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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03506
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: November 24, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03506

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VOL. LXX, No. 305 Saturday, November 24, 1973 Pric: 20 Cent


FNM LEADER GETS ROUSING RECEPTION, HEADS OFF LIKELY PARTY SPLIT





Isaacs wins full support,


IFNM


FNM Leader Kendal Isaacs

FOULKES TO

CONTEST


ST. BARNABAS
SENATOR ARTHUR
FOULKES has been selected
by the Free National
Movement to contest the St.
Barnabas by-election against
the Progressive Liberal Party's
Sinclair Outten.
Mr. Foulkes' nomination by
the party leadership was
overwhelmingly endorsed by
the FNM convention last night,
and warmly supported by Mr.
I. G. Stubbs, who was the
party's candidate for the
district in last year's general
election.
A member of the
dissident eight, who broke with
the PLP to form the l:ree-P'L'
and later the FNM, Senator
Foulkes is one of the most
vocal and popular members of
the party.
His selection as the FN.M's
standard bearer was announced
by leader Kendal Isaacs at the
end of his address to the
convention.
"We believe that it is our
duty to give the Bahamian
people a choice in each and
every constituency," Mr. Isaacs
said.
"We believe that wherever
there are people opposed to
the government, that those
people are entitled to the
opportunity to vote for an
alternative."
The Council therefore had
taken the decision that
wherever at all feasible, the
party would contest every
by-election in the
Commonwealth.
In accordance with that
decision, the executive
committee and the
parliamentary committee of
the FNM had met that morning
and decided to select a
candidate for St. Barnabas and
put forward his name for
ratification by the convention
as the supreme authority of the
party.
The nomination had been
made, Mr. Isaacs said, after
consultation with the St.
Barnabas Constituency
Association, represented by its
convention delegation.
CRUSADER
And on Senator Foulkes he
said: "He is a man who has
proven himself as a courageous
crusader in the cause of his
people. He is outspoken and
eloquent, a man of passionate
commitment and unswerving
dedication to the principles
which all of us here in this
convention hall hold dear....he
is a person who knows the
people and who is known by
the people."
The St. Barnabas by-election
is a result of the disclosure by
Mr. Outten that he is not
Bahamian-born and was
therefore not eligible to stand
as a candidate in the 1972
general election.
His election was
subsequently declared null and
void. Since independence Mr.
Outten has applied for and
been granted Bahamian
citizenship,


pledge allegiance


By NICKI KELLY
IN A UNANIMOUS SHOW OF CONFIDENCE, the Free National Movement convention last night pledged its


"total allegiance" and "unwavering support" of its leader Kendal Isaacs.


The rousing reception given
Mr. Isaacs before and after his
keynote address, demonstrated
the extent to which he had
unified the party after a near
rupture two days ago.
During the day, and in the
face of previous repeated
personal attacks by
representatives Sir Roland
Symonette, Cleophas Adderley
and Michael Lightbourn Mr.
Isaacs publicly endorsed a
resolution that would open the
way for the three expelled
members to return to the party
should they wish to do so.
"'There is no man in our
country tonight for whom I
have greater respect than our
Leader," St. George and
Dunmore representative
Norman Solomon told a
jammed convention hall.
Moving a resolution that
would put on record the
party's appreciation. Mr.
Solomon said: "There is no
one known to me who is more
deserving of your affection,
your respect, and your
allegiance. I promise you that
if you put faith in him, he will
never betray you."
Mr. Solomon reminded the
convention of his remarks the
night before. "I said to you
tnat the two greatest qualities
which leaders and governments
ougilt to possess are strength of
cha.t.- 'r' :nid finely honed
sense of justice for mankind.
"Kendal Isaacs has so much
strength of character that I say
to you he is a moral Sampson.
And with it he owns a
compassionate nature, a
mature and benign soul which
is committed at all times and
in all places to ensuring that all
those who come his way are
met with civility, equal respect,
and an abundant portion of
fair play.
"It has been said that he
is weak. But then many
mistake brazen bombast for
strength and mature quiet and
effective action for weakness.
"It has been said that he is
not a good politician. 1 hope
that is as true as I believe it to
be because I do not want
Mr. Isaacs to become a politician.
"He has enough good
polititicans on all sides of him
who, in the main, will never
rise above being good
politicians.
"What I want my Leader
to be, what I want him to
remain, is what he is ... a
statesman ... and leave the
driving to us. When we make
Kendal Isaacs Prime
Minister of this country and
almost all of you in this hall
will live to see that day I
want him to be what he can
be ... the finest, most
honourable Prime Minister
your country has ever had."
Mr. Solomon's resolution
was seconded by Senator
Henry Bostwick. It reads:
"Resolved that whereas the
lion. Kendal George Lamon
Isaacs is in the estimation of
his parliamentary colleagues
the only one of their number
who commands their total
allegiance.
"And whereas the Hon.
Kendal George Lamon Isaacs is
abundantly blessed with the
experience and the knowledge
to discharge the duties of party


WATKINS ANNOYED, NOT HURT
MARSH HARBOUR members Sir Roland
representative Errington Symonette, Cleophas Adderley
Watkins has denied he was and Michael Lightbourn.
"hurt" because he was left out Mr. John Morley, a delegate
of an FNM convention from the Nassau constituency,
resolution dealing with the told the convention yesterday
reinstatement of ex lled that he had been awakened by
Mr. Watkins at 7 a.m. and told
how "hurt" he was by the
omission of his name, which
had also been proposed.
"What I told Mr. Morley was
F *YOthat I was extremely annoyed
because my name was used
without my permission. I gave
no one permission and I have
spoken to no one about
readmission to the FNM."


SENATOR ORVILLE TURNQUEST has been re-elected
chairman of the Free National Movement with Dr. Paul
Albury and Mr. Fred Ramsey re-elected vice-chairmen.
Mr. Clifford Cooper was also re-elected to the post of
secretary-general.
Miss Lorraine Lightbourn and Mr. L. Garth Wright were
elected assistant secretaries-general, with Mr. Bill
Farquharson, treasurer; Mr. G. Newbold and Mr. Bazel
Nichols, assistant treasurer and the Rev. Thomas Smith
and Hubert Ward, chaplins.


Leader with distinction.
"And whereas the name
Kendal George Lamon Isaacs is
synonymous in the
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas with morality,
integrity, temerity and ability.
"Be it and it hereby is
resolved that this second
annual convention of the Free
National Movement here
assembled in formal session
does unanimously and by
acclamation pledge its devoted
allegiance and unwavering
support to and its total
confidence in the lion. Kendal
George'Lamon Isaacs both as a


Bahamian of unique distinction
and as the most capable Leader
of the Free National
Movement.
"Be it further resolved that a
copy of this resolution over the
signatures of his parliamentary
colleagues, and suitably
prepared and framed, be
presented to the Hon. Kendal
George Lamon Isaacs with the
warmest best wishes and the
sincere respect of his
parliamentary colleagues, his
party and his followers."
Earlier, St. John's
representative Noel Roberts
said "without hesitation that


Kendal Isaacs is a great man
and a good leader."
Devoting a portion of his
own address to the party's
critics, Mr. Roberts said that
after the election he had no
hesitation and neither did any
of the remaining seven
members of the FNM, in
selecting Mr. Isaacs as Leader,
"a job which he has done well.
"I say to his critics," Mr.
Roberts challenged, "you come
and be the scapegoat. Mr.
Isaacs is not a fence sitter as
has been alleged. He is devoted
to our common goal ... he
devotes his time unselfishly for
our good, and I will remain
loyal to him and to his
leadership in this party as long
as he continues to put the
interest of the people of this
country above all else."
Mr. Roberts said he was sick
and tired of the unjust
criticism "that has been laid at
our feet by our once so-called
friends. I say to them: 'don't
leave the struggle to just a few,
Page 3, Col. 3


'Overall development plan that PLP has


failed to produce, is needed-'FNM chief

By NICKI KELLY
AN OVERALL DEVELOPMENT PLAN what the country needsand what the PLP has failed"
to produce is the only real and permanent solution to the country's economic and social
problems, FNM leader Kendal Isaacs told the party's convention last night.


It was time, Mr. Isaacs said,
that we stopped thinking of
massive poverty as simply a
symptom of underdevelopment
and begin rather to think of it
as a condition that must be
attacked within the framework
of the nation's overall
development programme.
The Prime Minister in his
speech to the PLP*convention
had referred to the
unemployment, poor housing
and other ills afflicting the
country. If, however, the
government thought it would
find magic solutions to these
problems, he could safely


predict such magic would not
work.
"There is no way that
unemployment can be tackled
as a separate issue," Mr. Isaacs
said. 'There is no way that
poor housing and any other ills
can be treated as separate
issues."
What the country needed to
have was an overall
development plan. It was the
FNM's view however that the
PLP was incapable of
producing an intelligent
programme for the
development of the country.
Furthermore, the Leader


FNM leader slams PLP's


two standards of justice
FREE NATIONAL MOVEMENT LEADER Kendal Isaacs
served notice on the government last night that his party will not
tolerate victimization and would take every political, legal and
constitutional means to eradicate this evil.


"It is obivous that the PLP
intends to establish two
standards of justice in this
country. One for those who
subscribe to their philosophy
and one for those who refuse
to bow to their dictates, but
who prefer to act as free men
in the exercise of their
God-given and Constitutional
rights," he told FNM
convention delegates.
It was for them, he said, to
establish once and for all, the
promise and the guarantee of
the Constitution, "that we are
all entitled to be what we are,
to say how we feel, and to vote
according to our conscience
without fear of being
ostracised and victimized."
Everyone was aware of the case
of Sinclair Outten, who was
elected as the representative
for St. Barnabas and later
found out that he was not in
fact a Bahamian.
'The government hastily
went through motions to make
Mr. Outten a citizen under our
new Constitution and I do
not condemn them for that
Mr. Isaacs said.
But, he wanted to know, if a
representative of the FNM was
found to be in similar
circumstances, would he too
have been given the same
consideration by the
government?
"We know that the answer
would be No! And they, in the
depths of their hearts, also
know that the answer would be
"No."


Charged the Leader:
"There were other men born
in Turks Island like Mr.
Outten who did not run for
election, who did not even
vote in the last election, but
whose Bahamian wives
exercised their right to vote
for the candidate of their
choice, but who have
nevertheless, been cruelly
uprooted from their families
and from the land which is in
fact their home.
'They and their children
suffer because of an accident
of birth because of the
inhumanity of the PLP
government."
Mr. Outten however had
been made a citizen and had
been nominated to represent
Bahamian people in the
by-election in St. Barnabas.
Expressing his deep concern,
Mr. Isaacs predicted the
Bahamas would never achieve
peace and brotherhood so long
as the "evil practice" of
victimization continued.
"We must endeavour to
convince the people of this
country, be they PLP or FNM,
that is is wrong, this is
wicked, and that it is
destructive to our national
purpose to continue to indulge
in victimization and
discrimination."
It was his belief, he said
"that all of us have a
contribution to make and that
all of us are entitled to benefit
accordingly."


contended, even if they could
have someone produce such a
programme for them, they
would be incapable of putting
it into effect.
He said the PLP government
did not enjoy the confidence
necessary to put into operation
a plan which would bring
about economic revival in the
country.
'They have destroyed the
confidence in themselves and
in the country by a consistent
display of incompetence, lack
of understanding and appalling
bad faith."
To improve the social
conditions of the people, as the
PLP constantly talked about
doing, required and demanded
money, and the only way that
money could be made available
was through overall
development and economic
growth.
"We maintain," he said,
"that only a government by
the FNM can restore the
confidence necessary to
achieve the objectives of this
nation.
"It is through confidence
that we will be able to attract
much-needed foreign capital. It
is through confidence that
interest rates can be kept at a
reasonable level. It is through
confidence that we will be able
to provide development for the
entire Commonwealth."

Roberts slates 'false

pri ises' to farmers
"Agriculture in the Bahamas
today, in all its aspects, is
medieval in every respect and
Government has done nothing
to improve this situation," St.
John's M.P., Noel Roberts,
declared on the floor of the
FNM convention Friday night.
Mr. Roberts asserted that
"this country is able to sustain
itself from its own productivity
in this field, but unless the
farmer is given the proper
education, the proper tools and
equipment, the proper
chemicals, the proper
marketing process he is unable
to make proper use of his
abilities. "
Mr. Roberts told convention
delegates that Government
continues to make "false
promises" to improve the
farmers' lot, but the 1973
bucket, he said, allocated "the
measly sum of $8,000" to
that purpose, and "it is
doubtful that they will get
even this."


SENATOR ARTHUR FOULKES, (left) following his
nomination by the Free National Movement convention last night
to contest the St. Barnabas by-election for the party. His
nomination was fully endorsed by Mr. I.G. Stubbs (right) who ran
for the district in the 1972 general election.


Talk of industrialization


just PLP 'immoral lie'

THE GOVERNMENT'S TALK of substantial industrial
diversification and industrial development was described
Thursday night as nothing more than an "immoral lie."


In his address to the FNM
convention St. George's
representative Norman
Solomon pointed out that
water and electricity, both
essential to industrialization,
were on the verge of collapse.
When the PLP took over, he
said, there was sufficient water.
Had there been intelligent,
rational, forward-planning, the
present desperate situation in
Nassau could have been
avoided.
He maintained that in the
matter of electricity Nassau
was still subject to costly and
agonizing power failures, "and
it is only because the
expansion of the economy has
ceased entirely that the BEC is
able to keep pace at all with
existing consumer demands,"
Mr. Solomon charged.
Another "absolute essential"
in any developing nation, and
one which sought to
industrialise, was a "reliable,
economical means of
transportation within and
without the country.
When the PLP came to
power, Mr. Solomon said, it
was handed a ready-made
airline "which operated as
efficiently as any other aerial
network in a country our
size." The PLP had added to
this list of its wrongdoings by
bringing about the collapse of
Bahamas Airways.
Now the country found
itself immersed in another of
the PLP's national failures ...
Bahamasair.
Declared Mr. Solomon: "It
is an airline concieved by the
PLP and largely operated by
the PLP. Perhaps this explains


why it operates so inefficiently
that is must lose a small
fortune at the end of its first
year of operation.
"It never leaves on time,
never gets there on time. Some
of the time it doesn't go at
all."
One of the commodities
necessary in any nation bent
on industrialization was cheap
labour, Mr. Solomon said.
While this had not been
previously available in the
Bahamas, Bahamians were now
so economically deprived that
they were willing to work for
less than a subsistence wage.
The FNM had warned a year
ago that the government was
not making adequate provision
for the thousands of young
Bahamians leaving school each
year.
Last night Mr. Solomon said
all the signpoints pointed
toward a visible deteriorating
standard of living for all those
whom the government had
specifically pledged to elevate.
Faced with a growing and
steadily graver need for
increased public expenditure
and a shrinking economy, the
government had turned to the
last resort ... taxation.
While it was one thing to tax
while the people could bear it
it was quite another when the
country was faced with
inflation and increasing
unemployment.
And he added: It was one
thing to put your taxed dollars
into the hands of those who
will seek the maximum benefit
for the most people, and
another to enrich some PLP
supporter.


Architects cite Yellow Elder


as'pollution of environment'


THE INSTITUTE OF BAHAMIAN ARCHITECTS, asserting its
determination to promote protection of the environment,
yesterday cited the Government's much-maligned Yellow Elder
Gardens low-cost housing project as an example of "pollution of
the environment."
IBA chairman ROSTON But in Yellow Elder, he said,
MILLER told reporters at a "the pedestrian's only
press conference that one of protection is his own
the "familiar situations" for alertness."
which alternatives are needed is He said the answer was not
the fact that "the pattern of necessarily sidewalks, but an
development here is initial community design giving
helter-skelter a good pedstrains and vehicles entirely
example is Yellow Elder separate paths of movement.
Gardens. Mr. Miller added that, for
"It's obvious," he declared example. "children should
"that that project was not have access to playgrounds
properly planned as a without encountering cars at
community." all." In addition, there were
He said the project revealed methods of road design which
"no imagination at all," and would force cars to maintain a
the monotony of rows of relatively slow and less
nearly identical homes gives dangerous pace when moving
the home-owners "no incentive through the community.
to keep his property in good
repair." H.E & LIAY N 1
Mr. Miller said that in most .E. LADY N LUI
communities which are GOVERNOR General Si
improperly planned the main Milo and Lady Butler leavt
Nassau tomorrow for
problems which result can be Deadman' s Cay where the)
traced to the failure of the will begin a five-day tour ol
designers to "plan for people." Long Island and Rum Cay.
Such developments, he said, The official party will attend
mass at St. Paul's Anl'car
give the people things they do Church at Clarence Town
not need, and do not give the Sunday evening then attend
people things they do need. reception Monay morning o
IBA vice chairman Pat Mortimers and Gordon
citizens at the Mortimer
Rahming described Yellow Scihol
Elder as "a reasonable example Also on Monday, they wil
of a place where the visit the schools at Roses
relationship between cars and Morrisville, Clarence Town
people was not thought out." Buckleys, meeting the citizens
of these areas. Laday Butler will
He said it is possible to plant two fruit trees a
design communities v.here Morrisville,
meetings of pedestrian and Tuesday, they will visil
vehicular traffic is "minimal." schools and be hosted to


Sir Roland


has 'open


mind' about


going back
By Nicki Kelly
A FREE NATIONAL
Movement delegation, acting
on behalf of the chairman,
today called on Shirlea
representative Sir Roland
Symonette and presented him
with yesterday's convention
resolution pertaining to the
terms of his possible
readmission to the party.
"Out of profound respect
for these men and the country
itself, I have agreed to leave the
matter open and keep an open
mind until I have discussed it
with the other expelled
members," Sir Roland told The
Tribune this morning.
The proposed re-instatement
of Sir Roland, Nassau
representative Cleophas
Adderley and Clarence Town
M.P. Michael Lightbourn,
threatened for two days to
dismember the Opposition
movement.
The two warring factions
mended their differences
however on a compromise
resolution that welcomed the
return of the three providing
they first apologized for
breaking the party line and
declared their intention to
abide by the party's
constitution and regulations
"in word and spirit."
Sir Roland, who last night
told a Nassau constituency
meeting he would not go back,
said he had been in Miami
during the day and therefore
attended the meeting without
knowing the wording of the
FNM resolution.
DELEGATION
This morning Messrs. George
Thompson, Mike Cartwright,
John Morely and Peter Christie
called on him, he said. 'They
explained fully what went on
in the convention. How the
members spoke and showed they
definitely wanted me back."
Out of consideration for
them and the country Sir
Roland said he would keep an
open mind until he had
discussed the matter with the
other two members involved.
"I also must ask the opinion
of my people of Shirlea who
elected me, but I have
promised these men that I will
keep an open mind, despite
anything said at last night's
meeting."
The meeting was called by
Mr. Adderley, who also made it
clear he would not go back to
the FNM. Mr. Lightbourn was
off the island at the time, and
therefore did not attend.
UNFORTUNATE
"It was unfortunate the
meeting was called at that
time, before we knew what was
coming up at the convention,"
said Sir Roland today.
"I promised I would attend
and Mr. Adderley didn't see fit
to cancel the meeting." There
was an "unfortunate set of
circumstances surrounding the
whole thing," Sir Roland said.
Repeating his intention to
keep an open mind, he said
that as soon as Mr. Lightbourn
returned the three would get
together and discuss the
matter.
It was Mr. Thompson's
resolution calling for the
reinstatement of Sir Roland
and the amendment by Mr.
Morley to include the other
two representatives, which
launched the full-scale
convention debate on their
expulsion.
Mr. Christie provided the
compromise resolution that
restored the unanimity of the


party.


6 ISLAND VISIT
r receptions by the citizens at
e Grays, McKanns, Salt Pond,
Dea, Simms and Millars.
S A police launch will take
f the party to Rum Cay on
Wednesday morning where a
reception will be held by the
S citizens there and return to
n Cape Santa Maria
a





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Saturday, November 24, 1973


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JAQUELINE Thompson, a
26-year-old Blonde who says
she lost the pleasure of
kiming after facial injuries in
a road crash, was awarded
damage of $12.240 by
England's high court.

A 61-YEAR-OLD man has
been arrested in Terre
Haunte. ind. in the fatal
shooting of his
87-year-old mother and
80-vear-old aunt in separate
nursing home-,.
PRINCE CHARLES, heir
to the British throne, has
spent another day shooting
partridges at the Spanish
Estate owned by his hosts the
eigth Duke and Duchess of
Wellington.

ROBERT McNamara,
President of the World Bank,
h:;s climbed the 18,400-foot
Mt. Kalapatar in Nepal but
said he was content to just
look at the 29,028-foot Mt.
Everest.

INTERNATIONAL known
Japanese actor Sessue
Ilayakawa, 87, died of lung
trouble last night. Among the
well-known movies Hayakawa
act.J in were Bridge on the
Ri er Kwai and Yoshiwara.

THE CONDITION OF
David Bcn-Gurion, Israel's
first Prime Minister and grand
old man of Israeli politics, has
deteriorated the state radio
said today


PRESIDENT Nixon's
astior says he is under
pressure to drop Nixon's
church membership because
of the President's handling of
the Watergate scandal and the
war in southeast Asia. Pastor
T. Eugene Coffin of the East
ihftt ;.,_ f-'. -j,. t-.... .


vv illttel r rlenll
Nixon's hor
Whittier. Calif
ltad no intentit
Nixon's inembe

THE ( I tR
was lifted con
by the Govern
was no ind
martial law co

STUDENTS
rock-t hrow i
rampage to
industiral cent
The latest
Thursday, w
announced t
being granted
sub-inspecto
growing out of
which a stud
dead by police.

A NAPLE
received an
phone call t
person clain
k no w Iedg
disappearance
III. Police said
the call was a h


SIXTEEN Fl
flying to the (
Islands for
holiday divi
w o n d up
thanksgiving
U.S State De
The pilot o
aircraft r
malfunction in
instrument bet
Havana.


Bombers

pound

airstrip
SAIGON South
Vietnamese bombers pounded
a communist air strip and army
base near the Cambodian
border in retaliation for the
rocketing of the Pleiku airbase,
military sources said today.
Gove-nment planes flew
more than 50 sorties yesterday
against Katum, former U.S.
special forces camp 70 miles
northwest of Saigon.
The planes met heavy
antiaircraft fire. One
government F5 fighter bomber
was believed shot down and
the pilot captured in the
attack.
The attack on Katum, which
fell to the Communists after
American forces pulled out of
South Vietnam and is now
deep inside Communist
territory, came within hours of
a rocket barrage against Pleiku
in the central highlands.


TENSION increased today along the
Arab-Israeli ceasefire lines. Israeli government
officials warned that war could resume and
that Russia bad re-equipped the Syrian and
Egyptian annies.
Minor shooting incidents have been breaking
out almost daily along both Egyptian and
Syrian ceasefire lines, Israeli sources said.
A Tel Aviv newspaper reported that the
Israeli forces on the Syrian front have been
placed on maximum alert.
At Kilometer 101 inside Egypt, where
Israeli and Egyptian negotiators have been
meeting in an effort to implement the
six-point ceasefire accord, a U.N. spokesman


They're


JERUSALEM Lack of
discipline something the
Israeli Army has always
been somewhat proud of -
was partly to blame for
Israel's setbacks in the
October war, a top military
expert has charged.
"It is clear today that
part of our shortcomings at
the start of the war
stemmed from lack of
discipline ... from an
atmosphere of negligence
and who-give-a-damn that
spread through the nation
and infected the army,"
wrote Maj. Gen. (Res,)
Haim Herzog, former chief
of military intelligence and
now the nation's favourite
wartime commentator.
Herzog wrote in the Daily
Haaretz of "untidy,
unshaven soldiers needing a
haircut," and his words
were doubly harsh to an
army that believes its
fighting spirit makes up for
its casual style.
"Throughout the world,


That's no

way

to win
a war
no one has found a
substitute for uncompro-
mising discipline in
organizing an army," he
said.
Herzog complained that a
year ago, when he attacked
the Army's decision to let
its troops appear in public
without caps, he was
accused of "harping on
trivialities."
Now, he wrote
sarcastically:
"We are a big nation that
only deals with big matters
- billions, territories,
Kissinger, oil, international
policy and grand schemes.
We tend to ignore the
details that make up these
subjects."
Herzog said that "when a


said tensions were mounting and "there is a
chance of more incidents."
The negotiators conferred for IV2 hours
today on the implementation of the six-point
ceasefire but reached no decisions on the
crucial question of troop withdrawals.
The two sides agreed to meet again
tomorrow the fourth day in a row. There has
been speculation that the regularity of the
talks indicates progress.
At Kilometer 101, Egyptian Lt. Gen.
Hohamed El Gamasy and his Israeli
counterpart Maj. Gen. Aharon Yariv, emerged
from the U.N. tent after today's session, shook
hands and smiled. They had met for two hours
yesterday.


Arab unity 'still-


seems remote'


us Cnurcn in ALGIERS Palestinian
ne town of leaders move into the spotlight
ornia, said he
ornia, said he Monday when the kings and
on of dropping presidents of the Arab world
'rship. gather here to seek an Arab
A s consensus for the peace talks
inv Athens with Israel.
npletely today The Algerian government's
ment but there official news magazine
ication when Revolution Africaine described
muld be ended. the summit as "a turning point
in the history of the Arab
Sent on a peoples."
ig. fire-raising But from the outset,
idayi in the achievement of the Arab unity
re of Kanpur. sought by the Algerian hosts
unrest began appeared remote. The leaders
hen it was of Libya and Iraq, who reject
tha: bail was the Conn Zaidmf a peace
to a police conference with Israel, have
r on charges given notice they will boycott
an incident in the summit.
ent was shot Yasir Arafat, chairman of
the Palestine Liberation
Organization, is expected to
S newspaper play a key rolle here and at
anonymous the peace conference -as the
oday from a recognized spokesman of
ning to have Palestinians inside and outside
:e of the
f Israeli-held areas.
of Paul Getty Arafat conferred at length
they believed with Soviet leaders in Moscow
oax. last week on his strategy at the
peace conference. His reported
wl willingness to take part in the
orida residents peace talks at all was in
Grand Cayman conflict with the position of
a Caribbean some of the more radical
ng expedition Palestinian leaders, who still
s p e ending maintain that the state of Israel
in Cuba, the must be torn down.
pratment says. Argument also continued.
f the civilian behind the scenes whether
reported a Arafat should set up
a navigational Palestinian government in exile.
ore landing in Secretary of State Henry
l-p.rt.s from At' Kissinger has predicted the


peace co.-ference will open in
Geneva next month. Arab
officials here appeared less
confident. They accused Israel
of stalling by refusing to return
to the Oct. 22 ceasefire lines.

Some western diplomats
believed the Arab insistence on
such a withdrawal might
ultimately serve as an alibi, if
necessary, to conceal Arab
disunity.
The Israeli withdrawal
sought by the Arabs would put
an end to the encirclement of
Egypt's 3rd Army.
Syrian President Hafez
Assad has explained that he
accepted the ceasefire only
after receiving "firm
assurance" from the Soviet
Union that Israel would
withdraw from all occupied
territories presumably
including Arab Jerusalem and
the Golan Heights and that
Palestinian rights would be
restored. (AP).

01 talks
LIBYAN President
Moammar Khadafy met for
more than two hours with
French President Georges
Pompidou today in Paris to
discuss the Middle East crisis
and the cutback in the flow of
Arab oil to Europe.
Khadafy said he found the
Pompidou's view reflected
what he called the over-all
pro-Arab attitude of the
French people.(AP).


Rationing

'has been

approved'

BOSTON An official of
the New England Fuel Institute
says a national_programme of
fuel oil rationing has already
been approved by the federal
government.
Charles Burkhardt, executive
vice president of the institute,
says residential use of fuel oil
will be cut 15 per cent and
industrial use reduced ten per
cent from last year's figures.
Burkhardt says the proposal
will be revealed either Monday
or Tuesday.
He says two or three weeks
of discussion will follow
announcement of the plan.
And he predicts It will then be
implemented with any
approved modifications.
Meanwhile President Nixon
met today with two top
advisers on the energy crisis.
A White House spokesman
said no announcements were
expected.
The President met with
energy adviser John Love and
domestic counsellor Melvin
Laird.
White House sources said a
Sunday closing of gasoline
filling stations would have been
a key point under
consideration.
Administration officials say
there is no plan to ban Sunday
driving.

GM cuts


production
DETROIT General Motors
have trimmed 79,000 cars -
most of them standard and
intermediate sizes from its
production schedules for the
week of Dec. 16.
GM's normal weekly
production is between 120,000
and 130,000 cars. The
December cutback is the
company's first major
reduction in five years.
GM described the reshuffling
of production schedules in its
U.S. and Canadian assembly
plants as "a move to balance
dealer inventories of certain
passenger cars with customer
demand in the market
place."(AP).

Dull comet
SANFRANCISCO The
comet Kohoutek will not be as
bright as scientists had
believed, an astronomer says.
Ralph Palsson of the
Astronomical Society of the
Pacific said that recent
observation has shown
Kohoutek to be a dusty, rather
than gassy, comet.
On an astronomical scale,
Palsson said this means its
brightness will reach a
magnitude of minus five,
instead of minus 10 as first
expected


soldier walks about untidy,
unshaven, needing a haircut,
there is no certainty as to
the state of his weapon, the
condition of his tank's
engine ... the preparedness
of his unit."
He said this did not
damage the soldier's
fighting spirit, but raised the
cost of living and equipment
in battle.
"Our disaster was that we
were frivolous not only
toward the enemy but
toward the principles
accepted by the whole
world ... we thought we
were too clever to bother
with these matters," he
wrote.
"There was an attitude in
the top echelons that one
shouldn't bother with trifles
... today it is clear that
neglect of these trifles was
among the causes of the
disaster that befell us."
Herzog said his sense of
national pride was hurt (AP


-MARJORIE-

IS ON

TOP OF

THE WORLD

LONDON Marjorie
Wallace thought her legs were
too short, but others
thought otherwise, and today'
the 19-year-old American
blonde was the first Miss
World ever chosen from the
United States.
The brown-eyed, 5-foot-7
fashion model from
Indianapolis triumphed over
53 other lovelies last night to
win the crown that could
earn her $100,00 in a single
year as an international
beauty queen.
Mom was in London's
Royal Albert Hall for the
show, looking proud and
picking up dollars from the
bookies.
"I'm sure pleased with my
baby," said Mrs. Alice
Wallace. "I put $50 on her to
win at odds of 12-1."
Runner-up to Miss United
States in the annual contest
was Miss Philippines,
18-year-old Evangeline
Pascual from Bataan. She
wants to be a painter but in
the meantime is studying
karate "to fight off unwanted
wolves."
Miss Jamaica, 21-year-old
salesgirl Patricia Yuen, took
third place. Miss Israel, Haya
Katzir, 18, was fourth and
Miss South Africa,
22-year-old Shelley Latham,
was fifth.
The contest was staged
before an audience of 3,500
in the hall and an estimated
30 million watching on
television. The judges
included movie star Gregory
Peck.(AP).


-AMBUSH KILLING


till sniffing I'PLANNED AS


at The

Mousetrap

LONDON The world's
longest running mystery play, a
modest little thriller called The
Mousetrap, comes of age this
weekend after 8,717
performances.
When the curtain falls
tomorrow after marking its
21st birthday, the paly will
have been seen by more than
3,200,00 people.
The Mousetrap is a
straightforward detective story,
opening with a scream in the
dark as a body is found and
ending as the murderer is led
away.
Only a handful of the 1,300
actors and actresses who have
appeared in it have been or
become stars.

The author, Dame Agatha
Christie, now 82, has written
more than eight detective
novels and nearly a score of
plays. She knows the theatre
business, but she originally
predicted The Mousetrap
wouldn't last six months.
The Mousetrap has broken
all records for a continuous run
by a play, pulled in more than
$7.2 million at the box office
and still draws capacity
crowds. Company manager
Anthony Huntly Gordon is the
only survivor of the original
company.
As a matter of policy, the
cast of eight is changed every
year.
Since the play is set "in the
present," numerous
adjustments have had to be
made in the original script.
Reference to wartime rationing
disappeared nearly two decades
ago, and the cost of a night's
lodging at the guest house
where the action takes place
has been updated.

The play has become a
statistician's delight. Publicist
Toirington Douglas said that in
its 21 years, 137.5 tons of
programmes have been printed,
39 miles of the cast' shirts have
been ironed backstage, and
8,679 cigars have been
smoked by one of the
characters there was a gap
when he had laryngitis.(AP).

Killer stem
AT LEAST 38 died, 32
others were missing and
damage was estimated at about
$1.5 million in the wake of the
tropical storm nicknamed
Openg for Ophelia, the
official Philippine news agency
reported today.
The agency reported at least
10,000 families, from between
50-60,000 people were made
homeless. (AP).


ASSASSINATION'


BUENOS AIRES A
high-level police source said the
ambush killing of A U.S. car
executive appeared to have
been planned as an
assassination rather than an
attempted kidnapping.
"From the meticulous
execution ... I have no doubt
that it was a deliberate
assassination," the source said.
John Swint, 56, was killed
Thursday in a blaze of
machinegun fire by about 15
men who stopped his car in
Cordoba. Two bodyguards also
were killed and a third was
critically wounded.
Swint was general manager
of Transax, a parts
manufacturing firm owned by
the Ford Motor Co. Labour
leaders said there was no
trouble at his plant and there
was no firm evidence to suggest
a motive.
The police source said
Swint's guards had no chance
to draw their guns.
Transax officials may have
ignored kidnap or extortion
threats, and the attackers may
have just decided to enforce
their threat, the informant
said.
Police sources say they are
convinced the assailants were
from the People's
Revolutionary Army known
by the initials of its Spanish
name ERP outlawed in
September.
There were no clues, and the
ERP has said nothing.
"I have talked to many
foreigners about this," said one
qualified American observer.
"People are thinking that
kidnapping have moved on to
assassinations, and that's much
more serious. Obviously this
will have much more impact
than kidnapping solved by
ransom."
In any case, Argentina's
wave of violence showed clear
signs of increasing.
Unkown persons
kidnapped an Austrian-born
manager of a food company
Thursday, and police in the
city of Rosario shot to death
two alleged guerillas.
Three major kidnap victims
remained captive.
The economic impact could
be significant, businessmen


said. Aside from the possible
effect on investment, many
executives were suddenly
aware that any labour trouble
could mean violence.
The government has made
no official comment on
The Cordoba attack, but police
mounted a search.

Swint was the first foreigner
directly gunned down in
Argentina's political violence,
which began several years ago

Swint was due to leave in a
few months, a relative said in
Detroit.
"He was coming home for
Christmas, and his assignment
would have been completed
after the first of the year," said
Frank Sherman. Swint's
brother-in-law.(AP).


Bermuda murders

were 'for cash'
THE MURDERS of three
officials in Bermuda in the last
year. involved "Economic
interests," a spokesman for the
British U.N. mission said here
United Nations.
Britain had sent experts to
the territory to investigate the
killing of the Governor, Sir
Richard Sharpies, and his
aide-de-camp, Captain Hugh
Sayers, last March 10, six
months after the murder of
former police commissioner
George Duckett.
"We are satisfied that they
were not political murders,"
the British spokesman told
reporters.
'There were some economic
interests involved. When I say
economic, I mean in the simple
sense of cash."

He said he was unable for
the moment to elaborate. (AP)
at the United Nations.

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Saturday, November 24, 1973


UbhtP Urtbunt
NuLLUU AM oIrus JUAREI IN VERBA MAGBTIm
Being Piund To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publiher/Editor 1903. 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Publiher/Editor 1917-1972
Contrbuting Editor 1972.
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publiser/Editor 1972-
Published Daily Monday to Saturday


EDITORIAL


The moving finger writes

By ETIENNE DUPUCH
GRAND CAYMAN, November 1: Jack Anderson is perhaps
the most widely read newspaper columnist in the U.S. He is
recognized as the most successful investigative reporter in the
nation.
Under the caption "Nixon's Nephew, Businessman," he
revealed in a recent column that Donald Nixon, a nephew of
President Nixon, is active in the Robert Vesco organization in
Geneva and Costa Rica. No mention is made of Nassau. Anderson
states that young Nixon, prior to taking on his present job, had
lived in the mountains of California with what his father called
"hippies" and that Tony Wasewiez, a former New York
policeman who was used by the White House for a number of
varied assignments, was sent to the mountains to bring him back.
Anderson quoted from letters allegedly written by Donald to
friends in the U.S. in which he expressed dislike for his job and
particular distaste for Robert Vesco. In this alleged letter he is
quoted as writing: "I got myself into this by letting my parents
and the great god in the White House (President Nixon) pull wool
over my eyelids..."
For some time now a nephew of President Nixon has been
active in certain business circles in Nassau.
An American in Nassau, who thought President Nixon should
be informed, wrote to a friend in Palm Beach who is on speaking
terms with the President.
Apparently the White House was not interested.


Recently a group of investigative reporters from one of
America's most powerful and prestigious newspapers, were in
Nassau following a smelly trail from the White House to a leading
political figure in Nassau.
I don't know what they were looking for ... it was top secret.
Nor do I know whether they found what they sought but I am
told that they returned to the U.S. with a mine of information
which they will hold for use on an appropriate occasion.
This is most unfortunate for the Bahamas but, as I have often
pointed out in this column, politicians make the news ...
newspapers print the kind of news they make.
I am told that Cecil Wallace Whitfield was here last week on a
professional matter.
There is a feeling in this island that he will soon be returning to
the political arena in the Bahamas as the leader of a labour party.
Mr. Whitfield is now legal adviser to a strong labour party in
Nassau that is disillusioned with the P.L.P. government.
Mr. Whitfield was an interested observer of the Bahamas
Democratic League which I formed in 1955 in an effort to bring
black and white men together at the political level in an effort to
Save the colony from the destruction it now faces. He attended
- the meetings but never became an active member. At the time he
was a Customs Officer.
In January 1956 I was instrumental in breaking down racial
discrimination in the colony with a resolution I was able to press
through two stormy meetings of the House.
A happy racial relationship grew up immediately as a result
of this major reform but the two small extremist political
elements in Nassau ... the U.B.P. on the right and the P.L.P. on
the left ... concentrated all theii efforts against this
middle-of-the-road party at the general elected which came five
months later.
My brother Eugene was the only B.D.L. member to retain his
seat. I was defeated by a U.B.P. and a P.L.P. for the two seats in
the predominantly coloured district.
I then resigned completely from active politics and my brother
Eugene took on the chairmanship of the B.D.L. which he allowed
to die a quiet death some time later. He joined the U.B.P. and
became Minister of Welfare when Cabinet government was
established in the colony in 1964. He acted as Prime Minister on
several occasions.
I was appointed to the Legislative Council by Sir Raynor
Arthur and in 1963 my brother and I were among the 20-man
delegation that went to London to draft the new constitution
which moved the colony up from a Representative to a
Responsible form of government in 1964.
At this conference the name of the Legislative Council was
changed to Senate. I resigned from the Senate some time after the
P.L.P. took over the government in protest against an injustice I
felt had been done to Mr. Randol Fawkes by the P.L.P. in the
House.
The irony of the whole situation was that Mr. Fawkes was one
of two men who had made it possible for Mr. Pindling to take
over the government in 1967 when a general election gave the
U.B.P. and the P.L.P. an equal number of seats in the House.
These two men turned the scales in favour of the P.L.P. As a
reward A. R. Braynen was given the Speakership and Randol
Fawkes was made Minister of Labour. Mr. Braynen is now High
Commissioner for the Bahamas in London with the title of
Excellency.
Mr. Fawkes fell into disfavour with the govemment when he
refused to countenance the behaviour of the stevedores union
which had signed a contract with shipping agents in Nassau and
then wanted to repudiate, it.
Mr. Fawkes threw the problem into the lap of Mr. Pindling
who, for reasons of political expediency, allowed the union to
have its way. That day Mr. Pindling set labour on a road that
has built the present colossus which now threatens to break the
strangle-hold his party has had on the islands for nearly seven
years.
* ** *
In the meantime young Whitfield went to the Inns of Court in
London to read law.
On his return to Nassau as a Barrister-at-Law he joined the
P.L.P. and became a powerful Minister in the Party ... so
powerful that Mr. Pindling recognized him as a threat to his
power.
This was a man he had to be rid of. At an earlier stage he had
been able to get rid of Paul Adderley when this brilliant young
lawyer was getting too strong in the party. On that occasion he
had succeeded in making outlaws of young Adderley and the
three other members of the party who had refused to do his
bidding. The Adderley group were unquestionably right in the
stand they had taken but, unfortunately, being right carries no
merit in politics. Mr. Pindling had the ear of the people and he
succeeded in making the voters feel that the Adderley group were
traitors to the cause.
fThey were crushed politically. Mr. Adderley has since crept
back into the party through the back door and is now Leader of
Government in the Senate, Attorney General and Minister of
Foreign Affairs.


ISAACS WINS TOTAL ALLEGIANCE


From Page 1
get up and also do your part.
However little it might be, it
will help this party to grow in
strength.' "
Assessing the effects of the
convention, Mr. Isaacs told
delegates that the discussions
and debates opened windows
through which much fresh air
was let in.
And in case there was any


doubt they provided
incontrovertible evidence of
the fact that the FNM was a
democratic party ... "we
believe in, and practise
democracy, and every shade of
opinion within the party had a
voice which was heard and will
always be heard.
"There have been
disagreements," he said.


Mr. Pindling struck out at Mr. Whitfield at a party convention
one night but his attack backfired ... and he was obliged to
publicly apologize.
The ritt between these two men widened and at the next
convention Mr. Whittield walked out of the party with a
following of seven members.
It is understood that he had expected to carry a majority with
him but apparently Mr. Pindling got wind of the plan. Some new
and lucrative offices were created for disgruntled backbenchers.
And so Mr. Whitfield fell short of the majority he needed to
topple Mr. Pindling from his pedestal.
These men were branded the Dissident Eight. They took the
name of Free P.L.P. And so the colony then had three parties ...
actually four ... because Mr. Adderley also had a party. But in
by-elections it was shown that Mr. Pindling was still the king pin.
Mr. Adderley finally walked out on his group ... and left them
hanging ... to return to the P.L.P.
It was realized by U.B.P. and Free P.L.P. leaders that their only
hope lay in uniting their forces. And so both parties dissolved and
formed a new group under the leadership of Mr. Whitfield with
the name of Free National Movement.
In this merger most of the white men who had provided sound
leadership for the colony in the past bowed completely out of the
picture and gave their safe seats to men like Kendal Isaacs who
replaced Geoffrey Johnstone in the Fort Montagu District.
Once again in the general election on September 19th last year
the P.L.P. succeeded in making the voters regard the Dissident
Eight as traitors to the black cause ... and they were all defeated
at the polls.
The seats won by the F.N.M. were former U.B.P. seats that had
been handed over to newcomers to the political arena.
Mr. Whitfield took on a difficult district and was defeated. The
leadership of the party was then handed on to Mr. Isaacs who
offered Mr. Whitfield a seat and leadership in the Senate which he
declined.
I am told that Mr. Whitfield has withdrawn completely from
the F.N.M. because of their behaviour at the Independence
Conference in London when they drew even the praise of Mr.
Pindling and Mr. Hanna for the manner in which they had
cooperated with the government at this conference. They earned
a proverbial stick of candy from the P.L.P. for being good boys.
The F.N.M.succeeded in capturmg nine seats in me september
elections but the party has split down the middle with a revolt by
four members who also disapproved of the supine behaviour of
the F.N.M. delegation at the London conference and, as a result,
they have been expelled from the party.
Now, once again, Mr. Whitfield is looming on the political
horizon as legal adviser to a union movement that openly
condemns the leadership of Mr. Pindling who until recently rode
high in their sights as the Moses of the black man in the Bahamas.
Now they see Pindling as leader of a group of oppressive
plutocrats many of whom, in less than seven years, have moved
from a state of near pauperism to a place on exclusive
"Millionaire Row."

FOOTNOTE TO HISTORY: Just two small bits of interest.
Dr. Poulson, formerly government Medical Officer at Long
Island, left the Bahamas a few years ago and established in private
practice in this island. He has a clinic and, I am told, he has built
up a large practice.
His clinic is some distance from the centre of town and so I
phoned him to convey greetings to him from some of his friends
at Long Island to whom he sends fond remembrances in return
for their best wishes.

A striking young couple have a room a few doors from ours at
Holiday Inn.
We exchanged scraps of conversation in the hallways, dining
room and on the beach. They were friendly, likeable people.
He turned up at a Rotary meeting yesterday as the guest of
Alan Kimble who will be remembered in Nassau as a senior
member of the staff of Bahamas International Trust Corporation
and Treasurer of the East Nassau Rotary Club. Here he is Manager
of the Trust Corporation which bears the name of "Cayman"
instead of "Bahamas", thus becoming CITCo instead of BITCo.
We sat together. He had a slightly English accent arid so I
thought he came from Massachusetts. But he turned out to be a
South African who was educated in England ... disapproved of
the government in South Africa ... and settled in Toronto where
he married a charming Canadian girl. He has taken out Canadian
citizenship.
I gave him the address of my South African friends in Toronto
who have also left South Africa because they disapproved of the
oppressive racial policies of the government.
****
I have pointed out in this column before ... when you find a
South African who has left his prosperous country to find a home
in a foreign land, the reason is that he disapproves of the racial
policies of his government.
But, in spite of this fact, the P.L.P. government in the Bahamas
shows blind hatred for anyone who has come out of South
Africa!

Since writing the above "Footnote" two more bits have come
to my attention that may be of interest to readers of this column.
I.A.P.A. President Robert V. Brown has appointed a
48-member committee on freedom of the press and information.
This is the strongest team ever appointed by a new president. It
means they are going out seriously to fight oppression of free
speech in any form this year.

Sugar producing countries in the West Indies are upset by the
fact that the U.S. has reduced their annual quota from 220,000
short tons to 24,000 short tons.
Newspapers in Jamaica and Barbados suggest that this action
has been taken because the Big Four Guyana, Trinidad,


Barbados and Jamaica have cultivated friendly relations with
Cuba where Castro is bitterly hostile to the U.S.
An article in the Barbados Advocate-News suggested that the
U.S. attitude now would be similar to saying to the Caribbean, "if
you want it that way, ask Castro to buy your sugar."
My impression today is that the government and people of the
U.S. are tired of feeding the animal that bites the friendly hand.

Tonight we met two more Bahamian couples both coloured
- in the dining room of the hotel.
More and more Bahamians both white and coloured seem
to be travelling in this direction. They all say they like the island
and its people.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
I dream'd in a dream I saw a city invincible to the attacks of
the whole of the rest of the earth ... I dream'd that was the next
city of friends. WALT WHITMAN


"perhaps even serious
disagreements, but the thing
that pleases me most is that we
were able to speak persuasively
and forcefully to the issues,
while at the same time leaving
no doubt of our goodwill and
respect for one another and of
our genuine concern for the
ultimate good of our party.
Continued Mr. Isaacs: "It
seems to me that out of it all,
our party will emerge stronger
and more determined than ever
to fulfil its role as an
intelligent and vigorous
Opposition to the present
Government, and whenever the
next general elections shall
come, as the next government
of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas."
As the party's Leader, he
assured the convention that it
was "fully my intention to
continue to lead, so long as I
have the confidence of my
party.
"I do not intend to become
a dictator; I am sick of
dictators. I will operate within
the democratic process and
that demands me to consult
with my colleagues, to listen to
all points of view within the


Stubbs raps economic decline


blames govt's 'no policy policy'

BLAMING THE COUNTRY'S STAGNATING ECONOMY on the government's failure to plan,
businessman and council minister I. G. Stubbs predicted Thursday that the PLP's recently
announced five-year plan will also fail, outgrown by its limitations.


Mr. Stubbs told delegates at
the Free National Movement
convention that after six years
in office the PLP had only now
seen fit to attempt to
formulate a national
development polio. of some
kind.
He contended that the
"stop-gap" measure of a
five-year plan was almost
useless and meaningless, "for
long before all of the necessary
inputs are in, circumstances
and events will have overtaken
or outgrown such a limited
plan
"Since 1967, and more
particularly since 1972, one
would have expected that the
job of looking over and
formulating the short, medium
and long-term needs of the


I NICK KELLY REPORTS I


party, and to carry out what I
believe to be in the best
interests of the party and of
this nation.
"I will not dictate to, and
neither will I be dictated to, by
any individual or by any
special interest group of
individuals. I will lead so long
as I have your confidence and,
if the day should come, that I
no longer have that confidence,
I shall cease to be your
Leader."
In the belief that it was a
Leader's responsibility to
become involved with those
whom he leads, Mr. Isaacs said
he proposed, between now and
the next convention to visit
every constituency "to talk
with you and to listen to you,
to hear your views, and to
share your burdens and, with
the help of God, to do all that
I can to maintain the FNM as a
party which is responsible to
the needs of the people."
NO POINT THIS WEEK
DUE to pressure on news
space today, Sen. Arthur
Foulkes' weekly column "To
The Point" has been held over
this week and will appear next
Saturday.


Bahamas would have already
resulted in a series of
well-coordinated -programmes
establishing national priorities,
especially in the areas of
business and commerce to
determine what nature and
type of development would be
allowed, and the circumstances
and conditions under which
they would he allowed," Mr
Stubbs said.
For such a policy to be


meaningful, he pointed out, it
must result in the creation of
specific programmes designed
to allow the country as a whole
to reap the fullest benefits of
its national endeavour.
LACKS CAPACITY
However, the present
government leadership lacked
the capacity to unite those
instruments that were so vital
to national devleopment and
planning.
One would have expected
the government to develop an
educational system related to
the national need, and that it
would have learned from the
experience of other nations.
In this respect it could have
tried to accommodate an
enlightened immigration
policy. Furher, government
planning should be so designed
and developed that the investor
would know what he was
allowed to do and where he
could do it.
'From my own
experiences." Mr. Stubbs said,
"I would say that even at this
late date, the private sector is
still seeking assistance from
government to plan and realize
their various projects all of
which I feel would benefit the
nation."
He told the convention that
many investors had complained
about the government's


insensitivity to their various
project submissions. "Part, or
perhaps all of this was, or isas
a result of the government's
lack of policy or programme.
"As strange as it may sound,
and after spending hundreds of
thousands of dollars of the
taxpayer's money for
feasibility and project studies,
many ministers are still afriad,
and refuse to communicate
fully with their professional
planners and technicians, be
they local or foreign, and in
many necessary cases do not
accept their professional
advice.
The reason for this, he said,
was that political decisions are
implemented instead of
otherwise.
Eighteen months ago the
FNM has said that there were
hundreds of proposals
submitted to government that
were never reviewed or even
opened. Now there were
obviously more.
Imagine how many new jobs
could be created if only some
of them were acted upon and
approved," Mr. Stubbs
declared.
The "galloping economic
decline," he said, was the result
of a "no policy policy."
The country's meagre
resources were being fiddled
away without testing or proper
examination and control.


FIRST WITH PRE-CLEARANCE


Flight No.


Destination
Miami
Miami


Departs Nassau
8:00 a.m. Daily
10:45 a.m. Daily


BAHAMASAIR takes pleasure in announcing that the above flights will
pie-clear U.S. Customs, Immigration, and Public Health formalities at Nassau
International Airport effective immediately. As noted,BAHAMASAIR Flight
40 with convenient 8:00 a.m. departure time is the first flight out of Nassau
offering this facility, thereby eliminating delay on arrival in Miami and
affording greater margin for passengers connecting to Atlanta, Chicago,
Cleveland, Detroit, St. Louis, Washington, D.C. and other destinations.



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dimensions: 390 x 240 x 140 mm 15't/" x 912" x 5'/".


PHILIPS


TAYLOR INDUSTRIES LIMITED
P. O. Box N-4806 TELEPHONE 28941-5


~


ghP rthbut









Irtimwu


LADY BUTLER is shown making her selection of
Bahamas National Trust Christmas cards while Michael
Lightbourn (left) vice-president of the trust and Mr. Oris
Russell, president offer advice.


Conservation

cards go on sale


THE T. GIBSON primary
school held its annual harvest
thanksgiving service at the
school on Thursday. The
harvest message was delivered
to the young students by the
Rev. Charles Curry, who
advised 200 young students
on the importance of giving
thanks for all things. Items of
food, collected by the
students, were presented at
the ceremony to
representatives
of the Geriatrics hospital, the
Salvation Army and to the
Red Cross. The 40-minute
service was attended by the
school's patron, Mr. Timothy
Gibson, composer and writer
of the National anthem, and
by recently appointed
Senator Leander Minnis.
Picture shows students of
the primary school in a song
of thanks during the service.


P.O. BOX N 3622 PHONE 5-1339 Tlii BAHAMAS National
Trust, the official body for
wildlife conservation and the
SNassau Christian and Missionary preservation of environmental
SAL*IANCE CHURCH ualit. in the Bahama Islands,
ALLIANCE CHURC HW is offering a series of Christmas
Temporarily Meeting At Y.W.C.A. Building' cards to support conservation
dolphin Drive at John F. Kennedy Drive. progiinirnes throughout the
Rev. Weldon B.Blackford, Ministerommon alth of the
Bahiamas.
WorshipAt 11 A.M. Gospel Hour 7:30 A.M. All profits from the sale of
n TH I 'QUESITO OF the 30 cent cards go to support
BIDING THE QUESIOthe trust 's conservation
SACRIFICE' LORDSHIP' pro rantincs including the
t inagua rk, the nesting
national bird. the flamingo; the
Exumia Land and Sea Park: the
l T turtle raising project at Union
Creek. Inagua and several other
P.O.Box N 0 Phone l2012,5.704l parks and nature reserves in
hn rive North Y.W.C. t other parts of tfhe

Bahamas.
This year the Trust is
un a Services at 9: 5 an 11 am 0 .m. offering two very attractive
We mily service : .m. new Christmas cards produced
ecial Speaker Sunday, Nov. 25, 1973 from original water colour
Special Speaker Sunday Nov. 25, 1973 paintings b rs. Ethel H.
REV. JULIUS BRADSHAW Blum.
One depicts the preparations
of the altar in a church
iniinediately preceding the
coiimieniceinment of Midnight
services and is called
"Christmas Lve in the
Bahanmas" and the other
depicts a colorful
land-and -seascape scene with
two children on a beach
watching the star of Bethlehem
in the eastern sky at sunrise.
ST This one is named
I "('hristmnas Morning in the
Baham nas."
PALD'i in addition to the two
abose-mentioned cards, there
are limited supplies of cards
issued in previous years
i clouding "Island Vigil"
( Bahamian parrots).
MFisherman's Hut. Exuma
Underwater Reef cards and
Esomnie flamlingo cards.
I)emand for these cards is
great, especially as many
commercial concerns place
large orders and send Trust
aChristmas cards to their clients
and customers, and people are



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advised to secure their cards
early.
The available Chirstmas
cards and other Trust items
may be purchased from the
Bahamas National Trust office
at the western end of the
southern building of the Star
Plaza on Mackey Street.
Dedication

festival
THE RT. Rev. Michael Eldon,
Lord Bishop of Nassau and the
Bahamas, will officiate at the 80th
Dedication Festival of St. Patrick's
('hurch, Governor's Harbour,
Monday, Nov. 26.
Bishop Eldon will preach and
celebrate at a sung mass starting at
7 p.m. The Rev. John M. Larson,
St. Patrick's priest-in charge, will
assist.
Bishop Eldon also will rededicate
the church's 130-year-old pipe
organ, recently restored in a $4,500
project. Mrs. George Saunders and
Mrs. Ann Adair are organizing a
reception afterwards in the Parish
Hall.
St. Patrick's present church
building was dedicated in 1894
under The Rev, Charles William
Smith. It was constructed hv
Charles Johnson, Moonle Johnson,
and a Mr. Dillette. The first St.
Patrick's church was on Governor's
Harbour mainland, and the second,
on Cupid's Cay.
St. Patrick's church organ, the
only pipe organ in the Bahamas
outside Nassau, was renovated last
summer.
There were ,very generous
donations, both in memory of Mr.
Bethel, and of the late Mrs. Richard
A. Doane. Generous donations also
have been made by St. Patrick's
members. The Organ Restoration
Fund will stay open, as it is hoped
to establish an endowment fund for


Leam


1


,_F -I








tiovimiii 24, 1973 II hr Wrt-m-


IMWTo OIaSTMAS CARDS...
a* to pwatet way of saying
"OIrETNIQSI" to oM friends!
YOU'E JUST TIME FOR OUR
COLOUR PORTRAIT
u r
MttI ii


2 CORITMAS CARDS


age- whe...o -
on the waterfront at East
OC Bay St. & William St. -
Phone 5-4641


Grand Bahama wedding


MISS JULIET Merita Smith,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Lorenzo A. Smith, of West End
was married August 18. to Mr.
Lenworth Conway Smith, son
of Inspector of Police and Mrs.
Egbert Smith of Kingston,
Jamaica, in a ceremony at the
Prince Charles Room of the
Grand Bahama Hotel &
Country Club.
The service was performed
by Mr. Donald Murray and Mr.
Bertram Russel Sr. of the
Nassau and West Palm Beach


NEW




PHONE




NUMBERS





Nassau Agencies



Limited




ALL DEPARTMENTS


2-4356/7/8


unit of Jehovah's Witnesses.
Mr. John Martin was the
organist and the solist was Mr.
Rio Williams who sang "One
hand, One heart" during the
signing of the register.
The bride who was given in
marriage by her father, wore a
gown of white English net over
satin with an empire bodice, a
line skirt, high neckline and
long sleeves. The dress was
trimmed with French Venice
lace and beaded with seed
pearls in vertical strokes down
the skirt and attached train.
The shoulder length double
tiered veil was attached to a
matching headpiece of lace and
pearls. The bride carried a
bouquet of yellow carnations.
The matron of honour was
Mrs. Sheila P. Butler, sister of
the bride, who wore a formal
organza gown with a single
ruffle around the neckline and
hem. She wore a picture hat
and carried a basket of orange
carnations.
The bridesmaids, the Misses
Mary Johnson, Pam Russell,
Sharon Russell and Shelley
Russell as well as the
flower girls Georgette Forbes
and Fern Smith all wore gowns
indentical to that of the
matron of honour but in
yellow and lime green. They
also wore picture hats and

















I '
I .


Hil


r

4


4


ML
MR an I M LENWORTH r ITLM


carried basket of carnations.
The bestman was Mr. Walter
Campbell and the groomsmen
were Messrs. Ivor Smith
(brother of the groom), Walter
Smith (brother of the bride),
Las Talbot and Errol Dunn.
Gibao Butler, nephew of the
bride, was the ringbearer. He
wore a ruffled white shirt and
peach trousers. The ushers
were Lloyd Lewis, Dennis
Martin Carl Simons and Phillip
Smith.
The brides mother wore a
gown of chiffon in the shades
of pink and a white orchid.
The reception took place in
the Prince Charles Room.
Acting as Master of Ceremonies
was the Hon. Arlington G.
Butler, Speaker of the House,
brother in law of the bride.
Mr. Cyril Fountain, M.P.
toasted the bride's parents. The
groom's parents were toasted
by Mr. Carl Simmons. The
toast to the bride was proposed
by Mr. A. K. Wallace. Mr. Errol
Dunn proposed the toast to the
groom.
Out of town guests from as
far away as New York and
Kingston Jamaica included: Mr.
Stuart of Niew York. The ion.
P. G. Patterson, the Jamaican
Minister of Trade, Industry and
Commerce, and the Hon.
Lrnest Peart, the Jamaican
Minister of Labour
.


Daughter wants pill,

mother is ashamed
By Abigail Van Buren
C 1n iby ChicMg TributI-N Y. News Syli., Ic.
DEAR ABBY: My telephone just rang. It was a doctor
telling me that my 16-year-old daughter was just in his
office asking him for birth control pills. Abby, what are
these young people doing to us mothers?
I knew she had a steady boy friend but I never dreamed
they were in need of anything like that. I am heartsick.
I tried to raise this girl right. Where have I failed?
ASHAMED TO SIGN MY NAME
DEAR ASHAMED: You haven't failed, and if you tried
to raise her right you need not be ashamed. I am NOT la
favor of premarital sex, but once a girl has gone all the way,
it is unrealistic to think that she will stop simply because
she is denied the pill. So then what? She risks becoming
pregnant. And if she does, what has the doctor accom-
plished? He will have been responsible for [a] an unwanted
baby, Ibl an abortion, or [cl a hasty marriage. Which would
you choose for your daughter?
If you are among the mothers who say, "If that's the
way she is going to act, then let her suffer the conse-
quences," please consider the baby. Don't you think every
child should come into this world wanted by its natural
mother? I do.
DEAR ABBY: I am 17, and have no living father. He
and my mother were divorced 13 years ago, and he
was killed in an automobile accident three years ago. After
his death my brother and I were advised that we were to
receive Social Security benefits to be used for our education
and welfare.
We have been getting these benefits for three years
now, and with my portion I have been able to buy a car, all
my own clothes, and still manage to put aside some money
for college.
My problem is my friends who do not feel that I de-
serve this money. They say I am "ripping off" the govern-
ment every month. I think I deserve this money because
my father never was able to pay child support when he was
alive, and now I am being taken care of.
Answer soon, as I am made to feel guilty about this.
DIRTY MONEY
DEAR DIRTY MONEY: What's "dirty" about it? Your
friends could be jealous. And one way to put a stop to that
is to keep quiet about what you have and where it came
from. It's nobody's business.
DEAR ABBY: I am married to a man I love very
much. My name is Christine and his name is Christopher.
We are both called "Chris," which has been quite confusing
at times.
I have just given birth to twins-a boy and a girl. My
husband wants to name them Christian and Christina, re-
spectively. I think this would be a terrible confusion for the
twins and us in this household.


BAY STREET STORE ONLY


lemodelling




CONTINUES THRU SATURDAY,


IDEAL OPPORTUNITY TO Siu' EARLY FOR CHRISTMAS


0I. -_


*


I I II -1 9


-- --


PJ-.ATRONAL FEAST
THE PATRONAL feast of
S t. Cecilia's Church was
celebrated last night with the
si nging of a Latin Gregorian
[~figh Mass by the St. Cecilia's
cmtoir.
Concelebrants of the Mass
were Fathers Silvan
B romenshenkel and Remy
DIavid.
For many years one of the
boest known church choirs of
l assau, members of St.
C-ecilia's choir were honoured
bry a testimonial luncheon
sponsored by the Parish
C-ouncil and the Women's
G- uil1




























Impress someone with
the "Vintage" T gift
by Sheaffer.
In a vintage year, everything
avust be "just right'". Rarely has
-a writing instrument been de-
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Vintage" by Sheaffer. Solid
-steding silver or 12K gold-filled.
2;uperbly designed antique
Wtooled finish enhances ball-
point and matching pencil.


__


- ---- 'I


. an IT
N


Lturdr, Wvmb 24. 1973


UhP grtbumn


mints







6 Ibe ifti rntf


Saturday November 24, 1973


Billy Dee Williams (The Hit,
Shirley St)


Gwen Welles (The Hit)


SHIRLEY ST. THEATRE


Now showing thru
Thursday, "DILLINGER"
matinees at 2:45 & 4:55,
evening 8:30. Parental
discretion is advised.
STARTS Fridav."THE HIT"
matinees at 2:15 & 4:30,
evening 8:30. No one under
17 will be admitted.
A high school kid, black and
pretty Jeannie Allen I 1 INA
ANDRIVS) was in the car
with her bo\ trend IlM\V\KO)
CUMB'UKA\ c xperu i nt'ing
with drugs. Jeanin slui'mped
over, like going to sleep. while
he made tracks. Slie wasn't ,an
addict, lust a girl trying new
kicks, hbut now she Is dead,
buried beneath a maonnd a
wreaths i Ihe Hlilt
Jeannie's father \i.k *.lien
(BIL LY I)1 I ll II \MS) a
federal ope.rat ivc. is a
confirmed helievei\ it diiect
action. '1 o begin \ilh. he
tracks down the Pudill (1 I I
DUNCAN) and o !', stops
short of killing him \\hen hits
captive's whimnpers tinallS get
through to him. "\li\ me''"
Pusher iuestiols. "I'i
nothing! I lust push that's all'
lhey had to IuL\ r11 '
someone'! Y'oo w ant thi genl
who turned on' Ilhe g\s
who brings it in' I 1lie hig giVs.
the ones sipping 'h:trnpagne'"

I
Tropica
Extemintor


01'P N 6:30 Shows start 7 p. ,
(HIL DRIR'N (NDI R 12 I RI I
NOW thru TUES. *
"Guns it M;ag. 7" p.m. onl)
"7-11II" 9: 10 "Return" I 1:1


mL-rr.r~~ 1 I - -- U- a
GPN %lt lr 1

cooGEORGE KENNEDY '."
SLMPKA M D RILOR Un. :,es ,

YMQff


RETURN OF THEIR
-MAGNIFICENT SEVEN


IUJVV OnUvvINIu i I
Matinee 2:45 & 4:55 evening
S


NO ONE UNI)
Reservations not clain
on first come, firs

I-R
Now thru Frida,
Matinee starts at 1 45
Evening 8:30
"THE CHINESE.
CONNECTION" P(;
Bruce Lee,
Robert Baker
pluhi
"A MINUTE rO PRAY,
A SECOND TO D11' PG.
Alex Cord,
Robert Ryan
'Phone 22534



NOW THRU
Sunday continuous from
Monday matinee continue

CHRISTOPHER LEE
PETER CUSHINuA


And for Love

of the v 4e
PlARlknrNtAr C DrmmiceS
PARENTAL DIS(


Nick is on the way to see the
boss. The Director (NORMAN
HI HKIt is sympathetic but
practical. tleroin is a billion
doll ar business with
international ramifications, he
explains, and Nick's plan of
imountting a fast hit to wipe out
the key figures of the drug
syndicate in Marseilles is
contrary to national policy as
well as international law.
But Nick is determined to
have hisa way. "I'm going to do
it." he insists. "No you won't,"
the Director tells him. "I'll
have yumi killed. Allen."
Nick boards a cross-country
bis. Site of the best men in
the business are after him, but
he shakes them. They have
notlh ung n himn in guts and
iharactei parttime girl
tic lend. I sther (JANFAR
II N S works on a
eg i' !- rll ci n t computer
instlallatin. Nick makes a
iotirne\ to the little town
Share I sther is waiting for
hl iu w ith printouts of
personnel files programmed to
this speciftcatioils. Unknown to
I stllh. they add up to the
ilost i kel prospects.
iimo,tivtedi to kill. for Nick's
sc ret illusion.
I irst on Nick's list. Dutch
S chi ller I W A R R 1I N
KI \M11 RI ING). wias formerly
. i tihciitc l I fighter in the Frenih
Lndcrg~ltind. Presently a cop.
he ioins Nick after a dope
dlci lie jc rested is released on
J l n Jimalit Redhaired and
bei..auili Sherry Nielson
I( ;\ N WlELI.tFS attended
e\clussive girls' schools before
getting hooked on heroin. Now
. top call girl. she can pay for
ier lha:it, but can't help
thlikin ig about what will
haippci when nlen stop
\iant i tier. She joins up on
Nick's promise to keep her
supplied all her life, courtesy
of I 'ncle Sam.
A popular young teacher
and horseman. Barry (PAUL
tlAMPT()ON is blackmailed by
Nick to toin him. During his
ltuie in lictni i Barry made
iiotnc\ iin blackmnarketing
heroic iand although the
aachiges can't hi. proved, taxes
can be le\ied against the
n money Barry has stashed asway
from those da\s ,,Reluctantly
Barry agrees to go along as a
sharp-shooter with Nick's
party.
IHius.band ind wite. Hcrian
(511) MI ILTONI and Ida


'Ir"
.LBAnTnT I TIW4 I T -4qPBai
^H~~~~~~T RKin 1KMHM/--iiiiT lD~rAY


I-IIKU I MUM'SUIAnT. I
ig 8:30 'Phone 21004, 21005
the gangster's



Color by MOVIELAB 1
EN OATES BI JOHSON
LEACMIAN -I nEU PlP I
RICAN INTERNATIONAL Picltre 1.
ER 17 ADMITTED.
ned by 8:45 will be sold
t served basis.



Sunday thru Tuesday
Sunday continuous from 4:30
Monday continuous from 3:00
"BROTHER ON
THE RUN" R.
Terry Carter
Kyle Johnson
plus
"THE MONGOLS" PG.
Jack Palance
Anita Ekberg
No one under 17 will be admitted.



TUESDAY
S5:00 'Phone 34666
ious from 2:15, evening 8:30









CREATION ADVISED I


(JANFT BRANDT), have made
good in business despite their
criminal record, but have lost a
son to heroin. They join Nick
on a patriotic impulse to serve
the country that gave them a
second chance. Finally there is
Mike (RICHARD PRYOR), an
underwater demolitions expert
handy with explosives. whose
wife was raped and nmurderied.
A tragic figure, he joins Nick
out of an inner need to kill thei
destroyers.
With agents Carlin ( i)A VI
HALL) and Croshb (1y(t)I)
MARTIN) after him. Nick
himself is presently on ithe
target list and narrowly escapes
behind his shattered windshield
after outwitting his pursuers.
In l-rance, meanwhile, the
kingpins of the syndicate lie
in luxury indulging theii \ ics
at the expense of countle'ss,
"clients," whose habit niakes,
them a menace. Like figures in
a teaching film, we see big bhss
Zero I(P RRIF ('0() 11
Jean-Bijptiste (JI.AN-('LAlI )1
BE'RC'I, a shipper; Roe)ain
(YVI'S BARSACQ). in charge
of (Greek andl Turkish
operation, ns; fat old J ras.
(PAULL MERCEY). who runs
the syndicate's labs; I ie
Frelous (JlNNY ASTI'Rtl
ROBI:RT LOMBARDI).\ who
own a chain of fashion shop,
and control prostitution.
tiornou (ll NRY ('O()(; \N)
lesbian Miadanie I Oriss.i
(MALKA RIBOVSKA): and
big shot Monteca (RIC('.IHAR
SAINT-BRIS), who hais :
weakness for hboys..


Saturday night 8:30 p.m.
thru Friday, "THE CHINESE
CONNECTION" plus "A
MINUTE TO PRAY. A
SECOND TO DIE" Sunday


WULFF ROAD THEATRE


Now showing thru
Tuesday, "DRACULA A.D.
'72" plus "CRESCENDO"
Sunday showings continuous
from 5:00. Monday &
Tuesday matinee continuous
from 2:15, evening 8:30.
Parental discretion is advised.
Starts Wednesday,
"DETROIT 9000" plus
"TWITCH OF THE DEATH
NERVE" matinee continuous
from 2:15, evening 8:30. No
one under 17 will be
admitted.
In Detroit 9000, murder and
;:aial mayhem are rapidly
replacing the automobile as the
Motor City's most visible
product. While police patrol
inner-city streets, where Black
taces are a 9-to-I majority.
congressmann Aubrey Hale
(l.i ton (Rudy Challenger) is
MI chigan's first Black
(;uhernatorial Candidate and
Is political organization holds
.1a .ila fund-raising affair at the
clergalnt and once lily-white
Shleraton-Cadillac Hotel.
I here's only one complication
... ('layton is relieved of all his
glittering d tionions and a great
portion of his dignity by a
do/en uninvited guests.
It all happens in less than
tcii minutes. A well rehearsed
teani of masked robbers
quickly burst Clayton's
political bubble and split
\s tlout the decency of leaving
behind a single clue. The
newspapers swell with accounts
,f a governmental scandal of
iini-Watergate proportions:


media can always find room
for another political
double-cross. Clayton angrily
asserts that the robbery was
engineered by whites solely to
keep him from the Governor's
mansion, and demands a
complete investigation.
The Detroit police find
themselves holding a gallon of
political nitro-glycerin in a
slippery jar. Their first move is
to assign Lt. Danny Bassett
(Alex Rocco) to the case.
Bassett's compilation of arrests is
thicker than the Manhattan
Yellow Pages and he uses
Departmental Commendations
as doorsteps. But Danny has
had his share of problems
lately. He can hardly breathe
with chronic sinusitis, looks
like he sleeps in his clothes,
and is burdened with a
nmentally-ill wife whose care he
can barely afford. He has little
or no respect for standard
police procedure and cares less
for criminals. Bassett
inadvertently worsens the
racial situation when he
irreverently states, in radio
interview, that he doesn't give
a damn whether the thieves are
black, white, or lime-green.
As far as he's concerned, it's
just another grand theft, and
that's exactly how he'll handle
the case. As usual, Bassett
prefers to work alone.
Always anxious to spill oil in
Bassett's water the
Department assigns Sgt. Jesse
Williams (Hari Rhodes) as his
partner. Jesse is the absolute
antithesis of Bassett ... he's
younger, dedicated, and has
had a meteoric career after
only a few years on the force.
lie's a black super-cop with
brains, an ex-college athlete, a
mod dresser, and ... he hangs
tough.


thru Friday matinee
continuous from 1:45,
evening 8:30. Plus late
features Tuesday & Friday
ni g hts.


E\\\\m-


HAIL CAESAR Godfather of Harleml



.. FRED WIIAMSON .S xAE IE.-
AND AT 8:50

ANTHONY QUINN Un I
YAPHET KOTO il i Artists
NOONEUNDER ADMITTED




Exciting things are

happening at the Fabulous

Trade Winds Bar & Lounge

Paradise Island


NOW APPEARING














TtIE


BEGINNING


3F


TIlE ENB
SHOWTIMES NIGHTLY: 10:40 & 12:40

Make the evening complete with a gourmet dinner
in the Imperial Dining Room.
Dinner from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.








]I II I I I IcI I


WHAT'S ON


ACCOUNTANTS ANNUAL
DINNER
THE annual dinner meeting
of the Corporation of
Accountants and Auditors will
be held at the Nassau Beach
Hotel on Saturday, December
15 commencing at 7 p.m.
Members in Freeport are
advised to make reservations
through Mr. Richard Demeritte
at the office of the Ministry of
Finance and members in
Nassau can make reservations
with Mr. J. Tomlinson Mills.
ABACO ROTARY
ANNIVERSARY
THE Rotary Club of Abaco
will celebrate the second
anniversary of its Charter Night
on November 29 with a gala
dinner dance at the Treasure
Cay Hotel, Ath'o.


Have a


IT


SUPER SUNDAY SESSION
WITH BALMORAL AND PAN AM

12 -3:00P.M.


Enjoy all you can eat from a
Delicious Bahamian Buffet Lunch
for $6.00 per person, plus gratuities
Children under 12, half price.
See a Travelogue of Horizons of AUSTRIA
Compliments of Pan American
beginning at 12:00 Noon.
"THE IGNITERS" STEEL BAND


plays all afternoon!


*PanAm
&a Th Holcuon

BoLmoral Bachh Hotel

Imkwit/ you to something Iptdol Today


Financing his higher education


later could put you in deep waters.


Call in the


Imperial LifeGuards.


So your little boy wants to be a doctor.
Or is it a lawyer? An engineer, maybe?
It doesn't matter; you have an obligation to
your children to give them the education
they need to succeed in life, but the high costs
of higher education could cripple you
financially. Don't flounder.
Call in the Imperial LifeGuards, now.
The Imperial LifeGuards are specially
trained to assess your insurance needs,


and recommend the best possible solution to
your problem. The Imperial LifeGuards can
show you how easy and inexpensive it would
be to take out an Insurance policy for your
child, to mature when you need it most. An
education plan that gives you peace of mind
and ease of wallet.
There are a lot of problems for which
Imperial Life has the solution. Call for an
Imperial LifeGuard. He'll throw you a lifeline.


SII RisALes UFE


Fifth Floor, Nassau Bank House, Collins Avenue at Second Terrace West, Nassau, Bahamas. Telephone: 22506-9


SAVOY THEATRE


Ii


I

I
I
I

I
I

I

I
I


I
1













I


I


I

I
I


--


-~. -- ---P __ I 1 r rr


*LImram wa-ii3K4nlr\ ------


ISLAND T.V. SERVICE
"FOR SER VICE YOU CAN REL Y ON"
Dowdeswell Street

Channel Master Televisions
Antennas Boosters
SALES & SERVICE
Phone 2-2618 P. Box N327, Nassau


I


rL-1C -~CL1


I










Saturday, Nova'ibrn 4, 197 liIb Laahma--


CLASSIFIED


SECTION


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS-FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV.TELEPhONE 21980 EXT. 5


REAL ESTATE


I I


C12688
WE WELCOME YOUR
PATRONAGE AT BILL'S
REAL ESTATE ON SHIRLEY
STREET. CALL 23921.
C12683
PAY A LITTLE AND GET A
LOS AT BILL'S REAL
ESTATE. CALL 23921
0
C12719
9,000 sq. ft. of WAREHOUS-
ING 2 storeys situate
SHIRLEA. Was $90,000.00
make us an offer -
467,500.00. See anytime.
Income $8,400.00 year 60
days vacant possession.

DIAL DAMIANOS
DAMIANOS REALTY CO.
22033, 22307 evenings 41197.
C12686
LOTS WITH EASY
FINANCING NOW
AVAILABLE THROUGH
BILL'S REAL ESTATE. CALL
23921.

C12685
LIST YOUR PROPERTY FOR
QUICK SALE. CALL BILL'S
REAL ESTATE 23921.

C12564
YAMACRAW BEACH
ESTATES
$75 DEPOSIT tor 70 x 100
lot. Beach rights, priviw'- lake,
underground utilities. Priced
from $5800 and $80 monthly.
NO INTEREST CHARGES.
Tremendous savings. Call Pat
Rutherford at 4-1141 or
Morley & O'Brien at 2-3027 or
come to the Yamacraw Beach
Model Home any afternoon.

C12684
LIST US START YOU ON
YOUR WAY TO OWNING
YOUR OWN HOME. CALL
BILL'S REAL ESTATE
23921.

C 12663
FULLY FURNISHED large
dwelling house on double lot in
Blair Estates. Price $160,000.
Call 32723.

C12734
EXCEPTIONAL BUY IN Cable
Beach income-bearing property
close to beautiful beach. Main
residence has four bedrooms,
three baths, large living room
with fireplace and bar, separate
dining room, kitchen, two sun
decks on second floor;
detached building contains two
bedrooms, one bath,
living-dining room, kitchen and
balcony on second floor.
Two-car garage and laundry.
Price reduced to $90,000
furnished.
HIGH VISTA residence with
three bedrooms, two baths
living-dining room, patio, etc.
Ceiling fans throughout.
$40,000.
STATELY old Bahamian-
Colonial residence overlooking
Montagu Bay with extensive
grounds and fruit trees. Four
bedrooms, two baths, living
room, separate dining room,
breakfast room, three porches,
etc. basement area $200,000
furnished.

H. G. CHRISTIE LIMITED
P. O. Box N8164, Nassau
Telephone: 2-1041-2

C12689
WE ARE IN BUSINESS TO
SERVE YOU AT BILL'S
REAL ESTATE. CALL 23921.

C12736
3 BEDROOM unfurnished
house -- Shirlea, $275 per
month. Telephone 2-4777.
Evenings 4-2035.
C12738
FOR SALE
City property, 2'/2 storey house
on Charlotte Street. Call
4-1501.

C12690
STOP BEFORE YOU MAKE
THAT DEAL, CHECK OUR
EASY TERMS AND GOOD
PRICES AT BILL'S REAL
ESTATE. CALL 23921.

C12687
DO YOU HAVE A HOUSE
FOR SALE? LIST IT WITH
US AT BILL'S REAL
ESTATE. CALL 23921.


FOR RENT
C12735
3 BEDROOMS charmingly
furnished house on corner of
side entrance to St. Andrew's
School. Suitable for family
with St. Andrew's students.
Available Jan. 10th. Telephone
Chester Thompson 2-4777.
Evenings 4-2035.

C12328
FURNISHED AND
AIRCONDITIONED 2
bedrooms, 1 bedroom and
efficiency apartments.
Telephone 5-8679..

C12316
COTTAGES and apartments
daily, weekly or
monthly-airconditioned, fully
furnished, maid service
available. Lovely gardens and
swimming pool. Telephone
31297,31093.


FOR RENT


I -- -


C12604
OPPOSITE SCOTTISH
SHOP, Charlotte Street. Ideal
for store or office. mple
parking. Immediate occupancy.
41476.

C12704
UNFURNISHED two 2
bedroom 1 bath apartment -
airconditioned. Call 3-2205
day or night.

C12325
ONE EXTRA LARGE two
bedroom, two bath, apartment.
With large living and dining all
basically furnished Victoria
Court APARTMENTS on
Elizabeth Avenue between
Shirley and Bay Street.
Facilities, phone, laundry,
parking, T.V. antenna,
airconditionod. Phone 54631
between 8 a.m. and 5 n.m

C12695
On LOVE BEACH 2 bed/2
bath apartments superbly
furnished, wall-to-wall shag
carpet centrally
airconditioned dishwasher
etc. $625 per month -
includes membership in Club
(Tennis, Pool, Sailing etc.) -
contact 78421/2.

C12696
HILLCREST TOWERS 2
bed/2 bath apartments
completely furnished and
airconditioned -- $350 per
month. Contact 78421/2.

C12699
ATTRACTIVE DUPLEX, with
two apartments for rent in
Stapledon Gardens, Turnquest
Avenue. Call 34265.

C12624
WILLIAM'S COURT
APARTMENTS 2 one
bedroom furnished apartments,
airconditioned. Call daytime
2-2152.

C12708
2 BEDROOM unfurnished
apartment, airconditioned -
upstairs over Mae's Beauty
Salon, East Street, South.
Phone 3-5350.

C12726
COMPLETELY furnished one
bedroom apartment,
airconditioned, fully carpeted,
T.V. Antenna, automatic
washer and dryer. $200.00.
Phone 5-8512.

WANTS TO RETm
C12723
SENIOR BRITISH BANK
EXECUTIVE requires house
either East or West -
minimum four bedrooms, three
reception rooms, preferably
with pool. Ring Mrs. O'Brien
28711.

CARS FOR SALE
C12716
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD.
USED CARS
1967 CHRYSLER
4 Dr. Auto. White $550
1970 HILLMAN HUNTER
4 Dr. Auto. White $395
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
2 Dr. Auto. Green $1295
1970 PONTIAC LeMANS
4 Dr. A/C $1700
1969 FORD GALAXIES
4Dr.A/C $1200
1971 VICTOR
Std. Blue $995
1970 HILLMAN MINX
4 Dr. Std. Green $850
1970 CHEVELLE SS
A/C 2 Dr.Red. $1800
1968 VAUXHALL VICTOR
$450
1968 VAUXHALL
VICTOR $450
1969 VAUXHALL
VICTOR S/W
.S/W Std. Red. $300
1971 FORD PINTO
Brown Vinyl Auto $1700
1970 PONTIAC
LAURENTIAN
A/C Blue $995
1970 VAUXHALL VIVA
4 Dr. Auto. White $495
1970 MORRIS 1100
4 Dr. Std. White $850
1970 FIAT
4 Dr. Std. White $195
1969 MORRIS 1100
4 Dr. Auto. Blue $750
1967 TRIUMPH
4 Dr. Std. Red $495
1969 TRIUMPH 1300


4 Dr. Std. Green $ 600
1971 VICTOR S/W
Auto. Brown $1500
Telephone 34636-7-8
Located Oakes Field
Opposite the Ice Plant


C12728
1968 MUSTANG, vinyl top,
airconditioned, automatic
transmission, power steering,
chrome reverse wheels. $1600.
Phone 78192 after 6 p.m.
5-3208.
C12733
1968 BUICK, full power,
airconditioned, power
windows. Phone 32044 (21978
Mr. Hall).

FOR SALE

C12700
MILK SHAKE MACHINE.
$600.00. Call Mrs. Pinder
23237 ext. 3.


FOR SALE


C12727
21 inch COLOUR T.V. Philco
$250. Smith-Corona Portable
Electra 120 Typewriter $150.
Phone 78192. After 6 p.m.
5-3208.

C12732
SUNFISH of sale. Excellent
condition. 2 sets of sails. For
further details phone 22500.


PUBLIC AUCTION

C12590
PUBLIC AUCTION TO BE
HELD ON SATURDAY 1st
DAY OF DEC. 1973 AT 12
O'CLOCK NOON ON SITE
BEAUTIFULLY located 3
Four-plexes, i.e. twelve units
known as Lakeside Park
Apartments.
All those three pieces parcels
or lots of land containing
Forty-Two thousand five
hundred and fifty-two (42552)
square feet known as lots
numbers One Hundred and
Sixty (160), One Hundred and
Sixty-One (161) and One
Hundred and Sixty-Two (162)
Kennedy Drive, Sunrise Park
Subdivision situate at Freeport,
Grand Bahama Island, bounded
as follows:
Northwardly by land the
property of the Grand Bahama
ort Authority Limited and
running thereon Three
Hundred and Fifty-Five (355)
feet.
Eastwardly by lot
number One Hundred and
Eighty-Four (184) Kennedy
Drive and running thereon One
Hundred and Twenty (120)
feet.
Southwardly by a portion of
Kennedy Drive and running
thereon Three Hundred and
Sixty-Three and Fifty-Six
Hundredths (365.56) feet.
Westwardiv by a portion of
Kennedy Circle and running
therecn One Hundred and Five
(105) feet.
The above property (known
as the property of Ely
Investments Limited Freeport)
is being sold under the power
of sale contained in an
Indenture of Mortgage to
Barclays Finance Corporation
(Bahamas) Limited dated the
13th day of September, 1968
and recorded in the registry of
records in the City of Nassau in
Volume 1340 pages 324 to
339.
The sale is subject to a
reserve price and to a right to
the Auctioneer or anyone on
his behalf to bid up to that
price.
Terms: 10% of the purchase
price at the time of sale and
balance on delivery of title.
Dated this 10th Day of Nov.
1973.
SHEPHERD L. KEY
Real Estate
Auctioneer & Valuer


C12361
KIIaK S. HINSEY will sell at
the Parking lot east of the
Harbour Moon Hotel, Bay
Street, on the 30th day bf
November 1973 at 12 noon the
following property:-
"ALL THAT piece or lot of
land situate in the Eastern
District of the Island of New
Providence comprising a
portion of a tract of land of
3.5 acres being part of Lot
No. 34 in the allotments laid
out at Sandilands Village
which said piece parcel or
lot of land is bounded as
follows Northwardly by a
strip of land 10 feet wide
now 3r formerly the property
of Walter Ivor Claridge and
June Agail Claridge and
adjacent and parallel to Joe
Farrington Road and
running thereon 150 feet
more or less Eastwardly by
Fox Hill Road and running
thereon 100 feet more or
less Southwardly by land
now or formerly the
property of the said Walter
Ivor Claridge and June Agail
Claridge and running
thereon 100 feet."
Mortgage dated 24th August,
1964 John Samuel Smith to
Finance Corporation of
Bahamas Limited.
Recorded in Volume 794 at
Pages 503 to 511.
This sale is subject to a reserve
price and to the right for The
Auctioneer or any person on
his behalf to bid up to that
price.
Terms: 10% of the purchase
price at the time of sale and
balance on completion.
Dated 24th day of October
A.D. 1973.
KIRK S. HINSEY
Public Auctioneer.
C 12322
WOLSEY HALL
THE OXFORD CORRESPONDENCE COLLEGE
Whaever the qualiticaion you want -
SC.E. '0' and "A" levels a London
Univcersni Dleree. Profetsional Ex.
aminations or business Studies Wolsey
Hall founded in I R9l4 i s you:
A guarantee of tuition until you pass
)oure\aminajon at noctracost.
An outstanding record of success. For
example 87", of W'olse Hall students
sitting for B.A. honours degrees have
passed in he last 7 ears.
Oer 75 years of experience resultiul in
the moit elic nlt modern meiho s or
postal teaching h airmail ifreqt hired.
Personal tuition to neet )our precise
requirements.
Lou reespa )ahl instlments.
i f you w anl to knos how to
S\prepar for a succeuful future
l l ie fr a Free prospects 1o.


BUSINESS PROFESSIONAL


DIRECTORY

Save Time



By



b lNh It imicori Ml1219 EXI. 5

HIM luihrlltli 2L hiu *dh '

> S ETIM ms[

LOCKSMITH
Bahamas Lock & Key 2-4591 ext. C147
BOOKSTORE LAUNDRY
The Christian Rook DRY CLEANING
Shop 5-8744 New Oriental Laundry 2-4406

BUILDERS MEN'S CLOTHING
Richard's Construction5-7080 The Wardrobe 5-5599


CAMERAS MUSIC
John Bull 2-4252/3 Cody's Records 2-8500

CARPETS OPTICIANS
Lee's Carpet Craft 3-1993 Optical Service Ltd. 2-3910/1

CUSTOMS BROKERS PLUMBERS
Sunshine Plumbing
Martin's 2-3173 Maintenance Service 5-6251

DEPT. STORES PRINTING
Pixie's Dept. Store 2-3173 Wona's Printing 5-4506

DRAPERIES PROPERTY CLEAN-UP
Lee's Carpet Craft 3-1993 Gonzalez Clean-Up Service
3-1562/2-4726

DRUGS &
PRESCRIPTIONS RADIO & T.V. SALES
PRESCRIPTIONS
Carter's Records 2-4711
McCartney's 5-6068/5-2127

ENTERTAINMENT RUBBER STAMPS

Film & Equip.Service 2-2157 Wong's Rubber Stamp
Co. 5-4506

FLOOR MAINTENANCE SPORTS
Rug Cleaning & Installation Champion Sport Land 2-1862
Island Interiors 5-3576/4-2191
GARDEN & PET TRAVEL
SUPPLIES Playtours 2-2931/7
Modernistic 2-2868 R. H. Curry & Co., 2-8'81/7

HARDWARE TRUCKING SERVICE
Gonzalez Trucking
John S. George 2-8421/6 Go1562/2n4726
3-1562/2-4726

HEALTH FOODS WRECKER SERVICE
Nassau Drug StoVe 5-4506 Gibson Wrecker Service2-8896


FOR TlE ACTION YOU WANT


Shop Nassau
For Business


LOST
C12731
Orange and White Cat, West
Bay Street, vicinity of The
Grove, approximately 2 weeks
ago. Anyone with any
information, please call
3-4156, evenings.

ENTERTAINMENT
C12647


FRIENDLY
BIG AL COLLIE
Manages the new
BRIGDE INN RESTAURANT
Directly across the bridge on
East Bay Street
Serving food and cocktails
For information call 32077
Dress Casual.

C12318

MOVING?

For Expert Packing &
Forwarding by Sea or Air,
Contact E. H. Mundy &
Co. (Nassau) Ltd., P.O.
Box N-1893. Phone
2-4511.


APPROVE ARGO
= ^A"-,e


iRJOHT


I Merchants
And Services


ENTERTAINMENT

C12679
THE NASSAU AMATEUR
OPERATIC SOCIETY
will present







The Sound of Music

DUNDAS CIVIC CENTRE
November 24th to
December 1 st,
excluding Sunday
Curtain time: 8 p.m.
each performance
Box office now open at te
Maura Lumber Co., Bay Street.
Telephone 2-4003, for
reservations.


I ART I

C12701
SALES OUTLET for local
artist producing high quality
work. Paintings, sculpture and
original art work. Call 31410 -
5-9337.


ENTERTAINMENT


I I


C12673
THE UNIVERSITY PLAYERS
PRESENT


IL

"They Raising the Flag
Now Mama"
By P. Anthony White
Directed by Fritz Stubbs
DUNDAS CIVIC CENTRE
December 13th 16th.
Curtain Time 8:30 p.m.
Matinee 2:00 p.m.
Saturday & Sunday
Price $3.00 unreserved
$3.50 reserved Matinee $150.
Phone 34107.

IN MEMORIAL
C1 692
, ,. .


& F ;
IN LOVING memory of our
dear grandmother REBECCA
SYLVIA BODIE, who died
24th November 1970.
We love you but Jesus loves
you best.
Left to mourn: One son,
Orthland, one daughter Madge
and many grandchildren.

SCHOOLS
C12494
LEWIS AUTO SCHOOL
Learn to drive with confidence.
Phone 59805 between 7 and
8.30 a.m. or after 6 p.m. or
35084 anytime.


MARINE SUPPUES
C12315
PACEMAKER 44ft. Luxurious
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.

C11894
1969 -- 31ft. CHRIS CRAFT
Commander. Sleeps six, private
shower, two 230 h.p. engines
with less than 200 hours,
kitchenette, good condition.
Call 24267, 54011.
C12725

YACHTS AND BOATS LTD.

CHRIS CRAFT

CONCORDE

IRWIN SAIL YACHTS

AVON INFLATABLES
22 foot Aquasport with twin
55 h.p. Chryslers. Bimini top,
fish box, rod holders, boarding
platform and more. $3300.00
asking.

27 foot Concorde Sedan with
twin 225 h.p. Chryslers. Loaded
with extras at our dock at
$13,500.00

20 foot Bertram Bahia-Mar at
our dock. 200 h.p. Mercruiser
and all extras including trailer
$5500.00

AT THE DIVE SHOP
Shop early for Xmas. New ana
exciting equipment just arrived
for the season. Top quality
snorkeling sets, knives, books,
bags and other accessories, all
first class gifts for the avid
sportsman. See us about lay
aways on scuba equipment, all
guaranteed for life from the
best manufacturers. We are sole
representatives for U.S. divers,
dacor, and all the best in diving
equipment. At Nassau's most
complete dive shop, the shop
with the dive flag awning.

AT THE MARINE SHOP

Come and see our first offering
of parts, gifts, anchors, line,
pumps, and more. All new at a
convenient location.

P.O. Box N-1658


WANTED


I I


C12711
Careful English tenant would
like to rent furnished or
unfurnished 3-bedroom house.
Eastern district preferred.
Phone 3-1651.

HELP WANTED
C12631
E L E CTRONICS
ENG INEERING
TECHNICIAN, 5 to 10 years
practical experience. Must be
dependable, able to work
without supervision, capable of
training others. Phone 28039,
ELECTRICAL ENTERPRISES
LTD.


C12710
QUALIFIED Housekeeper, 5
years or more experience, age
35 or over, for Guest House at
Harbour Island. Phone Sunset
Inn, Harbour Island.

C12693
PEST CONTROL
SUPERVISOR, fully
experienced in all aspects of
general pest control and tent
fumigation. Apply in writing to
Rentokil Laboratories Ltd., P.
0. Box N395, Nassau.
C12674
QUALIFIED GARDENER
with references. Reliable
vardman.
Experienced cook with
references. Telephone 7-4142.

C12715
SECRETARY with 3-5 years
Legal Experience. Knowledge
of Company incorporation and
maintenance an asset. For
appointment call 28885 or
28886.

C12713
ONE EXPERIENCED/
RECEPTIONIST for private
club. Duties will require
successful applicant to handle
all correspondence, maintain
accurate club records. Must
have pleasant personality and
ability to deal with important
members of the local
community and international
visitors. Knowledge of food
and beverage management will
be an advantage in organising
various social functions.
Apply: Adv. C12713, c/o The
Tribune, P. O. Box N-3207,
Nassau.

C12724
WANTED for general office
work to include general typing,
taking dictation from
dictaphone, filing, clerical
record keeping. Reply in
writing to Warehouse Manager,
Solomon Brothers Ltd., P. 0.
Box N-3218. Phone
applications will not be
accepted.
C12720
SENIOR FULL-TIME
BOOK-KEEPER 5 day week
'(9.00 a.m. 5.00 p.m.) Diocese
of Nassau. Please forward
resume, stating educational
background and experience.
with two references to, P. 0.
Box N8187, Nassau, Bahamas.

TRADE SERVICES
C12326
T.V. ANTENNAS
Boosters for home,
apartments and hotels
Sales and services.
Call 5-9404
WORLD OF MUSIC,
Mackey Street next
to Frank's Place

PETS
C12702
GOOD HOMES wanted for
kittens two months old.
Phone;- mornings 2-4874,
evenings 41102.


AND BAHAMA


ILASSIFIED


H ELP WANTED

C6511
1 FOOD AND BEVERAGE
MANAGER, Responsible for
the efficient day to day
running of two Gourmet
Restaurants, two
show lounges and six bars and
auxiliary services through the
two casinos. Individual must be
fully acquainted with Food
and Beverage operations,
Kitchen service and bars, also
purchasing and control
procedures. Able to compose
"A LA CARTE" Menus and
Wine Lists. Must be capable of
supervising and motivating
Food and Beverage personnel.
Applicant should have a
minimum of five (5) years
experience in first class Food
and Beverage operations.
Knowledge of a European
language would be an
advantage. Good references
and Police Certificate required.
Applicants must apply to:
Bahamas Amusements
Limited Personnel Department
(El Casino)
P. 0. Box F-787 Freeport,
Grand Bahama.


TRADE SERVICES


C12323

Pw4.ds CiLmna


Madkey Street
A Rovelt AveRe
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
A PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING

HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN FINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-379, 2-3796,
2-3797. 2-3798
Airport 7-7434
FREE ESTIMATES

C12714
WINDOW AND DOOR
SPECIALISTS
We stock parts for all types of
aluminum windows and doors.

AND REPAIR:
Sliding Glass Doors, all types
of screens, awning windows,
jalousie windows and doors.
Phone 54460 night or day.

C12691
BAHAMAS ANTENNA
SYSTEMS T.V. installations
for homes. Hotels and
Apartments. Phone 23371 -
51772.

C12660
FOR ALL your Gardening
needs, trimming, hedging,
pruning, beach cleaning, for
prompt, reasonable and
efficient service. Call 5-7810.

C12730


KEITH REID


COMMONWEALTH
FURNITURE & CABINET
WORKS
Design, build and remodel
kitchen and china cabinets
Living bedroom furniture
Vanity Book and Showcases
etc. Phone 31120. 3 doors
south of Nassau Stadium.

C12317

TRAVELLING?

For efficient friendly
advice on Worldwide
Destinations by Airline or
Steamships. Contact
MUNDYTOURSat 24512.


APPROVED PASSENGER
RIGHTS


The Tribune

Classified


I ELP WANTED
C6*il
FRONT DESK CLERK/CASH-
IER REQUIRED. MUST BE
FAMILIAR WITH GUEST
CHECK IN/CHECK OUT
PROCEDURES. KNOW-
LEDGE OF N.C.R. 4200
MACHINE ESSENTIAL.
REFERENCES AND POLICE
CERTIFICATE REQUIRED.
APPLY SHALIMAR HOTEL
352-9631.
C6504
COST ANALYST
dahama Cement Company
requires a Cost Analyst with a
minimum of 2-3 years
experience in industrial
accounting including in-process
Standard Costs. To assume
responsibility for Standards
Maintenance, Forecast, Cost
Analysis and Appropriation
Control. Minimum education -
Junior College or business
school certificate in accounting
or partial qualification in
professional accounting
society. Interested applicant
contact: Per so nne I
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100.
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


a -- - o


Telephone 24869

C12672

NOWOPENI

iilA! IAI iENI rPiirPIiiS ITI.

WE STOCK WHAT THE NAME IMPLIES

Montrose Avenue opposite St. Thomas More School
Phone 2-4259


I


- --


I I II


I I


-I I


I


----- --


I 'I-" Ii-


a I


I


I


T-


wwpr


I


IGH1


I


I


I


IT


/ '
!


Saturday, November 24, 1973


Ikho R4rhtkme


L


.. -- ___










. Saturday, November 24, 197


IAm BAHAMA


El


_____ __I __ II


NELP INTED

,C6513
REFINERY OPERATORS
GRADE "B"
Required by Bahamas Oil
Refining Company, GRADE
"B" OPERATORS. Applicants
should have at least a high
school education, must have at
least five (5) years experience
in operations of large scale
petroleum distillation
equipment and/or related
facilities.
Mail resume in confidence to:
Personnel Officer, Bahamas Oil
Refining Company, P. O. Box
F-2435 Freeport, Grand
Bahama.


HELP WANTED
C6515
BORCO TRAINEES
REQUIRED
The Bahamas Oil Refining
Company is seeking applicants
for its OPERATOR
TRAINING PROGRAM.
Candidates should be between
the ages of 22-35, preferably
with some experience in
Shipping. High school
graduate, with G.C.E.'s in
English and Maths or the
equivalent. Salary
commensurate with education
and working background.
Qualified applicants may
contact the BORCO Personnel
Office, Monday through Friday
between the hours of 9 a.m.
12 Noon.


-- f


CLSIFE ADS-


I


.512
TAILOR required with eight
(8) years of tailoring
experience, must be able to cut
all types of design and
supervise other tailors. Wages
according to experience plus
percentage Please apply to:
Williams Variety Store situated
at Pinedale, Grand Bahama.

C6505
COST ACCOUNTANT
Accountant with minimum 3
years experience in Industrial
accounting including Standard
Costs. To assume responsibility
for supervision of accounting
office preparing Rudgets,
Forecasts and Standard Costs.
Minimum education Junior
College or business school
certificate in accounting or
partial qualification in
professional accounting
society. Interested applicant
contact: Personal Department,
Bahama Cement Company, P.
0. Box F-100, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.


The Tribune Comics Pav.


OH,MY' Soyouf YE
PASSED THE '
RED LIGHT
ON PURPOSE? OR


HE'LL PROBABLY FINE YOU
ONLY FIFTY DOLLARS ---
WELLTAKE IT EASY FRIEND!
HAPPY OTORING!




t>

b-0


ELP WANTED
C6514
CHIEF PILOT AND SAFETY
ENGINEER: REQUIRE
COMMERCIAL LICENCE
WITH MILTI ENGINE
INSTRUMENT &
HELICOPTER RATING.
APPLICANT SHOULD HAVE
AT LEAST 5000 HOURS
WITH PREVIOUS
EXPERIENCE IN AVIATION
MANAGEMENT
COLLATERAL DUTIES
ALSO REQUIRE SOME
EXPERIENCE IN INDUSTRY
SAFETY AND DESIGN
MANAGEMENT.
LBI EXCAVATION &
ENGINEERING. LTD.,
373-1046, P. O. Box F-30G.


You get

RESULTS with

(hbe Uribunp
CLASSIFIED ADS


m


. .. Ji 2 r*'71


Mhp Mirhimn









Saturday, November 24, 1973


"...A call about some emergency work at the office. I
told them your yard work was more important."


'ARE YA SURE IT ISN'T A 7ZRAYURGRGE f?.

A_Ea1rf18s'W-


"Tears wil1 get you nowh
churchm

CROSSWORD
PUZZLE


29. Butter
substitute
31. Appeal for hel
33. Dowry
34. Index
36. Formerly
called
38. Bookkeeper's
correction
43. Disagree
45. Malay canoe
46. Somebody
47. Government
agency
48. Pinafore
49. Windup
50. Asia: New Ye
51. University


p


ere. le already have a
=mse."
L LN Y




A. yE SINLY
A D
Al R I N A
IL 5 Kvraan I g
li, a i g 5 $ ( EM


SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE
4. Spider bug
genus
DOWN 5. Hags
1. Lyric 6. Acidity
2. Western 7. Exclude
resort city 8. Acquiesced
9. Moccasin
ar 3. Flowerless o r
0l. World War II
plant battle site
\9 o 16. Molecule
18. Curlicue
S- 21. Athamas' wife
22. Threaded
fastener
23. Torrid
24. Roman room
S- 3 2 25. Corrupt
27. Positive
Evidence
30. Early auto
32. Obstinate
35. Dismiss
37. Vacant
39. Unicorn fish
40.Assam
S silkworm
41. Christmas
S42. Weight
allowance
43. Fictitious
name'
ofatures 11-27 44. Imaret


Rupert and the Cake Race--6


Rupert, and Gregory folow Roger into the
panelled hal. "There Is lots of history to
this house," says the young man. "Thanks
to my grandfather's collection, there are things
here that people of utwood have long
forgotten-euch as this." And he shows the
pals a carved slab of stone at in the wall.
"Those were usd for marking the borders


O 3fFICE-HOUR


Winning

Bridge
By VICTOR MOLLO
Dealer Wet: Love Al
North
S9832
| A 10 7
South
A J 10 9 6 5 3
K Q 10 5
452
West North East South
'19 Pass 2( 34
Pass 44
West leads the OA and con
tinues with the 44. How should
South play?
Analysis: O the face of it.
even if the trump finesse fails
declare has only three losers-
a trum a diamond and a club.
West's opening lead of the OA,
however, points to a singleton
and the obvious danger is that
should West come in with the
*K. he will give East the lead
with a otlu and ruff the dia-
mond return.
South can, improve his
chances by giving up the trump
finesse and laying down the
4kA. Now he will be safe unless
West started with three trumps.
What if he did? With a little
forethought South can guard
that, too.
West East
4 K 82 7
A J 65 4 7Q 10 7
A 09 8 8432
SJ 8 6 4K Q 9 3
Going tu with the 6A at
trick two, South leads dummy's
VK. Unless East produces un-
expectedly the VA, South dis-
cards his second club and re-
mains tn control. Whatever
West returns South wins and
plays the ace and another trump.


Acroe"
I. toed.(et(
Ar-
S. ltofesl aI payment. (s

la: 1: 6<9
Tralto. (9)
IS. Thouht. (4)
20. Likely. (6)
21. Moved slightly. (6)
12. Shelter. (1)
2 Shows fear or repugnane.
(8)


bewn
1. Petty forsmality. (9)
*. oral. (3)
3. Extend too far. (0)
4. Made weak. (9)
.. Valley .(4)
7. W'OL (4)
I7. Me (4
n m

14. R m s.
IB N o a A
(3)
I8 Coqm.
iL well 1.
t mined. rrfs
(4) led~@


of the village at one time." he explains. See.
Gregory," ays Rupert. There are three oak
leaves and an acorn on it." "That was the
Nutwood crest." explains Roger. "And once
a year it was the custom to go round the
street lapping every crest with this rod."
"Ooo. I'd love to do tha I" cries Gregory.
ALL RINrTS REIEVEO


Nl-u-


REX MORGAN, M.D.


By DAL CURTIS


ICARROLL RIGHTER'S


from the Crroll. Rihter Institute
GENERAL TENDENCIES: Wind up work by
noon so you can then start afresh to go after
what you want for you can project better now than for some
time in past.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) Look into new, more
profitable outlets after lunch. Some new personalities can give
you a new approach. Evening fine for the social.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Reach right decisions with
associates early so you can get into important work connected
with them. Devote p.m. to home and mate.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) First get work done, then
come to better understanding with allies. Do some relaxing
later that will restore your energies. Take more interest in
public matters
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Plan recreations
early before going out. Talk your ideas over with fellow
workers and gain their cooperation. Your creativity is high
now.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Handling home problems m a.m.
makes it possible to get out to the business or practical matters
you like. Buy new gadgets. Have fun in p.m.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Work efficiently at regular
routines in a.m., then improve dwelling. Make out important
reports, statements. Home can be a joy tonight.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Handle money affairs wisely in
a.m. so you can go out to recreations without worry. Pay more
attention to facts, figures. Make no demands on others
tonight.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Handle personal affairs well
in a.m., then concentrate on the practical. Get property or
abode in better condition. Don't neglect necessary repairs.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Discuss the future
with experts in a.m. for greater success. Improve health and
then step out socially and meet interesting persons.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) Gain cooperation of
good pal for a project you have in mind in a.m., then get
advice from experts. A personal aim can be successfully
pursued in p.m.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Get busy at outside duties
during a.m., then devote time to good friends later. Please a
higher-up, or you could get into trouble. Avoid one who
depresses.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) A communication from out of
state needs further study, although it confirms your ideas.
Handle credit matters well. Understand political trends.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY ... he or she will be
very determined and needs wise discipline early in life,
otherwise he or she will be difficult to handle and will ruin the
fine promise in this chart. There is a definite "Think big and
get big" ability here, and once self-control is acquired, your
youngster can do that and can be of great help to the masses.
Foreign languages should be learned.
"The Stars impel, they do not compeL" What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & overgard


APARTMENT 3-G By Ale Kotzky


he. Comc pale


ACROSS

1. Yellow ide
5. Cram
8. Simulate
11. Consider
12. Confection
13. Caterpillar
14. Concerning
15. Smoking
material
17. Sanctify
19. Powder
20. French
sculptor
23. Retained
26. Dry
28. Bill of fare


Chess
By LIONARD BARDEN


Zi









White mates in three moves al
the latest, against any defence
(by Sam Loyd). This miniature
by the best- wn of al chess
puzzle composers may deceive
even expert solvers into choosing
the wrong key.
Par times: 1 minute, problem
master; 2 minutes, problem
expert; 5 minutes, good; 10
minutes, average; 30 minutes.
novice.
SOLUTION NO. 9823 -
Chess Solution
1 t2. If 1 ... P-K4;
Q-KKt 8or (i 2... Kx Kt); 3
q- 8. I . P-K 2
a. I i... P-K-L; 2
-KiKt2. If 1 . KxKt;
2 Q-Kt6 Sand3 Q-B7 mate. 1
1 . K-Kl; 2 QxP and 3
Q-K7 mate.
Solvers familiar with Loyd's
style will be tempted to 1
Q-ORI-but it fails to 1 . .
P-K; 2 Q--KRI, K-K1! when
White has no mate.






HOW mea*
oE R ur letter
or -ore ea9
ou3 make
from the
Letters shown
bere? I nmak.
lug a word,
eac letter
P 0 P my be usel
twoSS the t n-
must be at lat one Ut-etter
wore la the lst. No plaralt; no
6DAY TABO BI 21 words.
semorrow.
YBSTEIDAY'S SOLUTION:
lthoe honest boe host home
oest aose ou nous onse
onu oust UTSHONB seat
et oe shoe shoo shoot
shot shout shun shunt shut
snout son soot soothe south
stone stan suet thus tsh uaset
umbne unsbot.


Per time 30 min. AP Newsf


I- '


I-


_ _ -


her hirthimft




______________________________ __ ________ ______ _______________ ___


~ributw


Saturday, November 24, 1973


Prince paces Strachan's


to win over John Bull


AQUINAS College Aces
guard Prince Hephurn took
time ofi trom the 156 hours
basketball marathon last night
and paced Strachan's Auto
Alrikans with 21 points and
five assists in their 92-65
victol r ovci John Bull.
In the easy going match,
Strlachan's led by their big
centre Jetrome Barney and new
,daiditon I ionel "Snake" Evans
coimfolt.ihl\ controlled John
Bull in each half when they
inciea.ied ihier lead by ten

l.in ciir'cd a game high
oi i points. ave eight assists
aid captluire 1 7 rebounds.
I vans \, io also took 17
rchmluds s cored 18 and gave
live tisists. Bertie Johnson who
pirioe stinli in the Afrikans'
attack contributed 14 and 17
Sholnll ls.
M\1iill Jlohnson topped John
Bull wvith :t eaim high of 21
points. 11e took 12 rebounds.
\lie Ro llc contributed 15
Ichio lnds :110l 1- points.
\WitI their ofttence built
.aIrndl te shooting of Rolle
and.1 Johnliv'n. Jihn Bull stuck
close It the Atrinkans forging a
20 .ill lie n'ui was in the first
hall
Sti .,chlIn:',- on worked
I hel,, les ou, t of this and with
B.nii3 .i n Berltie n target to
c:iptiui the li hotuntd and send
it io\\ni t llephum and


Bernard Davis for the fast
break conversion they opened
a 32-38 lead.
Going into the final five
minutes, Leroy Fawkes
decided to stick on Hepburn in
an attempt to quell the scoring.
However, Barney around the
key hole proved accurate.
Evans and Bertie found late
baskets giving the Afrikans a
44-32 half time lead.
The second half saw
Strachan's off to a disorganised
start and John Bull, picking up
the pace break the lead by four
points. Immediately, Barney
called a time out to rectify
things. Later he brought on
David Patton for Hepburn and
the Afrikans were once more
ahead by ten.
Hepburn with ten minutes
remaining and the Afrikans
ahead 60-54 returned to team
up with Patton on the front
court.
I.ike the latter period of the
first half when Strachan's took
charge, so it was in the second
half and with 2:50 remaining
they were up front 83-63.
STRA. HAN'S AUTO
fg rb f tp
Clark 1 5 2 2
I)avis 2 1 1 4
I'vans 9 17 3 18
Johnsoun 6 17 1 14
Barnes 12 17 0 25
Pattern 3 0 1 8
Hepburn 9 6 3 21


NOTICE
N(-T I.I is hereby given that SUSAN AGUSTA PENN of
i-rsh Greek, Andros Isld. is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration
J.is citizen of The Bahamas, and that an"
prison who knows any reason why registration snouia not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 17th day of
November 1973 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
ri, Citizenship, P. O. Box N7147. Nassau.




NOTICE


NOIrCF is hereby given that EMMANUEL LOUIDOR of
Poincrilaa Avenue. P. O. Box 4560 is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
idatulalsation as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalisation should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 24th day of
November 1973 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P. O. Box N7147, Nassau.



NOTICE


NOT I(. is hereby given that THOMAS RANDALL HALL
of Fast Bay St.. is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationalhty and Citizenship, for naturalisation as a citizen
of Ihe Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
ijason why naturalisation should not be granted should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 24th day of November 1973 to
The Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.
O Box N7147. Nassau



NOTICE


rIl)T F E :i hereby given that CAROL JEAN FENNELL of
'ii i,',a a ',e Third Street is applying to the Minister
i,'1 .iibe 'cor Nationality and Citizenship, for
,.itiii,s.itiin as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
n-.,,vvso n,-ws any reason why naturalisation should
ii' hle :..:- sh.iould send a written and signed statement
Stihe 'J, .-ai.t.ii. twenty-eight days from the 24th day of
',,Vii-htr 3 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
iidi ( if.i,', -Ip.i P 0 Box N7147, Nassau.




NOTICE


N(rlL- ifr.,ebv gienr that JOHN DOUGLAS LAMBERT
'o0 f j ria ara Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama is applying
iir t 'ihe sister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
1I-i registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
iii in hiS iows any reason why registration should not
St- I 'iitcd 1'hould send a written and signed statement of
the a t ,'v", twenty-eight days from the 24th day of
rN, i(:-,! i V- 19'3 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and (.ti.i Ph,. P O0 Box N7147, Nassau.




NOTICE


NOT IC( is hereby given that INEZ LOUISE TUCKER of
RBlue Hill Road, Nassau, N. P., Bahamas is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
egistation a a a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
neir), who knows any reason why registration should not
br i atited should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 24th day of
November 1973 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P. O. Box N7147, Nassau.



NOTICE


NOTICE is hereby given that THOMAS H. HALL Jr., of
Harbour Club, East Bay St.,. is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalisation as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalisation should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 24th day of
November, 1973 to The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P. O. Box N7147, Nassau.


Barr
Stuart
Rolle
Fawkes
Johnson
Miller
Mackey


JOHN BULL
2 7
3 3
8 15
3 10
9 12
5 I
0 3
''a....


Steady rebounding
Selver and Reubin


1 4
1 6
4 16
3 .7
3 21
1 11
0 0

by Mirza
Mounts


together with the shooting of
Frankie Brice and Godfrey
Burnside pulled Rodgers Sport
Shop from a 20 deficit to an
80-79 victory over Superwash
Arawaks.
Van Delaney going 11 for 24
from the field and seven for 11
from the line topped the
Arawaks with a game high of
29.
The Arawaks threatened to
break the game open from
early in the first half when
they controlled a 26-8 lead.
Brice then came through with
12 points and Robert Johnson
added six as Rodgers trailed
43-32 at half time.
Selver added to Rodgers'
attack in the second half
scoring six of his nine from the
field and two of four from the
line. Adding to the Arawaks'
diminishing control was
Burnside's 12. He made
Rodgers' victory safe when he
picked off an offensive
rebound and played it up.
*******
Clifford Rahming scored a
game high of 25 points last
night bringing his total for
three games to 74 as Becks
Cougars Juniors stopped
Central Avengers 67-44
*****4**


Ray Rose going 11
from the field and four
from the line topped Jo
Juniors with 26 in the
victory over Budweisei

PARADISE 1.:A(;tUF STA


Strachan's Auto
Kentucky ('olonels
B.C.B. Warriors
Classic Pros
John Bull
Police Royals
Fox Hill Nangoes
Nassau Schlitz
NASSAU LEA(;EL
Container Saints
Becks Cougars
Pinder's Club
Rodger's Club
Reef Club
Heastie Supersonics
Superwash Arawaks
Bain Town


STAN


Results in British
league and cup ga-n-s
today:
DIVISION ONI-
Birmingham 3, Leicester 0
Burnley I Stoke 0
Chelsea 4 Southainpt.nl 0


Coventry J Shelfield United I
Derby 0 Leeds 0
Everton I Newcastle I
Manchester United 0 Norwich 0
Queen's Park Rangers 2 Liverpool 2
Tottenham I Wolves 3
West Ham 1 Arsenal 3
DIVISION TWO
Cardiff I Bolton 0
Carlisle 2 Bristol City 1
Hull I Blackpool 0
Millwal 0 Orient I
Notts County 2 Middlesbrough 2
Portsmouth 2 Crystal Palace 2
Preston 2 Luton 2
Sheffield Wednesday 0 Oxford I
Sunderland I Nottingham I forest 0
Swindon I Aston Villa 0
West Bromwich 2 I'ulham 0
SCOTTISH L.EA(;GUF
DIVISION ONI:
Ayr 1 Dundee United I
Dumbarton 0 Celtic 2
Dundee 1 Dunfermline 5
East Fife 2 Aberdeen 2
Hearts 2 I'alkirk I
Motherwell I Morton 0
Patrick 2 Arbroath 3
St. Johnstone 0 Hibernian 2
DIVISION TWO
Berwick 0 Clydebank 0
Brechin 0 Raith 4
Cowdenbeath 2 Alloa I
East Stirling I Queen's Park 2
Forfar I Stranraer I
Queen of the South 1 Hamilton 2
St. Mirren 2 Montrose 0
Stenhousemuir 0 Stirling Albion 3
I A CUP, IFirst Round:
Bournemouth I Charlton 0
Alfretoin 0 Blyth 0
Altrincham 2 Hartlepool 0
Banbury 0 Nortlhhampton 0
Bideford 0 Bristol Rovers 2
Boston 0 Hayes 0
Bradford 2 Worington 0
Cambridge 3 (illingham 2
Chester I Telford 0
Chesterfield 0 Barnsley 0
Colchester 2 Peterborough 3
Crewe 0 Scarborough 0
Dagenham 0 Aldershot 4
Doncaster I Lincoln 0
Exeter 2 Alvechurch I
Formby 0Oldham 2
Halifax 6 Frickley 1
Hendon 3 Leyton 0
Hereford 3 Torquay I
Hillingdon 0 Grantham 4
Hitchin I Guildford I
Huddersfield 2 Wigan 0
King's Lyn 1 Wimbledon 0
Plymouth 2 Brentford I
Reading 3 Slough 0
Rochdale 2 South Shields 0
Rotherham 2 Southport I
Runcorn 0 Grimsby I
Scunthorpe I Darlington 0
Southend 3 Borhamwood 0
Stockport 0 Port Vale I
Tranmere 2 Bury 1
Walall I Swansea 0
Walton 0 Brighton 0
Watford I Chelmsford 0
Weymouth 0 Merthyr I
Wellington 0 Blackburn 0
Wrexham 1 Shrewsbury I
Wycombe 3 Newport I
York 0 Mansfield O


for 16
for five
ohn Bull
1; 0-1 C


Quant can decide vital clash


By GLADSTONE THURSTON
CLASSIC Pros' player/coach
Cleve Rodgers' aim is to be a
constant winner. And don't
give him a chance-because
that just makes the task easier.
In their second showdown
this season, the sensational
Pros vie tonight against the
Kentucky Colonels to make it
two in a row and first place
honours in the Paradise
League.
Rivals from last season when
they left off battling for
League championship, the Pros
in their first match this season
against the Colonels held on to
a 82-80 victory.


Like their coach, the Pros
have taken on that winning
attitude, and to Cleve, the
worst thing the Colonels could
do tonight is challenge them
without their six-foot-nine
centre Sterling Quant.
Playing without Quant for
the past three games, fans have
wondered how strong the
Colonels were.John Bull's
97-96 upset over them will
long be remembered. It is one
of only two losses in nine
played.
"The Colonels have gone
through a big change," noted
Rodgers, "but they still have
that central figure Sterling


Quant and his presence is
going to decide whether they
win or lose in certain
games."
Rodgers observed that the
Colonels' back up forwards
were not too aggressive. "When
we set up an attack on these
players we put on them players
that are more aggressive than
they."
There are one or two teams
in the League that the Colonels
can beat without Quant," he
went on, "but if their fortune
should happen to be so hard
that Quant should not show up
when they are playing a heavy
team like the Sensationals then


they they will be in bad luck
because they will get
slaughtered."
Rodgers thought there was
something about reputation in
the League that makes Quant
quite outstanding.
"Quant has a psychological
effect on his team and on their
opponents. In a one on one
play, a guard would think
twice before driving in on him
or shooting a jump shot in his
face."
Cleve said the Colonels'
game plan basically is working
the ball to the big man on
offence or Quant on the
rebound to John Martin of Phil
Poitier for the fast break.


Bob's Golfer of the year


By IVAN JOHNSON
BOB SLATER stole the
show at the Bahamas Golf
association's annual dinner
dance last night as he collected
eight prizes and the coveted
Golfer of the Year award for
the second straight year.
Slatter's award came as no
surprise at the event held at the
Paradise Island Beach Inn
Pavilion.
This season Slatter won five
major tourneys, the McAlpine
Classic, the Nassau Golf Open,
the Amateur Championship,
the Tournaments of Champions
and the Prime Ministers Cup.
Collecting seven prizes was
Bahamas junior champion
Vernon Lcokhart 18. BGA
vice-president and tournament
director, Fred Higgs received
six prizes.
Master of ceremonies for the


evening was BGA chairman
Calvin Cooper and prizes were
presented by lovely Margerie
Nairn first runnerup in Miss
Bahamas 1973.
The promising Eric Gibson
Jr. took the Most Improved
Golfer of the Year award while
the elegant Lou Parker
captured the Best Dressed
Golfer award.
Speeches were made by
BGA president, Dr. Cleveland
Eneas, Lee Elder the Mr.
Livingstone Coakley and
Donald 'Nine' Rolle.
JULIE THROUGH
BUENOS AIRES A
number 2 seed, Julie
Heldman, of Great Britain, i
defeated Argentina's Beatriz
Araujo 6-2, 6-0 to reach the
finals of the $40,000 Argentine Golfer of the Year Bob Slatter I
open tennis tournament.(AP). Am.... Y.* ~ B.,-1,i .- eI...


PC 820 IS THE FASTEST IN THE FORCE


ir 6-7/ P.C. 820 JOHN DAVIS
r Eagles. proved that he is still the
fastest 'cop' when he clinched
DINS first place in the 100 metres
W i
8 2 and 200 metres during the
7 2 annual sports meet of the
7 3 Royal Bahamas Police Force
6 3 yesterday at the QE Sports
4 6 (Centre.
2 8 Davis streaked through the
o 10 winning tape yards ahead of his
8DIN nearest opponent in both races
7 2 to take the afternoon's most
s 4 popular events for the second
5 5 year running.
4 5 This year's Ludorum was
4 5 shared between P.C. 804
4 9 Young. of Central Division,
and recruit P.C. 147 Johnson,
of the Police College.
Young collected seven
points for his team, winning
the 880 yards, throwing the
soccer cricket ball and finishing third
played in the triple jump.
Johnson contributed six
points towards the Police
Colleges tolal of 17/2 points,
capturing first place in the
triple jump and the 440 yards.


The medley relay for the
John Bull Challenge cup was
won by the Police College
foursome of recruit P.C. 530
Forbes recruit P.C. 147
Johnson recruit P.C. 845
Stewart and recruit P.C. 387
Sands.
Edmund Lewis still remains
the fastest Sergant: in the
force. He won the sergeant's
race for the third consecutive
year with considerable ease.
Speedy Inspector Roland
Pierre captured the Inspector's
race for the second straight
year and Acting
Superintendent Edney Johnson
won the officer's race.
The Southern Division won
the divisional championship
with 20 points, followed by
the Police College in second
place with 17 points and the
freeport division in third place
with 13 points.
The afternoon's events were
watched by many including
Police Commissioner Salathiel
N. thompson, the Speaker of


Basketball blues


Sir,
I was very surprised to hear
on ZNS sports that the
Bahamas Federation of
Amateur Sports are upset over
the starting date of the
Bahamas Baseball Association
next year.
It seems to me, this
federation is geared to help one
particular sport. That sport,'in
my opinion of Basketball.
If while helping basketball
other sporting orgainzations


get help during the process, all
is well and good.
I believe the officers of this
federation must have forgotten
what happened last season (this
year).
Baseball was scheduled
months in advance Did they
play basketball on baseball's
opening night? Yes, sir, they
did.
So wfiit are they upset
about?
VAU&jMVI7 I CK? AnC*


the House of Assembly,
Arlington Butler and Mrs.


US struggle

MARBELLA South Africa
and Taiwan pulled to within
three and four strokes of the
United States today at the
halfway mark in the third
round of World Cup golf
magnificent play by Gary
Player and Hsieh Min-Nano.
The U.S. team of Johnny
Miller and Jack Nicklaus
struggled to a combined one
under par on the first nine.
At the end of 45 holes it
was: United States 348, South
Africa 351 and Taiwan 352.


Marguerite Pindling, wife of
the Prime Minister.
Arlington Butler competed
in the officials race which was
again won by fleetfooted
veteran Harold Munnings.


ll i Rlltl hits It
West Bay Street
WILL BE CLOSED
ONE WEEK
NOV.2lst.THRU.NOV.27t
MALCOLM TYRE
SERVICE
Down Town
WILL BE OPEN
TO SERVE YOU


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