISH CHOICE


PER LB


PER LB


$2.69



$2.69


690


3/79C


RICHS

CHOCOLATE ECLAIRS ooz 890


SPECIALS FOR THE WEEK MARCH 21ST, THROUGH MARCH 24TH, 1974.


15'

$ 3


IHIImBI


1*9
mw 1w~ l ow
^^ HA AIA ^^^^^^ C itrus^^^^^^B ^
COLE PUNCH^^^^^ ^ ^^^^^ ^
Purplineappe46o


1tW N-

REA


MATTOI


* BEU.S HOICE 2 *2




RIBSTEAKPerlllllfifb. 2039


KSI
LIB SVEN


SADWICH'TMEATSrH


I FOEN ODTEATS^


Lj


A I3 HH I






Mar *h.20, 1974


If


-


ALL STORES NOW OPEN ON '
SUNDAY.. .INCLUDING OUR
MACKEY &MADEIRA STREET
STORE, 7:A.M.-10:A.M. I











I nj')tf~ mi .


W KR -TJ eat -
MASMALW



10-oz.


FLORIDA

CELERY Each .39C

RED DELICIOUS $

APPLES 3- IbBagsla49

GREEN

& CABBAGE Lb. .19%


7 FLORIDA SWEET

GRAPEFRUIT Each 4 FOR .,99


DIXIE
CUP REFILL 100CT
KRAFT
ASSORTED CARAMEL
KRAFT
BARBECUE SAUCE
UNCLE BEN'S
RICE & BROWN GRAVY
UNCLE BEN'S
RICE & CHICKEN GRAVY
GLAD
TRASH BAGS
KRAFT
SDRESSIN LIQUID THOUSAND ISLAND


SARAN WRAP 50FT
CREST
TOOTH PASTE rges
71T Z nfAP


-VI wuni


3 OZ

14-0Z

18-OZ


75

179


590


5-oz 2/990

.5oz 2/990


20's

8-OZ


LARGE


BATH


PILLSBURY
CINNAMON ROLLS


' ill


*1tn


FAMILY FARE
AMER. CHEESE
FAMILY FARE
ORANGE JUICE


9-OZ


8-OZ


1/2 -GALLS.


$1.89

590

2/990

690

2/75C


650.


850


SUPERMARKETS
If it's value you really want,
you really want SuperValuel I


$1.45


I MMm


Cutlass raider
A MAN armed with a cutlass
burst into a home in New
Providence yesterday.
He threatened the maid.
Donna May Francis before
ransacking the rooms and
escaping with a wallet full of
notes.
Ilis haul: 200 Canadian
dollars, 35 Australian dollars,
three Austrian dollars and
thousands of lires.
The occupiers of the house
in Blair Estates, off Hudson
Road were out at the time of
the raid 1 2.20 p.m. They arc
Mr. and Mrs. Franco Marcelli.
The white raider was
wearing a shirt with holes in it,
long boots with fringes and
p cut-off trousers, lie was
unshaven and wore love beads.

i HISTORICAL SOCIETY
SPEAKER
DR. PAUL ALBURY, acting
president of the Bahamas
Historical Society, will be the
L speaker at the society's
i meetingon March 29(6 p.m.) in
the G(overnment House
) Ballroom.
Dr. Albury's subject will be
"The History of a Ship,"
recalling the days when
shipbuilding and seagoing were
important local industries in
the Bahamas.

UNDERWATER CLUB
The Bahamas. Underwater
Club are holding their regular
monthly meeting at 8 p.m. at
the Nassau Harbour Club.
The meeting is open to the
public and an interesting film
and slides will be shown.
NEW COSMOS
MOSCOW The Soviet
Union today launched Cosmos
636. an unmanned earth
satellite, the official news
agency Tass reported.
The government news
agency said the sputnik was
put into an orbit 245 miles by
106 miles.
The inclination of the orbit
was 65 degrees and its first
revolution of the planet took
90 minutes. (AP)


mTRn


-w Vw -'w V


w L, w ,l,' li

KC-EAi1]E.
SPAGHETT


I w w v w lo

PPII -C O LA ]


BAHAMIAN GROWN FRESH

WHOLE FRYERS Per lb. 069


lw lw w/ ilw w w ;1111 :d

KRAFT SRAWBERR


PREERV


i


l


IFRM OUR RCEYSELE


School
essay
contest
TH li CO-ORDINATING
Committee for Chamber of
Commerce week has
announced that a school essay
contest will again be a feature
of the week's programme from
April 22 through 27. The
assigned topic is "What
Tourism Means to Me."
A spokesman for the
committee said the topic was
chosen in order to encourage
high school children to
research and become more
aware of the broad economic
impact of tourism on virtually
all segments of Bahamian life.
Schools expected to
participate are St. Augustine's
College, St. John's College,
Prince William High School,
Government High School,
Queen's College, C.C. Sweeting
Senior High, R. M. Bailey
Senior High, A. F. Adderley
Junior High. Deadline date for
entry is April I.
Last year's winners
were Harry Bain from R. M.
Bailey Senior High and Patrice
Miller from Queen's College.
The topic was "The Role of
the Chamber of Commerce in
an Independent Bahamas."
The contest is opened to
students in Forms 4. 5 and b.

Dragon
lecture
DR. WALTER Auffenberg
of the Florida State Museum
twill present an illustrated
lecture on the "Komodo
Dragon" in the Government
House Ballroom at 5:30 p.m.,
Friday.
Admission is free.
The lecture will follow the
Trust's annual meeting and
the meeting of the council.
The Komodo monitor.
which can attain a length of
11 feet and a weight of 365
pounds, is the largest living
lizard.
Dr. Auffenberg spent two
years on Komodo Island in
Indonesia studying and
photography ing the
"Dragon", one of the last
remaining descentants of the
great reptiles which roamed
the earth before the dawn of
history.
The only reptiles now alive
which grow to greater size are
the saurians, the crocodiles
and alligators.


I DARY ELIGTS


MILgVAPORATED
MILK'









UPht ribunt


Wednesday, March 20,1974


By Abigail Van Buren
C 1974 i cmcae Trln-N. Y. New sTn"., IK.
DEAR ABBY: My experience may help some married
man avoid a tragic mistake. This letter is true. If you find
it column worthy, you may print it, but please do not use
my name:
Past 70 years of age and married to a faithful wife for
35 years, I fell madly in love with a music teacher 20 years
my junior. I courted her magnificently, gave her gifts of
jewelry, clothing, appliances for her home, weekend trips-
even a beautiful piano.
I divorced a faithful wife and gave up a highly respected
position to marry this lady in Las Vegas.
Now, after a few months of marriage, a divorce is
being processed, and I now find myself with a completely
loused up life. My "bride" got as much as she could out of
me and is seeking her freedom.
A lifetime reputation has gone down the drain. I have
broken my first wife's heart, and my children have lost
their respect for me. My health is failing, my heart is
heavy, and I am living proof that there is no fool like an
old fool.
Gentlemen, take it from one who knows: If you want to
stray, keep your foot in the door of your own bedroom, and
if you have more brains than I had, you will not become
seriously involved with another woman. LOVED AND LOST
DEAR LOVED. Regret is the cancer of life. It may not
be too late to pick up the pieces. Why not try?

DEAR ABBY: My mom counts calories, and she doesn't
like to see any high-calorie food on her own plate, so she
takes a little bit from me, a little bit from my sister, and a
little bit from my father, and all those little bits add up.
If she gains a pound she is very unhappy and yells at
us "Why did you 'let' me eat all those things thAt weren't
on my diet?" [Let her" How could we have stopped her?]
Please publish your advice before we all die of malnu-
trition and Mom chews our heads off. HER FAMILY
DEAR FAMILY: Next time Mom reaches for some-
thing on your plate remind her that it's in her mouth for a
moment-and on her hips for the rest of her life. That
should help.

DEAR ABBY: This is my third letter to you, and it will
be the last if you do not answer it. My problem is a lot
more serious than some of the junk I read in your column,
and I want to know why I have not received an answer. I



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereb\ given that IRENE ELIZABETH
POLLINGTON of P. 0. Box N-7542, Village Road, Nassau,
N.P. is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration should not be granted should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 13th day of March to The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship. Ministry of Home Affairs, P. Q.
Box N-3002, Nassau, Bahamas.




NOW IN STOCK



ELECTRIC FOOT & HAND OPERATED


Cor. Christie & Dowdeswell Sts.* Phone 2-1197



MANAGEMENT POSITION
HATCHET BAY GROCERY STORE
l i onu arc full. q udiied (b\ training ;ntd
S\pcrKi. n c !, : )-l11dt;;!:. Illcll ut
.,1 lin --.catk (,r.v r", 1 ,- tlion wo have a tinr

1 li IiARRI S\ I LL COMPANY
P .1. Potter
V\c. Presidcrnt
1' .. b \ N3217 \.,issju. Bahamas.


Why not try to pick

up broken pieces?


asked you for a personal reply.


DEAR LAST: If your newspaper doesn't run a line
indicating that for a personal reply you should write to
Dear Abby, Box 69700, Los Angeles, Cal. 90069 and enclose
a stamped, addressed envelope, they should. Everyone who
follows the above instructions receives an answer.
CONFIDENTIAL TO VIRGO: To mispronounce a word
is Ignorance. To correct one in the presence of others for
having mispronounced a word is cruelty. In my book cruelty
is a far more serious offense than ignorance.

Hate to write letters? Send $1 to Abigail Van Burem,
132 Lasky Dr., Beverly Hills, Cal. 9212, for Abby's booklet,
"How to Write Letters for All Occasions."
For Abby's booklet, "How to Have a Lovely Weddlag."
send $1 to Abigail Van Buren, 132 Lasky Dr., Beverly HMib
Cal. M12.


Phantom French


PARIS When Australia
begins the second phase of its
case against French nuclear
tests at the World Court in the
Hague this spring, it will be
arguing against a phantom
because France has quietly
renounced its agreement to
respect the court's decisions as
binding.
After boycotting pr e -
liminary hearings on its atomic
tests in the atmosphere last
year, France has abrogated the
statute it signed agreeing to
consider the court's actions as
having the force of law.
France already said it
excluded questions of national
defence from the court's


competence when it accepted
its jurisdiction in 1966. (AP)


"Beginner's luck, y'figure?"


When it comes to insurance

it's Dominion for Life

... in Nassau

call James Cox 2-3843



THE DOMINION LIFE ASSURANCE COMPANY


MY LAST LETTER


Commerce Term Deposits


We'll show you a sure way to


make more profit on your money.


Maybe you never looked at it this way.
But the interest a bank pays on your savings,
is profit coming to you. So the higher the interest
rate, the greater your profit.
Which is what our Term Deposit service
is about. It works like this: you deposit $1000
or more with us, for an agreed term. It may be
3 months, 6 months, a year, or longer.
We pay you interest according to the
sum deposited, and the period it remains
in the bank.


Call it a higher form of savings, if you like.
The fact is, you earn higher interest than you
would on regular savings. So you make more profit
on your money.
Talk to your Commerce branch manager
about your own personal Term Deposit.
It's profitable.



CANADIAN IMPERIAL
BANK OF COMMERCE


You and the Commerce.

Together we're both stronger.


NOTICE
NORRIS BRYAN is no longer associated with
SASSOON INSURANCE (Agents & Brokers)
LTD.








without fear.

even the bravest of vacationers.
Sure, you can probably find a room. But can
you be assured of the prices you'll pay, or the
service you'll receive after you get there?
Not really.
So do yourself a favor.
And stay with us. We'll spoil you with
great service and reasonable prices. Just
the way Sheratons always do.
We've got 140 beautifully furnished
rooms. Swimming pool. Children's pool
and playground (children under 12 free in
parent's room). Complete game and bil-
liards room. Color TV. Specialty restaurant,
Lounge with nightly entertainment and
dancing. Plus an 1-4 location that's
just minutes from Walt Disney World.
Cypress Gardens. Kennedy Space
Center. Daytona Beach. And
Tampa's Busch Gardens. -
For reservations, write or r.-
dial toll free 1-800-325-3535.
And stop living in fear.

Sheraton Inn/I-4 & Lee Road
SHERATON HOTEL&AND MOTOR IS, A WORLDWIDE SERVICE OF ITT
736 Lee Road, Ornd WMter Park), Fla. Phone (305) 647-112
John Klkeny. General ManMer
Developedand operated by Contintal ServicesCorporUati M Fla.
Charles Schlakman, Exacutv Vice Preeldnt/OtperMao. (30) 4 "&2493.

SPECIL BAHMAS GOMBAYR^rF







Wednesday, March 20. 1974


(Uhp 0ribunt


Saving...As You Like It Best


.,ENiOY GOOD HEALTH -EAT QUALITY FOODS!! 0


U.S. CHOICE

MEAT

SPECIALS

PORTERHOUSE STEAK $
T-BONE STEAK $
TOP ROUND STEAK $
SIRLOIN TIP ROAST $
SALT BEEF $
SOCIETY WHOLE OR STEAKS
BONELESS HAMS $
NEW ZEALAND
LAMB LEGS $


WINNER ...
THIS WEEK


TICKET


6'/2 oz. EATWELL"
TUNA FISH .530
CITADEL CORNED BEEF 12 oz. $1.15
AMURI RICE 5LBS $2.49


LOTS OF IN STORE SPECIALS PALMOLIVE SOAP


KERRYGOLD
BUTTER ,LB


HATCHET BAY
EGGSLGE.


3/.994


.790
DOZEN


QUALITY MARKET'S
PREMIUM
ICE CREAM
'2 GAL/ALL FLAVORS


[ I,
IL

1

t













'(.
II
v *
,t
I

',
I


1i

\ !
%,


$1.59


.69
PER HEAD


3LB BAG ONIONS


RECIPE


NATIVE GROWN
CABBAGE 3 LB AVG.


O

O0


0


STEAK'N POTATO SUPPER
Ingredients:
1-172 Ibs. round steak, 1 can condensed
1/2 inch thick beef broth
1/4 cup enriched flour 4 medium potatoes,
2 teaspoons salt pared and cut in
1/4 teaspoon pepper 1/4-inch slices
2 tablespoons fat 2 medium onions,
thinly sliced
Directions:
Cut steak in serving-size pieces. Combine flour,
salt, and pepper; coat the meat with flour mixture.
In skillet, brown meat slowly in hot fat-this
should take 20 to 30 minutes. Add broth. Cover
tightly and simmer don'tt boil) 30 minutes or
till almost tender. Add a little water if needed.
(When using electric skillet, follow manufacturers
directions for correct settings for browning,
simmering.)
Place potato and onion slices over meat.
Season vegetables with salt and pepper. Cover
tightly; cook slowly about 35 minutes longer or
till potatoes are done. Snip parsley atop.
Makes 6 servings.


1




7--i- -u


Wednesday, March 20, 1974


I TOWNgand AROUND I


B.A.N.C.-- a



charity with



a difference

IFtI BAHAMAS All) FOR NI I )'DY (11il )RN
;!'ieinattci releited o at 1 t lo c legal dlotLiinieiits sa I B..A N.C(
a, li.ir /,itable 01t alli ,in t in IP Nassaiu with a dil tfeCrnce


I hc ant ,s 1 i B \\( ,L l t
i Itit I( l )I th t it ICia ( 't ( I he\
S i lpr tVch th'iii l t I i.t let
f v ) r vr! vIlcged prd tt1,r-
l ii ;I1 th e I, l B thialid ti I to
I >, pi.'p ire I" th L tiiilI ir
- hi I lih .re w 'l killn tot
p tic poto b\ raisiiig
: ;, til t iunIds to starIt I
1 tiic t l di a b ushed ,is I a

I % ; t:ie ted Ihi trend aI nd

!, I h u t ik) I i ,t t h
1 1 in .111 IIIi i oi t hi tt
:1! 'c t h !h.' ch dil o ll'
i > hoped \ bt \\t tNha
A .in also brine ir''t or
hiel ti I t he t lic i lhf ,ii
It I' \h ,hI t I I,_'c ,+ .i tlld r-cI


SH \\t also ht.pes i that the
I'.' tis t ton I ti' I centre I thet
lidL IIlt\ 'A7 ill 11 ase aI theL.
blindss arse. Ihe\ ilntem


SI,. dS But so, tai how i, t thiI
S tlereni than ilani other
1 1 tab e I lt' ta isa ons i'. 1t1 tii.S
i I llhan Ill t
.l! : t ,11ne thn1.1 how itL
le edi,,topi; r naturally and
l i.p il s the be1.Ist
'* Aii'i 117 ol t raes.s loots
'l. hleI tntilp!l i i help int

Ann ) Duggan, an I-nglIsh girl
t ihl ia 'n;" of the lI:.aditi nal
2:, the english .rec
,r '-idl noted 'or 'ame to
l cma Is s lnw '1ears aro
.t l! her husband Rae. wh, as
I: t the Br:tishI Ht ih

I hi taniil lI\ ed i ti Ist
i eet. tai In l
'l-. lndit Ii: tron tflite Kcnitp R(,titt
--.a ,i t n t tar in ',eugriaph.c:Ial
i'star'.i ;
An'il toi Atiit not tal inI
'*'FIins 'it hiiiiidii dlstaite,
Ihe! Kemp R ),id ncighbours
CIere regarded natutrall I b
\Inn1 as nuch neighbours as ie
l tdd ole la-is neilghbours
He i children played with
'ilth Kelit p Roai d children andI d
\in i ot to kiiw htI k i ;
: i g h t i, ,
A I k the thing's -iu ,.'
w ps! i'h.i i
In the part ulat 'aid th.i;
i;.e li'rei. to k inow there .'aIi
l i *. ., outside la\,t "t hIelonged to t ,
tr l ti'. .t' people \lnu anI! d t li
';! uilr '! interested people .:h,i
',i arnrid th'emsel s iitl i B \\(
mid ttke the hi!dren .
i I hcse children ou!i. l
IdieIdJ with I word s o, I\;i
hn doe wlrmed tghe' t. oitt
ecintesk ihemsel ',dI s hiI aui
t1 n trtoswtr r: i. ,f
Ar k m itn thi , i:
:, :d m little an d w
i .i ::.' o fl st l ag ,A t Il 's
:" ';%1. v, h 1 h ran do,\1 d h1
\ l .i\ i ot \ed It' ( ti 'u
i -' ln ;tie ho\ tup \l ill



l] .' i *- i i t', p and ts
It c a I t i k ,, i \t I. t : ,nt
r i l I(I 11 1ja ti per p l t',i
t "a -i t a .,e t' t i n h .
li l n V t,\ s l l l !

B.i!t w. I in ou. it l dl e ar i
tl r on i et aI d i \.

I L A \ C It IhI hI id anl
poltu l]\ I get II l! i
t id s-ll lh except, rnal les,, .,,-
I s t t e n tL h t h a t I e ,' ,.' ,
do it I I\ I rocIrsel'.es
in our sl gtitnes,' we s", \ !htl
n,.bod\ I the Ba I li Im -
..I ,i!. st i'es thIat po\te i\ I
lhe I rpicls \\here hlcatmg alwd
iothes ale not necessItles IC
r.nie as hatl as point inl
teinperate inLiatCes that theI
,Ill and the soil and the sea
prevent staration ce all tdo
itur hit foi CliaIt\ with a
capital '("' but whether we are
reilly charitable in the biblical
sense of love lor our
neighbours and "There but
the grace of (;od go I is
another question
'Actual starvation no But
how does walking to Potter's
Cay in the morning to collect
conch skins and boiling them
to feed your children or
grandchildren (as one woman
dirt) strike you" Fspecially as
the nutritious water is feeding
more worms than child
!' tT hhe mothers and
grn mothers of Ann's


lii ldren',, iniend ,s grt.u ally
e.glllan !to ( oie0 to \nn \\ith
t Iih c.r rohl011s
thIis B\\( %as, tonnedI At
t' "1 t"o n" I thc\ J ir UstI
helping 'li-' aird butil have
duiihition lo e\palnd anti help
all ieeLd\ l childei n in the

B .\ ( started with .1
1 t'"sdl\i miorni nrp l, pl. group
\,wh! l \\his hL'ld in I lit,- ;.round
all (overnillic l t l Iiis i
H \\(t !.i'c n' i 'A it ,i


n1 i bI i ) l u eI ',t hilIII I ,
ti,111 '1 1i', 1V i .I itl' A gr.II p
including \ a n il' ,II tl c lie



eul er brotlt cI n b' i l t 1 iI




'Id l t Iin 7 a V ai
unit i nIs II e a tle tIhe t oI
1, lteInl
\n in o is t'Pu ic Relatins I
AOll 7er it B \\( told i lc
ite'U nli the headTus-t ",
t< ld thI,'ln lh l thc u cSll i
h id 1 l d I '' tl l s' t l i 't






t tI it B Ni )U tIII
pre -choo, piai. group
B \\( i, ,, i l ,p
, lt h '" pli\ group at ;''
PI.iri : t M\l -rs Schooi ,,t
I lit d ; appea'll.ng

'jtii ii I t' 'n ti l'es and h ,
7 iiiiT 'h plt' l h a7 1 i.1 p hi'

B \\< ,ocs t thei th:ng

'.i't !a ,.. p it' h, e i prh i h o. i







i1 a. ht1 i e h l .mrtie .hL t t h,
St, .; r ,irw ct hoclt ,ii of









'th le ,i: l n 1 i ,e a p t l .In '

aIv' heIi 'i'i t it d.' r l

Itis fur tIhe aidlt's isB{ ohs
thi' \ m sIlliit n plt hI s t
l ,.' hln i il . n t i l








B 'I h I \ o I he jI n'; l e
aId! u L! nee dr \ hep to he i pt


.in h anissin their lives hut
1th dioI lt' take up o
.it Ih It \ I \ J er ,.





S .Im o n into n I s I Ioa\ii itntg 5, 0
\ itl l n a1 il t Ic a t the



I Cmo e t \'i n said ,%e k e C
adulanged lo i theor ( hlden ogo
St Andrews School Duke oft \\
drsd rgh award s tud Jerrynt
contestants gave a party tor50





these children. Beach parties in
the sumI, ,er at Paradise Island
have t eel n rr anged. t t






het cOne to uS looking

this, for the adults, is line of
tlie iosp t mportd b u pant things that
BAN\t' can do Istia know theBAN
adults arranged for the children to gohelp
themselves and need guides and the
dinb orgh awaanising their lives student

they do nor at Paradise upoIsland



they do not take upon


the t,'Il iels' the uniateLi,ral I Ight
tI detet0r1 iln the itced, o tIe
depia\ed and needy
Ihe\ believe that it is the
pi(nt themselves wh know the
kind of help they really need.
Anid thi is how BA\N(' small
'though it might bhe. is a radical
departure in the Bahamas tfrom
the usual sort of charitiesl'
BANC' plan to begin a series
,> 'Rap Sessions' for the ptoor,
I lhew, will be a tar cr\ tim
. series o leictur's Iromi social
< t'ke t i educate the potir
Rather the poolt will educate
t ihe l! workers At the,, raplp
e' i tn i t ie potr will ai\ hwial
Ihe C' I n ed. t A ter all it is the
p... indi needy and depnrud
: eall knowlt where it >o at
\ t lhe Bahainana provecrb
"p ,.:ess it "Stone at the
",[*"' thi ie sea no know sun

\! : u :e nterestetd in helping
) a, ill '.i, t t a .t tl -% )
!' ;'i' b' s in tilhe photograph


I I \P1'I \RS !o hw al
''' '! i nl O wt1
ni Ihl i lh t ha e nit


\ . p i ,1 n, c i sn "t a,
1.1' teristic 1Ce youn and
S i \ iing enterprising
.innians aire now mllaking allnd
.,.I k a in g.. b Icke ttes lo i

S nW. dla recently Bruce
Rame ,egl _5 son oft Johnny


...by Daphne Wallace-WhitfieldJ


r. *^


-A


idea that's as old as the
Bahamas and the youthful
energy to put it into effect is
surely a good omen for our
young country.

The Dolphin Swimming Club
was established in October of
I 9ti') and until the recently
formed Barracuda Club was
the only swimming club in
Nassau There is one, however.
at Fieeport.
It would be expected in the
Bahamas, which is more water
than land, that we would
produce a nation of swimming
champions.
I he Dolphin Swimming
Club under their tireless and
dedicated coach. Miss Betty
Cole, has made a gigantic step
in this direction under
practically non-existent
funding.
Future plans for the
Dolphins include an Easter
Meet in Jamaica (the Jamaican
teetm came to Nassau at Easter
last year and the Dolphins
emerged triumphant).
To raise funds for this trip
to Jamaica the Dolphins are
staging a verv novel
dollar-raising event, a
sw, imathon.
On Saturday the Dolphins
will swim twelve miles around
Paradise Island.
Several of the seaman
fathers of Dolphin members
have planned out a course
around Paradise Island that will
be safe and catch all the tides
at the right time.
A boat will be by the
swimmer in the water all the
time and Mr. Percy Knowles,
who is spearheading this
venture, is taking swimmers in
his Houseboat from where they
will be taken by smaller boats
to the whaler by the swimmer
proir to their stretch in the
water.
Members of the public and
Town readers interested in
sponsoring the team as a whole
(the Dolphins are a team in the
real sense of the word so
individual swimmers are not
being sponsored) for so much a
mile or for the total 12 should
contact Miss Betty Cole at
Xaviers (2-3077) during the
day or at home (52104), Mr.
John Lindley at Xaviers or at
home ( 31 283) or myself at The
Tribune or any parent of a
Dolphin member.

Mrs. Paul (Bianca) Cole,
Chairman of the Benefits

Page 11, Col. I


TWELVE LITTLE
Bahamian children are now
settled in and attend school
regularly thanks to the efforts
of B.A.N.C.
Photo: Vincent D.
Vau i'an.)
FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157


and Pamela Raine, was
watching charcoal burning in
the C'armichael Road area
while on a shooting expedition
with his uncle
The pine trees are cut, put in
a kiln and smoked for four or
five days.
Bruce explained to me that
charcoal was originally used in
the old brick ovens and for
heating irons in the Bahamas
and still is in man\ cases In
tact I saw a ladI. iin the Kemp
Road area recently with lier
pot cooking on .a little lire
made of freshly ct wood
not nearly as sophisticated as
the brick oven!'
However. Bruce ,aw the
pot ential for marketing
charcoal brickettes for
hbarbecuing. Hle checked at the
Department of Statistics in
Nassau and found that in the
Bahanmas we import 150 tons
of charcoal hrickettes,.
So. together with another
enterprising young Bahamian
friend George Pyfrom, 22. son
ot the late Loran Pyfrom and
Dorothy Pyfrom. these two
have develCiped a small buti
viable industry in the Bahaimas.
Stihe\ package the charcoal
brickettcs properly to he sold
in the food stores
In fact "our's (charcoal) is
better I than the imp irted)"
but the Bahamian brand has
ever been packaged for
marketing. Bruce said
'wot young Bahaimans, an


NOTICE


TO OUR CUSTOMERS

SORRY

JOHN S. GEORGE CO.

LTD.

WILL BE CLOSED FOR

STOCKING

APRIL 1 st.


KENTUCKY

SPRMS

HOTEL
DINING AND
COCKTAIL LOUNGE


RGET IT .X
-ON!^


Located on Fowler Street
South. 27 modern
air-conditioned rooms
with private bath. Special i6
room rates $8.50, $10.50, lk
$12.50 per day.
Specializing in a variety of
native dishes ... come and EDD BURROWS
dine lunch, dinner or
have a drink in our PROP/MGR.
modern cocktail lounge.
HAPPY HOUR EVERY WEDNESDAY FROM 7--8
P.M. DRINKS ARE REDUCED! HOURS: FROM
11 A.M. 2 A. M. PHONE 28302 or 36458.


II


ROYWEST IBANIN CMIIATIOH LHIITED
OFFERS

TO A SUITABLY QUALIFIED INDIVIDUAL, THE POSITION O:



MIMAGER, 1ANKE DIVISION



Applications are sought from bankers with several years of extensive and
successful experience in international money market operations, including
the supervision of Euro-currency deposit transactions, foreign exchange
transactions and the related accounting and statistical data. Experience in
training and directing the activities of personnel in these functions is
necessary.

Applications, including details as to age, education, experience and salary
expected should be addressed to:



The General Manager
ROYWEST BANKING CORPORATION LIMITED
P. O. Box N-4889
Nassau, Bahamas.


March 12/74.


(i .


A f


w(Q i


.j. '5.-


THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF B.A.N.C. Standing back, left to right: Errol
McKinney (chairman), Herbert Stewart (vice-president) and Alaistair Fraser (member of
executive committee). Seated from left: Ann Duggan (public relations officer), Maureen
Constamagna (treasurer), Trish Fraser (member of executive committee), Margaret
McKinney (secretary) and Irene Kidd (member of the executive committee). Not pictured
are vice-president lan Bulloch, Meg Bulloch and Marina Carroll.
rimihto I (H iint Ii I'a liilan.


WOMAN BURNING PINE for charcoal brickettes for barbecuing.


NK


r


MdL


he Orthabunte











Wednesday, March 20, 1974


Uh Wrtbtt


From Page 10
Committee of the Bahamas
Association for Retarded
Children, who put on their
annual auction at Government
House last February 23.
informed me this week that the
final figure raised is now in
donations were still coming in
after the Auction. The amount
is $11,856.03.
On face value it might
appear that this year's amount
compares unfavourably with
last year's $23,500.
Not so, says Mrs. Cole, who
explained that. last year only
$4,000 was raised "from
private donations" and that
"all the rest was from that
household." (Last year a whole


OPENS: 6.30, Shows start 7 p.m.
CHILDREN UNDER 12 RI I :!
See 2 features late as 5/i
FINAL NITE:
lISCt-IT 7 & 10: 30.
ANGEL 8:50 ONI Y
WAlT DIIS ITM uCTO


household was donated).
Mrs. Cole expressed
gratitude for the generosity of
the public this year describing
the amount raised as a
"fantastic sunm all done by
private donations."

lime is running out for
those interested in attending
this year's Bahamas Humane
Society's Ball the I-merald
Ball, to be held at l.a Chandelle
Room. llalycon Balmoral
Beach Hotel on Saturday
coming at 8 p.m.

After spending 38 years at
Hope Town, Abaco, her
birthplace, six years in KeN
West. Florida and 36 years in
Nassau. Mrs. Lilly Belle Russell
added these years together and
discovered that she was 80
years old on the 10th March.
To mark this special
occasion Mrs. Wilford B. Moon,
her granddaughter, had a small
get-together at her home in San


U Z


I


Gu


I


STARTS THURSDAY
:inee 2:30 & 4:50, Evening 8:30- 'Phone 2-1004, 2-10051


"O O tF THE BEST 18 IT
CM on first come, first seed basis.
SPeter SelMSSINE lers, Eve Bruce











THEGFPLUS "THE HUNTING
AL WALL N PARTY" R.
BL OOD" PG. ODEAD ...r Reed

NO O.VE { ADt'R 18.4 DMITTt'D
Reservations not claimed by 8:15 will be sold
on first come, first served basis.




Now thru Friday Now thru Friday
Matinee starts at 1:45 Continuous Showingse 34666
Evening 8:30 from 3:00

"J. W. COOP" P.G. HURT" R. n
Cliff Robertson, Peter Sellers, Eve Bruce
Geraldine Page PLUSMEN!
PLUS "THE HUNTING
"PAYMENT IN PARTY" R.
BLOOD" PG. Oliver Reed,
y Madison, Edd Brynes Candice Bergen
'Phone 2-2534 \, one under 18 will be admitted.m




inee continuous from 2:15, evening 8:30-'Phone 346661
Rot SUGAR HILL andn





MARKI BEV ROBERT QUARRY' DON PEDRO COLLEY

LUS! THE DEATHMASTER g"
PARENTAL DISCRETIO.VADVISI:'1I


4* (iLta3po I'Im hkAi


in the Shenandoah Apple
Blossom Festival, Winchester,
Virginia on May 3rd, 4th and
5th.
Angela's paternal
grandmother, Mrs. Richard E.
Cartwright, resides in Nassau.
Angela will participate in the
Coronation of Queen
Shenandoah which begins the
three-day celebration. She will
also ride the Queen s Float in
the Grand Feature Parade on
May 4th.
Wellington E. Olander, son
of Mr. and Mrs. Olander of
Nassau, Bahamas, has been
presented with the AFROTC


ANGELA MICHELLE
Cartwright, granddaughter of
Mrs. Richard E. Cartwright.
Solici for -i few relatives and
.los friends of her
grandmother.
Mrs. Russell has three
daughters: Mrs. Byron Sands of
West Palm Beach, Florida; Mrs.
Cecil H. Fox and Mrs. Ishmael
Key, of Nassau. She also has
1 2, grandchildren, 21
great-grandchildren and four
great-great-grandchildren, who
live in America, England,
Freepot and Nassau.

Mr. and Mrs. Percy
Weatherford of Sans-Souci,
Nassau, are pleased to
announce the engagement of
their only daughter Deborah
Virginia to William Michael
Malone, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Theodore Malone, of Hope
Town, Abaco.
Wedding plans are being
made for August in Nassau.


Angela Michelle Cartwright,
7 year old daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Allen Whitcomb
Cartwright of Winchester,
Virginia, will be a Little Maid
to Queen Shenandoah XLVII


ARRIVED TODAY:
Bermuda, Grand Turk from
Miami.
SAILED TODAY: Bermuda,
Grand Turk for Miami: Joma
for Jacksonville.
TIDES
High 6.02 a.m. and 6:20
p.m.
Low 12:06 p.m.
WEATHER
WIND: South-south-east to
south-south-west 10 to 18


Distinctive General Military
Course Cadet Ribbon at Coe
College, Cedar Rapids, Iowa.
Cadet Staff Sgt. Clander was
awarded the ribbon for his
outstanding performance in the
Cadet Corns this term.


m.p.h.
WEATHER: Fair tonight,
sunny tomorrow
SEA: Smooth to slight
TEMP: Min. tonight 62
Max. tomorrow 80
SUN
Rises 6:18 a.m.
Sets 6:20 p.m.
MOON
Rises 4:37 a.m.
Sets 4:35 p.m.

ACTIVITIES AT
MARY STAR
ON SUNDAY, children attending
the C.C.). classes will receive First
Holy Communion at 8 a.m. The
C.C.I). classes meet every week and
are attended by children who are
not in Catholic schools. Father
Hector Poulin will be the celebrant
of the mass, and the pastor. Father
Brendan, will distribute holy
communion. The parish family is
very grateful to Sister Mary
Jeanine, Caroline Laton. Tina
Reynolds, and Bill Luptowski of
the staff of Mary Star who conduct
the C.C.)D. classes.
Bishop Leonard Hagarty will
confer the Holy Sacrament of
Confirmation at Mary Star of the
Sea Church on Thursday, May 2.
On Sunday, May 5, the annual
May procession in honour of the
Blessed Virgin Mary will be held.


MEMBERS OF THE DOLPHIN SWIMMING CLUB pictured Monday at their training pool at Xavier's College.
Photo: Vincent D. Vaughan.


COMMONWEALTH

POETRY PRIZE


THE Commonwealth
Institute and the National
Book League invite entries for
the Commonwealth Poetry
Prize 1974. The $600 Prize is
awarded annually for a first
book of poetry in English
published by an author from a
Commonwealth country other
than Britain. Manuscripts and
typescripts will not be
accepted.
Titles published between
July 1, 1973 and June 30,
1974 are eligible.
Seven copies of each title
submitted should be sent to
The Librarian, Commonwealth
Institute. Kensingston High
Street, London W8 6NQ,
England, and must arrive not
later than June 30, 1974.


MRS. LILLY BELLE RUSSELL pictured cutting her
80th birthday -ake. On her left is her daughter, Mrs. Cecil
H. Fox and on her right is her granddaughter, Mrs. Wilford
Moon. She was able to blow out 75 of the 80 candles.


GOODBYE MR. CHIB
AFTER a series of "bon voyage" parties held by friends
and well wishers, Mr. S.N. Chib, director of Tourism for the
Bahamas for the past seven years, left on Saturday for New
York enroute to India where he will retire. A group of
Ministry of Tourism executives, government officials and
friends were at the airport to say "good bye". Here
assistant tourism director Basil Albury gives him a farewell
handshake. Photo: Lorenzo Lockhart.

Unesco library science

workshop here in April


THE UNITED Nations
Economic and Social Council
(UNESCO) in conjunction with
the Ministry of Education and
Culture. will sponsor a
workshop in library science tor
Teacher-Librarians during the
week of April 8-12. ait the
Bahamas Teachers' College
The aim of the workshop is
to prepare librarians in
Teachers' College and Junior
High Schools where possible
towards developing existing
libraries into Learning and
Resource Centres. Included in
the course of work will be the
organization of books and
non-book material: teaching
library skills to students: and
how to handle teachingg
Practice.
The week's activity has been
arranged as a part of the
current UNESCO Project
Teacher Training and
Curriculm Development which
is specifically geared towards
Colleges and Junior Secondary
Schools in the Caribbean.
Heading the workshop will
be Mrs. Stella Merriman,


UN SCO S specialist in
Librarianship, and former
Chief Librarian of Guyana.
Also participating will be Mrs.
Hart of Belize. (Belize and the
Bahamas are linked together by
UNESCO for training purpose.)
Included among local
participants will be two staff
members of the Bahamas
Teachers' College Mrs.
Vanrea Thomas, librarian and
Mr. Arthur Roach, instructor
in educational technology.
Both have recently successfully
completed summer courses
which were organized by
t'\l St. and held at the
University of the West Indies.


A brief account of the life
and career of the author, giving
place of birth and present
address, would be appreciated.
The winner of the Prize will
be announced at the opening
of the Commonwealth Book
Fair, 1974 at the Common-
wealth Institute.
Further information may be
obtained from the Ministry of
Education and Culture, P. 0.
Box N3913/4, Shirley Street,
Nassau.


-ropic a I

Extrmnators


TWO SIDES OF THE SAME COIN
At NASSAU CHRISTIAN SCHOOLS
we care for the whole coin. Our rates our
academics, our christian training is all the same.
We even give a DISCOUNT for more than one
child if they are in either school.
Coins are like lives, you can only spend them
once.
We see to it that they are spent wisely.
Come Join Our Coin Collections...
WEE WISDOM e NASSAU CHRISTIAN ACADEMY
Collins Ave. Old Trail at Soldier
Phone 2-1586 ENROLL TODAY Phone 3-2641







PRE-EASTER SALE


Al



The [lin Shb
(Parliament Street)


REGINNING SATURDAY, MARCH 1iTH

IRISH LINEN DRESS YARDAGE
in solid colours and a few Prints

TABLECLOTHS -- GREATLY REDUCED
3 yds., 3/2 & 4 yds.


LADIES LINEN BLOUSES


BEAUTIFUL SHEER CURTAINING,
suitable offices, dens, etc.,
GREATLY REDUCED


tWEAN q


earisome And Losing

* WE lt, 4
NEED



ATONIC !!!


Come to the MISSION service to be conducted nightly between March 17
22nd. at SACRED HEART CHURCH, Shirley St. (West of Church St.) and
hear stirring sermons by the well known English Priest, Fr. Michael Hollings,
designed to revitalize us spiritually. This is the tonic we need and Must have
to get our lives, disturbed and confused by the pressures of a hectic world,
back on the right track. Make the sacrifice and attend. You will be the
WINNER!!!

Remember -Mission starts Sunday, March 17th 7:00p.m.
Weekdays 7:30p.m.
Nursery Service Available


If de Obeah bottle

don keep de tiefs

out yer fruit trees...


"Don't

give up


the ship 9


an d .toled in Sco"
tish Government Sunri


gWYLSADE





BLENDED
Kji....-* e v er t*/ll


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that JUNE BARR of Cable Beach
New Providence is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas and that any person who knows any reason
why registration should not be granted should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 20th day of March 1974 to The
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002 Nassau.


IML-


vI o une unaer l d


-i


ky 4, k


"AM ,.


h










Wednesday, March 20,


t lli Brittittit


REAL ESTATE


C13707k
iaritf w iil i t i
and sowi'
Cal! 3


FOR SA .

2 14 'r r L


1 3 ,..
d .-t'.' ,



li


I -St


I CiHA-\M;i 5ll!


t I /


BU(;N .F ;







I ' o
T U C ', '








. '. r


.L.ErNGARi'



MONTAGE. ) H





CITY OPP
REA TY C' '


s't .) .I pO
r0" Si I
it r e


FOR RENT


c 13/99)
I ltiNIbStH I) h bdroorn
a pal itment consisting of
ivinj/dinintg loom kilt hen and
It,, 'tOt "i 'fwyin'im Avenue
8 i 85

1 ,


it i',C)Ot r ho:4s,
.;,n,i-i'd Phone 4:)503


%\ Ml NTS nice
*M in Thompson
,. ill Nor man at
S .'1 .7 (nights)



:tA.b f o store re
S, St'ro t fa ir.
S' ; 'ld,'t. Contact


,i, o ned,

. i dorin andl
I tel thore


.. 'i. f, i t a l
r le i rti p t


s n I o t s
Tj it iritr



,;.' ': i-' 1 i opposite






bto .ige

ample


S', l iH LLCREST
TO W ERS

I ,. i w r, t lla I,



,! 1 L I i t t. i li ,



,. t I, t '.-,i l,'.lr,'dale
: t tjrj i u




; J ' ) [ ,'11 r,


- .i


- j ) % r [



WANTS TO TRADE


n n r t ( a i
t", l hd" IC
hI )


,- ,





PPCI S L i -Y
( u-' , .



W E i : '

HEA; -
CI tAL I A i
LOt i
A I I .
DF Vf Ci .. -
NASSA. A" i I ,,,t '!L
ISLANUS i' ir't \i /i,ArIj
BAHAMA ; ()N.(i It 1 Art r i
ELEU (ItI I '- r)
45 IA( t (. AY r INJ I'
EXUMAs ''WIT lF )1 tF
W A Tt Fr |i, '. i ,rj!.j
MORt

()AVSON'S RI '\i
IPh -. >1 i
Pho 1, -



n irts r i ,_
~ ,/otsO IG /
^j~IT# i


CARS FOR SALE


F t (. ,./ ic I t i i I u[[
'", I ( t u i I I
S AUSTIN MAXI < ...

(1'2 CHE\ROLET PICK-UP
i.. 1 1, ) HP$"K 0() 00r
1971 PL MOUTH 'CUDA
S (.:" ," 0 )
1973 DODGE CHALLENGER

1966 PLYMOUTH FURY
'114 DODGE DART
II 0O00.O
1969 FORD L.T.D. SEDAN
S, ,',. ,dtiu,) B$2250 .O)
1969 VAUXHALL VIVA
1969 RAMBLER REBEL
t. t 'O 0(0
1970 PONTIAC PARISIENNE
t,ni ., cadi) B$2950.00
19/0 VOLKSWAGEN TWIN
CAB TRUCK B$2350.00
1972 DODGE AVENGER
(.iiu) B$1975 00
1972 FIAT BUS Us$bbU5.UO
1970 VAUXHALL VIVA G.T.
w 1 O.00
1970 CHEVELLE MALIBU
(,it-', tadiio) B$1875.00.
,: "? '- 'i :" \N RAPIER'I


t1 I PAL GARAGE LIMITED
Thompson, Boulevard
P. 0. Box N-1525
Nassau, Bahamas
Telephone 3-4/11.


CARS FOR SALE


SECTION


I I


FOR SALE


I I POSITION WANTED I


' ..L... I r


.


p mn the l-.-.,1*. rl- property:
GC N-ROY INVESTMENT
L I MITED.
ALL THAT piece par"l 0or lot
of land situate in Se' h Two
uf the Subdiviwsio' lied and
tnown as Sea Bree.'- Estates its
the I astern District of tIhe
Island of New Pri dence
having the Number Six in
Block Number Two in the plan
nf the saiie bubdivision.i
MoiItgage dated 4th January
! 9 /3 Genr Roy Inv.'stmnent
L limited to Nassau Bank and
Ti ist Company Limited. Vol
2039 pages 428 to 441.
Dated this I 1th day of March.
A/ 1974.
KIRK S HINS-EY
Public A\t tioneer

FOR SALE
C13892
MUST sell 1974 Siuzi,'t 50cc
mileage only 2,000. Licensed
and insured. Contact Charles,
Cartwright Phone 51771 or
Box N5690 F S. Nassaui
C 3898
FOR SAL[
Potted Red Amaryllis
Potted African Violet-
Bulbs and Potted Lilies
Call 3-1340
Bags of rich, black, top-soil
Call ? 7612 or 4-2856

( 13929
BABY crib aind raittress,
(i esser good condition .
Phone 54380 after 6:00 p.m.
C 13928
2 820xlb5 4 Ply white wa!l
tyics $30 00
3 gallons Dutch Boy
N OLcic'l pin< paint.
$12.00
2 Bay
2 Bag boy golf carts and bags
$20.00 each
2 Power lawn mowers
$20.00.
Telephone 4-1146,

C13925
MOTOR CYCLE:
4 year old 350cc YAMAHA
excellent condition. Only
selling as owner leaving
Bahamas. Phone Mr. Franklin
days 28730. Nights 4-2060.


C 13926
FOR SALE
FISCHER 400 receiver
Fischer 401 Turn Table
Sony 250 tape deck
Leak Speakers
Owner leaving island.
Mr. Franklin 2-8730
4-2060 nights.


Phone
days


C13924
COUNTER height refrigerate
in excellent condition. $75.00.
See at Delaporte Paint office or
call 7-8181.

C13940
Pool table complete with balls,
rack and sticks. Phone 56916
after 5.30 p.m.

I ANNOUNCEMENTS

CL 3923


C13919
1968 Olds good condition
good taxi factory air. Tel.
51136 after 6 p.m.

C13857
1972 VOLKSWAGEN 1300
Sedans excellent condition,
adio, W'W tyies. low mileage.
Finance and insurance
available. Call 36611-2-3-4.

C 13868
19/0 CHEVROLET NOVA,
automatic, airconditioned
excellent condition 18,500
miles, $2,800. Phone 22188 or
9.

PETS FOR SALE
C13897
One large full-grown male
Weimaraner dog. Ideal for stud'
service. Call 42856 or 2-7612.

C 13834
PUREBRED "White" German
Shepherd puppies 6 weeks old,
wormed. Phone 5-4539.

PUBLIC AUCTION
C13932
KIRK S. HINSEY will sell on
behalf of Nassau Bank & Trust
Ltd at the parking lot of
Nassau Bank House, 2nd
Tei tace West Centieville on the
13th day of April 1974 at 1
) m. the following property
At. L that piece or parcel of
lind situate in the Western
District of the said Island of
New Providence comprising a
portion of the Oakes Airport
Shbdlivisio designated as Lot
Number Eight (8) in Blcok
Number Five (5) which said
pioce or parcel of land h.,s such
position boundaries shape
natrks and dimensions as are
shown on the diagram or plan
'tta( hod to a Conveyance
,:tted tIh 2nd day of May.
A.[) 195 / and made between
the Ai ports Board and
Matgaret Ellen Morris and now
of ,,( ords in the Registry of
Records in the City of Nassau
int Vel, 1 79 at pages 91 to 100
inclusive.
Meot tgage dated 30th
September 1966. MARGARET
ELLE N MORRIS to
International Bank and Trust
Co (Nassau) Ltd. Recorded in
Vol. 1039 pages 554 to 560.
EDted this 11th day of March,
A.D. 1974.
KIRK S. HINSEY
Pjhihc Auctioneer

C13931
KIRK S. HINSE Y will sell on
behalf of Nassau Bank & Trust
Ltd.. at the parking lot of
Nassau Bank House, 2nd.,
Terrace West Centreville on the
13th day of April 1974 at 1


BAHAMAS OBEDIENCE
TRAINING SCHOOL
Registration for classes will
take place April 23rd a* the
Sports Centre Oake, Field at 6
p.m.

I MARINE SUPPUES
Cl 11894
1969 31 ft. CHRIS R Ar "
Commander Sleeps six, priva
show--r, two 230 h.p engrins
with less than 200 hours.
vithcn'tte, qood cg'- d
Call 24267. 54011

:13913
15'ORLANDO Clipper .-id
trailer with 1973 1 15 hp.
Evintrude outb-otid FlIy,
equipped and ealdy t. go Cirll
Williarson 2453"9


C6728
57' DIESEL YACHT. Wheele,
with cockpit, twin Geneual
Motors 671 diesel, 12-i KW
generator. Machinery and
vessel completely refurbished.
Fully equipped, surveyed,
appraised realistically at
$65,000. Will sell or trade for
Bahama real estate, give ot take
difference.
N. Wolfson. P 0. Box 13021,
Port Everglades. Ft
Lauderdale, Fla. 33316
(524-4641).

SCHOOLS
C13695
LEWIS AUTO SCHOOL
Learn to drive with confidence.
Phone 59805 between 7 and
8.30 a.m. or after 6 p.m. or
35084 anytime.
C 13853
A FRIENDLY WELCOME
awaits you at the Peter Pan
Nursery, Bradley Street,
Palmdale. Hours 8 a m. to 5
p.m.. Monday through Friday.
Ages 2 to 5 accepted. Phone
5-8289.

[POSITION WANTED
C13861
BAHAMIAN young woman
high school education seeks
full or part time position as
cashier or sales clerk. Please
apply to P. 0. Box N1773.


C13922
CREW experienced wanted
before returning U.S. young
and fit. Some small boat
experience. Please write to:
Adv. C13922, c/o The Tribune,
P. 0. Box N-3207, Nassau.

HELP WANTED
C13860
LIVE-IN maid with references.
Write P. 0. Box !1112,
Nassau, Bahamas.

C13943
CAPTAIN and mate urgently
required for MV "San Salvador
Express". For interview call C.
N. Williams 31420 or 32695
after 5:30 p.m.

C13935
MAN needed to work at
coconut grove, situated at
Elbow Cay, Abaco. Must be
single between the ages 25 to
40. Call 2-2209 (9 a.m. to 5
p.m.).


TRADE SERVICES

C13696
T.V. ANTENNAS
Boosters for homes,
apartments and hotels
SALES AND SERVICES
Call 5-9404
WORLD OF MUSIC
Mackey Street
next to Frqnk's iPace


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV. TELEPHONE 21086 EXT. 5


TRADE SERVICES


I


b 0rtbunte


Nassau and Bahama Islands'

Leading Newspaper I

I -I


NASSMJ


K BUSINESS 6 PROFESSIONAL


DIRECTORY

Save Time


SHOP '

BY


PhONP

I i lslt I li Dictiny

I Lim ll rtitlth '61


Cill 21U 1EXI. 5

2 liu Pri Miht '11


I s CSAV' TIME SANEMONEY "

ANTENNAS MEN'S & BOYS' WEAR
Island TV 2-2618 .i The Wardrobe 5-5599
AUTOMOTIVE MEN'S WEAR
Lucas Batterip- Fashionette Ltd. 2-2376/7


Bay Street Garage 2-2434

BOOKSTORE
The Christian Book Shop
5-4506
BUSINESS FORMS
Executive
Printers 2-4267/5-401

CAMERAS
John Bull 2-4252/3:

ENTERTAINMENT '
Movies
Film & Equip. Service 2-2157
GARDEN & PET
SUPPLIES
Moderristic Garden
& Pet 2-2868
Nassau Garden & Pet
Montrose Avenue 2-4259
HARDWARE
John S. George 2-8421/6

HOUSE PLANS
Evangelos G. Zervos 2-2633

LAUNDRY
DRY CLEANING
-New Oriental Laundry
2-4406

TO LIST IN
THIS DIRECTORY
CALL 2-1986 or 2-2768


MUSIC
Cody's Records 2-8500

OPTICIANS
Optical Service Ltd. 2-3910,/

PRINTING


Wong's Printing
Executive
Printers


5-45CG


2-4267/5-4011


RADIO & T.V. SALES
Carter's Records 2-4711

RUBBER STAMPS
Wong's Rubber Stamp
Co. 5-4506
SPORTS GOODS
Champion Sport Land 2-1862

TRAVEL


Playtours


2-2931/7


R. H. Curry & Co.,
2-8681/7
TRUCKING SERVICE
Gonzalez Trucking
3-1562/2-4726
TV REPAIRS
Channel Electronics Ltd.
3-5478
WINDOW/DOOR REPAIR
Window & Door Specialists
5-4460


C13691

Pinder's Customs

Brokerage Ltd.

Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. 0. Box N3714
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-3796
2-3797, 2-2798
Airport 7-7434
FREE ESTIMATES

C13700
SEWING MACHINE
PARTS AND REPAIRS
Island Furniture Co.
P. 0. Box N-4818Nassau.
Dowdeswell and Christie Streets
Telephone 21197, 23152

C13702
FOR your building needs ane
CRANE hire see:
ISLAND BUILDERS LIMITED
P. 0. Box N-4559
Phone 31671 31672.


HELP WANTED

C15010
SENIOR MARINE
SUPERINTENDENT WITH
AN EXCESS OF TWENTY
YEARS SEA-GOING
SERVICE ON TANKER-TYPE
CRAFT. MUST POSSESS
CURRENTLY MASTER
PAPERS AND MUST HAVE
HAD EXPERIENCE AS A
MASTER OF FOREIGN
GOING VESSELS. MUST
EVIDENCE ALSO
EXPERIENCE IN PILOTAGE
PORT MANAGEMENT AND
ADMINISTRATION
INCLUDING HARBOUR-
MASTER DUTIES AT
TERMINAL OR
BUNKERAGE. BAHAMIANS
ONLY NEED APPLY
APPLY P.O. BOX F-2530.
FREEPORT. TEL.
373-3956.


'IF THEIR STUFF BREAKS 50 EASY, HOW
CQ E MY CALL IT 'NAOWA,4e' 1


CLASSIFIED


GRAND BAHAMA




CLASSIFIED

II FlEihrtT TEL. 352-111


FOR THE ACTION YOU WANT



Shop Nassau Merchants

For Business And Services


WQ4, rV04 l~~


-r-


IsI


1974


PARTY. PARTY!
Anniversary, Wedding.
Birthda,. Cocktail
or Dinner
('all Lawrence
and The Boys
We specialize in
VIP Serving.
Price: $25.00
Phone 51256
Box 5263. FS

C13910
EASTER IS NOT FAR AWAY!!
Copies of "BAHAMIAN
JOTTINGS" (by Bahamian
born ,', i.:dne-Irr,,3 Kemp
Johnstone) will make popular
anrd interesting gifts for mailing
to expatriate friends and
relatives. AT BOOK STORES
AND THE LINEN SHOP,
where they can be
autographed.

WANTS TO BUY

C13901
WANTED- ALL BOATS!!!
Boats any old boats Please
contact Peter John telephone
31891.,31881 or 31889.

LOST
I C13912
In Blair area and missed by
young owners, male cat named
"Oscar" White with black
spots, black tail and ears.
Reward Offered. Phone
3-2732.

PETS
C13R91


~: i


HELP WANTED
C 15011
Drive In Body & Paint Shop
Limited has vacancy for one
(1) MECHANIC with not less
than five (5) years experience
in all phases of auto repair
work, e.g. Auto Air-conditio-
ning, Automatic Transmission,
etc.. Bahamian only need
apply.
Grenville Drive & Wimpole
Street. Telephone 352-2002, P.
0. Box F-1340, Freeport,
Grand Bahama.









Wednesday, March 20, 1974


UhP (rtbunt


'YOU'RE TOO YOUNG TO JOIN THE NAVY...


"I assume you'll recommend a foot doctor."


CROSSWORD
PUZZLE
ACROSS
1. Theca 29 French
4. Limited friend
7. Urchins 30. Decompose
11. Arrowroot 31. Silver fir
12. Chalice 32. Compact
13. Low tide 35. High in the
14. Trailing vine scale
16. Silkworm 36. Boy's
17. Anthology nickname
18. Prevent 37. Priest's cap
19. Wall painting 41. One of the
21. Kimono sash caravels
22. Article 42. Turmoil
23. Chapel 43. Eternity
27. Easing of 44. Later
international 45. Hankering
relations 46. Insecticide


-CARROLL RIGHTER'S



from the Carroll Rightr Institute
S GENERAL TENDENCIES: As spring arrives
interesting planetary positions are in effect
which can enable you to go after your most ambitious goals
without delay. Be alert to modern trends and study whatever
of such you do not fully understand.
ARIES (Mar 21 to Apr 19) Work on your most cherished
aims and gain the right results with them Accept any.
invitations of a social nature at this time.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Go after your career aims
with enthusiasm and get the right results now Talk with those
who can be of great help to you now
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Entering a new activity now
can bring you greater benefits in the future Confer with
business experts for the data you need
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Make sure you
keep the promises you have made to others and gain their
goodwill Handle official matters intelligently
LEO (July 22 to Aug 21) Talk over your ideas with
associates and make the future much brighter. Improve your
image with the public. Relax at home tonight.
VIRGO (Aug 22 to Sept. 22) Talk with co-workers about
ways to increase production and have more profits, Improve
your appearance Do nothing irrational.
LIBRA (Sept 23 to Oct. 22) Think of ways to enjoy
yourself more in the future Try to be a leader instead of a
follower Be sure to pay your bills on time.
SCORPIO (Oct 23 to Nov. 21) Elevate your consciousness
and then see how to please family more Find the right
appliances to make your home more comfortable.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 to Dec 21) You have definite
ideas concerning how you want to organize the future, so talk
them over with associates Be logical.
CAPRICORN (Dec 22 to Jan 20) Making sure to decide
how to change and handle financial matters for the future is
wise. Use good common sense in all activities,
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb 19) Plan how to make the
future brighter for yourself Contact persons you like the
most. Evening is fine for attending the social.
PISCES (Feb 20 to Mar. 20) You have fine ambitious plans
and must follow through with them, so start action early on
such Avoid one who annoys you
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY he or she will have
a vision that enlarges as the years advance, plus an awareness
and understanding of new trends in the world Give as fine an
education as you possibly can so that your progeny will take a
rightful place in the world Teach to be more independent
early in life Sports are a natural here
"The Stars impel, they do not compel" What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


Winning

Bridge
by VIu, OR MOLLO
Losing witn Dad cars is vex-
ing. ,Loing witn ,ood ones is
humiliatinK, lor taere is always
tne suspicion that the iauit,
dear irutus, is in ourselves, not
i our stars, tnat we are under-
lings.' Here s an example:
Dealer South;: botn vul.
North
4 10 '1 2
V 7 53
0 10 6 4 3
South
*AKQJ
v 8 2
V AK QJ
*AKQ
South North
20(
dp9 2tiT

Picking up a 29 point hand
isn t an everyday experience and
boutht does well not to allow it
to go to his head.
voeat leads tne UK, Q and
1U to Easts ,,A. How should
bouth play ?
Confronted with a problem c'i
paper. ou.ta will douotless solve
it. in real life. miost outhls will
ruff and proceed to draw trump-i.
Should they breaiK 4-2-tfne
liKely distbriut.on--ey wiJ go
down.
West East
5 3 4 8 9 8 6 4
SK Q 10 v AJ 9 6 4
Q9754 106
*J 9 87 52
Once South has ruffed, trump
control will pass to East. And
yet, all South need do to ensure
thle contract is not to ruff t ane
third heart. Let him discard a
wrnner-any ace will do-and he
will remain in control. A fourth
heart can be rutted in dummy.


mAou mum Ban
ME. DOEA MonI
uwXoUmugIo


muSnNOWNU
E L. ABUIK
oCU PSTME OR
Eum num T DunE
UTION F mETEDY'w UZL


DO
1 Healt
2. Strait


time 22 min. AP Newsfeatures

Rupert and


NN 5. Space suit
*N 6. Existed
th resort 7. Certain
n 8. Only
t club 9. Couple
ly 10. Falling out
, o 15. Not patriotic
19. Arab's coat
* --- 19. Halfway W F
20. Western A I
Indian
21. Bronze
23. Baseball I
great
24. Neglected M E
2S 26 25. Meadow
barley
26. Certainly word must c
28. Doze letter, and tu
31. Brother of least one eight-
list. No plurals
Moses no proper n
32. Without: Fr. TARGET : 2
H,, 26 words, very
S 33.Hodgepodge excellent. Solu
39 40 34. Curtain
material YESTERDAy
S material Aloe also cail
37. Cove coal COALLBS
38. Orf lasso leal less
lose loss sale a
39. Bushy clump sole sola sola
3.2 40. Insect
the Ice Crackers--7


FJ

-r-

N


HOW many
words of
f o u r letters
or more can
you make
from the
letters shown
h e r e? In
making a
word, each
letter may
be used once
on ly. Each


contain the large
here must be at
*letter word In the
; no foreign words;
names. TODAY'S
1 words, good :
, good ; 35 words.
itlon tomorrow.
'8 SOLUTION :
I cell class close
SS cole lace lass
local locale loeom
scale seal sell sloe
ce sole.


Rather unwillingly Rosliambles across to should take him home." With a peevish grunt
there unwilling group. ShegaRosze at odgy who has Rosalie is about to lead Podgy away when
slowly sagged to the ground and is now Rupert notices she is carrying a small,
lowlying agnst a tre groHe's shamming I brightly-coloured pouch. I've seen that
nfts Rosalie. He wants everyone to feel before I he crhes. I know I It's Jack Frost's I
sorry forhime. "No, some hard lumps of snow Did he give you the pouch, Rosalie ? "
really fell on him," says Rupert.,'I think you ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


2 smsLmma


Chess


S9919 i
Black (to move) was
threatened with the apparently
crushing R x RP ch in this
Russian tournament game, but
found a surprise resource which
not only saved the game but
won it. Can you spot Black's
next move, and work out how
the game finished ?
Par times: 10 seconds. Grand
Master; 20 seconds, chess master;
1 minute, expert; 2 minutes,
county player; 4 minutes, club
standard; 7 minutes, average;
20 minutes, novice.
Chess Solution
Black won by I . B--5!; 2
R RP ch, K-Kt4; 3 P-R4 ch,
K-Kt5; 4 Q xB ch, K-R6: 5
Kt-B4 ch, QxKt! and White
resigned because if 6 Q x Q, R R
mate.













USE

(he (Tribune

CLASSIFIED

ADVTS.


No 27it7 hV 'riM MIAKAV
Across
1. Poller .eciallt. (9I)
8. One of the conuueror's imen.
9. Running rito (3. V. 4
M1. Semi-tronplal fruits (4
14 Zon animal 13)
Ii. Creed. (6)
IB Volesno. (41
ll. Metal. (4) to. ('old. ) t4*
'I. Part of speech. (4t
t2. Containers. (4)
23 One kind of hank (5)
Down
I. Write a note. (4 I. 4)
2. ChanmpionshlD lhlt. (5. 41
:. Just rliht for onur elevenmer.
(6. 3)
4 Thlnkina. 1()
5. Delivery vehicle. (13
If. Curtain. (3 2. 4)
7 Rubbish shot ere. (4)
IK 6 ( ai hhe.
43)
I. 4 and"


ta


STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD


YOU KNOW-AS SOON AS
I'M FREE- YOU'RE.
PRACTICALLY BEHIND BARS'








MOT
NECESSARILY


WN. TUAT6 ALL


f^WW*^


Saunders & Overgard


-e Comic Pae



REX MORGAN, M.D. Dal Curtis

MR ^THANK YOU FOR PERHAPS I SHOULDN'T HAVE DONE I FEEL HE'S JUST GOT TO GIVE
RETURNING MY THIS--- BUT I TOLD THE GOVERNOR JANIE A LITTLE BIT OF HIS
MrS SIMONS ? THIS CALL, DOCTOR / THAT YOU ASKED TO TIME / YOU WON'T LET HIM
15 DR MORGAN E HIM WHEN WE CATCH E IN THIS WHITE LIE,













JUDGE PARKER Paul Nichols

STRAND WAS PICKED UP NEAR HER AND STRAND HAS A HISTORY OF ABBEY SPENCER'S TIME FOR ABBEY!
ON A D AND D ABOUT TWO OE? BEATING UP WOMEN! AS A OUTSIDE, JUDGE! SHE
OURS AFTER EDNA BOWDEN MATTER OF FACT, THAT'S WHY WONDERS WHETHER
WAS KILLEDHE'S IN PERSON NOW! THE LAST YOU'D HAVE TIME TO
ONE HE BEAT UP DIED!/SEE HER FOR A
A R E BFEW MANUTEK ?










A APARTMENT 3-G BI Al! A KotkJD S


GET -]











Uhr ~rThuur


Wednesday, March 20, 1974


HIGH HOPES



FOR JAMAICA



GAMES


THil BAHAMAS Amateur
Athletic Association has
accepted otficial invitations to
participate in the 1974 (Caritta
Ganiies at the Jamaica National
Stadium bheginnine April 15.
It is the first (Cantrita (;ames
in which an Independernt
Bahamias will c [ompeteC and the
B.A.A.A. has high hope's that
public support and athletic
coimp titltlon will he it the
highest calihbrt .
In order, thc ercftrec, to select
thc f-Cst nisn ,i' al t tI I i n. lIlic
B A -\ \ A wdnsI all athletes in
and out of scho"Iols ito
participate iPin the liinei ti iils tor
track and l rcld C1ntIts i hc
held April i at thic Queen
I-li/a, cth Spt rtis ( entire
('omipelliton tor the (ti.iries
will be categ.'ri/cd in(ideC twoI
headings contesl.ints undcr 17
and udtei 201
h lle fullistrength of the
national team will he 33
athletess (hosen h tlire
B ..A A. the\ ill be made up
ot 10 bos under the agie of 20,
12 girls under thc age ol 20
three ho\s undt'e the agce it 17
anid tws girls idcr tie age I' it
17.


I he B \ A
special appei l

partiipitc in


\ has miade a
ut all athletes in
I slands to
the tlile trials


Plans 'ire uniderwav for :iti
athletes in the school system to
be informed ol these trials.
Parents anid guardians ot
Bahanuan athletes studying
abroad s, hii meet the age
conditions .arrekscd to contact
M r Ke nneth Adderley.
director of public relations for
the B.A.A -A., immediately so
that these athletes may be
considered in the selection of
the tcnii.
All ages iare to be reckoned
Irons DecAtltrber 3 1 1974, and
since c' iipt itilon is expected
to he ke''rn. all interested
athletes arc iskcd to continue
hI i i t S'I i iils tri ai ning
priog .ainn'- so ti hat the h st
possible tIia ris will he selected
oin \pril6.
Slist ito t hC 'vents are: Boys
under 20 100 in. 200 in, 400
in. SOO0 inI 1500 mn, 3000 mI.
high timnlp 10ne ii0tnip. triplC
Jiuilp'. shot 0 sputt, discus, javelin.
pole vault, I 10 in hurdles. 400
in hurdles, 4 \ 100 rela\ and 4
\ 400 rela.ns
('ir is uinte! 20 100 mn, 200
in. 400 in, >I00 in. high tump.
lonng r1iufp. shot puI tt, disc ti.,
raVlin. 100 Ti hurdles. 4 x 00
in relay, 4 \ 400 m relay. Boys
under 17-100 in. 200 mi, 400
i, girls und cr 1-100 in. arid
200 mI


CARACAS World
he a v vwig h t boxing
champion George Foreman
and challenger Ken Norton
were pronounced tit today
for their bout next Tuesda%
Doctors examined both
fighters at the dome-shaped
Caracas Poliedro Stadium.
where the fight is scheduled
to take place The Poliedro
has a seating capacity for
13,500 people.
Norton, who was the first
to be examined, was
completely normal" and in
"fine condition," the doctors
said.
And Ithey said Foreman
was, inI "perfect" shape as
well.
"I am lit and read\ toi
whip Foreiman said the
2,-..car-old challenge ir "I ani
sure Iof a victory because I


have confide nce in myself
and I arminien tall prepared.'"
Norton said.
The call enger weighed
217 pounds at ter the medical
examination.
He said t he weight was
good at this pointer because he
could easily reduce to 210
pounds his figlitinu weight
in time for t he fight.
"I feel ca Iin and cool,"
F orem'ana replied when
quest ioned about his
condition before the medical
check.
The 25-yea r-old champion
walked around the news
built, 13,500-seat, covered
stadium shaking hands and
signing autographs.
Norton Aon boxing
fame wlihen lie broke
e x- eha inpionii Muhammnad
Ali's jaw


Ball juniors




play it safe


By GLADSTONE THURSTON
THE RULES governing amateurism
accepted by the Bahamas Olympic Association
have made the current Bahamas Baseball
Association's senior league series a 'play at
your own risk' situation for the juniors.
Ihe many young ball players who were
looking forward to making their long awaited
debut into tht' senior league now seem to have
adopted a wait and see attitude.
Three prominent high school athletes have
been banned from competing in
inter-scholastic sports because of their
participation in the current B.B.A. series.
Research led to the understanding that the
B.O.A. disapproved of the ethics of the
baseball association in that the B.B.A. allowed
retired professionals to participate in their
series.
It was pointed out by the president of tlie
Olympic Association that the Bahamas, being a
member of the International Olympic


It's Saunders and


,t:Nt(; Anthony Saunders
was superb on his six-year-old
rnouni Sun Tiger.
\niong the last to leave the
gatcs inm the fifth and featured
iace yesterdayy at Hobby Horse
race track. Saunders steered to
tirst place over nine furlongs
winning the Bahamas Printing
and iltho ('up.
With stiff competition
corning from Last Hope.
Saunrders took the lead on
reaching the five furlong mark,
opened up two furlongs later
and heading into the home
stretch heat out Fleet Foot
b\ three quarters of a length.
I or Saunders. it marked his
21st win of the season. For
trainer l)udley Lewis it was his
second cup race triumph of the
month. Sun Tiger is owned bh
Jenson Iaylor.
Results and payoffs for the
22nd meet.
I IRtS I RA.I 5 I uriongs
I. i,,, Ne t s (9) J. Horton-
-13.7 5 ,.3 5,. $2 (5S


Sun Tiger


2. it dra (7) S. it Neil ,s5. 5.
,4.45.
3. I ad ('Cleo (1) \. .hbhs
$3.90.
Sl CONI) 1. Lad\ Lucks (5) J.
fitrlron S32.05. $15.30. 5K.45
2. Shanadoah (7) Ant.
Saunders $9.40, $6.15.
3. Red t'igg Bank (') J. ilain
S9.25.
I t11tI RA'C i, t Iurl)niigs
1. Boston Rose (). N
S\,eeting $2.45, $2.35, $3.40
)arts I)ouble (9 5) $63 45 I irst
Q)uinellia (5 7) S 1 1 11 s.
2. Julies I o 1 I 3) (,. ljiin
52.35. $2 65.
3. li)oe Doe (4) M. llo\ n
S 1.05
Second Q)uinella (7 9) 57.75.
1 OURTit 'kAC( 5 irlinhgs
1. Ms Diear (7) A. Sauinders
$2.5, $2.65, S2.15
2. S\weetness No\\ (9) S.
M1Neil 53.30. $2.30.
3. leaping Lena (8) I' Siiiiis1
Q2 30.
I hlrdl uinella (7-9) $7.75.
t II Til RAC -(' Furlongs
I Siun lier (7) Ant. Sandifrs


Lyle battles to 12


$22.35. $ 14.55. $6.65.
2. i leet I oot (I) J. Hain $3.95,
$3.95.
3. Dora's Hope (3) ;B. Bain
$6 15.
Iourth Ouinella (1-7) $42.00
SIXTH RACF 6 I uriongs
1. Valdez (3) G(. Bain $3.10,
S3.75, $315.
2. ROman Dancier (I) J.
I lortin $ I5.80, $5 .40.
3. Strictly (4) ('. Munnings
S3.60
I fifth Quiilella ( 1 3) $35.00
SI-VI-N It R.A I 6 1 uriongs
1. I'c tChild (S) J- Hotiton
$14.60, $2.55. $2.75
2. Puetr. In Motion (5) -G.
ruain $2.10, $2.50.
3. Raingo' Imave (1) A. Gihhs
S2.90
Sixth q)uinella (5-8) $3.45
-ICtif It RAC( 4", uriongs
1. Thie outsiderr (7) S. McNeil
$15.35, $6.05, $3.60.
2. Aunt ('Io (8) R. tlevitt
Si 1.35, $5.20.
3. 51oon Maiden (1) it.
\,Uoodsidc $5.60.
Ses'itlti )ticlliti (7 8) $S157.25.


Association had to live up to certain laws set
down by the international association if the
Bahamas wanted to compete internationally.
He noted that players in the current B.B.A.
series were infringing a ruling which states that
anyone who has been a professional or has
played against professionals knowingly will not
be eligible for Olympic competition.
"You will find that this is unfortunate for
some of the people who believe that 'well, I'm
not really a professional because I'm playing
baseball for fun.' But as you are well aware
there are a number of people on the baseball
roster who are in fact professionals," said Mr.
Arlington Butler.
"So. baseball cannot claim to be an amateur
league if it allows professionals to participate.
We know that most teams wait for the return
of their professional ball players to get them
moving.
"Therefore, the people who play in the
baseball league run the risk of losing their
amateur status."


However, it would seem that
competitors in the junior
league of the B.B.A. are
protected as the president said
that he was unaware of any
professional participation
therein. "At the moment as far
as I am aware, it's strictly for
the senior league," he said.
Mr. Butler said the situation
has reached the stage whereby
"the baseball association and
the amateur association is
going to have to sit down and
work out a condition whereby
we can clear up this whole
situation.
Until such time transpires -
if it ever will baseball in the
Bahamas can very well come to
a standstill since the young ball
players, threatened with
amateurism, find it difficult to
make a move to the senior
league.
The B. B. A. themselves
seemed more interested in the
young ball players and so as to
/avoid further conflict
reinstated to the amateur ranks
their former, pros who ceased
playing professionally for one
or more seasons.
"I have always been and will
always be a strong supporter of
baseball. .


- round


decision over Bonavena


I) NVI R, ('olorado
Ileavyweig.hlt Ris L Ie battled
his wa\ to a 1 2-round
unanimous decision last night
over Argentin c Oscar Bonavena
i a bout iin hiitch neither man
was able tol put the other to
the canvas.
The victors boosted the
record ot .. lIc, ranked fifth by
the World Buo\ing Association.
toS 27-1-1 arnd sparked hiis
hopes for all c''vntual shot it
the hCea\\vcwightn crown. IThe
slugging Bonl.ini a is 1nows()
59-9t- I.
Lyle used Is 2i-'Inch reach


advantage to clip the Bonaverina
repeatedly with lefts in tihe
later rounds. The D)enver pro
dazed Bonavcna in the 10th
and Illth rounds, but was
unable to score a knockdown.
Bonavena opened the bout
by moving quickly in on Lylec
with a round house left. He
followed up with numerous
left hooks ard uppercuts
through the first two rounds
before taking to the detence as
Lyle retaliated.
Referee Joe Ullmner
repeatedly separated the two
from clinches during the last
eight rounds.
Lyle came in at 216 pounds
and Bonavena at 207.
Lyle bruised Bonavena
under the right eye in the sixth
round, and Bonavena's face
remained puffy the rest of the
way. The Argentinian was
dazed by a roundhouse right
from his opponent, who is tour
inches taller, but Lyle wasn't
able to follow tip effectively.
"One time I had hini going
in the eighth round." Lyle said,
"But I couldn't get to him. I
wasn't sharp, and I didn't have


it (the knockout punch)."
Bonavena said Lyle was
"REALLY TOUGI(H'" anid
compares with former
champions Joe Frazier and
Muhammad Ali, both ot whom
Bonavena has fought.
Lyle was penalized one
point for a deliberate low blow
but when the bell for No. 11
sounded Bonavena appeared
recovered.
Ring referee Ullnier scored it
52-46, while Ray Keech had it
56-55 and Danny Loos 55-51.
Attendance was 10,807. (AP)



LONDON Results in
English soccer league games
yesterday:
Division Two:
Blackpool 2 Bristol City 2
1-ulham 0 Middlesbrough 4
West Bromwich 2 Hull 3
IDivisini iict-
Bristol Rovers I \\rex har 0
Oldham 4 Bournemouth 2
Shrevwsbury 3 Charlton 3
Walsall 2 Hialifax 2
Division Four:
Colchester I Bury
Rotherhain 1 oncaster 2
Scunthorpe i Darlington 0


4ow, 0;v, -47 w

SPECIALIZING IN
rA

ANTENNA



SERVICE





TV


RE-PAIRS



Ad

WORLD OF MUSIC

r-D-F '"Will
WAS ------- Aw


A' 0
FREEPORT Judo meets twice weekly. Tuesday
instruction for young and old evenings for advanced and
is just one of the activities adult students, and Saturday
currently being offered by afternoon for the youngsters.
the Grand Bahama YMCA. Here, "Scoobie" Rolle
The judo programme, instructs Michelle and Nicola
which is under the expert Bereaux. two enthusiastic
leadership of Black Belt rated beginners.
instructor "Scoobie" Rolle.


Foreman, Norton


fit for clash


ST. AUGUSTINE'S
College graduate Fletcher
Lewis (pictured), now a
student of Fairbury Junior
College. Nebraska, last
week became the junior
college long jump
champion with a leap of
24ft 2'/2 ins.


NOTICE
NOTICE i hereby give that MRS OLIVE MAY GREEN
0 P 0 Box N4903 Nj-.,. Njharmas is a pplying to the
Mi-itcti irsporsible f,oi Nationality and C citizenship, for
'qistr tin as j cati., ,,f The Bahamas, and that any
Df5so5, who knows any ,e sri why registratit son should not
be gi.rnitcd should snd j writteri arnd signed statement of
thre facts within twenty- eight days from the 20th day of
Mjich. 1974 to Thfi Minite y responsible f2or Nationality
,rid C0iti/enship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box
N 3002. Nassau.


SPECIAL EVENT FARE


for

THE PRIME MINISTER'S

BIRrII DAY

CELEBRATION
Freeport, Grand Bahama

MARC4 M23,1974

$68.00

ROUND TRIP

NASSAU/ FREE PORT

Birthday Dinner Ticket must be shown at time of air ticket purchase of qualify
for this special fare.

BaeaMasao i
Reservations Telephone 7-8511 (six lines)


The World Famous

Trade Winds Bar & Lounge

takes pleasure in presenting

THE SENSATIONAL



FR[DD0I MUNNINGS JRt


SHOWTIMES NIGHTLY: 10:40 & 12:40

Make the evening complete with a gourmet dinner
in the Imperial Dining Room.
Dinner from 7:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.


bI ra(j(B1se



IIand I^


9IT,",~y