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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03563
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: March 9, 1974
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03563

Full Text










8DUDLEY'S
COR. ROSETTA ST. & MT. ROYAL AVE.
NEW 1974 MODELS
"THE VERY BEST" "PIONEER"
ARRIVING SOON!


yrtibutt


(Reiatercd with Ponmafsr of Bharma for po concesion within th B.mn.) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper

VOL. LXX1, No. 90 Saturday, March 9, 1974 Price: 20 Cents
II Ili-Ii il Im IIi,


GOVERNMENT WITNESS'TESTIFIES:







They want







to nail me,







said Vesco


By ARTIIHUR EVI:RETT
NIW YORK (AP) On the
eve of President Nixon's
re-election, financier Robert
Vesco took the fifth
amendment before the
Securities and Exchange
Commission rather than "blow
the lid"' on his secret
$ 200.000 campaign
contribution, government
witness Harry Sears testified
Friday.
"He said, 'those bastards
would like nothing better than
to nail me and the President to
the wall together.' Sears told a
jury at the criminal conspiracy
trial of former Attv' (en. John
N. Mitchell and i.- (Coniinimrce
Sccurtair' Maurri it Stans.
lHo,'ever. ;Fi: Nixon's
r I: tiom SitaIs Av 'nt on,
V\ 'sc'. sotm f'hlt 1 *it Nisxon' s
brother Ionaldt, to "get a
messJge ;o thr' tlop." appe-aling
fo' Wh'tc House aid in his legal
battle v'.ith to SI (' Otherwise.
he tliiirate- ned to personally
disclose the contribution, the
t _'ver'ne'ti has charged
fhe goverirnmen charges that
in return for the $200,000
contribution, Mitchell and
Stans impeded an SC(' fraud
investigation into Vesco's
multi-billion dollar global
financial empire. The two
former Cabinet members are
accused of conspiracy,
obstruction of justice aind
periury .
VESCO FLIED
Vesco fled the country prier
to the indictment, which also
named hIim a defendant.
In return for his testimony,
Sears was given total immunity
as the fourth defendant in the
indictment.
Sears said Vesco borrowed
the $200.000 and routed it to
Stans through Barclay's Bank
of New York. It was this
transaction, Sears said, that
caught the attention of SEC
investigators.
lhey suspected that Vesco
had milked one or more of his
conTmpanies for the money.

It was around the first of
October, 1972, the tall, bald
Sears recounted, when Vesco
told lum that "he was
a bso lu tel y positive










i7

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iE Si


the Securities and Exchange
staff were making a concerted
effort to zero in' on the
contribution. Vesco had just
been subpoenaed by the SEC'
"There's no way I'm going
to testify that will blow the
lid on this," Sears said Vesco
told him. The witness added:
"He said, 'Nixon may survive
some of those other things, but
this would be the crusher." lHe
said he wished I would get hold
of John Mitchell and see if
there was n!l. thing he could
do."
JOINED VESCO
"1 was told by Mr. Mitchell
that lie : .." A i tile subpoena
was going to be withdrawn.
a iided Scars. one-time
Republican majority leader of
tIlie \ew Jrtsey state :senate
w ', switchd. to a $60,000 a
Lear iob on Vesco's legal staff
'\-. Mitchell indicated to
im he hoped we could get
beyond election day," Sears
testified "I asked him if he
thought we could. He said he
a niv hoped so, if they had
any concern for the President
of the United States."
Deciding to take the fifth
am endnment against
self-incrimination, Vesco was
quoted by Sears as declaring:
"I hope to hell that will make
them happy, because this is
just like another contribution."
Sears said Mitchell's reaction
was: "Please tell Bob that 1' mn
grateful."
SUBPOENAS
However, the SEC's next
move was to subpoena four of
Vesco's top associates.
"I told Mr. Mitchell that
posed the same problem
regarding the election date,"
Sears continued. "Mr. Mitchell
said, 'don't tell Vesco, but this
time I will go to the White
House. I'm going to talk to
John Dean."
Dean was ousted as White
House counsel as a result of the
Watergate scandal. He is
expected to testify for the
government at the
Mitchell-Stans trial.

In the end. the four Vesco
associates again saved the day,
Sears said, by following their
boss' lead and taking the fifth


SIR MILO BUTLER,
Governor-General, yesterday
on behalf of the Imperial
Council of the Ancient
Egyptian Arabic Order of
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine,
presented Ill., James E. Morley,
33 degrees, Ambassador-At-
Large of Nemesis Temple
Number 75, in Nassau with a
Certificate of Merit.
The award was given Mr.


amendment.
In early November. Sears
said, "Mr. Vesco tnild me that
he had information that he w as
now being accused ot being a
swindler, accused of looting his
mutual funds, and accused of
milking mutual funds, and the
SEC was now nmoing into the
offshore area and their
investigation ;appeared to be
expanding."
tHELP SOtG(;IIT
In that frame of mind, Sears
testified. Vesco taikeid to him; a
day or two aftci Nixon's
landslide re-election ot Nov 7
1972.
The testilono'l\ w.ntl ton
"Mr. Vesco called :ne and
told me he had beei al A' 11IL to
Newport Beach. lie said. 'I
have been talking \1 ith opie ofi
the brothers te said. '", :I
it's about tuie I go't some help
from the brothers I have been
discussing with them that 1
want to get a -.'-'jge to the
top ...' I said, 'Bob you have to
be joking out of your mind.'
Q. Does one of the brothers
live in Newport Beach''
A. Yes.
Q. Who'?
A. Don.
Q. Don who"
A. Don Nixon.
Some days after this
conversation, Sears said
Mitchell showed him a folder
addressed to Donald Nixon at
the Essex House in New York
Before its contents could be
explored in testimony, the trial
was adjourned for the
weekend.
NIXON'S BROTHER
Donald Nixon, one of the
President's brothers had a sont
who worked for Vesco The
indictment claims Vesco
sought to convey a written
memorandum to the senior
Nixon at the Essex House, "the
tenor of which was to threaten
disclosure of the secret cash
contribution and other adverse
consequences unless the SEC"
was directed to drop all
proceedings against Vesco."
In some unexplained
manner, the indictment said.
the memorandum came to
Mitchell who kept it and
"concealed its existence and
contents from the SEC and


Morley in recognition of his
devoted service to the welfare
and progress of the
A.E.A.O.N.M.S.
On hand for the
presentation were: Mr. Simeon
L. Bowe, Minister of Works, a
Junior Warden of St. James
Lodge No. 3; Illustrious
Potentate, Fred Lunn, of
Nemesis Temple No. 75; Most
Worshipful Grandmaster,


KULtK I VlSt(()
other law enlorIt. centll agencies
who proper! should haie been
made aware of it
There as no i:dication
whether Donaild Ni, .-: ever
saw the e.'l:top Sears
testified, "Mr. M\lti ti said
Don never arrivd."
Sears in hits 1 iw' .i..: on
Wednesday hd ais. nrI:,'ioned
Donald Nixon Jr. nerI'phew of
the President hl, ,.i\s also
serving as a Vesco aide aIt the
"Mr \liihe m ,n i. coursee
of a rather long dialhi'o by tile
listened vJry atle :ivel\ .
Sear- lei!::od
SLt ( CLIR'. \
"'lIe tld me '' :' things
were true that \ e'. would
certainly inp-a r d tes,,trve
I C :' e ',, 1 i h1 -. .!
will at lea',sl discli,s !t ,,ith Bill
(Casey ll said he'd .di that at
some convi'enienrt lwi, '
William (ase \wa the SI ('C
chairman then.
M:tchell took copious notes
as S:ars testified.
Sears told oi seeking
Mitchell's aid for Vesco, on a
number of occasions, both
before and after he retired as
GOP majority leader of the
New Jerse', senate at the end
of 1971.
Sears testified that while his
memory was nol too clear on
the point it may have been at
the Jan. 12. 1172 mteetine. uiti
Mitchell that the matter: I a
contribution to '.
re-election campaign came up
"I inia l have )ni 'ItIt
,, as-ioni indicated to l,'li
Mitchell that Bob
consid ri ng making a
substantial contribution to II,
campaign:,' Sears testified
SOUGHT PASSPORT
At any rate, prior that. sr '
said, "Bob had on a coupih ,,I
occasionls said that he 1wa.F,ut
to be a very substianti.l
contributor
"He spec icall iaidic lte.
that lhe wanted to hb' a. hi.'
enough contributlor t hi
recognized," hle went on. "'th'l
he wanted to get a dlpliniu
passport that Was s, i'!!ii i
he desperately wanted.
On oine oc.casion. Secars -,ai I
Vesco "said he'd like tou ivi.'
much as halt a million dou!.li,"


Patrick F. Knight, of Prince
Hall Masons, Boston
Massachusetts; Sir Milo; Mr.
Morley; Mr. Arthur D. Hanna,
Deputy Prime Minister, and a
33 degrees member of Prince
Hall Masonic Order, Nassau;
and Mr. Bismark Coakley, the
Rt. Worshipful Grand
Treasurer of Prince Hall
Masons in Nassau.


-BAHAMASAIR

GETS

GO-AHEAD

FROM

NIXON
PRESIDENT RICHARD
Nixon Thursday signed
Bahamasir's foreign air carrier
permit, thus formalising the
flag carried's authority to
operate between the Bahamas
and Ft. Lauderdale West
Palm Beach, Tampa and
Miami.
Until now Bahamasair has
been flying on the permit
granted Out Island Airways
for the same routes
Out Island was bought out
by government when it
created Bahamasair.
Bahamasair presently
operates between Nassau.
Freeport and Miami with
BAC-1 I jet aircraft, but is
presently exploring
development of new routes
both w within the Bahamas and
to other points abroad
including Turks and Caicos.
Earlier this month the
airline inaugurated three
weekly flights between
Nassau and Cape Eleuthera.
Routes to Florida points
included in the new
certificate will be considered
as part of the carrier's long
range operating programme.
In an address to the Nassau
Kiwranis this week. general
manager Max Healer said that
ian "orderly expansion" of
service to such Caribbean
di stiriiati sis ai Jiamaia.
\Xtigua. Me ,ic' and Cuba
was under consideration
together with direct service to
such American cities as
Atlanta, Chicago, Cleveland
Ilouston and New Orleans.
More immediate plans call
for the resumption of direct
flights between San Andros
and Miami in July, between
Miami and Great Harbour
Ca\ with a possible extension
to North Eleuthera. and the
initiation of "experimental"
twice weekly cargo flights
between Nassau and Miami


That was


close,


puzzlers

PUZZLERS are getting
very near to winning the
Tribune's prize boat in the
weekly crossword puzzle.
I his week there were tNwo
entries with just one mistake:
Gary Ryan Cancino of West
Oxford Street had "net"
instead of "nut", and
Gregory J. Roberts of St.
Paul Street, Chippingham had
"burrow" instead of
"futrrowu"
Well. better luck next
week. And remember it you
win you can be the lucky
owner of a $4,200 Orlando
Clipper Cutlass de luxe boat
with a 50 hp Johnson or
Evinrude engine And it's ion
show during the week at
Maurai Lumber Compian i s
office on Shirley Street It
you want to try your hand
read the rules carefully on the
back page where this week's
puzzle is also found. Last
week's solutions are found on
page six today.
SOME contestants get a bit
carried away by their hopes
and send in all manner of
little notes. Here is a
sampling:
One man named Kirk,
wrote to the Editor: "You
will find that I'm not bluffing
when I say that I have won


this prize. I have so much
confidence in myself that I've
won that you can contact me
by calling the following
number .."
Another wrote as follows:
"I am a farmer and I am
putting for number 6 down
"furrow". Do not put
"burrow" please. Furrow is a
familiar sight to a farmer ....
would not be burrow. I've
never seen a burrow in the
Bahamas. I am a patron of
your famous newspaper. I've
decided to win the prize this
week."


Well, sir, thank you for
your comments and praise.
And keep trying to win The
Tribune's fabulous boat prize.
Don't give up......


New fuel to ease



supplyproblems


BAHAMASAIR'S fuel supply problems are
to be eased with the introduction shortly of a
new type of fuel.
General manager Max Healey said this week
that there had been a "substantial
improvement" in the airline's fuel allocation
from U.S. suppliers after complaints were
made.
"Our January allocation was totally
unrealistic. It has now been doubled for March
and comes close to what we asked for.'
The company, however, will be using JP-4
fuel rather than straight kerosene. classified as
JP-I.
"JP-4 has a somewhat different
characteristic which requires certain
adjustments in fuelling equipment." Mr
Healey explained.
it also requires that fuelling he done under


the wing rather than over
Mr. Healey said'that until the necessary
adjustments and other equipment had been
installed, Bahamasair could not begin using the
new fuel.
NOT DANG('.ROUS
He noted that JP-4 was cheaper and more
easily available but denied reports that the fue;
was more dangerous to use
"That is false, misleading and erroneous
Rolls Royce would not have found it
acceptable for use with its engines if that was
the case," Mr. Healey declared.
He admitted that the fuel had a different
flash point from JP-1 but was being used by
Air Canada without any problems.
"Any fuel is dangerous if the proper fuelling
technique is not used," he said.


Coins for Sir Milo


Canadian High Commissioner to the Bahamas. His Excellency, John Harrington, right, called on
Sir Milo and Lady Butler, at Government House and pres'iiteu the Governor-General hwri a st of
four specially-minted sterling silver coins. The coins were stuck to commemorate the games of the
XXIst Olympiad to be held in Montreal. Canada in the summer of 1976.
At left is Mr. Ernest
Strachain. Chief Protocol W
Officer. It is estimated that out ', \
of a total of 60 million coins to
be minted by the Royal
Canadianl Mint over a
three-year period, Canadians
will purchase about 40 per cent
aind tihe rest will be made m .
available throughout the world xe
'wnn Ollyn iud Wntsel O\ty
II all countries expected 1to mW tem
send olitpic athletes to the
gamties. The sets consist of two
i;5 and two $ 10 ciins.


A set of the coins (shown right).


LABOUR PROBLEMS HIT


RACE TRACK CATERING


LAB(OUR difficulties with
her bar and dining room staff
,:t lobby Horse Race Track
maIy curtail those sewrices to
the public. The Tribune
learned today.
Although all the catering
facilities at the Race Track
were scheduled to be open
today, there was little certainty
what would happen Tiuesda,y
when the next race meet is
held.
The food concession is being
operated this season b\ the
management of the Track. Ihis
paper understands that about
three weeks ago Mr Garth
Kemp. general manager of
Hobby Horse Hall, dismissed
two of the 30 employees
working in the department
because of alleged shortages.

on the job and refused to work
until the two dismissed
employees were rehired.
Reportedly Mr. Kemp then
dismissed the whole lot and
engaged new staff to replace
them.
The Racing Commission,
which must approve everyone
engaged in racing, has taken
the view allegedly, that food
concession staff also come
within their jurisdiction.
Mr. Kemp was advised by
the Commission yesterday that
management must rehire the
old staff. The race track
management has reportedly
refused to do so and planned
to go ahead with the new staff.
When contacted today Mr.
Kemp refused to comment on
the situation at the race track.
The dispute involves there ,
sandwich stands, three bars and
one dining room.
In a news conference
Monday, Commission chairman


Franklyn Wilson ,on teredc
criticism of the race track tb-;
pointing out Ihati t Vi t i .
substantial coltrlibutoi to th:
country's ecornolmy.
He said that the totil
amount bet at the race track
last year was 55 millmn ot


wllchl approximately S4
million was returned directly
S.tc republic as winnings
Othel inembers of the
Racing (Commission are Oti,
Brown. Leroy Ferguson.
Sidney Wilson and Josenh
Sweetng.


Curling denies 'criticism


CECIL CURLING. acting
principal of the (. R Walker
Technical College. has denied
levelling criticism at teachers in
the Primary schools as m ght
have been suggested bh a
headline in the (Itardian
newspaper Thursday
Mr. Curling was the principal
speaker at the Teacher's Union
meeting Wednesday when he
discussed the need for "drastic
changes" in the educational
svste m.
lHe said he thought the
primary teachers were doing
the best they could under the
present system and that it was
hus personal belief that it was


(lit system which was at fault,
not staff or students.
I evidence )tf s,. un.melhiW. being
seriously wrong were the
results coming from the
primary schools over the past
several years, he said.
"I would like to make il
cleal that at no time did I
criticize the teachers in the
primary schools. I think the
primary teachers are doing the
best they can under the present
system." And Mr. Curling
added: "In fact primary
teachers should be commended
for being able to keep their
sanity under the conditions
they are forced to work."


Funeral services


Police Force and Drexel Rolle.
The funeral procession will
leave Butler's Funeral Home at
2 p.m.


V I :*


FUNERAL services for Miss
Lillian Rolle, 39, will be held 3
p.m. tomorrow at the Church
of God, Fowler Street.
Interment will follow in the
church cemetery.
Miss Rolle died February 27
at the home of.her mother,
Mrs. Phoebe Rollins, Kemp
Road.
She is survived by a son and
a daughter, Ray and Pauline
Bethel; her mother; three
sisters, Mrs. Sylvia Adams; Mrs.
Gloria Leyva and Miss Coraline
Rolle; two brothers, Inspector
Prince Rolle of the Bahamas


\


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2 m_____ te (ribmtn


Honest Jim, a union man all the way


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I i 'ihl i haund tii hr rudi'.'


LONDON James "Honest Jim"
Callaghan, Britain's new foreign
Secretary, is not the nation's most subtle
politician, but Britons feel he's one you
can trust.
One of the most powerful and
respected leaders of the Labour party,
Callaghan at 61 retains the Socialist
perspective that drew him into politics
about 30 years ago.
"I've known the degradation of
poverty from the worm's eye view," he
says, recalling his youth.
With a ruddy face, flushed with


It's just not British,

ories Labour legislator

",, i\ I[.abour legislator Marcus Lipton, 73, called
'.1' immediiatei arrest of nude runners trying to
.e': making craei in Britain.
i h' raise the issue in the House of Commons,
A il1. ,' .i.c arl Roy Jenkins to order stern action
S.,i::I; '-J 1
',! er In Britain was a blonde girl who ran
S,.i -,s d> in the English C'hannel resort of
h r tlh 1 eek
Si :i.i. i r r!) imnette streaked on Regent Street in
I 'n taihlionable West IFnd.
Si ''ii .iiri iinc streaker struck high above the
i i ',i:.' on a crowded jumbo jet flight from

\. .. -Aid its light 002 was the scene of the
-. .i :: i.irded I urk in his early 30s."
S l", :' miiinho landed at London's Heathrow
'.i: \:i hostess told newsmen: "The gentleman
Si ,, '.'tk through the aircraft by an Englishman
t to himl .
ii .' i, 1! ,! the toilet and ran stark naked through
A.-' ,1 ,~" O:I;' class and back again."
t in, 'it.g hi i others on again, the hostess said, the
t- t -1i ,''; the iet with his Fnglish friend collecting
,)r .hi',ri s narne was not disclosed. (AP)
i Ih I, Btiton Globe today had a one-word editorial on
t\:i ld o( streaking in the nude: "Brrrrrr!"


Strip could have


fIror stolen Vermeer


, !i % p. written
* I ii i I t .l 'ster to
S Irish
S : J o lif


IRKI) SIllPHERI). 55,
i: red I lhas been
;ir.. i I\ British Prime
'. l r, d I% l l.. .i r to) a
i b II his Cabinet of
S! Pi'V Seal and
i :1L ti Ilader of the
I orti
S!, (1', appointnieti


ii lorner Min
S : ,I State for
. th... tfli airs inl
s .. .bour govern-


imprisonment after being
convicted of injuring more
thap 200 people in bomb
attacks here a year ago.


ment, is well-known in the
Bahamas and came here in
the late '60s to discuss a
proposed conference on
constitutional advance for the
Commonwealth.
mm,


(\ I I) DOCTORS BIG GIFTS'
Mre expensive presents such as colour
\I\, free/ers and trips to Bermuda some
.ei wn out of catalogues were based on how
::,h of a company's products were prescribed
r old. they said.
Both doctors and pharmacists not
i (ifrcquentl. demanded free samples, the
S'otiim itt'ee was told.
I ras almost always 'held up' for free
i ,. iii b\h the pharmacist," testified Robert P.
P'rrr. who said he voluntarily left the
;'i r, i i'harceiutcal Corp. which markets
.. itraceptives
H Bsicallv." he said, "this meant I was to
S ,-! tiihern, samples which he could sell in return'
)or him atuthorizing an ... order."


s i
I i


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MRS NIXON

FLIES OUT

AS AN

AMBASSADOR

Aoi^fl -


WASHINGTON White
House staff members staged a
farewell for First Lady Pat
Nixon (pictured) as she and
President Nixon left for a
Florida weekend today.
It also was the first leg of a
Latin American trip for Mrs.
Nixon as the President's
Ambassador.
About 50 staffers lined up
outside the entrance to the
White House as the Nixons
were boarding a helicopter
for the flight to nearby
Andrews Air Force Base.
They held printed signs
with such messages as "Adios
Ambassador Nixon." "We
Love You." and "Hurry
Home, We'll Miss You."
Mrs. Nixon said a smiling
goodbye and the President
came over, too, for
picture-taking with the
senjloff group.
Mrs. Nixon will be leaving
from Florida Monday for a
six-day trip as Nixon's
personal representative for
the inaugurations of the
presidents of Venezuela and
Brazil.


humour and compassion, Callaghan spells
the consequence of those first years: "I
hate injustice I'll go out of my way to
help any inarticulate man and... I never
find it hard to be rude to my equals, but
I'm patient with the others."
His father, an officer in the Royal
Navy, died in 1921 when Callaghan was
9. His widowed mother had no pension,
forcing him to quit school and work. He
joined the Navy in World War II as an
ordinary seaman. By 1942 he was a
lieutenant in the Far East theatre.


Back from war, Calaghan entered
politics and was immediately elected
Labour Member of Parliament. Through
the years he worked his way into the high
echelons of the Labour party.
When Labour came to power in 1964,
the bluff, genial man who never got past
high school was appointed Chancellor of
the Exchequer and later Home Secretary,
roughly equivalent to the U. S. Attorney
General.
As Chancellor he did what he had
vowed never to do: devalue the pound.
He promptly resigned and moved to


the Home Office where he made the
decision that sent the British Army into
the streets of Belfast to fight a cruel
guerilla war.
As Foreign Secretary, Callaghan faces
complex decisions on a number of
difficult issues.
Here is where he stands on some of
them.
*U.S. relations: Callaghan built up
friendly links with the Johnson
administration. As chancellor, he


obtained
afloat.


Nixon gets tough




over kidnapping


KEY BISCAYNE
President Nixon, voicing
concern over the fresh wave of
kidnapping, has ordered Atty.
Gen. William Saxbe to press
for reinstitution of the death
penalty in cases where a
kidnapped victim is killed, a
White House official said.
Haig said Nixon also ordered
Saxbe to study "whatever
additional measures the federal
government might take to deal
with this problem of
kidnapping."
White House Staff Chief
Alexander M. Haig told
newsmen aboard the
president's airplane en route to


Florida that Nixon talked to
Saxbe on Thursday night and
again Friday morning about
the need to lobby Congress to
adopt the administration's
proposal to reapply the death
penalty.
According to Haig. when the
President spoke with Saxbe
"he conveyed his concern
about the increased incidence
of kidnapping."

Patricia Hearst, daughter of
a San Francisco newspaper
publisher, was kidnapped last
month. Since then, an Atlanta
editor was kidnapped and later
freed after payment of ransom.


There also were kisnappings
this week on Long Island and
in Virginia.
Haig said Nixon told Saxbe
he wanted "increased emphasis
on legislation that has been on
the hill for a year that provides
for reinstitution of the death
penalty."
The measure was sent to
Congress by Nixon on March
21. 1973. and would apply the
death penalty in hijacking and
terrorism cases as well as in
kidnapping where the victim is
killed. The measure would
apply to future cases and
would not be retroactive. (AP)


'I'm backing the president'


WASHINGTON The
chairman of the U.S.
Republican governors said:
"I'm going to break my neck"
to help keep President Nixon
in office.
Gov. Winfield Dunn of
Tennessee, who is ineligible to
seek re-election this year, said
his determination results from
a 25-minute speech Nixon
made to the nation's governors
at a White House dinner
Thursday night.
"I have never been more
inspired, I have never been
more elated, I have never been
more confident," Dunn told
reporters.
"Your children and my
children need a man with his


grasp for the next three years,"
he added.
Dunn was asked whether the
president's accomplishments in
international affairs outweigh
any possible guilt in the
Watergate or related scandals
now being studied by the
House judiciary committee.
"If they prove the president
has done something that
demands inpeachment," he
replied, "I think the president
would leave, probably."
Joining Dunn at a news
conference called to announce
a $100,000 fund raising effort
for Republican gubernatorial
candidates this fall was
freshman Gov. James
Holshouser of North Carolina.


South African police killed


PRETORIA Four South
African policemen were killed
in a clash with terrorists in
Rhodesia Friday and a fifth is
missing.
The government said that
four white constables were
killed and a white sergeant was
missing.
Associated Press cor-
respondent Reg Shay, re-
porting from the Zambezi
river frontier between
Rhodesia and Zambia, said the
skirmish was understood to
have taken place at
mid-morning near Kandahar
Island, about four miles north
of the small resort town of
Victoria Falls.
The South African police
patrol probably walked into an
ambush, Shay reported.
Zambia is believed to be the
base of the black insurgents -
branded terroristss" in
Rhodesia and South Africa but
hailed as "freedom fighters" by
Black Africa.
Paramilitary police units

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from South Africa have been
supporting Rhodesian forces
trying to control infiltration
across the Zambezi for several
years.
Sightseeing trips on the river
above the spectacular Falls
were cancelled today but the


resort was otherwise normal.


who was asked if he shares
Dunn's view of the president.
"Yes, Sirree," he answered.
An aide to Republican
Gov. Daniel J. Evans of
Washington, chairman of the
National Governors Con-
ference, said Evans had never
seen the president in better
form than at Thursday night's
dinner.
But Gov. Kenneth Curtis of
Maine. one of the few
remaining Democratic
governors still in town, had a
different view when asked if he
was inspired by the president's
presentation.


massive U.S. aid to keep Britain

*The European Common
Market: He's a strong
supporter of renegotiating the
terms of Britain's
membership that former
Prime Minister Edward Heath
got in 1972. He's on record as
saying: "Britain is not
finished if we stay out of
Europe."
*Labour disputes:
Callaghan's a union man all
the way. In a choice between
government policy and union
demands, he'll likely back the
working man. He opposes
wage curbs.
The middle east and oil
He visited Egypt and Israel
just before last month's
election. He believes the
Labour party, tradionally
pro-Israeli, should not deser
the Jewish state, but that thi
should not prevent closet
relations with the Arabs whi
supply most of Britain's oil

Pope better
VATICAN CITY Pop
Paul VI is rapidly recovering
from the flu which kept him i
bed over the past week and ha
resumed work, the Vatica
spokesman said today.


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Saturday, March 9, 1974


EDITORIAL


The death of a nation



By ETIENNE DUPUCHI
A FEW weeks ago in Coral Gables I had a telephone call from a
friend who told me that a certain high-ranking retired U.S. army
officer was critically ill with a terminal illness.
She told me that he said he had been reading my articles for
several years but we had never met. Hte had a great desire to meet
me. She felt that it would boost his morale if my wife and I
would visit him.
The friend who called me had been my nurse in Doctors
Hospital in Miami in 1966 when I was critically ill following an
operation. At that time she helped to save my life and so we have
been warm friends ever since.
This nurse is now retired. The army officer is a friend of hers
Sand so, when it was realized that the doctors could no longer help
him, she took him and his wife into her home where she could
take care of him personally.
I can tell you that Sybil Scott is a rare and a wonderful
woman.


She arranged to have us to dinner. My wife was in Nassau at
the time but she was flying to Miami specially for this occasion
Unfortunately the plane was several hours late and so I had to go
alone.
The next day "Scottie" phoned to say how much her patient's
morale had been boosted b y my visit. Would I repeat it now that
.my wife was with me again.
We set a date for another dinner ... that is, if her patient was
still alive. But unfortunately my wife was recalled to Nassau on
an urgent matter and so I had to go alone again,
When my wife rejoined me a few days later we immediately
drove out to our friend's house to give time and fellowship to a
stricken man who. in his time, had engaged in events of world
importance.
This man was not bedridden. lie was up and around on his
feet. His eyes shone with the lively spark of life, his mind was
clear and he was even capable of laughter. But he was a dying
man ... a man literally dying on his feet.
I have seen men die in bed and on the field of battle. But to see
a robust man walking around ... showing no outward sign of
approaching detail ... and to know that he was only waiting for a
foreign agent, deep down in his innards, to strike the fatal blow
that would end his life in a matter of seconds ... this was a new
experience for me.
We must all die. From the moment we draw our first breath in
this world ... in that moment every new born babe starts his first
movement towards the grave. Death is the only certainty of life.
But, however old tone nma become, the end always seems only a
Remote possibility. To know that it is not only a certainty but
that it is lurking :' ,.';:1 the next bend in the road ... poised to
strike ... is a_ g rn realization .
As you inay judge from what I have written so far, this man's
innards were riddled with cancer which had reached a stage
where the end must come soon. IHe was in constant pain but ...
disciplined soldier that lie was ... he had complete control of
himself and showed no evidence of ,suffering as lie laughed and
talked with me.
As a soldier this man had been engaged in fighting external
forces ... often facing death ... -ft all of his adult life.
Now ... here he was ... just sitting and helplessly waiting while a
foreign element inside his body steadily ate his life away. And
there was nothing in medical science to help hims.

Yesterday I discussed the seven stages of human life as is so
graphically outlined in Shakespeare's -s s'You Like It.
The visits I made to the stricken man was at the height of the
coal miners strike in England. It was during die closing week of
Sthe election in which the British people would finally decide the
Sfate of the greatest and most powerful nation in recorded history,
Snow reached the sixth stage in Shakespeare's picture of human
decay. These men and women of Britain would decide at the polls
Whether the nation would be advanced quickly to the seventh and
final stage of its decay into mediocrity.

A fact that few people seem to realize is that human life is only
a small part of God 's vast creation. There is a relationship
between the greatest and the tiniest particle of the universe. The
Stones on which we walk, the grass of the fields, the giants in the
forest, the great oceans, the sun, the moon and the countless
-trillions of stars that twinkle at night in the vast firmament of
space, are all inter-related. They ate all governed by a set of rules
that must be followed precisely if the whole function is not to be
thrown out of harmony.
S More and more every day man is learning that it is of
dangerous consequence when he dares to trifle with the simple
rules that govern the universe in a way that makes everything
man and beast, grass lands, and forest, heaven and earth all a
part of one grand piece.
S It is certain that the rules that govern your life and mine apply
equally to the family structure and on the long stretch to a
-bation, even to the heart of the former vast British Empire as we
bow see the pattern slowly ... painfully ... unfolding before our
eyes.
SThe only difference between the story of a mani's life and that
of a nation is time. Whereas the span of a man's life is limited to
within a century ... it takes centuries for a nation to grow to a
Dominant place in the world and, by the normal processes of
events, it should take more centuries for it to decay and fade into
he background.

SThe British people have been a warrior race. Locked away in an
land kingdom they became a sturdy people. fighting border
Luttles among the different tribes the Angles, Scots, Irish and
Welsh and facing foreign invasion by Rome, Normandy and the
horsemen, all men of hardy and sturdy races who stood toe to
toee. eye to eye and settled their disputes in manly combat.
SAnd so, when the British people finally emerged from their
land fastnessess to take a place on tile world stage they were a
Iturdy race that carried in their breasts the elements that make
?or greatness. And so the time came when Britain was no longer
fist Britain. This tiny island nation had earned the stature of
treatness in the eyes of the world and so she was justified in
king "Great" on as a prefix to the old Britain. In this wise she
became "Great Britain" with the proud boast that Britons ruled
{he waves.

And then signs of decay started to show in the structure.
English people in the Bahamas were resentful in thIe early years of
I'his century maybe it was at the turn of the century when
jhe late H. C. Christie, Poet Laureate of the Bahamas, wrote a
lament to Britain's fading glory. It was a powerful poem.
: At the time Britain was at the crest of her power ... and so it
temed to be clear lunacy for anyone to suggest that the days of
the old British lion were numbered.
I experienced the same hostility from Britons in the Bahamas
when I warned that Britain's failure to go to the aid of Ethiopia
'hen that tiny defenceless African state was raped by Mussolini's


kgions, revealed another crack in the structure.
" Winston Churchill himself recognize' that the end was
Ipproaching by the course events tuok under a Labour
government in Britain after the second world war that came as a
rI


Uhr dritbute


~It


THE


THE PLP GOVERNMENT is an incompetent crew with
an incompetent captain. Under them the affairs of the
country are being badly mismanaged and thousands of
Bahamians are suffering as a result. Furthermore, they just
do not care.
It has been that way now for several years but as obvious
as it is many of their supporters have been slow to see and
to understand. But they are beginning to see and to
understand, one by one and day after day. They are
beginning to see the tragic results of PLP incompetence and
they are beginning to understand that the PLP is incapable
of finding solutions for the problems which they have
created by their own folly.
As was pointed out in this column a few weeks ago, the
erosion of PLP support is taking place at the vital middle
level, the group between the top politicians and the
so-called grass-roots. These are the people who walk and
talk and who are mainly responsible for influencing opinion
and morale among the grass-roots. They are the ones to
whom the unsophisticated voter looks for answers and
explanations and hope.
When they have no answers and no explanations and no
hope to offer then it is only a question of time before rapid
erosion sets in at the grass-roots. Except for the handful
eho have been consumed by easy money and power
patronage, the middle level people are a great deal more
sincere than many of the politicians at the top. Their
greatest problem is their emotional attachment to what
used to be the spirit of the PLP but what is now really only
a rotten carcass.
Franklyn Ferguson is one of those strong PLP
supporters, indeed an officer of a party branch, who has
been having serious difficulties with his emotions and the
facts which stare him in the face every day. He might want
to remain a PLP and so avoid an emotional crisis but he has
demonstrated one thing and that is that he has courage, a
quality not found in abundance among Bahamian
politicians at the higher level.
Mr. Ferguson has had some interesting things to say
about his party before in letters to the Press but now he has
come out openly to condemn the Government which he
and others like him helped to elect and to sustain in power.
That Government, he says, has been guilty of violence
and autocracy and injustice. He is right, of course, and this
is what the original PLP Dissidents and the Opposition Free
National Movement have been saying all along.
Lynden Pindling has become, over the years, a selfish,
autocratic leader whose main political motivation seems to
be to keep himself in power. He has schemed among his
colleagues, and manipulated them to such an extent tli:tt
there are few of them who could truthfully say that they
have any confidence in him.
As a result of his bungling leadership and bad judgment ,
the Government is constantly in a state of unrest and the
party has been reduced to a soulless mass of squabbling
factions and individuals. Mr. Pindling has only one great
talent as a politician, as was observed by Paul Adderley
some time ago when he said that Mr. Pindling can win votes
but he .cannot govern and that there would be no
progress under him even for a thousand years!
Under Mr. Pindling's Government many Bahamians have
been subjected to various forms of victimization which
fully entitle the PLP to be accused of rank injustice. Old


result of Britain and France's failure to stop Mussolini in his mad
adventure into Ethiopia.
In one of his post-war speeches he lamented: "I have watched
this famous island descending incontinently, fecklessly, the
stairway that leads to a dark gulf. It is a fine broad stairway at the
beginning, but after a bit the carpet ends. A little farther on there
are only flagstones, and a little farther on still these break
beneath your feet."
And again it was Shakespeare who wrote:
There is a destiny
That shapes our ends.
Rough-hew them how we will.

In some of my recent articles I have shown some of the stages
by which nations and peoples decay.
In Britain's case one of the early blows was the loss of a whole
generation of potential leaders in the battles of Mons and the
Marne in the first world war.
Since then foreign cancerous elements have infiltrated the
body politic of the nation so that the British people have
undergone a slow, if hardly perceptible, change in recent years.
It is not necessary to go into detail on this point. We see
evidence of this fact all around us today.
Foreign elements have gradually invaded the very bowels of the
British people.
In previous articles I have outlined the methods by which
Russian Communism has been infiltrating ... like a cancer in a
man's bowels ... the elements of power in the western
democracies and destroying them one by one. Foreign influences
and especially Russian propaganda have reduced Britain to a
shell. New it's only a matter of time. And, as I have said
repeatedly in this column, America is the next objective for the
Communists' cancerous methods of undermining and
destroying from within any power that stands in its way.
** * * * *
I am frequently asked today what is going to happen to
Britain. No one should need to ask me this question because the
picture is as clear as the nose on a man's face.
In a recent article 1 quoted a letter from a friend in
England in which he said that 300,000 people would leave Britain
this year to start life over in another part of the world. These
people are the backbone of the nation. When they leave, the
nation will lose a crop of potential leaders for the future.
This letter was written before the election. As a result of the
startling results of the election there is bound to be a mass exodus
of the best elements in the nation. They speak of going to
Australia, New Zealand. Canada, some of them may come to the
Bahamas. A great many would have come to the Bahamas if there
were not so many uncertainties about the future of life in these
islands.

The British people and life in Britain -. have undergone a
radical change in recent years.
Pakistanis, West Indians, East Indians from Uganda and
elements that will move in from Europe after Britain enters the
European Common Market when immigration barriers will be
removed, will take the places in the nation of the island people
who are now leaving their homeland.
If it were possible for us to return to earth a century from now
we would probably find it difficult to discover any trace of the
true Englishman in England. This sturdy race will have become
history. A new people with a new tradition will have evolved in
the great cities and towns that, during the early years of this
century, were the heart land of the greatest Empire in recorded
history.
** *** *
A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
Men lived like fishes; the great ones devour'd the small. -
ALGERNON SIDNEY


SHATTERING


people have been fired from their humble but, to them, oh
so important and necessary. jobs. simply because they
exercised their right to support the political party or
candidate of their choice.
There are few things more revolting in human experience
than to see the powerful set about to destroy the innocent
and the weak. Mr. Ferguson calls it violence and that is
exactly what it was when this iniquitous Government did
such a shameful injustice to those children at Inagua by
deporting their Turks Island-born fathers. That was an act
of victimization which can hardly be matched in the
violence of its intent and consequences.
"The masses cannot bear much more." Mr. Ferguson
says. "At present the Bahamas is faced with a recess n and
moving into a depression. I want to know what the
Government's policies are? How are they going to solve the


r :tt
@ ;:: .:;.:.


.

TOI TH


unemployment crisis in these islands?"
It is a dismal picture straight across the national scene.
Confidence in the Government, which was so badly
damaged by Mr. Pindling himself, has not been revived and
as a result the economy of the country continues to
deteriorate. When that happens just about everything else
deteriorates with it.
There is little progress in improving the educational
system and the health services are just as bad. Public roads
all over the country are falling into disrepair. The
Government has moved into the airline business and set
back development there at least a decade. The development
of the tourist industry, the country's main economic stay,
has been allowed to fall behind.




TRIBUTES TO DR. HORAN


EDITOR The Tribune.

DR. Victor G. Horan was
not only an excellent doctor
but was kind, considerate,
thoughtful and a real friend to
all of his patients. lie lived
only to help others.
He always talked so kindly
to us, his young patients. When
we were sick and it was
necessary to visit his office, we
were not fearful.
l)r. Horan, by his constant
smile and the tone of his voice
had tih knack for putting us at
ease immediately and
reassuring us that all would be
well if we followed his
instructions.
When a house call was
necessary, he would even take
time to speak kindly to the
family pet before leaving.
A great man indeed, was our
friend and doctor, Dr. Victor
G. Horan.
DEBBIE & CHRIS SWEETING.
St. Andrew's School.


TRUTH


Mr. Ferguson says that the PLP Government is incapable
if solving the country's problems and again he is right.
They do not have the imagination nor the competence and
they are tooarrogant and too petty and too stupid.
But perhaps the most telling criticism made by Mr.
Ferguson of his own party is that the majority of those in
Government do not have the people's interest at heart.
There was a time when the PLP held out to the young
people of the country the promise of a better life through
preparation. They told the youth of the nation to educate
themselves and to prepare for higher job opportunities a id
a better standard of living. Today they tell the youth to be
satisfied with what they have which is nothing in some
cases and in other cases far iess than what they had every
reason to look forward to.
Taxes have been increased without consideration of the
ability of the people to pay and the people hurt as a result.
Yet this same Government which increases taxation so
easily just as easily gives away the people's hard-earned
money to its friends in what appear to be padded contracts.
Millions go down the drain. And Mr. Adderley, the PLP
Minister. says that PLP people are happy to pay increased
taxes'
In the middle of this the "fat cats" of the Inner Circle of
Mr. Pindling's Square Deal are getting latter and fatter. And
Mr. Pindling himself? How much does he care' While the
country is riddled with taxation, unemployment and a
declining economy, the Maximuim Leader gets himself a
half-million dollar mansion and a S40.000 car!
It is astonishing that an intelligent leader of a country
can lose his perspective to such an extent that he can
indulge in such an ostentatious display of luxury at a time
when so many of his people are scraping the bottom of the
barrel for mere existence.
Mr. Ferguson has come to the right conclusion about the
PLP Government of Lynden Pindling. They do not have the
people's interest at heart. They simply do not care. And
that is a shattering truth.


ALL WELCOME
TO THE

12 WEEKS WHIST TOURNAMENT

THE LOUNGE
Mount Royal Ave. (adjoining Bird Lend)
STARTING
Monday, March 11th, 1974
at 9 p.m.








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-I)ITOR Tribune,
Would you kindly allow me
space in your paper to pa\
tribute to the late D)r V. (;
Illoran. te was the Family
Doctor of our Family for as
lohig as I can remember.
Sincerelt
MYRTLE ALBURY.

TRIBUTE TO A
BELOVED DOCTOR
I his Doctor was very
Iuman indeed,
Who always help Others in
need,
Because he was gifted with a
Ranr q quality .
lincouraged by an \ilmiiring
wif I
,Ind together enijo\ cd Nature
to their delight.
'ItORAN' will be
remembered by uss along as
life lasts.


and M. Albury


Jil l










Saturday, March 9, 1974


4 ~tIw mburitut


Happy anniversary at the nursery

THE HARBOUR Island Day Nursery sponsored by
American residents of Harbour Island, celebrated its tenth
anniversary with a special programme attended by
Governor General Sir Milo Butler.
Over 700 Bahamian children have benefitted from the
facilities of the centre during the last ten years and 40
pre-schoolers and infants are now in residence daily while
their mothers are working.
The nursery was begun in 1964 by a group of winter t
residents who were concerned with the difficulty working
mothers were having in getting proper care for their small
children and babies.
The Anglican Parish House was offered at a modest
rental to house the nursery. It was equipped with cribs,
tables, sand boxes and toys. A matron and other attendants
were hired and in early 1965 the nursery opened with
enrollment at near capacity.
With charges at the minimal, the bulk of the expenses for
running the nursery are met through contributions, the
proceeds of a gift shop, raffles and entertainments.
Inoculations are a prerequisite for admission and each
child receives a vitamin tablet every day as well as a bath.
Breakfast. lunch and in-between snacks are served.
The 40 children are cared for six days a week from 7.30



Nassau Christian and Missionary
ALLIANCE CHURCH
IG Im Temporarily Meeting At Y.W.C.A. Building
Dolphin Drive at John F. Kennedy Drive.
Rev. Weldon B. Blackford, Minister



WI.I)NI.S) AY. 7.30 I'.M. 1IR. llLIAN IL AI). .R DN
TOCCA I ALLS BIBLE COLL G I.GUST SPI AKR


VISITORS WE LCOME

BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
Soldier Road and Old Trail
NASSAU FRIENDLIEST!
SERV ICES:
Sunday School:10 a.m. Preaching iI a i.m.
& 7:30 p.m. =.
REVIVAL SERVICES MARCH4th- 10th
ALL SERVICES NIGHTLY AT 7:30
Pastor: H. MILLS Phone 5-1339 P.O. Box N3622


NEW TESTAMENT
CHURCH '
Highland Park Dolphin Drive
P. O. Box N-9243
Phone 5-2012 5-9412 4,
Special Campaign for the Month:
"Marchi g to Sunday School
in March"
Julius Bradshaw
Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Julius Bradshaw
Sunday School 6:00 p.m. Pastor
Sunday Worship Service 11:00 a.nl.
Sunday Evangelistic Service 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Family Hour 7:30 p.m. Come
and hear the Children's Booster Band Sing".
"WHERE VISITORS ARE OUR HONOUREDI) GUESTS"


/ ', *~A


I


i


..'. ; ":o:


4


Pictures: ROLI. D ROSE
FROM top: The executive committee of the
Harbour Island Day Nursery are photoeralphed
with (loernor (General Sir Milo Butler (third from
right) and Mr. Ntorman Solomon. relprc-sentative for
St. (George's (Ilnex to Sir Milo) it the tenth
annliverar\ celebrations.

Sir Milo Butler makes a tour of the nursery.
Accompi mning him was the district's representative
Norlman Solomon.

Mrs. IMauLreen Mather, matron of the nurseryy.
receives a special plaque from Sir Milo Butler
marking her years of service.


Sir Milo Butler and St. George's representative
Norman Solomon chat with Mr. J. Warren.
president of the executive committee which
operates the nursery.


STAR INSURANCE
EXECUTIVES OFF TO
SCHOOL. Four Star
Insurance Co. district
managers and the manager of
the Ordinary & Group
Insurance Department will
leave the Bahamas tomorrow
for Daytona Beach, Fla.
where they will take an
intensive course in District
management offered by the
Life Insurance Marketing and
Research Association of the
U.S. (LIMRA). The course
II I II iP


covers planning, recruiting
selection, training and
motivation and leadership.
Photo shows the departing
students being wished good
luck by Shervin W.
Thompson, Star's general
manager (far right) and
Herbert H. Thompson,
controller (far left). Others
are (1. to r.) James M. Pinder.
manager district 3, Grand
Bahama and Bimini: Edward
T. Sands, sales manager
Ordinary & Group


Department : Joshua E.
Culmer, manager district 4
Eleuthera, Ralph C. Barnett
manager district 2, New
Providence and Farmiiy
Islands: and S Evans,
manager district 1, New
Providence and Family
Islands.
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Saturday, Mar :h 9, 1974


(h? (rtbtnt 5


Cast sparkle in 'The


Star S]

By Daphne W. Whitfield
THREE YOUTHFUL and
promising actors, Andrew
Wilson, Lola Saunders and Earl
Lightbourne formed the total
acting cast in the University
Players production of Neil
Simone's "The Star Spangled
Girl" directed by Samuel


Boodle at the Dundas Civic
Centre Thursday through
Sunday.
The set, which was Ihe same
throughout the three acts, was
imaginatively and pro-
fessionally designed by
Bahamian architect Donald
Cartwright, and constructed by
Director and lightman Sam


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Boodle, with the help of many
young hands.
It was the most intricate
"non-pretty" set I have ever
seen on the Nassau stage with
two sets of stairs one on either
side of the stage with
accompanying balconies. It
looked what it purported to be
- an old Victorian home used
as an office and apartment in
San Francisco in 1966.
Andrew Wilson and Earl
Lightbourne played Andy and
Norman, editor and sole
contributor respectively on an
intellectual anti-establishment
magazine. Andy and Norman
had both graduated top of
their class at university.
Lola Saunders played
Sophie, the all-American girl.
top athlete, the "Star Spangled
Girl" of the title.
The first Act tended to drag.
Andrew has a tendency to
parody although in this part he
was given scope for this
tendency as he played over the
telephone the heads of the
different departments of the
magazine and, to escape his
creditors and his voracious
landlady, many parts.
Both Andrew and Earl have
a tendency to overact. They do
this with sudden unnatural
bursts of dramatic climaxes
without a credible and gradual
build-up so that in these
sudden loud frenzies a lot of
good dialogue loses its clarity.
Earl tends to become squeaky
at such moments and Andrew
unintelligible.
However, after the
Intermission, in the last two
Acts, all three actors appeared
to relax and the staccato
climaxes were at a minimum.
In these two last Acts the
glory of the enthusiasm,
sensitive intelligence, intellect,
whackiness and integrity of


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pangled Girl'


WHO LOVES
WHO FORGIVES


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6 nhie Crihuttrf


Saturday, March 9, 1974


Communists versus the Rest


THIS is the second article hb
.Vews Report Lditor PE'TI:'R SA
infiltration of trade unions in
draws a comparison between t
totalitarian regime and in the dem
published the first article on Thu

THE MATERIAL COMPARISON B1
So the definition problem dealt
trade union discussion on the basis
worker first and torenvost in this
material conditions in the ('ommuni
A new comparative study of this has
Bush. and I am reproducing some o
table. His exanunation is based on wa
and in Vfour Western countries during
covers a aminly I t four. including a
mother and twot children under
Ameritan dollars is at the rate of
taken from the Soviet press and fro
Western countries concerned.
AVERAGE GROSS AND
(i) (h)
t1 SI 1 S
r uhint's duli.rn, s


kilt r tc le ,
I % C\icr.in-I, r I ,s
nuinthi', CirniiinI s 143.14
2 iI iin lita\ ti t 13 61
.i. ei.. 1 r,1 -C C u istl c rn till
4 + lt iili, Is alh ,alict, r till


5 scir i ininhi i
i e h c t'c ia\ IS
r. tin rt. J ti t s i
ptr w-rk holir
7. take -hiun p.in i i
perr sturk hoiiuI


717.77
69 28
41 .9
ill


I 2 ) hOh60 ..51
I ON.00 606.SI


97 3.41


5. l.ik' li.olll t' li. i) ( )
per' w.,fi., uniUt 1 I .62
This does niot of course


cover th


worker pays very little cor hits rent:
nine square meters per head. inclii
lavators and In the big towns e\en
people. Medical treatment and hospit
(On the other hand, however. a\era
relation to prices of consumer goods
rc c t th t f rt r ,,,rt, i d,t,,,, wlI


Swiss Press Review and gave me no less dreary an impression. Nor, were working
munist conditions better: there was no winter wind then to redden the
R on the Communist noses and hands of the workers in the workshops, but instead
democratic countries. He there was an unimaginable heat which covered them in sweat.
trade unionism under a Fither there was no ventilation, or the ventilation did not work.
ocraticwest. The Tribune Lack of heating (no joke in a Russian winter) and lack of
rsday. ventilation are widespread in factories throughout the country."
The safety and health of workers are often endangered through
ETWEEN EAST AND WEST insufficient industrial security in the factories a problem which
with, we can continue the is often treated in the Soviet press. Cloakrooms, washing
of facts. What interests every facilities, lavatories, and canteens are mostly unacceptable bt
is a comparison of actual modern standards. Leisure time is restricted: fulfilhnient of
st countries and in tine West. economic plans by overtime work is often obligatory, even on
recently been made b' Keith national holidays and at the normal rate of pay. It is possible for
f his figures in the following a worker to change his job, but this is not without its material
age levels in the Soviet Union consequences. As a result of Brezhnev's Tashkent speech last
the month of June 1973 and September on labour problems, it has now been laid down that
working father, a housewife every change of job must carry with it a reduction in salary. Fven
eleven. The conversion to under these conditions, however, fluctuation in the labour force
lune 30th 1973. The data is through job changes remains high. This is one way of expressing
om published sources in the an opinion in the Soviet Union. "voting with one's feet".
Even these things, however, do not cover all aspects of the
TAKE-HOME PAY quality of life. On the one hand, the Soviet worker enjoys great 'r
security at several levels. He is less subject to some of tIe
0() (dc (e) uncertainties which Western workers must always keep in \iev'
I r. I rane UK Although some unemployment exists in the Soviet Union, fear of
it is an emotion entirely strange to the Soviet worker. His world is
modest and narrow h but also in a way healthy for its central
assumptions are never brought into question. He is rarcel
1516.94 422 90 163.90 troubled with the growing claims ot an environment for which he
1 u 50 noil 21.30 has no responsibility.
2 6.06 i 14.70 9.63
nil 1t8.41 3.90 But all these advantages are bought at a highprice in many
cases too high a price. Free time denied is no free time. Thc
11 46 1496 st 135.97 Soviet worker is hardly ever in a position to take holidays worthy
463.56 361.94 3so.s0 of the name. The trade union holiday centres favourite there
of Soviet propaganda do not suffice even fo the upper
echoleons of the Soviet "new class". Hotels are just as rare. The
2 4 90 1.4 only leisure activities left are reading and visits to cultural
entertainments in both of which there is little choice.
4i5 .17 3.07 Possibilities of seeking genuine selft-.xpression through hobbies iis
e whole picture. The Soviet they are known in the West and almost entirely lacking.
but he has the right to only But above all, the Soviet worker is denied nearly all the rights
ding kitchen, bathroom and associated with the idea of freedom and this implies uncertainties
this is not available for most and fears which is their turn are unknown to the worker in the
al Cdrf are also free. West. Genuine choice of a profession, of where to work, iot
age wages have to be seen in religious and political beliefs, of where to spend a holiday. o
And it can be shown in this means of expression, or indeed of whether to emigrate all these
i, ,.,.. h.. ..il ...... aspects of free choice are totally denied to the Soviet wcoi kc.


I U ,\IW t- I LI t I(.l 1 C C LT a .t )t o is w it l rea U nee-I |tlk. eggs,
vodka the Soviet worker must work three times as long as the
American worker: while for others butter, sugar, soap, articles
oft clotthine he must work between five and ten times as long.
Fo:r potatt'es and cigarettes, he must work only twice as long as
the Amncrlian worker,
All things considered, therefore, this material comparison
shows quite clearly that the "exploited" workers in Wtstern
countries are \cry much better oft than the "'unexploited'
workers in ( omriunist countries
THE EAST-WEST COMPARISON IN TERMS OF QUALITY
OF LIFE
A. we sC a\\ caller, quality iol life is made up of other things
besides the maternal elements even though it would be
dangerilous to uniidret.iiinatc the importance of material things to
the .iseragi wc.rkir Spaikirngi at the grave of Karl Marx, Frnedrich
I -gels pointc'd uiil that mrn must eat. find lodging and ciothe
hinisell hetoic ht an tuin his attention to other things. These
"other thingss" ,rc dif icu'rrlt io iim asure, however, and it is very
hard ti l m.kC thcim tlihc iubjcct tl a comparison.
If wv lout, at I itusgii conditions in the Soviet Union, we find
that in general the\ arc ver\ bad. In many cases several families
have t, share iani .aprtintc'ln sulmcthing which brings with it
social as weall Jis riiialt.rldl problems. To cover these, Soviet law
contains clerimnts which are completely unknown in the West:
for instance, thIe right of passage through the room of a stranger
whi h is required t) reach onic's own room.
Hi ikin llndiitrios dic a lso \vers uch worse in the Soviet
Union than iin i lie Icst Here is an extract fromn a report by Roger
Bernlhicli. iwhmiI r ni.;:, ',eais has, been the correspondent of a
leading Sw-is ine-spr, peri in Moscow "It was cold Baku is the
cit\ oft winds, and the workshop in the electric motor factory
which we visitedd ,was uinheated. For some unexplained reason the
doors had t) be left open. The winter wind was everywhere, and
the wionlcn who had to he there worked in their winter coats,
with woollen scar\es iovrting their heads and ears Nor is this
industrial quarter of jku an exception. I saw those of Karsnodar
and Rost 5,-oin-thc-l cn in brilliant sunmerr sunshine, but they



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that TINA BESSIE JOHNSON of
James Cistern, Eleuthera is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration should not be granted
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 9th day of March 1974
to The Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs, O. Box N-3002, Nassau.




NO TICE
NOTIC( !+ hereby given that LOTTIE MAY TATOUL cf
Oakes F leld. Wester" District of New Providence is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for naturansation as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalization should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 2nd. day of
March 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. O. Box N-3002,
Nassau, Bahamas.




NO TICE
NOTICE is hereby given that IANTHY G. LIGHTBOURNE
of P. O. Box F-2681 Freeport, Bahamas is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 9th day of
March 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. O. Box N3002,
Nassau.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ALVERA ISADORA
DELANCY of Sea Grape. Grand Bahama is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 2nd. day of
March 1974, io I he Minisst irepolnstie ter Nationatty
and Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affaft, P. O. Sox
N-3002, Nassau.


BACK TO SHELEPIN'S CLAIM
In the light of these detailed comparisons, it is possible tio
make some sort of factual judgment (f Shelepin's claim, and it
turns out quite untrue that trade unions in (Conmmunist countries
have long since implemented what the trade unions nof the
capitalist countries are now struggling for.
We can now see that this is a rhetorical declanlation tor which
not the least shred of evidence exists. It is far more tr:ie to) say
that Western trade unions have come remarkably near 1to a goal
which trade unions in (Communinst couintries are not even ,i.. o ri
to name.
It is of course also true, however, as we have seen, that tlhe
trade unions in communistt countries are in fact striving towards
other goals. That is something which stems quite naturally troin
their nature as instruments of the Communinist Part and 1of the
state.
I have shown that these trade unions come under the direction
of the Communist Party leadership and have as ,on of their main
tasks the furthering of Soviet foreign policies. AnJd it is also
possible to show that these trade union instruments can le, and
often are, used against the interests of their own working class
me mbership.
On June 13th, 1972, in his speech at the I ighlth Congir'.., '
the C,(echoslovak Revolutionary Tladc Uniron
Movement, Alexander Shelepin said "'The highest international
duty of the workers of the socialist countries the vanguard omt
the international working class is all-inmbracing support for the
strengthening of the economic and political power of iach single
socialist state and of the socialist connm untly as a w s a:, t, -i'l
as active participation in realizing the comlprehensive p'rogrlnamme c
of socialist economic integration as the most usli prtrianl basis (,i
the growing power of international socialism"
In his speech in Tashkent last September, which I ha\e already\
mentioned, Bre/hnev put these requirements iln morec concrete
terms. He demanded an improvement in the organisationl and
utilisation of labour power. Hundreds of similar quotations Iron':
speeches by Soviet leaders during the last few' cars could be
brought out as added evidence of this tendency. anid in the light
of Brezhnev's speech new and distinct measures have been taken
An intensive round of discussions in the trade union orm' nisation
followed, the results of which were sununarised in thle iourn;il.
Sovietskaya Industna (September 26th. 1973). I1 these
discussions it was agreed that the phenomenon ol job changing


which had become so prevalent in the Soviet ecornoml was
mainly due to the bad conditions f wo\ok,. lack i. housing. lack
of sufficient space in nursery schools, as well as tlhe great gulf
between workers and tactor\ managements. In order o)i rIemedy
this, it was laid down that seeciywheie the sainte wok inul bhe
rewarded in the same way but that any change ol job will
.iutornatically result in a wage reduction.
The remarkable thing here is that these directives were
established by trade union officials in a country w which has been
under a ('onlnursnist regime fio llie last 55 years.
romr March 30th to April rth. 1 t71 te leveInth congresss ofl
the Soviet Trade U nin I: ederaiion discussed tihe results Of thl
24th Congress of the Soviet ('inmmunist Party, as indeed it was
bound to do. A\ resolution wais passed which demanded among
other things that all trade union organizations should tly to come
to grips with the problem of how higher production could be
achieved with fewer workers.
In the Soviet Union, increases in work productivity and work
:Irsciilie are the business not only of factory manaagements and
of the state which lays down that all attempts Ito hinder
either should be punishable ollences but also of trade unions.
which should in reality act as self-help organizations lor the
workers .
We canl indeed see froml this that it is Iprecisel self-help
niganisations which trade tunions in countric's run bl thIe
(' Immuniss are not. 'The\ are inluch more accurately d described as
coercive organizations for workers. Thev demand self-control
self-discipline the last being through "'comradeli tulirlt .
which are supposed to c'lst under trade union control in all
1jaconu'es. It cannot lie sufficiently emphasiscd that these trade'
unions are in the service oI the central! directed plannll'
'cInomIlly, and not ill the service ofl lie workers.
AND IN THE EAST EUROPEAN COMMUNIST COUNTRIES.
lhe Soviet Uniuon is the vanguard of the socialist countries, and
it is meant to serve as an example which ought to be followed ;as
rapidly and as closely\ as possible hi all the others. What has been
sid about tile Soviet trade uniions is also valid, i crelore, at least
in tcernis of goals tIo bI sliveln fol. In the cases rt all l tie
( Cmuinnist countes o I iascten I'nurope with the exception, ofi
,Iirtse. of Yulgosla\ ia
In his speech to tihe Se\enti (oneress nof the Polhsh Irade
1inrn Orgainisation, reported in the Warsaw paper. Tr\ buna
I luu (Noivenmer 14th 19721. the I'olishl (Conmmutnist leader.
I dulnrd (lierek,. said 'Tle ( mimnuni is PIart directs thie hbt ldinih
(I s'I.I alhism I guarantees the h excuition and ti decides ton 11
diilc tioi n. It lays down the p fitr line for all: for the state, l i tlL
trade unions, for all tile social roiga satio ns, and ford thie nation .i
a whole Ihe trade unions make up thle ni't.
irp r -tant social organisation in the building iof socialism i lih
oiitcet social cl'inate in Ith worik-place. a climate of conscious
diisipline, ofi high expectations. and ot honest ulillmerni <;
duties, with all due regard lri the rights of the \wirvker anld ior
go dl social conditions, as well as justiLfied i ward tfor Cellh !
these are the inost imnportaiil c'requiremeiits for the in oar i
population of the ecominin .id for good relations hainv,'. i
workers. Managemeint and tradii unions are together response '.,,
for the introduction and mlaiintenarnce o(i such a climatle 1' lhi
tlalories and enctrprisestl ."
A\ little more veiled pcrhitps butl not tlhe less etfec'live lthe
lesson is clear. I he Polish Iradc ulnins have the same role as the
S \ilet trade unionsii: he\ aie to he instruments of the stilAt. to
le iset where iiecessalr over anil against [he wotkers i. Inl tlh s.ale
speech. Gierek had hitter worts for thosine "w\ho work dishoiicstil .
\\ho despise wor k discipline, who lrwaste' lhin li' I I1as \wll ais
public property. Uniortuntinel such pCeop'le lei to bh ouniiid ill
professions and at all levels, nut just tihe lowest. WI\ mnust siatl the
hard truth' these people live at tile .ost of all honest woirkcrs.
the\ waste tlhe c0r1u0n1non gain. and the\ break the sacred pruncipic
of social justice. Therefore their deserve nc t ctonsuiderat ion ."
Ihe sai me is true all roviel astern I uItipc'. 'There is space fl r
Onl i one more iexamlple. The (;cneral Secretar i)f thie r lungariant
I rade lUnion Fedcration. Sandir ai spar. in a speech to tlhe Varna
('oresn s ol t Whe Woirld I edcration Oft l U'ade Unirons on October
17th 1973, said: '"The woting class is lbotth e eiploer andl tlhe
owner: and evertyne state, ,overnieniit and trade lulonls is
there Io serve thins cinplh)i) r and i l tins n ir." his is swell
formiluald, d. il \bihen i we look at clit s \l w sec1' litt 11 onlt
lightly cainuflages the chacractci oit Co( nuiiu nin l trade unions i',
organizations which exist to enforce work discipline aid the
planned distribution of labour.
*:********
Principle smomces olher than t hose saled iM tlih text
R sc',s/. Kriit ncintl r /,u11 St atulul cli. Kl I'l)It ((, uillunlntaI.,t s
on the iinstlt ution l ll io l Coli i t' nun(' un isi'It Pa l iOl tih Sc \ l 'c I nll 'i
Berne 1973.
Intfornlialmnnsdi tn S()I (the Int' lrr al iton Bullletin o lit e
Swiss I astern Inslilitut, B iriiC
THE WORLD FEDERATION OF TRADE UNIONS (WFTU)
Togclthr ith t he V(I)Wo ld Peace Council, (lhl e V, I is (ihe ;i;'I
importantly i the Co('onnunl itmi ut organisations inet \c todai\ It
was founded on So\it'i initiative in 1I 45 anld 1i toii a\ as then
under SoVict dilci'ul in. Its iigminal headqihuailcrrs ,\as in Paris. lut
in I 51 it was expc lled b\ th.' Flrenich (;o\lilnIniilt l r siubt'iS\es


------CROSSWORD SOLUTION--


EXPLANATIONS OF MORE
DIFFICULT CL.Ut S
CLUES ACROSS:
1. PROWLING not growling.
Since the "vacationer
would" probably "be"
taking home moviese"
that don't have sound.
what he "would be
pleased to" film would be
the animal on the move
(i.e., "a PROWLING
lion") rather than "a
growling" one
7. TOTTER not titter.
"Starts to TOTTFR" (i.e ,
feeling dizzy). yes, but
"when" the "patient
starts to titter," it is too
early to know that it's not
merely ordinary
anusemnent at something
If the tittering continues,
the "nurse may" then
"know".
8. KITTENS not mittens.
"About some KITTENS
that got lost." yes, since
there is the implication in
the clue of animation
"About some mittens
that" were "lost" would
be more to the point.
10. LEAD not head. "Ability
if" he "keeps his LEAD"
is more apt. The right
temperament, rather than
"ability if" he "keeps his
head."
12. LIE not die. The clue
phrase, "on the seashore,"
superfluous for die,
favours LIE where the
"naturalists" can do
something about saving
them. As regards die, the
clue already states that
the "oil-soaked gulls" are


PJ- GI'. LT T 'N Ui, jF- j r
E ul 1- A ul

T T N r T ; ', -T' -1 I 'R


iL IE

E S S.
EI D I

ZiE
" [21 ,I:


SL ; E R
S





Si 1 I
r 'F


"close at handle' and
there's nothing thal t tlic
"'iaturalmsts" can dlo or
then.
18. (OS I not cast Not tinl
comnplele cast wlth all
thcl nuillerous milmilllcrs o0
a "inutsical productiono"
surely. ul atihe lr those
that plaI tl i' lead part'; .
Talk interestinglr abo iut
the COSI es, itf, for
example, "'ne of his
successl'II prodtiuc t ions"
had been made on a
shoestring budget agnd
reaped huge profits.
20. YEARS not tears.
YEARS. yes, in view of all
the changes made since
she first started Hardly
fears, since if she had
"fears of flying." she
would not have become
an "air hostess."
21. WADDLE not paddle.
WADDLE, describing
"her" fat, ungainly body
as she walks is more
contributive than paddle
for the clue wording,
"sadly remember her
youthful figure." In a
canoe, her "figure" could


easily he well hidden froin
11in 1 "on" a beai."
CLUES DOWN:
2. RI VISI not revive Since
they resemblele" It
'I "mrkt k C l it tions'"
rather than Itpciat lheni .
hue would RI VIS1 It1e
'sales plan t e.. ust' it in
a ilodiflid t riini. ralhet l
thn re1 i e it hi' C lts,11n
one, whk h w1 iuIldnl I '-
exactlly rci\ .11 in lin,
s I r I I I cI i .1 n r, e dl'
C'11 1111,P l t 111 c"
ut ur>rnstl".n s
3. WAN II I) not s\ ailr,.
VX \\ I 1) iiiki's a
uonipt l lich nsis ,1ins m it and
ihnclldes thie it ac thiu li
has "wailed sIo long for
th e victor '
I'urtheiniore, in th inic
,sense, as "'l raing linvi'n
he" lias I rnlin.neld anid
fouuhl "'tor.' ralher than
siuIIpI "w' ailetd tui lIie
victor
4. NUTIS not nets lhe hclue
word, 'e\ e ntually "I
favors Nt IS which "gil
musty." "\ets il'
eventually start to rot.
5. FAFIIHER not lather.
Since later will icti ally
do sot. "'acct riding ito
mother in a fiiss\ moodd"
suits FATIII R, where he
has nmerel' used a towel.
for example, and niot
folded it perfectly again
afterwards.
6. FURROW not burrow.
The clue implies that any
farmere" will find this a
"familiar sight" which is
more apt of FURROW of
which there are many in a


plower'd licld 1 ;,kin' ,il!
S It 5 1I
1 I I t In I s i n t
consdIe.'r tion 1. a b \hrroi i
iwuld be sc11 en oini
int ireqniuentl i
SI I I noi teIll. 'Itkn r I ii
Sl II l oun omethnIg,'
in t noI "i' inslrl tso tell ) ui
sometinrig.' suice hlie is







'' ) rn (I lef' hi (.-Ic r ti
",, I i I lh (. i \ l h i ,,
"\ o hl" L [ho or 1 listen to



ihlli 0 lt ) 110SO
Inn nun inn
I \RI IS I S nl ait1ise I lie




I se o \RI IS Ir S applies
S' i illn to a child cwho

1 I. ll Is i, oi to lt ru
1ht'I'I i gtla outous
,i i a'indt f ill succeed
ilh l main people h"o



hlii ''nr d' ire to be in
14 PIitKS Icnot packs I I cn'ta



calre" '.ion iaipt l i tlhe

ptIcK ins "' ies "ti "
I iu I ihci i rIll i' in os i
KI i 1c l ltu I i r Igs t iL
,ai' s s'II at all n i ave a
co) SPA noit "To garntento"






wtheri lies Pc b'he packed
net trl nd fiends w ,lhoutl
extra alone It is too highlvague

It's ratkel that "he" would
dit terentll\ Irain one
ipchoose to another, if
presumably "lie" wants to
keep them tromi getting

creased resort all times.
whe same SPA where "he
himet the friends." yes, but
sea, alone, is too vague
It's rather that he would
choose to go to the very
same resort by the sea
where he "had enjoyed"
himself.


TRADE UNIONr


rieg I; lted charge for the same.


PATON, TOOTIl & CO.,
Attorneys for the Petitioners,
Thle Bank Houste
Frederick Street Steps.
P. 0. Box N4805.
Nassai. Bahamas.

NOTE: Any person who intends to appear on the
hearing of the said Petition must serve on or send
by post to the above-named Paton. Toothe & Co.
notice in writing of his intention so to do. The
notice must state the name and address of the
person, or, if a firm, the name and address of the
firm, and must be signed by the person or firm. or
by his or their Attorney (if any) and must be
served, or if posted must be sent by post, in
sufficient .time to reach the above-named not later
than five o'clock in the afternoon on Monday the
18th day of March. 1974.


I


activities. It was transferred to Vienna then in i,,
Soviet-occupied part of Austria. At the beginning ot 157..,:
the conclusion of the Austrian State Treaty. the WI.-:: t,.|l!.
had to move to Prague. 1st congresss (the founding coni.
September-October 1945, Paris.
2nd (ongess, June-Jull 1949, Milan.
3rd congress October !953, Vienna.
4th Congress. October 1957, l.eip/ig.
5th Congress. October 19 1, Moscow.'
6th congresss October 1965, Warsaw.
7t he congresss ()ctober 1969, Budapest.
8th C(ongress. October I173. Varna, Bulgaria.
THE WORLD FEDERATION OF rRADE UNIONS (WFTU)
1 he WFTUU i. under the direction of the Soviet Union., and lt,
overwhelming majority of its members are trade unli:,
organizations in Fast European countries.
One of the main tasks of the WFTU is the organisation !
strikes in democratic countries. In December 1954, the ('ouni;l
of the WFTU approved a "('harta of Trade Union Rights. etc." In
Chapter 1 of this document, it was stated: "The workers have tih
right to take part in any action in defence of their right
regardless of whether this action takes the form of strikL-
demonstrations or other forms of trade union struggle". In
Chapter 4 it was further stated: "The right to strike is a lisi,
right of workers. \ er5 worker has the unrestricted right to ciri,.
out on strike, whatever his work. The workers and the tr.ad1
union organizations have the right to take any action nececssi
for the organisation andi support of a strike. Organisation t I
strike, participation in strike, or partlitpatonl inl ainy solial;iit\
iiovemtient lor a strike shall in no case be justifications I" ;
punislihmlent, sanction or an\ repiressie measure, either betJw,
duinnn or after the strike.'
Bult in tile Sovl it 'iiilon. Poland. llungary, ltl. ,rii.i
Ruilllania. ('/echoslo\akia .nd I an l (;eriiian\ll silikc's anrid l llq
similar iianitestations are punishat ble by \'r\ severe sanc hiI-i
According to a Soviet Covernlmet Order ofl Ma\ 5th 1'-l. ,l
uinauthorised interruption of work or a refusal to begin swoik n1.
he punished with deportation and forced about for a duratin ,w
trtoin two to five yCear deporI station (usuall i to Siberia) eii!e ,i'.
nadill1niistrativc pulnishmi enlt ilim asur IIch is not ieiiItio ll td in l i .
ci diflied criin nal 1,1i oI the So\clt t'll l.




Pantyhose may cause


your itching torment.


t,< -.





It's true.
Your pantyhose may seal heat and moisture in, lock ,oi
out. Small wonder you tch. Sensitive vaginal and ritji
areas need special care.
That's BiCOZENE. (Say it "By-Co-Zeen.") Th .
greaseless medicine helps relieve itching fast. Quiets v ,:'
urge to scratch. You'll see BitOZENE even helps promnolt
healing of inflamed tissues.
BiCOZENE means special care tor sensitive vaginal wn1
rectal membranes.
Ask your druggist about BiCOZENE

THOMPSON DRUG CO. LTD.
P. 0. Box 6027/PHONE 2-235 !'NASSAU.

NOTICE

COMMONWI. ALTH 1 1F Fil BAiAMAS 1)74







ANI)

IN Till MAI I R ()1 H1l'0 (111 'IPAi I
A( I ('IAPT I'IR 184)


ADVERTISEMENT OF PETITION

\Nolick is lhereby given tiht a Petititn Isr the
iithitnin up l e' thle 'aboe-niaucid ('Compiany bly tlle
Suipr'eme ('ourt of Th lie lahalltis wais ontl thle 22iindl
da\ o( I'e:bruairy, 1I74 presented ct thle i(,ourlt b
ShirleI\ Oakes Butler ol' "Jacaranda". IarliaieIntt
Strec't in tl'e ('ity rlt Nassau in tlt Isllnd of' Ncsw
Providence. alhama Islands and by Oakes Holtldintg
C'orimpany. Inc., a company incorporated under the
laws oil' the Republice of Panamtta and having its
prii cipalX place of business at (;resham Hlouse. 2.
Charlotte Street in the said ('ity of Nassau
creditors of the said Companly. And that the said
Petition is directed to be heard before ithe
lonotltrable Mr. Justice Maxwell J. lThomlnpson,
sitllini at the Supreme ( 'otrt in tlie said ('ity of
Nassau on the 20th day of Marclih, 174 at 01(.)01
o'clock inl tle tforenoon; antd an\ creditors or
contributory of the said ('o'itlpa it desitois t(
oppose thle making of an O)rder for wiinding uip of
thli said ('otmp:ny under the above Act should
app;ir : t tlihe time of hearing by himself or his
coullnsecl totr that purpose: and va copy of the
Petition will be furnished to any creditor or
contributory of the said companyny requiring the
same by the undersigned on payment oft lii


-INK









Saturday, March 9, 1974


~lw xinrbiuw


SHIRLEY

STREET
NOW THRU Tuesday, "A
Touch ot Class," matinees at
2:30 p .n. and 4:45 p.m.,
evening 8:30. Parental
discretion is advised.
A 1 ici of (lass, a
iioti'' i t7-IlieC that revi' es the
11ii11 i',!a1 ntic clomledi from
n t tsi~llus, stars (;lenda


Jackson and George Seagal
Written for screen by Melvin
Frank, the movie is based on
the life of two ordinary,


decent, likeable people an
English divorcee ,anda young
\ in e r i c a n tm porarlly
stationed in Britain
Seagal plai' the part olf
'Ste\e Blackhurn \\hi m 'uibharks
upon a love iaff.ii \ i" t h i( 'nda
Jackson. poI tra1 in \'ilki" a
sophisticated dtil s- dlc'sig 'er
divorced troni: hlc ir lllian
husband.
Also appeanriLn in tlce movie
is Paul SorvmI II,' plain s the
role oIt '" alter \lenkes.' a
gregarious 1filiu pi() iji 'i friend
of 'Steve BlIckbiin'" who
synlnpatlhilss alll a i'i'd s thihi oIf
the dan rers it i s In c ataii.
Attractlive Ill'.-rdil \V -il is
seet' ill the parl lt 1 ilo la"
who is iarriil Ito 'S anev' .i1d
the illotlic'r ii lill, t\\c) ,Minall
children.
Others in the' .1Lt includell
(ec I.indei. K. C(all.ii. \ary
Barclay and Michael I Iw tin.
"A loucht o1 l (f .iss' was
produced and due l.led b\
Melvin Frank. troun .m original
screenplay bhy Milc'.i:ii rank
and Jack tRous. lthe romantic
comedy is ill Paiiaviion and
technicolour and wa,s lilmed in

I,7

Erpcl


The World Famous

Trade Winds Bar & Lounge

takes pleasure in presenting

THE SENSATIONAL



FREDDIE MUNNINGS JR.


























SHOWTIMES NIGHTLY: 10:40 & 12:40

Make the evening complete with a gourmet dinner
in the Imperial Dining Room.
Dinner from 7:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.



J5 Pu-iwlise




07 1'


A
REY_


London and Spain.
Starts Wednesday, "That
Man Bolt," matinees at 3 and
5 p.m., evening 8:30. Parental
discretion is advised.
A story of high adventure
and intrigue, with physical
challenges involving the martial
arts known under the general
name of "Kung-l u." and a star
who is agile, adept and strong
qualify the Bernard Schwartz
production "That Man Bolt."
Fred Williamson stars in the
motion picture as a handsome
black courier whose assignment
is to transport one million
dollars cash from a Hong Kong
bank to Mexico ('ity via Los
Angeles.
A clever fellow whose charm
and charisma is exceeded only
by his expertise in the martial
arts, Williamson is able to
extricate himself from some
very difficult conditions in a
marvelously divertive way.
"That Man Bolt" is directed
by llenry Levin and David
Lowell Rich from the
screen-play by Quentin Werty
and Charles Johnson from the
latter's story, it was
technicolour filmed in Hong
Kong. Kowloon and the New
Territories of British
Crown-colonised Nationalist
('China, Hollywood and
locations in the western United
States.
An ex-professional football
player for the Kansas City
Chiefs and the Oakland
Raiders, Williamson was first
seen in "The Legend of Nigger
Charlie'" by producer
Schwartz.






Final Nite: Superdad & I lubber

STARTS SUNDAY!*
At 7 & 10:20
"KARADO THE
HONG KONG CAT"
(P.G.)
And at 8:45

"QUEEN BOXER"
Starring (P.G.
Judy Lee (
Parental Guidance Suggested

llhim ri tifrl ll,


Aontecn a


"I DEMANDED that he sell me enough gas to get to
work that's when he turned the water hose on me."


NOW THRU TUESDAY 2100
Matinee 2:30 & 4:45, Evening 8:30-'Phone 2-1004,2-1005

George Glenda
Segal Jacksonn


iTouch
Of Class P
A.- G h- q ... PG -- *1-0

Reservations not claimed by 8: 15, will be sol
on first come, first served basis.



Now Thru Tuesday Sunday thru Tuesday
l Sunday continuous f
Matinee starts at 1:30 Sunday continuous 4
Evenin 8:30 from 4:30
Monday continuous
I"UV"1ND LET DOt" PG. from 3:00
"ooo FISTS OF THE
iMoore, Yaptht Kotto DOUBLE K" R.
PLUS Henry Yue Young
PLUS
"THE MECHANIC" PG. "THE HOUSE THAT
Charles Bronson, DRIPPED BLOOD" PG.
Keenan Wynn Peter Cushing,
Christopher Lee
'Phone 2.2534 No one under 18 will be admitted.


I I
i NOW THRU TUESDAY -
Sunday continuous from 4: 30-'Phone 3-4666


i UEIItE Y 1GJll llliIll, I
I P ~lugl 68 -RRWHE LEE M111

Plus ."LOLLY MADONNA" PG.
PARENTA L DISCRETION ADVISED.


WULFF

ROAD
Saturday night, 8:30 p.m.
thru Tuesday, "The Man Who
Loved Cat Dancing" plus
"Lolly Madonna." Sundays
showings continuous from
4:30 p.m. Monday and
Tuesday matinee continuous
from 1:30 p.m., evening
8:30. Parental discretion is
advised.
Lovely actress Marki Bey
portrays the title role in
American International's new
mystery film "Sugar Hill"
which shows another way to
combat organised crime
through black magic and
voodoo.
Proving to all that Sugar Hill
is a curvaceous female creature
and not the geographical
location the term so often
connotes, the sets about giving
criminals their comeuppance
by various means that they
have never heard of.
With the help of Baron
Samedi, Lord of the
Netherworld, ably portrayed
by Don Pedro Colley. she calls
to her aid an army of zombies
who rise from their moldy
graves to carry out her orders.
The gangsters' bullets prove
useless against the denizens of
the netherworld as, one by
one, they meet their untimely
demise in a variety of ways.
The movie takes as its
background a New York town
that houses some of the
greatest figures in the
underworld. One of its chiefs
sends his minions to beat up a
night club operator who
happens to be the boyfriend of
our star.
When police investigations
seem to be failing in locating
the persons responsible for the
death of the man. played by
Robert Quarry, Sugar Hill
decides to find out in her own
way calling up the dead.
And, while the mob cheftain
is celebrating his take-over of
the town's successful business.
the army of Zombies begin to
work and strange things begin
to happen.
And the carnage goes on
until they are called off by
'Sugar Hill.
Strange things begin to
happen in a small California
town when a rough hewn
coffin washes ashore on a
lonely beach where a strolling
surfer is passing.
The strange occurance is
i


being overseen by a big,
hulking figure.' from a sand
dune and suddenly, while the
su r e r examines the
sarcophagus, a hand seizes his
throat and' strangles him.
These happenings begin to
take place in the town itself
and a group of hippies on a
local commune unwaringly
become involved.
They tind out that
everlasting life teachings can be
had free Irom a stranger
handsome and tall Khorda who
dresses mostly in long flowing
robes.
This is setting and
background of "'The
Deathmaster," a tale of
ritualistic occult practices
specially filmed in
technicolour as the latest
horror thriller
"Fre l)eathmaster" stars
Robert Quarry as Khorda, Bill
Ewing as a confused young
rebel who goes against the
aimless existence of his fellow
hippies. lie later becomes the
hero of the story when lie
impales the evil Khorda on a
stake after discovering his true
identity, one ofi the undead.
"The l)ealhmnaster'" Was
produced by Fred Sadoff and
Robert Quarr% and directed by
Ray Danton.


SAVOY
Saturday night 8:30, thru
Tuesday, "Live and Let Die,"
plus "The Mechanic." Sunday
thru Tuesday matinee
continuous from 1:30.
evenings 8:30. Plus late
feature Tuesday night.
"The Mechanic" is a fast
paced story of a hired assassin
who has a hundred ways to kill
and they all work hence
the nickname. It represents
British director Michael
W inner's first II. . .1 film .
and stars Charles Bronson in
the title role.
Other players include Jan
Michael Vincent. Keenan
Wvnn. Jill Ireland anld Linda
Ridgeway.
The original screenplay for
"The Mechanic" was produced
by Lewis John ('arlini
"l' ie Mechanic" also stars
Lindsay C'rosby. Martin
(;ordon. James Davidson and
Takayuki Kuhota.


O It'NS: 6:.30 Sli,,' si;irt 7 p.mr
CH('tIlDRIt N I H I I t 1 l-,1:
Sc f 2 i 1.' 1/ o Ii. i' : v~:i .'1l
EXC LUSVL
Now thru Tuesday!
"(;(o sI' LI 1 7 10:45,
"Jt)oSt *. t' i









RATHER
"JOHIN .
RI STAl RANT \\11 l IF
(C'LO)SI' l i.impart l. repairs
.....N


... IT ALL ADDS UP




your reusable but unwanted

items of

clothing, tools,

appliances, clocks,

fans, etc. . clear out

your ciosets, garage, storeroom .

all can be of help


to someone else.

Donate them to


Sandlondl

Bazaar
ROSETTA STREET
TWO DOORS WEST OF
MONTROSE AVE


Miss J&B says...



"PLEASURE COMES IN BOTTLES TOO!"


are Scotch Whisky


1Birt Rclnol, lt .linul 77 I lie i icMn Who I oved ('at Dancing." finds
1t rIC\\ 7rnianc: \ l h 'siioibh I\cIe litho ,ti, tis a i tulmlan running from
her h.! '.t.'n d


. I











Saturday, March 9, 1974


:hutt


CLASSIFIED


SECTION


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS-FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV. TELEPHONE 21986 EXT. 5


REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE FOR RENT CARS FOR SALE NNoIE ENTERTAINMENT HELP WANTED


C13749
THE PRICE IS RIGHT. Ir
exclusive Winton Heights. Two
storey, 3 bedrooms. 2
bathrooms, 2 porches, fireplace
for use when temperature
plummets to 65 degrees.
Lovely landscaping. Fully
furnished. Generous financing.
YOU'LL LOVE THE
LOCATION. Close to
shopping, s hools. beach 3
bedrooms. 2 bathrooms, 2
wat t e r s y t 3
ai r c o n d t i o i s F uIly
furnished You'll love the rice
too. $46.000

PRIVATE VALUABLE
CORNER. In cOL.veni iet
Montag Heilghts, i Li' dcom,
2 baths, 'Llly fuir sh11ed. Jouble
lot, completely wall'led 'r P: .
$65,000.

CHOICE OF THREE IN
NASSAU EAST. Fully
furrished' thIrc ,i' d i oL
bedcriom herie' $ 37000 to
$4 7.o00
A SLEEPER ON VILLAGE
ROAD. Li- tern it thr, L.rige
corner iiot, 1.) 240, with 4
bedrou li holi,' and i h edroou
apar t ',et.- Pr ,,v te gajderi
m ary fl uit tree. Si' 'jb! e 1'..'

apartimr nt s ,l t i, .,0 ,.org
available Thle r 11 i
unbelievably !o,',
SANS SOUCI, CAREFREE
INDEED! 'Sirlilr fai !li\ (. ,
duple' lIti it ) Sran Sauci -a
excluiive Gi.in0bo Lirmbi LanIr

UEST IN BLAIR'. IA. ldrqie
luts, eaca 101( x i1 )) ODie. o"t,
$8,000 Buy b5 'ore ow.e'
charges- mirnd
TWO ACRES. Or WNest FBay
Sticet neir Balmoiral Ha ote!
Ho"te aDattit're t, shop ni
Centre site Prite' slashed to
$100.000 Terms available

ELEVEN ACRES on Hiaroid
Road. Highwali y V an d lake
frontage. palnolilm ( V ews-
$75,0(0i

MONARCH OF ALL YOU
SURVEY. A r cdg
opportunity at Abit '
acres Or highway aj ,,
waterfrrnit between Treaswuc
Cay and riaish Hit j1,)Ou Bi[iiv
today .t ycstr day', u' e i oi
totnor'O-'s pri if $80i Doer
acre.
CHESTER THOMPSON
REAL ESTATE
12 Charlotte Street
S Telephone 24777
Eveings 31425. 42035

C 13780
ATTRACTIVE resirence uor
large lot Mori.iIjig hiltfo a-er
three bedroomrn !'h'wo ths
living roomi. jahaifJ iOi.
separate, diriiit ',o ., ; .rqp
kitchen d'l' u :i.'
n ald's roiir dit 'i
A skirlq pr : .' 1000
fuir riished

Srxcellv- t L
two bath d il' ." ,!S

Coileqf $' t, () . ;, -


Large tp' I c i:o ., 2 ,
w ith 'fo iu !) "i ,, ,"
bathirolonms '
sepairat d :',j :
roo m bri} l '.k ,l !I,,: ,
basemrnen p' ( 1d .,"*'
garage and tii< 'ht ,,
semi ftirinistih d


H G C 1', r .,

C 13 1 '92

C O LoT .
DAVS5O 4

Certified' PR j r
Phones : .' -
P 0 .

1 : d., tlr :
F.'}f < i i(, -, .



2 3 a n ,d i ; j )w"
HOUSF S ,* 'I
areas.
E AST! N ..
oni the w1. 't, .
the hills
SAN SOUC
BLAIR E Sl.-r S
GLENISTON ;GA9, l;, '
SWINTON
THE GROVE (i'We., i.,
SKYLINE -HE IGHTl
NASSAU LAST
SEA BREEZE
VILLAGE ROAD
GOLDEN GAITE
HIGHLAND PARK
PROSPECT RIDGEC
WESTWARD Vil 1i
CONLI r.'1, J .)
APARTMENTS
in PARADISE ISLAND)
EAST BAY STRFf T
WEST BAY STORE E T
HOTELS and HOTEL SItIS,
BEACH LOTS. COMMER
CIAL LOTS, Rf SIDFNT!AIl
LOTS
AREA GE F O
DEVELOPMENT IN 1THi
NASSAU AND FAMILY
ISLANDS SUCH AS GRAND
BAHAMA LONG ISLAND,
ELEUTHERA 'BACO
5 ACRL CAY IN THE
EXUMAS WITH DEEP
ATER HARBOUR AND
ORE
CALL
DAVSON'S REAL
ESTATE AGENCY
Phone 21178 or 80932 21178
P. O. Box N-4648
Nassau, Bahamas


C13773
BEACH LOT Adelaide Beach.
Phone 4129b nite or day.

C13745
FOR SALE
3 bedioomr 2 bath house
financing available. Phone
2-1495 or -

C1370
4 t' 7ROO .' :' bathrit ."
lrfi..riilshecd houLse with carpotr
and sewing room. FOR SALE.
Call 31671 31672 (9 00 a.m.
12.00; 2 00 p.m 5. ,'n
p.m. weiekdad')

SC13809
A SI ONE BUILDING stujat
oMr a Loinet lot on Robinson
Road. Ideal tor doctor's office.
Call 23921 days or 4285b
nights and Saturdays

C13 71
ONE ". LLY bult 'riit
0LL ',' $'1 $ ;0 00I 0









PRINCE CHARLES AVENUE
Stni, rioms-i 2 bJiths some r

,'' .'.1 n .11, 1 *unic i ,eanr1 1in .
$47,9)00 '1DI. riAL
i' -AiNOU 22'30 ??1,/1
Sl'0> 4'20

C 13800
L001 NJassLu Vila'ge goo00
Titl 100 t i $6. (00I 00o
Lot'. !O x 100 S, b nchljnci
A "llufi- O./t
Nei A U Hannj $3,')0) 10
Hou t lot Robwison antir
WJshl.'.qt;'r Street $40.000.
Call 24:'43' ,

C 13710
BUY NOW!
SAN ANDROS
LOTS
14,500
sq. FEET!
Almost 1/3 acre
$45 DO''.'N, $45 per MONTH
CALL OR VISIT
FRANK CAREY
REAL ESTATE
P.. 0Box N4764
BAY & DEVEAUX ST.
T5. .27637, 248 15


FOR SALE
HILLTOP HOUSE GROVE
.lewl' oif "Se]. Patio, eainl sed
f i til1' id g3 ouLn ds .1 nd
SWIMMING POOL. v it
thijgingq rooms. fHas toir
bedroll l,is three b.rths
furnished Property in good
Lo r di t u n e od i t
occupancy Sales piI E only
$125,001)00 Piired 'dliowi
reptodu,. lo n eat is, GitGrlo nI
200 by 145
AN ESTATE Uii west vlth
312 fIret of SANDY IB FAC
fou bcdri oo, s toul bth


floor G1ed oud supie Ib
la iLd i l ued vu' i1ordit ell
See I,. toi pprl i ol
LAKEFRONT becdim 3

cointaied bedo,) bed i.i c bath,
sitting and kitii~,'i L atqe aPi,
rI nla n 1ooir 'ir-nius .1 r i '

kingsi-'e pool u' i it o
fruited grounds Id ncr witli
itrius Ta'stefullvy a i 4 ln v l,
LAi FOppe 1d f ti., h (i cl

,l vin1 laige p.ti1. .!1 '
f l $215,000 f S>
i'Ounw(NG R 'p t 1 ,lar' 13l

R tAL 1TORd 0 A {'l .'r.;
Hi TY 2 O us- e v >0id ll l'.' 0.r .
'i e T el rl ht T

S 'O NG E R'S l ottdiic tBu ., ,

( .ttage Business with Icasr .,n
;ii,1peity t otntac t T+,e
Mlnqger, Telephone 410US'


C 1 7 1)
FOR SALt
41 bedri,)oms 3 baths,, two
ki tr hcrl 't furrtn hed
HIGHLAND PARK was
./5,000 00. Owner would sell
foir $65,000 00

SANS SOUCI 302 by 100
ljuricje '.s views house has 3
bedrooms two baths selling
*i i.5 500.00

GLENISTON GARDENS
i,'(lihi n 3 behdiroms. 2 hath_.
Sulti a mroderri, (cathedral
Ceilings, furnished quiet area.
$60,000.00
MONTAGU HEIGHTS
rnIiidler Spanish style v' th 3
tbdroomins 21. baths, furnished.
As,;il $95,000.00 100 by
150

BLUE HILL ESTATES
hilltop, corner plot, 100 by
110 Asking $12,000.00. Was
$16,000.00. See anytime.

WATERS EDGE lot 100 by
100 Walled-in. Only
$22,500.00. Situate Southeast
Winton.
PALMDALE have house and
land on corner plot for orly
$32,000.00.
EASTERN ROAD facing Sea
lot only $18,000.00.
DIAL DAMIANOS 22033,
22305, 22307. Evening 41197.


i. 1 i l )
ONE LOT in Lill lh Ulia,
$.,')00 00. Phore 2 Il i, (avs,
3 2023 evenings.

I OR SALE
( 13 / 71
LOT with TWO SMALL
HOUSI S in Shirley rHoelhts ol f
MIou nit Ro yal A.ver iL
$13.0001 00 Phone 3 .0 b




FOR SALE
CENTF!EVIL.E 4 lot.
,t ,tu ,( ( fu t .) nn!m( 1 l0 l

S rts r' i table i':Jl ih 'il
( Ii :i- ( i P i ) c.ti -,i; ii|! Lil l ll!d 1 (;,
Ot f t. '. Apai tmn1 nt :,';t VaLtli d
$i179,)000 O, Ow)nlr t will itl1
for $1'i0,(iO 00
MARLBOROUGH STREET
WEST opp 1i. 11(- lii ist
Colkori, I. three propel ties One
as low as $100.000.00 othel
two ielajtvely cheolp Good
locatlor ioi tLoiiii tri de, or
INVESTIME NT Inve,t in high
S lass pi tLlCit e to beat
inflation
ARCADE BUILDING
opposite n:dlceOlms on Bay
t reeot lowest pirce available
oii 111iin stioe t See rr ytime.

THREE UNIT APARTMENT
BLDG. adj&afit r RPcu jt Club.
(iolurids '.b )'v 150. Irnconle
5,000 00 vjily Askiing only
12 7,00.0) With or without
t"i rils.
DIAL NIC K )DAPIAINOS, THE
ACTION RF AL OR 22033,
22 105. eveniirq .I 1 i97/


FOR RENT

L13821
TIHRI EBedlo m. 2 latith.
Ur niftirrisheild hItlt i In Hilghbury
Pajk Will lIt ,resonably to
;isponslible coupip with rio
lhrldrenr C(ali b r,842 aftei
S30


I 13 /I8
WHY PAY MORE TO SLEEP?
i furnished rooms, Polh ,i ,i
Garders Mot-M $20 weekly
$6.00 per dav Chippirnghanq
Phone 35380

13723
F FF ILIf NCY Ap.rtm nt ; i
PI I in d, I (l1 i e ser ved
ejritlermin ONLY. For
ifot-rm ;,tiori all .1 1044

C 3708
COTTAGECS aid .Ual, tmelles
monthly ait co ditioned,
fully fur wished, naid service
available Lovely q drIen arnd
.wim nlni g pool Telephorne
3129/. 31093
C 13690
'T H WAK E FIFLD
APAR TMENTS" Corn ri
Cordeaux AvenueC. Lrglpiston
Onie rand two bedi ooni
apa t me n'ts. completely
furnished Telephone daytime
2-82/2, after 6 00 pm. 534 18

C13799
FURNISHED 2 bedioomi
apartment consisting of
living/dining room kitchen and
bathroom Twynam Avenue
5-8185.

C 13820
THREE Bedroom, 1 bath,
house on F arrington Road,
unfurnished $200.00 a month.
Phone 5-4684.


C13701
IMALIDONNA APART-
MENTS" Corner Mount
Royal Avenue and Durham
Street, Two-bedroom
apartments, completely,
furnished. telephone daytime
28272, after 6.00 p.m.
53418.


C13751
2 COTTAGES on Deal's
Heights semi-furnished. For
information call 2-4656
daytime or 4-1238 nights.

C13687
ICTJS!_ suitable for store r,
.,fflic MN. clra Street facir.g
ShopDir.,J Plaza. Corltai l
2 3170


C1381 9
A TT ACTIVELY
'Liunshed 2 bedroom
private yard, South
$220.00 per month,
Included. Phone 34586


f L II v
houLse,
Beach,
water


S1 u J/tf

t I is 10 neeo, d (t I LotIir

pNASSAU EAST 3 beI( o tIIni' 2

b vth, in SfiSvd affi)( th fOi
,If,', ijKingr o all JatJ ers (olrl.
t 34WYNAM AVE 3-o3b

C 13795

FOR SALE
NASSAU EAST 3 bedioomn, 2
baths, fuirnished. All this fo
$3( 000 00.

SOUTHEAST WINTON 100
foot PROP Water foi is low
$2:).500 00 See anytime. Livc
like a King on the waters edge
TWYNAM AVENUE house
S '. i rtoif( s turnished, enitlose
ciioundl Onl v $32,0 00 .0,
CENTREVILLE HILLTOP


Si; oue foul becl ou) m
with 2 Wl l Ai pdlt tne tts All
,enteil Go a. iri(.jt i ( )
$l b0.50(00 00.
CITY PROPERTY ideal foi
tusiilrte Well maint,ia ed
g II si n i ( s i n m e d i i t e
oceiipo y. Oinlv $1 i00 00 ()
SpJOt io (joro unIds.

CENTREVILLE ont ColliIs
If f iceo and aopal tme it
b u id i ig I de o1 I o I
p r o( sio nials. Rea ,olliba lv
pi I( ett Good finam i,ig
DIAL DAMIANOS, THE
ACTION NUMBERS 2203
2230b Lveningir 411'!7


CARS FOR SALE |
C. 3724
CENTRAL GARAGE LTD.
'The Easiest Place in Town to
Tr de"
1970 FORD CORTINA
t;$8 '0
1970 SUNBEAM RAPIER
B$ f 50
1971 JAVELIN S.S.T.
(,utomatn rjdio) B$2850.
1970 FORD TORINO
(lautomrl,iti, adio) B$2695.
1968 G M.C. P;CK UP TRUCK
B$9)i1)
.970 CHE'CELLE kilLIBUI
(autoniatu radl) BI$1875
1968 PLYMIOUTH VALIANT
(rtdio., .tomr atic) R$1050
1971 DODGE AVENGER
(aut'iomr :!it ) l $1395
1965 BUICK SKYLARK
(Jutoimatle iadcio) B$750.
1969 CHEV II NOVA
(uptoimitic,, i(;do) B51 350.
1972 FIAT BUS (7 passenger)
13$1650
1968 ROVER 2000 SALOON
(automatic) ;[$1000
19Cl DODGE DART SPORT
(automjrli radio) 3$1 500
1972 VAUXHALL VICTOR
(attomat(i) [1$1475
1970 FORD CORTINA
S/WAGON B$1275
1969 VAUXHALL VIVA
B$775
1970 FIAT 850 B$550
CENTRAL GARAGE LIMITED
Thompson Boulevard
P. O. Box N1525
Telephone 34711

ClIjl1
1968 BULK SKYLARK,
Sar c onditI owning, power
steering, power brakes. Phone
2-2386 days, 3 2023 evenings.

C 13/77
1972 PINTO t state Wagon,
aircornditionlii i adio. 8,000
miles, excellent condition,
$4,200 Phorn 24095 or
7-7866

C13776
1973 VAUXIHALL VIVA, Irke
new, 8000 miles, perfect
condition $2200. Phone
2-4095 or 7-7866.

C13697

TRAVELLING?

Fo efficient t friendly
advice on Wor wide
Destinations by Airline or
Steamiships. Contact
MUNDYTOURSat 24512.



APPROVED PASSENGER
RIGHTS


C13811
JAVELIN 1968 Red with
Black Vinyl top in excellent
condition. Phone 5-44R8

:13754
1969 OLDSMOBILE 442
Excellent condition ono3
ow.er. $2500. Telephone
-5905.
C13817
1971 HILLiviAN HUNTER.
standardd snit, good co edition,
towbar. $1400.00. Phone
3-1627.

C13790
i972 Cutlass. $3,900. Phone:
56332 (7-9) morning 6-10
evening).


C13839
1970 FORD


Cortina Station


I
NI
Sr


C13777
O'DAY Sailer with Mercury
outboard and trailer, excellent
condition, perfect family
sailboat, $1100. Telephone
24095 or 77866.
C13689
WOLSEY HALL
THE OXFORD CORRESPONDENCE COLLEGE
'halecr the qiallllicalion )oui anl -
G ( E 'O' and "A' lcl. a London
L nimerin' Degree. Professional E>-
aminiion or niurness Sudiaci holwe
Hall fo'iunded ,n I k in ucaou
i UJriuir.inlce [i o tin ion inlll uiou pass
* An ouil,.indin rc-,.rdJ of mHce, For
C\,iniplC 1" i i\\ O1-0 \ Hall lrudenI s
Milling for B honouor degrees hare
pa-edin uhe lah i-ca ,
O\er -r tedr, or c'rrience rreuling in
ihe mostl edillrlft n lodcrn m rlhods of
postalI,ihilng !,% arnui laifrequirmd
Per'ronl lumuiin' lo Cei Iour precise
lIitilirderneflI,
*Lon f~ee p.rable tc> iiwualent.
i 1ou ant to kno1 how to
1 preprrae lor anrruntenul future
uriCe for a Free prospectui 10o
Dep i V l OF I Oi
Lf W"IL9S IFOnWO N1XM


C13802
ANYONE with a lot'a house, a
car, a boat, or other
merchandise they wish to
auction is requested to call
27612 days or 42856 nights.
For information regarding
auctions.
C.W SANDS
Public Auctioner.

C13833
ADDRESS INFORMATION
and Tax Free documentation,
including consulting
information of Tax Free
transactions of Liechtenstein,
Monaco (Monte Carlo),
Andorra and Hong Kong, etc..
Many addresses. Reasonable
fees. Write: P. O. Box N-4602,
Nassau.


I SCHOOLS
C13695
LEWIS AUTO SCHOOL
Learn to drive with confidence.
Phone 59805 between 7 and
8.30 a.m. or after 6 p.m. or
35084 anytime.


S IN MEMORIAM
C13827
In loving memory of our dear
husband and father Oscar A.
Sands of Savannah Sound,
Eleuthera who passed away on
March 10th, 1973.
When links of life are broken,
And loved ones have to part,
It leaves a wound that never
heals,
Within our lonely hearts.
Sadly missed by the family.

C13804


-I


C13743
THE UNIVERSITY PLAYERS







A








present
"The Star Spangled Girl"
by Neil Simon
author of "The Odd Couple"
and
'Barefoot in the Park"
March 7th through 10th
8:30 p.m.
Starring Andrew Wilson,
Earl Lightbourn,
Loletha Saunders
Dundas Civic Centre
Tickets $3.00
obtainable at both
Del Jane Stores.


HELP WANTED

C13808
DISCOTHEQUE operator
(female) required for
Buccaneer Lounge Flagler Inn
Paradise Island. Must enjov
music and have pleasant
personality. Previous
experience in this field
perferred. Please contact
Manager for appointment
between 9 a.m. 11 a.m.
Phone 5-5561

C13688
MOVING?

For Expert Packing &
Forwarding by Sea or Air,
Contact E. H. Mundy &
Co. (Nassau) Ltd., P. O.
Box N-1893. Phone
2-4511.



APPROVED CARGO
RIGHTS


C 13824
NEW 2 Bedroom Apartment,
unfurnished, Soldier Road west
of East Street. Phone 5-5417,
3-6687.

C13831
F or ent d three bedioomn
apartment, 1 bath, etc. Quarry
Mission Road. Phone 3 5886.

C13836
FOR RENT FURNISHED
Room with beautiful view.
Businres, girl preferred, East
I owlcr Street near Bay. Phone
31119.

C13837
F URN I SHE D spacious
residence overlooking Western
suburbs. Convenient beaches,
airport, shopping. Spacious
grounds, children & pets
acceptable. Phone 5-7224 6-9
p.m.

C13838
Nassau Hillcrest Towers
Swiimming Pool, Sun Tenace,
LdUndly facilities. Spacious,
fully furnished 3 bedroom 2
bath apartment. Large balcony
overlooking Harbour. Available
April. Contact 7-8421 -2,
evenings 7-7065.

--
WANTS TO RENT

C 13800
IRITISH Bank executive seeks
ie'tal fully furnished house on
one to three year basis.
Requires 3-4 bedrooms, 2
bathrooms, garden and, of
preferen ce, swimming pool.
Western area preferred. Call
28711 Extension 38 Mrs.
Carev.

WANTS TO TRADE

C13822
TWO bedroom apartment,
futly urrnshed on ocean, pool
etc. Owner wants to exchange
for apartment in Freeport. Call
2-4223 or Write Box N4635.
Nassau.


--~r*-rrrrr~rrrr LI I I II II I I I I


~------


----------------


C13812
SERVICE ADVISOR ANb
TRAINING OFFICER.
Required by expanding
automobile distributor. Tle
person required should ha e
the highest qualifications in al
phases of automobile repair
and administration. With 4t
least 25 years experience in the
trade with 10 years in ,a
supervisory capacity,,
culminating as a Service
Manager. Must have the ability
to institute meaningful traininL
programs for all grades off
service personnel and apply
efficient workshop procedures
ensuring quality work. Only
persons with first clas6
references will be considered.
Salary by negotiation. Apply i
writing with full resume an
copies of references t
Managing Director, Nassa
Motor Company, P. O. Box
N8165.

C6736
JOB TITLE: CRUSHERMAN,
MINIMUM EDUCATION
Secondary
MINIMUM EXPERIENCd:
Knowledge of cement plarit
crusher and related equipment.

DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Operate stone crusher anp
related equipment i.e. primary
crusher feeders, belt conveyor,
screens, lubricating equipment.
etc.. t
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Pe rsonnel
Department, Bahama Cement;
Company, P. 0. Box F-10q,
Freeport, Grand Bahama

C13748 J
QUALIFIED Painter required
At least 5 years experience
painting. Please call 3-6211
Monday through Friday 9 a.n
to 11:30 a.m.

C13810
BAHAMIAN with typing
ability and one year minimurn
experience rating and or
underwriting automotive
insurance. Advancement
potential good. Please repl~
promptly with resume toi
Insurance, Box N476 Nasn.i|


Wagon, automatic, good
condition, new tyres, inspected
1974/75. $1500.00 cash. Call
5-1379.

C13832

1968 FIAT 124 Sport.
$500.00 only. Call 7-8068.

C13828
1971 REBEL GOOD
RUNNING Condition.
Requires some body work.
$500.00 Phone 41105 after 6
p.m.


FOR SALE

(C13757
8 TRACK Tape -- one arid a
h,lf years old.
Perfect working condition.
$65. Phone 3-24 74.

Cl3813
WE BUY ANY GOOD USED
FURNI TURE AND
APPLIANCES. Call 2-2637 dsk
for Moss.
C13725
AQUA Kelvinator Foodarama
22 c,. ft. double door freezer
left igeratoi. Frost free
Excellent condition. $375.
Phone4-1095.


MARINE SUPPLIES
C13694
PACEMAKER 44ft. Luxurious
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.

C13835
YACHTS AND BOATS LTD.

CHRIS -CRAFT

CONCORDE

IRWIN SAIL YACHTS

AVON INFLATABLES

WESTERLY SAILBOATS

14 Foot Boston whaler with a
40 h.p. Evimrude. Boat has
extras such as Bimini top, oars
etc. $1,300.00

19 Foot North American with
160 h.p. Mercruiser in/out
board and a 9 h.p. Mercury
outboard auxiliary. Has top,
radio and more $3900.00 with
trailer.

Have customers, Need listings.
At the Marine Shop

Skiis round ones, trick ones,
regular ones, small ones,
smaller ones; come see. Also
we feature Interluz Yacht Paint
and Equipment.

P. O. Box N-1658
Telephone 2-4869

C6728
57' DIESEL YACHT. Wheeler
with cockpit, twin General
Motors 671 diesel, 121'z KW
generator. Machinery and
vessel completely refurbished.
Fully equipped, surveyed,
appraised realistically at
$65,000. Will sell or trade for
Bahama real estate, give or take
difference.
N. Wolfson, P. O. Box 13021,
Port Everglades, Ft.
Lau derdale, Fla. 33316
S24-4641).

C11894
1969 31 ft. CHRIS CRAF'
Commander. Sleeps six, private
shower, two 230 h.p. engines
with less than 200 hours,
kitchenette. good condition ,
Call 24267, 54011.

C13774
26' CABIN Cruiser. $4,400.
Phone 41298 day or nite.


-- -- -


I


it



;-;;
i '
i;;


Ilihp ~ri











Satruday, March 9, 1974


HELP MNTED TRD SERVICES
C13825 C13764
HANDYMAN to take care of C13764
many odd jobs.Contact David LANDSCAPING and for all
Young P. Box 5960, your gardening needs,
young, P. Box 5960, trimming, hedging, pruning,
slassau. tree felling and beach cleaning
call 5 7 R n 0


C 13830
POSITION available for cooks.
Must know international
cuisine, minimum of four years
experience, supervises all
kitchen staff and takes duties
of head chef when he is
absent.
Apply "to Cotton Bay Club,
Eleuthera, Bahamas.

TRjIE SERVICES
C13691

Plladr's Castom

Brokerale Ltd.

Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. 0. Box N3714
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-3796
2-3797, 2-2798
Airport 7-7434
FREE ESTIMATES


- I uI Oju. I
AND HEDGES.
reasonable and
service.


LAWNS
Prompt
efficient


C 13696
T.V. ANTENNAS
Boosters for homes,
apartments and hotels
SALES AND SERVICES
Call 5-9404
WORLD OF MUSIC
Mackey Street
next to Frank's Place
C13702
FOR your building needs and
CRANE hire see:
ISLAND BUILDERS LIMITED
P. 0. Box N-4559
Phone 31671 31672.

C13663
UNLIMITED commercial
Freezer space to 10 degrees
for any and all users. $3.00/cu.
ft. per year. Apply Adv.
C13663, c/o The Tribune, P.
0. Box N3207, Nassau.

C13656
FOR EXPERT
RADIO TV SERVICE
contact
Channel tiectronics Ltd.
TV Specialist
Wulff Road. Phone 35478.

C13700
SEWING MACHINE
PARTS AND REPAIRS
Island Furniture Co.
P. O. Box N-4818Nassau.
Dowdeswell and Christie Streets
Telephone 21197, 23152


GRAND BAHAMA




CLASSIFIED

II FREEPORT mT. 352- u


HELP WANTED
C6739
J.V. Hersent-Ballast has the
following immediate vacancies:
PLANNING ENGINEER/
COST ENGINEER Will be
responsible for critical path
planning and cost control.
Must be familiar with
computerized control systems.
Must be experienced in
Offshore construction.
CATHODIC PROTECTION
SPECIALISTS Will be
responsible for fabrication,
assembly and installation of
cathodic protection
installations above and below
sea level for sea island. Must be
experienced with impressed
current systems, earthing
systems, ship grounding
systems, etc.. Electrical
Engineering background
required.
Minimum of 5-10 years
experience for both above
positions. Wages AAE.
Applicants must be willing to
work long hours and weekends.
BAHAMIANS only need apply
in writing to: J, V.
HERSENT-BALLAST, Box
F-2518, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.
C6740
MANAGER for busy gourmet
type Dining Room and needed.
Minimum education: Must be a
High School Graduate or have
equivalent education.
Minimum experience: Must
have had 8 years experience in
fast food service and gourmet
type dining room. including 2
years experience in broiler
cooking and one year as
bartender. Applicant must be
between 27 and 35 years of
age.
'Must have had experience in
supervising staff and must have
the ability of find replacements
or additional staff that meet
requirements of General
Manager, as they are needed.
Must have had experience in
Inventory and Stock Control
and Purchasing.
Must have some knowledge of
accounting to maintain proper
daily records and to handle and
Control cash receipts. Police
Certificate required.
Must be prepared to work
more than average 48 hour
week in order to supervise
establishment properly.
Tuesday is day off. Salary
$900.00 monthly.
Applications and resume
accepted by mail only,
addressed to: James A. Wilson,
Bonanza (Bahamas) Limited, P.
0. Box F-2798, Freeport,
Grand Bahama.

C6732
PETROLEUM INSPECTORS
Applications are invited from
Petroleum Inspectors with at
least five years experience in
Inspection of crude and
petroleum product loading and
discharging operations.
Applicants should also have
'had some experience of oil
'storage tank and metering
equipment calibrations, also
laboratory testing of crude
petroleum and petroleum
'products.
Please apply, together with
evidence of experience, to: E.
W. Saybot & Co., S.A., P. 0.
Box F-2049, Freeport, Grand
Bahama. Bahamlans only need
apply.


HELP WANTED
C6737
DOCK FOREMAN
(MAINTENANCE) (2) -
Requires experience as
carpenter, sea-wright. Seaman
experience to enable fill in as
relief coxswain on pilot boat.
Must maintain dock fenders,
boats and buildings In harbour
area. Must assist in clocking and
be able to take 'harge of
maintenance and cleaning
gangs.
DOCK SUPERINTENDENT
Extensive experience
required in port operations,
communications, security,
harbour traffic, docking and
use of meteorological and
oceanographic instruments.
Merchant marine or navy
experience or equivalent
required. Rotating shifts and
night work involved.
UNDERGROUND
CABLEMAN Underground
cable experience required.
Must be able to assist in cable
installation and splicing and in
maintenance of equipment
used in conjunction with
underground transmission and
distribution. Should be
qualified to do splicing
unassisted as may be necessary.
Cables involved have insulation
for up to 15,000 volts,
paper/lead, Snugrite, etc.
SUPERINTENDENT
(TRANSMISSION &
DISTRIBUTION) Must be
thoroughly experienced in
electric power T & D
Construction and Maintenance
from 69,000 volt lines through
distribution voltage circuits.
Requires full knowledge of
overhead power line equipment
such as transformers, switches,
capacitors, etc. and proven
ability to supervise line crews,
including live line maintenance.
Must have understanding of
underground distribution and
street lighting.
ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT (LEGAL) Must
be able to assume
responsibility for preparing
licences, conveyances,
mortgages and leases.
Responsible for completeness
of documents, including
survey, financial and
engineering details. Reviews
completed documents and
arranges for review by parties
involved. Must arrange
recording of documents with
Government and to notify
Government of pertinent
cancellations. Must know legal
and governmental
requirements.
Apply to: Personnel
Department, Grand Bahama
Port Authority, Limited, P. O.
Box F-2666 or 30C Kipling
Building, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.


C6734
Toronto Stock Brokerage firm
requires a fully qualified
"TECHNIQUE INVESTMENT
RESEARCHER with five
years experience. The applicant
must have successfully
completed the 'prescribed
Financial and Technical
courses.
Write Draper Dobie & Company
Limited, P. 0. Box .F-2644 or
call Mrs. Joan Newton at
352-8127 for an appointment.


a


HELP WANTED

C6743
Wanted: experienced
MANAGER to control and
operate a high speed
Bar/Lounge/Restaurant.
The man selected for this post
will have the qualities,
appearance, personality to
maintain and increase the
current volume ot this segment
of our operation.
He will require the skills and
abilities to manage the room,
control and organize food
service personnel whilst
personally operating the bar
and cash.

He will be held completely
responsible for the entire
section including running
inventory control, return from
same to a stated profitability
margin.
Confirmable references
showing at least three years
experience in a similar capacity


HELP WANTED
will be required. Apply: Bass
Bahamas Limited, Pub on the
Mall Limited, Box F-331,
Freeport, Bahamas.

C6735
Freeport Merchant Bank offers
challenging career to
internationally experienced
banker. Qualifications Include
considerable general banking
experience with particular
emphasis on accounting
practices and organizational
skills and ability. English or
Canadian Institute Diploma or
comparable professional
qualification and some
knowledge of money
management and lending
desirable. Salary commensurate
with experience and ability.
Send resume in confidence to
General Manager,
MERCANTILE BANK &
TRUST CO., LTD., P. O. Box
F-2558, Freeport, Bahamas.


HELP WANTED
C6742
BOOKKEEPER
Extensive knowledge and
experience in maintaining a
large volume of Accounts
Receivable and Accounts
Payable: preparation of
disbursement accounts;
monthly balancing of ledgers.
A knowledge of the shipping
and freight forwarding business
is virtually essential. Must be
able to work under heavy
end-of-the-month pressure
demanded by foreign
shipowners. Bahamian only.
Applications in writing
ONLY E. H. Mundy & Co.
(Bahamas) Ltd., P. O. Box
F-2492, Freeport.
C6736
JOB TITLE: CRUSHERMAN
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Secondary
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
Knowledge of cement plant
crusher and related equipment.


HELP mNTED

DUTIES/ RESPONSIBILITIES:
Operate stone crusher and
related equipment i.e. primary
crusher feeders, belt conveyors,
screens, lubricating equipment,
etc.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahamas Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C6733
GOLF COURSE MECHANIC
Mechanic required with at least
1 year's experience in repair
and maintenance of golf course
equipment, i.e. power mowers,
tractors, spikers.
Apply to: Bahama Reef
Development Company, P. O.
Box F-241, Freeport, G.B.I.


1974
No. 79


IN THE MATTER OF
Island Merchants, Limited

AND IN THE MATTER OF
The Companies
Act


NOTICE is hereby given that the Order of the
Supreme Court of The Commonwealth of The
Bahamas dated the 28th day of February 1974
confirming the reduction of the capital of the
above named Company
FROM $2,207,160 divided as follows into

700,000 Ordinary Shares of $2.00 each
7,900 Class A Ordinary Shares of $2.00 each
20,680 6% Cumulative Preference


Shares


7,500 8% Cumulative Preference


Shares


of$2.00 each


of$ 100.00 each


TO $22,071.60 divided as follows into
700,000 Ordinary Shares of 2 cents each
7,900 Class A Ordinary Shares of 2 cents each
20,680 6% Cumulative Preference
Shares Shares of$2 cents each
7,500 8% Cumulative Preference
Shares of $1.00 each
by cancelling capital which has been lost or is
unrepresented by available assets to the extent
of $1.98 per share upon each of the $2.00 shares
which have been issued and are now outstanding
And to the extent of $99.00 per share on each
of the $100.00 shares which have been issued
and are now outstanding And by reducing the
nominal amount of all the shares in the
Company's capital in the case of the $2.00
shares from $2.00 to 2 cents and in the case of
the $100.00 from $100.00 to $1.00
and the Minute approved by the Court showing
with respect to the share capital of the Company as
altered, the several particulars required by the
above Act were reigstered by the Registrar General
on the 28th day of February 1974. The said
Minute is in the words and figures following:-

"The capital of Island Merchants, Limited was
by virtue of a Special Resolution and with the
sanction of the Court dated the 28th day of
February 1974 reduced

FROM S2,207,160.00 divided as follows into.

700,000 Ordinary Shares of $2.00 each
7,900 Class A Ordinary Shares of $2.00 each
20,680 6/ Cumulative Preference


Shares
7,500 8% Cumulative Preterence


of $2.00 each


Shares of $100.00 each
TO $22,071.60 divided as follows into
700,000 Ordinary Shares of 2 cents each
7,900 Class A Ordinary Shares of 2 cents each
20,680 6% Cumulative Preference


Shares
7,500 8% Cumulative Preference


of 2 cents each


Shares of $1.00 each
such reduction having been effected by
cancelling capital which has been lost or which is
unrepresented by available assets to the extent
of $1.98 per share upon each of the $2.00 shares
which have been issued and are outstanding And
to the extent of $99.00 per share on each of the
$100.00 shares which have been issued and are
outstanding And by reducing the nominal
amount of all the shares in the Company's
capital in the case of the $2.00 shares from
$2.00 to 2 cents and in the case of the $100.00
shares from $100.00 to $1.00.
At the date of the registration of this Minute
(after the said reduction) the following shares,
namely:
432,006 Ordinary Shares of 2 cents each
numbered 1 to 432,006

13,540 6% Cumulative Preference Shares of 2
cents each numbered 1 to 13,540

7,500 8% Cumulative Preference Shares of'
$1.00 each numbered I to 7,500

in each case inclusive have been issued and are
deemed to be fully paid."
Dated the 1st day of March 1974.

HIGGS & JOHNSON
Attorneys for Island Merchants.
Limited
II B'l I]1


IT SEZ HERE, "TO STOP
BLEEDING TIE TOURNIQUET
BETWEEN CUT AND THE
HEART. "


HERE-"BROKEN BUT Y'OURE
BONE"S'-MAKE NOT GONNA
THE PATIENT LET ME LAY
COMFORT- HERE ON
ABLE- THE TRACK!


~hu i~ritruno


"I DEIOE ODMA4 SM 'WHT WENT I
IwZ /4 1/ w III-1 'F sI

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Equity Side


--


---











10 Tih Zribune

wj- IIuxi i-Ii -- I Jaw I


"Couldn't we dine out on your expense account if you
tried to sell me 5,000 brass couplings?"


`*EMR IWT IrUS ABOIaT
PEOPLE WO L TEIR TU t"R!I


"Don't tell me we'll be dancing with WOMEN!"

CROSSWORD JUSTICE L

PUZZLE PI LE
ACROSS SITIA IS M


Dominant idea
Argument
Tilled land
Straightens
S-a n~mphs
Rims
Small barrel
Gallivant
Innova' v
Eggs
Larrb
Rose oil
Devoured
At home
leaching
degree


32 Ankara
34 African
antelope
36 Railway sy tem
38. Everybody
40 Affix
41 Column
44. On vacation
46. Frosting
48 Animal pen
50. Indian
antelope
52 White poplar
53 Houston
football team
51 Saunter


Por time 26 min. AP News


SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE
5 Baptismal
DOWN basin
6 Cordage fiber
1. Falsetace 7 Promote
2. Asian 8 Wait
3. Objective 9 Corner
4 Cyprinoid fish 10 Pipe hitting
I Sigmoid
a 9 0,o 15 Box office
notice
19 Kava
21. Conflict
24 Unexpected
inheritance
25 Finis
26 Lincoln
2- 27. Red arsenic
29 07 29 Anything
Shighflown
S 35 33 Annex
35 Glorified
07 37. Overflow
39 Resin
42 "Bus Stop"
S -- author
43. Kiwis
S-- - 45 Escape
46.Leucothea
-- 47. 102
49. Baseball term
features 3-12 51. Exists


SCARROLL RIGHTER'S


t'HOROSCOPE
S i from the Carroll Righter Institute

GENERAL TENDENCIES: Today's full moon
S makes you more likely to argue over
unimportant matters Try to be more thoughtful and
considerate of others Carry through with whatever promises
you have made and do so in a cheerful manner Be
cooperative
ARIES (Mar 21 to Apr 19) Keep busy at your regular
routine and do it exceptionally well Sidestep one who has a
big problem and could get you confused Be calm
TALRUS (Apr 20 to May 20) Take time to improve your
appearance and become a more charming person Help others
with your courtesy Engage in budget matters tonight
GEMINI '"rv 21 to June 21) Make sure you focus your
attention on home needs Get rid of whatever is causing
problems there Don't neglect to handle financial matters
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Make certain you
carry out your regular routines in a clever way Any health
treatments you need should not be overlooked now
LEO (July 22 to Aug 21) Look into important property
and financial affairs If unsure about anything, get advice from
a business expert. Avoid one who has axe to grind
VIRGO (Aug 22 to Sept 22) Good day to get your
personal appearance improved via health treatments Attend
social tonight Make sure you don't imbibe too much
LIBRA (Sept 23 to Oct 22) You have an opportunity to
clear utp those accumulated duties and make good plans for the
future. Try to assist one who is in trouble
SCORPIO (Oct 23 to Nov 21) Talk with an intelligent
person and listen to the good ideas offered Then follow
through and make the necessary changes Keep busy
SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 to Dec 21) Taking chances with
career affairs could result in much trouble, so be on the alert
Forget that civic work for the time being
CAPRICORN (Dec 22 to Jan 20) You have a fascinating
new plan and want to put it in operation, but it would be best
to study all angles first Obtain data you need
AQUARIUS (Jan 21 to Feb 19) Attend to credit matters
in an intelligent way Show that you know what you are
doing Show more devotion to loved one Relax tonight.
PISCES (Feb 20 to Mar 20) Get together with an associate
and come to a fine understanding A public matter needs your
attention Avoid strife tonight
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODY he or she will be a
true perfectionist, but it is important that you give the right
moral and spiritual training for best results throughout
lifetime


Chess


Bridge
by VICTOR MOLLO
QUIZ
Dealer North: Love All
North
4 A J 10
SA8
0 J72
4 AKQ43
South
+ a 9 6 5 2
IKQ 3
C, 10 8
4865
North South
14 1+
2v '*
The bidding is a matter of
style, but the contract Is cer-
tainly a desirable one. West
leads the 0OK and 05 to East's
OA. The 0 e3 comes back. South
ruffs and takes the trump finesse.
The 410 wins. How should
South continue?
ANALYSIS : There's a temp-
tation to cash the *A with a
view to drawing trumps. This,
however, may misfire badly if
either defender has four trumps,
for declarer cannot afford to be
forced again.
Should he cross to his hand
with a heart to repeat the trump
finesse? That will succeed if
West has four trumps, but what
if it should be East?
West East
7 K 8 4 3
0 10 97 6 J J 4 3
SKQ 95 Q643
J 972 10
Having used his heart entry,
declarer won't be able to get
back before East has ruffed a
club.
The solution Is to play the +J,
away from the *A. Should a
diamond come back, it will be
ruffed in dummy. With his
heart entry intact, South will
remain in control.


Saturday, March 9, 1974


REX MORGAN, M.D. By DAL CURTISi


DIDN'T EAT THEN TONIGHT SHE AS SHEHAD NOT EXACTLY--- BUT SHE AS'T
YOU SAY JANIE SHE WASN'T FEVER AND CbMPLAIN LIKE THIS NORTON PASS D AWAY
WAS FINE UNTIL HUNGRY OF PAIN IN THE BEFORE TWO YEARS AGO .
THIS EVENING ABOOMEN











41i


JUDGE PARKER Paul Nichols

Hm. r~ ME'S VERY SITTER M ME E E KNOWS ARE YOU KIDDIN'? YOU'LL
I VISH YOU WOULD GO TOWARD YOU! IT YOU'RE CRAZY TO SETTER THAN NEVER SEE NO PART OF THAT
WITH ME TO SEE YOUR WOULD ONLY MAKE THAT DEAL TO CROSS ME! FIFTY GRAND...AND NEITHER
BROTHER, MISS CALVIN! ANTAGONIZE HIM WITH WAKEMAN, WILL YOUR WIFE AND KIDS!
TO HAVE YOU LEFTY! YOU CAN'T
VISIT! TRUST HIM!I no e














APARTMENT 3-G By Alex Kotzky

IN SORT OF AN INDIRECT WAY, BY THE WAY, PIP I ASK PO YOU MINP IF I HAVE A
MISS MAGEE! I SUPPOSE OU HOW LONG YOU'VE NEIGHBOR COME IN WHILE YOU'RE
HOPW P YOU LEARN YOU CAN SAY IT WAS BEEN A FRIEND OFMR. QU STONINGME
THAT I KNEW PAUL? THROUGH HIS WIFE! SHE 1 LESTER'S? CERTAINLY.
HIRE A PRIVATE INVESTI- > YES,YOUI DP, POU 60 RIGHT
-ATOR TO FOLLOW HER SERGEANT! AHEAP AND CALL
HUSBAND! THAT WAS ANYBOMYOU
BEFORE HER DEATH, WANT---A
OF COURSE FRIEND, A
SLAWYER---
ANYWOPY!





STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & overgard


SOLUTION No 9910 -
T'ne gra ncmaster. who wa,
White (to move) spotted the
winn:.n idea here in a few
seconds. But you do't need to
be a grandmaster to beat an
opponent whose king has scanty
proteorion against the combined
:i:taok of your pieces. Every
practical player should know
wha, to look for in positions like
this, which often recur in play.
How did the game finish?
Par tirn s: 10 seconds, ohess
master or expert: 30 seconds.
county player: 1 :uniute, club
s:aIndt.d: 3 minutes, average; 6
minutes, novice




Chess Solution

I R> P clh' K v R: 2 Q-R3 ch,
K--Kt2: 3 Q-Kt4 ch, K -RI;
4 R--Q3 and Black cannot
defend against R-R3 mate


WELLU,'M HAPPY AN'THE KTTENS ARE HAPPY...AN' OUR
W/lKM4V' IS GONNA e HAPPY, TOO *


Rupert and the Jolly Holly-32


That afternoon the chums call for Rupert on
their way to Mary's party. It was kind of
her to invite us," says Bill Badger. "Thanks
for passing on her message, Rupert." "Yes,
and I've thought of lots of good games to
play," chimes in Algy Pug. "We'll have plenty
of room in Mary's big house." They arrive at


the mansion to find Mary staring at a
decorated Christmas tree at the foot of the
steps. Hullo, everybody!" she calls out.
'Come and help me solve a mystery. This
Christmas tree appeared from nowhere. Have
fou any idea who could have brought it?"
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


Swords oil
R fou r letters
or more can
you nmahke
Sfrmin the
iettera shown
here? In mak-
inX a word.
L U e Ch letter
Ilmay he used
onie only.
Ea(c word
must contain the large letter.
and there must he at least one
eight-letter word In the list. No
plurals no foreign words ; no
proper names. )TOD)A'.s
TI(ttET : 18 words, good :
2? words, very good : 2n words.
excellent Solutolln tomorrow.
YESTERDAY' SOLUTION :
Arne aenn uncon anion anli'e
anon cane canine ianoe c anon
CANONISE casein icallno coin
cone conlne cosine eosln icon
inane Incase Insane neon nice
nine noise nonce none nose
ocean once siane san scon eMon
neone senn:l lenna since sine
%onic.












Saturday, March 9, 1974


h rtibunetm


LATE WEDNESDAY evening Pierre
Siegenthaler, 35, won the Bahamas'
sole gold medal of the XII CA and
Caribbean games when he captured his
fifth race in the Sunfish class in Santo
Domingo.
Having won five of the seven
scheduled seven races Siegenthaler
could not be overtaken in the last two
;aces and so he forfeited the last two
-aces and returned home to Nassau.
In an interview with the Tribune
this morning Siegenthaler told of his
remarkable success at the games.
Siegenitaler said: "The competition
at the games was quite strong but the
Netherland Antilles made things easier


By IVAN JOHNSON
MIDDLEWEIGHT BOXER
Nathanied Knowles will not
attempt to capture the
Bahamas' second gold medal in
tonight's middleweight final at
the CA & Caribbean games in
Santo Domingo, coach Bert
Perry said today.
Knowles who injured his left
arm in Wednesday's semi-final
bout has been ordered to rest
for ten days by team doctor
Dr. Norman Gay.


for me by not sending their
representative who finished second to
me in the World Championships last
year.
"The weather conditions were
pretty good overall. We had light
winds for the first three races but the
stronger winds blew for the last two -
these two I won by a much larger
margin as the stronger winds suit my
style of sailing better."
Swiss-born Siegenthaler, came to
the Bahamas in 1964 as manager of
the Italian Bank. Cisaloine Overseas
Bank and leapt to the forefront of
Sunfish Class sailing when he won the
World Championship in Martinique


of final


"The pain in Nathaniel's arm
has grown steadily worse since
the fight on Wednesday. At
that time we thought that it
was just a sprain but it has
since been confirmed that the
ligaments in the left shoulder
are torn."


"He could not possibly fight
tonight; at present, he can't
even raise his left arm above
shoulder height, said Perry.
Knowles was scheduled to
fight Cuba's Alexandro
Montoya in tonight's final at
the games.


However, Knowles wil
receive a silver medal for his
win over Rosalbo Ochoa of
Venezuela on Wednesday.
The ladies volleyball, team
gained a brilliant three straight
sets win over No. 3 seeds
Venezuela yesterday for their


We were out hustled,


says Fred


By GLADSTONE THURSTON

THE WINNING
combination of all around
guards Peter Brown and Fred
"Slab" Laing contributed a
total of 49 points and 22
rebounds as Becks Cougars last
night took an 80-72 victory
over Pinder's Basketball Club
and a 2-1 edge in the best of
three Nassau League
semi-finals.
Scoring 16 of his 24 in the
first half. Laing who worked
the boards for 11 rebounds saw
to it that the Cougars trailed
by only one point at the half.
Brown netted 19 of his 25 in
the second half lifting the
defending N. L. champs to a
respectable 10 point lead going
into the final three minutes of
the came.
Head coach Fred "Papa"


'Papa'


Smith, though modest about
his team's performance
attributed their success last
night to Pinder's 77-72 victory
Wednesday which forced the
playoffs into a third encounter.
"1 think something like that
woke us up," he said. "It
showed us what we have to do.
Now, we'll be ready for the
Colonels."
The Cougars take on
Paradise League finals winners
Kentucky Colonels in the first
of a best of three Bahamas
Amateur Basketball
Association championship
Monday at the A. F. Adderley
gym. This will be preceded
by the Collegians/John Bull
junior championship match.
Led by rookie centre/
forwards Danny Edgecombe
and Harvey Roker, Pinder's
dissovlved the Cougars' 11-7


Smith


lead and took over by four
points with 12:21 left.
Van Ferguson then joined
Barry "Mossah" Smith at guard
as both teams played the
running game and varied their
defence between the full court
press and the man to man.
Walter "Liston" Major and
Bradley Knowles added to the
rookies offence keeping them
alive 33-28 with 3:45 left in
that period.
However, Laing was steady
with his six field goals and four
free throws as the Cougars
reached one behind 39-38 by
half time.
Smith figured his team had a
slow start before they really
got loose. "1 don't know what
it was tonight but it seemed as
though our team was a bit tired
in the first few minutes.
"Maybe it was just one of


Come and bring a friend!
YOUR TICKET TO PARADISE!


DISTRIBUTED BY



IAUE
llllI BIIEI

fllmY I


0


ESCAPE
from the hum drum

to the TROPICAL SETTING of the


PARADISE BEACH PAVILION
overlooking beautiful Paradise Beach

Pleasant service of reasonably priced meals under the
personal direction of Bernard Perron.
Breakfast e Lunch e Dinner. Open from 7:30 a.m. to 11 p.m.

RESERVATIONS: 5-7541
Paradise Beach Pavilion is just west of the Holiday Inn.
WHERE JAMES BOND MADE THUNDERBALL


Have a w4I
SUPER SUNDAY SESSION
WITH BALMORAL AND PAN AM

12 -3:00 P.M.

Enjoy all you can eat from a
Delicious Bahamian Buffet Lunch
for $7.00 per person, plus gratuities
Children under 12, half price.

IThi: ANERiAN F001ULL HHURHTS
Compliments of Pan American
beginning at 12:00 Noon.
"THE IGNITERS" STEEL BAND
plays all afternoon


those nights. Those guys out-
hustled us. Anytime they shoot
the ball, tri-y're right back up
at it. Those g,.ys have a lot of
fight in them." he said of
Pinder's.
Laing led off the Cougars'
second half with a soft jumper.
Brown returned with a three
point play and a push up and
three minutes later, the
defending champs held a 49-43
clip.
Although Pinder's moved to
.within one point of their
opponents power from the
Cougar's bench kept them alive
as they took the lead 74-64
with 1:44 left.
BECKS COUGARS
fg rb f tp
S. Ferguson 4 3 3 8
G. Robbins 3 16 0 6
B. Davis 2 6 0 4
D. Huyler 0 0 0 0
A. Bosfield 2 0 2 4
R. Forbes 3 7 4 9
P. Brown 10 11 2 25
F. Laing 9 11 1 24
PINDER'S
H. Roker 4 4 4 8
Ed. Edgecombe 9 15 4 19
B. Knowles 9 5 1 18
W. Major 4 16 1 10
V. Ierguson 2 1 3 4
T. Smith 0 2 0 0
B. Smith 5 4 3 11
1I. Lockhart I 3 1 2


last year.
Stegenthaler attributes his saili::
prowess in the Sunfish Class to living
in the Bahamas where conditions for
sailing are perfect all year round and
to his physical build.
He is five foot eight inches and
weighs 143 pounds. A Sunfish boat
weighs 130 pounds and is 13 feet long.
All the boats are made of fibreglass
and made by Alcort Ltd., a subsidiary
of AMS.
"My build is just right for this type
of boat," said Siegenthaler.
In 1971 he introduced Sunfish
sailing to the Bahamas for the first
time. He competed in the World


second successive win.
The girls, who lost their first
three games of the competition
finally displayed top form last
night trouncing the
Venezuelians 15-5, 16-14,
15-11.
Victory against Panama for
the ladies on Sunday will
assure the Bahamas of fourth
place. The men's team also
play Panama on Sunday.
The soccer side lost their
third match yesterday, 3-0 to
Bermuda. The Bahamas' only
win was last Monday with a 1-0
victory over Panama. The team
has no more games having
failed to qualify for the
semi-finals.
Cyclists Lawrence Burnside,
Jeffrey Burnside, Addington
Nairn and Herbert Saunders
ride in tomorrow's road race.
ENGLAND STRUGGLE
BRIDGETOWN The West
Indies cruised to 175 for one at
lunch on the third day of the
third cricket test against
England today.
Lawrence Rowe was on 91.
England all rounder Tony
Greig bowled West Indies
opener Roy Fredericks when
the score was at 126.
England made 395 in their
first innings.
Tea-time score: 297 for I


Liverpool
LONDON Newcastle
United, playing with ten men
after Pat Howard had been sent
off, came back from 1-3 to
beat Nottingham Forest 4-3
today and moved into the
semi-finals of the English
soccer cup.
The dramatic recovery came
after amazing scenes at
Newcastle's St. James' Park.
When the referee ordered
Howard off, thousands of
fighting fans swarmed on to
the field and the players went
to the dressing rooms for nine
minutes.
Police struggled to clear the


Golf line-up


0
0
^14


LINE-UP for tomorrow's Jiffy
Paradise Island golf course.
IST TEE
8 a.m. B. McFadden, S. Hall, W.
Wennick, J. Thompson.
8:10 R. McSweeney. B. Cooper.
0. Burrows, C. Cooper.
8:20 R. Adderley, S. McKinzie,
B. L. Sands, H. Poitier.
8:30 M. Evans. M. Kelly, S. Bain.
L. Dalgliesh.
8:40 F. Adderley, I). Lunn. J.
Duncombe, E. Gibson.
8:50 C. A. Smith, J. Virgil, I.
Higgs. V. Prosa.
9:00 J. Mackey, Pete, Andre, M.
Hamilton.
IST TEE
9:10 M. Zonni, M. Lockhart, C.
Flowers, P. Hall.
9:20 J. Gibson, A. Thompson. G.
Pratt, T. Kelly.
9:30 J. Major. S. Symonette, T.
Tufi. V. Cartwright.
9:40 L. Sweeting, C Lang. T.
Hepburn, S. Quant.
9:50 E. Dean, T. Sands, N. Rolle
Jr., W. Bethel.


Cleaners golf tournament at the
10TH TEE
W. Hudson, H. Munnings, P.
Adderley, S. Key.
F. Roberti, 1. James Z. Stubbs,
C. Bernadino.
E. Leach P. Tirelli. T. Blum, L.
Jenkinson.
W. Patton. G. Knowles, J. Butler,
H. Bethel.
V. Symonette, B. G. Sands, C.
Newry. B. Bonepart.
Sands. C. Newry, B. Bonepart.
G. C. Cash, W. Wisdom, L.
Parker. Gibson Jr.
J., Duffus. R. Cooper (;. Ellis. H.
Stewart.
10TH TEE
9:10 B. Bengerman, U.
Bostwick, E. Ramsey, S. Gibson Jr.
9:20 H. Cleare, P. Pinder, E.
Strachan, A. Smith.
9:30 F. Adderley, D. A.
Cartwright, C. Mercier. P. Matsas.
9:40 N. Wisdom. M. Stubbs H.
Lloyd, J. Wakeman
9:50 I. Bethel. G. Smith, T.
Jacobs, D. Gooding.


'II


Chamionships in Venezuela in 1.971
and finished 18th. The following year
he again entered the World
Championships in Bermuda and
finished a miserable last.
However, last year he achieved
international recognition in the
Sunfish Sailing class when he captured
the World Championship title in Fort
De France, Martinique.
Since then he has won the
Caribbean Championships and the
Bahamian Championship for the third
successive year.
This year Siegenthaler will not be
able to defend his World title at the
Championships scheduled to be held
next month in Curacao
'It was a choice between
representing the Bahamas at the games
or defending my title in Curacao.'


CITIBA



CHARI


THROI
RIGHT HANDED Frankie
Sweeting in a two-hit seven
inning mound performance
struck out eight and walked
only two leading Citibank
Chargers to a 10-1 victory over
Jet Set in the first game of last
night's double header at the
Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre.
Having given up one hit in
each of the first and third
innings, Sweeting sztied diuwn
and silenced Jet Set for the
remaining four innings striking
out seven of the remaining 12
batters he faced. Only four of
Jet Set's 21 at bits reached
base.
On offence, centre fielder
Kcndal Munroe and right
fielder Keith Gomez each
scorched two hits from four at
bats and scored two runs.
Short stop Lloyd Bowleg who
officially collected no hits
from four at bats topped the
Chargers' scoring with three
runs.
Consecutive base on balls to
lead off batter Bowleg and
Adlai Moss in the top of the
first culminated in the Chargers
exploding for back to back
rbi's as they took the lead 3-0.
Gomez in the following
frame scored his first of the
game and Munroe in the third
came through with his second
run lifting the Chargers ahead
comfortably by five.
Sweeting in the bottom of
the third saw his shutout go
when Jet Set's right fielder
Sam Adderley crossed the plate
for their sole run.
A throwing error on short
stop Bowleg saw Adderley safe
at first. He advanced to second
on Greg Woodside's walk
before moving on home when
centre fielder Richard Brooks
connected Sweeting's two balls
one strike pitch for an rbi
single into left field.


Why 5 ft 8 in Pierre is at the top


win -QPR out


field and restore order.
All the giant-killers of the
cup were silenced and four
First Division teams reached
the semi-finals.
Liverpool won 1-0 against
Bristol City, the Second
Division squad which upset
Leeds United in the last round.
Nottingham Forest, from
the Second Division, seemed
on the brink of toppling
Newcastle in a remarkable
ENGLISH CUP
Quarter-Finals:
Bristol City 0 Liverpool I
Burnley I Wrexham 0
QPR 0 Leicester 2
Newcastle 4 Notts Forest 3
ENGLISH LEAGUE
DIVISION 1
Coventry 2 Stoke City 0
Derby I West Ham I
Everton 4 Birmingham I
Leeds 1 Manchester City 0
Norwich 2 Chelsea 2
Wolves 3 Ipswich I
DIVISION 2


Bolton I West Bromwich i
Cardiff 2 Preston 0
Crystal Palace 3 Sunderland 0
Fulham 0 Carlise 2
Hull City I Luton 3
Middlesbrough 2 Millwall I
Notts County I Sheffield Wednesday 5
Swindon I Portsmouth 2


Division 3
Tranmere 0 York City 0


see-sawing game.
Nottingham were awatder -a
penalty, George Lyall slammed
the ball home to make it 3-1,
and Newcastle's Howard was
sent off for arguing.
The fans spilled on to the
field. First came Newcastle
supporters threatening the
referee. Then came
Nottingham fans on their heels.
Bobby Moncur scored the
winning goal in the last minute.
Southport I Chesterfield I
Watford 1 Bournemouth I
Division 4
Brentford 2 Scunthorpe I
Exeter I Mansfield I
Lincoln 0 Hartlepool I
Northampton 3 Bury 1
Peterborough 2 Newport 0


SCOTTISH CUP
Quarter-Finals:
Hearts I Ayr United 1
Hibernian 3 Dundee 3
SCOTTISH LEAGUE
Division I
Aberdeen 0 Morton 0
Dumbarton I Clyde I
Falkirk 0 Partick Thistle 0
St. Johnstone 1 East Fife 3
SCOTTISH LEAGUE
Division 2
Albion Rovers 3 East Stirling 3
Alloa 2 Queen's Park I
Brechin 2 Stenhousemuir I
Clydebank I Montrose 0
Cowdenbeath 0 Airdrie I
For far I Stirling Albion 7
St. Mirren 0 Queen of the South 0
Stranraer 2 Raith Rovers 3


PRESENTS


ZARAS


SONNY JOMSON

& THE SUNGLOWS

3 Shows Nightly

-g
MUSIC FOR YOUR :
DANCING PLEASURE

Jacket Requird.d


iCI
j^i Boe & Tunber ch & iT C
ic Rab a&The -


NK



GE



JGH
At an easy going pace, th#
Chargers combined the sixth
and seventh innings for three
more runs to win their second
in three played.

CHARGERS
ab r h rbi
L. Bowleg 4 3 0 0
A. Moss 3 1 1 1
K. Munroe 4 2 2 1
R. Burrows (dh) 3 0 1 1
S. Outten 4 0 0 1
A. Smith 3 0 0 0
S. Cumberbatch 1 0 0 0
S. Glover U 0 0 0
C. Mortimer 4 1 1 0
K. Gomez 4 2 2 1
R. Rodgers 3 1 1 0
A. Rodgers 1 0 1 1
JET SET
G.Woodside 2 0 0 0
R. Brooks 3 0 2 1
J.Dean (dh) 2 0 0 0
E Thompson 1 0 0 0
L,Gardiner 3 0 0 0
L. Johpson 2 0 0 0
L. Minus 1 0 0 0
S. McKinney 2 0 00
D. Johnson 0 0 0 0
L. McQuay 2 0 0 0
R.Fowler 1 0 0 0
S. Adderley 2 1 O 0
*****0s00
All-B.B.A. 20 game winner
Henry Williams mastered the
curve and the fast ball last
night for a nine-strike out
seven inning stint as Schlitz
Beer behind the offensive
power of centre fielder
Anthony Roberts and first
baseman Colin Thompson
offset the Bimini Marlins 85 in
the second game.
SMITH WINS
DANNY SMITH of the
Bahamas burst to a clear-cut
victory in the 60-yard high
hurdles with a 7.0 clocking,
at the National Collegiate
Athletic Association indoor
track meet in Detroit this
afternoon.
Smith was off to a fine
start and steadily pulled away
from runnerup Ricky Stubbs
of Louisiana State, timed in
7 1.


Injured Knowles pulls out


the










Ins
A1 "1


4.tt


WHY?

Why is it that only five out of
every one hundred young men get
what they really want out of life?
Why do some people move in
happiness and relaxation from one
successful venture to another?
why do some people seem to find nothing but frustration
and failure?
World famous Author of Psycho-Cybernetics, DR.
MAXWELL MALTZ has the answers and he will be
bringing them to you in NASSAU.
DR. MALTZ is world renowned as Author, Lecturer, Plastic
Surgeon, Playwright and Humanitarian. His famous book,
Psycho-Cybernetics, has sold over Thirteen Million copies. He
has helped millions of people throughout the world
accomplish success and self-fulfilment and in April he will be
taking time out of his busy schedule to share his knowledge
with the people of the BAHAMAS.
He will be conducting a dynamic two evening seminar at the
Polaris Hall, Holiday Inn, Paradise Island, from 6 p.m. to
10:30 p.m., on April Ist and 2nd. Seats $20.00 for adults
and a special price of $6.00 for students. Proceeds are to be
donated to educational charity.
PHONE 2-1500/1/2 FOR FULL DETAILS.
If you have ever asked WHY?
This will be a very important event in your life.


II O PanAm II

iou Il &TolkhHoII

wInvitou to "ft iouthlog IpdLT oday


___


I


I The games I













2Uh ( QrtiIUnttP Saturday, March 9, 1974


Be a BIG WINNER...Enter the


AU LUMBER OLT.


MAURA LUMBER CO., LTD.


i : :.i ;ie 0 clog it Aill respond to a ------- from its

S J: e ist. i -- an ------ new plant, its stockholders
i; .f 'l r" it in the long-term .
. !,-i .vho just -------- vacantly at people is
' ;'- *'anq! prouis.
S- Ceep to themselves are regarded as
fi i i .s people,
: '.. :' public from a dangerous animal in a

.. .. .'-. t eJs3 :t --. a barge along a canal.
**... i rt;,oon, a ------- parrot, pictured on a rainy
i- et "e miy iirmbrella!"
.i,:' i , 'j i-to c- ently -.- from the U.S.A. would be
,ti he;i hv ea: police



i vr.i --i* shi O siurprlisinq average ------- increase in
i'.iopiatuin _ver definite period.
..' ' Ik pijaent to go and get a ball that has
: .t hgh -----..
t. i ..ell ay that in his youth he once had some
S iit'i but never' tric-'.
t :,,.l,.i! or a fussy woman to feel vexed every time
.itcbh -on junior's pants.
., y n uight excitedly tell father he'd seen a ship
S 1- -- background.
'. hi;r ,elf without it might be forced to sell one
: a it:' ' J pittance.
: '-.i ~' brheaitiful garden will feel proud to have -----
i i; 1 f- a .aste. if soneo-ne with a lovely voice never
i t; i pr tessjionally
f":;. *-, n l nig ones seem to be going on interminably.

i ]:!-!,nts of the average person, dirty ------- create a

S .i.!!'i-: .i -iid is, s indpaper to remove a little -------- in
t if" ll Lc ,ir ;v d

(i F PAGE 6 FOR LAST WEEK'S SOLUTION)


-KEY WORDS
rTilS LIST CONTAINS, AMONG OTHERS
THE CORRECT WORDS FOR
PRIZEWEEK CROSSWORD PUZZLE.
UUMP ERA LEARNED SEEM
BUNCH EXPENSIVE LEDGE SEES
CAGE EXTENSIVE LUNCH SEWS
CARF GIGGLES LUMP SIGH
CENT GOGGLES MARCHES SIGN


DECKS
DEPARTED
DEPORTED
DESKS
DRAB
DRAG
DRAW


GREEN
GREEK
HEDGE
HEIGHT
HIPS
HUMP
JUMP


MATCHES
NIPS
PET
PLANNED
PLANTED
RENT
SEEK


SIPS
TAP
WEIGHT
WET
YEARNED


GRAND


RULES

I Suov1, T'r' h lIbtI it nt i,',- ii
ar ll n w.-i,,, ,a i ...1,
.echiuhe It I h.l til




drt irhoir P,, L i T,
Pel vih er in ,r l e i ; < T li


,w i'd P.zle



i i
ljl b 'final ardd


( ii 'ntres


become the property of The Tribune
3. A (orreit wiluition will be published by
The Tribune each SatL rday after the
puzzle appears, Thr p uile will be
published in Satuidays ed t iononly
4 After you have filled in every blank space
in tne puzzle, clip it out and send it or
deliver it to The Tribune Prize Crossword
Puzzle. P O Box N3207. Nlasau (or The
Tribune. Prize Crossword Puizle, Kipling
Buidirg. P O Box F485. Freeport) All
entire must be received at the offices of
The Tiibune not later than 12 noon on
Thursday following public nation of the


crossword puzzle Entries received after
this time will not be accepted This
newspaper is rot responsible for any
entries lost or delayed in the mail.
b A contestant may submit any number of
entries, provided the entry forms printed
in this newspaper are used,
6f Do not erase or write over your entries
Any entries containing erlasures Or
wrte-oveis will not be judged Illegible
entries will not be accepted.
7 The contest is open to everyone except
employees of The Tribune and members of
their immediate families, arid employees of


Maura Lumber Company limited and
members of their immediate families
8. The winner of The Tribune Piize
Crossword Puzzle will win a barind new
Orlando Clipper Cutl ss de luxe model boat
with a 50 h.p Johnson or Evmnrude engine
(retail value $4220 at Maura Lumiber
Company). In the event of a tie the
winners will receive Tribune vouchers to
the value of their cash share of the boat
prize encashable for goods of that value at
Mauia Lumber Company


'I,


CRUISE IN THE SUN


The luxu noius nternu i of this
..j ,Ir.I.I. ..' ORI ANI)O CLIPPER isthe
result of bhilliJ n' styling. It has
anodized metal tlime with tempered
shatte -proof glass. full recliiing seats.
The hull is trime tested and will give


... a Clipper Cutlass


ORLANDO
CLIPPER

CUTLASS


you outstanding performance. There is
no finer boat afloat for the money.
Made by a firm with over 20 years
experience. That's ORLANDO
CLIPPER! What a boat!!


*-. m.


- rJohnson
The name means Performance in outboard motors. Top
speed, trolling speed economy, dependability, all the things
you want in an outboard motor, If you want a motor of
mid range size with ski motor speed, you want the
IOHNSON 50 with loop charging for more Horse-Power
with less fuel. Johnson, the one you really need in these
days of fuel crisis.


EE VINRUDE
The outboard motor that's built for
everyone. It's right at home with
the jet fun set as well as the
commercial fisherman. EVINRUDE
50, the motor that's built for work
or play. IT FEATURES:
Fire power breakerless CD
electronic ignition Power pilot,
power shift with positive
mechanical follow through New
pre-set tilt lock e Pressure backed
piston rings Pulse tuned exhaust e
Automatic pressure temperature
controlled cooling Power port
loop-charged engine Computer
matched gearing!
And options you never even
dreamed about. "No motor so little
ever did so much."


MAURA LUMBER COMPANY LTD.
PHONE 24001 24101
P.O. Box N-8177, NASSAU


V "._.


'N I


12


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