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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03521
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: December 12, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03521

Full Text














(rtbutw


,4(MisMered with Posmnaster of Bahamas for postage concesons within the Bahamas.) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


VOL. LXX1, No. 18' Wednesday, December 12, 1973 Price: 15 Cents
J .1' I ii1 iiI


Freeport's Monte Carlo casino


1
~ 44


Moorish-snired El Casinn stave onan.


, YA- .


Bahama s Amusements
vice-president J. Miller.
In"


POST LARLYV


THE Post Office is urging
the public to post early for
Christmas.

Postmaster C. M Harris said
that on Saturday December 15
and 22, the Post Office Savings
Bank and Money Order
section of the General Post
Office will be opened to the
public from 8.30 a.m. to 12.30
p.m.

The Parcels Post section will
be opened on those Saturdays
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.


THE MONTE CARLO
casino in the Lucayan
Beach Hotel, Freeport has
closed its doors.
The shock announcement
was made today by the Grand
Bahama Development
Company, owners of
Freeport's two plush casinos,
and comes just two weeks after
government's announcement to
takeover all casinos in the
country "as a matter policy."
Finance Minister Arthur
Hanna announced in
parliament Nov. 28 that the
government would assume
complete ownership and
control of the country's three
casinos after 1976 "as a matter
of policy."
He announced at the same
time that the licence of
Bahamas Amusements Ltd.,
which was to expire on
December 31, 1973 would be
extended to January 1976
when the licence of Paradise
Enterprises Ltd. expires.
(Bahamas Amusements runs
both El Casino and the Monte
Carlo casino at Freeport, while
Paradise Enterprises runs the
Paradise Island casino in
Nassau.)

MISTAKE
On November 29 Mr. Hanna
corrected his mistake that the
expiration date on the casino
licence for Paradise Enterprises
was January 1976. !i fact this
I.!ic-e will not expire uiMul
December 1977 some two
years later than given by Mr.
Hanna.

But Mr. Hanna in his
corrected statement also
confirmed that government's
decision in so far as it affects
Bahamas Amusements Ltd.,
remained the same, "that is to
say, that the company will be
permitted to operate its casinos
until January, 1976."
Mr. Hanna also forwarned
the gambling operators on
November 28 that government


would introduce a revised
taxation formula for casino
gambling during the next two
years.
The brief announcement
from the Freeport gambling
operators today said:

''Bahamas Amusements
Limited today announced the
closing of the Monte Carlo
Casino.
The operation of the
Monte Carlo casino whose lease
expires on December 31, 1973
will be consolidated into the
facilities of El Casino. El
Casino the other casino here in
Freeport, is owned by Bahamas
Amusements Limited. By
contract the net profits of
Bahamas Amusements Limited
are received by the Grand
Bahama Development
Company Limited, a subsidiary
of Benguet Consolidated
Incorporated.
BOARD
"The Gaming Board has
given approval for the transfer
of staff and equipment to El
Casino." said the statement.

The effect of the closure is
likely to be felt immediately
on the tourism market in
Freeport, which already has
suffered a bad tourist year.

And the loss of revenue
from Monte Carlo to the
Bahamas treasury is likely to
be substantial and may,
necessitate a revision of
estimates of revenue in Mr.
Hanna's Budget to parliament.

In 1972 the two Freeport
casinos earned over $20 million
and last year paid over $4
million in gaming taxes to the
Bahamas government.

The Monte Carlo was the
first casino to open in the
Bahamas in January 1964. It
did so in a storm of
controversy over the hiring of
alleged underworld gambling
figures and led later to the
Gambling Commission of
Inquiry in 1967.


NO


NEW TAXES,


PROMISES HANNA


shuts


down


By MIKE LOTHIAN
GO V E RNMENT'S
SPENDING NEXT YEAR will
be kept within the limits of
existing revenue resources so
there will be no significant tax
increases and only limited
borrowing for capital
development, the nation was
told this morning.
Deputy Prime Minister and
Finance Minister Arthur D.
Hanna, in a 50-minute Budget
Communication broadcast live
from the House of Assembly
over Radio Bahamas, said the
legislature would be asked to
approve the expenditure next
year of just under $116 million
to keep the Government
operating and to service the
Public Debt. He mentioned it
would take $10.5 million to
service our debt.
Financing for the $116
million recurrent expenditures,
he said, would come from
revenue estimated during 1974
at $122.5 million.
And if unforeseen
circumstances cause a revenue
shortfall, he promised,
Government would tighten its
own belt rather than impose
new taxation.
The increase in estimated
recurrent expenditure next
year, almost 13 million over
the 1973 figure, is spread fairly
evenly among the Government
ministries and departments.
The only disproportionate
rise in allocation appears to
have been for the Water
Department. Recognising the
department's dilemma in trying
to bridge the dangerously wide
gap between the supply and
demand of fresh water,
Government will next year
create a-Water Corporation for
accounting purposes, and the
department's allocation will
next year be almost twice that
for 1973.
In addition, the department
has been given high priority for
loan financing under Capital
Development.
Education and Health
remain top-runners in the
budget allocations, sharing a
total of almost $42 million on
the Recurrent Account.
$1.39m. SURPLUS?
Mr. Hanna revealed that the
balance on the 1973 Recurrent
Account is now expected to be
more favourable than at first
anticipated.


Outten and ministers'


wives get citizenship


MR. SINCLAIR Outten
(pictured) and the wives of two
government Ministers were the
only three people to have
obtained Bahamian citizenship
in the three-and-a-half months
following independence.
The names of Mrs. Beryl
Hanna and Mrs. Zoe Maynard
were released today by Prime
Minister Lynden Pindling in
answer to questions put to him
in the House by Clarence Town
representative Mic hael
Lightbourn. Mr. Lightbourn
asked the Prime Minister, who
has responsibility for
citizenship, to specify the date
when Mr. Outten became a
registered Bahamian citizen.
In addition he asked to be
provided with the names of all
others granted similar status or
naturalization within the same
period.
Mr. Pindling informed the
House that Mr. Outten was
registered as a Bahamian
citizen on November 1.
(This is two days after Mr.
Outten informed the Speaker
by letter that he was
"vacating" the St. Barnabas
seat. He was forced to
withdraw after declaring that
he was not Bahamian-born and
therefore not qualified at the
time of last year's general
election to offer as a
candidate).


WEK
WINE RACKS



At AtU FREEPORT


The Prime Minister also
disclosed that Mrs. Beryl
Hanna, wife of Deputy Prime
Minister Arthur Hanna,
received Bahamian citizenship
on September 5 and Mrs. Zoe
Maynard, wife of Tourism
Minister Clement Maynard, on
September 21.
Mr. Pindling said no one
became a naturalized Bahamian
during the period July 10,
1973 and November 1.
MR. SINCLAIR Outten has
joined the staff of Bahamas
World Airlines, The Tribune
learned today.
It has not been confirmed
however, what Mr. Outten's
duties are.
As the elected representative
for St. Barnabas, Mr. Outten
became the centre of*
controversy when he disclosed
earlier this year that he had


discovered he was not
Bahamian-born.
This revelation immediately
disqualified Mr. Outten from
serving as the district's
representative. He has since
regularised his position and
become a Bahamian citizen and
will run again in the
forthcoming b y-election
January 18, on the PLP ticket.


Pilots dispute


THE BAHAMA Islands
Airline Pilots Association
Monday filed notice of its
dispute with Bahamasair,
Associati on president
Captain Paul Smith
confirmed.
Captain Smith said the
notice was delivered to the
Ministry of Labour,
Monday afternoon.
The dispute is the result
of a break-down, in
contract negotiations
between the airline's
management and the
union.
BIALPA won a
recognition agreement
from the newly-formed
nation al carrier in
September and has been


seeking agreement during
the past 90 days on a wage
contract.
"Management is
pr e pared to discuss
working conditions but
have said there can be no
salary increases at all,"
Captain Smith said.
In filing notice of a
dispute the airline union is
hoping the Minister of
Labour will intervene to at
least bring both parties
back to the negotiating
table.
The Industrial Relations
Act allows a 53-day
cooling-off period between
notice of a dispute and
strike action.


-St Andrew

board


members

reflected
AT THE annual general
meeting of St. Andrew's
School Ltd. all serving Board
members of the school were
reelected last night. Two new
members were added to the
Board to replace Mr. Barry
Nottage, who had resigned, and
Mr. Orfilio Pelaez, who had
stepped down because of ill
health.
Controversial chairman
William (Bill) Holowesko
announced in his report that if
he were returned to the Board.
he would not accept the
chairmanship. In addition to
Mr. Holowesko the following
members were reelected: Mr
Orville Turnquest, Mrs.
Leonard Chappelle, Dr.
Andrew Esfakis, Mrs. Ronald
Lightbourn, Mr. Raleigh
Butler, Mr. Ritchie Sawyer and
Mr. Macgregor Robertson. The
new Board members were Mr.
John Wanklyn and Mrs. Ronald
Strange.
"Contrary to this morning's
newspaper the Board of
Directors were not returned by
the majority of shareholders,"
an angry shareholder told The
Tribune today. "They were
returned by a handful of
people who control a large
block of shares at the school
and can determine the
outcome of any election
regardless of how the majority
of shareholders feel."
The morning paper had
reported that "the results of
the election indicate that the
majority of the school's
shareholders have approved the
decision of the Board to
replace the school's headmaster
John Chaplin."
Page 3 Col. 5


si'Maverick'


COCONUT GROVE M.P. Edmund Moxey
strengthened his growing image as a maverick
PLP backbencher today when he marched into
the House of Assembly in the middle of the
Budget Communication bearing placards
protesting the apparent deletion from the
budget of allocations for the Community
Youth Programme and the Jumbey Village,
both pet projects of his.
Mr. Moxey startled the entire House and
broke into Finance Minister Arthur Hanna's
delivery of the budget speech when at 10:48
he walked up the centre aisle with the placards
on.
One placard read:
"Mr. Prime Minister, how much do you
care? Community Youth and Jumbey Village
thrown out of Budget. "Help save the people
and country."


THE
Movement's
representati
decision as
approach fo
the party.
The FNN
by unanimi
to reinstate
they first
breaking t
declared t
abide b
constitution
"in word an


Moxey in


FREE National Sir Roland Symonette meeting has not yet been
three expelled (Shirlea) said he was still arranged.
ves have reached no actively considering the matter. Mr Cleophas Adderley
yet regarding an He had however met with his (Nassau), said yesterday that
ar re-instatement by constituents and they advised he was not ready to make a
him that "I have nothing to statement "at this time."
1 convention agreed apologise for," he told The "Sir Roland promised that
pus vote last month Tribune. we would get together, and I
the three providing Sir Roland told The Tribune am waiting to hear from him
S apologized for on November 24, immediately first." Mr Adderley said.


he party line and
heir intention to
y the party's
n and regulations
d spirit."


Vesco:


NEW YORK, DEC. 12 (AP)
- The U.S. government will
not appeal the refusal of a
Bahamas magistrate to grant
extradition of financier Robert
L. Vesco, a federal prosecutor
said today.
U.S. attorney Paul J. Curran
declared "we will not appeal."
Curran gave no reasons for the
government's decision.
Last Friday, a Bahamas
magistrate ruled that a fraud


alter the convention, that he
expected the three would meet
to decide their course of
action.
It is understood that such a


Mr. Michael Lightbourn
(Clarence Town), also said he
had made no decision in the
matter.


U.S. won't appeal


indictment against the New
Jersey financier did not
amount to extraditable charge
under existing treaties.
Vesco, 38, had been in the
Bahamas and Costa Rica, while
listed here as a fugitive for
failing to answer three criminal
indictments and one massive
civil law suit accusing him of
diverting to personal use some
of the $224 million assets of
four mutual funds he


controlled when he was board
chairman of International
Controls Corporation.
Vesco is a co-defendant of
former Cabinet members John
N. Mitchell and Maurice H.
Stans, due for trial January 9
on charges of conspiring to
obstruct federal probes of
Vesco, and on covering up a
then secret 200,000 Vesco
donation to the 1972 Nixon
re-election campaign.
-J 11


protest


On the other card:
"Mr. Deputy Prime Minister, why do you
cut off the Youth Community and Jumbey
Village from Government funds?"
Mr. Moxey strode boldly up to the foot of
the Speaker's desk, did an about face and
walked to his seat in the back row on the
Government side of the House, where he took
off the placards, leaned them against the wall
and sat down.
Government Whip Cadwell Armbrister
(PLP-Killarney) paid a brief visit to Mr. Moxey
at his seat five minutes later, but it is not
known what passed between them.
House Speaker Arlington Butler referred to
the incident later in the morning, when he
observed that "we must exhibit a degree of
decorum that will demand the degree of
respect we expect from others."


nihtly this week until 7p.m.



COR. ROSETTA ST. & MT. ROYAL AVE.


Govt would

tighten

its belt,

he pledges

He said Government is now
predicting a surplus in 1973
of S1.39 million, almost
twice the original estimate.
That will, if the estimate
proves correct, reduce the
carry-over deficit from the
1972 Recurrent Account
from $7.5 million to $6.11
million.
(He warned, however, that
returns for the final months of
the year are "difficult" to
predict, and the revised 1973
revenue estimates "should be
accepted with some reserve.")
Government anticipates an
almost $6.6 million surplus on
the 1974 Recurrent Account,
but $6.4 million of that, he
said, will be transferred to help
finance the $24 million Capital
Development programme.
TAXES
Mr. Hanna told House
members that the estimated
$122.5 million revenue for
next year reflects the new
sliding scale of Real Property
Tax, already approved by the
legislature and introduced, and
the proposed Business Licence
Tax which he said would come
into operation early in the new
year. The Business Tax is
expected to add about $1
million to the revenue, he said.
-Ie went on: "I believe that
the estimates of revenue- are
realistic on the basis of trends
in 1973. However, it is
impossible to predict, at this
stage, what effect on our
economy and on our revenue
may result from any check in
the growth of the American
and European economies
because of the energy crisis."
The 1974 estimates made
"some allowance" for such an
eventuality, he said, but the
accounts will have to be kept
under strict and constant
review.
"If it becomes necessary
during the year to ask
ministries to curtail their
expenditure I shall not hesitate


Bank with



Uv Barclays


to do this. I sincerely hope that
such a situation will not arise,
but clearly it is a contingency
that cannot be ignored.
"Should there be any fall
in revenue," he vowed, "my
proposal is that it should be
met by economies in our
public spending and not by
additional taxes."
NO NEW LOANS
He said that apart from about
a $6.8 million loan for water
and broadcasting under Capital
Development, "no new loans
have to be negotiated in
1974."
He said "it is the
Government's policy to keep
the total capital expenditure,
from year to year, at amounts
that can be financed either
directly, from contributions
from the current account of
the Consolidated Fund, or
from borrowing within the
limits which I am satisfied can
be serviced from current
account surpluses.
"The policy as regards the
public utilities electricity,
telephones, broadcasting, water
is the same. Development
will be financed by these
corporations from their own
cash flow or by borrowing
within limits that will enable
the loans to be serviced by the
net revenues.
The estimated $7.5 million
needed to complete the school
construction programme
during 1974 is already in hand
in the form of loans negotiated
this year with the
Export-Import Bank of
Washington and the Pirst
National City Bank and as a
direct eontritbrtion from the
Capital Account.

NEW COLLEGE
THE COLLEGE of the
Bahamas, on paper for at least
three years, is now to come
into existence in September
1974.
That, at least, is the estimate
of Education Minister
Livingstone Coakley.
Mr. Coakley, answering
questions put in the House by
Clarence Town representative
Michael Lightbourn, said:
"Plans are for the College of
the Bahamas to come into
existence in September 1974.


EXPELLED TRIO: NO DECISION


Lights on

for test run

PEDESTRIANS and
drivers along Bay Street hive
been surprised during thea pst
two nights to e the
thoroughfare aglow wth
Christmas lightIIng
A BEC spokesmen msM the
early glow is a dry run In
preparation for Decembwr I,16
the proposed date when the
Christmas lights en de o* I be
switched on for the hielay
season.
BEC chairmen Prests
Albury promised re-demb
their Christnumas Miob
appears Intent on lkepifl m
word despite a sedil
worsening fuel sitMUt


lii [ I


dii;












Wht ht rhW


Wednesday, December 12, 1973


BRIi AlI'S House of
Commons has approved an
order t hiding the Caribbean
island of Grenada's
association with Britain. The
order takes effect Feb. 7,
when Grenada becomes
independent.

GRENADA C chamber of
C to in ie r c e r ged
Premic; Gairy to disband the
secret police
Pil I LIPS -ci olcum Co. in
Oklahoma alid t(hait because
fc the Aiab ',n bargo it was
short otf crude -il and was
beini forced to cut back the
output from its six refineries.

\ 150 1 s Japanese
tflo.ting crane ship sank after
i' wN.i in collision with a
o. i t7 n D)anish freighter in
S. to pou' southwestern
Japan.

PRI- -i 1I .f Nixon says
he will nminmate Asst.
Defense Secr -tarv Robert Hill
as Unit.edi Stas Ambassador
to Argenitina.
THE AUnited Nations
Gcner Assemblv has voted
I! to 3 10to approve a
formnui for financing the
United Nations Middle East
o-ace force. Fhe United
State -, ill pay the most
sS.67 million. or 29 per cent
of the S30 iill ion bill for the
first six months.

PREMIER George Walter is
still the political leader of the
Progre. ve L n.hbor Movement
in Antigtiia i was --elected
unopposed i the party's
third annual ca ocntiotn held
in St. tJjhn-

THI RTf' IHRLi white
miin 'i detained last night as
they ttenimpted to enter
Uganda wosld he released as
soon as the authorities
" established their identities,
S said plicee
THl! ''\ l! i Communist
Part orgaii Pravda criticised
the. UUnited States for
station.in ships in the Indian
Ocean -a ing the action
-' isloii in southeast
Asia and the Middle East.


Al'l t A1


Light up your trees, Americans are told
WASHINGTON Americans may use lose the festive spirit of Christmas ornamental lighting of homes and
electric lights on Christmas trees inside because of the energy crisis," Simon said apartments.
their homes this season despite the energy in a statement. He said the ban on such lighting is
crisis, said William E Simn head of the He said the ban on such lighting is
crisis, said William E. Simon, head of the But he said his office would wage war voluntary at present, but he will enforce
office a stratenerg against other Christmas lighting, including it as soon as he receives authority to
"I do not want American families to outdoor promotional displays and make the ban compulsory. (AP)


Railmen



to batters


LONDON The British
Government said today it will
extend a month-old state of
emergency for another four
weeks as 29,000 train drivers
launched a go-slow that swiftly
caused widespread chaos and
worsened an already grave
energy crisis.
Cabinet minister said Prime
Minister Edward Heath will ask
the Queen to proclaim the
emergency measure a purely
formal move.
Home Secretary Robert Carr
was expected to announce the
royal consent.
Parliament will be asked to
approve it within seven days.
The original measure was
scheduled to expire at
midnight.
Ministers said the
emergency. declared last
month to deal with crippling
in d ustrial campaigns by
Britain's 270,000 miners and


add bitter



d Britain


18,000 key power engineers,
was to be extended because of
the railmen's action.
Rail services all over the
country were slashed within
hours of the locomen's go-slow
starting at midnight.
London and the urban
sprawl around the capital was
the worst hit with more than
200,000 commuters affected.
The state-run British Rail
reported the southern region
around London, one of the
busiest rail networks in the
world, was paralysed by 9 a.m.
Drivers refused to man
commuter trains because they
had no speedometers. Their
go-slow bans overtime, Sunday
work and operating trains that
they consider do not strictly
conform with rule book
standards.
Dozens of scheduled services
were cancelled around the
country, although British Rail


reported that some areas were
not seriously disrupted.
But a spokesman warned:
"There is no doubt the crisis
will worsen by the end of the
day as the cumulative effect of
the drivers' action begins to
tell."
The railmen like the miners,
power engineers and another
three million British workers,
are demanding wage increases
that go above the
G government's anti-inflation
pay freeze that limits raises to
seven per cent of base rates.
Their go-slow will aggravate
the nation's energy crisis
caused by the Arab oil squeeze,
the miners' month-old
overtime ban that has slashed
coal production by an
estimated 2.5 million tons and
the power engineers' campaign
that has already brought
blackouts in some areas and
nationwide six per cent voltage


Israel threatens peace


talks boycott


IN A hardening of its
position, Israel has threatened
to boycott the Geneva peace
talks unless Syria turns over a
list of the Israeli prisoners of
war it is holding.
Israeli Defense Minister
Moshe Dayan had already said
Monday that Israel would not
talk with the Syrians at Geneva
unless the list was provided,
but he did not threaten a
boycott of the talks then.
Syria is believed to hold 102
Israeli POWS.
Israel. Syria. Egypt and
Jordan have all been invited to
the negotiations, shceduled to
begin Dec. 18 under American,
Soviet and United Nations
auspices.
Syria has agreed to attend,
although it attached some
unspecified conditions, and


:. -. -. :. -_, ^^ w .i ,. sisissuiaesassaur e sss ssiasmt t 'cis


ATTENTION!



PAIMDALE FURNITURE STORE I
MACKEY STREET PHONE 2-3703

. ---OPENING HOURS ---

MON. TO THUR. --9 A.M. TO 7 P.M. I
FRIDAY 9 A.M. TO 5 P.M. K
SATURDAY 9 A.M. TO 8 P.M.






SA 1-8511d _'P






fRI[PRI/35-834


sources in Amman said King
Hussein is ready to send a
Jordanian delegation.
Egypt is expected to appear
at the conference despite
recent threats from some Cairo
officials not to show up if
Israel continues to refuse to
withdraw its troops on the
Suez front. Egypt and Israel
already have exchanged their
prisoners of war.
Meanwhile, an oil expert
said today that the future of
world oil supplies and price
rises rests largely on what Israel
does at the peace conference.
The expert who would
not be named said that if
Israel announced withdrawal
from occupied Arab territories,
Arab oil supplies will be
resumed in full and the latest
new huge rise in the price of
Iranian oil will go down
sharply
The expert was commenting
on last night's price increase


for Iranian crude oil from
$3.30 a barrel to $17.34 a
barrel.
The old figure was the price
for oil sold to members of a
western consortium that
includes British Petroleum,
Exxon and other large U.S.
companies.
The new figure is for oil sold
at auction to U.S., European
and Japanese customers.
The Iranian statement said
that 12 million tons of oil
would be delivered in the fjrst
six months of 1974 at $17.34 a
barrel for light oil, known as
API-36.7, and $16 a barrel for
heavy crude, known as
API-33.2.
While this price was set for
Iran's direct and independent
marketing of 12 million tons, it
will inevitably affect some 275
million tons which will be
exported to world markets in
1974, the expert predicted.
(AP).


blow


reductions.
That is the maximum
reduction before the state-run
electricity board starts blacking
out sections of the country.
The rail slowdown, apart
from adding to the woes of
travellers already battered by
fuel shortages, was expected to
seriously hit distribution of
dwindling coal supplies for
fuel-starved power stations.
Seventy per cent of them run
on coal. (AP)

Paint thrown


WASlIINt I O\ (AP)
President Nixon's $2.2-billion
request to help Israel replace
its October war arms losses was
approved overwhelmingly
Tuesday by the House.
The House passed the
authorization 364-52 and sent
it to the Senate over objections
that the Pentagon had justified
a need for only $1 billion and
that the Israeli aid could
further hold up Arab oil for
the United States.
But an amendment by Rep.
Paul Findley (R. I111.) to
recognize the Arabs' desire for
Israel to withdraw from Arab
territory taken over during the
1967 six-day war was trounced
334-82.
Findley's amendment would
have specified that the purpose


of the money was not only to
maintain an Israel-Arab arms
balance to avoid war but also to.
implement the 1967 United
Nations resolution calling for
Israel to withdraw from the
occupied Arab territory and
calling for the Arabs to
recognize Israel's right to live
within secure boundaries.
Opponents of Findley's
amendment, including Rep.
Dante B. Fascell (D., Fla.) said
it could be misinterpreted as a
U.S. position in upcoming
Middle East peace talks in
Geneva.
Top administration officials
testified at congressional
hearings that the need for U. S.
arms to Israel will be dictated
by how much is needed to
balance with the Soviet arms
being supplied to Arab nations.


Honeymooners in Jamaica


KINGSTON Governor
General Florizel Glasspole
and Mrs. Glasspole headed
the welcome party for
Princess Anne and Captain
Mark Phillips when they
arrived at Norman Manley
airport from Colombia today.
The honeymooning royal
couple will remain in


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Kingston until Friday
morning when they leave for
Montserrat.
Later in day the couple
will visit the Lister Mair
Gilbey School for the Deaf,
and National Children's
Home and Staff Training
Centre.
Tomorrow they visit
Papine Industrial Training
Centre and the Polio
Rehabilitation Centre before
leaving to visit the Princess
Margaret Hospital, named for
her aunt who opened it in
1955.
The Princess and
Captain Phillips will attend
two dinners during their stay,
one at King's House as guest
of the Governor General and
his wife tonight and the other
at Jamaica House, hosted by
Prime Minister Manley.
They will see a variety
concert in ballroom at King's
House featuring Jamaican
folk singers and other artists.
This will be Princess
Anne's second visit to
Jamaica. She was first here in
1966 with Prince Charles and
attended the Commonwealth
Games. (AP).


KISSINGER

TO VISIT

ALGERIA

FOR TALKS
LONDON U.S. Secretary
of State Henry Kissinger will
fly to Algeria, one of the most
militant Arab states, tomorrow
for talks with President Houari
Boumedlenne "on questions of
mutual interest," a Kissinger
spokesman said today.
He said the secretary would
stop in Algiers "for a few
hours" on his way to the
Middle East to promote an
Arab Israeli peace.
Sources reported Kissinger's
lightning visit to Algiers was to
seek support for U.S. Middle
East policy. He will also meet
with Algerian Foreign Minister
Abdel Aziz Boutflika.
Kissinger is due to return
to Europe for the start of the
Geneva peace conference Dec.
18.
Kissinger called on Prime
Minister Edward Heath and
Foreign Secretary Sir Alec
Douglas-Home today.
A nd he entinied iv


BASEBALL STAR


IN HOTEL'


SHOOTING DRAMA
SANTO DOMINGO Cesar Cedeno, the Houston Astros star
center fielder and one of the most talented young players in
major league baseball, was to appear before a judge today
following the shooting death of a 19-year-old woman in a hotel


room.


DUSTIN HOFFMAN'S
new film, Alfredo Alfredo
will premier before year's
end, poking satiric fun at
marriage, morals and the
empty relationships into
which people trap themselves.
Stefanina Sandrelli and Carla
Gravina co-star with
Hoffman.

Pritn nardflns


at No. 10 diplomatic fence-mending with REPEATING action in
LONDON A West African an address on American policy, previous years on the eve of
woman threw a bucket of Kissinger hoped to convince Christmas, Brazil's president
black paint at No. 10 Downing the British that their interests Emilio Garrastazu Medici has
Street, headquarters of Prime would be protected at the signed a decree commuting
Minister Edward Heath, shortly Arab-Israeli peace conference, thousands of prison sentences.
before Zaire President Mobutu (AP)- .osnsfpronetnc.
arrived for talks.
Police hastily scraped the Inflation rates soar
paint away and unrolled a PARIS Greece has experienced the worst inflation of
carpet for the visiting president any of the member countries of the Organization for
Mobutu cancelled an official Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) in the
visit to Britain two years ago year ending Oct. 31.
visit to Britain two years ago The Greek inflation rate was 23.2 per cent in the 12
complaining of a diplomatic month period, followed by Japan 14.4 per cent, Italy 11,
snub. f Britain 9.9, Canada 8.7, France 8.1, the United States 7.9
But he showed no signs of and West Germany 6.6.
being miffed this time and During the month of October, the inflation rate was
spent two hours in talks with higher in Europe than for the OECD members as a whole.
Heath before going to the For all OECD members including the United States,
Guildhall for lunch as guest of Canada, Japan, Australia and New Zealand the rate was
the Lord Mayor of London.r-old 0.9 per cent, while in European member countries it was
The Woman, 30-year-old 1 .2 per cent.
Ester Olaye, pleaded innocent The biggest rise was in Switzerland with 2.1 per cent,
in court to charges of followed by Britain with 2 per cent, mainly because of a
obstructing the highway and sharp rise in food prices. France was third with 1.1 per
defacing a public building. She cent. The United States, West Germany and Italy each
did not explain her action in record 0.8 per cent increases.
court and was remanded on fo_ r p r.
bail until Jan. 4. (AP).

Rockefeller for president?


ALBANY With three tries
for the presidency behind him,
politicians read Nelson
Roc kefeller's gubernatorial
resignation as the first step
toward a fourth and final
presidential bid.
Rockefeller announced at a
news conference yesterday he
would step down in a week
from the New York governor's
office he was first elected to in
1958. He said he would spend
his time working with two
bipartisan national
commissions which he heads.
"My only regret is that my
undertaking these tasks has
been interpreted as a political
manoeuvre to seek the
presidency or for any other


political office," he said as he
quit the office he has held for
15 years.
"Whether I will become a
candidate in the future, I do
not know. I shoudl like to keep
my options open."

Rockefeller said he would
not "face those options" until
late in 1975. "This is not a
gimmick. This is not a political
trick," he said. Nevertheless, in
widely scattered political
quarters, the move was seen as
a step toward the presidency.
And to some Republicans it
carried more hope of success
than when Rockefeller ran in
1960, 1964 and 1968.
Roc kefeller's resignation


turns the governorship over to
Republican Lt. Gov. Malcolm
Wilson, New York state's No. 2
man during Rockefeller's 15
year tenure. (AP).


THE
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District attorney Maximo
Henriquez Saladin said Cendeno
was to appear before a judge to
learn if charges of 'voluntary
homicide' would be lodged
against him or dismissed.
Although exonerated of any
wrongdoing in the incident, a
spokesman said Cedeno still
had to appear in court under
Latin American law.
Police said Altagracia de la
Cruz died of gunshot wounds
in the head, apparently from a
.38-caliber pistol owned by
Cedeno. Police said he did not
have a gun permit but that he
had been given special !
authorisation" for the weapon.
Cedeno, police said, called
the front desk of the hotel at 2
a.m. est. and told the counter
clerk the woman was dead. Hie
left in his car but appeared at
police headquarters at 8 a.m.,
accompanied by his father, and
was jailed.
Police said Cedeno, 22, said
he was with the victim at the
hotel and was attempting to
put away the revolver when she
asked to see it. Cedeno told
officials Miss de la Crum
accidently shot herself while
handling the weapon.
A four-year major-league
veteran, Cedeno has often been
compared with such great as
Willie Mays and the late
Roberto Clemente. He batted
.310 and .264 his first two
seasons and .320 the past two.
He was second in the
national league in batting in
1973 and third in 1972 and
played on the 1972 NL all-star
team.
Cedeno was in his native
Dominican Republic for winter
league baseball but a leg injury
prevented him from playing
Astros' general manager Spec
Richardson flew here after
learning of the incident
(AP)




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bht Uribunt
NuTaams AnDicros JUIAME IN VERBA MAGIWSR
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903. 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH,O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Publisher/Editor 1917-1972
Contributing Editor 1972.
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
PublisAer/Editor 1972.


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
I ALMOST missed one of the most unpleasant and at the
same time one of the most important experiences of my life.
When the late Louis Duvalier came to my office nearly a half
century ago and invited me to become a candidate for the district
of Inagua his birthplace in the House of Assembly I was too
busy trying to learn how to hold the precious tiny Tribune
together to have ever given thought to the idea of becoming
actively involved in politics.
At that time I had no wife or children to share my love. And so
The Tribune then a babe struggling for life with its every breath
- was my first love and my duty to the Bahamian people, as
expressed in The Tribune's motto ..Being bound to swear to
the dogmas, of no master ... was my sole responsibility.
At the time I was being tutored by my great friend, the Very
Rev. Chrysostom Schreiner, O.S.B., V.F., founder of the Catholic
church in the Bahamas. And so I did nothing without first
consulting him.

Mr. Duvalier was anxious for me to become a member of the
House because, at the time ... and for many, many years after
that ... The Tribune was the only public outlet for the hopes and
dreams of underprivileged groups in the islands. He felt that
if I were in the House of Assembly it would strengthen the
position of this newspaper in public affairs and thereby help to
broaden the outlook of the Bahamian voter who was then a mere
tool ... a chattel to be bought ... of vested interests that then sat
astride every opportunity that our society afforded its people.
I wasn't sure that I wanted to become a politician. My only
concern at that time was that I should learn to become the
colony's best journalist.But Duvalier was my friend. He was a
regular contributor to the columns of The Tribune I felt that I
just couldn't brush his proposal aside without deep and serious
consideration.
And so I took my problem to my friend Fr. Chrysostom. I-
asked him what I should do. His first reaction was immediate and
positive.
He advised me not to touch it. He said that politics was a dirty
game that tended to' undermine and destroy the character of
honest men who became enmeshed in its toils. He felt that my
spirit would revolt against the things I would see in the political
arena. Because of this fact, he believed I would hate it. At least,
he hoped I would hate it because, if I didn't, it could change my
whole personality.
That ended it. I would tell Duvalier I would not enter this den
of iniquity.
But when I saw Fr. Chrysostom the next day he had changed
his mind. He told me he had slept on Duvalier's proposal that I
should enter politics. And he had finally decided that I should.
He said that this was the only way I would learn the facts about
life in the colony and the people who controlled its destiny. He
said he was still afraid of what it might do towards undermining
my character as a journalist but that was a chance I must take. He
begged me never to become a politician in the raw meaning of the
word.
And so I entered the lists and, with his active help in the
campaign, I won the seat with the slim majority of one vote.
He went with me to the island for this election. It was really
remarkable the many ways in which his presence on the island
helped me to win the confidence of a people I was meeting for
the first time. An extraordinary fact is that at no time did he
become directly involved in the campaign.
He had told me before he went to the island with me that, as a
Priest, he could not engage actively in a political campaign.
As things turned out, this was not necessary. He spent all his
time on the island making friends and, without ever mentioning
the election, he made friends for me.

Both Fr. Chrysostom and Louis Duvalier proved to be right on
all points.
Duvalier was correct when he said that my presence in the
House, combined with the influence The Tribune wielded in the
community, would broaden my opportunity for service to a
section of the people who at that time had little or no voice
in the affairs of their homeland.
And Father Chrysostom was right in sensing the danger to a
man's whole personality by becoming involved in politics ... and,
most of all, that I would hate it.

I represented Inagua and Mayaguana in the House for 19 years,
the Eastern District for seven, and served in the Senate for eight
years.
And now I can say that I really and truly hated every moment
of it. In fact, it is the only thing I have ever done in my life that I
have hated so thoroughly.
But Fr. Chrysostom was right when he said that I would gain
an experience of life and people behind the scenes in politics that
1 could not learn from a book, nor from personal contact with
him.
Politics is unquestionably a great teacher but it is a two-edged
sword because it can also be a destroyer if a man, who comes
within its reach, doesn't examine his soul at regular intervals and
polish it regularly to remove the stain of its,contacts.

I have come to the conclusion that very few men are able to
steer a straight course through politics. The pressures and
temptations are indescribable.
The terrible thing about it is that the voters themselves are to
blame for this unhealthy condition. It is an extraordinary fact
that the average voter doesn't understand honesty, loyalty and
truthfulness. These are such rare qualities in human relations that
he doesn't expect to find it in politicians ... and when he finds it.
he is suspicious of it because he does not believe that it could
possibly exist.
In the first place, he has been fooled for so long that he has
accepted this condition as a part of human experience but, most
of all, the average person in life doesn't want to hear the truth.
He wants to be told any kind of story that holds out a bit of hope


to him.
I lost two elections one at Inagua and one in the Eastern
District because I refused to lie to the people. When my
advisers urged me to change my political pitch to suit the temper
of the people at the time, I refused to do it. I told them that it
wasn't important for me to win an election. But It was important
for me to know that at no time in my life had I stooped to
fooling the people to serve my own ends.
Even the great Winston Churchill was aware of the need to
walk warily on the political tight rope. On one occasion he said
that the strongest ally of a politician was the fact that the people


did not remember what he said a year ago.

An unfortunate fact is that even a newspaper reporter cannot
convey a true picture of the political machinery to his readers. He
has to stick to hard facts in writing a story.
In order to get a true picture of the situation one must be able
to see behind the scenes and to have a gift that makes a real
journalist ... a gift that enables him to piece odds and ends
together and make a picture of the real facts of life in a political
structure.


You will recall a recent article in which I said my daughter Mrs.
Carron had reported to me in one of our daily conversations that,
in his speech at the P.L.P. convention, the Prime Minister was
straddling horses for the first time since he got control of the
government nearly seven years ago. He was no longer confident of
himself or of the direction in which his government had taken the
country.
For nearly seven years he had placed great emphasis on the
importance of education. The schools had been given the large'
item in the Appropriations Act.
But now he was saying that they had missed the boat
somewhere because the schools were not producing the kind of
results the economy of the colony needed.
I told him in this column six years ago that this would
happen. Now he recognises the fact ... and there is no way ,for
him to change the course set for education of Bahamian children
because the government has made them believe that, if they get a
certificate from a school, there is a pot of gold waiting for them
all at the end of the rainbow.
Now he is complaining that there are thousands of jobs open to
Bahamians ... but they won't take them. They want something
better. Why not ... wasn't their Moses to lead them into the
Promised Land ... a land flowing with milk and honey and
affording an inexhaustible supply of ripe luscious grapes?

For years he had been telling the people that from where he sat
he could see great things in the future for people in an
independent Bahamas.
The ink had hardly dried on the independence document
before he started confessing that the government had been so
busy preparing for independence that they had neglected
important matters. This is the excuse he is now using to explain
the fact that the economy of the Bahamas is falling apart and the
islands may now face the seven years of famine as recorded in the
Old Testament.

In one of his very able articles Opposition Senator Arthur
Foulkes, an accomplished journalist who received his training on
The Tribune's news desk, tied the whole picture together with a
story on comments picked up in a Senate session by him.
Mr. Foulkes revealed that, in an unguarded moment of
exasperation, Government Senator Wilbert Moss had exploded his
conviction that ... "We will not totally change the face of Grants
Town in this age nor in our time."
Grants Town, therefore, must continue to be a cesspit of
poverty and insanitation that could ... with the polluted
condition in the waters surrounding New Providence ... cause a
terrible epidemic to scourge the island.
In a recent article I revealed plans that the U.B.P. had for
installing an adequate sewerage system in the island. The P.L.P.
failed to carry this plan through. Instead they have frittered away
the nation's money on all kinds of unproductive projects ...
including the fact that, in the process, they have enriched
themselves. And now the economy is too bankrupt for them to
borrow the money needed to safeguard the health of the people
and preserve the interests of the tourist industry.
Now then ... if the P.L.P. cannot lift the Grants Town people
out of the pit ... what was the purpose for these men taking over
control of the country?
Was it for themselves to get richer as they have done; and for
the "grass roots" to get poorer as they have also done?

Mr. Foulkes also recalled a statement made by a member of the
government at the time the Bahamas Airways folded up: "They
were never a part of us!"
And now all these people have in place of the highly efficient
Bahamas Airways ..are Flamingo and Bahamasair!
I will deal with this situation tomorrow when I will discuss the
experience of Mr. Foulkes on a Flamingo flight to Inagua that
failed to land him at his destination.

Mr. Foulkes also recalled a forecast by the Hon. Carlton
Francis, Development Minister, while he was Finance Minister
that ... "agriculture and fisheries may yet be all we have to fall
back on when the investors have given us the boot!"
Why should the investors give the Bahamas the boot?
He should have gone on to explain that this had happened only
because of the stupidity and viciousness of his government.

And then Mr. Foulkes focused attention on the fact that the
newly appointed Government Senator Sidney Carroll had
complained that "Bahamian food merchants are losing their shirts
because they have to sell some items below their original cost!"
Mr. Foulkes commented that "he might have added that the
workers are also losing their shirts and their shoes and their
dignity because they are underpaid or have no jobs at all in this
crippled economy."

Mr. Foulkes capped his story by reporting that when Senator
Mizpah Tertullien "was confronted with the Prime Minister's
admission of failure at the P.L.P. convention her first reaction
was 'that's not true !'"
But "when the printed words of the speech were read to her
she responded: 'That's not what he meant!' "
Whatever he may have meant or not meant ... the facts are
there for any intelligent person to see for himself or for herself
without being told.

Mr. Foulkes described Senator Tertullien as "a gentle soul and
a highly intelligent woman." He excuses her apparent lapse from
intelligence on "a tremendous struggle with deep-rooted and
misguided emotions."


Mr. Foulkes concluded his article with a quotation from Kahlil
Gibran: "If you would be rid of the tyrant you must first destroy
his throne in your heart."
I will go back further still and bring you a warning from
Confucius, the Chinese philosopher whose writings still exercise a
great influence on the Chinese people ... and put a restraint on his
people that ev that even the great Mao of today finds it difficult to
completely erase.
Over 2,500 years ago ... long before the birth of Christ ...
Confucius warned: "An oppressive government is more to be
feared than a tiger." And "the commander of forces of a large
State can be carried off, but the will of even a common man
cannot be taken from him." And, finally ... "study the past if you
would divine the future."
We needn't go back too far in this story. Just reflect on the
events of the past seven years and. even if you are only a half wai
intelligent person, you will be able to read the handwriting on the
wall.
I's that this government "has been weighed in the balarnces
and found wanting."

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
A politician thinks of the next election, a statesman, ol the
next generation: CLARKE


Scots-born Canadian is


remanded in fraud case i


WILLIAM "BILL" Hunter, a
47-year-old Scots-born
Canadian serviceman arrested
late last month on a charge of
fraud had his case adjourned to
December 27 this morning by
Magistrate Emmanuel
Osadebay.
The adjournment took place
in Hunter's absence. Also a
former Flamingo Real Estate
salesman, he has elected
Supreme Court trial.
Hunter was charged
November 14 before the
magistrate with defrauding a
visiting South Carolina real
estate agent, Mr. Charles Sain
Jr.. of $5,250 "by means of
false pretences."
The accusation arose from a
purported land sale deal at
Long Island.
Hunter was arrested at the
Ocean Spray Hotel by
members of the Criminal
Investigation Department on


the charge taking place
between March 6 and April 27
this year. He was represented
in court by attorney James
Thompson.
He was ordered remanded in
custody upon failure to pay a
$6,000 cash bond which was
allowed him with an alternative
bail min the amount of $8,000
with one surety.
Hunter was re ntl m listed in
civil suits filed in November in
the Supreme Court "for the
return of a deposit" paid to
Bay Street realtor Carl Braynen
of Braynen and Knowles Real
Estate Ltd.
The suit also listed real
estate agent Braynen as a
defendant as well as his
business operation.
A date for hearing the
matter in the High Court has
not yet been set.
Representing Sain Jr.. is
attorney David C. Bethel.


PERSONS temporarily out
of work if injured on the job
will be entitled to injury
benefits ranging from $13.50
to $100 weekly, a Bahamas
Information Services statement
said today.
The payments will be made
under the National Insurance
Scheme which the government
proposes to introduce shortly.
Injury benefits will be scaled
according to weekly salary.
Those persons earning up to
$19.99 weekly will be paid an
injury benefit of $13.50: those


earning $20 to $39.99 will be
paid $24; those earning $40 to
$59.99 will be paid $30; those
earning between $60 to $79.99
will be paid $36. those earning
$80 to $99.99 will be paid $45
and those earning $100 or
more will get $100.
The sickness benefits will be
almost identical to the injury
benefits except in the first and
second categories, which will
be slightly lower due to the
existing Workman's
Compensation Act.


MANGO IMPORTS ANSWERS


Nine firms or individuals
have been issued licences to
import mangoes from Haiti,
according to Development
Minister Carlton Francis.
Answering House questions
by Mr. Michael Lightbourn
(Clarence Town), Mr. Francis
listed the names of the nine
and said that the total value of
Haitian mangoes imported in
1972 was $111,148. No figures
were yet available for 1973, he

ST. ANDREW'S
From Page 1
"This is incorrect. The
majority of shareholders do
not approve of the Board's
action. Besides the meeting was
called to elect a Board, not to
decide the Chaplin affair." the
shareholder said.
Mr. Chaplin was fired by the
Board of directors earlier this
year after 19 years as the
school's headmaster. The firing
resulted in dividing the school
into factions.


added.
Licences have been given to
the following: Ronald A.
Albury Ltd.. April 20, 1972:J.
Baptiste. June 16, 1972:
Burrows & Burrows. April 6,
1972: Milo B. Butler & Sons,
March 29, 1972; Dr. Doris
Johnson, April 21, 1972;
Jeffrey Moultrie, August 22,
1972: Louis Pintard. May 17,
1972: Leonard Ross, April 11,
1972 and George Selver, April
27, 1972.

About 15 persons control
over 570 votes in the company.
while about 500 active
shareholders have 700 votes.
To remedy this situation a
letter was read from the Hon.
Godfrey Higgs, one of the
largest shareholders, suggesting
that the Board consider a plan
to allow one vote to each
shareholder regardless of the
number of shares that person
holds. To do this the
company's Articles will have to
be amended.


A Nivada novelty:



Colorama-

The fashion watch


-hg Urtbtm 3


NATIONAL INSURANCE

INJURY BENEFITS









Wednesday, December 12, 1973'


Sglh e Irtbmtt


Some last tips


for Christmas


WE ARK: till on ,.ie
Christmas foods and i0,,"c aer
25 is really just arimu the
next plum pudding no Fhe
kitchen is probably loaded
with delicacies for eating,
giving and entertaining and if it
isn't, here are a few more
Christmas ideas.
Because Boxing Day (a
Wednesday) is a holiday, we
will delve into New Year's
specialities next week. So
before you are even finished
with one holiday, it will be
time to think about the next.
One point to remember. If
you have a desire for
something really different for
Christmas dinner this year and
money is not too much of a
bind ask the local
supermarkets to order it
specially for you.
Although you will have to
dig up your own recipe, a roast


l~t


Ip'


suckling pig complete with
apple in mouth and ring of
cranberries around the neck
makes a very splendid meat
dish for the Christmas table.
Avacados are not usually
considered traditional
Christmas fare but they can be
made into .excellent dips for
those many drop-in guests or
for small planned Christmas
parties. They are also plentiful
at the Potter's Cay Produce
Exchange right now so take
advantage of them.
Fore each of these recipes,
you will need four avacados,
peeled, pitted and mashed.
For the first, add two
tablespoons lime juice, two
teaspoons salt, half a teaspoon
Worcestershire sauce, a dash of
hot sauce, and two crushed
garlic cloves. Blend well.
For the second, add to the
mashed avacado half a cup of


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SIRLOIN TIP

U.S. CHOICE

ROUND STEAK



Chuck Roast

AMERICAN

Spare Ribs


Chicken


sour cream, a package of garlic
salad dressing mix, a
tablespoon of vinegar, one
teaspoon chopped chives, three
cooked and crumbled slices of
bacon. Mix well.
And for the third, add two
tablespoons vinegar, two
teaspoons salt, a dash of
oregano, a quarter cup
chopped green onions. Blend
well with the mushed avocado.
Chill the dips and serve with
raw vegetables and crackers.
If about this time of the
Christmas season, the whole
thing is getting you down, here
is a quick refresher. The recipe
is for one! In the container of a
blender put two scoops of
vanilla ice cream and two
ounces of brandy. Blend
thoroughly and pour into a tall
chilled glass. Serve yourself at
once.
After that, you will be fit to
prepare some hot cinnamon
cider enough for 30 people.
Squeeze three lemons and
three oranges. Reserve the juice
and put the rind in a saucepan
with one and a half quarts
water, a teaspoon cinnamon
and a tablespoon of allspice.
Cover the pan and simmer
for two and a half hours. Strain
the liquid into a large kettle
containing one and a half cups
of sugar.
Add a gallon of sweet cider
and the lemon and orange
juices. lHeat to boiling but do
not let boil. Serve hot.
Here is a recipe for baked
ham and cider. Marinate a
boneless ham in three cups of
cider for eight hours turning it
now and then.
Bake the ham at 300 for two
hours, basting it often with the
cider marinade. Score the top
fat and baste the ham well with
corn syrup. Bake the ham for
another hour and let it cool.
For serving, slice the hamn
thinly leaving about a third
unsliced. Reshape, pressing the


slices together. Put holly sprigs
around it.
Serve the ham with baked
pumpkin (also available at the
Potter's Cay Produce
Exchange). Cut the pumpkin
into serving pieces. Take off
the skin and discard the seeds
and fibres.
In a saucepan, melt half a
cup of butter and add a quarter
cup of brown sugar and a
quarter cup of chopped
preserved ginger. Score the
pumpkin pieces and spread
them with the mixture.
Sprinkle lightly with salt.
Arrange the pieces in half an
inch of water in a baking dish
and bake at 350 degrees
basting frequently with butter
for about two hours, or until
tender.
Tangerines are available at
Christmas time and here is a
recipe for tangerine cookies.
Mix together six tablespoons
sugar, two tablespoons flour
and six ounces of ground
almonds.
Blend with two stiffly
beaten egg whites and the
finely shredded peel of two
tangerines. Drop the mixture in
small bits on a buttered baking
sheet and bake at 350 degrees
for five minutes. Increase the
temperature to 400 and bake
for 10 minutes longer.
Remove the cookies from
the sheet while still warm.
Here is a mince pie with a
difference. Have ready a baked
nine-inch pic shell. Sprinkle
one envelope of unflavoured
gelatine on half a cup of water
in a saucepan.
Place over low heat and stir
until the gelatine has dissolved.
Remove from heat and stir in
a quarter cup of rum and one
and a half cups in mincemeat.
Chill until the mixture
'mounds slightly when dropped
from a spoon. Beat three egg
whites until stiff and fold them
into the pie shell and chill until


Big crowd sees


Baptist choir


FillF FI I'll annual
Christmas concert of the
120-voice United Baptist Choir
drew an overflow crowd at
their Sunday performance at
Transfiguration Baptist
Church.
The concert was attended by
Prime Minister Lynden
Pindling and Mrs Pindling.
The choir is made up of
members from the choirs of 20
or more Baptist choirs of the
Bahamas Baptist Missionary
and Educational Convention.
Selections ranged from the
classical through the familiar to
"Mary's Baby Boy", sung in
lively Bahamian rhythm aided
by maraca, guitar, tambourine
and audience accompaniment.
Soloists were Mr. Chillian


LIBBYS
U


lb. $2.39



lb. 1.95



lb. 1.39


lb. 1.09



lb. 894


Poitier. Mrs Lillyimae Brown,
Miss Pamela Cox, Mrs. Gwen
Hanna. Mr. Philip Dorsett, and
Miss Alice Moncur. Mrs. Ruby
Ann Darling and Mrs. Edith
Mackey sang "Shine, 0 Shine,
Thou Christmas Star" and
"'Mary's Lullaby" was
presented by Miss Patsy Cox,
Mrs Edith Mackey. Mrs.
Miriam Strachan. and Miss
Debra Cox.
Guests, in addition to Prime
Minister and Mrs. Pindling.
included Dr. Doris Johnson,
the lion. and Mrs. Carlton
Francis. Sir Roland and Lady
Symonette. Mr. and Mrs.
Franklyn Wilson, Mrs. Oscar
Johnson. Bishop and Mrs.
Williams Johnson. and the
Rev. and Mrs. Charles Curry.


STORE HOURS:
Mon. Thurs. 8 a.m. 8.30 p.m.
Fri. & Sat. 8 a.m. 10 p.m.
Sun. 7 a.m. 10 a.m.


LIBBYS

sliced peaches 16 ozs.2/99t


Fab Detergent 20ozs. 45t



Lifebuoy Soap 5/99t


SAWYERS Pigeon Peas

LARGE TINS 3/994


Specials for Dec. 13

6 to 16th 1973 d


firm. Garnish the top
more whipped cream
sprinkle with nutmeg.


with
and


Now if Christmas really has
you down, open a can of beer
and pour it into a chilled glass.
As you sip. make a delicious
cheese dip.
In a bowl. combine half a
pound of cottage cheese, a
quarter pound of grated
Cheddar cheese and half a cup
of sweet butter.
Mix well and add two
tablespoons chopped chives, a
tablespoon of the beer you're
drinking, and a tablespoon
finely minced onions, a
teaspoon each of Dijon-style
mustard, caraway seeds, finely
diced sweet pepper, a dash of
paprika.
Pack the spread in a crock
and refrigerate. Serve with
small squares of bread and
more beer. This spread will
keep for about two weeks.


COMMON HEALTH
Caribbean sugar
manufacturers complaining
about rapidly rising costs of
production are to ask their
governments to seek an
increase in the negotiated
price Britain now pays for
sugar imports from the area.
A resolution to this effect
was passed at the annual
general meeting of the West
Indies Sugar Association in
Bridge Town.


mu


kGI'S If

CHRISTMAS SPECIAL
ITEMS


KlIg's WMAky
Jeeksm of P wodI
JedkM of Pl eedly
loaso. of Pkeedy


40 O$.

lift 7 vyrs em
4sy.ars
4 yunr


$4..
$4.M
$2.W
$2.W


RuM
CrelD Drk 7 yrs.4M ad 4.0$3.10
(MeId for fruit cake)
Corewl Dat ad White $2.50
VS.0.P. Brdy ... $6.-
V4.0.P. Dbrdy "l $4.,.
Grents Liquer f" $4.00
Creme do M Mtbe im $5.00
Crome doe le me $5.00
Creme do Coece ", $5.00
Blck Berry BrMdy nh $5.00
Aprkct Bromtdy f'f $5.00
Seogeleo Sogris $1.50


Celtte Gin 0.... $2.50


Ialalke Vfkia t"m $2.00
Spessokeye Veds ... $2.30
RSome f VOedka 'a $6.50


Red Stripe Booeer per case $9.50


PINDER'S FOOD MARKET
I P. O. BOX N467 MONTROSE AVENUE PHONE 24030


U.S. CHOICE
CHUCK ROAST

U.S. CHOICE

T-BONE STEAK


CHRISTMAS SPECIAL
ITEMS
o.m Splrtkh Who $M.
Itrowhry Smtek n $1.0


Strowboy Swbw
CdM DNok
Spwrtm WoinDeal
Pomed (twre)
TS ri S lUW
-q ra


pl P Win..
Cherry Wbe
aRobRby

Cron do b I
Apriet Roody Pt.
Blookbbry Broody Pt
Bo|efust Took WIe
Orft Mlorwe Llq
Alvor Crm Shry
Alveer Mee Dry
Alvew Vwy Paol r


fo $1.00


Soc. $2.00.
$5."








av $1.50
.... $1.50
$1.50
aPt. $2.25
$2.25


or $3.50
$3.00
S M$.M0


's




















46


Boa & 4iez Tl.M Codloes (wssrted) 50'

Southern Wholesale Bar
POINCIANNA AVE. & THIRD STREET COCONUT GROVE,
PHONE 35716, P.O.BOX 2015
IL.S. gmiu P OF tI~


SPECIALS FOR DEC. 13 to 16, 1973
SUNDAY MORNING OPEN 8. a.m. to 10 a.m.



a gof&


lb.$1.19



lb. $2.59


U.S. CHOICE

SIRLOIN TIP ROAST lb. $2.29


FRESH

CHICKENS

FRESH HAMBURGER

SPARE RIBS

Fresh MUTTON


CHEER DETERGENT

IVORY LIQUID

SCOTTTOWELS


SUNSHINE
SUGAR 5LB
CARNATION MILK
TOILET TISSUE 1.


HAND TOWELS
CONDENSED

SWEET MILK


J


lb. 95t

lb. $1.19

lb. 99t

1b. $1.25


GIANT 85t

(GIANT) 75t

(DOUBLE) 80t


2 FOR $1.20


14 OZS.
2 FOR 691

2 FOR 69t


SMEDLEY'S

NEW POTATOES19 ozs.45t

CAPT. CRUNCH


PEANUT BUTTER

CEREAL 11ozs.


*SPECIALs

OVALTIN
264 DIAL

0 PACK 1.39 SOAP

UMBO 644 FAMILY FARE

BLEACH


294


GLASS Cl


75t


E soz. 714


BATH SIZE 34$



QT. 35$

LEANER 14o. 494


FREE GIFT TO CUSTOMERS



Rodgers Food Store
JEROME AVE. PYFROM ADDITION
PHONE 56616


'. ol, $6.00
,- $4.00

,o. $2.00


U
U


STOKELY'S

KEFSUP 20 Z.

GREEN GIANT

SWEET PEAS

SUCCESS RICE


I


As@te har (Li wlae)


-er Cram
kruewv Crom







Wednesday, December 12, 1973


- m IL O gRI ii ^ *1j'in S


FROM OIJ6-4 GROCE RV


Jgv Mribmw










I"


SWIFT BUTTERBALL
TURKEYS
18-22LBS. $1.3!


SWIFT BUTTERBALL V .
TURKEYS 7-14 LB. $135 LB.
II


HORMEL REG. HAMS
SWIFT REG. HAMS
JONES DAIRY REG. HAMS
U.S. PORK CHOPS


lb.
lb.
lb.


Ib


$1.43
$1.43
$1.45


1.35


U.S. PORK LEGS


TULIP MINI SPARE RIBS

U.S. CHOICE CHUCK ROAST


FRESH GROUND BEEF


lb.

lb.

lb.

lb.


$1.35


890


$1.19

$110


SPECIALS FROM DEC. 13TH TO DEC.31ST, 1973
OPEN SUNDAY MORNING DEC.23rd,1973
1_ a^= 0~SW^


HELLMANNS MAYONNAISE
CRISCO SHORTENING


tVI. $1.39
3 b. tin $1.49


JOY LIQUID
MAXWELL HOUSE INSTANT COFFEE
ALPO BEEF CHUNKS
V-8 VEGETABLE JUICE


King 1.10
lOoz. 2.49
45
48oz 79t


1 00
I h' '
[ A^Lj


LESUEUR
EARLY PEAS 17ozs. 48C
SAWYER'S PIGEON PEAS
20 ozs. 36c


GREEN GIANT
ASPARAGUS


15ozs. 95c


1 > ,, ,,


_ VMS


LIB "


i


iw


go*


di.


chpisliffas






Wednesday. December~ 1.97Wh rbn


U S. C h i c
-HC RATh 2


U.S. CHOICE
CHUCK STEAK
U.S. CHOICE
RIB STEAK
U.S. CHOICE
DELMONICO STEAK


Parlb $1.39
Per lb $2.09
Parlb $2.59


BIRDSEYE GREEN PEAS
BIRDSEYE
WHOLE OKRA
MRS. SMITH APPLE PIES
HATCHET BAY
ICE CREAM


AXION PRESOAK
MODESS SUPER
KRAFT STRAWBERRY
PRESERVES
REALEMON JUICE
HEINZ
SWEET GHERKINS
LIBBYS
FRUIT COCKTAIL


12-oz 890
6.75oz 790
10-oz 2/694
1o.zo 2/990


26-oz


$1.29


25-OZ 890
12's 590
io-oz 2/990


32-Oz
16-OZ


89C
750


16-OZ 2/99N


CLIMAX SHELLED NUTS
CELLO BAGS



^^- -- -^ ---


o t


PTS ,,,.
2/99^^^^^^^^^ ^


oQs 69


DIRYDEIGHTS


SUNNY DELIGHT
ORANGE PUNCH
BLUE BONNET
SOFT MARGARINE
FAMILY FARE SLICED
AMERICAN CHEESE
HATCHET BAY
EGGSLarge


SPECIALS FOR THE WEEK DECEMBER 13th, THROUGH DECEMBER 16th, 1973 S R A


64-oz


1-4b


$1.9I


59(
so
lot


Dozen


qL


MOM


FAMILY


^^^HO~fLLYWOO
D^IETCOLA
^^^^^^^6-P^^c ^

99TTi^


I mop


MORTIMER'S SPIE( IALS
7ROAST 77
P p
Ol
EANUTS IR
YARD OF
POP-CORN 64 0000
0JA


FAY LACI 11"WER
SERVIETTESDI I(),.
L T- V F
TABLE Covers3',

BUY ONE GET ONE FREE


Wednesday, December 12 1973


FRO OU GRCER SHLVE


1^ FRZNFO OD TREATS


I


I


4


0


....j ro+J+


.

UPh arthmu=





N


Wednesday, December 12, 1973


Dance to boost Junkanoo fund


TO HELP create that
Junkanoo atmosphere that is
prevalent at the Christmas
season, the Masquerade
Committee has planned an
evening of music and dance
tonight at the King and
Knights Club on West Bay
Street. All Junkanoo
enthusiasts are invited.
Doors open at nine o'clock


and close only when the last
person "calls it quits." The
exciting King Eric (-ric
Gibson) and his Knights will be
on hand throughout the
evening to provide music for
dancing.
For t h e mall
contribution of two dollars, at
the door. one can be a part of
this gala fund-raising affair that


will ensure that the Junkanoo
parades on Boxing Day (Dec
2o) and New Year's Day (J an.
1 are successful.
I he object of this event, said
MiI dwin Davis. Chairman ot
the Masquerade Committee "is
to help raise sufficient money\
io giv n more realistic cash
pri/cs this year."
Other donations may he sent


TONIGHT IS THE NIGHT FOR


ROMANCE WITH THE BOTTLED

ROMANCE OF MEXICO.. .


TEQUILA SAUZA


to the Palmdale branch of the
Royal Bank of Canada or the
treasurer, Masquerade
Committee, P. 0. Box 5833,
Nassau.
SAILING CLUB
PARTY
FIlE MANGROVE Cay
sailing Club will hold a
Christmas party Friday
December 21 at 2 p.m. at Cool
Bree/e Club, Victoria Point. 1
All members, especially
those from South Andros
Sailing Club are being invited
to attend.
CRIPPLED CHILDREN'S
COMMITTEE DONATIONS
Proceeds from ILssence Magazine
,nl I astern Airlines fashion Show
3o1().100: Mr. & Mrs. Rudy Malone,
\ha.o 520.00: Maria Antonietta
Vc/zani $10.00; Mr. & Mrs. John S.
' \dd le $25.00; Women's
D)piartment, New Providence
District Convention, Bahamas
Baptist Union $50: Princess Beauty
Silon $25.00; Bank of London &
\,ntreal ILtd. $300.00; Allan J.
\% inner $25.00; Anonymous
$2S.00; Mr. & Mrs. James Wong
$10.O0: Anonymous $20; C. C.
Adais S 15.00; George & Katherine
McMahon $25.00; Bahamas
international Trust Co. Ltd.
(Second D)onation) $175.00:
Anonymous $1,350.00

$lOmillion
ransom
BUENOS AIRES A ten
in illion-dollar ransom
demanded by guerrillas for the
release of an American oil
executive and a terrorist attack
against the car of a leftist
union leader were the latest
events in the wave of violence
affecting this country.
The local newspaper El
Mundo reported Tuesday that
the People's Revolutionary
Army (ERP), a leftist guerrilla
organization, had demanded a
record $10 million ransom for
t he release of Victor
Samuelson, American manager
of one of the largest oil
refineries operated by Esso SA,
local subsidiary of the standard
oil company of New Jersey.
Samuelson, 36, was
kidnapped on Dec. 6 at
Campana, some 120 miles
north, while he was having
lunch with friends at a club
owned by Esso, nearby its oil
refinery there.

Carrier blazes
THE NAVY says six men
were killed and 38 injured in
a fire in an engine room of
the aircraft carrier Kitty
Hawk.
A Navy spokesman in San
Diego, California said the
hour-long fire broke out as
the carrier steamed toward
Subic Bay in the Philippines.


IVORY LIQUID


GIANT SIZE


FRANCO AMERICAN SPAGHEtI
& MEAT BALLS 15 OZS. CAN


GREEN GIANT

CORN NIBLES 12oz

KLEENEX
DINNER NAPKINS


89W APPLE TURNOVERS


57t


2 CANS
FOR 75


43t


UIACKER JA(KS 6PKGS FOR 79t


PURINA WUC(K WAGON
INSTANT DINNER DOG FOOD 5 LB.


GRAPE FRUff


BAG. $1.99


5 LB. BAG. $1.09


per PACK


84t


U.S. CHOICE B yIM

ROUND ROAST $1.99 lb.

U.S. CHOICE SIRIIN TIP ROAST

$2.09 lb.


U.S. CHOICE


SRIAIN fTEAK

$2.19 lb


U.S. CHOICE
TOP ROUND STEAK $1.99 lb.


OPEN TILL 9.00 P.M.
EVFRV NITE TILL CHRISTMAS


SCREWDRIVER
SAUZA


1 oz. TEQU'!LA SAUZA
orange juice.
Put ice cubes in 6 oz. glass add
Tequila S uza. fill 1 :,
orange juice and stir.


Centreville Food Market
6th Terrace East Phone 58106 P. 0. Box 5714
STORE HOURS Monday through Saturday till Christmas 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Sunday 8 a.m. 10 a.m.

SPECIALS FOR DECEMBER 13th through 16th

Blue C GIANT SIZE 99t REDDELICIOUSAPPESBAG: $1.29

PEPPERAGE FARM


G c 0. -










[ rl nf- i
Dt At
vtKQI
CHO *~
ROA mm &6.a.1IrL
148414"~


TRY THIS RECIPE TONIGHT.


a Wgi wvtu4_-


WWALJLL.VL.1 slw i I iL..%11 1'a vr-~


aho mr4ittM






Wednesday, December 12, 1973


9


iII


'I


NATIVE PORKLB $1.19I
IATIVE PORK LEGi
LB. $1.291 .
CHICKEN BREAST I S.


990


GLADSTONE FARMS
BREASTS
GLADSTONE FARMS
THIGHS


R$
$


LB .99 I
I
LB .99 *


- SPECIALS FOR WEEK ENDING DEC 13 16 FOR YOURSHOPPINGCON
QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED MONDAY THROUGH THURSI
-m Q .. ... .. FRIDAY & SATURDAY 8:30
'Buy QUALITY Meats and SAVE'


CHOICE
OLDER
IAST
j165 LB.


U.S. CHOICE
SHOULDER
STEAK


D.nL. ,,- U R I UTOE HOURS ARE:
DAY 8:30 A.M. 7:00 P.M.
A.M. 9:00 P.M., SUNDAY 7:00 10:00 A.M.
wmwm ,m


, , MAPLE LEAFI


MAPLE LEAF
BROLOaNA


U.S. CHOICE MAPLE LEAF
SIRLOIN STEAK I WIENERS 1 lb. PKG.
SDAISYCHEESELB.
HORMEL BLACK LABEL
S BACON 1 LB. PKG.
RlATH BACON 1 LB. PKG
FRES AVAILABLE
MUTTON 1 9 GEESE DU


LB. SALT MACKI
.."ISALT COD
CU AVAILABLE
ICROWH RIBS
%;i .0I


LB. .89


1.29


.99


1.69
$1.65


ICKS


ROAST


WALDOLF RED BIRD 4oz.
,,^ BATHROOM TISSUE 4PK. -69 VNA
** BATHROOM TISSUE 2PK 5 3 MOTT'S
BAYGON SPRY 2 ,99 APPLE JUICE Q 8
LER I BAYGON SPR 22 oz. N AMURI LONG GRAIN
AN TL LISTERINE 1.$CONVERTED RICE 5b. $2.1
ANTISEPTIC 14oz. $1.59
SMc. VITTIE'S CORN NIBLETS 12oz. 2/7
BISCU ITS MIXOR MATCH 3/99C LIBBY'S
S OLIVANO PINEAPPLE JUICE 46z. 71
COOKING OIL LIQUID DETERGENT $1.
SY'HETTI & MARCAL 150 CT. AST. COLOURS
B SPAGHETTI &
MEATBALLS 16oz. 2/$1.00 JUMBO TOWELS 2/99
OVALTINE 16oz. $1.25 MARCAL FACIAL ASSTD.200 CT.
SSAWYER'S
LIBY' LIMA BEANS 303 3/99.9 FACIAL TISSUE 2/99
T 1% 1 MAXWELL 2 lb. ANY GRIND MARCAL
B HOUSE COFFEE $2.59 1A6I0 2/
N IN 2 9 160 CT. 2/9
I EATWELL 6oz. 2/9 PINESOL 26oz. $1.3

l -',v I GOLDEN ISLES
GMilk 1/2 GAL 950 Quality Market
KERRYGOLD 1/2 LB.
^ ^ li "GA.- 3;? lICE CREAM $ 5
Butter 3for 99 1

BIRDSEYE J 954 BIRDSEYE 10oz.
12oz range uie FRENCH STYLE Green Beans 4


Walnut, Pecans AVAILABLE Lettuce EACH 594
I I AVAREG. WH.
Chestnuts AVAILABLE Pftattm 51 QQ


gI


39


MI


N11


"UMICE C [y4T


t


9MA


99
94 -HS

94

19


(Iht firtbunt


;L


. 4 -


t


a ID.


.ie


ERAL


II67


T


a -j



/


......... v


A Iqqw los VON%,,.










Wit $rthittit


Wn~a Deo o 1217


/- $21,514 FOR

MENTALLY

RETARDED
THIS YEAR'S raffle held in
aid of the Bahamas Association
for the Mentally Retarded
raised a total of 521,514, Mrs.
Eugene Dupuch, committee
chairman, announced.
Mrs. Dupuch said this was
"far and away the largest
amount ever raised by the
annual raffle for the retarded,
beating last year's record total
of $17,000 by over 20 per
cent."
The committee was able to
achieve this record total
despite the had weather
'experience in October during
,,storm Gilda.
Typical of the unselfish
.,efforts of the volunteer sellers
'was Mrs. Jennie Mackey who
was responsible for the sale or
-distribution of over 6,000
tickets, Mrs. Dupuch said.
Freeport and the Family
..Islands also contributed to this
national effort.


^Deat-A66



By Abigail Van Buren
C 1M9 Iy Caias Tribue-N. Y. News S1mt.. tc.
DEAR ABBY: I am planning my wedding, and a prob-
lem has arisen. My fiance's best man is a native Scotsman,
who proudly wears his kilt on all formal occasions.
Ours will be a formal wedding in a church, and we
have been told that it would be an insult to the best man
were we to ask him not to wear his kilt, but to dress like
the other men in the wedding party.
Some of your inquiries are so outlandish one sometimes
wonders if they are sincere, but be assured mine is a
serious inquiry. Thank you. BRIDE TO BE
DEAR BRIDE: In Scotland the wearing of a kilt is a
matter of pride, but Robert Burns, one of Scotland's great-
est sons 1who probably rarely if ever wore a kilt], wrote in
his poem about this very topic:
"A wad some Power the giftie gie as
To see oursel's as others see us.
It wad frae monle a blunder free us,
An' foolish notion;


What airs in dress an'


gait wad leg' us


Arrived today: Joma from
Jacksonville: Staniel Cay
Express from Bimini Air
Swift Marcella from Eileuthera
Sailed today: Madame
Eh/abeth for Andros: Deborah
K for Abaco; Windward Trader
for Acklins and Crooked Island
Sailing Tomorrow: Bahama
Star, Flavia, Emerald Seas for
Freeport.
TIDES
iligh 10:07 a m. and 10:36
p. m.
Low 3:39 a.m. and 4:24
p. i.
WEATHER
Wind: North-easterly 12 to
21 m.p.h.
Weather: Mostly fair
Sea: Moderate, locally rough
Temp: Min. tonight 60
Max tomorrow 73


Will a suit suit


a proud Scotsman?
An' ev'n devotion."
So, if you feel that a kilt would be out of kilter with
your wedding, ask the best man to wear a suit. And if he's
a well-bred Scotsman, it will suit him.

DEAR ABBY: I am the mother of three children, 6, 9
and 10. I am divorced from their father, and the children
live with me. I am now married to a man who loves my
children, and they love him.
This is the first Christmas that I will be married to this
husband. I want to know if you think I ought to buy Christ-
mas presents for my "ex" from the children-and put their
names on the cards?
So far none of the children have mentioned buying
anything for him. If I go ahead and do it on my own, he
might think I care for him, which I do not. Also, when we
were married, he hardly looked at them. And even now, he
doesn't see them as much as the law allows.
So what should I do? EX WIFE
DEAR EX: Children can be thoughtless, so ask them if
they want to remember their father at Christmas. If they
want to, cooperate. Otherwise, don't go thru the phony bit
of doing it for them.
DEAR ABBY: We have a heated double garage. We
use one space and our married son who lives near us keeps
his second car in the other one. He also uses it when he has
something to fix. He pays us nothing.
We are in our middle seventies. My husband has had a
stroke and has trouble getting around. Also, he has arthritis
in his hands and can't do any of the repairs around the
house.
Our son has never lifted a finger to help us. I couldn't
even ask him to fix a leaky faucet. I would like for him to
get his car out of our garage so we can rent it out and use
the money to get things done around here.
My husband says I shouldn't mention it as it would only
make trouble. Am I right or wrong? OLD FOLKS
DEAR FOLKS: You are right. You owe your son no
explanations. Just tell him you want to rent out your ga-
rage because you need the extra income, so he shouldn't
count on using it anymore. Period.
CONFIDENTIAL TO "BITTER IN HAGERSTOWN,
MD.": Why not listen to the other side of the story? The old
French saying "To understand everything is to forgive
everything" loses nothing in the translation.
For Abby's booklet, "How to Have a Lovely Weddnlag,"
send $1 to Abigail Van Buren, 132 Lasky Dr., Beverly Hils,
Cal. N112.
Hate to write letters? Send $1 to Abigaila Vas Buem
132 Lasky Dr., Beverly Hills. Cal. 90212 for Abby's booklet
"How to Write Letters for All Occasdons."
Problems? You'll feel better if you get it off your chest.
Per a personal reply, write to ABBY: Box No. g160, L.A.,
Calif. 3M0O. Enclose stamped, self-addressed envelope,

SUN


Rises 6:45 a.m.
Sets 5 22 p.m.
MOON
Rises 9:36 a.m.
Sets 9:57 p.m.
GUIDES CAROL SERVICE
THE BAHAMAS Girl Guides
Association will hold their
annual ('hristmas carol service
in the Botanr.ical Gardens on
Sunday. December 16 at 4
p.m. [he service is open to the
public.


i^ aYes. At Dolly Madison Furniture, you'll
I':'. l find something for everyone. For the
finest in furniture and giftware, put your
Rs family first and shop at Dolly Madison. -

Five piece Bedrooms from $330.00
Seven piece Dining Rooms from $695.00
N China Animals from $3.95 V
.00 China Center pieces from $18.00
Velvet Throw Cushions $7.50
Italian Glass Vases $11.25
Large Leatherette Bean Bag Chairs $59.00
48 x 95 Single Drapes $22.00 ,
Hanging Swag Lamps from $21.00
Little Bedroom Lamps $6.50 1 i]
China Livingroom Lamps from $14.00
S11 Bottle Wine Rack $18.50 ORIGINAL
Hanging Musical Santa $10.00 OIL
Christmas Door Wreaths from $7.50 PAINTINGS
rS" Mushroom Chairs (small) $35.00 FROM
ONES Quilted Bed Spreads (single) $25.00 $40.00


^ ^ > t"3^ A ^


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what's more, the food tastes better . .
is better . when it's cooked in the
Amana Radarange Microwave Oven.
Amana microwave cooking
means no more hot kitchen. No more


impatience over thawing frozen foods.
Easy after-dinner clean-ups. And no
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Cooking in the Amana Radarange
Microwave Oven is truly the cooking
of the future. Yours today. Why wait?


V M O VENby ?4aYVlO



Taylor Industries Ltd.


P. 0O. BOX N4806


TEL. 28941-5


25 years ago...


An Air Canada


North Star landed in Nassau


inaugurate the first and only non-stop service with

Canada. Flight frequency was once-a-week and the

North Star was capable of carrying 40 passengers.


Today...


Although many things have changed in our world, Air

Canada still operates the only non-stop service

between Nassau and Canada. Only now, we have eight

flights a week.


Air Canada salutes this anniversary with the earnest

wish that our friendly relationship with Nassau

continues to flourish.


Al R CANADA


QUEEN'S COLLEGE
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

Applications are invited from qualified teachers
for appointment in January 1974 to the post of
Assistant Teacher for english and French.

The appointment will carry approximately equal
timetable arrangements in both subjects.
Engagement in accordance with existing salary
and conditions of employment at Queen's
College.

Interested persons are asked to telephone
3-1666 or 3-2153, but firm applications must be
in writing supported by the names and addresses
of two persons to whom reference can by made
and should be sent to the Principal, Queen's
College. 1P.0. Box NI 27. Nassau to arrive before
the 20th. l)December 1-73.


BIMINI
DIRECT TO NORTH BIMINI BY GRUMMAN (;OOSI AMPHIBIAN
MONDAY WEDNESDAY FRIDAY
LEAVE NASSAU 8:30 A.M.
ARRIVE BiMINI (NORTH) 9:20 A.M.
LEAVE BIMINI (NORTH) Q:35 A.M..
ARRIVE NASSAU 10:30 A.M.



Bahamasafr
Knows the Bahamas Best.
For reservations call Nassau 7-8511, Freeport 352-8341.


I Af W- 7 T 7 =" 7 '. -'-; = 2 :a -' 7 '' v v -'= --' '-.'V ''- '- 6 T" . . "= .. . '' - .. .


Wednesday December 3





~Jbt ~Irtbunt


West is best, says T.C. after visit to Israel


IN NASSAU we read about the 4th Arab-Israeli war in the
newspapers and watch its progress on T.V. For us it's something
very much afar and not really connected with our lives except


TABLES & CHAIR SETS
9* GUN & HOLSTER SETS J
Large assortment of
BATTERY OPERATED TOYS





NERAL HARDWARE


when puportedly the Arab
embargo on oil almost doubles
the price of our cooking gas.
There is one Bahamian T.
C. (Thomas Carlton)
Symonette -- however, for
whom it is far from distant.
T.C., Manager-Designate of
the National Workers
Co-operative Society in the
Bahamas and Food and
Beverage Cashier at the British
Colonial Hotel left Nassau on
August 10 for Israel and
literally walked straight into
the war.
Before relating T.C.'s
experiences it would be in
proper chronological order first
to briefly outline the purpose
of his visit. Suffice, for the
immediate present, to say that
when I talked to T.C. on last
Tuesday the day after he
arrived home, he was very
much alive.
The idea of the National
Workers Co-operative Society
materialised about seven- or
eight months ago among the
hotel workers' union, T.C. told
me.
Why the hotel workers?
"We think that this is the
best way for the union to help
the membership (to combat
the cost of living)".
T.C. was selected as the
member to go away to learn all
the ins and outs of co-operative
operations.
We were "seeking the best
co-op school we could possibly
find", T.C. said, and came up
with the Afro-Asian Institute
in Tel-Aviv which provides an
educationally high standard in
a joint study in labour and
co-operation.
T.C. was living in a kibbutz
about four kilometres (three
miles or there about) from the
Lebanese border.
The next morning after war
broke out T.C.'s kibbutz was
evacuated and they were taken
back to Tel-Aviv.
"The day after we left th,'


I 0OWNi.an AROUND I


THOMAS CARLTVN
("T.C.") Symonette, after his
return home from Israel.

kibbutz they bombed it", said
T.C.
"The war was really a
surprise even to Israel". "It was
a helluva experience ...In
Tel-Aviv it was just as
frightening". T.C. said.
Mr. T.C. Symonette was
spilling over with the impact of
so many experiences during his
almost four months in Israel.
"It would take a normal day's
time to relate all my
experiences", he said.
From the war we progressed
to the topic of the people of
Israel and their society.
"To me the people of Israel
are real", T.C. told me and
added the further adjectives of
"friendly" and "kind" to
describe his hosts.
"I met the President", he
told me proudly.
lie spoke admiringly of a
society where each individual,
no matter what his job, is
treated with the same respect,
"I think Israel is a developinL
country where people live in


such a form where everybody
lives equally". The garbage
collector is not lower down on
the totem pole than say the
doctor. In fact, it appears that
there is no totem pole in Israel.
"Whatever your job (there) it is
important", said T.C.
Hle compared Israeli society
favourably against the
communist system and
implicitly against the
traditional capitalistic forms of
democracy in the West. "They
are making socialism work in a
democratic form in Israel", he
said.
T-C. used the kibbutz as an
example of what he was
describing.
The kibbutz, he explained, is
a collective village with a
co-operative system. However,
he emphasised, it is an open
system. There is no element of
compulsion in the Israeli
systems as in the communist.
You can enter a kibbutz and
stay a year without being a
mern ber.
They treat non-Jews the
same as they treat themselves,
T.C. continued. In Israel, he
says, they have a large Arab
population.
"The Arabs are treated
equally (with the Jews). There
are elected members (Arabs) in
government."
The Arabs are provided with
the same type of schools (as
the Jews). They have their own
co-operative villages. "In other
words they (the Arabs)
participate in everything
equally (with the Jews) only
the Arabs still practise their
own culture their own
dancing, folklore they're free
to do it".
Mpr. Symonette visited the
occupied territories (taken
from the Arabs in the '67 six
day war). Although they are
occupied territories they are
still under Jordanian or Arab
law, he explained. If a Jew
enters the occupied territory
and commits an offence against
their law, he is brought before
a Jordanian judge and
prosecuted according to
Jordanian law.
In fact, T.C. told me, one of
the Arab leaders told him that
they were better off now than
pre '67 that they prefer being
under Israeli rule because their
standard of living has thereby
been considerably raised.
I asked T.C. to sum up his
impression of the Israeli
character and personality.
"The Jews are an intelligent,
hard -working group of people
in other words they have a
lot of pride in what they're
doing ... this is what pushes
then ", concluded T.C.
1, then, asked T.C., if there
were any lessons we in the
Bahamas could learn from
Israel.
There were many he said,
but there were two main ones.
"One thing, I can assure
you, we can learn from
Israel...l was in Israel almost
four months and I didn't see
one man 'staggered'
although they (Israel)
manufacture alcoholic
beverages". T.C., among his
many activities crowded into
these less than four months,
visited a wine factory.
The second lesson was one
of co-operation.
"When we (in the Bahamas)


%. :. *^ l

PRISCILLA ROLLINS, one
of the big names, to be
featured in the Bahamas
School of the Theatre's
production of "Black Magic"
December 20.


speak of co-operation we have
a problem ... We're trying to
get a co-op off the ground ...
although are people have to be
taught much about
co-operation if we see how the
system works it shouldn't be a
struggle. It is always known
that two people can always lift
a road more easily than one".
But T.C. emphasised the
necessary element of trust.
'We have to learn to trust
each other", he said. "Until
that day we will have a
struggle".
And, yet to sum up the
whole of his experiences, T.C.
concludes that home is best.
Although, he says that in
Israel, "I was welcomed as a
brother" T.C. compares the
Bahamians' warmth,
friendleness and hospitality
favourably with the Jews'. In
connection with the
Bahamians' attitude to
expatriates T.C. claims that the
"foreign haters are in a
minority."
As in Voltaire's famous
novel when the weary travellers
return and reach the
conclusion that "Happiness lies
in cultivating your own
back-yard" T.C. concludes:
"I learnt to appreciate what
we have here. Although there
may be biblical significance in
Israel I do think we have a
pretty good country in
comparison'".
Of cause, love for country, is
very much an indefinable
thing.
T.C., however, gave some


concrete examples to show
that home is best.
One, the climate here is
better.
Two, the food is far
superior. In Israel, T.C. said, he
ate the same thing for
breakfast, lunch and dinner,
wherever he was.
And thirdly, culture T.C.
says that we in the West have a
completely different culture.
West is best, says T.C.

BAHAMIAN AUDIENCES
will be exposed to half a
century of Black and Bahamian
culture this Christmas season
when Shirley Hall Bass's
Bahamas School of the Theatre
present "Black Magic" at Le
Cabaret Theatre on December
20 and a matinee at
Government High School on
Dec. 29.

SANTA'S HELPERS, r
group of young concerned
Bahamian men and womed
under the Presidency of Mig
Margaret Guillaume, as
hosting a party on Frida y
December 14 for 150 need$
children who would otherwiE
not be paid a visit by Santa. :
Margaret said that thee
appeal for used but usable toy*
has resulted in a tremendoag
response from the public. 2
Among the numeroig
contributors are Maura's whC
have donated 15 boxes of toya
the pharmacies, Stop'N Shop
and Bahamas Paper Companye
Another good piece of newIt
is that the children's party i'
now to be held in Paradise. Mr:
Jack Gallaway, general
manager of Lowe's ParadisA
Island Hotel and Villas, hag
offered the facilities of hi-
luxury hotel, and Mr. DeWitC
Duncanson, the food anC
beverage manager, is going to"
supply all the eats and drinks,
The number of children*
being "treated" has expanded:
to 150 (100 was the original
aim). So that the children who
are being hosted and visited by*
Santa are really those most in.'
need. The committee of Santa's
Helpers have been provided;
with lists of names from Nursev
PersI Rodgers of the Red X,1
Miss Corolyn Hanna, the.
Ministry of Education's Officer
in charge of School Welfare,
Miss Leila Mitchell of the Child
Care Department, and one of
the committee members, Miss
Valderene Turnquest, Head
Teacher of T. A. Thompson

Page 12 Col. I


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THE GEl


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Wednesday, December 12, 1973


Kf, -.9 1 k S ,


i lln ( R....


I











Obe U-ribtubtn


Wednesday, December 12, 1973


U-


From Page 11
Primary School.
One of the speediest
responses came from young
Timothy Newbold, a pupil at
Mrs. Sylvia Munro's School.
Santa's Helpers have had
letters of appeal printed. One
of these was sent to Mrs.
Munro who in turn sent letters
home to the parents of her
pupils. However, Timothy beat
the letter to its destination. Hlie
told his aunt before she
received word from Mrs.


Munro and brought his present
to school to show his
classmates thus providing
them with further
encouragement.
However, hurry if you want
to help this worthwhile
seasonal charity. Friday is the
deadline the day of the
party. More toys are needed
for 7-8 year old girls dolls,
play ironing boards and such
like. The committee is being
aided by the Government High
School Key Club to whom
Tino Christofilis, a member of


RENAISSANCE SINGERS

IN CONCERTS
THE NASSAU RENAISSANCE SI \( RS.under the direction
of Mr. Clement Bethel. will present their annual Christmas music
concerts on Monday and Tuesday, December 17 and 18 in the
ballroom of Government House at 8:30 p.m.
The concerts are under the patronage of the Governor General
, and Lady Butler.
The programme will include traditional and contemporary
carols as well as works for small instrumental ensembles. Tickets
may be reserved by telephoning 4-2044.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that EDWARD MONTAGUE LEE
of McCollough Corner, N.P. is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration should not be granted
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 12th day of December
1973 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau.




NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that HUBERT GEORGE MELLIS
of South Beach (East) is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person wi."
knows any reason why registration should not be granted
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 5th day of December
1973 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. O. Box N7147, Nassau.




NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ARCHIBALD NATHANIEL
COX of Freeport, Grand Bahama is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration
as a citizen of The Bahamas and that any person who
knows any reason why registration should not be granted
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 5th day of December
1973 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau.




NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FRANKLIN ROBERTS of
King Street, N.P. Bahamas is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalisation as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalisation should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 12th day of
December 1973 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau.



NOTICE


NOTICE is hereby given that LESLIE JOSEPH QUANT of
(Turks Island) Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 12th day of
December 1973 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau.
:= II III I I III


NOTICE


NOTICE is hereby given that ALCY JOHN MACK of
Whites Addition, Nassau, Bahamas is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalisation as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalisation should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 5th day of
December 1973 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau.


NOTICE


NOTICE is hereby given that JOHN JOSEPH of Carmichael
Road, N.P. is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for naturalisation as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why naturalisation should not be granted should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 5th day of December 1973 to
The Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.
O. Box N7147, Nassau.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CARL BALLOT PIERRE of
Lyon Road in the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why naturalisation should not be granted should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 12th day of December 1973 to
The Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.


the committee, is staff advisor.
Your used and usable toys
may be sent to T. A.
Thompson Primary School
(formerly Western Senior) on
Blue Hill Road just south of
Government House grounds
between 4 p.m. and 8 p.m. or
you can have them picked up
by telephoning 22635.
No toys? Then your cash
donation can be deposited at
the Oakes Field branch of
Barclays Bank.

THE ALPHA-KAPPA-
-ALPHA SORORITY are
hosting a Dinner Dance on
Friday, December 21 at the
Balmoral Beach Hotel.
Cocktails will be served front
8 p.m. with dinner at 9 p.m.
Dress is lounge suit.
This event will be held under
the patronage of the
Ambassador of the United
States. Mr. Ronald I. Spiers
and Mrs. Spiers.
Members of the


A THANKSGIVING DINNER given last year to the children of the Children's
Emergency Hostel by the members of the Alpha-Kappa-Alpha Sorority who are hosting a
dinner dance this year on Friday, December 21 at the Balmoral Beach Hotel. Photo:
Philip Symonette.


Alpha-Kappa-Alpha Sorority in
Nassau are: Paula Bain,


;Gwendolyn Godet, Thelma
McMillan. Joan Vanderpool,


I
1 1

ii


YOUNG TIMOTHY NEWBOLD proudly displays his gift for a needy child this
Christmas to his classmates at Munro Kindergarten School. ` S. ia Munro is seen at
rear right and Miss Margaret Guillaume, President of Sant.' t!ppers, is shown right
foreground with her hands on Timothy's shoulders.


THE CAPELLA DA CAMERA ENSEMBLE will be appearing in concert this weekend
at the Lutheran Church, J.F. Kennedy Drive.


Two chamber music concerts


at Lutheran Church


THE CAP ELLA DA
CAMERA I \SI \Mlil is to
perform two concerts in
Nassau Saturday and Sunday at
the Lutheran Church, J. F.
Kennedy Drive
The concerts will begin at
8 30 p.m. under the
sponsorship of the Bahamas
Music Society.
The Capella da Camera
Ensemble are members of the
faculty of Andrews University.
Berrien Springs. Michigan. The
ensemble was founded by
Professors LeRoy Peterson and
l.lIn,-.l'rg'en Holman.
Born in Canada, violinist
LeRoN Peterson began his
musical studies in the Far Last.
After his debut recital at 14. he
left for Europe. the Orient.
Canada, and Bermuda with
appearances on radio and
television.
Hie received his Master's
Degree and Artist's diploma
from the Peabody
Conservatory in Baltimore.
Maryland.
In addition to being the

recipient of several awards and
prizes for distinguished
performances. Mr. Peterson has
also recorded several albums.
He has performed as soloist
with such orchestras; ,; the
National Symphony Orchestra
in Washington D.C. at age 16;
the Baltimore Symphony,
Peabosh i(rchesTra. Singapore
Symph. ., -.1 he Worcester
Symphe, vhich he was
the i,.r ,'.' 'nister iHe
appeared n the ,',70 and I l7 I
editions of "Outstanding
Young Men of America "


The l Worcester e'gr r
wrote ol Mr IPe
"Outs-tanding was th, e 1 t11:: :
p e r orn I.nli e A
expressive reci lal. is ., ,
clean and i~ibrant 1 -I ;ni
was of high rIrdcr
T he R ,,ail ( a/cAI c "
Bermuda said: ".\ ;ia :'
agilit\ arnd !ine' s,'- \ hluh'l
polished p'er! t m.11 'e
vivacious pla% itn ."
I he Washintlon I vn'
Star said: "Recital was a .
definite ssucces
D)r llans-Jorgen lhixn'
pla, s harpsichord and
chairiian of the \lUst
Department ol Andrews
University. Born and educated
in Austria, he is a soloist in his
own right and has tonI 'd the
U.S Canada and I rope
accompanied by his wite \Mr'.
Rae-Constantine iHolman 'A h,
is the soprano soloist o thic
Ensemble
Other members oI the
ensemble are \Mrs. I xonnie
Baasch. violin-viola and \lr.
Ralph Coupland, baritone
soloist.
The ensemble takes its
repertoire from the 17th aind
18th centuries the baroque,
pre-classical and early classical
eras.
Saturday 's concert will
feature a variety of composers
including ,nt,:nii,' Vi\ .,Idi',
T'ro S-1i ta I n ll iiiinur
e\c'rpi, Iruin I utic ihudt,: s
Rejoice Belomed Christi,nrs'
and .Aris and Recititisles ior
Soprno ao ad Bjariine I.ini the
Handel's Messiah"


i kets tor both concerts
will be available at the door or
for reservations c211 43048.


Marilyn Granger, Linda Lewis,
Carol Penn, Julie Sands, Lillian
Walker, Othella Missick and
Mellany Zonicle.


JUNKANOO in Miami?
Yes. It's all part and parcel
of the Bahamian Student
Association of Miami-Dade
Community College display of
their own culture and talents
abroad.
At the college October 29 to
November 2 was designated
International Week in which all
international organizations on
campus did their own thing.
On Thursday, November 1,
the Bahamian club staged a
Junkanoo Show on campus
and paraded in their own
original Junkanoo costumes
carrying the Bahamas National
Flag.
Van Bethel, president of the
Club, further reports that
"every student on campus
loved it and thought that this
was the highlight of the
week."


THE Nurses Association of
the Bahamas held their
annual Nurses Queen's Ball at
the Sheraton British Colonial
Hotel last month and Mrs.
Lily Mae Major (pictured)
was crowned Nurse Queen of
the year. A 1973 Dodge ,
Avenger was raffled at the ..
event and proceeds will go
towards the Nurses 0
Association building fund and
the Children's Emergency 1
Hostel.
i lll ,,l i


PHOTO CHRISTMAS CARDS...

a re the perfect way of saying
"GREETINGS!" to old friends!
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SITTING
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Bay St. & William St. -
Phone 5-4641


Lister Blackstone (Caribbean) Ltd.


MARINE ENGINES

P. 0. BOX 6275 -TELEPHONE 2-8488
EASTERN END NASSAU SHIPYARD.


U _____________________________


CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION
Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
8, December, 1973


DEPARTMENT


REWARD


$7,500.00


The police is offering a reward of $7,500.00 to any persons who can
give any information leading to the arrest and conviction of the
persons responsible for the murder of PAUL V. HOWELL, which
occurred in the Holiday Inn Hotel at Paradise Island, on the night of
Wednesday 5th December, 1973.
Any information given to the police will be held in strict confidence.
Information can be given to any police Station by calling
telephone numbers 2-4444 or 2-3335 or by calling the C.I.D. telephone
numbers 2-2561-2, 2-3049, 2-2311.

J. T. CRAWLEY, A.C.C.
CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION DEPARTMENT.
FOR
COMMISSIONER OF POLICE.
I II [ I III


AT E See our large


PALMDALE SHOPPING PLAZA NEXT TO CITY MARKET Girls BlOUSes

CINDERELLA & NANNETTE ALL KIND

DRESSES

*PANTS SUITS

"*BLOUSES


HER MAJESTYS
CHILDREN'S SLEEPWEAR
S BRIEFS &BLOUSES


O MENS' BUSH JACKETS
BOYS' -BUSH JACKETS ______._"---
SMEN & BOYS' CUBAVERAS XMAS SHOPPING HIORS:
OPEN WEEK DAYS 'TIL 7:00
BOYS'SUITS FRIDAY ALL DAY 'TIL 8:00
*Bt SATURDAY 'TIL 8:30
*-' ^0 K0 ?K9 ?K0 _K0 ___K9 _r


12


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*-

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Wednesday, December 12, 1973


By PHILIP SYMONETTE
IN AN AGE when the word "youth" is sometimes
believed to be synonymous with drug addiction and other
vices it might come as a form of consolation to some to
learn about the exemplary work of the members of the
newly formed St. Joseph Youth for Action.
On Monday, December 3 the Youth for Action
conducted an unaided service at St. Joseph's Catholic
Church, commemorating the 40th anniversary of the parish.
This service was completely organised and carried out by
the youth group whose members now total 35. The
homilies were given by Andrea Bethel and Rudolph Cleare.
The basic aim of the St. Joseph Youth for Action is to
unite the young people of the parish "in the sharing of a
common love and faith towards God in the Christian way
of life." In adhering to the principles of the group, the
young people are deeply involved in assisting the needy of
the parish through fund raising events.
As in the case with any effective and enduring force, the
St. Joseph Youth for Action formed itself through the
work of only a small number of minds and bodies and has
now reached the present membership of 35.
Sister Mary Patricia Russell. Regional Superior of the
Benedictan sisters, moderates the group who are also
advised by Sister Mary Benedict Pratt, Principal of St.
Joseph's School and Patricia Coakley, secretary of the
Catholic School system. All three advisors work hand in
hand with the youth group and attend all the meetings.
This year St. Joseph's church will be decorated by the
youth group so will certainly not lack any of the youthful
spirit of Christmas.


CHOIR MEMBERS OF THE ST. JOSEPH YOUTH FOR ACTION being conducted by Sister Norita Lanners at their
recent service at St. Joseph's Church. Photo: Phillip Symonette.


SHREYS. tic


St. Joseph Youth for Action seek to help the needy


FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE -FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157


NOW SHOWING
7:00 & 10:45
Bonnie's Kids
Thak od-w one had two!
Stamin: TIfrAY BOlING, MSTEVE SAND ROBIN MATTSON. nd SCOTT BRAY a KN.
Co-St ia: Aa Rocco, Ma Showalter, Lenore Stevs, Leo Gordon aid Tit 8toa .
AND AT 9:05

DETROIT


9000
A City Torn Apart
SGtNPA m COW P fese is "'DETOI 9000"
Stoumnrg ALEX ROCCO tA 5NOOS ar VONETIA McGfE
Co Somn ONE J d tlA EDWL)OS Aten UNDER17 ADMI MPTONE
NO ONE UNDER 17 ADMITTED


ak., SELF S [ERVUCE RESTAUR 1ANT


What's happened to Comet Kohoutek?


By Malcolm N. Carter
ABOARD THE QUEEN
ELIZABETH 2 (AP) -
Fr us treated photographers,
amateur astronomers and other
sky-watchers pressed their
seaborne hunt Tuesday for a


view of Comet Kohoutek.
Thick clouds blocked any
glimpse of the comet early
Monday as this packed ocean
liner sliced through rolling seas
on a 2'A day voyage out into
the Atlantic from New York.


And going.


Eastern now offers you the convert ,
ienceofDC-9Whisperjets'on
every flight to Miami and every
flight to Ft.Lauderdale.
That includes 12 daily non-
stops to Miami and 12 back. More
than any other airline.
Plus one daily nonstop to and
from Ft.Lauderdale and Nassau.
And starting December 16th,
we'll even have one L-1011I
Whisperlinefflight to Miami.
Eastern's DC-? Whisperjets
and L-1011 Whisperiner.
Two more ways we're working
harder for your dollar.


- EASTERN TheWings of Man.-


. CLAIROL the name to be trusted in hair care
& beauty aids...

Wishes you a Merry Christmas
by bringing you this Special offer


at 15% off on their
Kindness Custom
Care Instant
Hairsetter i .


Conditioner
Model K-300
BUYNOW
while stock last at
Participating
stores below:
-,WILMAC PHARMACIES LTD.
LOWE'S PHARMACY
*McCARTNEY'S PHARMACY
COLE'S PHARMACY
CITY PHARMACY
e COLUMBUS PHARMACY
9 CITY PHARMACY (Freeport)
L. M. R. DRUGS (Freeport)

0 Come in & see the other CLAIROL appliances
^ and hair care & beauty aids for the whole family
?-- ^ ^ | ^ ^ f j ^ ^ ^^ ^r ^- ,,, "A1 ..... ^ ...i- ^- A*^


- NOW SHOWING
Matinee 2.30 & 4:50. evening 8:30-'Phone 21004, 21005




PARENTAL DISCRETION AD VISLD.

* Now thru Friday Last Day Thursday
Matinee starts at 1:45 Continuous Showings
Evening 8:30 from 3:00
"THE DEAD ARE "THE MAN FROM
ALIVE" R. NOWHERE" PG.
Alex Cord Samantha Eggar Giuliano Gemma.
PLUS Fernando Sancho
"EL CONDOR" R. PLUS
Jim Brown Lee Van Cleef "CANCEL MY
No one under 17 will be RESERVATION" G.
admitted. Bob Hope
'Phone 22534 Eva Marie Saint

WULFF-RD.


U
I
U

U

*

*



I
I
I
I

I.


*


Leave Arrive
Nassau to Miani-Daily Nonstops
9:05am 9:50am
10:25am 11:10am
12:35pm 1:20pm
1:35pm 2:20pm
4:50pm 5:35pm
7:30pm 8:15pm
9:25pm 10:10pm
*SrinS Dec. 16 new L1011Whisperliner *erv.
ice Leve a 3:15pm and arrives 405pm
Nassau to Ft.Lauderdale-Daily Nonstop
3:40pm 4:25pm
(Continuesto Miami arnming5 I6pm)
Freeport to Miami-Daily Nonsaops
8:35am 9:15am
11:45am 12:25pm
2:55pm 3:35pm
5:55pm 6:35pm
10:30pm 11:10pm


ght rtbttt 13


I


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I


!











Uihe grtbut


Wednesday, December 12; 1.73


CLASSIFIED


SECTION


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS -FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV TELEPHONE 21988 EXT 5


F A


SEA BREEZE bedroorr
VILLAGE ROAD aircondi'
GOLDEN GATES 2-2152.
HIGHLAND PARK
PROSPECT RIDGE C 12769
WESTWARD VILLAS COTTA(
C O N D O M I N I U M daily, v
APARTMENTS in PARADISE aircondil
ISLAND maid sei
EAST BAY STREET garden
WEST BAY STREET Telephoi
HOTELS and HOTEL SITES, -
REACH LOTS, COMMER- C12870
CIAL LOTS, RESIDENTIAL FURNISH
LOTS. bath ho
AC R E A G E FOR Terraceto
DEVELOPMENT IN THE Box NI,
NASSAU AND FAMILY
ISLANDS SUCH AS; GRAND C 12890
BAHAMA LONG ISLAND, FURNISH
ELEUTHERA, ABACO. two ba
45 ACRE CAY IN THE country
EXUMAS WITH DEEP January
WATER )HARBOUR AND month.
MORE children
CALL private
DAVSON'S REAL laundry
ESTATE AGENCY overlool
Phone 21178 or 8093221178 conveni
55408 or 8093255048 shopping
P. 0. Box N-4648 consider
Nassau, Bahamas 5-7224


L ESTATE


I


Ii


in Highland Park 100'
will sell separately or
Phone 2-1722-3-4-5.


BUY A LOT
N EASTWOOD
and receive
JND TRIP TICKETS
R TWO TO MIAMI
IS $100 VOUCHER
II 27667 or 24815
irey Real Estate. Box
Bay & Deveaux


REAL ESTATE REA
C12915 C12875
EXCEPTIONAL HOUSE in
Ocean Estates consisting of x 150'
three bedrooms, two together.
bathrooms, lounge and together.
separate dining room etc. Fully C12780
furnished. C12780
House in Marathon Estates has
3 bedrooms 1 bathroom family
room, dining room, lounge etc. ROU
Furnished. RFO
Also houses in Blair, Skyline FPL
Heights and other areas. Call Ca
Bill's Real estate 23921. Frank Ca
Frank Ca
N-4764,
C 12884 Streets.
MAKE AN INVESTMENT
THIS CHRISTMAS. ONLY C12868
$75 down for a YAMACRAW
BEACH ESTATES lot 70 x A LAR
100 Private lake and beach suitableI
rights. From $80 month. No with one
interest compare amount suitable
paid with subdivisions that
charge interest. A choice
Call Pat Rutherfprd at 4-1141 Northerr
or Morley & O'Brien at 2-3027 75c per s
or come to the YAMACRAW Choice
BEACH MODEL HOME any surround
afternoon, road co
acre-pric
C12895 Resident
EXCEPTIONAL BUY Village Seven H
Road area 4 bedroom 2 bath 2, South
house, separate living room, Glenistoi
dining room, kitchen, T.V. Addition
room, store room, laundry and Yam
room, carport etc. Over 2,000
sq. ft. Completely enclosed Terms a'
yard, Patio, barbeque pit, and goo
above ground swimming pool, offered.
decorative awnings, nicely
furnished, all new and modern Call Bill
appliances, T.V., dishwasher,
dryer, self cleaning gas stove, C12773
large self defrost frigidaire etc. EXCEPT
Only $50,000. Beach in
DON'T MISS THIS close to
OPPORTUNITY! Call 24777 residence,
- Evenings 3-1425. three ba
with fire
C12900 dining ri
Ocean view Eastern Road 1 decks
and 2 bedroom apartments, detached
fully furnished with pool, bedroo
laundry, phone. Direct from living-dir
owner. Phone 3-4402. balcony
Two-car
C12874 Price r
HOUSE FOR SALE furnished
3 bedroom 2I bath,
living-dining-family room HIGH V
utility, maid's room three bh
beautifully furnished, wall to living-din
wall carpet, fully air Ceiling
conditioned nice view $40,000
attractively landscaped STATEL
walled in located in exclusive Colonia
Highland Park will sacrifice, looking
Phone 2-1722-3-4-5 (days) Bahamiar
3-4953 3-4462 (Nite). overlook
extensive
C12833 trees. F
DELIGHTFUL semi-hilltop baths, I
residence Eastern District dining rn
excellent view. Four bedrooms, three po
two baths, living room area. $2C
separate dining area, den, sun H. G. Cl-
proch, modern kitchen, garage, O. GoN
laundry, etc. Centrally air Telephor
conditioned. Secluded
swimming pool patio area.
$115,000 furnished. C12924
Prestige-type hilltop residence RESIDEI
with beautiful view Montagu sacrifice
Bay. Four bedrooms, three executive
baths, separate dining room, AREA.
swimming pool, two patios, Overlook
large rain water tank, fruit Private
orchard etc. $155.000 supply.
furnished, highway,
Excellent buy semi-hilltop Phone o\
residence off East Bay Street. -
Three bedrooms, three baths, C12925
separate dining room, patio, INVESTI
two-car carport, etc. $69.000 Two hou
furnished. Telephone H. G. You ma
Christie Ltd. 21041, 2 or 3. located i
that is
C12819 FOR SALE tenants.
DAVSON'S REAL ESTATE same ti
CO. LTD. renting.
three f
(Certified Real Estate Brokers conditi
& Appraisers) furnishec
Phones 21178 55408 room, v
P.O. Box N-4648, TV roor
Nassau, Bahamas patio. Hi
Proudly present
SMASHING REAL One there
ESTATE BARGAINS baths,
THROUGHOUT THE condit i
COMMONWEALTH carpeting
2, 3 and 4 BEDROOM patio an
HOUSES in the following prop erty
areas.
EASTERNROAD portion
EASTERN ROAD on the water believing
as well as on the hills. 42968.
SAN SOUCI
BLAIR ESTATES
GLENISTON GARDENS i
WINTON
THE GROVE (West Bay) C12761
SKYLINE HEIGHTS W I L L
NASSAU EAST APART


for apartment complex
existing large building
for eight apartments.
:e beach lot on the
n side of Exuma price
sq. ft.
commercial property
ed on all sides by a
)mprising nearly one
e $25,000.00
ial lots Sunshine Park,
ills, Golden Gates 1 &
Beach Est., Seabreeze,
n Gardens, Sands
i, Stapledon Gardens
nacraw Beach Est.
available in most areas
Dd cash discounts are

's Real Estate 23921.

"IONAL buy in Cable
ncome-bearing property
beautiful beach. Main
e has four bedrooms,
eths, large living room
*place and bar, separate
oom, kitchen, two sun
on second floor;
J building contains two
ms, one bath,
iing room, kitchen and
on second floor.
garage and laundry.
educed to $90,000
d.
'ISTA residence with
bedrooms, two baths,
ing room, patio, etc.
fans throughout.
.00.
-Y old Bahamian-
I residence over-
Montagu Bay with
n-Colonial residence
ing Montagu Bay with
grounds and fruit
Four bedrooms, two
giving room, separate
oom, breakfast room,
'rches, etc., basement
00,000 furnished.
HRISTIE LIMITED, P.
x N-8164, Nassau,
ie 2-1041-2.


NTIAL HOMESITE -
$10,000 terms superb
ve-t ype HILLTOP
Secluded approach.
ks western suburbs.
unlimited fresh water
Convenient airport
beaches, schools.
owner 5-7224.

MENT OPPORTUNITY
cases for sale by owner.
ay purchase a house
n popular Blair Estate
rented to long term
Purchaser must allow
snants to continue
One four bedroom
ull baths, fully air
oned, completely
I, children's play
wall-to-wall carpeting,
m, utility room, large
hurricane awnings.
ALSO
*e bedroom two full
completely air
oned, wall-to-wall
. Fully furnished,
oom and utility room,
d hurricane awnings -
walled around. A
of the purchase price
financed. Seeing is
I. To view phone


FOR RENT I

IAM'S COURT
MENTS: 2 one
n furnished apartment,
tioned. Call daytime


GES and apartments
weekly or monthly -
tioned, fully furnished,
vice available. Lovely
and swimming pool.
ne 31297, 31093.

iHED 2 bedroom 1
me, between 8 and 9
Collins Avenue, P. 0.
399.

SHED colonial style
th residence secluded
estate. Available
1st lease $350 per
Acre flowers, fruit,
's pool, unlimited


fresh water supply.
machine, television,
ks western suburbs
ent drive beaches, golf,
g.schools. Winter lease
red. Phone owner
after five.


FOR RENT


GE 3 acre property


responsible for any work done Telephone 2-2117. C
by him. Ci

C 12867 LOST
FOR HOMEMADE white andi -- L Tick
wholewheat bread, raisin, Jane
coconut, apple and pumpkin C 12894 $35
pies, chocolate layer cakes and GREY Persian cat from P$3o
fresh killed chickens -CALL Harmony Hill Reward Phone
SANDS' POULTRY AND 31627.
BAKERY 31340. !


C128
SEN
YEIA
TOP
KNC
CON
STA


C12775

NOWOPENI

NIAI WINIENiTIlPUESLIEITII

WE STOCK WHAT THE NAME IMPLIES
Montrose Avenue opposite St. Thomas More School
Phone 2-4259.


C12
PAI
or
Mat
Stre


ESSIONAL




ie
9R


1


HELP WANTED


C12853
BARCLAYS BANK
INTERNATIONAL LIMITED,
P. 0. Box F-2404, Freeport
requires a Senior Supervisor
with minimum 6 years banking
experience. Should have Part 1'
or Institute of Bankers
Examinations or be prepared
to study for these exams.
Bahamian only. Please
telephone Freeport 352-8391
or Nassau 27466


I


C12766 E3
FURNISHED AND
AIRCONDITIONED 2
bedrooms, 1 bedroom and
efficiency apartments. BUNNESS 5 PROF
Telephone 5-8679.
C12772 DIRECT
ONE EXTRA LARGE two
bedroom, two bath, apartment.
with large living and dining,all Saw. m
basically furnished Victoria
Court APARTMENTS on
Elizabeth Avenue between 5laW
Shirley and Bay Street.
Facilities, phone e
laundry, parking, T.V. antenna,
airconditioned. Phone 54631
between 8 a.rm.and 5 p.m. L T l
C 12922
$350 secluded furnished 1 2a I
colonial stone residence
western suburbs acres i
grounds. Spacious interior, two
baths, laundry, maids room,
phone, television, children's
pool, unlimited private fresh ANTENNAS
water supply, convenient
airport, schools, beaches, golf, Island TV 2-2618
shopping. Available January Nev
first. Phone owner 5-7224 BOOKSTREo
evenings. O STO
The Christian Book 5
S CARS FOR SALE hop 8744
C12910 BUILDERS MEN
ISLAND MOTOR Richard's ConstructionS-7080 The
COMPANY 1970 LTD.
USED CAR LIST CAMERAS
1968 VAUXHALL VICTOR John Bull 2.4252/3 Cod)
$450
1969 VAUXHALL VICTOR CARPETS
S/WStd.Red $300 Lee's Carpet Craft 3.1993 Opt
1973 PONTIAC VENTURA
2 Dr. A/C Bucket Seats
Vinyl Floor Shift $5600 CUSTOMS BROKERS
1970 VAUXHALL VIVA Martin's 2-3173 Mai
4 Dr. Auto. White $495 MIn 2
1973 PONTIAC FIREBIRD DEPT. STORES
ESPRIT,
4000 miles only Pixie's Dept. Store 2-3173 Won
A/C Stereo $6500
1969 TOYOTA DRAPERIES PR
Red $150
Telephone 34636 7 8 Lee's Carpet Craft 3-1993 Gon
Located Oakes Field
Opposite the Ice Plant DRUGS &

C12891 PRESCRIPTIONS R
1968 FORD Zephyr right Carts
hand drive automatic good McCartney's 5-6068/5-2127
gas mileage. Owner leaving
island. Telephone 31093. ENTERTAINMENT
C12918 W
1973 BUICK CENTURY Film & Equip. Service 2-2157 Wo.
air-conditional radio. 6000 Co.
miles, excellent condition.
$6100. Phone 34527-28295. FLOOR MAINTENANCE
C 12917 Rug Cleaning & Installation Char
1973 MORRIS MARINA, Island Interiors 5-3576/4-2191
excellent condition Only GARDEN & PET
8000 miles. $3300. Phone SUPPL
34527 28293. Modernistic Gar. & Pet 2.28 1 Playt
C12916 Nassau Pet & Gar. R.H,
1973 PLYMOUTH DUSTER. Morose Avenue 2-4259
air-conditioned radio tape HARDWARE TR
deck. Only 200 miles. $6100
Phone 34527 28293 John S. George 2-8421/6

FOR SALE HEALTH FOODS WF
C12814 Nassau Drug Store 5-4506 Gibso
American made very good
sound. Telephone daytime FOR TiE ACTION V
2-2152.
C12914
1970 FORD 1 ton truck
$1975. Phone 5-2398. Shop Nassau Mer

C12913 For Business And
J.C.M. Cash Register siness And
Show Case
Writing Desk
Phone 24076, 51601, 23324. ARINE SUPPLIES I

C12847 C12762
GARAGE SALE PACEMAKER 44 ft Cl2
Enjoy great living ... indoors .. Phone 32371. 9 Yacht
outdoors 32i
a Inside & Outside Floral
Arrangements
* Live green & artificial potted C11894
plants 1969 31ft. CHRIS CRAFT
e Christmas Decorations inside Commander. Sleeps six, private -
& out shower, two 230 h.p. engines
* Chairs, Lounges, Platform with less than 200 hours,
Rockers kitchenette, good condition.
6 25" Colour Television Call 24267, 54011.
* Cutlery, Crystal, Chinaware.
Y t name it ... we got it. ------- 1
Ph ic 34462 ANNOUNCEMENTS 1


f' Z z C12832
C12892 LUDEN LIMITED
TO WHOM IT MAY LIQUOR SUPPLY
CONCERN: This is to inform offering best
the general public that Algy CHRISTMAS SPECIALS
Malcolm is no longer employed until January 5th
by ABCO (BAHAMAS) COME AND PROVE IT D
LIMITED, and will not be Dowdeswell Street. n


MORY to MAR

en 4 years on
er
iu departed
ou most
you were so dear
re the dearest
me, Sister
w you're gone
dearer still, Sister.
r forget
d times together
e day soon
together.

'our loving sister
)ers you always.
IASTASIA 7FZ


chants LOUIS H L
Services TRADE SERVICE

I TII MT C12777
r~ ~~TNMIATRETiiNEtT "


673
E UNIVERSITY PLAYERS
PRESENT














"They Raising the Flag
Now Mama"
By P. Anthony White
Directed by Fritz Stubbs
JNDAS CIVIC CENTRE
ECEMBER 13th 16th.
curtain Time 8:30 p.n.
Matinee 2:00 p.m.
Saturday & Sunday
.ets obtainable at both Del
Stores. $3.00 unreserved,
i0 reserved. Matinee $1.50.
ne 34107.

HELP WANTED

866
BARTENDER
IOR MAN WITH MIN. 10
NRS EXPERIENCE IN
CLASS NIGHT CLUBS.
)WLEDGE OF STOCK
ITROLS. REFERENCES.
kRT DEC 20th-2-2325.

2902
RKING lot attendant male
female with knowledge of
thematics. Apply Charlotte
Met Carpark at 10 a.m. only.


Mackey Street
& Rosevelt Aveni
NASSAU, BAHAM
P.O. Box N3714
IATA CARGO AGEI
CUSTOMS CLEAR
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORA(
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
HEAVY DUTY TRUC
FORK LIFT RENT
MECHANICAL HAND
EQUIPMENT
SPECIAL QUOTATI
EXCELLENT SERV
REASONABLE RAT
CONTACT LYMAN PI
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-3
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 7-7434
FREE ESTIMATE

C12906
BAHAMAS ANTENNA
SYSTEMS
For Better T.V. Rec
23371 -51772.

C12767
T.V. ANTENNAS
Boosters for I
apartments and hotels
SALES AND SERVI
Call 5-9404 WORL
MUSIC
Mackey Street next to
Place.

C12912
CHARLES E. MOSS
L. P. MECHANIC


Repairs Service
reconnections of a
appliances. Tel. 54455.


I I TRADE SERVICES


C12909
COOK NEEDED
experience of Contii
Cooking. Five evenings a
Telephone 2-8312.

C12923
THE ROYAL BANK
CANADA, Freeport,
Bahama requires the servi
a Senior Assistant AccouI
Applicants should be mal
24 to 30 with G.C.E. in
and English, and have at l
to 10 years previous ba
experience. Must be ab
supervise subordinate
numbering about
Bahamians only need app
the As sistant Ma
Administration, P. 0. Box
Freepor t, or tele
352-6631 for an appoint


S 1


C12905 C12858
UNLIMITED PAINTING MAKE YOUR Christmas
When we paint you save more Shopping easy by buying a
Apartment H ouses Homes copy of "Bahamian Jottings"
Call Harley Fox 23371. autographed by Bahamian born
SWlIhelmina Johnstone. Of
course we have many other
C12843 fine Items to go with these
WINDOW AND DOOR books. The Linen Shop,
SPECIALISTS Parliament Street.
We stock parts for all types of
aluminium windows and doors.
AND REPAIR C12896
Sliding Glass Doors, all types
of screens, awning windows,
jalousie windows and doors.
Phone 54460 night or
day.

C12887
IF YOU are planning to have a
party -
We can seat from 20 to 120
at
THE KING & KNIGHT'S CLUB
For reservations call 24758
King Eric or Chicago.
WE HAVE SOMETHING FOR CHRISTMAS f
SPECIAL IN MIND. FOR CHRISTMA ..... itle 4
SPECIAL INMIND.Gift that will be re .rSd
and appreciated thiNipout
C12845 the year Barbaql Setsl
FOR ALL your Gardening Nassau Drug StorA
needs, trimming, hedging, Mackey Street
pruning, beach cleaning, for We hold the Key to Good
prompt, reasonable and Health
a '.irian t v i I 0r119_21


IEANDR


with
mental
week.



OF
Grand
ces of
ntant.
e. ace
Maths
east 6
nking
)le to
staff
40.
ply to
nager/
F61,
phone
ment.


retary
r of
itions.
ing 60
years
cutive
rk on
Neat
5-day
with
Felix
in of
n the


I















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12th













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RVOS
LOUIS

:S






ue
IAS

NTS
NC.E
GE

3G

KING
AL
ILING
ONS
ICE
TES
NDER

796

S'


IA

ception



S
homes,


AHAMAI



HELP ENTED
C6550
Catalytic West Indies, Ltd., P.
0. Box F-2544, Freeport,
Grand Bahama, have* job
opportunities available for
Bahamians in their Pefinery
Maintenance organ>-ation,
Freeport for the fohiwing
positions:-
ELECTRICAL INSTRUMEN-
TATION SUPERVISOR -
Must have minimum of 10
years Instrumentation
Electrical experience as a
Mechanic and Foreman and
have thorough knowledge of
Refinery or related industries,
in conjunction with pneumatic,
electronic and Refinery
electrical equipment.
Qualified applicants should
reply to:
Deputy Chief Industrial Officer.
Ministry of Labour,
Freeport, Grand Bahama,
BAHAMAS
C6549
Experienced JANITOR for
night work. Knowledgeable in
floor and maintenance
procedure.
Apply: M & J, 352-9333,
Freeport.
C6533
COOPERS & LYBRAND have
several vacancies for qualified
Chartered Accountants in their
Freeport office. Apply in
writing to P. 0. Box F-210,
telephone number 352-8471,
Freeport or P. 0. Box N596,
telephone number 2-1061,
Nassau, Bahamas.
C6547
REAL ESTATE SALESMEN
Rewarding and exciting
opportunity for sales people
with one of Freeport's largest
and expanding real estate
companies. Applicants should
be qualified to meet regulatory
requirements of the
Freeport/Lucaya Real Estate
Board. Ownership of own
automobile an asset.
Apply to: First Atlantic Realty
Ltd., Phone 352-7411.

C6548
MICRO FILM EQUIPMENT
TECHNICIAN: with no less
than five (5) years experience
wanted.
Salary based on experience.
Bahamians possessing driver's
licence need only apply.
Contact: Pan American
Business Machines Ltd., Box
F.2628, Phone 352-6167-8.
C12764
COST ACCOUNTANT
Accountant with minimum 3
years experience In Industrial
accounting Including Standard
Costs. Minimum
education Junior College or
business school certificate In
accounting or partial
qualification in professional
accounting society. Interested
applicant contact: Personnel
,Department, Bahama Cement
iCompany, P. 0. Box F-100
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

41 Lig^ ires


I'S & BOYS' PEAR
Wardrobe 5-5599

MUSIC
y's Records 2-8500

OPTICIANS
ical Service Ltd. 2-3910/1

PLUMBERS
shine Plumbing
ntenance Service 5-6251

PRINTING
big's Printing 5-4506

OPERTY CLEAN-UP
izalez Clean-Up Service
3-1562/2-4726

ADIO & T.V. SALES
her's Records 2-4711


RUBBER STAMPS
ng's Rubber Stamp
5-4506

SPORTSB90ODS
mpion Sport Land 2-1862

TRAVEL
ours 2-2931/7
. Curry & Co., 2-8681/7

UCKING SERVICE
Gonzalez Trucking
3-1562/2-4726


ICES
.D OF

Frank's





s and
ill gas


E caiiis S IFTS


C12921
TOP-h
required
Person ni
Shorthai
wpm. I
experier
Secretary'
-own
appearar
week. A
reference
Musgrov
Paradise
hours of



C12911














IN MEI
LOUIS.
It's be(
Decemb
Since yc
I miss y
Because
You wei
Thing tc
And no%
You're (

I'll neve
The goo
And oni
We'll be

From y
rememb
h


L 1 L [ rl]ll


r


-7


DECKER SERVICE
n Wrecker Service2-8896


I


01 WANT
9

i l I I


i 1


I


W


REAL ESTATE
C6520
FLORIDA Corporation seeking (
income producing properties
and/or land in Freeport,
Nassau or Out Islands.
Unlimited cash available. Please
submit full details with
location, prices, Income, terms,
etc. Reply in confidence to:
-C.S.N., Drawer G, Miami Fla.
33164.

HELP WANTED

C6543
Trainees Wanted
Bahamas Oil Refining
Company (BORCO) requires
Trainee Laboratory,
Technicians (male) in its
Product Control Laboratory.
Applicants should possess
G.C.E. or equivalent
qualifications in Mathematics,
Physics and Chemistry and
should be interested In learning
modern routine analytical
techniques, including
ch romatography,
spectrophotometry and
analysis by X-ray.
Qualified applicants may
contact the BORCO Personnel
Office: P. 0. Box F-2435;
jTelephone 352-9811.

C12763
COST ANALYST
Bahama Cement Company
requires a Cost Analyst with a
minimum of 2-3 years
experience In industrial
accounting including in-process
Standard Costs. To assume
responsibility for Standards
Maintenance Forecast, Cost
Analysis and Appropriation
Control. Minimum education -
Junior College or business
school certificate In accounting
or partial qualification In
professional accounting
society. Interested applicant
contact: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C6544
BOOKKEEPER/TYPIST: To
do daily ledger for shops,
operate ten key adding,
machine and work foreign
exchange dollars conversion.
3-5 years experience. Police
Certificate required.
PIANIST: Pianist to play with
OSSIE HALL BAND at the
Grand Bahama Hotel. Should
have ten years musical
background in playing and
reading music. Applicants
should bring along Police and
Health Certificate.
Interested persons apply:
GRAND BAHAMA HOTEL.
WEST END, GRAND
BAHAMA, Personnel Office
between the hours of 9:00 a.m.
and 3:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday. Elon Martin,
Jr., Personnel Director.


o TCH secr
J for Directoi
el and Public Rela
nd 100 wpm typ
Minimum three
nce as Exe
y. Ability to wo
i nitiati ve .
ice. Hours 9-5,
Apply in person,
es, to Mr.
e at Holiday Ir
Island between
9-5.


MEMORIAL


c e service 7810


1


I


I OFI I0'a


I


11


- Aww










Wednesday, December 12, 1973


jLi
OEI


OK FingFAm S l.h....a.. 19. V i .Id ..l
"The Labor Committee advised us to come prepared
for an all-night bargaining session."


"If you're net a good boy, I'll
put coal in your stocking."

CROSSWORD
D PUZZLE
ACROSS 21. Interview
1.-Draft 23. Prosecute
SHeadquarters 24. Children
4. Eccentric 25. Solo
Piece 27. Early car
: 7Rail 28. Fellow
1l. Sanction students
13. Russian 30. Fixed
inland sea 33. Hackneyed
14. Dotterel 34. Sow
'15. Southern 35. Headliner
France 36. Attire
16, Star in Draco 38. Cote d'Azur
'17. Formerly 40. Precise
called 41. Beryl
'19. Demerit 42. Scattered in
20. Malines heraldry


R4ger takes the two foxes aside and demands
to, know the whole story. The brothers admit
Ibt Freddy had purposely stayed out of the
a ke Raoe so that he could help Fordy collect
ca-kek. "And I-4 happened to -se Ferdy
Mhen he was losing the race against Rupert,"
hiNmpers Freddy. "So I took his plece."
That was why you won so easily." says


"Make it an even ton and I'll
take It."


UTION YESTERDAY'S PU ZLE


W43& WO w~' 15


r


Winning

Bridge
By VICTOR MOL.O
A useful gadget In defence,
though little used in number
bridge, is the trump signal.
Here's an example:
Dealer South : Love all
N J 1 2
0 KQ 8
SJ 10 7
East
A 8
S10 9 3 2
S108
A A9843


South


North

S34


West leads the 42. East wins
and gives West a club ruff. De-
clarer wins the heart return and
leads a spade. East rises with the
A and leads ... another club ?
That will defeat the contract If
West has a third trump. But
South aould have six spades,
say: KQ 109 6 5 A54
OK IQ 6 5.
Here, a third club is fatal.
West can't ruff and the losing
diamond disappears on dummy's
fourth club.
A diamond return will be Just
as fatal, however, if South's
hand is: K Q 10 9 5 A4
A 3 2 4Q 6 5.
Maybe one holding is more
probable than the other, but
East must guess unless the
partnerslip uses trump signals.
Then, when a defender can ruff,
he shows three trwmps by play-
ing them high-low and on* two
by following in the natural,
ascending order.
If West ruffed with the 4,
then played h t 3, East return
a clubIfor West has a third


13. Comprehend 3. Spar nrump.If, b
with his 'to
44. Colorant 4. Learn ino more an
DOWN 5. Means of mond.
access
1. Rain tree 6. Street fight
2. Fine china 7. Surface-to-air
missile
1 1 9 r 8. Extraction
- 9. Walkie-talkies
S10. Straighten
S- 12. Tease
18. German city A
7 - 21. Suppress
V _ 22. Overly
23. Little girl E
25. Glamour
26. Curie's R I
discovery s
27. Social system er mst
S 28. Charges letter, and t
29. Fixed customs leastone exhl
30. Place no proper
S31. Ahead of time TARGET : R
28 words, ver
32, Handicraft excellent So
35. Title of YESTERDA
address Clod code col
dole dome
7 - 37. Mark aimed at Iced idiom I
Sin curling llmed lode I
, 12-14 39. Victory sign olid.

ind the Cake RKace-21


however, West xined
west trump, he has
id East leads a dia-





ow '"iany
Swords of
Y flour letters
or more can
yon make
rom the
N letters shown
N here? In
making a
word. e ch
letter. may
be sued once
onty. e ach
contain the large
there must be at
t-letter word in the
is; no foreign words*
names. TonAY'S
S words. good:
r &ood : 34 words.
oluilon tomorrow.
&Y'S SOLUTION :
led cold dice docile
dome DOMICILE
die Idol lodle lied
neld melodic mild
malted odic oiled


Chess
By LEONARD BARDEN










t


White to move; how can he
win? A subtle touch is required
here.
Per times: 30 seconds, chem
meate; 2 minutes, c bsee expert;
5 minutes. county player; 10
minutes. club standard; 16
minutes, average; 30 minutes,
novice.
Entries are heading tot a new
world record in the 4000 lven-
ing Stiandard congress at Isling-
ton on December 79.. 'There
London C(amplonsh (or
players every re from
master to beginner, wth ah
rizes for even nners You
miagaht w OuM y l whik,
play the T1me Shaftrg ,.
chessifteo u t win ol-
from pubvee ord and


which has a da le entry
formn. Aek for It im ,dti





and BItck os tas aftO," tf you
enter after next ua o. Sind

EveningPxP at any stage, the.



















No. 7.4 elehone. 01b TIM MKA
he must Make aw ve.
2 -ow up. (5)
St -7 dy (3) Black
0. Laundry wporer uses them.
(4-5)
ft to Witress, IS
1. Title. (4)w e e
I noadner."" (
7. Mew up. ()

I1. 't'an wrok lham r lerthoe
I, FOtah. ta e
21. Aninmal.
Down

3. Ir a I t r i n charge for
cannon. (0-4)
4. Loundr) adjunct. 94-51
IS $ a Iver.



pal TI ,.nit mll, ,


ng[Migg[ IWINil -


Made in Dixie for Southern Climate,.. I .. I I


It's not too late ti
to Freshen up ATEX

A &&withBright ..


Beautiful Colours

before Christmas -


ACRYLc LATEX

HOUSE WALL PAINT

PAINT ecorator Selected









900tw to FADE-RESISTANT

aSee-white House Paint
|U 8eatf lMatching Colours












9 .75 per gal $10.70per gal

$3.55 per qt1ir ja'ty
SPRAY
SLON G A PAINT
m EL Exterio U e








$2.U0
*E ~ ~ ~ gg .^ gg-ggg g* t-w ^^^^"- j ~ L"'< ^h esJek *t-Arf


fMOMMM---MWMr


Roger. "You're so much alike no one would
have guessed but for the patch on Ferdy's
jacket." Roger Insists that Ferdy should give
ack the cakes he and his brother had won
by such unfair means. "lere are yours,
Rupert." says the little fox glumly. "You are
the real winner."
ALL RIOTS RESERVED


-] CARROLL RIGHTER'S

'HOROSCOPE
free the CarrollRiht Institute
V GENERAL TENDENCIES: A day that you
would be wise to study public and company
reports to give you a clearer insight into just what is happening
about you. Avoid getting into any arguments with others as
Mars is acting up. Strive for harmony.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) If you are more devoted to kin
now you find that all improves at home with little effort.
Good day for putting across new idea.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) You have to use much care
today so that you don't upset present good position. Sidestep
an ally who is in argumentative mood.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) You are apt to go overboard
on spending in one area and be positively stingy in another, so
strive for better balance. Be wise.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) It's fine to be
ambitious now but take care you are not pretentious with
others. Don't attend the social affair tonight.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) You have problems that need
careful thought and handling now instead of radical steps that
could prove to be very unwise.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Don't get into a heated
argument with a friend who does not agree with your views. A
desire you have could lead to trouble.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Handle any career matters in a
most efficient way and derive more benefits from them. Take
no risks where the public is concerned.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) You have good ideas for
bettering your life but need to see experts so that you know
better how to put them across successfully.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Make sure you keep
any promises you have made with others. Try to reach a far
better understanding with loved one tonight.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) Not a good day to have
discussions with associates since they are in a bad mood, so
keep busy with important work at hand.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) If you attend to
important work ahead of you without delay, you find it can
be done efficiently and on time. Relax tonight.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) It is wise to keep rooted to
important tasks awaiting your attention, since recreation
would only bring difficulties now.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY ... he or she will be
able to solve problems easily, so give plenty of leeway. Direct
the education along civic lines. Teach early to be objective for
best results. A great peacemaker in this chart. Sports must not
be neglected, nor religious training. Give an opportunity to
study music, also.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


5/m Com' pa


SREX MORGAN, M.D. By DAL CURTIS]

I'M OAP YOU vYO MUST B ENOW THAT YOu MTHE. .INLdOB5Y
ENJOYED IT / I FAMISHED / MENTION AT ci-OSPTA.







j UDGE PARKSE R By PAUL NICHOLSASOTICKETS


















MAG SEE WOK MISS M5E JUST AN TEIDO TOEP SHERD VE KNOWN SHETTECR WIEO
BEUTI FUL AND YOU'RE AC WELCOME TO
ERIENCE, USE THEM / DON A T HAVEAT
TTOEELIOPPOTUNITYTOO! SH
WWOOT FO
oLNCERTSUN









16E
JUDGRPARENTR-GB PAULNICHOLSk
IDiOE M I$ I II iN II AIT! II 1 II IIIIIOGE I T IC WIT
IDAGEEWO YEMSSIM EfWlJANTDWAIDON'TEX TO HOULD'VE KNOWN BETTER WHEN I
I'MRSORRY, MR. DRIVER_ E OU WT4YOU KNOW WHERE ACCEPTED TAT MONEY FROMT A
BUTAMIS SPENCER LEFT SA THEY IENT, NOWN RACKETEER,A E
HERE SOMETIME AGO! ROBERTS ? DO YO BUT YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT
YO TO DL LIKE TO 1 3E DE NT !









...... ..M WAT TO
HELP YOU,










APARTMENT 3-G By Alex K otzky


DOE6 M155 I!ILL RINC 7 WAIT! I"-I I'VE GMTTOCET IN TOUCH Wr
MFAGEE. WORK MISS MAGEE! JUST WANTED TO HER! I KNOW SHE- RECOGoNIZED
BYRON FROST THERE 2 KNOW WHETHER I ME LAST NIGHT!
ADVERTISING!" HAP THE RIGHT PLACE.! I'LL COME
MAY I. HELP I HAVE SOMETHING aACK AT
YO C TO PELIVER! 0 SHE
coW.t MUT sO
OT FOTr-R
LUCH


j -


LUTION 0 YESTERDAY'S PU;


i
l


SOL


fillto BirlMleft













t ilS Edilittit


Wednesday December 12, 194


Rosie's

top

of the

bowlers
By GLADSTONE
THURSTON
ROSIE SAUNDERS with a
league leading average of 166
pinfalls per game from 45
games played once again
proved supreme.
She is not only tops in
individual bowling but was the
mainstay in Amoury Bowling
Squad's 39 and nine record
which won them the first half
championship in the Zephyr
League.
The Amoury Squad in 48
games fell a total of 33,338
pins. 7,476 of which were
collected by Saunders.
Team-mate Pallas Roberts who
rolled 45 games averaged 149
from a total of 6,741 pinfalls.
Z/PHIYR i. LAGtIE TOP
TEN BOWL .RS
avg. gp
Rosie Saunders 166 45
Tootsie Thompson 152 44
Joan Hayling ISO 48
,nnie Russel 150 42
Ivy IFrench 150 42
Pallas Roberts 149 45
I-ola Pinder 146 30
1 lorina Kelly 144 36
Donna Iryers 141 42
Patricia Sweeting 1 38 39
I first half standings.
w \1.
Amour> 39 9
Super Value 25 23
Thompson's 21 27
Home furniture 21 27
Maura's 21 27
New Oriental 18 30

Valdo Prosa's Guiness
Bowling Squad in a late rally
picked up three consecutive
victories taking the first half
championship in the Maderia
League.
Consistent bowling by Prosa.
Charles Lunn, Roy Parks and
Graham Bell gave Guiness a
commanding 33 and 15 record
six games ahead of second
place Albury's Supply.

Albury's with a total of
39,192 pinfalls top Guiness in
that category by 2,399 pins.
Star Insurance who held the
lead for nearly three quarters
of this season dropped in a
second place tie with Albury's.
MADEIRA E1.1 AGUE TOP
TEN BOWL IER
Mike Albury 189
Pat Sweeting 188
Bradley FIriesen 187
Sidnev I rench 187
Jeff Alhury 184
Billy Alhury 182
Valdo' Pros., 78
Perrs (.'ooke 176
Mike Saw'er 176
Terry Chea I174
I IRST HAL I SI ANI)INGS.


(uines.s
Alhury 's
Star Insurance
isso frigers
Heineken
Pritchard s
K. C. Auto
tinker's Paint


Regatta sails back to George Town


THE 22nd annual Out Island Regatta,
the most unique event of the Bahamian
sailing calendar, is scheduled for April 25
to 27 in Elizabeth Harbour, George
Town, Exuma.
The three-day series of races pits
Bahamian work boats and crews against
each other for trophies and cash prizes.
The regatta offers the boatmen a
chance to augment their annual incomes
between the close of the crawfish season
and the beginning of the summer fishing
season.
Some 60 boats are expected to race in
five classes, governed by the size of the
boats. The Bahamian work boat and
fishing boat fleet is one of the last purely
wind-driven work fleets in the world.
Besides the races the annual Out Island
Regatta will feature field days for school


children, model boat sailing races, fashion
shows, cocktail parties and possibly a
concert by the Bahamas Police Band.
The 1973 regatta was switched for the
first time in the history of the popular
event to Nassau and the time was moved
to July to coincide with the
Independence celebrations.
In 1974 it reverts back to the
picturesque waters of Elizabeth Harbour,
and the tranquil community of George
Town will come alive for a week of
revelry.
The regatta draws spectator yachts
from Nassau and South Florida, and the
luxury craft anchored in the harbour to
watch the races are a stark contrast to the
sturdy wooden work boats with their
canvas sails in keen and exciting
competition.


The work boats start the races at
anchor and at the sound of the starting
cannon the crews haul on the anchor line
to gain momentum and hoist the sails
simultaneously. They race a triangular
course of about eight miles.
The November issue of Yacht Racing
Magazine carries a story on the regatta
written by veteran boating writer and
sailor Bob Smith, who sailed on the Tida
Wave during the Independence regatta.
Smith described the regatta as "one of
the most rewarding episodes in which I
have ever been involved ... I was further
honoured by being asked by Rolly Gray
to sail again in the 1974 Out Island
Regatta on Tida Wave."
PICTURED: Capt. Roily
Gray, in light shirt at the helm
of Tida Wave.


Top boys teams


for knockout

competition

UNDER the guidance of Mr. Phillip Worrell, BFA's
vice-president responsible for the youth soccer development
programme in the Bahamas and sponsored by the Kiwanis Club of
Fort Montagu, the four top senior boys teams in Nassau will
participate in a knockout competition.


Bowlers

shoot

for new

honour
MIAMI Top junior
bowlers from around the
western hemisphere will have
an additional honour to shoot
for during Miami's 12th
Annual Tournament of the
Americas at Cloverleaf Lanes,
July 14-20 next year.
All-events trophies, in both
junior boys and girls
competition, will be given the
first four finishers based on
total pinfall for 21 games.
Juniors roll 12 games of singles
and nine of mixed doubles.
This is the third year for
juniors in the tournament and,
according to tournament
executive director Lee Evans,
the addition of all-events is a
result of very competitive
fields during the first two
years.
"Bowling is a growing sport
with young people throughout
the world and the Tournament
of the Americas is trying to
enhance its appeal by providing
an opportunity for juniors to
engage in international
competition," Evans said.
''We had junior
representatives from 13 nations
and territories in 1973 and I
think this indicates a definite
interest throughout the
hemisphere," Evans said.


Gottfried no.1 seed for open


BENGSTON AND GRAEBNER ARE

RANKED TWO AND THREE


_,', S. ..
: "


Ii; "-'- X; "

" .-'-.. <-*
"


33 IS
27 21
27 21
25 23
24 24
23 25
18 30
15 33


Guatemala
out


PORT-At' PRINCE, Haiti
Frinidad-T obago beat
Guatemala 1-0 in a regional
elimination soccer tournament
for next year's World Cup.
Other competing teams in
the region are Mexico, Haiti.
Honduras and the Netherlands
Antilles
I le winner also will be
proclaimed champion of the
North A erica Central
American and Caribbean
Soccer Federat on

Monday's game eliminated
Guatemtali from title chances
and rinidiad I obago is already
out of the running with two
defeats and one victory.


The standings by points
after nine days of play in the
roundrobin tournament are:
tlaiti 6. Mexico 4. Honduras 3,
Guatemala 2, Trinidad Tobago
2, Netherlands Antilles I.I(AP)


V
t\ :
t, ,-' -


Fritz Schunk .. back for the open

Reds trade pitcher


CINCINNATI The
Cincinnati Reds announced
today they have traded minor
league pitcher Steve Blaterick
of their Indianapolis farm team
for outfielder Roger Freed of
the Cleveland Indians'
Oklahoma City farm team.
The two switched effective


Freed, 27, was cho
league player of th
1970 when he hit
Rochester of the Int
League and had 24 h
and 130 runs batted i

He was with the P1
Phillies in 1971 and


BRIAN GOTTFRIED, 26,
ranked No. 10 in the United
States and presently lying 10th
in total win money with
$87,000 this year, will be
seeded no. I in the $10000
Bahamas International tennis
open scheduled to start at 2.00
p.m. tomorrow at the Ocean
Club courts, Paradise Island.


Gottfried has played on the
U.S. Davis Cup team for the
past six years and is currently
placed 1 lth on the World
Tennis championship tennis
tour with wins over Stan
Smith, Jan Kodes, Tom
Gorman, Illie Nastase and
Charles Passerell.
In August, Gottfried
clinched the $3,5000 first prize
in the Allen King tennis classic
in Las Vegas when he defeated
Arthur Ashe in the final.
In previous rounds Gottfried
had disposed of Colin Dibly,
Marty Rissen and Clark
Graebner.
Earlier this year Gottfried
captured the South African
championship with the WCT
tour group.
Seeded no. 2 in the tourney
will be Ove Bengston, Sweden's
no. 1 player, while the
belligerent Clark Graebner is
seeded no. 3.
At 28, Graebner has been
ranked in the world's top ten
players for the seventh time
this year and boasts the most
distinguished career of all the
players in the tourney.
In 1968 Graebner was the
hero when the United States
sen minor regained the Davis Cup from
eyear in Australia; he has twice reached
e year in Wimbledon's semi-finals and
ernational won the US Open at Forest
home runs Hills in 1971 when he defeated
n. Cliff Richey in the final.
This year Graebner reached
the quarter finals of the US
hiladelphia Open. He is presently ranked
1972. No. 8 in the USA and lies
f second in total, money


By IVAN JOHNSON I

earnings in the US LTA indoor
circuit.
Also among the seedings will
be British Davis Cup players
Steven Warboys and Buster
Mottram.
The draw for the tourney
will be completed today and
posted for all events at the
Ocean Club tennis courts.

The final of the men's open
singles and doubles will be
played on Wednesday,


December 19: the finals of the
men's senior singles and
doubles and the ladies singles
on Sunday, December 16.

The tourney carries a first
prize of $2000 for the winner.
Fritz Schunk. former
Sonesta Beach tennis pro.
twice Nassau champion and
winner of many championships
whilst resident in Nassau. will
be returning to take part in the
open.
Schunk is presently ranked
no. 2 amongst teaching pros in
the United States.


BOXING '(mipicle Antcmm
NASSAU STADIUM Bo

FRIDAY DEC. 14
Coakley Malakius
Presents
> "THE
& RETURN
OF
ELISHA ,W
I10-ROUNDS
ELISHA OBED..
Bahamian Champ

SAULO HERNANDZ
Puerto Rico Ace
also
FREDDIE MAJOR
JERRY POWERS
CLEVELAND WILLIAMS
.vs-
AFRO DAVIS
If You Love A Boxing Show oil
Come and See ELISHA 0. H
TICKETS: Ringside $8.00
Gen.$6.00
A Coakley
Malakius Show
- - . .- - -


LIFE, RETIREMENT or


DISABILITY INSURANCE

Why Not Join the Other
Thinking Bahamians
Protected by Imperial Life?
SEE

WINSTSN 'TAPPY' DAVIS
IMPERIAL LIFE REPRESENTATIVE

225081-


During the regular
competition the first four
teams qualified for the
semi-finals of the knockout
competition: Queen's College,
R. M. Bailey, Government High
School and St. Andrew's.
The semi-finals will be
played at 4.00 p.m. at Clifford
Park as follows: Queen's
College v St. Andrews,
Thursday, December 13; R. M.
Bailey v GHS Monday,
December 17.
The final will be played on
New Year's day starting at 1.30
p.m. at Clifford Park. The
President's Cup game between
the present holders. Red Lion
and the team leading the league
table, is slated for the same day
beginning 3.30 p.m.
The BFA has named 26
players in Nassau to form the
basic core from which the
national squad of 16 players
will be selected to represent
the Bahamas at the I2th
Central American and
Caribbean Sports Games early
next year.
Players from Division A,
Grand Bahama, are expected to
participate and the necessary
arrangements have been
initiated to coordinate travel
expenses for the players to
take part in training sessions.
Practice sessions under
national squad coack Dick
Wilson will start on Saturday,
December 15 at 3.30 p.m. at
the grounds of Queen's
College.
Players are asked to bring
along a football at all training
sessions.

Players named are: RED
LION: P. Johnson, P.
Whitfield, R. Steward, B.
Seville, D. Maples, C. Knight.
TROPIGAS: R. Rodgers,
K. Love. P. Cole,
R. Rodgers, K. Love, P. Cole,
B. Laing, S. Darville, S. Haven.
ST. GEORGE'S: R. Davies, S.
Nicholls. P. Nunez, P. Louison,
L. Minns. PARADISE: N.
Keeling, H. Rossi, 0. Fullone,
M. Haikitis. McALPINE: D.
Jenner, J. Williams, F. Crozier,
I. Lever, R. Simpson.





Uf0)('1


16 -


the


IMPERIAL LIFE
covers you for life


mro-o wwo sjlXA"* I I


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