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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03560
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: March 6, 1974
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03560

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irtbuttn


stored with Postmaster of Bahamas for pota conceouo within th t.) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


VOL. LXX1, No.87 WJeesday, Mich 6, 1974 Price: 20 Cents
I "t!
|h . :


THE FIRST vice-chairman <
South Beach branch of the Progr
Liberal Party has accused
government of violence, autocracy
injustice, and said that
disillusionment with the party
his support of Independent can
Ruby Ann Darling in the St. Bai
by-election in January.
Photographer I'ranklyn, I'ergiu
who ran Mrs. Darling's cam
issued a statement today highly c
of the government's policies, or I;
the i.
He alleged that the administ
was inflicting social, economic, ji
and political hardship on the p



WHERE IS

HUBERT

PINDER?

RIDDLE

By SIDNEY DORSETT
I 1-l l \ I. accountant
l:lheI: Leopold Pinder, 39.
whose t~c turn to I ngland is
he ing sought hy the British
(its\ ornli t on several counts
uo swintdllig and a charge of
oigamil continuesli to elude
thha i.!liill police authorities
I li e Si r, r ,,.ad certit ..,.
.i ,iio tit!i!! lrst appeared


i) ,ed n!:! :i w white
', 1, i kc ,i!' eight green
rciii 'i,, ,iid . ,, i, w ith the
l i i~ c .1 i he wlie s was
i i,.r i C! ", his second

; \\ rri. ito tihe
*. \h.;, MI hldnt Mary
S, i ,1 nl -ig d I englishh
istoI i C'!nl ,I r.'ed inIu ,' that
c 1 i charge of bgliing y to
S id 111 lii l of
,l forwairdd h\ the British

Relt.i'ned as p t.rsectutor in
ihl h ,in e i s .at orne Keith 1..
D itho' n bc. appearing ion
hehi lt o ()fli t; K
IPdice contacted today were
tiinilN to ,lstre lhic course their
ivlisi tig tion s have taken in
tIr iii lio loc iate tile mian.
N i; do pIolic know the
wherlie. lb tilt olf the' wo l.an
wllo) hald beeii aptpi'a ing in
court with tliin. Miss (olden,
one of lhc coiliplailinals in the
chliie.'s a11aiin t hiin is also thel
i< tlihei otf his l wo ) car old son,
Jonatllon
\ tclcphionie ill to Pinder 's
Sear', Road home went
unanswered alter ringing for
several m niuties .
ilkideir was released on a
s I 5,00(0 cash hond on January
.4 afle his attorney, Hlenry
ttostlwiLk. who was being
assiscd h\ attorney\ ('ecil
SWailliace W\Vhitfield, filed
,ipl l i, lioii fior hail with the
SiupiueliC' C urtl.
A\sI condition for his
release, lie was also to report to
the Centrail Police Station once
daily .and was ordered to
siirrenidei his British passport.
But l te whereabouts now o
ll uhell t inder remain a
i sllt er

DEATH OF MR
LEON PATTON
MIR I 1ON SIDNEY Patton,
57, of New York C'ity, died in
New York last ilednllesd.
Mr Palton, who was born in
Nassau, is survived by two
daughters, Patricia and Leona;
one son Sidney; one brother
Carl; tiwo sisters Nurse Doris
Alle ne and Mrs. C('orinne
Thompson, a lecturer at the
Bahaminas I teachers College.
Funeral services will be held
4 30 pu.n. Iridax at Wesley
Methodist church Baillou till
Road. Ilte Rev. Denis Magnus
will officiate and interment
will be in the Western
Cemetery.

TEA TIME


THilE .ADI)S of St.
Anselnis Church will sponsor a
lenten tea, scheduled to be
held on Sunday in the parish
hall, commencing at 2 p.m.

AT

SEE
LOVELY &
EXCITING
GIFTWARE

amd YOU SAVE!


"The masses cannot hear much
more. At prese the Bah*' *%s is faced
with a recessiG6 ',pd mo- ..g into a
depression. I alt .. know what the
government's policies are. How are
they going to solve the unemployment
crisis in these islands?' Mr. FiVgnson
asked.
He said the government was
incapable of solving the country y's
problems because the majority o*
those in government did not have :he"
people's interests at heart.

National Insurance was being
brought in at the wrong time because
at this stage it could not benefit the


People, he charged.
"'Np one i-as any clear knowledge
wl: '*,or AIe is paying more ar.,
"more ..xes F')er4: ya because there is
so t:', to 'fe shovw'-for it.
jI he Out IslanAd' arAlbenefitting
frL. ;,. their fathers' labour. There are
no major developments being put
forth by government."
The first step in restoring the health
of the economy was to cut back taxes,
Mr. Ferguson contended. This, he said,
would encourage businessmen to
employ more people, both local and
foreign, to help beat the
unemployment crisis.
In addition government should seek


Bahamas


'as good




By NICK KELLY
THl IBAIHAMIAN labour force is
equal to that in other parts of the world
and will respond "magnificently" given
leadership, incentive and example.
This is the assessment of Dr. Neilr Worker,
resident manager of the $10 million, five-year
agricultural research project being financed in
North Andros by the U.S. Agency ftor
International Development (AID).
A New Zealander, Dr. Worker has had field
experience in Sierre Leone, Canada, the United
States, Argentina and Uruguay.
As guest speaker of the Nassau Rotary Club
yesterday, Di-. Worker outlined the aims of the
techni-'al assistan,Ce p,.giirniie, whiat has been
accomplished thus far and expectations over
the next five years.
"When I came to the Bahamas I was led to
believe by prominent local people that one of
the problems that would be encountered
wold be labour. I was told that local labour
would not work ... that they were indolent." _


Dr. Worker said.
The information didn't
phase him because he had been
told the same thing in Sierre
Lcone and other parts of the
world.
"It has been my obser-
vation." he told Rotarians,
"that the labour resources
available on Andros (there are
34 local workers) are one of
the most valuable this country
has for agricultural
development, if they are set an
example and provided with
leadership and incentive."
lie ranked Bahamian labour
equal with that of other
countries in which he had
worked, and emphasized that
he did not subscribe to the
belief that workmen could not
be provided from the local
labour force.
Although the All) project
came into being in January
1973, the first equipment did
not arrive until mid-year. In
the past six months some 500
acres of land had been
developed of which 400 acres
were ready for sowing for
mixed pasture for livestock.
The research programme had
already been initiated and
evaluation was being made of a
number of grasses, legumes,
forage and vegetables for their
suitability to the local
environment.
l)r. Worker expressed
confidence about the outcome
of the Andros project. He
pointed out that a number of
valuable species of grass and
legumes were already known to
grow on the island.
The purpose of the research


DR. WORK-
ER ... meat
and milk for
world market


being carried out would be to
determine which of the
hundreds of strains of guinea
grass for example, would be
best suited to Andros.
"We know sorgham and corn
will grow there. What is mainly
lacking is organization of the
system to exploit the natural
advantages commercially," Dr.
Worker said.
After six months the five
technical specialists presently
attached to the project had
accumulated considerable
experience in the local
environment.
On the basis of their
findings. Dr. Worker said he
did not see anything in the
local situation "to preclude
establishment of a viable
agricultural and livestock
production system.
"A development programme
of this type is very much
overdue because there is no
real justification for this
country to be importing 85 per
cent of its food at a cost of
some $60 million," he
declared.
lie had no doubt that if
agriculture in the Bahamas was
properly developed it could
supply the needs of the
country and provide meat,
milk and agricultural products
to the world market as a
whole.
In addition to the island's


GANJA is an all-purpose
folk medicinal plant in Jamaica
and the most commonly used,
Dr. Vera Rubin, director of the
Research Institute for the
Study of Man in New York
told the international drug
abuse conference here this
week.
"It is the working class
remedy, par excellence,
substituting for patent
medicines ... and is estimated
that 65 to 75 percent of rural
Jamaicans men, women and
children consume ganja in
some form."


loans from local banks and trusts on
long term and with low interest rates
in an effort to further expand
employment.
"There are some 7,000 children
coming out of school this year and
only God knows where they are going
to be placed," Mr. Ferguson declared.
Sometimes he wondered if anyone
in the government had any creative
ability. "There is a need, and a great
one, ty find a new avenue of
employment for our youths," he
stated.
There were only two ways to get
,money he added either
:straightforwardly or by stealing.


labour


IS


project in north Andros and
the Bahamas with beef
livestock as the central feature.
Since then the concept had
been broadened to include
dairy and lamb production.
There were five components
to the development, Dr.
Worker explained. First was
establishment on a 2,000 acre
area of a series of production
demonstration units in beef,
dairy, sheep, goats and swine.
Secondly was research
towards solving the problems
:'i- h might arise as a result of
the production demonstration.
This research was very
practically oriented he said.
Third was the training in
agricultural and livestock
production for Bahamians at
all levels.
Fourth would be the
settlement of a number of
private farmers on 1500 acres.
The other 500 acres were being
allowed for research. In the
ensuing question period I)r.
Worker said he expected the
first farmers would be settled
in the third year of the project

I he fifth component was
develop i ent of the
infrastructure necessary to
serving the industry. This
would include processing
plants, a modern abattoir and
dairy processing facilities
A sideline to this would be
establishment of small
businesses arising from the
project, e.g. manufacture of
fence posts and concrete.


manpower resources, Dr.
Worker also mentioned the
natural advantage large areas
of very good land underlaid
with a huge reservoir of almost
unlimited fresh water; a very
favourable climate with mild
temperatures and 50 to 60
inches of reasonably
well-distributed rainfall.
Explaining some of the
background to the project Dr.
Worker said the basic objective
was to investigate the
possibility of establishing a
viable agricultural development


Dr. Rubin said that regular
ganja smoking in Jamaica
began anywhere from '-25
years of age, the average age
being 15.
She said that the primary
use of ganja, aside from
medicinal purpose was work
correlated. "Taken
immediately after rising and
during the periodic work
breaks, smoking ganta is
perceived to be energizing.
Nonsmokers as well as smokers
say 'it makes them work like di
holy hell. "


Ferguson accuses PLP ofinjustice'


I his finding, she added, was
in sharp contrast to reports
from the U.S. of the
'anmotivational syndrome' of
the alleged marijuanaa inspired
drea my drop-outs from
society." It was found in a
properly conducted research
study that the major effect of
ganja was that ganja smokers
were all highly motivated to
work.
And she stressed that
nowhere among these
working-class users was there
any evidence of escalation of
other drugs.


TEACHERS RAP



GENERATOR



MAINTENANCE


-University


director

suggests

cannabis


licence
THE DIRECTOR of Legal
Education at the University
of the West Indies suggested
that one of the best ways of
controlling the use of
cannabis (ganja) might be by
licensing it like alcohol.
In a prepared paper before
the international drug abuse
conference at the Sonesta
Beach Hotel, Mr. Aubrey
Fraser, speaking on the
subject "The Law and
Cannabis in the West Indies"
said that "statistics have
demonstrated the futility of
total criminalization of
activity in the use of
cannabis."
The enforcement of
out-moded legislation has not
halted the illegal activity in
cannabis, he said Monday,
and it would not be easy to
persuade the rural dweller in
Jamaica by enforcing punitive
legislation that the habit of
consuming ganja tea was a
crime.
"Nor has total cirminalizi-
ation diminished the external
trade between Jamaica and
North America," he added.
What legislative controls
should therefore be imposed?
he asked.
He suggested two
alternatives:
e First: by abolishing
possession of cannabis as a
crime, except in such
quantities as might justifiably
call for an explanation on
charge of trafficking. (But he
said this was not likely to
help the endemic situation in
Jamaica and thought the
second alternative might offer
a better and more useful
approach).
Secondly: Control by
licence in a manner similar to
alcohol.
And he added, "in the
event licensing is adopted it
may be wise for the state to
establish a monopoly similar
to the monopoly of the
Canadian government with
respect to alcohol.
"By licensing the
product." he went on,"
attention would necessarily
have to be given to quality
and purity and, not without
importance, to the potency
of the drug, in much the same
way as advertisement and
public health authorities have
aided in the setting of
standards in the tobacco
industry."
In this event, he said, sales
by unlicensed persons would
be made a serious criminal
offence.


30 groups to take part in March youth convention


THE NATIONAL Youth
Congress, representative of the
majority of civic improvement
organizations throughout the
Bahamas will stage its first
annual general convention
between March 28 and 31 at
the Garfunkel Auditorium,
Madiera Street, Palmdale.
Approximately 30 youth
groups are expected to
.participate in the function, the
first of its kind to be held
during the history of youth
organizations in the Bahamas.
The convention is being held
primarily to elect new officers
to serve during the 1974-5
term and will begin each
evening at 6:30 p.m.


The Convention marks the
amalgamation of youth
organizations throughout the
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas and has as its theme:
"Unity Breeds Strength,"
taken from the motto of the
National Youth Congress(N.Y.
C.).
President of the NYC,
Carlton A. Martin, will deliver
the opening address at the
convention.
"The four-day session will
consist of discussions on issues
common to young people
throughout the country. Youth
development policies will also
be a forward subject along with
gambling in the Bahamas," said


a spokesman.
The latter is an issue which
the N. Y. C. has been viewing
ever since Government
announced its decision on the
casinos. The N. Y. C.. which is
a non-partisan, politically
unbiased organisation, will
however ask delegates
attending the convention to
vote on the issue. This will
determine the stand of youth
groups on the matter.
Although the views
expressed by the religious andi
political organizations should
not be taken lightly, the N. Y.
C. feels it most significant that
the views of the youth of the


Bahamas should also be given
concerning gambling.
Guest speakers addressing
the convention will be the
Hon. Arlington Butler, Speaker
of Parliament, on its opening
day and, his Lordship the
Honourable Leonard J.
Knowles, Chief Justice of the
Bahamas.
The Chief Justice will deliver
the key-note address at the
convention during its second
session on Friday, March 29.
Speaking to the delegates on
that same day will be Miss
Gladys Brown.
Miss Brown is a teacher in
the Hiitory Department of the
R. M. Bailey High School,


editor of the Third World
Group magazine and was also a
member of the steering
committee of the National
Youth Congress.
Also expected to attend are
several other dignitaries and
persons associated with youth
development in the Bahamas.
The meetings are open to
members of the public.
4 DAY FUNCTION
A special programme has
been drafted for the four-day
convention; the function will
climax with k display of youth
talent on Saturday evening,
March 30, which will also
feature a special raffle-drawing.
Proceeds of this raffle will be


given the Persis Rodgers Home
for the Aged.
A number of young
performers will be featured
during the entertainment
session including, Mr. Philiq
Symonette, soloist; the Joe
Karatis Dancers, a young
troupe already locally
acclaimed during its
appearance on the stage; Miss
Bonny Wilson, soloist, and
several other persons.
Prizes for the raffle-drawing
have been donated by local
Nassau businesses, Inter-
national Air Bahama and
Mademoiselle.
The convention will end
age 9, Col.


BTUI that the "simple yet
durable" Lister engine was
being condemned, and a more
expensive and as yet untried
Better engine wa, being
substituted.
"Many teachers feel thait the
condemned engines could have
been repaired and that the
supply ot a new engine is a
waste of much-needed
government funds," the union
charged
NIC.(1 SSITY
The BTU pointed out that
the presence of a generator at a
Family Island school makes it
possible for the teacher to h:t''
hot and cold water ir
home: to have lights i
enough to work by at nighl.
and also enables him to h.,vc
night classes at his school.
In addition electric.
educational materials can h,
used in the schools' education
programme.
Since therefore generators
were vital to the function of
the school, every effort should
be made to keep them
serviceable.
lo correct the present
condition the ITeachers, Union
has recommended that
maintenance of generators and
Family Island schools be taken
over by the Mtinistr' ol
Education, and .that where
possible workers should bt
found on the island to do the
work
Secondly, all FAInili
Island headteachers should ',
given a special course in the
maintenance of gener;ti "- c.t ,
that the\ y can do most o t
simple things necessary to keep
the generator working.
third, that the Ministry of
Works maintenance unit he
investigated to see whether
government funds have becc
mismanaged.


THE LACK OF MAIN-
TENANCE for generators
supplied Family Island teachers
may well be due to the
"serious mismanagement" of
funds allocated for that
purpose, the Bahamas Union of
Teachers alleged today.
Following numerous
complaints over the past few
months about the "total lack"
of a maintenance programme
for the generators, the union
conducted its own question-
naire survey of teaching staff.
teaching staff.
The generators are necessary
in those districts where there is
no commercial electric power.
The union survey revealed
that once generators are
installed, no preventive
maintenance is carried out by
the Ministry of Works to
ensure that the generators last
as long as possible.
Secondly, it takes anywhere
up to six months, and in many
cases longer, for a Ministry of
Works unit to investigate a
complaint Some generators
have been out of service since
1972. the union alleged.
Third, and thisis the charge
viewed most seriously by the
BTU, there is a suggestion that
funds allocated for generators
maintenance have been
seriously mismanaged.
EXCUSE GIVEN
The union claims that the
excuse given by Ministry of
Works officials is that they are
short of funds to carry out a
proper maintenance pro-
gramme.
Said today's BTI1 statement .
"It is the BTU's contention
that if the money allocated was
spent wisely more work could
be done."
In support of this it cited
case histories to show the
financial waste resulting froii
the lack of forethought.
Generator 'A' quit working
in October 1972. A report was
made to the Ministry of Works
in Nassau and a plane was
chartered to bring an engineer
to look at the generator.
THREE VISITS
A photograph was taken of
the generator and the engineer
returned to Nassau. This same
engineer has subsequently
returned to the generator
twice, photographed it twice
and to date the generator has
still not been repaired.
Generator 'B' stopped
working in February 1973 and
it was condemned by the
engineer when he visited the
generator.
A new, more expensive
generator was supplied in
November, but no hand crank,
or battery was supplied with
which to start the generator.
"Apparently the engineer
intended to charter a plane to
fly the crank handle to the
island and start the generator,"
the union commented.
LIMITED WORK
The BTU said there were
also reports of an engineer
flying to an island where more
than one generator was out of
service, servicing only one and
then insisting he return to
Nassau instead of servicing the
second generator about 20
miles away.
He must therefore charter
another plane to return to
service the second generator,
the union said.
Reports had also reached the


II


A REMINDER TO
CUSTOMERS
PLEASE COLLECT YOUR REPAIRED
ITEMS IMMEDIATELY!!


-DOUDLEY'S COROSETT^.ST
MT. ROYAL AVE.
IIIln II.M~T~


Speech

finals
FINAIAISTS in the National
southh Congress' first annual
speech contest will compete
for the coveted Prime Ministec
and Govenor general's s trophy,
awards this evening at 7 30
at the Stephen Dillctt
Primary School, Wulff Road.
Twelve persons are expected
to participate in the event
which is being conducted ho
the N. ('C. in conjuncti, n
with the Ministry of education
and Culture, Quality ("Big Q")
Supermarket and (;old and
Silversmith Ltd.
1 he speech contcsl.
undertaken by the Y C. with
the help of the Ministry of
l-ducation and Culture and the
private businesses, is being held
with the purpose ol
promotingig a keener lense i)f
awareness among Bahamlanns."
a spokesman for the giouip
said.
It is also hoped that the
contests, expected to be held
annually, will provide a forum
for youth views on national
issues and help produce better
public speakers.
The eliminations for the
contest began in January, this
year and contestants are
entrants from various local
groups and other organizations
throughout New Providence.

SPECIAL SUNG MASS
I HE GEORGETOWN
University Glee Club will sing a
special Mass at St. Francis
Xavier's Cathedral on Sunday
at 7:00 p.m.
This renowned choir has
sung at the inaugural of
President John F. Kennedy and
on other state occasions.
The Glee Club will present a
concert on Monday at 8:30
p.m. at the Sheraton British
Colonial Hotel.


II-'--" I


GANJA... the all-purpose


folk medicinal plant


L:


0


~hP











Wednesday, March 6, 1974


itbPiribuiwt


A i RICAN model
Marjorie Wa.alace, 19, arrived
back in Britain today from
America and stamped firmly
on reports that she plans to
abdicate as Miss World.

PRESIDENT Nixon today
announced his promised veto
of energy emergency
legislation, saying it would
result in reduced energy
supplies, longer lines at the
gasoline pumps and "worst of
all serious damage to jobs in
America

STEWARDS and
stewardesses of long-range
flights of British Airways
stopped work for three hours
in protest at the
compensation they receive if
injured in a hijacking.

A COMMISSION of
experts investigating the Paris
air crash, history's worst air
disaster has held its first
normal meeting to start a
painstaking process that
could take more than a year.

A HIGH British official is
due in the Netherlands
Sunday to discuss possible
Tradition of the two young
\rabs who hijacked a British
i rw; y s VC- 0 to
Amsterdam.

*-----1 --


Min 1% Max
45 59 cloudy
32 43 sunn
Lunn%
30 36 overt st
34 43 .'l,,ud%
23 28 clear
32 4 I suinn
57 64 clear
4S S"5 ,iiid\

'S 75 cloud%
7' 9 le.ar


Athens
1 oniinii
ari


Nord 'lrk
' 0 v es


J OU AN t SBUR (
'tludri-ds ,!t pc pipe s.tlpporting
tle Lesoth' Opposition
Congress Party have been shot
out of hand s'!Tce allegations
that party supporters attacked
police posts in the mountain
.L.! ... early in January. the
Johannesburg Star reported.
\ Star rn'portetr. (;rahtam
Lib c tt s.aid lie had
.t.iliihld deaths in one area
1at 4 in: iine week
lI W tr Lea u t;i ha.n Prine
Nih-c- I cihbU 1 01,thi0an sai


TRUDEAU'S-

LIBERALS

JUST

HANG ON
OTTAWA Prime Minister
Pierre Trudeau's minority
Liberal government has fought
off a second no-confidence
motion in five days despite
criticism of its economic
policies by all opposition
parties
The Liberals who hold 109
of the 264 seats in the House
of Commons. were again
rescued by members of the
New Democratic Party last
night. The vote against the
Conservative motion was
129-109.
Last Friday, two days after
the new session of parliament
opened, the Liberals and New
Democrats voted together to
defeat a social credit motion of
no confidence 125-83.
The motion condemned the
government for not taking
''effective and immediate
measures to stop the increase
in the cost of living, which
seriously affects persons on
low and medium incomes."
The Conservative motion
last night said the House had
no confidence in the
government but made no
specific charge against 't
New Democratic support has
kept Trudeau's government in
office since the Liberals lost
their majority in Commons in
the 1972 election.
But (Grace Macinnes, the
New Democrats' consumer
i!I r expert, has warned that
the government will lose the
part support if it does not
act against rising prices.
particularly those for food.
(\P)

Hurok dies

NEW YORK Impresario
Sol Hurok. who brought
Russia'. greatest performers to
the most prestigious -\meritan
concert halls, has died oi a
heart attack. He was 85


January 8 live persons were
killed when supporters of the
opposition Basutoland
Congress Party attacked police
stations in the northeast of the
country
The government said the
attacks were part of a "massive
plot" to unseat Jonathan and
his Cabinet but the statements
did not say it was an outright
attempted ,oup.
Basutoland was Lesotho's
name bet ore it gained
independence from Britain in
I Qsu


! I


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S


the miners'


Who's who in

the Cabinet


MINISTERS in Britain's new
Labour government.
Prime Minister: Harld
Wilson5. 57,
Chancellor of the
Exchequer: Dcns alciki 56
Foreign Secretary: Jiam's
C c
Home Secretary: Rev
Jenkins, 5.,
Employment Secretary:
Michaclt/ foot,60.
Industry Secretary:
A nthoni .'', . /B 'n,in. J- .,
Social Services Secretary:
Mrs. HBarbara C'as'c/ h2,
Environment Secretary:
Anthoi Crosian,, 55
Energy Secretary: /--(
Varlhy, 41:
Prices, Consumer Protection
and Fair Trading:
I Trs Shirlc i ',,. 43-
Scottish Secretary: Wilhamo
Ross. 62,
Lord President of the
Council IEdwuiar Sh ,r. !, 6,
Trade Secretary: Pctcr
Shore. 40*
Chancellor of the Duchy of
Lancaster: Ilar(id It .cr, eir.
Lord Chancellor: Sir f/utvi
Jo,,s, QC, 64
Agricultural Minister: frrcd
Part, 59
Defence Secretary: RoY
,iason, 49
Education and Science
Secretary: ReminaiJ I'rentice.
f) 0


Secretary of State for Wales:
.1,hn mlorris, 4.?
Secretary of State for
Northern Ireland: Mlhrlin Rc'cs,
-' 1


LONDON Talks opened today to
end Britain's crippling coal strike, and
miners' chief Joe Gormley said he
hoped an agreement could be reached
by tonight.
Prime Minister Harold Wilson's new Labour
government cleared the x\ for quick action
b telling the Miners' Union and the National
Coal Board they could ignore the anti-inflation
ceiling on pay raises imposed by Wilson's
Conservative predecessor. Edward Heath.
Once the miners go back to work, Wilson is
expected to end the three-day work week
Ileath ordered before Christmas to conserve
the nation's electricity. Ninety per cent of it
copies from coal-fueled plants.
Wilson yesterday chose a new cabinet with a
left-wing look and immediately ordered swift
action to tackle Britain's economic crisis.
As well as aiming to settle the miners' strike
in his programme were arrangements to set up
billions of dollars worth of foreign credit to
keep Britain solvent and steps toward
renegotiating terms of Britain's membership in
the Furopean Common Market.
Brokers, bankers and bsuinessmen appeared
relieved that a phase of uncertainty and
instability now seemed to be ending. Shares on
the London Stock Market surged forward at
the prospect of an end to the three-day
workweek and reopening of the coal mines.
Wilson's 15 Cabinet ministers, with two
women among them, seemed on the surface to
be a careful balance of the Labour party's left,
centre and rightist factions.
But with crucial posts going to
radical-minded socialists, the over-all bias
appeared distinctly leftist.
Among those considered more radical were
Michael Foot, Anthony Wedgewood Benn,
Barbara Castle, Peter Shore and to a lesser
extent Denis Ilealey.

The middle-of-the-road Liberal Party,


WASH
President
informed t
Committee
all the mat
turned ove
grand
limitation.-


'Kidnap'

food

hijack
HILLSBOROUGH The
waiting continues for the
family of kidnapped Patricia
Hearst after completion of a
third free food giveaway for
30,000 persons was marred
by a hijacking.
News media reported that
a truck carrying food for
4,000 people was only a few
minutes away from its
Hunters Point distribution
site in San Francisco
yesterday when it was
stopped by gunmen. They
threatened the driver and left
with the rig.
The truck was found later,
emptied of between $34,000
and $60,000 worth of meat,
poultry and produce,
according to reports.
Police said no complaint of
the hoist had been made and
that orders from "high up'
appeared to be out not to
press the matter. Officials
heading the food distribution
would not confirm the theft.
As the massive food
handout proceeded quietly at
12 centres, Gov. Ronald
Reagan asked for prayers for
the safe and quick return of
thle 20-year-old daughter of
newspaper executive
Randolph A. Hearst.



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mmmi


r to the Watergate
jury "without


crisis


which holds the balance or power between the
much larger Labour and Conservative parties,
said in a statement that "claims that this
would be a government of national unity are
wholly bogus."
Wilson will need the Liberals to get major
legislation passed in the House of Commons,
where he holds only 301 of the 635 seats.
That is more than any other party, but not
enough for an outright majority.
But his minority government would not
necessarily fall on every defeat, unless the issue
were made a question of confidence.
Wilson handed the major ministerial
assignments to:
Foot, 61, Employment Minister, was
under orders to settle the coal miners' strike
quickly. He conferred with union and National
Coal Board leaders. They arranged to resume
negotiating with a promise that the
government will not block any deal giving the
strikers more money than they had been
offered previously.
Harold Lever, 60, got the trouble shooting
post of Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
with an office in Wilson's 10 Downing St.
Headquarters. His job will be to seek
mammoth credits from the United States,
government banks, the Euro-currency markets
and even, possibly, from Arab oil producers
with surplus funds
Roy Mason, 49. became Defence
Secretary with the task of cutting back
Britain's military spending. The Labour
campaign platform called for bringing military
spending down to the same proportion of the
budget as in North Atlantic Treaty
Organization states.
Merlyn Rees, 49, was named Secretary for
Northern Ireland with orders to broadly
continue Heath's policy of conciliation. All
three major parties support the attempt to
promote power-sharing between the Protestant
majority and the Roman Catholic minority.
Frederick Peart, 59. was named Minister
of Agriculture, a post he held from 1964 to
1968.


t which
idicated
findings
role in


St. Clair said that the
report is 1in to 2 pages long;
that is in addition to the
briefcase containing grand
jury evidence which was given
the judge along with the
sealed presentment.

Referring to news accounts
about the sealed report, St.
Clair said: "We consider there
has been a serious breach of
grand jury secrecy."


Wilson digs in to


Israel's

Labour

leaders


unite


JERUSALEM The
quarrelling leaders of Israel's
Labour Party agreed to form
a minority Cabinet today,
and the Israeli state radio
attributed the reconciliation
to rising tension on the
Syrian front.
The broadcast did not
elaborate, but Israeli
newspapers published reports
from abroad that the Syrians
were concentrating forces
along a 40-mile front on the
Golan Height--.
There were indications that
Premier Golda Meir might
even be able to form a
majority government.
Mrs. Meir made plans to
submit her new minority
Cabinet to President Ephraim
Katzir after winning Defence
Minister Moshe Dayan's
agreement to remain in the
government.
And the National Religious


HOW VESCO


'MET' MITCHELL


NEW YORK Former New
Jersey Republican bigwig
Harry L. Sears testified
yesterday that he introduced
the then-Atty. Gen. John N.
Mitchell to financier Robert L.
Vesco at a time the latter was
on the hunt for a man of
influence.
The occasion was a
testimonial dinner in his
honour in March 1971, Sears
told a federal court jury of
eight men and four women at
the criminal conspiracy trial of
Mitchell and former Commerce
Secretary Maurice H. Stans.
"Mr. Vesco came through
the receiving line and I
introduced him," Sears said.
"As far as I recall, I said to Mr.
Mitchell, 'I want you to meet
my friend, Robert Vesco, and
his wife, Pat.' I think I said.
'this is the fellow I talked to
you about.' "


Mitchell and Stans are
accused of impeding a
securities and exchange
commission investigation
begun March 18, 1971 of
Vesco's multimillion dollar
financial empire in return for
the latter's secret $200,000
contribution to President
Nixon's 1972 re-election
campaign.
The two defendants had
resigned from the Cabinet to
run the campaign.
Sears, a tall, bald man,
testified as a key government
witness at the trial after being
granted total immunity from
prosecution in the case. A
codefendant with Vesco,
Mitchell and Stans, Sears' case
has been separated from the
others. Vesco fled the country
and never answered the
indictment.


Balloonist reward
WASHINGTON A $10,000 reward has been offered
for information leading to the safe recovery of missing
balloonist Thomas Gatch jr.
The adventurer's two sisters put up the reward to spur
further efforts in the search for Gatch, a 46-year-old
bachelor from Alexandria, Virginia.
Gatch was trying to become the first man to cross the
Atlantic Ocean in a balloon. He was last seen Feb. 21 by a
Liberian ship about 1,200 miles west-southwest of the
Canary Islands.
Offering the reward are Gatch's sisters, Eleanor
Armstrong Hoaglan and Nancy Gatch Svien, both of
Rochester, Minn.




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Party, whose decision to stay
out of the Cabinet prevented
Mrs. Meir's putting together a
majority in Parliament, said it
was reconsidering its position.
D ayan withdrew his
resignation at a meeting of
the old Cabinet last night.
The meeting had been called
to discuss developments in
either foreign affairs or
national security that the
government cloaked in
secrecy and nobody would
explain.


HUNDREDS SHOT'
IN LESOTHO


Nixon to hand over


Watergate material

I N G T 0 N Nixon also offered to with the sealed report
Nixon today answer written questions and sources have in
he House Judiciary submit to an oral interview if contains grand jury f
that he will give it the committee is not satisfied on the president's
erial he has already with the written answers. Watergate.


Nixon's decision was
announced by James D. St.
Clair. Nixon's chief Watergate
lawyer, at a hearing called to
hear arguments on the
disposition of a sealed grand
jury report.
St. Clair told U.S. district
judge John J. Sirica that the
Nixon government would
offer no recommendation as
to what the judge should do


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Wednesday, March 6, 1974


(ihpe ribun
NULLIUS AeDICUS JUBE IN VERBA MAGIMSTI
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903. 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH,O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Publisher/Editor 1917-1972
Contributing Editor 1972 -
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972.
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

EDITORIAL


Where is democracy?


By 1 I-INNL DUPUCH
PEOPLE in America today are concerned about the hard line
taken by labour unions in Britain at a time when the nation is
struggling for survival in a world being torn apart by a fuel crisis.
While e the coal strike was in progress a TV commentator in
Miamni pointed out that the labour unions in the U.S. today had
enough power to destroy the nation if the Communists got
control of these organizations. it is feared that this is what has
happened in England which he described as formerly being the
most sensible nation in the world.

In order to understand what is happening around us in the
world today ... and how the Bahamas might be eventually
affected ... we must look back into history and trace the social
and political changes that have evolved in the world since King
John signed Magna Carta on the fields of Runnymede 757 years
ago.

Prior to Magna Carta, kings no matter how wicked they
might have been were considered the chosen of God.
At a king's coronation his head was anointed with holy oil ...
-and this conferred on him powers that were known as "the divine
right of kings".
This right gave him absolute power over the lives and affairs of
all his subjects. lie could have a man executed, send him into
exile, confiscate his property, or take any member of a family for
his service or his personal use. His word was law. His authority
was absolute. And no one dared touch a hair of his head.

David was conscious of this law. Some of my readers will
remember the passage in 1 Samuel in which it is told how King
Saul sought David out to destroy him because he feared him as a
rival for his throne.
One night David and Abishai sneaked into Saul's camp while he
and his soldiers slept deeply.
Abishai whispered to David: "God has delivered your enemy
into your grasp this day. Let me nail him to the ground with one
thrust of the spear: I will not need a second thrust!"
But David said to Abishai, "Do no harm to himn, fr who can
lat hands on the Lord's anointed and remain unpunished "

At Runnymede the Barons extracted from King John a charter
of freedom from which the democracy we know today has
evolved.
The Charter, which was demanded by the Barons in the name
of the people of England, diluted the King's powers which were
.-. thereafter shared by the Barons. The people of Britain felt no
benefit from this change. They continued to work under
conditions that would be considered slave labour today

The time came in the 18th century when Britain moved into
industry. This period is known as the Industrial Revolution.
This activity produced another power group that changed the
whole social character of Britain and shoved the Barons into the
h background.
Out of this change arose a group of men who were labelled
S "Money Barons". After this money ... rather than the power of
S the sword ... held sway in the councils of the nation.

We have seen a similar change take place in the Bahamas as a
"--result of the "bootleg industry" which started when America
went dry in 1918 and ran well into the 1920's.
Prior to this period a small group of old families controlled the
t affairs of the colony.
+ Almost overnight a group of obscure adventurous young men
and a couple of foreigners, too, who became British subjects
iu accumulated great wealth.
j Within a few years these men had taken a place in public life
-+ and evCntually they pushed the old families into the background
Sso completely that, with possibly one or two exceptions, they
I had completely disappeared from just about every department of
+ life that had any weight in the islands by the time the P.L.P. took
t control of the government in 1967 and introduced another
radical change in the pattern of life in the islands.

% But let us get back to the Money Barons of the Industrial
SRevolution in England.
These men accumulated great wealth by the abuse of labour
w \which they worked to death on a barely subsistence wage.


Their most outrageous abuse was in child and female labour in
the iines.
S The conditions for labour in England were so brutal that they
are beyond description ... far worse than anything that happened
in the African slave trade ... the difference being that it was no
Concern of the industrialists if a min or a woman or even a child
died at the wheel of sweated labour whereas the slave had a value
that demanded a certain amount of care.

It was these conditions in Britain that aroused the indignation
of leaders in England early in the 1800's. And they linked a
Movement for the suppression of the African slave trade with a
crusade for the protection of labour especially child labour
- in Britain.

S As I have pointed out in this column from time to time,
capitalists of that period were not special where their labour came
From so long as it was cheap.
In this connection, let us come back to our part of the world
for a spell.
When enterprises in Britain's colonies in this hemisphere were
launched in the 1600's the land owners imported white
indentured labour from Britain whose condition was far worse
" than that of the African slave who later took his place. The
- difference in the conditions of the two groups was explained
+ earlier in this article.
, After slavery was abolished the land owners in the West Indies
Imported East Indians, Portuguese and Chinese indentured labour
Which was virtually a form of slavery.

S At this time it is interesting to take a look at the effect cheap


hi (ributtr


SI U--- ~ -


Headline offends


baseball bat would you then
have called him a Baseball
Bandit?
Not being a practitioner of
Karate, but having some eight
years experience with other
aspects of the martial arts I
would like to point out some
of the ultimate goals of these
arts. Karate, Judo, Akido etc.
all have different training
methods and different basic
philosophies, but the ultimate
goal of all of these is to make
the practitioner a better
person, both physically and
mentally so that he/she can
make this world a better place.
The fear is sometimes


I enterprises in the West Indies by
s achieved at that time in Britain's

niple, that L.ord DU[)tInore was first
when he was promoted to the
and finally promoted to the
nas in 1780, arriving in the colony


EDI' OR, The Tribune.
As a student of the Martial
Arts I must take exception to
the headline of your paper
dated March 4th, 1974,
"KARATE BANDIT BEATS
LIQUOR STORE BOSS". I
feel that this headline and the
cover story does a great
injustice to all interested in
Karate as well as the general
public.
Your article goes on to say
"when Mr. Butler tried to
intervene, he (the bandit) hit
him a couple of Karate chops".
Are these the words of your
reporter or Mr. Butler? Are
either of these persons
qualified to define a Karate
Chop?
If Mr. Butler had been
robbed by some one with a


labour had on agriculture
comparison with standards
North American colonies.
You will recall, for exa
governor of New York
governorship of Virginia
governorship of the Bahar
towards the end of 1787.
This may sound absurd
Hamnshere's book. "The Brit
early 1700's the islands in i
to Britain than her North Ai
Hamshere points out that
small, the 18th century wa
of the West Indies. They
richest possessions of the Br
Even I can remember
Bahamas as an ancient jew
considered "poetic licence
Bahamoas was one o f Britai
never meant to Britain wh
area meant to her in the 18t
Sugar was the most impo
a recently published. "Histi
this period Britain consider
French islands of Martiniqi
Today sugar is no longer ii
economy is depressed with
figure. For the first tmle t
from France-
"'In the three years 1715.
L.eeward Islands, Barbados
exported to the United Ki
as. all the mainland colonies
"The Leewards exported
364, 577, Jamaica 322. 2
576. Towards the end of
four-fifths of the British inc
the West Indies.
"The West Indian sla
"produced the great wealth
in industry which turned Br
of sugar, coffee, cotton am
finance the defeat of Napole
**
Now let us get back to
West Indies after the abolit
first labour legislation in Bri
The descendants of slav
poor white man all over the
now they are emerging on t
man's age-old struggle to evt
These changes for whit'
labour unionism ... for the I
Christian society that volu
century.

As in all previous cases
Right of Kings, then the
Barons, now labour unions
group, unfortunately, has
reasonable measure of restra
The result of present-day
West seem bound to take t
hands of absolute authority
Kings but bearing the label
raises the spectre of George
*
I will return to this sub
evidence to show that the
major labour unions of the
This means that eventual
tiny places like the Bahamni
Soviet overall strategy of
America which is today the
world.
But there is no chance t
blind greed ... allow them
their own destruction in th
are so subversive and sin
willingly into the trap.
*
FOOTNOTE TO HISTOI
for some time now that R
this hemisphere.
An Associated Press des
26th reported that "U.S. in
advisers have moved into t
first time.
"The report is that Russ
train Peruvian soldiers in t
from Russia last year.
"Russian military advise;
a dozen years, but never ha'
nation ."
*
CORRECTION: In two
mentioned Antigua instead
to any informed reader.
It is extraordinary the
newspaper, never mind how
I wrote the article. As us
left my hands.
After that it was check
none of them picked uip the
And yet it hit me in the
night.
**


A THOU
On an occasion of this k
to speak one's mind. It bec


expressed that the martial arts
would be a dangerous weapon
in the hands of people within
questionable purpose and
character. For example.
gangster,,s ,Jd tough
undisciplin:ed :ouA necks. IT .'i
svii, never "pp It take-
strong will ai d ,i lteMrm; in t latl
to acco!iip lish ia ste 0 of an;
of the matritl :rts. and people
of iluestit nile purpose and
low moral! .harait 1r 1,ack 1 1 il
power andI ,!i r:mii inmi.
I feci tiat when the
"Bandit" it \: Butler's i.
caighit .it ll'tinly be
est.iblislhed h1it' li 1 olt no0
has ever been c-!ilient of any
respcctahle Kaltadit eK i-i-;
i I llr a l\ e .:. ell .)iCle o!
the highly onltrove sial sie-,
of late, shoIV ing perC!-ons wM1ho
nmiused the ir : Iowledgce b

o I s. I b ..- moV i0
U I lortuI n it '> give :e

t file I i to f .'- I -. t il d ,


and defends only if attacked.
Or better still join one of the
artiarti arts schools wlheic he
- an have instruction in all
asp-. is of that particular art by
-., ..'! .1 sense.
In closing I think an apology
'by Ihe Iribune is in order to
th' Students and Senseis ot
k :iate.

DON MALONI-
I I;,. ielt. h Kodoka,; tilu i


in Soctk


1"4Tinm inC *AIti veI in


today but it is revealed in Cecil this X whav ,1,1 ; .. i, .o! a ,. .r.i
:ish in the Caribbean", that during ile i1l b1 lut
the West Indies weie more important nhe i1k 0
ydui (d to kct.i t ; tile K iv I
lerican co'!(nies.
.despite the fact that the islands were ( ai has a\
is the most prosperous in the histcy
were recognized in E-ngland ais the ; s
itish Crownn. LOCAL BOY
the time when poets described the \
el in the British crown. This may be ELECTED
". of course, because although the
n's earliest colonies the islands have EI I TOR t he 'l-.ine' i
at the sugar producing islands of this
h century. t'icase ve thne letter ]
rtant export. It was so important that in our valalr ..' l t i, I
ory of Barbados" records that during indhe ed rereslin to learn that t A
T Hie Aba kt. Business-menic nt.i
red swapping French Canada for the Ao. iatin ha y elect
ue and Guadeloupe in the Caribbean. as their president ia loal o A a
nportant in these French islands. The biy, naimel Mr hc'rt
Sa 15 to 40 percent utnemploymentt Bethell. Mr Hi!hei! is :an
here is talk of seeknint idependence example :d t!ie 0 ji''i i
yoing ene o: f ul A !I iL -
1716, 1717," reports liamshere. "the also the n.'i t A\n'& A lbL stT
s and Jamaica. in that order, each B. A. r '1; .. --i- AVAiILf A BLE:
ngdonm more than, or nearly as much at n ; seacr;-ta'v I!: -:ei ,
Sof America put together. Independent men
t3p' :'. o Hi The General Hardware
4 0 3 39 4 po u n d s ste rln g,. B ar b ad o s t h at so me t t h ,.: :) i t i +
66 North Amertican colonies 382. Ao, i 't ii '' T he G general H ardwit
the century it was estimated that a ,,. l :: :: -:i'.r-tio 1
ome derived from overseas came from the CO IM PAN Y LI Il TED
F. G. SAUNDI)RS
ve society," continued Hamshere.
that helped to finance the revolution Marsh ihtrbour. CENTREVILLE PHONE 2-1960 / 2-8844
itain into a modern state. The exports A baco.
nd other tropical products helped to Feb. 24. 1974
eon at Watecrl. "
** .* C
the conditions in Britain and in the
tion of slavery' and the passage of the
tain. Be a BIG WNNER Enter the
es in the Western Hemisphere and thie Be a BIG W INNER...Entr


olve a stable s,,:ietv .
e labour have been achieved through

ntarily set him i tree early in the I ('(i


Sof power groups first the )Divine
hereditary Barons, then the MoneMA LUER C.,LTD.
and ain emerging black society ... no
been able to exercise power with h. )
aint.
V conditions in the democracies of the
he peoples of the world back into the
v ... the san;e as the Divine Right o t
of a Communist dictatorship... whit11ch :- o" :-- t 'i f
Orwell's "Big Brother".

ject toniorrovt when I will bring ,, . -
S Russians are today inltilll.rae 2 tIlhe' '
world. P "
lly this influence is bound to spread tt .
as that would have importance it t he. i.
isolating and getting control o
only hope for the free peoples of their CU TLA SS

of escape when free people ... in the i Complete with 50 HP.
selves to become tite instruments oit Johnsoo Esinde otor
ce hands of a destroyer whose methods (
sister that unthirnking people walk The tluxuou ..a.tel of this
tagniet l t NF ) I CL PER isthe
result of 01 t, l ,t s;Ol.ivh It has
S* *** anodized mt1 ti ie .At:' tempered
RY: I have been saying in this colutin shatter, pr Pof gla ,, full t~I rg seats.
The hull is tsit, t tt,'!(J wid wrll give
ussia's next move will probably be i you outstandi g per fo rnt e There is
no finer boat floait foi tt, e money. p,
patch from Washington on Febru or, Made by a fir wth ove 20 yeas ...
telligence sources say Russian nilitar CLIPPERn. hat RLboat NDO
the South American continent for the ~i

sian technicians have arrived in Peru to, E 'EVINRUU.D E
the use of T55 medium tanks boug-t The outbo.ord motor that's built for everyone. It's right at
home with the jet fun set as well as the commercial NEWSPAPER
rs have been present in Cuba for about fisher man. EVINRUDE 50, the motor that's built for work
Fire powet breakerless CD electronic ignition p Power pilot,

pre-set tilt lock Pressure backed piston rings Pulse tuned
places in this column yesterday I exhaust Automatic pressure-temperature co trId AVAIA
of Grenada. The mistake was obvious ..- cooling Power port loop-charged engine Computer)i
-..-..- matched gearing!
b And options you never even dreaAmed about. "No Imotor so T
way stupid mistakes slip through a le e id sumuh.M TRI
careful one might be.
usual. I read it over twice again before it






PHONE 24001 24101
ind it becomes more than a moral duty
omes a pleasure. WILDE


i.-
S. .: .i-


udo official


(IF IT WAS TAKEN BY TOOGOODS'!)



------------HOTOGApiT
en the waterfo :i{ at East Bay & William Sts.
iPHCNE 5-46L.


Now


I I I I II II IIIIIII I


~3R3HE EDlTE1


~Bi31B~CZll ~ac~rl~- I --P~l "I$LLPP~ r


I


'----- -1-'~--c--cl C~ "- ~- ~-"' -~1 --l-tL---~- --








U


i
I
I
I
I


in --Jinm (ibUmmmm F rtun
~ ~ ~ ~ r l i I;~ m i1iiiig i mm B Inmi il


Wednesday, March 6,11
wo InmI m mI


S-mm m m m mmmmmmm mmmmmmmm mm mmm mmam|mmm mmm mmmm mmm mm m mm mm m m mmmrm mmmm mm


M.ATS

FISH

POULTRY
IN 10LB.
CONTAINERS


HOMEOWNERS ... BUY WHOLESALE-


SPECIALS FOR THIS WEEKEND

Fresh Bahamian Seafoods


onl $6A0
(cleaned) only S7O00
only 85 LB.


10 LBS.
0(StewBeef) CANADIAN BONELESS CHUCK S14.00
10LBS. PIG FEET $3.50 (35cperLB.)


I -


MADEIRA FOOD STORE
PHONE 24524 P. BOX 6143


DANISH
SPARE RIBS $1.15 Ib.
AMERICAN
PIC-NIC HAMS 90C Ib.
AMERICAN
PORK CHOPS $1.40 lb.


NIBLETS '
WHOLE KERNAL CORN
12ozs. 38


SAWYER'S
PIGEON PEAS


SAWYER'S WHOLE
TOMATOES
COME
CLEANSER
PILLSBURY
INSTANT
BREAKFAST


COLGATE
TOOTH PASTE
LIBBY'S
SWEET PEAS


20ozs. 40e


20ozs. 504


(Large)


45e


900


SUPER
81.20


303 45o


Centreville Food Market
6th TERRACE EAST PHONE 58106 P.O. Box 5714
STORE HOURS Monday to Thurday 8 .m. 8:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday 8 a.m. 9 p..
Sunday 8 a.m. 10 a.m.
----II--------------------- -----------------
Specials for March 7th to 10th.
U.S. CHOICE *lml..,mm.mmI mi mmla


CHUCK ROAST
U.S. CHOICE
CHUCK STEAK
U.S. CHOICE
SHOULDER ROAST


U. S. CHOICE
STEAK


lb. $129

lb. 1.39

Ib. $139

lb. $1.49


Celery


29c Head


Oranges 5 Ib. Bags $1.29


\II


Florida Fresh Citrus Punch (1/2 Gals.)
Kraft Fresh Grapefruit Juice Qts.
Libby's Peaches Sliced Large Can
Cold Power Giant Size
Ritz Crackers 1 Ib. Package
Purity Flour 5 lb. Bag
KELLOGG'S Corn Flakes 18 oz. pkge.
Motts Apples Juice Qts.
Red Delicious Apples 3 Ib. Bags


$1.19
.89c
.69c
.99c
.95c
$1.25
.74c
.85c
$1.39


PINDER'S FOOD MARKET
MONTROSE AVENUE PHONE 24030

LAST WEEK'S SPECIALS CONTINUE


OUR GRAND OPENING SPECIALS WERE SO


THAT WE ARE HAPPY


PLEASING,


TO CONTINUE THEM FURTHER


UNTIL MARCH 10th-----


COME ON IN AND VIEW OUR


STOCKED SHELVES,


AND MEET OUR FRIENDLY STAFF


WHO ARE ALWAYS WILLING


TO SERVE YOU.


S IR STORE HOURS ARE AS FOLLOWS
Monday thru Wednesday 8 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Thursday 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Friday & Saturday 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.
OPEN EVERY SUNDAY 8 10 a.m.
i .. .


NEW ZEALAND R CHOPS 10
LAMB SHOULDER CHOPS lb. S1.16


FRESH
BROILING CHICKENS


lb. 89C


U.S. CHOICE
BEEF ROAST lb. $1.9


CANA CORN ON COB
PINE SOL
SPRY SHORTENING
HELLMANS
MAYONhAISE
MAHATMA RICE
LIBBY'S
SLICED PINEAPPLE
LIBBY'S
TOMATO CATCHUP


79e
(28 OZS.) $1.35
3LB. $1.32

OT. $1.43
20 LB. $9.50


15 OZ.


481


20 OZ. 69


HARDING' S
P.O. Box 5290 ES


FRESH NITTON


IANISH SPARE RIBS
MAPLE LEAF WIENERS


BEEF LIVER

FRESH PORK

SHEEP TOgilE
IANISH IAc'N

PORK CHePS


Pli FEET
LEAN STEIN i IEEF


FOOD MARKET
Phone 2-3067


fI. $1.10 i


lb. e89




It. $1.15

I. lot
16. $1.50

6. $129
lb. s35
lb. $1.5


WATERMAID RICE 5 Ibs.
CAMPBELL'S VEGETABLE SOUP 4 Tins
MAXWELL HOUSE 10 oz.
COKE 5 Tins
ROBIN HOOD FLOUR 5 Ibs.
JEWEL SHORTENING Tin
CARNATION CREAM 3 Tins
DRIVE DETERGENT Giant
HATUEY MALT TONIC 6 Bottles
ARMOUR CORNED BEEF 12 oz.
CELEBRITY LUNCHEON MEAT 12 oz.
DEL MONTE
WHOLE KERNEL CORN 303 2 Tins
BLANCO BLEACH GALLONS
ZEST SOAP 3 Bars Large
SAWYER'S PIGEON PEAS Lar 2 Tins


I


asttau Portion

(control Centre
TELEPHONE 2-3237 5th TERRACF. CENTREVILLE
OPEN 'TIL 4 P.M. SATURDAYS!


5 LBS. GROUPER FILET
10 LBS. UNSKINNED CONCH
5/10 LBS WHOLE GROUPERS


$1.99
.99c
$2.49
.99c
$1.19
$1.35
.88
$1.10
$1.49
$1.25
.69c


.89c
.99c
99c
.79c


I


AdF' IL


c


I


-- I n II


i I


----


I I I I II


I


Rjl


2A






Wednesday, March 6, 1974


Clhr Oribunt


----------- ---- --- .______________


Saving ...asYou Like It Best
These days, it's rather hard to make a dollar go any distance at all. Excep at Quality Market. We make your money go further. You see, we
want you to get as much mileage out of your money as possi*b. So we give you lollg distance savings, with lower shelf prices and
A FANTASTIC specials. Enjoy the trip with us; enjoy Saving As You Like It Best.


HAMBURGER

PATTIES
NEW ZEALAND SHOULDER
LAMB CHOPS

SHORMEL BACON


4 PATTIES
PER PACKAGE
SI-LB. AVG.


gg


9.9i.
199LB

891/2LB


GROCERY SPECIALS


U.S. CHOICE

MEAT

SPECIALS
PORTERHOUSE $2.85 LB
T-BONE STEAK $2.85 LB
SIRLOIN STEAK $2.55 LB
SIRLOIN TIP ROAST $2.55 LB
ROUND ROAST $2.25 LB
NATIVE PORK .990 LB
B.B.Q. DANISH SPARE RIBS $1.19 LB
MAPLE LEAF BOLOGNA .95 LB
MAPLE LEAF WIENERS $1.29 LB


COLGATE TOOTHPASTE SUPER SIZE $1.09
LIPTON TEA BAGS 100 COUNT $1.39
SCOTT TOWELS JUMBO ASSTD. COLOURS .69


CAMPBELL'S
V-8 COCKTAIL JUICE 48 oz.


5 LB
ROBIN HOOD
FLOUR
Sl09


GOLDEN ISLES
MILK
GALLON $1.89


LARGE LOAF
PURITY
BREAD

.39w


.79


CRACKER JACKS 1-3/4oz.
FRANCO-AMERICAN
SPAGHETTI, 15 oL
STARKIST
CHUNK LIGHT TUNA 60, o


3 LB
JEWEL
SHORTENING

$119


6/.840


3/.65C
.65


ZEST SOAP BAtHSIZE 3/.990
GERBER STRAINED
BABYFOOD ALL FLAVORS 5/.89C


DR. BALLARD
DOG FOOD
CHICKEN LIVER
BEEF
4As8


DAYTIME 30's
TAPE-ON!
PAMPERS
S249


FROZEN FOOD
BIRDSEYE 10 oz.
BROCCOLI
SPEARS .73C


HATCHET BAY X-LARGE I


EGGS


PRODUCE
REGULAR POTATOES
10LBBAG $1.55


6


:1:
I I, i
m.in


QUANTITY
RIGHTS
RESERVED
FOR YOUR SHOPPING CONVENIENCE,
OUR STORE HOURS ARE:
MONDAY THROUGH THURSDAY
8:30AM-7:OOPM
FRIDAY & SATURDAY 8:30AM-9:00PM
SUNDAY 7:00AM-10:OOAM


:11c


PRICES GOOD
THURS., MAR. 7
THRU SUN., MAR. 10


CORNER OF WULFF
AND VILLAGE ROADS
P.O. BOX N.439
PHONE 3-2668-7-8-9


- LOTS OF IN STORE SPECIALS!!!


RECIPE


BARBECUED SPARERIBS
Ingredients:
*I I t ) I pun~' I 1t [ it i lit t' ,' f' f~,



I I Inlil t Dp i td i tm pll
1li l h pit( t of f 1 I ' ith da lice of u ln -led
It'ion anlld da lt t of on .
C D bir e retmi ai ingredients; brioc tso
htoil and por over ribs. Lower temperature
Control to 350 ; bake till well done, about
1- 1/2 hours. Baste ribs with sauce every
15 minutes. If sauce gets too thick, add more
water. Makes 4 servings.


I


a m


-IL


GLADSTONE FARM WHOLE
FRYERS


I I I





Wednesday, March 6,
--


6 U~UShe rtbune


. FT RE S


HATCHET BAY
WHITE MILK


9


H


TI



B


NET


HATCHET BAY
ICE CREAM


9


HATCHET BAY
WHITE MILK


i/2GALLON
h6, 0


*-- a
b rrt -r


HATCHET BAY
CHOCOLATE MILK


/2 GALLON


SPECI



ILUES


THIS


L


FOR


EE


J- HATCHET BAY
ULRGE EGGS


EN85


HATCHET BAY
ROASTING CHICKENS


3TO04
LB. AVG.
LB.


MILO
POWDERED MILK


9


9TO1
TOM2


P CHAMPION
TOMATO PASTE

CO-O.
CANS 9


SAWYERS
BLACKEYE PEAS

303
CANlS


INEDt84
Im^.


12-OZ.
CAN


D N CORNED BEEF


79'


SAWYERS
WHOLE TOMATOES


NESCAFE
INSTANT COFFEE

*1 89
8-OZ.
JAR


SAWYERS
KIDNEY BEANS


303


JEWEL SHORTENING


jl


.DRIVE


SAWYERS
PIGEON PEAS


SAWYERS
GREEN LIMA BEANS


GIANT SIZE
DRIVE


-" DETERGENT

49-0Z.
PKG.


220-OZ.
CANS '


303
CANS


WaterMaid
RICE p.. ICj
WATER MAID RICE


5-LB.
BAG


GALLON


MuI@


1-LB.
PKG.


3-LB.
CAN


L


Vn


~-~3
~3~1~h


n.&


j;w',w
*r t~l


A4- 4Snmwjo^p -7_
_KICV-R l
WOW"S







March 6, 1974 7


III


'1 4


QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED


jHGLADSTONE
FARM
WHOLE FRYERS



LB.


N


IIf4.


NEW ZEALAND
LAMB SHOULDER CHOPS


S W-D GROUND BEEF



LB.


LB.


LIBBY
WHOLE KERNEL
CORN

I YE
303
CANS


GROUPER FILLET .............. 1.79
CUT UP FRYERS ......... L.79
FRYER QUARTERS ................LB. .89
W 0 SMOKED
PICNIC HAMS ........................ 89


W 0 ALL MEAT
BOLOGNA ......................... LB 1.29
WO ALL MEAT OR
DINNER FRANKS .... LB 1.29
NATIVE PORK LB .99
WINDSOR BACON .................. 99


NATIVE PORK LEG PORTION


LB.


APPLES


POTATOES


B B TOMATO JUICE



CANS


AB
HOT SAUCE


4s() 1'
Mf,
I tb*,b1


6-OZ.
DTTLE


LB.
BAG


LEMONS
tRN


CELERY.


I6 AMBUCA SICES
-mm


KRAFT AMERICAN
SLICED CHEESE



11


12-OZ.
PKG.


5for .79
5for.95


CARROTS



3 FOR6


SUMMER COUNTY MARGARINE


HARVES'' SH
ORANGE 'IE

I i


/2 GALLON


/2- LBS


SAWYERS
GUAVA JAM
OR GUAVA JELLY


S-LB.
JARS


BAHAMIAN




FRIS


5


DOZE iN


WI
^ ^


BIRDS EYE CORN ON COB


4-EAR
PKG.,
4-I s


1'' u~
~ ,~L ~blb~\
)
~ ;ol C~
FrrY


ROBIN HOOD
FLOUR


AJK I

10-LB.
BAG


DIXIANA PEAS & CARROTS


*!f


16 0. PKG. CHEF STAFFORD'S


i 24-OZ. PKG.
PK6. CHEF STAFFORD'S


aljI


COCA COLA
IN BOTTLES
16oz. 6 PAK. 790
PLUS DEPOSIT


BUNCO BLEACH


132 OZ. SARA LEE


JAM
Mi A*wX


,....


B~tu ~t~bunP


Wednesday, March 6, 1974


7


I*


I









SAY IT

WITH

BEANS K


I 1\l\ iLt \\S ar' still in the
Inlelight aiI the Po' tcr' s Ca
P ,du'lc I x.hange and should
bCe hoidinI the f alie c\halted
'-mitniili i the kit.ehl n rght
>,A k h rf i, .in cx, II',ll
Si>' i i iii 1 11 d sji l il tos
Shll' :.nough i 11u h lLantoI t
HiJkC I 'Itulnd Ccik theIlm in
hinlin' s ltxd atlcr oi'r halull ai
I.i i xx n h i il' in i "
01W il d l CIdL i lan i jiu

. il. l h iL
pitl blK in th ii .d the fine
tI. !.; a*i L ,t :, i-. A d I lit
' .lC. ,l J -Clod d




S ,i 1 i 1 ; Add 1l l




S . tirp M in



: ; als ; j t ani l
p'l!

p Ii *'." ]-; II I' c. d ixlt h
h ih n i l it' l ti ii xi



m '.ilt i thd






ii. > i 1 0',i i x i
_; il l lxl- l: . !in 11,1




k 1.%. n 111)ql'kj j d f.!. c


x .ixii l- .ii
ax 1I


lxiii.i


*i
BUY B AH


wIEON EA


Macaro
ChkiIda

;lglpI
^^


!a


ri
lr IT
GODN RI


SU.S. CHOICE
DELMONICQ STEAK
U.S. CHOICE
m GROUND CHUCK


SLAB BACON


BOLOGNA SAUSAGE


Per Ib

Per Ib


Per Ib


Per Ib


$2.59


Fwww


I' i '
. :; : h .: ar ,. II


ltii I 1 ii : ; .: : ?, w hic i
i,- x.l i '.'l x x ;! .i xxi p
ai n- 2 la i ll,






"it hamd tiii iiii i! iu',n ;[is in1
C11 !hc Il~1
1! ta s ..i .s . A i
the ham iin i ll ciiC i ltieanf i
"lAt,-r J i i he s .!

,it it-'l/ il ilt it 'IW l oIn
lh Ip xii! ur ii !te iis I h 1taein
p pel lxi x t )er t e pa, i lllt dl
Idl;' h Hi hi i -,i.,i hall : L"or
l'a's 'nit <' he ril i And ha iud
snll inl i tir 0 0 111ies r unt ilt
tl t ir lia 'Ai are t ender. \i
ne and a i halt tespool
arrowroot with a tadldepop n of
water. Sti it int! the bean
mixture and sAir unlil it has
thickened. In a lI i I i. saute ai
cup Q thinly sliced nuishronms
in better For two minutes
Season thiem with' sil andi
pepper anl d co(I k (tor five
minutes tl iric Adid thei
xx itsh rootmllS t0 x fitl' l eIan
mixture.


ZEST S
Bah AB OO 42-z 4/69

KELO G'

13/991 2A
jCORN LAKES 2-oz


- AWIIZ j 3A B


OSCAR MAYER


WIENERS LL MEA
CELERY EACH 39 OSCAR MAYER
ANJOU WIENERS PURE BE
PEARS 3's 69 OSCAR MAYER
RED DELICIOUS "', CHOPPEDHAM
APPLES 3- b 1.49 OSCAR MAYER
)BRAUNSCHWEI


NT 1-lb 1.39

:EF 1-lb 1A45


8-oz 1.05


IGER soz 65C


U.


SPECIALS FOR THE WEEK MARCH 7th, THROUGH MARCH 10th, 1974.


5 4
BUYBAHMIA


BLACOBLAC


r* .


I U.S. CHOICE MATS


w IW w NW w mw I


I .


m


IIIJ~il~lilJ~lM ^B iti

POTRHUE .BN Ib2,5
U.S. CHO ICE^^^^^^_1-J-----^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

SIRLOIN STEAK b. 239


U.. HICE^^~fl


S MILKAPORATE
14 Y2-o


BUY BAHAMIA
CHA M IO N2 1 9


is
*it


F


I
i :

i i


y!f















NNT


I MAYCOCK IN

' U.K. FOR

S INVESTMENT

DISCUSSIONS


I


UI


qw W IW


w W w '


ALL STORES NOW OPEN ON

SUNDAY...INCLUDING OUR

MACKEY &MADEIRA STREET

SSTORE 7:A.M.-1O: A.M. -
I imi-mmm ---mm----mm---


,al


w lw W 'w _,
BUY BHAMIA











AMURI

RICE -1 b


12+29
Li i 2)


( KRAFT
ORANGE JUICE
KRAFT MEDIUM
CHUNK CHEDDAR
DANICA BRAND
BUTTER


1i?



U


ALL BRANDS

LARGE EGGS


RED BRILLO
SWEETHEART LIME
FABRIC SOFTENER
WISHBONE CHUNKY
BLUE CHEESE
6-oz
MANGO PINEAPPLE NECTAR
ALEGRE
PINEAPPLE NECTAR


REGULAR


SARAN WRAP REGULAR


SLENDER LIQUID ALL FLAVOURS


JOY LIQUID

LUCOZADE

KOOL POPS


GREEN GIANT
NIBLETS CORN
GREEN GIANT
BROCCOLI SPEARS
SARA LEE
CAKES


MINUTE MAID
ORANGE JUICE
SWANSON
POT PIES


1/2 GALLS. 51.59


12-oz

1/2-lb


DOZEN


18's


64-oz

8-oz


1.39

2/790


95s


69C


99

79?


RC 1


-SIX PACK $1.09


12-oz

24's

24's


3/89C

'1.49

I1,49


50' 2/99C


18-oz

10-oz

22-oz

28-oz


790


2/79C


89C

1.29


2/89C


10-oz

10-oz

14-oz


590

69C

'1.29


BANANA/ORANGE/CHOCOLATE


6-oz


2/89C


8-oz 2/'1.09
CHICKEN/TURKEY/BEEF


THE
BAHAMIAN
SUPERMARKETS
If it's value you really want,
you really want SuperValue I


VA]


YOUTH CONGRESS
From Page 1
with a special interdenomina-
tional religious service on
N. Y. C. decided was only
appropriate in its attempt to
adhere to the triangluar
philosophy of the enrichment
of the soul as well as the mind
and body." a spokesman said.
The N. Y. C., which was
formally launched in June. last
year. is made up of member
groups whose representatives
sit as a coordinating body
the Central Committee.
BASIC AIMS
The basic aim of the
organisation is to unify the
youth of the Bahamas and
membership with the N. Y. C.
is open to all civic
improvement clubs and other
youth organizations in New
Providence and the Family
Islands.
The N. Y. C. has
participated in international
youth programmes, during its
short period of existence. Last
year. with the help of several
private firms, they sent
delegates to represent the
Bahamas at the Youth for
Mankind Conference, (La
Conference de la Jeunesse pour
I' Humanite), which was held
in Chicago between August and
September.
The seminar was one of the
Youth for Mankind's
quinquennial meetings which
was held in conjunction with
the International Congress of
Anthropological and Ethno-
logical Sciences.
"The N. Y. C. is particularly
interested in communicating
with any newly formed youth
organisation or any other
youth group not yet affiliated
with it but operating in the
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas," a spokesman said.
PROJECTS
In its attempts to promote a
keener sense of awareness
among the youth of the
Bahamas, the N. Y. C. last
month undertook the staging
of several projects including an
annual speech contest. This
contest ends tonight and is
being held in conjunction with
the Ministry of Education and
Culture. Gold and Silversmith
Ltd., and the Wulff and Village
Roads Quality (Big "Q")
Supermarket.
Contestants will speak at
7 30 p.m. at the Stephen Dillet
Primary School. Wulff Road.
A future goal is the
establishment of the Jane
Ilutchinson Scholarship
Foundation which will be
officially launched on May 4
with a banquet at the
Governor's Hall of the
Sheraton British Colonial
Hotel.
It will be held under the
patronage of Prime Minister
Lynden Pindling and Mrs.
Pindling and the parents of
Miss Hutchinson, an active
worker among youth organi-
satl ins and a Government High
School teach until the time of
her death, last year.
Present officers of the N. Y.
C. are: President, Carlton A.
Martin: vice-president, Felix
Rolle; treasurer, Melvin
Seymour; secretary, Philip
Major and asst. secretary
Beatrice Moxey.
They represent the Kemp
Road Youth for Action;
Englerston Youth Association,
the Highbury Club, St. Francis
Xavier's Youth Club and the
I Elks Youth Association.
respect ively.


AT


L" -au


w l I&w Awk wAwALwAL


rr




rp


r)
1W 1^w 1w^^ low


^*BUYiBAHAMIA
i ,.BOR.DENS



ICE REAM2 Galon

$ *29



REGAL


MiAsk


PICCH A.t
IJNIIL^^^


r ANk


m


/


w


l


Alk Alk AIL ARL


I OUR RO! YSHLVES


I ROENFODTRE


WNWIM N


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,q q lw q 'I


m


0


THF HON. Alfred T.
Maycock, Minister of
Development. and Mr. Percy
Campbell, Director of
Industrial Development. are
official guests this week of the
British governmentt to discuss
with leaders of industry.
financiers and national
organizations concerned with
overseas industrial develop-
ment, the opportunities for
investment offered in the
Bahamas.
They were greeted at a
Foreign and Commonwealth
Office luncheon by Sir Duncan
Watson. Deputy Under-
Sccretary of State.
The Minister will also meet
the chairman and deputy
chairman of Lloyds of London.
members of the London
chamberr of Commerce and the
\%, i India Committee, and
visit a new town development
at Runcorn. near Liverpool.
During part of the tour the
Minister will be accompanied
bh former Minister of
Development, Mr. Jeffrey M.
Thompson, now studying law
at Gray's Inn. London.








10 Tltr Tribunt


Wednesday, March 6, 1974


By Abigail Van Buren
C 1974 Dy ChiCagO TribuntN Y. News Synd., Inc.
DEAR ABBY: I am in a dilemma of good neighbor
relationship and good '.itii.'n-r hil One of our neighbors is a
patrolman who constantly drives the patrol car into his
driveway for hours He keeps the loudspeaker very loud so
he can hear it inside his house or while he is working in the
yard or fixing another car parked next to the patrol car
The other neighbors also notice his constantly playing
hooky, e.,ll during the nights and weekends. They
joke about it Since we live in a rnce, quiet town with a
population around 20,000, we want to keep a good neighbor
relationship, we pretend seeing nothing.
However. I just read in the paper the police department




Orlando


without fear.

Let s face it Staying n Orlando has been known to terrify
even the bravest of vacationers
Sure you can probably find a room But can
you be assured of the prices you ll pay or the
service you i re. ..,-r. : ,~,e:r there'
Not really ))
So do yourself a favor
And stay with us We 1l spoil you with
great service and reasonable prices Just
the way Sheratons always do
Wevegot '14' :.;., ' furnished
rooms Swimming pooi Childrenspool
and alay r...ur.' f4. fi'!ren under 12 free in
parent s room) Complete game and bi \
hards room. Color TV Specialty restaurant
Lounge with t' r '. ir f -,t,-, r.r, -r-' and
dancing Plus an I 4 location that s
just minutes from Wait Disney World (
Cypress Gardens Kennedy Space
Center Daytona Beach And
Tampa s Busch Gardens
For reservations wr:te or
dial toll free 1-80_0325 3535
And stop living n fear '-t

Sheraton Inn I-4 & Lee Road
SHERATON HOTELS AND MOTOR INNS, A WORLDWIDE SERVICE OF ITT
736 Lee Road. Orlando(Winter Park), Fla. Phone (305) 647-1112
John Kilkenny. General Manager
Developed and operated by Continental Services Corporation Miami, Fla
Charles Schlakman E executive Vice President/Operations, (305) 445-2493


'Good citizen' hates


to squeal( on policeman

wants to transfer desk officers to patrol duty to cut down
the town's costs. The police department claims they keep
six patrols on the road at all times, therefore their over-
time costs are tremendous. [According to the newspaper.
the overtime charge totalled $90,00( la-t year! I
Knowing this. I feel that as a taxpayer and good citizen
I should do something about it But how can I do it without
making any enemies' DEBATING
DEAR 1I B\ TI\G: Have a friend across town [NOT
another neighbor living near the patrolman, tip off the
police department's intelligence division. Let the depart-
ment satisfy itself on the patrolman's conduct. That way
you can remain a "friendly" neighbor and get the job done.

DEAR AtBBY Like "Burned Once," I know what it's
hike to be married to an aging doctor who takes advantage
of "doctor worship When my doctor-husband was in his
late 50s he had an affair with a young married woman in
her 20s. According to him, it was all part of the "profes-
sional treatment" and her husband approved.
Why a young woman with a young husband would want
to have jn:.tihnic to do with a man old enough to be her
father is beyond my comprehension For the most part, the
patients are either young divorcees looking for economic
security, or bored housewives, looking for excitement. The
M D is overwhelmed by their wiles-never mind that he
looks even older when accompanied by them.
BURNED SEVERAL TIMES
DEAR BURNEI): To such misguided medicos, I can
onli repeat. '!'h>sician, heal th>self:"
0' 11 %ll IA L TO "SELF-ClI s\,f'llOL IN L.A.":
Don't confuse "etiquet" with "good manners"-which is far
more important. Etiquet is more concerned with which fork
to use. "Good manners" las defined by Jonathan Swiftl "is
the art of making those people easy with whom we con-
verse. Whoever makes the fewest people uneasy is the best
bred in the company."
Hate to write letters? Send $1 to Abigail Van Burea.
132 Lasky Dr., Beverly Hills, Cal. 90212 for Abby's booklet,
"How to Write Letters for All Occasions."


. -., .-- ------ ----
-: ), ,. f .- i'.. q .- r,- Iq: l "U ,ll : .',,
"If my complaints about such poor work are making
any impression on you. why aren't you crying?"


FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, A. L. Thompson, Manager
Nassau district, A. C. Joe Darville (staff manager) and Hens
P. Vanderschoot, President of British American Insurance.

U.S. SAVINGS ASSOCIATION

OFFICERS ARE ELECTED


NASSAU I W. Dickey,
Jr. president. First Federal
Savings and Loan Association,
lluntsville. Ala.. was elected
president of the Southeastern
Conference of the United
States League of Savings
Associations at the concluding
session of the Conference's
43rd annual meeting held here
\LMrch 3-7.
'I 1e C S ou th e aI st r
conferencee. made up of 1(100
individual savings and loan
,asso titions tr oml the 1'
southeastern states and tIhe
Dlisrict of (olumbia. is the
iiartct and oldest regional
salingCs and loan gioup i th l
luited States
iin addition Io l )ickc other
.coni rncr e l.c ottticcrs elected
\ucr.. Rober S (oldlsilith, Jr.r
pred &lnt. Peoples Federal
Sit\ :nis and L oalln Association,
R n k e Va. first
S i. c pres.id eni Frederick
t\ 11lli ts J r president,
operativese S;avings and I oanl
.Asscnon. \Wilmington. N.C..
sc nd vlC ee-president, and
Jaii c- W Clark, executive
\ ic -pre si denrt. J e person
Ie de ral Sav wings anld LIoaxn
\sso iation, i .li iir i. lr 1) C
S i i r I c ei con 're icr'C
dlle iicl'is re also elerced
I ic re: Biooiks ildl i ng.
t"eeciiitIe since president.
.ietCer on ilederal Savings and
\la Itarold J. Kruger.

\ sso i i ion \ ilrnington,
I)ela are. (I lance -. Kefau ,ver
Jr .Chinrnn oi the board.
Soliiilhia Iedeial Sav ings and
I can association Washinteon -
I) ( Joseph II Walker,
e\eculire i ice president., first
Federal Savings and Loan
Association. \Miami la. 11. IF.
C (owi ii. ieecuti\ve vice
president. lTukckr tFederal
Sai ings anid Lolani Association.
I iu ker. G(a.: Jack 1 Keen,
president. Roswdale I federal
Savings and Ioan Association,
( -...ii.:i ,i K : Richard .
IFun ke, president. Atlantic
I federal Savings. Baltimore,
1d : James 1. Ouilnn. executive
xc president. Magnolia
I edcral Sa\ ings and Loan
Assiociailon. Jackson. Miss.
I red -\ Parker. president.
PeopIles IFedeLal Savings and
I oan associationi. onroe, N.
( C. (haies W Scales Jr..
president. Firsi t Cderal Saving
a id I)an l Xssi-ciation.
S reeinvillc. S ( t- A.
SCo"i igto xl Jr president.
Secunrilt Federal Savings and
I oan association. Nashville,


Tenn.; Joseph L. Weller Jr.,
president. Mutual Federal
Savings and Loan Association,
\,.riil., Va.: and W. W.
Wagner, president First Federal
Savings and Loan Association,
Logan, W. Va.

TIDES
fligh 6:46 a.m. and 7:08
pi.m.
Low 12 24 a.m. and 12:53
p .11.

MOON
Rises 5:44 p.m.
Sets 5:35 p.m.


HONOURED
A SPECIAL presentation
was made recently at British
American Insurance Company
Limited to honour Mr. Aranha
C. (Joe) Darville, staff manager
of the Company's Palmdale
district.
Mr. Darville recently
celebrated 25 years of service
with the Company.
British-American's president
Hens P. Vanderschoot.
presented Mr. Darville with a
suitably engraved gold watch.
Mr. Vanderschoot thanked
Mr. Darville for his loyalty and
dedication to his Company and
to the highest ideals of the
insurance profession.

Florida's Complete and Only General Merchandise Show

P/,m r FLORIDA
MERCHANDISE SHOW
OPEN TO TRADE ONLY
MARCHI 17 18 -19
PLAYBOY PLAZA HOTEL-MIAMI BEACH
A One-stop Shopping Center with HUNDREDS of
EXHIBITS. Nationally known companies showing
every kind of CONSUMER MERCHANDISE

HOUSEWARES GIFTWARES JEWELRY *NOVELTIES
TOYS* HOME ENTERTAINMENT IXMAS GOODS, ETC.
BIGGEST ORDER-WRITING SHOW
for general merchandise in Florida with buyers
attending from in and around this State, plus Puerto
Rice. South America.Bahamos. etc.
SPECIAL ROOM RATES ON REQUEST.
For Complmentary Admittance Badge and/or Hotel Reservation.
write or call LARRY KAREL,PRESIDENT
FLORIDA MERCHANDISE SHOW
2373 COLLINS AVE.. MIAMI BEACH. FLA. 33139
Ph: (305) 534-8321
5&9hf Saec.f/WdIAT tSkrsA'sinc 1952


BLACK DECKER
aI

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NO. 7004
1/4" DRILL JA
C "


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DRILL KIT


Black & Decker
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SAW


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0 FINISHING
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ADO COMPANY II noITI
u mnSSAUS okMST oll UTuSTIAU u1855


U I- -- s-lI


DISTRIBUTORS THROUGHOUT

THE BAHAMAS


THE GENERAL AGENCY LTD.

PATTON STREET PALMDALE. PHONE 2-1551


MAYTA HOMELAUNDRY CENTRE


AUTOMATIC WASHERS & DRYERS

PORTABLE WASHERS & DRYERS


WRINGERS WASHERS


DISHWASHERS & FOOD DISPOSALS

BUY WASHER DEPENDABILITY


TAYLOR INDUSTRIES LTD.
P. O. BOX N4806 TEL. 28941 5


_
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WednidaYMardi6, 174 1


Woman to boost Freeport


FREEPORT/LUCAYA
Promotion Board chairman,
Albert J. Miller has announced
the appointment of Ms.
Frances (Frankie) Shenker
(pictured) as regional
representative for the board.
Ms. Shenker, whose office
will be at 1271 Avenue of the
Americas in New York City,
has a broad business
background, ranging from
hotel sales to publicity and
public relations."
Her last position, before
joining the board, was with the
Granit Hotel and Convention
Centre as assistant sales
manager.
This is not Ms. Shenker's
first affiliation with the
Freeport/Lucaya Promotion


Board. She was employed for a
year in the Board's former
Miami office.
In making the an-
nouncement, Mr. Miller
stated: "We are delighted to


have Ms. Shenker back on the
team. She is a true Freeport
booster and her background in
hotel sales and publicity will
serve her well in her new
position."
Ms. Shenker will work
closely with the Bahamas
Tourist Offices in the United
States and Canada, and the
sales offices of Freeport's
hotels.
She will service both retail
and wholesale agencies and
follow-up prospective group
and convention business.
A native of New York, Ms.
Shenker moved to Florida as a
child. She is a graduate of Palm
Beach High School and
attended the University of
Florida.


CHEMIST IS PROMOTED
C. A. SMITH m-inager of the Employee Relations Depart-
ment at the Bahamas Chemical Division of Syntex
Corporation, today announced the promotion of Donald A. Glass
(pictured) from process development chemist, B. Sc. to
employment coordinator.
Donald joined Syntex on November 1, 1971 as a chemist in the
Process Development Department and was the first Bahamian
chemist ever employed by Syntex.
In 1966 he graduated from St. Augustine's College in Nassau
where he was head boy.
After receiving tuition scholarship assistance from the
Catholic Church, he enrolled at the University of Albuquerque in
New M'exico where he earned his B.Sc. degree in chemistry.
The 1971 graduate later took additional courses in chemistry
at New Mexico Highlands University, Las Vegas, New Mexico,
and is now a member of the American Chemical Society.
A devotee of physical and mental fitness, Donald is a tennis
enthusiast and a recent yoga convert. A guitar instructor, Donald
is a member of the YMCA and also editor of the division's
newspaper, SYNTROPICS. The former Process Development
Chemist is also an active member of the Freeport Branch of
Toastmaster's International.
One of'nine children, Donald is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Leroy
A. Glass of Third Street, The Grove, Nassau.


NOTICE


NOTICE is hereby given that JANICE ROCATA HALL of
Baillou Hill Road Nassau is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration should not be granted
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 27th day of February
1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. O. Box N7147, Nassau.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that FELIX EMANUEL
BUTTERFIELD of Sea Grape Grand Bahama Is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 6th day of
March 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs P. O. Box N3002,
Nassau.




NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ST. LOUIS FENELON of
Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalisation as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalization should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 27th day of
February 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P. O. Box N7147, Nassau.




NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that HILDA ERNESTIBA
BANNISTER of Kemp Road, Nassau, Bahamas is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for naturalisation as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalisation should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 6th day of
March, 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, Ministry of Home Affairs, P. O. Box
N3002, Nassau.


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... IT ALL ADDS UP




your reusable but unwanted

items of

clothing, tools,

appliances, clocks,

fans, etc.. clear out

your ciosets, garage, storeroom...

all can be of help

to someone else.


Donate them to


Bazaar
ROSETTA STREET

TWO DOORS WEST OF
MONTROSE AVE


I.c-






I)


RAFFLE

WINNERS
BAHAMAS Red Cross has
announced results of the
Detachment No. 4 raffle held
on Saturday. Prizes may be
collected from branch
headquarters on Dowdeswell
Street between 9.00 and 5.00
p.m.
Trip for Two One way to
Miami Ticket No. 0934 Won by
Wilfred Moxey Tel.24976
Culmer's Alley Donated by
United Shipping
Trip for two Haiti Donated
by Ilamingo Airlines Ticket
0642 Won by (Greg Williams -
Nassau
Trip for two Rock Sound
-Donated4 by Pan American -
Ticket 0866 Won by Monique
Brown P. O. Box 2039-Robinson
Road
Bicycle Donated Nassau
Bicycle Co. Ticket 0577 Won by
Chivonne Miller Marathon Est.
Tel. 56070.
Dinner for Two Captain's
Table Donated by Flagler Inn -
Ticket 0550 Won by Joetta Smith
- Oxford Avenue
:iftcen Gallons Gasoline -
Malcolm's Garage Ticket 0690
Won by Ste V Yamacraw Road
- Tel. 42402
Dinner for two Donated by
toward Johnson-Nassau Beach -
Ticket 1375 Won by Ethyn D.
Farrington Palm Beach Street -
Tel. 22005
1 Bottle Champagne Donated
by Bethel Robinson Ticket 1715
Won by 8e R. King Tel. 77501 -
Box N-4812
Ten Gallons Gasoline Kemp
Road Garage Ticket 1384 Won
by Sylvia Iorbes Tel. 24682
I Bottle Perfume
Cole-Thompson Pharmacy Ticket
0127 Won by A. 1Ba Claridge
Road Tel. 34384
I Electric Iron Donated by
Kelly's Hardware Ticket 1727 Won
by Michell Hanna Tel. $3275 -
Montel Heights.
I Bottle Whisky Donated by
Maury Roberts Ticket 1214 Won
by Clinton Outten Freeport -
Box I:-1217 Tel. 252-5725
$10.00 Food Voucher
Donated by Bahamas Supermarkets
Ltd. Ticket 1435 Won by
Vincent Peet Nassau East Tel.
43107
Shampoo & Set Donated by
Mar I)ees ticket 0526 Won by
Trevor Johnson HIghbury Park -
Tel. 32424 32429
I Bottle Perfume Ticket 1216
Won by )esiree Clee Humes East
Street -- Tel. 53476
I Bucket Kentucky Chicken -
Ionated Restaurants (Bahamas)
Ltd. Ticket No. 0499 Won by
Adrian Miller 8th Street The
(rove Tel. 3S321/4

Lenten

services
REV. I'AUL J. Cusack, '.P'.,
Provincial of the PasI nit Order in
Toronto, Canada will preach at a
one-week Lenten Renewal Mission
at Mary Star of the Sea Catholic
Church beginning Sunday, March'
10 and ending Saturday. March 16.
His general theme will be "The
Purpose of Life" and finding that
purpose in the Person of (Christ.
Subjects to be treated are:
"Christ, the One Who loves",
"Christ. the One Who forgives",
"Christ, the One Who is present",
"Christ, the One Who prays", and
"Mary, the Mother of Faith".
On Sunday, March 10, the
well-known Canadian preacher will
give the sermon at all the Masses.


AS a tribute to the late Theodore
Richardson, who was choir director at St.
Joseph's Church for more than 25 years up to
the time of his death last August, the Catholic
Diocesan Choir has started the Teddy
Richardson Memorial Scholarship Fund.
The first recipient of a scholarship award
was Miss Sandra Richardson, daughter of the
deceased Mr. Richardson.
Sandra is a Form 4 student at St.
Augustine's College. Making the cheque
presentation for one year's tuition, $420, is


Homes recovery


Mr. Eric Wilmott, treasurer of the Catholic
Diocesan Choir Association.
The amount represents part of proceeds
from a Christmas Musical Concert given by the
diocesan choir last December at Our Lady's
Church.
The association plans to award scholarships
to other deserving students. Left to right are:
The Rev. Grorge Wolfe, O.S.B., administrative
officer at St. Augustine's College; Mr. Lou
Adderley, headmaster, Mr. Wilmott and Mr.
Adrian Russell, secretary, Catholic Doicesan
Choir Association.


'may not be strong'
A TOP SAVINGS and loan official cautioned today that while
home construction activity should pick up in the second half of
1974, there is no assurance the recovery will be particularly
strong.
George B. Preston, president of the United States League of
Savings Associations, expressed the view that the comeback in
home construction should not be counted upon to provide any
major stimulus to the economy during the balance of 1974.
Addressing the Southeastern Conference of the U.S. League
now being held at the Paradise Island Hotel, Preston said that
while savings flows to savings and loan associations have improved
in recent months, the improvement has not been uniform across
the country. "There are a good many areas where savings flows
are flat or just mildly favourable," he said.
The League official, president of Fidelity Federal Savings and
Loan Association, West Palm Beach. Florida, said that the current
recession in housing was triggered by last summer's "credit
crunch" that the recovery from the present slump is being
impeded by the energy crisis and the shortage of gasoline.
"Home builders report that the shortage of gasoline has
reduced the flow of customer traffic to their developments and
these builders- along with the lenders who are financing them
certainly share the typical American's interest in seeing some
early relief in the gasoline shortage," said Preston.
The League officials said that some economists expecting an
upsurge in home construction have overlooked the considerable
"time lag" between the time savings institutions receive greater
savings flows and when this improvement shows up in a rise in
home construction.
"Trying to predict this time lag with great exactness is, at best,
an imprecise science," said Preston. "In the periods of recovery
from the credit crunches of 1966 and 1969-70, there was a lag of
about six months between the pick up in savings and the start of
a recovery in home building and buying."
"Whether this time lag is longer this time than the two other
"post-crunch" periods remains to be seen.
"One thing we do know is mortgage loan commitments
outstanding are at a fairly low point, having dropped from 15.9
billion to 7.3 billion at the end of the summer.


MR. DUDLEY Martin-
borough (pictured) an
employee of Navios
Corporation for the past ten
years, has recently been
appointed Supervisor of their
Chartering and Contracts
section.
As part of the management
team, his responsibilities will
include the negotiation and
preparation of ships' charters
and other agreements
connected with Navios
Corporation's world-wide
bulk shipping operations.
Mr. Martinborough joined
Navios in August, 1963 after
completing his secondary
education at the Government
High School here in Nassau.
Following qualifying
experience with Navios and
under the company's
sponsorship, he attended The
City of London College in
1971 to prepare for the
Institute of Chartered
Shipbrokers advanced level
examination. Upon passing
this examination, Mr.
Martinborough is believed to
have become the first
Bahamian to qualify for and
attain membership in the
Institute of Chartered
Shipbrokers Association.
Mr. Martinborough, his
wife Val and their two
daughters, Michelle and Mia,
live at Tower Estates, Nassau.


FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157

When you get tired of
Beauty Aids that don't
aid, you're ready for Betty
Weider, Nassau Drug Store
on Mackey St. has all the
exercise AIDS for the
Whole Family.A'.h I


a I


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lose up to 3'1 inches
in lust 14 days using
S the exclusive Waist
Shaper Plan. Look
two inches slimmer
INSTANTLY by
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Bustline Persuader
Body Dynamic System
Waist Wheel
Leotards
Dumbell sets
Skip rope, etc.

NASSM DRU6 SIMT
Mackey St. Phone 54506


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN TIE SUPREME COURT
Equity Side


1974
No. 141


IN THE MATTER OF VALUE CAPITAL
LIMITED


AND


IN THE MATTER OF
ACT CAP. 184


THE COMPANIES


Notice is hereby given that a petition for the
winding-up of the above-named company by the
Supreme Court was, on the 25th day of February
1974 presented to the said Court by Lawrence
Wilkov of 4510 Fillmore Street, Hollywood Hills.
Florida. U.S.A. David Warham of 1965 South
Ocean Drive, Hallandale, Florida, U.S.A.

And that the said petition is directed to be heard
before The Honourable Mr. Justice James Smith
sitting at the Supreme court in the City of Nassau
in the Island of New Providence, one of the
Bahama Islands, on Monday the 29th day of April
1974 at ten o'clock in the forenoon and any
creditor or contributory of the said company
desirous to support or oppose the making of an
order on the said petition may appear at the time
of hearing by himself or by his counsel for that
purpose: and a copy ofa petition will be furnished
to any creditor or contributory of the said
company requiring the same by the undersigned,
on payment of the regulated charge for the same.

SELIGMAN. MAYNARD & CO
The Butler & Sands Building,
Bay Street,
P. O. Box N7525,
Nassau, N. P.
Attorneys for the Petitioners
NOTE:- Any person who intends to appear on the
hea-ng of the said petition must serve on or send
by post to the above-named Seligman, Maynard &
Co notice in writing of his intention so to do. The
notice must state the name and address of the
person, or, if a finn. the name and address of the
firm, and must be signed by the person or firm, or
by his or their Attorney (if any) and must be
served, or if posted must be sent by post, in
sufficient time to reach the above-named not later
than six o'clock in the afternoon of Friday the
26th day of April 1974.


Blaze victim's fund
A FIRE relief fund in id of the family of Mr. and Mrs.
Joseph Edecombe who lost their home and entire
belongnlp in a fire on Saturday, February 23, has been
opened by Mr. Alfred Maycock, M.P. Ft. Fincastle.
The public is notified that donations to the fund may be
made through the Joseph Edglcombe Fire Relief Fund
which has been opened with the People's Penny Saving's
Bank, Gibbs Corner and East Street branch.
Donations of ekthing and other household goods will
also be accepted, a spokesman for the fund has said.


AdwB


Wednesday, March 6,1974


Wednesday, March 6, 1974


'12


Uhp iuribunP











Ghr? ribuit


Wednesday, March 6, 197


Jennie Mackey's whole




life is--children!


"TFHER-'S ALWAYS room
for one more", sang Mlary
McLeod Bethune, or rather the
actress that played her in the
movie of her life. as she
reminisced about her
childhood in which. although
poor, her mother 'woud aliwa as
find an extra place round the
table at meals for unexpected
visitors.
This refrain nagged at me
continually after interviewing
Mrs. Jennie Mackey of Nassau
Mrs. Mackev has adopted or
fostered t went\-seven children
These adoptions were not the
drawn out. pl.nned-well-in-
advJane .ind surrounded bl a
morass o! legal steps kind
lhe'y mist happened
"I iist lo'e children". Mr,
Mackek told me in a recent
interview "M(',i tf them came'
to spend a week or a weekend
itith me tan rid the\ ne er go
back So I kept them and
iediated them 'til they go
married "
Whlic the mindl air!s
bo:ggles at thle enormity of
rasng rtwentsy seven children
a sort '" oone-\vwonan Ranturh!
lorneis' tlts hi's a lnot enough
for this indo iniiahl
elteriescent little vwom rr a.
Hecr communiiIt1t w work
involves an incr-d' ble schedule
for a woman without children
Mrs Jlelnni \Mackey is a
Vice-Presidecrn of Oiti'en Mary 's
Needlework (;ii!
She i, o, the Boardt o the
Ranfurl i ,m.nesi tr (-Children
on which s, he is co, I. itaannian of
!he Ittlnd-Raissnig _onrini!tt'ee


Mer: !l Retarhded
iSh s \s-i,'oclAt' Member
oA Bhihe B h.ias lH rariria
Socw'.' .sd: ( h.dirTiinn
pm ve sae, rnI
She i- Y''low Bird the
: r ... Marga.reot s olual t.iry
, s, rkers, :.i 'hih she is the
0 tI):r' a!. tir ( Casually
De;-rtment"
She i- a member of the Red
iCoss andi is involved with the
\I e. -o n-Wh.t--i programme.
Sh:-' ss a member of the
i\;wrnranr WVimen' (lub and
S''rn.i Soi.et and usdsi t
deriitr Ahil ri's: to the i)ea!

She sells tickets for the
Crippled Children's raffle in
fact wherever there is a raffle
for chadrti there you'll find
Jennite Mckc pushing tickets
harder nil ta ste r than the best
re t'lic'! "No-hbod\ has ever
turredi :,'' di si.'. she ,aid in
rp me t) a ury oit i'ne as
ti wh other ciharit able
donations i -re 'becoming more
diflicul i to get nowada s
What miake, a Jennie
Mlackei A woman whose
whir li!e s .i! expression of
.hiiu l n its ;ne-it sense, a
:;'e t,'r r h.'r teliw human
beings utter ii devoid of any
"eulid crrne' of the lady
t' thi,' alnr e! rianrng gilts to
'he peas.nts, A regular and
pec ied intmUl' r'.;ti 'or Jennie
MS ki 's !' : the gift ot
hn rselt
Sh e 's r- : Irn t theI


Southern States of America
over sixty-two \ ears ago.
She came from a large
famiily lier mother and father
h:-d seven. children, her
mother's mother had 23 and
her father's mother had 17
lier memories of her
childhood are of a happy
united family She recalls no
hardships, deprivations and
menictions none of the
difficulties of growing up black
in the Southern States half a
century ago
For Jenrnie Mackey has
always -ppeared to transcend
age. race and nationalist\
She does not look her
sixt\-tso years. She does not
look an particular age
\lthouih nicely dressed, she
obvi oui, s has lusedt few of the
dex !ce- :or retarding or
covering up the ageing process
lHer vitalrt\ and infectious
sense of ittn, however, have
retarded the ageing process and
her personal.,t gives lie to
the sixth-two sears she has
!icd
l1er mother wa s a nurse and
wo rked at nights lHer father
.was a carpenter and worked
da\ s So. Jennie and her
tro1thers and sisters always had
thie presence tof losing parent
in the home.
Jennie and her brothers and
sisters were brought up with
both financii.i and emotional
secustr!t
ftlowever, they were not
iavisihd with material goods
"veC used to get 2c. a ds.y for
lunch", she reminisced and we
saved out1 of our allow ances for
Xnias, and birthdays adding
thatt is how I bring my
children up."
I so years ago Jenny packed
uip the seven children she still
has remaining at home
(in,-udiitng the baby who was
thben only eight months old)
and took thenlt holele" to
celebrate her mother's 80th
birthday. All in all about 300
members of Jennie's mother's
family came from all over the
world to celebrate her birthday
with her.
Knowing the daughter, it is
not difficult to imagine the
nmoher She is rnom 82 and
"she thinks she's 16"', said
Jennie ot her mother
A teek of so before my
inter icv with Mrs Mackey I
met her at the Laundramat.
tier stationwagon overflowed
with pre-school children and
laundry tier laundramat bill
came to, S35'
IMy e! \iear old son. wh is
very concrious ot the cost of
living and childrearing, asked
me whtheer her husband
"minded" her having so many
children!
Not so, laughed Mrs.
Mackey, who has been married
to Carrington M\ackey for 32
years they were married in
June. 1942 \lr Mackey is
self-employed He runs a
battery business, a farm and
together they run a boarding
house on Lew is Street.
"lie's wonderful." she told
ine in descriing hter husband.


SAM (AGED 4) AND GEORGE (AGED 2) make an
eloquent plea for their more unfortunate brothers. They
make a striking poster in advertising the Bahamas Humane
Society's Emerald Ball to be held at La Chandelle Room,
Halycon Balmoral Hotel on the evening of March 23rd. Sam
and George are examples of how beautiful well-cared-for
Bahamian pot-cakes can be. They were adopted at a few
weeks old by Mr. and Mrs. Gus Roberts from the Humane
Society after having been picked up as starving,
worm-infested puppies.


JENNIE MACKEY ... lover of children.


"Ie likes it (rearing such a
large brood of children)
because I like it ... anything to
make nme happy."
"Without him and the
children I would be very low,"
admitted Mrs Mackey.
For this amazing woman has
had two heart attacks. Why
doesn't she slow down. then?
"If I took it easy I'd worry,"
she said simply. "I love doing
this. As far as old people and
children are concerned that is
my whole life."
flow then, in a day and age
of the high cost of children do
the Mackeys manage'?


"You can't take it wi
when you go", Jennie sal
admitted that she is ver
with the children in th
makes them look atte
treat the furniture ot
home in Danotlaes' I
with respect "I haven't
anything for years.
And how do the
chores involved in cari
such a large family e\
done.
Again, no sweat
children and I work like
... we share everyone
his part", Mrs Mackes sa
What about pers s


I TOWN and AROUND I


problems, problems i(,
adjustment, incidents ol
trauma etc.
Again Mrs. Macke. said that
she'd had no problems
explaining that she'd taken the
children when they were small,
In fact. Jennie Mackey does
not believe in "bad" children,
"It burns me up", she admitted
when institutions don't w%.nt
to take children because they
are bad.
Neither does Mrs Macke\
believe in beating
low does she discipline' .
then''
Mostly a look from iher is
enough to inhibit the riautiiril
behavior
"On the whole I believe that
if you sit down and talk to
ihildircn the i are nirt i olnr! ti,
, believe \ oui rilghlt i: .i, itl
git radually
"It's no good Lo ri.tg". slhe
said. "Thie less \,ou halae tiio .
to ttheni (about their iisdleed
th \ oL the better This inl p.itwiul.ii
id Slit' applies to "'.Jck t.ilking
11 iri don't stretch h lie s b ct
sit shli You'll onl i mtake th liu Icel
cr al,1 the\ 're snilIl
thf I r \Ml s M ackey's Iltdti.il l,' !. i
I.tat' ( if discipline for a iisdt m a.in'o
blioi iiht is not to ill tiheil t t o(l!
toI ai event to \t ihi l lt th d
cindill' been looking foiwl .id
l111 I1 r M rs. lakek\ is stnti l tb ut
er 1i,1 the children keC 'pIL c ir!t'\ s
b ui t (II the \ill lc' riiI 1s .itld
i" relt llliations aire it a I i lin i.
a I rIu "I keep' thlim like a pl' sihe
e doeu saild in i esIbInt hi lie
id. relationship w ith ler lkli i
onuia* "' lie% 'ill lv\" th, f) fam i' .'"


...by Daphne Wallace-Whitfield


she said. "I got a hor'e tromi
the IHuanel Society. They ( the
children) are marvellous with
it. You have to I keep them busy
althoughI yl can't control
their lives
And it seems tliat this last
,sentence is a good sumllmlinlg iup
tf tihe child-raising philosophy
of a great little womllan who has
success lill launched over
teimcnt childirn ntiro the world
io leadl hippy and productive


Will i11t R it's an indication
of the interest human beings
ali, se in li-irI ar-liKe or
Shethel' tlhert's ntot an awful
lot of things ti1 do with your
children in town. II.M.S.
I eailess, the British warship.
which \w,is dsockted ill Nassau
last week was absolutely
intuniIdaltd with visitors. The
hoot was on the ,other foot as
H .i in ins wih tli lheir children


turned "tourist" to explore
"Fearless" on Thursday
afternoon.

From "Fearless" to
Bahamian fishermen might not
be an apparent connection but
it was to me last week when I
was on the dock at Potter's
Cay buying fish.
The guide books to the
Bahamas do say something
about not bargaining with
Bahamian vendors.
I asked for two large
groupers. The man fished them
out of the hold of his boat and
said "S 20.00".
I said "That's too much. I
was thinking about S15.00".
lie said: "Lady, you don't
want two large groupers" and
promptly threw them back in
the hold.
I ended up with one large
and one smaller grouper for
$15.00. Partly I admired his


guts and partly I
wanted to give a young
Dartmouth cadet a
neighbour of my parents
who was on "Fearless"
something Bahamian to eat.
Next time I'll quell my urge
to feed visitors Bahamian and
invest my $15.00 in a nice big
roast of beef.

Mr. Noah Newton is a
Bahamian who believes that
our soil can raise much more
produce than we're doing at
the moment. The photo on this
page are of cabbages and
cucumbers Mr. Newton grew
on his farm at Nichols Town,
Andros.
Hurrah for Mr. Newton and
I hope that he and many like
him get support and
encouragement so that we can
eat "Bahamian" within a

Page 13, Col. I


When it comes to insurance

it's Dominion for Life


... in Nassau

call George Evans 2-3843


THE DOMINION LIFE ASSURANCE COMPANY


Commerce Term Deposits



We'll show you a sure way to



make more profit on your money.


Maybe you never looked at it this way.
But the interest a bank pays on your savings.
is profit coming to you. So the higher the interest
rate, the greater your profit.
Which is what our Term Deposit service
is about. It works like this: you deposit $1000
or more with us, for an agreed term. It may be
3 months, 6 months, a year, or longer.
We pay you interest according to the
sum deposited, and the period it remains
in the bank.


Call it a higher form of savings, if you like.
The fact is, you earn higher interest than you
would on regular savings. So you make more profit
on your money.
Talk to your Commerce branch manager
about your own personal Term Deposit.
It's profitable.




CANADIAN IMPERIAL
BANK OF COMMERCE


You and the Commerce.


Together we're both stronger.


=::zx((


I


- -I L -~--- -


I _


Wensdy March- 6,~ 19


I^


w









Wednesday, March 6, 1974


UPhr tribune


TOWN- cid AR


13


Sir Milo tours flagship


From Page 1 2
reasonable budget!
I was in court recently on a
minor traffic charge and boy,
did I have plenty of company.
There was a whole bunch of
people there answering charges
of disobeying traffic
policemen's signals. Nearly, if
not all, pleaded guilt' with
an explanation. The
explanations were all variations
on the same theme: they had
either misunderstood the signal
which they claimed was
unclear or said that the
policeman had given no signal
at all.
One gentle-mannered young
lady demonstrated her point to
the Magistrate by showing him
what she'd always understood




Tropica


OPENS: 6:30 Sho\ss start 7 p. m
CtHILI)REN UNI)ER 12 ifRE!
See 2 features late as 9-,00
--EXCLUSIVE-.
STARTS TONITE! *
"GODSPELL"7 & 10:45,
"JOHN "9:00


OSPEL Ac1CR IN







COLORD GP c.i...F. e,,.,


SHARON LEVARITY
Miss Homecoming 1974.
to stop signal to be and then
demonstrated what she claimed
the particular "stop" signal in
her case had been.
The Magistrate mildly
excused the police on the
grounds of having so many
lanes of traffic to deal with and
gently admonished the drivers
to stop if at all in doubt.
Hlavinsg experienced all the
frustration of these drivers the
firm clear signals of the
policewoman on duty outside
Queen's College in the
imornings last week were a
delight and much appreciated.
And what is more. more
difficult t,' ii, and different
lanes it would be hard to find.

Sharon Levarity, the
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Carl
Levarity of iiiuniiir was recently
cirownid Miss Hlomecoming
1074 of Florida Memorial
Miss Levarity is a senior
inaioring in Business
Administration. She stands 5ft.
8'-ins.. weighs 130 Ibs and her
Sital statistics are 34-25-37.
She is a very active student
aro und her college campus. She
is a member of Zeta Phi Beta
Sorority. the Social Science
Club s on the Year Book Staff,
i .1 Pan Hellenic Council


NOW SlOtI l\(i'
Matinee 2:30 & 4:45, Evening 8:30-'Phone 2-1004, 2-10055

George Glenda I
S i Segal Jackson I


rnch
U Of Class PGI

PARENTAL. D4ISCRI:T(IO.\ DI'ULD
Reservations not claimed by 8:15, will be sold
S on first come, first served basis.
IA I

S Now thru Friday Now thru Friday
Matinee starts at 2:15 Continuous Showings
Evening 8:30 from 3:00
"WICKED, WICKED" PG. "BLACKGIRL" PG.
Tiffany Boiling, Brck Peters,
David Bailey Leslie Uggams
PLUS PLUS
"THE CREEPING "A MAN CALLED
FLESH" PG. GANNON" PG. I
Tony Franciosa,
'Phone 2-2534 Michael Sarrazin



NOW SHOWING THRU FRIDAY
Matinee Continuous from 2:00,
Evening 8:30-'Phone 3-4666
OTTTTT YRES I


*_ jSTARRtG I ffas i U *
S ROSCO E ORMAN IANA SANS e TECHNICOLOR TECHNICOP
NV ()%I \ I tFR' IS I BV ADBVITTFD.


Johnny, walker

toabar

and say...







"Don't

give up

the ship!"


Representative, a past Miss
United Negro College Fund, a
Sweetheart of Phi Beta Sigma
Fraternity and also a member
of the Advisory Board of
Council.
Her hobbies are: swimming,
singing, meeting interesting
people and most of all,
travelling.
Vincent Higgs, of Nassau,
has been placed on the Dean's
List of Toccoa Falls Institute
(Bible College) Georgia, for
high academic standing during
the first semester of the
1973-74 school year.
To attain the Dean's List a
student must have earned at
least a 2.6 grade point average
on the 3.0 system so
congratulations are in order for
Vincent.
John Church, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Robert Church of Rock
Sound, Eleuthera, is a new
student at Florida Air
Academy, Plantation, Fioriaa.
Florida Air Academy is a
private military school which
offers grades 1 through 8 with
facilities for both boarding and
day students.

IN:!f ~S~I


KIWANIS GOVERNOR
ON OFFICIAL VISIT
THE Kiwanis Governor of
Eastern Canada and the
Caribbean district, of which
the Kiwanis clubs of the
Bahamas form a part, is making
an official visit here starting
tomorrow.
Mr Hedley G. Ivany will be
accompanied by his wife,
Christina.
During his ten-day visit Mr
Ivany will grant the new
George Town Kiwanis club at
Exuma its charter on Saturday,
March 9, will visit the
Eleuthera clubs and grant the
charter to the new club at
Eight Mile Rock, Grand
Bahama on Friday, March 15.

TEACHERS'
TALK
MR. CECIL Curling, acting
principal of the C. R. Walker
Technical College is to speak
on "Winds of Change in
Education" at a meeting of the
Teachers Union to be held 7.30
p.m. tonight at the Teachers
College, Oakes Field.

CONCERT
THE HARDECKER Clinic
Association will present The
Georgetown University Glee
Club in concert Monday at
8.30 p.m. at the Sheraton
British Colonial Ilotel.
The concert is under the
patronage of Mr. George
Mackey, M.P. and Mrs.
Mackey. Tickets can be
firchased froih members of
the Clinic or the president,
Mrs. Olga Bethel, telephone
3-2434.

BASRA MEETING OFF
The regular monthly meeting
of the Bahamas Air Sea Rescue
Association (BASRA)
scheduled for tonight has been
postponed. An announcement
will be made of a new date
within a few days.


ARRIVED TODAY: Joma
from Jacksonville; Grand Turk,
Bermuda from Miami, Fla.
SAILED TODAY: Joma for
Jacksonville: Grand Turk,
Bermuda for Miami
SUN
Rises 6:28 a.m.
Sets 6:15 p.m.


d Botted inSco
blt C^Vernment "UIP








I BLENDED
^eNr t tvrlr tlLPV


CABBAGES AND CUCUMBERS grown by Mr. iNcao Newton on his farm at
Nicholls Town, Andros. Photo: VINCENT VAUGHAN.


Star in 'Drumbeat f or


CYNTHIA WHIT L-
(pictured) vivacious star of
"Hallelujah Baby" fame, will
be the headline guest star at
the annual "Drumbeat for
Heart" show at the Drumbeat
Club on Friday, March 15th.
The annual show, produced by
Peanuts Taylor and Mary
Kelly, raises funds for The Sir
Victor Sassoon (Bahamas)
Heart Foundation. This is the
eighth consecutive year that
Mr. Taylor has turned his
nightclub over to the Heart
Foundation Committee for the


the imselv- % -
sings he ,.
T h e "'' ,. ; ,
show wiii h.ii,
of local .
top B ii h 'i::
well as i .
Club .
Taylor. I'. :
dancer I -A


I -


I d waids. .,..
I)rumni be. (I!.. 1 i
One '
evening hili i -i v ,


GOVERNOR (i, '.1 I 'I Sir
Milo Butler Monday was
taken on a guided inspection
tour of the visitim t'.;S S
Coranado. :.., -' (oi the
.\nl0.hll i.i Squadron fight
which, along with th.- t S.S
Fairfax County arrived i m port
during the weekend.
The two ships, al-niv with
the U.S.S. Speigei (,rove which
was in Freeport Monday. make
up a fleet ot five ship, under
the command of C ommodoore
Marcellus Pit/.
The inspection hb Sir Mlilo.
who was a.lso ac('iiqi aia;id i i
A. D.C. ( ol i()iL [Lin l
Chapman, II % I a courtesy
call paid at Governimc'!t at 1 1
a.m. Monday 'y .S.
Ambassador Ronald Spiers.
U.S. Naval Attache ti. Cmdr.
Joseph )'Amato and Conim.
P'it/.
The squadron is a part of the
U.S. Navy's C -'It ., t task
force.


Also inc ided in the tour of
the U.S.S. 'oranado, which is
iiti., lai-ir than the H.M.S.
Feartess., i: port last week,
w,'re liku!c Commissioner
S.lathiecl !hompson, Mr.
R o d nie y B a i n A sst.
Cominnssioncr Major.
I'he two ships left Nassau
this molrnig tor Virginia.
"The (Go ernor-general's
interest and hospitality
certainly made him many
friends in the U.S. Navy," a
spokesman this morning said.
Many persons also took the
opportunity 'to have their
photos taken with Sir Milo
while aboard the ship, which
was open to the public.

COTNMTRSS"


show


it :!t" prizes.
Sthe 1974
;, I bird Sports Coupe.
.-L ri;.' R( A TV
Sis two
: .. i. --p t ic c tts to
1 .. *;,'- u' ,inl. *Hiuith prize
'-- 1 '' ", du;\ vaculnum

-iu doo-
:- ':': ;.i' ..,' nding thc
: -. plus an
: lint i n ltt .


TO BUY OR SELL
BAHAMIAN PROPERTY, Call or See

GROSHA l PROPERTI LTD.
"grwinq th .'' 1947"
107 SHIRLEY ST. -- NEXT TO SASSOON HOUSE
PHONE 2-7662 -2-8966 BOX N-1706


special fund raising show.
Cynthia White's last
appearance in Nassau was at
the Crow's Nest of the Holiday
Inn in November, 1971. Her
other Nassau appearance was in
1969 at Paradise Island's Le
Cabaret Theatre. ter
appearances at top supper
clubs around the Caribbean,
South America and the United
States have been described as
nothing short of "electric".
Her captivating song stylings
ignite a certain type t
excitement as her repertoire
shows off many kinds -)!
music, from standard pieces t
current popular songs. She is
noted for adding exciting bod\
movements to her renditions.
giving her performances added
depth.
Living in Brooklyn, New
Yof k, of Bahamian
grandparents, the svelt singing
artist has been singing
professionally for eight years.
She got her first big break
when she stepped in the lead in
the road company of the Tony
Award winning musical
comedy "Hallelujah Baby" and
stole the critics' hearts.
Her earlier singing
engagements found her singing
the lead with a calypso hand
from St, Maartens in the Virgin
Islands and a lengthy tour of
the Caribbean hotel circuit.
She originally moved to New
York to study modelling, but
in the meantime continued
singing with small vocal groups
throughout the country.
The successful singing artist
emits pure "naturalness"
there is nothing phony at all
about her. Miss White believes
that even on the stage the
audience can sense insincerity
and "You must show them
you're not a phony."
"Drumbeat for Heart"
audience will have the
opportunity judging this for

RED X DONATIONS
THE Bahamas Red Cross
acknowledges the following
donations in response to the
President's Appeal of January 1.
Staff Ministry of Agriculture &
Fisheries $41, Red Cross Group
Burnt Ground, Glintons &
Seymours $152.75, Red Cross
Group Rum Cay $70, Staff
Barclays Bank International $38,
Mrs. Robert Holt $500, Syntex
Corporation $150. Mrs. R. Castle
$25, Bahamas Amusements Ltd.
Grand Bahama $68, Mrs. & Mrs.
F. C. Rubbra $100.
THE CURRENT three-day
state visit of Libyan President
Moammar Khadafy to
Pakistan will result in
increased co-operation over a
wide field between the two
nations, informed Pakistan
sources said.


'- NOW SERVING F



From 11 : 00 an.Till 5:00
DAILY SPECIALS I !'; ONLY $1.00

DINNER SERVED p. nto MidnightI

Plenty of FREE PARKiNG
EAST BAY A 9'0I BRIDGE






The Wor Famous

Trade Winrs ar & Lounge

takes pleasure in presenting

THE SENSATIONAL



RE[DDIE MUNNINGS JR.


IinI
SHOWTIMES NIGHTLY. 10:40 & 12:40

Make the evening complete with a gourmet dinner
in the Imperial Dining Room.
Dinner from 7:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.






Lsuw ''w


NOW SHIW ING AT 7 & 10:20


AT 8:45


I FIRST .ASSAL: SIO WITNG
'U-I 4!Am :1Iq a : [ U1 Ti nUIinTa


I


I 1


i


1


i












(hP Zribunit


Wednesday, March 6, 1974


CLASSIFIED


SECTION


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS -FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV. TELEPHONE 21986 FXT. 5


REAL ESTATE


C 13773
BEACH LOT. Adelaide Beach.
Phone 41298 nite or day.

C13662
SPONGER'S Cottage Business
with property or Sponger's
Cottage Business with lease on
property Contact: The
Manager. Telephone 41052
1376 7
FOR SALE
Hltor "Cascadilla", East
t. eet and Miller's Court. Main
I' ,, ,, j3 bedrooms. 3 baths.
p", w'ei room, living room,
r rars large f.-, er, dining
o L -rn, ..I etc. Guest
house: 2 bedrooms 2 baths.
Beautifully planted wooded
go, den,. Approximately 2
a en's. Enquiries as to sale oi
iit 'o H. G Christie Ltd 309
[i3j Street. Phone 2-1041.
.- r:..'j?
",vSON'S REAL ESTATE
SCO LTD.
,..rtified Real Estate Brokers
Phones 21178 55408
P. 0. Box N-4648
Nassau, Bahamas
Proudly present
\ SINGG REAL EST ATE
BARGAINS
THROUGHOUT HE
COMMONWEALTH
3 and 4 BEDROOM
)OU'JSES in the following
a 'Js
EASTERN ROAD
Ste waste as well a r

ir SOUCI
.AIR ESTATES
NISTON GARDF NS
;INT ON
AE GROVE (West Bay)
SKYLINE HEIGHTS
S'-,'-SAU EAST
FrA FREEZE
'. LLAGE ROAcD
j.'..DEN GATES
-'.GHLAND PARK
PROSPECT RIDGE



-, raiseADIE ISLAND
S- BAY STREET
S- r AY STREET
S.. rtd HOTEL SITES,
S. LOTS. COMMER-
LOTS, RESIDENTIAL

SE A G E F O R
A VELOPMENT IN THE
S SSSAU AND FAMILY
I ISLANDS SUCH AS GRAND
r .)C;AMA LONG ISLAND,
t LEUTHERA ABACO
.5 ACRE CAY IN THE
i -..UMAS WITH DEEP
'VT. R HARBOUR AND

CALL
DAVSON'S REAL
ESTATE AGENCY
P!h.;.e 21 178 or 80932 21178
P. O. Box N-4648
Nassau. Bahamas
Ci3749
THE PRICE IS RIGHT. In
extc!sie Winton Heights Two
storey. 3 bedrooms. 2
bathr ,rs. 2 Porches, fireplace
for .,se when temperature
plurnmet s to 65 degrees.
LoCve, !ar'scaping Fully
furis' -J Genero financing.
YOU'LL LOVE THE
LOCATION C'use to
slh, ppnrg. o...l, beach 3
bed' i,'ms 2 ba'' ,orons. 2
wa I . m s ll. 3
ai <, ir -her- .- fe p ii e
tot; "b ;'..o 0

PRI .'.AE VALUABLE
CORNER, i. cor-venilent
\1', ; ',it .]. eIrQ SS 3 t.)r tc om ,
S ', ull, -j ir .hedo double
I. ,' ",trio''- ", /alIed in- Price
$6 .000

CHOICE OF THREE IN
NASSAU EAST. Fully
'urrished three and four
bedrioriii homes $37.000 to
$47.000
A SLEEPER ON VILLAGE
ROAD. Listen t, this Large
corner lot. 125 2 240. with 4
bedroom home and i bedroom
aparturert. Private garden,
nari f lit trees Suitnable for
large family, nursery school.
apar trne'it site. F inrancing
available The Drn( e is
unbelievably low
SANS SOUCI, CAREFREE
INDEED! Single family or
duplex lots in San Sauci on
exclusive Gumbo Limbo Lane.


BEST IN BLAIR'. Two large
lots, each 100 x 150 One, only
$8,000. Buy before owner
changes mind

TWO ACRES. On West Bay
Street near Balmoral Hotel.
Hotel, apartment, shopping
centre site. Price slashed to
$100,000. Terms available.

ELEVEN ACRES on Harold
Road. Highway and lake
frontage, panoramic views.
$75,000.

MONARCH OF ALL YOU
SU RVEY. Acreage
opportunity at Abaco. 120
acres on highway and
waterfront between Treasure
Cay and Marsh Harbour. Buy
today at yesterday's price for
tomorrow's profit. $800 per
acre.
CHESTER THOMPSON
REAL ESTATE
12 Charlotte Street
Telephone 24777
Evenings 31425, 42035.


REAL ESTATE


II


C13796
FOR SALE
HILLTOP HOUSE GROVE -
views of Sea. Patio, enclosed
fruited grounds, and
SWIMMING POOL, with
changing rooms. Has four
bedrooms, three baths
furnished. Property in good
condition, immediate
occupancy. Sales price only
$125,000.00. Priced below
reproduction costs. Ground
200 by 145
AN ESTATE Out west with
312 feet of SANDY BEACH -
four bedrooms four baths.
spacious house, with garages,
with five bedrooms on second
floor. Grounds superbly
landscaped good condition.
See is to appreciate.
LAKEFRONT 3 bedrooms 3
baths, plus one complete
contained bedroom and bath.
sitting arid kitchen. Large area
for playroom. Gorgeous views
of lake, has dock,
kingsize pool. over acre of
fruited grounds laden with
citrus. Tastefully furnished,
equipped for high class
entertaining ideal outdoor
living large patios all this
for only $215,000.00. See at
moment's notice.
DIAL THE ACTION
REALTORS DAMIANDS
REALTY 22033, 22305,
41197 Night.


C13745
FOR SALE
3 bedroom 2 bath house
financing available. Phone
2-1495 or 6
C13794

FOR SALE
CENTREVILLE 4 lots
(60,000 s(. ft.) including
quality built building with
three units rentable. Ideal for a
Cnurch, Professional Building,
Offices. Apartments etc. valued
$179,000.00. Owner will sell
for $150,000.00.
MARLBOROUGH STREET
WEST opposite British
Colonial, three properties. One
as low as $100,000.00 other
two relatively cheap. Good
location for tourist trade, or
INVESTMENT. Invest in high
class properties to beat
inflation.
ARCADE BUILDING
opposite Malcolms on Bay
Street lowest price available
on main street. See anytime.

THREE UNIT APARTMENT
BLDG. adjacent Racquet Club.
Grounds 55 by 150. Income
$5,000.00 yearly. Asking only
$27,500.00. With or without
terms.
DIAL NICK DAMIANOS, THE
ACTION REALTOR 22033.
22305, evenings 41197.
C13779
"NICE-VIEW" APARTMENTS
(Located on Hill-top)
Montrose Avenue
Comprised of the following:

One 3-bedroom 2-bathrooms,
wall to wall carpet; three
rooms air-conditioned;
completely furnished; front
porch and back patio.
One 2-bedroom 1-bathroom
apartment. Iwo rooms
air-conditioned.
Three 1-bedroom apartments
(one air-conditioned); also,
garage, laundry and washing
machines.

These apartments are
completely furnished with
isdli -r- lawn and fruit trees.
Buildings are all of concrete
block. Originally priced at
$100,000. A BARGAIN for
$75,000 or nearest offer for
cash. Mortgage available for
one half over a period of five
years
For appointment to view
telephone 32109.
All apartments are now leased
for one year ending October 1,
1974.
C13793
FOR SALE
4 bedrooms 3 baths, two
kitchens etc furnished
HIGHLAND PARK was
$75,000.00. Owner would sell
for $65,000.00.
SANS SOUCI 302 by 100 -
gorgeous views house has 3
bedrooms two baths selling
for $57.500.00.
GLeNIMlON GARDENS -
modern 3 bedrooms, 2 baths,
ultra modern, cathedral
ceilings, furnished- quiet area.
$60,000.00.
MONTAGU HEIGHTS
modern Spanish style with 3
bedrooms 21'/ baths, furnished.
Asking $95,000.00 100 by
150.
BLUE HILL ESTATES -
hilltop, corner plot, 100 by
110. Asking $12,000.00. Was
$16,000.00. See anytime.
WATERS EDGE lot 100 by
100. Walled-in. Only
$22,500.00. Situate Southeast
Winton.
PALMDALE have house and
land on corner plot for only
$32,000.00.
EAS ERN ROAD tainLI .a -
lot only $18,000.00.
DIAL DAMIANOS 22033,
22305, 22307. Evening 41197.


REAL ESTATE


Hundred and Sixty-one
(161) which has been laid
out by the Airports Board
according to a plan now
filed in the Crown Lands
Office of the Colony as
Number Four Hundred and
Seventy-seven (477) N.P.

Mortgage dated 26th June,
1968 Michael Glen
Thompson and Eudane
Thompson to Finance
Corporation of Bahamas
Limited. Recorded ib Book
1323 at pages 144 to 151.
The sale is subject to a reserve
price and to the rifht for the
Auctioneer or any person on
his behalf to bid up to that
price.
Terms: 10% of the purchase
price at time of sale and
balance on completion.
Dated 13th day of February
A.D. 1974.
KIRK S. HINSEY
Public Auctioneer


I I I I


C 13707
4 BEDROOM, 2 bathroom
unfurnished house with carport
and sewing room. FOR SALE.
Call 31671 31672(9.00a.m.
12.00; 2.00 p.m. 5.00
p.m. weekdays)

C13797
FOR SALE
PRINCE CHARLES AVENUE
5 bedrooms 2 baths some
furniture spacious grounds --
patio needs some cleaning.
Sales price $47,500.00. DIAL
DAMIANOS, 22305, 22307,
Evenings 41280.
C13710
BUY NOW!
SAN ANDROS
LOTS
14,500
sq. FEET!
Almost 1/3 acre
$45 DOWN, $45 per MONTH
CALL OR VISIT
FRANKCAREY
REAL ESTATE
P. O. Box N4764
BAY & DEVEAUX ST.
Tel. 27667, 24815

C13791
ONE NEWLY built unit
townhouse $80,000
3 bedroom, 2 baths, fully
furnished, airconditiono'd
house $45,000
Phone: 56332 (7.9 morning
6-10 evening).

C13795

FOR SALE
NASSAU EAST 3 bedrooms 2
baths, furnished. All this for
$36,000.00.

SOUTHEAST WINTON 100
foot on Water for as low as
$22,500.00. See anytime. Live
like a King on the waters edge.
TWYNAM AVENUE house
11/2 storeys, furnished, enclosed
rounds. Only $32,000.00.
CENTREVILLE HILLTOP
gorgeous views swimming
pool, patio front and rear.
Main house four bedrooms
with 2-unit apartments. All
rented. Good income. Only
$150,000.00.
CITY PROPERTY ideal for
business. Well maintained
grounds, immediate
occupancy. Only $110,000.00.
Spacious grounds.

CENTREVILLE on Collins
office and apartment
building. I deal for
professionals. Reasonably
priced. Good financing.
DIAL DAMIANOS, THE
ACTION NUMBERS 22033,
22305. Evenings 41197.

PUBLIC AUCTION
C 1368?
KIRK S. HINSEY will sell at
the Parking Lot east of the
Harbour Moon Hotel, Bay
Street, on the 22nd day of
March 1974, at 12 noon, the
following prope(ty:-
"ALL THAT piece parcel or
lot of land being Lot
Number One Hundred and
Five (105) in "Yellow Elder
Gardens" Subdivision situate
in the Western District of
the Island of New
Providence.
Mortgage dated 7th March,
1967 Kenneth Eugene
Frazier and Inez Louise Frazier
to Finance Corporation of
Bahamas Limited. Recorded in
Book 1098 at pages 497 to
503.
The sale is subject to a reserve
price and to the right for the
auctioneer or any persoonon his
behalf to bid up to that price.
Terms: 10% of the purchase
price at the time of sale and
balance on completion.
Dated 13th day of February
A.D. 1974
KIRKS. HINSEY
Public Auctioneer.
C 13686
KIRK S. HINSEY will sell at
the Parking Lot east of the
Harbour Moon Hotel, Bay
Street, on the 22nd day of
March 1974, at 12 noon, the
following property:-
"ALL THAT piece parcel or
lot of land comprising a part
of Oakes Field in the
Western District of the
Island of New
Providence one of the
Bahama Islands and known
as Stapledon Gardens and
being Lot Number One


I


PUBLIC AUCTION
C13681
KIRK S. HINSEY will sell at
the Parking Lot east of the
Harbour Moon Hotel, Bay
Street, on the 22nd day of
March 1974, at 12 noon, the
following property:-
"ALL THAT piece parcel or
lot of land situate in the
Western District of the
Island of New Providence
and being Lot No. 14 on a
Plan of the Subdivision of
Lots Nos. 13 18 in Block
No. 2 of the "Oakes Airport
Board Subdivision."
Mortgage dated 28th July,
1971 Joyce Veronica Bain to
Finance Corporation of
Bahamas Limited.
Recorded in Volume 1800 at
pages 491 to 497.
The sale is subject to a reserve
price and to the right for the
Auctioneer or any person on
his behalf to bid up to that
price.
Terms: 10% of the purchase
price at time of sale and
balance on completion.
Dated 13th day of February
A.D. 1974.
KIRK S. HINSEY
Public Auctioneer.

FOR RENT
C13630
LARGE spacious I bedroom
apartment. Walking distancing
from town arid shopping
centre. Phone 23709 34881
C13741
2 BEDROOM apartment
furnished airconditioned,
telephone Palmdale 2 3010
4-1301

C13732
THREE Bedroom, 1',; Bat".
Unfurnished House Phone
4-2193. After 5 p.m.
C13735
EFFICIENCY $135 per month
all utilities Montagu Beach
IHoLruse (next to CGip;eag,'s)
After 6 p.m. telephone 31156

C13723
EFFICIENCY Ap'- ti men
Pal dale for reserved
gentleman ONLY. For
information call 5 1044.

C 13708
COTTAGES and apartments
monthly airconditioned,
fully furnished, maid service
available. Lovely garden and
swimming pool. Telephone
31297,31093.

C13687
HOUSE suitable for store or
office Madeira Street facing
Shopping Plaza. Contact
2-3170.

C13759
3 BEDROOM 1 bath house
Adderley's Addition, Call
daytime 2-4491 Sundays and
nights 5-9839 see Tony Allen.

C13799
FURNISHED 2 bedroom
apartment insisting of
hiving/dininq Igoin kitiher, and
bathroom Twv -iair Ave ue
5-8185.

C13778
NEW duplex apartment
Malcolm Road 2 bedrooms,
$180 per rmonr,th Call bt,901

C13789
TWO bedroom.; aipartlmrntr
Centreville, nri, it ,t Baj .. I
furnished Tel 5b 8.'1 .

C13758
3 BEDROOM I )iath hur,e
Foxdale. Call daytirne 2-4491
Sunday arid nights 'b '. I' Soee
Tony Allen.

C13751
2 COTTAGES on Deal'
Heights semi-furnished. For
information call 2 4656
daytime or 4-1238 nights.


CARS FOR SALE
013724
CENTRAL GARAGE LTD.
"The Easiest Place in Town to
Trade"
1970 FORD CORTINA
B$850
1970 SUNBEAM RAPIER -
B$1650.
1971 JAVELIN S.S.T.
(automatic, radio) B$2850.


C 13776
1973 VAUX ,IAEL -. r..
-,v, 8000 :, '.
, f, .ditiao, $?22( ".....
2 1.'09 or 7 781,,

C : 775
I'7? PINTO EQ n ."..Iun,,
ani;r onditioned, radio, 8,0(00
wilts, excellent -or. 1ii' n.
$4.200. Phone 2-40" 0
7 7866.

C 13 790
1972 Cutlass. 53.000 I'
56332 (7-9) morning i)
evening).

iFOR SALE
C1372"5
AQUA Kelvinitor Foodd'i amn
22 cu. ft. double do f' re. 'e
ref iiger aito ri Fr st ,r' I
Excelleint 4 )ndt,, 1 $3 7i.
Phonc 4 10'i5.


C137b'/
8 TRACK I .pt.
half years i d.
Perfe t v.,af ( I r
$65 Phorn; ?4 24,


ENTERTAINMENT

C 13 713
THE UNIVI 'SI PL\ AYiYER






ftF i








present
"The Star Spangled Girl"
by Neil Simon-
authoi of "The Odd Couple"

'Baiefoot ;,1 the Park"
Marn'h /th tI iough lOthh
8.30 p.m..
Starring Andrew Wils(on,
Earl Lightbourn,
Loletha Saunders
Duntdas Civic Centle
Tickets $3.00
obtainable at both
Del Jane Stores.


MARINE SUPPLIES
C11894
1969 31 ft. CHRIS CRAFn
Commander. Sleeps six, prival -
shower. two 230 h.p. engines
with less than 200 hours,
kitchenette, good condition
Call 24267, 54011.
C13777
O'DAY Sailer with Mercury
outboard and trailer, excellent
condition, perfect family
sailboat, $1100. Telephone
24095 or 77866.

C6728
57' DIESEL YACHT. Wheeler
with cockpit, twin General
Motors 671 diesel, 121r KW
generator. Machinery and
vessel completely refurbished.
Fully equipped, surveyed,
appraised realistically at
$65,000. Will sell or trade for
Bahama real estate, give or take
difference.
N. Wolfson, P. 0. Box 13021,
Port Everglades, Ft.
Lauderdale, Fla. 33316
(524-4641).


C 13765
ABC MOTORS


Bud ,'t-priced, A-1 used cars.
Best value for your money.

1 9 7 2 L I N C O L N
CONTINENTAL, 4-door.
a u tormatic t ra sm issiuIr
i[r '.ridil,, radio. stecPo
$6,500
1973 FORD GRAND TORINO
2 -do ( a u to ma t i
ti ansrnissio'i, air nnriditioned,
radioo $4,500
1972 CHEVROLET VEGA
2 d o o i d i a t o ari at i .
trarn iisir.ni, ar.ico tid 1tionfed
$3.300.
1972 TRIUMPH TO. EDO
4 dooi, standard $2 000
1971 DODGE AVENGER
4 L im0 ,itt)rn;ettr iar .-ta ,urii
$1,500
1970 FORD LTD a.-ti;,;
iditi stiul $i 3.0. 0

1970 FORD CORTINA R P i)
standard $1,400
1970 FORD CAPR! Sthai.rId
$1.200
1969 TRIUMPH HERALD
s'tridariid $300
ABC MOTORS
Collins Avenue
Phone 2-1031
OPEN MONDAY TO FRIDAY
8 a.m. to 6 p.I|
SATURDAY 8:00 a m to, 5 p.n r

C 13 709
1973 VOL S'.'.' .
Spdain. Excellt .r 'I- .


Janmacan citizen, a pro-
fessional in the below listed
Hotel and Service Specialties,
and are planning on returning
tj Jamaica to live, we would be
very happy to hear from you.
I tere is your chance to join the
largest international hotel
chain in the world.
Executive Assistant Manager
Front Office Manager
Executive Housekeeper
Chief Engineer
Executive Chef
Sous Chef
Food and Beverage Manager
Assistant Food and Beverage
Manager
Accountant
Laundry Manager
Cost Controller
Maitre d'

Director of Personnel
Intercontinental Hotels
P. O. Box 431820
South Miami, Florida 3314.


HELP WANTED


C13774
26' CABIN Cruiser. $4,400.
Phone 41298 day or rite.

DINING GUIDF

C 13629






-








Ma n iger
Friendly Big "Al Collie"
Hostess Ms.Penny Kemp
THE BRIDGE INN
NOW SERVE ING LUNCH
Open 11:00 a.m. 5 00 p.m.
Dinner Served 5 p.m. to Midnight
F F[. PAf- I J,
7383
DINING GUIDE
tn I T ERA'S PF1JR & INN
.,! :r L", A',:.]d K-N, Hi, Street
-i i' i i tji-i.
--': ine.ri I sli.
,j:

SCHOOLS

LEWIS AUTO SCHOOL
Learn to drive with confidence.
Phone 59805 between 7 and
8.30 a.m. or after 6 p.m. or
35084 anytime.


POSITION WANTED
137 !
FINANCE executive seeks a
,raillr- ginrn p),'sitior Write to



SHIP CAPTAIN AVAILABLE,
Sdii q j P.i arnaniar
;-,, r i. t-', ''i n r i irn ras etrs
i t" a Linei aIn ll tonnages
f .-iq n going rmasteis licence
j-,i B aharnia;n masters licence.
!., ve vah. r.- t nrg jnd tugging
o 'sYer 1enie
FuI '-1 ni l riat ion contact:
(.aptj!i FHanna, P. 0. Box
f -2580, Freeport, Grand
B3ahaa.i. Telephone: 348-3020
(I 352-9212, anytime.

WANTED

SI 3755
RIDING liats new or second
han. Please ring 42037, 41203
or 12,160.

[ HELP WANTED
C 3,
C, R F T A. K E 'M A I N TEN-
ANCiE i'AN. P',.rson must be
45 ,-r ov.' n m st be sober,
,.: -t a' d t. Ol.illy r liable.
Sv 'ni qe bcnfetits. Group
t ,;s i .i.. Lo rit,( t M i s M miller
l tele'icr..r 2 1031


CAREER OPPORTUNITY
I inarn e and Mortgage
companyy in search of 2 male
'lahar.niJan- 21 years old and
over to lb train d for future
rmanaqgeiai posts. Apply Adv.
C13726, c o The Tribune, P.
O 0on- N 3207. Nassau.


L IVt i i.id with i felencfes.
lelephcune 22799 Mrs. Minus.

C 13762
I Aji ir ,i,' r maid $25 per
weke. Telephone 22799 Mr.
Sirnms.
C 13792
FOOD AND Beverage Director
foi 535 Rooms Resort
Property. lMust have three to
tive y iears previous experience
as I c(ud & B.eveorage Director.
Pl-.a s |'II;'' 'ni person with
r'tfeu n er ',', holiday Inn
Paam d s' Isla rind, Felix
M igio .e, Director of
Person -i,,-

Cl13/H5

INT L RCON1 INENTAL
HOTELS sARE pleased to tell
you that during the next two
years we will be operating four
hotels in Jamiaica. In Kingston,
Montego Bay. Port Hendeison
and Ocho. Rios. If you are a


II


C13748
QUALIFIED Painter required.
At least 5 years experience
painting. Please call 3-6211
Monday through Friday 9 a.m.
to 11:30 a.m.
C13766
ASSISTANT GENERAL
MANAGER
The Bank of London and
Montreal Ltd. invites
applications for the above
senior appointment.
Candidates must be career
Bankers with
a) at least 15 years of overseas
Bank experience, preferably in
Central or South America,
b) wide acquaintance of all
types of lending operations and
of Bank administration.
c) fluent command of the
Spanish language, written and
oral, since responsibilities are
connected with Branches in
Central and South America.
The post will be located in the
Bank's International
Headquarters in Nassau.
Write giving a synopsis of
qualifications to the Personnel
Manager, BOLAM, P 0. Box
N1262, Nassau.

TRADE SERVICES

C13656
FOR EXPERT
RADIO TV SERVICE
contact
Channel tLectronics Ltd.
TV Specialist
Wulff Road. Phone 35478.

C13696
TRADE SERVICES
T V. ANTENNAS
Booster s for homes,
apartments and hotels
SALES AND SERVICES
Call 5-9404
WORLD OF MUSIC
Markey Street
next to Frqnk's Place

C13700
SEWING MACHINE
PARIS AND REPAIRS
Island Furniture Co.
P. O. Box N-4818Nassau.
Dowdeswell and Christie Streets
Telephone 21197, 23152
elp n


TRADE SERVICES


-F,


S ribu p


The Wardrobe 5-5599

MEN'S WEAR
Fashionette Ltd. 2-2376/7

MUSIC
Cody's Records 2-8500

OPTICIANS
Optical Service Ltd. 2-3910/1

PRINTING

Wong's Printing 5-4506
Executive
Printers 2.4267/5-4011

RADIO & T.V. SALES
Carter's Records 2-4711

RUBBER STAMPS
Wong's Rubber Stamp
Co. 5-4506

SPORTS GOODS
Champion Sport Land 2-1862

TRAVEL
Playtours 2-2931/7
R. H. Curry & Co.,
2-8681/7
TRUCKING SERVICE
Gonzalez Trucking
3-1562/2-4726
TV REPAIRS
Channel Electronics Ltd.
3-5478
WINDOW/DOOR REPAIR
Window & Door Specialists
5-4460


CARS FOR SALE MARINE SUPPLIES


K BUSINESS S PROFESSIONAL
DIRECTORY

Save Time


SHOP'

STA~


Ci219 EXlT. 5

2 Li Pei Mid1 '1

IMIIIIi iV


FOR TillE ACTION YO WANT


mmipmmmasmmlmauemanml-
Shop Nassau Merchants


For Business And Services


--I


kILllhi1ll0IllkIF

HIMliS ll'rlla



ANTENNAS
Island TV 2-2618
AUTOMOTIVE
Lucas Batteries
Bay Street Garage 2-2434

BOOKSTORE
The Christian Book Shop
5-4506
BUSINESS FORMS
Executive
Printers 2-4267/5-401

CAMERAS
John Bull 2-4252/3

CARPETS
Lee's Carpet Craft 3-1993

DRAPERIES
Lee's Carpet Craft 3-1993
ENTERTAINMENT
Movies
Film & Equip. Service 2-2157

GARDEN & PET
SUPPLIES
Modernistic Garden
& Pet 2-2861
Nassau Garden & Pet
Montrose Avenue 2-425`

HARDWARE
John S. George 2-8421/6
HOUSE PLANS
Evangelos G. Zervos 2-2633

LAUNDRY
DRY CLEANING
New Oriental Laundry
2.4406


Sldio, white .' ail
leaguege ,licenir
ill 3 061 1 4
1 37'4
1;69 Ol90 S LD OH3i [
e ( llent con dit
.)nOf! l : n1 ["


1970 FORD TORINO
(automatic, radio) B$2695.
1968 G.M.C. PICK UP TRUCK
B$995.
1970 CHEVELLE MALIBU
(automatic, radio) B$1875
1968 PLYMOUTH VALIANT
(radio, automatic) B$1050
1971 DODGE AVENGER
(automatic) B$1395
1965 BUICK SKYLARK
(automatic, radio) B$750
1969 CHF.V II NOVA
(automatic, radio) B$1350.
1972 FIAT BUS (7 passenger)
B$1650
1968 ROVER 2000 SALOON
(automatic) B$1000
1969 DODGE DART SPORT
(automatic, radio) B$1500
1972 VAUXHALL VICTOR
(automatic) B$1475
1970 FORD CORTINA
S/WAGON B$1275
1969 VAUXHALL VIVA
B$775.
1970 FIAT 850 B$550
CENTRAL.GARAGE LIMITED
Thompson Boulevard
P. O. Box N1525
Telephone 34711.


I = T = :


IJ p Rl


C13691

Pinder's Customs

Brokerage Ltd.

Mac .ey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. 0. Box N3714
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMSsCLEA RANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
S fEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-3796
2-3797, 2-2798
Airport 7-7434
FRFE ESTIMATES

C13764
LANDSCAPING and for all
your gardening needs,
trimming, hedging, pruning,
tree felling and beach cleaning
call 57810. LAWNS
AND HEDGES. Prompt
reasonable anrid efficient
service.

C13663
UNLIMITED commercial
Freezer space to 10 degrees
for any and all users. $3.00'cu.
ft. per year. Apply Adv.
C13663, c/o The Tribune, P.
0. Box N3207, Nassau.

C13702
FOR your building needs arr'
CRANE hire see:
ISLAND BUILDERS LIMITED
P. 0. Box N-4559
Phone 31671 31672.


*i t :'


u TIo at(I I


I












Wednesday, March 6, 1974


I hr trihunt


HELP WANTED
C6725
CONVENTION MANAGER:
To be in charge of adl
Conventions and Facilities and
Convention Groups. 3-5 years
experience in Hotel
Management. Health
Certificate, Police Certifticte
and letters of reference
required.
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY:
Must be able to take shorthand
and type at least 70-80 w.p.m.
Should have at least 3 years
experience. Police Certificate,
Health Certificate and letters
of reference required.
SOCIAL HOSTESS: Social
Hostess that speaks French. To
work with Tours, mostly
coming from Canada. Must also
be able to travel with the group
at times. Police Certificate,
Health Certificate and letters
of reference required.
Interested persons apply:
GRAND BAHAMA HOTEL,
WEST END, GRAND
BAHAMA. Personnel Office,
between the hours of 9:00 a.mn
and 3:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday. 4.fliling Address
158 Port Road, West Palm
Beach. Florida, 33404. Elon
Martin, Jr., Personnel Director.


"Happy birthday to you, happy birthday to you, happy
birthday, dear Mostly...

CROSSWORD TANKLAO R

PUZZLE T R L
ACOSS 31. Broom
1. White 32. Perfect IOR SAC AR N
vestment 34 Soldier ROOD COT YEN
4. Puts on 35. Ticket office DANAE A
8. Misfortune notice D IS VE E
11. The Lion 36. Sweetheart P TE
12. Turkish 37 Stopper
regiment 39. For example SAG E D T P'
13. Frost 40. Cowardice DE RE E15 ELU
14. Jane Austen 42 Delve SOLUTiON OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE
novel 44. Household DOWN
16. Organ key appliance 7. Placard
18. Encore 47. Talking bird 1i Malt brew 8 Obserer
20. Later 50. Simurgh 2. Landing craft 9. Wood sorrel
21. Evening 51. Ill-repute 3. Blockbuster 10. Conger
23. Route 53. Cob's mate 4. Russian assent 15. Melody
25. Permits 54. However 5 Used 17 Hercules' slavi
28. Disunite 55. Not any 6. Expert girl 19 Sprit
30. Risen 56.Tosspot swimmer 21 Prude


Daddy has given up trying to clean the paint
off Rupert's boots, so the little bear carries
them to the front door and places them on the
step. "I suppose the Gomnies will collect
them during the night," he thinks. "I hope
they won't keep them long. I shall need them
tomorrowrwhen I go to Mary's party." That
evening Rupert prepare for Santa Claus's visit


GRAND BAHAMA




CLASSIFIED

II FIEE T TTL. 352-661


Winning

Bridge
by VICTOR MOLLO
Some people rejoice in art!-
ficial gadgets for their own sake
and cheerfully p:y the price for
the resulting confusion. This
can be prohibitive when partners
are unfamiliar with each other's
styles, but seasoned pairs, too,
have their misunderstandings.
Not infrequently there is a comic
side to them, as on this deal
from the finals of the Spingold
Cup, one of America's two main
tournaments
Dealer East: N'S Vul.
North
AA2
QJ9 5 41
A Q 5 4
O 6 5
West East
A 8 7 6 5 3 4 Q 4
2 2 p
S10 6 A K J 9 8 7 3 2
4KQJ94&832
South
4 K J 10 9
SA K 10 8 7 6
4 A 10 7
West North East South
- -- 4' 4M7
44 6"' Pass 7)


Dble
Asked the meaning of East's
4 opening. West exolanned that
it was a transfer bid. showing
a powerful spade suit, and over
4" he duly bid 4+. North's
6) was. apparently, an advance
sacrifice against 54. South. who
all along suspected a systemic
misunderstanding, felt sure that
his partner had the 4A. Hence
the grand slam.
Convinced that both North
and South were bidding on the
strength of void spades, and ex-
pecting to score a trick in clubs,
West doubled to stop East from
sacrificing needlessly In 74.
With the #Q coming down,
the play was straightforward.
It's on record that East kept
a poker face throughout.


22 South of
France
24. News serviceA

27. Air pollution
29 Flawless
31. Swallow
33. Sheltered
34. Travel
37. Belief
38. Kiplin word must
38 Kipling letter, and I
character
41. Radio-guided least i to elN
tlhe list. No I
bomb words : no
TOIAV.S TAI
S43 Cheats ood ; '" TA,
44. Saute w ord %. ex
45 Mahogany tomorrow.
streak YESTERDAY
46. King Arthur's Ahele able
hallee hllze
lance hezel bile hla
48 Modernist Isle laze lease
SEI ZAtLE
49. Plant cutter zeal.
52. About
Jolly Holly-29


HIOW many
Swords of
N four letters
or more can
you make
S roon 111 t e
letters shown
here? In
S a k i n g a
word, each
letter m a y
be used once
only. Each
contain the large
there must be at
ght-letter words In
plurals ; no foreign
proper naies.
IHGET : 24 words.
rds., ery good ; 3.
rellent. Solution

Y'S SO(l.LTrIO :
il)seil aisle alee
hale lluse belle
ize ease easel else
.abhle sale seal ,eel
elie sizable ize


and begs an old pillow-case from Mummy.
" Why not leave a piece of your Jolly Holly for
him?" suggests Mrs. Bear. "After all, we
want to be sure that he has a happy Christmas
too." "What a splendid idea! cries Rupert.
And Mummy gives him a sprig of holly from
the decorations.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


Chess


By LEONARD GARDEN
M9S07)
White mates in two moves,
against any defence iby F.
Gamage) White. as usual, is
playing up the board, with his
kmi a" KR8. Clue: none of
White's obvious discovered
checks with his rook work-
watch out for the black bishop
on the long black diagonal.
Par times: 3 minutes, problem
master; 7 minutes, problem ex-
pert; 15 minutes, good; 25
minutes, average; 45 minutes,
novice.

Chess Solution
1 R'Kt7)-Kt5 (threat 2
Q-R6. If I . BxR ch; :
QxB, or if R-KR5; 2 B-B5
or if Kt-Q5; 2 R-K2, or i)
R-B6: 2 R-K3. or if P-R4;
2 R-Kt6


ROwiN G
At l S


USE

ihP Tribunp

CLASSIFIED


ADVTS.


No. 7.368 .. by TIM McKAY
Across
1. Shift domicile. (4. 5)
7. Sheep. (3)
8. With which you speak. (5)
12. Eaten ly theatrical
backers '? 3-4)
13. Transmitter. (6)
14. Vegetable dish. (6. 3)
1.. Girl's name. (3)
;1. Hint. (3)
N1. Tavern. (3)
tr. Stage buns (anaS.). (3-6)
22. High. (4)
23. Continental city. (5)
24. Political crisis times. 1'J)
Down
i. Steam tape (anag.). (4-5)
2. Possesses. (4)
3. Out of the garden. (9)
4. Smooth. (4)
.:. urip well. (4. 5)
6. Your morning break. 9U)
t. solid water. (3)
10. NaSxinx. (7)
H8. Make
last. (3)
16. Double.
(4)
17. Powder.
(4)
is. Fw eet
flower.
ti. B a rIel.M
(3) rosserae-'. soehum


CS CARROLL RIGHTER'S
rHOROSCOPE


S from the Carroll Righter Institute
GENERAL TLND NCIES. A day to think out
ways and means by which you can better
understand your basic desires You can now make considerable
progress in whatever means the most to you by intelligent
planning for the future A time of true happiness.
ARIES (Mar 21 to Apr 19) You can find a more up-to-date
system for handling your affairs now, so put it to the test
quickly Contact good friends tonight
TAURUS (Apr 20 to May 20) Make whatever
improvements are necessary at home, but use modem
methods. More affection for mate is wise You can increase
your happiness Relax at home tonight
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Find out how to make the
right changes in routines so they become more productive in
the future Show others how much you like them
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Make the
improvements to home that are necessary Talk with bankers
on how to add to present abundance Listen carefully.
LEO (July 22 to Aug 21) Improve your appearance and
make a better impression on others Making new contacts is
wise at this time You can gain your true aims.
VIRGO (Aug 22 to Sept 22) Contact a good adviser now
and get the data you need Make sure you schedule any
activities for the future wisely Think cleverly.
LIBRA (Sept 23 to Oct 22) Listen to what a bigwig has to
suggest for your advancement Get together with a fascinating
group to gain your fondest desires
SCORPIO (Oct 23 to Nov. 21) You are able to get a bigwig
to give you the backing you need in order to further your
plans Think along positive lines Be wise
SAGI1 I ARIUS (Nov 22 to Dec 21) Gain more knowledge
about a new outlet than you already have. otherwise it will not
work out very successfully Be calm
CAPRICORN (Dec 22 to Jan 20) Your intuition is high
now so put it to good use and show that you are a clever
person Do something thoughtful for mate tonight.
AQUARIL'S (Jan 21 to Feb 19) Talk with associates and
come to a finer understanding Look for better results in the
days ahead Reach a perfect agreement
PISCES (Ieb 20 to Mar 20) You can accomplish a great
deal now so be sure to apply yourself Take any treatments
that will make you a stronger person Be logical
IF YOlR CHILD IS BORN TODAY he or she will be
very understanding of others and will be able to comprehend
what others are thinking For this reason success in life can be
assured Direct the education along lines of psychiatry,
medicine, teaching and allied fields Send to the right schools
and give good spiritual training early in life
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


Z
**>


t -


/ (^


--- Comic Par---




REX MORGAN, M.D. By DAL CURTIS


AND I MU57 ADPMIT--- N0 r T-INK OY 'i MEANWHILE IN THE GOVERNOR'S MANSION
MEI HAD SOMAE VERY KAREN ~Or,LOFF GOVERNOR, IS
S IT POSSIBLE FOR ONE TO ROMANTIC IDEAS IS AN EXCcLLENTI ', Y HE'S N C
GROW UP IN A DAY1 BECAUSE ABOUT YYOJ AND ME/ ATTRACTIVE YOUNG FEEL NG
I FEEL THAT'S WHAT I'VE DONE YOU MU51 TtHINK PHYSICIAN W 0 WEL IL
ME A FOOL' 15 ABOUT TO BE-










11

JUDGE PARKER Paul Nichols
JUDGE PARKER BECAUSE OF MITIATING CIRCUMSTANCES, IT' MY UNDERSTANDING MUCH
CALLED TO TELL ME ABOUT YOUR VISIT I DID SOME PLEA BARGAINING! THE THAT HE NOW CLAIMS THAT BETTER
WITH HIM! I WANT YOU TO KNOW THAT DISTRICT ATTORNEY AGREED NOT HE NEVER TOLD ME HE THAN I
I SUGGESTED YOUR BROTHER PLEAD TO GO FOR FIRST DEGREE HAD KILLED EDNA BOWDEN KNOW YOU,
GUILTY ONLY AFTER HE TOLD ME MURDER! HOW WELL DO YOU KNOW MR. DRIVER!
THAT HE HAD KILLED YOUR BROTHER?
EDNA BOWDEN'

/


S






APARTMENT 3-G By Alex Kotzky


THE THING I I PON'T KNOW-'-AND PROFESSOR, MAGEE---HERE IT IS---
CAN'T UNDER- I DON'T FEEL THAT YOU'RE NOT APARTMENT 3-6!
NO, I DON'T STAND IS WWHY HE YOU SHOULD BE SUGGESTING
THINK YOU LIED TO ME! INTERESTED IN THAT PAUL
SHOULD CALL FINDING OUT! HAD ANYTHING
PAUL LESTER! TO P0 WITH HIS
HE' S PONE WIFE'S DEATH
NOTHING BUTNO
LIE TO YOU,
MARGO!







STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & overgard!


I'M SURE YOU THESE TwO GAVE ME A CONTRACT THATh WHY SHE WHY.' YOU DIRTY-.//
STAY RIGHT THERE! WOULD, NOMAD! ON HIS PARTNER! THEN, BECAUSE ---MRS. VANCE NOW WE'LL ALL GO
-OR LL USE 50 I'Ll. TALK OFTHAT OVERCOAT SWITCH, IT BROUGHT YOU TOPRISON!
HIS / FROMHERE./ WAS NECESSARY HERE TONIGHT./

iiOF TC~~0HE WAY./or IS,


HELP MANTED
C6730
One GARDENER wanted
immediately.
Apply to: Evelyn Hann,
Hanna Hill, Eight Mile Rock,
Grand Bahama.


Published daily


Monday to Satrday.
Monday to Saturday.


___


I-=


e


E


E














Wednesday, March 6, 1974


DISTRIBUTED BY


IE

WILIAM NEWI


CIIrAY LTI.


rin--- 7


TWENTY THREE class 'A'. 'C', and
'D' yachts set out at noon today from
Nassau Harbour to compete in the first
ever Nassau-Kingston Cup Race.
Competitors in the 650 miles race are
expected to arrive in Kingston harbour
early Sunday if present weather
conditions continue.

Durward Knowles, a race official, said
no Bahamian yachts or crews are taking
part in the race which will run around
lleuthera, past Cat Island and Long


ROUNDI-UP
by Ivan Johnson

BA1 A A 1 IAN sailor
Pie r r c SiegentClllhaler
Capture the Biallhamas
first medal of the C(A&
(Caribbhan galiles veystcrda
when he ensured himself f
of a silver medal, winning
his fourth straight race in
the Sunlfiish ('lass achts in
S.in to IX)1o11ingo
With a total I sevell aces to
be runt, vict\ri\ in today s fittih
race would secure him the gold
medal
Swiss-horn Sieg .nthaler is
the .urrcnt World Suntish
Champion. Siegenthaler
captured t th title for the first
time last April in Fort De
France. Martinique.
A veteran in the Sunfish
('lass. Sieg'nthaler introduced
the Class to the Bahamas in

Swnimmer And\ Knowles
powered his way into the 200
metres freestyle final when he
finished third in this morning's
semi-finals.
Knowles who narrowly
missed winning a bronze in last
Saturday's 400 metres freestyle


Xr


Island. past Inagua between Cuba and
Haiti and on to Kingston. Jamaica.
Harbaby. a former American Eagle and
1972 SORC winner is the most
distinguished entry among the race's
entrants. Warbaby has since been
converted to a sleek 67 foot ocean racer
and is now owned by Warren Brown of
Bermuda.
The race will be run every other year,
alternating with the existing Miami
Montego Bay race.
The idea for the Nassau-Kingston race


.1'




\ '
r ia


rrt/ '
S, .





PIERRE SIEGENTHALER
A medal

final. clocked another best
timn today) with a time of 2
mins. 04 sees. .03 secs. behind
winner Garcia (Guill'ero of
Mexico.
In an interview with the
Tribune this morning Knowles


NICK BUONICONTI. middle linebacker for
the world champion Miami Dolphin football
team was visiting the King's Inn and Golf Club,
Freeport this week with his wife. Terry.
He addressed a large convention at the
King's Inn and Golf Club.
Topic was: "Importance of the wife in the
success of her husband's career
Vice-president of Princess Hotels
Bahamas. LeRoy Bailey, and his wife Karin.


TT
t I


Call the experts, the ones who
children and your grandchild
quick investment returns, too.


think about your
Idren, and about


I


ANDY KNOWLI
A chance


said. "I feel I have
good chance of winning
a bronze medal
afternoon's final.
"This will be my las
the games so I'm deter
finish on a good note."


originated with the Royal Jamaica Yacht
Club last year and has since then been
approved by the Jamaica Yacht Club. The
Bahamas Yachting Association, headed
by Durward Knowles, also supported
plans for the race.
On hand to get today's race underway
were Commodore Desmond Blades of the
Royal Jamaica Yacht Club and
Commodore Bob Fletcher of the
Montego Bay Yacht Club.
Presentations for the race will be made
in Kingston on Sunday.


In all his races so far.
Knowles has clocked best times
ever Last week he recorded
best times of 17 imins. 34.1
sees and 4 mins. 20.06 sees. in
the 1500 metre and 400 metre
finals respectively.
Knowles attributed his fast
times to hard training
'Guillermo, who clipped two
l seconds off the 400 metre
freestyle record last Saturday
tow in the gold medal with a
fast time of 4 mins. 12.04 sees,
is again favoured to win the
200 metre final today.
k i Middleweight boxer
Nathaniel Knowles could
secure a possible third medal
for the Bahamas when lie
4 meets a Venezuelan in what
has been billed as the feature
tight at the games tonight.
A win for Knowles would
give him a bronze medal at least.
Fellow boxer Gary Davis
will fight for the first time
ES tonight. Davis meets a
Jamaican in a welterweight
bout.
Yesterday Sprinter Walter
a pretty (allendar ran a disappointing
at least i 00 metres semi-final.
in this Callendar failed to reach the
final when he clocked a poor
race o time of 11.4 sees to finish fifth
ined to in the race.
Cyclists Lawrance and
Jeffrey Burnside were both
eliminated from the cycling
sprints yesterday. The Burnside
brothers are now scheduled to
ride in the road race on Sunday
along with fellow-riders,
Addington Nairn and Herbert
Sears.
Volleyball coach Tom G(rant
reports that the volleyball
teams hope to gain their first
win tonight when they play the
seeded Virgin Islands.
Both the men's and ladies
S teams have lost four
consecutive games, destroying
their chances of winning any
medals.
The soccer team. fresh from
Monday's 1-0 win over
Panama, take on the No. I
seeds Mexico tonight
Dick Wilson said: "Morale is
high after Monday's win but
tonight's game will be really
tough. With the poor condition
of the ground and the low
standard of refereeing, the
Mexicans will be looking to
play a very physical game."
Star hurdler Danny Smith
has still not arrived at the
games. Smith is scheduled to
race in the 1 10 metres hurdles
on Friday.


Results and pay-offs of Tues-
day's meet:
I IRST RACE 6 Furlongs
I. I'ovetry in Motion (5) (.
l3ain $3.70, $2.50. $2.25.
2. lop Secret (7) A. Saunders
52.e6, $2.30.
3. tie Child (9) R. Ilewitt
S2.60.
sI (')NI) RA'ACI 4', furlongs


WE THINK ABOUT YOUR CHILDREN.
And, we think San AndryS is the investment
opportunity with a future.
by the time yojr children are old enough to buy real
estate for themselves--the choice land may be gone.
And the prices rmay be sc high they could not afford
land anyway.
You can solve that problem for them. Invest for them
in San Andros. NOW These low terms cannot last
forever:

*4 DOWN 45 MONTHLY.
(Just $3495 for more than 1/4-acre; $3995 for almost


1/3-acre!)


CALL

C. A.Christie Real Estate s .n ndr.... BhAl I.md
Norfolk House, 2nd floor, Suite 8 Phone: 5-9737
"The name that's a tradition in Bahamas real estate."


23 YACHTS IN NASSAU-KINGSTON RACE


1. Mileaway Champ (4) R.
Hewitt $6.95. $4.70, $3.50.
2. Bold lightening (9) Ant.
Saunders $8.05, $6.25. 3. Lady
Mary (8) (;. Bain $4.25
Daily Double (5-4) $1 i .90
Iirst Quinella (4-9) $34.90.
THIRI) RACE 5 Furlongs
1. Roman Dancer (1) J.
Horton $4.05, $3.15.S $2.75
2. Leaping Lena (2) P1. Simmnis
$9.45, $5.50
3. (unsmoke (6) G. Set chwell
$3.05
Second Quinella (1 2) $34.00.
FOURTH RAC'E 6 Furlongs
1. Spanish Dancer (4) ;. Bair
$2.40. $2.60, $2.40.
2. Rango's Image (I) A
Saunders $3.80, $3.80
3. Knightly Manner (9) M
Brown $4.55
Third Quinella (1-4) SIO.10
HI TH RACI(' 9 1 I.ldongs
1. Kimho (3) (. Serchwell
$22.15, $7.50. $4.30.
2. (,o News (8) M. Lewis
$4 15,$3.20
3. Soul Brother (4) M. Brown
S 3.25
I ourth Quinella (3 8) $42.65.
SIXTH RACF. 4V/ Furlongs
1. The Bad (7) S. McNeil
S13. 85.S8.05,$6.50
2. Winged Duchess (1) M.
Brown $3.95. $2.90
3. Shaheen (5) G. Bain
$3.00
I fifth Quinella (1-7) $128.15
SEVENTH RACE 6 Furlongs
1. Hot Rod (1) G. Serchwell
$1 1.20, $3.75. $3.05.
2. Justice (5) J. Horton
$3.25. $2.70
3. Sweet N Fasy (2) R. Hewitt
- $3.30
Sixth Quinells (1-5) $11.90.
FIGHT RACF 6 Furlongs
1. Thricie (5) G. Bain -
$43.45. $7.95, $3.25
2. Sweetness (1) R. Hewitt
S4.00. $2.60
3. Miss GTO (7) Ant.
Saunders S2.65.
Seventh Quinella (1-5) $13.95.


A MEDAL FORPIERRE


And it could be gold soon


-Baby Boy

stopped

in the


eighth

LIGHT HEAVYWEIGHT
champ Baby Boy Rolle
dropped an eight round
technical knockout to James
Scott in last night's scheduled
ten round main event at the
Miami Beach Auditorium.
Scott was said to have used
a body attack to wear down
Rolle before the ring doctor
stopped the fight two minutes
and IS seconds into the
eighth. The American last
night fought his first main
event.
******
Young South Andros born
boxer Ernest Barr fast
making his presence felt in
amateur boxing takes on
Richard Major Friday during
a Freeport/New Providence
amateur tournament at the
Birdland Arena.
Barr recently upset golden
glove light heavyweight
champ Allan Bullard.
Other boxers from New
Providence include light
heavyweight Levy Rolle and
welterweight Sammy Rolle.

Welterweight champ Elisha
Obed in a ten round main
event at the Nassau Stadium
on March 15 takes on Eddie
Davis a junior middleweight
from Tampa, Florida.
Obed recently scored his
44th consecutive victory
which placed him seventh in
the world of undefeated
fighters.

Critics

rap

Bailey
BRIDGETOWN Former
allround Essex and England
cricketer Trevor Bailey was
accused here by critics and
administrators of trying to
detract from West Indies'
successes against England in
the current test series.
Bailey, here as commentator
for a London newspaper, was
quoted in the local daily press
as declaring the M.C.C. team
now touring Caribbean, "... is
probably the weakest team
since 1948."
Bailey was quoted as saying
England fast bowler John Snow
should have been in the team
and blaming the M.C.C.'s ten
wicket defeat by Barbados in
the tour-day match which
ended here Sunday on bad
batting.
Bailey was also quoted as
saying "If the third test is
played on the same wicket on
which the four-day match
against Barbados took place,
the visitors would be fortunate
to level the series."
One local official said:
"Before his country left home
on their Caribbean tour,
English critics, including Bailey
predicted Mike Denness and his
men would beat West Indies.
This did not happen at
Trinidad, nor in Jamaica."
(AP)


IThegmesI


By GLADSTONE THURSTON
THE ROOKIES of St.
Bernards really put stick on the
ball last night.
They outhit Schlitz Beer
11-9 and were on their way to
a major upset when a
misunderstanding in the top of
the fourth and two base
throwing error in the bottom
of the fifth snapped their
winning form and the brewers
took a 7-6 victory in the first
of last night's double header.
Sound hitting by third
baseman Dave Wood and right
fielder Hugh Bethel together
with a steady nlound
performance by left hander
Larry Turnquest saw St.
Bernards overcome a 6-3
deficit and to tie the score in
the top of the fifth.
Going into the bottom phase
of that inning. Schlitz short
stop Gary Johnson with one
down scored what proved to be
the winning run.
Centre fielder Anthony
Roberts, the third batter of
that innings, placed a bunt
down third base line. It was
neatly fielded by Dave but in
his attempt to pick off Roberts
at first, he overthrew the relay
and Johnson scored.
The Saints' head coach
Sidney Bain was not too
impressed with the
performance of Schlit/. He felt
that they are not as good as a
ball club as people make them
out to be. "To mie, Schlit/ are
weaker than we are. Our
pitching held up much more
than theirs and our infield was
real good." he said.
Off on a sound footing, the
Saints on runs by brothers
Andre and Dave Wood took a
2-1 first inning lead. Schlit/
catcher Mackey Bain who had
a three for four night at the
plate drove in their sole run.
However, it was Roberts'
three run homer in the
following inning that placed St.
Bernards in the rear until the
fifth. Dave on D)encil Clarke's
sole rbi ot the game brought
the Saints one behind.
Going into the controversial
fourth inning, Bertie Murray
who replaced Vincent Strachan
on the mound allowed catcher
Iverette Neeley and first
baseman Rudy Levarity on
with a base on halls and a
fielding error respectively.
With one down. Andre
chopped a ground ball towards
short stop Johnson and
Levarity on his way to third
seemed to have collided with
Johnson. Meanwhile Neeley
went home
However, third base umpire
IHarold Fernander ruled
interference on Levarity and
called him out. Neeley was
then sent back to third, On
that ruling. St. Bernards lodged
a protest.
goingg into the fifth inning
trailing by three Lorenzo
and Dick I.ockhart scored for
Schlit/ in the bottom of tihe
fourth St Bernards ripped
Murra, for .four consecutive
hits which was complimented
by Necley's two rbi double.
Second baseman James
Wood vith one out scorched a
single itto right centre driving
in Bethe' for the first run of
that inning.
"Tonight, the rookies hit the
ball like they should and I
know sooner or later we're
going to witi a lot of ball
games," cotmlented coach
Bain.







.
S^T


dI &^~


I english League
Division I
Southampton I l)erbh I
divisionn 2
I ulhlam 2 1 uton I
Sunderllnd 3 I'ortsint,uth o
I)ivision .1
Bristol Rovers I Rochdale 1
Oldham 6 'Cambridge I


.O
t* p








[^^~g


shr Tribunt


SCHLIT!
ab r iI rbi
A. Roberts 4 1 2 3
(l. l'neuas 4 1 3 I
L. Lockhart 2 1 0 0
V. Albury 3 0 0 0
M. Bain 4 0 3 2
I. Fountain 0 0 0
C'.Thompson l 0 0 0
W. North 2 0 1 0
I'. Itiggs 2 0 0 0
(;. Jolnson 3 2 o O
I). Lockhart I 2 0 0
ST. BFRlNARIDS
A. Wood 3 1 0 0
('. Johnson 4 0 I 0
I). Wood 3 2 2 0
tH. Bethel 4 1 3 0
D. ('lark 4 1 2 I
J. Wood 4 1 1 1
F. N t eele.\ I 2
R. Levaris 2 0 I 0
'. Austin I o O0
(. Blyden 1 0 0 0
LEFT I FIELD)IR Willie
Knowles in a two tor four plate
appearance scored one aitd
knocked in two while third
baseman Fred chicken n
Taylor who also faced tihe
pitcher four tines scored two
and knocked in one leading
double defending champions
Becks Bees to a 0 2 victory
over I)el Jane Saints
Del Jane however played the
game under a protest statnilt
that Becks right fielder John
Williams was under contract to
them.
Winning pitcher and Bahaliam
Baseball Association's I1Q73
most valuable player I)on
Taylor worked the seven inning
route. fie struck out seven .nrd
gave uip ie lilts. Roscoe I. ill
took the loss
Hurling stead\ o ver six
innings. I a, lor silenced 111ie
Saints on two hits whiIc Becks
on offence took a 4-0 lead.
First baseinii Peter Bctlhel
and right fielder Benn\ tiiin
scored Del Jane's sole runs iin
the bottom of the seventh
inning.
lici nel ken St ars ilcet
('a.rroll's Food Store in I lie iirst
game 7 o'clock 'hurrsda, nilit.
Jet Set play St Bernards iI lthe
second gale.

Squash teams

arrive
T1FAMS fromln Berll nda,
Jamaica and \assau arnm\cd
today in Freeport to take part
in a foilrway s(adsh touItrna-
nient at the ( B. Tenlnii &
Squash Club.
last held in Ireeport III
S1 7 I tile local squash luh
won overall.
This year sees a inew l.l lie
playing at No 1 spot Ior
Freeport, Alan Newall
Playing No. I for Nassau is
Bob Montgomery, twice
Bahamas champion.
For the first time a ladies'
team is included fromi coach
island. In this division Ireepoit
looks particularly strong w! ith
l)oreen McNeill. the Bahamias
ladies squash champion for the
past three years at No. I.
The final imatchles will be
played on Sunday.


SAINTS




SHAKE



SCHLITZ


LONDON
yesterday's
ganes:


hosted the football star and his wife to dinner
and opening night of the Zaras in the Bahamia
Club.
Buoniconti, who is still suffering from a
recent arm operation was signing autographs
for fans.
Pictured during dinner in the Rib Room are
left to right: Terry Buoniconti. Nick
Buoniconti, LeRoy G. Bailey. and Karin
Bailey.


THINK ABOUT YOUR CHILDREN.


- II


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Results of
British soccce


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I RCerIG ESUTS


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