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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03570
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: March 18, 1974
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03570

Full Text










BDUDLEY'S
COR. ROSETTA ST. & MT. ROYAL AVE.


PIONEER IS HERE!


fRgistered with Postmaster of Bahamas for postage
VOL. LXXI, No. 97


e ovt
concessions withinthe Bahamas) Nassau a7hiibitBahama Islands Leading Newspaper
e cNo
:e count Monday March 18, 1974


LUCAS C.A.V. GIRLING

BATTERIES
,-r other ORIGINAL Spares

BAY STREET GARAGE
)Wl)t SW L'-.I ST. PIIONE 2-2434


Price: 20 Cents


happenn be
in a mid-'


five. 3alam n to blame for promiscuity -cartoonist
S mother died at 3ar
eti -d time but they had the By NICKI KELLY for the poor guilty of films shown viewed the tourist industry in a this level were black, Mr. Saunders said
kept The Tribune lree. THE BLAME for the promiscuity here. predominantly positive light, these people had not been properly
- Some time after I b that pervades Bahamian life must rest "We have to examine the taste of Besides its value as a source of trained by a catering school. They
foreigner suggested with Bahamians not the tourist our people to see why they prefer the employment, amenities established to therefore acted in this fashion because
f print both e j'r industry, cartoonist lddJre Minnis kind of movies being brought in," Mr. please the visitor often provided t th they felt they were in a subservient
I tu r charged Friday night in an Minnis declared. impetus for cultural development, position.
42 t f - Interdenominational Christian Youth HYPOCRISY
Ct1I n l adbil.-oi B Bahanmians were a npnneople who From Goombav Summer he noted On the negative side, Mr. Saunders


MLdO"--


charged


A FO(RMI R R\D)l'
BAHAMAS disc jockey linkc
by police with the d.rir
hold-up of two ('hla
Manhattan Bank mcsscng.c'rs
the Frecport Intc'rnatlion
Airport on Ilridai\. .Janll;li
25, was arraigned in lihc Iow,
tourt today.
Cleveland "Cleve" Rodiers,
player and also tlic head coach
the recently suspended (lassiic PI
basketball tean., was chaigeie1 bet
Magistrate I:nlianuliel ()s;itldc
with armed lobbei, anid i 1
fireartns to cominult ai' iottlllie
The charge t.icitces Rodgeli,
of being conilc'tri \t iti
another person, bilte hiichv It.
unknown to police at I1 Il:t
The 2 ; ',i r Stifec 'sp 1' l r 1
t i ., i0 ll , ,: ;! ;i ,
a t torncys. McI sr- i',',
Christie and Julian 1:.I. ni.rdi
shortly after 1 I i l
Police .ic t"lIcs Rod o'r.
dressed this imorniing itn i
coloured p aisle print
three-piece 'alki' siit \\ i .i
matching sh.rt an I red .,shliot
ol taking pai iii tli hlud-itip o
Greg llanna and 'ldne) linkcir
Hanna and inkerr. bIth
Chase M anhattan Iank
employees were reportcdll


) RODGERS
t
HELD IN

t FREEPORT

AIRPORT

HOLD-UP

< CASE


ie li' SID)N.Y "ORSETT

hldd 'ip h\ two masked'l auied
It.. i %l i, 1'T dd 0 oi



S~ k, ;iakii] delivc er of
i; ,i.'" h, I w, h h as
c', oias 'ne t)o the Chiase
lManhattan Rank's ''Irecport

R,'dg-i; s. i'cesi d last week
,\ poli I' t)l'cf ei's .i the Nassaui
It.: t.i ,i un l Airplort. wasi
Iciii'"' 1 I it tuiuo h\ bhv Ml .
;i'. i' "' ii 'ri n.v I m the date
s it i a preliminary inquiry.N
I'lehnui n.ir> hearings into (Ihe
hlild-iiu are to take place
Nbetore Magistrate Kenneth
\li, :\iisleral t I re port.


CIGARETTES UP
ALL AMERICAN brands of cigarettes went utp in price
here today by 3 cent a pack retail and 5 cents from vending
machines.
A spokesman for Solomon Brothers, whv'olesale importers
of cigarettes and cigars, said the UIS increase was "purely a
manufacturers' increase."
Cartons of American brands \which contain 10 individual
packs have gone up from $4.41 to $4.65 and the 100s,
which are extra long. have gone up from S4.69 to $4.90.
Individual retail packets will now sell for 53 cents
(previously 50 cents), with the extra long brands jumping
to 58 cents from 55 cents.
Canadian ind English brands ot cigarettes are still selling
at the same price, the spokesman said



Arabs lift US


oil emb

VIENNA The Alabs
decided today\ to lilt the oil
embargo they imposed onl tihe
United States fi\c montlis agti
as a political weapon lo wiin
favourable peace terms in thel
Middle Fast.
But a spokesman for nine
key Arab states said the oil
ministers of the Arab countries
would review their decision at
a June I meeting in Cairo.
The United States was
getting about 10 to 14 per cent
of its oil front Arab prodtiucIs
before the boycott \was
imposed.
Oil experts said it would
take between six and eight
weeks for Arab oil to reach ilte
United States.
U.S. energy officials had no
immediate cotnlllent oil I he
lifting of the embargo.
There was no mention inm
today's announcement whether
similar oil embargoes imposed
against the Netherlands. South
Africa, Portugal and Rhodesia
also would be lifted.
Saudi Arabia's oil minister
said his country, the biggest
Arab oil producer, initiated
lifting the restriction against
the United States. Sheik

AT

SEE
US SMILE WHILE
YOU SAVE

K USAVE!





.N K ..


Pargo

Ahnmedt /aki l allani said most

retpiescented i h'nr gave their
supl ot l ib a anid Syria did
not
I bll a had opposed lifting
the embhaigol because it claimed
l .iliit-'l'ti.. 's police rem gained
directed against the Arabs.
Syria was against having the
oil weaponn abandoned before
Israel agreed to withdraw its
forces from the SN rian
lei i rito c'apt urged i the
October \wa,
The iinisteis iceting today
relprcscnled Algeria, Abu
l)habi. Bahrain., I g pti, Ku\aait,
I ibta. Qatar. Saudi iArabia and
S Iia. (AP)


CLFVE RO)GERS
I:x-disc jockey
Defence attorneys Christie
and Maynard this morning
made application that the
court allow Rodgcrs bail. But.
police prosecutor, Chief
Inspector Okell C. Cartwright
objected.
Mr. Osadebay in turn left it
open for Freeport Magistrate
MacAlister to deal with the
matter of allowing hail.
Informning the defence that it
would be left open to them to
reapply when the hearing
opens at Grand Bahama.
Mr. Christie, in his request
tor h.il. told the court that the
matter is one which has been
eoing on for several weeks
luringg that time, Rodgers
has made no attempt to
abscond," Mr. Christie said.
chief f Insp. Cartwright
however, said that the police
have not ended their
investigations into the robbery
as yet lie also told the court
that Rodgers, when arrested by
police, was at the Nassau
International Airport.
"lie was travelling at the
time." he told the court. Mr.
Cartwright said he was also
objecting as police had received
information that the accused
had planned to abscond in the
event he was allowed bail by
the court.
"I also ask you to take into
consideration the grvaity of
this offence." he told the
iiagisl rate.
But, defence attorney Julian
Maynard told the court that
although the police had picked
his client up at the airport, the
prosecutor failed to state that
he was on a return flight from
Miami and was not leaving New
Providence as could have been
implied.
lie told the magistrate that
Rodgers has been in custody
for one week already and
before Iis arrest, has been held
for questioning by authorities
on several occasions.


Suez sweep

THll STATF Department
says that at the request of
Egypt the United States will
help sweep mines from the
Sue ('anal. (AP)


One ot eight panellists disc
the social effects of tourism o
p''ional character, Mr. Minnis
illegitimacy, broken marria
S.en studding :'nd women bree
all exsited be ire tourism
foothold in the Bahan.as.
"The immorality was there ...
blame other people for our prol
Let us carry our own guilt an<
our own responsibilities,"
cartoonist challenged.
Bahamians, he said, were lazy.
had adopted a "something
nothing" attitude which was
improved by the example set b:
country's leaders, who "str
around like peacocks enjoying
new found wealth without
sweating."
Nor could the tourists be I


Hungry

for

Kordel
MANY of our readers,
who have been following
Lelord Kordel's "Eat and
Grow Younger" series in
The Tribune, have written
for a copy of his
"Better-Eating Plan", which
has been prepared in
connection with this series.
This pamphlet is now on
order and as soon as copies
arrive at The Tribune, the
"Better-Eating Plan" will be
mailed to those readers who
have sent self-addressed
stamped envelopes to this
newspaper.
When Mr. Kordel's
popular book, "Eat and
Grow Younger," arrives at
The Tribune it will be
advertised and made
available to our readers.
This book is now on order.

Manpower

picture

THE Ministry of Education
and Culture is presently
compiling information in
order to project a factual
picture of the nation's
manpower over a period of
years, government announced
today.
To facilitate this project.
students studying abroad or
their parents or guardians are
asked to submit the following
information to the planning
division of the Ministry of
Education.
Name of students studying
abroad: college and
universities and disciplines of
same.
Names of students
studying abroad below GCE
"A" level standard.
Names of related high
schools, colleges and
universities of students within
the first two categories.
The Ministry has suggested
that students intending to
enter institutions abroad
inform the Ministry of
Education before their
admission to the university.

Fighting again

ISRAt -Ii and Syrian
artillery clashed for the se\ nth
straight day on the (;alan
Heights. and each side claimed
the other started the fighting.
(APi


professed to be Christian and were
not. "We are not ignorant of the kind
of moral stands we should allow to
govern our lives, but we prefer to hide
behind the convenient form of
hypocrisy that religion has become."
Mr. Minnis pointed out that without
a cheap source of labour, the Bahamas
had no real alternative to tourism. He
was highly critical therefore of the
approach taken by many to those who
came here to rest, relax and recover
from the stresses of life elsewhere.
The Bahamian attitude was to see
how much he could"get out o' tlhe
tourist with little thought given to him
as a person.
Helping the visitor to the Bahamas
gain a new lease on life should be a
challenge, he declared.
Law student in.tlon Saunidrcr also


had arisen a folklore show which is
attended by more Bahamians than
tourists.
As an international resort, the
Bahamas also attracted serious
educational symposiums, the most
recent one being the conference on
drug abuse. Further, Mr. Saunders
added, tourism is a "clean,
non-polluting" industry.
Tourists who came here initially as
visitors often stayed to invest. "The
cross-fertilization that tourists bring
with them is healthy." he said. and
contributed to the cosmopolitan
character of the country.
He however deplored the aggressive
attitude displayed towards the white
visitor by lower level workers in the
tourist industry.
Noting that most Bahamians at


MAJOR MURDER:



APPEAL DISMISSED


Till- API'Pt Al. Wendell
"Red" Burrows, 25, and Philip
"Polka" Ilumnc s. 20. against
their conviction in the 1972
Perpall Tract murder of I \1I
supporter Barry Major has been
rejected.
Appeals courtt Judge Sir
Paget Bourkc dismissed the
three grounds of appeal by
Burrows and lumes and ruled
that presiding judge Janmes
Smith had acted propcrlx on
the basis of the evidence.
Burrows and Major argued
that the ver,licts were against
the weight of thc evidence.
secondly that the Judge
wrong admitted their
statements in evidence and
third that the Judge
misdirected the jury witli
regard to the evidence by othici
witnesses.
Burrows further claiined
that the Judge "inisdirectcd
the jury in that he "withdrlew


from the jury the defence oft
duress or coercion."
During the trial tiInows'
told the court he had shot
Major after having his life
threatened by Rayiiond
"Skull" Scavella, who, with the
deceased, was oine f the four
imeni in the car on the da\ s i
the murder.
Said Sir Paget: "I't is evident
that having had the benefit otf a
full and careful summing up
from the Judge of trial, the'
jury accepted and acted uponi
the evidence led foi the
prfosecultion confirmed, as in
some respects it was. h\ the
\idcencc for the detence."'
Here was ample evidence
eaisonabl' to jutstilt tIlh
\crdicts returned, he said in his
lcdgeiti1ent.
\s to the ini'crii nal I i.n il
sttilc lents given to thle plicke
ione h\ Brrowt s aind l\so I\
Il niI cs tlie Judi e t IL e to'


Large campaign


handouts 'not usual'


NIEW YORK (AP) A
layer tfor former ('ommtrc'
Sccretar> Maurice II Stan's
sought today\ to picture ,
-200,000 cash contribution
tiom financier Robert L. Vesco
as iust one of mian large grit's
in the 1972 campaign.
one contributor gave ',2
million and another gase I
million to President Ni\on s'
Ic-election campaign, .1 forinie
N i\on aide told a I'edcal
court jury under crtoss-
eniination b\ Stans la aw\cr
Robert Baker.
I he witness. Hughs W. Slt)oan,
Jr.. did not identify the big
tontrihbutors in testimon ati
the trial of Stains and ftOirmel
Att (;cen. John N. Mitchell on(
chi.rges that thie\ iimpledi .
iov'ernmi ent fraud in\c'st ,gtiioi
of Vesco's financial empirep inI
rcl Ii ll ilt thye Cisli
c'ln tributLi on.
Bar ker pictuiired Stans,
ws'rking fro l d iawni until latC
ia night on the campaign.
iiaivelling 45,000 miles and
o\ersecing the collection ott
SO million.
IHowever, Sloan would not
agree that there were ianmr


large cash contributions to the
campaign. IIc said it \\as inot lt
t.i1tlommonti practice to give large'
iash contributing ns, althouti h a,
tt)t,il of S1.7 million in cash
was collected.
Sloan, formnei personal ,ide
to tIhe PrI sildenlit ,it' 11
assistant to Stans on ll h \ition
finance clommiittee cduinn.' tile
cmuipaiugnHl e was trceam.is r )ot
the committee. Stans quit tihe
Commerce Department li head
the commiiItee c
Sloani said he wa s, uindeir
ortlers ironi Stans to piire\elt
disel 'Cl rire oit tlie inamei's o
those twho it) itadie lae ,'e
contributions before \pil 7,
1972. the et fet tive date (t a
law rcquirmng disclosure oItI ll

Sloan said the ic cul's weci
locked in ,i sIale each ni glhl iant l
that tlie cttiiM itte hi id ,l i
guard, at tirst for nigit' Is andt
weekends and later alioun1d the
clock.
T hte sec et 'e s L o
contribution, according to
testimony at thie trial, \\as
delivered to Stanrs on A\pri 10
three days after the tine law
took effect.


the conC lusion. after the trial
within a trial, that the
sIit a e eII I n ts were gliien
\ oluntaril .
"They were accordingly
ad intted in evidence, and
when it calic to thIe summinelill
up the Judge wias at pains to
direct the jury as to tie weight
the\ considered should, having
regard to the evidence before
iheni. be accorded to the
colintents oft those statements. "i
Sir Paigel wrote
Regardinig the evidence given'
by 1t1'h p ,':,ution \vitni-.esess
thl Jidtte believed them andit
disbelieved the appellants. Sir
Paget said.
It is to he obisci\ced thai
thie tlial J idgIe d ohted aI
considerable part of his
sit tui ing tip tail 1 to> i indicate'
it I the .tur tlie \ ariou:;
d i s c r e p a )'iI a e .t n d
inconsistnicice. and he enjoined
them to hear these and other
differences in nund when
c;onsidlering hotw 1ai. it at all,
tlie could rel\ on, tlhe eildencec
1 these witnesses as
trustworthy. testiioitn to the
s-tbstani tial truth."'
lIc thcrefoic did not accept
the submission hat it was
incumbent upon the Judge to
go further and direct the tiury
that the evidence was to be
viewed as that of wholl'
unreliable witnesses which
s l o uldI Ihere I e be
J isregarded(i
Sir Paget alsIo tlind noi
inerit in l urrows i lai;n lt hi l li
shot MaIor undtitc dies
inas timuch as he iliisill was
aried, shot thc'decieased i1 lh11
stomach anrd shtt lill) i i n a
tie fell to the ro nd

Man drowns
A 28-YEAROL.1) Woods
Alley insurance company
employee whose body was
taken from the water off
the western esplanade
yesterday at 3:30 p.m.. died
from drowning police reports
stated.
Godfrey McQuay. also the
organist at St. Joseph's
Church, had been swimming
at the time, police reported.
He was being observed from
the shore by a friend who
became alarmed when he
failed to surface. Foul play is
not suspected.


Sirica orders Watergate report be passed to inquiry


WASIIIN ION I. S.
)District Judge John J. Sirica
ordered the Watergate Grand
Jury's Nixon report turned
over to the Hlouse
impeachment inquiry today,
noting tlhal "'it draws no
accusatory conclusions."
He said he had no other
choice, declaring that delivery
to the HIouse judiciary
committee is "eminently
proper, anid indeed,
obligatory."
The judge said "it seems
incredible that Randnd Jury
matters should ... be
unavailable to the House of
Representatives in a proceeding
of so great import as an
impeachment investigation,"



R E .....


when such reports often go to
police investigations and
disbarment proceedings.
"We deal in a matter of the
most critical moment to the
nation, an impeachment
investigation involving the
President of the United
States." Sirica said in a 22-page
opinion.
The judge allowed lawyers
for the seven men indicted
Marci I in the Watergate
cover-up two days to appeal
the ruling.
Sirica received the report
and recommendation that it be
placed in the hands of the
judiciary committee at the
time of the indictments.
John J. Wilson, the lawyer


for H. R llaldeman and John
D. Ehrlichman, and a attorneys
for the other defendants
opposed transmittal to the
House. One reason was that
leaks from the report might
prejudice their clients' ability
to get a fair trial, they said.
Wilson said he will file an
appeal by Wednesday
afternoon. He would not
discuss the matter further.
Sirica said "the person on
whom the report focuses, the
President of the United States,
has not objected to its release
to the committee. Other
persons are involved only
indirectly."
He thus gave the first official
confirmation of widely


published reports that the
secret report centres on the
actions of the President in the
aftermath of the Watergate
break-in.
At the White House deputy
press secretary Gerald L.
Warren said Nixon had been
informed of the order but gave
no presidential reaction.
"It draws no accusatory
conclusions," Sirica said of the
document. "It deprives no one
of an official forum in which
to respond. It is not a
substitute for indictments
where indictments might
properly issue.
"It contains no recom-
mendations .... it renders
no moral or social judgments.


The report is a simple and
straightforward compilation of'
information gathered bh the
Randnd Jury and no more "
Reps. Peter W. Rodino Jr
tD-N.J.) and I dward
Ilutchinson. (R-Mich.) the
chairman and the senior (OP
member of the House judiciary
committee said they were
pleased at the decision
"The grand jury report was
obviously intended for the
committee and the committee
should have it," Hutchinson
said.
The grand jury had
recommended that the
materials it turned over to
Sirica be given to the House,
the judge said, because the


evidence has "a material
bearing on matters within the
priniar. jurisdiction of the
committee in its current
inquiry. "
Sirica said it is up to the
committee to decide whether
to accede to a request by
President Nixon's lawyers that
they be allowed to review the
report.
Monday's opinion was
Sirica's last major act as chief
judge of the U.S. District Court
for the District of Columbia.
He relinquishes the title at
midnight, on the eve of his
70th birthday, but will remain
an active judge. (AP)

* Other report-Page 2.


deplored the transience of tourism and
its total superficiality to which
Bahamians were susceptible.
It was important to look at the fact
that the Bahamas had always been
what he described as "a sucker
country." thriving on the adversity of
other people.
Remarked Mr. Saunders: "I wonder
if there is not something in the nature
of the Bahamas that does not become
a part of the Bahamian that God
will provide"
Others participating in the
discussion at the Stephen Dillet
Primary School were: John Delevaux,
assistant director of Tourism, limbo
dancer lI)acion it'Nic': teachers Leila
Mltcicll and (;Gladis Brown. assistant
hotel manager Birklc h Pilgrim and
B '(' engineer l:dwin llHut.


Air fares


unjust,


rules


board


WASHINGTON The Civil
Aeronautics Board ruled today
that many of the air fares
charged by the nation's airlines
are unjust.
It ordered the carriers to
raise their coach fares on
short-term trips and to
decrease the price of
long-distance journeys.
'The Board also said the
airlines must increase their
first-class fares over a two-year
period beginning in July.
The rulings came as the
board concluded its broadcast
tare proceeding in its 36-year
history .
The orders announced today
are effective in three months
unless appealed by the airlines.
The board said it found "the
existing coach tare structure is
unjust and unreasonable" and
ordered that fare structure
cancelled.
"In the long run," the board
said, "the coach fare structure
ought to be based upon the
cost oft service .."
The board said this policy
should be implemented on a
partiaIl hasis at first.
The board ruled that the
fare peir mile charged by the
ii lines did not decrease
sufficiently as the distance
travelled increased, even
though the cost to the airline
dropped.
I'his resulted, the board said,
in tares running below the cost
in short-haul lmarikets but
above costs in the long-haul
markets.
Under the formula worked
out by the board. coach fares
between Boston and Hartford,
Conn., a distance of 91 miles
would increase from the
present cost ot $15.74 to
$18.92.
In comparison, Miami-St.
Louis coach flights would drop
from S8180 to S78 70 and
Mianmi-San Francisco coach
fares would decrease from
S167.59to S158.33.
The board said first-class
fares. now about 130 per cent
of coach fares, should be raised
in July to 137 to 141 percent
iof coach fares, depending on
distance.
The board said it found the
cost of providing first-class
service ran as much as 163 per
cent of coach service
depending on distance.
The board said first-class
fares, under its formula, would
increase in July from $20.37 to
$25.93 between Boston and
Hartford, Conn. First-class
fares between Miami and St.
Louis would jump from
$105.56 to $110.19.
Miami-San Francisco first-class
fares would decrease from
$231.48 to $223.15. (AP)


I












Monday March 18, 1974


2 i ( IShe bunt


Miss Whaite gets a ban on men


Violence


warning


for


Grenada

BRll)(;t TOWN (Grentada's
otfit al c,)ppi)oslition leader.
Herbcrt Blai/c. declared hc
doe" noit rule out 'l(,cetlcC int
ii n e w 1 \ -1 11 C pcendent
island.
Interviewed in Bai batd,,, v whcrc
he stopped ovcr cn rtute tCo
Jamaitic. Bl ici/, h.ed ot
(;reniada's Nation.il l'art\
stated that it I'lline imiister
I nr (i;trc i glt)oresC dlema L.it
thIat his e\tra-legayl ptlie
torce be disbanded. "'\,c'l
liVL'C to find (so)t le other
Wmans to persuade linm
"\\e AIre not saints ... I aln not
.n.lish enough t to rule outl
jtn vIlence." llt e salid.
t d .idded that the Islitl han s ,'
it i rC t e 1 1ndei ( iit


th' c'\ uctc tc i 55 ttt It '.
sl1dtIllted ll he sadl 1 it
ilnilt le c le 1lt tth e |






tieninl t I \li k ee I


Wilson to win

11 AI R 0 1 1) \k ,I 1 .- 10 \s S
I ll otrlt i \itl a ) ,IeI t ncI t
wa, 1 xpcted te \is lll liot
tcst in rlr ianm eek wOith h iep |,
.I hb s t e tl i n l llS I r) ll M H C
opp l 11sCon 11 I t I, oda
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LONDON Amelia Whaite faces
five years n ihout a date or a dab ol
lipstick If she wants to inherit more
than $400.000 front the estate of her
straight- aced dentist employer.
She was a director of his corn pany,
and both were fined 12 year' ago for
plotting to defraud the state health
service. He also was charged with being
a sleeping gas addict.
The ban on mien and makeup for
Miss Whaite. 46. was specified in the
will of Philp Grundy, who died four
months ago at the age of 69.


MEMPHIS Elvis Preslev
(pictured) is back where it all
started 20 years ago and the
hometown fans are happy.
"The President lives in the
White House. but the king
lives il Memphis," said one
man,
Presle'\ was in town for
five shows four over the
weekend and one oili
Wcdliec'.c.i\
The opening performance
Satulrdaa drew a crowd ot
1 2.000 who screamed,
cheered., waved and jumped
out of their seats.
"lHello, Memphis. said
Pre'slc\. "it's good to lIe
holnme." It was hiss tirsi
Melphis performance in 13
years
Presles 39 crooned,
bumped. teased, w-iggled and
tossed silk scarves to begging
womenti. Nobodi fainted.
"'Sc gave out a lot (t
aspirins and earplugs, htll
nobody needed the o\genci
tank." said Iave Martin. a
Red ( ross volunteer.
Glittering in a white
julpsuiut. Preslev worked hisl
Nwa through more than 20
songs) lopeicingt with C (C
Rider iand bowing oiut t I
Can't Help Fallii.s in I o\e
Wi th You
Ht u ndreds ot people
shoutlcd for mi re.o but Pr l
wahs gonei
O(licials said the singer left
lhe ib) l(d n in niie secon) ds
llati


The will left 180,000 pounds or
about $414,000 to the tall brunette,
who had worked for Grundy as a
nurse receptionist since she left school.
In July 1962, Grundy and Miss
White were found guilty by a
professional court of conspiring to
defraud the National Health Service by
charging unjustified fees.
But he later built his practice into a
thriving business with a staff of 14.


His will said Miss
"never use any lipstick
ani kind whatsoever


Whaite must
or makeup of
apart from


clear nail varnish and wear
jewelry such as rings, earring
necklaces, and never go out with a
man on her own, or with a party
men, during the next five years."
Friends said Miss Whaite probably
would find little hardship in the
conditions of the will.
Moreover. Miss Whaite is the sole
executor of the will and there is no
provision for anyone to check whether
she obeys its terms.
Miss Whaite stayed indoors at the
weekend at the house where she lives


Sirica orders over-




secret report


W\SlII\(; I ON s
l)itsiit Judgc John J. Sirica
todai oi i Ird tcrd the seccietl
\W i'Ategale tIt\ i'port delivered
o Ihe I S I house of
Rcp ir ,e t. It ,! v t ludiciart
' 'm 1 i IlttIc' LIit It nIIipc JchlneTiIeIIl
..rinkitee 1m its im peachment

Sinca tdelJ cd implemen-
Il.tion tl his order for two days
to permit l1i1ng o t appeals.
11c sid in Ills opinion the
S .ild ul I\ "strongl\
or. ,in ctie ds" that its report
,.nil ,1 ,if~he! lilled wvilh
1I1 p dc ni t llc' It o ill iitll1ee


"Having carefully examined
lhe contents of the grand tiury
report, the court is satisfied
that there can be no question
regarding their materialitI to
the house judiciary commit
tee's investigation."
Sirica's opinion appeared to
confirm reports that the scaled
report deals with President
Nixon's role in Watergate.
The judge said it would be
up to the house judiciary
committee "to determine the
significance" of the evidence
and the court offers no opinion
as to relevance.
Sirica also said that the


US base gets a taste


I ()\)N The Ic S \av\
S>m'inl un ationIis station at
I ordorndcrr. Nort hern
Ireland, is normal alily a quietly
eni..ll i'a e t .mercia setI atlidst
lihe civil suiteI' the troubled
Hitrlish pro\ tvce
Bill ciiI \ esterda\ the
,,se a 244 sailors and their .300
dependents utj got a rare
lirst-ihand a111 t ot tlhe ( i rill i
w f itare w c.ge'i itc lween
S\ r'inst ( atlholics aind
Protest 1i s
\s u St IPjlick's l)a\ dance
.\\.is undeii i .i\ at ,a base
trettelion h ll. tour masked
rtldc ls O lhie outlawed Irishi
Rkptiblh in 1 \rin\ broke into
thIe hacse, took a sailor hostage,
tied up to)1i more and tried to
ste-il weapons liom the base
arimturi


warfare

The raid was aborted,
however, when one of the tied
sailors wriggled tree and raised
the alarm. The IRA men
climbed over a wall and
escaped. No one was injured.
(apt. Albert J Ashurst, base
commander, said in a
telephone interview Monday
the raid was a rare political
int rusion and that
' n on in vol versment and
i )operation" with local
authorities are the watchwords
of his command.
"We are morally and legally
obligated by the status ot
forces agreement to restrain
from participation in any
political activity of the host


Sadat praises Nixon,


\ I \\ K



1 g \ p lhi i ll i ';- -. : ;1' \ '.'.,,t1


lltilt
lit .u1 tit:


t i--:" \ t i"t c'it


magii/t l ce. S.idtil aidl the Nixon
.1i t I Ii I t1 I t l i o 11 h a d
d'unC llI/on dIeId tlhe thrust ot
S pdit \ it tI our area anit
h"-to li it in l ihe r eus, of the

Sidat sail Sccretari ott State
I r.-iir\ Klissllgi't was "the first
I S )ittlic l whit thi.as dcaltt with
tir prohlcms who has proved
htlTlt eil to ie a I;ain of


i t wilh .\ it i t n a cticials in
Itic twc t ii'. uitt ac
Saiat tilt1 Kttincer "under
hle i rc at] tnc'it' tit Presidenlt
ci\' gll ( IIdtiic Itl uc'.a ki'
io tr i d nI I cann lt ot
rtepa tJli c' e I \(O" is doing "tile
ti llhinkable' in tile i deast
I It wauld indeed be a
terrible l iJged it the
Americanl people lost sight of
the global pcLture tfor the sake
ot narlrowI, dtmllicstii political
lotsllderations," Sadalt aid.
lie s id tile October Middle
I a,t war %,as the -l "turningll
point wh ih led the I S. to,)
take a n\ew look at the middlee
1-das and to Ctembark, as a result
of that,. ion policy ot working


judiciary committee rather
than the court should consider
a request from White House
counsel for permission to
review the grand jury evidence.

The grand jury gave the
report to Sirica on March 1.
the same day it indicted seven
former Nixon administration
and Nixon campaign aides for
allegedly conspiring to block
the investigation of the
Watergate break-in.
Sirica said last week that he
has spent a lot of time working
on the decision.



of Ulster
country and to cooperate with
the local securitN forces,"
Ashurst said.
The base. the only 1U.S.
outpost in Northern Ireland.
was set tip in July 1944 as a
wartime relay link for allied
ships in the Atlantic Today it
rel a ys c umC im u nI i ca t it ns
between U.S. Navy. British andi
NATO ships at sea and military
commands ashore.
Despite Northern Ireland's
civil strife. Ashurst said, base
personnel try to lead normal
lives within the colmmunity.v
"We are right on the edge of
the city." the commander saidl.
"and really a part of it. Almost
everyone on base has a number
of friends in the city.'"
Ashurst added there are no
parts ol Londonderry or
Northern Ireland off limits


Kissinger


toward peace based on justice
for the region."
"My talks with I)r Kissinger
convinced ile that he rejects
the simnpli'.tic notion of some
of your strategists who see
or saw Israel as the :\nterican
gendarme in this part of the
world "
Asked i the interview if he
felt that Israei policy was
changing, Sadat said
"'it weC witness a successful
disengageitent on the Syrian
front as I tlink w'e will
then youi cai sa\ that there is a
new look in Israel. It is not
disengatgemenlltt in itself that is
it portantl but what it
signitics hie significance,
quite 'siinply put. is that
expansion ha iris come to an end.
I lie theory\ of secure borJers
through acquisition ot others'
land has p roved a iilure."
Sadlat insisted that a solution
satisatcttor to the Arabs
depended upon evacuation of
all Arab land t )cccupiled by the
Israelis since I4(17 and "a
solution of the I'alestinian
problem that is asked oiln the
legitimate national rights of the
Palestinian's "
Disavowing ant\ intent to
dismantle the state of Israel,
Sadat said "I pledge real and
honourable peace It I were
interested in dismantling the


Israeli state, why didn't I use
mny ground-to-ground miissiles
during the war"
I ven fwc Egyptians know
that niy long-range missiles
were targeted against three
iain cities in Israel. And whyl
didn't I give an order to launch
an all-out attack against their
pocket on the west bank of the
canal' Just a simple, short
order. "We had rockets ieroed
in on every one of their 400
tanks, which at night were dug
into static positions ... we also
had 800 of our own tanks
around their pocket, ready to
roll over the rest of the Israeli
force.
"But wars are a serious
business. You don't start or
restart them the way you do a
student demonstration. Some
3,000 tanks were lost in the
October war on both sides ...
there is no more point to more
war.
"Pleace is now on the way, a
peace based on justice under
which all states in the area can
thrive and prosper.
"My attitude is crystal clear.
I will discuss this in Geneva.
This is the best way to
convince the Israelis that we
are sincere .. but if we Arabs
don't obtain further Israeli
withdrawals N ou can draw your
own conclusion." (AP)


d makeup

alone in the Lancashire town of
Leyland.
Harry Baron, who knew Grundy for
years, told reporters: "The will is
of him. He was posessive.
I and jealous. But I don't
was any romance between

bachelor, wrote
in ia Whaite to
be end
to
at he


SOVIET scientists have
offered a theory explaining
why giant comet Kohoutek
did not break out in the
bright lights generally
expected: It was surrounded
by a heavy armour of high
density fluid made up of
cosmic particles.

BRITAIN's coal prediction
reached 74 per cent of
normal last week in the first
five working days after the
miners' four-week strike.

A ST. PATRICK'S day
dance erupted into a riot
early today with 22 arrested
and a mob of 200 besieging
the police station in
Ballbofev. Ireland.

MEMBERS of the Wire
Service Guild struck United
Press International in a work
contract dispute today in
New .York. A spokesman for
the guild, which represents
editorial employees of UPI.
said both sides had agreed to
continue the negotiations
Tuesday at 9 a.m.

FIFTEEN lise hens were
helicoptered from Katmandu
into a Himalayan base camp
to boost an attempt at the
women's mountaineering
record. Miss Kyodo Sato, the
35-year-old leader of a
12-wonian Japanese team,.
said: "I hope they lay eggs."


ABOUT 6.500 long-haired
Korean youths were rounded
up over the weekend in a
nationwide crackdown on
"hippie-styled hair." national
police said today.

ARAB oil ministers could
not reach agreement
yesterday on lifting the oil
embargo against the United
States and scheduled another
meeting for today a
spokesman said.

A SCIENTIFIC expedition
sets out from Britain
Wednesday to search for blue
whiting expected to yield
annually one million tons of
fish for human consumption.

ARMY troops moved into
the capital of Bihar state
today to control rampaging
students who burned public
buildings and looted shops in
a spreading revolt against
food shortages in india.


-MRS NIXON:



TRUTH HAS



SUSTAINED ME


MIA'MI turning from
what she described as a great
trip to Latin .America, First
Lady Pat Nixon said that truth
has sustained her through the
difficult \ear iot tlc Watergate
scandals

because I have great faith in
F Ti\' hiuslbaii l," se said. "lIe's
an honourabllc, dedicated
person. :\nd swhen Cou knosA
the truth you hive nothing ito
t 1ar. I lhic ,i c'rI positive
outlllook "
\Ir'. '\i\ot liid ,in airborne
news lct i cc'lc'l it' ,111d rttt2ini1




~sraitn ol thie pi'sl ea
I"dNo. I ieill\ d ln't wish
to speai k o( Iti." slie said.
inlc'teIrupi I !i bhc'loie a
qlesliotncl riot o tlhe word
"'Water t.ie
,1I' ist 1 perII sonal thing
and wh\ hling th i'ntt o ithe
trip tl osu '1ll o ol lo\w meli
dai \ atci di\ know llot
positive I telc .biiouti
e\er\ til ng A\nd I1 I ,illc have
laith in tlhe uiidgi enl ;t o the
Anicrican people and lh press

"i'll not oin )r to tchash an
In ln uI en do-,ji '0 li st o v
.011iound. ie dej lircdi
Mrs \ il, \o lio al it dodged


Watergate comments f(
months. appeared agitated b
i he question. She had bee
kneeling in the aisle of th
plane, talking with reporters
he: journey home froni
six-day visit to Vene/uela ar
Bra/il in a happy bithid:
mood.
Rising to her feet, she ga
her answer vigorously ar
Sought to cut off the lqurLii.,
She suggested birthday drainn
and champagne for everyontc
I earlier. a reporter started
ask wctiher anyone in 1;
\tAmerica asked her about.
Again Mrs. Ni\o
intterrupted before it
questioner could finish
Il n I i o tn t e w or
"Watergate."
"No.' she said. "lhis ist
covered there. It's only cover
in the metropolitan ntc\
papecrs. Given out in l
cou(lntr\ in the U.S.A. it isn't.
What did she expect iln I
upcoming 62nid year ot hi
lift.' "llard work and lmil
ever\ minute of it." \I
Ni\oni replied. repeating i
phttrase twice more.
\s lor a birthday wisihl I
I -irt Iady said : "'I ,il\,
nt ke big wishes .. peace iIn t
S oit ld aind all those ttni
\e e're' working for. I dil
thi nk of tilings personal ( \


STREAKING AROUND


LONDON S"ven youngsters streaked in the nude
across Kingston Bridge in southwest London yesterday.
Police arrested one of them, an attractive girl.
She was to appear in court today to face indecent
exposure chalrgi'
And in Tokyo as passersby shouted. "do it, do it., a
17-year-old American high school girl streaked 60 feet on a
busy street todal She was arrested and charged with public
indecency.
Officers said the girl. not identified because of her age.
told them she ran in the nude because her friends offered
her $35. (AP)



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NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOAN BRAZIER of Avson
House, Devonshire Drive, Coral Harbour is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 18th day of
March 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs P. O. Box N-3002,
Nassau, Bahamas.





NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MANDEVILLE O. POWELL
of 17 Drake Avenue, P. O. Box F-14, Freeport, Grand
Bahama Island, Bahamas is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration.
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration should not be granted
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 18th day of March 1974
to The Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002, Nassau,
Bahamas.


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Monday March 18, 1974


Thp BOribunp
NULLrUS AADDITUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LI-ON E. I)UPCHtl Publisher/Editor 1903- 1914
SlR 1TIENNI DUPIUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D).
Publisher/Editor 1917-1972
Contributing Editor 1972 -
El LEEN i)ili'UC'l CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972 -
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Sh i rley Street P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TEl: ITlIONIS
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768


Monday March 18, 1974


BylI Ill NNL DUPUCII
A C'UltliI 1 situation exists in the Middle East today
where a flew, small Arab nations are holding a knife at the throat
o' the world because they have oil that the industrial nations
can't surviv e without.
'Ihey have not only reduced the supply of oil to these nations
.they hav-e increased the price of their fuel to the point where
the balance ol pay ments of all the major nations of the world will
he seriously, affected.
I he IigtUres were broadcast over the radio. I was unable to
write tlhei down at the time. I don't remember them. But I can
tell you lliN; t tlhe ran into many billions of dollars.
**** * *
lhe U.S called a conference with a view to presenting a united
hion t to tlis outrage. But France was openly opposed to any
united action hby the nations. Even England has not shown alny
great co'luragel in this situation.
Surely tciere is something that the great nations can do to force
sense inlt t he Arab oil chieftains.
I will go 'o 'far as to say that I have seen wars fought for far less
pit ovo calior i.
It is ieal Irl tagic to see how some of the once great nations of
the \\ world kecp ton retreating in the face of outrageous behaviour
hy a.lmosl nilnyie Itoiday who will kick them in the pants.
*******
An celraordinary fact is that the Arab nations are themselves
not united in spirit. But somehow they regard Israel and the
westerill powers as a commonly enemy ... and so they are working
t gec thc orn the oil embargo and price hike.
I his article may not be published for several weeks. By that
tune ithei may be changes in the situation. But even as I write
this article a small war has broken out on the borders of Iraq and
Ilan. Bolh sides report heavy casualties.
Anid Libran Leader Moamnmar Khadafy is crusading against
several oflt I s neighbours because they have not fallen in with his
plaii l uni te the Arab states under a single leader.
ISs alte I- pt to merge his country with Egypt last year failed.
lie then turned lis attention to Tunisia. This nearly happened but
at the last ilinute the Tunisian leader backed away'.
lie is inow urging the people to overtliow their leaders inl
"tgypt,' Tunrisia and Algeria. le charges these men with being
against Arab unity.
*** **
Iliere hasi always been great conflict and wide division among
rulers If thei C small Arab states.
United tihey could become a formidable force. I hope it never
happens hiecause their present attitude towards the West shows
ath a. with Russian backing, they could become a dangerous threat
to oui part o lithe world

Manrv ot- the older readers of this column will remember the
s"ll\ f La .wrence of Arabia in the first world war. lie was the
I nglishmian1 who united the Arabs against their Turkish masters
11nd played ani important part in clearing the way for General
Allenby to march British troops successfully into the holy city of
.Je rusalem.
The iew ird for the help they gave to Britain at that time was
that they ,would be left to run their own country. But Lawrence
could not get them to unite under a single leader. The result was
the disarray we see in llthat area today with each small Arab state
intriguing against the other.
Tlhiis disunity among thie Arab leaders opened the way for tlhe
Jews toesta.blish an independent state in Palestine.
I'hc Arabs are united on only two points. These two points are
thle destrui tion of Israel and the oil boycott of the western
powers. Tth is situation could lead to a world depression. I wonder
i if mthe Bahaliasgovernment is aware of this grim fact.
Russia is now opening up the vast resources discovered in
Siberia a few years ago. She has been pursuing a policy of
Sattrition against the United States ever since the end of the
Second world war in which the U.S. helped to save her from total
Sdestruciton by Hitler's panrer divisions.
If she c-an help the Arab states to broaden the field of
attrition to include the other major powers ... the western world
sw ill gradually grow weaker while Russia grows stronger from the
almutost ineuhaeustible resources she is now tapping in tfle frozen
Sregions0of Siberia.

Now it is being said that the western powers had plenty
warning that this crisis might arise. And so they are being
critici/cd [tecause they did not take any measures to find another
source oft power to ineet just such a crisis.
i' It you look back in tile files of The Tribune you will find that
years ago especially after atomic power was discovered I
point ted ou i this danger.
I became aware of this danger when I saw the Gennans get
with in strike ing distance of Cairo in the second world war.
I lad Rormiiel's panzer divisions broken the line held by Field
Marshal Montgomery's Eighth Army on the African desert and
reached the-' oil wells of the Middle East ... the Allies would have
quickly col lapsed and Hittler would have sat astride the world.
Two thini gs are certain. Had he won the war he would have
extenninat ed thle Jewishl race and sent the black man back into
Slavery.
Wllen aftolmic power was discovered I saw this as an
Sopporlunity for Britain and the U.S., with which I feel a close
identity to' place themselves in an independent position.
This was important because what Hitler almost did in the
second wo rid war another great power might succeed in doing at
some later time.
And surely Russia has been trying hard enough to get political
control of the Middle East long enough for the U.S. and Britain
to have been alerted to the danger.
Russia almost got control of Egypt last year. But Sadat ordered
the Russians out. Now it looks as though the Kremlin will
succeed in getting a toe hold in the Arab door ... if only to the
Extent uf helping to upset the industrial nations with the present
" oil squeeze.
*.* *, t* *


No man can ever be completely independent. We all depend on


doing was representative of labour unionismi we would not have it
in The Tribune. If they pursued their hostility I would lock the
door and throw away the key. I could do this because I owned
the business absolutely. I had no stockholders to consult. They
understood. They knew I wasn't joking.
I spent all miy life trying to help the Bahamian people. I always
believed that it was possible one day to do something big enough
to win the confidence of the people for whom Tie Tribune had
opened many doors. I thought that I had reached this point when
I broke down the barriers of racial discrimination in public places
in 1956.
When the people in a district imy family had served in the
Legislature for four generations turned me down five months
later for an inexperienced young man because I refused to do
something I knew to be wrong ... and the British Legion ... which
I had served faithfully as Honorary President for years, elected
this same youngster Man of the Year for having defeated me ... I
knew then that I was under no further obligation to continue in
active politics which I had done for years although I had hated it
from the start.
My friends argued that the people of England had done the
same thing to Churchill. I told them the difference between
Churchill and me was that Churchill loved politics. I hated it.
I also accepted the vote of the people in the Eastern District as
a release from any sense of obligation to carry on the B.D.L.
which would have saved the country from the terrible situation in
which if finds itself today.
I finally realized as die September 19, 1972 election
approached that this was the last chance for the country to save
itself from complete self-destruction. I told the people so. I also
made it clear that if they persisted in destroying themselves I


DOESN'T WANT 'OUTSIDERS'

TELLING US WHAT TO DO

I:DITOR, The Tribune,


each other for many things every day. But if a man wants to be
strong ... and free in spirit ... he must put himself into a position
where, in any situation, he can stand on his own two feet.
I learnt this important lesson from my father over 70 years
ago. People often wonder how Tie Tribune has been able ,
come hell or high water ... to maintain a place in the centre of the
stage.
I will now t211 you a story.
My father started The Tribune over 70 years ago with a tiny
treadle press which is still on exhibition at The Tribune building.
He had a couple cases of type. No money. And immediately just
about every strong hand in the country was raised against him.
lie expected this to happen because he knew that a free and
independent newspaper in a mid-Victorian society would find it
difficult to survive. And so my mother and brother and sister
became printers. That is why I had to start delivering The Tribune
at the age of five.
My mother died at 36 and my father at 44. They had had a
hard time but they had the satisfaction of knowing that they had
kept The Tribune free.
Some time after I became the Editor of The Tribune a wealthy
foreigner suggested that he put up a modern printing plant and
print both The Tribune and Thn' Guardian under contract.
I turned down the offer because I knew from my father's
experience that, if we were to be free, we inust control all our
facilities.
When I tmet m\ wife in Pennsylvania it was a case of love at first
sight I warned her about marrying me. I told her of the hard life
she would have to lead. The more I told her of the difficulties she
would have to face the more interested she became. It was the
kind of challenge in life she had wanted.
And then I told her that we would have to build our own army
if we wanted to survive. She agreed and so we had six children in
eight years. We trained our anny. She became a part of this army.
And so. when the Old Guard bought The Guardian and
declared in its first editorial that it was their intention to run The
Tribune out of business. I could laugh at them. They had an idea
that money was all powerful but they were soon to find that it
was no match for the human spirit.
Some time earlier I realized how right my father had been in
saving that itf The Tribune was to be free it must be as
indepeendent as possible of all outside sources.
Stanley l.owe was printing '77e Herald on a rented press. IHe
criticized mie i every issue of his paper because this was then the
popular thing for him to do to get support from certain elements
in the city who handed him a few shillings in charity any time he
asked them for a "loan".
Miss Mary Moseles. Editor of 7he Guardian resented Mr.
I owe. She bought the press from under himt. This put him out ot
business. I thought this w is unfairr and so I sent for Mr. Lowe and
offered to print T7he i erald c,,; him until he could get another
press. I did this for him free cf iliarge.
When he got another press he thanked me in his first issue. But
went right back to criticizing me in every issue after that. IHe
apologi/ld when I ran into him one day. He said this was the only
way he could make a living. I told him to have fun.
When lie died Cyril Stevenson. who was supposed to be a
friend of mine, took oin 7he Herald and did the same kind of
dirty job for the P.I.P. Now Th'e Herald is dead and I have lived
to see Cyril Stevenson eat his own dirty vomit.
The Guardian spent most of its time ... under Miss Moseley ...
and later under its new owners trying to crush 7Tie Tribune. They
seemed to have this simple ,>Ojective.
Oin one occasion The' Guardian plant was destroyed by fire.
Miss Moseley wsas out of business.People who had contracts with
7/e (;Guarnlihan came running to ime. I refused to take their
contracts. Instead I placed Tie Tribune s facilities at the disposal
of Miss Moseley ... free of charge ... until she was able to get her
own equipment. When it was over she thanked me ... but she
could not overcome her hatred for The Tribune. She went right
back to trying to block me at every turn.
And then she woke up one day to the fact that she was an old
woman and bioke ... she could no longer carry on the newspaper.
She had not prepared anyone in the family to carry it on. And so
she lived to see her darling paper degenerate into an organ lacking
in principles or clear direction. Apart from her hatred for hie
Tribune Miss M\lsle\ was a great Bahamian in many ways.
When 77he Tribune was wrecked by the 1929 hurricane we had
no money to repair the damage. The paper's enemies stood
around and gloated. "That's the end of that dirty yellow rag"
they gloated for me to hear. But they were wrong. We brought
out a small sheet on time tile next night because I was able to set
type and run a treadle press as m\ father had done.
For 48 hours without a break I worked at rebuilding my
machinery while my wife ... then six months pregnant with our
first child ... stood at my side and fed tie milk and hot soup.
The time came when the Old (uard owners of The Guardian
saw the wisdom of cooperating s\ ith The Tribune. At that point
we both started making money.
When we installed our miiodern plant John Bethliell. then
president of 1'he Guardian, proposed that we formn a company
thait would own lthe printing presses. The company would print
both newspapers under contract.
lie was annoyed when I turned down the proposal. The
Guardian then installed their own plant and returned to their cut
throat competition with 77The Tribune.
The inte came when they found they couldn't run The
(;uardian. They offered it to me at a bargain price. I turned down'
the offer because I feel that every town should have at least two
newspapers and two banks. I felt that a monopoly of the
newspaper business in the islands would be a bad thing for my
children. I knew that The Tribune would be strong only as long as
it had to fight for its place in the community.
On onie occasion the P.L.P. had infiltrated our plant to the
point where a couple of myi Linotype operators were threatening
to refuse to set mv articles because they disagreed with the policy
of the paper. They started to form a union.
I called tile staff together and tod told hem that if what they were


I 0TDAYN HSTOY


By The Associated Press
TODAY IS Monday, March
18th, the 77th day of 1974.
There are 288 days left in the
year.
HIGHLIiGHTS in history on
this date:
1973 President Lon Nol
of ('ambodia orders stern
measures under a state of
emergency declared after the
bombing of the presidential
palace in Phnom Penh.
1972 British Prime
Minister Edward Heath and
French President Georges
Pompidou meet in Britain on
enlarging the tEuropean
Common Market.
1971 Indira (andhi is
sworn in as India's Prime
Minister for third time.
1970 Prince Norodom
Sihnaouk of Cambodia is
deposed as ciuef of state while
he is on visit to Moscow.
1969 The ",'ited Sta,"
and the Soviet Union piop5*
an international treaty to har
nuclear weapons from the
ocean floor.


1967 Russia expels two
Chinese diplomats from
Moscow, charging them wi'.h
anti-Soviet activity.
1965 Exiled King Farouk
of Egypt dies in Rome.
1963 U.S President John
F Kennedy and six Presidents
of Central American States sign
i declaration in San Jose, Costa
Rica. that their countries will
cooperate on political and
economic matters.
1962 Cease-fire in
Algerian war is signed by
French and Algerian rebel
delegations in ivian-les-Bains,
France.
1959 Hawaii becomes
50th U.S. state.
1938 Mexico moves
toward t a keover of
foreign-owned oil properties.
1937 Defeat of Italian
mercenaries at Brighuega
checks rebel threat to Madrid
in Spanish ('vil War; more than
400 persons. mostly children,
are killed in gas explosion in
school in New London. Texas.
in the U.S.


would leave the islands and make a home elsewhere. No one
believed me... but I did it and am now a ,.uilpleil\ free man ...
as free and happy as any man can be in a world that has
apparently lost direction.
The Tribune goes on under the direction of miv eldest
daughter. She will carry It on ... as long as it can be flee. When
the day comes that it can no longer be free she will close it down
and I will stop writing this column. By that time I will have
somewhere for my family to come for a crust of bread.
********
If you want to be free ... and happy ... in this brief life you
must be able to look ahead and prepare to meet any crisis that
might arise.
This is equally true of an individual, of a business, of a
community ... and especially of a great nation.

Even some of my closest friends still cannot understand how I
have been able so completely to change my life style overnight
without being upset. They often ask me how I could "give up so
much "
What I can't get them to understand is that I have not given up
anything. A man who doesn't want anything for himself hasn't
anything to give up.
I didn't want power. I didn't want public position as a means
of enriching myself because I was able to satisfy all my needs
through the successful operation of The Tribune.
All I ever wanted from the Bahamian people was an
opportunity to serve them honestly and unselfishly. When the
time came that it was clear that they neither wanted nor needed
my services I moved myself from the scene and started building
the kind of life I had always wanted to live but never had time to
indulge. It's just as simple as that, folks.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
A man is an animalthat writes. HOMER.


- f -I -- ~-- --


I have read your article in
The Tribune of March 5 by
Niki Kelly. "Freedom to
Smploy Foreign Staff,
Essential". This report was
supported by a survey made by
Dayton Keenan Consultancy
F iri .
We an independent Nation
should not need an outside
firm to tell us how to control
our tourist industry. It is not as
though tourism is something
new to us, this has been out
bread and butter tor the past
decades. I would now
comment on their suggestions.
They say that the hotel
staff is not a fully qualified
one. I agree with them and it is
because hotel management
have tried to keep top-pay
management for the foreign
staff, they have for the sake of
the government t and the
Public, promoted mostly flunky
type Bahamians who they
know would never really make
it mentally, and for that reason
would satisfy with the position
and not the authority. So it is
no wonder when immigration
started watching permits
closely and refusing to renew
some, the quality level had to
fall, because the Bahamians
that were promoted, many of
them were not qualified and
the ones that showed any sort
of potentiality were transferred
to other areas or given work
that was not relevant to that
particular section of work.
The Bahamian who
possessed a sure attitude of
progress in the hotel field, but
was not of the flunky material,
was pressured into either
resigning or they find some
reason to fire him, if he had a
gripe about being fired for no
reason, he would have to take
it to the "Ministry of Labour",
Well now that is a different
ball game, because sometime I
wonder if that Ministry is
employed by the foreign staff
in the hotel, or the Bahamas
Government, and I speak from
epxerience.
I feel that if the Minister is
really interested in tourism and
the Bahamas then he should
get nore involved personally
and let the foreign experts
handle the foreign affairs,
because it stands to reason that


they will support the foreign
element.
There are a few other points
I would like to write on. in
that article, but not today.
Now we know what good lion.
A. D. Hanna did do when he
was in charge of Immigration.
with hin there, management
knew they were going to have
to train Bahamians because
that foreign personnel who had
his permit renewed for the past
ten years will not be getting it
anymore, and I agree with the
Minister, because you mean to
say, it takes more than ten
years to train a Bahamian to be
a credit manager,
superintendent of service. chief
auditor. supervisor of cashiers.
and reservation manager'
You will notice that most
hotels have a Bahamian for
personnel manager, and he or
she is more qualified if they
have just come out of a
G;overnniment Department.
preferably I migration or
Labour. This is so when
management want to stand on
a progressive Bahamian head.
and they feel that the
Bahamians may seek justice.
The matter is then handed
to the personnel manager and
the Bahamas is then pushed
hack one step by a fellow
Bahamian
CHARLES SEALY
Freeport
(randl Bahama.
March 11 1974

For the record

EDITOR. The Tribune,
Would you please permit me
a little space in your valuable
paper.
In Mr. 1'. G. Saunders letter
to the Editor on Feb. 24 1974.
he stated that the Abaco
Businessmen's Association has
FINALLY elected as their
president a local Abaco boy.
I would like to correct Mr.
Saunders and state that prior
to my becoming president of
A.B.A. there were three other
local boys who served as
president of A.B.A.
HUBERT BETHEL.
Marsh Harbour. Abaco
March 12, 1974.


hb (Tr ibune









.4 Ch ribunir


Humane Society Ball Saturday


NOTICE
NOTICE is heieby given that I, JOHN A. FRASER of
Roetta St.. P O. Box N1382. Nassau, Bahamas is applying
*t the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
oC reeist!'atio'r as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
'ersor who. knows any reason why registration should not
be qiaited should send a written and signed statement of
the 'jcts within twenty-eight days from the 11th day of
'a',-h li74 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Cir'i.-oerhip, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0 Box N-3002,
Nassau, Banamas.




OT0 F UN 0ou


FUN FOR THE KIDS
N1 I A DELIGHT FOR THE
1owV PARENTS!

CHILD PORTRAITURE
/__ '* on the waterfront at LuJi
-- _- -' ::a: 3a St. & William St
.-.. : o: r Pno"e5-.64i


(COlI(MON1 i \l TH OOf
fill B\ HAM \ 15ANI)S
iN 111 SLTPR11() COL RI-
i .lit .5, c.


1 )74
No. 11


NOTICE

1\ I 1- \I\FiI-R O()F Al TIHAXT piece parcel
ol lot iof Lnd sl .ituatC i thil Southern l)District of
Island oft Nec Providence one of tilhe
Sominonii. lti of the Bahama Islands and being
I ,t No 1 of J Subdixision laid out hb Hill Top
I)t'sel ,piient C(ompany Limited and being!
bilnJied Northsiardl\ b\ Lot No. 2 of the said
.bIh ,lt.iO tI;c property, of George King and
.n; r tIcrein light\ 8 >0t feet East\wardlk b\
I ', N, It Ii the said Subdivision the property
i ,it frne, t King and running thereon
I ':.- c.i et and Sevent% hundredths of a
S -0 South1iardil by Cordeaux Avenue
S* thereon Eight. (80) feet and
o s .-':, 's F ast Steect and running thereon
-and SCvent\ hundredhi, of a
; 4 ) .tihc said piece parcel or lot of
...7 .. "il sion ,hape bo lndalries mllarks
J:;.'; ,, ., shown thereon coloured
n" :- ..... it ior plan filed herein.

\)l I1 fIll X\I\TITR of The Quieting Titltes


\\i) i\, !1I ,XIll R oft Thie Petitil.; of
\AkrcJ k l

V' K: t,. i'tt: cr in this m ttter, claim
.' ; s plc in possession of tilhe
ir lot of land and has made
S 'i] .i ti. Sutrei le Court of tihe
'.' .: t!'1 t! i_ Btialaiaus under Section 3 of
S. I.';: t:'. lit! \t .t 1( 59) to have his title to
t ... 1 ;' i.> p r.ii i lit iftland investigated and
S. \t .!t thereof determined ,nd
i .' i lrttlite i f Ti s htle to be granted br
r ':; ; ') i'ti the provisions of the


() PIIS i1t ti,- sid plan nma be inspected
!- :, i al + tI f t!Ic i tl-outrs at the following places:

'. lie ReIt.i- ot tle Suprerme Court. Public
Siiit- in ll0ie (iti of Nassau.
Slite (liatibrI osit (CASH. FOUNTAIN &
B()\I s it 'at in Arim trong Street in the City


NO)I 1C is h,erehb glen that an\ person having
sowe r or a nerit to dower ir arni adverse claim or a
cilil inot recogrlietd in the Petition shall on or
hbct re the T\ienti- si\th dao of April 1974 file in
the Supremie (ourt in tlie C'it\ of Nassau aforesaid
and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a
statement of his claim in the prescribed form.
verified b\ an affidavit to be filed therewith.
Failure of an; such person to file and serve a
statement of his claim on or before the said
Tw-enty-sixth day of April 1974 will operate as a
bar to such claim.
CASH, FOUNTAIN & BOWE
Chambers
Armstrong Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner.


THE HL'MANI[ Society Ball.
to be held on Saturday. March
23, at the Htalcyon Balmoral
Hotel will be a truly gala
occasion.
The theme this year is
"Emerald" and the La
ChandeHle Ballroom at the
Balmoral iill be spectacularly
decorated in this theme b h Mr.
Mel Dot,, who has been
responsible in past years tor
designing the previous theme s
"(;old". "'Silvei" "'Rainbow"
and "(r twal'"
('ockta:ls will be s e ed on
the patio. weather permitting.
from i to ) p i m .. ii h .'. e'l tr
dinner and dan ing in tihe
Ballroom u tilti the lwee hours
Mui. .... be provided from S
p m bi Perce :. e i, s Band.
\ir Leonard 1.Capelle oi
I or d s Jewclelrs. lwhso cever\
'eai Jonra t e le cwe lern iti tihe
Humane S.ocietrt Ball. has thii
Sear give: a.1 stiuinnintg eCImeraild
brooth as th'de main doorpri/ec
Yo1 mna\ 1be tihe luck\ inner
)i thli C\,quIiste peieCe Ofc
eie raiJ .cwellert or a jn\ ion
o0 '.l. n other lbuaiouS'
pr O/e\ \ iini-raittle will also
bc he 'd du:ing the Ball.
\!id I, i j \ on e rememberits
the gr'e. siu prnic o', last sear",


Ball. the horse-drawn main
course, L.orraine Onderdonk.
the Ball Chairman. assures that
this \ear's Ball holds an evenr
greater surprise in store.
livkets for the Ball. which
are S25 per person, may be
purchased from Lorraine
Oniderdonk, at the sBahamas
Hotel Asso.ctiat lio opposite
the Ocean Spra\ Hotel. from
the i.romiitt ee lr. Mrs. Veronica
A.dderl'cy at tile -imerald Beach
lotel. Mrs (athls Perron ,i
41 1i0. Mlrs ( \pnrania Bethel at
5 1 140, at iIbros)ine sn
(eorges Street o)i Housec arnd
Garden at .il\ord C(a\ )Dre'
Bla.k 1ie
Proceeds from the Ball "\ill
urtheirr iith e god iyorks ,t hle
1 lumn.iie Society which ha s
been 'l eing I tlhe commutiiit
sinte the 1I20's and ha.s nol
gri'. i to inc lude uil] operating
ta.ill ies. Iw() aillburitiantces.
three ispic totrs and a,
permanent, resident et I lhie
lHiuiiinalre Socieit is nli m!11l\
supported li I chariii atffais
su>h as the Dogi Slimw the
II .r- Sho\,. RuinmrCe Sales.
the 1.ill I lsta Dinner )anc .
the 1 eb it.ir Street Raille. the
rth t;.ila and prin alc
d oH![ I'w HI ?


Hotel training director


to address BAMTAD


Mr Stephien Blundell.
pictured1 lotel trainingg
D)riectot of thc Baihanias Hliel
I ra;nnilg ('0 L uni iit\ll he
the Iest speaker at the
liin iii1 l u', nc T lheolll oi the
baithafIIais A\ssoi..ia t oni tor
Sanpower Traiinng and
Deel.,pment to be Iheld -nI
Sedneswdas,. March 20 at the
Nassau Htarbour (lub .at 12.30
1p m His sl',,ubjCct ill h
"'l)\eiiipmenit i i the Itlot.l
'I .aing (Council".
Mlr. Blundell aiter studying
otel Macnagement at college in
Britain. gained experience in
various departments of hotels
in I urpe adnd sLondon. After
o, nipleting his "o'n ijib"
practice at the renoI ned Sa.\o\
llitel. Londin, he entered
management with the large
holetl and catering firm ot .1
mI ;ns and CV.
duringg this period ins
iItcriest !oh %Cd towsairds
training anid alter a tints as
mraine ikor the company heI
mo\ed to Lull-time lectI'unng at
Cambridge. Hotel School.
More recently ie h as been
head ot Hlotel. Touiirsm and
Flood Technology at the Malta
Polytechnic. head i liHotel
Marnagecln .it iat lastinigs. and
Project Manager i; the Hotel
and Catertnlg SchOI'l in
Singapore, this prs'ic,:t being a


im1t In ternational [ aibti If
Organli at ion ad I 'itced
Nati o n s D)e v e I p inmc nt
IPrograIel S-: v\.'ntui'. fHe ha.i
also hbcn adeMs.t an .ld
co ll's 1 lt. 11 i i sce \ .'iral
(on\e!n'eil ts of flotel Il.ainingm
iniatters and recently spent 2
nionths in central \% m'ic,
inr\i.tigat ting tile Ieamsiliti \ a '!
st.riting a Regi>ti al olitel
Trai;nilin (Ce'ntre.
I hi.' liholt itdutiis \ ar i s the
tounst reliAted .,c ti\ities arc the
largest rnmpltoyers oit ianlpoi\we
in the Bahamas today. \s
lHotel TIraiing Director of ihe
B hah.s is Wtcl lrisnig
Council il, I r, Blundell has
played an np'rt.nt pirt ii tIhe
deeslopimeint i t he is erall
t r aining p att e n n:i d 1
prouigratlm es ': the C. ouniill ;I


History & untold thousands

lie buried in 'quake city


A(,ADIR, MORO()CO IA\P
(;rass covers the rubble and
no on e will e vr .know how
man\ dead lie buried in the
ruin, ot the ancient kashah ito
Agadir. destroy ed 14 sears igo
m ,oe of the great killer
earthq;iakes ot the centur.
1 foreign tourists. oitten
.inuware these are standing onl a
vast graveyard. look ouit from
the hilltop kasbah iler the
sprawlinIg modern iit, that ha,
rilen troml the ruills :Agdir
talmot iotally destro-ed un
leap year day Feb 2., l%0. is
)on the way to becoming one of
Alria's biggest vacation sporrt,.

Beach
(Gleaming white hotels have
sprung up along the sands
beach stretching 25 iles in
both direti s I )orcig
investors are Jostling lor space
to build more and mn,re tourist
accommodat ionI t lgant stores
an d miod ernislt public'
buildings have grown trom the
heart of the stricken cits'
.A concrete soirn !iment


beside the brh :dnew ci't. hail
p roclai, s ti;l A\gasdir1 wi as
rebuilt "b' the \ ill )It \!Lih
But i Inowi ere 's there a
imemIorl.ii t the \;. tniis n: the
earthquake I heir number r \i as
original esiiimated .t 1 2.011)(
but i n w k to e cd
2().00() dead. pis 2.00(
ln ured More t!h ;: hijl the
psi i listl oi di ti "',
seconds Othrs ..ine
slow. .igc'i ingll end t.r
her ond the reaih .! hlic!p
ihe k.isi.ili l .rt i ed i t l s
one o: "' !es .iCreas :'ot
rebuilt I x. was epic'i'iitre st
the quake Ille anlcienlt stone
buildings s .. . I on the
2.000 :nhabitjnts and ha.itll
ain. OI1u s, irved \ er'.> e'i \
bad es were r>,"'ered r)!\
the lI th century bi tt.il !e e ts.
built b the D..un h io' pro tect
their route to t ( .ip' ..ie s;ii
sl and k 0 tg
"I he kash.ii
sulei i t in Agdti .i 'i
\\hli w as .ltit'ti thle' rjr
sunIriIors "\c' '.e t ilks .i l.b'.it


There's more than one


way to lose weight


By Abigail Van Buren
V 1974 by CChicag Tribne-N. Y. News Synd., Inc.
DEAR ABBY: I have heard that every time a person
has sexual relations he burns up 300 calories.
I would like to lose 10 pounds, and my husband would
like to lose 20 pounds.
Do you recommend this method of losing weight? And
how many calories would a person have to burn to lose one
pound? NO PUT ON
DEAR NO: I'm advised that one must burn 3,500 calo-
ries to lose one pound of body fat. The number of calories
burned per hour for several types of measured physical
activity reads as follows:
Slow walking-115 to 200.
Dancing-275 to 350.
Skating or swimming-300 to 600.
Tennis-350 to 700.
Gardening--250 to 300.
Golfing [18 holes I-150 to 225.
There can be no reliable figure on the number of calo-
ries burned during sexual relations because the amount of
physical exertion varies with the individual. While losing
weight, however. I think you'd be wise to supplement mat-
tress acrobatics with more [or less?] strenuous physical
exercise, using the above as a guide.

DEAR ABBY: Regarding the seven-year-old Lutheran
boy who wanted to turn Jewish because his 10-year-old sister,
who was being raised Jewish, got seven presents [one for
each day of Hanukkah] and he got only one present for
Christmas:
His parents should give him seven presents for Christ-
mas and let him decide later whether he wants to go the
Protestant route or the Jewish route.
He might even decide to be a Roman Catholic and go to
Notre Dame and beat U.C.L.A. again some day! BILL K.
DEAR BILL: Judging from some of the names of those
fellows on Notre Dame's teams, you don't have to be a
Roman Catholic to play for Notre Dame.
CONFIDENTIAL TO O.B. IN ROME: I'm no invest-
ment counselor, but the advice from Herbert R. Mayes,
publisher of The Overseas American, a new and brilliant
fortnightly newsletter for United States citizens abroad, is:
"The old story about Swiss banks is still valid: If you see a
Swiss banker jumping from an office building, follow him
out. There's 15 per cent to be made on the way down."


Monday March 18, 1974


Cricketer slain


1 R I R I,- I \ )I % I w ',
i th e murder
i't Rl ,- s-' r imol
K. 'i I ,i .i at the

P. "i'i [v-si i
j l ilk .'

S,, I It court

k. rrt . l ,d a
.S a i ,,i5,1 l ( ) ; i .' it o A *al d


KENTUCKY

SPRINGS

HOTEL
DINING AND
COCKTAIL LOUNGE


S :t ., ;,, th Special
;10150.
l .I d
.. :, ,.:' 5: -.. (0. 1 .5 0,1"
S.:- "t h' d y50.
ihdv

S , , i r
S i I. i i


joined (;loucestershire as a
professional on the
recommendation of Mike
Prouter. the county's South
African all-rounder.
"'He was a good player and
would have probably made the
lir,,t team if we hadn't already
used our quota of overseas
players," club captain Tony
Brown told newsmen. (AP)


LET'S '
GET IT
ON! r


EDD BURROWS
PROP/MGR.


HAPPY HOUR EVERY WEDNESDAY FROM 7-- 8
P M. DRINKS ARE REDUCED! HOURS: FROM
S 1 A.M. 2 A. M. PHONE 28302 or 36458.





QUEEN'S

COLLEGE
SCHOOL PLAY


'THE CRUCIBLE
/' I/RI7TH R 1/1.1 /F:R

WILL BE HELD IN THE PRIMARY
SCHOOL "QUADRANGLE"

\ I I\l 1 ) \ \1 \R(' H 20TH
ilI I') \ \. \R( IIA 2 1ST
I RI1)\\ \ARCH I 22ND

TICKETS $2.50 EACH
( ,'li.: .i ij\ee'nt College office
01 t .ith di o ii t t each performance


r A
- T '- r


I


I


Xi





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Call us at 322-1538, or see your travel agent.








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WE MAIKEYOU FEEL GOOD ALL OVER


SEPTEMBER ENROLLMENT

Nursery 3 Yr Old Program
'Wee Wisdom offers a small world t!
new friends new things. new tiun
for the Pre-Schooler
Kindergarten 4 Yr & 5 Yr Olds.
Nassaus leading Pre-School Progrr.its.
based on over 19 .vrs of PretorlmantL.
Phonics Reading Numhers
Elementary Grades 1 (
Nassau Christian Schools,
Traditional Academic approach for
Sound educational foundation.
Junior High Grades 8 9
Small ('lasses Individual Attention
Academically Challenging
High School TO BE ADDI)D
one grade per year
PLAN NOW FOR THE FALL
NASSAU CHRISTIAN SCHOOLS
P.O.Box 3923-Phone 32641


I


r
r
r
i
r









Monday March 18, 1974


Ohb eribunr


HARRY PE)ERSON, with glasses well known underwater film Iaker
and lecturer chats with Oris Russell, permanent secretary to te Ministr aof
External Affairs before the showing of Mr. Pederson's our I atho
World" at tile teacherss training College. The filmiecture wit part of the
oahamas National Trust's Auduhbon Wildlife series. and drev an over-flow
crowd, including Inany nlmehrers, of the Bahamas Underwater Club.



NOTICE


TO OUR CUSTOMERS

SORRY

JOHN S. GEORGE CO.

LTD.

WILL BE CLOSED FOR

STOCKING
APRIL 1 st.


Film man points to effects


of pollution on our waters


\ QUARTER (I \II R'N
love affair with the Bahamas
was unveiled in vivid colour
last week for an overflow
audience at the Teacher's
Training College at ()akes
Field.
IUnderwater film maker,
lHarry Pederson. an articulate
TIaan who has heen coining to
the Bahamas since 1948, was
presenting his spectacular
underwater fli "Four Fathom
World" as part of the
Bahamlas National Trust's
Audubhon M, ild ii.. series.
II is h u m orouls a nd
inforniative narration of tlhe
two-part tilm indicated a deep
u nl, i i a .l i of the
underwater world and a
profound frondnlless for the
particular underwater world of
the Bahamas
IIe warned his audience,
however, of the dangers ot
pollution. "When I first came


ROYWES1 BANKING CORPORATOlN LIMITED
OFFERS

TO A SUITABLY QUALIFIED INDIVIDUAL, THE POSITION 07:


MANAGER, BANKING DIVISION


Applications are sought troll blianketrs with s severall vC, ars of cI\tensivc and
Successful experience' in illnternatiolll Illone1 nuarke t operations. illtcludis
the supervision It I: uro-clurrenc deposit transactions. lorie- n extlS anu e
transactions and (lie related accounting and statistical data. I -xperience ill
training and directing the activities of personnel in thesc t' f actions is
necessary.

Applications, including details as to age, education, experience and salary
expected should he addressed to:


The (;encra'l Manager
RO)YW.I'ST BANKING
P. (). Bo\x N-488
Nassau, Ba 1am111.Is.


March 12/74.


I WHY?

SWhy is it that only ffve out of every
one hundred young men and
woman get what they really want
out of life? Why do some people
move in happiness and relaxation
S from one successful venture to
another?
Why do some people seem to find nothing but frustration
and failure?
World famous Author of Psycho-Cybernetics, DR.
MAXWELL MALTZ has the answers and he will be
bringing them to you in NASSAU.
DR. MALTZ is world renowned as Author, Lecturer, Plastic
Surgeon, Playwright and Humanitarian. His famous book,
Psycho-Cybernetics, has sold over Thirteen Million copies. He
has helped millions of people throughout the world
accomplish success and self-fulfilment and in April he will be
taking time out of his busy schedule to share his knowledge
with the people of the BAHAMAS.
He will be conducting a dynamic two evening seminar at tha
Polaris Hall, Holiday Inn, Paradise Island, from 6 p.m. to
10:30 p.m., on April 1st and 2nd. Seats $20.00 for adults
and a special price of $6.00 for students. Proceeds are to be
donated to educational charity for construction of Central
Andros High School.
PHONE 2-1500/1/2 FOR FULL DETAILS.
Under the distinguished patronage of the Hon. Darrel Rolle,
Minister of Home Affairs.
If you have ever asked WHY?
This will be a very important event in your life.


hbe.n ime Id Im thu W .I liu\,
Itl ic.! I \ o rt! ( .i




11
gn ir i ll l<,i 1 1 months '1ill 1

IS alt lha 1N 0 n'i, 11 ii
i l I iii
1 1}. l ]' 1 i 'r I niiii to tlhe
B .i] is 1 ti ,i i mi t ol

I is ii' n 1l Iii in 1h1il
a lii d ,\ o i [i ii li h s < -, t!






Ililtti!rr i a I 'l l C, cI l It g
EIuT\ IoH u .- lo ,t l.
g;\rer tunllie, quite n ai'ih ls
a olI lnit I i !s ,ili d a l l % I
I lleIt-, tI lc 'I, \\ 1 i lo1rt
\ Icl' tw I >l,!i!ti i t .! l !t I
N01 th a i t i n!i Kt1et) I lu i ,

West \'ir nu nl \'ir"iInd
\l f i1 (l 'n l 'I.!! id li n | c11 i .k

leie and I/I t i i ;} l ] e


REPORT THAT
)ILMAN FREE
il sail td h ie uer rillas m"al
nhave rut 11 into problems


1 IBSON (Al) T he
go v rn me n t a n nlo n ce d
Sliurida. it had put down a
military rebellion byl a group iof
PoIrtuguese arm officers
without a shut alter thc\ tried
to enter the capital with an
arn ioured column.


REVOLT IN PORTUGAL
I he government said the
attempt, "to induce other
units" of the armed forces to
join the revolt failed
"Calm reigns in '!he
country. a governi i,,int


statement said 12 hours after
the column was turned back
from Lisbon
l'he officers, reportedly
about 200, were placed under
arrest at (aldas da Rainha
ahoutt 50 miles north of
I ishon, the government said.


here in 1'4-."- he said, "wet
could see for 2O fleet. By
1971 that visiilitty at tunes,
was down to 10 feetl
"''his is one' problem li i'
mlust lace and usl ,l\so'lve \e
are able jnitd 'we mcuist ldo(
everything wer can Ito preserve
thle heaalit of these waters.
stated t le s-\ Carl-old
..li alr't .1112 l, 1,. c,
Mr. Pcderson siudl ihe hadi
spent I so lmu h lln 1111 int
Bahalian waters his skin gotil
wrinkled. "anId it li age tl' e
wrinkles don't go aii wlihen I
get )out of tiht water." hie
quipped.
Mr. Oris Russell, ])IIIJIHn!nI
secretary to lte 'Mlnister ot
I'xternal \Affialr and ;1
well known and active ili li'er
of the' Bahamnas Ntilonal liiist
and other conseCrdal iii-iiiindetilC
organi/alions. ai,'ctd is %1C liI
the enlerl am ini c\'clrnin ;iiud
thanked MIr. Pedcrrson as "i
naturalized concih ."
This is the third tilil \1 r
Pederson lihas inadtii on ther
underwater world o)t the
Bahamas. most o! \lnih hli-

ESSO DENY R

KIDNAPPED (
-BUENOS AIRFIS (Al'i
Esso Argentina today denied a
newspaper report that
kidnapped American oillman
Victor ti. Samuelson haid heen
released h\ his gicrrilla
abductors.
( ronica qIuotedlt ;il
unidentified spokcsmnain at t li
I:sso rcfinery at ('a nilani.
where SIramuelsonii s .tablduceil
Dl)c ,. as sai ing, lie \,.-,
"I'readi\ free." It sil
Samlelsolrn \wa;is inI gIood hlialll
buit that he had lost scir.il
poiulnds.
"We have checked tlih rcpoi,
and unfortunately\ it is not
true." said Francis I'dwaids.
I sso's public relations otficct.
Last Wednlesday I ssNo
acknowledged having paid
the People's Revoliutionarl.
Ai ii a re cord ransom ot
14.2 million for the relciasi'e
Samuiiielson, 36, a (llevclandri
()Oiro iativct. here h'is hee't not
i n i r ti a ti ii n o Il Is
whereaboIuts since.
Bult l dards said, "-\e are
not conn crned aI C bout
Samuelsoln's fate and beithic\
his release could be a inaltet ol
i irours o r of davs."


n n n- + -.
GRAND PRIZE I






CUTLASS
Complete with 50 H.P.
Johnson or Evinrude Motor
(Valued at $4,220)
The ItlIn Iou. intelnoi of this
imlrr;irtint ORl A\NL)OCLIPPIR isthe
Iosult of tiilltI iit styling. It has
jnodi.od r i etil fir ,utl e with ternpeled
shatte i-pir t Ilf lo full declining seats.
Tlhe hlul I ti'nt 't,,,li, d aJnd will give
youii ut'stndtil tnq P i i fui i ni.iirn' Their is "
no finice b oat Ilh ,]t i,, the n loru'y. .-
Mad-l, by ,i fiir, ith ovei 20 yeats
expert iltrcO. That's ORLANDO
CLIPPF R! Whjt I boat'l


SEVINRUDE
.i The outboard motor that's built for everyone. It's rlqht at
.. hone with the jet fun set as well as the commercial
t nfisheirmanrl. EVINRUDE 50, the motor that's built for work
r'' plav. IT FEATURES:
S Fire power breakerless CD electronic ignition Power pilot,
power shift with positive mechanical follow through New
Spe-set tilt lock 9 Pressure backed piston rings Pulse tuned
exhaust Automatic pressuie-temnperature controlled
cooling Power port loop-charged engine Computer
-- matched gearing!
S Anrd options you never even dreamed about. "No motor so
_ little ever did so much."


NEWSPAPER

COPIES

AVAILABLE AT


THE TRIBUNE


OFFICE

THIS WEEK!


When it comes to insurance

it's Dominion for Life


...in Nassau

call Philip Russell 2-3843


9p,ues


I


Be a BIG WINNER...Enter the









\ O MIURA LUMBER CO.,LTD.

Fk, I


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMA ISLANDS

TENDERS FOR TREASURY BILLS

The Trleasurcr Ihercln ive\ s notice, that tender, S\ill be received on
I 'uscdal l th lMarch. I 974 lur ITreasur\ Bills to bie issIud tinder the
Itt'h, lc TreasrL Bills Act \ .l 1 ) t11nd the Public I reau r\ Bills Amendment
\el 19 51 oin Thul sda.I. 21st MlarIch. 1974 ais 1, ii -

Bills denominated and payable in
Bahamian dollars .....................B$1,700.000

Ilr bhills \\ill ie in minimiiuml multiples iof 's 10t)a ld redeemlable
ninet\-o1ne ()1) d \ s froN l t111 d e oItC issue.

I hle hills \\ill he issued ld paid ,at t(le I llliam is \lonetai-\ A\utl ority.
)ct ilsj of I\ llmenlt ,1 II l ie hItilicl l to sLtcce'istI l tendterers in letters otf
ice plmcc.

I lach lender muist b in ll s.cakld N neclo)pc maiirked "" lIuAlcr esscr'd tlI :-

THE BANKING MANAGER
Bahamas Monetary Authority
A\ld slli()l lieC deli1vered t to e ol'ice o tlIthe \lA tllho it\ in the Il.I).
Sa,001n luildin., co- rner oi' Shlirle\ a l laP rliriitnent Strcisc N\, ssau before
3:00 p.m. on Il esday, lth \lurchli. I 074.

lenders must hle lllde onl special oItormlls \ \ which i mai\ he inlit.n nc! from the
Ilt1ahmltas \Moetlcry tlliority and the (llmmlrcia1l IBanks ;lad must be for
l(it loessI', I I ll. 11' t ill llllltll ;IllM tllllt st:ited ill [i Lr.lrt1p.iil 2. Ile1nders1 m u11 st
"sIte l1li net price per cent (lhein a Imulltiple iif (1'one cent) which ill he
paid
I CIe rIeasulrer rec l -es tihe ri til to reei ct I n or all lender.

\itlis ir\ ol inrance
\atssa lalhta rn s.
I 1th \larch, 1974.


* $ ^


I I -


TH"E ,- iI.r11I,,! IE -4 s i"Li rNCE COMP r'o!I


CORPORAL IR()N UIMI II 1)











flhp rihnbiP


Monday March 18, 1974


CLASSIFIED


SECTION


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS-FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV. TELEPHONE 21986 EXT. 5


REAL ESTATE


SI
I I


C13915
FOR SALE
3 bedroom 2 bath house
financing available Phone
2-1495 or 6.

C13707
4 BEDROOM 2 bth' ,.
unfurnished house with carpo,
and sewing room FOR SALt.
Call 31671 31672 (9.00 a m
12.00 2.0,. p ': 1'
pi m. week' 'itiL' s)

C13710
BUY NOW'
SAN ANDROS
LOTS
14,500
sq.FEET!
Almost 1 '3 acre
$45 DOWN. $45 per MONTH
CALL OR VISIT
FRANK CAREY
REAL ESTATE
P. Box N4764
BAY & DEVEAUX ST.
T.1 ;'7637. 124815

C13904
HRAL ST-A T
.' - R Y O i S l
SHI 'L lY LO- 5-"i .I

1td ish t ". *

B3a k Bai th,,,r, '.e.'. ; !,.
;ro e .tv -,u ,d ,
:ecluded area ,1 hir''v Sl;)]),.
,tr!.d e dl 1i i n i ) i i i a 5 l ,i
i' '2 T' 1 ''' ,H l''- !



bedli.r *, t i I

bedr ') i,, Hi i '
spaci 'J i; i' ai .lle i t),
sitt inrq Ig ,,', i g ir o'i ,



L-o al O',ni OfU t i- piii ,i,

onslidIelrdl

Cl3'692
DAVSON'S C ,L
UC LLI:'
Ceitified Rea L at' '
Phones 21 1 7, *,b4-41
P 4 43

Pr oudly pi-'
HINt ', F i L -

1SHRO.)UG IIOUT T if
COMMON' .LT"
2 3 and 4 ,' jLT OO, i
HOUSES ir '' '.; v. i

LAS-t- R1 O" J
tI i cr a '

SAN SOUCI
CBLAIR ESTATE S
GLENISTON (',ARDN r"
WINI ON
THF GROVI I/," .i
SKYL''In. tIE I IGTS
NASSAU AS T
SEA BRE ZE
VILLAGE ROA!'
GOLDEN GAT EI
HIGHLAND lA l-
PROSPI L RPI[)(,
'/[SrT. i L 'LI i L ,


in PARADISf ISL .;,
EAST BAY S1R Ti T
WEST BAY STRIP I T
HOTELS arid HOIITF 'Il!
BEACH LOT', LO_ 0 I ,
CIAL LOTS. P[ SilDt NTIAli
LOTS


EVELOPM[ NI ,
14ASSAU: AN\ .
tSLANi)S s, l I.',
SAHAMf [ O.'.
1LEUTHif ,
45 /%(L R; i AV
X U 10 A S .'-
ATER Hl;
OR[


lii,

,ii .11 -
'''Ii

- Ill
I I


DAV"L .,
I T S iTAT I f ':
tihomn ] 8, / ,, .'





* {p { 's i J ,




tayn ,in I '
alan .
ox N W

WANTS TO TRADE

1382;'
*W O bt 'd ,> .. i .-*p .. ... '
ily tuirillhl ii ,'I i )i i
tc. Oveg ri'l W t . 1 .i(p
O apatr t in T i i
-4223 of W, Of ..



WANTS TO BUY

:13901
WANTED ALL gOATS"'
Ioats ariy i.' ", 'jlh )(
lodel Ph ,e,(s o. ti t Wn, lf
Sroegei. Tel. 3181)1. 31 i"," i
1889.


FOR RENT ]


3708
STTAGES and ,tia tr,,:,
r monthly airco)ditionec.
f ly furnished, naid serve
a ailable. Lovely garden anid
S imming pool. Telephone
3 297,31093.


FOR RENT


C13687
HO JUSE 5iiab:e foi stnl ,
office aJili',lr Street fI ltrg
Shopping Pija C ontiati
2-3 170

C13799
t'URNISHSD 2 hfedicom
apartment Ltionsti'q if
livirlg. diinnq 1o0i kitty heni aind
bathroom Twimsv ll /voLnue
5-3185

C 383(,
i OR RE NT f URN I ItE4
pRoomi with ot i! iti', il i'V.
Bt sifine', (jIl pI t-feIrill i ist
Sovvlie Sti'ft lina! R(a Phorne







-8
-% si 4- ) (, o ? It I CI




3 i 1 ,
cfu, !''i-i i.'ii i); 'e'Kln .












5' 14) Ii S! ,].' l' ilrl(l lidn^
B ,,uleva i ( i, i Nu li viL it
62 (d ,) 3 71 / (nights)


C ; (r f. :i!'.,
WHY PAY MORE TO SLEEP?




























1.liii
Ga,.er', t',, S i$20 19 <




f t .VllILCi'


T. ii trl t i I -i wVAIL [bL(

o, Ot i i I .' t' 't verl i t, ii
!io hr t, i rt1'Ai ft5 I l I I,.

CENTRAllt'! wiG VA-tl plllv .
v n & h ri I I( f n a, r s100r )
'The Eph)rins BrP v n hillsid" i
























970 SUNBEAM RAPIERl,




















1971 JAVi tIN- 55t
1968 C t S. d PCK UP TR ,IUC


































970 Ci-iFELh ,- -'i
t ( ., ',i P

I 'i 1.'1
l'( ,)p t l!d i ; Rkiu(
uP' P'hi ] I n 1 dl 1 iLI ,NliH


2 Tw 'd (,i '.l j3': i! it,



















iE) C 0ti 3'TlI jhA



19l69 lf LH V lI N I( T
.1972 FIAT BUS l 'ii ,4" '''-, 'i











1968 ROVER 2000 SALE(DON







3"i DODGE '1101" CPQFIT
!970 SUNBEAM RAPIER 0






9710 E'8'EL0 '
Thomlpson boulevard
8 PLY iOUTH VLINT
i971 DODGE AVENGER






1968 ROVER 2000 SAL OON
,. j ', ) t ;" .




1970 FORD CORTINA

1969 VAUXHALL VIVA

1970 FIAT 850 TO:,...
CENTRAL GARAGE LIU ICTED

P. Box N1525


Telephone 34711



/ VOI KSvi N i .,)u
i IV IP I.t.' II I l(J(

: i,-lt ilc (I all Jiuu tl 2 i .1


C 13699
TUITION
THE RAPID RESULTS
C OL LE G1 Wor Id-farius
)postal tuition for the GCE,
. h I C e il a n d
Accoun ta y Banking law,
Marketing. Comirpany
Secretaryship Examinations.
f or details of our specialised
courses write for Free copy
of YOUR CAREER to The
Rapid Results College
Department. TNI Tuition
House London SW19 4DS.


S CARS FOR SALE


C 1 38t')
S 9 / 1 i O R L 1 L
,ilt onditiInt'd, sto'l o ta)pe
p i yv ef ,gi tj k co n ll i lin $ 3,10 0
(ONO) Phone M, Russell
21i90 lxt 5 1 x.vee cld iy' H

.: 1 38>68
1H0 LtHf VR.OLL T NOVA.
d t oni t l i, i oriLonditloned
iexc lloft d n'. tilon I 8,50
,. $2.8H00 Phon '! 1 ,'8; t 0
9


,105 0 dtl Ch n't gont!

re-uphols itd atd iespayped.


S Old 1 qi.';ll ndit i nr
o'o dd 'tai 'a t Il IIll Tel
S1 1 3' tei H p.m.


FOR SALE

Ph A 1 "R


( i 3;S'"'


I OR SAt


B'tt,, ,i'u 5 ott.d
L. l .j 1 i 3 1 )
bo(i 1 l t) kaI i ..


Lilies


Th t' pll J'IU' ois d(tsks with
,'tai! I),dles 4--di vood top .
e '.i I o l at P[uS .'1 2'),.


*.!... S. T 1 ] 4 Stiz ili 50( c
"'iiiagje li ,2.000l Li ernsed
a,'ii m ii' ed(i F i ta- I (Ihaih JI
C ,r t i. ight Ph ).., '.) 1 / / 1 0'
Plo. "Nb)(90 i S No>n- ,


SI ;K0 PALI
i OR SAL
\i V I UR ITURE l
-'OO i.) )CONI) ION


"N.& f,'d lwliy ir



PETS FOR SALE
( 3843
rUi I loCl ('i mi Shliphei



I /
ipip ft)1 s, ii? PII i t-i i l niii0.

St,.ept iofl i i ; it R i,yal


1 3 1 /
Oiie IPlr full gDI I(lvovn male
ieilaimane doq Ideil for s'd id




PUR[ BRI "Wh'AUCTIOI" Gr









-Shepl t) i puppi t? ';i, 'le olI .
wno Ph'cl H ,.p bj h id

















i i hti lil ar I t, 1 Ici' ifi, rd byi

Sti~t1. tl,ni ,., Slidi. iii ifi
"Oe.( jr White iti black





s; ij ', bltj k 1 '. il l) f ( aii



-IR eK S i i INl Y .\ ill sell ift


o PN o i lt' I I Irt a >i f ti nc
Hl tii ui Mi 't i Ht tel [ vay
Street. t ion ;l 3nd Ii cli ,<
idh1 i 1 (/ ,1 < N 1 2 n nr t he
F It, jflg ,rop t ).,d! t m )


Al [ T HAw I i.- iarte I oN Y
i.. t ,II I rfth "., oko > iA tll e




P 'jSI 'iL l )thI' i ( t eT

G Nji L, f : ; h ,l l r, i I fJ
























of t Rea [stre, Hencal)
1 ]l d vi V .i .. i, 1 i rl n t )

B.Il-i,ip t e (atii iri'il' e e'
RPo (.-Idc i V i o,, ,, t ,jt

21 t to

ti u l 't t I I t l t i t a t

T9 i 3i ) 1 ft' ,1 9 t r haep
I)' Ih a t ill i f ',i t, fl .'d


A l) ] l t/20
KIRK IlNS[ Y
t',ili, A, ; L]( !iu neci




CaI 18l 1
B ILL 'S R AL f ITATL
AGF NCY LTD has a vailncy,
for a Real I state salesman with
previous experience in the saleP
of Real Estate, )wnII
transpol tatiorl good le 1en(e,
and neat appeaianc t ( all
27612 for infor-mation


MARINE SUPPLIES

C11894
1969 31 ft C H R I r -. Commarnde i Sleeps si.,, private
show-r, two 230 h.p engiics
with less than 200 hours,
k itchch nettr qood 'e, ,
Call 24267, 54011


I MARINE SUPPLIES I


.13913
lb'ORLANDO Clipper and
trailer with 1973 115 h.p.
F vini iUde outboaid. Fully
ieqluipped and ieady to o. Call
Willinison 24539.


IN MEMORIAL
(13921
IN Loving memoir y of our deai
another Mrs Mar y (Mamie)
Smith who dcepip ted this litf
Mar(Ih 1I7th 19/1.


k he'n links i i liltc are bri ik- 'ii
A.\nd li 'ed ones hati' to patl.
I l % 'a\', a wouniid Ihai ni'C\C'i
licvils
\ hit l In o IIiiI'l I hc Iarls.
Sa -i/ ',i,',ed b, fi je daughters.
hiiol 'it l S Iislci d Ia hostl ii



ANNOUNCEMENTS

[-3910
EAblER IS NOT FAR AWAY''
Copies of "BAHAMIAN
JO r TINGS" (by BahamianI
boi in Wilhelmina Kemp
Jiilnmstone) will riake' popuilZ,
jnd interesting qifts for mailing
to .'xpatiiate friends and
,iitlives AT BOOK STORES
ANDI TIlf LINEN SHOP,
whi re they can be
jaitogi aphed.




C I ..3












PARTY. PARTY!
/' r/:n i sir]'i W eddirg.




I ac\ i 301n,
Iliii '. Ii 5 .(l )
i'lhi' 5125.i Re's .:I 3) 4 ) us.
Boi\ 52 3. I s

POSITION WANTED
CI 38tI, I
HAl hAMIAN /ounr1g womanI
high s hool education seek-s
full 01 piit time position as
cashiei or sales i lork Pleise
apjll) / to P. U( Box N1 //3.


C 1392;'
I Rl W i'( peiliio n ci d wVanted,
beioi(, ietllunlinii U(.S. young
an id fit Somr small boai
expe Ionr( n Plea s w- Iite 1c o:
Adv C13922. n The Tlibunie.
P E0 Box N 320/. Nasau.


SCHOOLS


LEWIS AUTO SCHOOL
Learn to drive with confidence.
Phone 59805 between 7 and
8.30 a.m. or after 6 p.m. or
35084 anytime.

L 138'-.
A I IENII Y WE L COME
awaitsy yitui at the Pettel Pan
Nuii r y. Bradley StIeet.
Palnmdale HIours 8 a m to 5
p in Monday through F i day.
Ages 2 toi 5 accepted Phone
5 8289


HELP WANTED


L\Rt t i 51 LI IIMPROVt
',t N4T ( S I10'li STU 'DY
PpRO(;IRAMM[SL S IN I Vf RY
PR A ( T I ( L I1 LD
I X AM PL S. MANAGING
R TAIL S1ORI RFAL
i STA T t i\G NI. HOTEL
MANAGE( MEf NT, INTf RIOR
Df SIGN. AIRLINE[ TRAVEL L.
Tt.ChI NI( Atl- If It [ S AND
MORE I US INI S S S
SPONSOR F MIPL E v
TI RM PAYM1l NT1 P ANS P.
O BOX N/.Iji4 Ti : t'b270
SOR I N T F RVIW IN
NASSAU OR F R [ PORT'

(138111
t IV [ IN aii'l v.11,il t .I n-es
WlenE P uO '1 12
N.issaul, Bjham ,

C1390()
RE C[PTIONIST TYPIST
Seqluiied lte Iji l ige ils ii'iri
agency Walnted a cjquink, leit
person who is willing to leainr
C o nirieiL al e xpei iO Ice
desirable Please apply i I
writing giving detail, of
educational qiualticationils and
previous employment to Office
Manager, P. O. Box N 4870,
Nassau .

C13909
Fl IENG CLE RK VYorng ,i.,
gi willing to lear in Please
write to Office Managel. P 0
Box N-4870, Nassau

C13911
LIVE-IN Maid. References
required. Phone 24894 (9 a.m.
to 5 p.m.).


II iL-L I I ,


HELP WANTED


( 1 b003
,C ; -"T-I- "- MOBILE
[.OiCpr.M-r T MECHANIC
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Secondary. Diploma int diesel
mechanics preferred but not
essential
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years. Diesel mobile
equipment mechanic.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Inspect, test. adjust, ,.' 1 ''1
aiid replace unit assemblies or
plai ts and make complete
repairs to gasoline or diesel
powered eq(clipmernt
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: PC isonnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company P. Box F-100.
irpepoit. Grand Bahama.


TRADE SERVICES

C13702
FOR your building needs an('
CRANE hire see:
ISLAND BUILDERS LIMITED
P. 0. Box N-4559
Phone 31671 31672.

[ 13/00
S WING MACHIINE
PARTS AND REPAIRS
Island F'irnittei Co.
P. 0. Box N-4818Nasui,
Dowdeswell and Christie St5tlr ts
Telephone 21197, 2152


TRADE SERVICES


--


FINANCE CORPORATION
OF BAAMAS
LIMITISO

TRINITY PLACE & ROBINSON ROAD
The Bahamas' Oldest and Strongest Savings
and Loan Association

P.O. BOX N3038, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, PHONE 2-4822-6

P.O. BOX F29 FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, PHONE 2-8896

MEMBER OF THE RO iyW ST GROUP OF COMPANIES


GRAND BAHAMA




CLASSIFIED


II FREEPIT TEL. 352-6611


C13691

Pinder's Cuttoms

Brokerage Ltd.

Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-3796
2-3797, 2-2798
Airport 7-7434
FREE ESTIMATES

C13696
.T.V. ANTENNAS
Boosters for homes,
apartments and hotels
SALES AND SERVICES
Call 5-9404
WORLD OF MUSIC
Mackey Street
next to Frink's Place


BUSINESS 6 PROFESSIONAL


DIRECTORY


Save Time


SHOPNE

BY



I list l llh rictir CAl 21988 EI. 5

1 1im hrFlltr '' 2 Ie lluPe Mr h '1"

> S TillM SAi MHNEY <

ANTENNAS ii MEN'S & BOYS'WEAR
Island TV 2-2618 i The Wardrobe 5-5599

AUTOMOTIVE MEN'S WEAR
Lucas Batteries Fashionette Ltd. 2-2376/7
Bay Street Garage 2-2434 MUSICi

BOOKSTORE
BOOKS Cody's Records 2-8500
The Christian Book Shop
5-4506 OPTICIANS
BUSINESS FORMS M Optical Service L' 2- "10/1
Executive
Printers 2-4267/5-401 PRINTINIJC

CAMERAS (tWong's Printing 4506
Executive '
John Bull 2-4252/3 ti .: Printers 2-4267/5-4011

ENTERTAINMENT RADIO & T.V. SALES
Movies:: :--
Film & Equip. Service 2-2157 Carter's Records 2-4711

GARDENr& PET RUBBER STAMPS
SUPPLIES Wong's Rubber Stamp
Moderristic Garden 28 Co. 5-4506
S Garden & Pet 22868 SPORTS GOODS
Nassau Garden & Pet _________
Montrose Avenue 2-4259 Champion Sport Land 2-1862

HARDWARE i: TRAVEL
John S. George 2-8421/ Playtours 2-2931/7
H Playtours 2-2931/7
HOUSE PLANS R. H.Curry & Co.,
Evangelos G. Zervos 2-2633 iI: 2-86a 1/7
TRUCKING SERVICE
LAUNDRY -
DRY CLEANlNG Gonzalez Trucking
RY CLEANING 3-1562/2-4726
New Oriental Laundry AI
2-4406 .. TV REPAIRS
.K|. Channel Electronics Ltd.

TO LIST IN 3-5478
THIS DIRECTORY WINDOW/DOOR REPAIR
CALL 2-1986 or 2-2768 Window & Door Specialists
S5-4460


i4 I


HELP WANTED
C15003
JOB TITLE: MOBILE
EQUIPMENT MECHANIC
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Secondary. Diploma in diesel
mechanics preferred but not
essential.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years. Diesel mobile
equipment mechanic.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Inspect, test, adjust, dismantle
and replace unit assemblies or
parts and make complete
repairs to gasoline or diesel
powered equipment.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. O. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


C 15006
(One) GARDENER required
immediately. Apply to:
Bertram Stuart. Eight Mile
Roc',, Grand Bahama.

C15002
Air -cornditoningr /Refrgea-
t ion lGeneral Appliance
TECHNICIAN NEEDED.
Min rmurn of 5 years
experience.
Apply: Electrical Contractors,
Ltd. P. O. Box F 727.
Telephone: 352-5250.




3 GROWING
SWITH Tf N
%-4.Ji
I^ y ~


- --- ---- -- --- ----- ---- --.-------L _~,_. ~~_______~~ _____ ~__ ___C ___ __~_________


W414 %F4SA62444


----~


-


ill


I


HELP WANTED

C15009
FOREMAN (MECHANICAL
MAINTENANCE)- Applica.it
should be able to overhaul
equipment in accordance with
instruction, assisted by skilled
or semi-skilled craftsman while
requiring a nliillmunl of
supervision. Individual should
possess experience and
capabilities in vdrirous
equipment overhaul which
require precision machine lathe
work, etc.
WAREHOUSEKEEPER/
GANGLEADER Responsible
for operation of the entire
warehouse. Must know
warehousinig practices for
proper receipt, storage arid
release of cargo. Required to
organize and direct work of
gangs.
Apply to: Personnel
Department Grand Bahiama
Port Authority Limited, P 0.
Box F-266t) o0 30C Kipliig
Building, Fleepo.t. Giand
Bahama.


C15008
1 CHEF BUTCHER: Must
have theee (3) years, experience
in first class hotels or
restaurants in preparation f
Gourm et Cuisilne0. Should be
catpabl of relieving Chef
anytime. Good referentces and
Police Ceitiflate re(lq ired.
Applicants should apply in
person to:
The Persoliel Departmient
Bahamas Amnusemeint Limited
El Casino
International 3aiaar
P. 0. Box F 78/
Freeport, Grand Bahama


I I *


I I


I


No In


Al


I I


I


8
I


I


I











Monday March 18, 1974


Brother Juniper


"In the future, men, make fire by rubbing ONE stick of
wood together."


CROSSWORD A ODA OLE

PUZZLE B -GUSS
ACROSS DIVAN TAO
1. Forage plant 32. Ridiculed ACED Al ER N
4. Route 35 American lRMANE NINE
7. Considerable author
I1 Valve 36. Indian CRANE L T
2. Macaw mulberry H INT FOE IL
3. Light color 37 Piquancy A TI o E N A
4. Towhee 38 Fastener
6 Animal's couch 41 Vacation cards, L
7. Summon 44 Reflected SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE


18. That man
19. Self-esteem 45
21. Party
25. Judge 46
27. Bound 47
28. Witch bird 48
29. Highstrung 49


sound
Babylonian
sky god
Tibetan ga'lleh
Seven days
Of course
Menu item


DOWN
And so tIrth
Exact
RestaJlant
employee


I 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 o






2 5 .6 27
28 29 30 31
a 33 34 35
S-- 37
9 40o 41 4 43

iqq /q5


Par lime 30 min.


AP Newsfeotures


3 20


5. British
composer
6. Grunting ox
7. Fracas
8 Fiddler crab
genus
9. Call: Fr,
10. Charioteer
15. Expansive
18 Greeting
19 Perambulator
20 Western resort
21. Retainer
22 Deficit
23 Tipster
24. Church recess
26 Complete
30 Macaque
31 Enormous
33 Mattress
filling
34. Greco
37. Belt
38. Chop
39. Expert
40. That girl
41. Salary
42. Firewood
43. Settle


by VICTOR MOLLO
Delayed ay severe teething
troubles, Britain's third bridge
perioa.z.L, ue 'Poputar rtuye
Monthly (WcSB Pu-o..iotns) is
now in being. Rhoda and Tony
Lederer. the original eoait.s, are
no longer associated with this
magazine whicn is edited by Joe
Am .soury.
Among the contributors Is
Derek Himington who wrttes
about duplicate and special tac-
tics in teams events imposed by
the state of the match. This is
one ot Rimingtons examples:
North
A Q 7 4 2
V KJ 9
Q K 3
4QJ 6
West East
4 - 10 9 3
V 10 6 3 Q 8 5 4
0 A 109 6542 J 7
4842 410 753
South
4 K J 8 6 5


;A 7 2
SAQ8
*AK9


In both rooms, the contract
will surely be 6*. but there s
a lot of duplication and declare
will need the heart finesse. Other
things being equal, he will lay
down the ":A, then insert
dummy's J, hoping to find West
witva the Q.
But what it other things areii't
equal ? Suppose that with only
a few boards to go. you suspect
that your side is trailing ? You
need a swing and to create one
you lead the J, hoping that
East has the (rQ. If luck is with
you, declarer in the other room
will go down, whereas you will
make your slam by fnessing
successfully against the C 10.
You need two cards right, but
by playing deliberately again-t
the odds you may well win the
match.


Chess


By LEONARD BARDEN


From the GRE Open at the


E v e n i n g Standard congress.
White fBohm) was threatening
Q-R5 or Q-R6 mate. He cal-
culated that if Black Antunac.
to move) continued 1 .. Q- K
ch, then the endgame would 1)
drawn. Was he right ?
Par times: 10 seconds, chess
master or expert: 30 seconds.
county player; 1 minute, club
standard; 3 minutes. average: 8
minutes. novice.
Chess Solution
No. After 1... Q-K7 ch: 2 Q x
Q, Kt Q: 3 K-Ktl. Black zron
by the well-known but eleoiant
idea 3 . Kt-B8!; 4 KxKt.
P-R7 and the RP oateens


'HFe Make ion Very 'ROSS-word The one with no niumbters,
and except for the first in each section, no order to the clues.
One hint hy compiler TIM McKAV : The eight-letter word %ill
help iou find your place. Solution o on Monday.


-- -- ---


Clues Across
easrilde remorl. (11)
Sacked. (5)
Pacinr. (9)
Harvest. (4)
Kind ofr arprt. (9H


'eer. 4 1


tRabbhhits. (i
'art or tihe day (4)
Moment. (I) I'laiet. (S>
"%%ith it." (3) Fine rit. (i)
Dirti and anntid, (53)
C'litle DowIN


Stulfed perhaps iVs taildermikl-I
(5, 4)
Scull. (3) Easy-goilng. (:)
Parts of d.inamiasw. (9)
Head-in-the-sand birds. (9)
Trim with a hears. (4)
I'ia-fat. (f)
It e I at IV" 1 6A CE R I E
1it It created
(3) 1EN RI
joh. (M) !!E E A
Used with L AT v
I( ks. ( )
ontks. (4 eE B s
Na 11 1 I al EREM U
III e a, llrc. m
tIo ;d la qm u


Rupert and the Ice Crackers-5


"Maybe Willie's right," says Bill. "Those
crackers could have been -left over from
Christmas. They look good. I vote we try
one." Then please etand well way," begs
Willie. "Bangs always make me jump." So
while Willie and Podgy stay by the snowMan.
Rupert and Bill prepare to pull one of the
crackers. Now, tug hard! laughs Rupert.


I J words or
A G f o ur letters
ior nmore ran
v o make
f ro in the
letters shown
here? In mak-
Ing a word.
Search letter
mav he aa,.ed
4 once uonlv.
- ach word
must contain the large letter.
and there must he at least one
elght-letter word In the list. No
plurals: no foreign words : no
Prper names. TODAY'S TAR.
wordET : good3.1 ood words.
very good : 48 words, excellent.
solution on Mondav.
YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION :
Dinger dire dirge DISlOR(iK;
doer clogger dose dre rd ore
gorged grid ride redo ride ridge
rigged rode rosed side tired.


REX MORGAN, M.D


CARROLL RIGHTER'S

HOROSCOPE
from the Carroll Righter Institute
V\"/, GENERAL TENDENCIES: Delays attend
whatever efforts you make now so be sure you
work on a plan of action that does not require swiftness in
execution Patience and steadfastness will payoff in the long
run Associate with cheerful persons.
ARIES (Mar 2 1 to Apr. 19) Engage in outside activities and
forget those unfavorable conditions at home Avoid a situation
that could lead to trouble
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Do some careful shopping
for items you need. Care in motion is most important now
Exchange ideas with good friends tonight
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Studying new ideas can bring
you fine profits in the future Seek advice of financial experts
Do something nice for a good friend
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Conditions around
you seem to hold you down but if you use a more up-to-date
system, all works out fine Be earnest
LEO (July 22 to Aug 21) Steer clear of whatever is
irritating and get in touch with associates who have modern
ideas. You can gain the goodwill of others easily
VIRGO (Aug 22 to Sept 22) Use more modern methods in
handling duties and get fine results Take time to entertain a
loyal friend and deepen the relationship.
LIBRA (Sept 23 to Oct 2 2) Engage in new recreations that
please you and make new friends. Public affairs are apt to be
upsetting so avoid them at this time
SCORPIO (Oct 23 to Nov 21) Take time to work on a new
plan you have Don't be rebellious with a bigwig and stay out
of trouble. Show more thought for mate
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Contact the persons
you like and make plans for the future Don't neglect a credit
matter Attend the social tonight
CAPRICORN (Dec 22 to Jan 20) An associate may not
want to go along with a plan you have in mind, but be patient
and all works out fine. Be practical minded
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb 19) You want everything to
go your way now and you can accomplish this if you are
tactful. Attend to routine duties early in the day
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar 20) Talk over with a strange-acting
associate how to gain mutual goals Engage in recreations that
appeal to you Be kind to a friend
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY he or she will be
impatient with those who do not follow modern trends There
is much ability here at making streamlined plans that can
benefit mankind tremendously Your progeny will need the
support of associates to gain objectives A fine organizer and
humanitarian. Give religious training early in life
"The Stars impel, they do not compel What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU'


Winning Bridge


Dal Curtis


BUT WHY BECAUSE HE KNOWS
WOULD HE NOT THAT THE MINUTE I
WANT TO SEE WALK OUT OF HERE,
YOU FREE ? I'M LAPPING HIM
"-- -^TFf WITH A LAWSUIT!


Paul Nichols


APARTMENT 3-G By Alex Kotzcky


STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD


HOW O I FIT I T7OL YOU-
YOUR PLANS, BARON INELEGANTLY-THAT
kAISER? JI'M NOT A I NEEPEP A "SUCKER,4
FINANCIER. MR. CANTRELL.



L. 1 4





ff 1I


'S'CUSE MELAOYT... 5UT COULD
WE USE YOUR ATRO ?
I l-, i


's IT STILL 9 NIN/'?"


Saunders & Overgard


PAUL- FLANPES,OUR
CLIENT, IS WANTED W
THE POLICE OF SEVEN
COUNTRIES. HIS
DISAPPEARANCE LEAVES
ONIY ONE PERSON
ACQUAINTEP WITH HIS
CRIMINAL ACTIVITIES.


NOTICE



TO ALL


EN.M. SUPPORTERS


IN GRAND BAHAMA



We need your help and assistance in

the up coming fair which is to be held in

Nassau on March 30, 74



If you can be of any help please contact


WILKIE (Cochise) HANNA

at


352-2601

or

GILES NEWBOLD

at

352-5071.


Next instant there is a shattering noise as the
cracker breaks in two, a noise much louder
than the chums had expected. It is so sharp
that Willie and Podgy clasp their ears, whie
the sound echoes far away across the fields.
And at the same time the snowman splits
apart, most of it tumbling on to poor Podgy.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


I


JUDGE PARKER
YON'T' OU SEE, JEAN...THE
., LAST THING HE WANTS IS FOR
WHEN HIS 6S5-ER ME TO GET OUT OF HERE!
ADMITS TALKING
TO SAMA DRIVER, -.- .
KARL WAKEMAN
BECOMES VS'16BLY

741 Ai


modyMrh1,17


SOMEONE WHOSE REPUTATION
FOR HONESTY IS ABOVE
SREPROACH-ANP INTERNATIONAL
IN SCOPE. YOU WERE. MAAPE
TO ORPER.
THANKS.
NOW GET TO
THE SUCKER
PARZT.


1
1
1
1
1
1


Ch' h rtbuue


11













(he r ribuni


Monday March 18, 1974


RIGHT HIANDIR Basil flall
pitched seen innings of heat
yesterday. Giving up nine hits
and two walks, Hall. backed hb
great defence struck out two
enroute to Citibank Chargers'
5-0 shut out of Schlit/ Beer.
"It was one of those days
when everything worked
right." said H[all pondering
their giving the brewers their
first loss in six played. "Schlit,/
is just like an' other team.
The\' can be beaten like wec
sho'wCed today\ ."
With sound chatting coming
frimi cc nt Ire fielder Kendal
Munroe and designated hitter
Bernard Bui rows, the ('Charger,
scored all the ILns needed t'oi
victory in the first inning hutl
added three mole toti nsuLancec
in the thitd.
Munrore ronm three times a
bat scored t (Iwo aont ( iith t
three hits, He Iwas, issued a base
on ball. Bu13rows who'll wsent onil
foi three Iromi the plal scored
one and knocked inii t wo.
Ol the 27 hatlters Schlh/
sent to the plate onl\ oinel


reached third atnd threc
leached scconld.
SHead coach Rick ,Alhury was
natiall\ elated about the win
hut seeing that it is carly in tilhe
seCason I I woul] oId not risk
any thing .or yesterday 's
victory "'I .m always
confident whcnc\ci an\ o(it 1iy
pitches ate on tlic mound," he
said. "I Just .i led Basil Hlall
to gho o utihre aind tie the Basil
hall lie cai lhe andi hC dil just
th ati."i
Roo'kitc right liandci Authil
;aitoi starts, for the C(hargers
on the mound t night whc'r
lhe'. ietCi dc.lcnding chaimps
Bk.I ks Bees.

Shorl stop [Llod Bow leg got
the Chargers off the mark in
the top otf the first wilh a
ohuble into letll field, moved to
third o(n \Adlaii Moss' sacnticec
hit and scored on a throwing
elrr n hy\ catcher Mackec Bain.
Munroe who tJined hlii)


Knowles, master of Star
BI HA \.MAS Yachting association'ss nomiinatIon tor the
Ba.haulns I'deration X Aoit'u;'o Spoits' "Spo.rtsan of the
Year" is l)urward knowles'
Born in Nassau on Noemlber 2. Il) 1 S Dtrarid hlied
along the waterfront for thle ;;ntor part oft ilc \hlicr-' hie
began sailing .it a \ cr \ sg,rtr i tu ian Thc '| ,,l.'
leadership of his Ilather. ( aplain .ifla .iy l .\\ii.'cs
Baick 111n tile lat 30's, D)rv Jrd decided to comip0 c 1e in thle
nulost i. iInpetiltili. rc.tLing ritihr itn achlting the Star class
I)ursard has sailed l his. niaii t, the crecoril iooks of ever\,
ioatr regatta in the Siisi J 'l hj\aing \ on 'each at least
once
Durward is the on!> skipper in their w" tii to is in evei\
major regatta in til' Star (C ss,'
His acoinL plisht ni'nIts in 1 0 a! tithe age of started b\
winning the Bahamats ( h.1mpirIonship, l)iDrilg thec
International Spring Series lhid at \iassaii in thle early palt
ofl l'3 out ot a fleel ol 25 which included 4 toinner World
('hanipions and a host of top skippers Iromn the States hlie
placed 3rd in the Captain Hlarry Memorial series and 3rd in
the Spring Championship, first and second being won by
World Champions Bill Buch.an and ling Schonmaker
At the World famous Winter Bacardi Series in Mianmi
which ottilers one of the ver\ compettit\e series, as it draws
top sailors from all cover the States. I urope and South
America. l)uriward placed third in a fleet of 52
At the North \mericai championshipp I)urirtad placed
second, .ne point behind the iw\inner in a tieet of 70.
Nevertheless he \went on to win the l'Paul Nason trophy and
the Ned Ilays Memorial I tophy conlpeting against the same
skippers.


with a base on balls
represented the Chargers'
second run of that inning as he
cam.ne home on Burrows'
sacrifice fly into centre field.
Silenced in the second
inning on one hit, the Chargers
camera through with thicc
consecutive hits in the third
which culminated in three runs
bringing them ahead 5-0.

Moss, the Bahanmas Baseball
Association's 1973 rookie ot
thie year chopped a single inot,
left. Munroe followed willI
another into right passed the
outstretched glove of first
baseman C(olin Thompson. This
play moved Moss to third.

Schlitz only threat to the
Chargers' shut out game caiec
in the bottorn of the fourth
w he n Bain and left fieldcier
Vincec Albury each connected
"w ith con secutitie hits.
IowCe\Cer, a double plai
secured the inning and for tihe
remainder three frames onl
one Brc'we reraciIhed first.


CHAR(;F'RS
ab r
I Howleg 2 1
A. Moss 3 1
K. Munroe 3 2
t,. Burrirovs 3 1
S.()uten 3 0
C. Mortimer 3 0
R. Rodgers 3 0
I (u easier 3 0
K. (,unme1 3 0

S Ill IT /
I. Roberts 3 0
I Lockhlart 3 0
1 ockharl 2 0
('. thompson 3 0
G. Iucnas 2 0
M. Ilain 3 0
V. Alhurs 3 0
(i,. Jnh.isoni 2 0
S. I itu t:;ii I 0
It. 1 irt I\ 2 (i
A. Minus I 0


Right hander Roscoe Hall in
Sli\v hit performance, struck'
iout five and issued no base on
balls Saturda\ as Del Janeo
Saints shut iout Jet Set 2-0.
In the Saints" six hit attack,
cent re fielder I ddie Ford
collected two from three times
it bat. Anthony Bowe and
JOhn .dderley each went one
tor tUlur.


-Dodgers upset Royals


SHIOR SI I' ilndre w ood,
froin three tu.es at hat. scored its.,
and kn'oc ked in one Saturday t .s S (
Mti h.iel's tDodgers upset last
season's second pllate tinishlers
\ I 1). it\ ;als 7 3 p'rtectinie lheir
iunheitL.ii rect.rd ii I vWO pIua\ cd.
\\ itls \iuining pilcher Br.iad Simith
On the mot iunid. the iidgers
,v'.'rc;.inmc three i tun third inning
attack and delenced Ihe HiR als to
lust ts' hlilts for tlhe remainder ofi
lic s,%en Inning t.ui;ic'.
fhic' )Ddi'ers in their first outinmi
list week .titled i urterg Cardinals
14-9 behind tihe coined offeinc'
oit \%\,)d .iand c.itihcr C resell
'r.itt H \\o dl \with .a third of i1n
inning help tfroni \ lung% Mi\ril I oLrd
took ii.h' ,win in th .i gain
(;ine L into yesterday\ 's iganti'. the
!)odgclers w\ho aire .onsiidered lthe
te.Uii It" beit this s .Atsolli. put
together four runs in the first twn,
innings taking the lead h' /ip.
SCnuiLI b.tsetnian Kc'Rin e Ri niuue
t..l t led off tihe 1w lttoim .f the first
rAching fi trst oin a .catcher's errir
ini0vUed t o sec Liond i oilt ,.lter
I ergusun's sacrrit'ice hunt Iron
where lie scored onil Andre's double.
Pratt in picking up his third rhi
of the season knocked in Andre i.or
thle scL.nd run of the inning.
As thuc Ro .mis in the second
again \%fL nt down withoutt scoring
first ha..emiAn Jenson I arquharson


and centre fielder D)ann\ Stubbs
imde iuse of a fielder's choice and
two errors to give the Roe als their
4-0 lead.
Threateningly, the Royals in the
third inning came out of the
d(o Ildruiiis uand transformed their
hits into u three runs breaking
Smith's shut out hid.
Second baseman F tienne
I aruharson in that inning scored
,one and knocked in one- ead otf
baiter Melbourne Miller scored the
first run and right fielder Ashles
Meadows scored the other.
Although they took a; scoreless
fourth inning to recover, the
Dodgers put the finishing touches
on their victories with runs th trad
Smith and (Crestwell Pratt in the
filth and sixth respectively.
In picking up the win, Smith
struckout five and walked two.
losingg pitcher Melbourne Miller
struck out two and walked two.
Centre fielder Vaughan ('ash and
catcher David Armbrister each
scored two runs Saturday as the
Nassau mAstros defeated Killarney
Prous 8-5.

In the first junior game under the
lights this season, defending champs
Becks Bees Jr. play A.I.D. Roy als in
the first game Wednesday at 7 p.m.
hoth teams have vet to win.


GATES OPEN11.30 a.m.


POST TIME I.15p.m.

VlRY ItlISDY NI SllBllY




lAILY iOOUILS 1st 1 211 HACS

ALSO OUINELLAS
GOVERNMENT SUPERVISED PARIMUTUEL
BETTING.
COMFORTABLE AIR CONDITIONED DINING
ROOM & BAR OVERLOOKING THE TRACK.


Basil makes it hot





for Schlitz Beer


Results of Saturday races at
Hobby Horse:
I IRST RACtI 4'.1 Iurlongs
1. I ellero (91) J. Horton
2. Son Of Pie (4) R. Hewitt
3. Roman Dancer (2) A.
Gibbs.
SI'CONI) RlAC'I Iurlongs.
1. Pie Child (9) J. Horton $8.35,
S 4.40. $2.80.
2. Jubils (5) A (;Gibbs $6.65
$5.40
3. Neysa's Jo% (6) G(. Bain
$4.50.
Daily Double (9-9) $9.95
First Quinella (5 9) S22.95.
FHIRD RAC'l- 5 1 urlongs
I. Drink In Draw (9) A..
Saunders $20.55. $12.35. $10.25
2. FI Pulsar (6) H. Woodside
$ 1.45. $7.25.
.3. Trouble Maker (7) J.
Horton $4.50
Second Ouinella (6-9) $121.10
FOURTH RACI-: 5 FIurlongs.
I. The Bad (7) J. Bain 59.60.
$4.95, $3.45.
2. One Point Hive (1) A. (;ibhs
$5 75. $3.95
3. Southern Ilame (3) N.
Sweeting $4.05
Third Quinella (I-) $ 17.50
IlII THI RAcI' 9 F urlongs
1. Stiletto (3) N. Sweeting $4.10.,
$2.85. 52.15.
2. Jungle Pie (9) J. Bain $4.55,
$2.30
3. Miss Millie (6) Ant.
Saunders $2.50
Fourth Quinella (3-9) $7.95
SIXTH RACE 4". I furlongs
I. Dusty Wind (6) J. Hain $6.20,
$3.80, $3 10


AND AT 8:50



Hitt
RV 5AN* TEONCOLOR I

ne Under18Admi


Dear Sir,
Responding to your invitation to
forward personal views in
connection with amateurism in
sport I would like to make known
my versions, based on many years
of experience as participant and
administrator in the past. Whether
there have been any drastic changes
in the rulings governing amateur
status I am not prepared to argue,
but these versions of mine are based
on amateurism as it applied when I
was actively involved...any recent
changes must he included as
amendments.
Briefly, an amateur is one who
participates for the love of, and
enjoyment derived from, any form
of sport, without remuneration in
any way, either in cash or kind,
from his activities. This does not
debar him/her from any genuine
and certifiable "out of pocket"
e penses whichh lie/she may incur in
the pursuit of that activity by way
of extensive travel or overnight
accommodation, etc. which lie/she
may have to pay. and which can be
re imhursed by the organizers of
si m ilar administrative hod
concerned with the promotion.
Even the presentation of items of
equ ipment, often quoted as
"advertising'", is strictly. forbidden,.
and many international athletes
have learned to their regret that
such "backhanders" have led to
trouble, often to being eliminated
from international competition.
occasionally in solving the Olympic
(ames. Such practices have been
frequently unearthed in the past,
and many promising athletic careers
ruined as a result.
Where national teams are
involved, as in the recent ly pics
in G(ermany. the umpire (;ames in
New /Zealand, and the more recent
(C'aribbean Games in Santa
D)omingo, the athletes are
compensated for loss of earnings
for the duration of their stay in
competition, and maintenance in
suitable accommodation ... these
amounts being established and
funded by the national and/or
internationIal organizations
concerned.
Here. in the Bahamas, I have
lrequeitly been surprised by the


2. The Hustler (1) A. Gibbs
$7.55, $4.80.
3. La Negra I ueta (7) H.
Iernander $3.45

Fifth Quinella (1-6) $44.50
SEVENTH RACE- 9 Furlongs
I. Mighty Joe Young (3) I.
Hlorton $7.00, $4.00, $2.30
2. Dehi (6) S. McNiel $8.35.
$2.85.


BAHAMAS' first major
leaguer Andre Rodgers and
former Olymnpic track and field
star Jessie Owens will be the
guests of honour on March 30
during the Bahamas Federation
of Amateur sportsman/sports-
woman of the year award at
the Sonesta Beach Hotel.
So far, 10 organizations have
sent in a total of 17 nominees
for the yearly award. Any
other organization is asked to
have their nominees in as soon
as possible. They may be sent
in care of Mr. Peter Drudge, P.
0. Box N4523 or by
telephoning 27624.


laxity shown by the ruling bodies
toward this oft abused term of
"amateurism". This criticism
applies to many differing sports,
because locally there are' so many
"all-rounders" involved, and this
lays them open to rule breaking in
this respect by the mere fact that
they are actively participating with,
or against, the few professionals in
the community who make it a
living, either fully or in part; these
comments are particularly true of
Baseball, American Ilootball.
Boxing, and Golf, all of them
claiming professionals from local
sources.
In turn, each of these
professionals have, perhaps
unwittingly, by participating in
competition with, or against,
amateurs, whether in their own
particular sport or another with
which they are familiar, have placed
the amateurs in that delicate
situation which could mean
debarment. I believe the
terminology in that" an amateur is
not permitted to competein any
form of sport against or with
professionals". This ruling, if still
applicable, means that there are
very rfes amateurs in Bahamian
sports.
Another method which could be
considered as debarment from
amateurism is that of sponsorship,
because this can be construed as
"advertising", and/or "accepting
remuneration in kind" viz ... items
of clothing and equipment. There
are, or have been, many teams
bearing the names of business
sponsors, some of them blatantly
advertising the products of the
sponsor. In your issue of Tuesday
we read of "Courageous Cougars
fight back to win" when playing
against the "Kentucky ('olonels".
otli teams are sponsored by
business firms, one of them being a
foreign brewery. Such instances can
hie repeated many times. In these
there is a positive campaign to
advertise the wares of the sponsor;
the names being embla/enedi on the
uniforms.
Strict amateurism is hard to
follow according to the regulations,
and, as with legal jargon, can be
twisted, or bent. to suit the


AMATEURS
I HE SUBJECT of 'amateur
status' will be discussed tomorrow
(8 p.m.) at the Red Rooster Club,
East Street during an emergency
meeting called by the Pros
IFootball Club.
A member of the Bahamas
Olympic Association and the
Bahamas Football Association are
expected to be on hand to assist in
the discussion.
Following their annual meeting,
Whitney Rolle was elected
chairman of the Pros Club. Gerry
Harper was elected as head coach.
Others are Dave Blake vice
chairman. Allan Ingraham
secretary, Claudius Anderson
assistant secretary, Cleve Rodgers
publicity director, and Benny
Adderley chief representative.


1 NOW THRU THURSDAY
Matinee 3:00 & 5:00, evening 8:30-'Phone 21004, 21005





PARENTAL DISCRETIONMARTIAL ARTS







expertsMatinee starts at 1:30 *
o I




FR"LOLLY MA DONNWLIAMSON" PG. PG
PARENTAL DISCRETION AD VISED
Burt Resernot claimed by 8:15, will be solMECHANIC" PG.
on fist come, first served basis on,




Last Day Tuesday Last Day Tuesday

i Matinee starts at 1:30 ening 8:30-Phon 3
Evening 8:30 Continuous Showings

"LOLLY MADONNA" PG. from 3:00
Rod Steiger, Robert Ryan "LIVE & LET DIE" PG.

plus Roger Moore, Yaphet Kotto
"iTHE MAN WHO LOVEDplus
I CATDANCING" PG.DISCRETION ADVISED m
Burt Reynolds, Sarah Miles "THE MECHANIC" PG.
Plus late feature Charles Bronson,


'Phone 22534




NOW SHOWING

1Matinee continuous from 2:15, evening 8:30-'Phone 3466 4


her ZOMBIE HIT MENI









PARENTAL DISCRETION ADVISED


F-


By GLADSTONE THURSTON


occasion, yet the general concept
leaves little doubt as to the
intention. We are now reading of
sports such as tennis, cricket, and a
few others, where amateurs and
professionals are in competition,
but only because there has been-a
loosening of the attitudes by tiy
ruling bodies in those sports. This
cannot be said of athletics -'1
believe in which case many of
those representing the national
teams in recent competitions
abroad have been violating the rulqs
of amateurism, and someone, no
doubt unsurping a carte blanche
attitude of officialdom, has allowed
this to take place, thereby risking
international action by authorities
of a higher eschelon in the world of
sport. # I
The writer is pleased to learii
that the President of the Bahamas
Olympic Committee is making j
long overdue effort to remedy the
misunderstandings in this respect,
and perhaps, as new seems evident,
the Bahamas continues to send
representatives to international
competitions, and perhaps provide
some winners of events in athletics,
we will not face the embarrassing
situation of having the athletes
debarred because of a
misunderstanding or flaunting -
of the rules governing the status of
an amateur.
As a last thought ... in
connection with any of those who
have played sport professionally: it
was. in the past. possible for such
persons to re-establish themselves as
amateurs by re-registering with
their national association for the
sport involved. In this manner a
professional can then resume
playing in competition with
amateurs when his acceptance is
confirmed as an amateur once
again. This method will eradicate
any risks fur the others who have
continued to retain their amateur
status.
I BlFLII VtF THIS RULING
STILl API'LII.S, AND COULD
EASILY B I: FENIORCED IN
LOCAI SPORTS It' THI RUL ING
B 0 I) I F S M A I) E I T
COMPULSORY.
"WELLWISHER"




3. Miss Glo (2) A. Saunders
$2.30
Sixth Quinella (3-6) $26.95
LIGHT RACt' 6 1 urlongs
1. Banquero (2) Ant. Saunders
$28.60, $4.95, $2.35.
2. Justice (6) J. Horton $2.30.
$2 .10
3. Sling Shot (7) A. Gibbs
$3.45
Seventh Quinella (2 6) $17.15.


BAHAMAS PRINTING


SLITHO CO.


CUP RACE


No one under 16 admitted to the RACE TRACK


pl II I I


- b


--- ~1_1--1-11 ~--1 i. ----. 1^11I-_-.L-l


IBI^II RiESULTS


I v,0 7 7


J


d