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 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: March 13, 1974
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03566

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rilrtutt


itd with Potmster of Bahamas for pota eone wi ithin thBaha.) Nassau and Babama Islands Leading Newspaper


VOL. LXXI, No. 93 Wednesday, March 13, 1974. Price: 20 Cants


$3.6m DRUG HAUL




Police stumble on 76 sacks at remote cay


A SI-('R1T C(A('CHI of marijuana
worth a collosal S3.6 million on the
drug market has been discovered by
SRoyal Balhamas Police Marines on a
remote cay off the south-eastern tip ol
tleuthera.
The discovery quite by accident while on
a routine patrol in the area is by far the
largest drug haul ever made in the Bahamas.
Authorities today said that 76 burlap sacks
each weighing 100 pounds or more were found
on little San Salvador cay. midway between
Cat Island and the southern tip of Eleuthera.
The amount of marijuana ,s worth an
estimated $3.6 million to drug traffickers in
the IUnited States.
The current market value place. It was f
is S30 an ounce, low shrubs ir
The largest haul ever in had been co
Bahamian waters was last canvas to pr
September when more than elements, poli
eight tons of marijuana worth The burlap
an estimated ;5 million were the drug we]
seii/d by the US Coast (uard by plastic mat
neai Anguilla Cay. The boat The msriji
with two Miamians aboard was custody by pc
towed to Miami to Nassau
The recent marijuana cache abo-'1 1' p
was discovered last Wednesday Friday.
bi membClhrs of the Royal The burlap
Ba h a Imas Police Marine no markings
Division. I he men, aboard the they had bee
police launches San Salvador 'ithor'ries st
and Acklins, were making believed that
routine patrol around 'the put there ei
I leuthera cays, police said. dropped by


They had gone ashore at the
ci-y and "'while stomping
around in the bushes,"
stumbled across the hiding


convenient
removal.


Drugs in the headlines


I (i\11t'N A rush for jobs
in Britaini's state-run coal
induslt r has developed
follow ring the miners'
su ccessful pay claim
settlement, the National (oal
Board reported today.
The hoard said there had
been 500 inquiries at 49 pits so
far this week. Many of them
are former miners.
Last week Prime Minister
Harold Wilson's Labour
government approved an
across-the-board settlement
raising the miners' yearly wage
bill by about $230 million and
elevating miners to the ranks of
the best-paid skilled workers in
Britain.
Increases ranged between
$15.443 and $35.63 a week,
bringing the basic wages of coal
face workers to $103.50 a
week. With bonuses and
overtime from night shift
working, a face worker could
earn as much as $184 to $207
a week.
Other underground miners
AT

SEE
YOUR $$$$'S
GO FURTHER

at YOU SAVE!_


ound under some
n the bushes and
covered over with
otect it from the
ce said.
sacks containing
r" also protected
aerial.
uana, taken into
police, was br .)ught
Sr cori vacation
)l laur,-hes last

sacks "contained
to indicate where
n brought from,"
ated. It woa a;so
.they had been
ther by boat or
plane awaiting a
time for their


There is no landing strip on
the isolated cay, however.


in the coal industry now are
getting $52.80 a week and
surface workers a minimum of
$73.60.
The n at ional weekly
earnings for British workers in
the manufacturing industry run
at about $95.50.
The coal board said that
even before the strike, miners
were quitting the job at the
rate of 80 a week, and there
were about 1.500 vacancies.
A board spokesman said
mine officials now were


The discovery made by the
police ,marines, under
supervision of Asst.
Commissioner Lawrence Major.
is believed to be the largest
single find of marijuana ever in
the Bahamas.
And it also indicates that
drug trafficking activities are
taking place around the eastern
areas of the Bahamas. Past
discoveries were most often
made around the western cavs
in the Biminis or in Andros
which are near the U.S.
mainland.
There is no indication as to
what leads police investigations
are taking or whether it is
known to whom the cache
belonged.
However, the investigation
has been taken over by
members of the Criminal
Investigation Department.


Marijuanai racket: man


By SIDNEY DORSETT
('RIMINA.L Investigation
Department officers cracked
down ont the distribution
headquarters of a marijuana
importing racket Monday,
arresting its operator and also
seizing 125 pJounds of the drug
and over $6.000 in cash
representing profits gained on
the local market.
Arrested in the raid was
Jaimaican-born clerk, Anthony
'Tony" Montgomery Cooke,
26-)ear-old grisly-moustached,
sei-mnod attired nale who was
sentenced to two years in jail
with hard labour by Chief
Magist ate Wilton Hercules.
The youth appeared in court
I'uesday afternoon. Also on
hand were .several friends of
the defend, nt who left the
court as police escorted him
iawai to the Central Police
Station cell.
('Cooke had pleaded guilty to
itntport ini' and possessing
imarijuaina charges.
A hearing into a charge of


jailed

having an unlicensed gun and
ammunition is to take place
later. lie pleaded not guilty to
the offence.
TO MAKE MONEY
The accused told the court
that he was "only trying to
make some money" when
questioned by the judge.
But the court took a dim
view of him "corrupting
Bahamian society" and the
magistrate sentenced him to
one vear on a charge of
importing dangerous drugs and
two years in jail for being in
possession of two suitcases of
marijuana.
The crackdown itself proved
valuable to police investigators
who also took possession of a
cash sales book recording
points of distribution
"Grand Central. East Street
and Livingstone."
Fach of the listed places and


names bore the figures of
outstanding debts owed.
Recordings of takings for one
day alone amounted to S1,900.
Police arrested Cooke at the
Towne Hotel where they
executed a search warrant. But
the actual drugs and ledgers
were taken after a search of
another house occupied by
Cooke on Rupert Dean Lane.
Cooke also listed his address as
the Racquet Club, on West Bay
Street.
Also taken in the haul was a
market scale for weighing the
drug and paper bags used in
packaging.
The magistrate ordered the
$6,000 be forfeited to the
police reward fund. The money
was taken by police after
investigations showed that
Cooke also kept a safety
deposit at the Sheraton. British
Colonial Hotel. The money, he
told the police, were proceeds
from the sale of two other
suitcases which he had already
got rid of.


predicting that for the tirst
time in many years, miners
were not quitting their jobs
and it was possible to look
ahead to forming a stable work
force in the mines.

In the House of Commons, sev-
eral Opposition Conservative
lawmakers called on the
government to legislate pay
raises for Britain's armed forces
that would put their salaries
above those of coal face
workers.(AP)


Resorts statement


ALTHOUGH Resorts
International Inc. showed a
$2,767,198 increase in net
sales and operating revenues
last year, the loss on net
earnings was $1,094,528.
A statement on the
company's consolidate results
for 1973 was released today.
It showed that Resorts,
developers of Paradise Island,
registered net sales and
operating revenues of
$40,918,973 in 1973,
compared to $38,151,775 in
1972.
Loss on net earnings
however was $1,094,528.
Net earning loss per share


was SO.24.
The Resorts statement said
that a number of issued and
outstanding shares of Class A
and Class B Common Stock of
the company has been reduced
to 3.639,500 shares as the
result of the previously
announced September 1973
sale by a wholly-owned
subsidiary of undeveloped land
in exchange for 250,000 shares
of the Company's Class A
common Stock and of the
recent tender offer which
expired Febraury 5, 1.974
under which the company
purchased an aggregate of
773,837 shares of Class A
Common Stock.


WITH TODAY'S mammoth drug haul by
Bahamas police in a remote out island cay it is
interesting to see that the pattern of drug
traffic in the area, while still conforming to a
known pattern, seems to be greatly on the
increase.
In a recent exclusive interview, Asst.
Commissioner of Crime John T. Crawlei told
The Tribune that there had been no change in
the pattern of drug trafficking in the Bahamas
and the following methods were being used -
mainly by Americans to get the "stuff" into
the United States.
The crime chief said that light aircraft were
hired from various firms in Florida, then their
seats were removed and the planes flown to
Jamaica via the Bahamas.
The marijuana "there is very little other
stuff used this way" is picked up in Jamaica
and flown back to the United States via the
Bahamas. The planes normally stop to refuel at
Inagua, Exuma, Long Island, Andros or
Bimini.
He said that a number of yachts and
fishing vessels are also used and these also
stopped at the islands mentioned to refuel.
Mr. Crawley mentioned one case where a
vessel from Colombia with an Englishman and
South African aboard had been followed all
the way to Nassau and the vessel arrested when
it docked at Paradise Island. A large quantity
of marijuana was found aboard and the two
men arrested, tried and sentenced to lengthy
prison terms.
But drugs are also dropped from aircraft in
plastic bags and are retrieved, according to
police, by traffickers using boats who then
smuggle the drug into the United Slates and
also the Bahamas.
The police chief cited a case in 1972 where
a duffle bag had been discovered on Bimini.
"It was padlocked and wired up," said Mr.
Crawley, "and had a bomb inside. Anyone
could have been blown up by it if he didn't
know what he was doing." Inside the bag, after


it had been defused by a bomb expert from
Miami. 14 pounds of pure cocaine were found.
The matter was handled by the US federal
authorities and was never reported locally.
Judging from statistics, an increasing
number of Jamaicans has been arrested in the
past year smuggling drugs into the Bahamas on
their person, using false bottoms to suitcases,
even in the soles of their shoes and in the
lining of their clothing.
The Commissioner also said that drugs had
been shipped here from Jamaica in furniture,
cartons, gas cylinders, machinery and in one
case, a funeral casket.
American tourists had also been found
smuggling drugs into the country in their
luggage, golf bags and on their person.
However, the pattern for Bahamians dealing
in drugs was somewhat different. Often, drugs
obtained by Bahamians from Jamaica arrived
here in suitcases "as unaccompanied baggage"
which is later collected and sometimes with
the collusion of persons employed at the
airport. These persons who are in the racket
remove the suitcase before it arrives at the
customs inspection area, according to police.
Drugs have even been shipped to the
Bahamas from Jamaica by parcel post and by
airfreight.
In many cases police dogs trained in drug
sniffing have located such drugs at the airport.
During the past six months, said Mr.
Crawley, 215 persons were arrested for
smuggling drugs into the Bahamas. Fortyeight
were Americans, 140 Bahamians, 18
Jamaicans, four Canadians, two Germans and
three others.
Over 800 pounds of marijuana were found,
1a/ ounces of cocaine, but no heroin. However,
in addition, 1,350 pounds of marijuana were
found by Bahamas police on remote cays or in
the customs department and in these instances
no persons were charged in relation to the
offences.


by the way, no pocket,'" Sears
replied
11i conceded hi1e mn1a h1ave
told 'oimiebody one he was "inl
a box "


THE BAHAMAS Youth for
Christ is sponsoring the first
Bahamas Conference and
Biblical Prophecy at Garfunkel
Auditorium running through
Friday.
There will be five sermon


Transport



pushes up


living

A I 51 t'R (C-NT increase
in transportation costs was the
major contributory factor to a
1.82 per cent rise in overall
living costs during January.
I he official Retail Price
Index for New Providence
increased by 2.1 points or 1.82
per cent in January from 115 7
in December, the Statistics
Department said today.
Ihe groups contributing
largest increases were
transport, which rose to a high
of 5.51 per cent: other goods
and services which rose by 2.15
per cent and food which
recorded a rise of 2 per cent
The housing, health and
personal care, and clothing and
footwear groups rose by 1.2o
per cent: 0.88 per cent and
0.84 per cent respectively.
The recreation and reading
group recorded a decrease of
0.61 per cent.
The All Items Index stood at
S1.8 in January, an increase of
12.1 per cent over January
1073, which was 105.1.
FOOD UP AGAIN

The food index rose by 2.4
points to 122.3 in January
from 119 ) in December Items
recording the major price
changes were rice, beef and
The housing index
jumped by 1.4 points from
110.9 in December to 112.3 in
January. Items 'recording the
largest increases in this group
were electricity, kerosene,
unfurnished rent-ils and dining
room furniture, *which ..,L. !:s
0.11, 0.08, 0.07 and 0.03 of a
point respectively Baby sitting
fell by 0.04 of a point.
The clothing and footwear
index rose by 1.0 point in


cost

Januais Boys and men's
clothing contributed 0.07 and
0 04 of a point to this increase.
(irls' footwear fell by 0.02 of
a points
I lie transport index
contritrhuted a record increase
io the ,vcr:ill index in January,
rising hb 6.1 points or 5.51 per
cent troim 110.7 in
i)cimbhr to 1 16.8 in January.
\IR FARES UP
'[his rise also showed an
increase of 13.07 per cent over
January 1973 index. which
stood at 103.3. The increased
costs of air fare and gasoline
products contributed 0.27 and
0.23 of a point to this rise.
HIhe health and personal c;,r
index rose by 1.0 point to
I 13., in January. Barbers fees
and medicines increased by
0.04 and 002 ef a point
respectively .
In January the recreation
and reading index recorded a
idll of 0.7 of a point from
115.0 in December to 114.3.
contributingg to this decrease
were drinks in bars, and
nightclub entrance fees which
fell by 0.0) and 0.01 of a point
respectively
Newspapers rose by 0.07 of
a point.
The other goods and services
index contributed the second
highest increase in January.
rising from 116.4 in December
to 1 18.9.

The items significant to this
increase were life insurance for
!ildren and adultst.vwhvch rose
by 0.11 and 0.06 of a point;
laundry and dry cleaning which
rose by 0.04. and
hospitalization insurance and
funeral expenses which each
rose by 0.03 of a point.


-PURSE

SNATCHER

ROBS

TOURIST


THREE elderly female
tourists visiting St. Francis
Xavier's Cathedral this
morning became the victims
of a purse snatching
The women, who were
passengers on the Bahama
Star, had strolled to the top
of West Hill Street at about
9.15 a.m. when a man in his
20s lounging on the side of
the road, came up behind one
of the women and snatched
her handbag.
It is understood that the
purse contained tickets,
travellers cheques and money.
On Monday night there
were two other robberies of
visitors in the West
Street-Nassau Street area.
Shortly after 7.30 p.m.
Monday, two young
American female visitors were
walking up West Street when
two youths grabbed at one
girl's handbag. The girls,
guests at the Buena Vista
screamed and struggled but
the youths made off with the
bag.' said to have contained
cash and travellers cheques.
At 11 p.m. the same
evening two male American
visitors were accosted by two
men on Nassau Street and
robbed of an estimated $300.
The area round West
Street. Delancey Street and
Nassau Street has been the
scene of repeated attacks on
visitors, most of whom live in
the various guest houses on
those streets. And residents
complain that the area is
rarely patrolled by police.

BA'HAI MEETING

ELLSWORTH Blackwell, a
black American who now lives
in Port-au-Prince, Haiti and
who is a member of the Ba'hai
faith will be the quest speaker
at a meeting at the Sheraton
British Colonial Hotel
tomorrow at 7.30 p.m. His talk
is entitled: "A look into the
future."


Vesco had me in no


NEW YORK Government
witness Harry L. Sears told a
jury today that financicr
Robert L. Vesco never had hlin
"in a box" or "in his pocket"
so that he was forced to ask
former IGMS Attlotneo
General John N. Mitchiell toI
help Vesco out ot a tIaud
investigation.
Sears, a prominent New
Jersey Republican testified tor
a seventh day at the t S.
district court trial of Mitcht I
and Maurice Stans.
Sears has denied that he
tried to fix the Vesco case
through Mitchell. after Vtesco
secretly contributed 52100,000
to President Nixon's re-election
campaign.
Sears and Vesco were both
codefendants. Sears was
granted immunity froni
prosecution for his testimony
Vesco is a fugitive, reportedly
in the Caribbean.
Sears, who is former
Republican leader of the New
Jersey Senate, has said that
Vesco contributed $50,000 to
his unsuccessful campaign for
the Republican gubernatorial
nomination in New Jersey.
He also said Vesco had given
him a S60,000-a-year job on
his legal staff and had
presented him with $10,000
for helping him get out of jail
in Switzerland on one
occasion.
Questioned by assistant U.
S. Attorney John Wing, Sears
wai asked whether he didn't
fel in debt to Vesco.
"He had me in no box, and,


n a

station
Nassau and Paradise Island
on display in New York's
Pennsylvania railroad station
takes the form of the largest
colour transparency in the
world ... measuring 100 feet
long and 10 feet high.
The mammoth display,
arranged by the
Nassau/Paradise Island
Promotion Board in
cooperation with DuPont, is
viewed from a terminal
balcony by (from left) Steve
Norton, chairman of the
promotion board; Bob Burke,
the board's director of travel
agency sales; Ronald C.
Muzii, promotion board
executive director.
The colour photos that
comprise the ticket rotunda
exhibit include pictures of
Rawson Square, the cloister
on Paradise Island, sad
boating, gardens, and
beaches.
More than six million
people will see it during
February and March.


"I never felt in a to\ which
would put me in a position
where I would do anything
illegal or immoral because of
my debt." Sears said I' P)


Murder charge


A RPI'RTI i)1 AN Lane
carpenter, arrested Iy police in
coni nectt ion w-ith the
nI steIouis burning of an
Andceson Street house was
\ esterda\ charged with
Murder.
Joseph Bernard Matther, 39,
was ordered remanded in
custody without bail by


Magistrate (;cotgc lannas s
until Max 27 for a preliminary
inquiry. The charges accuse
him of setting tire to the house
on March 2 and also to
murdering Doreen Strachan
whose badly burned body was
found inside the wooden
building which was owned by
Mrs. Mildred Archer.


Crash horror


NORTHAMPTON Mass
pileups on a fog-bound
motorway killed five people
and seriously injured at least
30 today. Police said at least
160 vehicles were involved.


The crashes cane as the fog
closed in quickly on a
four-mile stretch of the M-l,
Britain's main north-south
artery and the backbone of its
superhighway system. (AP)


Bahamas conference


topics with local speakers
taking part. They are: Signs of
the End Time; The New
Testament Church; Present
Human Behaviour, Occultism
and Even after the Second
Return of Christ.


A REMINDER TO
CUSTOMERS
PLEASE COLLECT YOUR REPAIRED
ITEMS IMMEDIATELY!!


[ DUDLEY'S =-' '
COT. ROsETTYAST A
MT ROYAL AVE.


Bank with




E Barcys


How the pushers operate


-by air, sea and land


Rush on for mine jobs


box, says Sears


1hp













~hr ~ribunr


Wednesday, March 13, 1974,


0 t





TH '"2-NATION group of
major oil co.numers, meeting
in Brussels to prepare plans
for a conference with oil
producing countries, has
made rapid progress, reliable
sources said.
The sources said the close
agreement on most issues and
the speed at which accord
was being reached could
make the conference possible
as early as June.

EIGHT members of the
American Congress sent a
letter today to Soviet party
chief Leonid Brezhnev urging
him to allow dancers Valery
and Galina Panov to emigrate
together from the Soviet
Union.
Representative Elizabeth
Holtzman, Democrat-New
York, denounced as "cruel
and cynical" the reported
Soviet attempt to force
Valery to leave the country
without his wife.

XAVIERA HOLLANDER,
author of The Happy Hooker.
has lost an appeal in Canada's
federal court in which she
contested a deportation
order.
Miss Hollander, a
32-year-old Dutch citizen,
vwrote a best-selling book
recounting her life as a
prostitute and brothel owner
in New York.


ST. GFORGES Supreme
Court Justice ric Bishop has
adjourned the criminal cases
until April 1 as the
strike-created fuel shortage
continues to hamstring judicial
operations.
Witnesses and jurors living
outside the capital of St.
George's claim they cannot
attend court sessions for lack
cf transport.
Commercial shipments of


Br


Doing a


Godiva


in the


seventies

NEW YORK Getting there
is more than half the fun for
today's streakers.
Lady Godiva had to rely on
a horse. But modern-day nude
dashers are speeding about on
everything from skis to
snowmobiles
Ski enthusiasts in Michigan
and New York were recently
treated to the sight of a sort of
slalom streak. A young man
wearing only goggles, boots
and skis sped down the snow
ridge ski centre slope at Turin,
N.Y.. apparently oblivious to
the 25-degree temperature.
In Missoula, Montana, a
nude man in cap, goggles,
boots and skis joined a jumping
contest.
Canadian hockey fans have
had their share of streaking
too. First it was Gary Murphy,
a member of the Pickering
Panthers, a teen-age team, who
won a $40 bet by taking a turn
around the memorial areana in
Belleville, Ontario, after a
game.
Four streakers in Hallock,
Minnesota. braved 18-degree
weather as they stripped
Even in Coventry, England.
where, legend has it. Lady
Godiva made her famous ride
to get a local official to ease
the tax burden on the
townspeople, about 20
members of a soccer team
streaked through the city on
foot. (AP)


gasoline into Grenada have
been cut off by a waterfront
workers strike that began
January first. A limited
amount of fuel has trickled
into the island.
The major gasoline
distributors. Shell. Texaco and
Esso. announced more than
one week ago that their bulk
storage tanks were empty.
The waterfront workers
strike is part of a general


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that FELIX EMANUEL
BUTTERFIELD of Sea Grape Grand Bahama is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 6th day of
March 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs P. O. Box N3002,
Nassau.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that IRENE ELIZABETH
POLLINGTON of P. O. Box N-7542, Village Road, Nassau,
N.P. is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration should not be granted should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 13th day of March to The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. O.
Box N-3002, Nassau, Bahamas.


AQU


-Kissinger



gives pledge



on Europe

WASHIGNTON U. S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger has
pledged to resolve trans-Atlantic differences with "patience and
goodwill."
But, he said in a statement issued in his name by press officer
George Vest, "these differences are real and serious and will take
some time to resolve."
The Secretary of State's statement represented an obvious
effort to take the edge off remarks he made on Monday.


Wilson makes

EEC move
LONDON Britain's new
Labour government today
summoned home British
ambassadors from eight
European capitals to map its
strategy for renegotiating
membership terms in the
Common Market.
A Foreign Office
announcement said the
envoys will participate in a
one-day conference March 20
with Foreign Secretary James
C allaghan.
"The disucssions will
centre on the question of
renegotiating our terms of
membership with the
European community," a
Foreign Office spokesman
said.
"The agenda will cover all
questions concerning our
relations with the com-
munity."


Kissinger addressed a group
of some 100 wives of
(ongressmen at the State
Department on Monday. He
spoke e\tIerinp,_riIr.te 'iisl. and
without realizing that a group
of three reporters was covering
his speech,
lis belief that he was talking
without newsmen present
likely explained the unusual
candor with which he talked
about the difficulties of the
United States government with
its European allies.
I he United States, Kissinger
said Monday, has fewer
problems with its adversaries
but "the biggest problem is
how to bring our friends to a
realization that there are
greater common interests than
simple self-assertiveness."
Kissinger also gave a
historian's view of European
history since World War One.
IEurope, he said, has never
really recovered from the
devastation of the First World
War, and the European
governments "have never fully
regained public confidence,"
Although spokesman Vest
was flooded with questions in
connection with Kissinger's
remarks on Monday, he
declined to answer most or to
give an explanation for the
misunderstanding about the
coverage by newsmen on
Monday. lie said the meeting
with the Congressional wives
"was supposed to have been a
private session."
At the outset of his news
conference. Vest read this
statement by Kissinger:
he overwhelming problem
today is to construct a
cooperative world order. The
essential component of this is
unit in the west. In the last
year. in trying to inject a new
vitality into the Atlantic
relationship, we have
encountered difficulties in
working out consultation
practices which would meet
the needs of all. "These
difficulties are real and serious
and will take some time to
resolve. But we are determined
to resolve them with patience
and goodwill "(AP)

200 Britons

crash


victims
PARIS The French
Ministry of Justice said most of
the bodies of the 346 people
who died in history's worst air
crash may never be identified.
A statement spoke of "very
great difficulties" in
identifying the remains
Medical officials said most of
the bodies were torn and
scattered over the forest site
where the Turkish Airlines
DC10 crashed March 3
Only six bodies have been
claimed so far by relatives who
came from several countries for
this purpose Other deaths
were confirmed by the
identification of clothing or
other personal belongings.

The jet, on a flight from
Paris to London, crashed five
minutes after takeoff. I he
airline said there were 344
passengers and 12 crew
members aboard
Ihey included about 200
Britons. 46 Japanese. some 27
Amnerlcans and a number of
other nationals, according to
the airline. The airline has yet
to compile an exact breakdown
of nationalities. (AP)


$400m COMPLEX


LONG BEACH City
councilmen have given initial
approval to an offer by
Twentieth Century-Fox Filni
Corp. to build a $400 million
recreational complex "that will
rival Disneyland in size" on a
site near the Queen Mary in
Long Beach Harbour.

On Tuesday, the councilmen
directed city manager John R.
Mansell to open negotiations
with the movie company on
the project and the installation
of a motion picture exhibition
aboard the Queen Mary.


shutdown ordered bi the
Committee of 22, a united
front of unions, businessmen
and civic leaders that condemns
alleged police brutalities by
Prime Minister Eric Gairy's
regime.
Workers in essential services
are now back to work. but
electric power is partly
curtailed due to the fuel
shortage.
In Greneda electric power is
provided by fuel-fed dceisel
generators.
Waterfront workers met
yesterday to discuss strike pay
and other related matters. A
spokesman for the dockers
claims the rank and file is now
more adamant following what
he called "ugly remarks" made
by Prime Minister Gairy about
dockers in his broadcast
message to the nation last
Friday.
In the broadcast the Prii. e
Minister said that dockers are
responsible for present
hardships, including the
government's inability to pay
public workers their salaries for
the month of February.
Gairy also said that students
who fraternised with dockers
are not acting in their best
interest, as parents will not
accept a docker as a son-in-law.
This reference to dockers
and students surprised many,
as Gairy's platform emphasizes
social equality. (AP)


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World War soldier reports in -after


TOKYO Lt. Hiroo Onoda, the
Japanese intelligence officer who held out
for nearly 30 years in the jungles of the
Philippines, has made his final report on
American troop movements in World War
II and won his former commander's
congratulations for his memory.
"He gave me a detailed report on his
activities, giving me intelligence reports
such as enemy movements including the


Japanese expedition that discovered
Onoda last Saturday and formally
ordered him to end his mission.
Onoda, now 52, made his report to
Taniguchi Monday night before flying
home to Japan. Included in the report
was word that the U. S. task force off
Lubang in 1945 had 143 aircraft carriers.
warships and escort vessels, Taniguchi
said.


'Wiretapping' during



Kennedy administration


WASHING TON U.S.
Attorney General William
Saxbe said today he has
discovered a classified justice
department file which shows
widespread wiretapping was
conducted during the Kennedy
and Johnson administrations.
Saxbe described the file as a
"tremendous list" and said it
might have included taps on
some newsmen.
At a briefing with reporters,
the Attorney General said he
offered to special Watergate
prosecutor Leon Jaworski a
portion of the file which had a
bearing on the Nixon
government's wiretaps on four
newsmen and 13 national
security council aides.
Jaworski told him he already


had the information, Saxbe
said.
Saxbe said he inspected
the portion of the file running
back to 1960 and found that
wiretapping was prevalent
"clear up to the Keefe
decision" of the Supreme
Court in 1972. That decision
outlawed domestic wiretapping
without a court warrant.
Saxbe said the file agreed
with information already
disclosed about the extent of
wiretapping during the Nixon
administration.
He at first said some
newsmen were wiretap targets
during previous administra-
tions, but later modified the
statement to say he wasn't sure
of that.


POPE ON BIRTH CONTROL
VATICAN CITY Pope Paul VI, noting that 1974 has
been dedicated to the study of overpopulation in the world,
reaffirmed today the Roman Catholic Church's stand
against abortion and birth control.
He spoke to a general assembly of the Vatican's
Committee on the Family and reminded the
representatives, both lay and clerical, that 1974 is the
United Nation's world population year.
"In this year of population we are following your work
with attention," he told the members, appointed last year
to advise on moral and spiritual matters involving family
life.
He said one of the most difficult responsibilities to
exercise in today's world is a "responsible motherhood"
and "by this we are not talking of disturbing artificially the
act of procreating or even less of cutting the life of the
human being that was conceived." (AP)


He gave no indication of the
number of taps or the number
of individuals subject to them.
Saxbe said he discovered the
file in a cabinet in the
Attorney General's office suite
during his process of reviewing
department records after
taking office two months ago.
"The only thing that
surprised me was the presence
of a file we didn't know
existed," he said.
On another subject, Saxbe
said he believes President
Nixon need not start paying his
Watergate lawyers from his
personal fund unless and until
the house votes impeachment.

"Once it becomes an
impeachment trial, then I think
it becomes personal." (AP)


New gunfire

TEL ANV Syrian uns
opened heavyfire .A ore
than two hours today alt'g the
Golan Heights front where
Israel claims the Syrian army is
planning a major attack,
Premier Golda Meir
announced

The Syrian military
command confirmed from
Damascus that the shelling had
occurred. (AP)


White House 'probed tax cuts'


WASIINGTON Within six
months of President Nixon's
1969 inauguration, the White
House was exploring possible
income tax deductions and
asking whether previous
presidents' returns could be
checked tor ideas.
This was disclosed in
memoranda that came to light
in connection with the
investigation of Nixon's tax
matters by the Congressional
joint committee on internal
revenue taxation.
A monig the m a t ters
mentioned were possible
deductions for business use of
the president's houses at San
Clemente. California, and Key
Biscayne. Florida, enter-


tainment and gifts, and the
possibility of paying the
president's daughter, Julie
Eisenhower Nixon, for services
as a White House guide.
The memoranda also
mention that Nixon would be
taking the maximum 30 per
cent charitable deduction -
apparently a reference to his
intention to donate papers to
the national archives.
A memorandum of June 16,
1969, from presidential aide
John D. Ehrlichman to
presidential counsel Edward L.
Morgan said: "The president
holds the view that a public
man does very little of a
personal nature. Virtually all of


his entertainment and activity
is related to his 'business' "
He wants to be sure that his
business deductions include all
allowable items. For instance,
wedding gifts to congressmen's
daughters, flowers at funerals,
etc. He has in mind that there
is some kind of a 25-dollar
limitation on such expenses.
(AP)


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size of the U.S. task force off Lubang
Island in 1945, fortifications, munitions
and supplies," the former commander,
Yoshimi Taniguchi, said today.
Taniguchi wis a member of the


The former commander
said he was surprised Onoda
had carried out his duties so
faithfully, and more surprised
at Onoda's "amazing capacity
for memorizing."
Asked if Onoda had
presented a written memo
Taniguchi replied: "No, that
was one of his duties: never
carry written information on
your person because it was
liable to fall into enemy
hands.
Onoda committed
everything to memory".
Taniguchi said Onoda had
also memorized a calendar.
He based the calendar on
Filipino villagers' Christmas
observances.
Taniguchi said that after he
found Onoda, he told him:
"The first thing we'll do
when we return to Japan and
you've settled down is to get
you a bride."
"But Onoda didn't show
any interest," he said. "He
was apparently too concerned
with completing his
mission." Onoda, now
recuperating in a Tokyo
hospital, looked out today
from his 15th-floor room at
the capital's crowded streets
and high-rise buildings.

"It's an artificial but very
economical way of living
here, and nature's way is
not," he said, apparently
referring to his life in the
jungle.

His brother Shigeo, who
was staying with him in the
hospital room, offered him a
glass of coca-cola and found
he didn't know what it was.

"Never drank such a
delicious thing in my life," he
told Shigeo after his first sip






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Wednesday, March 13, 1974.


Z'he tribune
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURAJE IN VERBA MAGSTRI
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903 1914
SIR FTIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Publisher/Editor 1917-1972
Contributing Editor 1972 -
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972.
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
General Offices(15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Wednesday, March 13, 1974.


By F lI NNI- DUPUCH
This is the second article I am writing on the Ps'l, II1, f'ir of
Power as it relates to fear)
IT HAS been said that "life starts at 40". I would be inclined
to raise the figure to 60. This is why I think that compulsory
retirement at 60 is, in :nany cases, unfair and a loss to the
community. It is at 60 and beyond that a man begins to
understand many phases of life that confused him as a young


I am 75 and I am only now beginning to understand the power
complex and its ability to inspire fear on its surroundings.
Tlie first tine I was confronted with this puzzling situation
was in Italy during the first world war. This was 55 years ago.
I told you in this column a few months ago about how the
standard of the British West Indies Reginient fell to a disreputable
level by the time recruitment passed the fifth or sixth battalion.
Bi thIe tine they got up to the tenth battalion the islands were
taking men out of prison to make up the numbers.
I don't know which was tougher ... the men in the tenth or the
(olonel in command. Ills name has slipped my memory. He had
tl' reputation of being a brute.
I will tell you a little story to give you some idea of the kind of
manl he was.
One day in France lie was inspecting the tent lines in the
ba!ttilion. A rnian was stretched out on the ground with both legs
\vralpped in bandages. He was obviously in pain and was unable to
stand up and salute when the Colonel approached.
"What'is wrong with you ... you didn't salute me?'", the Colonel
dcmaniiled.
"G(ot frost bite, sir," the man answered.
The Colonel then dug his spurs into the man's leg. The man
juunped up and hobbled away .
"When you write home to your mattie (Jamaican for mother)
mountain, tell them Imn turning Jesus Christ over here. I'm
making the lame walk."
Thet men hated their Colonel. One night their anger overflowed
10 ,, and a large group of the men surrounded his tent with fixed
bayonets. They stuck the bavonets into the tent's canvas ... they
cursed hinmt the dirtiest kind of curses ... they' held a jumping
dance outside the tent but they dared not enter.
When they had worked their anger out of their -.' .,ni they
walked .1,.' i. without carrying out what appeared to have been
their original intention.

Everyone in the reginient suffered for this pointless exhibition.
,A number of the mnien were couirt-ntartia!ed and given sentences
up to 15 to 20 years in prison.
The whole battalion was placed under punishment and
restrictions were placed on all units o:' the regiment in Itlay at the
time.
Aftci that severe sentences were passed on the men in all the
battalions for the slightest offence. And the punishment in the
prison camps was increased to the point of brutality.

Because I stuck with the captain of my company one night in
Belgium when all the other men ... who disliked him thoroughly
.tailed him, he was very kind to ine. He was an Englishman and
his name was George Dawson.
After that experience with mte ie treated ine with special
',tssiderationr even better than the junior officers in the
comirpansy.
W\hea he sas appointed Deputy Assistant Provost Marshal in
charge oi' the West Indian prison camp in Italy he had me
transferred to the prison compound as his Secretary.
I was only a Private soldier. There were Sergeants in the
compound but Capt. Dawson practically turned over management
ti the camp to me. leaving the Sergeants to carry out the
Punishment. He came in the compound for only a short time
ever day to make a check.
This was irregular procedure but Captain Dawson was also a
tiiinl man and so the Sergeants didn't cross me because they
were afraid of offending him.
And so I saw the punishment that was being given the men. It
started at daylight in the morning and ran through the day into
the early evening. For the final punishment of the day the men
were tied up in the position of Christ on the cross for two hours.
* * ** * *
Several of the men among them two Bahamians were given
i()l days of this punishment for a trivial offence.
I did all I could on the side to make it easier for them but I had
to be very careful because I was breaking the rules when I
...l, lred tobacco and some extra food into them. They were
almost on starvation rations.
At the end of 30 days these men were in a state of complete
collapse. They could not stand on their feet. The Sergeants were
well picked fr to is job ... they were brutes. They continued to
drive these men in their punishment with short lengths of wood
.. a kind tof policeman's billy.
I finally went to the Captain. I told him that these men would
.'die if this punishment was continued. Since it had been a Court
Martial sentence, he had to make representations to a higher
authority to get the sentence reduced to No. 2 Field Punishment.
Tlii.. imein.1: tlit for the balance of their sentence these mnen were
,ibiled Ii 1 -i ii a lent with an armed guard mounted over Ihemn
[lies wec .ill'i wed to gel up only to go to tie toilet
lie I\'' B:lhallnian Inenr never forgot what I hud done lii
ithenl. t)ie ias i. d raT)I.n In Nassau, the other man camlle tromi
I,ripull B I. I.letithlera The Nassau Inan died a long teice ago.
[lie Il.'-ullhcia I.tlnI died in Nassau just over a )ear ago and I \was
blI to Jlited hIis funeral Up ito the end oi Its life lie called ime
Conlirde

S I will lell oii of a sill sorse case thai happened at thaiI IIlle.
Duiling ihe i inter months the regiment was moved froin
France and Belgium to Taranl)o ln the south of Italy where Ihe
weather iwas wrln and the men worked as stevedore labour
hm


Bahamian lady



with soft spot for



Haiti & Haitians

MUCH HAS BEEN SAID about the inhumane, or at least


unsympathetic.


treatment of Haitians in the Bahamas.


However, they have a gentle
lady-like friend at court in the
form of Mrs. Vera Cartwright.
This Bahamian lady is the
official Haitian interpreter at
Court. In addition to her court
work which often carries her to
the Out-Islands, Freeport,
Andros, Abaco and Governor's
Harbour, she also doubles up as
an interpreter in the com-
mercial crime department,
fraud, forging of documents,
cheques, land cases etc.
Although Mrs. Cartwright
works official court hours she
can also be called out at any
other time when needed to
take statements and such like.
Why then did I describe Mrs.
Cartwright as a "friend" of the
Haitians?
She is fully immersed in the
French/Haitian culture and
life-style and for this very
reason she does not despise the
Haitians she cones into
contact with in the Bahamas.
"The Haitians are the most
cultured people there arc",she
told me although she further
admitted that it is mostly tihe
poorer classes from the
mountains that come to the
Bahamas seeking work.
Mrs. Cartwright spent her
formative years living in Hlaiti
From the time she was seven
until she was fifteen.
She was horn in Inagua to
the late Mr. Joseph Ford and
Lillian Ford. Hecr father left
Inagu. during the depression
for laiti where hI worked as .
chef to high-ranking Armerican
officers stationed there and
also leased out ti S b":t which
plied bet ween l;aigua atnd
Haiti
Mr. Ford brought his family
to Hlaiti as soon as he swas
settled. The )youthful Vera was
seven and two brothers, Roger
and Percy and one sister.
Dorothy, were born in luaiti.
in Elaiti the young Vera, or
Valencia (her second more
"''French" nanie) as she was
called, learned the lanigtape
spontaneously fro m her
playnmates as children do.
Mrs. Cartwright recalled the
first phrase she learnt just matter
she arrived. The little Valenuia
was sitting on the porch of her
new home watching the
children play. "QuitteC/ oit
tranquil" one child called to,
another. That eventing little
Valenila asked her atitlhe what
this meant and he tiidt her


talked Crele h t s
'

Photo 1.'/.\Cf v'/ t .I C,//.1A\








ipor. A sister usas Ilmi s un
"Leave me alone! "
With her pla tn-iatu she
talked Creole hut at school
Immaculate (')s:icCptiin the
sisters all came from France )
creole was strictll forbidden
and pure r tench ils lisisied
upon. A sister was ways on
duty during their play p riads
at school and any talking
Creole ws -uarefiiuly noted.
Two tableaux were kept at
school on the wall. On :ic all
the names ot the children who
had lapsed into (Crtole at play
were in black letters, !he name'
oft the children -.li!, had not
lapsed were upl in gold on tihe
other tableau.
In spite ,of Ite stinet
discipline V'ri.a.i is hra'pps'
at school. "l he', ".re oI've!ly
people". Mrs. art iwriht said
of the sisters. "io ~!t!iiet"
hie dia\ i ks l'. -: in ll1;iiL' II
began at 4 j.iii. t or mass fil
adults, after which lley sipped
a demitasse i)t c(!'ce
Then the school d<, began
The uniform wis a white dress
with three hox pleats I on rot,
a square ellar .ind long sleeves.
a grey and white belt and
paniatma hats, within a !;it chi;ii'
hat ban d
Mrs ('aitv.right tld ::ic "I
havie never see!I tlie s-tci-i
lie.re or i ;iinhere elsc., dilesse
like these sisters." ]The h !ii
we re I the long conveiuitioiini
ones which covered cvei\ thling
except the facet front ihe
cychrows to the chin inrd
chic in the French manniiier a
belted grei habit witi whiii
tri m .
M!s (:rtwright recalled her
sch1 ol u C rIiculumi: lots


unloading ships briiirii., supplies that I think came from Salinica.
1 put in long hours as a stevedore on the docks of Ital\ arnd so
no one can tell me about labour because I was obliged to do ltie
hardest and dirtiest kind of work during the three years I \ka: iii
the army ... and I am glad it happened to mie because it i:J"Li
good experience.
One day the company marched to the docks to work o on e oi
the ships. When the\ got there Englishmenr in a labour battalion
were engaged in cleaning toilets on the dock.
As soon as our men appeared the tEnglislhmen were taken r 'ti
this dirty work and some of our men were detailed to take ril'ei
place. Our men resented this detail and refused to obey lie oi id
They were arrested, court-martialed and given 15 years in pi min
for disobeying an order.
This was a terrible sentence. I was upset by it because t. i :,
the men in tlhe group were among our tifinet soldiers.
The Jamaican was the cleanest maln iIn our coipanl; lii
uniform was always immaculate, his slhoes polished. Il I t, k
pride in being a soldier of the King. The Bahaliarn ;,a e I' ::
Eleuthera. ie was a close friend of mine.
Some time after tile war I heard thai tlie Bahatmian had ec.i
sent home and was on the "Crazyv Hill", located on the hillts'p
south of the hospital on Shirley Street. Today it is located a;
Sandilands Village and is called the Sandilands Mental ltosoital
I went to the Crazyi Hill to see my friend. I was told ihe was
violent and I couldn't see him. lie was in a padded cel!! I kne,
the Superintendent of the male ward at this place and I asked it
might look in on hinm.
lie took me to a peep hole in the door through which food was
pushed io this unfortunate man and I saw : sight I shall nevei
forget.
My friend was moving around the room on all-fours like a
caged tiger. I saw immediately that he was violent.
Suddenly he became aware that someone was looking tlitoughl
the peep hole. He rushed to the door on all fours ... snarling and
making noises like a wild animal. When lie got to thle door Ih
reared up on his hind legs like an animal and clawed at the hlioe i
the door.
Oh God! It was awful. Even today, over a half century lat .
tie mnenmory of this experience haunts mie.
And that is why I feel so badly today that I ngland has iumed
her back completely on overseas subjects who have remained
i.,, al i o lie int spile ol distiurbiiig InI 0denits like llbl li [ i ,':,1
Ilaec einhillered their live, bcci.ui teW llieillKi II .C
%rwLe all itlniL eeLr ino con~seliph i I ihi-. \\J It bohli '..ai ji
Balid iiiin nien mi .iid \rIomen i ho i hr sered I Ie .tilih nd .I r t.. '
voluni eeiir
* ** *
Just one final line.
Ilhe Colonel of the lentil balallion wJ.i plomoiledJ I lihe r.i1lnk
0 Brigadier the only Brigadier In the leg it ll dLIIItng 1il,' \ ..1'

** *** *i *

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
N maiin is absolule lord of his life -- OWFN MEREDITI


...by Daphne Wallace-Whitfield


geographl an' history of aitl
there wias muiich studying for
honirewcork. whiith had to, he
recited in class the tollowing
day and lots of intcrestang
e xtra-cuiricular activity es:
drawing designing painting.
Music and rinrth fine
enibroidety. She recalled how
enthusima'ic and little Haitan
children \ii. itn studying
F nglish
I our .'.ho k in the
atternIIon wis I promrenade
time. Mlr iCarrright recalled
that thl,. tHaltian b.oys andm nec:!
would treatt .il wo ian a, ii shti
were a i (lil'e l at ill tires". is
young ladies H'I ynring man.
whoti was iln l)\, wil tha friend
o! Valencia. ai'i';......- d ier on
a promenadee, !'i-in.,i"ti l i's hta
and made a der- ..; w n!Il! l' .,\
artnouncing Mi l C t 'i'doc' ii
l \,,F' %iui "tc i ilhe TlciiI l
tld flor i adoredw "

,1 ,_ i than ngl hsihL
A lter the i'- niio;,idc it ,t.i
st nll rng for :i d) t in iar ,
th tad llii iri' \ 'and diniicr
1 t'l a s : th. i bitter

c:.;idlciihliht b 1 : i pl, va-
I Irs t i.- I- hsrt'er

ai 'I.are 1 re i. 1 I litpk' V rw
W n r v 'A N o- o r. I s' a




Si iih .k ral.
Is 1 \. i !.rir i .i ,!', p'; (t itr ,



,it' ,rr i, t the
(; Xil ic I l I I.a! sll.'
hei i q it 1 ti ;, thi -. -

a it d sli, H ih '-. : .tiib s ,1.


o, the Bc~ii';,
("lir it t
R:ihnlng. M,. ,
to Venu. I : -


ti 1n
ik
ii .i!\ ta!k i rl.i' :

( .* v. n hi l i -i


PI; e i tlt'tl



ii: rit-




dt! th
, s \11-


there II.-c 't,- p ,ii ".
Ihe\ l i' e ;i ;ii li h t lnd those\
,',,n,' th l:l letn !l- b li- ; l !',I
ihe ic'bo r ini I,;; ,!!:" n '. l
i'A ket "r' 1 I l. V
Pagte 12. 1ol. 3


OI-







N'


16


MISS GOVERNMENT HIGH SCHOOL and her Court pictured after the judges'
decision at the Beauty Pargeant at the school on Saturday evening. From left to right are:
Lisa Seymour, Miss Orchid, 4th Runner-up who also captured the Miss Photogenic
Award; Meg Bowe, Miss Buttercup, 1st runner-up who was also voted Miss Amity;
Melinda Hepburn, Miss G.lr .;.q Glory, who gained the Crown as Miss Government High
School; Michelle Rolie. Miss Bougainvillea, 2nd runner up who also won the Miss
Popularity award and Barbara Gibson, Miss Vellow Elder. 3rd runner-up.
i'/"or > | i unciir 1}). I uihran.
:- ,1 II II=I I I.. . ....... III


BAHAMAS NATIONAL TRUST

ANNOUNCES
AUDUBON WILDLIFE FILM SERIES- 1974

"FOUR FATHOM WORLD"
Ih rc i,, eitherr cnithiallngi ilndciS; pn ildution superhi l phirtiirr iphel d aid engagingl) narrated
,i li:irr 'Pcdersonr As tihe tli, 1 rs gert aiiTqu d witr s i sh squds, rctoipuses and sharks, viewers find
thimisclves getting Irt-r ittll I, .c ll 'in Mir. 'edersor'- lht i,,riiaur and ',h i s affection fnr his
ih I,.Im s. I i,,d m IE lh n HJ li.JV 1 1 -1 i a t v d tasti featm- the trunkfi h.
Sii,- i .'i- i-aIs it i: n tti l i.,, ii :, I 111i l : qi.,i i ''ii.- i, thde siitrsi;rgissiumn Hee DONT MISS
I S I ()P 11 I VAl1) I i) R ( (;R M Il
By: HARRY PEDERSON

TEACHERS TRAINING COLLEGE AUDITORIUM
OAKES FIELD
'ffLU ,DA1'h /JiArJ 'J .A 'L


ADMISSION $2.00


FINAL PFOGRAMME IN 1974 AUDUBON SERIES!
\ll proraimmes pers. nall) preentrrit by Nutional Audubon sPsrkers in coope
lHahl. masi NA.tinlrr Iru-it


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NASSAU


CHILDREN $100


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TEL: 2-8333


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exppi,,-r, rx ,ot 0im ANDO
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THIS WEEK!


I


1 111 11 I I I


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TOWN and AROUND^


1


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(hir Ulrilnuir


L-


d
1


ft II-V I/%II


~Uc -411~c~c
~=c
C~


r;;irL,


ats,
--*u
1







Wednesday, March 13, 1974


hbe grtbunte


~4er
,I.


TO FAMILY*SIZED SAVINGS ON


FINE FOODS


MEATS
FISH


POULTRY
IN10 LB.
CONTAINERS


-HOMEOWNERS . BUY WHOLESALE
SPECIALS FOR THIS WEEKEND


10 bs. AMERICAN PORK CHOPS $12.50


- '10.40


N Fresh Bahamian Seafoods
SBAHAMIAN SKINNED CONCH
SHIMP 3.00per lb. (Mir


CRSCO $1.50
3 LBS. TIN $1.50


nvys TROPICAL PUNCH


IE CHEER


($1.25 per Ib.)

($1.04 per Ib)
85e per Ib.


S1.10per lb.
nimum Order 3 Ibs.)


MADEIRA FOOD STORE
PHONE 24524 P. 0. BOX 6143


46 OZ.


75C


(GIANT) $1.00


CNOX 2 POWDER BLEACH


HALTINE


iTn APPLE JUICE

MSEALE PEAS


TRP LUNCHEON MEAT


80C


80Z 70C


(32 OZS.:


ORANGES


U.S. PORK CHOPS

Libby'
Libby>
Libbgi
DELICIOUS
FR U


Bags $1.00


Ib. $1.40


90C


303 35C

12ozs. 65C


SMEDLEY'S CELERY


HEARTS No 2


SMEDLEY'S BUTTER BEANS 15 oz
JEWEL SHORTENING 3 Ibs
CITADEL CORNED BEEF 12 oz.


I LIPTON'S TEA BAGS 100's $1.36
mmmm mm mm mmmmm mmm mmm m


SHIRLEY STREET


U.. CHOICE
MUCK ROAST Ib. $1.39
U.. CHOICE
MiCK STEAK Ib. $1.59
FRESH
V UP FRYERS lb. 95C

tWIPl MINI DIRN Ih ROA


mini n niwv


IU. VVu


PALMOLIVE LIQUID
22 oz. 86c _


LIBBY'S
TOMATO
CATCHUP
20 oz.
69c


GROUND BEEF Ib.


A GREAT COMBINATION!
A-ntA=nt.-
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SYRUP COUITE
32 uz. 1b. PKQ.
1.34 47 a


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OPEN 'TIL 4 P.M. SATURDAYS!


10 Ibn. NEW ZEALAND
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CANADIAN BOLOGNA


65c
26c


$1.35
$1.19


_ ..


_ __ ~ _-_


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S1.39


i
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E











Wednesday,' March 13, 1974.


Malone-Pinder wedding
THE WEDDING of Miss Eleanor Pinder and Mr. Curtis'
Malone was solemnized at Ebenezer Methodist Church onv
February 7 and the ceremony was performed by the Rev.'
Dennis Magnus.
The bride given in marriage by her father Mr. Percival:,
Pinder was attended by her sister, Mrs. Norma Howard and,'
a cousin Mrs. Loree Sands. MissaChrisanne Aston, a niece of
the groom was flower girl. /' -
The bridal gown of Candlelight Peace Satin with chapel '
train and matching headpiece with cathedral veil was an
original of the House of Bianchi. The attendants gowns
were of royal blue French velvet and were designed and
made by the mother of the bride, Mrs. Evelyn Pinder. The
bride carried a bouquet of yellow roses and the bridesmaids ,
bouquets were of matching yellow carnations.
Capt. Richard Weichbrodt, brother-in-law of the groom
was best man and Mr. Andy Key was groomsman.
The bride's mother wore a gown of turquoise silk
shantung with matching orchid corsage and silver
accessories. The groom's mother wore a gown of petal pink
silk with matching orchid corsage and silver accessories.
The organist for the ceremony was Mr. George
McCartney.
The reception immediately following the ceremony was
held in the La Chandelle Room of the Halcyon Balmoral
Hotel. A toast to the bride and groom was proposed by Mr.
Donald Pritchard to which the groom responded and a toast
to the bridesmaids was proposed by Capt. Richard
Weichbrodt.
Out of town guests included:- Mr. and Mrs. Peter Aston
and Miss April Anne Aston of Freeport, Grand Bahama. Mr.
Marc Vincent of Freeport, Grand Bahama. Mr. and Mrs.
Leroy Weichbrodt of Miami, Florida, and Mrs. Gwendoline
Clarke of Great Britain.


Centreville Food Market
6tn TERR AC E AST PHONE 58106 P. O. Box 5714

STORE HOURS ',I, iThursday 8 a.m. 8:30p.m. Friday and Saturday 8a.m. 9p.m.
Sunday 8 a.m. 10 a.m.


She swashes like



Errol on



troubled waters


PlIVL1. LOV I l.



(IF IT WAS TAKEN BY TOOGOODS'!)




on the water froit i t ,, & .I i Sts.


planning agencies in the West,
and, indeed, they are based on
somewhat inconclusive and
erratic reports from behind the
Iron Curtain.
Mainly because of this, there
is no great enthusiasm for the
method by recognized
population experts. The
International Planned
Parenthood Federation sa.
cautiously "We know nothing
about it The Family Planning
Association are even more
blunt. "We certainly wouldn't
recommend it to anybody,"
says their spokesman.
Even astrologers in this
.country are cautious about the
claims.


At present immersed in all *
concepts of fashion while
living in Britain, her current
preoccupation is with the
weather: "The climate is the
one thing that distresses me
about England."
By'this time her strumming
had reached a whining
crescendo. "Do you like it?
This is my favorite song." she
said, "it's called the
After-School Twist."
We started with the
photography session.
rejecting several' pleas for the
guitar to appear in the
picture, and explaining that
this was not the mood that
we wished to convey.
"But Dorothy Lamour had
one," we were told. One felt
that one's knowledge of 40s
film stars had been
sufficiently enriched.
Afterwards, as she posed in
front of a mirror, primping
her shingled hair and
smoothing the front of her
blouse, she was asked it we
can expect to see her
pursuing the family tre id on
to the silver screen?
"Oh no," she said throwing
up her hands in horror. "I'd
rather watch it any day."
Then unplugging her guitar
from its amplifier. "Love and
peace brethren," she cried as
she skipped from the room.
Her head reappeared in the
doorway. "Sincerely she
added.


Nowthere's a
Howard Johnson's Motor LWOWO
Just 60 seconds fom
Wait Disney World. '
So from now on, no one's going to get your fannily t
:in\ closer to the mouse than we can. And we'vegot t
Sr.h thing Heated pool. Separate children'spool & 6
playground (children under 12 free in parent's roon). ,.
I'utting.green. Shuffleboard. Complete game &
billiards room. Cocktail lounge. Restaurant. Color TV,
double beds & double vanities in every room. ti
Beautifully landscaped courtyards & fountains, .
Free parking. Transportation available to andfrom r
\Valt Disney World. Plus we're close to the Kennedy.
Space Center. Cypress Gardens. Daytona Beach.
Seaworld. And Tampa's Busch Gardens.
For reservations call your travel agent, oryotar .v
nearest Howard Johnson's Motor Lodge. .
I toward Johnson's Motor Lodge-Main Gate Disney World
S.S. 192 & S.R. 545 (1 mile west of Walt Disney
world d Entrance). Kissimmee. Fla. Phone (305)
S46-3500. Robert Alwine, General Manager.
DI)e eloped & operated by Continental Services Cotlpoib l,
Miami, Florida. Charles Schlakman, Executive Vice Ptlesltt
operations Phone (305) 445-2493. A


LONDON Miss Amella
Flynn would seem to have
inherited much of her father's
swashbuckling combustion.
On her arrival at the
photographer's studio, she
leapt through the doorway
and with one bound she was
at my side.
Trifling obstacles such as
chairs and small coffee tables
did little o impede her
relentless progress, she simply
launched herself ,ver them.
"Do you remember
Yvonne de Carlo in all those
1940s pirate movies?" she
said, pausing only briefly to
plug her guitar in to a handy
amplifier.
"Wasn't she divine -
always swinging from one
ship to another."
She strummed tunelessly as
we talked. Tall, verbose and
angular. 21-year-old Miss
Flynn is, paradoxically,
nothing if not demure.
"I do believe in women's
lib," she confided, "but I
don't go as far as burning my
bra ... and I still think men
are yummy."
The daughter of film star
Errol and screen actress
Patrice Wymore, she was born
in Rome, schooled in Los,
Angeles and lived in Spain on
her father's yacht before
moving to Jamaica where her
father had purchased a
2,000-acre plantation in
anticipation of his intended
retirement

Can a

girl

thank

her lucky

stars?

LONDON An unusual
method of contraception is
catching on astrological birth
control, known by its critics as
Zodiac roulette.
Like the traditional safe
period method, it depends on
calculating and avoiding fertile
periods.
But unlike the normal
rhythm method, these fertile
periods are calculated by the
movement of heavenly bodies.
Quite how many couples
practise this cosmic rhythm
method is not known, but
estimates suggest there may be
several thousand in America.
In Britain, it is still limited
to scores rather than
hundreds of people, but it
already has its enthusiastic
proponents. One girl who has
successfully used it for two
years explains: "It works, and
it avoids all the heavy bit of
the pill. Mind you, I'm not sure
why it works."
The principle is simple.
Women who wish to use the
cosmic rhythm method must
find out what was the angle
between the sun and the moon
at the hour of their birth. (A
booklet is now available in
some underground bookshops
which has relatively easy
charts.)
Each lunar month, the moon
moves into the same angle: this
is the peak fertility moment
that must be avoided. For
example a woman born at 8
p.m. on March 28, 1944 had a
peal' fertility hour at 4 p.m. on
Ftoruary 27.
Some very convincing
figures are claimed for the
astrological method. Based on
research by a Czech and a
Hungarian doctor, practitioners
claim the astrological method
gives a 15 per cent chance of
pregnancy.
One snag about these figures
is that they have not been
recognized by any family


hP rir*tbutt


NOW IN



ELECTRIC FOOT & HAND O IEkATED


Cor. Christie & Dowdeswell Sts. Phone 2-1197


EASTER SPECIAL


II _. I I I I I I I I I I II I


----- --------- ------- ------ .__... ,


iw RE





Wednesday, March 13, 1974
. ..... .. .....


Z h Gribunr


,4NERE SH73^


H


HATCHET BAY
WHITE MILK


GALLON


TC


i


H


HATCHET BAY
WHITE MILK


HATCHET BAY
ICE CREAM


/2 GALLON


I


LUE


4W


Wo HATCHET BAY
EXTRA LARGE EGGS

UN 3io


i HATCHET BAY
Wml T CHOCOLATE MILK

1/2 GALLON



S GLADSTONE
OL FARM
M i WHOLE FRYERS

L56


JUST FOR


ou


W-D GROUND BEEF

PURE GROUNDiEEF


LB.


r HATCHET BAY
ROASTING CHICKENS

LI.


WINDSOR BACON


W-D SMOKED


PICNIC HAMS


LB.


A


LB.


FULL CUT ROUND STEAK


W.O ALL MAT OR
DINNER FRANKS


CUT UP FRYERS


LB.


I,


LO.


SIRLOIN TIP ROAST

Lis


TBONE AND
PORTERHOUSE STAK.......L. 2.19


ROUND ROAST .............. 2.19
SIRLOIN STEAK .................. 2.69


FRYER QUARTERS

LB.


VI


I


Slv


I


F--


Ail


A.****r
d
ed


'8:?5~-~ 2


-Mim


LB.


,VPc--- ,.
N ew
rrr InrnBH wnBBa l


I






Wednesday, March 13, 1974. ~JIw ~rtInuw .7


TAY


40U PKI .
TIDE lIANT SIZE
BETERGENT


s^e


PRIES 00 THURSAT mAIC 14.


MAR H 17,1974.


TOMATOES
LB.


BYE THE SEA
HlCNK LIGHT TUNA

6 -82.
6'S


BAG
ORANGES BAG 1.39 10LB. UA
COJ MIBERS ..........4 FOR .9 POTATO
CELERY ...... ..................... GA REEI


DONALD DUCK
GRAPEFRUIT JUICE


GIANT PEAS


HALF
GALLON


A


APPLES


TOES........ ............. 1.89
SPEPPERS ...............5 FOR N


$


SOUTHERN BISCUIT
FLOUR

LB.8
hh o


SUBBYS YELLOW CLIMU
SLICES OR VALVES
~n


SUPERBAUND
AMERICAN SABNWICH
SLICED CHEESE 7
SAMERICAN LB.


1 -LB. BLUE BONNET
1It FAMILY BOWL
4 BLUE SOFT NARlARINE


(C


303
CAMS


B AND B TOMATO PASTE


,..j-r'


LB.


CHEF BOY ARN EE
PEPPERONI PIZZA


I oz.I(
13 %-0Z.
PK8.


SOTOMERS POP cOR


SPRY CRISP ANm BTD
PURE VEGETABLE SNORTf. JA


32-0o.
BOTTLE


S


I


CREST REU LAR G MINT
TOOTHPASTE
3-OZ.

LAME


o i

Ir -
^^^ySI QQ^~aB
ilbJ r IZ9 r


MORTONS APPLE PIE


PL I
a2oz,
PKG.,


mRBS EvE 11 lo. MTS CHICKEN ANo tURKEY
El VEiETABLES ......... R TV BINE RS........................


MAIET ASSON


24.OZ. DXIANA
.76 BLACKEYE PEAS ........


KIIT.
PIUS.


NIET WT ,U/'-Li "j


S
LI.
uAs


SI
)IRANMS


lit I


Cahu QJ;t~buttP


Wednesday, March 13, 1974.


7


6 Morton fritpe


nl''1


'j
.i .;


e5
Ir


'e


N* 0


r3s


I*








Wednesday


8

TOMATO

TIME AT

EXCHANGE
IF YOU WANT to go ( on a
toitomato hinge or on a dit. no
is the time since the' Potter's
Cay Produce I \change is
catering to the most particular
tomato fancier
Price.,s are good too and with
the cost of pri.tict lly
every thing nitiitnltinI at a
fantastic rate, toitat es a!e a
good hbu. The\ arle igd Oi
the pocket book, go, d to th
taste buds and verC ktilt t o ti h
waistline
Try these tomato trccipes to
save on the family ihldgt and


-


- am


o7


I- -


SPECIALS FOR THE WEEK MARCH 14th, THROUGH MARCH 17th, 1974.


bringten up the meal
**,*****
This tomato salad st.tts with
cooking the vegetables Broll
six tomatoes, two greenI and
two red peppers until the skins
begin to shrivel and turn
brown. Peel, seed anld coutrscli
chop the tomatoes and peppers
and put them in a salad serving
bowl. Add a diced oniln, a
quarter ctp of olive oil. the
Jice (ti hall a lemon, and a
teaspin tt capers. ( oarsely
chop a tfew mint splits and the
salad (;arllish w ith slices
ot hard cooked eggs and Jull
thoroughly
Or. tfi anot)ti r s.itlad. petel
land thinly slice si\ tolimatoes
and three sweet 'n!l, ls ILa ci
a salad bowl wi:th I i natocs,
Sthern onions, thenl chpped
I parsley. Make a dressing of
" three-qtuattets cup hI\e ioil. a
quarter .up wirte \inegar and
salt and pepper: o1ss t he
dressing gentil ito, the salad
and chill
Here are tio tomato soup
recipes. Saute in a kettle a cup
)of diced n(ion, hlt a cup of
diced carrot. and qIuartti; ilup
ot diced celery in four
tahlespo >nis ot butter Peel s;\
tomatoes, coarsely chop Ithemr
arid add them to the kettle
witlh a tablespoon tolmato
paste, a teaspoon otI topped
garIc, a tcaspoti)on ) sail anld a
teaspoon ott suIgar. Add a
bouquet garntil made ot parsley
sprigs, thime sprigs anlld a b a
leaf I et the mict ure i me Iit ,
the boil user high heat. siirrlng
tccasionall'. Lo, iet the heat
and simmncr, ci.oered. i f, 20
min the's. Stain it thiotI, gh a
sieve into anlolthet kettle
rubbing as much ,tf the solids
through as possible. \-Add four
cups of chicken ,stock and
ti er tor 10 t nt iti s Pus i
tile soip Into bo \ s 1 i!d
garnish with cht popped dill,
til\ves 1 t11111
Add iIL. l iiLheris for
\ iat liti In ,I I ii't p.in ,
ciM ittlblt. ll0 tie c pe.Cltdt arid
chopped ()tom atioes ta"di three
cuips chicken stoi .k Irtn to a
Ih, l b antit sc i l iiii i




sugar, and a pinciI ii iii
tiiio l teasp. I i l h1 1i'i i \, hl
rI hb teal pl i ns in lt' I t il ih :1
soup. Sindiuanei ( Pr I lu d tin ,,
and % eimit e ( tt 'il. It h k'm! .i \dd
ha,11t1 1tcasp(wm i,. "iAl d!111d






csiup wedlld and sers iI ,ni cli
t\% (I tch as m p i i Ii cll l t l

stud hlik h i l esi ( i tht s l li Is
nion etcirht t tiatitesi cia. uit

daint in a t tow i
l cie. i lir iers | i i t .1
i I illt pi t PCt'rli j t lip






Sres11is Ae oi l tt 1 i \
lated tos i tl iles i t his )Ip
reser etl oil In d i l I Jd
w llitil in i iire ll







each w itli lit le ti hiciu l initI
atid li tle o l th e t ser 1' ..i i
,uld place (lie tomatoes In l,
dish Btake 7 dal i .ces,,i
luia ant ioir hetoiu re sr iti'r.
s['rinkle thI e to h ia es is h i
chopped paiste ior Iticit 1 Itici
ear be served oi i
Try this slad si i tthe added
spark ol gitnge r c n a sad
bowl, com Ie l t i peeled
seeded anti itt lis stl ie it
tomatoes with a titrt (liPC
union separated nit r tips It
another bowtd mii\ke the


dressing. Coll1mbine the iluice of
a lemon, qa quarter Ies'pootn
ground ginger and salt and
pepper to taste Pour the
dressing over the tomatoes and
onion and toss well (Iarnish
with green pepper. ('hill
Page 9 Col. 8


II, II
U.. H O~f fi HICE 125ji

CHUCKlllilllil lb-- r


U.S. CHOICE

RIR.STEAK

U.S. CHOICE

GROUND CHUCK

DANISH CHOICE

SLAB BACON


SALT PORK


PER LB


PER LB


PER LB


PER LB


*2.39


'1.49


'1.09


.590


I n

6199

w w a















C. B. A


TEXAS RED
EPA DDIrTC


1 /1A A


MCKENZIE MIXED

VEGETABLES


VMKIIU I 1-LB / CHEF CHOICE FRENCH
RED DELICIOUS I CUT POTATOES

APPLES 6s 1.s PBIRDSEYE

CALIFORNIA ORANGE JUICE
LEMONS FANCY 5/590 BANQUET

t APPLE PIES
i i


24-OZ


850


K14


wNWW


w W wW


S. S
qwl4I


2-LB 85C


6-OZ 2/79


20-OZ 750


l II wq ". -


HOMO'~i MILK 1.\ Gall 019 ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^-BB^B
AL RAD



LARGEEGG S DOZE 'Nr~lrl:Ir


l~~~~~lr~


HAWA~~IIANCTU


PUCH46oz


I __I~~_ _.:---~u,r ---Y- --~--- --C1- Y--l -t~L1_:~~_^i I~r^~;---L1~ ---L~~-~~---~~-Ci_v-c~at~~ -I_~,,,,_ ., _~'~t~YPYIIIII~----~~---LIL-


i


r


I


OIhp lribhnP


m


I







aM r 13, 1974.


I


01 Cl


I ALL STORES NOW OPEN ON
I SUNDAY...INCLUDING OUR

I MACKEY&MADEIRA STREET
m STORE, 7:A.M.-10: A.M.


w iw 'ow
MOGA



RC

$ 1 *79




PEPSI-COL


KAKN

SLICED BACON


KAHN 8-oz.

COTTO SALAMI


KAHN ALL MEAT

WIENERS

KAHN PURE BEEF

WIENERS


1-lb.


1-lb.


KRAFT
FRENCH DRESSING
S BOUNTY
TWELS ASSORTED
O.C.

POTATO STICKS
SUNSWEET
i PRUNE JUICE


NABISCO
VANILLA WAFERS
T YORK
PEANUT BUTTER


PHILADELPHIA
CREAM CHEESE soz
PILLSBURY CRESCENT
DiMIER ROLLS 8.oZ
KRAFT
CHEESE WHIZ 8oz
SUNNY DELITE
ORANGE DRINK 64OZ


1-Ib.169


.89


a1.49


$1.49


16-OZ


1 ROLL


l/2-OZ


40-OZ


74-OZ


9-OZ


.59C 4


3A49C


1.09


p~w~ ~ ,w w w w


.59C w'


.69C _i_
I~nLs~


3/69C


590


$1.09


$1.09


THE
BAHAMIAN
SUPERMARKETS
If it's value you really want,
you really want SuperValuel


I m


S price plunging
AT EXCHANGE
From Page X
Try lasagne with this spicy
tonmaltoh sauce I Irtwo diced
slices of bacon in a saucepan in
halt a cup ol ol,.li' oil for two
nlinutes .\dd a chopped onion.
a chopped carrot and a clove of
garlic Cook until the
vegetables arc golden. )iscard
the garlic clo\e Peel nine
tomatoes and chop them. Add
to the pot with three sprigs of
parsley. a sprig of thynie and a
bha leaf. Simmer. covered
stirring often for half an hour.
Press through a sieve into a
saucepan and simmer
uncovered stirnng often for 40
minutes.
this is another sauce for
pasta. Heat a quarter cup each
of butter and olive oil in a large
saucepan. In it saute a minced
onion, minced garlic clove,
minced carrot, a minced stalk
of celery, and a good pinch of
basil. Cook until the vegetables
are soft. Add a dozen peeled
and chopped tomatoes, a pinch
of sugar, salt and pepper.
Siniiiiici ,coered o\ei low heat


KL


IT


In mI


FU


0*I





_ ~


-I FAl] ICHM1EA I


I^WIENERS


r -r I-


r


i


I


BAHAMIN GROW

WHOL FRYRS Pr lb .69


I FR M ORGOEY HLE


TXS
COfRNE BE


*12-o7


I DA R Y EfL GTS jH


* WHY THE
GOLD
RUSH?
Bv Jim Alberse
LOTS of investors,
especially those who worry
about the short term, have
concluded lately that most
major currencies will lose much
of their purchasing power in
the months ahead. That
conclusion has set off a
55orldwk ide stampede among
certain t\ pes to buy tangible
commodities of all kinds:
copper, silver, sugar, even
pota I ocs
\loIst oI all. the nervous ones'
aret bluing gold. which still
lcIaI a nil stical s, inbol of
eternal \.luie Reacting to
demand. thlie price of gold
r,,.,ket.l il, SIi,-s 5 O per trox
olurice I, week. More than
) double tile quote of a year ago.
In j couple of wa"\ the gold
S ush is ai pairadlo I o begin
Switch. leaps in the gold price.
used to reflect doubts about
thie worth 1 the dollar but
h I ie doll.iir price in foreign
cllir. c. sics has gecnerall\ been
imihing r tlhe past several
i llonths
S Secondl ithe values of most
maisiror crnncies are no longer
lonr all i ied to gold. Ihe
S ex i pla i! nalu of seeming
parad-'. \\ oild c s m to be that
i Cestois re diClsturbed by
ti ,ecast- tlihat inflatiorI will
aser.ge close to e( in the U.S.
this year,. between 10'' and
15' in I iirope, and as much as
S 01 in Jiapn Ihat means that
paper roeirnicies will buy
steadily fcwer goods and
Services. no matter what the
price at which the\ can be
Sexchanged lor one another.
iBuiti er. o! cold apparently hope
S thIl \ii n li Ili papermoney
storm is overt the\ will emerge
with theui investments intact in
bh\ ing ipo-' and mllabe a bit
inpvro, ed.
At all\' r.ite. -.tys IIlMlI
t i lgaiine'. gold is being
r purchased ividl h\b iist about
ailne v with asset, lo protect
corporationi. blinks. Arab oil
sheliks, oftlshiore mututial funds.
(Germranst, wmho iirii remember
the wall-paperi/ation of their
currency in Weimar years
and. ot tiorse, thle iarmners of
S France. Amncrican citienis are
part ol the rush. too. They
cannot legally buy gold bars,
hut they have always been
permitted to own gold coins.
Sales of British sovereigns.
Mexican 50-peso goldpieces
and cood old double eagles
itU.S. S20 gold pieces) are
booming In the past fornight
alone, double ealges traded in
N \e y gork lha\ gone from
S200 ipicce to nearly $300.
Sotte central bankers are
.showing renews ed interest in
Sold, too, although it is
t 1suppoI;d to b phasecd out of
lie w'c olid monet i r system.
)lSome" officials ihave suggested
tripling or quadrupling the
"official" price of gold held hb
government banks That action
might enable some nations to
exchange their gold for another
costly commodity, imported
oil. on a basis more realistic in
terms of relative n:market values.
Here are international rules
against such action., biut when
people in high places succumb
to panic, anything can happen
Whatever happens to the
oiticial price, trades ciai see
little thal might soon bring
down tile tree market price it
gold. Production in South
Atrica. wslhlicl miInes imiost ot
the world's gold. Iias been
declining iIn recently \ ears as
veins become played iout a
trend which has lielped keep
the price high (torntrary to
iti tl. hswev ci. gold
purchasing is not \sitihout risk.
'[he world supply available for
tradiing is st small that the
sudden sale io a few million
dollars' worth could send the








Wednesday, March 13, 1974.


GIh, (ribunm


NEW MAN AT
THE U.N.
LONDO\N hr Richard,
4 1- ear-old tormer Labour
legislator, haj been named
B r i t a in p it r i n e nt
represen tivc t o i.the I ited
Nations hb th. nc:w 1 abour
goerrini'it Prl :ne Minister
Harold Wi;si:
Hie repi.,- So IDon.iald
Maitland, a .,aretr dip'loat
and foner prcs-, chic: tor
I-d iard llc.ath. erati c
Prim \li istn .' !' i p r.i't
!,, t the Ie : ,n \t'>

Troica

'Extrintr


Salem


refreshes


naturally!
Natural Menthol is why.
So, ciin uit'iss i\ hnturil menth ol,
niot the irtitj alt kind That's vhs
Sai-,m nt.-,,r tasts harsh ir hot


Sal[m I


Extra
long


promoted

at

Cititrust
COLIN HONESS
SEVERAL recent promotions at First National City
Trust Company (Bahamas) Limited have been announced
by Peter H. Page, president & general manager.
Mr Colin G. Honess has been promoted from assistant
manager to senior assistant manager, in charge of the Trust
Company's operations Mr. Honess has been with Cititrust
since July. 1965. He resides in Blair Estates with his wife,
Be\erley, and two children.
Mr. Norman Macbeth III was named assistant manager
and is responsible for the investment advisory services
performed at the Trust Company. After graduating from
Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, Mr.
Macbeth joined First National City Bank in New York, and
was transferred to Cititrust in July, 1972.
Mrs. Carlis Chisholm has been promoted to official
assistant with responsibilities in the management of
personal investment companies. She is a graduate of the
Eastern Secondary S hool and Nassau Technical College,
and joined Cititrust in February, 1970. Mrs. Chisholm
resides in Kennedy Subdivision with her husband, Samuel
Chishol.n and son. Alexander.
One-man paintings show


ALTON Roland Lowe. called
bh one American painter the
Winslow Homer o tlhe
Bahamas. will give anothi r one
man show ot his paintings in
the Victoria Room of the
Sheraton British Colonial Hotel
from March 29th through \pril
Before the show is opened
to the public a private showing
will be given in I he Victoria
Room at S p.m. on March 29.
the public showings are open
from 1 1 a.m. to 9 p.m. from
March 30.
This will be Mr lowe's fifth
exhibition after cor!mpleting his
studies under Michiael Aviano
and the late Frank Rcilly ol
New York.
A native of New Plymouth.
Abaco, his extensive avels


have taken him through many
ot the picturesque villages of
the Family Islands, allowing
him time to sketch, paint and
know the peoples of his
homeland. In this year's
exhibition Mr. Lowe has
portrayed on canvas many of
the beautiful and historical
scenes of Abaco and Eleuthera
as well as other islands of the
Bahamas.
The day after his exhibition
opened last year Mr. Lowe
received a congratulatory
telegram from Jack Gray. the
noted American painter of
marine scenes. Said Mr. Gray
"You are the best painter of
the island life since Homer
(Winslow). Better, because you
were born there and really
know it sincerely."


BUTTON PRESENTATION
GIRL (UIDIIS (Commissioner Mrs. Robert
Vaughan-Cox (right from lngland and on a tour
of the (aribbean was presented with a
camp-site button Monday by local Guides
Commissioner, Mrs. ('lrice Granger. The
presentation was made at the West Bay Street Girl
Guides Headqluarters following na tea party held in
her honour.
Some guides and their leaders are shown in
background.


Admircsl.


S0









2o










30


Imperial 3-Door Duplexk


Three Doors To The Ultimate
in Convenience
See it at your Admiral dealer's showroom


New easy-access
UPPER FREEZER


Separate large
STORAGE FREEZER


Big capacity REFRIGERATOR


TAYLOR INDUSTRIES LIMITED
111 SHIRLEY STREET TELEPHONE 2-8941/5 P.O. BOX N4806


HARDING' S FOOD


P.O. Box 5290 ES


FRESH MUTTON


DANISH SPARE RIBS


MAPLE LEAF WIENERS


BEEF LIVER


FRESH PORK


SHEEP TONGUE


DANISH BACON


Phone 2-3


Ib. $1.10


Ib. 89C


lb. $1.00


Ib. 89C


Ib. $1.15


Ib. 700


MARKET 'WATER MAID RICE 5 Ibs $1.99
M CAMPBELL'S VEGETABLE SOUP 4 tins 99c
1067 ROBIN HOOD FLOUR 5 Ibs. $1.15
u .-_I BLEACH (gallon) 99c
JEWEL SHORTENING 3 lb. tin $1.35
| ICOKE 5 tins 99c
SHATUEY MALT TONIC (6 bottles) $1.49
| ,H POTATOES 5 Ibs. 99c
ARMOUR CORNED BEEF 12 oz $1.25
Im m---- m- mm m--- m .


I
LEAN STEWING BEEF Ib. $1.50


PORK CHOPS Ib. $1.29'


PIG'S FEET lb. 35C


b. $1.50
1


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KENTUCKY
SPRINGS
HOTEL
DINING AND
COCKTAIL LOUNGE


a


Located on Fowler Street
South. 27 modern
air-conditioned rooms
with private bath. Special
room rates $8.50, $10.50,
$12.50 per day.
Specializing in a variety of L
native dishes ... come and EDD BURROWS
dine lunch, dinner or
have a drink in our PROP/MGR.
modern cocktail lounge.
HAPPY HOUR EVERY WEDNESDAY FROM 7 -8
P.M. DRINKS ARE REDUCED! HOURS: FROM
11 A.M. 2 A. M. PHONE 28302 or 36458.


IU I I I


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r


i






Wednesday, March 13, 1974.


Qho bi ribune


ual it...AsYou Like It Best

,BUYAND SUPPORT BAHAMIAN PRODUCTS! *'"


U.S. CHOICE

MEAT SPECIALS
TUUP MINI


SPARE


RIBS


GROCERY SPECIALS


48 oz.
OLIVANO
COOKING
OIL
$1.99


0 20 oz. l10oz. 10oI
SAWYERS CHAMPION MAXW
WHOLE TOMATO HOU!
TOMATOES PASTE COFF
2/.890 2/.69C $1.0


DAIRY


GOLDEN ISLES
MLK GALLON


$1.89


FROZEN FOOD 1


BIRDSEYE 10 oz.
BLACKEYE PEAS


2/


PRODUCE
S lb.PKG.
DIAMOND WALNUTS .790
0 CABBAGE 3lb.AVG.EACH .690


POTATOES10 LB. BAG $1.55

WITH VEGETABLE SAUCE
Ingredients:
1 pound lean gl)ound meat
1/2 cLup finely chopped onions
1/2 cup hine fresh bread crumbs
1/2 teaspoon each garlic salt and olremano
1 teaspoon salt
I tablespoon Worcester shire sauce
S egg, beaten
I (an (10-3/4 ounce) condensed
oc~am of celery soup
Scall (b ounces) stewed tomatoes
/12 cup beet broth
I pdakaie ( 10 ouice) frozen peas and i ( l(ts
i (ups hot cooked rice
Directions:
Combine qroLiund miat. onions., behiad cil mbis. s iIsonis.
Worcestershi e same and egg. Mix well. Folir into six paitt's about
one-half inch thick Place in lightly gieased shallow two quart
cassrole. Bake 15 minutes at 450 degrees. Blend soup. tomatoes
and broth. Pobur over meat patties. Sprinkle with peas and
carrots. Cover. redu e the heat to 350 degrees, andd continue baking
for 30 minutes. Seive over beds of fluffy rice. Selves six, ea h
serving contains 319 (aloiies.


BUY BAHAMIAN!!!


1 -










Whr Tribuntt


Wednesday, March 13, 1974.


Deoanabb





Let sleeping dogs lie


SO you wonI t
.,'


(Yet


From Page 3
Saturday morning". However,
all the people who come down
from the country every
Saturday morning are not all
begging for alms. Some come
on the backs of donkeys with
their farm produce in a sort of
double basket (macoute) over
the back of the beasts.
Mrs. Cartwright feels that
her youth spent in Haiti was an
enrichening experience being


TOWN and 0ROUN


exposed to the Haitian/French
culture and way of life.
They are "very soft in
speaking", she said and
"whenever you enter a Haitian
home you kiss everybody".
One of her childhood
Haitian friends, Adee'e Goldine
now Farquharson married
Bahamian and lives in Nassau


bit


By Abigail Van Buren
c 1974 by ChKicag Tribune-N. Y. News Synd., Inc.
DEAR ABBY: I wrote to my hometown police station
in Illinois three months ago for some information and so
far I've had no reply.
I inquired about some trouble I was in when I was 15. I
am now 30 and a registered nurse, happily married with a
family, but for all these years I have wondered if I have a
record, or NOT.
I remember that I spent two days in jail, but I never
knew what the charges were. They took my picture and
gave me some tests. I was told I had a venereal disease,
but was never told which one.
It took a lot of guts on my part to write them as I
hated to familiarize anyone there with my past who didn't
already know about it. Also, some of my family still lives
there.
I recall being on probation for several months. I really
don't know what I did besides having intercourse with my
boy friend. I didn't know that was against the law!
Please tell me how I can get an answer to my question
as this bothers me WANTS TO KNOW
DEAR WANTS: If you're a happily married registered
nurse with a family, why dig around in 15-year-old records
to unearth that which hasn't given you any trouble since? If
you're not satisfied to let sleeping dogs lie, have an Illinois
attorney investigate it for yo:!.
DEAR ABBY: Please settle a disagreement between
another woman and me. She insists that there is no such
thing as a platonic relationship between a man and a
woman. She says that given time and the right set of
circumstances a man and woman are bound to end up in a
sexual relationship I say she's wrong What do you say?
BESS
DEAR BESS: I say that any woman who subscribes to
this theory is admitting that she is incapable of holding the
interest of a man without bringing sex into it.
DEAR ABBY Help' We have an argument' We have
the only phone in a rural area. Naturally, we allow our
neighbors to make occasional calls on our phone
A neighbor, who is of foreign extraction, came over and
asked to use our phone to call her husband. She spoke to
him in her native tongue. I had another neighbor here
visiting me at the time.
After the caller left, the visiting neighbor said she
thought it was rude of the caller to speak in a foreign
tongue.
I maintained what she said was none of our business.
Who is right? CHIMACUM, WASHINGTON
DEAR CHIM: You were! IP.S. I hope you didn't tell
your visitor anything you didn't want repeated. She sounds
like a busybody.)
CONFIDENTIAL TO "ENGAGED TO A SAILOR FOR
ELEVEN YEARS": You are not "engaged," Sister. You
are permanently in drydock.

Problems? You'll feel better if you get it off your chest.
For a personal reply, write to ABBY: Box No. 69700. L. A..
Calif. 99969. Enclose stamped, self-addressed envelope,
please.

For Abby's booklet, "How to Have a Lovely Wedding,"
send 1 to Abigail Van Buren, 132 Lasky Dr., Beverly Hills,
Cal. 99212.
Hate to write letters? Send $1 to Abigail Van Buren,
132 Lasky Dr., Beverly Hills, Cal. M212, for Abby's booklet,
"How to Write Letters for All Occasions."

" , ,


A RRI VI 1()1)A'I
Bermuda. (; rand lurk trnnI
M It 1r t I J in it r min

SAI II) 1I()1) \' trri
i tirk. J iiia Bti ri ii ftIi

ARRIV1\(,10 l'I()R KKR
I ropic Il l r Inulm ,, mi-l l',ilii
Bicdh.
S.\ILIN(; I()M()Rk()
Bahaimr.i Star. I mi .liltl S is.
taviaa (tor Miamii
TIDES:
lii.h 12 0 p i
is( 1i 04 .i [ii i l (1i
p) ii.


WEATHER:

nintt nth-nrth-wesI rl 12 t 22
ii I' h.i
W Ml l \IIII R: la-n r toI Iht

lI orro w w ith isolh tt.'d
\lio w a's Ikli.l\


SUN:
R c',s I I 2 l i
S..'ts (, I p in.
MOON:

'sits 10 32 Ill


BARBARA LIGHTBOURNE, music freshman at Luther
College, Iowa, experiences snow for the first time.


to-day.
Mrs. Cartwright's father's
move to Haiti has not only
affected her choice of career.
lHer brother Robert, who was
also schooled in Ilaiti, served as
an interpreter on General
I isenhowers staff in France
during the second World War.
She has four brothers and
i5o sisters and although this is
MI,. Vera Valencia Cart-
m\iht's story tw\o brothers,
irsides Robert. will surely be
,f interest to To\wn readers.
Brother Percy Fod is on
1li Irihune staft anld his been
l, 40 years,
anotherr brother is T Joe.
I'.P I' represeintfidiv' in the
IiHouse of Parlianii'nt toi Inagua
,ind May agIIuaon and (Cihairnian
IIt Bahamas 'Teil c'omninica-
tinis C(orpora'iion. S,. in a
A.i\ even "I'. Jor is 111i
"i ul inltil nications".
\ nephew l Mrs.
(';rtwright is Wenty Iord the
niailtr league pro hiscball
pla% er,
Mrs. (artwright is the
muirthetl of tour ilildrcin.
Kendolyn ( 251 is I,.a lrartc
Evelyn ("Evie") 23 is .
Lt.ichelir. Michael iI 1 is
dr,.iolhtsman and litllt .rutl ptlcd
daughter Lisa is six.
\rs. Cartwright's ib .is ian
IntTrpretcr is a tail r ii'L'enit
ritne It began in IlQ'7 wh ien sihe
\ass t'griinally attaclicd to the
Immiit-ation Departiuniit.
Before that (and indeed still
twhen she can find the tinim)
she was a shaker extliardinir t'.
Sih baked and declr,.iati caker
t"! weddingss aind ininel\CrsAiit's


SHERMAN STEVENS ...
success in journalism course.

There will be many who will
recall the results of this
creativity. Mrs. Cartwright
would first find out the hobby
or special interest of the person
for whom the cake was to be
baked. For example for a
contractor she made a cake in
the form of a house in the final
stages of construction. A flat
cake with chocolate frosting
formed the foundations of the
lionse. \ cake o" top of this in
white frosting formed the
house. wafers the roof shingles,
candles tor street lights, square
candies as the walkway, a
white picket fence surrounding
the property with trees on one
side and piles of cement and
sand (brown and white sugar)
on the other.
Mrs. Cartwright is also active
in her Church St. Mary's.
Ilere she is President of the
\.C .W. and she also helps with
the Red Cross Fair as readers
will surcl guess, she is in


.
. -y
'.* ^ <",-' 4,

CATHERINE M. Patton ...
off to school.

charge of the cake stall.
************
Mrs. Anatole Kodgers,
Headmistress of Government
High School, is justifiably
proud of her students, in
particular her fifth form who
unaided and under the
chairmanship of Miss Jennifer
Knowles, 1st runner up in last
year's Miss Nassau High
School, organised their own
Beauty Pageant on Saturday in
the Auditorium of the school.
The hall was full for the
event and the programme went
off smoothly. There were the
usual few hecklers during the
talent show but Mrs. Rodgers
told me that all the girls
remained "very poised and
dignified" throughout and
showed "no hesitancy in
answering questions" to which
they all "gave sensible
answers."
The Queen, Melinda
Hepburn, Miss Morning Glory,


received a floating trophy
presented by Mrs. Rodgers on
behalf of the Prime Minister.
(See picture page 3)1

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald E.
Malone celebrated their 50th
wedding anniversary at the
Nassau Yacht Club last
Wednesday with the aid of
family and friends.
The toast was given by Mr.
Donald d'Albenas, former
Member of Parliament, who
was in Nassau on a short visit
from Canada where he has
retired.
Guests also celebrated Mr.
Malone's birthday; he was 74
on March 6th.
Mr. Malone of Hope
Town, Abaco has been in
Government Service for most
of his life. He was Chief Out
Island Commissioner when he
retired in 1955 and currently is
working part-time as Registrar
of Births and. Deaths. Mrs.
Malone is the former Una Higgs
of Spanish Wells.
Present at the celebration
were several members of the
family who flew in from
abroad. Mt. Malone's brother,
Durwood, arrived from Key
West, and his two sons, Ronnie
and Pat, arrived from Toronto
and Freeport respectively.
Rev. Peter Swinglehurst of
Trinity Methodist Church gave
the invocation.

Rev. James C. Maclan Jack,
Minister of the Kirk in Nassau
from 1961 to 1970 is now the
Minister of the historic Church
of St. Andrew's, Melbourne,
Quebec. Rev. Jack has also
been elected Moderator of the

Page 13, Col. 2


Planned Savings


with the Commerce.Together


we'll make beautiful things happen.


There's always something beautiful
worth saving for. The day you become
engaged, for example. Whatever the occasion,
you'll find that Planned Savings can work for
you.
Each payday, why not put part of what you
earn into a Commerce Savings Account?


Soon, you'll have saved the money you need
for that special occasion. We help your
money grow by adding interest regularly.
That's why we say, "You and the Commerce.
Together we're both stronger".





1(>
CANADIAN IMPERIAL
BANK OF COMMERCE


You and the Commerce.

Together we're both stronger.


WHY?
Why Is It th,)t ,rily five out ofevery
orte htundlred young men and
womarn g(et what they really want
out of Ilfe' Why do some people
move ,in happriess and relaxation
Sfromrr one successful venture to
Why do some people sIern) to find nothing but frustration
and failure?
World famous Author of Psycho-Cybernetics, DR.
MAXWELL MALTZ ha' the answers and he will be
bringing them to you in NASSAU
DR. MALTZ is world renowned as Author, Lecturer, Plastic
Surgeon, Playwright and H-umaritiaran. His famous book,
Psycho-Cybernetics, has sold over Thirteen Million copies. He
has helped millions of people throughout the world
accomplish success and self-fulfilrnrent in April he will be
taking time out of his busy schedule to share his knowledge
with the people of the BAHAMAS
SHe will be conducting a dynamic two evening seminar at tha
Polaris Hall, Holiday Inn, Paradise Island, from 6 p.m. to
10:30 p.m., on April 1st and 2nd. Seats $20.00 for adults
and a special price of $6.00 for students. Proceeds are to be
donated to educational charity for construction of Central
SAndros High School.
PHONE 2-1500/1/2 FOR FULL DETAILS.
Under the distinguished patronage of the Hon. DarreJ-Rolle,
Minister of Home Affairs.
If you have ever asked WHY?
This will be a very important event in your life.
TIt til Ie II veyiprateen nyu


___ _~~ __


I


-" -I











Wednesday, March 13, 1974.


From Page 12


Jlhr ~ritruntn __


$20 freshman at L.uther C('ollege,
Pis, te el n ()i t u rDchcc h i)ecorah, Iowa. tier studies I
IheIe \elliccirne (Church is include French, history, opera
S thi, one derici te l 1 the back1 n workshop and physical she says. "I still have time to exposure to snow (see picture Mrs. Gladstone Patton of
&DcI ecer. ((anadian 2 bill, and education this semester, and make that decision". page 12). Dannottage Estates, is oft to
Piund9tide ci Sin183t, is of she also takes piano and voice "I love going to school", she "Sntow is cer different from school
u1 s3 1 ini e .ra1le hisi trick signif- lessons and sings in the says, "and I think it's one of what I'm used to". she says. She leaves for I ecnnessece
FOR 3 in 1 Icinie ii the eastern oratorio cliuaus. the primary things for young "but 1 love it he first time. where she will' enter I e.
LAWN SERVICE tc inlips She isn't sure yet whether to women to do. It's a functional though. I don't know how to College
FERTILIZE FNGICI go into teaching or look prerequisite as far as our walk in it: and it is cold". (Cathciine graduated from
ERTILIZE FCONTRO Iarbara Lightbourne towards a professional career in position in society goes". ******** (oii~inment High School ini
PEST CONTROL \linasli collegee graduate arid music, but isn't really One of Barbara's many new lu I and was employed at the
TROPICAL 2-2157 dg later of Mrs. Marie concerned at the moment. experiences is snow. Her Miss Catherine M. Patton. Ro al Bank of Canada for the
:rnla under, of Nassau, is a "This is just my first year". college trip was her first eldest daughter of the Rev. and past \ear and a half.


1


(atherine ilans to study in
the field of business and also
wants to become an
accountant. ,he is very fond of
music and holds tIeCllt,. Jit in
thie Theory of Music and the
Pianoforte troin the I rlntii:
School of Music.
She still plans to continue
her music.

Karen Angelia Bennett of
Nassau is one of 13 students
who has filled out applications
for the Associate Degree for
the Spring Conliencemenlnt
scheduled to be held in the
Physical Iducation ( entire at
Seminiole Junior College,
(Oklaholia.
('omlmencement is planned
lor Saturday, May 11, 1974. at
10 a m which will be the
orinal closing of tile school
\ear.

Miss Lilly L. Carol Knowes
of Nassau, wlo studied
recently in Mona, Jamaica. has
been awarded the Certificate ill
Public Administration by tlhe
University of the West Indies.
Miss Knowles' Public
service career started in the
Ministry of Finance where she
worked for several years with
the Financial Secretary. Mr
John I. F. Codrington,. CM (;
who later became this
country's first ColnrIIssioFner in
London.
Having previously acted 1in
tile post on occasions. Miss
Knowles' post for the past
eight months, hia, been that of
Acting Assistant Secretair.

Sherman Stevens, the son of
Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Stevens of-
Sunshine Park. Nassau. lias
succcssiilly completed a
course ill n modern liotinalisin
cwit I, the Trans-World
Corr espo ndence ( college,
Jerse ( Channel Islands.


NOTICE

ESTATE OF R. LIVINGSTON SULLIVAN

N(oTI 1(' is heIrchi given that ill pcirsons having
any claiinms or dmrlands against the above-named
IStite.tc arre( quested to send the same duly
certlifid to the undersigned on or before the
Iwenty-ninth day of March, A. I)., 1974.
AND NOTI(' is hereby given that at the
expiration of the time abose-mentioned the assets
of the deceased will be distributed among the
persons entitled thereto having regard only to the
claims jof wlhiclh the F xecutor shall then have had
notice.

IIIGS & JOHNSON,
Sandringham House,
X3 Shirley Street,
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Executor





NOTICE

ESTATE OF MARY L. SULLIVAN

N()OTI( is hercey given that all persons having
any claiiims or demands against the above-named
Estate are rcq'cIuested to send the same duly
certified to the undersigned on or before the
Twent\-ninth da Iof March. A.I).. 1974.

ANI) NO)II(I: is hereby given that at the
expirattionl of Ie tth ime aboe-menitioned the assets
of the deceased will be distributed among the
persons cnlitlld thereto having regard only to the
claims of \lhichl tdie executorr shall then have had
notice.
HI(;(;S & JOHNSON,
Sandringham Hlouse.
83 Shirley Street,
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Executor.









A14
ANTENA 40








SERIC


--


--


WednesdayMarh1,


The college is associated
with the Trans-World College
London Advisroy Centre. The
course took approximately 19
months to complete by
correspondence
Mr Stevens, 20, is employed
at the Ministry of Health,
School Lane and Shirley Street
as an Inspector and now
intends to further his studies in
the course. It is also his
intention to enter the field of
news-writing and reporting.
the Ranfurly Library was
started 17 years ago during the
tenure of Lord and Lady
Ranfurly when Lord Ranfurly
was Governor of the Bahamas.
When the Ranfurlys left, Sir
Dudley and Lady Russell took
over the Ranfurly Out-,sland
Library. parent to the Ranfurly
Library Service.
Many of these books
S155,000 up to mid-1973) are
distributed throughout the
Out-Islands free of charge.
Meanwhile the Ranfurly
Library Service has distributed
more than five million books in
88 countries to combat
illiteracy and promote educa-
tion in the last 17 years.
S lie only hooks that are
rejected are pornography or
books likely to up set political
feelings" said a recent article in
I lie Catholic Herald.
lThis same article also said
that the Forces, transport
companies, Unesco and some
governments have made cheap
transport facilities available.
Australia, New Zealand and
Canada have recently joined
thrt sAtltiee.
An article in a recent issue
of the magazine of the
Voluntary Committee for
(veiseas Aid and Development
said hooks were going out at
the rate of 10,000 a week from
the service's Kensington
headquarters in London.












Wednesday, March 13, 1974.


REAL ESTATE


I!


C 13809
A STONE BUILDING situate
on a corner lot on Robinson
Road. Ideal for doctor's office.
Call 23921 days or 42856
nights and Saturdays.

C 13848
FOR SALE
3 bedroom 2 bath house
financing available. Phone
2-1495 or 6.

C13797
FOR SALE
PRINCE CHARLES AVENUE
5 bedrooms 2 baths some
furniture spacious grounds -
patio needs some cleaning.
Sales price $47 50000. DIAL
DAMIANOS, 22305, 22307,
Evenings 41280.
C 13707
4 12[JDROOM. 2 bathroom
i. i, rushed house with carport
and sewinrig ioomn FOR SALE.
C.lli 3!671 31672 (9.00 a.m.
12 00. 2.00 p.. 5.00
p m. we'ekdays)

C 13710
BUY NOW!
SAN ANDROS
LOTS
14,500
sq FEET!
Almost 1/3 acre
$45 DOWVN, $45 per MONTH
CALL OR VISIT
FRANK CAREY
REAL ESTATE
P. 0. Box N4764
BAY & DEVEAUX ST
Tel. 27657,24815

C138Q1
CABLE BEACH --
CONDOMINIUM APT.
"CONCHREST" 2 Bed 2
bath swimming pool &
BtEach Rights Tastefully
turnished & decorated ... View
b/ appt. Price $65.000
CARMICHAEL ROAD
Opp.-ete Golder Isle Club Lot
,',," < 50' $20 0(00 or nearest
of'e .
CARMICHAEL ROAD
C( .ro ie'cial Site 212' x 167'
$;, .100
';ILLACE ROAD
Apartment Site 9 < 124'
$15,500.

'ANS SOUCI Duplex sites
"om $8900 Terms
BLAIR ESTATES
Apartmn nt Site 80' x 120' .
$]14,000

STAPLEDON GARDENS
Commercial Site with
unfinished building. $15,000

STAPLEDON GARDENS
Apartment Site $9,000.

OAKES FIELD Residential
Lot 50' x 100' ...$6,500.
IMPERIAL PARK
IMPERIAL PARK Lot 75' x
100' ... $6,500
LITTLE HYDE PARK E.ist
of Sea Breeze Lot 60' x 100'
$4,500

MARATHON ESTATES
Residential Lot 60 100 .
$6,500
ADELAIDE BEACHFRONT
LOT 100' x i2' ONLYV
$13,000
STAPLEDON GARDENS
Residential Lot 80 A 120'
$7,000
Lall BE RKLE Y i EGCUSONI
Rt-AL ES TATE Be win Htouse.
E rederni St Ph," 2 23;r


C 3692
-,\VSON J'S RE .L ( STTE
CO. LTD
Certified Rtj al Estate t ro-ker,
Phores 21 178 )5408
P O. BO N-4n48
Nassau, Bah ain '-
'./\SlIrl Pf iL f P TtTf

T-IROUGHOUT THE-
C OMMONWE AL rOO
2, 3 ,iid 4 0 i)QOOQ',r
S.O'JSU S in the' olwir q
'i'44as
EAS'ERN R O;,
On the water as Wei] '!
the hiis.
SAN SOUCI
BLAIR ESTATES
GLENISTON GARDENS
WINT ON
THE GROVE (West Bay)
SKYLINE HEIGHTS
NASSAU EAST
SEA BREEZE
VILLAGE ROAD
GOLDEN GATES
HIGHLAND PARK
PROSPECT RIDGE


WESTWARD VILLAS
CONDOMINIUM
APARTMENTS
In PARADISE ISLAND
EAST BAY STREET
WEST BAY STREET
HOTELS and HOTEL SITES,
BEACH LOTS, COMMER-
CIAL LOTS, RESIDENTIAL
LOTS
ACREAGE FOR
DEVELOPMENT IN THE
NASSAU AND FAMILY
ISLANDS SUCH AS GRAND
BAHAMA LONG ISLAND,
ELEUTHERA, ABACO
45 ACRE CAY IN THE
EXUMAS WITH DEEP
WATER HARBOUR AND
MORE
CALL
DAVSON'S REAL
ESTATE AGENCY
Phone 21178 or 80932 21178
P. O. Box N-4648
Nassau, Bahamas.


REAL ESTATE


II


C13816
ONE LOT in Little Blair,
$6,500.00, Phone 2-2386 days,
3-2023 evenings.

C 13858
BARGAIN HUNTERS --
Attractive 3 bedroom, 3 bath
furnished house with almost an
a-re of land in Ridgeway. Just
off Eastern Road. Don't miss
this deal at $65,000.00.
DIAL DAMIANOS,
DAMIANOS REALTY CO.
LTD., 22305, 22307, Nite
41197

C13856
LOOK! We're No. 1. Take
advantage of this once in a
lifetime opportunity. 3
bedroom and 4 bedroom
houses for a low $2,000 down
payment and easy monthly
instalments. For information
call J. Leslie Frazier at 2-3854.

WANTS TO TRADE

C13822
TWO bedroom apartment,
fully furnished on ocean, pool
etc. Owner wants to exchange
for apartment in Freeport. Call
2-4223 or Write Box N4635,
Nassau.


WANTS TO RENT

C 13863
English Couple require 3
bedroom house to rent May
and June. No children or pets.
Good references. Telephone:
7-7494 (home) 2-1667/8
(office)-

SFOR RENT
C 13768
WHY PAY MORE TO SLEEP?
Furnished rooms Polhemus
Gardens Motel $20 weekly
$6.00 per day Chippingham.
Phone 35380-

C13723
EFFICIENCY Apartment in
Palmdale for reserved
gentleman ONLY. For
information call 5-1044.

C13799
FURNISHED 2 bedroom
apartment consisting of
living/dining room kitchen and
bathroom Twynam Avenue
5-8185.

C 13708
COTTAGES and apartments
monthly airconditioned,
fully furnished, maid service
available. Lovely garden and
swimming pool. Telephone
31297, 31093.
C13820
THREE Bedroom, 1 bath,
house on Farrington Road,
unfurnished $200.00 a month
Phone 5-4684.

C 13824
NEW 2 Bedroom Apartment,
unfurnished, Soldier Road west
of East Street. Phone 5-5417,
3-6687.

C 13687
HOUSE suitable for store or
office Madeira Street facing
Shopping Plaza. Contact
2 3170.


C13836
FOR RENT
Room with
Business girl
Fowler Street
31119.


FURNISHED
beautiful view.
preferred, East
near Bay. Phone


C13831
For rent a three bedroom
apartment. 1 bath, etc. Quarry
MAission Road. Phone 3 5886.

C 13838
Nassau Hillcrest Towers
Swimming Pool. Sun Terrace,
Laundry Facilities. Spacious,
fully furnished 3 bedroom 2
bath apartment. Large balcony
overlooking Harbour. Available
April. Contact 7-8421-2,
evenings 7- 7065.

C 1 3845
2 APARTMENTS nice
location on Thompson
Boulevard. Call Norman at
24626 (days) 36717 (nights)
for details.


FOR SALE
(13875
USED STORE FIXTURES
One Iron Safe with
combination S85. 2 Sliding
Ladders with all attachments,
in good condition $75.
Several wrapping paper 15".
$20.
(all 2-4697 Jack's Department
Store, Fast Bay and Deveaux
Streets.

C13813
WE BUY ANY GOOD USED
FURNITURE AND
APPLIANCES. Call 2-2637 ask
for Moss.

C13847
STEELCASE Junior Executive
Desks (3) Grey Steel bodies
with white formica tops. 30" x
'O". $75.00 each or three for
$200.00.
Three miscellaneous desks with
metal bodies and wood tops.
Best offers. To view, please call
Mr. Ford at PDS 24296.


FOR SALE


C13757
8 TRACK Tape
half years old.
Perfect working
$65. Phone 3-2474.


!!


one and a

condition.


C6728
57' DIESEL YACHT. Wheeler
with cockpit, twin General
Motors 671 diesel, 12'/z KW
generator. Machinery and
vessel completely refurbished.
Fully equipped, surveyed,
appraised realistically at
$65,000. Will sell or trade for
Bahama real estate, give or take
difference.
N. Wolfson, P. 0. Box 13021,
Port Everglades, Ft.
Lauderdale, Fla. 33316
(524-4641).

CARS FOR SALE
C13849
'72 PINTO, excellent
condition, $2,600.00. O.N.O.
call 5-4977.
C13842
1965 Blue Chevrolet, good
condition. Recently
re-upholstered and resprayed.
$500.00 Ring 5-2167.
C13840
AUSTIN HEALEY SPRITE
1968. Lime Green, excellent
running order and condition.
Just Serviced. New soft top.
Fast, economical sports car.
$1,000. Phone 2-4500 Ext.
146 Weekdays 9 to 5. or
7 7423 after 6:30 p.m.
C] 3724
CENTRAL GARAGE LTD.
"The Easiest Place in Town to
Trade"
1970 FORD CORTINA
B$850
1970 SUNBEAM RAPIER -
B$1650.
1971 JAVELIN S.S.T.
(automatic, radio) B$2850.
1970 FORD TORINO
(automatic, radio) B$2695.
1968 G.M.C. PICK UP TRUCK
B$995.
1970 CHEVELLE MALIBU
(automatic, radio) B$1875
1968 PLYMOUTH VALIANT
(radio, automatic) B$1050
1971 DODGE AVENGER
(automatic) B$1395
1965 BUICK SKYLARK
(automatic, radio) B$750.
1969 CHE_V II NOVA
(automatic, radio) B$1350.
1972 FIAT BUS (7 passenger)
B$1650
1968 ROVER 2000 SALOON
(automatic) B$1000
1969 DODGE DART SPORT
(automatic, radio) B$1500
1972 VAUXHALL VICTOR
(automatic) B$1475
1970 FORD CORTINA
S/WAGON B$1275
1969 VAUXHALL VIVA
B$775.
1970 FIAT 850 B$550
CENTRAL.GARAGE LIMITED
Thompson Boulevard
P. O. Box N1525
Telephone 34711.


C13855
WE'RE OVERSTOCKED
25% off on any of the
following:
1970 Morris 1300 Estate
1967 Ford Cortina 4-door
Saloon
1966 Ford Cortina 2-door
Saloon
1968 Ford Future 2-dooi
Coupe
1968 Plymouth Satellite
2-door Coupe
1965 Morris 1100 4-door
Saloon
1969 Morris 1100 4-door
Saloon.
1970 M.G.B. G/T
1970 Ford Cortina Estate
1971 Rambler 4-door Saloon
1970 Ford Capri
1971 Triumph Toledo 4-door
Saloon
1971 Ford Capri
1970 Ford Escort Wagon
1970 Triumph Estate 4-door
1970 Morris 1100 4-door
Saloon
1971 Chev. Malibu 4-door
Saloon
1971 Morris 1100 4-door Saloon
1971 Morris Mini-Van
1969 Chev. Pick-Up 0" ton.
Priced from $600.00 up
Financing available on most
cars.
BAHAMAS BUS & TRUCK
Montrose Avenue
Telephone 2-1722/5

C 13857
1972 VOLKSWAGEN 1300
Sedans excellent condition,
radio, W/W tyres, low mileage.
Finance and insurance
available. Call 36611-2-3-4.


PETS FOR SALE
C13843
FULL Breed German Shepherd
pups for sale. Price $150.00.
See Alexander Virgil, Durham
Street off Mount Royal
Avenue.

MARINE SUPPLIES


C13852
ENTERPRISE sailboat
gear trailer. $350.
2-8048.


- all
Phone


C 11894
1969 31 ft. CHRIS CRAFT'
Commander. Sleeps six, privat-
shower, two 230 h.p. engines
with less than 200 hours.
Kitchenette, good condition
Call 24267, 54011.


SECTION


SCHOOLS


I!


C 13695
LEWIS AUTO SCHOOL
Learn to drive with confidence.
Phone 59805 between 7 and
8.30 a.m. or after G p.m. or
35084 anytime.

C 13853
A FRIENDLY WELCOME
awaits you at the Peter Pan
Nursery, Bradley Street,
Palmdale. Hours 8 a.m. to 5
p.m., Monday through Friday.
Ages 2 to 5 accepted. Phone
5-8289.

POSITION WANTED
C13712
FINANCE executive seeks a
challenging position. Write to
P. 0. Box 4697, Nassau.

HELP WANTED
C13830
POSITION available for cooks.
Must know international
cuisine, minimum of four yeais
experience, supervises all
kitchen staff and takes duties
of head chef when he is
absent.
Apply 'to Cotton Bay Club,
Eleuthera, Bahamas.
C 13841
APPLICATIONS are invited
for a position as Financial
Controller. Candidates should
possess a University Degree or
its equivalent Professional
Certification, though desired,
may be waived in lieu of
experience.
The incumbent will be
expected to assume a
tremendous amount of
financial responsibilities;
therefore, only persons with
extensive training and/or
experience need apply. For
further information call
5-9326/7; or, write to: P. 0.
Box N-4940, Nassau, Bahamas.

C 13859
BANK OF MONTREAL
(BAHAMAS & CARIBBEAN)
LIMITED requires an
experienced teller, preferably
someone with typing ability.
For further details telephone
Mrs. B. Knowles at 21690.


HELP WANTED


C13726
CAREER OPPORTUNITY
Finance and Mortgage
company in search of 2 male
Bahamians 21 years old and
over to be trained for future
managerial posts. Apply Adv.
C13726, c/o The Tribune, P.
0. Box N-3207, Nassau.
C6745
JOB TITLE: TWO
MACHINISTS
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Lay out work, set up and
operate machine tools,
machine parts to precision
tolerances and specified
finished. Use precision
measuring instruments and
performs any dismantling,
fitting or assembly work
required for plant maintenance
or construction.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
C 13850
SEAMAN, 5 years experience
over 30 years old. Must be
experienced in steering ship
handling freight weekly.
Telephone 5-5238 Captain
Moxey.
C6746
JOB TITLE: GENERAL
FOREMAN (OPERATING)
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
At least 2 years at college
level.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: At
least 4 years in the operations
department of the Cement
industry.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Co-ordinate and supervise a
three shift seven day cement
making operations necessary to
produce slurry, clinker and
finished cement of the type,
quality and quantity required
to meet customer requirements
and shipping schedules.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department Bahama Cc'nent
Company, P. 0. Box F 100,
Freeport. Grand Bahama.


I I HELP NNTED


Island TV 2-2618

AUTOMOTIVE
Lucas Batteries
Bay Street Garage 2-2434

BOOKSTORE
The Christian Book Shop
5-4506
BUSINESS FORMS
Executive
Printers 2-4267/5-401

CAMERAS
John Bull 2-4252/3_

CARPETS
Lee's Carpet Craft 3-1993.

DRAPERIES
Lee's Carpet Craft 3-1993:
ENTERTAINMENT
Movies
Film & Equip. Service 2-2157

GARDEN & PET
SUPPLIES
Modernistic Garden
& Pet 2-286'
Nassau Garden & Pet
Montrose Avenue 2-425
HARDWARE
John S. George 2-8421/6'
HOUSE PLANS
Evangelos G. Zervos 2-2633

LAUNDRY
DRY CLEANING
New Oriental Laundry
2-4406


MIcNI oi DuTo rVVCM
The Wardrobe 5-5599

MEN'S WEAR
Fashionette Ltd. .-,376/7

MUSIC
Cody's Records 2-8500

OPTICIANS
Optical Service Ltd. 2-3910/1

PRINTING


Wong's Printing
Exec utive
Printers


5-4506


2.4267/5-4011


RADIO & T.V. SALES
Carter's Records 2-4711

RUBBER STAMPS
Wong's Rubber Stamp
Co. 5-4506
SPORTS GOODS
Champion Sport Land 2-1862

TRAVEL


Playtours


2-2931/7


R. H. Curry & Co.,
2-8681/7
TRUCKING SERVICE
Gonzalez Trucking
3-1562/2-4726

TV REPAIRS
Channel Electronics Ltd.
3-5478
WINDOW/DOOR REPAIR
Window & Door Specialists
5-4460


FOR TNE ACTION YOU WANT


Shop Nassau Merchants


For Business And Services


III


!!I


C6744
JOB TITLE: FOREMAN
MECHANICAL MAINTEN-
ANCE
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Supervise the mechanical
maintenance in the installation,
assembly, repair, inspection
and testing of equipment for
the entire cement plant. The
facilities include hammer mill
crusher, cranes, conveyors,
kilns, coolers, pumps,
compressors, ball mills, piping,
boilers, oil handling and firing
equipment and dust collectors.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

TRADE SERVICES
C13691

Pinder's Customs

Brokerage Ltd.

Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2 3795, 2-3796
2-3797. 2 2798
Airport 7 7434
FREE ESTIMATES

C13764
LANDSCAPING and for all
your gardening needs,
trimming, hedging, pruning,
tree felling and beach cleaning
call 57810. LAWNS
AND HEDGES. Prompt
reasonable arid efficient
service.

C13702
FOR your building needs and
CRANE hire see:
ISLAND BUILDERS LIMITED
P. O. Box'N-4559
Phone 31671 31672.

C13696
T.V. ANTENNAS
Boosters for homes,
apartments and hotels
SALES AND SERVICES
Call 5-9404
WORLD OF MUSIC
Mackey Street
next to Fr4nk's Place

C 13862
Cartwright's Swimming Pool
Service repairs leaks in
Swimming Pools and Filter
System break-downs. We offer
monthly maintenance service
at a very low price. Please call
3-1950 before 8 a.m. or after 6
p.m. Write: Box N-8830,
Nassau.

C13700
SEWING MACHINE
PARTS AND REPAIRS
Island Furniture Co.
P. 0. Box N-4818Nassau.
Dowdeswell and Christie Streets
Telephone 21197, 23152


HELP WANTED

C6744
JOB TITLE: FOREMAN
MECHANICAL MAINTEN-
ANCE
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education
.MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBI LITI ES:
Supervise the mechanical
maintenance in the installation,
assembly, repair, inspection
and testing of equipment for
the entire cement plant. The
facilities include hammer mill
crusher, cranes, conveyors,
kilns, coolers, pumps,
compressors, ball mills, piping,
boilers, oil handling and firing
equipment and dust collectors.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C6743
Wanted: experienced
MANAGER to control and
operate a high speed
Bar/Lounge/Restaurant.
The man selected for this post
will have the qualities,
appearance, personality to
maintain and increase the
current volume ot this segment
of our operation.
He will require the skills and
abilities to manage the room,
control and organize food
service personnel whilst
personally operating the bar
and cash.

He will be held completely
responsible for the entire
section including running
inventory control, return from
same to a stated profitability
margin.
Confirmable references
showing at least three years
experience in a similar capacity
will be required. Apply: Bass
Bahamas Limited, Pub on the
Mall Limited, Box F-331,
Freeport, Bahamas.

C6749

(FOUR) DISHWASHERS
to wash dishes, pots, pans,
silver, utensils, etc..
(FOUR) GENERAL UTILITY
MEN to clean property,
toilets, assist in moving heavy
furniture, etc..
Apply to: ROYALE
LUCAYAN INN, Telephone:
373-5164, Freeport.


C 15001

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
Able to carry out all office
duties necessary in running a
Construction Company
knowledge of bookkeeping
essential. Applicants must be in
possession of a certificate in
"Commercial Education".
Phone 352-8186, Glenerik
International Ltd., Yellow Pine
Street, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.


HELP WANTED
C6746
JOB TITLE: GENERAL
FOREMAN (OPERATING)
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
At least 2 years at college
level.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: At
least 4 years in the operations
department of the Cement
industry.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Co-ordinate and supervise a
three shift seven day cement
making operations necessary to
produce slurry, clinker and
finished cement of the type.
quality and quantity required
to meet customer -icuirements
and shipping schectules
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Po rsonnel
Department, loahaijj Cement
Company, P O0 Bo'x F-100,
Freeport, Grand Balharma


C6745
JOB TITLE: TWO
MACHINISTS
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Lay out work, set up and
operate machine tools,
machine parts to precisionr
tolerances and specified
finished. Use precision
measuring instruments and
performs ,i;1, di'.- a:itling,
fI tting or !.-- ;-ir bi y work
required for plait miriintenanice
or construction.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT FP, .;nnel
Departmoerl., Baharnja L- nent
Company, P. 0 Box F 100.
Freeport. Grand Bahama.


C6747
DIRECTOR OF
ENGINEERING:
une (1) Director 4t
Engineering and Maintenance
to be directly responsible to
the General Manager for the
Engineering and Maintenance
of the Hotel complex He
should be a Professional
Engineer preferably a
member of the Institution of
Marine Engineers with
proven Executive experience of
mechanical and electrical
engineering and comprehensive
knowledge of al! plart allied to
refrigeration, steam generation,
commercial laundries and
sewage and water treatment.
He will be requii-ed to
inaugurate and operate planned
maintenance programmes and
daily logistics and be
responsible for purchase of
engineering equipment,
budgetary control and
organizing sub-contracts.
Written appilcationi with
resume of experience and
references should be forwarded
to the Personnel Department.
Holiday Inn of Lucyarn Beach.
P. 0. Box F 760, Freeport.
,Grand Bahama.


CLASSIFIED


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS-FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV.-TELEPHONE 21986 EXT. 5


GRAND BAHAMA




CLASSIFIED

II FK I TEL.352-611


BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL


DIRECTORY

Save Time

HOP

wTi~


SCIA21U Xl. 5

2 Dm hril '."

IF MMIV If"


M


L I


(Ehli ihtmtle












Wednesday, March 13, 1974.


ghr Q rtbutm


"You're their supervisor. Why haven't you kept
happy and contented on the salaries I pay?"


24. Blood type
26. Ourselves
27. Plural ending
29. Hebrew month
30. Alaska's
governor
32. Kindled
34. Swing
38. Hawaiian
baking pit
39. Forfeit
40. Dessert
41. Oppose
43. Zenith
44. Arrow poison
45. That is: abbr.


them


1481


TT
TXI LA


KnIE r C 6
PE EKE TO


SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE
47. Phoenician 2. Valuable
seaport violin
48. Judah's son 3. Unseat
49. War god 4. Somebody
5. Promise
DOWN 6. Foes
7. Coach
1. Outmoded 8. Mythical
7 0 9 Io hunter
9. Tree
13 10. Heavy hammer
16 Table
I centerpiece
18. Cavil
121. Italian
S commune
S 25. Experienced
S 27. Evoke
S 28. Dealings in
sacred things
S 30. Christian
3 7 festival
31. Claw
4o 33. Piano adjuster
35. "Sweet ....
OF 4 O'Grady"
46 36. Strainer
37. Jinxes
42. Pipe joint
43. Collection of
features 3-15 facts


Rupert and the Ice Crackers--1


"ODar me, It seems colder than. ever this
morning." says Mrs Bear when she sees
Rupert off to play w:th his chums. "Make
st.* you move about and keep warm." "I
ill. Mumnwmy," promfs upTe. "*Wny. the
1no' is quite herd. It nust have frozen
dJring the night." He sets off at a jog-tre;
aoro* the white fields. "I know where 1')


find the others." he thinks. "They're bound
to be by the snowman we built yesterday."
Making :s way towards a ridge, he notices
two broad marks in the snow Could they
be the maiks of a sledge 7 "he wonders
" They lead to those bushes."
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


,C CCARROIL RIGHTER'S

HOROSCOPEE I-
( s" r from the Carroll Righter institutee
SA GENERAL TENDENCIES: Plan your future in REX MORGAN, M.D.
S a definite and determined fashion in a m., and
think through the best campaign possible to attain your most l "7 YOU K NOW WvAT, j


cherished longings, but postpone action until p m
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) You can handle those duties
that are pressing during a m., then meet with others for your
finest purposes Make plans with mate in a m
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Know what partners want of
you, then you can work on new plan Something crops up in
a m. that shows how to proceed on an important matter.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Schedule your time well so
you can get much accomplished in a.m., but reserve the
afternoon for talking matters over with associates
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Plan your
amusements for the coming days early and get right into the
work ahead of you. Show liking for others.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Handle home affairs
conscientiously before running off to amusements with
congenials Get into fundamental monetary affairs
VIRGO (Aug 22 to Sept 22) Get your business operating
nicely and then enjoy own home and kin. Do important
errands Catch up on reading you've neglected
LIBRA (Sept 23 to Oct. 22) Handle monetary affairs early
before you go out with congenials Plan property
improvements Get the expert advice you may need
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov 21) Don't take any chances and
money matters can be handled well Talk to long-known
friends and get ideas for your improvement
SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 to Dec. 21) Morning is ideal for
planning your future with an expert Then go out to the
recreations you like. Make appearance attractive first.
CAPRICORN (Dec 22 to Jan. 20) Listen to what a good
friend has to say that can be helpful to you You need more
information for some outlet before you go out socially
AQUARIUS (Jan 21 to Feb 19) Get that civic affair in
back of you quickly, then off with the congenials you like to
the social affairs that please you
PISCES (Feb 20 to Mar 20) Get data needed, then call new
interest to attention of a bigwig. A communication that
reaches you today can bring prestige.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY .he or she will be
able to absorb a great deal of information during youth. Later,
when starting own career, this youngster will become highly
articulate and can help others to expand their interests far
beyond their dreams Much travel is indicated and the field of
imports-exports is especially fine in this chart Give good
spiritual training
"The Stars impel, they do not compel What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


JUDGE PARKER
THE IMPLICATION 1I
WHAT REASON WOULD THAT SINCE HE WAS
YOU HAVE HAD THAT / WITHOUT FUNDS, I
THIS MAN PLEAD DIDN'T WANT TO
GUILTY, SAM? } WASTE MY TIME IN
--- i l \ HIS DEFENSE!


he Comic pare


Dal Curtis


Paul Nichols


APARTMENT 3-G By Aler Kotszky


Winning

Bridge _
by VICTORY MH u.O
Justice may be blind, but
Fortune Isn't and if wooed STEVE MIKE NOMAD
ssiduo he has vo STEVEROPER & MIKE NOMAD
bestow. South had a chance
here:
Dealer East: N/8 Vol. I UWDUHSTAND, STEVE! F
North I'LL BE OUT FOR A WHEN SHE WALKED IN,
K J 10 a WHILE,. HONEYDEW, I 5AID TO MYSELF,
10"9
o 2 SHOWING MIS6 HALE THIS'LL BE A LONG
4 h AROUND/ INTUHVIEW.

SWn oth
A 3
A 10 4
- -- 4 i
Pass 34 Pass 4
West leads the 46. How should MEI
South play?
Winning with the 4A. South
drew txumps, which broke 2-2,
discarded a club on dummy's
third diamond, and coming back
with a trump, finessed the )l0.
This Isn't unreasonable for it
looks as If the only change Is to OW'S BEEN KIDNAPPED
find West with the D J. And yet ...OR HELP ACGAINST HIS
South can do a lot better. Before WILL. HY. SOMETHING
touching hearts, he leads the WL HOE.O IT L
A10. knowing from West's lead HE'S PONE...OR IT COULP
that East must win. He will BE SOMETHING ONE OF
surely play another club. De- |
clearer rutfs and now takes the HIS CLIENTS HAS DONE
heart finesse. L T S
West East W
K 8 7 63 VAJ
0 J 975 01086 T
698 4XKQJ52 TI
The hearts are blocked and
East must present declare with A
a ruff and discard-but only I
because the clubs have been LI
eliminated. L.E


No. :.373 by TIM MeMKAV
Across
I. A good one Is what man)
housewives aspire to ie.
(3. 4)
S. Victorian poet, (6)
9. Go wlter-sporling. (St
10 Lonn-hasred pt. (,. 3)
It. cry alonu4. 4)
12 Cleaner. (3)
14. Die. Galway (anal.). (5. 41
16. Part of a circle. (3)
Il. Seabird. (4)
2'L. Uitch. (4)

i2. Ascend. (4)
P4. Ace. (3)
25. Old sixpence. (0)
26 May dernrlhe a popular
blue. (3)
i'. Horse. (3)
I)own
I Spend your time at goll or
tennis. (4. 1)
;. Narrow therouxhlte. (4)
3 Church of England mem-
ber. (8)
4. Imate. (4)
5 Scandinavian. (i9
6. Fill overfull. (4)
1 Stakes In some card amnes.
(5)
9. Frownlng in Ill-tempered




1i. onln-
WAY. ( l)
Ito.V a ae-
a h a ped
eonla)n-
(4). (4)

t D oer..
(3) reflemmse ** a1*me


HE DON'T MEAN EVYTHING HE SAY5,
0Ur WHAT HEMEANS, HEMfANS'A


CROSSWORD

PUZZLE
ACROSS


Saunders & Overgard


Chess
By LEONARD GARDEN


The woman world champion.
Gaprindashvili and one of her
current challengers Kozlovskays
,White, to move) were caught
napping when play from today's
diagram continued 1 Kt-KtS,
B-Q4: 2 R-B5, R-Q2; 3 R
iQl -QBl. B-B5; 4 B x B,
Kt, B and the game was even-
tually drawn. During this
sequence one side missed a good
opportunity Can you spot the
move thev overlooked ?
Par times. 10 seconds, chess
master: 20 seconds, chess
expert; 1 minute, county
player: 3 minutes, club stan-
dard; t i minutes, average; 15
ininutes, novice.

Chess Solution
I Kt-K'5, B -Q4?: 2 Kt x RP!
ri:ns a useful pawn. for if 2 .
K Kt: 1 Q-R5 ch and 4 9 B"




LoW many
H words of
fo u r letters
or mnore can
you make
f r onl it he
letters shown
T here?" In
ltma klng a
word, each
le A G tter i m v
be used once
only. Each
ttord inlst contain the large
letter and there must le at
least one right-letter word in the
list. No plurals; no torelln words;
no proper nauies. TODAY'S
TARGUET: 2 words, good;
31t words, very good; 42 words.
excellent. solution tomorrow.
YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION
Arre aerie arlel arll care
CEtLEI. AC cere cereal ceric
circle clear cleric creel earl lair
leer liar race rail real reel relic
rice.


1. Solidum
5. Hawaiian lava
7. Cattle
11. So be it
12. Tin symbol
13. Seed cover
14. Magnetic
strip
15. Aseptic
17. World War
II area
18. Taunt
19. Used
20. Spend
22. Egg drink
23. Pennsylvania


V2y< g


__X


6BXR:MRW


,
,r
fr

r;
rl
re
- I*r D













he i Tribntt


Wednesday, March 13, 1974.


WHY RODGERS WAS ALLOWED TO GO TO GAMES


THE BAHAMAS Football Association
under the International Football
Association's rules on amateurism has
allowed baseballer Randy Rodgers to
compete in the Central American and
Caribbean Games, Mr. Arlington Butler,
President of the Bahamas Olympic
Association said today.
Mr. Butler said that besides the
International Olympic Committee, there
are international federations for every
sport. Each sporting body must belong to
its international federation which sets up
its own rules.
Certain federations he explained, have
rules that allow for certain things. "If you
are a professional in one sport, they
would allow you to regain your amateur
status for their particular sport, not for
the sport you are professional in."
However, such an athlete would not be


eligible to take part in Olympic
competitions. "You are only allowed to
compete in regional competitions under
their relaxed rules. Outside the region
you can't compete."
That he said is the reason why Rodgers
was able to compete in the Central
American and Caribbean games.
Mr. Butler in an announcement on
Monday set the sports scene into turmoil
when he said that high school and college
athletes competing in the Bahamas
Baseball Association's senior league series
will not be able to compete in
inter-scholastic sports.
An adoption of amateurism by the
B.O.A. has ruled the B.B.A.'s senior
league professional by virtue of their
having ex-professional ballplayers
competing therein.
Because the B.O.A. is a member of the


MARGARET ALBURY,
team captain of the Bahamas
ladies national volleyball
squad, was selected among 12
other players for the Central
American and Caribbean
Games all-star team.
Albury who represented the
Bahamas in volleyball since the
formation of the ladies team
was cited for her top all around
play especially her blocking
and spiking ability against
second place Mexico.
She was named the 'most
valuable player last year when
the Bahamas captured top
honours in the English
Speaking Caribbean Countries
tournament.
International coach Gene
Selznick who accompanied
both men and ladies teams was
very pleased with their
performances. He thought that
there were three other
Bahamians who were truly
outstanding Florence Rolle.
Celestine Wilson and Winsome
Davidson.
Competition at the games he
said was very tough but the
overall performance of the
volleyballers was more than


satisfying. "They have elevated
themselves to a different level
of volleyball." he said. "They
jumped the hurdle and are now
ready for the other hurdle."
Selznick figured that if the
girls were to return, they
would get at least third place.
It took the Bahamas a few
games to get into the knack of
things. They were fifth in the
final standings. "Nevertheless,


the improvement of the team
was remarkable.
"They are content now that
they know that they have
elevated themselves." he said.

The men's team which
placed eighth, lost yesterday to
the Nethcrland Antilles 8-15,
15-4, 5-15. 15-3, and 6-15, al-
though they beat the


Antilleans easily 4-1 in a
practice match.
The talk of the tournament,
noted coach Tom Grant, was
the rookie sensation Kevin
Rolle. "He was outstanding in
all games and has shown the
big guys that he is a player of
the future." All he lacks is
experience.
The team is expected to
arrive in Nassau tomorrow.


Play Aaron, says Kuhn


NEW YORK Baseball
Commissioner Bowie Kuhn
said Monday he disapproves of
the Atlanta Braves' plan not to
start Hank Aaron in the
season-opening series at
Cincinnati and expects the
veteran slugger to be in the
lineup opening day.
Kuhn ordered the Braves to
use Aaron in the opening
three-game series April 4-6-7
"in accordance with the
pattern of his use in 1973.
when he started approximately
every two of three Braves
games.


The announcement put a
damper on Atlanta owner Bill
Bartholomay's expressed desire
to have the 40-year-old Aaron
break Babe Ruth's record of
714 career home runs at home.

Aaron finished 1973 with
713 career homers, and the
Braves begin an l-game home
stand April 8.
Aaron, questioned at West
Palm Beach prior to Kuhn's
statement, intimated he
expected some sort of ruling
from the commissioner.
"If the commissioner orders
me to play." said Aaron, "I
guess I'll have to play. Even if
it means I got a hurt leg or I'm
not in shape, I guess I'll be in
there.
"The way things have been
going, I'm not surprised at
anything he (Kuhn) does."
Last season, Aaron started
two of three games in the


Braves' opening series with
Houston. He appeared in 120
games, some of them as a
pinch-hitter, and batted .301
with 40 homers and 96 runs
batted in.
"1 have had a number of
discussions with Bill
Bartholomay about his
February announcement
regarding Henry Aaron," Kuhn
said.
"Although he has advanced
some substantial arguments in
support of his announcement,
he has not been able to
persuade me that the
procedure he wishes to follow
is good for baseball.

"As a result. I have advised
him that I am disapproving the
announcement and that,
barring disability, I will expect
the Braves to use him (Aaron)
in the opening series in
Cincinati.. "


'1c4j


International Olympic Committee, then
they are bound to live up to the I.O.C.'s
ruling regardless of the effect it has on
sports in the Bahamas, Mr. Butler
explained.


Sports, he
inter-dependent
dependent upon
other countries.


pointed out, is an
thing where "we are
the rules that exist for


'1'
'5


"We don't make our own specific rules
and set ourselves up as authority on rules.
We must follow the international rules."
Mr. Butler evaded questions on
whether these rulings are in the best
interest of sports in the Bahamas but
commented that until the rules change
internationally "we have to go by it if we
want to be a part of the international
scene."


SNIPE SAILING isn't
necessarily just puttering
around in a little boat.
This scene indicates
Montagu Bay can be as much
a challenge as most bodies of
water.
Capsizing in rough weather
are frequent, and here
Bahamian sailor Peter
Sweeting clambers back
aboard as crewman Richie
Sawyer steadies the craft.
Sweeting popped out of
the boat as it came about
after rounding a market
during a previous Midwinter
Snipe Championship.
The annual snipe
championships opened in
Nassau today with an
impressive international field
of nearly 30 boats.
The eight-race series, sailed
on a modified Olym course in
Montagu Bay, will include
three races for the Bacardi
Cup and five races for the
Dudley Gamblin Memorial
Trophy.
Included in the list of
international starters will be
consistent winner Tom Nute,
a San Diego sailmaker who up
until three years ago had
dominated the series, winning
the Gamblin Trophy three
years in a row. Earl Elms,
another sailmaker from San
Diego, and former World
champion, won the Gamblin
series last year, but will not
be competing this week.

Other outstanding snipe
sailors competing this week
will be Bruce Collyer of Fort
Lauderdale, Don Hite, from
Detroit, Dr. Peter Duvoisin


Roughing

it in


Montagu


Bay

from Chattanooga, Gonsalvo
Diaz of Miami and Bob
Bigham, formerly of
Cincinnati and now a resident
of Nassau.
Veteran Bahamian
yachtsmen who are expected
to show well in the
international competition
include Basil Kelly, Wassitsch,
who won all three Bacardi
races two years ago, Godfrey
and Davis Kelly, consistently
high finishers over the past
several years, Monty Higgs,
Peter Christie and current
World Sunfish champion
Pierre Siegenthaler, who won
a gold medal for the Bahamas
in the recent Commonwealth
Caribbean Games. Nassau's
Ron Strange and John
Dunkley are expected to sail
in both series, and the
youngest sailor entered is
14-year old Mark Holowesko.
A full social schedule has
been arranged at the host
Royal Nassau Sailing Club.
The Bahamas series represent
the final event in the Snipe
Class winter circuit. The
previous regattas awarding
points toward the overall Carl
Zimmerman Trophy are the
Clearwater Regatta and the
recent Don Q Regatta in
Miami.


Yamacraw


dominate

THE SIXTH annual
inter-house sports meet of the
Donald W. Davis Junior High
School was held at the Queen
Elizabeth Sports Centre.
Yamacraw House dominated
the event and scored a total of
189 points. Delaporte placed
second with a total of 107/2
points.
There was a battle between
Lyford House and Adelaide
House for the third position.
Lyford House edged out
Adelaide House with a total of
88 points, and Adelaide
realized a total of 75%V points.
The Victor Laudorum award
went to Kendal Clarke of
Yamacraw House and the
Victrix Laudorum award went
to Antionette Berry of
Yamacraw House.
Results:
7TH GRADE (GIRLS)
lOOm. D. Rolle 13.4 (Y), L. J. G.
Trembley 13ft. 4ins. (d), H.J. G.
Trembley 3' 11" ()). Relay:
DELAPORTE
7TH GRADE (BOYS)
lOOm. P. Turnquest 13.4 (L),
L.J. E. Poitier t3ft. 3ins. (I.). H.J.
E. Poitier 4' 5" (L), Relay:
YAMACRAW
8TH GRADE (GIRLS) 100m. A.
Berry 13.2 (Y). ISOm. A. Berry
21.0 (Y). L.J. A. Berry 13' 4/%"
(Y). H.J. D. Morley 4' I" (L), Shot
Z. Butler 29' I" (L), Discus C.
Sutherland 58' 10". Relay:
YAMACRAW.
8TH GRADE (BOYS)
0lm. R. Collie 12.7 (L), 200m.
H. Coakley 27.2 (Y). L.J. H.
Coakley 14' 9" (Y), H.J. N. Hall 4'
2" (Y). Shot R. Collie 26' 2V/" (L).
Discus A. Rolle 62' 5" (A), Relay
YAMACRAW.
9TH GRADE (GIRLS
lOOm. V. Warner 13.0 ()).
200m. V. Warner 27.6 (D). L.J. Y.
Nairn 13.6 (L), H.J. C. Morley 4'
I" (L). Shot D. Sands 26 (1)).
Discus E. Taylor 66' 3" (A), Relay:
YAMACRAW.
9TH GRADE (BOYS)
100m. M. Francis 12.5 (Y).
200m. K. Clarke 25.8 (Y), 400m.
M. Francis 62.0 (Y), L.J. K. Clarke
17' 5" (Y), T.J. C. Collie 33' 6"
(A), H.J. K. Rahming 4' 9" (A).
Shot C. Munnings 31' 4" (L),
Discus A. Nottage 84' S" (L).
80OOm. D. Smith 3.44.8 (D)
OPEN IS00m. J. Missick 5.29.8
(Y), Relay: YAMACRAW
JAMAICA WIN
AT THE 4 way squash
tournament held last weekend
at the G.B. Tennis and Squash
Club between Jamaica,
Bermuda, Nassau and Freeport,
Jamaica emerged victors
Jamaica won 9 matches,
Freeport won 5, Nassau won 3,
and Bermuda won one.


JET SET STOP BEES


When it comes to insurance

it's Dominion for Life


...in Nassau

call Henry Knowles 2-3843



THE DOMINION LIFE ASSURANCE COMPANY

I


DEFENDING champs Becks
Bees sent ten batters to the
plate in the fourth inning, the
same in which they crammed
seven runs as they went on to
stop Jet Set 16-5 in the first of
last night's double he dr"
Winning pitcher Don
Taylor, backed by great
defence kept Jet Set shutout
over three innings while Becks
took a 5-0 lead. Taylor
struckout five and walked
three.
First baseman Anthony
Huyler topped Becks offence
going two for four from the


Results of yesterday's races
at Hobby Horse track:
FIRST RACE 4'2 Furlongs
1. Senilosa 11 (8) G. Serchwell
$7.20, $3.15, $2.35.
2. Rickee Tickee (1) R. Hewitt
- $11.80, $3.60.
3. Smithy Boy (2) R. Ferguson
- $3.30
SECOND RACE Furlongs
1. Joan-Sirvilus (6) G. Bain -
$6.50, $4.05, $2.45.
2. Mama Waldee (4) N.
Sweeting $10.35. $8.20.
3. Little Angel (7) A. Saunders
$3.70. Daily Double (8-6
$29.75.
First Quinella (4-6) $114.70.
THIRD RACF 4V/ Furlongs
1. Sweetness Now (1) S.
McNeil- $33.05, $7.15, $4.20.
2. Lady Cleo (8) K. Johnson -
$5.00, $2.60.
3. Hydra (3) Ant. Saunders -
$3.70.
Second Quinella (1-8) $75.95.
FOURTH RACE 5 Furlongs
1. Four V's (2) N. Sweeting -
$6.05, $4.45, $2.55.
2. Wall Eye (6) S. McNeil -
$12.35, $5.85.
3. Boston Rose (4) K. Johnson
$4.55.
Third Quinella (2-6)- $41.55
FIFTH RACE -- 9 Furlongs
I. Hot Love 11 (3) -- S. McNeil
$19.55, $5.55, $3.40.


NOW SHOWING
At 7 & 10:20
"KARADO THE
HONG KONG CAT"
(P.G.)
And at 8:45
"QUEEN BOXER"
(P.G.)
Starring
Judy Lee
Parental Guidance Suggested


plate while knocking in two
rbi's. He scored two and had
seven put outs.
Catcher Geof Stuart who
secured Taylor's strike outs
added a two for three, two rbi
performance. He scored one.
Fleetfooted Roosevelt
Turner who stole the most
bases last season scored four
times * * * *
Left hander Paul Johnson
confidently worked himself
out of a four run sixth inning
barrage as Heineken Stars
defeated Citibank Chargers 7-5
in last night's first game.


2. Fellero (7) J. Horton
$4.10, $4.10.
3. Lady Mary (5) A. Sands -
$5.40.
Fourth Quinella (3-7) -- $13.05.
SIXTH RACE 4'/ Furlongs
I. Security (8) N. Sweeting
$18.95, $11.40, $4.45.
2. Obeah Woman (4) H.
Woodside 6.40, $2.65.
3. Lil Jess (I) S. McNeil
$2.30.
Fifth Quinella (4-8) 19.55.
SEVI'NTH RAC' 5 IFurlongs
I. Sweet n Easy (6) P.
Newbold $11.95, $13.55, $2.20.
2. Aries Moon (4) -- A. Saunders
$10.40, $2.60.
3. Clint (7) Ant. Saunders -
$2.10.
Sixth Quinella (4-6) $64.00.
EIGHT RACE 4V2 Furlongs
1. Valdez (4) -- ;. Bain $3.75,
$2.50, $2.30.
2. Lady Lucks(2) A. Saunders
- $2.95, $2.55.
3. Lucky Girl (6) R. Hewitt -
$2.50.
Seventh Quinella (2-4) $8.05.








OPENS: 6:30, Shows start 7 p.m.
CHILDREN UNDER 12 FREE!
See 2 features late as 8:50
STARTS TONITE!
BISCUIT 7 & 10:30,
ANGEL 8:50 ONLY
1-W PMR-











TECHNICOLOR .
RESTAURANT WILL BE
CLOSED temporary for re


NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that HILDA ERNESTIBA
BANNISTER of Kemp Road, Nassau, Bahamas is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for naturalisation as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalisation should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 6th day of
March, 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. O. Box
N3002, Nassau.





Matinee 3:00 & 5:00, Evening 8:30--'Phone 2-1004, 2-1005





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I I









Now thru Friday Now thru Friday
Matinee starts at 1:45 Continuous Showings
Evening 8:30 from 3:00
"WHEREDOESIT "WICKEDWICKED" PG
HURT" R.
Peter Sellers, Tiffany Boiling





Oliver R fired, Candice Bergen T ROB" PG.


No one under 18 will be admitted. George Peppard,
Phon 2 2534 France Nuyen Friday






U "NOW SHOWING
I eter Seller, B I








Matinee continuous from 2:15 Evening 830-'Phone 3-4666

atie h I SUGAR HILL and
qll f Iher ZOMMEHIT MENt



Olir Re Cnolor y b M Ame.c nienrgn B Pe
THE NOW STIOWING
SP ARENTAL DISCRETION ADVISED

MA RKI BEV


PARENTS L DISRETION D S1$E


Margaret in all-star team


THE WILLIM BREWER CO. LID.
























9 l 1I J lllI II







BECKS CUP RACE STH RACE


BETWEEN THE HOURS OF 12:30 to 2:30
r ~BECKS


(HEBIGONE 500

WILL BE SOLD FOR ONLY

COME OUT AND LET'S HAVE A BALL


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