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 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: March 14, 1974
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03567

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hl1


ritbunte


Registered with Postmaster of Bahamas for postage concessions within the Bahamas) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


VOL. LXXI, No. 94 Thursday, March 14, 1974 Prica: 20 Cants


Protestant


prior


wins

Templeton


prize

A PROTFISTANT prior at
T'a i, e. France h as
been awarded the 1974
Tempeton Foundation Pri/e
for progress in religion.
The Foundation said the
$83,000 pri'e for Brother
Roger was for his worldwide
work among N young people.
The Templeton Pri/e was
established in 1973 by Mr.
John Templeton, a Ly ford Cay
resident for the past 1 1 years
Financier and philan-
thropist. Mr. e:'iitpleton
felt the need to do somethic Lt
for the spiritual world at a L I
wh.'n so Imuch of man's energy
and itmoney was being
expended on the sciences
Brother Roger is the second
winner ol tihe award It was
s- won in I 173 b i Mother I cTresa
'of (C'alcut ta.
SFRI'NCH HORN
Brother Roger Schuti was
born in Provence, France in
1915 oil a I'rench lather and
Swiss mother. lie is a member
ol the Swiss Protestant
Churches Federation. .
The pri/e and the m )ney
will be presented by Prince
|- Philip, husband of1 Queen
Elizabeth II. at Windsor Custle
on April 10. I he Prince ,Iso
S made the presentation to
Mother ''resa lasi year.
Brother Roger fled to)
(;oesnea in 1942 during the
(;eruaii olccupation bf France.
bul retutrn'ed It lai/e in 1944
with three oliter brothers to
found his oimIunt iitVy and
f work alt'. 1r 0lt > young.
Ils work took a new turn
after the Ma\ 19 8i student
riots, when thousands of young
people flocked to ai /e to
work with hinn.
Another 8,000 are expected
in Tai/e at I aster this year to
gather in common worship in
search of aI better life.
S Br their Rogerli IouInded the
Council of Youth imovelment
which promotes 'rec'on-i
S ciliation between (;od and thec
j world
(Christians around tlie world
are members o his communiity
which has close ties with the
World Council ot Chinlches at
(;ieneva and tle Ihllol See in
Rolme


I li I I listltcInio ii alltonal
Ch stian Youti Association
will hold a panel dicuissioni oi
lihe "Social Valiic tof Iolllils
to thi Bahias" alit Ilhc
Stephen I)illel Primary School
IFriday at 8 p.mn
raking parl \will be John
)cleveaux of tile Ministr\ of


A Ml 'ITING( of St. Anseln's
school parents with the
C('atholic I dutcation Board
tonight is likely to decide itf tile
37-\ car-ld (Catholic parochial
school is to close in Junle.
Parents ot children at school
have been advised by Bishop
Paul Leonard i lagarty aind
Sister Maedene Russell,
Superintendent of ('atholic
Schools, of the likely closure
and have been asked to attend
an important meeting at the
school tonight, at 7 30 p.m.
According to notices sent to
parents, they are to discuss
with Catholic officials,
transfers of children to other
parochial schools. It had
been rumoured for some time
that because of financial
difficulties the school was
expected to close at any time.
Built in 1937 the
preparatory-level school has
160 students and about seven
teachers.
Headmaster Anthony Carey,
appointed in 1970, told The
Tribune that any statement
would have to come from the
Superintendent of Catholic

AT

SEE
DECORATOR
FURNITURE
JUST FOR YOU


-LICENCE

PLEA

GOES TO

GAMING


BOARD

THE APPLICATION by
Lucayan Holdings Ltd. for a
gaming licence for the
Lucayan Beach Hotel's Monte
Carlo Room is to be heard by
the Gaming Board Thursday.
March 21 at 3 p.m.
Notice of the hearing is
posted on the front door
of the Ministry of Workp
Building, John F. Kenne y
Drive, where the Go' ing
Board offices are lor -ed.
Lucayan Hol,P,ngs applied
to the Gairtng Roard last
r nth for ;4 licen for the
Mo tr '.. l 'om which had
pre )een operated as a
'as by Bahamas
A muse :nts Ltd.
With the expiration of
their ten-year lease in
thDecenir 'ber Baamas
Amuse e mnts announced it
Amusem .
wa clo sig down the Monte
Carlo asd consolidating its
facilities into those of El
Casino.
Closure of the Lucayan

Beach sinmo came within
days of the governmentt s
nent that i:wu
announce'. n t .a I.t 7 would
take ov township and
manageniel o tie country's
casiuos wh/t'tlie last licence
that of Paradise Enterprises
expired in December 1977.
Meantime the Grand
Bahama licences, which
expired in December of last
year, were to be extended a
further two years to January
1976.
BADLY HURT
Since the shutdown of the
Monte Carlo casino however,
the hotels along the Lucayan
Beach strip have been badly
hurt by the loss of visitor
business.
Approaches were made to
the Gaming Board which.
after receiving a favourable'
report from the Ministry of
Tourism, subsequently
requested Lucayan Holdings
to submit its application for a
gaming licence.
When the first Certificate
of Exemption was granted to
Bahamas Amusements Ltd. in
1963 it was specifically stated
that no other casino licence
could be granted in Grand
Bahama so long as the present
certificate continued in
existence.


Io lurismi; Winstlon Saunders.
la istIudent. casrtonisl I ddi
Mntii1s1. !lllibo daicel eI)cacLn

(ilrit s Itl\\n, othli lachu 11
and I dwinI Ihlunlt and
Birkle\ Pilgram of the ICYA.
Chailes Hlunl of It('YA will
Inoder.ilc.


Schools, Sister Russell. But she
was not ,l\allable for comment
today.
St. Ansel111's lad been on
lthe erge of clostic in 19 )
when the Catholic I Iducationa
Board decided to close the 7th
and 8th grades and make it a
primary school. The reason
given at thle tille was because
of lack of funds Io maintain
the two grades
To cover some expenses the


By SIDNEY DORSETT
BAHAMAS Hotel and Catering
Workers' Union president, David
Knowles, has expressed "concern"
over recent decisions made by the
management of Paradise Island
Limited that will result in dismissal for
over 30 of its cleaning staff from
tomorrow.
The B.H.C.W.U. today claimed that
firing of the workers was decided in
order to allow their jobs to be handled
by a contract cleaning company --
Commercial Cleaners ".wbitAi '
I4


tees cwere raised trolii 3 In (A s
per term alld since thel n Il.ic
clhiibed to 1 -' a let i i still .e
nominal fec, illlitom li,( some c
parents aire not able to .tffold
this. Mr Ca'iCe s.l itodla.
It has been lepoIled ih1l,
other (Catholic schools aie ,also
facing a tough : ime with
ineeting present finances.
All Catholic schools clt
solc go\lelnent subsidy\ at
presentCII, bit still hla c to lind


believe probably does not even exist."
Mr. Knowles said.
The union president this afternoon
told The Tribune that the situation
extended back to about two weeks ago
when Paradise Island Ltd. General
Manager Duncan Rapier gave 39
members of the company's cleaning
staff notice of dismissal. Working
along with Rapier in this decision was
Paradise Island Ltd. Personnel
Dire.tco.lPhii.p Smith, former North
,.tiidd Long Island P.L.P. representative
in Parlianment, the union leader


I Its' sLitlC s, i i hIIi I Iti itl
laue ss n t l or then '.li\
pirochiil schools

ccihtrsi to repoliIs 11,
Catholic high school. Sit
Nig'lus ine's collegee is not Is'
renew llC thIe cont iI Net il f j
numbeiICr ol teachers when IhiI
conl acts expire at Itie end rI I
the current school \ tn N\.
lrasIons lor lnonI -reinewal l.1\.
beIen given bhi college oflliciils


charged.
The union official however stated
that the only reason given for the
decision by management Nvas that
"they had installed some inew carpet
and their present caretakers were not
doing a proper cleaning job." But
nowhere along the line was this ever
substantiated. Mr. Knowles said.
And, although Rapier has claimed
that he made several complaints to his
cleaning staff about the quality of
their work, investigations made by the
union showed that "this was not in


Talks fruitful,


MosQ


By NI('KI KELLY
111 I AM ( Al1 tillon
\wNs to he I vislcd tilts
evening whclhcr or lial
goverilnlintt is tprc'pir'dl oI
accj'i'pt its t ltro oilsci
ililuinll 'lnts t(o the nelc\
ta\i t iar' s w liCill \\cil intt o
ct'lt ct MoinlI\ .
I 'liln pi)csidenl Richard
Moss e'licite ed l smillin Iioln
this l ninn '" I\' -iid- -h, ill
hol nieel i n wilh P iinlet
NMinistlei [.lndn Plinidlilhng and
i1 anspoiin Minlister (Getoie'

IIe described the talks is
"ftruitft l
"'We discussed the new ilates
and government e\pecl tto gi\e
us an answci before 7 .0() p in.


tonight when we ineel wt ith
union inelihers." he said
I lihe controversial proposal
tiOr i public btus service
bitwccni Nassau International
\urport and downtown Na,stau
was alsa thrashed out.
Mrr Moss said the union',
"'\ecuiM\e had put certaill
on'tteIr-pioposals to go vern
nllilt el bally but had beten
asked to reduce thesCe s
writnMg.
"W its' I to sltlrlil t itil
IIp oposals in writing to the
Minister of I transport at whi h
t liln ti rllih r discussions \\ill I'e
held.""
ie sK.ail ;lite official rei lnIon
to llte utniot c)oulnltei-proposa.il
was "wonderfiIl. W Ie ai
e'lcouirad eld bl todaI's talk
the unionll president said.


The 400-cmincra\1 MM union
has tIetuisd to accept lthe I )
per ktl e t als' tlC II l',.iC ,
announiced 1it I i soIl
Minister Sinitih last Thuid i
Altlhough theC nes lir' scale
went into cfecl l M da,. tlhei
cabbies are operating onil the
old fare. pending inirhtt I's
answer hb governlimnit
The union initial\ sourli ,I
50 per eent increase l'' in el
rising fucl costs Me\lmn is h Ii\e
conI l gained thi il i t Is
inmpossible I to opet tllC e 'I 0 css
and still sta\ in 1`i1 ,1sineC
This Itlornini L tein i )11)
repres'litativ s 1'. lts dii.t' \!
\ndrct Mi N tl ilnlgs IeslIid tl wnh ti'e uto t 'list tIi 1in 1 r t

p nii
lrom 10 30 t si i s t t t Its !I

rlce I ribuine uinkldc'lxnd
ltha t th le first int l %It MondIi \
\,is a heated lione. \\H !I l C 1e 1\i
iitmen hluntl 1 rei'tt ndt Ii lhe
IPriine 1inis !er llt i :he\ lih w e
PIeen so inl' ot ih linC- 11 1 \ .11, L
supporters ol llie 1P; o i, I
l liberal PI a l.
The 'riim e \ liis| r ..i. i to
have told the union 1 1 h1!, e lui, h l
received numii erotutl o n!p]|lun)i
about ithen acl i lti s ,t li
airport including llth !a l lh. !
lthc were e hl ui I 11i ()tit
Islanders having, g o i.ike t ,i\isi
into Nassatt

that a nuimiiber ol d ivici! hist


been ignorrirg ssitois
,ippitlentl k o1 w ihe legi
jlnd taking up to til%
Islanders tl a t iune ,tind li
l lih n S *5 h lie ad
I rihe PrIllc \11 I
reportedly told the tunllllO
this kind oi pertornanic
not in the bes t intcests s
ti calling public
0cinsiderabile argtiIc'ient
si sd o haie stiggesled th,
union come i ip o I ilt
I ilk' tI r-pri oni().il stl
queslion ol ,t'i ,tir 1^ 1
\11 inflormed1 011! 1 C i d ;
proposal \s ouli ld bl !o
collcestsion to hbe operit
'lie ulllln
A prel ious aiiltenpl t l
lIo CIt sion to esti
I 1\ I ('Cat 1 11011W ul C't,i
li'.s service btlteen l tl e I ,
.A ld do\ nli'tI \\d ,1 1N.Is L
,ilie,id\ caused wonsil
nellion ..himon p clllnIle-,
I lie Emerald Green
Com('I panyl 111in \ ich the it
,'\e, til\Ce thold ltht snIlt
"11.1 is 't, 'e l t'h \
0ll 'li'es tis alsed h11si
1 i 'inspor! n' i.irt'e oI
l I 'unsts
R ; k and ile
ilii nlullh i],i\ e ilp
|iverslslentl that aill
establlihinenl of the
coIIpanll \\,is intended
henetil t ill union licni ber
prince o shares were place
piholu li e sUO.


Conspiracy trial hears 'bad guy Vest


SIC C('AIRMAN William
Case\ was pictured blv a
government witness today as
resisting pressure from former
Ally. Cien. John N. Mitchell
and othI.'rs to go easv in a
fraud investigation against
financier Robert L. Vesco.
Laurence B. Richardson Jr.
51. a one-time aide to Vesco.
testified at tihe conspiracy trial
of Mitchell andi fornner
C'onnmerce Secretary Maurice
H. Stans that he was told Casey
still felt Vesco was "a bad guy"
five months after Vesco made a
secret $200,000 cash
contribution to President
Nixon's re-election campaign.
Mitchell aid Stans, who quit
the Cabinet to run Nixon's
campaign, are accused of
impeding an SFC investigation
of Vesco in return for the
contribution.
Richardson andi Harry Sears,


a tormeisCr N i JerIse y
Republian i igci1. and Vesco
l:iw\eri hli e l est il d inI lhe
U'S, d l[ricl ,t oiU l I lnal that
thev deliVeled ithe 200.000 toi
Stans lon Apil 10. h-772 Sears
said tlhalt sa Ce da\ lie saI\
Mitichell. \\ho aIrrainged ,ian
immediate conference for lin
with Casey
In Sptemibecr. R ichardson
testitied loda ,. Sears reported
to Vesco "that he thad notion
word from Mr. Mitchell that
Case\ was extreinel\ irritated
aboul all the pressures b'inig
put on hilnlf tionli various
sources in addition to Mr.
Mi tchell '
"'Sears complained tlial
there was a lot of activity going
on that Sears and Mitchell
didn't know about." Richard-
son said.
lie quoted Sears as saying:
"'There's no sense in talking


to ('asie atny Imol re,. Ile s
completely lincd up with the
SIC stattlI and convinced tlhat
Vesco wsas a bad gul ."
I'he SI C filed a civil I raud
itll against Vesco anlld about
40 other defendants o N\ov.
17. 197 2. charging that the\
looted mutual fuLnds that
Vesco controlled ot s 224
million. Vesco hias fled the
country\ and the civil suit is sti!l
pending.
Richardson confirmed Sears'
testimonL that Vesco \\as"
incensed that hie was
subpoenlaedC in Octoher b\ the
SI-C. which lie \as conrinced
as trying to find out about
his campaign contributions.
lie said Vesco told Sears to
get Mitchell or solnebod. to
quash the subpoena.
"And if they didn't. tell
them hc was going to blo\v the
lid off the whole thing."


Richardson kiiutoed V's''. as
sa intg.
In July 11) : Rthi ul idson
said. hlie madeil a ln ppoiiln nlt
to see Stans in New' York Inh
that Stans' secretlar told himn
that the appointmenict \% is
cancelled because "A.,' N o
ought to take up his Iproble'ins
with Mr Mitchell dc xdlt ri!d
Mr. Stans did not \winl Io see
mne.
On Wednesday Rihi.ad.ln
testified that Stins had passe, d
the buck to Mitchell when
Vesco sought help wih t lhi
SIXC fraud probe.
Yesterday liarr\ S.ears CLdd
seven days of testllinionn in
court with a sworn aissertion
that President Nixon knew
"nothing whatever" of a secret
S 200.000 campaign
contribution from financier
Robert Vesco.
Sears testified at the


I rillin l i .o i s nii ac I ri
\Mit helll and 1Stalls that
's, Id lie took thi
.;iineiulndmentt aI a traud h
to protect the President
Securities and I \c
Coi in issll ion hearing
qutl-stion was hIeld s
before the I1c- 2 pres'r
elccltion.
\ ftar as you knov
\'r Nixon ha\e an. thing
w\i t h th is 1 20(
coltnlribtion'.'" askeId as
I S. attorneN John Wing.
NIXON INNO('IN1
Shouted obJections
front defense attorneys
I'.S. district court judge
(Gagliardi promptly sus
them. However. Mit
attorney. I'eter Fl
suggested a stipulaion
record "out of fairness
President."
"That's what I'm try


tact ever done.
"The union has no file on record oi
any complaint being made by the
company concerning the inefficiency ol
workers, or that the job was not being
done properly," Mr. Knowles said
He said that the union also
approached Mr. Rapier on the matter
and opposed Paradise Island's decision
to dismiss the cleaning staff attached
to the casino. gourmet restaurant and
walk way areas "a couple of weeks
ago.
Mr. Rapier, he .iaid. told
the union that a number of
I the local cleaning companies
had applied to take over
cleaning of the areas being
handled by the workers. One
of these companies was also
Frank Hanna's. he said.
But the decision was in
favour of "Commercial
: Cleaners," operated by Glen
Wells "who happens' to be
employed with Paradise
Island Ltd.," Mr. Knowles
q said.
"This was because Wells
agreed to absorb the
employees being dismissed
whereas Hanna intended to
S use only his own staff." Mr.
Knowles said.
He charged however that
this was not in fact the true
situation because "up until
1:30 p.m. today, Wells has
not said what he would do in
retaining the staff."
And the union official
declared that "this is a
classical example of what
"It could happen in the industry
and in some cases, what has
already taken place.
"Thile general public should
be made aware and all
those who love to criticise the
union that when we say to
the employers and to the
government that we want
certain conditions placed on
the employer, it is being done
to protect circumstance*- such
as these.
"Tile Ministry of Labour
should also begin looking for
employment out of those
thousands of jobs they .claim
are available so that these
people can support their
i t h families," he asserted.
I ritss Mri Knowles also stated
c Out that the majority of the
arguing workers being laid off are
elderly people and persons
n l v with families to support and
,li bills to meet.
'c Funeral

At clr Il NI RAL seivs t,1
ht is I thel Stolr, 7'i, Ili\kins
at the l1ill. will -b I1 2 jim
Ih a Sunda.i .i1 St Mltll thei
th C ('Chutrch. Shik's St cl
bus Il he Rev l ., I .t e s \\ill
ftticiate ind I lnle i w eIti ir ll ti
eid this in St' \1'lllhth1 (clutclcr i.
a lls M iss lorli is t. i\ it l h\
h\ 1 In111clOnln I c l t iv^. i. l lih t i:
M rIs. N |1 sl tl Bt|< 1 1 I
S the llighbur. Park. Nt I1 llahii
lislh a 1 lajoi lof Sk lin H hlcights. ,11
irp t p s() w w 1 S i n '' d S' t
h.is ( 'hipi)'iri harit .;d' M\t '. I nei '
blll M \ eM K n/it ol o li i 1, st tl ii'

,Bus Charged

rolinri VI R\O\ \ \ iki',s.n 1 O
tiOM W ekst Sirlt'cl. %\ ,.haltl'Cd in
tor \1agst i' ( t'i; I ltodl \
is o l 'f t. 1.. i., i .' ,1 it ( r i' ri i lh in12
ini ld nl w In r\ I 1111 Slt l t
In ion \ s.stsltd i i l ior in L
l. nitd IIt is ii ndi rs ,od lll
ihouigh 'Wilkinssn .Is a.irrci'stl \isthin
iis min iites itrlir I. the r ldi'nt
d to 1hi hiandtbag was, l.iake tris r
rs. the' (ol' it' tl hree elderly visitors
'd at a \tio had iiist airrn\cl i ltha
1ornrt ir r aboard 1itt Iithr ni.i
Slta


io' story


1at sot bring out." Wing declared
esets Irhe objections then were
lit h withdrawn and Sears answered
caring that Ni\on had ''nothing
1he whatever." do with the
'lhngc contribution.
S "rtl Ihe indictment charges that
inrtly in return tor the contribution,
Mitchell and Stans sought to


im uped an SIC investigation
to d into Vesco's mirltibullion-dollar
0,000 corporate enmpirc.
0. 000 The charges against them are
conspiracy, obstruction ot
justice and perjury, punishable
upon conviction by a
ar0se maximum of 50 years in
e aLnd federal prison.
ae Lee Sears anti Vesco were named
stained defendants in the indictment,
chell's but Sears was granted total
eming, 6iiiuntly from Prosecution
on the in return for his testimony.
to the Vesco tied the country and is a
fugitive.
'ing to


Hotel union chief 'concerned' on dismissals


Workers."
From 2-2.30 p.m.
Agriculture and Fisheries
Minister Anthony Roberts will
r speak on Cooperative
Development in Agriculture
4 and Fisheries.


SDUDLEY'S
COR. ROSETTA ST. & MT. ROYAL AVE.
NEW 1974 MODELS
"THE VERY BEST" "PIONEER
UNVEILINiG TOMORROW!


CABOT'S CREOSOTE STAINS
NOW IN STOCK

BAHAMIAN PAINTiiiIY LI.
BAY STREET PHONE 2-2386


Hotel

union

to hold

seminar

1111: BAHAMAS HOTFI
and Catering Workers Union, in
association with the Ministry
ot Labour, is holding a
three-day educational seminar
lhis weekend as part of a
general effort to improve
.inuagement-labour relations
ilt hin the hotel industry.
I he seminar is being held in
thIi Nassau Room of the
Shlraton British Colonial Hotel
beginning 10 a.m. Friday and
Saturday and at noon on
Sunday.
Sunday's programme will be
open to all union members and
lhe general public, with
particular emphasis on those
people actively associated with
other areas of the tourist
industry.
"We feel that there a
number of small prol, s.s
which shop stewards can help
solve it they are given the
proper training." union trustee
T. C. Sweeting said today.
Fhe same thing also arose
with hotel workers in general,
and the purpose of the seminar
is to assist the union side of the
industry in improving
standards within the country's
most important industry.
"We are opening Sunday's
session to the public because
we feel that straw workers
clerks, taxi drivers and any
number of other people who
come in direct contact with the
tourist, might be able to
benefit from the discussions,"
Mr. Sweeting said.
I he programme for the
three-day seminar is as follows:
FRll)IAY. 10.15 to 11.30
a in. Labour Minister Clifford
Darling wi'l discuss "The role
oft the Ministry in the

the will be followed by
at torney Orville Turnquest
who will discuss "Labour laws
in the Bahamas."
Following lunch, another
Bahamian lawyer. Mr. Max
I'uriner. will lead a discussion
on lahour laws.
M r. Dudley Williams,
president of the Engineering
and G(eneral Union will then
speak on "F'he Duties of Shop
Ste wards and Grievance
I Handling.'"
M r. David Knowles,
president of the hotel union
\ill discuss the recently
negotiated contract with the
hotel industry and the
alttci noon will end with an
,iddeiss from Mr. John G(auchi.
a representative of the
American Institute of Free
Labour Development (Al IL)
S SA IURDAY'S session will
IopCei at 10 a.mi with a talk
I .ron Mr. CGauchi on "Self Ielp
t hIouglh Cooperationo"
In addition to his AlIFlLD
affiliation. Mr. Gauchi is also
associated with the Council of
Sell Help l)eelopment in New
York.
I:rom 11.30 a.m. to noon,
tinman. i.il consultant Anthony
I htmpson will speak on
''ltioblems in the Field of
itlislt lat RelatiIons."
AN 1 pint.. following lunch.
\i I t evel an (Cooper,
execu'ti tl direclt oir of the Hiotel
I implhIits Association will
Italk ion "'l'he Relationship
between l Shop Stewards and
Sltanageme nt."
.Al I 30 p.m. Mr. S Hadad
\\ill speak on "The Activities
ol thie American Institute of
Irec' Labour Development in
the Caribbean.
At 2.30 p.m. Mr. T. C.
Sweeting, union trustee and
chief representative for the
Sheraton British Colonial liotel
will discuss "Cooperatives in
Israel.
ON SUNDAY, beginning at
noon, Mr. Gouchi will lead a
discussion on "Cooperation of


Panel talk


Meeting tonight on St. Anselm's future













1hp Qrtibut


Thursday, March 14. 1974


SILSON

FACES

CRUCIAL

VOTE

MONDAY

LONDON Opposition
political ,if II combined
todax in a threat to bring
dos\\i lritat.'s new Labour
(;terp.men't only two weeks
letterr it l1ok office.
]he keC vote comes iln the
lHousi, of ('ommnons Monday
on victlher to approve the
ptub I \ programme
submitted by Harold
Wilson's Socialists. and read
out b\ Queen Ili/abeth at
the ,,pcning of Plarliament.
The O(ppo,,ition (Conservatives
scored not ice Wednesday
thatu they will draft an
a rn end iment demanding
stilItr controls on wages in
order to tight inflation.
rising ,t sonii 12 per cent a

The '.Jdlc road Liberals said
to-ay tlies would vote with
i.t conservatives.
ro vcther, Conservatives and
Liberals liave enough
strength to outvote Labour
Monday\ but this would not
necessarily force Wilson to
resign and call new elections.
hie Labour Premier has three
other options. Hle could
agree to accept the
Conservative-Liberal amend-
ment, under duress, and
thereby cling to office.
Labour Party sources said
this course was being
considered.
Wilson could also seek support
from fringe parties, such as
the Scottish Nationalists,
which together with Labour
would still give him more
votes than a (onservative-
-Liberal combination.
Third, and some observers here
believe least likely, Wilson
could say the vote on the
amendment was not one of
confidence and .Ittempt to
carry on.
It would then be up to the
opposition to submit a
separate confidence motion
and vote him out


WASHINGTON The U.S. Senate
has amended a bill to restore capital
punishment in the United States.
The upshot was that kidnappers,
airplane hijackers or other criminals
could escape the death penalty if they
released hostages they were holding.
The amendment, offered by
Senators Edward Kennedy and Philip
Hart, was adopted by a 49-40 vote
after being watered down.
Senator John L. McClellan and
Roman L. Hruska denounced the
amendment as an inducement. To a


criminal to seize hostages and to barter
for his life.
Earlier the Senate rejected, 47 to
41, an amendment to take the
mandatory death sentence provisions
out of the bill.
But adopted by an 87-0 vote was an
amendment to prohibit the execution
of a pregnant woman.
The latter would not prevent a
death sentence from being carried out
after the woman had given birth to her
baby. The bill is designed to
overcome a 1972 U.S. Supreme Court


Prisoners ask



for TV time



to help Hearst


ItLLSBOROUGH A
judge took under advisement
on a request to give two
prisoners a nationally televised
appearance which they claim
could help save the life of
kidnapped heiress Patricia
Hearst,
Lawyers for Russell Little,
24. and Joseph Remiro, 27,
asked Judge Sam Hall to
permit their clients to make an
appearance on television for
five to 10 minutes.
They said it would be in a
courtroom with only one
camera and one reporter
present.
The judge said he would
make a decision on Monday.
Lawyers later said he seemed
reluctant to agree to their
request.
Remiro and Little, charged
with murdering Oakland.
California, school super-
intendent Marcus Foster, also
are charged with attempted
murder stemming from a gun
battle with police on Jan 10.
The Symbionese Liberation
Army (SLA). the terrorist
group the kidnapped Miss
Hlearst. 20, on Feb 4. has
frequently referred to the two
men as its "soldiers."

Fhe SLA has threatened to
cut oft communications with
the tlearsts unless the request
is granted.
Judge Hall said his decision
would be based only on the
attempted murder charge
stemming from the gun battle


LOTTERIES GO-AHEAD


BRI l;I IOWN \pprovcd
national sports orgainitAo'is in
Barbados can io w operate
lotteries to r aisd f untids
following pa rl I. e n, taryv
approval of a bill amending lthe
1017 (;ambling Act
Acting rPri ic \Minlster I'dw
I.ill'ui said Ihf Hll ,c u fe


Assembly had voted large sums
of money to assist sporting
organizations but this was still
inadequate to meet the number
of requests received by the
government.
National sporting
organizations will now be
regarded as charitable bodies.


with police.
"My duty as I see it, is in
this case and in nothing else. I
read the papers and look at
television like everyone else.
and I realize the outside
pressures existing. I cannot
allow those outside pressures
to interfere with this case or
their trial," he said.
Even if the judge were to
grant the request, there was no
guarantee that American
television networks would
provide live coverage.
Spokesmen in New York for
the American Broadcasting Co.
(ABC) and the Columnbia
Broadcasting System (CBS)
said they would wait until any
news conference is scheduled
to decide whether to provide
live coverage.
"There's no way of knowing
until we find out when and if,"
said a CBS spokesman An
NBC spokesman said that
network would cover any
conference just as it does a
regular news story and ruled
out live coverage.
The two men asked for a
national television forum last
week to report on their
treatment in prison and said
they had ,g.'-.' i, that
possibly could save the life of
the 20-year-old coed.
Her father. Randolph A.
Hearst, editor and president of
the San Francisco Examiner
and chairman of the Hearst
Corp.. said he would be
"delighted" if the two men
could appear on the air.
because "they may tell me
something that I don't know."
In San Francisco, organizers
continued efforts to revamp
Ilearst's two million dollar
food giveaway programme
demanded by the SLA. The
terrorists have accused Hearst
of handing out "hog feed"
instead of the high-quality
fresh food they asked for.




Min I Mas'


Athens
Rome
P'aris
Berlin
Amsterdam
Brussels
Madrid
Moscow
Stockholm
News York
San I rancisco
Los Angeles
Miaimi
Tokyo
Long Kong
auenos Aires
Montreal
Honolulu
Toronmito
Rio
l.ishon
Tehran
Seoul
tangkok
I aip)ei
Vancoi'vetr


39 45 rain
39 S9 suniimn
43 48 cl)tiud
37 45 )iter,.c:as
36 40 1air
34 40 lair
37 46 Ow rcasI
46 54 clear
26 34 overcast
25 34 sunni
1 37 clear
48 61 clear
52 73 clear
21 30 ch'ear
66 814 cloudy
34 48 sunn
57 64 overcast
63 77 cloudd
4 26 clouia
66 81 clear
13 28 clear
72 99 clear
50 61 clear
37 43 rain
26 44 clear
78 92 clear
52 59 cloud
36 52 clmiud


decision that the death penalty, as
applied under existing laws, was
unconstitutional.
It would set criteri:t under which,
depending on the findings of a jury or
a judge, the death penalty would be
either mandatory or prohibited for
persons convicted of espionage or
treason or other crimes, such as
kidnapping or hijacking in which
someone was killed.
The most heated debate was over
the Kennedy-Hart amendment dealing
with the release of hostages.


It provided that, on assurances given
by the Attorney General in exchange
for the release of hostages, a defendant
could not be given a death sentence no
matter how many persons he might
have killed in carrying out a crime.

Kennedy and Hart emphasized that
the Attorney General would have full
discretion on whether to give such
assurances but said their amendment
would put flexibility into the
legislation and could help to save lives.
(AP)


VATICAN CITY The
Vatican ordered all its
employees, from Cardinals to
doormen, not to leak official
church secrets to the press or
to other unauthorized
persons.
It threatened violators with
"sanctions commensurate
with the crime."
The ,Vatican's move, made
public today came in the
form of "instructions" or a
directive signed by
Secretary of State Jean
Cardinal Villot and approved
by Pope Paul VI.
It amounted to what
Vatican sources said was the


SECRETS

IN THE

VATICAN


Vatican's "official secrets
act."
"To maintain secrets is
convenient to human
nature," the directive said.
"Therefore silence, very
difficult to achieve and no
less important than to speak
frankly and with thinking, is
still in the nature of perfect
man.


Israel makes troops




drop, says paper


BEIRUT Israel has dropped paratroopers
on the slopes of Mou't. Hermon following two
days of heavy artillery duetr wilt. Syria in the
Golan Heights the pro-Syrian Beirut newspaper
Al Shark reported today. "
It said the landings occurred 'yeserday
after sh after a three-hour artille',
duel along the northern half of the 40-mile
Syrian-Israeli cease-fire line died down.
The paper did not give exact locations of
the landings but implied they were carried out
to reinforce two Mount Hermon observation
posts Israel captured in the October war. They
overlook the Beirut-Damascus highway, the
paper said.
Al Shark, which speaks for Syria's ruling
Socialist Baath Party, described the alleged
landings as part of an Israeli build up for


"continued aggression" against Syria.
The landings' report followed Israeli charges
that Syria is preparing to launch an offensive
to recapture a 300 square mile salient Israel
occupied on the Kuneitra-Damascus road last
October.
Syrian and Israeli forces have been reported
put on alert since the Tel Aviv accusations
were made last vweek.
two sides, however, still publicly abide
--l' n agreement to send representatives to
W inglon shortly to negotiate a military
dftrngagemeni accord through U.S. Secretary
of I State Henry Kissinger.
SKissinger reportedly has put off a scheduled
trip to the Soviet Union for a week to
concentrate on Syria-Israeli disengagement
efforts.


Mars landmgs Treasury chief

MOSCOW An unmanned
Russian space probe has landed Shultz to quit
a scientific module on Mars, to


andiu the capsule nas transmitted
"new important data" about
the red planet, Tass reported
today.
Is said the capsule also sent
information on "near-planet
cosmic space and properties of
the interplanetary medium on
the route of the flight." (AP)


ARABS 'TO LIFT OIL


EMBARGO AGAINST U.S.'


TRIPOLI, Libya The Arab
oil ministers ended a one-day
greeting here late Wednesday
and a high Libyan official said
they decided to lift the oil
embargo against the United
States bit would not officially
announce it in Tripoli.
The oil ministers adjoutrnel
their closed meeting without
aninouncin.1 ati decision
Tlhe Liby.ain official said the
meeting would be resumed in
Vienna, Austria, on Sunday.
Fgyptian sources said earlier
the conference would translate
into acceptable diplomatic
language a political agreement
worked out ill Algeria last
month at a mini-summiit of the
chiefs of state of Egypt. Syria
Saudi Arabia and Algeria.
The meeting was the third
try by the Arabs to get
together on a proposal to end
the embargo in appreciation
for U.S. Secretary of State
Ilenri Kissinger's efforts to get
Israel to withdraw from the
Sue/ canal
Meanwhile. in Washington
the heads ot lhe tive major
int ernai I1 na 1 inancial
institutions said that the
di. \,'i, -t'iI c, utintrie', as a
whole "urgentitt require
additional external aid" as a
result of the international
energy situation.
"Many ot the developing
countries dependent on
imported energy resources will
find it very difficult to absorb


the impact of higher costs
upon their economies," said
the heads of the World Bank,
the International Monetary
Fund (IMF). the Inter-
American Development Bank,
the African Development Bank
and the Asian Development
Bank.
The financial chiefs met in
Washington at the headquarters
of the Inter-American Bank to
assess the impact of the energy
situation on their developing
member nations.
They issued a statement on
their analysis of the situation.
"The heads of the
international financial
institutions pointed out that,
in the light of the expertise and
experience of their respective
institutions in effectively
channeling resources to the
developing world, they have
the capacity to play an
important and timely role in
the international aid effort.
"To perform this function,
additional funds are required
by these institutions and a
special effort should be made
to mobilize such resources
from the increased financial
assets of the oil-exporting
countries.
"The heads of the
international financial
institutions agreed to continue
their exchange of information
and to coordinate their actions
in the light of these new


More use the railways


WASHINGTON The
number of' passengers riding
the nation's rail system
jumped 28 per cent in
January the third straight
month since the energy crisis
began that rail ridership has
increased. Amtrak reported.


Ihe nation s rail passenger
corporation said it had no data
on February ridership yet but
said advance bookings continue
to run about 2": times higher
than its previous peak last
summti er
It said it now has about
213,000 advance bookings in
its computers on any given
day.
Amtrak said the number of
first class passengers jumped
from 34,634 in January of
1973 to 39,907 in January,
1974 an increase of 15 per
cent.
Coach class riders increased
from 1.074,444 last year to
1,383.281 in January, 1974,
for a 29 per cent hike.
The corporation also had
increases in ridership and
revenue in November and
December. Amtrak said earlier
its November revenues were up
55 per cent from those


collected in November, 1972,
while its December revenues
were up 40 per cent over a year
earlier. (AP)




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from tiredness
and discomfort
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find yourself getting irritable,
it could be caused by inade-
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financial requirements.
"The participants stated that
the present situation should be
viewed as an added
opportunity to bring into the
cooperative international aid
effort new and important
sources of development
financing." (AP)

NIXON 'RIGHT'
WASHINGTON -- Roger V.
Barth, former deputy chief
counsel for the Internal
Revenue Service, says he
believes the president was
correct in taking every possible
deduction from his income
taxes.


WAS H st GTON
President N-.on otday
accepted with "a sense of
personal regret" the
resignation of Treasury
Secretary George P. Shultz.
Announcing the impending
departure of the last member
of Nixon's original Cabinet to
still hold federal office,
Deputy Press Secretary
Gerald L. Warren said the
president feels Shultz "has
served with great dis-
tinction," starting as
Secretary of Labour in 1969.
Warren said the 53-year-old
would continue to "assume
special assignments" after
leaving the treasury post he
has held since June 12, 1972.
Shultz was the first
economist ever to serve as
Treasury Secretary. He has
indicated he would like to
return to university life after
leaving the administration.
He was at the University of
Chicago as Dean of the
Business School when named




X l r l n t


to serve as Secretary of
Labour in Nixon's first
Cabinet in 1969.
He became the first
director of the new office of
management and budget in
July 1970 and served there
until June 1972 when Nixon
named him Secretary of the
Treasury to succeed John B.
Connally.
Shultz is chairman of the
east-west trade policy
committee whose rote is to I
develop increased trade
between the United States
and the Soviet Union.



McAllisteiHitil
DOWNTOWN MIAMI



hilulun li0n

Single $ 9
Double $11
Triple $13
Quadruple $16

Home of the
AMERICAN-BAHAMIAN
FEDERATION


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III p N. C AUeS A meY l eti r


Senate amends 'death for kidnappers bill


ST. PAUL'S METHODIST SCHOOL

Freeport, Grand Bahama

Applications are invited from qualified and
experienced teachers for two senior appointments with
effect from the 1st September, 1974.

A. DEPUTY HEADMASTER. The person appointed
will be required to assume an overall interest in the
work of the school, and undertake specific
responsibilities for Grades 5 to 9.

B. HEAD OF INFANTS AND LOWER JUNIORS -to
undertake responsibilities up to Grade 4.

Applications by letter giving full curriculum vitae
should include the following information:

Full details of person (marital status and family if
applicable), education and training, qualifications,
teaching experience, present appointment, interests,
names and addresses of two persons to whom reference
can be made.

Applications should be supported by two recent
testimonials and addressed to the headmaster, St. Paul's
Methodist School, P. 0 Box F-897, Freeport, Grand
Bahama, to arrive not later than Friday, the 22nd March,
1974.


4.


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it's Dominion for Life


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11


I





I


I


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
This is the third article I am writing on the Psychology of
Power as it relates to fear).
I SAT down to write an article on the psychology of power as
it inspires fear among men and, as memories of long past events
Same to the level of consciousness, I am now on my third and
final article on this subject.

On two occasions in this column recently I referred to a
disturbance at Inagua when two brothers held up Mathew Town
Sfor several days ... committed a murder ... escaped to Haiti where
:. they were betrayed by a sweetheart for a reward ... and were
finally brought to trial, convicted and sentenced t'o death by the
Supreme Court in Nassau and hanged in the Nassau Prison on
East Street.
S I told you how the men sent for me as the representative of the
SInagua district in the House of Assembly on the eve of the
execution and the state of fear in which I found them in their
cell.

This is a strange story. It is difficult to understand and
impossible to explain the actions of these two young men at
Inagua on the day they committed a senseless murder.

To understand this story I must give you some background
material on social conditions at the island.
Prior to the first world war, Inagua was the most prosperous
island in the Bahamas ... far more prosperous than Nassau.
At that time Nassau was served by a monthly Ward Line
Freighter out of New York with accommodations for a few
passengers ... and the Miami link was just being developed with a
local line of small motor vessels.
Frequently there were four ships of the Hamburg-American
SLine ... and other German and Dutch lines ... anchored off Inagua
Where they took on stevedores to unload their cargoes in Haiti,
SCentral and South American ports and Jamaica.
Money was so common in the island that I am told that a
., liquor.merchant a Mr. Dorsett, father of Logan and Eustace
SDorsett who later moved to Nassau kept a bucket of gold coins
under the counter in his bar room and didn't bother to even try
to secure the money. At that time everybody on the island had so
F' much that no one needed to steal.
S, Other enterprises were in operation by foreign staff at the
qr island. The salt industry and an extensive sisal plantation were
r among other large operations of an earlier period.
ii. Inagua became a typical sailors port. Everybody mixed with
I everybody else. This was one island that was not touched by
or racial discrimination.
* ********


Over 30 years ago the Erickson family of Massachusetts
decided to revive the salt industry at Inagua. At that time the
island was in such a depressed condition that I still don't know
how the people survived. Money was the scarcest commodity in
the island which ... because of the density of salt in the air ...
produced very little foodstuffs.
There was plenty of fish a short distance from the shore but
Inagua doesn't have a safe harbour ... it is a treacherous coast ...
and so only a few people had boats.
But in spite of all this the people ... who continued to live in
Mathew Town after its economy collapsed on the outbreak of the
first world war when German ships were driven from the seas ...
managed to survive somehow.
** ** ** * *


The Ericksons were a new experience for the people on the
island. They were different from any of the other investors who
had become identified with the island in the past.
They didn't go there primarily with the idea of making money.
They were a wealthy, aristocratic Massachusetts family with three
sons. These young men had a choice between going into a bank or
politics and living the easy social life of lounge lizards.
They didn't want an easy life. They wanted a challenge. They
wanted to do something that was creative and useful to some
backward area of the world.
In this state of mind they picked the dead salt industry at
Inagua as their project.
They were all married to highly placed young women. One
wife was the daughter of the Chief Justice of New York, the
second was the daughter of a General who headed the Atomic
Energy Commission in Washington, the third was a Russian
princess.
They were all fine women and the remarkable fact is that they
went to the island following the Duvalier disturbance and their
husbands had become reasonably established and lived like early
American pioneers.
The Ericksons were probably descended from Lief Erickson, a
Viking who, it is believed, landed in America many generations
before Columbus.
These were all people of quality and high moral standards ...
and so they lived their own lives without becoming involved in
the personal lives of the local people.
Other foreigners who went there became involved and they
were often dragged down by the people with whom they
associated.
Some of the people resented the aloofness of the brothers ...
and the rigid rules of conduct they laid down for Americans they
brought to the island to work for them. As soon as any of their
staff became indecently involved with a local woman or got
soused in a bar room he was sent home.
Although me revival of the salt industry provided the
community with their only means of livelihood, some of the
people resented their presence and wanted to drive them out.
The two Duvalier brothers decided to do just that. Although
no one else joined the Duvaliers openly in their mad adventure
they had a lot of sympathy among the people.
They burned down Erickson properties. They cornered
Commissioner Fields and one of the Erickson brothers and had a
gun levelled on them. They cursed them but did them no bodily

l The Commissioner and the Ericksons got away from the island
in a motor boat. The engine failed them and they drifted to the


Tourist Ministry,one of the best of its kind in the


THE BAHAMAS' MINISTRY OF TOURISM is one of the best
organizations of its kind in the world according to several criteria
advanced by its outgoing director, Som N. Chib.


0tbP heribunt
NULLUS ADMCTUS Ju*AE IN VEBA MAcmST-
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903. 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL,D.
Publisher/Editor 1917-1972
Contributing Editor 1972 -
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972.
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

EDITORIAL

The psychology of power


operation.
"I believe that this is an
ideally good formula." he
added.
Another method put
forward measuring the
effectiveness of an NTO's
performance was to analyse the
way it spent its money.
MONEY
"If too much is being spent
on non productive adminis-
trative overlay then it is not
doing a good job, whereas if
most of the money is being
spent on promotion, publicity
and improvement of facilities
and services, then it is doing a
good job," he said.
In the Bahamas, the Ministry
of Tourism spends 11 per cent
of its annual budget on such
areas as salaries, office
equipment, and stationery. In
contrast, most European
countries spend 15 to 20 per
'cent of their tourism budgets
on these non productive areas
and many other countries

iN


OUTGOING TOWURSM DIRECTOR, Mr. Som N. Chib,
accepts a gift from Rotarian and friend, Oakley Bidwell.
Mr. Chib was making his last public appearance in an
official capacity as guest speaker at the Nassau Rotary Club
luncheon held Tuesday at the Sheraton-British Colonial
Hotel. Mr. Chib spoke on "The Role of a National Tourist
Organization."

coast of Cuba where they were seized and thrown into a dirty
prison until representations were made by London and
Washington to establish their identity.
There had been so many revolutions in Cuba around that time
that Cuban authorities mistook them for possible foreign
insurgents. They had a rough time in prison before their identity
was established and they were released.
The disturbance stopped after Mr. Fields and the Ericksons left
the island.
On the last day of the disturbance the Duvaliers were walking
on a road outside the town when they saw a man coming in fromn
his field after an absence of several days. The farms were many
miles out of the town and so farmers spent days away from the
township. This man didn't even know that anything was
happening in the town. The fanner was suspected of being i. II
disposed towards the Ericksons.
Without a single question or word of explanation the elder of
the two brothers walked up to this innocent man and shot him
dead.
It is evident that this brother had murder in his heart all along.
His grievance was against the Ericksons and the Commissioner
who was their friend. They had a gun on the Commissioner and
one of the Ericksons but did them no hann.
They waited until they met an innocent man on a country lane
to vent their hatred of the Ericksons on him!
This is a clear case of the psychology of power. The
Commissioner represented authority and the Ericksons were
white men who belonged to a ruling class. They were untouchable
in the minds of these two island boys.
** ** ** *
This secret resentment of the Ericksons persisted in a small
group until they sold the operation to the Morton Salt Co. of
Chicago many years later. But at no time was any attempt made
to harm them or any members of their family.
** ********
In this column recently I told you the story of an experience I
had at Inagua one night when a man cornered me with a butcher
knife on the porch of an Erickson house in Mathew Town.
I told you how I frightened him by reminding him that if he
killed me he would hang for it.
The only reason that this man gave for wanting to kill me was
that I was living with the Ericksons. I was their representative in
the House of Assembly and he felt that I had let the people down
by being a house guest of this family!

How do you explain this kind of mentality?
Later developments have helped me to understand the
psychology of power and the fear it inspires in the hearts of
weaker men.
The white race was then the dominant race. Two world wars,
which revealed the white race at its worst in the eyes of formerly
docile people, have broken the spell.
This explains the behaviour of many black people in the world
today who will murder white men without provocation ... rape
white women because they want to humiliate them ... and in
every way possible display a spirit of hatred and a desire for
vengeanceon people who have done them no harm ...just because
their forefathers had regarded people of European origin as a
master race and were afraid to do them any harm.

1 find human behaviour a fascinating study. No one will ever be
able to explain the strange ramifications of the human mind ...
and this is what makes the human animal such an interesting
creature.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
Shadow owes its birth to light. GAY


world, says outgoing director


Mr. Chib, who is retiring and
returning to India at the end of
this week was the guest speaker
Tuesday at the Nassau Rotary
Club lucheon in the Sheraton
British Colonial Hotel. His
topic was: "The Role of a
National Tourist Organi-
zation."
In his last public appearance
as Director of Tourism Mr.
Chib said that the qualities of
flexibility and versatility on
the part of Ministry personnel
were essential to the task of
coordinating activities within
the industry and within the
Government and in promoting
friendly attitudes toward the
visitor.
"In this respect the
Bahamas' national tourist
organization (NTO) is one of
the best in the world. Our NTO
has the official prestige and
status of a government
department and yet not being a
part of the civil service it
enjoys flexibility in its


ft (


since then it has been found
that to be effective an NITO
iimst be a part ot the
government. By 1970 almost
all of the 115 countries
represented in the Inter-
national Union of Officia'
Travel Organizations were
found to have full-fledged
government tourism
departments or statutory
bodies.


in the di- lopeii d ;::; -.
he continued i. ihe tr.d .
have t,,al andJ n,', ;\
mental tourist :'ge;;i ; r'-
ince the indo iih s i -.i-
ufficiently :i i
provideC for I It- : ,
nd govrn r i'i
ailed upon to pnd It':i I !
in this area untii I; i .,
'The US Tnravt,- S:. ,
only formed in 1'1,l 1 .


lias an annual bId11 l s ot 5
muilion )
In the less i' eiop.:d
countries, however. the process
'was re.nsed. Since the tonrist
indunstr was no0 ire.adv
dlcveloped govcrnen.iL t iwai
f.,rtcd to take t hv i-;,
ain set up i h1
irlanizations. It wa .i o i. I.r'
that lo al Inunm ig -. -
individual pIrmoIotion d.i'rds
amen into being. I -ahi


spend as much as 50 per cent.
Mr. Chib defined he
actitiitiies of NTO's as being:
(a) areas of direct action
promotion, research, reception,
overseas offices. domestic
tourism and (b) areas of
indirect action planning,
transportation, the hotel and
catering industry, youth travel,
vocational training, resort
t\.-l ii and regulation of
the travel industry.
FORMULAS
lic e .plained that in the
Bahaidim the traditional role of
the NTO had licen to promote
and pubhliciee the country (on
the oimrlte a-numption that if
x ;ii011oun1t Oii d(tlars was spent
then < ' ni ibcr of tourists
would l. ., ,i H. | Co Ce.
'" il lmalor NfO activity is
still ; .in tion nd
iniroit, "i .T! cs. hut L is
impossible ifr ti to he. effective
todav i' dioe oqnly this.
"Thi nul woi t 1ic
sucei-tif il' It; the 60's he
said. "when I.c had an annual
growth rate *i bIctk'teen 1 5 anid
20 per cent ftlowever, I have
felt fotr soic years that this
formulaii would not continue to
work and that therefore it *5ik,
necessary tol enlar; e the scope
and range oif oin :i. ivities."
Mrr Chil described the
dev elIpiment o1 NTO's from
the time when modern tourism
began 'in a hbi way" at the
end ot World V,'., II. Most
countries set up semi-private
tourist agencies that werec
non-rovernmental t but often
subsidized hl\ -i\ernment. but


Area parent

teachl. meeting

Coiillttc, il t; tll auspic
of the hI. ;, .4 I u i. :
and i' ; ',. '! i .:' t :,
Parent I -.ic,.h- Mc.tcLie
invoilvii;- 14 I N ':v S tch 1...
at >he t n di \l i ,Nij l'n i;\
Schoo'l io d'it i ..i 730p .'in
lihe gI,,t spilJk i will he
Miss Marjorie i)'lvis. -ssistant
Director of I:ducition Pupil
Personnel Divisionr tIr topic
wili be. "'he children we teach."
Chairman for the evening will
be Mr Sinclair (utten.
parhamtentary secretary ior the
Ministry of Education and
Culture.


Available in the Bahamas at
Supermarkets and Drug Stores


'Y~I'


in"'


Leading Pharmacies,


hp lfrtibun


TIGER BALM s sp5ei ii pI'ep.rd fr0.m a1 exclusiv
formula. It gently and effectively soot-es away muscula
aches a an pars and gives re;e"' from rheljmati'rm, insec
bites, itching, lumbago, headache,. toothacihe, etc


Thursday, March 14, 1974


3


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t -':- K':


Tiger Balm
M. Pd... r.


*b
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I


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1





I


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Thursday, March 14, 1974


Liberace and a touch of luxury


-'
-li '"5
N' -r


The new addition 4o the Datsun tine is the station wagon which is available at Motor Centre, Thompson Boulevard

Space '*ith grace from Datsun


ONE of thle 2~,-
handsome members i fli
compact set on the ro5.'0i
today is the new ):iDatsin
sedan which is nailal'
through Motor Cenir ;ii
Thompson Boule';vr I .
sporty without *il s;
stripped down knei- !e,
It has good tat- i ,
prevention. A nd I
economical to tliv and
run.
Motor Centre imw *i .i
new addition to the lI-,-
line in the form of the :!r:
wagon. This model has aii th
graceful yet hiltcu:,'
features of the scwii vi\
lot of cargo space in th, .:
The rear design fte;tusr
swing-up tail p. e I l
concave tail-lights -
makes breaking the gl5a b
bashing into another
very difficult thing to di,
In styling, the Dats n ,
excellent. The hood is !hin
and low. The ca:ar :i:
available in many ini ,- s
colours. There '
wrap-around bumpers 3ian
smartly angled ;w- r,
molded grille. Tlhe pal'or nrn'
windshield and tullview ,:6;
windows of cur.t:s i- ; .
extra light, extra room inside
and extra visibility.
The rear view of the sedan:
starts with smooth floswss;
lines and larger taillights ih l
easy-opening trunk hais I
room. Standard o:
Datsuns are white '.i
tubeless tires. Optional t.-


*i.s radials,
ihe word for the Datsun's
ii- rir is comfort. The fully
iphoitered deep foam
ibc kets and rear bench seats
it available in sporty fabrics
,a.t ire nice to look at and
*t and cool to the touch.
the instrument panel has
en newly designed. The
kihk panel split curve is good
it look at and truly
urtional. Reflection-free
ir -re can be read at a glance
i these are all neatly
.i -nged in the top half. The
...ttin half is devoted to
miI placed, easily reached
introl knobs.
o inp plementing the
tided dash is a number of
,iesirihle elements which
:on-i as standard equipment.
ihsc inlcude a roomy glove
o unipartmient, upholstered
.ins. rests, a handy package
a cigarette lighter and
1 lasting. door-to-door
i-rpeting. Available as
-.'ionais are head rests, a
1::Jio, tachometer and clock.
x1any engineering features
the Datsun apart and


above the rest. A
master-engineered overhead
cam engine assures high speed
efficiency. The cylinder block
has been specially cast with
five-bearing support for
durability. Smooth power
comes from the fully
balanced and special steel
forged crankshaft. The
wedge-shaped combustion
chambers have been
combined with aluminum
heads, aluminum cast pistons
and other features. Important
during the gasoline shortage is
the two-barrel, down-draft
carburetor which delivers
increased power while
reducing fuel consumption.
This engine delivers not
only efficiency but it is also
virtually vibration free giving
a quiet, pleasant ride.
For accurate, sporty
control, the Datsun has a
short-throw, four-on-the-floor
gear shift which is quiet and
effortless. The gears are fully
synchromeshed.
An important option is
collapsible steering. Datsun
features the steel-ball type


because it absorbs more
shock more effectively. The
frame and chassis of every
Datusn are not bolted
together but firmly welded
into one rigid body. In
addition, the front and rear
sections are specially
constructed to give under
impact, absorbing shock and
protecting the passenger area.
A steering lock provides a
touch of convenient security.
This is standard equipment.
So are the fully padded
sunvisors, one for each front
passenger. They are easily
adjustable and are
particularly useful to cut out
sun glare. Optional is a handy
push-button solid state radio.
The spacious glove
compartment has a lid which
falls open perfectly
horizontally. It has molded
areas for drinking cups which
are held securely.
The handsome Datsun
160J and the Datsun station
wagon are available at Motor
Centre on Thompson
Boulevard.


$14.2 million ransom paid


i, FNOS AIRS Esso Oil
i!; my paid $ 14 2 million to
kidnapped Victor
'i ,;. the world's highest
.ansom, according to
'im nts released hv
; J iy.


The executive was expected
to be released sometime during
the night, 98 days after
guerillas seized him at the
refinery that he manages.
The oil company paid to
have the advertisements


printed in
newspapers
condition.


major morning
as a ransom


Editors of several papers said
they planned to print the ads
as submitted. (AP)


/-
, *


l


limousine and a dining table
and four chairs.
"I have 15 kinky cars," he
said. "Most of them are stored
in Palm Springs, including a
Rolls Royce, a 1934 Mercedes
and a 1900 Oldsmobile. His
station wagon has piano keys
painted along the side.
Liberace works 26 weeks a
year and said, "I won't let
them book me more than
that." He spends four of the
five months he is free in Palm
Springs and a month in Los
Angeles.
His zest for sequins and


studded jackets and suits began
when he performed many years
ago at the Hollywood Bowl in
white tails. It caused such a
sensation that his contract with
the Riviera Hotel in Las Vegas
specified that he had to wear
white tails.
"I wore a gold lame jacket
and the photographers went
wild," he recalled. "After that,
Elvis Presley appeared in a gold
lame suit. So then I had to add
jewels and sequins. I was
wearing silver-and gold-studded
tee-shirts 20 years ago. Now I
have to be really outlandish


I
'^f^NC^4


PALM SPRINGS Liberace
admits that he is an "incurable
collector."
He collects cars, miniature
cars, antiques, chandeliers,
unusual jewellery, rare crystals,
silver, china and miniature
pianos.
The pianist, famous for his
flashing clothes and sparkling
smile, owns three houses two
of them in Palm Springs and
has 10 dogs. Two dogs live in
his Hollywood home and eight
live here.
One Palm Springs home is
used for guests. The other, near
the heart of the city, is a
Spanish style bungalow with
so many rooms leading onto
four separate courtyards that
he has lost track of the
number.
He does know, however,
that he has space for 22 house
guests at the same time,
"provided they are all on a
friendly basis."
The house was originally
built as a private residence and
then was a 32-room guest
ranch before he bought it five
years ago.
One of Liberace's hobbies is
d signing fixtures for his home,
including covered appliances, a
specially insulated freezer, and
oven with shutter doors,
butcher boards converted into
holders for sinks and an
antique phone that hides a
modern one.
Liberace's most valuable
piece of furniture is probably
the Louis XV desk in the master
bedroom. It once belonged to
Czar Nicholas and Empress
Alexandra of Russia.
"In order to get the desk I
bought an entire museum in
Pensacola, Fla.," he said. "It is
one of the most sought-after
desks in the world." He places
its value at $275,000.
Among his prized
possessions are a dozen dinner
plates initialed JFK that
belonged to the late President
John F. Kennedy. He
purchased them at a benefit
auction for $40,000.
Liberace said he loves to
surprise guests by saying, "let's
eat in the garage. It has shiny
waxed tiled floors, his
collection of miniature antique
automobiles, several games,
books, a spotless white


and it's an expense that costs
me $100.000 a year." (AP)
FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157


MM
R E.D
Cf. NuuFVfIlE DRUI
& DEP ^^I SOR
T f '. p !1 101JF 5-934


about Gremlin's
low r.p.m.'s for


special too. You can even get an optional Levi's
The bucket seats look just like the popular Denim
rivets.


Gremlin is FUN TO DRIVE.

Warranty offers 12,000 miles or 12 months.
Trade-ins accepted ... Finance & Insurance available.

fladau r COmpany liifi
"Where after-sales service is a pleasure"
A dcu "'QUALITY and SER VICE"
M PHONE 2482-7-8 SHIRLEY STREET P. 0. BOX N8166 '
j


/


American Motors' Gremlin is unique any way you took at it.
Certainly its rakish styling says so. There's nothing ordinary
engine either. You get a six-cylinder engine...that turns at
operating economy and low maintenance.


_ _-,-Romp,


CENTRAL GARAGE LTD.


ThE PLACE TO TRADE I/

Invites you to join the Happy People.

Happy People own a DODGE.


in 74, Treat Yourself to a


DODGE l i

EXTRA CARE IN ENGINEERING
...T MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN DODGE B g .:RYL
... DEPEND ON IT.







DODGE MONACO CUSTOM DODGE DART-SPORTS






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GODFREY SIMMS SHERLIN SEYMOUR AGATHA THOMPSON LEO RODGERS
Sales Repr native Sales Representative Sales Representative Sales Representative

Cme IseM ad ewr courtetso service ... yols beglad you cae.


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MiRik 2l ---.tmv


Gremlin interiors are
Custom Trim package.
Pants, including copper


I














Thursday, March 14, 1974


GIRL GUIDE CHIEF

VISITS BROWNIE PACK
MRS. ROBERT VAUGHAN-COX Girl Guide
Commissioner for Branch Associations (second from left)
arrived in Nassau this week for a brief visit with the
Bahamas Branch of the Girl Guide Association. Shown with l
her from left are: Mrs. Thelma Gibson, District
Commissioner for the West; Mrs. Vaughan-Cox; Mrs. Clarice -
Granger, Bahamas Commissioner and Miss Barbara Brown, L
Assistant Commissioner. They are watching a Brownie
display (at right).


DETECTO VELVET ROSE ESEMBLE

-SHOWER CURTAINS

ALSO

NEW BEDSPREADS WITH

MATCHING DRAPES

HOURS: Monday through Friday 9:30 a.m. 6 p.m.
Saturday .............9:30 a.m. 9 p.m.


THOUSANDS of visitors are
expected to make their way
to the sunny Bahamas aind
join in "Giving Goombay
Summer '74 a Go."
The exciting people-to-people
programme will be held this
year from June I to August
31.
Goombay Summer draws
promotional support from
the Ministry of Tourism, the
Paradise Island Promotion
Board, the Freeport/Lucaya
Promotion Board, the
Bahamas Hotel Association,
the Out Island Hotel
Association, the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce, and
scores of other civic-minded
groups and individuals.
The major events of the festival
will closely follow the
pattern that has been set by
previous programmes.
Goombay Sunnier '74 will
again feature a Shoppers
Mall \ihtl on Bay Street
and at the International
Bazaar in Freeport. Street
dancing, which proved so
popular last year following
these parades, will also be
featured again.
The Bahamas Folklore Groups
that thrilled thousands of
visitors and local residents
alike' with their exciting
productions, will again take
to the stage in performances
in Nassau and Freeport,
Grand Bahama.
The 36-piece band of the world
famous Royal Bahamas
Police Force will be present
again during Goombay
Summer '74 to thrill its local
admirers and visitors.
Another popular event of
Goombay Summer '74 will
be the bi-monthly Changing
of the Guard ceremonies at
Goveernuient House. This
adds more colour and a bit
of British tradition to the
festival.


Fashion shows, beach parties
sporting events, hotel
functions of every nature
round out the list of
Goombay goings-on,


SOME 300 BROWNIES
participated in a Brownie Revel
display at Queen's College
Tuesday in honour of the visit
nf Mrc RobeHrt V \/ hn- Tn.I


O Mr,. a t al o x. ,
Girl Guide Commissioner for
Branch Associations. The
Brownie pack from Trinity
Church is shown in a paperbag
skit.


TWO HYATT Emerald Beach Hotel employees in the
housekeeping department Eula Moss (left) and Floria Dean
were named Maid of the Month by general manager Dennis
Davis (centre). Both maids tied on points totalled up during
the month of February and both received awards of $25
each. Not shown is Inspectoress of the Month, Dorothy
Deveaux, who received a $50 award. Below is Mr. Roy
Bannister who was named Houseman of the Month.


ANGLICAN

CHURCH MEN'S

THANKSGIVING
The annual thanksgiving
service of the Anglican Church
Men. will be held on Tuesda,.
March 19 at 8 p.m. in Chri.:i
churchh Cathedral.
The Lord Bishop of Nassau
and the Bahamas. the Riglih
Rev. Michael H. Eldon will b,
the celebrant at the mass. ,
which time officers of tt'.
Anglican Church Men Council
will take part.
At this service, the Anglican
Church Men's contribution to
the Bishop's Annual Project,
will be made.
After the service, which will
be attended by members of the
various A.C.M branches of
New Providence and the
Family Islands, a social will be
held in the Churk'h Iall. on
George Street, for members of
the congregation.
Members of all A.('\C.
branches should assemble it
the Church Hall at 7:45 p.m..
when they will leave in
procession to the Cathedral for
the service.

SEX CHANGE

DOCTOR TALKS
CASAllt ANCA, Mt()Ro('
M') It looks like a fashnal
gy ncciologist's w',aling room
anywhere in the world. Nouni
'women. some accoipnic t iarl Is their
husbands, anxiously aw:ai their
turn while uniformed nurses s. urrn
about
Silver\ few d 's, thoiiui h. a
different kind of ps.tieint rneis .it
Dr. (eourresr Iurot'i doi,,r .r 1 an,
invariably. aline'. k' inlin Ir h
aitpointment to he translorned
into a \wofltnin.
Burou. 63-1'ear-old Irent ih
surgeon .andl g necilogist. is
regardedd .s li orl, tie rld' trenmst
pioneer ot srx cl.ane opneratin.
Since lie first deelnped his
revolutionary nmetlhrdl in 19t5. hie
Ii:sL perfturnled nearly I .OO sulch
operations.
Although his renown l.has spread
all over the world through \wh hie
calls "a kind of trans-se\u:il rmaia.,"
:Burou shuns publicitNs and waited
more than 16 \cars before
presenting the first sientifii paper
on his technique ti, medical
congress.
Tile sun-tanned. ,athletic lioking
i' sician sa% s lie entered tllhe
sex-change field jnloslt bh accident.
"A patient. ,I I rench electrical
engineer. pestered ime for montni. ,
to do, it hrecause lit' tuld no l)ner'r
endure life as a man. I finjllb
consented and tried it a;s in
e x periinent. Surprisingl\ it
worked, and tIe patient his lied
\era satisactoriot as a woman ever
since."
That was in 19S5. In Iebruarn,
1973. Burou puhlicl\ revealed his
Method at a Stanford L'niversit\
symposium on trans-sexu:llisnm.
He calls it "haisicalls plastic
surgery." because his newly
transformed women can never hope
to have babies. "But they become
women in every other respect, I
literally turn their genitals
inside-out, as you reverse a glove,
Tile sensitivity remains unchanged.
The breasts develop natUally, with
the help of hormone tre&rinent."


Popular preacher

at Mary Star

Father Paul ( usack, ('.I.. of
[oronto, Canada who is
preaching daily at MarL Star of
the Sea (Church. report at 7
p m. is drawing very
appreciative crowds.
I'he Lenten rne eal, or
mission services, '.i! continue
to be held every da\ this week
In addition to the principal
mission service at 7 at night.
the Canadian priest also
preaches a homily at the
morning mass at 7:45.
A special feature is the
"'Question Box" in which tlie
congregation is invited lo place
their questions.


PWAP f PI-OTO

(IF IT WAS TAKEN BY TOOGOODS'!)


/c Dg :DcD E
0HOIOGAPMY
on the waterfront at East Bay & William Sts.
PHON rE 5-4641


GOOMBAY READY TO GO


QUEEN'S


COLLEGE

NASSAU

Applications are invited from qualified teachers for
the following appointments in September, 1974:
1. ART TEACHER to teach up to "O" and "A"
Level. The person appointed should have knowledge
of Modern Art teaching and ability to teach Pottery
would be an added qualification.
2. DOMESTIC SCIENCE Cookery up to "O"
Level
Engagement in accordance with existing salary and
(. ,1111 , of employment at Queen's College.
Applications by letter should afford full details of
person; education and training; qualifications;
teaching experience; present appointment; interests;
names and addresses of two persons to whom
reference can be made.
Applications should be addressed to The Principal,
Queen's College, P. O. Box N-127, Nassau, arriving
not later than the 22nd March, 1974.


QUEEN'S


COLLEGE

NASSAU

Applications are invited from qualified persons for
secretaial appointments at Queen's College.

1. SECRETARY TO THE PRINCIPAL
The person appointed will be required to assume
responsibilities of an administrative nature, and able
to assist the Principal in all secretarial matters
pertaining to the College.

2. PRIMARY SCHOOL SECRETARY
The person appointed will be required to assist the
Head of the Primary School in the secretarial duties
of that Office.
Both appointments require a high degree of
competence in shorthand and typing.
Full details of conditions of employment, salary,
etc.. will be afforded on request.
Applications (typewritten) should afford full
information of person, education, qualifications,
experience, the names of two persons to whom
reference can be made, and addressed to the
Principal. Queen's College, P. O. Box N-127, Nassau,
so as to arrive not later than the 22nd March, 1974.


TOMORROW NIGHT
Continuous Entertainment
from 9:30 p.m. 10


-" -----" *- --*-*

ALL-STAR SHOW

FOR "HEART."


SPECIAL GUEST

Singing Star


CYNTHIA

WHITE

PLUS
PEANUTS TAYLOR
ELOISE
PAT ROLLE

and other Top
Bahamian Talent

PLUS
DRAWING OF
"RAFFLE FOR HEART"

1974 Pontiac Firebird
Sports Coupe

Also: DOOR PRIZES

.., ..... .. v . .. :, .. .... .,.
" .


-- --. -.. . .... --r '


"DRUMBEAT FOR HEART"
In aid of THE SIR VICTOR SASSOON (BAHAMAS) HEART FOUNDATION
TICKETS $5.00 and $10.00
Available from MARY KELLY King's Court, Bay Street 5-5507 8
Also at The Drumbeat Club Market Street -- 3-6272


RAFFLE TICKETS ON SALE FROM 3 P.M. 9 P.M. IN FRONT OF DRUMBEAT CLUB.
RAFFLE DRAWING TO TAKE PLACE LIVE AT ZNS AT 10:30 P.M.


ROYWESI BANKING CORPORATION LIMITED
OFFERS

TO A SUITABLY QUALIFIED INDIVIDUAL, THE POSITION OF:


MANAGER, BANKING DIVISION


Applications arc sought from bankers with several years of extensive and
successful experience in international moneyl market operations, including
the supervision I 1uro-currency deposit transactions, foreign exchange
transactions and the related accounting and statistical data. Experience in
training and directing the activities of personnel in these functions is
necessary.

Applications, including details as to age, education, experience and salary\
expected should be addressed to:


The General Manager
ROYWEST BANKING CORPORATION LIMITED
P. O. Box N-4889
Nassau, Bahamas.

March 12 74.

.----,---..-


..... .. . .r .


''


he ~tributt


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Thursday, March 14, 1974


6 ght_ (rthbu


By Abigail Van Buren
o m4 by Chica TriLue-N. Y. News SYn., Ilc.
DEAR ABBY: After living with "Mr. Your Job" for 20
years, I have had it.
I used to love to cook but it's no fun anymore, because
no matter how hard I try, my husband never says it was
good. If I ask him if he enjoyed the meal, be says: "Yes,
but why should I say anything? That's your job."
I made draperies and curtains for the whole house, and
even slip-covered the furniture myself, and he never said
one word. When I asked him if he thought the house looked
nice, he said: "Sure, but that's your job."
Funny how if he washes the car or mows the lawn and
I don't rave about what a wonderful job he's done, he pouts
for a week. '
Please print this, Aliby. Maybe "Mr. Your Job" will
see it, and take the hint. "MRS. YOUR JOB"
DEAR "MRS. YOUR JOB": Too bad "Mr. Your Job"
hasn't learned the power of praise. Most people need only
to know they're appreciated to keep them whistling while
they work.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE
BAHAMA ISLANDS 1974 No 4
IN THE SUPREME COURT 1969 No. 23
Equity Side
THE QUIETING TITLES ACT 1959-NOTICE
The Petitions of Skees Limited in respect of All those
two tracts of land on Great Abaco Island namely:
Quieting 1969 No. 23. All that tract of land situate at
Cooperstown comprising about fifteen acres bounded
northerly by land of Gertrude McKinney easterly by land
now or formerly of Samual Cooper southerly by the Sea
and westerly by land said to be of the estate of Tobias
McKinney through which the highway runs.
Quieting 1974 No. 4. All that tract of land situate at
Thurston Bay comprising about thirteen acres originally
granted Thomas ancd Augustus Roberts by the Crown
bounded northerly by a reservation along the Sea
easterly by land originally granted Neely and Mathews
southerly by land originally granted Jabez Lowe and
westerly by a road reservation separating it from land
originally granted Curry and Roberts by the Crown.
SKEES LIMITED claims to be the owner in fee simple in
possession of an undivided interest in the above described
two tracts of land and has made applications to the
Supreme Court under Section 3 Quieting Titles Act 1959 to
have its title to the said lands investigated determined and
declared in Certificates of Title.
Copies of the filed plans may be inspected on the Notice
Board of the Commissioner at Marsh Harbour at the
chambers of E. Dawson Roberts, Higgs & Co. on Parliament
Street Nassau and at the Registry of the Supreme Court.
Copy of the filed plan in Quieting 1969 No. 23 likewise on
the Notice Board of the Justice of the Peace at
Cooperstown.
Notice is hereby given that any person having dower or,.
right to dower adverse claim or a claim not recogpsed mn
the Petitions shall before the 16th April 1974 tiM l~ tle
Registry of the Supreme Court a statement of his claim in
the prescribed form verified by an affidavit filed therewith
and serve a copy of same on the undersigned E. Dawson
Roberts, Higgs & Co. Failure of any such person to file
statement of claim on or before the 16th April 1974 will
operate as a bar to such claim.
E. DAWSON ROBERTS, HIGGS & CO.
Bayparl Building, Nassau,
Attorneys


Come and bring a friend!

YOUR TICKET TO PARADISE!


00


'Mr. Your Job' should


learn power of praise


DEAR ABBY: Will you please settle a family
disagreement? We've decided to abide by your decision.
We have two children, ages 10 and 12. I require them to
write thank-you notes for all the gifts they receive for
Christmas, their birthdays, or for any other occasion.
My husband says they are too young to be required to
write such notes. What do you think? OHIO MOM

DEAR MOM: A big fat vote for you! As soon as
children can print they should be taught to write thank-you
notes for gifts. The habits they form when they are very
young [and this is a good one] will carry over into their
adult lives. This goes for boys as well as girls. For some
strange reason boys are more Inclined to neglect this im-
portant courtesy. Stick to your guns, Mom.
DEAR ABBY: I like the way you tell people who have
to live with something they can't change to accept it. [In
my son's case, it was being the shortest one in his class,
and it really helped him.]
Along that line, I am reminded of this story: A friend
of mine lost a thumb and his forefinger in an accident-a
very awkward handicap for a man who is in business and
has to shake hands several times a day. My friend adjusted
to this defect beautifully. I once asked him how he did it.
He replied, "Everybody has a defect. It just happens that
mine shows." BOSTON READER
DEAR READER: Beautiful!

DEAR ABBY: I took this beautiful young lady out on a
date. For no reason at all, I beat her up, took her clothes
off, and left her to sit in a cold locked car from midnight
until dawn.
After I thought about what I had done, I went back and
gave her her clothes and told her that I was sorry.
Abby, I have never done anything like that before. I
have never in all my life even hit a woman. I still can't tell
you what made me do it.
I have called her up several times to tell her I was
sorry, but as soon as she recognizes my voice, she hangs
up on me. I don't blame her, but I just want her to know
that I am very sorry for what I did, and I need to hear her
say that she will forgive me. ASHAMED
DEAR ASHAMED: You're lucky she didn't report you
to the police. Quit calling her. You may be earnestly "sor-
ry" and at the same time seriously "sick." Tell your doctor
what you've told me. If he doesn't recommend counseling,
call your local mental health association. And do it now
before you do something else you can't explain.

DEAR ABBY: I have been married for 17 years to a
man who is good to me and the kids, but he's always been
the quiet type until we have an argument, and then he
explodes. For instance the other night we had an argument
about the bills I ran up. [I admit, I have a tendency to
overspend.]
After he yelled about that a while he said: "And anoth-
er thng, -yhy do you make 'ISH all the time? You know I
hate fish!" I was shocked. t ever knew he didn't like fish.
He always ate it without saying a word.
How can a wife get her husband to say what is on his
mind without waiting for it to come out in a fight?
IN THE DARK
DEAR IN: Without nagging ["Why don't you ever talk
to me?"], try to involve him in conversations. The more
communication you have between you, the more you will
learn about his likes and dislikes. And hurry up. You're
already 17 years behind!
DEAR ABBY: My husband and I are heartsick! Our
son and his lovely wife have been married 10 years and
have two adorable children. Together they have just in-
formed us that they are getting a divorce. We were
shocked.
We are quite well-known in our community and all of
our friends and relatives thought our son had made the
perfect marriage.
Our clergyman has advised us to ask them no ques-
tions, and to refrain from urging them to try to make a
"go" of their marriage. He told us that they had sought
counseling and they have been unable to reconcile their
differences, so we should simply accept it.
Our question: What should we tell relatives and friends
when they ask us: "What happened?"
HEARTSICK PARENTS
DEAR PARENTS: Tell them you don't know. [P. S.
You don't owe anyone any explanations.]

CONFIDENTIAL TO "BROWNIE": I think you should
take all those letters and file them under "Y" for "yester-
day." And if you find yourself reading them Lwhich you
admit depresses you immensely], throw out the file! He is
gone, and it is over.
Problems? You'll feel better if yeo get It off year chest.
For a pernmal reply, write to ABBY: Box Ne. Wf. L. A.,
Calif. MSeS. Eaclose stamped, self-addresued envelope,
pleauce.


Hate to write letters? Sead S1 to Abigail Van Barea,
132 Lasky Dr., Beverly HIll, Cal. 212, for Abby's booklet.
"How to Write letters for Al Oeeads."

For Abby's new booklet, "What Teea-Agers Wast to


Know," sed 1 to Abigall Van Bmr 132 Lasky Dr., Bev-
erly HUbt, Cal. m212.


-oc-s & Decisi


ARRIVED TODAY: 1Tr,,,c
Flyer from West Palm Beach.
SAILED TODAY: Tropic
Flyer for West Palm Beach;
Bahama Star, Emerald Seas,
Flavia for Miami.

TIDES:
High 12:42 a.m. and 1:03
p.m.
Low 6:59 a.m. and 7:03
p.m.

WEATHER:

WIND: North-east to
easterly 8 to 16 m.p.h.
WEATHER: Fair
SEA: Slight
TEMP: Min. tonight 65
Max. tomorrow 83


ESCAPE

from the hum drum

to the TROPICAL SETTING of the


PARADISE BEACH PAVIIUON
overlooking beautiful Paradise Beach

Pleasant service of reasonably priced meals under the
personal direction of Bernard Perron.
Breakfast Lunch e Dinner. Open from 7:30 a.m. to 11 p.m.

SRESERYATIONS: 5-7541
Paradise Beach Pavilion is lust west of the Holiday Inn.
WHERE JAMES BOND MADE THUNDERBALL


0

(1


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MRS. GERTRUDE EDITH
SEYMOUR FRITH of Pine Dale Grand Bahama is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 14th day of
March 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. O. Box N-3002,
Nassau, Bahamas.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that RICHARD S. MISSICK of P.
O. Box 2182, Nassau, Bahamas is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration should not be granted
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 14th day of March 1974
to The Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs, P. O. Box N-3002, Nassau,
Bahamas.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MARK WILLIAM ANDREWS
of No. 8 Nina Apartments, Freeport, Grand Bahama is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration should not be granted should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 14th day of March 1974 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, Ministry of
Home Affairs, P. O. Box N-3002, Nassau, Bahamas.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that LESLIE C. HOYTE "LITTLE
SPARROW" of Freeport, Grand Bahama is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 14th day of
March 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. O. Box N-3002,
Nassau, Bahamas.





NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that GEOFFREY RONALD
BOURNE, M.D. of 9 Tradewinds Drive, Freeport, Grand
Bahama is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration should not be 'granted should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 14th day of March, 1974 to
The Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs, P. O. Box N-3002, Nassau,
Rahamas



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that KENNETH LLOYD
CROSDALE of Freeport Grand Bahama P. O. Box F-679 is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration should not be granted should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 14th day of March, 1974 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, Ministry of
Home Affairs, P. O. Box N-3002, Nassau, Bahamas.




NOTICE
NOTICE Is hereby given that THOMAS SMITH of Eight
Mile Rock, Grand Bahama Is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 14th day of
March 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs,.P. O. Box N-3002,
Nassau, Bahamas.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that WELLINGTON CURTIS of
West End, Grand Bahama is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalisation as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalisation should
not be granted should send a written and sianfed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 14th day of


IMarch, 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. O. Box
N-3002, Nassau, Bahamas.




NOTICE
NOTICE Is hereby given that MARGARET HAWKINS of
Utting Place, Fortune Bay, Freeport, G.B.I. is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 14th day of
March 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. O. Box N-3002,
Nassau. Bahamas.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ALBERT RICHARD
HAWKINS of Utting Place, Fortune Bay, Freeport, G.B.I. is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration should not be granted should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 14th day of March 1974, to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, Ministry of
Home Affairs, P. O. Box N-3002, Nassau, Bahamas.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that EMADLE GRISSILDA
HANDFIELD of Crooked Island Street, Nassau, N.P.,
Bahamas is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration should not be granted should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 14th day of March 1974 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs, P. O. Box N-3002 Nassau,
Bahamas.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that LLOYD GEORGE JARRETT
of Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 14th day of
March 1974' to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. O. Box N-3002,
Nassau.





NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MR. GEORGE COLEY of
Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration should not be granted
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 7th day of March 1974
to The Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs, P. O. Box N-3002, Nassau,
Bahamas.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MRS. LAURA A. COLLY of
Eight Mile Rock Grand Bahama is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration should not be granted
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 7th day of March 1974
to The Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs, P.O. Box N-3002, Nassau.






NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that NORMAN GARFIELD
CARNELL of Bahama Shores, West End, G.B. is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration shouldn't
be granted should send a written and signed statemeritof
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 7th day of
March 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. O. Box N7147, Nassau.





NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that KATHLEEN A. SUZUKI of
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Island is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration should not be granted
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 7th day of March, 1974
to The Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs, P. O. Box N-3002, Nassau,
Bahamas.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that NORMAN JAMES
GERAGHTY of P. O. Box F-2, Freeport, Grand Bahama. is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration should not be granted should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 7th day of March, 1974 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, Ministry of
Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002, Nassau, Bahamas.





NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that KATHLEEN CRUDDACE of
Freeport, Grand Bahama is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration should not be granted
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twentv.eiaht davs from the 7th day ot March 1974
to The Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs, P. O. Box N-3002, Nassau


I



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MELSAIDA L. HARRIS of
Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration should not be granted
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 7th. day of March 1974
to The Mini:ter responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P. O. Box N7147, Nassau.





NOTICE
NOTICE Is hereby given that LEONARD SMITH of John
Street, New Providence, Bahamas is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why natusallsation should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eght days from the 7th day of
arch 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. O. Box N-3002,
Nassau.












Thrdy Mr1-4,174.&


EART

AFFLE

RAWN AT

RUMBEAT
NE of the highlights of the
rumbeat for Heart" show at
P nuts Taylor's nightclub
borrow night will be
tdwing of the "Raffle for
S wrt" prizes. Grand prize is a
1 4 Pontiac Firebird Sports
Cpe, second prize is an RCA
c ur TV set, third prize is
t round-trip tickets to
Lembourg and fourth prize
is a heavy duty vacuum
c laner.
Proceeds from the raffle and
frIm the show go to the Sir
actor Sassoon (Bahamas)
Hlrt Foundation.
eadlining the top flight
sl w at the Drumbeat will be
C ithia White, the vivacious
st of Hallelujah Baby fame.
P nuts Taylor will be in
cqnmand with the regular
Drumbeat show including Pat
R611e, Eloise, fire dancer
Ttboo, limbo star Edwards and
tlt famed Drumbeat band.
,Tickets for the raffle will be
oft sale before and during the
show up to draw time, and
there will be many door prizes
fo" those attending. The draw
wQl be carried live over Radio
Bahamas.
*ome members of the Heart
Foundation raffle committee
ar shown (below) from left:
Mb. Florence Soldwedel, Mrs.
KJthy Boone, Mrs. Sue
V~aghn-Johnson and Mrs.
E in Deal. In foreground are
Ms. Georgette Maynard, raffle
committee chairman and Mr.
PAnuts Taylor.


Investiture
THE FIRST BAHAMAS
branch of Toastmasters
recently held its installation
banquet at the Sonesta Beach
Hotel and the new officers
for 1974 were installed.
Vickie Wood, area Governor
of the 47th district of the
international body conducted
the investiture. Standing from
left to right are Vickie Wood,
Lester Gibson, President;
Philip E. Davis, Ed.
vice-oresident; Clifford W.
Lockhart, Admin. vice-
president; Francis J. Bain;
secretary; Bentley Hamilton,
treasurer; and Labon M.
Lundy, Sgt. at Arms. Sitting:
Mrs. James Rahming, Mrs.
Lester Gibson, and John
Diaz, international director of
toastmasters international.


SAN ANDROS TEAM


ANNE JOIINSON,
picturedd), is the new customer
serVice representative for San
Andros (Bahamas) Limited.
Peter J. Porath, president of
the company, announced the
appointment of Miss Johnson
today.


Miss Johnson
the new San
located on the
Notfolk House
Street, Nassau.


is in charge of
Andros office
third floor of
on Frederick


She says of her new
position, "I will simply try to
smooth the way for San
Andros customers. Property
owners may bring me monthly
paymnets on real estate, ask
questions or arrange a visit to
their property on Andros. I am
hert to help in any way I can."
Leonard Atlas, president of
Sari Andros Inc., the sales and
public relations arm of San
Andros, says of the office,
"This is going to be
headquarters for anything to
do with San Andros. It's a
goodwill station and a business
office. You can even make
hotel reservations for San
Aqdrds Inn and Tennis Club by
caring our new phone,
5-1515."
Miss Johnson is well
travelled and has attended St.
Ann's School, St. Augustine's
College and the University of
Hong Kong. She also studied in
Japan and' has visited
Anchorage, Alaska and the
seaboards of the United States.
She was second runner-up in
the 1972 Miss Bahamas
contest. She is the daughter of
Mr. Andrew B. Johnson,
assistant general manager of
BaTelCo, and of Mrs. Ruth
Johnson. She has three
brothers and three sisters.
An experienced veteran of
promotional work, "since
about the age of 10, when I
started modelling," she has
appeared in television com-
mercials and modelled in
Goombay Summer Fashion
Shows, in charity shows and in
designer shows from the states.
Her photographs have appeared
in Ebony and Jet magazines as
well as in German magazines.


"I take modelling as a job
like any other job not for
fun. Fun! There is little fun to
it it takes guts!"
She adds, "I love this job. I
hope to be an asset to San
Andros in developing the
property and to the people of
San Andros. We're all working
together to make Andros a
more beautiful resort island.
Miss Johnson lists her
hobbies as "travelling, dancing,
tennis, horseback riding,
writing poetry, designing
clothes, meeting people and
cooking. .. and, I can do most
of those at San Andros. It's
lovely."
Miss Johnson was previously
employed with Sonesta Beach
Hotel as senior reservationist
and at the International Supply
Company.


Intimacy

and the

married

woman.


The need to be sure
It's so important for your well-
being as a woman to feel sure
about the functioning and fresh
ness of your body.
Because douching isn't practi-
cal, or even always advisable, cau
tious married women of today rely
on Norforms feminine supposito
ries.
Positive protection two ways
Norforms do a two fold job most
effectively. They protect you
against embarrassing problems
with their highly perfected germi
cidal formula. And they protect
you against offensive odors with
their rapid deodorant action.
Complete confidence
So simple and convenient, Nor
forms dissolve at normal body tem
perature to form a protective film.
Theydo not harm delicate internal
tissue.
Next time ask for Norforms, an
ideal way to have the confidence
you need as a married woman.
Sold at pharmacies in packages
of 6. 12 and 24.
Informative booklet, write to:
Norwich Intemational
410 Park Avenue,
New York, .
N.Y 10022 il


Barclays Bank's successful


BARCLAYS BANK
International has
recently completed a
successful supervisors'
course held at the bank's
training centre from March
4-8.
Staff attending were
instructed in the methods
of staff management and
control, customer
relationship, branch
control and security,
management by objectives
and other technical aspects
of supervision in the
bank's system.
The training course is
part of the bank's policy
of developing and
promoting promising
Bahamians to kev


g


supervisors' course


positions within the bank.
Pictured (at left) from
the left: Mr. Thomas T.
Ferguson, Pioneers Way;
Mrs. Thelma Johnson, Bay
and Dunmore Lane; Mrs.
Nellie B, Wells, Pioneers
Way; Mr. George E.
Rodgers. instructor: Mrs.
Alice F. Edwards,
Palmdale: Mr. Patrick V.
Basden, Thompson
Boulevard; Mrs. Ruth A.


r


Fawkes, Bay Street and
Miss Mary E. Nairn, East
Bay.
Barclays Bank
International's head office
is on Bay Street.

Rises 6:23 a.m.
Sets 6:18 p.m.
MOON:
Rises 12:35 a.m.
Sets 11:22 p.m.
Last Quarter 2:15 p.m.


CAREER ImImHiTy


FOR THOSE WANTING TO JOIN
THE REAL ESTATE
PROFESSION


INTERCONTINENTAL REALTY LIMITED
OFFERS THE CHANCE TO BECOME
INVOLVED IN THIS REWARDING
BUSINESS. APPLICANTS SHOULD BE
BETWEEN AGES 23 TO 35 WITH HIGH
SCHOOL STANDARD EDUCATION.
SUCCESSFUL APPLICANTS WILL BE
GIVEN THEORETICAL AND ON THE JOB
TRAINING.


[ < ,I . I APPLY TO PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT,
S' INTERCONTINENTAL REALTY, P.O. BOX
F260, FREEPORT. TELEPHONE 373-3020.
'4 -


SINK-
INK -


Bermuda Express Service and r

United States Lines are r"

pleased to announce a fast,

new, regularly-scheduled and

direct container shipping

service between Bermuda/Nassau

and major ports on three

continents. This new service

links Bermuda and Nassau

with United States Lines' Tri-

Continent Container Service-

a 15,000 mile Sea Bridge to

and/or from the United King-

dom, Europe, the United States

West Coast, Hawaii, Guam and

the Far East.



r complete details, please

contactt Bermuda Express Service

local agent: United Shipping Co.

d., P.O. Box N-4005, Nassau,

Bahama, or P.O. Box F-2552,

Freeport, Grand Bahama-or any

United States Lines office.



Bermuda Express Service/


ited Staes Uners
OF0ICM8 ANOD ANTS THROUGHOUT TM WO o E o ADW v. Sm o N.. ta TE I -
ARPI W. futhwr Nmv "mo bbo.
|fK:R7 E: ^


Thursday, March'14, 1974


7


She Erthune















Thursday, March 14,1974


GLEE CLUB CONCERT

PAUL HUME, director of the Georgetown Glee Club
(second from right), shown with Parliamentary
Representative George Mackey and Mrs. Mackey, under
whose patronage the Club's Nassau concert was held. From
left are: the Rev. John F. Sullivan, pastor of St. Joseph's
Church; the Most Rev. Paul Leonard Hagarty, Bishop of
Nassau; Mrs. Mackey; Mr. Hume and Mr. Mackey.
Photo: Franklyn Ferguson


MR. DEHAVILLAND NEWTON (right) has been
promoted to Convention Manager at the Loews Paradise
Island Hotel and Villas. Dehavilland joined the hotel back
in 1967 as a bellman and in June 1972, was transferred to
the Sales Department as its V.I.P. driver. While there
Dehavilland took time out in helping with convention
services of which he is now manager. Prior to joining the
hotel, he worked as a bellman for one year at the Lyford
Cay Club. A native of Stanyard Creek, Andros, Dehavilland
is vice President of the I.C.Y.A. (Inter-denominational
Christian Youth Assoc.) and he enjoys spiritual music. He is
married to the former Eula Maria Newton and the father of
a son and daughter. Pictured congratulating him is
managing director, Mr. John Gallaway.


HOTEL PROMOTIONS


a,: ___________ _-
THE GEORG ETOWN '~VF SITY GLEE CLUB presented a highly Often a major part of musical events, the Georgetown singing group has sung
successful concert at the O1 "- British Colonial Hotel Monday evening in with the London Philharmonic, the National Symphony, the Kansas
aid of the Hardecker C :, Gl;ee Club performed to a capacity crowd, Philharmonic and other leading orchestras.
including the 'ost R- L cnard Hagarty, O.S.B., Bishop of Nassau. Photo: Franklyn Ferguson.


M R. DOR RINGTOO0
PO ITIER (above) tha
recently been promrc'ed t
Activities Director at mi-
Loews Paradise Isiand Hotei
Prior to his employment at
Loews Mr. Poitier was for fiv.-
years Bell Captain at the Jact'
Tar Hotel, West End, Grand
Bahama.
A native of Stevenson. Cat
Island, he is married to the
former Maria Holmes and the
father of six children.


MR DAVID HADLAND
(above) has recently joined
t'he Loews Paradise Island
'Hotel and Villas as Executive
Assistant Manacer
Mr Hadland comes to
Leew.i from his most recent
JpnOimrtment at the Hotel
:rndda del Mar., Acapulco,
Mxcri o.
In his present position Mr.
Hadland is in charge of the
overall front office
reservation department.


L7


! -



to`
;' "**
1 .


I,'


MRS. AMANDA
Colebrooke (pictured) has
been promoted to
Paymistress at the Loews
Paradise Island Hotel and
Villas.
A native of Deep Creek,
-'Andros, she joined the hotel
. as a front office cashier in
.August 1972 and in June
,1973 was promoted to head
,,"front office cashier.


MISS OLA FOWLER
(pictured) is the new head
front office cashier at the
Loews Paradise Island Hotel
and Villas.
Ola first joined the hotel as
a checker/cashier in the Food
and Beverage Department in
1971, and was later
transferred to the front office
dept.


u c~l I-~lt'l- ' .~




1hr ,tribimtt


:t
r:t
;




~





MR. ALFRED T the Bahamas as an
Maycock. Minister iof international maritime
Development became the fir- nation.
member of the Balhar.i;- O)verlooked by a bronze


Cabinet to be receIv_ .
officially at Lloyd's t
London. He was greeted by
the chairman Mr. Paul Di-iv
and deputy chairman Mr I
B. Langton.
Mr. Ma\rcock is iin
Britain to talk with ler:ders (i
finance and industry of tih
incentives and tax haven
advantages of investing in thol
Bahamas. At Llods !he w.
particularly interested in
discussing the future role ot
ji-==--- -


O)N NS, 3..ni Shoss'. in it 57
.c'c 2 !'a ','ir. I s
Now thru Tuesday!
.\N(;I L s:?o 5 ;i
WALT DOSET PSNE cw'n





-bi



TECHNICOLOR I
RRE.STAURAR NT \r W t Ii
ICLOSED) temlporary for rvpairs%


f o Admiral Lord Nelson and


looking at the log book of
HMS Euryalus who acted as
the signals and communica-
tions centre of the fleet
during the Battle of Trafalgar
(left to right) Mr. D. Gay,
chairman of Cooper, Gay'and
Company insurance brokers
who acted as the Minister's
guide: Mr. Alfred T.
Miaycock, Bahamas Minister
o. Development; Mr. Percy
C ampbell, director of
industrial development; and
Mi. Charles McFarlane,
inminager. Burmah Oil
(Bahamas) Ltd. whose
company is completing a
tanker terminal in Freeport,
Grand Bahama Island.

m11m1


NOW SHOWING
At 7 & 10:20
"KARADO THE
HONG KONG CAT"
(P.G.)
And at 8:45
QUEEN BOXER"
(P.G.)
Starring
Judy Lee
Parental Guidance Suggested


SINGER-DANCER and comedian,
Chickie Home arrived in Nassau from the
United States last week in time for his
performance with the other stars of the
John Hall production of the "NASSAU
ALL-STARS" a special show being
presented in the well equipped Le
Carbaret theatre on Sunday, March 24.


The all-stars show, a special being held to many, many others. The production will
finance the Le Cabaret stars, a local also include portions from the nightly Le
softball team will encompass the diverse Cabaret show, "One thousand and one
talents of some of the leading Bahamian Bahamian nights." Freddie Sales will be
stars such as Freddie Munnings, jr., the master of ceremonies. Picture shows
recently made his Bahamian debut, Jose, Mr. Horne being greeted on his arrival by
the silver prince of the Junkanoo Club, Mr. Jim Dodd, co-ordinator of the
Bedie McKenzie, Priscilla Rollins, and star-packed "Nassau All-stars."


m e INON sn'vC; V
Matinee 3:00 & 5:00. Evenin 8:30 Phone 2-1004, 2-10055



i RTLRRTS I







P_' Rh'NTAL I),SCRt'I!\ ..1017.IS P
I Reservations not claimed by 8:15, will be sold
on first come. first served basis.



SLast Day Friday Last Day Friday
Matinee starts at 1:45 Continuous Showings
Evening 8:30 from 3:00
1 "WHERE DOES IT .WICKED, WICKED" PG.
HURT" R.
Peter Sellers, Tiffany Boiling,
Harold Gould Steve Bailey
PLUS PLUS
"THE HUNTING "ONE MORE TRAIN
PARTY" R.
Oliver Reed, Candice Bergen TO ROB" PG.
PLUS Late Feature George Peppard,
| Friday night. P
No one under 18 will be admitted. France Nuyen
'Phone 2-2534

N I II E

NOW SHOWING
S Matinee continuous from 2:15, Evening 8:30-'Phone 3-4666

Meet SUGAR HILL and
her ZOMBIE HIT MEN!



SColor by Mo1i elal a., .,ra p e I
MARK BEv ROBERT CARRY DON PEDRO COLLEY
w THE DATHMASTEDR
SPARi T.I DIWSCREI A77I0EN ?lWU


I


Now visiting London are a group of Nassau summer to London. Other highlights will be a work study sessions with British Airways head
travel agents. The trip was arranged by British day trip to Paris, visits to a theatre and some Mr. Reg Knowles, Mundytours; Mr. Ronald
Airways to familiarise the travel consultants of London's famous restaurants and pubs, plus Bethel, Bahama Holidays; Mrs. Joanne Bell, R.
with conditions in Britain and hotels beingtments. he aents are le
used in British Airways package tours this office departments. The agents are left to right H. Curry & Co., Mr. Robert Cook, District


K


Sales Manager, British Airways, on hand to
wish the group a successful trip; Miss Debbie
Scates, MM Travel Agency; Mr. Marcel Waugh,
Playtours.


young Bahamian sLudent at Miami Date
IT was a gala evening of recognition and are flanked by Tony Tomassill, left, and Dan ommung Bityhamian Coll ent about Miami
festivity at the Paradise Island Hotel and Villas Dura, right, sales managers of Apeco The Bahamas took an active participation in CommunityCollegewho hlp outinnot
last week as 80 dealers of Apeco Corporation's Corporation an American based company the current Miami International Boat Show. booth co-sponsored by the Ministry of
Mobile Home Group were honoured by the that specializes in manufacturing mobile Walker's Cay in the Abacos was featured in an Tourism. On the wall is a spectacular vew of
corporation with plaques and trophies for their homes, recreational vehcls, marine products attractive booth display, shown here with, the Walker's Cay marina. The Minlary e
outstanding achievements in sales during the graphic arts products and paper copying from left to right, Mrs. Fanny Gardiner, Tourism shared a display booth wtth .
past year. Pictured with one of the four machinery The Corporation held its 35th assistant to the senior executive, sports popular Florida boating magaltneQe bGoil
trophies presented to top mobile home dealers annual convention at the Paradise Island Hotel promotion for the Ministry of Tourism; Miss The magazine I organIzin, n I oneelo
is Mr. Roland Ralch, second from right, of from Feb. 20 arch 1. Karen Perkins, a Miami model and one of the with the Ministry, a plotted nrute th 1e
Manchbter Nw Hampshire. He and his wife show's five princesses, and Peter Major, a Bahamas thisJuly.
. ... .~~~~~~~~ --__ ._ . .",_ -,. .. ..,.-.,-- .. .1c-r


r r __


-~I---i-c~--~-~I----"


Thursday, March 14, 1974


- -, -


U11~---------------- ----


Ic


I


Wht irtbuim


Thursday, March 14, 1974


I


Olf-Suvii RsIMtiltlatlj


1 0


0'


F
















~hg Wrthuut


Thursday, March 14, 1974


REAL ESTATE
C13809
A STONE BUILDING situate
on a corner lot on Robinson
Road. Ideal for doctor's office.
Call 23921 days or 42856
nights jnd Saturdays.

S13707
SBEDiROOM. 2 bathroom
-jr.lurnished house with carport
-di sewing oorn FOR SALE.
Cia 3i67l 31672 (9.00 a.m.
IP }0 2 00 p.m. 5.00


383
S...i H NTERS
Atti -;Ave 3 bedroom, 3 bath
; i lh .'d h ise with almost an
.P f !ai d in idgeway. Just
i t,'.i o Road. Don't miss
t i- 11 3It J $S ..5.000.00.
: A D M I A N 5 ,
.. REALTY CO.
T- ,_ Ob 2-2307, Nite


-a


aM.


FOR SALE
.:, ;. 2 2 bath house
Sr lable Phone

:I;a .


Little Blair,
- : I r; '* 2 2386 days,


BUY NOW!
SAN ANDROS
LOTS
14,500
sq. FEET!
Almost 1/3 acre
-15 DOW.'N, $45 per MONTH
CALL OR VISIT
FRANK CAREY
REAL ESTATE
P. O0. Box N4764
BAY & DEVEAUX ST.
r'-l 276S7, 24815

C 138(.
W,-H n ,inirue paying rent?
-''L : a hance to own your
,;,.'v 3 bedrooms, 2-bath
Shouii ,r d i; down payment
I $' .000 and monthly
'"3t-ai.- it' tnjt you can easily
S i:- infori action call
SH,:: i'J t at 34471 or
38 53

' 3526
COMMERCIAL SITE
:',\LMDALE Foi Sale 180ft. x
S30ft. Short term mortgage
,.'1 ilable. Previous approval for
.ces Tol-phone Gleniston
addens Ltd. at 2-1741 or 2 for
",orm atio,.n
! ---------------------

S P T ;V E residence on
l c _;,ontaigu hilltop area
thit-;:' n:drooms, two baths,
IlVi'! (iino Bahama room.
O-r : dining room, large
Ct m. detached garage,
rfidl, iourn' and laundry.
s-Kjrig pricL $55,000


L -'l .,ltt buy in three-bed,
two- bial. '~~.;idcenrn of" Village
"'dad t'iitop !.'r Queenl's
'.'np .- 1 0000 fLurn:shed.

Large rtside,.cr Village Road
-;ti to!i !i bedr io ms, four
S, iiviig room,
"D-':" I!.(.ig rr.rn, Bahama
'- ti ';i- rumor', spacious
S; two car
'1.' ; ... h,.,rie $i5b000

i T i f T.
1 , 3 4


S : S L E. STATE
CO LTD
S :t.d Peai Estate Brokers
i'- s 2"' 1/7' 8 55408
S f~.;x 1i-4648

c yi;'d prcrent
j :' :, ; ] *,-AL rST; / T _

i IKOUGLHOUT THE
:'. )YOJNWFEALTH
S r ,d 4 BEDROOM
h -fio i wt'hei following

: /,i a N ROAD


,,*:A' -,)1 TFS
(.; i A( GARDE NS

TiL ".OVE (West Bay)
'. IN"L G HEIGHTS
rj.ASScAiJ FAST
'[ A FRFr F ZE
VILLAGE! ROAD
GOLDF N GATES
H IIGHILAND PARK
PROSPECT RIDGE
WL iSTA ARi) V LLAS
( ON i 1 ()vIIr ) M
t-IA /RT Mif -,5 S
in PARADISE ISLAND
EAST BAY STREET
WEST BAY STREET
HOTELS and HOTEL SITES,
BEACH LOTS, COMMER-,
CIAL LOTS. RESIDENTIAL
LOTS
ACREAGE FOR
DEVELOPMENT IN THJ
NASSAU AND FAMILY
ISLANDS SUCH AS GRAND
BAHAMA LONG ISLAND,
ELEUTHERA ABACO
45 ACRE CAY IN THE
EXUMAS WITH DEEP
WATER HARBOUR AND
MORF


CALL
DAVSON'S REAL
ESTATE AGENCY
Phone 21178 or 80932 21
P. 0. Box N-4648
Nassau, Bahamas.


178


I I I I I ir


REAL ESTATE


I


C13724
CENTRAL GARAGE LTD.
"The Easiest Place in Town to
Trade"
1970 FORD CORTINA
B$850
1970 SUNBEAM RAPIER -
B$1650.
1971 JAVELIN S.S.T.
(automatic, radio) B$2850.
1970 FORD TORINO
(automatic, radio) B$2695.
1968 G.M.C. PICK UP TRUCK
B$995.
1970 CHEVELLE MALIBU
(automatic, radio) B$1875
1968 PLYMOUTH VALIANT
(radio, automatic) B$1050
1971 DODGE AVENGER
(automatic) B$1395
1965 BUICK SKYLARK
(automatic, radio) B$750.
1969 CHEVY II NOVA
(automatic, radio) B$1350.
1972 FIAT BUS (7 passenger)
B$1650
1968 ROVER 2000 SALOON
(automatic) B$1000
1969 DODGE DART SPORT
(automatic, radio) B$1500
1972 VAUXHALL VICTOR
(automatic) B$1475
1970 FORD CORTINA
S/WAGON B$1275
1969 VAUXHALL VIVA -
B$775.
1970 FIAT 850 B$550
CENTRAL.GARAGE LIMITED
Thompson Boulevard
P. O. Box N1525
Telephone 3471 1.


CARS FOR SALE


C13849
'72 PINTO, excellent
condition, $2,600.00. O.N.O.
call 5-4977.

C13857
1972 VOLKSWAGEN 1300
Sedans excellent condition,
radio, W/W tyres, low mileage.
Finance and insurance
available. Call 36611-2-3-4.

C13855
WE'RE OVERSTOCKED
25% off on any of the
following:
197C Morris 1300 Estate
1967 Ford Cortina 4-door


Saloon
1966 Ford
Saloon


Cortina 2-door


fn.


hundred and Two (202) feet
more or less.
The property is being sold
under the power of sale
contained in an Indenture of


SECTION


PUBLIC AUCTION


II


I


HARRY D. MALONE
Public Auctioneer


PUBLIC AUCTION


-r-


C13890
FOR SALE
Three and four bedroom
houses $2,000 down, balance
in small monthly instalments.
Phone 34471 after 6 p.m.

C6750
FOR SALE TWO LOTS IN
CORAL HARBOUR, NASSAU
AND ONE SOUTH BEACH.
WRITE: BOX F-604,
FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA.

WANTS TO TRADE

C13822
TWO bedroom apartment.
fully furnished on ocean, pool
etc. Owner wants to exchange
for apartment in Freeport. Call
2-4223 or Write Box N4635,
Nassau.


WANTS TO RENT
C13863
English Couple require 3
bedroom house to rent May
and June. No children or pets.
Good references. Telephone:
7-7494 (home) 2-1667/8
(office).


FOR RENT
C13687
HOUSE suitable for store o
office Madeira Street facing
Shopping Plaza. Contact
2-3170.

C13708
COTTAGES and apartments
monthly airconditioned,
fully furnished, maid service
available. Lovely garden and
swimming pool. Telephone
31297,31093.

C13824
NEW 2 Bedroom Apartment,
unfurnished, Soldier Road west
of East Street. Phone 5-5417,
3-6687.
C13820
THREE Bedroom, 1 bath,
house on Farrington Road,
unfurnished $200.00 a month.
Phone 5-4684.

C13831
For rent a three bedroom
apartment, 1 bath, etc. Quarry
Mission Road. Phone 3-5886.

C13836
FOR RENT FURNISHED
Room with beautiful view.
Business girl preferred, East
Fowler Street near Bay. Phone
31119.

C13799
FURNISHED 2 bedroom
apartment consisting of
living/dining room kitchen and
bathroom Twynam Avenue
5-8185.

C13838
Nassau Hillcrest Towers
Swimming Pool, Sun Terrace,
Laundry Facilities. Spacious,
fully furnished 3 bedroom 2
bath apartment. Large balcony
overlooking Harbour. Available
April. Contact 7-8421-2,
evenings 7-7065.

C13845
2 APARTMENTS nice
location on Thompson
Boulevard. Call Norman at
24626 (days) 36717 (nights)
for details.

C13864
2 BEDROOM unfurnished
duplex apartment McKinney
Avenue Stapledon Gardens.
See proprietor on premises.
$180.

CARS FOR SALE
C13842
1965 Blue Chevrolet, good
condition. Recently
re-upholstered and resprayed.
$500.00 Ring 5-2167.


1968 Ford Futura 2-door
Coupe
1968 Plymouth Satellite
2-door Coupe
1965 Morris 1100 4-door
Saloon
1969 Morris 1100 4-door
Saloon.
1970 M.G.B. G/T
1970 Ford Cortina Estate
1971 Rambler 4-door Saloon
1970 Ford Capri
1971 Triumph Toledo 4-door
Saloon
1971 Ford Capri
1970 Ford Escort Wagon
1970 Triumph Estate 4-door
1970 Morris 1100 4-door
Saloon
1971 Chev. Malibu 4-door
Saloon
1971 Morris 1100 4-door Saloon
1971 Morris Mini-Van
1969 Chev. Pick-Up 2 ton.
Priced from $600.00 up
Financing available on most
cars.
BAHAMAS BUS & TRUCK
Montrose Avenue
Telephone 2-1722/5
C13868
1970 CHEVROLET NOVA,
automatic, airconditioned
excellent condition 18,500
miles, $2,800. Phone 22188 or
9.
C13865
1971 FORD LTD
airconditioned, stereo tape
player, good condition. $3,900
(ONO). Phone Mr. Russell
21690 Ext. 147 weekdays 9-5.

FOR SALE
C13813
WE BUY ANY GOOD USED
FURNITURE AND
APPLIANCES. Call 2-2637 ask
for Moss.
C13847
STEELCASE Junior Executive
Desks (3) Grey Steel bodies
with white formica tops. 30" x
60". $75.00 each or three for
$200.00.
Three miscellaneous desks with
metal bodies and wood tops.
Best offers. To view, please call
Mr. Ford at PDS 24296.
C13867
1972 YAMAHA 100cc "Red".
$450.00. Phone 22188 or 9.
C13893
FOR SALE
USED STORE FIXTURES
2 Sliding Ladders with all
attachments, in good condition
-- $75. Seven wrapping papers
15". $20. Call 2-4697 Jack's
Department Store, East Bay
and Deveaux Streets.

PUBLIC AUCTION
C13887
HARRY D. MALONE will sell at
his premises on the Western
side of Albury Lane, five doors
from Shirley Street in the
Eastern District of the Island
of New Providence on Friday
the 22nd day of March A.D.,
1974 at 12:00 o'clock noon
the following property:-
1. ALL THAT piece parcel
or lot of land situate in the
Eastern District of the
Island of New Providence
bounded on the North by
the Sea and running thereon
Sixty (60) feet more or less
on the East by land now or
formerly the property of
Mary Elizabeth Lee and
running thereon Fifty-seven
(57) feet more or less on the
South by East Bay Street
and running thereon
Fifty-nine (59) feet more or
less and on the West by a
reservation for a road and
running thereon Sixty-three
(63) feet more or less.
2. ALL that piece parcel or
lot of land situate in the
Eastern District of the Island
of New Providence aforesaid
bounded on the North by
East Bay Street and running
thereon One hundred and
Three and Three tenths
(103.3) feet more or less on
the East by land now or
formerly the property of
Mary Elizabeth Lee and
running thereon One
hundred and Ninety-four
and Forty-seven hundredths
(194.47) feet more or less
on the South by land now or
formerly the property of
Philip George Brice and
running thereon Eighty-four
and Five tenths (84.5) feet
more or less and on the West
by a road reservation and
running thereon Two


Mortgage dated the 15th day
of August, 1963 between
Imperial Investments Limited
and The Bank of Nova Scotia
and recorded in the Registry of
Records in Volume 639 at
pages 123 to 129.
The sale is subject to a reserve
price and the right for the
Auctioneer or any person on
his behalf to bid up to that
price. Terms 10% of the
purchase price at the time of
sale and balance on
completion.
Dated this 13th day of March
A.D., 1974.
HARRY D. MALONE
Public Auctioneer
C13889
HARRY D. MALONE will sell
at his premises on the Western
side of Albury Lane, five doors
from Shirley Street in the
Eastern District of the Island
of New Providence on Friday
the 22rd day of March A.D.
1974 at 12.00 o'clock noon
the following property:-
ALL THAT piece parcel or
lot of land being a part of a
tract of land known as
"Ivanhoe" situate in the
Eastern District of the said
Island of New Providence
and set out as Lot Number
Forty-four (44) in the
Diagram or Plan of New
Allotments filed at the
Office of the Department of
Lands and Surveys of the
Bahamas and being Diagram
or Plan Number One
Hundred and Thirty (130)
wnich said piece parcel or
lot of land is bounded on
the NORTH by land now or
formerly the property of
Ralph Parks and running
thereon One Hundred and
Fifty (150) feet on the
EAST by Twynam's Avenue
and running thereon Eighty
(80) feet on the SOUTH by
Ivanhoe Road and running
thereon One Hundred and
Fifty (150) feet and on the
WEST partly by Lot
Number Twenty-five (25)
and partly by Lot Number
Twenty-four (24) in the said
Diagram or Plan and running
thereon Eighty (80) feet.
The property is being sold
under the power of sale
contained in an Indenture of
Mortgage dated the 6th day of
March, 1967 between Gladys
Adelaide Zouro Breitung and
Stanley Richard Darville and
recorded in the Registry of
Records in Volume 1095 at
pages 593 to 598.
The sale is subject to a reserve
price and the right for the
Auctioneer or any person on
his behalf to bid up to that
price. Terms 10% of the
purchase price at the time of
sale and balance on
completion.
Dated this 13th day of March
A.D. 1974.
HARRY D. MALONE
Public Auctioneer

C13888
HARRY D. MALONE will sell
at his premises on the Western
side of Albury Lane, five doors
from Shirley Street in the
Eastern District of the Island
of New Providence on Friday
the 22nd day of March, A.D.,
1974 at 12:00 o'clock noon
the following property:-
ALL THAT piece parcel or
part of a lot of land being
the Western half of Lot
Number Eighteen (18) of
the Subdivision known as
Cable Beach situate in the
Western District of the
Island of New Providence
aforesaid and being bounded
on the North by the Sea on
the East by the other half of
the said Lot Number
Eighteen (18) now the
property of Imperial
Investments Limited on the
South by West Bay Street
and running thereon Fifty
(50) feet more or less and on
the West by Lot Number
Nineteen (19) which said
piece parcel or part of a lot
of land has the position
shape boundaries marks and
dimensions as are shown on
the plan attached to an
Indenture of Conveyance
dated the Twenty-sixth day
of February in the year of
Our Lord One thousand
Nine hundred and Fifty-six
and made between Mary
Augusta Wilson and Walter
Scott Wilson of the one part
and the Vendor of the other
part and now of record in
the Registry of Records in


C13876
MR. HOWARD DARVILLE
age 50 years died Sunday
March 10th 1974. He is
survived by wife Delores, 7
children and other relatives.
Funeral arrangements will be
announced later.

S IN MEMORIAL
C13851


IN sad memory of our late
husband and father Roland R.
Evans.
May God grant him rest eternal
What are these that glow from
afar
These that lean over the golden
bar
Strong as the lion, pure as the
dove
With open arms and hearts of
love?
They the blessed ones gone
before,
They the blessed for evermore;
Out of great tribulation they
went
On to their home of heav'n
content.
Left to mourn Wife Sarah,
daughter Barbara, a host of
relatives.

SCHOOLS
C13695
LEWIS AUTO SCHOOL
Learn to drive with confidence.
Phone 59805 between 7 and
8.30 a.m. or after 6 p.m. or
35084 anytime.


SCHOOLS II TRADE SERVICES I TRADE SERVICES'


C13877
Harry D. Malone will sell at his
premises on Albury Lane
situated Five (5) doors from
Shirley Street on the right
hand side on Friday, March 29
1974 at 12 o'clock noon the
following property:-
ALL that piece parcel or lot
of land situate in the
Southern District of the
Island of New Providence
one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas and forming part
of the Subdivision called
South Beach Estates
(hereinafter referred to as
"the said subdivision")
which said subdivision has
been laid out according to
the plan thereof filed in the
Department of Lands and
Surveys (formerly Crown
Lands Office) in the City of
Nassau in the said Island of
New Providence and having
the number Five hundred
and Nineteen N.P. (519
N.P.) (hereinafter referred to
as "the said plan") and being
known as and having the
Number Twenty-seven (27)
in Block Number Five (5) in
the said plan of the said
subdivision which said piece
parcel or lot of land has such
position boundaries shape
marks and dimensions as are
shown on the diagram" or
plan attached to an
Indenture dated the Seventh
day of September, A.D.
1966 and made between
Nassau Beach Company
Limited of the one part and
Reginald Coledridge
Williams and Alice Williams
of the other part and now of
record in the Registry of
Records in the said City of
Nassau in Volume 1094 at'
pages 475 to 480 and is
delineated on that part
which is coloured Pink on
the said diagram or plan.
Mortgage dated the Sixth
day of March, A.D. 1967
and made between Reginald
Coledridge Williams and
Alice Williams of the one
part and First National City
Bank of the other part and
now of record in the said
Registry of Records in
Volume 1094 at pages 481
to 489.
The sale is subject to a reserve
price and to the right for the
Auctioneer or any person on
his behalf to bid up to that
price. Terms: 10% of the
purchase price at the time of
the sale and the balance on
completion.
Dated this 13th day of March
A.D. 1974.


OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-3796
2-3797, 2-2798
Airport 7-7434
FREE ESTIMATES .

C13696
T.V. ANTENNAS
Boosters for homes,
apartments and hotels
SALES AND SERVICES
Call 5-9404
WORLD OF MUSIC
Mackey Street
next to Frqnk's Place


C13862
Cartwright's Swimming Pool
Service repairs leaks in
Swimming Pools and Filter
System break-downs. We offer
monthly maintenance service
at a very low price. Please call
3-1950 before 8 a.m. or after 6
p.m. Write: Box N-8830,
Nassau.


C13764
LANDSCAPING and for all
your gardening needs,
trimming, hedging, pruning,
tree felling and beach cleaning
call 57810. LAWNS
AND HEDGES. Prompt
reasonable and efficient
service.



Aa^b6\ : 0
;CbLUr\IWIT~lNTH(~


C13853
A FRIENDLY WELCOME
awaits you at the Peter Pan
Nursery, Bradley Street,
Palmdale. Hours 8 a.m. to 5
p.m., Monday through Friday.
Ages 2 to 5 accepted. Phone
5-8289.

MARIE SUPPLIES
C13852
ENTERPRISE sailboat all
gear trailer. $350. Phone
2-8048.

C11894
1969 -- 31 ft. CHRIS C-RAFr
Commander. Sleeps six, private
shower, two 230 h.p. engines
with less than 200 hours.
kitchenette, good condition
Call 24267, 54011.

PETS FOR SALE
C13873
PEDIGREED Miniature
Schnauzers puppies. Both
parents AKC registered. Shots
and house broken. Reasonable.
Call 41383 after 2.00 p.m.


C 13843
FULL Breed German Shepherd
pups for sale. Price $150.00.
See Alexander Virgil, Durham
Street off Mount Royal
Avenue.



C13871
BILL'S REAL ESTATE
AGENCY LTD. has a vacancy
for a Real Estate salesman with
previous experience in the sale
of Real Estate, own
transportation good references
and neat appearance. Call
27612 for information.

HELP WANTED

C13726
CAREER OPPORTUNITY
Finance and Mortgage
company in search of 2 male
3ahamians 21 years old and
over to be trained for future
managerial posts. Apply Adv.
C13726, c/o The Tribune, P.
O. Box N-3207, Nassau.

C13859
BANK OF MONTREAL
(BAHAMAS & CARIBBEAN)
LIMITED requires an
experienced teller, preferably
someone with typing ability.
For further details telephone
Mrs. B. Knowles at 21690.

C13850
SEAMAN, 5 years experience
- over 30 years old. Must be
experienced in steering ship
handling freight weekly.
Telepnone 5-5238 Captain
Moxey.

C13870
COMPETENT Shorthand
typist required preferably with
3 years experience. Good
salary paid to successful
applicant. Apply: Financial
Comptroller, Box N-3919,
Nassau.

C13860
LIVE-IN maid with references.
Write P. O. Box i11112,
Nassau, Bahamas.

C13869
YOUNG gardener/boatman
/handyman to live on premises
Eastern Road. Call 2-2113.


TRADE SERVICES

C13691

Pinlader's Cstomr

Brokerage Ltd.

Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER


By



11 LII b h Illnrctrl
iiir hrllht 1'

", SUVPIrTi


MAI I ItI^MO
Island TV 2-2618
AUTOMOTIVE
Lucas Batteries
Bay Street Garage 2-2434

BOOKSTORE
The Christian Book Shop
5-4506
BUSINESS FORMS
Executive
Printers 2-4267/5-401

CAMERAS
John Bull 2-4252/3

ENTERTAINMENT
Movies
Film & Equip. Service 2-2157
GARDEN & PET
SUPPLIES
Modernistic Garden
& Pet 2-2868
Nassau Garden & Pet
Montrose Avenue 2-4259
HARDWARE
John S. George 2-8421/6

HOUSE PLANS
Evangelos G. Zervos 2-2633.

LAUNDRY
DRY CLEANING
New Oriental Laundry
2-4406

TO LIST IN
THIS DIRECTORY
CALL 2-1986 or 2-2768


C13702
FOR your building needs and
CRANE hire see:
ISLAND BUILDERS LIMITED
P. O. Box N-4559
Phone 31671 31672.

POSITION WANTED
C13861
BAHAMIAN young woman
high school education seeks
full or part time position as
cashier or sales clerk. Please
apply to P. O. Box N1773.


I HELP WANTED

C15002
Air-conditioning/Refrigera-
tion/General Appliance
TECHNICIAN NEEDED.
Minimum of 5 years
experience.
Apply: Electrical Contractors,
Ltd. P. O. Box F-727.
Telephone: 352-5250
C15001

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
Able to carry out all office
duties necessary in running a
Construction Company -
knowledge of bookkeeping
essential. Applicants must be in
possession of a certificate in
"Commercial Education".
Phone 352-8186, Glenerik
International Ltd., Yellow Pine
Street, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.


CI21I KEX. 5

LI hrlMrl '1"

IHlY

The Wardrobe 5-5599
MEN'S WEAR
Fashionette Ltd. 2-2376/7

MUSIC
Cody's Records 2-8500

OPTICIANS
Optical Service Ltd. 2-3910/1

PRINTING

Wong's Printing 5-4506
Executive
Printers 2-4267/5-4011

RADIO & T.V. SALES
Carter's Records 2-4711

RUBBER STAMPS
Wong's Rubber Stamp
Co. 5-4506

SPORTS GOODS
Champion Sport Land 2-1862

TRAVEL


Playtours


2-2931/7


R. H.Curry & Co.,
2-8681/7
TRUCKING SERVICES
Gonzalez Trucking
3-1562/2-4726

TV REPAIRS
Channel Electronics Ltd.
3-5478
WINDOW/DOOR REPAIl
Window & Door SpecialistS
5-4t30


CLASSIFIED


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS-FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV. TELEPHONE 21986 EXT. 5


GRAND BAHAMA




CLASSIFIED


II FEPRT Tit. 352-6ll


muSaU


BUSINESS 6 PROFESSIONAL


DIRECTORY

L Save Time A


| I I-_ _II __ _T__ _


FOR TIE ACTIOII YO WANT




Shop Nassau Merchants
For Business And Services


__._ .. __


--





HELP WANTED

C6732
PETROLEUM INSPECTORS
Applications are invited from
Petroleum Inspectors with at
least five years experience in
inspection of crude and
petroleum product loading and
discharging operations.

Applicants should also have
had some experience of oil
storage tank and metering
equipment calibrations, also
laboratory testing of crude
petroleum and petroleum
products.

Please apply, together with
evidence of experience, to: E.
W. Saybolt & Co., S.A., P. O.
Box F-2049, Freeport, Grand
Bahama. Bahamians only need
apply.


the said City of Nassau in
Book H.16 at pages 541 to
542 and delineated on that
part of the said plan which is
coloured Pink.
The property is being sold
under the power of sale
contained in an Indenture of
Mortgage dated the 15th day
of August. 1963 between
Imperial Investments Limited
and The Bank of Nova Scotia
and recorded in the Registry of
Records in Volume 639 at
pages 117 to 122.
The sale is subject to a reserve
price and the right for the
Auctioneer or any person on
his behalf to bid up to that
price: Terms 10% of the
purchase price at the time of
sale and balance on
completion.
Dated this 13th day of
March A.D.. 1974.


mmb i..


-r- --


1-


I


I


I


I!


!1I


1 1


HARRY D. MALONE
Public Auctioneer.

ANNOUNCEMENT


Si:"


}


-.

r,


(he (ribun


SCHOOLS


TRADE SERVICES


TRADE SERVICES:















T s a M h 1 w ai 5 ii


"This isn't what my group therapy class said would
happen once I learned to assert myself."


"AW, Jo3...DtN WORRY'iOUT 'AOYOU CAN WORRY.
1ItI [S'TIALTPEYWPN,'tA /'


CROSSWORD

PUZZLE
ACROSS
1. Defense 28. College In
missile Cedar Rapids
4. Experienced 30.Lyric
8. Boy's 31. Unsorted flour
nickname 32 Pronoun
11. Palm leaf 33. Proclamation
12. Ponder 34. Rice dish
13. Past 36. Neckwear
14. Remote 38. Insecticide
15. George 40. In want
Washington's 43. Facing
profession 47. Golf marker
17. Scheme 48. Backward
19. Title 49 Gen Bradley
20. Greek letter 50. Hindu cymbals
22. Statute 51. Dandy


SOLUTION OF
52 Adjacent
53. Annex
DOWN
1. Divan
2 IVs Alda
3 On tihe bori


YESTI





der


12 13 4 s16 7 ,46 9


14 15 16


20 21 2i 2 23 2I7 ?4

27 28 29 30
31 2 33 1
35 K 36
38 39 40 4 1
it s--- 6-^--
46- -4 41


3


AP Newsfeafures


3 :6


ERDAY'S PUZZLE
4. Perturb
5 Worthless coin
6. Blunders
7. Gimcrack
8 Round Table
knight
9. Vanity
10 And not
16 Epoch
18 Pilot's book
21 Expert
23. Garden rose
24 Harem room
25 Tulle
26 Chasm
27 "Downunder"
native clan
29 Crumb
32 Troy's river
33 Charge
35 Turmoil
37. Lifeless
39 Occasion
41 Business
arrangement
42. Cheer
43. On vacation
44. For
45. Music or art
46 Tariff


pmaOaM:EU M


Winning


Bridge
By VICTOR MOLLO
1 mtgiUgi have known it." ex-
Li .nied the Professor citterly.
Lserytlhing was wrong as usual.
And yet I gave nlysell every
ahiance.'
Except the chance t'o make
the contract." rejoined tde Setuar
Ki.)itzer coldly.
Dealer West : Both Vul.
North
*KQ6
3 932
A K J 10 9
8 4
South
4 A J 10 8 5 4 3 *
V --
6 4 2
& K J
West North East S.outh
1 2 2' 4 4
West led the CK. The Profes-
s-r rutted. ,a.i down the 4J.
noth defenders following. and
turned to the di.unonds. A lesser
player might have finesse, out
the Professor knew better. If
West hid the vQ. he didn't need
the finesse for West could d3 n)
h inm, and there wa., alw.iv'y tie
(.inlnce that East had the d:)uble-
tJn CQ.
Unfortunately. E.ist couldn't
be kept out ofl the le.id a.nd a .
cliu thr-ouih the closed hanld
proved fati.
West East
4 9 7
A K H ., 4 Q 10 7 6
5 3 Q 7
SA Q 7 6 4 10 9 5 3 2
"Did y:>u have to ruff t.he
K ? ;,ked SK. Since y u
were prepared to lobe .a diaollid
:ihy not dis-;aird one on thte K
i 11l live ha.pily ever after
Even a 4 1 d.uiiiond bre.ik
couldn't hive hurt you. f::'r \iU
Ilid enough .t.nii.p entrie- in
dlllll:In t) Ir;l:- out the ault.'






Hi Ve ltlany'
H vords of
f o T r letters
0 T or nire can
I U l-m i l k e
r orkolt he
letters. ,hoeI
S V A e r III
III -- 1 ak I g 9 a
| ord, e a e h
letter III a y
S [ A he I sel ollce
only. af.h
word tlust i oi tanilt the large
letter ;and there mliust he at
lte:l. orle eight-letter word In the
list. %o tllratilt; not fooreigi words:
ito proper ilname'-. TODAY'S
I'A.ltET : 19 words. good :
*i4 wortle, rery good: 29 words.
r.rcfllt'nl. iSollltion tomorrow.
Y TSE'r KIlAY'S SOI.I'TION :
\gile a:glet ;lglelt eight emit gale
galie gailte gitilet gleamn haii
haInlte hai let hate heal heat
helin image iteim lane late lathe
tret ligate lime lithe male mate
meal Ilieat MEGAI.ITH meelt
lletatl itilaige nile u1ilte title
talie leitil leam f tile timte.


Rupert and the Ice Crackers-2


* Rupeit reaches the bushes and finds two long
Strips of wood stuck in the snow. Oh.
- they're iWce!" he gasps Next moment he
N*leI$iel they belong to his chum Algy Pug
who ii l prawled amongst ihe twiggy growth
"Hullo, Agy! Are you all right call" out
Rupse:. "Of course Im not' sno-ls the
1 'tlle pug. Come and get me up' After a


struggle Rupert manages to help his chum
out of his plight. 'Whew. thanks." puffs
Algy This is the first lime I've tried ski-ing
and I took a header ,n:o that clump Hey
what's that he says glancing down at an
oblE:l n the bushel it s a box repliis
Rupert I thought it was yours
ALI RICGiS RESERVECF


-I ie 'Comic /Page I


CARROLL RIGHTER'S


^CHOROSCOPE
from the Carroll Righter Institute
GI I\R \L TENDENCIES: Take some time
out to think over your basic views and the
school of thought that can be most helpful to you. Then
consult authorities in thee fields for guidance.
\RIlS (Mar 21 to Apr. 19) You have up-to-date, clever
ideas and should put them in operation quickly Become
friendly with those of different backgrounds.
TAURUS (Apr 20 to May 20) Follow hunches on how to
gain your fondest aims. Be more frank in letting others know
how you feel. Avoid one who is two-faced
(.1 MINI (May 21 to June 21) Sit down with that associate
who could not understand your ideas before and you come to
a fine meeting of minds now
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Deliberating too
much can cause you to forget to take action on something
important today. Discuss problems with co-wok ers
LLO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Plan now for future recreation
ana contact congenials. Show how much you appreciate your
mate and good relatives and be happier
VIRGO (Aug 22 to Sept. 22) Add the cultural things and
art pieces to your abode that make it more charming and
comfortable Get into basic matters for fine benefits.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Ideal day to reach a fine
understanding with regular associates. Do not permit some
troublemaker to upset you badly now Keep appointments.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) You want to add to present
income so labor along such lines. Talk matters over with an
expert Bankers can be of assistance, too.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Let others know
exactly what you want of a personal nature. Take action to
bring such to yourself later. Meet socially with a fine group
(APRICORN (Dec 22 to Jan. 20) Quietly seek out the
information you need, which is the best way If you follow
through with what mate desires, happiness ensues.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb 19) Being your own sociable
.elf is the best way to proceed Get into that group meeting
that appeals to you so much
PISCES (Feb 20 to Mar. 20) You can add considerably to
your success and the respect others have for you Show your
finest abilities Impress others.
IF YOUR CIIILD IS BORN TODAY . he or she will act
on the spur of the moment and it is well to teach early to keep
silent rather than get into trouble by loose talk Teach to have
all facts and figures straight first. An ideal chart for professions
that require much travel, whether in business, art. or cultural
fields Give as good a spiritual training as you can Don't
neglect sports for health.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make of
ayr',ir life is largely up to YOU!


APARTMENT 3-G


Dal Curtis


REX MORGAN, M.D

Ms 5 ISMON SYES--I THOUGrT r
STHE PHONE / ,ANIE/ PICeED UP A LITTLE
I KNOW THAT DR MORGAN NORTON s1 FINE HEART MURMUR / I'D
WILL fE MAPPY TO LEARN THIS MORNING /DO L0 E TO DO A MORE
THAT 5E'S FEELING BETT fR, YOU WANT TO SEE THOROUGH PHYSICAL
SMRS SIMONS / JUST A J JANIE AGAIN 7 HERE AT T4HE OFFICE /
Mi ITE AND I'LL


_5- -o+ "






JUDGE PARKER


JUDGE PARKER


By Alex Kotzky |


Chess


STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD


A hite lnal'ts al two moves.
agrain-t any defence iby D.
Sh:e,. This pii/'ze taken frc:n
the :'i:;en: issue of the British
Ch-s'- Mavayine. which has a
tull report dn the Evening
Standard congress) has an
inu.-oial feature for a composed
ironhleil Spot the offbeat idea
and vou are well en route to
the oluttinn
Pa: times I lllnue. problleIlm
ar:ste:' i minutes. problem
txpre:t: a minutes. eood: IIt
: iin,;at iveraCe; 20 ninuter t


(hess Solution
T'Ih' he keu Io e i (' iir cil
r l,'ah urioaillv sp.l.ns a probhl'r
but is justified here by other
rthc(k'\ IN iri.h are nea'r-,ra''\No
It I Kt K'5 ch K-- QS' ,* I
KI W7 rIa ? K8-H o I Kt B5
.iI K-QJ but (rite, I
Kt Kt7 ch White forces namut


No. :.3t t


. TIM IKAV
by TIM MPKAV


Across
I. Ill-starred. (3-:-4)
;. %all-coverln. <5)
9. Sports equipment. (3)
IU. Dolt. (-4)
II. Make speech. (5)
I'.. Ladv unable to lunch 44)
1l. Cinema ouhllelt v Dictre.
(1. 5)
I. Figures. (4)
ti. Feature of oil lamD. (4)
't1. Flying hazard. (3-6)
'4. Neat. (4)
t;'. Old magistrate. ()
1t. Hurried. (9)
Down
I. Old-fashioned. (3-2-4
'. rest Jiurney. (e. 41
:3. Whale. (3>
4. Deception. (4)
.S. Show train rourher t4
harrier. (3-6)
6. Small roat. 3)
8 Fired. (41
13. Of that kind. (3)
14. Crit rI
e I sedt
S6)

17. a Dler
l'. l I e n

(3)J l.
covering.


YFEAH-HE HAS BUTTERFLIES
IN HIS STOMACH....RUNNY
NOSE AND A COATED
TONGUE.
-+ 2)


DAGWOOD, I WANT
YOUR OPINION ON THE
READING I'VE CHOSEN
FOR MY POETRY CLUB,
!- -


S GREAT IT IS y
TO BELIEVE THE DREAM
WHEN WE STAND IN YOUTH
BY THE STARRY STREAM,



,\ /K -


Saunders & Overgard


THANKS,
MOTHER/


a
0'


Paul Nichols


1


OIH


Thursday, March 14, 1974


tiW WrHimit














Ciw lributtr


Thursday, March 14, 1974


Osgood,

Moore

on the

move

LONDON England striker
Peter Osgood hit a new high on
Britain's spiralling soccer
transfer market when he
moved from Chelsea to
Southampton for a record cash
deal of around 285,000
pounds. or $645,500.
And ex-England skipper
Bobby Moore left West Hamn
for Fulham.
Osgood, one of turope's top
marksmen with 148 goals in
369 appearances for Chelsea.
has been unsettled with the
London club for some time.
His move to Southampton
will team him up with fellow
England striker Mike Channon
in what could be a highly
potent duo.
Southamipton manager
Lawne McMenenim refused to
disclose the amount paid for
Osgood. But .t was reliably
reported the fee was marginally
less than the 300.000 pound
$690,000 Chelsea asking
price.
The move by Osgood, 27,
came hours before Thursdav's
deadline for soccer transfers
this season.
Although total transfer
deals, involving players and
cash. have exceeded Osgood's
price, the biggest previous
straight money for player fee
was 250,000 pounds, or
$575,000 paid by Derby to
Leicester for David Nish in
1972.
Also on the move
Wednesday was Scotland's
World Cup squad forward Jim
McCalliog. He went to Aston
Villa from Wolverhampton for
60,000 pounds, or $138,000.
West Ham moved away from
the bottom of the First
Division while Moore sat on
the sidelines
Moore an all-round
defender and sweeper, had
some classic battles on the
international field opposing
soccer giants such as Pele of
Brazil.
But when Fngland tailed to
qualify for the World Cup
finals. Moore was largely
blamed
The Moore move came just
before the final deadline for
transfers this season,
tHe joins former I ngland
colleague, midtfi.lder and
captain Alan Mullern. who has
revitalized Fulham this season


NEWCI
LONDON The ruling
English Football Association
today ordered a replay of the
controversial English soccer
cup quarterfinal in which
Newcastle United defeated
Nottingham Forest 4 3 after
rioting crowds invaded the
pitch.


SMoss the


- 96-73


i "
Picture. I'Y VC'N-' VA UGHtA .
Collegians' team captain and 1974 most valuable player
Tyrone Hamilton goes up for two.


'. 'i c I
7-


Kentucky Colonels' Sterling Quant makes little of Becks
Cougars' Stancil Ferguson in this layup

CASTLE MUST REPLAY


In an unprecedented move,
a special commission decided
that Second Division Forest
were justified in their
complaint the riots may have
altered the result.
Forest were leading 3-1
when trouble started in which
more than 100 people were


hurt, some serious-l

The match to decide which
team enters the semifinal of
t he top knoc kou t
competition in England will
be replayed on a neutral
ground on Monday.


BA GLADSTONE THURSTON
BASKETBALL champs
Kentucky Colonels going into
the defence of their title were
like a ship without a rudder in
their first game. They needed
someone to operate the team
from the bench.
The Colonels found that
leader in the form of guard
(lifford "Nine" Moss and last
night's second game of the
Bahamas Amateur Basketball
A association's championship
playoffs saw the newly revived
Colonels.
Scoring 51 percent from the
field, six-foot-nine centre
Sterling Quant burned a game
high of 32 points and captured
25 rebounds while guard
Anthony Bostwick added 21
points to his five assists as the
Colonels triumphed 96-73
notching a one-all tie in the
best of three series.
The final game will be
played Friday night 8 o'clock
at the A. F. Adderley Gym.
Moss who feels confident
that Kentucky will take the
championship Friday pointed
out that Monday the Colonels
were not their old selves.
"Monday night we crowded
the ball and the Cougars were
pressing." This, he said, forced
them into numerous valuable
turnovers.
Last night they were
successful against the Cougars'
press. "We stayed wide and we
passed the ball a lot. We took it
up off the floor because that
was the only way you can
break the press," Moss recalled
Playing a strong 2-1-2 zone
defence with Charlie 'Softly"
Robbins and Keith "Bel/ee"
Smith joining Quant in the
centre/forward area, the
Colonels in a revengeful attack
opened a ten point attack
indway in the first half.
controlled the end of that
period 47-33 and increased by
over 20 points before giving
their bench the opportunity to
win the game.
"'In order to have a running
game, you have to be able to
out rebound the team," noted


By GLADSTONE THURSTON

BY Tlls time last season,
the now defunct Big Q baseball
club were in dire need of a
competent second baseman.
Ilheir regular had left
unexpectedly and Big Q was on
the verge of beginning one of
the longest winning streaks in
the history of local baseball.
Manager I d Moxcy did not
have to look very far. I'roni
junior champions Flamingo A's
now Becks Bees Jr. he
tound all he needed in second
baseman Adlai Moss.
Outstanding in his junior
games, Moss tilled the gap like
a pro and besides good defence
used his hat effectively
powering himself to the
Bahamas Baseball Association
1973 rookie of the year.
"You learn more when you
come into the senior league."
Moss noted looking back over
last season.
Though Big Q is no more,
Moss' outstanding debut made
him a sure choice of the newly
formed Citibank Chargers.
This season, over 35 young
strong ballplayers will be
making their senior league
debut, some with an aim of
making it to the big leagues
and others playing just for the
love of the game.
Moss attributed his quick
advancement in the game to
beneficial knowledge he got
from veterans Andre, Adrian,
Roy and Randy Rodgers and
others.
Again, the former
professionals this season take
time out to teach and
encourage the rookies showing
them the finer pointers of the
game. Two former big leaguers
Tony Curry and Fred
"Papa" Smith both of Jet
Set are making this their aim.
Jet Set this season picked up
two short stops Kenny
Fawkes from Becks Bees junior
and Jackie Wright from A.I.D.
Royals.
"We are looking for young
ball players to take the place of
the older ones," noted manager
Kenneth Woods.
In actual game situation,
their regular short stop Sidney
McKinney moves to second,
second baseman Louis McQuay
goes to third from where Ruel
Fowler goes behind the plate.
Woods is confident in the
bat of Fawkes which


Colonels'


commanded a .389 average to
win the junior crown. Besides
th;t, both right and Fawkes
have proven their worth on
defe nce
We will all remember the
rookies of Pinder's; fighting
and conquering like a champ
before ben g finally dethroned
by veteran champs Becks
Cougars. Their roster with
the exception of two were first
year players.
Since Pitrder's has set the
pace. Iher' teams in the
Bahamas Baseball Association
should look out for the rookies
of St. Berna rds. Of their roster.
half is first year players.
Already made their debut in
the curre nt season. St.
Bernard's though winless in
two have shown new strength
and determination They held
both Schlitz and defending
champs Bec ks bees to a mere
one run vict ory.
Actually. St. Bernard's led
until they fell into beginners
misques late in the innings.
Rookie thirdbaseman Dave
Wood. already a starter on that
team, in four games so far has
collected a total of three hits,
socred four runs and gave ten
assists.
Joining him at short stop is
his brother Andre who is just
as much good a ball player. tie
too has scored four runs,
recorded three hits and gave a
total of 14 put outs.
From the mound, Keith
Ford made his debut against
Schlitz Beer but found the
going rough having given up
eight hits while striking out
two and allowing five earned
runs.
In centre field, Dencil
Clarke is at home. His glove has
nabbed five pop flies and line
drives and his strong arm has
contributed clutch assists.
Cedric Johnson saw action
in one game and his
performance warrants another
try.
Backing up Keith and Larry
Turnquest on the mound are
strong right-handers Oswald
Beneby and Tryone Neeley.
Claude Ferguson is a good
sub at second base or behind
the plate while Cecil Cargill
and David Patton handle the
infield.
Actually, head coach Bain
pointed out that it was a
pleasure for the youths to have


an outlet in sports instead of
getting into mischief on the
streets.
From among the top ball
players A.I.D. Royals junior
club put out, Del Jane Saints
have picked up outfielders
Huel Riley, Tyrone Neeley,
Wenzel Clumer and pitcher
Cecil Forbes.
Of the lot, Riley was
outstanding at bat going four
for seven from three games.
Another first baseman for
the Saints comes in the form of
Eric Albury.
(itibank Chargers picked up
their second 'most valuable
player' in the form of junior
league all star pitcher Gary
Davis. His performance with
Becks Bees Jr. has earned him
the unanimous nod for the top
junior award last season.
Davis joins fellow rookie
Authnel Gaitor, Frankie
Sweeting, Basil Hall and Andre
Rodgers on the mounds.
Becks Bees got their share,
but it is not yet certain
whether they will be able to
use it. Right hander Morris
Demeritte was signed recently
by the Boston Red Sox
organization and is scheduled
for spring training in Florida.
Another of A.I.D. Royals,
Tony Capron has strength-
ened the Freeport Bucks'
pitching staff. High school left
fielder Lester Taylor joins
Julian Russell on the infield.
Although he was not in any
of the games, from the
exhibitions Capron showed
that he has a good fast ball and
a good breaking curve. His
offensive talent is often put to
use as a designated hitter.
Out fielders Anthony Carey
and Willie North along with
pitcher Lavern Bain make up
Schlitz Beer's rookie camp.
North in his debut against St.
Bernards collected one hit
from two at bats.
Outfielder Lester Dean,
presently being used as a
catcher is holding his own in
the senior league for Carrolls
Food Store. They also picked
up John Martin for first base,
John Sands for second and
Kendal McKenzie for mound
duties.
The Royals' final graduates
went to the new Heineken
Stars in the form of Spurgeon
Johnson a crafty short stop.
The Stars also got pitcher
Rodger Almond.


general


TRIUMPH GIVES ONE-ALL TIE IN BEST OF THREE


Moss. "If you can't
out-rebound the team then you
can't run because you can't run
without the ball." The
Colonels won the rebounding
battle 57-40.
Young strong rookie
Grathon "Sugar" Robbins
topped Becks with a team high
of 17 points and 12 rebounds.
All around guard Fred "Slab"
Laing added 15 points and 10
rebounds. Peter Brown
contributed 15 points.
Cougars' head coach Fred
"Papa" Smith agreed. "They
beat iusonr the board too badly.
We didn't block out and the
guys tried to match up with
Quant. You can't do that," he
said assessing the game.
"It's not that they break our
press, it's just that we didn't do
it properly." Losing Nassau
League rookie of the year
Reggie Forbes, Smith said,
really hurt them last night.
"We couldn't go to the boards
and we couldn't go to the
bench the way we wanted to."
Forbes in the freak accident
with tearn mate Bennett Davis
during Monday's game suffered
a cut over his eve. lie is
expected to be back in action
ton orrow
Bostwick, an all around ball
player joined Phil Poitier at
guard in the first half
contributing to the Colonels
12-7 lead when Becks took
their first time out.
Returning to the court.
(;rathon added vital help on
the boards while Peter Brown
and Bennett Davis picked iup
their range from the outside
holding the Colonels to just a
four point lead.
1I owev er, this was
short-lived. Bostwick moved
into the forward position and
John Martin joined Poitier at
guard and, in their usual fast
breaking spree opened a 14
point half time lead.
Quant who scored eight of
his 1 1 field goals in the first
half captured 15 rebounds
as the Colonels made good 22
of 40 from the field. Smith and
Bostwick each added four of


their eight.
Grathon and Davis topped
Becks' 15 field goals in that
half scoring four each. Laing
and Brown added three.
The little defence the
Cougars were able to muster
came to no good against the
versatile Colonels who opened
a 24 point gap 12 minutes into
the second half. They never
recovered from this and,
although Grathon proved
outstanding in his
championship debut, alone he
was no use.
Bostwick led the Colonels'
bench going into the final five
minutes of play strongly
maintaining their command.
And yet, one thing Smith
has learned about the Cougars,
"they always come back. They
never let defeat get them
down."'
COLONELS


Martin
Poitier
Russell
Wood
Beneby
Simon
Bostwick
Thompson
Smith
Robbins
Quint

Robbins
Ferguson
Brown
Davis
Huvler
Bosfield
Lockhart
Laing .


''OU(;ARS
8 12
I 4
7 8
5 7
I 0
5 1
0 0
7 10


.*******
John Archer's Collegians last
night disproved all doubts as to
who is the best junior team in
B.A.B.A.
Centre Carl Albury scored
16 and captured 16 rebounds
while guard Dereck Vogt added
another 16 points and gave off
six assists as the Collegians
took an 87-79 victory over
Paradise League pennant
winners John Bull juniors and a
2-0 triumph in the junior
championship.
Michael Colebrook and
Tyrone Hamilton added to the
Collegians tally with 11 points


each. Hamilton who is the
Nassau League most valuable
player captured 19 rebounds
and gave eight assists.
Brian Cartwright topped
John Bull with a game high of
20 points and 10 rebounds.


Phillip Turner contributed 17
points and also 10 rebounds.
The Collegians made good
41 of their 78 from the field
while John Bull went 36 for
95.


BBA rules



on amateurs


BASEBALL players who
have ceased playing
professionally for a period of
one or more years will be
reinstated as amateurs. This
was announced today by the
Bahamas Baseball Association
during a press conference.
The B.B.A. also stated that
current professionals will be
barred from competition as of
tonight.
The press conference was
called to answer certain rulings
made by Mr. Arlington Butler,
president of the Bahamas
Olympic Association.
Speaking on behalf of the
B.B.A.. Mr. Sidney "Budts"
Outten, treasurer, said that it
was not a matter of their
agreeing with the B.O.A. that
the B.B.A. is professional, "but
seeing that they say that once a
pro always a pro until that pro
is reinstated, then that is what
we are doing."
Their main object, Outten
said, is protecting the status of
the youngsters in high schools


and colleges.
Mr. Butler, in a surprise
announcement Monday, ruled
that the Bahamas Baseball
Association was professional
and any other athlete
competing therein stand liable
of losing their amateur status.
He further said that high
school and college athletes
competing in the current
B.B.A. series will be ineligible
to compete in inter-scholastic
sports.
Contrary to Mr. Butler's
ruling, "the baseball
association," Outten said, "is
an amateur body. In the strict
wording of amateurism ball
players are not paid to play the
game." He pointed out that
their level of play might be
above that of the amateur, but
that was attributed to their
system of development.
The B.B.A. Outten
continued, is affiliated with the
National Baseball Congress
which is a non-professional
organization.


Consistency, please
Dear Sir,
I am writing in reference to a sports article appearing in
your newspaper on March 11 under the caption, "School
athletes have broken amateur rules."
The reason I feel so strongly about this matter is the fact
that the officials or guardians involved are not being
consistent ia their ruling.
The writer of the above mentioned article quoted Mr. A.
Butler as saying that there is no hope for reinstatement for
the athletes involved because they had been warned that
participation in local baseball would be in violation of
amateur rules.
The reason for the violation being the fact that the
B.B.A. is infiltrated with professionals.
Well, that's quite understandable, but here is where the
inconsistency appears; because according to Mr. Butler and
his ruling, if an amateur competes with a professional, then
the amateur becomes a pro.
Now we know that there is quite a number of
individuals who are now competing in the current B.A.B.A.
series who also play baseball. So if we are then to follow
Mr. Butler's ruling then the B.A.B.A. has lost its amateur
status including all those who competed in the past regular
series and those now involved in the play-off.
What I am trying to show here is that at least one of the
teams involved in the B.A.B.A. finals have three players
who compete in the B.B.A. They have therefore lost their
amateur status and should not be allowed to play in the
B.A.B.A. Since they are allowed to compete those with
whom they play must also lose their amateur status.
I for one, would gladly accept the B.O.A's ruling if they
were consistent throughout. But how can I?
BERTRAM JOSEPH RECKLEY (Jr.)
P.S. Would the president of the B.A.B.A. explain the
reason for competition, allegedly against pros in recent
competition abroad. Was the game sanctioned by the
governing body under which the B.A.B.A. falls?




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ORVILLE R. CLOUGH of
Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration should not be granted
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 14th day of March 1974
to The Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs, P. O. Box N-3002, Nassau,
Bahamas.



STOP- LOOK- OBED

NASSDAU fl fSVNMIfSNASSAU
SIAI0 LQ)O UAIISUM

FRIDAY, MARCH 15/8:30 P.M.
COAKLEY/MALAKIUS ENTERPRISES PRESENTS


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