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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03561
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: March 7, 1974
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03561

Full Text




T77


S registered with Postmaster of Bahamas for postage


conceissons within the


rtrn tw


L1 DUBLEY'S
COR. ROSETTA ST. & MT. ROYAL AVE.
NEW 1974 MODELS
"THE VERY BEST" "PIONEER
ARRIVING SOON!


VOL. LXX1, No. 88


Thursday, March 7, 1974


Price: 20 Cents


Shirley Oakes moves to liquidate Vesco company


By NICKI KELLY
SIIRIFY OAKES BUTLER and the Oakes
Holding companyy inc., have petitioned the Bahamas
Supreme Court for the liquidation of Fairborn
Corporation Ltd., the company through which
Norman P. LeBlanc, now president of Bahamas
Connionwealth Bank, gained control of Butler's
Bank in 1972 and merged it into the Bahamas
Commonwealth operations.
The petition was presented to the court on
Febiiuar 22 and will be heard before Mr. Justice
Maxwell J. Thompson on March 20 at 10 a.m.
Mrs. Butler and Oakes Holding, a Panananian
company with offices at Gresham House, Charlotte
Street, are named as creditors of Fairborn in the
petition.
The action by Mrs. Butler and Oakes Holding
follows an earlier one on February 19 in which the
two parties filed suit against Fairborn, Mr. LeBlanc
and Mr. Robert Vesco, claiming payment of S2.7
million plus interest due under an agreement dated
August 17. 1972, between Mrs Butler and Fairhorn






Shell (


as agent for Mr Vesco and three promissory
notes by Fairborn, each totalling $1 million.
FURTIIFR CLAIM
Mrs. Butler is further claiming damages from Mr.
LeBlane and Mr. Vesco for breach of the provisions
of a Letter Agreement dated August 8, 1972 made
between herself and Mr. LeBlanc. allegedly acting as
agent for Mr. Vesco.
Both Mrs. Butler and Oakes Holding Company are
seeking damages for loss suffered by them "as a result
of fraudulent misrepresentations" by Mr. LeBlanc
made on or shortly before August 15, 1973 "knowing
the same to be untrue" and as the agent for himself
and Mr. Vesco.
On the same date as Mrs. Butler and Oakes Holding
filed their suit, Mrs. Butler's husband Allan Butler,
formerly head of Butler's Bank, took action to
repossess a Sabreliner jet allegedly sold to Fairborn
Corporation.
A one week court injunction granted on February
19 was intended to prevent Mr. Vesco, Mr. LeBlanc,
Fairborn and the pilot of the Sabreliner from






dealers


,nI tile estate
lie lie.il olf tlle St
S'utio'usly in this.
r \ ,


By NICKI KELLY p())
FROM MAR(Cl 25 SHELL 'STATION
1)1 Ali. RS will he requited to pay l for all
pi'l v Iolitmiil ,iinl motor oil supplies. A
'Pii i:i;c-'1 dieveloplimc is ir anllo i in the lics ilf side
effcts ci I ii-' flh oil crisis whiwh is threateinrig to put a
uiitilm, r lo! daleis out of brtsiness.
Mi. Algie Darville secrn'ary of the Pctrolinu:i Dealers
,, ciwt -. cd .i Shell dealer himself. s: ;i that Shell
slliln piira-, \scrtec serveol notice by the c liipniy seven
cwc'. ;gi, thal thlt 'y would have to settle all outstanding
,i.ic II ;,s tby 'SMait h 25.
'I Ie't ,;. ( g rAy-s : vwou ld
ia\ve to bie paid for cash on delivery.
ihe reason given is that suppliers overseas are making
cash deimandIs on the oil company and in some cases asking
tlr pay ment in advance," Mr. Darville said.
TWO ALRI:ADY CLOSE
lic letter also advised dealers that any station failing to
settle its accounts by the deadline could not expect to
receive further supplies, even though prepared to pay in
cai, until the amount outstanding was settled.
\Two Slidl dealers former PDA president Livingstone
Pinder. Baillou Hlill and Robinson Road, and Denis Gibson
on Rosetta have closed their stations because they were
no longer profitable, Mr. Dar\ille said.
RKcprtedlthI both men had prospective buyers for their
ltusiiircsses but wecr not allowed to sell by Shell.
1 lie company has adopted a policy since the oil crisis of
nmt approving sale of a1in unprofitable station, preferring to
shuti it down iiand redistribute its fuel allocation to other
stations in the area, Mr I)arville said.
Ili s id his station on Wulff Rd. and t wo others near that
t \Ir Pintder had now\ had their monthly allocations
i lCleased.
According to Mr. Darville the Petroleum Dealers
Association was "very concerned" by the Shell ultimatum
because it might force more of its members out of business.
")Ou outlay has increased tremendously in the past few


months and many dealers say they
financial hardship ti ying to cover their cost
The dealers were reportedly told by
distributors were conducting business on
present conditions left the company large
the Bahamas no alternative but t.. follow
VLRY ICIG COSTS
Mr. Darville pointed out that prior to I)D
the first fuel increase was announced, de
$1.820 for a 4.000 gallon tanker ot iuel.
"Now the same volume is costing
declared.
In addition Shell has increased its mi
from 1,000 gallons to 4.000 gallons.
"We must now accept full tanker delivi
said. lHe assumed the company had in
practice as a cost-cutting measure. "'hat
have to make as many trips in the week
added.
Shell has advised dealers they have
arrangements if they wish less than a 4,OC
"but we have no assurance they ,ill a
amount," Mr. Darville said.
Shell also stipulated that motor oil sup
delivered where the order is $100 or nmo
will haec to be picked up by the dealer.
NO PLAN 01 ACTION
For the moment dealers ha.ic n, p
coping with the latest difficulties taci
industry.
Mr. Darville admits that the P.D.A. we
price fight with government in a disorganiz
"We held an election of o officers last ni
rcorgani/ing the Association and es
communications with the public to make t
problems we are facing."
Mr. Darville said the dealers were being
for the most recent increase in the pri
public has the impression that we increase
when all we got out oif it was two cents.'"
No Shell official could be contacted to


I





I


"-

THIS SHELL STATION ON ROSETTA is one of two Shell stations which have
recently closed because their owners could not beat the rising cost of living. The second
Shell station to close is the one operated on Baillou Hill and Robinson Road by
Livingston Pinder, former president of the Petroleum Dealers Association.


Britons back to work full-time


LONDON (AP) Britain's
new Labour government
Thursday ordered industry
back to full-time working
following the settlement of a
miners strike that forced
factories into a three-day week
to conserve fuel stocks.
Energy Secretary Eric
Varley decreed factories would
resume. normal working at
midnight Friday after 68 days
on half time. That will signal
the end of the gravest
industrial crisis this nation has

AT
NILY VIAIINFS Nl1
SEE
TWO STORES
FULL OF
HAPPINESS
and YOU SAVE!
fcrmimii--


faced since World War I1.
As he spoke, coal shipments
started moving again from pits
to power stations for the first
time since the 280,000 miners
launched a nationwide strike a
month ago for more money.
Varley said industry should
get back to a five-day week
"pretty quickly." The coal
now moving, all of it from
pithead stocks blocked during
the strike, was heading for
power stations and state-owned
steel plants on which much of
industry depends for its raw
materials.
However, the secretary
appealed to Britons to
continue to cut electricity
consumption in their homes to
speed the return to normality
in industry.
"I most seriously urge
people to economise as much
as they possibly can," he said.
Varley said the three-day


week had cost about two
billion pounds, or 4.o billion
dollars, in lost production and
unemployment payments to
temporarily laid-off workers.
The government's swift
settlement came as coal stocks
neared the danger level of
seven million tons. According
to energy ministry estimates,
they were down to about 8.5
million tons Wednesday.
Actual pit production was to
resume Monday when mining
crews are slated to return to
work. Safety teams went into
action before dawn Thursday
in a race to get the mines
ready.
The 27-man executive of the
miners' union voted 25 to 2
Wednesday night to accept the
coal board's one-year, 100
million-pound, or 230
million-dollar, package after a
marathon bargaining session.
(story page 2)


De

elh

ofi
VICF
operator
Wulif Roa
has been
president
Dealers A.s
lHe r
Pinder, w
station.
At the
meeting
Arms l'
called
reorgani
association
need
guidelines
Elected
Prince El
Perigord,
a candid il
Mr. A
re-elected
Donald A


Any

on c
A SEN
Ministry
be visitit
Bahama
discussion
have qun
with
citizenship

He wil
govern
office, SU
Pioneers
9.30 a.m.
2.30 p.m.


removing the aircraft from Nassau International
airport where it was parked.
The Tribune understands, however, that the plane
was flown out the following day.
In his affidavit Mr. Butler claimed that he agreed
on August 17, 1972 to sell Faiihorn all the issued and
outstanding shares of (onnex Press Inc., which
owned the Sabreliner.
He is alleging that Fairborn failed to carry out any
ol its obligations as listed in Clause 2 of the
agreement, despite inquiries and demands made by
Mr. Butler's attorney.
AGINT FOR VES(CO
Mr Butler said that Mr. I eBlane induced him to
sell to Fairborn which Mr. L.Blanc claimed to
control. His affidavit added however that I airborne
entered into the Connex agreement .as agent for Mr.
Vesco.
In October 1972 The Tibhune was granted an
exclusive interview with Mr. LcBi. ic who at that
time viorouisly denied any iiinani,:.ii a ,is nation with
former i()S chairman Robert Vesci
M\r. LeBlan sii d that he and
Mr. Vesco l,carinoi. "financially
disassociated i, every wax"i
when his otiip.'n'.ny. (;lobal
Holdings, purchased the
majority stock of International
Bancorp and Value Capital
Ltd.
International Bancorp,
parent company of Bahamas
Commonwealth, holds the
banking assets of ItOS. Value
mCapital. now under threat of
liquidation by a shareholder,
was the repository oi the real
estate and natur.Al resource
assets ot IOS.
(;BC (CO'NNslCTION
I'airborn Corporation,
are erxpicricing another cf Mr I I.'..'s
ts." companies boueht Lewis
Shell that tilier Oakes Ltd. in September 1C72
a cash basis nd and thereby gained control of
gest distribute in Butler's Bank ail Il., Butler
suit. group'.. entire's! :1 (C neral
Balrai,.ain Coriiipni .',
ecemnber 28 i\hcn In i petition filed Iebruarv
alers were. p, inl 2,. th!s lear. I luridian.
l.,lwrene Wilkov applied for
us $2,700." he liliiidaition ot Value Capital
urncii court order.
niunun single sale 'li Wilkov claimed that Mr.
LeBlanc used two Bahamian
ery," Mr. Darville incorporated companies,
stituted the new l(;obai Holdiins L.td and
way they don't i;lobal Financia; Lti. both
to a station." he without assets of an\
substantial value to acquire
to make special control of IOS, the four IOS
0 gallon delivery, Dollar F unds and their
gree to sell that in.anagenlent companies, as
well as control of Value Capital
plies will only be and International Bancorp.
>re. Anything less Mi. Wilkov alleged Mr.
I lBlanc was part of the
"Vesco Group" which "caused
lan of action foi o'r permitted" three ofi the
ing them in the IFldOs :o becoite involved in
ti.!isaictions which we'' "a
'nt into its recent iraud upon the investors" aii
zed manner iiit in their best interests.
ght with a view to GBC BUYERS
tablishing better I he Fribune reported or:
them aware of the nuary 21 that liquor
: Irchants Percy Munnings.
g blamed unjustly S-nator Sidney Carroll alid
ce of fuel. "The t.eorge W. McKinney h:id
d the gas 12 cents Agreed to buy Value (apit.i
romi Mr. L.eBlanc. The samr
day for comment. .Ioitp was also reported to be
'iiiying General Bahiliarria!
I companies for 57.4 million.
.a Iers NMr. Wilkov is seeking
liluidation of Value Capital I'i
nCt ieiW griounds that the Aineric.r
assets of Property Resourie,
f ei ers I united, which is controlled b\
'.ilue Capital. are in the ihand,
OR C L A R K 1 oi a receiver who cannot nmakei
of Fsso Servicentre. tienm available to shareholders
d and Macke) Street, : Value Capital uintil
elected tlh neric ii stallation of a rianageiien.
of the Petioleli'i or liquidator of Value Capi:.:
association and Property Resourc-
eplaces Livingstone acceptablee to tIhe U.S. Dl)stric
ho has given up his (Court.
Secondly that, tIhe I english
Association's general assets of Property Resour ,es
at the Marlborough are frozen until the I ngish
tuesday, Mr. Clarke courts are satisfied that the\
for "a complete can safely be handed over to
nation" of the the management of Value
n and stressed the Capital and Properts
for constitutional Resources.
to govern its affairs Mr. Wilkov said in his
vice-president was petition to the court that
llis to succeed Ken arrangement for the purchase
who did not offer as of Value Capital by ITaino
re. Investments Ltd.. is dependent
Ugie Darville was on release of the trozen fundic
secretary and Mr. by the English Court.
rcher, treasurer.
MONDAY DEADLINE FOR
queries DISTINGUISHED CITIZEN
AWARD NOMINATIONS


citizenship? T IE Co-ordinating
Sf Committee for 1974 Chamber
IOR official from the of Commerce Week April
of Home Affairs will 22-27 has set noon Monday,
ng Freeport, Grand March 11 as the deadline for
Friday to have receiving nominations for the
is with persons who Awards to be presented at the
series in connection Distinguished Citizens Dinner
nationality and Saturday, April 27.
p matters. The dinner will be held in
the Governor's Hall of the
11 be located in the Sheraton British Colonial
ent administrative Hotel.
un Alliance Building The categories open to
Way, Freeport, from nominations are Civic Service,
to I p.m. and from Creative and Performing Arts,
to 5.30 p.m. Business and Government.


7'





rL


UK Cabinet

member


was here in


Vesco case


"THE newly appointed
Lord Chancellor in Prime
Minister Harold Wilson's
British Cabinet is Sir Elwyn
Jones, Q.C., who was part of
Robert Vesco's defence team
in the recent extradition
proceedings here.
Sir Elwyn. (pictured) flew
to Nassau with two British
barristers. Michael
Burke-Gaffney and lan Glick
last November to join Vesco's
high-powered legal team of
Eugene Dupuch Q.C., Orville
Turnquest and Peter Graham.
Sir Elwyn, 57, attorney
general in Britain from
1964-70 in Wilson's previous
government, succeeds Lord
Hailsham as Lord Chancel-
lor in the 20,000 pound post.
A distinguished barrister of
Gray's Inn, Sir Elwyn has
been the Labour Member of
Parliament for West Ham
South since 1950. He is a
former president of the
Cambridge Union where he
was an undergraduate and
scholar of Gonville and Caius
College.
lHe was a member of the
British War Crimes Executive
at the Nuremberg war trial
and has written several books
including Hitler's Drive
to the East, the Battle for
Peace and the Attack from
Within.
Sir Elwyn is also a Privy
Councillor.


MEISSNER


'Police bungling'


says magistrate,



frees drug accused


By SIDNEY DORSETT
RALDO ClARKE, alias "Leslie Sewell," had a charge of
importing marijuana dismissed against hin following a hearing
into the natller before Chief Magistrate Wiltoni lercules this


Clarke. 28. presently in
police custody on another
matter was represented by
attorney Cay (ottleib. Police
accused him of importing
approximately 15 pounds of
marijuana on March 12 when
he reportedly attempted to
collect a consignment of
hassocks which were stuffed
with marijuana. Four of the
hassocks were at the airport's
customs shed on March 12 and
officers were alerted when a
porter was seen taking them to
a white Volkswagen car.
Mr. Gar) Snith, an officer
at the airport with the Customss
Department said that he
recognized the shipment as
being in transit to Grenada
from Jamnaica and decided to
ask the porter. Lancelot
Christie, about them.
Mark Fox, a former customs
officer, said that the
Volkswagern car w a.s
impounded anld the matter
turned itver to police after
some plant material resembling
marijuana was discovered in
the hassocks.
But. a police officer Alonio
Rolle. said that after taking
custody of the hassocks, they
were placed in the police
strortghnld until Janulary 24
this year. On January 25. he
said that they were given to the
analyst to take samples.
He also spoke wirth Clarke
on that day and cli.gtD .- hi,..
with the offense as the
a.nalst's examination had
positively identified the
substance as marijuana.
STILL FRISIH?
Public analyst Rupert
%H r,,, said, when questioned
b\ the magistrate, that the
subitiance appeared to be fresh
:it the time of his examination.
probably put there within one
month. he said.
B1 ,th witnesses, pc. V
aid public analyst \VWal::


were also further questioned
by the couit.
Mr. lercules wanted to
know hoyw secure was the
stronghold that police officers
could not enter it as they
wanted.
The officer said, however,
that it was the Supenntendent
at C.I.1). headquarters and
Inspectors who had the keys
for the room and authorized
persons to enter it.
But any police officer could
enter it all the samtte, the
magistrate said.
lie said that he was not
satisfied with the evidence
especially after hearing that of
the public analyst concerning
the state of the drugs when he
saw it.
"rlhere has been toe, much
bungling in this matter," the
magistrate said. He then
disismsed both charges against
('CIake.


TWO UP ON

DRUG CHARGE

BAIIAMASAIR p o rter
Sherwirn Pinder. 20, and
A.rnthony Thurston 1'. of
South Beach Fstate, were
formally charged before Chief
Magistrate Wilton Hercules this
morning with importing
marijuana
Ihe charge i- '-i-,s 11 1 I :i
incident leading to the men's
arrest on March S.
Both men pleaded not guilty
to the charge and were released
on $1.500 bail with two
sureties until 'Xpril 24.
Police accuse them of being
concerned together in
imponurting four .suit-cases of
;:a-rijiiail irotil Jamaica. They
.ire ,ils;) charged ,vith being in
poSSsion t of the drugs.
I lIton ir I represrenlcd by
t. i cir v lt tI''-rt Itgrahain.


TO TESTIFY Playboy Lounge operator


IN N. uORK


It \1 MBOURG i AP)
Silirln I Meissner. 111
,\iii]i.iii financier, has h ice
rcl.1 .rd1 oin bail of 2 nillhon
tri[m, S50,000 after accepting
a sl;plmelrnai to appea hefori a
Nc 'i rik grand tlury
wi ,t r titiqtng the alilI irs r of
RoirZ t 1 esco. a .S.
t. i ;s spokesman. saLid

tic' his bern in prison si ce
Juin .l .
I tllner Attornes treneral
Jolhi 'Mitchell is on trial iln New
o'iol i for allegedly accepting
'0ii 000 ifro V.'ns,,. t, i
P-,.'nt Nixon'.s campaign
tund. in return for impeding
investigation of Vesco by the
SeC Iuties and Exchange
I oniiii ssion.
he office of Meissner's
Iaw eis said he was released
Tuesday and left the country.
lhey would not say where he
went. lhe case against him tor
fraud and breach of confidence
is still pending in Luxembourg.
Meissner, bO years old, was
arrested while in Luxembourg
discussing the disposition of
145 million dollars frozen
there from the funds of
Investors Overseas Services
lOS, which was part of Vesco's
financial empire.
Luxembourg froze the funds
after the U.S. Securities and
Exchange Cnommission SEC
filed a civil suit charging
Vesco directed the looting of
$224 million in IOS assets.


MARTHA DUPUCH DIES
MRS. Martha A. Dupuch
died yesterday in Fort
Lauderdale, Florida.
She is survived by her
husband, Alfred, one son
Dennis and one daughter,
Suzette.
The funeral' will be held in
Miami at Lowe Hanks Funeral
Home, Hialeah, Florida at 7
p.m. on Friday, March 8.


up on fraud charge


IHEARINGS into a charge f1
obtaining money bhiy' flse
pretences brought agi:r.st d
real-estate broker. Nat (-Iintii
opened in the lowt limitt
Wednesday.
(;linton. former .iperato
of the Oakes Field I'i. boy
Lounge is accused ot passing
himself off to Mrs. MNirgaret
Saunders as the owner ot the
building between October 26
and 30, 1972.
The woman, a witness in the
trial, told the court she entered
into a transaction with (Glinton
to lease the premises for a club
but after paying him 52.830
and settling a 52.000 electricity
bill with B.F.C. she discovered
he was not the real owner of
the property.
She also told the defence
attorney. Miss Jeanne
Thompson, that at no time did
G(inton, who had been leasing
th! property from another
company, inform her that she
would be sub-leasing it from
him.
She said that radio
commercials aired to announce
the opening of the club under
her management resulted in the
real owners contacting her and
saying she had no authroity to
go ahead with plans. They also
told her Glinton had no right
to rent the property to her, she
said.
Mrs. Saunders said that the
person who contacted her was
Mr. Graham Cooper, a director
of the company owning the"
property. However, she entered
into an agreement with him
and later re-opened.
Mr. Cooper told her that
Glinton was trespassing as a
court order had been issued to
evict him from the premises,
she said.
Mr. Cooper told the court
that Glinton had been the
original tenant of the building


si I' 106 b6ut he never
C i)iilh'd with any of the
cl,.iuses in the agreement he
i.idec with his company.
\s ,a result he had the
;:ipani 's .ttorneys obtain
a1n rider for his eviction which
ws granted, he said.
M\r Isaac Saunders. husband
if \Irs. Sauinders told the court
that C;liinton told him and his
wife that the premises
belonged to his mother who
was not on the island at the
time.
lie felt that this was true
and never insisted on seeing
any ownership documents. The
case has been adjourned to
Friday. Glinton has pleaded
not guilty.
HUMANE RAFFLE
THE Bahamas Humane
Society will hold its raffle draw
9:30 p.m. tomorrow at the Cat
and Fiddle Club, Nassau Street.
Tickets will be sold at the
club in the afternoon and
evening prior to the draw.
A Dodge Avenger car is one
of a number of prizes being
raffled.
CAR-WASH
THE Gospel Bells Choir will
hold a car wash on Saturday,
March 9 between 9 a.m. and 4
p.m. at the Grace Gospel
Chapel in Palmetto Village.
Proceeds from the car wash
will be used in the rebuilding
of the Gospel Bells Broadcast
Studio which was destroyed by
fire just over a year ago.


Baham.s) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


CABO'S CREOSOTE STAlNS
NOW IN STOCK

BAHAMIAN PAINT IPrH Y Llb
BAY STREET PHONE 2-2386


'1C
I l,


_ __ ___


tR~


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f



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She


i


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r













Thursday, March 7, 1974
------------


THE FAMILY of
8-year-old John Cal'adilla
had no further word today
from kidnappers who enticed
the boy into a car as he
walked hom from school with
a companion in Dix Hills.
N.H.
Two men and a woman
lured the boy into a car
Wednesday afternoon, calling
him by name and telling him
his grandmother was ill,
police reported.
The boy's father is Michael
Calzadilla, co-owner of the
Irving Tyre Co. of Carle
Place. one of the largest
wholesale and retail firms on
Long Island.

FORME.. Beatle Ringo
Starr has been sued in federal
court in Los Angeles lor
$10,000 which Abkco
industries alleges he owes
from a total of $160,000 in
loans between March 1971
and March 1973.
The suit filed did not state
the reason for the loan from
the recording and distribution
company.

TO .; HO W tha
"censorship here is not so
bad", the Communist Parts
weekly Tribuna in Prague has
published a letter supporting
banished Russian writer
Alexander Solzheiitsyn.
Report fr i t I

No weather
BRITAIN'S Sweather \\ n
off the air to r i c h ,i, s,
yesterday as torec.asters ajid
other government s cent lt
staged a five-honul st!lk, ii
support of pay demands



BBIII^^^^^H


Aberdeen
-\imsiterJm
Ankara
Athens
Auckland
Berlin
Cairo
Casablanca
Dublin
(;eneva
lutng Kong
Lisbon
London
Mtadrid
Malta

Paris
Peking
Romee
SRdne\,
l et\'.e
oIuk >


4 tdriel


7 ''2 tci td
t46 clouds
' 5 c'liiear
7 5 cloudJ
541 ichdl
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5 cliud
43 Iclud .
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4 S cIloud'


24 ,'lud

r cir
1\ 11


Meir triumphant



as political



crisis ends


J F R SA .lFM Premier
(;olda Meir emerged
triumphant from two months
of political crisis today as the
nation nal religious party
indicated it would join her
government and give her a
majority in parliament.
Mrs Meir announced a new
Cabinet of Socialists and
I berals Ilat night an hour
before her legal deadline.
cookingg tired. she told
President Lphr'iml Katzir that
she was. able to form a
goren ment nuade up of her
LWibour party, the independent
i .ierals and three Arab
'gislators atfilitcd with

Ih. t ineup coin nds oily
5. o! theta '( 20 seats in the
K iness,,et r I.raeIl's PParliament
Rut sihe tol! nrews!ment their
leaders of the religious parts
t.ibour's traditional coaliionn
partner ha.d agreed in prin,-iple
Oi !'i! itl;- governrmei nt hlctler
she sth nlli'., thei ('bimn t to tli
Knesset Suprdy. lotr a svte At

I !h e re ligyi tn p> r .' ,s t1 s.. a',i
'. uiJ gi'oo \ tr,. Meir i'. sotes
'ite K ''nese., or .1 hi ilthl\

i c 'n t ti opIt
eo .ii 'te n. t insttee voted
30( i+ o ret:,i. i s prc",l ):i


refusal to join the new
government after government
sources circulated reports of a
Syrian military buildup on
the Golan Heights.
The party's central
committee was expected to
approve participation in the
government today.
The party stayed out of the
Cabinet earlier because Mrs.
Meir refused its demand that
religious requirements for
Israeli citizenship be tightened.
All the leading members of
the previous C'abinet were
retained in the new one
Moshe Dayan as Defence
Minister. Yigal Allon as Deputy
Premier, Abba Eban as Foreign
Minister and Pinhas Sapir as
Finance Minister. The Labour
portfolio went to Yit/hak
Rabin, former military chief of
staff and ambassador to
Washington.
Radio Israel reported
tension was higher on the
Syrian front than at any time
since the October war. )ayan
after a tour of the Golan
Heights said in a television
interview that more than 1,000
Syrlan tanks were deployed
along the 40-mile front, several
hundred more than were
reported there before the last
war I A.P)


\I VW Y(iORK 'onnrier
presitd .lI.a! adviser John
I h!!i, ltn.i:'. a' well as the
the:: \tt.'r:: (;e ener.il Joh!n \
\lith '!l ':nterceded on behalf
"! I .i'n.e'r Robert Vesco a
'i r a '.rw s '.;i at the .rimTinidi
S oni--p!,I.., aidl oIf the lornni r
[ S ( l m!:,'t iemiberr
io c'i:imenr t witness liarn'
I1 '.i' '.v esttifying ab.-ut a
J.air 2 meeting lie hIad
set Wo!h .a i
\l!:.hv" is on trial with
ient i i' t ( iite rce' Sec retary
\ aur.e r tias orn charges ol
ipe'diln a se iicrities and
e \ ,.h 1 i g in e nll lssion
iinvestigAni ot \! esco im1 return

th. i irti '.i 'ito n.i n eicr to
P' d.: I election

S had t.ilkced to Mr.
il't1 i i '' : lti e;ei'ione,"
S. 'I l '.nJ he had

ii 1"1"! Iro mn


Canvas clue to

stolen Vermeer
LONDON Scotland Yard experts today studied a sliver
of canvas which could prove to be their first major clue in
the theft of a Vermeer masterpiece trom a London
museum last month.
Ihe tiny piece of canvas was pinned to a letter sent to
the Times of London along with the typewritten message:
"Send the Price sisters back to Ireland to finish their
sentence
The Times said the letter also contained details that
could only be known by the persons who took the painting.
Vermeer's "Guitar Player," and by the police.
The Price sisters. Marian and Dolours, are Irish
nationalists who are serving life sentences in a London
prison for bombings in London a year ago.


I hrlichnan in which lie asked
Mr. Mitchell to make some
calls to various embassies on
Mr. Vesco's behalf."
Sears said Mitchell
apparently wasn't aware of
exactly what was wanted of
hiiim and asked Sears to bring
some details to the Jan. 12
meeting
In response, Sears furnished
Mitchell with a memorandum
,it the meeting in which the
wish was expressed that various
American embassies be
contacted in cities where Vesco
had corporate investments, and
be told that the financier was
a reputable American
;iti/en.
Vesco also asked that the
I S emnba:,,ies in Luxembourg,
Amsterdaml. Beiru' and Hong
Kong be encouraged to answer
tavourably when they received
inqluires about 11.hi
Apparently \'esco's concern
grew out of his arrest Nov. 30,
1970 in Swit/erland on the
complaint of a stockholder.
lie stubsequentlsy complained
that his liaison there with the
American 1m nbassy was
unsatisfactory.
Mitchell interned in the
case with a long-distance
telephone call to the American
F'mbassy in Bern and Vesco
was released shortly thereafter
in $125,000 bail
Sears testified that Vesco
told hin the Swiss arrest "had a
devastating impact on
international relations."
Referring to the Jan. 12
ineeting in Mitchell's justice
department office, Sears said:
"I told him Bob Vesco not
only supported me,. he
supported the president, and
was close to members of the
Nixon family." ( AP)


Wilson gets the miners back to work


LONDON Britain's 280,000 coal
miners are due back at work Monday
following a wage settlement to end their
month-long strike.
But industry that has been snarled by
the walkout is expected to take some
time to get back into full production.
Prime Minister Harold Wilson was
expected to order a speedy end to the
three-day work week which his
Conservative predecessor put much of
Britain's industry on to conserve
coal-supplied,electric power.
But much of industry will take some
time to get back into full production
because the shortened work week
disrupted the flow of raw materials and
component parts.
Maintenance men began preparing the
coal pits today just hours after the leaders
of the miners' union reached a


$230-million-a-year wage agreement in 12
hours' bargaining with the National Coal
Board.
The settlement was the first order of
business for Wilson's new Labour
government, which took office Monday
after displacing Edward Heath's
Conservatives in the general election last
week.
To get the settlement, the government
threw out the 7 per cent anti inflation
ceiling on pay raises which the
Conservatives tried to defend in the
elections.
The miners will get an average increase
of 22 per cent, with the lowest category
of basic pay increasing from $58.17 to
$71.30 a week and the highest from
$84.60 to $103.50. Bonuses for shift
work and other benefits will mean an
additional $18.40 for most of the


underground force.
The settlement, $29 million less than
the $259-million package the miners
demanded, still must be approved by
union local meetings on Friday. But the
vote will only be a formality because of
the 25-2 vote for acceptance by the mine
unions executive.
While leaders of the miners and
National Coal Board were thrashing out
the pay settlement, lawmakers assembled
in the two Houses of Parliament for
traditional swearing-in ceremonies.
"It' is going to be an exciting
parliament for all of us," Wilson told the
crowded chamber from his place in the
government benches that had been
occupied since 1970 by former
Conservative Prime Minister Edward


Heath.


Nixon: I never


author


MISS WORLD

STRIPPED

OF TITLE

LONDON Marjorie
Wallace, 20-year-old
American model from
Indianapolis who won the
Miss World beauty crown
last November, was stripped
of her title by the British
organizers today.
The organizers of the
annual beauty sweepstakes,
Mecca Ltd., said in a
statement Miss Wallace had
failed to fulfil the basic
requirements of the job.
The dismissal was
without precedent in the
22-year-old history of the
Miss World competition.
No one would be elected
in Miss Wallace's place,
Mecca said. She was the first
American girl to win.
Mecca chiet Eric Morley
said the parting had been
amicable.
"Marjorie felt it was
fair," he said. "We shook
hands and parted friends. I
expect her to return home
to America now."
A spokesman for Mecca
said Miss Wallace's dismissal
had been prompted by the
publicity surrounding her
relationship with former
soccer star George Best,
whom she has accused of
theft.
The blonde model is
expected to appear in court
here March 27 when Best is
due to answer allegations
that he stole a fur coat and
property worth $13,800
from her Marylebone flat.
(AP)


ised clemency

PRESIDENT NIXON said last night he never at any,
time authorised clemency for any of the Watergate
defendants.
"I never at any time authorised the payment of money to any
of the defendants," he said at his White House news conference.
The grand jury last week charged H. R. Haldeman, former White
House chief of staff, with lying when he testified that Nixon had
said hush payments would be "wrong".
But Nixon contended he had indeed said, "it's wrong. That's
for sure." The President said he meant "The transaction for the
purpose of keeping this whole matter covered up."
The grand jury also related a series of events that seemed to
trace one $75,000 hush payment, directly back to the March 21.
1973, meeting at which Haldeman claimed Nixon disapproved the
payments.
The President conceded that veto of the emergency energy
anyone listening to the White bill, which he said would have
House tape recording of the led to longer gasoline lines and
crucial meeting might reach a rationing.
"different interpretation" from GOP The President
his own. said that predictions of
But Nixon told reporters, i' Republican defeats in this fall's
know what 1 said. I know what congressional elections would
I meant. I know what I did, prove to be wrong.
and I think any fair-minded EMBARGO Nixon said
person (upon hearing the tape) U. S. diplomacy in the Middle
would reach the same East will influence the Arab oil
conclusion I have stated here producers to end their embargo
tonight." against the United States.
The President said, CAMPAIGN FINANCING
however, he would not now The President restated his
release a transcript of the opposition to public financing
March 21 tape to prove his of presidential campaigns.
assertions because to do so
might interfere with upcoming Just
Watergate trials.
Other main points at his k i
conference: streaking
WATERGATE PAYOFFS P
Nixon said he never President Nixon, in a
Nixon said he never good-natured exchange with a
authorized payoffs to anyr
Watergate defendants and told reporter following Wednesday
two aides nearly a year ago, "It night n ewsO ce'eferene
is wrong, that's for sure." brought up a vague reference
INVESTIGATIONS The to the latest college lad called
S INVESTIGATIONS The strki
President said, as his lawyers "streaking.
Th e reporter, Sarah
had announced, that he intends ,, b
SMclendon, w-ho baderd
to turn over to the House icC' ndo, who badgered
N.. on at his Feb. 25 news
Judiciary Committee all o about p ne
material provided to the onernce ut a, men
veteranss betnieits, halted him
Watergate special prosecutor as he walked out of the White
and grand jury. oas h East Room oloe wing
e ENERGY Nixon praised Weudnesda 's session and
the Senate for upholding his hh ... i t, t ..1,h .


Margaret to visit U.S.


PRINCESS Margaret and her
husband, Lord Snowdon, will
make an official visit to the
United States in May.
The visit, will be the first


time the Princess has journeyed
to the United States since
1965. Princess Margaret will
travel to Canada after the May
2-9 visit (AP)


FREAK STREAK
CARROLLTON, Georgia Streaking reached a new high
early today when a male student at West Georgia college
parachuted from a single-engine plane in the nude.
The student, identified as Phil Canard, jumped from an
altitude of about 2,000 feet and landed safely in a campus
parking lot shortly after midnight.
Canard had a flare and a pair of shoes on when he landed
amidst nearly 2.000 students watching for his descent.
"I'm very happy because I believe I'm one of the first
sky streakers," he said. (AP)


niumttoI" nlun u fir waUs
getting gray.
The President asked where,
and Mrs. Mc'lendon patted
his head behind the ear.
"They call that streaking,"
said Nixon, enjoying the
ensuing laughter in the room
at what was an obvious
reference to the youth craze
for running nude through
public places.
- -lq


Wilson's minority govern-
ment, with 301 places
in the 635-seat House of
Commons, faces
parliamentary struggles in the
months ahead. The
Conservatives have 296 seats,
the Liberal party 14 and
smaller parties a total of 24.
Wilson thus will need help
from the Liberals to get
legislation passed. Under the
British system, he would not
necessarily fall with the
defeat of a particular bill
unless he lost a confidence
vote.
Heath commented: "I
offer to the Prime Minister
the congratulations and the
understanding of the whole
house due to anyone who
assumes the immense
responsibilities of the First
Minister of the Crown."
Only a few hours earlier
Wilson had met with his
Labour followers privately
and warned they
ready for a new
any time.

'Nine
BRIDGETO Nine
people were d last month
in troubled grenada, an
opposition le er on the
Eastern Cari bean island
claimed in Barbados.
Maurice Bishop, a leader of
the radical New Jewel
Movement in Grenada. said in a
Bridgetown news conference
that seven of the nine dead
were members of Grenada's
secret police.
lie said some of the dead
were chopped to death, one
was shot and another poisoned.
Bishop. however, did not
identify the dead, or give any
more details on the deaths that
allegedly occurred during a
period of strikes that began to
cripple the tiny island's
economy at the beginning of
the \ear.
Labour trouble and protests
against the government of
Prime Minister nric Gairy also
came at the same time the
former British colony and later
British associated state became
independent.
Grenada police officially
reported only one death, and
the single victim was identified
as Rupert Bishop, the father of
the new jewel movement


PRISONERS

HAVE PLANS

FOR HEARST

RELEASE
TWO JAILED members of
the Symbionese Liberation
Army say they have ideas to
gain release of newspaper
heiress Patty Hearst and they
want to present them on
national television.
Joseph Remiro. 27, and
Russell Little, 24, said they
have a list of suggestions to
help win the release of Miss
Hearst, a University of
California coed who was
kidnapped Feb. 4 from her
Berkeley apartment.
Authorities had no im-
mediate response to the
suggestion of a public
presentation by the two men.
who are in San Quentin Prison
awaiting trial in the Nov. 6
murder of Oakland School
Supt. Marcus Foster.
The FBI urged more public
participation in its Hearst
investigation. Oreanizers of a
massive food giveaway said
they would distribute more
groceries Friday to meet the
free food demands of the
terrorists holding Miss Hearst
The SLA, which abducted
Miss Hearst, also claims it
assassinatedd Foster, a respected
b,.ck educator, because he
ail. edly supported repressive
sc, 1 policies.
1: young woman's father,
newsp.,v.r magnate Randolph
A. Hearst, has not heard from
the group since Feb. 20 when
it demanded he add $4 million
to an existing $2 million food
giveaway to feed California's
dy.


n Grenada
leader, who was shot during
clash between police and
protesters on Jan. 21. (AP)
Bishop Al claimed that hil
group had obtained support for
his cause from four African.
Asian and Latin Americar
nations, but he declined to
name them. He said one of the
nations was a member of the
United Nations Secunti
Council.
The leader also said tha:
plans were being made to bring
former residents of GreArda
home for a conference as part
of a campaign "to inte:-
nationalize the struggle"
against police brutality in
Grenada and against Gairy.
lie said the conference was
planned for late April or Ma.,



McAllister Hotel
DOWNTOWN MIAMI



ahinlli lIn

Single $ 9
Double $11
Triple $13
Quadruple $16


Home of the
AMERICAN-BAHAMIAN
FEDERATION


Nixon wi

WASIHINIGTON President
Nixon is willing to be th
interviewed under oath before th
the house c omn ittee mn
considering his impeachment, a gr
White House lawyer said an
yesterday .
Attorney James I). St. (lair w
told an extraordinary session cc
of the U'.S. District courtt that th
the president is ready to give sa
the house judiciary committee w
all of the materials and tape o:
recordings he previously gave w
the grand jury. tl


lling to be

St. (lair told newsmen later
at he w;'s referring to all of
e matenals that had been
ade available to the three
and juries hearing Watergate
id related matters.
Nixon is ready to answer
written questions from the
rmmittee. St. (lair said. If
iese answers are not
tisfactory, he said, Nixon
would be willing to undergo
ine or more interviews and
wouldd have no objection to
hem being under oath.
Lawyers from all three
ranches of government
xcutive. legislative and judicial
filled the long counsel table
s U.S. District Judge John J.
irica heard arguments on
whetherr he should turn over a
secret report from one grand
ury to the house inquiry.
The White House said it
ook no position on the matter
since it was turning over the
materials anyway; the special
prosecutor asked that the
rand jury's recommendation
be followed and the report be
iven to the committee;
twyers for seven men indicted
cy the grand jury last Friday
opposed its transmission.
It is "unthinkable that this
rand jury must remain mute,"


quizzed'

said Philip Lacovara speaking
for Special Prosecutor Leon
Jaworski, who was in the
courtroom.
Lacovara said that although
the report is pertinent to the
impeachment inquiry it "is not
an accusatory document."
He said it "would be
unreasonable and unrealistic"
that the report should be
withheld from "the impeach-
ment process which is of
tremendous importance to this
country."
As John Doar, counsel to
the committee, argued that the
inquiry is entitled to the
report, Sirica asked whether
there had been any discussion
that it might be advisable to
delay the inquiry until the
Watergate cover-up trial is
finished.
The judge said the date for
the trial had tentatively been
set for Sept. 9.
"The house judiciary
committee has not considered
that," Doar told the judge.
But in answer to another
question from the judge, Doar
said that the committee had
adopted stringent rules
designed to keep the
information secret.


I /






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Thursday, March 7, 1974


EDITORIAL



Russia's next move?


B13\ 11ll NNI l)DPUII
IN TillS (COl.t MN I SII RDI)A I tiaced the evolution of
nodern society, tli;mu, li its Illill stages, Ilomn tlie da\ King John
signed Magna Carlt oln tlie fields of' Runnymede 759 years ago,
down to he piesei i tini \\l'Iwh evel\ tlilng points to a possible
reversal of the liend ifmii fiecdiom ;is we know it to a new form
of authoritaiiain ule. centered in lth (ninunmmisi dlocctrlne.
* * * *
In recent articles in this column I tiaced tihe stages by which ...
step by carefully plane1 d step ... M scow hais succeeded in
pushing Uncle Sam oult in lth middle of tile international stage
and creating cotiflict and coltlusml on the houiie front in the U.S.
I have been telling you for years thliat Russia will not go to war
with the I'.S. She has no need to because unscrupulous and
dishonourable methods she uses in furthering her plans are
Designed to cause the AllericLni people eventually to destroy
themselves.
Russia has jus authl completed its job tl work in Britain.
NOW Moscow can focus its hull ailleini oil the U.S.

E\,rything now points i, the pIostsibihty that their next move
to confuse, emibariass ,d vAkcen hle t .S. may be in this
hemisphere.
The one chance that tIh, nmlll'h lie delayed or averted lies
in the smart move made b1 I'Pieident Nixon last year in forging
close relations with (Ciimi111nisn (Clnhi This is the first really
Smart move in foieigri prlik th\ lit hais come outl of Washington
since the U.S. dlniicld lie muiitilc (t i world leader after the
second world wal.
America's greatest Ipe ltd;a. riets inl the remarkable
I. eiei.Li lliii ability of its fo ieign secretary Henry Kissinger a
German Jew wh'o escaped to Ith U.S. during tie Ilitlerian scourge
of Europe.
.#: ,+ ..+ *
Russia is de, thill\ ilt:nl ut ( ln;m Site acili/es that ishe cannot
afford to push incle Sim i litii d in Ihs )\owi backyard while the
Chinese are cillonce trlit i 11' ll d mi i troops t n11 ud armalnelnt
ion lthe RIssiain buhidci.
Russia ciiO ld eLCs.iil\l des.tl ('li1i:i ;it t11s staI e )u development
in Chinesei .IIllamnni1 s l h ill Ishe t li ii "s th i thle U.S. might come
in on the side of (Clili. Not niltit cin ittallrd to lace a war on
two. fonts.
The R ,ussi, s ,ae i <.'il.iin thit i tlhe\ become too
embroiled with the I.S. in tie \Westl. China would seize that
tppoiunlitly to sti ke ia thle i licei ol the Soviet Union. And so
Mosco ini lit i\c, nho c.h it iivtt [ ill s area than slie would
h ivoc Itl i,,- hl itl Ni\ i' i\ 'i I'. d1 li .lli'ii e \vit l l C hint .i
I dt i'it a, !h ii!. i ui i n i c. p litics. It apper.hs to
hc dirt\ lit ,ii tp t ., t 11t ",, ttlpi hill. \,it i eveil mn av be the rights
S ,. *i: iil']e s ualdi l that low threatens to
M \ *i :i '! 1 I' i ,'l i his lerm expires
1 n ii t I- ,i' i :U, is; ecoi lni/ce the Lict that
N il\ di i .1 !it'.il e'l\i i' It,, li ct, 'i, u li\ ... aInd indirectly to til the
2ntie lice \t,\ i i \.i li' ,i !iciie dl\ iclations with the
(+ nllll n iillll sti 'iv iii!ii! i
hire ic. !i,\cv il\l. mt' l ind in i e siiblc \\av;ys by which
Russi.i cain tIII ,! inll iiA iii l igd abtiii tlhe downfall of the
western demtoii iCh 'I, Ih I le ii eidenc' otl this itove may have
S- eeni seeni in the behl, i\hOl ot lin ,i t inii)iis in IE glanid during the
,** reccnii cnil nlin ieI .I i Ike ( ll-il p .i ,illv cli)ppled the industries ol
the nationn.
i ,, + + :c. (: *
I lie .S'ist.\ /'P cs ( i( n / \c('i\ ARc'/h't of January 7tli
devoted its e'niim i \\issit i .1 icpIii 11 Ilteniational Trade
Unionism.
I his is A; li sl inipou, ilint i .li .l tilil i ( )lt li iIlnl it would be too
Song toi pubichili, i i lb(/ I ri/bhio ind l i is not the kind of
article th i\e iC il I liui sl\tdl i
: But th e licic i incs l'.w. ; is it lthe dil I .1 inewspapci Inot to
l consider \lihail itI ict dd l'i v\\ S should klno\\. I [ i ltis .i i n I1 ti I pt ci dilnCiiment will be
published i ili /!iA /I/h t i/ >b u I/ lic li nsti liislaiment
appears todI.i

You will sc b\ tllst icpit Hllit il is inm lthe illention of
Russian tlade l iiniiis to illltite;l trl dc t ionis\ in thie West. This
could be the listl ind lial si tAke dcliveCed Iagainst Ihe West by
ilmeans of dcv iois RISl l,|i p tiop[ ,ii:idi.

The RlSiinii s lii1tr I 1+ !Jr I \\,i\ rfl c,' ii Is Alwss es.
1-oi extniple. ilic\ iiL i o hi e ,i demii ci1ilic s" cil:ist state. InI
facl tl he ,ir e ic 'itl 'i .1 del. ,'> ', it \ i i kil.l l.ilt I e ct .
tllhe ,y rC e he i ii, l linpeI 1,i11 1i ilt int iin il Ii e \\W ild l(odli \ .. lli at
homeanc mid abilol id
A\ fewC y cI s A'.o I t10 d \()I t1liI viII lIlICt C'oiiiunulists
v i-:t u '. ,il .i tlhe C /;i lil i ''ii e l 111 li ll i i Ce il o! eltle nl tion
-" W\erc inetmbels ol the Ct i i (aiml iiist p ll
Youi \\ill see bh\ llic ip, u ii thlie .S'nl'/ v \ / v(/V'Ic litha even
I today only five to flif tLen pei cel o tlie Russian people are
" iiembers ot llic p ily.
SMeinhbershilt in (i' pil \ i ,i \>'l \ j'l,'c tllis posi ion bI caliis ii
* x t C h.i. s w ilth it piitil'e 'is t l 'i It, lt ic l .ist in t|orilt of tlhe
i Russian lpcnlc.
whI suppose iln cl.in iiei iinit I e liip t the Pail ci Russia
vwilli bciii ;i litn mbc e rl 1 lwt' excilusti, e Stliaile Deal Clubl in the
BaihamIas!

S In spite t his sihi, .ittiion Riui Issi ii hi u ulindcl thie Uii ioptcan
nations in llhe I lined \N itions \\lli tlie clihiige ti| limipe ialisnim to
Sthe point whec ltht' lhiiv been ibicid to cast oill theii colonial
t ties ... even in coloh ial lelliltoils ilhit don'l wainl to be set "ficc".
As a result, llie U.N lod iy is ciu'vded with repiesentatives ot
inv liatiols who h.;ve noi cicplnl Jol the devious forces by

" In effect, lie t U.N. tod/iy Is contitnllcd bI tlle Asil -Afllican
bloc who cair\ willi tihemii o cil fuei n, i iCcv l .igainisl colonial
m i ule.
; Why ... eVeln Ii .S. I 'ilcaii Seciel.i\ Ioslei I)ullcs sloid up in


the U.N. witli the Russ.iln i Ckpi'senL'tliA (111111g tlie Sue/ crisis inl
PI-56 and coiidlCiinCLed Blilisli Iiiipei iM il'
1This \iva ote oe li of i\'t la illl.ike s Amellt'c.i ihas evc imiade in
h ile game of intclllitiolhill phlies n which i, iloi often Illini nolt,
she seems to play the lole oI llie be i ll1 the \ goods .
The extraordinall\ succies o f the Russilan game is s homn \\ hei
Sit is remeimeieiil ha it no pi otesl \is iaise'd in tlie I.N. whlicn
some time later Russia Ji lap I Ihlmgi \., lPoland and
SCzechoslovakia in llhe most vicious e\lhibitiuo of Imperialist
P power!

Russia uses tlh same line ol dIeception in its Ilnldce union
Propaganda.
It poses as a model of trade unlilon peli section and declares thai
their workmen already have what labor is seeking in the Wes'.
This kind of propaganda might imipess tlhe illiterate and the
weak-minded but anyone who has any knowledge of tlie facts
Knows that the Russian working nuii i as exactly nothing. I saw
This situation for myself during a visit to Leningrad three years
Sago.
There is a marked difference between trade unionism in the
West and in Russia.
S Trade unions in our part of the world are completely


Ghr Zribuni


By PETER SAGER
"What the trade unions of capitalist countries are nowv
struggling for has already been implemented long ago in the
USSR and the fraternal countries of socialisni."
These words were spoken by the Chairman of the Soviet Trade
Union Federation, Alexander Shelepin, at the beginning of the
Eighth Congress of the World Federation of Trade Unions
(WFTU) in Varna on October 16th 1973.
At least indirectly, Shelepin admitted with these words that
the trade unions in open democratic societies have different tasks
from those in totalitarian states, particularly in Eastern Europe.
But whether the difference really lies in the fact that the East
European trade unions have long ago implemented what the
Western trade unions are now struggling for is a very different
matter. It is worth detailed investigation.
This is an important question for a number if precise reasons.
During the last few months, Shelepin has been showing
considerable interest in establishing cooperation between Fast
European and Western trade unions with the definite purpose
of influencing the activities of the latter. In this sense, he has
been trying to get his organisation a place in the new luropean
Trade Union Confederation as well as to establish the Deput
.lead of the Soviet State Committee for Labour and Wages. Ivan
Goroshkin, as Chariman of the Governing Body of the

(AT present there is an attempt being made to bring the
trade unions of the East and West together. If this should
happen, the World Confederation of Trade Unions, led by
the Soviet Trade Union Federation, will have much to say
in the affairs of non-Communist trade unions. Ieter Sager.
Editor of the Swiss Press Review and News Report, here
writes a comparative study of trade unions in Communist
countries and in democratic countries. Great efforts are
being made by the Communists to infiltrate trade unions in
democratic countries; and yet their own trade unions are
organs of state, with aims quite foreign to those in
democratic countries. Today's article is the first of a two
part series).

International Labour Organisation (ILO), one ot the specialised
agencies of the UN.
So far these efforts have been unsuccessful, hn somethingg
perhaps as important has been achieved. On Januar! I th 19'74
conversations are to take place under the auspices it the ILO
with a view to establishing closer cooperation bctweln I Iast
European and West European trade unions.
WHAT IS A TRADE UNION IN THE WEST?
Shelepin's above-quoted claim is quite clear: the Smiet trade
unions have long since achieved what the Western workers'
organizations are now striving for. In order to consider such -,
claim objectively, however, we must first try to dicfimc the
meaning and purpose of trade unions in an open. democratic
society. They are first and foremost self-help workers, and their aims can be briefly summarized in this way .
improvement of working and pay conditions in order to give
the worker:
a maximum of economic independence
durable employment
a growing proportion of the national wealth.
The trade unions have the established right to resort to strike
action when necessary in order to obtain their justitiable claims
namely, every possible improvement in the condition of the
workers.
We can sum this up by saying that it is the job of the trade
unions to achieve a better quality of life for the worker. Many
things belong to this goal: on the one hand, high wages: on the
other, however, more effective self-expression by the worker in
terms of human values, through education, equality of
opportunity, a voice in the affairs of state, security in his work
This aim is so all embracing that it is hardly possible ever to
realise it. The important thing about it, however, is that steps
should always be in the process of being taken towards the aim.
And it is by this slow but steady process of improving the quality
of life that a member of a trade union can measure his
organisation's success or lack of success.
The material elements in this quality of life are certain!
measurable. Wages averages can be worked out, and the
individual's share of the national wealth can he calculated. With
this, calculation of the differences between countries becomes
possible. But there are other, not less important, elements of the
quality of life which cannot be measured so easily.
tlow. for example, can we define the extent to which freedom
is protected so as to compare it with life in other
circumstances? Is it of importance to the worker whether he canl
frcely choose his religion, belong to one of a variety of political
tendencies? Is the worker afraid of the sudden horrendous
medical costs which may be caused by an accident or an illness, as
in America? Or has he no need to be afraid of these, as in the
Soviet Union? Need he fear to be enclosed in a psychiatric clinic
because he holds opinions diverging from the norm'?
flow, indeed, can such differences be defined? There is perhaps
no alternative to establishing an inventory of the advantages and
disadvantages in [astern Europe and in Western tEurope. But.
then. even so, it will still be impossible to measure the rauli ot
the individual items on either side.
Nevertheless. I feel that there are \alid comparisons which can
he nladc.
WHAT IS A TRADE UNION IN A COMMUNIST STATE?
A tiade union in a ('omrmunist state has a meaning and purpose
completely different from that in a democratic state indeed.


independent oe glniu/tions tlhait are almost clnstantlyv it war wilh
capital and goverlnmenilt in their county iCs.
Tiuldec unions ill Russia are not free institution I he : ii
controlled b\ the government. 7/t('' are denied tih rtghI to< strike
Membership is limited by the fact that only a small percentai e
of tie population are members of the ('Commnunist parly anld these
members follow the strict part\ line. TIhey would do linothini t
cimdangsc their membership in the party.
In addition you will see by the Swiss Rericw that the KGB
thile unscrupulous Russian secret police have infiltrated thII
unions and hold top posts in the origanil/ations. And from this
vantaie point they contirol every otllle form of organii/ation inl
the union.

The la.nk .iind file of people inll te West are 11no aw.Ie o tllhese
facts. And so they swallow "hook, line and sinker" the Russiani


claim to being a democratic socialist state and to having tiaidc
uIlions tl hat ve no reason to complain.

I feel that everyone in the Bahamas should read the Swiiss
Redicriw report on trade unionism. At least I feel that eve\
itember of the government and the opposition .. as well as
labotir leaders ... should take the time to read the report so t lt.
when the time comes for foreign influences to tr\y to infiltrate
union activities in the Bahamas they will at least know what they
are dealing with.
And then the decision will be theirs ... and theirs alone.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
Kings may learn front the story of N: poleon Bonaparte that
their safest study. as well as their noblest. is the interest of the
people.
The people are taught by them that there is no despotism so
stupendous against which they have not a recourse.
And to those who would rise upon the ruins of both, he is a
living lesson, that if ambition can raise them from the lowest
station, it can also prostrate them from the highest. CHARLES
PHILLIPS


the only thing the two have in common is tlhe name The new
constitution of the Soviet Trade Union Federation established iat
its 15th Congress in 1972 describes the organization's purpose
and task in these terms:
he trade union associations carry out all their work under
the leadership of the Communist Party of the Soicet Union the
organising and guiding power of Soviet society ... I he trade union
associations of the USSR range the workers. kolchoz farmers and
employees round the Party and mobilise them in the struggle for
the development of Communist society ... Parallel to Soviet
society's moving forward towards Communism. the role and
purpose of the trade union associations as the Leninist school of
Communism are permanently growing to an ever increasing
extent they involve themselves in the solution of tIquestions ot
national, economic and cultural development ... Central tasks of
the trade unions are molilising the masses for the fulfilment of
the most important economic aims (and) the establishment of the
material-technical basis of Communism (as well as) the struggle
for further strengthening the economic power ot the defence of
the Soviet state ... The trade union associations educate the
working person in the spirit of ('oiinlunist conscioutisiss nmd in
the firmness of adherence to ('omniunist primliple,, (o Soliel
paiiitisin and of the C'omlnmunist attitude \\to rk aind to
comrmulnal socialist ownership ... The trade union associations
fight for the further strengthening of the social ;and national
system ... A.n nictrnitional obligation of the Soviet trade unions is
biotherla aid lor working class interests (and) universal support
ol the national liberation movement iof the colonial aind
dependent peoples (as well as) of the \workcls' struggle in those
countries which have opted for the road to independent,
development, the strengthening of their economy, and national

"Ihe entire activity of the trade union associations is based on
the method of convincing the masses, on the actlvil, initiative
and own activities of the workers and employees, on strict
adherence to trade union democracy (and) the principles of
criticism and self-criticism. The collective leadership does not
exempt the vworkcrs and employees from their personal
responsibility for the work with which they have been
cntruisted."
This is a very concrete and detailed description of the tasks
which Lenin allotted to the trade unions, as indeed to all "social
organizations": they were to be "tranuissin, hc'lts" for the
(TnnCmunist Party The result is that the trade unions of the
Soviet Union and all (Comnunist countries arc instruments of the
('ommnunist Party. and therefore in a state controlled by this one
single party they obviously cannot fulfil the functions of self-help
organizations of the workers.
It is true that trade unions in C(oninunist-led countries also
appear to have the same tasks as genuine self-help organizations
would have: for example, drawing up collective count acts with
managers, or controlling working conditions in factories. Buit
these trade union organs ot state which noninally support
"socialist competition", possess a veto right against nieasures
which may hc taken by managements, participate in the
elaboration of economic plans, and are consulted iln matters of
production clearly possess functions of a legal and
administrative nature. and appears in this respect also to be
institutions forming part of the state. This ineans that lhe trade
unions are expected to put the interests ot the state abo\e those
of the workers and not. as with trade unions ill democratic
countries, to look after the interests of the workers over against
the state and the requirement of the national economy. One piece
ot powerful evidence for this is the remarkable fact that
communistt trade unions possess no means of struggle on behalf
of the workers: the right to strike exists in ni (,Conunt.\t
i'li4ntry.
THE PARTY AND THE "TRANSMISSION BELTS"
In all ('omnunist countries, the Communist
Party is an organisation of the elite. It takes in only
about 5'; to 15,' of the population, whereas its monopoly
position would enable it to recruit front 50'; to 90'; of the
population, if its leaders delmandeId it. The task of this elite
organisation is not to control the people direct ly for this it
requires what Lenin called "-transmission belts". With a
membership in the Soviet Unionl t f oer 100 million, the trade
unions make up the most inmportlinl I,> these lhe (',Colnunist
Party claims the right to direct all snwcial org.anistiois: it builds
up party groups within th iCI.te Jims1C of \hlich .are iven in
Article 68 of the constitution of tli S~\il Co(' nisinit IParty ,is
"to strengthethe he influence of the ( mll il lnin l Pa.i on every
side. to push through Party polht ies 1mnin non-paly members, to
strengthen the discipline oit ilh i 'iil\ ,id dtl thci stae, t fight
against bureaucracy, and to i lntioll ilt iniIl 1111 ni'c ili on of IParty
and state directives". \l 11 tllese PI'.ni l ps t\lJi caln also be
described as cells conir u11nde Itli direction ot higher party
committees and in the aise ,o1 lie So\iet U union under tlie final
authority of the (eniral ( oninitil ie of the So\lit ('o1ninunist
Party.
It stems natural\ flrom his ith,i l hec social orgaiils.lit ,,
tiust have the same chuaileislics. they are led h\ the
Communist Party, they all IJi\e the building of ('ommunnisnm as
their main purpose, the\ arn all bhult up on the same orgamniltion
principles as thc (Coln unisti Iail\. anid finally tihe\ ,re all
expected to coopcrai c with ill other (iganisations.
When it is laid do~ n ti.ilh the (tinmunist Parly f'ads these
organizations the mosi ilnpo tlnt ol which, as we hl.ve een. is
the trade union oiranisaitlln this means that all important
matters of principle lie decided by the Part\ ind thec
*rg;!lnis;t!ons themselves ()hi1 posses' c'omlpetence in unimnportan
matters relating to day-i,-d.iy petition. The lead rn' il r the
(Con un nist Party is laid di' n ill Ithe constitutions otf ill these
organizations. In the same \,i\ ,is i' lanId down in consrlltltion ot
the Soviet trade union oi(r.inisl.tioii \which I hale alreJid\ quotlcd
This also means, of couse', thail the leaiding positions in tli triade t
uniottn organisations are in tle irip or th ('otniniist I.ltl . ld
in ilOst cases the arce held by people also possec'sitl i tllci.l
Party functions. \ C(oimrnnist I'lI\ decision ot M,11i I '2l
under Icnln's leadership is still \,ilid today: it declared that the
Part s\hoiild fill the leading position in the trade unions and thail
"naturally the leading forces of the trade union organis.il ions
must bhe under Party control".
STATE SECURITY AND THE TRADE UNIONS
thc protection of the Lseculty of th; sl',te, in lhe widest
possible sense w which these wtortds can p isscss. is !he t.isk ot a
specjl committee in the Sict Unlon, the KtiB ,i as is i S
rilOc comrmonly known, t he secret police'. I his iIl'ti i tl
whichli has estahlished aj ver\ special position in Sov\iet tll.lrs is
concerned both with espionage ;nd coitnter-esplinaige. .ind it
possesses means, in term, ot both Inaterial and personnel, which


are certainly without parallel any where in the \vwold. Ihe K(;B is
in a sense a state within the te and in the same sens i s also
i Party within the Party. One of the tasks of the KG(B is to wokr
w iithin all the institutions of the Party and the statt' and one ot
these institutions is of course the trade union organisation.
The present chairman n of the Soviet Trade Union I eder:tion,
Alexander Nikolayevich Shelepin, was froni 1952 to 195X head
of the Komsomol, the Communist Youth Organisationh. Fronm
1958 to 1961 he was head of the KGB, and at this time he also
became Chairman of the committeee for Party Control of the
Soviet Communist Party. This Committee constitutes the
"Supreme Court" of the Party: it forms the highest disciplinary
board and control organ respecting the "personal affairs" of all
Communists. According to Article 39a of the Party constitution.
this committee is responsible for "securing party discipline by all
members and candidate members of the Soviet Communist Party.
establishing the responsibility of any Communists guilty of a
breach of the Party programme, the Party constitution. Party or
state discipline, or Party morale". For this purpose the committee
possesses a very widespread network of control
organizations which are totally independent of other Party
bodies. A man like Shelepin, established at the head of both this
Control Committee and the KGB, disposes of a remarkable
important position of power in the Soviet hierarchy; and it is
certainly no coincidence that precisely this man was in July 1967


called upon to become Chairman of the Soviet Trade Union
Federation. There is no doubt that Shelepin's arrival in this
position immensely aided the infiltration of the Soviet trade
union apparatus by the KGB.
INTERNATIONAL BUREAU OF THE SOVIET TRADE UNIONS
The KGB has a particular interest in the International Bureau
of the Soviet Trade Union Federation. This Bureau is of great
political importance, in that it is in regular contact with trade
unions in l11 different countries, it organises training courses in
the Soviet Union for foreign unionists, it deals with Soviet
propaganda abroad in the trade union sphere, and it undertakes a
large anlount of research outside the Soviet Union. In the
European Department alone, there are more than 100 specialists.
There are also KGB agents working with this Bureau, and these
are often infiltrated through the Bureau's activities abroad into
the trade unions of other countries, as well as into international
organizations concerned with labour problems
When the Rinaldi brothers were arrested as spies, m Italy ii
March 1967, it came out that a Soviet delegate at tle
I international Labour Organisation, Mikhiil I:codoro\ich
Kleinieno\, was involved in the cise. Kleiicmnol wis recalled Ito
Mlosco'w in sonie haste.
Naturally enough, not only the Soviet trade unions. but .also
those of the other East European states, are used hb thie KGB. On
September 22nd 1972, Wilhelnm Gronau \was Jlresctd in Berlin
iust as he was handing over to his I ast (ci man contact
nicrofilns of secret material concerning the West (;erinan trade
unions. Gronau had left last (Gerany shortly after the war. had
joined the West (;erman trade unions in 1948 and had thereafter
worked hilnself up into a union position in which he 'was
guaranteed access to secret documents.
The head of the International Bure,iu oi lIe Soviet I trade
Union Federation is Boris Averyanov. i'e t!'I Ihclongs to the
KGB. Irom 1959 to 1961 he was Second Secreltar at the Soviet
Inmbassy in London witn special responsibility lor trade union
questions: and it was presumably through hinm that were
channelled the considerable contributions from the Soviet 1 rade
Union Federation to the strike funds of certain British Irade
unions during that period. In this L. ,hion also. a iotal of 3700
pounds in Soviet funds was distributed in (Great Brllain during
1972, and in the same year nuners who had been on strike were
offered free holidays in the Soviet Union to tlhe tune of .;tauut
30.000 pounds sterling.
Av\eryanov's predecessor as head of the Intlerlialonai Bureau
was Piotr Tinmofcyeiit h Pimen!T who is now Sccret:try of the
Soviet Trade Union Federation and in 19()7 was the first official
from a (ommunist country to become a member of the
Governing Body of the Intcrnational labmour Organisation
Piinenov is an extrovert. very confident in his way o making
contacts on the widest possible scale qualities which are always
xtrenl el useful in strengthening international relations. In 19771
he accompanied Shelcpi;i on a visit to Japan with the :,:in of
establ shng a Sovict-Japanes tIr ide union iclationll ip which
would make Japanese contacts with ('hina at the trade union level
more difficult.
THE OFFENSIVE IN WESTERN EUROPE
Infiltration into the Iiiternational ILabour (rg.inisation is one
of the objectives of the Soviet Trade Union Iedcration on the
instructions of C'omnutinist Pailty leaders. This United N.ilions
specialized agenric inherited trom the old tLeaguc of N'lioi.
works on a tripartite basis, grouping reprcscnll;tives of
governments. cnmployers' organizations and trade unions. As far as
the ('onmmunist countries ire concerned. however, this tripartict
basis defeats its original purpose since the nomiinal rrcoresentatives
of all three groups are in reality delegated by the ('omlnmnist
Party which is entirely dependent on the %Mosc ow leadership.
Strengthening the Soviet position in the International Labour
Organisiion will provide natural opportunities for increased
contacts with democratic trade unions. It \was tor thins reason that,
as we have seen. Ivan (;oroshkin. the Deputy (Chirman of the
Soviet State (Committee for Labour and Wages, wAS put forward
unsuccessfully for the post (o C'hairmnian of the governingg
Body of the International Laboul r Organisatlion. I'he Soviet
delegate:, originally thought that the l.atin Allericans would
support this nomination: but at tlih last nlonilit a; Mc\ican.
\Imno/ Ledo, was proposed and elected. Goroshkin later declared
that his detcat was due to "Lonservtlive circles" which were
ready to fieht every sign ot change nd \hlihi despised the
principles of "peaceful coexistence" "lhe So ,\ict lIad union
organ. Trud. later published in article Idemianding a, cmplkic
change in the structure () the lnternationaI 1 jbom ()rganisation
Shelepin's intention of establiihing closer relations with West
I uropean trade unions vwas hjdli hindered tor several years by
ile weight of Soviet propaganda against the ('oinuion Markei
utl at the beginning of 1 973 the (m'onlmunist line was changed on
this. and the Soviet Irade Uninon I:clCedeiton applied for
membership of the nc\vly-touinded I uropearl Iride Union
Federation in Brussels
llhis move put the" We I uropean trade unions ,which have
traidilionilly becen under )n C'* tlll nl l leclllt I hI p sii li ,is the
liench 'Cont'ederation g generic dir.il\al' id Ie Italian
'Confedera/ione (Genicrle ltaliana de La.iro in a storage
position. The Soviet f'rade 'nion :Federation would naturally
take over the leadcrshipi of tlhe C('onlnlnllis unions within the
i-ionen Trd'rd1e U L'n Federation These Ircnch and Italian
trade unliions would ths be c.ugIlt t iJhi\een hle hainliler and the
n\il between lheir ideology Iand their responsibility\ towards
Iheir members since Western trade unions are entirely
independent from hle stalt adii. in conLtaist I .asl I uropean
Lraide unions. frequceltty reCort to ihe strike weapon If the Soviet
I rude Union F-ediration is Jccepiled into the I uropCan
Fedrruton, the (iiCommunists will be ,ible to woik troii two
directions within til' org.an isatioli: the Sovet I'edeirtalition will
represent the interests of Sovilt ;and L.as I uropcan governments.
'hle C'olmmlitinisi tr.idc' unions in Western countries will be able
to spread the samilit n'l.agec among Western workers
IFor the moment these .hicic.s on the p rlt of Shelpipl have
foundered. Tl' :< wh\ he now hopes to establish more fruitful
contact!; through the (Geneva negotiations While waiting for
betLt'r oplortunitic.., however, he must be content with
infiltration K(GB agen ;. :nto the Interna.tional Labour
Organisation in the guise of Soviet oft icials
THE OFFENSIVE IN AFRICA.
Ihe Internationa!l Buicau of the So\iel I rade Union
lederatioi is also interested in intensifying its relations with Ith
dcvelopinlg countrieN I his is anmply shown hby its activities in

When he recently visited Africa. Averyvanov was often seen to
he accompanied b) Anatoli I\anovlch Botvinov. director of Ilie
African and Near I astern Department ot the International


Bureau. Although he is a good miixer Bilvinov is not liked
everywhere: he was, for example, expelled from (Gabon in 1961
for subversive activities.
Botvinov's deputy is Fridrikh Petrovich Pannikov. who is
fluent in a number of West African languages and is frequently
used as an interpreter. le was also involved in subversive activities
in Gabon and in 1063 was refused entry into Mauritius; five years
late;, iiowever, he was able to take part in the independence
celebrations there and to use the opportunity for propaganda
purposes.
This tendency of the Soviet Trade Union Federation to
become involved in the affairs of developing countries has often
aroused antipathy. In 1969, for example, the Sierra Leone Trade
Union Federation was heavily pressurised into inviting a Soviet
trade union delegation to observe the September elections. The
Nigerian Trade Union Congress (NTUC) objected to Soviet
activities in a similar direction the following year; but, in spite of
this, Averyanov has been able to visit Lagos on a number of
occasions, and it is certain that the NTUC, which is Nigeria's
biggest trade union grouping, has been receiving considerable
financial aid from Moscow and it now serves as Moscow's main
trade union bridgehead in West Africa.
The central organisation in Moscow often has to replace agents
when their subversive activities abroad become known. In this
Page 5 Col. 3


'





-i


Communists versus the Rest




Communists versus the Rest


TR A DE U NIO N I











Thursday, March 7, 197


- 1
. -


t 'it ~ i


:" s -cs* LTD BSo,.hams 9'- 1? 4 at ABC Motors ,n Centreelie

Getting from A toB ... with


that little bit of luxury


MANY PEOPLE aook at a
car as far more than mere.*
a wa% to get from A .A B o-
wheels The'\ a: a :he
luxury. the comfort; a'd
quiet ride of a ful; s'ed ;f
with all the trimm:ngs 4BC
Motors offer- th:5 q a .:
vehic-e :n the 'Q'4 F-'-
top of the ':ne- LTD
Brougham
The LTID Brouihm-
look the part: sd an : e
par: The% ha'e o:t:srn-. -
performance atd a -
n.de th:a means :he ;: ..
been wel pu: :oie:her
The' mico;rp r:e :a,:-'.
e-egance o.c d:s::c: e
stryh i wth Ford's p:ec;.:
emrreenng The doors h i-
snug and straight The ::=-.
a-,d hc d od :: )oi .;:


There Ire tree -.f
Brsugharr. mcies t-e
fourdoor ptilired hrd:-
the rv-c-dor hIrdtzop a-d
the four-door hardtop- A n
ecb mode' displays the
qaality arnd styl-ng ri c
make I TD Bra-ghans s:3--'


o : -ro :h e cro ,d
The Brouhghanr as e a
,: :h s~ ro end -;< :.o'. : 'g .
.e e- : a" d-*.:p h ,x-d
r d
~.'-7._- "; i: ";an d :he ptr '."
h7 : t r :nt -.











7 r hee oes
S a es: a ct 1-
i.








e and T '
.N .s r





Te r ,ee xt. :reat a
.men ..S are and :
sh-sws n the .goo-d-rnn
,- -"- -T
.: h:" ,:e:' ab ::; z.4


co'oi:rs
Brougham offers an
S-:ona spit bench s-ea
S: od-down -en-tre
7r"rests and manuil
e ci-er Th:s :s i aiiable I"
kn:: c-oth and invi or
2 :n\ Tr:m The seat is
:d:'.dual, adustable and
:he s pIlent0 of room for
Sron; and back
Pa de-d. fli -length do-or
a: ests Jdd more coTmfor:
The '.uxur;ous appomnmen:t
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EMPLOYEES of the
Ministry of Tourism and
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in the Bahama said "bon
oy age" to outgoing
tourism director S.N. Chib
and Mrs. Chib at a party
held in there honour during
the week-end at the Paradise
Island Hotel and Villas.
Mr. Chib who has been
the Bahamas tourism
director since 196" will
return to his native India
where he will retire.
Pictured with the Chibs
left) are Mr. and Mrs. E.P.
Taylor. Canadian financier
and owner of the South
Ocean Hotel and Golf Club
in Nassau and developer of
Lvford Cay

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Thursday, March 7, 1974


ARRIVED) TODAY: Tropic
Haven from West Palm Beach
SAILED TODAY: Bahama
Star. Emerald Seas. lavia for
Miami
WEATHER
SWind: Easterly 6 to 12
m.p.h.
Weather: Mainly fair, but
with a few showers
Sea: Slight
Temp: Min. tonight 68
S Max. tomorrow 80.
SUN
Rises 6:28 a.m.
Sets 6:15 p.m.


I

I


T D N


From Page 3
respect, the expulsion of 105 Soviet spies by the British
Government two years ago caused great difficulty because
these names became known and could only be used again in the
future with the greatest possible circumspection. An example of
this is Igor Klimov, now Averyanov's assistant, who was First
Secretary at the Soviet Embassy in London and one of those
expelled. In April 1973, he was sent to Cyprus; and on June 9th
one of the local newspapers, "0 Koosn Simera", published a
report on Klimov's activity entitled "A well-known Soviet agent
in Cyprus on a special mission". It was revealed in this article that
Klimov had officially gone to Cyprus to give lectures on trade
union questions but had in reality engaged in intensive
propaganda in favour of the candidature of the Soviet Trade
Union Federation to the European Trade Union Federation in
Brussels.


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Communists versus the Rest


I


It comes out very clearly from these documents that East
European trade unionists must consider it as one of their
duties to further Soviet Foreign policy aims in the sphere of trade
unions and this in the name of "proletarian internationalism".
Questions as to the general tendency of these policies are fairly
easily answered. In the first place, the economies of the
democratic countries are to be progressively weakened. Those in
the West who provoke unofficial strikes, as well as trade unions
which most frequently and effectively resort to the strike
weapon, can count on increasing Soviet support, both direct and
indirect. And there is also the obverse of this: the Soviet
economy must be strengthened as much as possible; trade unions
in the West which support credit-based exports and technological
assistance to the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe can count on
growing support from the trade unions of those countries


ON POSSIBILITIES OF AGREEMENT
A detailed study of the Varna Congress Documents enables us
to pick out a particularly important aspect of the linguistic
problem which stands in the way of all attempts at
communication between representatives of the two opposing
social orders. The missuse of words by Soviet ideologists is a
well-known phenomenon. The technique is to take fairly
frequently used words and and invest them with quite other
meanings. Thus, words like peace, war, prosperity, sovereignty,


TRADE UNIONS AND FOREIGN POLICY
The significance of KGB activity in the state trade unions of
Communist countries cannot become completely clear until one
more fact is brought into focus: as instruments of the Communist
Party in these countries, the trade unions always work in the
service of Moscow's foreign policies.
This is definitively established in the constitution of the Soviet
Trade Union Federation, from which 1 have already quoted: "An
international obligation of the Soviet trade unions is brotherly aid
for working class interests (and) universal support for the national
liberation movement of the colonial and dependent peoples (As
well as) of the worker's struggle in those countries which have
opted for the road to independent development, the
strengthening of their economy and national sovereignty".
When we stop to consider that the Soviet military interventions
in East Germany on June 17th 1953 and in Hungary on
November 4th 1956, as well as the Soviet invasion of
Czechoslovakia on August 21st 1968, were all defined as
"brotherly aid", and when we remember that the Brezhnev
Doctrine gives any Communist regime the automatic obligation to
intervene when another Communist regime is in danger of
eviction by popular pressure then it is not so difficult to see
that the constitution of the Soviet trade unions clearly implies a
self-ordained right of intervention in the affairs of trade unions in
other countries.
Similar implications were scattered throughout the
deliberations of the eighth Congress of the World Federation of
Trade Unions, which is controlled by the Soviet Union. This was
held in Varna, the Bulgarian seaside resort, in October of last
year.
The twenty pages of official reports ot this congress which
appeared in the trade union periodical. Sovietskie Profsoyuzy
(No. 18/1973), are with the exception of unimportant details
about the circumstances and alleged achievements of trade unions
in Communist countries (onccricd exclusively with the
international situation and with the international tasks of trade
unions in Communist countries. One of the achievements of this
Varna Congress was the elaboration of a "Charta of trade unions
rights and socio-economic demands of workers in contemporary
capitalist countries." The formula which runs through these
documents is simple and crude but nonetheless effective: for
every ten sentences which praise the situation of the workers in
Communist countries there are ninety more which condemn the
workers' lot in those designated as capitalist countries.


5


DANISH

MAGAZINE

FEATURES


BAHAMAS


the right of self-determination, freedom, etc., are invested by the
Communist ideologists with an entirely different meaning from
the one which is applied by non-Communists. This phenomenon
is known and under constant examination in the West, but it is
nevertheless far from universally recognized.
But above and beyond this there is another important semantic
problem in the way of true communication. Under the cover of a
statement of fact it often happens that the Communist ideologist
implies totally new definitions for the words he is using.
I shall bring forward one frequent example to illustrate this.
When Soviet representatives say, as they do say nearly every day,
that in the Soviet Union the exploitation of man by man has
been brought to an end, this is not intended to be a statement of
fact which might be backed up by evidence brought forward on
the basis of other facts. This is what the more or less unconscious
reaction of the Western listener expects it to be on the basis of
a common use of words and acceptation of meanings used by
people discussing such matters in democratic countries. But the
Soviet representative is doing something quiet different. He is
simply establishing a definition and there is not the least
implication in his assertion that proof or evidence can be brought
forward for what he is saying. The only implication is that he is
free to choose his own definition and that this is it.
What the Soviet representative is really saying is simply this:
"We have brought the exploitation of the workers to an end
because we have established a socialist order; in your countries.
however, the workers are still exploited because you still have a
capitalist social order". He is not stating facts in what we would
regard as a normal and consequential fashion; he is simply stating
definitions. It plays no role in this whether the Soviet worker is in
reality exploited or not, or whether he is exploited more or less
than workers in democratic countries. The only thing which is
important in this so frequently reiterated remark by
representatives of Communist trade unions is the definition that
there is exploitation where there is capitalism and there is no
exploitation where there is Communism.
In so far as this phenomenon is not always clearly understood
the Western representative finds himself obliged to make use of
similar techniques so that one cancels out the other and there
finally emerges to genuine dialogue in which facts are used to face
facts. The only way to do this is for the Westerner to bring
forward a definition which runs counter to the definition which
the Communist has brought forward something like: "On the
contrary, we have brought exploitation to an end, whereas you in
the Communist countries have carried it to its most extreme
degree."
Here, definition is brought up against definition. There is no
answer, and therefore the make-believe discussion has to be
brought to an end. Either the dialogue itself is terminated, or else
it changes into a true discussion solely based on facts.
So when Shelepin declares that what the trade unions of
capitalist countries are now struggling for has already been
implemented long ago in the Communist countries, he is simply
stating the basis ot a definition. This particular definition is that
the trade unions in Communist countries no longer have to
concern themselves with "wage polemics" for the simple reason
that exploitation of the wroker has been abolished. The fallacy
lies in the fact that over and above the actual sense of exploitation
there lies an ideological sense. What is really contained within
Shelepin's definition is the following sequence of ideas: "The
worker in a cpaitalist country is exploited, quite apart from his
material situation, quite apart from his wage level or his
individual share of the national wealth, simply because he is in
the service of a non-Communist employer: and he would not be
exploited if he were in the service of a Communist employer." It
is fair enough, you might think, to follow such a train of thought;
but what is quite unfair is to confuse this with exploitation in the
material sense, based on facts and evidence which can be
established. TO BE CONTINUED


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THE BAHAMAS will benefit
from overseas exposure
when this Commonwealth is
featured in the April issue of
Portfolio and Fund Guide
International magazine.
Published each month in
Copenhagen, Portfolio is
perhaps the only English
language media which
concentrates on off-shore
banking, mutual fund and
tax haven business. Its
circulation is directed
primarily to 10,000 bankers,
tax planners and mutual
fund executives located
throughout the world.
Featured on the cover of the
issue will be T. Baswell
Donaldson, chairman of the
Bahamas Monetary
Authority, who was
interviewed extensively by
the magazine's editor and
publisher. Noel Fox. when
the latter visited Nassau in
December of 1973.
Additionally, Mr. Fox polled
other Government officials,
bankers, trust managers.
lawyers and accountants in
the Bahamas. Using this
basic information against a
backdrop of the entire
financial story of the
Bahamas for his
international audience.
In response to the idea of the
special supplement, Mr.
Donaldson said: "I think
this comes at an important
time, just when we in the
Bahamas are seeking to
broaden our financial and
economic base."
In addition to the
editorial spread on the
Bahamas, Portfolio will also
include advertising
submitted by the various
banks, trust companies, real
estate agencies and related
companies seeking to attract
increased international
business.


I


~qr


-".,-**;i' :








ihp flrihiun


Pregnant teen has

nowhere to turn

By Abigail Van Buren
e 1974 DY Chicago Tribrn-N. Y. Nes SYUnd., Inc.
DEAR ABBY: I hope to God you can help me. I am 16
years old and pregnant. I really can't understand how this
happened. My boy friend promised he would be real care-
ful
I have got to find a place to go real quick, because
there are four girls in our family, and my mom said if any
of us ever got that way we may as well pack up and leave
home
My btoy friend is joining the Navy and says he will
come back and marry me if I wait until May, but I can't
wait that long.
What I want you to tell me is where I can go to have
my child' I'd like to keep it if possible and come back and
finish school. I don't have five cents to my name, but I am
willing to work like a horse as long as I can. Please help
me
ALL MESSED UP
DEAR ALL: There is a Booth Memorial Home near
you. It's run by the Salvation Army, and a more kind and
generous group of people would be hard to find. Tell them
Abby sent you. May God bless you.
DEAR ABBY My daughter was a young bride when
her husband went overseas in the service. She wrote to him
every day. She was lucky if she got a letter from him once
ever three weeks, and when he did write he said things
like. I am leaving my wedding ring in the drawer and am
having :-.-,i' a good time." She used to cry herself to
sleep every night
I said to her, "Don't be a fool. Don't write to him for
three weeks Then write that you decided to leave your
wedding ring i,: the drawer, too, and you are also n w
having a good time. In the next letter, write and tell him
you met a lovely man who is making you forget your
loneliness
Abby. it worked like a charm. Her husband started to
write every day, asking her questions, and telling her how
much he loved her
S,::.:.ir worked out just like I thought it would. By
the time he got home, they were madly in love. I believe in
fighting fire with fire.
MAMMA KNOWS BEST
DEAR MAMMA: Not all sick marriages respond to the
same treatment. In your daughter's case, it worked. But
usually when people fight fire with fire, they end up with
ashes.
DEAR ABBY: Will ycu please tell the reading public
Lhat rnllions of otherwise perfectly normal people have a
4*earing loss and all they expect from their friends and
relai. 's is a little consideration. Example: I have had
,people [on discovering that I wear a hearing aid] speak to
me as tho I am mentally deficient and unable to compre-
hend normal language. Some even shout at me, amplifying
the sound to such an excruciating pitch, I nearly faint from
the thundering noise!
A few tips: Speak distinctly . don't mumble, but
don't shout either. Don't everybody talk at once. If someone
else is talking, wait until he has finished. When talking to
one who has a hearing loss, talk TO him-not AT him, or
round him
And please remember-we are not stupid-only hard of
hearing.
SAID MY SAY
DEAR SAID: Your "say" was well worth repeating. I'U
pass it along.
For Abby's an booklet, "What Teen-Agers Waat t
Know," send SI tr 'lgtll Van Burn, 13 Laky Dr., Bev-
*ry HillsUI, Cal. o 2.


L





K K n -l F ulse Syndiclte Inc.. 1974. World rights re. rred
"I was told that I didn't get the promotion because I'm
too (.,.il, distracted by you office girls."


"Never seen stretch pants before?"


Thursday, March 7, 1974

1,000 ATTEND 'DISCOVER

CANADA' EXHIBITION


7-'


S "


xi


9.


#


NEARLY 1,000 PEOPLE,
many of them school-
children, viewed the
Canadian Women's Club
"Discover Canada"
exhibition at the Sheraton
Bntish Colonial Hotel
Monday.
Each of the country's ten
provinces and the Northwest
Territories were represented
with posters, art work and
artifacts from the area.
In addition the d'Albenas
agency staged a display of
Canadian foods while the
Asa H. Pritchard firm
featured a selection of
Canadian wines and cheeses.
One of the displays attracting
the greatest attention was
the show of mink, made into
high fashion coats.
The "Discover Canada"
exhibition was the CWC's
way of returning the
hospitality extended to
them in the Bahamas.
"We have come to know and


love this country, so we felt
we should acquaint
Bahamians with our
country," CWC publicity
director Beth Rooney said.
The exhibition, first of its
kind staged by the CWC, was
voted a great success.
"We were very encouraged
with the response," Mrs,
Rooney said, "so it is quite
possible we may do
something of the same kind
again next year."
Among those attending the
exhibition were (from left):
External Affairs Minister
Paul Adderley; the Hon. W.
F. Hoogendyke, Canadian
Counsul in Jamaica; Mrs.
Hoogendyke; Prime Minister
Pindling; Mrs. Dorothy
Harrington, wife of the
Canadian High Corw-
missioner, Jamaica and
Tourism Minister Clement
Maynard.


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Shr $frtlibm


NOTICE
NOTICE Is hereby given that LEONARD SMITH of John
Street, New Providence, Bahamas is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalization should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 7th day of
March 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002,
Nassau.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that OCTAVIUS MERON
WALTERS of Freeport G. B. Box 306 is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 28th day day
of February 1974 to The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau.




NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that PAUL SMITH of Hawksbll
City, Freeport, Grand Bahama is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalization should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 28th day of
February 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P. O. Box N7147, Nassau.




NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CYNTHIA MARY BOWEN of
West End Grand Bahama Is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
Knows any reason why registration should not be granted
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 28th day of February
1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that KENNETH PRICE
RAINFORD of West End, Grand Bahama, Bahamas Is. is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration should not be granted should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 28th day of February 1974 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P. 0. Box
N7147, IPssau.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that NORMAN GARFIELD
CARNELL of Bahama Shores, West End, G.B. is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 7th day of
March 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that KATHLEEN A. SUZUKI of
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Island is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration should not be granted
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 7th day of March, 1974
to The Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs, P. C. Box N-3002, Nassau,
Bahamas.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that NORMAN JAMES
GERAGHTY of P. O. Box F-2, Freeport, Grand Bahama. is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration should not be granted should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 7th day of March, 1974 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, Ministry of


SHome Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that KATHLEEN CRUDDACE of
Freeport, Grand Bahama is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration should not be granted
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twentyveiaht davs from the 7th dav ot March 1974
to The Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002, Nassau




NOTICE

NOTICE Is hereby given that MELSAIDA L. HARRIS of
Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration should not be granted
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 7#1. day of March 1974
to The Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P. O. Box N7147, Nassau.


BARCLAYS AID NEEDY
BARCLAYS Staff Community Projects Committee have
taken their first step in helping the needy in the Bahamas.
On Tuesday, February 26, the committee, on behalf of
Barclays staff members, presented the Ranfurly Home with
a gift of clothing, books, canned fodds and various other


items. Pictured at the Ranfurly Home are from left to
right: Mrs. Stephanie Dorsett, Bay St.; Miss Ingrid Wilson,
Thompson Boulevard; Mr. Winston Basden East Bay; Mr.
Rupert Jenoure, Bay Street; Miss Sandra Stubbs, East Bay;
Miss Wendy Burrows, L.H.O., Committee Chairman; Mrs.
Edwards, Ranfurly Home; Mr. Alexander Reckley,
Palmdale, President Staff Activities Committee.


^ Crippled Children's donations


CHIB TO ADDRESS
ROTARIANS


SOM N. Chib. Director of
Tourism for the Bahamas
Government since 1')i7, will
make his last public appearance
in that post next l'uesday.
(Mar. 12) when he will be guest
speaker at the weekly luncheon
meeting of the Rotary Club of
Nassau. The lucheon will be
held at the Sheraton British
Colonial lotel.
Mr. Chib's topic will be
"The Role of a National
Tourist Organisation."
Mr. Chib leaves the
Bahamas for retirement in
India a few days after his
Rotary speech.
NEW CONTAINER
SHIP DUE SOON
TIHE container ship, nv.
Hibiscus will arrive in Nassau
on Tuesday. March 12,
beginning the operation by the
United Shipping Company of
its Bermuda Express/United
States Line combination
service.
The m.v. Hibiscus will
provide a 14-day service from
Savannah, Fla., to Nassau.
linking up with the United
States Lines services from the
Far East, Europe and the
Mediterranean and the East
and West Coasts of the United
States.
The vessel carries 200 foot
container loads.

SUPPER SALE
The Key Club of Queen's
College will hold a Supper Sale
on Saturday. March 9 at
Ebene/er church h IHall on
Shirley Street, from 3 p.m. to
6 p.m.
The event is to raise funds to
send members of the Club to
the Key Club District
Convention in Toronto this
summer.
Tickets are on sale at $2 and
may be obtained from
members of the Key Club or at
the Church Hall.


Off to Canada
WAYDE C. Christie
Pictured) has recently been
assigned special duties with the
international audit team of
Canadian Imperial Bank of
Commerce operating out of the
Bank's head office, Toronto, it
was announced today by J. D.
Cockwell, area manager.
A graduate of St.
Augustine's College, Mr.
Christie joined the Bank as a
trainee in 1971 and has held
various positions in the bank's
main office and branches in
Nassau after completing his
initial training period.
The purpose of Mr.
Christie's assignment is to
broader his experience in the
Bank's worldwide operations,
the bank said.
Hle will be returning to the
Bahamas in January, 1975.

NEW AGENCY
I'HE educational services division
of Southworth Consultants Ltd.
announced today that it had taken
on Bahamas representation of
International Correspondence
Schools of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
ICS was founded in 1890 and has
over 8 million enrolled students
throughout the world including a
number in the Bahamas. Career
programmes cover a wide range of
home study courses from
accounting, business management
and data processing to hotel
management, interior decoration
and design and electronics
technology; in all about thirty-five
programmes are offered over a time
frame of one to three years.
Making this announcement, Mr.
Philip Cheetham, managing director
of Southworth Consultants said he
believed this new affiliation would
enhance opportunities in career
improvement for Bahamians in
commerce and technical trades,
especially in view of the fact that
they would be able to continue
their employment while
undertaking the courses. Residents
of the Family Island might derive
particular benefit from the
programmes.
Southworth Consultants have
offices at Columbus House on
Shirley Street, Nassau, and provide
a range of management consultancy
and business information services to
local and oversees clients.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MRS. LAURA A. COLEY of
Eight Mile Rock Grand Bahama is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration should not be granted
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 7th day of March 1974
to The Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002., Nassau.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MR. GEORGE COLEY of
Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship. for registration
as a citizen of The Bahamas. and that any person who
knows any reason why registration should not be granted
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 7th day of March 1974
to The Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Ministry of Home Affairs, P. 0. Box N-3002, Nassau,
Bahamas.


The Crippled Children's
Committee acknowledges the
following donations:
Ms. Mary B. Albury & Mr.
Aubrey Deal In memory of
Mrs. Alice M. Hill-Jones
$50.00, Mr. Henry H. Deal in
memory of Mrs. Alice M.
Hill-Jones $100, Chase
Manhattan Bank $150, Past
Exalted Rulers' Council No.
108 $30, Mr & Mrs. G. L.
McMahon $50, Mr. Peter L.
Schellens $15, Nassau Shop
Limited $100, Roy West
Banking Cororation Ltd. $300,
Bahama Cement Company,
Freeport, Grand Bahama $250,
Ms. Sheena Darling in memory
of her mother, Mrs. Ursula


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in the Super

@ 1973 R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.


Darling $20, Ms. Irene M.
Bantouvanis $10, Anonymous
$1,000, Mr. Frank H. Fisher
$25, Dr. & Mrs. G. F. Davis
$50, Eunice, Lady Oakes $145.

Q. C. WALKATHON
THE Key Club of Queen's
College will stage a Walkathon
on Sunday. March 10 to raise
funds to send members to the
Key Club District Convention
in Toronto this summer.
The walk will begin at
Queen's College at 7 a.m. and
will cover the route to Blake
Road via East-West Highway,
Harold Road, Kennedy Drive,
West Bay Street, Shirley Street
and return.


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Thursday, March 7, 1974


Waxing worldly


New resident manager at Balmoral


MIAMI Wometco
Enterprises, Inc announced
that it will expand its
leisure-time activities to
Europe and the Asian
sub-continent through the
construction ot wax museums
with sound and automation in
Lourdes, France and
Singapore.
Richard F Woltson.
executive vice president ot
Wometco, described the
ventures as part o1 a continuing
plan to expand the company 's
international tourist-attraction
business. Wometco already
operates wax museums in
several cities in Japan, as well
as in Torrance. California.
The Singapore museum will
be located in "People's Park,"
the city's high! successful
shopping centre and a tourist
attraction in itself. The


museum will feature both
Oriental and Occidental
themes, including scenes of
Singapore history. Travelling
exhibits are also planned.
Opening has been scheduled
for April
At Lourdes. \\ i '. wsa\
nmuseuii will he located on one
of the main streets lead ng t,
the Shrine and will be relige i ,
in nature. It is -et to open Jln.
June 1
T'he taax iilusc tiims part "o
Vo o meICto' s entertainm1,11ent
division, are operated b: a
subsidiary I nternmiat'nal
Leisure corporationn (;eoiiC
D)rucker. president
In addition to mnusieum,'.
Womeneo operates tour tourist
attractions in Florida the
wo r 1 d I a i e d Mi n i
Seaqarinum. Florida's (i it'
-Tower and citrus fruit rovs.


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THE LYFORD Cay Art Gallery managed by Mrs.
Dorothy Lithiby, third from left. is currently exhibiting
works by three American artists. Mrs. Ethel Blum (left),
li ho hails from Lakeville. Conn., has a number of lovely
island scenes in water colour. Jon Legere of Portland,
Maine. has several oils and water colours. Robert Barnet of
New York, right, is exhibiting several portraits. The
i\hliibition which opened March I will continue for the next
10 days. Next month the gallery plans to exhibit works by
Bahamian artists.


MR. ROGER WESTOBY,
general manager of the
Balmoral has announced that
Mr. Basil Foster (pictured) was
promoted from assistant
manager to resident manager of
the Halcyon Balmoral Hotel.
"With his attitude that 'my
job is of primary importance',
Mr. Foster has a great devotion
to the hotel business and
efficiently handles the
Balmoral's many visitors, their
requests, their problems and
their wishes."
Born and educated in
Nassau, Basil Foster came to
realise that the island depended
S that the happier the tourist the
happier the island. His love of
meeting people inspired his
decision to join the hotel and
catering business -at an early
age.
As a young boy just out of
school, Basil began his career in
the "hospitality business" as a
bus-boy at the Montagu Beach
Hotel Jungle Club.
But the call of the sea lured
him towards ship life and he
shortly afterwards joined a
charter boat outfit operating
out of New Jersey.
On charters between the
States and Nassau Basil worked
as cook and came to
understand the realm of food
and beverage catering. His
knowledge of his native
Bahamian waters promoted him
to Captain of vessel and he
took on the unusual dual role
of captain/cook.
Basil spent six and a half
years with this company,
became a master mariner and
during his summers in New
Jersey took night courses at
New York University in
business administration and
commercial sales.
)rawn back to the islands,
Basil then joined the Texaco
Company as a commercial sales
representative travelling
between Nassau and many of
the Out Islands.
He worked for Texaco for
two and a half years but his
devotion to the hotel and


catering business caus
return to hotel night
finally in early 1970
the permanent staf
Halcyon Balmoral Ho
There Basil wa
through on-the-job t
the many varied
departments.. He soo
the assistant food and


manager, then in 1973 assistant
manager, then resident
manager. Happy in his new
position, Mr. Foster says: "It's
a challenge. Every day there is
Decisions must be made
quickly, guests must be
satisfied."
The day for Basil Foster
S often begins at 6 a.m. and is
S one of "meeting and being of
4 service to people". Many nights
he doesn't return to his
residence in the Balmoral
Grounds until midnight.
"My job is of primary
importance", he says, "and
everything else is
secondary.... In my eyes, as a
hotelier, my social life must
revolve around my job not my
ied him to job around my social life as can
work and often happen."
he joined Basil Foster's life revolves
f of the around meeting people and
tel. pleasing them. He handles
as given visitors from all over the world
raining in with a wide smile, quick,
d hotel efficient service, and the
n became know-how of an experienced
I beverage hotelier.


0


THE 'ZARAS, one of the
top entertainment families,
opened Monday night in the
Bahamia Club Showroom of
Freeport's King's Inn & Golf
Club.
Originally romr Spain, the
Zara spec ialiee in
flamenco type music. But this
multi-talented family can also-
render dynamic versions of
current hits.


SPECIAL NOTICE.

Bill's Real Estate Agency
Ltd. invites you to
inspect the following
list of lots. Make your
selections and call us for
details:
BAMBOO TOWN
BLUE HILL ESTATE
BEL-AIR
BLAIR ESTATE
BOYD SUBDIVISION
CANTERBURY PARK
COCONUT GROVE
COLONY VILLAGE EAST
DANNOTAGE ESTATE
ENGLERSTON
GLENGARIFF GARDENS
GLENISTON GARDENS
GOLDEN GATES (1&2)
HIGH VISTA ESTATE
JOHNSON ROAD ESTATE
LITTLE HYDE PARK
MILLER'S HEIGHTS
PALMETTO VILLAGE
PLAMDALE
PYFROM'S ADDITION
SANDS ADDITION
SAPPIRE RIDGE
SEABREEZE ESTATE
SHIRLEY HEIGHTS
SOUTH BEACH ESTATE
STAPELDON GARDENS
TROPICAL GARDENS
WINDSOR PLACE
WINTON MEADOWS
YAMACRAW BEACH
ESTATE


Come and bring a friend!
YOUR TICKET TO PARADISE!



ESCAPE
from the hum drum

to the TROPICAL SETTING of the


PARADISE BEACH PAVILION
overlooking beautiful Paradise Beach

Pleasant service of reasonably priced meals under the
personal direction of Bernard Perron.
Breakfast Lunch Dinner. Open from 7:30 a.m. to 11 p.m.

RESERVATIONS: 5-7541
Paradise Beach Pavilion is just west of the Holiday Inn.
WHERE JAMES BOND MADE THUNDERBALL


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NEW ARRIVALS

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HOURS: Monday through Friday 9:30 a.m. 6 p.m.
Saturday .............9:30 a.m. 9 p.m.


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(IF IT WAS TAKEN BY TOOGOODS'!)

-/oB I
P"OTOGIAPNM
o; the waterfront at East BCav & .'... Sts.
""' !' 5-4641
I ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ;- IIIII II


FOR SALE NOW
Highbury Park near Soldier Road
and Regency Park

BRAND NEW 3 BEDROOMS
2 BATHS HOUSES WITH
CARPORTE & UTILITY ROOM
r m mmme.....mmm......mm
S$4,000 down $389.89 per mth.
S$6,000 down $367.25 per mth.
$8,000 down $344.65 per mth.

Mortgage available for Qualifying Applicants
for further Information Contact

Berkley Ferguson Real Estate
Exclusive Agents
Ph. 21238 24913
P. 0. Box N4278, Nassau, Bahamas.


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Thursday, March 7, 1974



Farewell dinner


for the

OVER 230 friends attended St
a farewell dinner-dance Di)
Saturday to show their th
gratitude to John and Jean
Chaplin for the 19 years of p
service given by them to th
education in the Bahamas. fi
Mr. and Mrs. Chaplin return fo
to the U.K. aboard s.s. Oriana
on March 25 after almost 20 y
years in the Bahamas. c
"Whatever we may have be
done" for John Chaplin "will TI
always seem trivial when at
compared to what he has done di
for us," said Dr. Paul Albury, w
principal speaker for the qu
evening, and a former chairman
of St. Andrew's School Board. ,
"We speak of gratitude," Dr. we
Paul continued, "and we are DI
anxious to show gratitude DI
while realizing that such an d',
expression is merely an ch
acknowledgement of the debt
we owe and in no wise a
repayment. But that much we ou
have to do for ingratitude sci
remains a sign of ignoble souls, du
among whom we would not sai
want to be counted." (I)r. m
Albury 's speech is published in pu
full on this page j. of
Mr. Chaplin was headmasterr re,
of St. Andrew's School for 19 fo
years, while his wife, Jean, go
headed the English
department. Dr. Albury was on rea
3-- *~CI-


Chapli:

S Andrew's Board of
directors for five years, two of
em as chairman.
Introduced at about 10:15
im. in La Chandelle room of
e Halycon Balmoral Beach
Jtel. Dr. Albury set the tone
r the evening.
"In speaking to a number of
iu," he said. "I find the
mmon desire that this should
a happy occasion.
ierefore, I will make no
tempt tonight to revive old
fficulties to reopen old
pounds or to excite again,
ieted emotions."
Returning to Nassau
pr i. ll., for the occasion
ere Sir Etienne and Lady
upuch and Mr. and Mrs.
onald d'Albenas. Mr.
Albenas was also at one time
airman of the school board.
GRATITUDE
"Perhaps no other friend of
.rs has been so intensely
rutini/ed as has John Chaplin
ring the last nine months,"
id D)r Albury. "But it didn't
matter how many times he was
t in the balance nor how
ten we were called upon to
ad the scale we never
und him to be anything but
od and honest measure.
"Tonight, we want to
affirm our faith in John
haplin as a man and as a
icher ... I cannot," said Dr.
bury, "adequately convey
e fullness of the gratitude we
we to John Chaplin ..." He
s "an ability to help us to


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8:45


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DAILY SPECIALS DRINKS ONLY $1.00

DINNER SERVED 5 p.m. to Midnight

Plenty of FREE PARKING

EAST BAY AT THE FOOT OF BRIDGE
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Matinee 2::









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~ENTAl. DISCRETION AD VISED
nations not claimed by 8:15, will be sold
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y Friday Last Day Friday
tarts at 2:15 Continuous Showings
ng 8:30 from 3:00
PICKED" PG. "BLACK GIRL" PG.
Boiling, 1
Bailey Brock Peters,
Bailey
us Leslie Uggams
USU
KEEPING PLUS
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GANNON" PG.
-2534

Feature Tony Franciosa,
night. Michael Sarrazin




LAST DAY FRIDAY
Matinee Continuous from 2:00,
466 ._ -ijcei


*I "OmrNDM w TwO I

No ONE UNDE 18W WILL BE ADMIITTED.


ns

make something of the most
precious possessions of our
lives our children. And this,"
he continued, "he has done
with a talent and a dedication
of purpose which has not been
surpassed in these islands...
"Let us savour this evening
to the fullest," he said in
closing, and "hope that the
genuine warmth of our feelings
will flow into the hearts of
John and Jean so that they
might always include these few
hours among the happiest of
their memories."
In reply Mr. Chaplin said he
and his wife were "over-
whelmed" by the kindness and
generosity of all present.
"It is not often that a couple
is shown so distinctly and
movingly that they are
surrounded by friends. Let me
hasten to say that Jean and I
have always felt loved and
wanted during our time in
Nassau, and when you consider
that this is more than 19/20ths
of our married life we feel we
have been a most fortunate
pair."
Mr. and Mrs. Chaplin
arrived in the Bahamas a year
and a half after their marriage.
Both their children Joy, now
at university in England, and
Ken, a student at St. Andrew's
were born in the Bahamas.
Ken will join his parents in
June after completing his
G.C.E. examinations at St.
Andrews.
Mr. Chaplin delighted his
audience especially his
former students with
reminiscences of St. Andrew's
in the "good old days."
He recalled the school's
"amazing" walkathon. "I shall
boast about it for the rest of
my life", he said. "$16,000 in
one day for our swimming
pool!"
CONFESSION
He confessed that "there
were times when I wondered
how long we would stay in
Nassau. We came out here in
1954 to stay for three years,
and here we are in 1974.
Imagine how I felt back in
1954," he recalled. "I found
myself the fifth headmaster of
a school which was five years
old. And the school motto
Egomet Sequar (I too will
follow) writ large. Do you
wonder at my discomfort?
"But we survived," he
laughed, "and the school
survived and what we leave in
1974 is somewhat different
from what we came to in 1954.
"Talking of mottos," he
continued, "I have one for the
new headmaster. Like all the
best mottos it is in Latin. It
goes Pisce et labor et navem
exis. I am working on a
translation which will be ready
by the time my successor is
appointed. So far it goes 'fish
and cut bait ... and get
vour. donkey out of the boat!'
MEMORIES
"But this is a joyful
evening," he said, "and these
are serious matters. When we,

almost 20 years it will be the
joyful memories we shall have.
And I suppose it will be people
we shall remember rather
than places or things. We will
look back on our pupils,
teachers, friends, fellow
Rotarians, fellow Caledonians,
Operatic Society friends,
members of our church. And
names will flow in endless
stream, each one conjuring up
other pleasant times."
As he closed with a
"goodbye until we meet
again," the audience gave him a
standing ovation as they did
many times during the evening.
The Operatic Society, of
which Mrs. Chaplin was a
founder-member, sang in their
honour songs from "The Merry
Widow", "The Mikado",
"Brigadoon," and "Fiddler on


the Roof". To enthusiastic
applause Mrs. Chaplin took her
place among the sopranos for
the madrigal from "The
Mikado."
Lisa Dimbero, 16, and Lane
Deveraux, 17, both students at
St. Andrew's, took up their
guitars to entertain with several
songs, ending with "To Sir,
with Love."
It was Mrs. Chaplin, who
with choking voice, said a
moving "thank you."
Mr. Michael Stewart, emcee,
introduced Mr. d'Albenas who
presented the Chaplins with
gifts. Mrs. Chaplin received a
gold chain with a $20 gold
piece in an exquisite gold
setting, while Mr. Chaplin was
presented with cufflinks made
of two $10 gold pieces.
At 11:30 p.m. dancing
resumed to the rhythms of
"The Message", a band of
teenage boys, one of whom is a
student at St. Andrew's.


"TONIGHT we want to
reaffirm our faith in John
Chaplin as a man as a teacher;
to express once again the
gratitude that is in our hearts",
said Dr. Paul Albury, principal
speaker at the farewell
dinner-dance given in honour
of former St. Andrew's School
headmaster and his wife on
March 2.
Following is the full text of
the speech.
'Ladies and Gentlemen:
Even after much deliberate
thought, I have found it
difficult to satisfy myself with
what should be said here
tonight. It was no light
responsibility to have to take
into account the things which
all of you would like to be
said, nor was it an easy matter
to put words together that
would do even partial justice to
our honoured guests who in
twenty years have contributed
so much to this community
and who mean so much to us.
In speaking to a number of
you, i did find the common
desire that this should be a
happy occasion. And that
fitted my own thoughts about
the matter. Therefore, I will
make no attempt tonight to
revive old difficulties to
reopen old wounds or to
excite again, quieted emotions.
This has been called a
farewell party for John and
Jean Chaplin. But, of course.
we all realize it is much more
than that.
Our hearts and minds are
such that we sometimes feel a
strong compulsion to
demonstrate in some striking
manner the human bond which
exists between ourselves and
others. In response to that, we
have organized this
dinner-dance-in honour of ttwo
esteemed friends who by evci\
test we can think of aic
eminently deserving of that
honour. That is why we art
here.
GOOD HONESTI
Mentally we are forever
assessing and reassessing other-
including our friends even
as they are forever doing the
same with us. Perhaps no other
friend of ours has been so
intensely scrutinized as has
John Chaplin during the last
nine months. But it didn't
matter how many times he was
put in the balance nor how
often we were called upon to
read the scale we never
found him to be anything but
good and honest measure.
Tonight, we want to
reaffirm our faith in John
Chaplin as a man and as a
teacher; to express once again
the gratitude that is in our
hearts; to reassure both John
and Jean that bond of
friendship between us is indeed
indestructible. And that is why
we are here.
In the matter of faith, we
never had cause to waver. In
fact, everything that has been
said or done has served only to
make our faith in John
stronger with time.
This has meant a lot to the
Chaplins we know. But it is
also good to reflect on the
truth that it has meant a lot to
us.
There is something
exquisitely satisfying about
knowing that our faith is
vested in a worthy cause, or a
worthy person. It may cause us
some work and trouble as, in
this case, it has done but
none of us can regret that. For
we gain the reward of an inner
contentment which is pay
more than enough.


UPt ribUntu


"When a man has faith".
wrote Carlyle. "his limbs might
be wearied with toiling his
back galled with bearing but
the heart within him is
peaceable and reposed". And
that is the way we are here
tonight "peaceable and
reposed" in the sure
knowledge that we took the
path which honesty pointed
out, and did what in good
conscience we had to do.
(GRATITUDI"
However I may phrase it, I
cannot adequately convey the
fullness of the gratitude we
owe to John Chaplin. He had
not the ability to help us in a
financial way, or in any other
material way. But he had, and
has, a far more important
ability an ability to help us
make something of the most
precious possessions of our
lives our children. And this
he has done with a talent and a
dedication of purpose which
has not been surpassed in these
islands.
Whatever we may have done
for him will always seem trivial
when compared to what he has
done for us. We speak of
gratitude and we are anxious to
show gratitude while
realizing that such an
expression is merely an
acknowledgement of the debt
we owe and in no wise a
repayment. But that much we
have to do for ingratitude
remains a sign of ignoble souls.
among whom we would not
want to be counted.
CHERISHED
Therefore to demonstrate in
some signal manner the
thankfulness which we feel is
the reason 'hy we are here
tonight. Our deeper thoughts,
probably, can be best
expressed in the paraphrasing
of a short verse:
Our debt to you dear Johl,
Is one we cannot pay
In any coin of any realhn
On any' ', k '-'i'd day.
We are also here tonight
because we want it to be
known that we stand proudly
as friends of the Chaplins and
we want it to be known that
we look upon it as a cherished
honour to be able to claim
them as our friends.
lhe ability to feel close ties
of friendship is surely one of
the most precious bounties
which God has given to man.
Friendship is the green valley
which brightens the tired eve;
the bubbling stream which
runneth by the way and which
soothes the troubled mind. It is
the universal balm for
wounded hearts: the magic
lamp which lightens the gloom
of our days.
How dull, dreary, meaning-
less and unbearable would be
these lives of ours were it not
for friendship.
'hus, tonight, above all, we
want John and Jean to know
that we are their friends, that
we have been their friends
and that we will remain their
friends. That, perhaps, is the
one assurance that they need
most tonight: the most
valuable gift that is in our
power to give at this time. And
we give it unstintingly.
SADNESS, NO
There would naturally be some
sadness here tonight if we
thought that we were losing
John and Jean for any great
length of time. But, wherever
they go they are bound to feel
the pull of some powerful
magnets here in the Bahamas.
The Bahamian soil and sea is
in their bones. John knows


what a thrill it is to raise a crop
of tomatoes and have them
eaten up by worms. He knows
the joys of sunken boats and
broken down engines. There is
more than sand in his shoes,
and in Jean's shoes. They will
be back.
Therefore, my friends, there
is little room for sadness here
tonight and none at all for
bitterness and rancor. The
good Book has wisely decreed
that there should be a time and
place for everything. And
surely this is a time for
warming of hearts.
Let us then savour this
evening to the fullest. Let us
enjoy that conviviality which
should always make a gathering
of good friends. Let us hope
that the genuine warmth of our
feelings will flow into the
hearts of John and Jean so that
they might always include
these few hours among the
happiest of their mem-
ories.
Ladies and Gentlemen, I
will now ask you to stand
raise your glasses and drink
with me to the most wonderful
gifts that Scotland ever gave to
the Bahamas our dear friends
John and Jean.'




Intimacy


and the


married


i woman.


The need to be sure
It's so important for your well-
being as a woman to feel sure
about the functioning and fresh
ness of your body
Because douching isn't practi-
cal, or even always advisable, cau-
tious married women of today rely
on Norforms feminine supposito
ries

Positive protection two ways
Norforms do a two fold job most
effectively. They protect you
against embarrassing problems
with their highly perfected germi
cidal formula. And they protect
you against offensive odors with
their rapid deodorant action.
Complete confidence
So simple and convenient, Nor
formsdissolveat normal body tem-
perature to form a protective film.
Theydo not harm delicate internal
tissue.
Next time ask for Norforms, an
ideal way to have the confidence
iyou need as a manied woman.
Sold at pharmacies in packages
of 6, 12 and 24.
Informative booklet, write to:
Notwich International
410 Park Avenue,
NewYork,
NY 10022


1Vgo1' s~


9


CARIB ENTERTAINERS

DIE IN AUTO CRASH


-*w


SAN JUAN, P.R. March 6
(AP) Three Caribbean
entertainers perished in an
automobile crash early


Good news

for boys

LONDON If you want
a baby daughter, go on the
birth pill.
That's the latest in family
planning from a team of
doctors at the World
Organization's research
centre on human
reproduction in Szeged,
Hungary.
In a letter to the
authoritative British medical
journal The Lancet. the
doctors said a recent study
of 560 mothers had
indicated "that oral
contraception before
pregnancy increases the
chance that infants
delivered subsequently will
be female."
Just over 54 per cent of
women who had never
taken the pill gave birth to
daughters, the doctors
reported. This figure rose to
more than 75 per cent
among women who had at
some time used the pill.
"Such an effect on sex
ratio at birth would have
important social
consequences," the doctors
said.
In other words, good
news for the minority of
boys. (AP)

FEDERAL energy chief
William Simon announced
today he is ordering gasoline
distribution to insure that all
states receive at least 85 per
cent as much gasoline this
month as they had two years
ago.


Wednesday near San Juan
while returning to the city
after an engagement at a resort
hotel, police said.
Dead were Trinidad born
limbo dancer Ricardo Osborne,
32, and his dancing partner.
Joyce Phipps, 28, also
described as a native .
Trinidad. The third performut
who died in the two-car crash
was Winston O'Neal, 38, a
singer and guitarist. All three
were residents of St. Thomas,
in the U.S. Virgin Islands.
O'Neal used the stage name
of Win de Neal. Osborne was
known professionally as Rick
Richard in Trinidad, and "The
Great Ricardo" in St. Thomas.
A fourth fatality was
identified as Harold J.
Schneider 28, also said by
police to reside in St. Thomas.
A fifth person in the car,
identified as Ralph Mallory.
25, was seriously injured.
According to police, a Ford
Falcon station wagon driven by
Osborne collided head-on with
a Thunderbird driven by
Marciano Navedo Martinez, 57,
a passenger in the station
wagon, named Harry Maloney,
was also badly hurt.
San Juan theatrical agent
Jimmy Stevens, in an
interview, said that Osborne
and his companions were
returning from an engagement
at the Cerromar Beach hotel,
located some 30 miles west of
San Juan, when the accident
occurred.
Stevens, who handled
bookings for Osborne and
O'Neal said the three artists
had performed for delegates
attending a convention at the
Cerromar.
Osborne' body will be
returned to St. Thomas for
burial Thursday morning.
Stevens said. It is expected that
the bodies of O'Neal and his
dancing partner will also be
returned to St. Thomas, but
details have not been disclosed


JOHN AND JEAN CHAPLIN photographed by Stanley Toogood at their farewell
banquet at La Chandelle at the Halcyon Balmoral Hotel. Shown inset are their children
Joy and Ken.




'Our debt of gratitude'


AL
OPENS: 6:30 Slihms start 7 p.mi
CHILDRENN UNI)IR 12 I RI .!
See 2 features late as V. 00
--EXCLUSIVE
Now thru Tuesday! *
"GOI)SPELL"7 & 10:45,
"JOHN 9:00



CG;OSPP'L ,ACCORm1lNt1
l 7f TOODAY ...

YI V





RESTAURANT WI L[ Hi
I CLOSED temporary for rcpairsi


COMMONWEALTH OF
THE BAHAMA ISLANDS 1974
IN THE SUPREME COURT No. 11
Equity Side.

NOTICE

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel
or lot of land situate in the Southern District of
the Island of New Providence one of the
Commonwealth of the Bahama Islands and being
Lot No. 1 of a Subdivision laid out by Hill Top
Development Company Limited and being
bounded Northwardly by Lot No. 2 of the said
Subdivision the property of George King and
running thereon Eighty (80) feet Eastwardly by
Lot No. 18 in the said Subdivision the property
of the late Ernest King and running thereon
Forty-seven feet and Seventy hundredths of a
foot (47.70) Southwardly by Cordeaux Avenue
and running thereon Eighty (80) feet and
Westwardly by East Steeet and running thereon
Forty-seven feet and Seventy hundredths of a
foot (47.70) which said piece parcel or lot of
land has such position shape boundaries marks
and dimensions as are shown thereon coloured
Pink on the diagram or plan filed herein.

AND IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles
Act 1959.

AND IN THE MATTER of The Petition of
Alfred King.

Alfred King the Petitioner in this matter, claim
to be the owner in fee simple in possession of the
said piece parcel or lot of land and has made
application to the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas under Section 3 of
The Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have his title to
the said piece parcel or lot of land investigated and
the nature and extent thereof determined and
declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by
the Court in accordance with the provisions of the
Act.

COPIES of the said plan may be inspected
during normal office hours at the following places:

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court, Public
Square in the City of Nassau.
(b) The Chambers of CASH, FOUNTAIN &
BOWE situate in Armstrong Street in the City
of Nassau.

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having
dower or a right to dower or any adverse claim or a
claim not recognized in the Petition shall on or
before the Twenty-sixth day of April 1974 file in
the Supreme Court in the City of Nassau aforesaid
and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a
statement of his claim in the prescribed form,
verified by an affidavit to be filed therewith.
Failure of any such person to file and serve a
statement of his claim on or before the sai4
Twenty-sixth day of April 1974 will operate as t
bar to such claim.
CASH, FOUNTAIN & BOWE'
Chambers
Armstrong Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner.


Evening 8 30-Ph'fon -,v
ne 3


-- -- I


m


- - ------ ------ -- - -~--` -~'~-""-';~~-7-----


i


I











10 C tjhr Cributie


Thursday, March 7, 1974


REAL ESTATE


C13780
ATTRACTIVE residence on
large lot Montagu hilltop are3
three bedrooms, two baths,
living room, Bahama room,
separate dining room, large
kitchen, detached garage,
maid's room and laundry.
Asking price $55,000
furnished.

Excellent ouy in three-bed,
two-bit', residence off Village
Ro.;d hilltop near Queen's
College. $46,000 furnished.

Large residence Village Road
with four bedrooms, four
bathrooms, living room,
separate dining room, Bahama
room, breakfast room, spacious
basement playroom, two-car
garage and boathouse. $65,000
semi furnished.
H. G. CHRISTIE LTD.
Phone 21041, 2. 3.4.
C13692
DAVSON'S REAL ESTATE
CO LTD.
Certified Real Estate Brokers
Phones 21178 55408
P. 0. Box N-4648
Nassau, Bahamas
Proudly present
SMASHING REAL EST-AT-
BARGAINS


THROUGHOUT THE
COMMONWEALTH
2. 3 and 4 BEDROOM
HOUSES in the following
areas.
EASTERN ROAD
on the water as well as asr,
the hills.
SAN SOUCI
BLAIR ESTATES
GLENISTON GARDENS
WINTON
THE GROVE (West Bay)
SKYLINE HEIGHTS
NASSAU EAST
SEA BREEZE
VILLAGE ROAD
GOLDEN GATES
HIGHLAND PARK
PROSPECT RIDGE
WESTWARD VILLAS
CONDOMINIUM
APARTMENTS
in PARADISE ISLAND
EAST BAY STREET
WEST BAY STREET
HOTELS and HOTEL SITES.
BEACH LOTS, COMMER-
CIAL LOTS, RESIDENTIAL
LOTS
AC R E AGE FOR
DEVELOPMENT IN THE
NASSAU AND FAMILY
ISLANDS SUCH AS GRAND
BAHAMA LONG ISLAND,
ELEUTHERA ABACO
45 ACRE CAY IN THE
EXUMAS WITH DEEP
WATER HARBOUR AND
MORE
CALL
DAVSON'S REAL
ESTATE AGENCY
Phone 21178 or 80932 21178
P. O. Box N-4648
Nassau, Bahamas.
C13749
THE PRICE IS RIGHT. Ir,
exclusive Winton Heights. Two
storey, 3 bedrooms, 2
bathrooms, 2 porches, fireplace
for use when temperature
plummets to 65 degrees.
Lovely landscaping. Fully
furnished. Generous financing.
YOU'LL LOVE THE
LOCATION. Close to
shopping, schools. beach 3
bedrooms. 2 bathrooms, 2
water s v stems, 3
air conditioners F ully
furnished You'l 1 lov, the price
too $46.000.

PRIVATE VALUABLE
CORNER. In convenient
Montagu Heights, 3 bedroom.
2 baths, fully furnished, double
lot. completelyy walled in. Price
$65.000

CHOICE OF THREE IN
NASSAU EAST. Fully
furnished three and four
bedroom homes $37,000 to
$47.000
A SLEEPER ON VILLAGE
ROAD. Listen to th', Larqge
corner lot. 125 x 240, with 41
bedroom home and I bedroom
apartment. Private garden.
many fruit trees Suitable for
large family, nursery s hool.
apartment site Financing
available The price e is
unbelievably low.
SANS SOUCI, CAREFREE
INDEED! Single family or
duplex lots in San Sauci on
exclusive Gumbo Limbo Lane.

BEST IN BLAIR'. Two large
lots, each 100 x 150. One, only
$8,000. Buy before owner
changes mind.

TWO ACRES. On West Bay
Street near Balmoral Hotel.
Hotel, apartment, shopping
centre site. Price slashed to
$100,000. Terms available.

ELEVEN ACRES on Harold


$75,000.

MONARCH OF ALL YOU
,$URVEY. Acreage
opportunity at Abaco. 120
;acres on highway and
waterfront between Treasure
iay and Marsh Harbour. Buy
'foday at yesterday's price for
tomorrow's profit. $800 per
,acre.
CHESTER THOMPSON
REAL ESTATE
; 12 Charlotte Street
Telephone 24777
' Evenings 3142$ 42035.


REAL ESTATE


II


C13662
SPONGER'S Cottage Business
with property or Sponger's
Cottage Business with lease on
property. Contact: The
Manager, Telephone 41052.

C13745
FOR SALE
3 bedroom 2 bath house
financing available. Phone
2 1495 cr F-

C13773
BEACH LOT. Adelaide Beach.
Phone 41298 nite or day.
C 13793
FOR SALE
4 bedrooms 3 baths, two
kitchens etc furnished
HIGHLAND PARK was
$75,000.00. Owner would sell
for $65,000.00.
SANS SOUCI 302 by 100
gorgeous views house has 3
bedrooms two baths selling
for $57,500.00

GLENISTON GARDENS
modern i 3 bedioonms, 2 baths,
ultra modern, cathedral
ceilings, furnished quiet area.
$60,000 00
MONTAGU HEIGHTS
modern Sorinish stvle with 3
bedrooms 2 baths, furnished.
Asking $95,000.00 100 by
150.
BLUE HILL ESlATES
hilltop, corner plot, 100 by
110. Asking $12,000.00. Was
$16,000.00. See anytime.
WATERS EDGE lot 100 by
100. Walled-in. Only
$22,500.00 Situate Southeast
Winton.
PALMDALE have house and
land on corner plot for only
$32,000.00
EASTERN ROAD facing Sea,
lot only $18,000.00.
DIAL DAMIANOS 22033,
22305, 22307. Evening 4 1197

C13779
"NICE-VIEW" APARTMENTS


(Located on Hill-top)
Montrose Avenue
Comprised of the following:

One 3-bedroom 2-bathrooms,
wall to wall carpet; three
roorns air-conditioned,
completely furnished; front
porch and back patio.
One 2-bedroom 1-bathroom
apartment. Iwo rooms
air-conditioned.
Three I bedroom apartments
(one air-conditioned); also,
garage, laundry and washing
machines

These apartments are
completely furnished with
walled- in lawn and fruit trees.
Buildings are all of concrete
block. Originally priced at
$100,000. A BARGAIN for
$/5,000 or nearest offer for
cash. Mortgage available for
one half over a period of five
years.
For apporintmenrt to view
telephone 32109.
All apartment', are now leased
for one year ending October 1,
1974.
C13710
BUY NOW!
SAN ANDROS
LOTS
14,500
sq. FEET!
Almost 1/3 acre
$45 DOWN, $45 per MONTH
CALL OR VISIT
FRANK CAREY
REAL ESTATE
P. O. Box N4764
BAY & DEVEAUX ST.
Tel. 27657, 24815

C13788
THERE IF, mio need to ui.ntinue
paying the landlord 'row you
can buy a three or four
bearicor r, two-bath hofusm for a
low t.,rwn payment of $2,000
,rm d rii,)rthliy ir'tjalm en ts that
you t rn easily j aff rd for
'if rrmn tion t 0 al Ji J nes Oliver
at 2 : ,854 or1 3 4635.
C 13 79t)
FOR SALE
HILLTOP HOUSE GROVE
,'rews of Sea. Patio, enclosed
fruited grounds, and
SWIMMING POOL, with
changing rooms. Has four
bedrooms, three baths
furnished. Property in good
condition immediate
occupancy. Sales price only
$125,000.00 Priced below
reproduction costs. Ground
200 by 145
AN ESTATE Out west with
312 feet of SANDY BEACH
four bedrooms four baths,
spacious house, with garages,
with five bedrooms on second
floor. Grounds superbly
landscaped good condition.
See is to appreciate.
LAKEFRONT 3 bedrooms 3
baths, plus one complete
contained bedroom and bath,
sitting and kitchen. Large area
for playroom. Gorgeous views
of lake, has duck,
kingsize pool, over acre of
fruited grounds laden with
citrus. Tastefully furnished,
equipped for high class
entertaining ideal outdoor
living large patios all this
for only $215,000.00. See at
moment's notice.
DIAL THE ACTION
REALTORS DAMIANDS
REALTY 22033, 22305,
41197 Night.


REAL ESTATE


C13797
FOR SALE
PRINCE CHARLES AVENUE
5 bedrooms 2 baths some
furniture spacious grounds
patio needs some cleaning.
Sales price $47,500.00. DIAL
DAMIANOS, 22305, 22307,
Evenings 41280.

C13795

FOR SALE
NASSAU EAST 3 bedrooms 2
baths, furnished. All this for
$36,000 00.

SOUTHEAST WINTON 100
foot on Water for as low as
$22,500.00. See anytime. Live
like a King on the waters edge.
TWYNAM AVENUE house
1'2 storeys, furnished, enclosed
grounds. Only $32.000.00.
CENTREVILLE HILLTOP
gorgeous views -- swimming
pool, patio front and rear.
Main house four bedrooms
with 2-unit apartments. All
rented Good income. Only
$150,000.00.
CITY PROPERTY ideal for
business. Well maintained
grounds, immediate
occupancy. Only $110,000.00.
Spacious grounds.

CENTREVILLE on Collins
office and apartment
building. I deal foi
professionals. Reasonably
priced. Good financing.
DIAL DAMIANOS, THE
ACTION NUMBERS 22033,
22305. Lvenings 41197.

C 13 791
ONE NEWLY built unit
townhouse $80,000
3 bedroom, 2 boths, full'
furnished, ai rconditionri'i
house $45,000
Phone: 56332 (7.9 rnornr.i:
6-10 evening).

C 13806
LOTS Nassau Village good
Title 100 x 100 $6,000.00
Lots 60 x 100 Sandilands
Allotment
Neai A. D. Hanna $3,50U.00
House lot Robinson and
Washington Street $40,000.
Call 24068.

C 13794

FOR SALE
CENTREVILLE 4 lots
(60,000 sq. ft.) including
quality built building with
thiee units rentable. Ideal for a
Church, Piofessional Building,
Offices, Apartments etc. valued
$179,000.00. Owner will sell
for $150,000.00.
MARLBOROUGH STREET
WEST opposite British
Colonial, three properties. One
as low as $100,000.00 other
two relatively cheap. Good
location for tourist trade, or
INVESTMENT. Invest in high
class properties to beat
inflation.
ARCADE BUILDING
opposite Malcolms on Bay
Street -- lowest price available
on main street. See anytime.

THREE UNIT APARTMENT
BLDG. adjacent Ra,quet Club.
Grounds 55 by 150. Income
$5,000.00 yearly. Asking only
$27,500.00. With or without
terms.
DIAL NICK DAMIANOS, THE
ACTION REALTOR 22033
22305, evenings 41197.

C 138Q1
CABLE BEACH -
CONDOMINIUM APT.
"CONCHREST" 2 Bed 2
Bath swimming pool &
Beach Rights Tastefully
furnished & decorated ... View
by appt. Price $65,000
CARMICHAEL ROAD
Opposite Golden Isle Club Lot
400' x 150' $20,000 or nearest
offer.
CARMICHAEL ROAD
Commercial Site 212' x 167' ...
$15,000
VILLAGE ROAD
Apartment Site 93' x 124' ...
$15,500

SANS SOUCI D)uplex sites
from $8,900 ... Terms
BLAIR ESTATES
Apartment Site 80' x 120' ...
$14,000

STAPLEDON GARDENS
Commercial Site with
unfinished building. $15,000


STAPLEDON GARDENS
Apartment Site $9,000.

OAKES FIELD Residential
Lot 50' x 100' ... $6,500.
IMPERIAL PARK
IMPERIAL PARK Lot 75' x
100' ... $6,500
LITTLE HYDE PARK -- East
of Sea Breeze Lot 60' x 100'
$4,500

MARATHON ESTATES
Residential Lot 60' x 100'
$6,500
ADELAIDE BEACHFRONT
LOT 100' x 112' ONLY
$13,000
STAPLEDON GARDENS
Residential Lot 80' x 120' ..
$7,000
Call -BERKLEY FERGUSON
REAL ESTATE Berwin House,
Frederick St. Phone 21238 -
24913 Box N4278.


SECTION


REAL ESTATE I


C13707
4 BEDROOM. 2 bathro,'r,
unfurnished house with carpor*
and sewing room. FOR SALE.
Call 31671 31672 (9.00 a.m.
12.00; 2.00 p.m. 5.0q
p.m. weekdays).

C 13809
A STONE BUILDING situate
on a corner lot on Robinson
Road. Ideal for doctor's office.
Call 23921 days or 42856
nights and Saturdays.

FOR RENT
C13723
EFFICIENCY Apartment r,'
Palmdale for reserved
gentleman ONLY. For
information call 5-1044.

C13732
THREE Bedroom, 11. Bat'i
Unfurnished House. Phonre
4-2193. After 5 p.m.

C 13708
COTTAGES and apartment-
monthly airconditionec.
fully furnished, maid service
available. Lovely garden and
,swimming oool. Telephone
31297. 31093.

C13735
EFFICIENCY $135 per month
1al utilities Montagu BedcLhi
H ise (n'-xt to Glene.igles)
After 6 p.m. telephone 31156

C13759
3 BEDROOM I bath hOLrsr
Adderley's Addition. Call
daytime 2-4491 Sundays and
nights 5-9839 see Tony Allec

C13687
HOUSE suitable for store
office Madeira Street facet ;
Shopping Plaza. Contain c
2 3170.

C13741
2 BEDROOM part ne,'
fur isshed a i rcordidtioieo,
telephone Palmdale 2 3010
4-1301.

C13758
3 BEDROOM I bath hou.,c
Foxdale. Call daytime 2-4491
Sunday and nights b59839 S5
Tony Allen.

C13768
WHY PAY MORE TO SLEEP?
Furnished rooms Polhemus
Gardens Motel $20 weekly
$6 00 per day. Chippinghamr
Phone 35380.

C13789
TWO bedroom apartment
Centreville, near city. Basically
furnished. Tel. 5.8256.

C13799
FURNISHED 2 bedroom
apartm ent c I r,.,i of
living/dining room kitchen atid
bathroom Twvnam Avenue
5-8185.
C13798
TWO Bedroom apartment Las'
Street, South, opposite
Coconut Grove AvenueP Phone
3-2544.
C13778
NEW duplex apartment
Malcolm Road 2 bedroom n.
$180 per month. Cjll 5fi90!


CARS FOR SALE
C 1,3724
CENTRAL GARAGE LTD.
"The Easiest Place in Town to
Trdde"
1970 FORD CORTINA
B$850
1970 SUNBEAM RAPIER -
B$1650.
1971 JAVELIN S.S.T.
(automratr .rdio) (5$28501
1970 FORD TORINO
(automatic, radio) B$2?r 5
1968 G.M.C. PICK UP TRUCK
B$995.
1970 CHEVELLE .vIALIBU
automaticr, radio) B$1875
1968 PLYMOUTH VALIANT
(radio, ,iitoma tic) B$1050
1971 DODGE AVENGER
(automatic) B$1395
1965 BUICK SKYLARK
(automatic, radio) B$/7bO
1969 CHEV II NOVA
(auton.matic, radio) E$1350
1972 FIATBUS (7 .. -)
B$1650
1968 ROVER 2000 SALOON
(automatic) B$1000
1969 DODGE DART SPORT
automaticc radio) 35$ 500
1972 VAUXHALL VICTOR
(automatic) B$1475
1970 FORD CORTINA


S/WAGON B$1275
1969 VAUXHALL VIVA
B$775.
1970 FIAT 850 B$550
CENTRAL GARAGE LIMITED
Thompson Boulevard
P.O. Box N1525
Telephone 34711
C13709
1973 VOLKSWAGEN 130r0
Sedan. Excellent condition,
radio, white wall tyres, low
mileage, licensed for '74 to '75.
Call 3-6611/4.
C13776
1973 VAUXHALL VIVA, like
new, 8000 miles, perfect
condition $2200 Phone
2-4095 or 7-7866.
C13754
1969 OLDSMOBILE 442.
Excellent condition -- ona
owner. $2500. Telephone
5-5905.


CARS FOR SALE


C13775
1972. PINTO Estate Wiqotn,
aiiconditioned. iadio. 8.000(
miles, excellent condit' I .
$4,200. Phone 2-4005 j
7-7866.
C 13 790
1972 Cutlass. $3,900. PhFi,l
56332 (7 9) mo rin :
evening).

FOR SALE

C1375 7
8 TRACK r.ip, on ,,.J .
half years old.
Perfect u'.U king i ot;(i't, I
$65 Phione 3 2474

W'-,'J /\NG'JY GOO([) inS
F Ul R 'J I L I R PF \ .
,il'PLI'iF'LS. Call 2-?t. / .-r-
',i Moss.

ENTERTAINMENT
C13743
Fi I .INIVF RSI Y '-








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TO PLACE YOUR ADV. -TELEPHONE 21986 EXT. 5


I MARINE SUPPLIES
S ,74
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WANTS TO RENT












NOTICE


SC
'The Star Sp ng l i '
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a t'i .t i .',h, ,e .r 5,r .r
w a fo t' t h ,. '; '. .n
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DINING GUIDE LPOSITI
L13629 '


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Dinner Served p m.to [sIiniglt C c F
IFRI P P t Fir
C13784
SETTLE P !,,, ,& I,
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i. HELl
NOW SL .VI';. L IJUL' I L .'







T in . I; .* l) , .' ' '


IN MEMORIAL
C 380/


In lovin Ig i ntll v I )f Oim i di 1 rT
Mother arfd G !rn!i" th,'f
Elizabeth Acst'o, ,i vtI,
departed thet , 'I -- ',
March. t1r 1W
"Safe rm, thte Jrin-i Jr,. "
Left t to moirImm a1 'lifIl 'i -
g r a r d (d a I rlh t I' I i )e e
grandsons, a ho ,t ,- f i ',itv,-,i
and fioienrds
C13772





'- .


IN LOVING memory oi of ou
dear sister Idel Evans who
departed 7th March 1967.
In death's dark vale I fear no ill
With thee, dear Lord, beside
me.
Thy rod and staff my coinfort
still
Thy cross before to guide rne.
Sadly missed by Mabel
Woodside (sister), Dennis
Evans and Roland Evans
(Brothers), Chris and Wilton
Finlayson (Nephews).


S'
u1 l

/('.11 '.',' J -'


ir r"s
cir.P l r


HOOLS


05 het.-eein 7 ,ii d
S a i fr c p [i or


m'NiFV


ION WANTED


cc


1--


P WANTED


' n T' ip i:JN!f y




cl' pm 111 I Yf
















.'rc




1, i ; i
' ) ' : .: l I r* 1 ,/

tii i'' I ,i' l'
ci ... ..(



mc I' cc mcI t mI


,n I I. cI '. .I





I. executive Ir lO 'ekeep
rI inq-f,,. n i t '''rim
I I I l I ,I"i I ,,1 .I ,, ,'1,'trvv IIi .- ,


Itrr g in. I nA It It M'I.IIn I ( eI

F Or-c fI(c f(Im tr I mlo i

I xe(nntive f cI r,,elr'rrpi'
Chief nrtrlrml'e
Fxe( utive C hef
Sois (hel
F -ood and Hoevrlinle .'.i.n g gr'
Assistant food arid [everage
Mannager
Account nt
Launhdiy r.in.rie'r
Cost Corillr rill
Ma itIo d'

Director of Personnel
Intercontiner tal Hotels
P. 0. Box 4M11820
South Miami, lIorida 33143


HELP WANTED


I i


Cl 3748
OUALIFIED Painter required.
At least 5 years experience
,minting. Please call 3-6211
Monc,IdlI, tIrough Friday 9 a.m.
to l :30 a.m.

c 13805
HIANI)YMAN to work around
the home and store. Apply to
Maxwell's Studio, Market
Street.

C 13792
G OOD AND Beverage Director
for !35 Rooms Resort
popen ty. Must have three to
fIv ycOIs p riev Ir )ks experience
., I l & B'vei ge Dii ector.
P'li ,cm ,i'pip v imi pel sonl with,
o f 1( e' to to HI oliday I nn
P, :1 t,1 I sla d, Feli x
it. 'I 'r I) D i ector of


1 1381-3
II A DN [i Y MAN (lui r e d.
..A ntact b Rbb56

TRADE SERVICES


,1 J /bo
LANDSCAPING and for all
i chi gardening needs,
t imrrmrmq. hedging, prunring,
ti.".' fel(l;,g ind beach ( leaning
all 5 7810 LAWNS
lrI IeL FDG)FS Prompt
* eJ1.1,rile Jm ld efficlerit


I i It.'int
ITF
1r;


RAUF St RVIC 'S
V ANTENNAS


[iosters for homes,
ipar tmeints ard hotels
SALES AND SERVICE'S
Call 5-9404
W'(L_[1 OF MUSIC
M .,v Str et'


TRADE SERVICES


C13691

Pinder's Customs

Brokerage Ltd.

Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. 0. Box N3714
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795,2-3796
2-3797, 2-2798
Airport 7-7434
FREE ESTIMATES

C13702
FOR your building needs and
CRANE hire see:
ISLAND BUILDERS LIMITED
P. 0. Box N-4559
Phone 31671 31672.

C13656
FOR EXPERT
RADIO TV SERVICE
contact
Channel Liectronics Ltd.
TV Specialist
Wulff Road. Phone 35478.
C13572
ACT now before the burglar
comes. Call Scriven's
Maintenance Service for your
s purity requirements. Tel.
51748.


lext to Frink's Place








Nassau and Bahama Islands

Leading Newspaper




WASSAU -


BUSINESS 6 PROFESSIONAL


DIRECTORY

Save Time




BY

PHONE


1i List 1kis l Dlctiq
I Lie hPi IlvtkI'


0- 1216 EXT. 5

21 [P hruh 'l,


1111 SAVE MY

ANTENNAS MEN'S& BOYS' WEAR
Island TV 2-2618 The Wardrobe 5-5599

AUTOMOTIVE MEN'S WEAR
Lucas Batteries Fashionette Ltd. 2-2376/7


Bay iStreet Liarae 2-2434,

BOOKSTORE
The Christian Book Shop
5-4506
BUSINESS FORMS
Executive
Printers 2.4267/5-401


MUSIC
Cody's Records 2-8500

OPTICIANS
Optical Service Ltd. 2-3910/1

PRINTING


CAMERAS Wong'sr
Executive
John Bull 2-4252/3 Printers


noting


CARPETS RADIO & TA
Lee's Carpet Craft 3.1993 carter's Records
Carter's Records


5-4506

2-4267/5-4011


V. SALES


2-4711


-DRAPERIES_ I RUBBER STAMPS
Lee's Carpet Craft 3-1993
long's Rubber Stamp


ENTERTAINMENT
Movies
Film & Equip. Service 2-2157

GARDEN & PET
SUPPLIES
Modernistic Garden
& Pet 2-286
Nassau Garden & Pet
Montrose Avenue 2-425

HARDWARE
John S. George 2-8421/6

HOUSE PLANS
Evangelos G. Zervos 2-2633

LAUNDRY
DRY CLEANING
New Oriental Laundry
2-4406


w Co. 5-4506

SPORTS GOODS
I.Champion Sport Land 2-1862

TRAVEL


Playtours


2-29


93 1 / 7


R. H. Curry & Co.,
2-8681/7


TRUCKING SERVICE
Gonzalez Trucking
3-1562/2-4726

TV REPAIRS
Channel Electronics Ltd.
3-5478
WINDOW/DOOR REPAIR
Window & Door Specialists
5.4460


CLASSIFIED


ADVS. BRING RESULTS-FAST


FOR THE ACTION YOU WANT


mmmmmm mm mmmmmm-mmm
Shop Nassau Merchants

For Business And Services A


I "It


---------- T- I


I


I


I..---,- n_:_












Thursday, March 7, 1974




GRAND BAHAMAI




CLASSIFIED

IN FIEEPIfl TEL. 352-61


HELP WANTED
C6725
CONVENTION MANAGER:
To be in charge of all
Conventions and Facilities and
Convention Groups. 3-5 years
experience in Hotel
Management. Health
Certificate, Police Certificate
and letters of reference
required.
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY:
Must be able to take shorthand
and type at least 70-80 w.p.m.
Should have at least 3 years
experience. Police Certificate,
Health Certificate and letters
of reference required.
SOCIAL HOSTESS: Social
Hostess that speaks French. To
work with Tours, mostly
coming from Canada. Must also
be able to travel with the group
at times. Police Certificate,
Health Certificate and letters
of reference required.
Interested persons apply:
GRAND BAHAMA HOTEL,
WEST END, GRAND
BAHAMA. Personnel Office,
between the hours of 9:00 a.m.
and 3:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday. Mailing Address
158 Port Road, West Palm
Beach, Florida, 33404. Elon
Martin, Jr., Personnel Director.


HELP WANTED
C6732
PETROLEUM INSPECTORS
Applications are invited from
Petroleum Inspectors with at
least five years experience in
inspection of crude and
petroleum product loading and
discharging operations.
Applicants should also have
had some experience of oil
storage tank and metering
equipment calibrations, also
laboratory testing of crude
petroleum and petroleum
products.
Please apply, together with
evidence of experience, to: E.
W. Saybolt & Co., S.A., P. 0.
Box F-2049, Freeport, Grand
Bahama. Bahamians only need
apply.

C6733
GOLF COURSE MECHANIC
Mechanic required with at least
1 year's experience in repair
and maintenance of golf course
equipment, i.e. power mowers,
tractors, spikers.
Apply to: Bahama Reef
Development Company, P. 0.
Box F-241, Freeport, G.B.I.

C6731
SALES MANAGER with at
least 10 years sales experience.
Knowledge of Freeport/Lucaya,
area. Must have own car.
Commission basis.
Submit resume to: Republic
Realty Ltd.. P. 0. Box F-2570.


"Coffee break?"


CROSSWORD

PUZZLE
ACROSS 30 Pick up the
1. Money check
6. Sea bird 31. Golf clubs
12. Bouquet 32. Several
13. Lethargic 33 Vocalize
14. Riding 35 Harmless
academy lizard
16. Spry 37. Hawaiian porch
17. Jack 39. Scribble
19. Worn 42, Program for a
20. Nourish meeting
22. Work hard 44 Pickets
24. Skate 45 Crumb
25. Relative 46 Rest
26. That man DOWN
28. There
29. Hatred 1. Barrier


Par time 30 min.


AP News


SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE
2 Boy's name 7. Japanese song
3. Grivet 8. Compute

5 Long story 10 Small island
6 Italian river 11. Require
SE15. Nightfall
8 9 0 ,ii 18. Pardoned
20 Friar
21. Feast
.. 23 Tree
S25 Japanese
S2 salad plant
/ 26. Poor actor
3 f -- -27 Watch
29 Political
26 7 publications
30 Pet
o 31. Interior
-- 32.Toast
y32 33. Bridge bid
S- 7 34. Othello's
enemy
ai 36.---- and robbers
I 38.Orf
4 -- 40. Shelter
4- 41. Telepathic
Faculty
S43. Boy's
f.9fures 3-9 nickname


1i


I CARROLL RIGHTER'S


1 from the Carroll Righter Institute
9 GENERAL TENDENCIES: An excellent day to
NN l get together with persons you like and engage
in whatever entertainments you enjoy Also fine time for
looking at your surroundings and making improvements. Make
future plans with influential persons.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) Ideal day to be with friends
and make the plans necessary for your advancement in the
future Affection for mate brings fine results now.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Adding new items to your
home now makes it more charming and functional. Improve
on those plans you have made. Take health treatments.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Getting together with persons
who like the same amusements you do can result in your
having a happy time. Show more devotion to mate-
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Give more
attention to home matters and get them operating on a more
successful basis. Take no chances with one who is irate.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Talk with experts and get the
right advice for improving routines. Avoid one who has some
strange notions. Strive for more happiness.
VIRGO (Aug 22 to Sept. 22) Keep focused on financial
affairs today and get the results you want. Be sure to arrive on
time for an important appointment you've made.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) You intuitions are working
fine, so get out in the world of activity and make a fine
impression on others See that your diet is right.
SCORPIO (Oct 23 to Nov. 21) You need information and
can get it by going to the right sources. The evening is fine for
the social side of life. Strive for happiness.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 to Dec 21) Look to a good friend
who has much understanding and can give the advice you
need Make allowances if loved one is irate.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan 20) Know what it is that
bigwigs expect of you and make sure you follow through and
please them Taking part in civic affair is wise
AQUARIUS (Jan 21 to Feb 19) Many fine situations await
your attention today, so get an early start. Take care of
important correspondence See business expert
PISCES (Feb 20 to Mar. 20) Make sure you keep any
promises you have made to others. Spare time with loved one
brings real happiness. Avoid one who daydreams too much.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY . he or she will have
the compassion to understand others, plus the ability to bring
much success and happiness. Direct the education along lines
that require precision Give the finest training you can afford.
Don't neglect the spiritual side of life. There is ability at sports
here, even from the professional standpoint.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


Winning

Bridge
by VICTOR MOLLO
Is it too much to ask to find
something right sometimes ?
asked South rhetorically, look-
ing accusingly at his Guardian
Angel. GA waved his magic
wand.
North
A 9
SK 9 7 6 4
4 K J 10
West East
4* J 8 4 1054
t K J 10 8 7 V 6 4 3



0Q 5 2
A 8 2
4Q 5
CONTRACT 64 LEAD 0i10
South won in his hand, drew
trumps in three rounds and
played the 4Q. East held off,
won the club continuation and
switched to a heart. South went
up hopefully with the (Q, but
West had the VK and the
defence came to two more
tricks.
South was about to expostu-
late, when a chord snapped on
the magic harp and the scales
fell from his eyes.
His plan was sound. He
intended to throw a diamond on
dummy's third club and ruff out
the diamonds, setting up two
discards for the hearts. But he
went wrong in taking a third
round of itrumps, for the 4Q
was needed as a vital entry.
Had he switched to clubs
after taking the +AK, all would
have been well, for East, who
had a third trump, also had a
third diamond. That was lucky.
The heart position was im-
material. Had East held the
baK, he would have led it, still
breaking the contract.


-OW many
Ho words of
L M toou r letters
or more can
you make
from the
P letters shown
here? In
making a
word. each
R E P letter maay
be used once
only. Each
word must contain the large
letter, and there must be at
least one eight-letter word In the
list. No plurals, no foreignwords;
no proper names. TODAY'S
TARGET : 15 words, good;
19 words,. very pood: 24 words,
excellent Solution tomorrow.
YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION :
Aglst. gait iant gixst gnat goat
Ingot Into iota oast saint satin
satin stag stain s tain tatn tion
sting stint stoat 8TOATING
4tot tain taint tang tango tanist
tasting tigon tins tint toast
TOASTING toga toting.


Rupert and the Jolly Holly-30


That night, when Rupert goes to bed, he hangs
up his pillow case in readiness for Santa's
visit. I'll leave the Jolly Holly at the top
where he car, sea it," smiles the little bear.
Then he climbs into bed and is soon fast
aseap. Next morning he awakens early. "It's
Christmas Day," he murmurs drowsily. Has
Santa been ? He looks towards the end o0


his bad and sees the pillow case bulging with
gifis. "Yes, he has! cries Rupert. And
he's even brought me a lovely steam-roller.
it's so big that he had to leave it on the
foor !" Suddenly he remembers the sprig of
Jolly Holly. "It's gone, so Santa must have
taken it," he thinks. Good, that will keep
him merry." ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


Chess






.l,*,*


99wou
By LEONARD BARDEN
(9908)
Hungarian grandmaster Le-
vente Lengyel (Black, to move)
had this position in the Costa
Brava tournament In Spain He
played 1 . Ktx P, calulating
that ,after 2 B-Q5 ch, K-B1;
White couldn't play 3 Q xKt
because of 3 . B x P winning
the queen, which Is pinned -
against the king by black's rook.
But when the game went as
Ie.ngyel planned and the posi-
tion after 3 QxKt was reached
on the board, he turned pale
and resigned. Why ?
Par times: 10 seconds, chess
master or expect; 3(1 seconds.
county player; 2 minutes. club
standard; 5 minutes, ave-age:
10 minutes, novice

Chess Solution
Because he realized that after
1 ... KtxP; 2 B-Q5 ch. K-BI;
3 QxKt, BxP: 4 Kt-Kt6 ch !
PxKt: 5 R-R8 is mate


USE

The SIribunr

CLASSIFIED


ADVTS.


No. 7.389 . by TIM McKAY
Across
1. Gardeners should be wary
of this creature. (3. 6)
9. Girl's namine. (3)
10. Den. (4)
11. Give out. (5)
12. Spiral. (4)
13. Once more. (4)
14. Fruit. (.5)
15. Light up. (9)
20. German wartime figure. (6)
22. Estates settled on wives. (9)
25. 0r-htetural feature. (4)
26. Vegetable. (4)
27. Cash. (5)
Down
aiovtlon task. (U. 3)
2:Unrumed. (4)
ome to a conclusion. (9)
1. MDilltarmjdi ulay. 16)

18. rBnlea b
17. Dress*


to. sure.
It ha a4
is.^^^


-if k e Cornimc Pale



REX MORGAN, M.D. AL

I'M GLAD YOU YES, SIR/ I'D RATHER No1 OR REX MORGAN THEN GET IN TOUCH
CALLED, /MR6 WAIT UNTIL YOU GET BACi( IN HASTAKEN CARE WITH HIM RIGHT
I DON'T LIKE CALLING SIMON SHOULD TOWN TOMORROW' OF MWY FAMILy AWAY ---AN ASk
YOU AT THIS HOUR --- WE CALL A WHO WOULD YOU FOR YEARS/ HIM TO PHON ME AS
BUT r'/ WORRIED DOCTOR SUGGEST WE CALL? SOON AS HE'S
ABOUT JANIESEENJANIE
GOVERNOR -NW












JUDGE PARKER Paul Nichols
g E h\ YOUR BROTHER THEN YOUR BROTHER FOUND THAT I WOULD LIKE TO WHAT WOULD THAT
TOLD ME THAT EONA BOWDEN WAS A SHE WAS ALSO DATING ANOTHER VISIT WITH YOUR ACCOMPLISH? THERE'S
MARRIED WOMAN BUT HE DID NOT MAN! HE BECAME VERY UPSET, BROTHER AND A MAN IN PRISON WHO
KNOW IT! HE GAVE HER A RING WENT TO HER APARTMENT AND HAVE YOU GO TO I WILLING TO CONFESS
WHICH SHE ACCEPTED!' AT THE THEY HAD A FIGHT.' HE LOST HIS THE PRISON WITH THAT HE KILLED EDNA
TIME HER HUSBAND HEAD AND ACCIDENTALLY E, M166 CALVIN! OWDEN
WAS IN VIETNAM! KILLED HER!












APARTMENT 3-G ByAlex Kotzky


[STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & overgard


THIS DOESN'T EVEN LOOK
LIKE ITALIAN
SPAGHETTI! '





dP


U PTribune


5












Thursday, March 7, 1974


Baseball association to fight 'exploitation


Knowles gets




among the medals


;: Iain Johnson
i\ t. \t Il (t S Nathaniel
S .. arnel i he Bahamias
ti'l i medal when he
S1 i rd round decision
\ t.K Liin Rosalho
i t night' semt-final
ii !. L i t the ( A &
i .s e i i; i i Slint

i s ;.. i; \ t -* ( ba 's
Snito a in
I, ;,!1 v l tic he w ill
., I \ i the



ir t ii ii.
.... r K :" w ls last
N 1 t J i o sible whlet
7 ,* hl, lIc frlln his





l t!is .i d I s d,

t ,l.. ti 1' L \. h i

S t I ei C 1I
; ht ,on i Is
1- t 1, 1. I t he n rt I



ti t




;. c l, i d i

Sit t r l

1 s i 'titit
it i 'N il t.' Ilettl
.J t n 1 leit I





ad l i a on'
. is ii 1 I's s>i.id t t, t lil '.


t i .i l
j 1 1 1 1h 1llal ,,
% i,\ I' ,t h l h
: :,l i(L'!\ little +I ic


deeinceless.
After the tight. Knowles was
lrinmarked while Ochoa %was
s1 ,Illen abo, lt the eyes swith
the chin.
A\'tl.cordinr to reports tiom
I'er\ today O ()hoti has been
detained in hospital after
,.l' ,' iig in his dressing room
aittl lthe fight .
,elt'erweighit (;r\ )avis lost
li;s firsi tight toi Michael I
M% ( alluill ot Jamailca el er Ihc
tilhe e\enirin when the re'lCeee
tloppcd tihc fl t tilln the third
ii tl it t t)

lii' I tIMe i 's al1i d latIes,
ille ',\ bl l l'.it I ad'Alinedt th l
lrst Iwins t \ ite ida when they
bolli dielated t lhic tiginl
Islands
J he imen led b\ r ookle
Kevin R.,le, spike; lr I ro% I '\
iand scel Joe DCenritte
clint h oi d a hard Itoight l first set
17-15 before l miiping to a 2-0
ild. Lakitre I he second set I 5-I
Sirth i
THie Bah.iians eased oftl the
piesure i n the third set
iIt lir tlie Virginians to take'
!1 t Cset 15-I but iihmoved into
i t.p e. i agm. int the fourth tto
o, '1 l l tie 11t NI
I hei la' d is annihilaited tei
lidles \'i !'It Islanitd len i I tI
li t n sl it !l sets, 15i. I 5- 1. I 5-2
1 r to ..i I lheir first i win of

l ,'d.tI lie girls meet tIop
N-tdI \ ,iINo lthe men l ia\c
lh -' !,'s i t day s before thtte
'si.s\ li :i oil s 1 Sunda\
"Swi!;i: And\ Knowles
Ai! .ipture a medal inn
I.t d\ '" 200 metre final


when he finishocu ifth in a time
of 2 mins 04 04 sees.
Having finished his
competition at the Igallme,
Knowles left the ciamp Ithis
morning to return toi Miatmi
I'nmvrstl Florida wherc he is
scheduled to comil pete in ,
meet in Jackson rilte this
Swee ke n d
Sprinter Waltei Calltendiit
qualified for today 's .200 ) iet e
semi-tinal thenn ihe inishidIl
fourth in this mi rn *iriii'i hitc.i
with a tinle ot 21.8 sees SIoltiO
Lenard. ofl ('uba recorded the
fastest tnile this nirniotte!,
running 21.00 sees. in his heit
I'he soccer team lost .3-0 1'
No. I seeds \lcicO l .itfl nghli
1'hiis lt se cliiiin i.itir i Ilh i ii t it,
the iici'dt.tIs
Mexiit wesint i1 the Ic id
after .i30 ininute ;n11 l( ii1
nIinUte I before hi allt timc' look 2-0 l.id wiith the hI tBahai .i
playing swith ten men O(tsiUis
left Paul WVhitfield had leC tIll
li'1ld ilter hbei ki ked inll It '
Nt oitll,
Howe\e fr.or ltI e the irst it
inirlt s ot f thte tc t 11,11 halt n111
Bth,ih m ds plt a' l theiir tr t .I
Ilo tIball so tar ITn luI
lom pl tl ition hut illl 1cod ''I
hreak ihrotugh the soiin
Mexican defence.
lTimorrow the soCceir s il
play Bermuda.
Sailor Pierre SiegenthItlC!
will tr\ to capturi e til'
Bahamias' first gold iietlil 1r
the rallies when hC cIfeiCtipel ,
his fiftth Suntish Class sili'l".
race today.
Siegrenthaler has alI dil\
secured a silleit iedi0l lair'
wOtl the first iour laces ot )It.
sailing c)ilpetltion.
lturdler ID an Snillh \\i
not ho: taking part In I lih
gaines IC, c.trdilg ito ltiack irI
field tanairgr FIrank Ralntimi;
Smith who was scheduled il,
run in the 110 meiitres hturidles
I tomorrow, is reported dlt
comlmiltted to run in the N(CAA
track and field chanipiionshlips
this weekend. Smith is the
current (Conm onvowealth record
holder for the 50 lmetre indoor
hurdles.


: iS (COUGARS rookie
.i Reggie Fores lihas
li iitstanding debul in


S r th 'r er anipliied by
i. ," nted 'rookie of Ihee
td \sportsmlian of tlhe
SIr the Btlahinmas
SB i a sk e ;i it ll

i t) who p sla\ s an
;, Aito;Il part ill the
" L.. il. W 'de tenet t their
tt.l \Ill a im)a pI0lu er

Ol N tiii stii t Ii the
S if i Lhl B d i KA s ,w rs will
+ H \ % B A ards willI


hb preseriinie ne'let week
di'ring tlhe ciiminpronship
finals at the A\ I \dderley
G \ t.
Kermirt "Patr Rollc captured
the most valuatile player
award and Rudti Levarnt> of
Reef Basketball (lub was
voted best defelnsic e player.
In the Paradise League
Sterling Quant for the second
consecutive season was \,,ted
sportsman of thIe sear.
Jerome Barney of Strachan's
A\uto was unaniiiiirousIh tIhe
iiost valuable tplaver tic also
calpturel the best defensive
award.
In the Nassau League


junior division, Tyrone
Hamilton of the Collegians
got the 'most valuable player'
award while team mate centre
Carl Albury was voted 'best
defensive.'

Ray Rose playmaker guard
for Paradise League champs
John Bull juniors got the
'most valuable player' award
in that category. Nassau
Schlitz' Crestwell Pratt was
awarded the 'best
defensive.' In the ladies
division Cynthea Moxey-Pratt
captured both the 'most
valuable player 'and the
'sportswoman awards.


Charming People are luilllng Delightful Houses at:




CAPE SANTA MARIA CLUB


LONG ISLAND, BAHAMAS



Resident Builder
Finest Lee Beach in the Bahamas
Choice Lots Available on Harbour. Hills, and Beach
ojat Rentals and Tennis Facilities


Private Airstrip
Club has outstanding Food and Accommodations
Friendly Islanders Doors never locked
Maria Site with 200' Dock For Sale


Call or Write Leslie Knowles, Manager, for Brochure,
or Information


Reservations.


Bahamasair Scheduled Air Service (to Stella Maris seven miles
South of Club)


Nassau Architects of Houses Built or Building at The Cape Santa Maria Club:
Donald Cartwright -for J. H. Lee Chambers
Philip Pool for Pierre du Pont 111 -- Andre van der Meersch
Douglas Minns for William C. Horn
Robertson Ward The Cape Santa Maria Club Cottages


The games-


annoullnce the inclusion of two Family
Island baseball teams it the
two-sweek-old 1974 series.
Thle newl\-elected vice president
said that tile signing of players should
be done through the Association
which is more experienced in the field.
Some of tile youngsters lie said sign
for jist their plane til kel to reach
spring training in lIlord.i
"'The Associationt can more or less
ser ;i as an agent for (the players to
protect hist interest li Mackey> said.
"There are sonie I oour guNys who iray
bave the potent ial to irelly justify a
reasonable bo iis.
Teamrns tromi Hinnni .iltd Freeport.
(Grand Bahamlna \ill liet, tcltiired in their
firsi ainies tonioiio o ti. .aturda'y aind
Si.idai at tIhe ticen i t iabeihetl Sports


Centre.
The Bimini Braves take on Schlitz
Beer in the second game of the double
header 9:30 tomorrow night following
the Citibank/Jet Set encounter at
7:00.
On Saturday, the Braves again clash
with Schlitz in the first game to be
followed by Freeport against Del Jane.
Freeport and Del Jane return Sunday
in the first game at I o'clock.
"This exercise the inclusion of
Family Island teams sponsored by
the Baseball Association will assist the
bringing together the various islands
that constitute the new nation," Mr.
Mackey noted.
'I believe it will truly make the
Association a national body rather
than one whose activities are confined


/


/ .


KX3.f


N~'rr5~)~ ,,


-- N i,.. +


The class B start in the inaugural Nassau to Kitgston, Ja!ir ica Race was captured here by Bahamas Tourist News Bureau
photographer Wendell Cleare. All the boats shown are Jamaican. Twenty three starters included nine Jamaican racers and 14
of the competitors from the recent Southern Oceanr Racing Conference series. The 638-mile race in expected to end some time
during the weekend. Sorne of the smaller r boats i 1 'Ot tNt fini u until early next week.



Sterling the unstoppable


By GLADI)STONE THURS10ON

SIN1 100(1A -NINI ,eiL'rt
Sterling Quant is polcltntuil1 a
teali by himsell Hcsales being
lead c' ta h lie is it intll et1il] 0l '
defenci nearly i unstoppable onii
otilncI motrust \italuablec pls ci
rand sportsman t ltlie ca er

gadime aid ill lia e tio plt
It'verytbodi his to be movinle.
lias to blie li k t nIt'. i d1
everyt ody lis Ito I knowing
lhat the olti i g i\ is doim
We said t "11's ,1 I sp liis one t' ilt idul l

I' 0 r.ei u n d i -I pi ,i t
per torml iiie r' Is si p iu c'N'
backed hi d lending Ji,itmp
Kentiiu k ( oltonels |l (, h
cs bbeed PI .nalilse I e iuec
pnnant winners Stliacian s
rAuto 1 \ l 4 takI Nt t 2-i0
V a nittor\ itn the hcs' i l l tihi e
semtlll I 1 i i "s1
"i Tol ght we olii ed i ilwt Iill
well and I \as gltad that w'r lad
th IIarllgin we i had so ilthit i
get l lhe" l'est I t le s s on ll'
bench in .' .i id
uant. iela\ 'd nw \ thi l !!ie
tIrst lIe o l lI),11t e ; p l ;\ i I

\\e ita it i el'\ w i ll II c '
needing htaitll i w 'n 't ii i ',t t
the ( ougl is '" 1l1 l!tinn ^ lie. ks
h a s th e I P ll' \ '.. k i l t' r ''.
W ith s]\ l i, .it, ,i ('h l i J'
Robbi x ,idl kc>lhsi tlih
t e am i tll g l l )p \ ill h (11 Q li l t i '.
centre lo rw ,id wM ilk. .' Ill11
M a r t in ,l nd ['l hi] I \ ot0lkkd
ih t' lisl 1) 1 t. i hnI (k 11w' (
opened 1 I2 p12 1- .1p1 j!h!:l
the tirsl st\en nin uti ol tlih
ga ellc
la~iig Iaken oin lthe
coachllng duties silite leait l
m ate 111ll d lr 1 i tor
spring trains ig. I (.) i poi rIted


lia S i ll i ,,r. ',


< ia ldnll :',." t :: .
lie i il i .
I i te l h t 'i i Ni ', it ,

II t lu I i mi
it llg \ 1ot: l I,* v it*l ..; ,



l t 11 i l]i .' i i
It o ui till. I' ' i. I P i it' i 'l i t i




i ell c d I l lt i


eii ii iii
I i 'l I Q i < l C 1 1 H I '
lie tlr rrr'l .' i
sto t a i ; '' i .


l i ld W I .l M, ;'I !! i l' .11 1 il\
fle I l l\\1 h \. . i l i iri
line Q ua ts il : .'i '! i Ii 'its




A ss I .tIti .i i S
tl th I lit ]'' Ij t





1 I11rt it' I ll 'ir It
t \s St I .tIti .i, t Is '- it li
Sit fItai ",1 1 ,, 0' t I.. l it' i
night I IIv I i l t i 'd

I hei'\ t d I t !i i l" I '.i l to o





ii e 'lj ', d Is Ii ' 5 'l n 'd .


hlltled ig ion i cd '. ill r ietI
7i ittg lit l iii \!i ll :i i llt t i it
a nd J 1r1 d t lI).\t;, tiii(i I,
close th gap oI s"



Ilit ing 1ti 1 gait tI unld
ceontrlll hi the i' ieiNdin' Jumps t
displayed pomwe ionI thl e
bench hbecore thIe gaI e witlhI


Feel fit


with



DOANS


Give yourself happy rchef from
backache, rheumatic pains. stiff
aching muscles or the c ommron
urinar> disorders due to
sluggish kidney
action. rake Doans
K & B pills to keep
you feeling tit and
active. i


KIDNEY AND
DOANBS PILLS
at chemists and stores.
Distributed by:
Thompson Drug Co Ltd, Box 6027, Centreville, Nassau.


I (, Ii 1t t liIeI to an end when
I,'C ipC' I i cIarted leaning.
I a,.k ii e'S perincC at lithe
a'nai.iid posaii on i. whial ltally
lin S!: aihan' uto, headed
1, oa 1i n. c\ e\plalned. "Our-
,'its ,ii 'ooid hio s ardt they're
i;l N, tltIrno re vers ar yi' ti
Nmostis '5i'eNtall at ithe guard

t it i :ri tied Iiard and I'm
t1l0.d tis lhcir I i e', a ugl t ll
th.' w ,i ,ow n to lhe wfie
Ih ,',w1di 1 i i ll t l lli t t ilt
it)nd 1 : \ ke'pt t1 ailh i g."

1 \\' lit lloi Major
t.' 'hil t l I 't i roin thie
tichli .in l ai lotIur I 'II th ro\w
,atl'I omp to iop 'iour other
pla, eis i i' doM luile ti!ures as
I ,'ders Baskctbiall (lub revived


Now


from a 24-4 deficit ard
stopped Becks Cougars 77-72
last night.
Both teams in tlie Nassaul
League senu final playoffs arc
now tied at one gamre i'each
with the decider being played
'rinda night at 8 o'clock.
Scoring 21 of their 55 field
goal attempts in the first half.
thie ('Cogars Ield on to a 43.42
edge.
Bradtley Knowles in the
second half came through with
10 of his 14 together with
Pinder's nine for 17 froni the
line to take the lead for the
final time t>6-hO with l:46 left.
Peter Brown topped the
Cougars with 23 points. IFred
"Slab" laing added 21 points
and 12 rebounds.


to just New Providence alone as has
been the case in the past."
However, the most prohibited
factor in this new venture was the cost
of transportation, but by working with
the various airlines, the Association
came up with "a good package deal
with Bahamasair."
They would reserve a certain
number of seats for the Freeport
players and fans wishing to come to
Nassau. The baseballers will travel at a
cost of $42 per person.
The Bimini team will travel to
Nassau by way of Bahamasair's San
Andros flight at a cost of $32 per
player.
It was pointed out thay by next
year's series other Family Island teams
might be entering.


George

rolls

top


score
TH1F bowlers of the Men's
Scr\ice Club league watched
George Bethel roll the first 700
plus A.B.('. Sanctioned set ever
bowled in the Bahamas.
There have been other 700
plus sets howled in Nassau and
one other bowled in lFreeport
by I van Bethel, but.
unfortunatelI the\ were not
sanctioned bh AB.('.
George opened his scoring
with a 232 game.
tie startcdi thie 2nd. game
with ttwo spares and then
struck all the way ouit ( 10
strikes) for a fantastic gaiine
and this gave him the high set
of 724. The other league scores
are as follows.
The Lions B Teatm melt tie
Kiwanis A teani and both
teams bowled extremely well
but (George Bethel's great *et
proved to be the winning eiht.e
as the Lions won 4-0 For the
Lions George Bethel led with a
279-724 set, ftllowe\d hv Bill
Debusk with a 200-521 set.
Bob Manning led, thie scoring
for Kiwanis with a 194-554 set.
The Raid's Raiders bcit
Rotary B 4-0. For the Raidicns
Vcrnon Wells blasted the pins
with a 245-622 set. Ivan Bethel
had a two game set of 410. F-or
Rotary B Perry Knowles hlid
the high set of 177-412.
The Lions A teamin clashed
with Tanqtuetra and tilh
results ended up a 2-2 tic. I 'i
the Lions Will Wilson paled the
twa\ with a 212-545 set the
Buck d'Arville followed with a.
191-542 set
UK 395 ALL OUT
S\i .1 \\1) were all owt t lot
395 Thursda r in their thirst
innings of the Third Cricket
I est against the \iWesc Indie. it
B arbiados.
(Ireig equalled his highest
test score of 148. hit against
India. lie struck, t\\o sixes and
fours before being ciiaght
inidwicke't by Sobers lt'i
Julien.


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Forbes makes great debut


El


12 lr;r Tri ibuur


__ __


a --


By (;L.\A)STONE THURSTON
TIlE BAHAMAS Baseball
Association is considering protecting
its players tron what they terni
'exploitation by American professional
organizationss"
"\'e are really investing a lot ot
nloney into baseball and I don't tlink
it is fair for the local Associi:tion to be
exploited by tile professional
,American teams whereby we deelope
their players, and they in turn just pick
the players up without putting
anything back into the source that
made it possible." Mr George lackey.,
vice president of the B H
announced.
Mr. Mackey was speaking \esterdas
during a press conference called to


,
*Hi-..
*)


S-....AIN
-. *' *** a,