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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03538
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: January 4, 1974
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03538

Full Text










Tapit - p ill


i DUDLEhY'S i

COR. ROSETTA ST. & MT. ROYAL AVE.

Registered with Postmaster of Bahamas for postage concessions within the Bahamas) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


[F-SHP lot

the BAHAMIAN
SUPERMARKETS
if", value you really want,
v ."j really want Soper Value!


VOL. LXX1, No. 35


Friday January 4, 1974


Price: 1 5 Cents


Bahamasair

files

fares


hike

BAIIAMASAIR filed an
application today with the Air
Transport Licensing Authority
for an immediate six per
cent increase in their Miami
1ires to bring them into line
ith Iinternational air ,ar!"'rs.
All international air li;:'s
operatingg ii the Bahamas
increased their fares six per
cent as of January 1st
I t. .1 i,.i a "fuel surcharge" on
existig fares. This was
icpo'ted exclusively iin The
I ribunric yesterday.
Today. Bahamasair general
mianagei Max tHealey told The
ribune' that the airline was
filing a an application with the
A I L A tor an immnlediate fare
increase and expected that the
new six per cent hike would be
in effect Ib next week.
But the national flag carrier
received a further blow
vestc.day when it was notified
by its iiei supplier that as from
1974 fuel to the airline was
hiked "an additional 35 per
cent oier current prices.'
I he news, although
sL.pe:ced, will certainly deal a
-tlgerinr r blowPh to passenger
i-ar. d itcairgo, rates which the
airline has already said will be
piing up drastlclly on January
S to reflect "successive,
it-iupt-1 c!i.cascs" 'iS the cost of

'Istww ith- airline 'will absorb
i a iddet' 1- per cent cist stin
a: already dccoulaita
f ',; ;,,11:hlrds ot ihe running
cost ot Bahamnasair is still
bei,nt discussed at the highest
seu-Is.
(On Jan .:i 2 the airline
warned thfi its announced
January 15 fares hike ranging
fro nm 0 ti 20 p.'r c'nt did
-I : t tu t st..t liit i WOLii, r
io further increases.
Ye'terday"'s notice to the
airliLe froni 'exauo nmay mean
that thi gotvernllment may have
to subsidize the national flag
carrier like the government has
done tor the out island
mirilboats for years.
But. as the general manager
tiiirniIented: "We iealise there
s : limit to, which the paying
public will pay."

1FASiTRN AIR LINES
today c nftirined that all its
inteinaititnal fares have been
.1 reased by six per cent in line
with other carriers.
lheir Miamii fare goes up
Itrnm .'-, to $50 round-trip,
their Baltimore fare (one way)
goes up from S108 to $114
first class aind from $84 to $89
econlomnly their Philadelphia
t.iLc (one way): goes up from
$1 ist S125 first class and
iri;i $89 to $94 ccnonosly.


Tourism is barely holding its own, says Pindling


Tilt: CRISIS in the Bahamas'
tourism industry was openly
acknowledged by Prime Minister
Lynden Pindling last night when he
told a Progressive Liberal Part-,
campaign n. .*irine that: "The
tourist industry is barley holding its
own."
The industry as it was known 20
years ago "will not serve Bahamian
needs over the next 20 years," he
said.
For this reason the Ministry of
Tourism had commissioned a
st ia y no w be fore the
Cabinet which prop sod a
complete reorganization of the
tourist industry to provide more
employment in New Providence.


Randnd Bahama and the Family
Islands.
The restructuring of the tourist
industry is one aspect of a
five-point economic programme
being proposed by the government
for expanding einployment
opportunities for Bahamians.
The Prime Minister's discussion of
the programme was prompted by a
question from youth leader Ortland
Bodie Jr. who wanted to know
what concrete plans the
government had for dealing with
the unemployment situation.
in addition to the preservation
and continued development of
tourism, the government also
intends to preserve and continue


the international financial industry r
move for the rapid establishment of
an industrial complex based on the
petrochemical industry, and the
development of agriculture a;nd
fisheries.
"I beleive that in those five
principal areas there is enougii
employment to occupy ever)
able-bodied man wishing to work in
the country," Mr. Pindling said.
Although tourism was
e .pei..n in' difficulties, the
financial community was going
through its normal expansion, the
Prime Minister said. He noted that
all the bankers with whom he had
met recently had outlined plans for
expansion.


I or the moment tor il :iu-Ilt-iri:
base was being i aited !t (;ranii
Baharna, where the lat,' i
development was cSabihl'i nLe-n I
Jn oil terminal .Itper.lti; wnhici '.
heing put into olcai.t ::; thrtuigh
the -niiiuih. of the givpcrmue'int.
"This particular plan government has been knr cked anid
criticized by thle (tlppsitiin ihIt
have accused us tl esut : i!i tti,
tourist potential." \i. Pi:,dlg
,aid.
Over the last thrce niiin;i!l
how ever "they don't talk jfa ut thie
oil industry," he rm-inarke I. It the
Bahamas had the tcrmi' al ; mng
since January 1973 Ihi:. ciut;n:
would have now heein sunil'in, g


jriiil a


i-0 i .


---'WE CANT IHEI P--


W E'VE GO'T A PAR T


"HMF CANNOT take care
of anybody up here lonig!ht
because we are having a
party." These ,mordi.
repeated not once but three
times, were heard clearly over
a police ear radio on the lart-
afternoon of December 30.
Thev came from the
Princess Margaret llospital
where tour car driver
WENTWORTH ROBERTS
iand twoi other car atiiie'n
victimns had been rd.kcn :i
emergency attention.
Mr. Roberts. 43, iand thi-
father of five children i it
hospital.
Mr. John O'Brier of tihe
real estate firm of Mrleyv .iitd
O'Brien. told Ihe I ii- iu"'
that hlie was --.'I 'i !,it <)oi it
side of the rt.'d iat Dihck
Point where the t.
accidents oc'uirred i hevi he
heard the mn'tsagie cuni'
through on the pi!ice radir,
"'t wasn't said once but
was repeated thiee tinies," he
stated.
Mr. Roberts was driving
mast at about 5.30 p m. when


I t i d t :i 1 :
lit '- Pir'ii Ha lf an hour
a.ter a. s 'cim i iccidit nit that
mnure sl w miv ptIp o. curled
it altirl-t th- -iarnte p01
1Mr N itis v; ir' trirtng Orn a
iostijv rfi en -'a u h


i'ot heit'
*i' crc't'e d s ;oid 0I 1ppe1 [ t- |

c- .NF iM V r:.'loi di e i inher
itc:ird tlir -*.% ,t iroi iu tice

1 -" I-of I qv ;b ln
'I ;i i J d'ith Il
rei'e da y I d Id'i I' INE
P'N IRM .NI n No died inher


lct'.i l t i tthro IIh redI
tip n r, h e I- cildI







ui .i"Q ii' ii iV-, bring
,ondi.e d at th'e hospital
in t l' i'e deaths f JMr
K mbii iib


il diesel fuii, .used by
Spo.v.r piant in the
kb.o' r:c. ga-.i!itor' and


i, 1.in is to develop a facility
:lhi: il ptoduce those basic needs
: he cn the Prime

S't w- i'j now being made
a, e siuppliers iof crude in the
;rt in er!nsphclic nd -utside it
[ .:t, i..' t u- ".vdy of,- the i .,l nl,.,
cddi.
I) i' u w ih ag inctito retr and
S .' tie IPl i'umie Mi!ri'ter said he
lxpii 4 ws' 04 old ,see a redirection
t ;htiib- king 'it yoiun,; Bahamians
1. Ih potential in these two
. ti stcic .


I!h- tourist industry brought
'- 1.1. visitors to the
Blhaiaris. In view of the
,-;1n1er 's ibil iy to produce
Spinea pplses and
lrii'l. ti' i,.ii-.'ir it ligjcail
'ili tile B;.ihaml as be bible to,
plduc c the breakfast titces
M!,: these vw litors.
!,r .agiricltut e to be
\p1tnilct'd t i Lulid take i new
inie!dc in the part of young
Bah tianll;iis. the Prime Minister
i'mi'd I11u. Not every
.siri bl- it, j t. w j" s a while c, ll- r

I l handle this aspect ot
maricullure canning facilities
wiloild e riecdet Mr I1l ll iin,:
rcd.l tefd that this ye-.- all
tI niatos produced at
I leuthera would be marketed
tii'l .' 11l'. and overs':tls "so


,;'l i n, id we wiiI ho ve
1 1 f a1 I ti e oi;!i' nvinciog




,i ',.it oi I and thie o.'yr :.







it t of forc' in si som r
; ,h ," t i Th i was pi.tt;i teW








S \ ii i S: vc ict.! 1orc

S tii ;t; i il e tiii i cy





S, Pri Mi sti s ii thit
Si r p r, t oi n the I w.N. iai e
: t it there wer large
1, --^.1IuIFis ini 1hc lah.l!lias
Vl:.h Lould bc naia rk Ieid

t h.i!i"-i ins had s, tar only

li ti fepet. 1or




















j nhradraft t
r;;'m !i t'hiw ,." n had ti


:: .i. wiai kc cr red
-' *"I' i ,n e' e.i'2 -crnf iost oi
'.. k ( 'I. Is i he ad;i u td,

1 i ;- imh .rJti -u't hc;:c bu!
', "C't1oads used h1
1.i.i i X I ; d -. o t c ; p e le su
S. i !- ,-.t, T! ,,1 IhI ti l l Oiw
!1: ::.:-i i:ie i10, s 111n thIe

.\ "A ih!1c 11ve2nt 'eni i lst
'[ : ; i:i! d a wav {,, pc thn

S,* i' r::i *nn:'o tlhcc ocam( \votwic









Aircraft


By MIKE LOTHIAN
THE ISLAND'S retail fuel
dealers, bitter over a crippling
one-third cut in their
percentage mark-up under the
new gas price structure, are
giving authorities just one more
chance to ease their burden
before they take "drastic
action" to help themselves.
The Petroleuin Dealers
.\ ,,. tijon voted urnanimnously
to ask Deputy Prime Minister
and Minister of Finance Arthur
D. fIanna for an urgent
meeting to solve their problem.
They unanimously agreed to
take certain steps if Mr Hfanna
f.ic rangee a meeting
within a specific time.
The dealers agreed to
Tribune coverage of their
meeting at the Mlil,,rth'[gl'
Arms on Marlborough Street
last night on condition that
neither the action decided
upon nor the deadline to he
given Mr. Hanna are revealed
They suggested that the
actions they propose could lbe
accurately described as
"drastic."
Concerned primarily with
the price of high-test gasoline.
the dealers declared they
cannot continue to operate
unless the retail price is raised
at Icast six cents a gallon.
LOSING
All said they were losing
money on the mark-up they
are allowed under the
December 28 revision of the
Price Control regulations
relating to petroleum products.
"I've lost $120 in the last six
days." one dealer exclaimed


Retail dealers call for


urgent talks with Hanna


-'-C
The dealers' complaints
centre around the fact tha.
under the revised pri.:
structure they now have to pay
imorc for each gall-n 'i -;a;t
they buy from their supphtlie
but are limited to a r--i.. i
retFurn on their investment thn
ev- They point out, too, that
Aliile the wholesalers were
allowed to raise their price of
high-test by 11 cents a gallon.
retailers were held to a
nine-cent increase.


THE TR!BI NI was
informed late this afternoon
that all gas stations in the
island would close at 6 p.m.
today and remain closed until
they receive "a favourable
response from Go ernmnent."


Before last month's price
revision, dealers had to pay
suppliers 48 5 cents for a
gallon of high test, and were
able to sell the gas to motorists
for 64 cents, a mark-up of 15.5
cents or 32 percent.
Since the revision, the
dealers have to pay 59.5 cents
for a gallon of high-test, but
the retail price is pegged at 73
cents, giving the dealers a
I 3.-ctcent or 22 percent
n'crk-u n


That dealer mark-up
is relied on to pay all the
operating costs ot the service
stations utilities, staff,
inaintenance, etc. .'nd should
bh high enough to give the
station operator a profit.
With the cut in the mark-up,
the dealers say, the> are losing
monero with every gallon they
sell

The dealers held their first
emergency meeting on the
same day the prices were
revised, and at that time
estimated that their mark-up
had dropped about five
percent. and they resolved to
demand a mark-up of at least
25 percent over theii
investment.
More accurate calculation-
have been made since, and last
night dealers were told by
Association officials that in
fact their mark-up had dropped
from 32 to 22 percent aI lll
orie-third and that a retii",
to the 32 percent margin was
the least on which tihe
operators could survive.
A return to the 32 percent
inark-ip would mean hiking
the retail price of high-test
gasoline to 79 cents a gallon.
Dealers are little concerned
with regular gas and high
octane fuel, because sales ot
the former have been dropping
steadily for a considerable time
to the extent that mitst
stations do not even carry it


Pindling: Outten was loyal


By NI'KI KIlLLY
PRIME MINISTER Lynden
Pindling and the Progressive
Liberal Party re-nominated
Sinclair Outten to run for St.
Barnabas because Mr. Outten
had remained loyal to the PLP
through the bad times as well
as the good.
Fhis explanation, offered by
Mr. Pindling last night, was
repeatedly endorsed by
Agriculture and Fisheries
Minister Anthony Roberts,
Transport Minister Darrell
Rolle and Killarney
repi resentative Cadwell
Armbrister.
In tact a good part of Mr.
Outten's campaign meeting at
S. C( McPherson school was
devoted to emphasizing his
continuous party allegiance in
contrast to the disaffection of
candidates ('lyde (,ardiner and
Wentred "Site" leastie.
Both men have broken the
party line to run as
Indepenedents, claiming they
couli not support Mr. Outten
since his disclosure he was not
Bahamian.


SALE
DAMAGED
MATTRESS SETS.

40% OFF

1 IAIIU FIIIIIIF1
NASSAU ONLY
ONLY...- -


"'The PLP had others it
could have chosen from, but
the PLP does not make it a
practice to turn its back on
those who are with it all the
time," the Prime Minister told
the capacity crowd of soime
300.
To make another choice
would have been to turn their
backs on Mr Outteii, Mr.
Pindling said.
IDNlI NO)lHi\
"That would have been our
right if Sinclair done us
something hut he ain't done us
nothing. "
Declared the Prime Minister.
"I would rather go down with
a friend than have it he said
and thrown in my face that
'you turned your back on yaur
friend.'
"All of us believed, and
Sinclair believed he was
Bahamian. He behaved as if lie
was and we all behaved as if lie
was. He told us he wasn't. We
didn't tell him.
"It is true that after he told
us we told him that 'Sinclair
the only thing to do is to
regularize your position
according to the law.'
"When he told me his
predicament I told him:
'Sinclair, you went with us and
1 have to go with you,'" Mr.
Pindling stated.
LOYALTY
This might appear a
contradiction of the
government's Bahamianization
policy, he said, "but there are
some personal virtues stronger


than police and that is loyalty
to a friend who was loyal to
the cause when things were
though."
It Mr. Outten was to lose the
elect ion ion that account.
which the Prime Minister did
not think he would. "I would
feel I had done ni share and it
wasn't tme that let him down. I
would like to tlink that when
lie looked over his shoulder for
a friend he saw nme" he said.
Mr. Pindling said he had no
apologies for dealing swiftly
with Mr. Outten's application
for Bahantian citizenship. "If
we made a mistake in that %e
made a mistake."
He informed his audience
that Mr. Outten's particular
case revealed that many other
people were in the same
position, but they had not
made the situation publicly
k now n.
'"lMin% are fellows I went to
school with and they will be
treated in exactly the same
way." he said.
The Prime Minister
described Mr. Outten as "true,
good and honest" and with the
PLP all along.
DEDICATED
For his part Mr. Armbrister
said he had known Mr. Outten
all his life, "and no one can tell
me that he is not as dedicated
or sincere as any other PLP
regardless of where he comes
from."
The only people running
against Mr. Outten in the St.


Barnabas by-election he said
were "rejects or outtcasts."
Those who hopped from paint
to party were not to bhe
trusted.
Mr. Outten however had
been with the PLP from the
beginning "and I believe he will
be here right to the end." he
declared.
"Sinclair Outten has also
been decent. le is a rman," Mr.
Armnbrister declared. While
sonieone else might have kept
the knowledge of his birthplace
secret until he was found outt,
Mr. Outten had chosen to
reveal it.
The Prime Minister, whos
indicated he would accept
questions, was asked by one
female member of the audience
how and when Mr. Outten
discovered he was not a
Bahamiani .

Mr Pindling said what he
knew of the matter came troni
Mr. Outten who rang and asked
to see him. "He told me that
after independence he went to
his father and said 'you have to
get yourself straight.'"
It was then that Mr. Outten
senior told his son that he was
not Bahamian-born. lHe
reportedly told the 37-year-old
Mr. Outten that his mother left
Abaco where the family was
living to return to Turks Island
for his birth.
"That's what he told me and
I believe him," the Prime
Minister declared.


anymore and sales of the
latter have fallen r1, ,l :i.
since the price went from t9 to
80 cents a gallon.
Association secretary Algie
Darville of Shell XitAtomrotive
Services on \,..I' Road told
dealers last night of hls
inability to contact authorities
since the Association's Dec. 28
meeting
lif said lie had ro success in
contacting the Prices
Commission last Saturday. hut
he did reach former
(Comnission chairman Neville
Adderley on Monday.
But Mr. Adderley informed
him that the tenure of
Commission mnem hers ended
with the close of 1'73. and nus
new Commission had been
appointed.
NOBODY
"[There is no (official) bodk
to meet witli us,'" Mr. Darviti-
said.
Hfe added that Mr Adderile
I"rn,ti_.jI. I that lie would
approach the I)eputy Prine
Minister to get him to let the
former Comlmission act until
the new one is appointed
"At 5 p.mi to!0.J
(yesterday) lie in ftou1ed R ii
that no progress waasrladc,
there was no indiatiin o;
when an official body : .u!
be appointed."
Mr. Darville said \1r
Adderley told him there wis a
possibility of a nr.'etlr'r i' o
January 8, "but it's likely thil
nothing really can happen .un '
around the fitreenth ii hn
hopefully, a Colii ssion will
be appointed "
One dealer said "I rlltk w\c
are wasting time wni!h the
Co nlnission. The 1 'rom
Minister sets prices."
[hat brought
Association p r eid. I
Livingston t Pin der the
information that he had tried
to contact Mr. Hlannai and was
told by someone in his otsie
that the Deputy can onili
approve proposals the
Commission sends to hiiii
"I believe this is a shamn.
Mr. Pinder declared. Ithy are
holding us otff as long as
possible, and my understanding
is that prices are going ip again
in February.
"They are stalling us to keep
the public happy." he added
"We must put on some kind o
pressure"
I he dealers went on to
discuss the various inethods of
applying pressure before finally
deciding on the most drastic ot
the several suggesti'-iin'
They decided also. however.
to give Mr. Ianna an
opportunity to act before they
do. They, however, drafted a
telegram requesting an urgent
meeting The telegram was
telephoned to the Bahamas
Telecommunications as soon as
the meeting ended at about 1 1
p.m., and was expected to be
on Mr. Hanna's desk this
morning.
There are 77 service stations
on the island. There were 31
men at last night's meeting
and, together with other
dealers not present but known
to be willing to back the
Association in whatever action
is taken, about 85 percent of
the gasoline outlets on the
island were said to be
represented.


It ROI Il S,1.i\I L.i



,i=i ( ic \ i .

N. test I ii' ci i i ; :
'id i t i
on Oslt A'll i .-





W ent re S 1. :-. --
I'LlP'scn i t s i t. l..* i ...

Bot : .pp, ;
ountt -- o Ien nt -i'

dislosurhir' w".is In's ; '5 i

had pri'e\ io' is i tts u it !h

ail ran l lart il e ,,i :.i

idar n-s n it th' i .i- i'. t i:
I11 lr fC ii 11 i

at.ll .niii n i's tl !'. ri'd ?
1eUrti\ of 1 t1'-il lt t
o n stIt ii "u ni i .2 !idn I .'
(nhe i *ii .!.t e's .ii-t\ -

thne s s 'dt 51'h .,;. .,: C .
BIle huill R. il to h, -c \!
(. ittem. rind .i itt .nt : -
PL parildiirietIrnl ,n.n.n>pe.i'
1)1 ( tIH t\
k l t h o u P ,'iii!H
repeatedly lo '-le:t I v is i ti
issues. \l' r (tiltt iiII ;
spent his tine ulciis i ntn I
uoicc as the indul.id i
decry i g the 'loIt. e
diiion"ie c C lc ie c'seek
to ont use partN sipp.to ti is.
l1 he N,( inetd and dea
wth all tue candidates, and
the final analy isii ain,
ulaninouNsl decided 1o e
Sinclair Outten he said
Ilowevers nl.riiceri'us per'o
were going aloundl tl
constituency saying ihe wei
PLP but did not agree with tl
Council s decision. 'But h i
can you be PLP and fail to g
along with the party>'?" M
Outten asked.
"They talk about demc.rat
being dead, but they fail
adhere to the lundament
principle of democracy an
this is majority rule.
"What you know aboc


'- I t I' t




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or t- -





H i i .. ;

= .:
- ii I


ii t -


It
I'll' l in 1 .1 i ,i





S i ti i \ l i


'BULLA'
Ri In 11 si


search
,,- I ,, S A Sea Resct e
S :; \ i seeking the
i : sj!'ni--t et rsing Lake
S: i':i ; i!cift at. last seen in
'ii t .'.M r B!imini around 2
. -- ::i )D ceimber 21. last

S I ih ir cralt, with Ben
leeror iad Miss Roddy
S ;Gosmann abo.rd. had left
.. N.'0,.ia earleral in the day.
: ") .tI I I S Sta vLt.
'B .\.S R.A. duty officers this
S .' i i::i l ni g I .. Irh- J the aircraft
s a' Uas being white and blue with
,t hi'' gdold trnm on its exterior Its
'~,~ !ci seal number is N-39385.
St' craft 'l ir'g the route
i il-it hi- \kas tlt,
t beteen Nassau and Bimini
jin.titiliai tc' \sork
a 1 worK have been placed on the alert
4 \ .en' hea tor any signs of the aircraft
Sa he hich disappeared
1 t ,tf .te mn seriously.
S The amphibian is also being
sought along with a sailboat,
OWENS DIE8 the Citation, which left Ft.
S,,, ,, .. Lauderdale, Fla.. on Tuesday.


73. iled at his home on
iurnquest Alley I thursday He
is survived b fhis son Reginald;
two nephews and two nieces,
Charles. tyrui and a Cynithia
Joh!:somn of Brooklyn, New
York and Mrs Merle McDonald
of Boca Raton, Florida and six
grandchildren.
Funeral arijanrtcnemits will hec
alln .i'.i cet d Ialtr.


.....- I


Fuel: drastic








action threat


Outten: I was



selected



democratically


ILr


c'


NEWt
Volpinill


- -- --- --- -------- ---


----- ----------- --


- ---- ~~ -1--"-


- L I L L1 JI ~_I -L--I CI~BCL 9LdbII~-L


~1 - 1 9 '













Friday January 4, 1974


___h___ ribunt


P,0 1 -

















ti er 1


^&-2-rta


Nixon to step





into oil crisis


-\ l t .S S liI o Sl.i




S l. Pro P 1.


own interest because neither the oil users nor
producers want a global depression.
At!ter his nes conference, Kissinger said
Nixon will take undisclosed initiatives next
swee k and announce them later.
Responding to questions, the Secretary of
Salte said that rougnit -U countries would be


e mcO lti!passed
planiinig.


Dayan may




offer a



withdrawal
.' s-iN(, I N !r i- tso said lic would otter to
. 1 -. \! ,I \l,. I! .. I n -.stihdraw tO heC Mitia and
.: . .. (; ',!d passe ut 30 miles
* '- : the wI - is sa


Meanwhile. King Hussein of
JoIdailn l has "- i Ili r .j',.t his
c,,e<- lro: tthe Syrian front and
S.r!d 'he Arab world that
IS. might uiie the Geneva
, n"teren to conclude a
.cp r te pc p ce siith I g Fpt.

S I hit seCn to be the Israeli
,tr.itec" the 38- ear-old
C;- iih i 'd n an interview
'1Itl tih ItH irut llagi: ine Al
xCS .1.


* ._ .... .,. A '.p .ir le Igcp ian- Israeli
S i v old eaken Jordan's
ii. >,. { ,, =.,^ ,: 'i '-,[l,"n .is ja i--Cotui t r and
S srac! tke ot Syria alone
.. the h itl- ie "


b\ thle new move Nixon is
One of the major aims of the
Nixon policy, he said, would
be to bring soaring oil prices in
line with the needs of the
world economy.
Asked when lie thought the
Arab embargo on oil shipments
to the United States might be
lifted, lie said' "We can't tie it
to any particular time frame."
lHowever, he expressed the
view that continuing Arab use
of oil as a weapon was
increasinglyl i, ,.pi. .pria. in
view of U.S. support for a
United Nations resolution
outlining the bare bones of a
proposed Middle Fast
settlement.
\Lreo\er, he said, the
United States is the chiet
promoter of Arab-Israeli peace
neCwl'ti tlons l (AP)

Gas limit
filE LI DI- RAL Energy
C nhie f sat is cotmpan> -owned
gasoline stations will be
imposing a ten-gallon limit on
oisoline sales.
Williamn Sinon says major
companies agreed to encourage
the limit. And he says the
I-nergy Offlice will announce
February a new price increase
to compensate dealers for sales
lost to the shortage.


HONG KONG Workers
today began breaking up the
wreck of the once-proud liner
Queen Elizabeth, destroyed
by arson a year ago.
Demolition of the rusting
hulk is expected to take three
years.
A spokesman for the
owner, C. Y. Tung's Island
Navigation Corp., said the
first job will be to cut up the
superstructure showing above
water. The next step will be
to try to refloat the hull. But'
if this proves impossible,
workers will have to cut up
the ship underwater, he said.
The 83,000-ton Queen
Elizabeth went to a fiery
death near the Western
approach to Hong Kong
harbour on Jan. 9, 1972,
after fires broke out
simultaneously in half a


Russian


Rou lette


kills man
ROCHESTER, New York
While his wife and two
friends looked on, Jasper
Perry took two chances at
Russian Roulette. He killed
himself on the second try.
police said.
Investigators said Perry.
54, took the cartridge out of
a .22-calibre revolver,
replaced one and spun the
cylinder.
lie then aimed the gun
at his foreheandand pulled the
trigger. When the weapon
failed to discharge, he
repeated the motions and
the gun fired.
He died in his living room
of a gunshot wound to the
head, the Monroe County
Medical Examiner said. The
death was ruled a suicide.
(AP)


The end


for the


old Queen
dozen places. An official
inquiry determined that the
fires were set "by person or
persons unknown."
Tung purchased the former
flagship of the Cunard fleet in
early 1971 and was
converting it into a floating
university. The ship was only
a week away from her first
trial runs when she was
sabotaged. (AP)
ABOVE: RMS Queen
Elizabeth pictured during her
last cruise call to Nassau in
1968.


Minister


gets


threat
BONN, Foreignl Minister
Walter Scheel was under special
guard today after his Ministry
received a mysterious IRA
kidnap threat against him. an
official spokesman said.
He said the ministry recieved
W,, d ..-s ., a letter signed bI
"IRA Rhoendorf." threatening
to kidnap Scheel unless the
government paid one million
pounds stealing S. 28
million into a Cologne postal
account.
Since then. the ministry has
received a tape cassette
containing sim ilar dentands
The threats from "IRA
Rhoendorf" came days after
German businessman Thomas
,icdd.illl. i.il, 44, Bonn's
honorary consul in Belfast. was
kidnapped outside his
N- rilik.ti, Ireland home


Stiff upper lip and money in



the pocket sees Britons through


- i - -


5'.


-
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-- -


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I" LI


- I I I -
- -. I it -
-- .it..... i-s
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t Iore
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\, : L ..!. :"-- [. orL !hI- ,'\ i'' 'it Ite srrtrpts
:=, '' '**L-. .;',i *.i i'?. c tlic,! !ti f 'w "i" in 1ee s auple
1 II~'- 1~5 'i I 'i i -. t t e abl
{ -; -, ,: ,;, ,i'd Ii s- t.tlade pplticaiions tot
5t . -''.: ii ol tiC Ig t l tl-ies \ct 1 SI
-II '10 -it :laitiedt


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t-il a the not
SH tirhbour and


Ll meI ii
"* : il-. :: . ; l 1 ' | il
1 1,-;1 r it c i; 1 tI: w r 5c ol h5ed l
v "'d : ... J-!'l'i..>!l ti lI ti rho es s t!: i I ai!ire or amt si
p' -' i c -ie -: t i eiile ot ciLIn i'll orn befoic the 1-
S hix '4 wili iperatL as a bar to such claim, Wal
S- S t () li\x |(1I. \asall


I U\Dl)ON Irions arec
i' d w n '- i: s witl l iC
p \ Cr 5si. sh p itng in
Il lit stores i snd s working
I CI tc; d ol'l0 s 1, It hornet

I tt he industrial Crisis that has-
-.r.Ced Britain into a three-dai
-' work week and idled tons of
thousands appeared forgotten
A least in central London, as
hou sewrives jammed thie
department stores otr the
tadition.I !r new s ear sales.
Worried} exclaimed One-
: .pper hOf course I'll)
v irid. IBut I'm dairmn d t l'ri
ii t .i ake Ini i woise bI-
J, sing at homite and griumbltihn
S- I here to spend sCiiie Iione,
l d enio> it
IC's But the crisis had its bite,
p1 Oli'ndolln streets, once aiongll
ith world's satest, were hall
darkened and eerie.
1 \ 1 ort gage 111 t loan
companies nlade plans to
revise payments plans for their
S stomiliers
lHopeful travel agencies
stepped up advertising Ito
I Ira tinainit snUminIIlhr vacation
bookings tiCleaily lit crunch
S as Wide sections ot industry
were half idle. The government
announced that 7'tt.000
workers were itnemployed
ied yesterday as a direct result of
in tihe short week,
til lIopes of earl\ settlements
It to put Britain back oiln normal
te working died Wednesday when
of talks with the governmIent
ri k broke down oi both tronts
i al ministers warned that tilhe
three-day week was likely to
continue at least into
I february.
'v, Opposition chiefs reacted
the .iigril 'Fhursday.
t I abour leader Harold Wilson
iccuised prime minister Edward
Ieath of "'politicking" and
ice '"petulance" and told himn to
at salvage the economy by
reaching agreement with the
miners regardless of his seven
tlii per cent anti-inflation curbs on
ite pNay hikes.
S 1 ihe rl leader Jerent
tile I'Ihorpe urged a "generous
t settlement and said Heath's
h economic policy was "in
4th ruins."
iter ruins
r Bitt the man-in-the street
went about his business


quietly. taking the good news
Silth the bad. upper lip still
I hic good news Tliursdas
was that the train drivers'
union voted against
intensifying its go-slow.
I tie bad was that food prices
rose by 18.25 per cent last
year. according to the
authoritative trade magazine
the "Grocer" and that new
increases had been authorized
for such goods as bread and
chocolate.
London stores. however,
reported that shoppers did not
appear to be tightening their
belts.
"We've had a good week,"
said a salesgirl at 'Mates"
fashion boutique in the throes
of sales fever. "We've sold all
our stuff and are getting more
in already.
A furrier in Chelsea's King's
road sunimmed up the carry-on
spirit in a hand-printed notice
displaced in its show window:
"Open by electric power, by
candle power and by will
powerv"r
The go ve rn n t' s
emergency regulations to eke
out fuel supplies limit the use
of electricity in nonessential
stores to six half-days per
week. Pharmacies are
exempted, but hairdressers
must get their clients out of
the hairdryers at noon, wet or
dry.
Shopkeepers have been
urged to tighten precautions
against shoplifters working
under cover of literal darkness.
One leading department
store said it had doubled the
number of its store detectives,
but added- "It might prove
wasted money. Two can't see
any better than one."
Women were more anxious
about Britain's darkened
streets than its darkened stores.
The electricity restrictions have
backed out many streets and
severely dimmed others.
"London is supposed to
have safe streets," commented
a young Chelsea girl. "But I
feel nervous walking home
at nieht. There isn't a single
lamp lit between the bus stop
and my home, and that's a
10-minute walk."
Many workers seemed
reluctant to adapt to the


energy crisis,, perhaps in the
hope it right go away if they
ignored it
Thomas Smith,. partner in a
small engineering firm in West
London, was asked if he
planned to cut back his wife's
housekeeping money.
"Good God." lie replied.
"I'm not thinking of anything
like that yet. If might be
necessary if the three-day week
goes on. but not right now.
Smith said he planned a
spring vacation as usual and
could still be found in the pub
most evenings after work.
"If I couldn't afford that,"
he said, "I'd go out and buy a
shotgun."
Four operators said tighter
money had not affected
bookings for foreign holidays.
A spokesman at Cooks, a
leading travel agency, said the
crisis actually appeared to be
working in their favour.
"If ,iii:. ntliig more people
seem to want to go away." she
said. "They need to get away


from it all "
But there was one hot spot
in Britain's cool Thursday.
A group of angry contiuters
at a suburban station near
London delayed by the
locomen's go-slow shouted
for the drivers; to "show your
faces."
"'[Theys shouted we should
turn the drivers over to them."
said Southend station manager
John Abel "T'hey said they
would settle with them."
"But there was no bother.
the drivers are hard to find.
Ihey put overcoats over their
uniforms so that no-one will
recognize them and use side
doors to get into the stations,"
he added, (AP)

Saxbe in
S11 1.1 \M SAXBL became
the United States 70th
attorney general today. Saxbe
officially gave utip his Senate
seat yesterday after five years'
service.


I~-1 1 I ~~


But the "Times" of London
and a member of the
Opposition party said today
the trio should be brought to
trial.
Both the newspaper and the
politician said a trial could
convince guerillas not to try
anything in Britain.
Both men attended Santa
Barbara City College.
Police say the girl and one
man were picked up Saturday
when she arrived in London
front Los Angeles and
contacted him.
Automatic pistols and 150
rounds of ammunition were
discovered.
1\ljin. I ii, k British security
forces are convinced that
extremist guerilla forces are
linking up for coordinated
terrorist campaigns
throughout the world, an
intelligence expert said.
The expert, a Briton who
refused to be identified b\
naine, said this new
development in growing urban
violence is apparently the
result of a secret meeting a few
weeks ago at an unspecified
location.

lie was commenting on a
report in the Beirut daily
newspaper Al Liwa that
Palestinian guerillas andi thlie
Irish Republican Army
IRA-have agreed on joint acts
of terrorism in Britain. I AP')


Car owners


end it all
POR I LAND Some car
owners here are apparently
using their last drops of
gasoline to set fire to their cars.
The Portland Fire Bureau
said it has received increased
reports of car fires,
"particularly in large,
late-mode! cars with large
engines and low gasoline
mileage."
"Early appraisals indicate
the car fire increase is related
to the shortage of gasoline."
chief f James Riopelle said.
Ilhe bureau is ready to
present to the district
attorney's office the cases of
two of the fires it believes were
set deliberately. It is
investigating the others.
The buireaui's chief
investigator, ('apt Juohn
I-arber. said two 1t'74 cars had
burned in the previous two
dats, one with a price tag of
more than $r. i iii lie said
more than 10 such fires had
been reported in the previous
two weeks
Riopelle said accidental
fires, as well as incediary fires.
have increased "because people
are now carrying extra supplies
of gasoline with them in their
vehicles "" (AP)


BEATLES BOUNCE BACK

NEW YORK Helen Reddy's "Leave Me Alone (Ruby ked
Dress)" continued its steady climb in popularity, reaching the top
of the best selling single pop record list in the United States.
"Time in a Bottle" by the late Jim Croce was right behind,
climbing from third to second place on Cash Box Magazine's top
ten. Steve Miller's "The Joker" also moved one notch to third
place.
Four newcomers made the top ten this week, among them two
former Beatles. Paul McCartney's "Helen Wheels" jumped into
sixth place and Ringo Starr's "You're Sixteen" took the eighth
spot.
In London, "The Dark Side of the Moon," the British Pink
Floyd's space rock extravaganza, was Britain's most popular
albu in 1973., the Melody Maker reported,
Dublin-born Gilbert O'Sullivan, now light years away from his
initial image of the shy young man with the clothes that didn't
fit, took third place with "Back to Front."
The Beatles clocked in at sixth and eighth places with reissues
of their hits of 1967-70 and 1962-66. but the only individual
Beatle to show was Paul McCartney with "Red Rose Speedway,"
in 36th place. (AP)






LEARN

Master Kermit A Ford,
San Dan (3rd Degree)
FATHER OF KARATE IN THE BAHAMAS
Invites Everyone (Men, Women & Children) who wishes
to learn the Ancient & Noble Art of Karate, Shotakan
The Bahamas Karate School will open for Begin-
ners & Advanced Students
January 7th at .-00 p.m.
Classes held Monday through Friday 6 to 8 p.m. at West
St. Hill opp. St. Francis Church
A -' --11..1W m.Ma ,.. p Mo.,-W. . 0w.1 .4


Why wait to see your Christmas pictures?


Bring in your Kodak film now to:-

Island Shop (Bay Street) Kokeshi (Balmoral Club) Godet Jewellers (George Street)
Island Camera Shop (Bank Lane) Tom-Mae Pharmacy (Wulff Rd.) Maura Lumber (Shirley Street)
Island Photo Centre (Palmdale) The Photographers (Madeira St.) D & D Drug (Centreville)


J & D Drug (Kemp Road) Island Colour Lab (Oakee Field)


,_, ~ ~ ~ ---'~I'--- -"-~ I ~ ---- ----- ---II


II r r I


POLICE SEIZE


SECOND GIRL


IN GUN ALERT

l ON )(ON Security police seized a second young American
girl today for questioning about arms smuggling and international
terrorism.
Scotland Yard said she was a "known associate" of Allison
Thompson, an 18-year-old waitress from Santa Barbua.
California, who has been held six days with two male friends.
The second girl arrived by jutboi jet from New York and was
still being questioned at London airport three hours later.
Airport sources said she was in her early 20s and Special
Branch security police had been watching for her for the past
three days. She was not identified.
Prime Minister Fdward Heath's government may deport Miss
Thomnpson and two Moslenm men suspected of terrorism.


ILI~E-I~IPr~ I


L


ii.i~


J & D Drug (Kemp Road)


Island Colour Lab (Oakes Field)











Friday January 4, 1974


-thu Cributir


NULLfJS ADDICTUS JutaRE IN VWRBA MAGISTM
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D
Publisher/Editor 191 7-1972
Contributing Editor 1972 -
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972 .


ByETIIl\\l DUPUCHi
(This is the third installment in a series of five articles in which
I will tr, bh' using disjointed scraps history, to paint a picture
of the destructive Jorces of pride and prejudice in human
experience.
(This series arises out of a recent conversation with a friend in
tIngland who was disturbed to see his great country sinking into
the mediocrity that has overtaken great nations of the past. Space
is too limited to permit an expansive discussion of the human
store All I can present in this series are bits and pieces that may
serve to stir your imagination.)

SHAKESPEARE revealed his resentment of the black Moors in
Othello. one of his most interesting plays but a damaging one in
human relations.
It's the story of a Moorish ruler who married a beautiful white
patrician maid and strangled her to death in a fit of unjustifiable
jealousy.
This play contributed somewhat to the prejudice against mixed
marriages in our time. Until recent years it required a great deal
of courage for both parties to enter into a racially mixed
marriage. Now that period has passed.

The black man in this hemisphere has laboured under great
handicaps because his forbears were brought to this part of the
world as slaves. The first tragedy was that the African slaves were
sold into bondage by their own African people.
But the black man has travelled a long way in a short time
His advance has been much faster than that of any slave race in
recorded history. This has been possible because he has been
accepted in a highly developed Christian society and has been
permitted to share in all its advantages.
It is unfortunate that. having now "arrived", many of these
people are accepting their good fortune in a spirit of hatred and
revenge, not realizing that, although their forbears suffered
hardships and degradation at the hands of their masters ... today's
generation of blacks is reaping the benefits of having been
transplanted into a beneficent s.iici.

A former Colonial Secretary of the Bahamas, who later became
the governor of a major British colony in Africa, is an ardent
stamp collector.
"Who is this great Bahamian Bain onii the postage stamp?", he
asked me when lie came to lunch with my wife and me at the
Savoy during our recent visit to England. "Am I supposed to
know him?"
IN,, I said.
Surprised by my brief reply lie looked up from his lunch and
smiled at me across the table.
"What did he do?" he asked.
"Ilad he done anything you would have known him." I said.
lie understood.

Sir Harold Christie was one of a small group of Bahamians who
built the economy of the Bahamas and gave prosperity to the
Bahamian people.
In spite oft ,.,., ,in, that has happened Sir Harold continued
to do all in his power to promote the wel'f, c of his beloved
islands.
An ill man for a long time, lie refused to give up. While on a
recent mission in Germany that he hoped would help stabilize the
collapsing economy and provide employment for our people ... he
died suddenly. lie was actually on the job when he died.
Sir Harold was a 'i,,e.lilt\ man. le could have taken it easy but
he refused to relax his efforts on behalf of a country he helpedd to
build.
Except for a record of his achievements that I wrote in this
column ... and other news stories in this newspaper ... Sir Harold
might never have existed as far as the present government was
concerned.
His body was cremated and his ashes were quietly interred in a
grave with his parents in the Western Cemetery.
This whole affair reminded me of a poem I read in a "Royal
Reader" in the Boys Central School about 65 years ago,
describing the funeral of Sir John Moore, a great British general. I
can't remember the exact words but it went something like this ...
Not a drum was heard
Not a funeral note
As his corpse to the ramparts we hurried
Sir Harold Christie was a great Bahamian in the highest sense of
the word.
Today, unfortunately, mediocrity is the standard by which
greatness is measured by this government.
For some time after I left the Bahamas last year ZNS
periodically referred to me as a great Bahamian. In this column I
asked them not to include me in that ,ail.-,ur c.
Every standard in the Bahamas has been dragged down to such
a low level that there is no recognition left in the nation today
that could be regarded as greatness in thle real meaning of the
word.
The present government is trying to date the history of the
Bahamas from the day the P.L.P. got control of the nation seven
years ago. They would have the world believe that nothing of any
importance happened in these islands before that date.
This fonn of conceit ... an expression of an inferiority complex
... goes far back into history.
The Chow dynasty in China dated from 1122 B.C. They
started out well but one of the last rulers of this line wanted his
reign to go down in history as the beginning of the Empire. He
destroyed all the literature that dealt with previous ages and had
over 406 learned men buried alive so that they might not
produce new records.
But his project was defeated. It was during the Chow dynasty
dat Confucius, the great Chinese prophet, was born. This was
about 551 B.C.


The Chow dynasty was overthrown in 255 B.C. by the Tsin or
Chin dynasty, from which China takes its name. It was during this
period that the writings of Confucius were discovered. It is
interesting to recall that the Tsin dynasty built the Great Wall of
China to keep the Tartars out.
The writings of Confucius have influenced the thinking of the
Chinese people down to this time, so much so that China's
present ruler Mao Tse Tung is now trying to stamp out the
Confucian philosophy of family as the important unit in life as
opposed to the state.

In one of his brilliant essays Turgenev, the powerful Russian
author, creates an imaginary conversation between two majestic
mountain peaks in the Alps that had not been soiled by the foot
of man.
In this conversation the mountain giants spoke scornfully of
men as two-legged beetles that scurried around their base defiling


FRIGHTENING PARADISE EXPERIENCE


I 1)11 OR, The Tribune,
I am one of millions of
Americans that have visited
and enjoyed your beautiful
Bahamas islands. The people
are friendly and cheerful. They
always have time to help and
to be courteous, and I think
most important they're always
able to give you a smile.
Because of these reasons, and
your lovely climate and sky
blue waters, the Bahamas is a
very popular resort area that
has not lost its native
traditions.
A few weeks ago, while
visiting thet Bahamas on a
combination business pleasure
trip, I had a frightening
experience happen to me
which I wanted to relate to
you. One night I went to the
casino at Paradise Island with
some of my friends who live in
the Bahamas. Because they are
not allowed to gamble, they
stood and watched me. When


everything they touched.
This conversation was spread


TFTTES TO HF EDIOR0


the casino closed, an American
woman and I who were
gambling at the same black
jack table, decided to get a
drink. We were enjoying each
others company and talking
about New York. the state in
which we both come trotm.
Suddenly, two black
Bahamian men grabbed mte and
questioned my intentions.
They became very physical and
called mIy friends black
Bahamian pigs. They told me
that they were security men
for the casino, and that thie
weren't going to let the lady
and myself leave together.
They offered no explanation
for their behavior.
I had not done anything toi
even warrant their attentionti.
They held me while they
dragged the lady oft and told
her to leave.


over great intervals over a long


period of time....thousands of years.
In their last talk Finsteraarhorn looked down on the earth and
reported to Jungfrau.
"Now it is well," he told his neighbour. "It is clean
everywhere, quite white wherever one looks, ..every, where is our
snow. level snow and ice. Everything is congealed. It is well now
and calm."
The two-legged beetles had been removed from the scene by
their own evil and destructive contrivances.
,************* *
Long years after we have all been removed from this scene
historians will search the pages of The Tribune in pursuit of the
truth about the period of transition through which the Bahamiani
people are now passing.
And men like Sir Harold Christie will be given their proper
place in the story of Bahamian achievement, while mediocre men
will fall to their proper level.
I don't mean any discourtesy to the memory of Mi. Bain. iHe
was a nice chap, but The Tribune is concerned with the truth and
for this reason it will play an important part in guiding the pen of
the impartial historian of the future.

Galileo Galilei (1564-1642), Italian astronomer and
experimental philosopher, was condemned for here) by the
Church when he produced proof to show that the world was
round. Up to that time it was held that the earth was flat and if a
mariner ventured too far out into the ocean his ship would fall
oPt the edge and disappear into space.
It was not proved beyond dispute that the world was round
even though the Columbian voyages of discovery of the new
world on October 12, 1492 pointed to this great truth. You will
recall that Columbus' crew were near to mutiny when vegetation
was seen floating on the sea, indicating that land was near.

But there were other great explorers of the past. Marco Polo.
1254-1324, was a Venetian, the greatest of medieval travellers.
Oh yds, even tiny Venice was a centre of trade and great power in
its day.
Marco Polo heard tales of a great kingdom in the far east. iHe
set out in search of it. lie found it. When he returned to Europe
some years later no one believed the stories lie told of a fabulous
kingdom, far more resplendent than anything then known to the
European nations.
Marco Polo had "discovered" China. For centuries China had
locked her borders against foreign intrusion. Their own territory\
was the world in which they lived and moved. They sought
nothing beyond it.
Eventually the West "discovered" China and forced their
power on these peaceful people. This great people finally came
under foreign domination.
They were heartlessly exploited. Foreign merchants enriched
themselves in the drug traffic. The opium dens in China were
something terrible to behold. The Chinese alone seemed addicted
to indulgence in this deadly vice.
When a Chinese emperor tried to suppress this trade his eItfoi!
were firmly suppressed by the western powers in the name u,
freedom of trade.
Today....the youth of the West are being desti,\ cJ by the drug
traffic....and thllargest source of supply is the East!
Time never falls to exact a price from thdie wicked.

FOOTNOTE TO HISTORY: The Roman Catholic Church claimits
that the Pope is infallible only on questtinns of faith and morals
His decisions in this respect are not to be questioned by the
faithful.
The strength of the church had always been its disciplined
There has been a weakening in the discipline in the church in
recent years and its effects in some areas are disturbing.
Whether or not one believes in the infallibility of the Pope on
questions of faith and morals, it cannot be denied that htis
Holiness has great vision in temporal matters as well.
Over 46 years ago I was a student at St. John's Universits in
Collegeville, Minneesota where one of my friends was the late
Father Virgil, O.S.B., one of the finest brains in the university\
His ability was recognized by Rome. lHe had been given some
important commissions by the Holy Father.
Fr. Virgil told me that St. John's had received instructions
from Rome to pay special attention to the education of the dark
races because he was convinced that the power structure wa,
moving from the West to the East.
Rome was not concerned with who ruled the world. The
Pope's only concern was that thie church should play its part in
helping to prepare any future world leaders for the task that la\
ahead.
This conviction explains the fact that all over the world todas
members of the dark races are being advanced to posts of dignity
and responsibility in the church.
Jamaica now has an Archbishop for this territory, in Malawi,
Africa I met an Archbishop who was not a very learned man.
India now has a Cardinal Archbishop. Most Popes so far have
been Italians but when 1 was in India a few years ago...and there
was talk about the possibility of Pope Paul retiring ... the name oh
the Indian prelate was being seriously advanced as a possible
successor to Paul in the seat of St. Peter.
This is how far change is being envisioned for the future.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
Asleep, awake, by night or day.
The friends I seek are seeking me.
No wind can drive my bark astray,
Nor change the tide of destiny.
What matter if 1 stand alone?
I wait with joy the coming years,
My heart shall reap where it has sown,
And garner up the fruit of tears. JOHN BURROUGHS


As they were dragging me
out with the help ot a German
Shepherd attack dog nearby,
they did considerable damage
to my clothes and beat andt
bruised me. I asked to see the
manager and these answered
with threatening me with the
(German Shepherd attack dou.
Finally. I ,was able ti contact


the police who cooperated as
much as they could. However,
one police told me on the
scene. I'd like to help you. but
the casino controls things
around here."
The officer at the police
station asked me after hearing
my story it I would relate it to
you. because its ., i mitin. that
not onis has happened bet ore.
but is bad lor the Bahamas,
I am a businessman and I
own several of mni own( v


businesses. I am coung,
experienced, and well travelled.
I have gambled in casinos all
over the world, but never have
I ever encountered a situation
anything like this one.
Considering the fact that I had
not had a drink the whole
night, and I never do drink
when I gamble. I feel that I am
able to give you an accurate
account of what happened.
It is beyond bs
comprehension how the peiiple


of the Bahamas could let such
an atmosphere exist the way it
does in their homeland. I
understand that the casinos are
not owned by the people of
the Bahamas and that they
gain nothing by the casino
being there. My question to
you why!?

HENRY A. JULICHER
934 Lancaster Ave.,
Bryn Mawr, Pa. 19010


THE WORLD IS WATCHING


Il ili the I buine.
Alter viuineI tlihaiks for
space. I amt consItaiiiecd to say
that there is I lie growing
tendency of our people here itn
the Bahamas to he less
coUtltcrteus It w otid appear
that there are ma.in who hold
the philosophy thaiit to tbe
discourteou 's is a tirte or sort
of desirable. There .I.' some
xho belhcevc that coiiesv is a
weakness that should he
shunned like dreaded leprosy .
This is IS ve\ untortiLtunte amnd it
requires that each one inspect
himself slf to see if this i ,i oe fits
him.
I know one liad1 who lhas a
phone inuti her. the same iI' ias
anothci phone butI lor one
digit, whih ca I '", her to1


CALL TO !
I )I ITOR, the I tbutne,
\it open let r di!
Butler
Sir Mdio.
Sir Ihomais Lptun took tea
from India and mnide thie drink
famous
Youth and yours h1j.e shown
gre.it enterprise Could you Inot
take dill seed or strong back,
introduce it as a national drink
and make it famous. Make a
try at it. please.
I have seen the -lI I
enterprise in the Bahama.s
grow. M\ lather told me that
the toindter of R II torry andI
Co. began as a boy making
pond top hats which sold for
6d. or 12 cents. lie was, elected
to the Hlouse of Xssembly and
sat on to negotiate for a
steamship service for which lihe
began the agency.
But back to the hat. Pond
top hats, which were made
from the Palmetto plant.
developed into an industry
w hen a governor's wife
introduced it to the tourist
world. It is now a worthwhile


THE GIN II


I GIN.

---w..


police force could go home and
find something ese to do. even
if it is to sleep imagine!
A few months ago my sister
and I were going west on Wulff
Road on a motorcycle, riding
immediately behind a large
truck, when suddenly the line
of traffic grounded to a halt. I
found my brakes, but still I hit
the rear of the truck.
On taking a look at the
rear-icve\ mirror of tlie truck,
mn sister noticed that the
driver could be seen laughing. I
wonder it he had been dri in g
in an urea where there ale sonic
large ties and !an into one of
them, if he would have laughed
then a broken w ith neck


People on motor-cycles ride
crazy at times, I grant you, but
still it cannot be gainsaid that
drivers of cars don't care five
cents if they cause a
motorcycler to get into an
accident. They take the ride
away from motor-cycles with
the attitude, I imagine, "he
can't hurt me."
Given though we have many
well-meaning citizens here,
who are generously courteous,
yet there are so many that
seem to have grown up with
the dogs and cats. When will
we ever learn?
Remember "the world is
watching."
CHARLES RALPH CAREY


3


answer many phone calls that
are intended for the latter
phone. I his can be annoying to
her it she realizes that anyone
can make a mistake, so site
politely states. chen tilte
occasion arises, that the person
at tihe other end has the wrong
number Th'ile reply is lnot
i ll. "sorry. I have called
the wrong number." but rather
sonie indecent retort, or simply
P. i-" when the receiver hits
its resting place.
I atim sure that she is not the
only titone who has experienced
such reicltionl. Wt in canItt't
people do iunt, othut's ais these
would that others do ti t them?
B% thie wa i it peopl'-
obe ld the g olden rule the


SIR MILO
mdutlMsI'r I wore hat as a bio
bought lor hd made 1oml tuhe
Pahnuetto palm straw which was
the0 called p 101d 0,,1
Another industi anlld person
Vw. ich developed fromi .... i'
O .i,- as, a poor ho ) Ihe
pineapple and Captamn (Culnier
My father told meli that lihe
started it a very small wa\ and
was helped along b\ people at
thie Southern end of i leuthcra.
ite hbcatme pineapple king and
President of the Bank of
Nassiau.
Now'. 'sntce In' mind ti being
carried h,ick it) childhood. I
wouid like toi mention ; a
remedy tha. was used tnor
common colds Onlions were
sliced aind broiwni sugar
sprinkled 0ni the slices and put
outt ocver night in the de'
uncovered and the liquid from
the container drunk and it
cuied the cold.
Ma be some pharmacist canr
develop this ilto a worldwide
remtedy and cause a great
production of onions here
OSCAR JOH-NON\










BRIEMA





!A





ICE


I


THE FROSTED BOTTLE


Distributed in the Bahamas by Bethell-Robertson & Co. Ltd.


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P 0 BOX 6330 E.S NASSAU, M N.P.


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Friday January 4, 1974


A nn, Emmeline and a tale about Joy


By Daphne Wallace-Whir' eiJ
AS WE EMERGE into a new
year there appears to be a
burgeoning and grat.l !.'
trend towards the cultivation
of the less materialistic side of
our young nation.
Susan Wallace's new
(second) book of poetry is on
its way fresh ofi the press.
Patrick Rahming, young
Bahamian architect, also has a
book of poetry on its wax It's
unfortunate that the paper
shortage and fuel crisis delayed
the arrival of these books
before Xmas for they would
have made ideal gifts, a more
lasting and rewarding land
more economical) substitute

TrpI c

Extrintr


for the traditionit and popular
gift of clothing.
A new delight book for
children (ank adults too') is a
story poem entitled "'lhe Tale
of t-immeline Itffin'" written
by Ann Duggan and
delightfully illustrated bx Sam
Rae.
In case you missed it. it is on
sale at the Island Book Shop.
the Nassau Stationers, the
Bahamas Angdo American
Book Store. Maura',. Nassau
Staioners and the City'
Markets at Cable :i. i and
Lytord Cay
Ann's bac kgrou nd.
experience and interests would
suggest that in this medium she
has found a most appropriate
outlet for her creative iS ,l ii
In any case the proof of the
pudding is in the eating and
this gentle little book is an
original
Ann was born in Fngland.
She trained as a chemist but a


dermatological reaction cout
short this career
Working with old books at
the British Museums wett, d
-\nn's appetite toi the written
culture of the ages. (Hler best
subject at school was history).
She went to work in an
antiquarian book store, took a
course in Egy ptian archeology,
then a two-year drama course
and started to write poetry
In 1963 she married her
husband Rae. who is in the
diplomatic service, and a life of
travel began.
In New Zealand Ann
worked in a museum. did
archeological work and when
immobilised by a broken leg.
started writing poetry again.
Two of the Duggan's children
were born in New Zealand
In Switzerland Ann wrote
poetry constantly and from
Switzerland the young family
came to the Bahamas where
their third child was born and
where Ann provided herself
with plenty of scope for what
is probably her first love and
talent her rapport with
children. She is presently
associated with the Bahamas
Aid for Needy Children and
the Bahamas Mental Health
Association She played a very
active role in the play-group
for deprived children which
wx as held in the grounds of
governmentnt Htouse.


Ann aiso pats on puppet
shows and is p:.'scntl:. running
a drama course at St.
Matthew's School in the
evenings.
She took a course t n
social psychology, joined the
Bahamas Poets and Writers
Association and helped edit
and produce their magazine
"Contact". She also helped
conduct the Mental healhh
Association's survey on
pre-school and day-care
centres.
Ann's rapport with children
appears to be a natural
extension of her own life-style
where no artificial boundaries
are eTected between dillers-ni
p.r ."i ot people whether bN
class or age.

At a private party .'. Lii
at the Duggan s home on
M.oseley Lane little and even
big boys from the adjacent
Kemp Road area wandered im
and out and danced with Ann.

From dancing to the
expression of joy is only a step
And Joy is what "Ilhe iale of
I mnmeline TulTin" is all about
Miss Fuffin is a very high
class doll who takes !, i:.mi, tea
with the Hlonourable Bear
every afternoon I hey scorn
the other lowly toys ho
.1.: I l. get mon ie ituni oIt 1 0 !
ie. and 'though less endowed


with the material things of life
get more affection (albeit
rough) lavished on them.
Keeping up with the Jones's is
a deterrent to the joys of
living, or, as Ann explained to
me. "a lot of Joy goes out of
lite when you're too refined".
"Ihe Tale of Emmeline
Tuffin" is an original
expression of Ann's drive in
life the happiness of
children
Ihe delightful and sensitive
illustration are hy Sam Rae.
Sam was born in l'-44 in
Perth Scotland.
Ifis first malor success as a
designer occurred when he was
I i and a pr/ce x inning
medalist in a national poster
design competition sponsored
by N A. I 0
IHe studied Art intensively in
I dinburgh college e of Art from
I 'lI to 1 i )7 winning a
t! "' scholars ip and
w Is' distinguished with a
post gradultit \ear of studI .

Sai has e\ xhi bitd
succe,slulli in four countries
and has works in private
co''ection-, in Britain C anada
and the .S.
iHe taught for several .eari
and in various schools before
coming to the Bahamas in
\ugius' 1 .' lic presentIy
tetiaJes \1i in the I(1 \Nash
.Jui ,' -co d.i i Sch .


An HONOURABLE bear, MISS TUFFin Whd saSPEd,

Anld FLO EDh6r Iwardrob fnl hfd-LOOKIf9 sLQSs,

Qout mE W (O0h Sc re srved For rOcosons'
Afd PhIhif5 LIIbOULUd SCTVC Or EhbCQUtILCOion,
ANd P01it 'e--N


From the Tale of Emmeline Tiiffin


PAGE OF


Susan and the echoes of her island


By DAPII\I W. II 11 II L I>
AS THEY SAY about
important speakers when
introducing them to an
audience that they need no
introduction Susan J. Wallace,
Assistant Director of
-ducation, playwright. actress
and poetess, wife, housewife
and mother, active
church-worker and believe it
or not a recent painter,


certainly v needs nC
introduction.
So there h i'' be no
biography of Susani Instead I'd!
prefer to devote the space I
have to a review of her second
published volume of poetry
"island Echoes." published b\
Mamillan and soon to he on
the bookstands of Nassaiu.
lHowever., readers will '' .ii,
me if I boast a little about


Susan She is mix husbanditl
ciuisinl's wiflte andl tile whole
'', itv t ',kes usi mide in'
Susanl. who is onel .,i the first
published Bahamian poets.
"Island L hoes" unlike
B.i h;iiann Scen"' s nit int
di.i 't i c ept fIr; l ihe odd
co e of poems ll) As Mr
D'avidson L llphiurn writes in
hIs introduetLicon to this voltlinir
!t !s more Hdacti;. Ian the-


5' 'Q


K"


"I'


'S


filt \iume.i '" 'Island I choes'
in its descriptive, clear and
tender latiguage. speaks not
oni1ly to BahIlmianis, butt to
people et i wheree"
lThough in straight I-nglish
"Island choes'" has a distinct
Bahamian q Wlii its,
langutape
Ihfis volume is divided into
tive sections' Prologuc, Travel,
In l .wns iand Settl'e!ents. O(
he .Set.iisons and Ailit.iidc.
I derive most i r1. m Susan's
comic poetry. "Bulla Claudy
Fluner.ial is the most vivid and
gentle Iu in- Iaki ng description
o ;; i -ahaiml ian iunera! I have
evee reads: \hI. tys'" is a
touch poCem about a
"Nau'gh."\" b'o ,'.xho w',akcs up
t h r-st,[ ii.! tmo ning 'to
discover that "Santa brought
me more than Mommy
, ', -., ,I 1 for Moin ,y had
neglected ti tell Sainta about
his nisdeeds.,

n t'it serhouls si \clt l' t., the
"h th'nII ,s iln lit as ist.in t.




J iip[is lr l ti i ,it ll\1 ",o


lhia tOer inie' is ilite dclihltiu!
'indi \\i1 t lait'icil iti lht \set
\. bie a liimilicd one


in IPaal ii
o'q cnth a







.i O'l



li e li 'dlow
!11 J < 1c q +


/ .


('rosing tIe ( reek. one ot
tilhe eiglihl ei calne paintings
b\ Richard \ine. based on
idi;ea' hNS Sdneu Wallace
that ill.iin Susan J.
Wallace's new volume of
poems: Island tEchoes."

M. W.W~ l


Vat 69 and ginger
Sis a very adult drink
People say you actually
taste the Scotch.
After all, isn't that what
drinking whisky is for

VA'T'69


NOW SHOWING
First Showing in Nassau
at 7:00 & 10:05

IfYOND ATLANTIS
Patrick Wayne
John Ashley
Plus -
at 8:45

IWYIoHI PEOPLE
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Except Sat. Matinee, evening 8:30 Phone 2-1004, 2-1005
Sunday Matinee 2:45 & 4:55, evening 8:30
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"RIDE IN THE Ken Wood
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'phone 22534 Saturday night.
Shows start 7 pin. *gI
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Starts Saturday Night 8:30 p.m.
Sunday Continuous from 5 p.m. Phone 3-4666






Plust "ZAAT" PG.
PARENTAL DISCRETION AD VISMD.


W ha t is also ,so ill c'!e '.iii
about "(. anll ln I ,m 'II ;
tha.t it it ancd a '
" Stra h g' hi p, : : .:
homely I nIt Iii;l t ix I
problem treated \,A;th tp ,i
Sutsn WValiate \\ '
It he I hu::'. li h I I .-"
another seitiout po l,. tindler
and -i!. ,.1, and the %oice that
speaks in this is that o. a
perso In. i inable tI expI\.-,.
hisher lo\c veiball' but hlito
0.i ienly e pi) rc es, i' i
doin i
Some here 11i betwIen the
old poet who sticks to hiotmet
themlles and the expaindn' !
tragician Ti lh Ila d ." ln ek 11:
irtatmelint is ithe ld tresttdmett
bit theI subject ciial:e
indicates the expires s on, t, a
greater social awareness ih)
longer is Ssitian mertci\
recording as Ilhepburn
Davidson sa\ s lih l p 'ills .it
beco !i-ng iioite didatIc
*\Ild it Is 0, i 1 )!' i l It C

-;J d, li ,l iI L '. itLI


10 1Cianld 10op a l i h i.
mlat vdIL1


iin'deIt n snrs world of 1974
n i ; tihe old ai d good


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I1 1 ( O M M It R C I
l).pai ;;nen; o: C R Walker
I hnical collegee is receiving
.ppli:ations tor the ordinary.
cert;lic ti in Business Stud!its
Coiiise e h;.clh begins t .i
month.
Applicants must be 16 yea-rs
oI age and have GC(L *' lecvl*
I ngitsh Language or


I p -e l s.' ed applicants,


I't 55


.ol'l i the Registrar
l'. i;. i; ,h wd 'tle u


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on the waterfront at East Bay & William Sts.
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Friday January 4, 1974


psmciH

Sailing ex-London and Liverpool
THE PACIFIC STEAM NAVIGATION CO.
DUE FREEPORT.

"ORTEGA" 6th FEBRUARY



KN5M
Sailing ex-Hamburg, Bremen,
Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Antwerp.
Due Freeport
"PALAMEDES" 4th JANUARY
"HERCULES" 26th JANUARY


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that DROSOS PANTELIS
TSAKKOS of P.O. Box E.S. 6091, West Bay Street, Nassau,
Nationality and Citizenship for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration should *not be granted should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 4th day of Jan. 1974 to The
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P. O.
BOX N7147, Nassau.



NOTICE
NOTICE is here given that HERMIS CORNELIUS
HANDFIELD of Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration should not be granted should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twentyeiqht days
from the 3rd day of January, 1974, to The Minister
responsible forsa Nationality and Citizenship, P. O. Box
B N7147, Nassau.





NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that FROSWELL SIMMONS of
Wulff Road, Nassau, Bahamas is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration should not be granted
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 4th day of January 1974
to The Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship
P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LUCIEN MESADIEU of
Ridgeland Park West, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for naturalistic i as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why naturalization should not be granted should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 4th day of Jan. 1974 to The
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship P. O
Box N7147, Nassau.
NOIC


NOTICE


NOTICE is hereby given that STANLEY ALMON
HANDFIELD of Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration
should not be granted should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
4th day of January to The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau.




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OFFERED PRICE ................$1.16
BID PRICE ........................... $1.09
YIELDING ...........................1.76%
I1 11I--II-


They're itching to get




They're itching to get


their complaint


across


By Abigail Van Buren
z 1974 by Chicago Tribune-N. Y. News Synd., Inc.
DEAR ABBY: I recently returned from a trip. I trav-
eled for one day on a bus and returned by jet.
I wasn't back two days when my husband and I discov-
ered that we both had body lice. That's right! This was
embarrassing for my husband and myself as we aire clean
people.
My point is this: I would like to let the public know of
the health dangers involved in public transportation. I real-
ize there could be other factors involved, but they are
negative in our books.
I'd like to make a complaint, but have no idea who to
contact. We are concerned with the health of other people
as well as our own. Can you help us?
ITCHING IN CONNECTICUT
DEAR ITCHING: Your complaints should be made to
the passenger service departments of the airline and bus
company on which you traveled.
DEAR ABBY: I was married for the first time at 20. It
lasted just two years. [No children, fortunately.]
Now I am 25, and am engaged to be married again. My
parents are in rather modest circumstances, and I cannot
ask them to give me another wedding since they spent
much more than they really could afford on my first wed-
ding.
The problem is that my fiance would like to have a
wedding that he will "remember." He wants all his friends,
and of course his family, which is a large one. I have
explained why this wedding will have to be small and
rather modest, and he understood, but he wasn't happy
about it. Now he came up with the suggestion that he put
on the wedding and foot the bill. He can afford it. But what
will people say? They know my parents can't afford it.
BLUE BRIDE
DEAR BRIDE: The important issue is not what people
will say, it's what will make you and your fiance happy. If
he wants to have a memorable wedding and can afford to
foot the bills, I see no reason why he shouldn't.


DEAR ABBY: At the risk of perpetuating the "Living
Will" controversy, may I add my two cents worth?
As a nurse, I have seen many elderly terminally ill
patients become artificially-breathing vegetables. Some
pray for death, others refuse nourishment in order to has-
ten their end, some cry softly, some become bitter, and
some just wait with resignation.
To allow human beings to die with dignity is not "mer-
cy killing." When death is imminent, a patient should be
kept as comfortable and pain-free as possible, but these
patients will die as surely and inevitably as they did in all
the centuries before "modern medicine."
Where is it written that an appointment with God
should be delayed; that He should be kept waiting while
man experiments with His creation?
A NURSE IN LA JOLLA, CAL.
DEAR NURSE: Well said.

DEAR ABBY: There are eight in our family and my
dishwasher has been. broken for over a year. My husband
has the tools and know-how to fix it, but he still hasn't
gotten around to it.
I finally said: "If you don't fix this dishwasher pretty
soon I am going to call in a repairman and pay him."
My husband said: "Not with MY money!" Now what?
WORN OUT
DEAR WORN: As his wife, you are his partner. Give
him a deadline, and if he stalls, go ahead and call In a
repairman.
DEAR ABBY: This is a question many young men
must have on their minds and your answer will be very
beneficial to hundreds of thousands of fellows.
MUST a male be circumcised? And if so, why?
WONDERING
DEAR WONDERING: Altho some disagree, the over-
whelming majority of medical authorities agree that cir-
cumcision is necessary for hygienic reasons. And it is a
fact that the wives of circumcised men are far less likely
to have cancer of the cervix than wives of men who have
not been circumcised. [P. S. Contrary to what many be-
lieve, circumcision originated with the Egyptians. The Jews
later made it a religious rite.]

DEAR ABBY: When you spoke to our high school in St.
Louis, when I was a teen-ager, you gave us your definition
for maturity. I kept it for all these years, and now it's lost.
Will you please give it to me again? Thank you.
STILL READ YOU
DEAR STILL: Maturity is the ability to do a job whether
you're supervised or not; finish a job once it's started;
carry money without spending It. And last, but net least,
the ability to bear an injustice without wanting to get even.

CONFIDENTIAL TO SICK OF BEING SICK IN ELIZA-
BETH, N. J.: Try this: "Talk health. The dreary never
ending tale of moral maladies is worn and stale. You
cannot hope to charm or please by harping on that minor
chord 'disease.' So, say that you are well, and all Is well
with you, and God will hear your words and make them
true." [Ella Wheeler Wilcox.]
Iate to write letters? Send $1 to Abigail Van Bmees
132 Lasky Dr., Beverly Hills, Cal. W212, for Abby's beelet,
"Hew to Write Letters for All Occasions."


ARRIVED TODAY: T.S.S.
Mardi Gras. Southward from
Virgin Islands
SAILED TODAY: T.S.S.
Mardi Gras and Southward for
Miami
ARRIVING TOMORROW:
Tropic Day from West Palm
Beach: Bahama Star, Emerald
Seas, Flavia from Miami.
WEATHER
WIND: South-easterly 12 to
16 m.p.h. WEATHER: Chance
of showers during the night


SEA: Slight TEMP: Min.
*tonight 69 Max. tomorrow 80.
TIDES
High 4:32 a.m. and 4:50
p.m. Low 10:51 a.m. and
10:49 p.m.
SUN
Rises 6:55 a.m. Sets 5:32
p.m.
MOON
Rises 2:44 p.m. Sets 3:47
a.m.


INTERNATIONAL

BANCORP

CHIEF NAMED
ROBERT ROBERTSON,
whose career in banking spans
35 years, has been appointed
president and elected a director
of International Bancorp
Limited, a publicly-owned
company registered in the
Bahamas.
From 1970 until the end of
last year, Mr. Robertson was
the United Kingdom manager
of Oversees Development Bank
with offices in London. Prior
to that he was a senior
executive of the F.C. Financial
Group, also in London.
Born in Banchory, Scotland,
Mr. Robertson entered the
banking field in 1938 and
joined the Royal Air Force
three years later. He was
demobilized in 1946 after
serving in bomber and trainer
commands.
The Annual General Meeting
of International Bancorp
Limited was held in Nassau on
December 31, 1973. Other
directors re-elected with Mr.
Robertson are Eusebio A.
Morales, Stanley E. Graze and
Benson McDermott.
IBL's principal area of
operation is the provision of
international banking services
through subsidiaries in Europe
and London. It also has a
representative office in Hong
Kong.
In Nassau IBL's
wholly-owned subsidiary is
Bahamas Commonwealth Bank
Limited.

LOMBARD

INCREASES

ITS PROFIT


LOMBARD North Central
Limited has announced a
record group profit of
19,157,000 pounds before
taxation for the year to
September 30, 1973 which
shows an increase of 23.3%
over the profit of the previous
year.
The subsidiaries overseas
have achieved increased profit
and thereby made an increased
contribution to the Group
results.
"The increase in cost of
money, particularly in the
September quarter, prevented a
more rewarding outcome to
the year's trading in the United
Kingdom," a company release
said.
The directors have proposed
a dividend for the year of
2,600,000 pounds on the
ordinary shares which are all
owned by National
Westminster Bank Limited.
Retained profit of the group
was 6,829,000 pounds last year
compared with 5,636,000
pounds in 1972.


Padmi & American

sign route

exckane agreement
AMERICAN AIRLINES and
Pan American World Airways
have announced a route
exchange agreement that
would achieve a more rational
competitive pattern in air
transportation and achieve
other substantial public
interest goals.
The agreement, wnich needs
the approval of the Civil
Aeronautics Board and the
president of the United States,
calls for the transfer of
American U.S. mainland/
Hawaii/Pacific rights
except for Boston/Honolulu
and St. Louis/Honolulu
authority to Pan Am.
American will apply to the
Civil Aeronautics Board within
20 days for authority to
suspend these services, and will
actually suspend the service 30
days after receipt of permission
from the Board.
Pan Am would in turn
transfer to American its
US/Boston and New York to
Bermuda, New York to Santo
Domingo Dominican Republic,
and New York to Barbados
non-stop routes.
The agreement was signed
by C. R. Smith, chairman of
American Airlines, and William
T. Seawell, chairman of Pan
American World Airways.
Either airline may terminate
the agreement if government
approvals have not been
received by December 31,
1974.
Employees of both
companies at foreign points
overseas involved in the route
exchange will be offered jobs
of comparable salary and
benefits from the airline taking
over the route.


MANILA, PHILIPPINES
Benguet Consolidated Inc. has
announced that its proposed
plan of reorganization had
been approved at a special
meeting of stockholders by
more than the required
two-thirds of outstanding
shares.
Un rider the plan of
reorganization, holders of
21,355,608 shares of Benguet
may exchange up to
13.881,145 shares thereof for a
like number of shares of
Intercontinental Diversifield
Corp., subject to proration if
more than 13,881,145 shares
of Benguet are surrendered for
exchange. Shares of Benguet
may be exchanged through
January 28, 1974, and this
date may be' extended for an
additional 30 days.
Shareholders of Benguet may
exchange all. part or none of
their shares for shares of
Intercontinental.
When the exchange has been
completed, there will be two
public corporations: Benguet,
which will continue to own the
assets and business in the
Ph il i p p i n e s a nd
lnterc3ntinental, which will
own 92.5 per cent of the
Grand Bahama Port Authority.
Limited, its 80 percent
owned subsidiary, the Grand
Bahama Development
Company, LimitcJ, and other
assets and business located
outside the Philippines.
PHILIPPI\l LAW
The plan of reorganization
had been proposed in order to
facilitate compliance with the
provisions of the Philippine
Constitution, which requires
that natural resource
companies in the Philirippn.,
such as Benguet, be at least 60
percent owned by qualified
Philippine citizens by July 3,
1974. In order to complete the
plan, the outstanding shares of
Benguet which presently are
about 94 per cent owned by
persons other than Philippine
Citizens. will be .lap,,oi .d
into Class B Shares. New
Convertible Preferred Shares.
restricted in ownership to
qualified Philippine citizens,
will be sold to an investment
banking firm in Manila for
redistribution in the
Philippines. The new
Preferred Shares will comprise
60 percent of the voting shares
of Benguet and will be
convertible at the option of the
holders into Class A Shares,
also restricted to qualified
Philippine citizens.
Upon completion of the
exchange. it is expected that
the Class B Shares of Benguet
will continue to be listed on
the New York Stock Exchange
and that the 13,881,145 shares
of Intercontinental will also be


COLLEGE COURSES
THE C. R. WALKER
College will enroll students for
full time Masonry, Welding,
and Survey Technicians courses
on Monday. Tuesday and
Wednesday, January, 7. 8, 9,
1974.
The Masonry and Welding
courses are of 12 weeks
duration. Young men aged 16 -
19 wishing to join these
courses should visit the college
bringing with them reports
from previous schools. The
course fee is $12.00
The survey technicians
course is of 4 terms duration.
It is intended for young men
and women educated to
General Certificate of
Education level in
Mathematics, English and
Science, and working for a
Survey or Allied Practice.
Persons wishing to enter the
course are advised to visit the
college for interview, bringing
with them records of their
previous education. The course
fee is $48.00.
FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157
1 II I I I I I I II II .


listed on said Exchange. The
number of shares of Class B
Stock of Benguet to be
outstanding will depend upon
the number surrendered in the


Exchange Offer.
Allen & Co., Inc. is the
Dealer-Manager for the
exchange of Benguet shares for
Intercontinental.


When you open a Standard
Deposit Account with
Lombard North Central you
will be assured of a good
rate of interest with complete
safety for your capital.
Your savings earn 91%
interest per annum which is
paid twice yearly without per annum
deduction of U.K. tax. Alternat-
ively the interest can bei
credited to c our Account to


build up your capital. Six months' notice of withdrawal is required
but 100 is available on demand during each calendar year.
Time Deposits. Sums of 5,Wf+ placed for fixed periods of
1,2, 3,4 or 5 years can earn attractive rates of interest which will
remain fixed throughout the agreed period of deposit.



Lombard

LNorth Central
Bankers
Lombard North Central Limited is a member of the National Westminster
Bank Giouo whose Capital and Rese'ves exceed E470.O00,000.
Head Office: LOMBARD HOUSE. CURZON STREET,
LONDON WIA 1 EU. ENGLAND. TELEPHONE: 01 -499 4111
S City Office 31 LOMBARD STREET. LONDON EC3V 9BO,
i ENGLAND. TELEPHONE: 01-623 4111
I To: The Deposit Accounts Manager, Lombard North Central,
I Lombard House, Curzon Street, London W1A 1 EU, England
Please send me full details of your Deposit Schemes
(BLOCK LETTERS PLEASE)
Name I
Address

482A I
....^ m.....m .....m ._i


Feelfit

with


DOAN'Sd

Give yourself haJpy relief from
backache, rheumatic pains, stiff
aching muscles or the common
urinary disorders due to
sluggish kidneyI
action. Take Doans
K & B pills to keep Doana
you feeling fit and Kidney -nd
active. P ills




DOANSBPILLSADD
at chemists and stores.
Distributed by:
Thompson Dru, Co Li1Box027, Centreville, Nassau.

YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED
TO ATTEND


A FREE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE


LECTURE
Come and bring a friend

Subject: "KEY TO THE
MINISTRY OF CREATION"
Lecturer:THOMAS A. McCLAIN, C.S.B., of Chicago
Member of the Board of Lectureship of The Mother Church,
The First Church of Christ, Scientist, in Boston, Massachusetts.
Time: Tuesday, January 8, 1974 8 p.m.
Place: Bahamas Teachers' College Auditorium
Gregory St., Oakes Field
Auspices of First Church of Christ, Scientist
Nassau, Bahamas.


I


REGULAR SERVICE
EX LONDON A LIVERPOOL

DUE NASSAU
ORDUNA 24th JANUARY
CHRISTIANE
BOLTEN 30th JANUARY
ORTEGA 24th FEBRUARY
CHRIST ANE BOLTEN 2 MARCH


Phone 2-8683 P.O. Box N8168 Bay St. Near Charlotte St.


Benguet shareholders approve


new reorganization plan


ts~a;


r-


_I


I


Shert rxtt





Friday January 4, 1974


..4P .-


OUR
BAHAMA
HARBOUR IS
A SMASHING
SUCCESS!


NOW


SAN ANDR'

OFFERS TO YOU

CHOICE PROPERTY

IN


-44
.I -I,.
q *


BAHAMA


VILLAGE!


I


SAN ANDROS
BAHAMA VILLAGE III
12,000 SQ. FT. HOMESITES
(OVER 1/4 ACRE)

ly ,'34951


SAN ANDROS
BAHAMA VILLAGE II
14,500 SQ. FT. HOMESITES
(THAT'S ALMOST 1/3 ACRE)

on,'3995 !


FUTURE DEVELOPMENT
PLANS INCLUDE:
* V n i Do D .:a; 1 "-,e l
G'. Cou'se
* F
* u,', s e ue en f
* Maicr Expansion Iur .t ,ex


AT PREVIEW TERMS!


monthly!


all sites


TOURISTS!
THIS MAY BE JUST THE OPPORTUNITY
YOU'VE BEEN SEEKING. THE IDEAL TIME
TO GET ALL THE FACTS IS WHILE YOU'RE
VISITING NASSAU. THESE LOW TERMS
ARE NOT OFFERED IN THE STATES. SEE
YOUR NASSAU BROKER HE CAN AR-
RANGE FOR YOU TO SPEND A DAY ON
ANDROS AS HIS GUEST.


SAN ANDROS
BAHAMA VILLAGE SUBDIVISION
Residential al""ed tes
,'n and 'ry p'p-rt, e ce!ient drainage
Abundar ccierage .v.t 0 to 6' pnes and large
palm etto.
Flowering sIrubs suet as hibscus. ug'j i .' ea and
citrus grow fast and luxuriantly i fertile soil.
Located only 41 r:.. from San Andros -1.irb.ur and
a few steps from the San Andros Hotel with its
myriad activities,
Cleared, graded and compacted roads making
every homesite accessible by car in early 74.
2 bedroom .. a1 designed to blend with the Island's
beauty. are contracted to a Bahamian company
S.'-1 Cinnabar International, Ltd. or you may choose
your own contractor when you are ready to build.
Construction costs will include a fresh water well for
about $600. and an electric generator (until public
service is available! for approximately $1600.
Perpetual right of access to the private Evans Bay
Beach is conveyed with Title Deed to Property.
Membership ;n the San Andros Beach Club 9 miles
from Bahama ',,i ,.. by paved road is automatic
wi'h property ownership.
No future building commitment required oy purchaser.
* Title: Fee simple. Free, Ciear and Marketable.


A B HA MA VIL LA GE IS 1110 W!


There's an ample supply of Dream Time


II


n8nswl n IV V & -%A6. IW 1 % V But there's a shortage of Buying Time
If you plan for a holiday retreat, a year 'round villa, or a wise investment for your future in Bahama Village,
a subdivision of San Andros, the time for your decision has been reduced drastically. Pressure will be increasing
almost daily for this limited supply of great land, as sales in the U.S. are now underway! and the better parcels
go first. That's why we say your dream of tomorrow must begin with a wide awake decision today!
, GET THE WHOLE STORY. CALL OR DROP IN AT ANY OF THE FOLLOWING OFFICES TODAY:


Berkley Ferguson Real Estate Cosmopolitan Realty
Berwin House on Frederick Street King's Court
Phone: 2-1238 or 2-4913 Phone: 5 7477 or 5-7478


McUeigan & Associates Ltd.
Bernard Sunley Building
on Bay Street
Phone: 2 4284


Grosham Property Ltd.
107 Shirley Street
Phone: 2-7662 or 2-8966


C. A. Christie
Real Estate Company
2nd Floor Norfolk House
Frederick Street
Phone: 5-9737


Maxwell Woodside Real Estate Morley & O'Brien Real Estate Davson Real Estate Company Ltd.
Corner of Bias and Blue Hill Harris Building on Shirley Street BEy & East Streets (upstairs)
Phone: 3 5632 Phone: 2-2794 Phone: 2-1178


Frank Carey Real Estate Ltd.
Bay & Deveaux Streets
Phone: 2-7667 or 2-4815
Tennant & Cooper Ltd.
First National Bank Bldg.
Freeport
Phone: 2-7841 or 2.2097


I I


/


I I I I I ran ~~-ITIT I II IZZ I I III


t:- -- -- --


It's unique ... with oversize homesites... extravagantly covered with tall pines and
blazing flora ... offering gracious living at the focal point of the proposed
San Andros town center. But most of all . it holds a fabulous future for you!
HAVEN'T YOU ALWAYS WANTED TO BE FIRST IN LINE? TO ATTEND A PREVIEW?
NOW YOU CAN!
Bahama Village is a PREVIEW OFFER a rare opportunity to acquire some of the finest
land at San Andros--while INAUGURAL PRICES are still in effect at BOTTOM-LINE TERMS!


I


I L


4p a
, K
m


arf*^


b


;**?


I'*:.
i tg


&iUu*


.










7




CLAS


REAL ESTATE REA
C13111 C13028
-TWO f.;FLiRO .' two bath LEAUTII
cottage on Montrose Avenue house
4North of Winchester Street, Compl.xy
'garage and storeroo ., laundry, bedroom
orchard with bear ng fr u!Lit centrally
4rees. Ten minutes usc of
distance Bay Str ot r d 'I T ,lephrh
Paln imddoir Shop1l)ti e ntif,, t li(jhla id
-TERMS AVAIL Ak I (. ali ia
2-3041 between 9 ad 5
-4-1346 after 6 C(13086
NAC RE
p13089
SKYLINE ho I I A N20
separate 2-storey duplex. I/
Main house has four bedrotnr wat01" d i
three baths, fLurnished, (e t ti at l fo ,I
Air, Tastefully fLuit shedI 2-o<, 'i nJtt
garage. Spac.iou- glci nds. Only 41 1m9/
$165,00.00.
WESTERN SHORES hith 13110
and dry on hilltop GCo.,,j,, t WO L
views and a pc)(i pati), I k, w
secluded. F ur nihed i, g ,, i i ) kaw
taste. Only $88,000 00. h ttwoon
SEMI-HILLTOP [ x(iu i 1
House, at Prosp-ect RilIt, ( 30 /
views of i' and cjolf k',. A
Country side dtmut pho)it d pt K
four bedi Onitits, f I i s tud, with I t
A Ir. Has entilo'ed sw rtitn lt l tl &
pool and patio. Proi t .i ,
DIAL DAMIANCO ?;p /3, Ci.e
41197 evenintg- ip lu l
C1308b SLuffillei(
SEA-SIDF C( ttai,. t ,tl, b: d (I 1 o r.
W aterfro nt. li ,.L t lt,lv c p
furih-,d w: ., | SANS S
King o the W ,t t swinitiig, i t.l 2 t
W t f [ itW
Sk iing fish l-r) r,! f.- I 1:. ,!. ;j! I I' ) t
gift from S/AIN T A O ly I 1
$88,000 .00. lI .,- t:,.t .
OCCiipatn y e R t infvtt i
DIAL I)AMIANOS 1 OR
ACTION 22033, v 1iril,
41191 1 1L091
___________________WOODL
S1 1 5 l)i)pp"
( AN l .OIS t,!
it ot t-, 2 It ( [ o L i 11 ih Of
Bit It .pfit ti i '/V
1 (lv tl? C Jl l .>,i i.t
Lver aIr ""lrl

LieiD 13i l 0 1-) 2
L 3092 |
WESTWARD VILLAS WIT
SANDY BEACH RIGHTS
HJave two ,) i, ,w. I I) O1
t)(.dIt n nin s, 2 I,.!t\,, ;tl1 ,, iir(! A ltH l..r
w ith 11 f t iy O$ ', ')()[) iu i tl]it
FOUR BEDROOMS iil, A.,'!.
heated Y*fswim iinq p I. p, i In, ,, ,
A\i. illuiw d !;)f; I tla ,
B'aith op f,- b it ,t f 30
Only $. 5),00 .000 : ;:t UR
S)peacia! n'. n
H I LLTOP W I N T O N p



one it I D I 00 it 1 ilC
itbeach. W $ h? tinL hdi t,!,, : 'A t3044t
i0n at A I (
B I t, drti in ', ti;ti th! ,it iel veth ')t'
-vo i i wllot lt i i i ( 1 l
DIAL I AMIAN'( t' -;f'. ,eph0
22,30,. .1 1 197
13090 x( -170


Nassau Bah 1, /", 1 [
W



tCmrnouedl prl es t AT
B1 Iti sh Ctlonel u ,l[lVti'P ,_ ^
You will be sutpiin i l It th T
low aisk int N p i 1 9
22033, 2230b, 4,1 97. O.N.O.
ItB M

D A V SO N 'S R E A L E STA T E >,eat' ,tl
CO. LTD 1970
(Certified Real Estate Brokers C '.(.O
Phones 21178 55408 ONL


SMASHING REAL
ESTATE BARGAINS 1972
THROUGHOUT THE O.N (.
COMMONWEALTH $,70 C
2, 3 and 4 BEDROOM
HOUSESS in the following 'M dlO,
areas. 1971'
EASTERN ROAD 1971
EASTERN ROAD on the t i,
water as well as on the hills. 1969 A
SAN SOUCI 1
BLAIR ESTATES $1100o
GLENISTON GARDENS $1900
W;NTON A, T,
THE GROVE (West Bay) $1,200
SKYLINE HEIGHTS 1 0
NASSAU EAST 19700
SEA BREEZE $1,00
VILLAGE ROAD 1970
GOLDEN GATES ONLY
HIGHLAND PARK 1972 F
PROSPECT RIDGE ONI Y
WESTWARD VILLAS 1970 F
C O N D O M I N ILi M w'Iy
APARTMENTS in PARADISE ONLY
ISLAND 1971
EAST BAY STREET STATI(
WEST BPY STREET $1,200
HOTELS and HOTEL SITES, 1971
BEACH LOTS, COMMER- ESTATE
CIAL LOTS, RESIDENTIAL $1,450.
LOTS 1969 F
A C R E AG E FOR ONY
DEVELOPMENT IN THE THIS V
I NASSAU AND FAMILY
ISLANDS SUCH AS GRAND 1969 (
BAHAMA LONG ISLAND, ONLY
ELEUTHERA, ABACO. MOT(
45 ACRE CAY IN THE TH
EXUMAS WITH DEEP THO
WATER HARBOUR AND
MORE
CALL
DAVSON'S REAL C13104
ESTATE AGENCY 1971
Phone 21178 or 80932 2117R Good
P. 0. Box N-4648 conditi
Nassau, Bahamas town. T


ihpe ribumt'


SIFIED


L ESTATE


I


SECTION


CARS FOR SALE


C 13038.
FUL Ocean Front BL AC K
in Harbour Mews CAPRIC
, i 'lly fu ru'hed 3 condition
21 bathroom, 58134.
airc ndi tiont d Ind -
pool, marina, etc. PE
7 77525 or write
. P. 0. Box N-4812, C13084
WANTEr
Guinea F
$5. Telep
/AG[ F OR SALt
C13107
00 acres at LONG NEW YE/
I D I including Purebred
ntagc. Ideal for high eyed Weii
velopmrent. Inquiries ahead thi
Ined. Dial Nick home wi
22033, evenings German
$ 1 75-F
Telephone

OTS in BLair near F
*av Call 2-3041
' aid b. 4-1346 after C13056
SETS
Encyclop
Atlas ar
IP HIGHLAND informant
tdt. Gotreou's views. C13079
us(.' and of (outse 1970 BE
swinrIming pool. Porsche
*d, immaculately and radio
d with Air. offer.
it spiae for a fifth Lorando
m. PI iced below 613113
ctiOn rosts. BABY P
OUC I Hilltop, 3/4 BABY l
5un ,. 1htree bedrooms & scale'
f't shed. Maqnificent side tat
only $)7,500.00 View nlayer/ra
T n[ ACTION MAR
RS 22033, 22305, -
evenrings 41197. C13108
GOODS
will be
AND quiet-, ea to Compan
i ai'd school Has 3 C 11894
i, 2 baths, furnished 1969 -
tiiistally spacious Commar
S38,000.00 With shower,
$10,000.00 down, with er
10 yea's at Oio kitch en
md iont:ily. Ideal gift Call 242
NTA.
DAMIANOS 22033, C13041
41197 23' BRI
Boat 1;
FOR RENengine.
i Reasona
35913.1
NJIIiONLD b'droorr
Nt Shu ley Park N
$'3') pei r tionth.
-334. C13109

rNISH[ Di ?9 bedroom
i Iviel Sti et, fo; rent.
io m oth. Telophon"


N ISHED AND
ONDITI ONED 2
Is, I bedroom and
'L av ap iI In trIent s .
v ') >3 79'

IN SAD
OR Of1 I1( L Chairlottu Mr. Hot
ippO'ste Scottish Shop. who del
at tking, immediate 4th 197
,cV Telephone 41476 Sunset
And oiri

IRS FOR SALE at the ,
When I
Left to
McQuee
MOTOR CENTRE Elizabet
WE HAVE Rodger;
THE USED CAR brother!
FOR YOU other re
CHEVY MALIBU SS -
AC tape, A.T., P/S CAR
aq wheels, vinyl top,
(nsoleo, shift bucket C13102
ONLY $3,400.00
BUICK SKYLARK
A'T, P/S, P/B radio
nty top, W/W tyres at
$3.200.00
HEAVY IMPALA O.N.O.
\ C. P'S, P B, Radio, |
\v.Ies at O NLY I
FORD MAVERICK
A T, radio at ONIY i
.00
:HEVY IMPALA A/T, '
P'S, P/B, W/'W tyaes &t '.
ONLY $1,800.00
A.M.C. HORNET A/T, '
ON.O. W/W tyres at e be
$2,200.00 Zeddre
T.M.C. AMERICAN S/W the fri
A T, O.N.O. at ONLY a a
FALCON S/W radio, Thanks
O N.O. at ONLY Nurses
V/W. iaduo at ONLY Cno
.00 N Rector
HILLMPN MINX at
$1.100.00
DODGE AVENGER at c13039
$1,750.00 LEV
ORD CAPRI 0 N.O. in


aod contditioit A/T, at Learn t
$1,400.00 Phone
VAUXHALL VICTOR 8:30 a
ON WAGON at ONLY 35084
.00
MORRIS CLUBMAN C13094
E A/T at ONLY
00
ORD CORTINA S/T at
$850.00
WEEK'S MECHANIC'S
SPECIAL
CHEVY MALIBU at
$550.00
OR CENTRE LIMITED
MPSON BOULEVARD
PP. DAVIS STREET
P.O. Box N-3741
PH.56739

1 TH
GT COMET sports car.
condition with air will col
oning. Owner leaving on Mo
Telephone 3-6668. inform.


C(HEV ROLE
E n excellent
. L. J. Knowles, Tel:

IS FOR SALE

D good home for one
Pig with large hutch.
phone 41166.

war'sS SPECIAL
silver and beige blue
maraner Puppies. Plan
s year to protect your
th one of these rare
guard-dogs. Males:
females: $150.
e 3-1554.

OR SALE

of World Book
iedia Childcraft World
nd Dictionaries. For
ion call 23921.

EACH Buggy Truck
and gearbox, mag rims
io. $1600 or nearest
Contact Robert
s Refrigeration 24842

PRAM, stroller, walker
,. Also ceiling lamps
)le & stereo record
idio. Phone 3-2110.

INE SUPPLIES

LEFT over 20 days
sold. Nassau Bicycle
y Limited.

3ift. CHRIS CRAFT
idei Sleeps six, private
two 230 h.p. engine
ess than 200 hours
ttte, good condition
67, 54011.


OADWATER Plywood
23 H. P. Ford Falcc-i
Sleeps 3. Ice box.
ble buy. Call home
Work 74198.

MEMORIAL


, /


but loving memory of
race Lowell Demerntte,
parted this life January
2.
and evening sun
e cleati iaill foi rie.
y there be no mourning
art.
set out to sea.
mourn: Mother Mrs.
en Demeritte; Wife -
h; 2 sons, Darville and
1 daughter, Iris; 3
s; 4 sisters and a host of
natives and friends.

0D OF THANKS
2


if /M

reaved family of the late
Brice, wishes to thank
ends who sent flowers
attended the funeral.
to the Doctors &
of the Princess Margaret
Il. Special thanks to
John Pugh of St. Anns


SCHOOLS

VIS AUTO SCHOOL
o drive with confidence.
59805 between 7 and
.m. or after 6 p.m. or
anytime.


pp"


IE NASSAU CIVIC
BALLET SCHOOL
mmence iLs Winter Term
nday, January 7th. For
nation call 5-2353.


I


BUSINESS PROFESSIONAL

DIRECTORY

Save Time






b lIIt Ik DIlrt. CSO 21986 E Xb
1 LN h NrllOth 1'61 2 lie PerMii 'IO


;I
5
tl


ANTENNAS HARDWARE
Island TV 2-2618 John S. George 2-8421/6
AUTOMOTIVE LADIES'PANTIES
Lucas BatteriesBBE LTD. 34208
Bay Street Garage Ph. 2-2434 Ladies' Panties Wholesale Only
BODY BUILDING LAUNDRY
Wong's Barbell Club 5-4506 DRY CLEANING
OKSTORE New Oriental Laundry 2-4406
The Christian Book LOCKSMITH
Shop 5-8744
Sp -4 Bahamas LOck & Key
BUILDERS 2-4591 ext. C147
Richard's Construction5-7080 ME,'S & BOYS' NEAR
CAMERAS The Wardrobe 5-5599
John Bull 2-4252/3
CARPETS Mu
Lee's Carpet Craft 3-1993 Cody's Reco- 2-8500

CUSTOMS BROKERS OPTICIAN
Martin's 2-3173 Optical Service Ltd. 2-3910/1
DEPT. STORES PRINTING
Pixie's Dept. Store 2-3173 Wong's Printing 5-4506
DRAPERIES RADIO & T.V. SALES
Lee's Carpet Craft 3-1993 Carter's Records 2-4711

DRUGS &
PRESCRIPTIONS RUBBER STAMP I
Wong's Rubber Stamp
McCartney's 5-6068/5-2127 Co 5-4506
ENTERTAINMENT SPORTS GOODS
Movies -----
Film & Equip. Service 2-2157 Champion Sport Land 2-1862

FLOOR MAINTENANCE TA
Rug Cleaning & Installation Playtours 2-2931/7
Island Interiors 5-3576/4-2191 R. H. Curry & Co., 2-8681/7

GARDEN & PET TRUCKING SERVICE
SUPPLIES
Modernistic Gar. & Pet 2-Z868 Gonza!ez Trucking
Nassau Garden & Pet 3-1 62/2-4726
Montrose Avenu 2- '59
WRECKER SERVICE
Gibson Wrecker Service2-8896


FOR THE ACTION YOU WANT



Shop Nassau Merchants
For Business And Services
J __


ANNOUNCEMENTS
C 12E32
LUDEN LIMITED
LI'UO0R SUPPLY
offering best
CHRISTMAS SPECIALS
until January 5th
COVE AND PROVE IT
Dowdeswell Street.
Telephone 2-21 17.


HELP WANTED
C 13083
FIRST NATIONAL CITY
TRUST COMPANY
(BAHAMA) LIMITED
P. 0. Box N1576,
OAKESFIELD
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
BOOKKFEPE RS
ACCOltNTANTS
W anted x pe iL' t n i
Bookkeepers Aclcouitafit-
applilc ts must bet? LL nVL: ,,
with all aspect /cts i t i' ,; '
foir Maniaged Ccorpa iit0u ca ^t
Ti usts.
Apply to lMu Bi cice Os'C" ')'.'
telephone 2-4240

C13063
POSITION AVAILABLE. CFOk
MASTER MARIN-R IIsIil
Cement Company Lim-ted. I'
0. Box 5140, Nassau. Bah a .t
is seeking a qualified B.athi'i.i
for Master of the M V "Isl.ut
Cement", a 1500 DWT B.,-
Ocean Vessel. AppliLt.at mil,'
be at least 30 yea s o .
fully qualified as to eilLCitoi
and professional exp i iei ,
possess ing a Bititl
Foieign!-Going Mastei Ma ,''-
Celtificate.
Applicants to please ar.r
writing to the above adcdt
giving a full resume ot
education, expel ience and
technical certification.


HELP WANTED

O .


I 1 / /
.0 [AN I I C !(






1311 3



gh ,tvo Bu N"37, '.-',






/'IATA CARGO AGENTS'
TRADE&E SERVICES

C 1304,5



MackeOVING, STORAGEet
& PACK.,;-- ;It A eilNG
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N371!.4
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDIN-C
& SHIPPING
HEAVV 'UTY TRUCKING
FCRi5 LiFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERV:CF
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDE
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-3796
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 7-7434,
FREE ESTIMATES.


Friday January 4, 1974
' 11


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS-FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV. -TELEPHONE 21986 EXT. 5


II


TRADE SERVICES TRADE SERVICES TE


NASSAU r


CLASSIFIED PAGES





Sehip ritmtnt

Nassau and Bahama Islands
Leading Newspaper


ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT


I!PHONE 2-198


_ ~


~__


I _


_ __


t


Irr:


II Ist `


1


I


~I __


J ----


SRE TIME SAWV MI[Y


1


I


-- C~ -g II-~~---


!1


S1 30f 2 C1305 C 13065
T.V. ANT[NNAS FOR REPAIRS on sma1l PACEMAKER 44ft. Luxurious
!3o. t .s fo, (o..- clecti i il aJlpplonces at Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.
,pa ;,.unts .:d ,ute-i r' *,...a r cn e p es .<,, 276 12
i130' Charter
.'JORLD OF MUSIC FOR INFORMATION on a
.. r-,i-.v ,t i,, -.C ....." ,, oh yiou, home f lghts
i, I.h wI .ve Tyou 30 ea of lights
Sp,,,t tee seivicn. Call 27612. B
By Peter liall
PORT AU PRINCE, HAI'Il
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES APm (Charter flights to haiti
rCP W N 'are being cancelled, local and
DISTRiBUTORSNE O DED SPARE. PART orFULL TIME .NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY international airlines cannot
AUTO HOME ACCESSORIES & CARE PRODUCTS increase or expand existing
New marketing system permts man or woman Itodstribute mult million S pre-sold hu s r is i e
adv sed poducts of 6 m r U.S companies in the eleven billion $ AutoHodulthis winter's
products fild Rtoc our company seured acountt weekly with hih profit, tourist SaISon, and gasoline
high imput fast repeat consumer products from ric ar going to o up "a
SIMONIZ TXZ DUPONT JOHNSON WAX lot" e r og to go up a
HOLLYWOOD ACCESSORIES PREMIUM TOOLS
N OVFN i ai NAME BRAND PRODUit'TSJL'" hs r arl f th. fir
K2r JANITOR IN A DRUM, FANTASTIC. SPRAY & WASH, SUPER BRAVO. The re part of the first
PLEDGE. FUTURE. GLADE, RALLY WAX, MASTER WAX. ZEREX, VISTA, shock-UVf 0to hit Haiti from
SJ/WAX & MANY OTHERS,
T9tI ItiS tLSIVI PPOiIUNITY IS Ififltt ONLY T llTsIMS I 01OlIl COMPANI the current international fuel
SNO INTIALt s11N1s61 iN(Ob M 1S(TA R iitDIATILYi shoilages. And conditions are
Wi fURNtSH A ACC((OUNISI expected to become worse in
MINIMUM CAS H INVISTMINI $10S $2722, 5271 UP TO $710 i0i ir
Appliant should hav. car, minimum of 6 l ar. hour wI ly, rla s ,.ie lo llbl. re.
to aoo h. c a, t in,,,,.nt and ,,ccely w.nt to own your own basiine, J wr n Dai Texaco
and include phone number to
INTERNA1.JNAL MARKETING SYSTEMS INC. ",ana.' here. says only one
AUTO/HOMI Di 1, IPT 11. *a142 aIB-.COUiTy INDUSTIAL .* SI TI OIS loiU, I OUIs i1M 1 lt te flight has been
f IMOW9ag1PAA, a 0M i cancellcd so ftar the result of
insufficient avjet (Kerosene) at
Port-Aui-Prince refuelling
but the word has gone out that
no unscheduled or charter
R H flights will hbe able to refuel
Avlet is the commercial fuel
Cr l the crisis hasbended.
lor jets and turbo prop planes.
SraftL uSire thc less-restricted
100-1f35 ctane tuel may be
iItIor e fortunate because
,,supplies arc relatively more
plentiful. an airline spokesman
HELP WANTED j HELP WANTED s.i
Restrictions were enforced
t A I A, VA1 PTA IN mut o because of fuel quotas
l ,l.TR I .,iR I:.I. i, -l _TTe (3) yeai .xpeiien e in announced fby Texaco, which
S ,,i ,'h) n lt', r (t C lt class hotels and hand les refueling at
0 B-. b10.o. N ta.ij:, I.,... staurants with Hiench Se vice. -rancois Duvalier international
a.. ki q a ui B i,1, it.i Knowluedge of preparation of airport. Ilaiti's only jetport.
', ' th 1/V i ,. l amb1 t iten .hsi entiat. Good Quotas affect all regularly
I '" '0' ), i ,i- ences aind Puoice scheduled flights of American
0 -1.. A V, I,.i. Appu ,: ;, t' .Ci ltCic Lte i(Luieed. airlines, .astern Pan Am, Air
i. a -lOt .30 ,pi .. (,, /\iplicjrits thol.Jd Jpply inh
",11 ,, ,,l i,,.d d t,) I I.t, on t The Personnel F rance, and others.
S,- t Ba'h:ras ihe winter tourist season -
'. ' ' ,', \iunie LI which was expected to have
S ... P. Box F-787. produced record figures this
, F oepott. rd Bahama year will not have, under
'.,i; i ;i,, .i' present shortages, any extra
V'.,' .!; ".' *i a l. i flights, is has been normal in
pas i ..t years.
' ^" *i r ,: ,, Local airlines recently
planning increased and
expanded schedules, are now
reconsidering such moves.





LOOK




TO SEE





WHAT'S BEINGOFFERED





WHO'S OFFERING IT





WHERE THE ACTION IAKESPLACE













i APPEAR INIHE


1


I


I


s









By Alex Kotzky

U- .


ROPER & MIKE NOMAD


# A'H '4E OFFD-DUT" i3ARB SOME c ,z I!
M'KE ,.OQ-TTEL .E TJ H0OP, 'TE-E jI
.N7lIDARE ON j F 9# j I


A-$200 CHECECK
AN,. | :l i s TA ,- 1N 5| L!FE


ET ME 5LP iNC '5 A Bit EXTREME T A ~
COAT WILL V A i -AND OBV'OuD5 I
-A,;rE


I APARTMENT 3-G


by saunders & overgard



t: N
:7. OVERCOAT


r Al


T'5 LOVELY :
H '5 7HqW N BEENY SAN A AFE A
.:;-A3 \A sA AEA N' 'NE JUST LIKE IT
NO 'I ~P" ^ A% N1AN
., =, ILP
r ^,,~i -


O': HER .- -', .
:* TOO ^ R
-.i -xO, P-J .', I'


A MOTHER FEELS L ELWAITING
FOR HER DAUGHTER TO COME
HOME FROM HER F1RST PATE ,.,
NERVOUS, JITTERY,, ANP
SSOMEHOW GUILTY[ ..

,7 4


WAT PO YOU PO L WEL, IM NOT A MILUION-
I MEAN.YOU PO AIRE N PSGUISE,IFP
HAVE A JOB, THAT' & HAT YOU MEAN ..
PON'T YOU? OR AN HEIR ON THE


Idi


irni


All


f -
.4-.'


.. <. *. .. *...* ..
ii

:Ii


eal for Gifts

[D ECDIEPI


11UL L I1 L 1b.



SOUVENIR E ]D I



EDITIONS sM JA



available
at


01 h

.lur ,\ ... ', .

offices

Nassau & Freeport



Both
for only

504


- -


ISTEVE


_ _


t l i lTritbuntt


STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & overgard
5EY1/ SOMEBODYS THAT DOESN'T
GEE, HONEY' THAT JIST LIKE I TOLD YOU, COPPED THE SEEM LIKELY
WAS A MARVELOIJ5 DONNA JEAN, THIS HERE LOES I HAD IN MIKE... MAYBE IT
DINER RESTAURNT IS KNOWN HTS- I THIS POCKETOF I N'T YOUR COAT
ALLER FOR GRE AT MY NEW COAT -


THOUGHT THE THAT REMINDS ME
PLACE WHERE I'M I MUSTN'T KEEP
WORKING HAD YOU UP LATE, SO
6 0 GOOD FOOD, BUT- LL GET ACAS AN-

BUT YOU'X NO MATTER. WANT THAT OTHER JOKER MUST VE
As TE APPARENTLY ADMIT THAT MY BENNY./.I HAD FINGERED THIS MIGHT HAPPEN.
~~7 A GENTLEMAN THIS ONE IS NEW GLOVES IN THIS HE HAD HIS NAME AND USINES
E& ,/E5 8HO INEDEARLIER A GOODUFIT POCkET TOO. .THAT ADDRESS ON THIS SLIP
.ATOK THE WRONG'AWD QUITE I PAID-
A )TO K THE WRONKNOWA OF PAPER.






JUDGE PARKER By PAUL NICHOLS
ROLY THIS 5 SLADE YES! YOU LOOK, YOUVE GOT ARE YOU KDIN'?)
D D YOU ET THA GIVE TEN TO CALL T OFF NO WAY
00075OOIGAVE YOU? POINTS!


4WJ





The Heart of Juliet Jones By Stan Drake


_ ~_~ ~_


icr~ ~" ~ ~-- -~- ~'---- -^-- ~~~


Friday January 4, 1974


I


-' -"/
r : .












January 4, 1974


t (Irtbtttun


OKi.g F Syn"-...r,, I 1973. Worid .ightl reserved.

'Under our pension plan, if you manage to last for
thirty years you get to retire to a life of poverty."


"They laughed when I sat
down at the organ "

CROSSWORD

PUZZLE
iOSS


1 t 3 Ag -. r'LV
3n' 3 ur jp.u sc



t. u .7 35 Sn '.e
4 A',; '. m" C tr. .n' '.
3i:ottf +1 Lav w 0 ",'in nu ,
,. 42 3 t vi nd
+ m',ong gr3n3ialaughtt r

^ jston 34 Mr C aus S
't.'tcjil team 35. S c/eti
LL : .-* .sion 37. Eh're button


4. :I| ts
/ U'esn 45 I _tif cation)
n Id 46 1 i% ly
47. Tui',, h chamber(
2 P:xy 48 Co-P,.iss pript


Ar Ne- 'F*f.


"But when I began
to play.. ."
TE|STA A|TET

GREASE PR
ERON AP E
IDES rRIRNlE
.MjI!D P 'l|NT P|O
lN 5TEEIN 11Ou
METAp FOILF
CL A, Di L 1
OA S. ,I READE

E E
SOLUTION OF SATURDAY'S PUZZLE
CW 5 Prosperous
times
1. ;mercan 6. Through
hidian 7 Buttress
? By's 8. Soldiers
,cY&,,ime 9. Involved
3. I:r art 10. At all
4 Coinseance 12. Adjust
: i 9 17 'aty on the
18. Rendezvous
20. Mud volcano
21. Traipse
23 Mountain
banana
24. French friend
7r 3 5. Absolve
29. Ni-asuring
Tworm
31. egance
36. Piquancy
/7, 38. Yarn
39. "Exodus"
8 ?'9 author
40. Unit of force
41. West Point
S dar.;cee
42. Radiation unit
,1 3. ggs
45. Ariticial
1-7 language


t .`CARROLL RIGHTER'S

HuOROSCOPE
from the Carroll Righter Institute
A'/ GENERAL TENDENCIES: Handle odds and
ends of all practical matters, working out some
down-to-earth arrangement to make your surroundings more
attractive and valuable.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) Study progress toward
financial prosperity you desire. Correct wrong moves in
working methods. Consult expert. Make p.m. a happy social
ofie.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Get into the small details of
improving your good looks to win the approbation of others.
Accept worthwhile invitations, mixing business with pleasure.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Make constructive plans for
future. Being very thoughtful toward loved ones brings fine
results. Don't permit one who has mistreated you to get you
down.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Showing devotion
to good friends can bring you more support. Invite key
persons to luncheon and others to sup in p.m. Get an "in"
thusly.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Improve credit and career
matters. Make sure every detail of some civic work you do
today is right. Put more zip into your life.
VIRGO (Aug. 2 to Sept, 22) Get the right pointers from a
specialist in your field foi greater success. Do research work;
don't overlook some detail that is the key to the whole thing.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Study your books of record
well now and know how to handle your affairs more
intelligently. Investigate new subjects that give answers you
seek.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Plan with partners how to
have greater success in the future this a.m. Try to find out why
one has given you trouble. Reconcile amicably.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Handle duties you've
put off now. Study apparel to make it more stylish, attractive.
Don't be a copy of others.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) Plan to get into
amusements you have really liked in the past and have fun.
Show devotion to mate. Don't believe tall tales.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Get your home in fine
order and please kin more. Extend invitations to those you
like and entertain royally Avoid any jealous person.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) First handle important affairs
with associates, then off to the shopping and errands vital to
your well-being. Increase productivity.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY. .. he or she can
easily use charm to get what is wanted without considering the
feelings of others, so teach early to give in proportion to what
is received and be independent, fair. Give spiritual training
early so love of money does not become the all-consuming
aim. Musical ability should be encouraged.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


Chess
By LEONARD BARDEN


II I I 1- 1 I II
Radulov v. Tukmakov, we-Id
championship Interzonal 1973.
With both players having only a
few seconds to reach the time
control, the game finished in a
la'pid-flre draw by repeated
moves: 1 K-Q2. Q-B6: 2 K-Kl.
Q-R8 ch: 3 K-Q2, Q-B6: 4
K-B3, Q-B3 oh; 5 K-Q2.
Q-KB6 with a drew. During
this sequence, one of' the grand-
masters missed a win: can you
soot it ?
Par aimes: 30 seconds, chess
master; 1 minute. chess expert:
3 minimes. county player; 8
minutes. club standard; 15
minutes, average; 30 minutes,
novice.

Chess Solution
After 1 K-Q2, Q-B6; 2
K-KI. Q-R8 ch; 3 K-Q2.
Q-B6; 4 K-B3, Q-B3 ch.
White could have won by 5 Kt-
B4! when if 5 . B-K3 it 5
. Q-B6 ch; 6 K-Kt4 wins): 6
QxP ch! QxQ; 7 Kt-Q6 ch
and KtxQ wins.


TA Ean
words of
R i M Iir rmillen.
or oiiii re (aill
v o isi s It k r
I ro n o I h r
L 0 let er%' liown
She nre? In
Sword. e a c h
Y E S ltIr in a y
lie ij-eol once
o n I y Each
wiord mulsl toitliin the large
lelt tel all there must Ihe at
lewat ione elbll-ktlier word In the
liIt. No illril-s; nip fiorelgn wordnt;
In proper lasioeo. T4lli. '5
rAK4oTM : -! w w r t i., good :
19! words. erpy good 33 words,
crceel/cnt SolillIon tlonmorrow.
% '; sI'';llAIq %OI.UTIO"N :
Centl r hite'c ivet'in coen coie
(*five covescove'l inuin evict
Icirio I it Iinc iilte Invilce
llcer neeti nollt liie novice i(ner
otic lier 1oiti vice voice


Rupert and Raggety Again-13


Fdmedod remains sJent until the farmer has
Jlone back to his tasks, than the scarecrow
means forward and mutters "' It wasn't the
ind that blew my hat away, Rupert. Around
uousk an odd little creature popped up from
where and took it off my head." What
ort of creature ?" asks Rupert, his curiosity
roused. Well, it's rather hard to describe."


replies Odmedod. It was a twiggy looking
thing w:th a lono thin nose. I hadn't seen It
before." When Ruoert leaves the farmyard
he thinks carefully of what Odmedod has told
him. A twiggy thing w;th a long nose," he
muses. There's only one creature it could
possibly be--Raogety I "
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


Winning


Bridge
By VICTOR MOLLO
Richard Lederer, Britain a's
*Mr Bridge during the great
Culbertaonian era, used to say:
Wehk layerss should t double.
The coFollary is that it's vwse
to think twice before doubling
strong players. Here's. a c .se in
point, reported n tie South
African Bridge Bulletin.
Dealer West: Love All.
North
4 A 10 6 2
0 98
4AQ42
West East
K 83 QJ 75 4
Q 65 10 8 4 3
(A Q 10 7 4
& 5 4K 10 98
South
S9
SK 9 7
K 6 5 3 2
4763
West
1NT
Dble
North
Dble
East
24
South
30)
'West led the 4J, the flne.se
losing to East's 4K. The 410
canee back ani ,, S'th took stock.
What made West double? Hold-
ing the KQ he would have led
the 4K. He didn't have the 4&K
either. So he had a rmmnnui.
opening and, ttser'f re five
dlaminds to justify his double.
South played accordingly.
Winning the second trick with
the hA, te laid down the 4+A
and uffed a spade. Then came
the C'K. a heart to dummy's J
and another spade ruff. That
came to six tricks. 'Tle A was
the seventh. On dummy '. last
spade Souththrew his third
club. Having trumps only left,
West had to ruff. With four
boards left, despite his A.AQ107
over South's KJ65 he had to
concede twa tricks --and the con-
tract.


U ., 13 I I J4 1^
irr-li


ir "" 1 r
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-r~--mr -


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No. ;.324 by TIM MeKAY
Across
1. Pot of suet (anag.). (3,2.4)
U. Steal game. (5)
1t. How others (anaeM.) (3. 6)
IL Stimulate. (a)
13. Move imootihlO. (4. -5)
'' Unpleasaitl woinuli (4)
16. Sttin iltll l 1 (4)
1I Hidden writing- !491
MUr. Iqniire 43)
2l. Pile. (4)
2. Not very gRodi. ,2-2
2: 3. MPasurepmonte L 51
i)OW11
I. Times gone byv. ( '. 4)
*. Complete falltHre. ( 1. 41
3. Iart of i lbrewer, (4)
4. I'Pull. (3)
5. Printed passage. (9)
IS. Olame for ciefltritltii 14)
1. Frand. (5)
M. Vell. (5)

1 4. e ,rli .


p i a cc.
(a)
1S. Mat. 3 Ji
1 -. I e a d-
1ear


SREX MORGAN, M.D. By DAL CURTIS


APARTMENT 3-G By Alex Kotzky


9


'm


If


I 11












Friday January 4, 1974


Top trainer


out

I ,l P 1'f Pi ln. \lrnistcr
ii li .a- >. ; 1 .-":K lJil O pti ,
S i74 a ig season
i .'i! rOw I i he snips a
shori-. 1 rec the first

i. ace .onsc is briN/ing
i it: n I iVt ,n ., i i1. i*n for
i 'peni'g I eight races are
H :e d a r,,cur.d crowd
. si, ra.i.ng officials.
0 tinJ1er o1 3 and for
;t three e ars. Melvin
; s ii he out to rieain his
ell as (iry Baln. king
h c saddIhle-sitters Banm
'.... ye s i.spende :d ;n the
. I the season bh
.. tw.rds was ahead
= *u ioc.ke'i s mr wins.
t n s he ame .is last
S i p nd gats open

ac are s i.ikng 'orard to
- :'\c'!t+ig a!nd K:iterestin]g
+ : 55 5 ,j '.t."[ Sl! al"[ '12.


.,.eer MT Kemp
[f lmt ) iR
P M "[ 6 1 uN'.riW, g-,



S r L d'.
S 1 t a r e





S '. i'..r Mesl

Pwer
1 ONDlt c t 4 i rlng.
1 AS- N 3 V1 AR 01 s
Y a1 1 i', ,.ab.le
1 Whig ShAt
i \.4 i t .riu.'-
in t i

Sren
OrI
k iw -" i





p. r hod
SHiiRA) i.A 1 5 l uriones
(L VSS 1)


Melvin-


to retain title


i il***


lnWi


li - ,
The new stewards' tower on top of the grandstand at the track.

SPORTING SAM'S SELECTIONS


R FA BEST.BU. STRAIGHT OUT CLOCK
RACE BEST BUY THE PADDOCK UPSET WATCHERS

S9. Cigarllo 4. Fair Lady 9.Clga, -. 2. Wait Awhile
S 7 Miss G T 0 9. Cigarillo 4. Fair Lady 9. Southern Star
2 Wait Awhile 5. King Fire 2 Wait Awhile 7. Miss G TO 0
1 Slinq Shot 8. Limbo Queen 3. Cunado's Boy 3. Cunado's Boy
9 8 Limbo Queen 4. Commanche 1. Sling Shot 1. Sling Shot
3 Cunado's Boy I. Sling Shot 4. Comanche 8. Limbo Queen
9 Lollipop 2. Dedi -'9 Lollipop .9. Lollipop
3 8. Wicked Gal 9. Lollipop 8. Wicked Gal 2. Dedi
.* 6.Samantha __ 4. Hawley's Diana 2. Dedi 8. Wicked Ga_.
9 ..Ship 6. Doger Lossa 9. Rocking Ship 6. Doqerlossa
4. Banquero 3. Star Mare 3. Star Marie 1. Banquero
D. oger Lossa 11 Banquero 6. Dogerlossa 9. Rocking Ship
9. Horan Shoran 2. The Avenger 2. The Avenger 2. The Avenger
i 2 The '.-. One Point Five 4.The Bad 3. Dat Like Dat
S 3 Dat Like Dat 4. The Bad 9. Horan Shoran 4. The Bad
Five By Five 3. Miss Lene 1. Five By Five 1. Five By Five
6 6 Ger:ghis Kha, 1. Five By Five 6. Genghis Khan 3. Miss Lene
Stagazer 5. Mentoine 5 Mentoine 5. Mentoine
4 Poetry In Motin ColouredGir 4. Poetry in Motion 4. Poetry In Motion
7 5 s Brite 4. Poetry In Motion 7. Juries Joy Ii 1. Coloured Girl
7 e Joy i1 7 Junes Jov li 6 Sweetness 5Miss Brite
3. Shaad..h 8 Baby Twist 8. Baby Twist 8. Baby Twist
8 6 .N Seat Jane 6 No Seat Jane 1. Lucky Gitl 3 Shanadoah
35 Ld rite .3 Sharnadoah 3 Shanadoah 5. Lady Brite.


4 tIa.-lei S liia n1
5 idi Stell.i
i. Smantha
7 Lad F na
S. Wicked .al


START SMALL BUILD BlI
SI \RT x S. .i ; I li\4 ,P! itRi I \,IIt N I \\i 5SHo N Ii
1|r a 1. ie id a us tme n n O tmr cin d 5ith pr,,ent






mivi *> \- i 'rni liiia05
S ,)r .. i- car, % c ha c ta ighI t cI tii' m i s In 3 trsi hos ri 'tart.
S srin Ik t ,- di i 'l I their ow% i \ ; |l,,pit i l, 1 1 l' h ttii drre
+1iternIati 11 ,li, w, ttl ut the nt ,ol+l wm + n0 t ft p r-f ll A-ipital.
S tn % with salaried rtppr i tmit ncr ., h -+ ,',ti, d t, operitc inI
"paretlnie ,ther have one mt f,1xpmm tur: hunted companllles
m jll --rk 1 Id our hiwe r gf h, rrt-pon, en e t
f, s, t ,,-! intern ti onalo ,
N hiwrt iiut (ii)Mt I II P, t r theit ree

- TH N T 1. Y i YI I \Ait) (C S t 1el I T N T h Di n! ', \ (
A' T OI S IN
ANTHONY WADE (CONSULTANTS) LTD.


PI-i 'S N VL.S fI i 1101 N I kSiiil.l
1 N(ILANP.


( i' S. I(ONi)tON


I ,, ih es
5\ in ed i 'u he '.



3. Star Marie
4 m -lsinrl.1
S R,,c al pr.- ,
h I)iigerl ,,I'I
7 Red (uinea
8 Rkos ai Priion
l RoLktng Ship
*MS t'.L ,l I,
*\t i,.i-
I aNs Ieg
l.iquid. tt r
I I 11 1 R -\ l S I url.,ngIs
I eaturc t i. ,
2 lhe1 es-iener
3 li ike iD,
4 the B.ad
a. d I.d L nn-
6 I liusie No..
- *\le Sugar
a Wolt Hunter
i) l{)r.ill 'hinir.in
l., I ,rn r-i .


BOXING- BIRDLAND


Mt.Royal & Carew St.


FRIDAY- JAN. 4th

DOORS OPEN 8RM.

CAN SENSATIONAL YOUNG
MIDDLEWEIGHT KID BARR

REPEAT HIS LAST TWO MAIN EVENTS
AT BIRDLAND??

K.O.'d Miami Roscoe Bell in 2 Rounds
K.O.'d Gypsy Mike Whymns in 3 Rounds

HIS MOST WORTHY OPPONENT, One of
Florida's Top Middleweight Contenders out
of Dennis Riggs Camp.


CHARLY"BABY" FULLARD
i 2" \car "Id Seaisnctd Bo\er Beat Popula Slick Mitchell
Bc.,,t Vi.. r Pcr., -/ iii dM 'tcjt i.. m, i nii g tthicrs. Mi mi t. Roscoe Bell

PLUS 3 OTHER EXCITING BOUTS


A"/ It
.,/%//'f


FIRST HALF OF SHOW-
4 GREAT AMATEUR BOUT!

COME EARLY -
DON'T MISS THE ACTION

SAVE $1.00 BY PURCHASING YC
TICKET IN ADVANCE AT ANY
BUTLER & SANDS STORE

WHITE LABEL & TANGUERY
WILL BE THERE! WILL YOU?


OUR

dl1


, on /rs X h
K''IX M' I r 5 urling.
v I %Kin.isig N



I 1 6 (enighis Kh.in
I s 7 btargai/t
1 A 5 o tckdqa
I 1 7 Als,, Flisible,
S l.ri Bur'p
DI5 l)r S ( S
StV-l NIH l.C1 t 5 1 rln
1 CLASS 1.
S 1C (olnurd (Girl
i 2 1 ad (Cleo
'Pete
4 Poiietrs In ',tini
(Spanish 'lioi'tes,,a
S Miss Br+t
18 Ssen'- iess
S 7. June J,. I
SI ) lh She r mmn
li M 1li nip
12; \ I hla -
i14 ieapii nL t'en
3 ( n;u i' ,mw k f-
1, ,, oi l r.,r


fI l l Ii H -. I 4 1 uri-.g
C I. Lucks Girl 1 i4
2. Mis Shirlene 1 h1
3, Shanidoih 16
4. Stni tl-i l I1
5. LJds tintr
(lt ..i l ielhi tI
6. No Sei t Jan i- (
7. Bold Liihtenww l (
(I Bold I di I I



I he Kid I 1

Osgood up

for sale
[ONON) N D '\,-cr Osgood
and linr Ills,.p. (helsea
soccer sltar ret eiisC It' train
yestirdax inJ V wer p ,i on the
transtir 1.1
Ihc I 11 1,i,,. datt t both
player- hiad t' 'ict n out uf the
Che! si. i ic ip against
Sheftfield 1nit'd on New
Year's DI;i
the tall and si lish )Osgood,
who has played three times for
I ngland, is valued at around
250,000 pounds 56(100.000
in the transfer market and
could b e Britain's most
expensive player ift (helsea sell
hiti
lHudsoni .i lted nuidfield
player. i, ated ,it about
150.000 p..Ounds S30.0000.
(heliea, wht.ii have had a bad
patch recently. ie t Osgood.
Iludson and t)1 niol)e regulars
oult of' iIhc tI,[i, m l i Nes Year's
day and bea ,i I united
2 1 away
I lie row over the two stars
cal e ai (. lI, i prepared for a
vital galiii against i,ial rivals
Queen'" Park Rangers in the
third round ol the I english cup
tonmo rrow
A a statement trom the club
said "tludson and Osgood
both refused to train .v!th the
first team squad this morning
and have been suspended for
one week Both have expressed
a wish to move and Chelsea are
making them available for
transfer immediately." (AP)


Now we


can go


places,


says


Jerome
By GLADSTONE
THURSTON
THERE IS no doubt about
it. The Bahamas is on its way
to becoming a force to be
reckoned with in the world of
international basketball.
"Our performance showed
that we can go places."
commented national team
co-captain Jerome Barney.
"A little dedication, a little
discipline and lots of hard
work.'
He was referring to the
Bahamas' "successful" tour
of Luxembourg and France
which ended yesterday.
Under the auspices of the
Bahamas Amateur Basketball
Association, the Bahamas
National Basketball team in
their return match won two
of four games.
Luxembourg in their visit
to the Bahamas last year
dropped all three games
one each to the Bahamas
Nationals. Becks Cougars and
the Kentucky Colonels.
"If we were use to playing
international ball we would
have swept that series,"
continued Barney. "We had
the best talent. No one over
there could have matched us
in talent."
Arriving in temperature
hovering around 20 and 30
degrees, the Bahamas' team
of 12 players under the
direction of head coach Vince
Ferguson found the residents
generally hospitable. I hey
stayed high up in the
Luxembourg mountains
Playing their first game
December 29 "gaiinst
Luxembourg Nationals, the
Bahamas, after trailing.
picked up the momentum
and scored a 67-53 victory.
Using a zone defence, the
Bahamas found Luxembourg
deadly from the outside
resulting in them trailing
36-26 by half time
However, the accuracy of
guard Freddy McKay
together with a strong nman to
man defence saw the
Bahamas oust s core


l.10 arn : the Bahamas Amateur Basketball Association's
photographer VINCFN I VAUGHAN after their return trip from


Luxembourg 41-17 in the
second half. McKay who had
a brief spell in the first half
scored a second half high of
15 points
Six-foot nine Sterling
Quant a:'d six foot five Elisha
McSweei'y provided board
,.i.,yii I1 for the Bahamas
with 20 and 12 rebounds
respectively. Barney captured
10 rebounds and scored a
team high of 20 points.
Guard Peter Brown. playing a
little off due to an injured
finger passed off seven assists.
Within 24 hours the
Bahamas were back on the
court again this time in a
double header against
Budelanne and Sceinsel. the
first of which they won 56-50
before dropping the second
55-53.
VMcSweeiev. a Classic Pros
forv'ard scourd 12 of 18 trom
the field and five of six from
the free throw line to top the
Babamini:as with 29 points
ava.insti Buti.alln/. Quant in
that game captured 11
rebounds and Brown gave
eight assi ss.
I h Bq.ihamas siifteied their
tirst setback going into their
third game the second half
of the double-header when
McSweenev twisted an ankle.
However. top performances
by Kentucky Colonels'
forward Keith Smith kept
them in the game pacing then
it a four point lead with a
little over a minute remaining
in the game.
Smith scored seven of 13
from the field and two of
four from the free throw line.


The final game in France
against Joeuf saw
McSweeney, Quant, Barney
and Smith all in top form all
scoring high in double figures.
However, tamed by fouls,
they were forced to cut their
performance dropping their
final game 97-91.
The Bahamas Amateur
Basketball Association now
have their eyes set on the


national team pose for
Luxembourg.

Central American and
Caribbean Games next
month. Although the
Bahamas Olympic
Association said that the
Bahamas will not be
represented in these games, it
would be worth their while to
at least get basketball
represented even it the
B.A.B.A. has to again do it on
their own.


GATES OPEN I.30a.m.

POST TIME 1.15p.m.

EHViERY \ISDY INO SAIBRDY


AIL 1Y11111S 1st 1 21d 1C1S
ALSO IUINHLLAS
GOVERNMENT SUPERVISED PARIMUTUEL
BETTING .
COMFORTABLE AIR CONDITIONED DINING
ROOM & BAR OVERLOOKING THE TRACK.


I


mU


_ I ~C


hel tri ibuttP


- -~---bU~- 1 --


cl-i-- ~---c~-


I


3


IG