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 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: November 17, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03500

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S COR. ROSET
/ PREMIER
SPERCUSS
INSTRUM

(RegItered with Postm


Lrirtuntte


orf of Bhama for poaconessonsi wthinthe .) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


VOL. LXX. No. 299 Saturday, November 17, 1973 Price: 20 Cents


UNION BRANDS MINISTER'S SPEECH 'ONE-SIDED'


Hotel


workers


by


By MIKE LOTHIAN
THE JOBS OF STRIKING UNIONISTS will be
protected "by force," if necessary, and "what the
Minister says or the law does" will be ignored by the
Hotel Union in its fight to win better pay and working
conditions for New Providence's 8,000 hotel workers.


"The passive demonstrations
we have had in the past shall
no longer exist." declared
union president David Knowlks
in an interview this morning.
Mr. Knowles' hard-hitting
statement reveals that his
powerful union is completely
unabashed and undeterred by
Labour Minister Clifford L.
Darling's threats of legal action
and firings following
Thursday's three-hour wildcat
strike at eight major hotels in
Nassau and Paradise Island.
In a nation-wide radio
broadcast Thursday night M-.
Darling said "on the face of it'
the strike appeared to be
illegal. "The law has been
broken and it is now left to the
legal authorities to determine
what remedies must now he
applied.'"
IL stated also that by
striking Thursday the workers
"have terminated their
employment and when or if
they return to their hotels it is
entirely up to the discretion of
management as to whether or
not they will be re hired."


Mr. Knowles revealed this
morning that the whole
object of the strike was to
force the Ministry to
intervene and by mediation
mnd the deadlock between his
unionn and the Hotel
Employers Association over
contract negotiations.
Mr. Knowles said when the
union on November 7 filed
formal notice of a dispute it
was expected that the Ministry
would immediately set up a
negotiation meeting conducted
by Ministry officials.
C.I.O. LETTER
Instead Chief Industrial
Officer Lambert L. W. Parker
on Monday wrote a letter
dressedd to union secretary
B)bby Glinton a letter not
ye received by the union,
acceding to Mr Knowles
which both the Association
and theUnion have interpreted
as a Minstry rejection of the
,'tter ani its contents only
after the str|'e, the Union's
president saiil.
He said that because the


force'


to






if


protect





necessary


'WE HAVE DONE SOMETHING

TO GET MINISTRY MOVING'


Ministry had for eight days
taken no action to end the
deadlock, "we decided that the
notice.
In this morning's interview
with The Tribune Mr. Knowles
said:
"We registered a dispute
with the Ministry and we were
waiting for eight days to hear
from them. We expected the
Minister to let us know that a
mediation meeting had been
arranged."
But instead Mr. Parker wrote
his letter, a copy of which was
sent to Association executive
director Trevelyan Cooper.
"The Union was not aware of
the Ministry's decision and up
to this day we have not got
that letter," Mr. Knowles said.
Hie went on to say that a day
or two before the strike Mr.
Glinton and Union executive
committee member Basil
McKenzie met Mr. Cooper.
WAITING
"With this knowledge that
the Ministry had rejected our
notice and wasn't going to call
a meeting, Cooper told Bobby
and Basil that since we had


registered a dispute he was
waiting on the Ministry to call
a meeting."
The union learned of the
workers in the industry had to
take matters into their own
hands. We have done
something to get the Ministry
moving. That's why we
demonstrated."
Replying to Mr. Darling's
radio speech, Mr. Knowles told
The Tribune!
"While we are negotiating
we are not going to concern
ourselves with what Minister
Darling says or with what the
law is going to do. We will take
whatever steps we feel are
necessary in order to get a
contract with the Association;
not merely an agreement for
two years, but improvements
in the conditions and salaries
to help the workers.
"When the Government
raised the cost. for example, of
electricity, very little was said
by the Association although in
some cases it pushed up some
of the hotels' costs over
$20,000.
"Government was not


National Insurance pay & benefits spelled out

By NICK KELLY
THE DOLLARS AND CENTS CONTRIBUTION to be made by employer and employee under the National Insurance Scheme and
the rates of benefit payable have been spelled out by the Ministry of Labour.


Labour Minister Clifford
Darling Wednesday tabled a
26-page pamphlet in the House
reviewing the preparations
made to implement the
scheme.
The review points out that
contributions and benefits will
be related to wages or earnings.
There will be six such groups
with an insurable wage for


GOVT. WILL INVEST

INSURANCE MONIES
RESERVES accumulated
by the National insurancee
Fund in the early years of the
scheme are to be invested, a
National Insurance Review
paper by Labour Minister
Clifford Darling states.
"These reserves would
constitute surplus monies
which it would be proper for
the National Insurance Board
to invest wisely," Mr. Darling
states.
The money will be
invested, "as far as is possible,
in the development of the
economy and thus provide
greater opportunities for
employment for our growing
population," according to the
Minister.

Ministry promises

insurance advice
Employers and trade unions
with private insurance schemes
are to be assisted in adjusting
them in view of the National
Insurance Scheme.
The Ministry of Labour
proposes to issue a special
advice leaflet on the effect of
National Insurance on existing
employers schemes.
"The leaflet will in no way
be a directive," says the
Ministry. "It will merely give
advice, leaving it to the parties
concerned to adjust their
existing schemes in whatever
way suits them best."

You
can't
buy
too
much
u J


each. In most cases this will be
the average wage in each group,
which will be used to calculate
the contributions or benefits of
the persons insured in that
group.
Employers will pay two
thirds of the contributions
payable for general benefits for
individuals earning up to
,$59.99 weekly and half the
contribution for employees
earning over that. The balance
will be paid by the employees
themselves.
Contributions for industrial
benefits have been estimated by
the International Labour
Organization at 2 per cent of
insurable wages.
This is to be borne wholly
by the employer since the
employer is at present
responsible for the whole of
the benefits provided under the
Workmen's Compensation Act.
which is to be repealed.
WHEN EFFECTIVE
The general benefits under
the National Insurance Act will
come into force one month
after the Act becomes effective
and industrial benefits in three
months.
In six months insured
persons with at least 26
contributions will be eligible to
sickness benefits,
Maternity and funeral
benefits will be payable 12
months from the start of the
Act.
Self-employed persons are to
be brought into the scene in
12-18 months. Retirement,
Invalidity and Survivor's
Benefits for which 150
contributions have been made,
will start in three years. Those
for self-employed will start
about three years after they arc
brought into the scheme,
A special benefit of the
Scheme will be Industrial
Benefits for employment
injury. These will replace the
benefits now provided under
the Workmen's Compensation
Act.
Industrial benefits will apply
to any employed person
whether above or below the
upper limit of compulsory
school age.
GENERAL BENEFITS
Following are the general
benefits obtainable and the
contributions which must be
made in order to qualify.
Sickness Benefits This
will be paid to insured persons
certified as unable to work for


reasons other than
employment injury, providing
they were employed
immediately prior to the day
they were incapacitated.
To qualify, a person must
have paid no less than 50
contributions. Secondly, a
total of at least 40
contributions must have been
made and credited in the
previous year.
During the first year of
insurance contributions will be
reduced to 26 weeks paid.
The Sickness benefit will be
paid on the basis of the
greatest number of
contributions made in a
specific wage group during the
previous contribution year.
Sickness Benefit will not be
paid for more than 26 weeks.
Invalidity Benefit This
will be paid to persons under
65 medically certified as
permanently unable to
continue further employment.
To qualify a person must
have paid a minimum of 150
contributions and have a
record of at least 750
contributions and credits,
including special age credits.
This will entitle him to 30
percent of his insurable wage in
the group to which he had paid
the greater number of
contributions.
His invalidity benefit will be
increased by 1 percent of
insurable wage for each
additional 50 contributions
and credits above 750.
Reduced benefits will be
paid to those whose paid
contributions are less than 750
but above 150.
Maternity Benefit A
woman, providing she is
insured, will be entitled to
maternity benefit for 13
weeks, six weeks before the
week of confinement, the week
of confinement itself and six
weeks after.
To qualify she must have
paid at least 50 contributions
with no less than 40 credited in
the previous year or no less than
30 in the 40 weeks before the
week when benefits
commence.
Maternity benefit will be
based on the group in which
the greater number of
contributions have been paid in
the preceding contribution
year.
Retirement Benefit- This
will be paid at or after 65
years.


To qualify, at least 150
contributions must have been
paid and there must be on
record a total of at least 750
contributions and credits.
including special age credits.
On this basis 30 percent of
salary will be paid on the group
for which the most
contributions have been
credited.
Benefit will be increased by
1 percent of wage for each
additional 50 contributions
and credits above 750. The
maximum however will be 60
percent of wage.
Reduced benefits will be
naid those whose contributions
are not less than 150 but less
than 750.
Survivor's Benefit This
will be payable to a survivor if
the person was receiving
benefits at the time of death or
was 65 and over and entitled to
retirement benefit.
The rate of the survivor's
benefit will depend on the rate
of retirement benefit or
invalidity benefit the deceased
was receiving at time of death
or to which he was entitled.
The rate of benefit will also
depend on the relationship of
the survivors to the deceased
and the number of them.
Funeral Benefit An
amount of $200 is payable if
the decease had paid at least 50
contributions. A similar
amount is payable on the death
of the spouse of such a person.
BENEFIT TI RMS
Following are the terms on
which Industrial Benefits will
be paid.
Injury Benefit This is
very similar to sickness benefit,
but in the lower wage groups a
slightly higher rate than
sickness benefit will be paid.
Disablement Benefit
Rates payable will be related to
the degree of disablement. It
will be a lump sum paid at less
than 25 percent with a periodic
payment assessed at 25 percent
or more.
Disablement benefit will be
payable whether or not the
injured person is able to work.
Death Benefit This is
similar to survivor's benefit
except that the rate will be
related to the rate of injury
benefit.
Where death is due to an
employment injury a funeral
benefit of $200 will be paid in
addition to any funeral benefit
Page 4, Col. 5


concerned about what money
if any was left to improve the
conditions of the people who
keep the industry alive. But
they were prepared to
discourage, threaten and even
aggravate the situation when it
comes to improvements for the
workers.
"We are not surprised over
the one-sided statement made
by the Minister blaming the
union totally for what has
happened," Mr. Knowles
continued. "HIe has on similar
occasions stated that he would
give employers the right to fire
all employees who go out on
wildcat strikes and to hire new
ones.
BY FORCE
"The workers are therefore
notified and advised," he
declared, "that in all future
demonstrations they must
protect their jobs, even by
force, and this means that the
passive demonstrations which
we have had in the past shall
no longer exist, and there will
be a different kind of positive
move that the union is now
being forced to take."
He said when Mr. Darling
called for a Minister-Union-
Association meeting 10 a.m.
Monday, the Union asked the
Minister to tell the Association
to bring along its
counter-proposal on wages.
The Association's failure to
submit any wage proposal for a
new contract, its refusal to
even discuss wages until the
cost of negotiated
improvements in working
conditions are assessed, and the
union's refusal to negotiate at
all until the Association
submits a wage proposal, have
all contributed to the
deadlock, even though there
has not yet been one
negotiation meeting.
The union on October 3
submitted its proposals for a
new contract to replace the
one which expires January 6,
and the Association submitted
its counter-proposal., without a
wages section, on November 1.
The matter has been stalled at
that point ever since, but
Monday's meeting at the
Labour Ministry is expected to
at least lay the groundwork for
the start of negotiations.
The union has called its
members and supporters to an
open-air meeting 8 p.m.
Monday at its incomplete
headquarters building in the
Grove to discuss the
negotiations and Mr. Darling's
speech.


Employers ready

to negotiate

AFTER telling The Tribune
they would have nothing to say
after Labour Minister Darling's
radio address the Bahamas
Hotel Employers' Association
late yesterday made a
statement to the government
radio station.
They branded the union's
work stoppage as "illegal and
in direct contravention of the
joint labour contract" also
stating the wildcat strike came
at a time when industry "is in
serious financial difficulties,
and the number of visitors to
this area is showing a decline."
Admitting that during the
first 10 months of 1973 hotel
occupancy was down "by over
11 percent" they said "the
month of October was a
disastrous one with a drop of
21 percent compared with
October 1972."
The Association maintained
that the existing contract with
the union remains in force
until January 6, 1974 and were
still willing to sit down and
negotiate. It welcomed the
Minister of Labour's moves in
the matter, stating "prospects
for the forthcoming winter


season are encouraging and we
hope that nothing will be done
to damage those prospects."


JOHN A. LOWE
under questioning.



2 BANDITS

ROB

BARCLAYS

NASSAU was hit by its
third bank robbery in the
past month and its sixth since
July when two masked men
armed with shotguns held up
the Oakes Field branch of
Barclays Bank yesterday and
escaped with a "substantial"
amount of cash and cheques.
The men entered the bank
shortly before 11 a.m. As one
of the bandits remained at
the door, the second man
went behind the counter
stuffing a bag from the
drawers of two cashiers.
A deposit bag trom one of
the customers was also said to
have been snatched before
the two robbers made their
escape in a blue Chevrolet
car, travelling west along
Horse Shoe Drive.
The car was later found
abandoned in the Perpall
Track area.
The past five bank
robberies have yielded a total
of $91,000.
On July 2 the Chase
Manhatten branch at Cable
Beach was held up and
robbed of $47,000.
On July 17 First National
City Bank and Trust on
Thompson Boulevard was
broken into and $4,000.
mostly in cheques, was
taken.
On August 16 the Royal
Bank of Canada at Lyford
Cay was robbed of $34.000.
On October 22, $2,500
was taken from the Canadian
Imperial Bank of Commerce
in Coconut Grove.
On October 29, a hold-up
at the Robinson Road branch
of Barclays Bank netted
bandits $4,000.




MP QUESTIONS

PRISON ESCAPES

QUIESTIONS concerning the
number of prison escapees in
the past year and conditions at
the Fox Hill prison have been
raised in the House by
Clarence Town representative
Michael Lightbourn.
Mr. Lightbourn, who put a
series of 12 questions to
government, has asked for
names and dates relating to
prisoners who have escaped
during 1972 and thus far in
1973. giving the length of time
each was out before being
recaptured.
In addition the
representative has questioned
prisoner capacity and the
number of officers presently
employed and the total
number required.
He also wants to know what
licences have been issued to
financier Robert Vesco or
others to operate a
communications system from
the Charlotte House building.
Other matters raised by the
member concern:
The alleged overpricing of
grits by Milo B. Butler and
Sons wholesalers.
The date when the College
of the hahamas is to come into
being.
a The contract between the
operators of the Paradise Island
Bridge and the government.
o The purchase of food
supplies for the San Salvador


Teachers' College.
The general revenue
balance.
The importation of
mangoes from Haiti.


Defence seek to show



US fraud charge is


not extraditable here

By MIKE LOTHIAN
ASSISTANT U.S. ATTORNEY John A. Lowe underwent two
hours of sharp questioning Friday as Vesco defence attorneys
pressed an attack intended to prove that the fraud charge against
Vesco has no equivalent in Bahamian law and is therefore not an
extraditable offence.
The extradition treaty the last three years been, he said,
validity of which is still in studying and prosecuting
question requires that for criminal matters in New York.
financier Robert L. Vesco to
be returned to the U.S. to face
a $50,000 fraud charge in
federal court the prosecution
must produce evidence
sufficient to prove a prima
facie case against him under
both U.S. and Bahamian law.
The prosecution must also
show that there is in Bahamian
law an offence "substantially
similar" to the offence in U.S.
law that Vesco is alleged to
have committed
ORDERED
Lowe, assistant to Paul
Curran, U.S. Attorney for the
Southern District of New
York, was ordered into the
witness box by Magistrate SIR ELWYN JONES,
witness box y Magistrate PC,QC,MP,(pictured) joined
Emmanuel Osadebay on Friday the 11 -member Vesco
over the objections of defence team earlier this
prosecution attorney Patrick week from England along
Toothe. with British barristers Michael
The prosecution, following Burke Gaffney and Ian Glick.
the pattern set earlier in the Sir Elwyn, attorney general in
extradition hearing, wanted Britain from 1964-70 in
only to read Lowe's affidavit Harold Wilson's Labour
and have defence counsel raise government, is also a Privy
whatever objections they Counsellor and has written
wanted .several books on the war. The
wante British lawyers returned to
But Mr. Osadebay ruled that England yesterday.
as Lowe was present in court
anyway, his direct evidence Yesco mi* his
and the subsequent VSCs missOs his
cross-examination would be
desirable. wuld wife' s birthday
EXPERT INDICTED financier Rober
Lowe's testimony was to be L. Vesc will be unable t
that of an expert on American attend his wife's birthday part
criminal law and particularly in San Jose, Costa Rica, thi
on fraud laws. weekin San Jose, Costa Rica, tnd.
He read his affadavit, Vesco disclosed thi
describing the relevant U.S. law information Friday, the fourth
and citing a precedent to lay day of his extradition hearing
the ground-work for the in which the United States
prosecution to prove a prima seeking his return to face
tacie case against Vesco, from federal court indictment
the witness box just before the charging him with fraud.
luncheon adjurnment Friday The inquiry was recess
afternoon. until Monday afternoon, an(
Fugene Dupuch, Q.C., the wealthy 38-year-old Vesc
conducted the defence s is prohibited from leaving th
cross-examination when Lowe Bahamas by the magistrate'
returned to the witness box court which ordered his arrest
Friday afternoon. Nov. 6.
PROFESSOR He is free on $75,000 cas
In court to advise him on bond, but his passport an
U.S. law for the purpose of the other documents have bee
cross-examination was New confiscated.
York attorney Patrick Wall.
An expert on criminal law, fttie ii i
Mr. Wall has been Associate OUtten s citizenship
Professor of law at New York
University since 1965 and is a queried by NP
former Fulbright scholar and
Ford Foundation fellow. PRIME MINISTER Lynde
The cross-examination, Pindling has been asked in th
conducted on a high legal House to disclose the date o
plane, brought Lowe's admission which former St. Bamaba
that under federal law devising representative Sinclair Outte
"a scheme and artifice to was naturalised as a Bahamia
defraud" is not a crime unless citizen.
inter-state or international The question was put b
communications are used in Clarence Town representative
the execution of the fraud. Michael Lightbourn (Ind.) wh
ASSERTION has also requested the names (
While the prosecution argues a ther persons granted t
that the use of communica- same status between July 1
tions is written into the charge and the date when it wi
only to establish federal accorded Mr. Outten.
jurisdiction as opposed to state Mr. Outten told the Tribur
jurisdiction, the defence has on November 7 that he ha
air, ady and is likely to been granted status earlier
continue to press the assertion the month. On November 8
that the use of communica- was renominated as the PLP
tions is an essential element in standard bearer in the S
the federal offence of fraud, Barnabas by-election.
and is in that respect dissimilar The by-election w
from Bahamian law. necessary because of M
Mr. Dupuch served notice Outten's disqualification wh4
late Friday that his technical he revealed he was born
questions Lowe's technical Turks Islands.
answers are likely to continue No date has yet been set f
for two hours more when the the election.
hearing resumes Monday FNM CONVENTION


afternoon. THE FNM Convention ge
During much of Friday's underway at the Sherato
cross-examination Mr. Dupuch British Colonial Hotel a
cited a number of American Wednesday, November 21 at
cases and court decisions and a.m; and goes on through
asked Lowe for his opinion, the week ending with t0
When Mr. Toothe at one keynote address from lead
point questioned the relevance Kendal Isaacs Saturdi
of Mr. Dupuch's questions Mr.
Osadebay observed that many
of the questions were intended
by the defence to challenge
Lowe's assertion that he was an
expert.
Lowe graduated from
Cornell Law School in 1968,
spent two years in private
practice which included no
criminal law, and has for the


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Saturday, November 17, 1973


FOOD PRICES in Britain
increased 3.3 per cent in
October, the biggest monthly
jump in 18 years, government
figures show.

THE UNITED States
announced in Paris it will
contribute the equivalent of a
million dollars in Egyptian
pounds for the preservation
of historic temples in Egypt.

THE NORWEGIAN
government has earmarked
$163,000 to give refuge to
100 political refugees from
Chile, the foreign ministry
announced.
THE WEST German
freighter Cap Antonio burned
in the English channel today
despite a six-hour battle by
crewmen and British
firefighters to control the
blaze through the night. Six
men were missing and
believed dead.
THE HEAD of Chile's
development agency said the
government will invite foreign
companies that previously
operated there to return


Bomb


go in

LONDON The jurors who
convicted eight Irish
Republican Army guerrillas of
planting bombs in London are
in hiding. protected by armed
sec-curity guards.
And Judge Sebag Shaw, who
sentenced the terrorists, and
the detectives who caught
them are also under Scotland
Yard protection.
The extraordinary security
measures were taken when the
RA,\ vowed Thursday night to
get revenge after the eight were
sentenced to life
imprisonment. They were
i changed with bombings last
March 8 in Which one man was
killed and 216 wounded.
I'he two women and six men
along with a fellow bomber
who pleaded guilty and was
s in-nctd to 15 years were
dispersed yesterday among
maximum security prisons in
Brilain. The movements were
cloaked in elaborate security
arrangements, including decoy
convoys.
Officials believe the
2g rirll.iau I try to free the
two women who were said to
have led the bombing raids.
Dolouirs Price and her sister
Mar on have become IRA
heroines since the raids.
I he London Daily Telegraph
said ithe IRA s provisional wing
has compiled a "death list" of


Athens The Greek Government called out
army troops and placed the country under
martial law today after bloody clashes between
students and police left four people dead and
hundreds injured.
The move came only hours after army
troops and police smashed into the Athens
Polytechnic Institute to put down the
remnants of thousands of student
demonstrators who had demanded the
overthrow of the government.
Army tanks took up positions on main
squares on the capital and troops in full battle
dress ringed the Parliament building, where
strongman President George Papadopoulos, a
former army colonel who came to power in a
1967 coup, has his office.
Earlier, a tank ripped down the heavy iron
gates at the Polytechnic Institute, and
helmeted soldiers rushed through as students
waved clubs and shouted "murderers."
A number of students was beaten and
kicked as they pleaded for mercy.
Dozens were thrown into police buses and
taken into custody.
Shortly after the soldiers entered the
institute, demonstrators began to gather again


trial jurors


to hiding

persons involved in the Catl
ten-week trial. Cat]
It said the list included tilhe
Judge Shaw. Atty. Gen. Sir Irelh
Peter Rawlinson. Home pro,
Secretary Robert Carr and Rep
several Scotland Yard officers T
as "potential victims". leas
Meanwhile in Northern wou
Ireland, the outlawed Ulster Nor
Volunteer Force said in a earl
statement it was suspending dam
terrorist activities until Jan. 1. Belt
But the Protestant group said it Mat
would resume raids if a T
government agreeable to them Prot
is not formed by the first of stin
the year. Prer
The British have been Prot
seeking a government that onl)
would include both moderate IRA


outside the school, shouting antigovernment
slogans. Police fired warning shots into the
area in an attempt to disperse the crowd.
The army was called into action last night
after six hours of bloody street fighting across
downtown Athens. Police clashed with an
estimated 15,000 demonstrators on virtually
every square of the capital.
The governme-it said the four demonstrators
were killed when they attacked state buildings,
and hospital sources said at least 100 persons
were hurt in the street disorders.
In announcing martial law, the Government
said Papadopoulos, who was sworn in as
president last August after he had abolished
the monarchy then headed by the exiled King
Constantine, would make a radio and
television address to the nation later today.
A government communique said martial law
was imposed "because enemies of Greece have
again proved unrepenting and do not want
elections."
The action of the demonstrators, the
communique said, necessitated army action
"to restore order" and it warned that "the
supporters of the anarchists should weigh up
their responsibilities."


holics and Protestants. The
holic IRA is battling to oust
British from Northern
and and to unite the
vince with the Irish
public.
'he British army said at
t nine people were
minded in seven bombings in
then Ireland last night and
y today. One bomb
aged the maternity wing of
last's Roman Catholic
er hospital.
he explosion, laid to
testant terrorists, drew a
going rebuke from former
mier Brian Faulkner, a
testant, who said it served
' to boost the cause of the
.(AP).


Oil ban 'irrevocable'


BEIRUT King Faisal of
Saudi Arabia has reiterated his
oil embargo against the United
States is "irrevocable."
''Only when Israel
withdraws entirely from all the
Arab regions it conquered in
1967, including the Arab
sector of Jerusalem, will the
Saudi oil ban be lifted.,' the
69-year-old monarch was
quoted as saying.
His statement, as reported
by the Beirut newspaper Al


Anwar, appears to knock down
President Nixon's prediction
yesterday the Arab oil embargo
would be eased.
Al Anwar said Faisal made
the statement during a meeting
he had with visiting Lebanese
former Premier Saeb Salam.
The King reportedly said he
regards the United States as the
only country in the world that
can pressure Israel into a
complete withdrawal.(AP).


Ford: If I were president


WASHINGTON Vice President-designate
Gerald Ford said that if he became president
he would seek to screen lawbreakers out of his
administration, insist on voting rights
enforcement and keep control of the CIA.
Ford was before the House Judiciary
Committee considering confirmation of his
nomination to be vice president but the
questioning leaned heavily on what his
philosophy would be if he succeed to the
presidency.
"I'm thinking you'll be president
within I year." Rep. George Danielson,
D-Calit.. said at one point. Rep John Conyers
Jr., D-Mich.. said he agreed.
Ford discussed scandal under questioning


from Rep. Harold Donohue D-Mass. Dl)onohue
asked whether he believes President Nixon's
administration had maintained the rule of law
and how Ford's would.
[he Vice President-designate replied: "I
know of no instance where the president has
been accused of violating the law," although
some members of his administration have.
Ford said he would thoroughly screen and
supervise his staff if he becomes vice-president
to assure there were no violations of law.
'If I became president I would try to
follow the same approach," he added "... I
would seek to assure the people under my
immediate jurisdiction did not violate the
law."(AP).


Martial law was lifted last
August in Athens and Salonica,
where students also
demonstrated yesterday against
the government.
The ant government
movement had spread 200
miles to the north where
students occupied the
Polytechnic Insittute in
Salonica.
A broadcast from the radio
station at the Polytechnic
Institute in Athens said:
'Tonight is our night...don't be
afraid of police; the junta
collapses tonight."
Earlier, the students had
called for a general strike
aimed at bringing down the
government.
The radio station claimed
the students had occupied a
building housing the office of
the head magistrate for the
Attica region which includes
Athens.
Students burned piles of
trash, and danced around the
flames daring police to come
after them.
About 4,000 students inside
the polytechnic campus
shouted "out with the
Americans."(AP).
Nixon
questions
FOUR hundred editors were
told they will be able to ask
President Nixon any questions
they wish when he appears in
Orlando today at the annual
meeting of the Associated Press
Managing Editors Association.
APME President John Quinn
said Nixon will dispense with
opening remarks and get right
to the questions of the U.S.
and Canadian Editors attending
the APME convention at
Disney World. The session will
start at 7 p.m. EST and last
one hour. (AP).
Castro's call
MIAMI Prime Minister
Fidel Castro has called for
"Active Struggle" against the
military Junta of Chile and
offered asylum in Cuba for
Chileans expelled during the
recent revolution.
"We don't have n' "h but
the little we do have we will
gladly share with our Latin
American brothers." Castro
said in a three-hour speech in
Havana. (AP)


Martial law .



alert as



four die PRESIDENT PAPADOPOULOS



in student clashes


HOUSTON The Skylab 3
astronauts, a trio of rookies
seasoned by a docking problem
they overcame, today start
nearly three months of
scientific research in their
orbiting laboratory.
After rendezvous and
docking, mission control
denied permission last night for
Skylab 3 commander Gerald
Carr and crewmates William
Pogue and Edward Gibson to


enter the
station 13
schedule.
A good


home-sized space
hours ahead of

night's sleep was


LOS ANGELES A Black
doctor who has studied the
effects some diseases have on
members of his race says
there is an "ethnicity" to
some illnesses.
"This is not to imply racial
inferiority," said Dr. Richard
Williams. "But high blood
pressure is the greatest killer
of blacks, and we have to do
something about it as a
matter of survival."
Williams, who says he has
compiled the first textbook
on diseases that particularly
affect blacks, headed a roster
of black and white specialists
who participated in the
two-day John Beaureaard


STORMY

START

FOR ANNE

AND MARK
BARBADOS The world's
most celebrated newly weds
kept the day of an 18-day
cruise to themselves yesterday
but it was almost certain that
Britain's Princess Anne and her
husband. Captain Mark
Phillips. had to stay indoors.
The whereabouts of the
royal yacht, which will take
the couple through the
Caribbean and into the Pacific
on a dream honeymoon, was
unknown.
But it was inevitable that it
was affected by the heavy rain
which drenched Barbados and
the eastern Caribbean during
the day.
"No one knows where
Britannia is but it could hardly
be out of range of this weather
mass by now," a weather
expert in Bridgetown said.
He blamed the
uncharacteristic Caribbean
skies on a cold front extending
down from Puerto Rico in the
north to Trinidad in the south.
The Britannia left Barbados on
Thursday night.
International news
photographers and journalists,
seeking clues as to the course
of the Britannia, were at their
wits end.
In perfect weather, aircraft
would probably have been able
to spot the vessel and
telephoto lens may have
snapped candid photos of the
two lovers on deck.
In Friday's overcast
conditions, such an exercise
was fruitless.(AP).


more important, ground
controllers said. So the
astronauts bedded down on the
couch-like seats in the Apollo
command module that earlier
had hooked onto the orbiting
Skylab. (AP)

Oil threat

GENEVA -- Iraq today
called for "a total cut-off of
oil supplies" within a range of
severe measures against "The
imperialist states which insist
on backing up the Zionist
aggression." (AP)


Blood pressure, the

black man's enemy


Johnson
symposium on
and other
diseases.


m e mor al
hypertension
black.relamed


Johnson was a black
cardiologist and researcher at
Howard University w-t-o
recently died of the
hypertension.
Other specialists at the
conference yesterday said
high blood pressure, or
hypertension, is twice as
prevalent among blacks as


among whites and that the
death rate for blacks under the
age of SO0 is five times higher
than that for whites.
Dr. Jeremiah Stamler of
Chicago said hypertension,
while a common disease in
the United States generally, is
an "acute problem in the
low-income community
where people see doctors less
often and have less effective
long-term, medical care."
(AP). r


MORTAR

CLASHES

ON SUPPLY

ROUTES
PHN6M PENH Military*
sources today reported sharp
clashes on Phnom Penh's two
key supply routes, Highway 4
to the sea and Highway 5 to
the rice paddies of Battambang
Province.
Both roads have been cut by
Khmer Rouge insurgents since
early September.
IGovernment troops
attempting to dislodge
insurgent forces from Highway
4 at Trapeang Kraloeung, 37
miles southwest of the capital,
ran into heavy mortar and
automatic fire yesterday, the
sources said.
More than a score of men
from both sides were killed in
the day-long battle, they said.
Along Highway 5, military
sources said, insurgents
attacked two villages 43 miles
north of Phnom Penh
yesterday. Twenty Khmer
Rouge troops and 12
government soldiers were
killed.
The posts Phum Preah
Neang and Boeung Trey Ros
have been the scene ot
constant skirmishes for the
past four days,
Other fighting was reported
near Takeo, 39 miles south ot
Phnom Penh where
government forces were
reported to have battled an
insurgent unit for eight hours.
Casualties were not
immediately known.
Government forces,o
meanwhile, broke the siege of
Trapeang Thnot 14 miles
northwest of the capital in a
two-pronged attack in which
the government commander
claimed 54 Khmer Rouge were
killed.(AP).


U.N. resolutions and
relinquishes all territore-s it
occupied and until the
Palestianian's rights are
restored."
There is nothing so f~ar to
indicate that the -Arab
countries' oil policy has
undergone any change," Anis
continued and added: "'The
Arabs do hope that IL srael
would implement the
international resolutions."
Meanwhile, the Israeli
Military Command said
another 1,670 Egyptian
prisoners of war were relt=3'ased
for return home by Red C0ross
airlift on the third day- of
exchange.
And another 20 9-Traeli
POWs were returned from
Cairo, bringing the numbe-r of
returnees to 74. )
In the first two days o0ft the
exchange about 1.400 of the
8,211 POWs held in Israel were
flown to Cairo.
For the first time, ClZairo
newspapers reported thmt a
prisoner exchange was In
operation, but no figures -%yre
given in the reports.
Egypt has staged :", prjhlhc
homecomings for the priscaners
and observers btdieve the
authorities want to avoid
calling attention to the ramuch
larger number of Egyptian
prisoners invfted in the
exchange.
In a broadcast in *srael
Premier Golda Meir said
negotiations for a Middle East
peace agreement certainlyy
have to take place" buttallkof
a December peace conference
as suggested by some U.S.
officials is premature. (AP ?)


EWARS WHITE LABEL
SCOTCH

THIS OFFER IS LIMITED TO ONE IFiTH PER PERSlON'
- I - - ....


;ell.


THE EGYPTIAN
government warned today
that Israel could be in "serious
violation of the ceasefire
agreement."
Government spokesman
Ahmad Anis said Egypt is
carefully studying reports that
Israel is using cement to
reinforce its bridges across the
Suez canal.
"This would be a serious
violation of the ceasefire
agreement and constitute a
major change in the canal
engineering structure and
endanger it as an international
waterway," Anis said. The
canal has been closed since
1967.
He also commented on
President Nixon's suggestion
yesterday that the Arab oil
boycott would be eased.
"The Arabs made it clear
that the boycott will continue
until Israel implements the


EGYPT WARNS

OF VIOLATION


--KENNEDY OPERATION -

GOES AHEAD
WASHINGTON Doctors today amputated the right leg
of 12-year-old Edward Kennedy jr., son of the
Massachusetts senator, above the knee in hopes of arresting
bone cancer.
His father said: "I am sure the operation was a success."
A spokesman for Georgetown University Hospital said
doctors reported young Kennedy "tolerated the operation
very well and his condition is satisfactory."
The operation lasted just under an hour, according to the
hospital spokesman.
The spokesman said the diagnosis of the physicians was
that young Kennedy had a form of bone cancer called
caondrosarcona, which is a tumor of cartilage tissues
associated with the bone.(AP).

Skylab trio anxious to go


SBuler &fSand$s ORfer..


IF YOU SEE YOURSELF IN THIS HAPPY GROUP PICTURE, CLIP ITOUT AND BRING IT
TO --- BUTLER & SANDS COMPANY, LTD. WAREHOUSE OFFSWIIRLEY STREET JUST
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LIQUOR:


Time Has A Way of

S Slipping By!
Why not get ahead with
your Christmas Gift List
by buying copies of


BAHAMIAN

l JOTTINGS
Poems and Prose
with photographs and reminiscences of old Nassau
by
WILHELMINA KEMP JOHNSTONE
Born in Nassau in 1900
This charming book is just off the presses
Available at All Book Stores and News-stands, and at


THE LINEN SHOP
Parliament Street,
where Mrs. Johnstone will autograph copies.

Price: $4.95


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Saturday. November 17. 1973


(he Ulribunt
NuL.us ADDicrus Jjum IN VEBA MAcmGIST
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH,PubUither/Editor 1903 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Publisher/Editor 1917-1972
Contributing Editor 1972 -
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972.
Published Daily Monday to Saturday


Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) .2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Saturday, November 17, 1973

EDITORIAL

An exercise in memory

By ETIENNE DUPUCH
(This is the fifth article in a series I am writing on the late
George Murphy an Irish-American who became a British subject
and was one of the pioneers in the development of Nassau).

IN HIS RETIREMENT George Murphy showed a great deal of
interest in the blind. He made donations to many blind charities.
This was probably compensation for impure bootleg liquor
sent to the U.S. by someone in Nassau which blinded thousands
of people.
There was an investigation into this traffic by secret service
men from Washington. I was tipped off to it by The New York
Times. I met the three men when they arrived in Nassau and was
their only contact in the island. Not even the U.S. Consul at
Nassau knew they were here until I told him.
This was supposed to be top secret but the news leaked out
and the next day bootleggers tried to swamp .a boat in which they
were studying the shore line from the harbour. They left the
island hurriedly.
It was thought that Mr. Murphy would make substantial
provision for the blind in his will. But he didn't. He left
everything to his wife with Sir Kenneth Solomon as sole
executor.
Unfortunately his wife took to the bottle. She was the patient
of Dr. Turner. Suffice it to say that she left everything to Dr.
Turner who immediately took the estate out of the hands of Sir
Kenneth and made his friend A. R. Braynen the executor.

Who was Dr. Turner?
Dr. Turner had come to the island from the U.S. some years
earlier, apparently sponsored by Mr. Braynen. It wasn't easy for
hifn to get a licence to practise medicine in Nassau at the time
because the licensing was controlled by a committee composed of
doctors who were keeping the profession pretty tight.
But Dr. Turner avowed that he didn't want to go into private
practice. He wanted to come to the island to establish a free clinic
for the Seventh Day Adventist church. The Adventists were
enthusiastic about the plan, of course. It looked like a good thing.
Mr. Braynen took the doctor around to people of influence in
the community to solicit their support for this charitable work.
They came to me with the plan and The Tribune backed him.
He was finally granted a licence and he immediately abandoned
the charity plan. He rented the second floor of Mr. Braynen's
office building at Shirley Street and the road leading to the
Queen's Staircase and went into private practice. He built up a big
practice.
The doctor was supposed to be single. He became romantically
interested in one of the nurses ... a very attractive young woman
... and wedding bells seemed to be in the offing. But this young
woman was drowned in the Selma Rose tragedy described in an
earlier instalment in this series.
Soon after inheriting the Murphy fortune Dr. Turner
disappeared while flying a plane between Miami and Nassau. The
only trace found of the plane was an oil slick on the surface of
the ocean.
For some time many people believed he had found it
convenient to disappear into another country and that he had not
really been killed.
Anyway, this left Mr. Braynen in complete control of the
fortune. A look around for heirs turned up only an estranged wife
of the doctor who got it all. She then married an entertainer who
became very popular in musical circles in Nassau. But conditions
on the hill at Tower Heights where they lived in the Murphy
house became intolerable for him and so he returned to the U.S.
where he got a divorce and married again. He went back to work
.. he had found that the Murphy money was destroying him.
Anyway A. R. Braynen ended up by owning the big Murphy
louse on the hilltop at Shirley Slope. This is ironic because
George Murphy often told me that he did not have any time for
Itm.
SA. R. Braynen was a poor boy from the Current. He was for a
time an Out Island School teacher. He finally came to Nassau and
got a job with his fellow Current Islander, R. T. Symonette, and
later with A. B. Malcolm. The Malcolm job ended in a scene in
thie chambers of the H'n. Harcourt Malcolm.
Then he became friendly with Evelyn Major, a young Long
Island girl who had been adopted by Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Albury,
Harbour Islanders, while Mr. Albury was Commissioner at Long
island. He married her and there were two children by this union.
Gilbert who was in a hospital in England when I last heard of him
in 1963 now I am told his address is unknown and Thelma
Who went to the U.S., married a Mr. Dangers, got a divorce, and is
(ow a school teacher in Clio, Michigan.
It was through his connection with Mr. Gilbert Albury that he
came into possession of the Albury property, after the couple's
death. There he had his offices as an agent for Sinclair Oil Co.
with Dr. Turner on the upper floor.
'After the death of his first wife he married a Miss Curry from
Spanish Wells. No children.


A couple of years ago his Spanish Wells wife drove him to the
airport ... they kissed goodbye. She understood he was going to
Miami on a business trip. A few weeks later he came back to
t4assau with another wife ... a Current Island girl whom it was said
be married in Mexico, after divorcing his second wife. I need
pot give space to outlining Mr. Braynen's political career as this is
already known to Tribune readers. Suffice it to say that he ended
up as Speaker of the House after the P.L.P. victory and he is now
tlis Excellency the High Commissioner of the Bahamas at the
Court of St. James in London, despite the fact of his publicly
declared dislike of English people. His third wife is with him.

Whatever may have been good or bad about the Murphy
contributionn to the Bahamian society...he did one good thing for
Ohe islands.
While he was manager of the Montagu Hotel he brought a
iung American secretary to Nassau. I got to know her almost
buwdiately as I was doing some promotion for Mr. Murphy at


Perspective

A MEALY-MOUTHED editorial in The Nassau Guardian
Tuesday of this week called on "our politicians" to get
their perspectives right with regard to crime, drugs and
related matters.
It was obvious that The Guardian had followed a wrong
interpretation placed by Attorney General Paul Adderley
on some remarks I made in the Senate last week. They
succeeded neither in revealing good judgement nor
contributing to right perspectives.
"After all is said and done," says The Guardian, "we
would rather see a bipartisan approach to crime, drugs and
related matters."
That of course, is an admirable suggestion, but before
that can be, politicians and newspapers must begin to see
the world as it really is today and not as it exists in the
hide-bound mentalities of some people.
One of the greatest contributions made by the young
people in today's world is their insistence that the older
generation get their perspectives right. For instance, youth
has rebelled against the hypocritical attitude of a
civilization which has for so long glorified war and its
misery while at the same time systematically down-grading
the beauty of sex.
It could well be that the simple slogan "make love not
war" which took the young people of America into battle
against an unresponsive establishment might have saved the
lives of thousands, even millions, of human beings, by
finally bringing about an end to the war in Vietnam.
The young people forced America to take a good look at
herself and her values and to come to the conclusion that
there was something drastically wrong with a value system
which portrayed human love as submission to weakness and
the waging of war as noble and honourable.
Western society has been agonizing in recent years
over the so-called drug subculture and wonders why it is
that we fail so miserably in reaching some understanding
with the new generation in this important matter.
PERSONAL VIEW
Before Mr. Adderley and The Nassau Guardian again
misinterpret the point, perhaps my personal view should be
made clear so far as drug abuse is concerned and for this
purpose abuse of alcohol is placed in this same category.
I believe it is better for human beings to avoid
dependency on any drugs, including alcohol. Perhaps that is
the eventual objective we can work towards. However, the
frustrations and pressures to which man has been subjected
ever since he first started to live in organized societies have
been a great temptation an irresistible temptation for
many to turn to artificial means of escaping or coping with
these pressures.
Some years ago, in the United States, a high pressure
promoter marketed a product called Hadacol which quickly
became a multi-million dollar business. Hadacol was said to
be a tonic and builder with special appeal for the older


the time.
This young woman later married Theodore Pyfrom, member of
an old Bahamian family, and she has proved to be a remarkably
fine Catholic woman.
This union gave the Bahamas one of its finest families today ...
William who runs the family's business since the death of his
father and uncle Sidney in a crash while flying their own plane in
a storm somewhere in the region of Eleuthera ... Eugene of the
Cavalier Construction Co ... Jerry, a successful lawyer ... and
Lynn a charming housewife.
Bill married a French Canadian, Eugene and Jerry married
American girls, Lynn married William Holowesko, an American
attorney who, through doing research into land titles for the real
estate firm of H. G. Christie for many years, probably knows
more about the background of Bahamian families than anyone in
the world today. He came to my office one day and brought me i
copy of a document showing that Elias Dupuch, the first
member of my family to settle in the Bahamas after fighting
under Napoleon's banner at Waterloo, arrived in Nassau in 1840
and 15 years later became a British subject.
All the Pyfrom children are now raising fine families of their
own.

Before going on to the final instalment in this series I want to
recall an interesting proposal that was made in the House of
Assembly when "bootleg" wealth first started filling the coffer of
the impoverished Treasury.
Members of the House immediately became very active. They
were full of ideas and were jumping all over the place like
stimulated crickets.
But there was one member of the House and the Executive
Council, J. Ronald C. Young, who had always acted as a brake on
extravagance by the House. He had the reputation of being
against spending money on anything. He was a sobering influence
in the House.
He was the only son of Sir James Young of whom I know very
little beyond the fact that he was a successful businessman -
sponge on the exchange and hardware in the Ironmongery store -
and that he went to the top in politics.
Ronald Young who was educated in England,
inherited his father's fortune and husbanded it carefully. He was
an outrageously fat man ... but very charming. He was never seen
without a big cigar in his mouth but he never lighted it ... he
chewed it.
When bootleg revenue started pouring into the Treasury Mr.
Young urged the House not to spend any of it. Accumulate and
invest it for a few years, he urged. Then spend the income on
developments. He told them that they had all lived frugally for all
their lives ... they could continue doing this for a few more years
in order to build up a sound financial position for the colony.
This made good sense. But the idea didn't appeal to members.
And the House has gone on merrily ever since that time spending
more money than the Treasury earns ... and in six years of P.L.P.
government the country has been plunged so deeply into debt
that it may never see daylight again.
It was interesting to recall that Mr. Young married an
American Jewess. There were two children by this union a son
Ronald and a daughter whose name I have forgotten.
The son still in his teens, died on a beach at Paradise Island
because he went in swimming too soon after eating a heavy meal.
This brought on a heart attack. The daughter married an
American and left the colony.
Mrs. Young went to New York after her husband's death.
During a visit to that city Sir George Johnson was talking with
her on the telephone one day when her end of the line went
silent. She was found on the floor with her hand still clutching
the receiver ... dead from a heart attack.
The daughter came back to Nassau with her husband briefly
during the great post-war Stock Market boom in the U.S.
liquidated all her father's estate, and invested the fortune in the
Stock Market. She was wiped out when the Market crashed and
no more has been heard of her.
No trace of this family is left in the Bahamas.
A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
All things that we ordained festival,
Turn from their office to black funeral;
Our instruments to melancholy bells,
Our wedding cheer `*- a sad burial feast,
Our solemn hymns to sullen dirges change
Our bridal flowers serve for a burial corse,
And all things change them to the contrary.
SHAKESPEARE


Tes on Drugs ai

generation. From all over the country came testimonials
from older people who claimed that they had "a new lease
on life" by taking daily doses of Hadacol.
When the authorities decided to investigate Hadacol,
they found it had some tonic value indeed but that Hadacol
was liberally laced with alcohol!
Older people who would not take alcohol in other forms
were shattered by the revelation that their new feeling of
well-being was due to the fact that they were slightly high
on Hadacol.
In the Bahamian culture the story of the medicine bottle
is well known. Many older people who for religious or other


reasons claim that they "never touch the stuff" have
nevertheless been found to keep a bottle of rum under the
bed. According to them the bottle is only in case of
"sickness" and some go so far as to insist that they merely
use it to "rub down!"
Most of the young people of this country have grown up
in an atmosphere where the use and abuse of alcohol is
commonplace and they get the impression from an early
age that human beings need to have artificial stimulants or
depressants.
In addition to the alcohol problem, nearly every
Bahamian medicine cabinet or bedroom bureau is decorated
with drugs narcotics wnich are used on a daily basis
without medical advice.
Everyday at the present time the national radio


id Alcohol

advertises a product which is said to be "more than an
asprin." It proclaims that the product contains an
anti-depressant and that this is really what you need to give
you that extra lift!
In addition to this particular product, there are dozens
of others which are bought over the counter in drug stores
and consumed by thousands of people to the extent that it
can be categorized as drug abuse even though it is legal.
It would seem obvious, therefore, that if society is to
help those young people who are unfortunately developing
a dependence on narcotics both the hard and the soft -
then society should admit that the problem did not just
begin with the new generation.
That admission of imperfection may appear to Mr.
Adderley and The Guardian as giving comfort to those who
indulge in the illegal use of marijuana. They are entitled to
their view however foolish it might be.
If the Government is serious about the promise it made
in the Speech from .the Throne to support "a campaign
against alcohol and drug abuse" their perhaps they ought to
be told now that the success of that campaign will not be
guaranteed by building bigger jails where drug users and
alcoholics can be isolated from society, nor by adopting the
pompous attitude of so-called "upright citizens" seeking to
bring shame on those who have unfortunately developed a
physical or psychological dependence on drugs.
It would seem that the right approach would be first to
admit the imperfections of society and to adopt a
sympathetic and helpful attitude to those who might be
heading to destruction along the road of drug abuse.
Furthermore, the law should make distinctions between
crimes related to drug abuse in the same way distinctions
are made between crimes related to violence. The range of
penalties for users and pushers should be clearly prescribed
by statute and should not be left entirely to the discretion
of those responsible for the administration of justice.
There is nothing wrong either, in the face of widespread
ignorance, in admitting and recognizing in the law
differences between one drug and another. Young people
who become hung up on drugs do not necessarily need a
term in prison. They need help. Certainly those who sell
drugs, particularly hard drugs like heroin, to young people
or to anybody, deserve the harshest penalty of the law.
Their crime is motivated not by understandable human
weakness but by an inordinate greed for money which leads
them to exploit the weakness of others and thereby bring
misery and even death to those who become their victims.
The community indeed faces a serious problem in
alcohol and drug abuse, but the crime and punishment
attitude and the shame which flows from it will not by
itself provide a solution. The causes which are deeply
rooted in our society must be clearly identified, examined
and freely discussed by all citizens in an honest effort to
reach a solution.
It is indeed possible and desirable that a bi-partisan
approach should be taken since it would be inexcusable and
supremely wicked if politicians see the drug abuse issue as
just another means of collecting more votes for themselves.


Future business op rtu s


could one day v havyou floudeimn.


Callin ie


Imperial LlfeGMiards. Now.


ghr grtritnt













ht arthbun


Saturday, November 17, 1973


er &'hr


$3.7m. TREASURY
BILLS TAKEN UP
ALL BIDS at the $3.7'
million Treasury Bill tender
held at the Bahamas Monetary
Authority Tuesday were
accepted in full, an Authority
statement said today.
The average rate at which
the Bills were allotted was
approximately 8.1 per cent,


approximately 8.6 per cent per
annum.
YOUTH RALLY
YOUTH for Christ will hold
a rally tonight at Wesley Hall
beginning at 8 p.m. Special
music will be provided by the
Humming Bees and the Prince
William High School choir.
Rev. Simeon Hall will be the
guest speaker.


AMOURY'S



', .


CARPET CLEANING
BY DEEP STEAM EXTRACTION
BY FACTORY TRAINED TECHNICIANS


I


APPENDIX I
Weekly rates of contributions in respect of each class
of insured persons

Weekly Weekly rates of contributions
insurable -
Wage or income wage (or Voluntary Self-
group income) contributor employed Employed
I Up to $19.99
per week $ 15 $0.75 $1.05 $1.35
II $20 to $39.99
per week $ 30 $1.50 $2.05 $2.65
III $40 to $59.99
per week $ 50 $2.50 $3.45 $4.45
IV $60 to $79.99
per week $ 70 $3.45 $4.80 $6.20
V $80 to $99.99
per week $ 90 $4.45 $6.15 $7.95
VI $100 upwards $110 $5.45 $7.55 $9.75


APPENDIX II
Sharing the employed person's contribution between
the employer and the employed person


Wage group Employed person Employer

I $0.25 $1.10
II $0.50 $2.15
Ill $0.85 $3.60
IV $2.40 $3.80
V $3.10 $4.85
VI $3.80 $5.95

APPENDIX III
Rates of injury, sickness and maternity benefits

Sickness and maternity
Injury benefit benefits
Wage or income group weekly weekly

I Up to $19.99 per
week $13.50 $10
1 $20 to $39.99 per
week $24 $20
III $40 to $59.99 per
week $30 $30
IV $60 to $79.99 per
week $36 $36
V $80 to $99.99 per
week $45 $45
VI $100 upwards $54 $54


INSURANCE
From Page 1
payable under the deceased's
own insurance under general
benefits.
Medical Care for
Employment Injury Free
care will be provided under
special Medical Care
Regulation. The Ministry of
Health will act as the agent of
the National Insurance Board
in providing medical care.
Age Credits This will
cover older persons who, when
the scheme goes into effect, are
of an age which would not
qualify them for even 30
percent retirement pension, or,
for a similar rate of invalidity
pension.
Persons over 35 will
therefore receive 25 special
credit contributions for each
year of age over 35 when the
scheme begins, up to a
maximum of 600 credits.
These specially credited
contributions will be given
only to those insured persons
with not less than 150
contributions in the first three
years after the Act comes into
effect.
Assistance This will be
provided to persons not
qualifying for benefits and will
apply particular to old age
pensioners.
Persons applying for
assistance under this part of


the scheme will have their
resources tested before
qualifying for benefit. This will
be payable at $26 per month.
In the case of Common-Law
marriages the Director will have
power to accept such marriages
as if they were legal for
payment of benefits.
All claims will be
determined by the Director in
accordance with the National
Insurance Act. Such
determinations will be open to
appeal to an appeal tribunal
consisting of the Mininster, a
legal chairman and two
members, one representing
employers and one trade
unions.
SUNKIE ROKER DIES
ELOISE Louise Roker,
better known as "Sunkie" and
formerly of Chapel Street died
this morning at the Princess
Margaret Hospital.
She is survived by her
husband Hezekiah Roker, five
children, including Burn Evans,
her mother, Albertha
Rutherford, seven sisters, one
brother and nine
grandchildren. Funeral services
will be announced later.

TrpI c


*1eriatr


SAY


CHRISTMAS is COMING !!!

CLEAN IT NOW


COMPLETE CLEANING FOR HOMES
OFFICES AND APARTMENTS

WINDOW WASHING
CLEANING AND WAXING OF ALL TYPES FLOORS
UPHOLSTERY CLEANING

PEST CONTROL AND EXTERMINATING

FULLY INSURED


PHONE 2-8256 TODAY

AMOURY'S p%. ASSOCI4r
JANITOR SERVICE -
E. SHIRLEY STREET g 1
PHONE 2.8256
BOX-5802 E.S.


PanAm asks CAB approval to carry


charter fares on


scheduled flights

PAN AMERICAN WORLD AIRWAYS, citing the fuel crisis,
asked the CAB Friday for emergencyy authority" to carry charter
passengers on its scheduled flights for a 90-day period.


The authority could result in
a saving of approximately 7.3
million gallons of fuel, Pan Am
said. Under Pan Am's
proposal, the authority
requested would be limited to
charters already under contract
as of the day of the CAB
approves the plan. Charter
passengers would be assigned
to seats available on scheduled
services with groups, where
required, being broken into
smaller groups and carried on
several different scheduled
flights.
Pan Am said it will not sell
any new charters, once CAB
approves the plan, for
operation during the 90-day
period. The only exception,
Pan Am said, would be charters
sold for the unused ferry leg of
certain flights.
Pan Am said it now has
contracts to operate 1,361
charter flights involving
approximately 224,000
passengers during the period
November 15, 1973 through
February 15, 1974. These
flights would consume
approximately 19.4 million
gallons of fuel. Pan Am told
the CAB it estimates it could
eliminate 438 charter flights
during the 90 day period,
resulting in fuel savings of
approximately 7.3 million
gallons.
The airline also told the
Board that charter flights to be
operated after the 90 day
period would contain a
provision that the flights are
subject to cancellation if
necessary because of the fuel
shortage.
Earlier last week Pan Am


JUST ARIIlVID


SILVER FRAMES
FOR SILVER
B$10.00 COIN
also -
B$2, B$1 & 50c
SILVER COINS
Set in Silver Frames


18Kt. GOLD FRAMES
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B$10, B$20 & B$50
GOLD COINS



TEL. 28405-28406


told the CAB it had been
advised by two major oil
companies, which together
supply almost 50% of its total
supply, of impending "massive
shortfalls" below the
contracted levels of fuel to be
supplied to the airline.
The shortfalls will be on the
order of 25% in November and
may ''deteriorate
substantially" in succeeding
months.
The immediate shortages
will occur not only in supplies
of fuel which it purchases in
the United States "in bond"
for use in international
operations but in fuel
purchased abroad as well, Panr,
Am told the CAB.
Approximately 41% of the fuel
used by Pan Am is purchased
from bonded fuel supplies in
the United States. About 6% of
the carrier's fuel is drawn from
unbonded domestic fuel
supplies, with the remaining
53% purchased overseas.
Pan Am said that in addition
to the shortages of bonded
fuel, the 6% of domestic fuel
used by the airline will also be
cut under the mandatory fuel
allocation regulations adopted
by the Energy Policy Office.
Pan Am also asked the CAB
to grant it "emergency"
authority to carry military
charter passenger on its
scheduled flights to the extent
that seats may be available.
UI


Bahamas Racing Comaission
L OTIC3


1. Licence applications will be available for the 1974 racing
season at the Racing Commission office, Hobby Horse Race
Track, from Monday, October 15th, 1973.
JOCKEYS will have to produce a certificate showing they
have FULL INSURANCE COVERAGE WHILST
ENGAGED IN RACING FOR THE ENTIRE SEASON
AND DURING EXERCISE. This in accordance with the
Workman's Compensation Act.
All persons who were licensed for 1973 need only supply
the Commission office with an up-to-date C.I.D. certificate
and OWNERS will also have to up-date the registration of
their horses.
All new applicants will be required to obtain licence
applications and provide all the necessary information plus
an up-to-date C.I.D. certificate and two signed passport
size photographs of themselves.
Licence fees are as follows: Owners: B$3.00.
Owner-Trainers: B$6.00, Trainers: B$6.00, Assistant
Trainers: B$3.00, Grooms: BS2.00, Jockeys: B$3.00,
Farriers: B$3.00.
THE REGISTRATION OF TWO YEAR OLD HORSES TO
RACE IN 1974 IS STILL NOT COMPLETE, NEITHER IS
THE RECORD OF HORSE TRANSFERS MADE SINCE
THE CLOSE OF THE 1973 RACING SEASON.
THE CLOSING DATE FOR THE RECEIPT OF ALL
APPLICATIONS, HORSE REGISTRATION AND HORSE
TRANSFERS IS NOVEMBER 28th, 1973. NONE OF
THESE WILL BE CONSIDERED AFTER THIS DATE.
2. The Racing Commission is now accepting written
applications for the posts of Commission Veterinarian and
Commission Steward.
3. Applications are requested for the posts of Racing
Commission Supervisors for the following positions:
Clubhouse Entrance Gate, Grandstand Entrance Gate.
Saddling Area, Jockey Room, Timer, Horse Identifier,
Weighing-Out and Weighing-In, also four assistants to the
Commission's Veterinarian to work in the testing enclosure.
APPLICATIONS for points TWO and THREE may be
mailed' to P. O. Box N3205 to arrive no later than
November 28th, 1973. Signed: B. W. SNOW,
Executive Secretary.


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Saturday, November 17, 1973


lib hit hartsl Ii
West Bay Street

WILL BE CLOSED
ONE WEEK
MALCOLM TYRE
SERVICE
Down Town
WILL BE OPEN
TO SERVE YOU


Methodists attend a


Kingston conference


iDELEUA i TS representing
the Methodist Church in th
Bahamas are attending th
inauguration of the Caribbea
confernece of churches i
Ifinatofnn Jamai-a


Nassau Christian -id Missionary
ALLIANCE CHURCH
Temporarily Meeting At Y.W.C.A. Building
Dolphin Drive at John F. Kennedy Drive.
SRev. Weldon B. Blackford, Minister

Worship At 11 A.M. Gospel Hour 7:30 A.M.
"The Harvest of Fruits.- "To fill the Hand"

TUES -r7 30 p.m.r"PALESTINE FOR JEW OR ARAB"


DISCOV F CE
AT NASSAU'S FRIENDLIEST CHURCH
Rev. H, MILLS Pastor
TEEN PROGRAMME JUNIOR CHURCH -
BUS MINISTRY DYNAMIC PREACHING

BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH -V
Located on Soldier Road & Old Trail
P.O. BOX N 3622 PHONF 5-1 33


g Leading the Methodipt
we delegation is the Rev. Edwmin
Ce Taylor, chairman of the
n Bahamas district of the
n Methodist Church.
Also in the delegation are
Mr. Raymond Higgs a
layman, Mrs. Judy Munroe and
the Rev. Colin Archer who is
attending as an observer.
The delegation left Nassau
on Tuesday afternoon along
with representatives of other
denominations in the Bahamas.
The Rev. Dr. Reuben
Cooper, president of the
Bahamas Christian Council;
Bishop Michael Eldon of the
Diocese of Nassau; Mr. Idris
Reid; Canon William
Thompson, an observer; Bishop
Paul Leonard Hagarty of the
Diocese of Nassau, and Major
Henry Russell of the Salvation
Army are attending the
conference.
Delegates representing
Church and State from
throughout the Caribbean area
are now in Jamaica for the


sessions of the conference,
which began on Tuesday
evening.
It is expected that the
conference of churches will
become a dynamic force for
the promotion of Christian
action and unity in the
Caribbean.
The Rev. Mr. Taylor will
remain in Jamaica following
the inauguration of the
Caribbean conference of
churches for the meetings of
the general purposes
committee of the conference
of the Methodist Church in the
Caribbean.
He is expected to return to
Nassau on November 22.
Upon his return, the
chairman will be accompanied
by Miss Pauline Webb of the
Methodist Missionary Society.
Miss Webb will participate in
services for the celebration of
harvest festival in Methodist
churches in Nassau on Sunday,
November 24.


MPs at Remembrance

Day service
On Remembrance Sunday at Freeport's Mary Star of the
Sea Church members of Parliament and the Senate Kendal
Nottage and Henry Bowen and Senator Garnet Levarity, led
a large congregation in commemorating the victims of
modern wars.
Ministers of various denominations on Grand Bahama
were present in the sanctuary. Ven. Archdeacon Foster
Pestaina of Christ the King Arnglican Church and Rev. Eric
St. Clair Clarke of St. Paul's Methodist Church read lessons
during the Paschal Candle service.
David Ross represented the Hebrew Congregation.
A guard of honour from the Royal Bahamas Police
attended.
An officer and detachment of men from H.M.S.
Bachante, a British Frigate in harbour on Sunday were
present.
During the sounding of the Last Post by Alexander Barry
the colours of 12 nations were dipped in salute to the
dead of the modern wars.
A collection for the Bahamas branch of the British
Legion amounted to $175.50.
Father Cornelius Osendorf, O.S.B., O.B.E. Dean of
Grand Bahama, gave the sermon and Father Brendan
Forsyth, O.S.B. Pastor was the celebrant.


REV. DAN TRUAX Baptist International Missions
REV. ORMAN NORWOOD- International Board of Jewish Missions
REV. BILL McMULLIN Baptist World Missions
SUNDAY MONDAY FRIDAY
MORNING 11:00 a.m. THRILLING MISSIONARY SLIDES 7:00 p.m.
EVENING 7:00 p.m. EVENING SERVICE 7:30 p.m.
SPECIAL MUSIC AT EVERY SERVICEl


23 years.
Much of this time was spent
among the Nomadic people of
the Sahara.
Rev. Norwood is presently
serving as deputation secretary
of the International Board of
Jewish Missions, Chattanooga,
Tennessee. He will not only be
representing this world-wide
Missionary Ministry, but will
also be providing special music
during the week.
Rev. McMullin is making
preparations to go to France as
a missionary with Baptist
World Missions, and will be
showing slides of this country.

Advent service
ADVENT Penance services
will be conducted at four
Nassau churches.
On December 14 at St.
Anselm's Church in Fox Hill,
on December 17 at St. Francis
Xavier's Cathedral on West
Street, on December 19 at Our
Lady's Church on Deveaux
Street and on December 21 at
St. Bede's Church on Sutton
Street.
These services will be
conducted at 7:30 p.m.
Many priests will be
available for confession.
Catholics are invited to
make use of these services at
any of the churches.


Highlights in history today:
1972 Former Argentine
dictator Juan Peron returns to his
homeland after years of exile.
1971 Premier Thanon
Kittikachorn seizes power in
Thailand, abolishes parliament
dismisses Cabinet, and suspends
country's constitution.
1970 Russian unmanned
vehicle moves on moon's surface.
steered by signals from earth.
1969 New Cabinet is formed
in Afghanistan
1964 Britain says it will ban
arms exports to South Africa.
1963 Army in Iraq revolts and
sets up a new revolutionary
government headed by Abdel Salam
Arif.
1961 U.S. prepares to resume
nuclear testing in the atmosphere
after Russia ends Informal
suspension and begins testing.
1958 Sudanese army
suppresses constitution and Ibrahim
Abboud becomes Premier.
1956 Kashmir votes to become
integral part of India.
1954 General Nasser becomes
head of slate in Egypt.
1937 Lord Halifax visits Adolf
Hitler attempting peaceful
settlement of Sudeten. marking
beginning of Britain's policy of
appeasement.
1929 Nlkolai Bukharin and
other members of right opposition
In Rusia expelled.
1922 Far Eastern Republic
votes for unloo withbLuJIa.


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By Abigail Van Buren
2 17 MIW CCiM Trf>4. Y. eY. Symu., Ic.


DEAR ABBY: My wife is the private secretary to an
important executive. She called me at work to tell me she
was at her boss's HOUSE for a few hours to take dictation.
She said he was on his "vacation" and was afraid if he
went to the office he'd get tied up there all day.
I hit the ceiling, and told her in no uncertain terms that
I didn't like the idea. She assured me that her boss's wife
was home so I should simmer down.
An hour later I phoned the boss's house to make sure his
wife was home. [She was.] Then I asked to talk to the boss.
I told him it was O.K. this once to have my wife working at
his house, but I didn't like the idea, and not to ask her
again.
Well, Abby, since that happened my wife has been
boiling mad at me. She said I humiliated her before her
boss and his wife, and if I ever did that again, she would
divorce me!
She insists I don't trust her. I do trust her, but I don't
trust her boss. Do you think I was wrong to check up on
her, and tell her boss how I felt? FRANKLY JEALOUS
DEAR FRANKLY: Yes. You showed an insulting lack
of confidence In both your wife and her boss.

DEAR ABBY: I'm in love with a man who is attrac-
tive, hard-working, honest, sober, and morally sound, but
he has one failing that absolutely drives me up a wall. He
is cheap from the word go!
When he takes me out [which isn't too often] we al-
ways go to the least expensive place he can find. And there
can be a parking lot right next to where we're going, but
he drives around for half an hour to find a parking place
on the street.
He tells me not to buy him anything for Christmas,
because he hates to shop, and he's not buying ME any-
thing.
Abby, I realize that he was poor when he was young,
but he makes good money now, and has only himself to
support.
He says he loves me, and we're discussing marriage,
but I'm wondering what marriage would be like with a
man who's so tight with his money. He's a beautiful person
otherwise. Do you think he'll ever change? FRUSTRATED
DEAR FRUSTRATED: He's a creature of habit. I
doubt if he will ever enjoy spending money, but with some
gentle prodding, you could loosen him up a bit. When
discussing marriage, don't forget to discuss budget, or you
and this "beautiful person" will be having money fights for
the duration of your marriage.
DEAR ABBY: The other morning while doing the
dishes, my wedding ring came off. The water was running,
and I didn't realize the ring was gone until it had already
gone down the drain.
I called a plumber right away. He said the ring was
already in the sewer and it couldn't be retrieved.
Abby, that was my husband's grandmother's wedding
ring, and if he knew I was doing the dishes in it he would
kill me. I bandaged up my hand and told him I had burned
it. I can't go on wearing this bandage forever. Please tell
me what to do. BUTTERFINGERS
DEAR BUTTERFINGERS: Remove the bandage and
tell your husband the truth. It's an unfortunate loss, but if
that's the worst thing that ever happens to either one of
you. you'll be lucky.
CONFIDENTIAL TO "WONDERING IN ATLANTA":
It's only a wild guess, but it's the rare 52-year-old man who
leaves a marriage--even a dull one-to "try the fun of
bachelorhood." A man that age who wants a divorce usual-
ly has someone waiting in the wings.


i


KINDNESS TO

ANIMALS

ESSAY CONTEST
STUDENTS from all over
the Bahamas are being invited
to participate in the 1973
Kindness to Animals Essay
Contest, which is being
announced today in
conjunction with "Be Kind To
Animals Week."
Students between the ages
of eight and twenty are asked
to submit essays of no more
than 500 words on the topic
"Why I Should Be Kind To
Animals."
The closing date for the
contest is December 31.
There are three sections in .
the contest, each according to
age. Section A is for students
from 8 12 years old, Section
B for those 13 16, and
Section C for students 17 -
20.
Entrants are requested tol
send their essay, accompanied
by thier name, address and age,
to Essay Contest, Box N-242,
Nassau.


Saturday, November 17, 1973



" NOTICE
NOTICE Is hereby qiven that SUSAN AGUSTA PENN of
Fresh Greek, Andros Isid. is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration
as a citizen of The Bahamas and that an"
person who knows any reason why registration -snoui not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
:the facts within twenty-eight days from the 17th day of
November 1973 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
Sand Citizenship, P. O. Box N7147, Nassau.


NOTICE



The public is advised that Mr. Wedley Butler
is no longer in the employ of Bethell
Robertson & Co. Ltd. and effective November
1st, 1973 is not authorized to do business on
behalf of the company.


U ~


ONLY 7 DAYS LEFT!


The "Opportunity Boat" leaves Not 24,1973

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INVEST...VACATION ON YOUR OWN LAND...OR LIVE YEAR
ROUND AT SAN ANDROS...THE DEVELOPMENT THAT'S DOUBLY
BLESSED-AN ALLURING GET-AWAY HAVEN, YET ONLY
15 MINUTES BY AIR FROM NASSAU!


SAN ANDROS


Ty S sunders Real Estat Ltd. 7.712
2nd Floor. Bernard Sunloy gilding
Groswam WPro Irty Ltd. 27 or 2wi
107 Shirley Street.
Cosmopolitan Realty, King's Court
Phone 57477 or 57478,
Dawson Real Estate Company Ltd.
2-1178. (upstairs) Bay & East Streets.

IN FREEPORT:
Tennant & Cooper Ltd. 2-7841.
First National City Bank.


SAN ANDRS IS FOR LOVERS... AND WISE INVESTORS. TOO.



2*fi


Exciting things are

happening at the Fabulous

Trade Winds Bar & Lounge

Paradise Island

NOW APPEARING

















BEGINNING


BF


THiE ENB
SHOWTIMES NIGHTLY: 10:40 & 12:40

Make the evening complete with a gourmet dinner
in the Imperial Dining Room.
Dinner from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.



L Inwt 1se


WILL YOU OWN A PART OF
BEFORE IT'S ALL GONE?
CAU RIGHT NOWI or see
Berkiey Ferguson Real Estate
Principal Broker. 2.1230 or 2.-413
Berwin Houa on Frederick St.
McOegan & Assocates Ltd. 2.4284
Bernard Sunley Building on Bey Street
Morley & O'Brien Real Estate
2-2"74 Harris Building on Shirley Street
Braynan & Knowles Real Estlkte 22-1N
Sheraton-British Colonial Hotel Arcade
Frank Carey Real Estate Ltd.
2-7667 or 24815 Bay and Oeveaux Streets
Maxwell Waxjlde Real Estate 3.5632
Corner of Bias St. & Blue Hill Road.


AMERICAN FRIENDS AID CLINIC
THE AMERICAN FRIENDS of Bahamas Foundation, Inc. has donated over $2,000
worth of badly needed technical equipment to the Agnes Hardecker Laboratory and
Children's Clinic, located on Deveaux Street South. Equipment purchased for the clinic
consisted of a high-powered binocular microscope (shown in the photo), a chair scale, a
differential counter, a bio.dynamics blood analyser and a set of clinical files. In the photo
(I to r.) are Dr. Julie M. Wershing, director of the clinic; M. Oakley Bidwell, vice president
of the American Friends Foundation; Frank Clarke, the clinic's laboratory technician;
and Sister Ginny of the clinic's staff.










Saturday, November 17, 1973


(ht gritlmu


Where in the world are the scenes shown below ?


Photo No. 26

City or Scene ......................................
Country ..........................................
My Name........................................
Address .......................Phone ...........


Photo No. 27
City or Scene................. ......................
Country............................................ ...... *
My Name........................ ...... .......*** ****
Address.................. Phone................. ..........


4) I


,w /
44~



k


Rhoto No. ZB
C(ty or Scene ................. ..............
Country....................... ........ .....................
My Name......................... ......* ................
Address..................Phone............................


Photo No. 29
City or Scene....................... ...............
Country..........................................
My Name............... ..... ................. .
Address............ .......... Phone ...........


Photo No. 30
City or Scene..................... Country................
My Name......................... Address..................
Phone. ............................... ...................


Contest Rules


The Tribune will run a total of 30 photo ads showing a scene from
somewhere within Pan Am's travel system. Name the City or Scene and Country shown, using the picture
and answer blank included in each ad. After the final photo has run on November 17th, mail all 30 entries
(stapled or clipped together) to: Vacation, The Tribune, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas, You may
enter more than one group of photos, as long as you use official Tribune blanks and groups must be
fastened together.
Should you miss an edition of The Tribune with a Pan Am photo ad, back copies can be purchased at The
Tribune reception desk in The Tribune Building, Shirley Street, Nassau, or The Tribune office, 9B Kipling
Building, Freeport.
In case of a tie, the tie will be broken by additional photos not previously published. All entries must be
postmarked no later than midnight, Monday, November 19th, 1973.
Employees and their families of The Tribune, Pan American World Airways and their advertising agencies,
are not eligible to enter.



Contest ends Saturday, Nov. 17th


Winner may choose round-trip for two
to any one of the following 26 European
Cities served by Pan Am.


AMSTERDAM
BARCELONA
BELGRADE
BERLIN
BRUSSELS
COPENHAGEN
DUSSELDORF
FRANKFORT
GLASGOW
HAMBURG
HANOVER
LISBON
LONDON


MADRID
MUNICH
NICE
NUREMBERG
OSLO
PARIS
PRAGUE
ROME
SHANNON
STOCKHOLM
STUTTGART
VIENNA
WARSAW


Lz- I --- %,Opw --



























.
WARREN OATES MICHELLE PHILLIPS
(Dillinger, Shirley St.) (Dillinger, Shirley St.)

Shirley St. Theatre


Now showing thru
Thursday. "Black Caesar"
matinees at 2 45 & 4:55,
evening 8:30. No one under
17 will be admitted.
Starts Friday, "Dillinger"
matinees at 2:45 & 4:55,
evening 8:30. No one under
17 will be admitted.
John Dillinger (Warren
Oates) and hiis gang enliven
newspap er headlines as they
rob banks in -. 13 throughout
\mericafs 'nidwest With
illinger arI three" escaped
convict\ Illnrr) Picrpont
it;cotfrey L ewis Charles
lackley (John Raiin) and
I tomner Van Meter ( larry Dean
Stanton)
Debonair Melvin Purvis(Benii
Johnson) is an I'.B.I agent
charged by IFB.I director J.
I dgar tloover with special
responsibility\ to bring I)illinger
ind his henchmen to justice.
lie is head ot the Midwest
Office of! B I.
Dillinger'\ girl friend is
half-l ndian Billie Frechette
\lichelle Phillip'. A new
membiher join the Dillinger
: ,n. driver I ddle Martin


(John Martino).
Purvis captures 'Machine
Gun" Kelly and shoots to
death two other notorious
criminals, Wilbur Underhill and
"Hlandsome Jack" Klutas
(Terry Leonard). He continues
his search for Dillinger.
Charles Mackley is killed
during one of the Dillinger
gang's bank robberies, and so is
Eddie Martin. Dillinger and
Billie amass S70.000, and they
have a chance to skip to
Mexico, but they continue
their hazardous way of life.
Dillinger is arrested by Tucson
sheriff Big Jim Woolard (Read
Morgan) and extradited to the
Crown Point. Indiana, Lake
County jail.
Although the jail is heavily
guarded. Dillinger carves a
pistol out of soap, blackens it
with shoe polish, and makes his
escape. lie is assisted by a
black prisoner, Reed
Youngblood (Frank McRae).
With them, held at gunpoint.
are the warden and a prison
mechanic En route out of
town Dillinger robs a bank. IHe
gives the warden and mechnic


ISLAND T.V. SERVICE
(OR S,/ l R 1C YVO( CA4.V Ri:l. } V"
Dowdeswell Street

Channel Master Televisions

Antennas Boosters
SALES & SERVICE
Phone 2-2618 P. 0. Box N327, Nassau




PHOTO CHRISTMAS CARDS...


are the perfect way of saying
"GREETINGS!" to old friends!
YOU'VE JUST TIME FOR OUR
SPECIAL:
COLOUR PORTRAIT
SITTING
25 CHRISTMAS CARDS
complete ... $15.45


/ <1X7'-Jbwo


~-


on the waterfront at East
Bay St. & William St.-
: Phone 5-4641


NOW SHOWING THRU THURSDAY
Matinee 2:45 & 4:55, Evening 8:30- 'Phone 2-1004, 2-10050


Godfather
Sof Harlem!
L *... the cat with tne
SI .45 caliber claws!




l ... RED WRe Lr AMSON s o ......o....a. n A...C ..AnA.- ...l... sa ,.
NO ONE UNDER 17 WILL BE ADMITTED
Reservations not claimed by 8:45 will be sold
on first come, first served basis.



S Now thru Friday Now thru Tuesday
Matinee starts at 1:45 Sunday Continuous
S Evening 8:30 from 4:45
"THE HARDER THEY
COME" R
Jimmy Cliff "KUNG FU, THE
Janet Bartlev INVISIBLE FIST" PG.
PLUS
"THE MONGOLS" PG. PLUS
Jack Palance "TROG" PG.
Anita Ekberg
No one u inder I 7 will he admitted J.oan Crawford
'Phone 2-2534 Michael Gough



NOW SHOWING THRU TUESDAY
Sunday Continuous from 4:30-'Phone 3-4666
Monday Matinee Continuous from 1:30, Evening 8:30
11TL GEIiO iPc1 IM pS Mffs I





AND

rThDEEDAreAblVE
"o ALEX CORU- SAMANTHAECGGAR
BNO ONE UNDE-R 7 ADMITTED.


part of the loot and releases
them. Youngblood
accompanies Dillinger as he
rejoins his gang.
Dillinger takes Billie to meet
his father and sister at their
Indiana farmhouse. Then he
and Billie and the gang hide
out in a lodge at Little
Bohemia, Wisconsin. "Pretty
Boy" Floyd (Steve Kanaly)
and "Baby Face" Nelson
(Richard Dreyfuss) join the
gang.
More bank robberies, and
then a chance meeting of
Dillinger and Purvis in a
Chicago night club. But
Dillinger slips away. Purvis is
left with his fiancee, Janice
Jarvis.
Dillinger and his gang are

Wulff R&L 1
Saturday night 8:30 p.m.
thru Tuesday, "The Dead Are
Alive" plus "El Condor"
Sunday showings continuous
from 4:30. Monday &
Tuesday matinee continuous
from 1:30, evening 8:30. No
one under 17 will be
admitted.
Starts Wednesday,
"Dracula A.D. '72" plus
"Crescendo" matinee
continuous from 2:15,
evening 8:30. Parental
discretion is advised.
In The Dead Are Alive, a
team of young archaeologists is
working on the ancient tombs
and remains of the Etruscan
civilization. While the
explorations are taking place, a
series of brutal murders of
young couples occur. The
bloody bodies are found in the
tombs and places connected
with the archaeologists'
studies. It is believed that the
murders are directly related to
drawings on the walls of the
tombs. Thoughts of
reincarnation are indicated.
"Crescendo" is a top-notch
psychological thriller.
Producer Michael Carreras'
cast includes two American
artists. Stefanie Powers and
James Olson, in the lead roles.
They are ably supported by
Britishers Margaretta Scott, as
the powerful and eccentric
mother, Jane Lapotaire as the
scheming maid, and Joss
Ackland as the mysterious care
taker.
Miss Powers, plays ai
American student who arrives
at the secluded family home
prepared to write a thesis
about the late composer's life
and works. She soon becomes
an unwilling pawn in a
horrorific game among the
various remaining members of
the composer's immediate
family.
Olson portrays the crippled
son who becomes romantically
involved with Miss Powers.

Oaiki AM hrts ldI
West Bay Street
WILL BE CLOSED
ONE WEEK
MALCOLM TYRE
SERVICE
Down Town
WILL BE OPEN
TO SERVE YOU

I -l/Im


NOW SHOWING
at 7:00 & 10:20
BROTHER ON THE RU
Kyle Johnson
and at 8:50 "HONKY"
Brenda Sykes
No one under 17 admitted
I S11 Im ti


ambushed by police when they
attempt to hold up a South
Bend, Indiana, bank.
Youngblood is killed, and
Tommy Carrol (Jerry
Summers), a new member of
the group, is fatally wounded.
By now Dillinger is Public
Enemy No. 1.
Purvis, in bed with Janice,
receives a telephone call telling
him Dillinger and the others
are at the Little Bohemia
lodge. He leads three carloads
of F.B.I. agents in an assault on
the hideout, and an F.B.I.
Inspector, Samuel Cowley
(Roy Jenson), participates.
Billie becomes a prostitute,
under an assumed name, in
Chicago. Dillinger, also using a
different name, moves into the
same building.


JAMES OLSON
(Crescendo, Wulff Road)
her, and seconds later,
Lillianne lies lifeless with a
knife in her back.

Sa.Ov


theatre Theatre


|i 8


FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE i
PEST CONTROL L
TROPICAL 2-2157


Have a

SUPER SUNDAY SESS
WITH BALMORAL AND I

12 -3:00 P.M.
F nin o all ouH ran af frn


SION
PAN AM


k-|vy un y u cdan edlal Iru a
Delicious Bahamian Buffet Lunch
for $6.00 per person, plus gratuities
Children under 12, half price.
See a Travelogue of Horizons of Scandinaria
Compliments of Pan American
beginning at 12:00 Noon.
"THE IGNITERS" STEEL BAND
plays all afternoon!


4 ii r


Saturday, November 17, 1973


WHAT"S O


mi | ip iW 111 16 111
ON T IN I( I \ l 1 1 \\ I


-------


P


hte ribtutw


IL


El














. Elit dillittt


CLASSIFIED


SECTION


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS-FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV. TELEPHONE 21986 EXT. 5


I I -I- 'I


C12550
NOTICE is hereby given that
CHARLES GROVENER
HALL of Maxwell Lane,
Nassau, Bahamas is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 9th day of November
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N7147,
Nassau.
C12553
NOTICE is hereby given that
MALCOLM FREDERICK
PIKE of Stella Maris Estate
Long Island is applying to the
M in sister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship.for
naturalisation as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why naturalisation should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 9th
day of November 1973 to The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.
C 12560
NOTICE is hereby given that
CROFTON WHITFIELD
BEEN (sometimes called
BAIN) of P. 0. Box F450
Freeport, Grand Bahama is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 9th
day of November 1973 to The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.
C 12566
NOTICE is hereby given that
WILLIAM JOHN SWEENEY
of Freeport, Grand Bahama is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any
reason why registration should
not be granted should send a
written and signed statement
o'. the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 9th
day of November 1973 to The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.
C12558
NOTICE is hereby given that
SIDNEY PATRICK RIGBY of
West Street, Nassau, Bahamas
is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 9th
day of November 1973 to The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

C12554
NOTICE is hereby given that
VE RNICE ESTELDA
DENNISON of Nassau Street
P. O. Box 2089, Grant Town,
Nassau Bahamas is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and CitizenshiR for
registration as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why
registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
fatts within twenty-eight days
.from the 9th day of November
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
CiTizenship, P. O. Box N7147,.
Nassau.


CIf555
NOTICE is hereby given that
HYACINTH VICTORIA
LEWIS of Yellow Elder
Gardens, Nassau, Bahamas is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
seQd a written and signed
statement of the facts within
tv4nty-eight days from the 9th
d y of November 1973 to The
Mn sister responsible for
Nilonality and Citizenship, P.
OtBox N7147, Nassau.
W2322
WOLSEY HALL
11K OXFORD CORESPONDENCE COREGEM
WIever the qualification you want -
.C.E. "0 and *A' levels a London
Unersity Degree. Professional Ex-
*minations or Business Studies Woley
11UM rounded in 1114 gives you:
*A guarantee of tuition until you pass
ourexaminationatnoestraco u.
An outstanding record of success. For
ampt 7'. of Wolsey Hall students
slting for B.A. honours degrees have
p pssdin he last yearsr.
SOver 7 years ofexperience resulting in
the most efficient modern methods of
postal leaching ty ItIrma ifreqi hired.
4 et-onal tuition to me our precse
requirements.
Low fe rpayablet y installments
SIf you i n tI kno hw ho to
l pepae for a sueetalil future
S for a Fres prp us to
Dep. V.E.I.


C12649
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
I, VERNON T. CURTIS, of
George Town, Exuma,
Bahamas, had no knowledge
until November 11, 1973, that
my name is being used in
connection with the sale of
Real Estate by a certain Nassau
Real Estate firm.
The firm had ho right to use
my name on any documents in
any manner. They were doing
so without my knowledge or
consent. I cannot condone
such actions.
I am hereby advising the public
that I am not liable for any of
their actions in regards to the
use of my name on any real
estate documents.As I do not
know entirely the extent that
my name has already been
used, I am asking anyone who
might have grievances
connected with documents
from that firm bearing my
name, to please contact me
immediately at the PIECES OF
EIGHT HOTEL, in George
Town, Exuma.

I REAL ESTATE
C6490
Lot, 80' x 120', conveniently
located at Stapleton Gardens,
selling below price. Call Nassau
3-5277.
C12564
YAMACRAW BEACH
ESTATES
$75 DEPOSIT for 70 x 100
lot. Beach rights, private lake,
underground utilities. Priced
from $5800 and $80 monthly.
NO INTEREST CHARGES.
Tremendous savings. Call Pat
Rutherford at 4-1141 or
Morley & O'Brien at 2-3027 or
come to the Yamacraw beach
Model Home any afternoon.

C12651
1 lot 100 x 100 situate Nassau
Village near Sea Breeze Estate.
Price $5,500.00.
1 lot 100 x 150 near Claridge
Enterprises Limited South of
Soldier Road. Price $7,000.00.
12 lots 70 x 110 Sandilands
Allotment in Vicinity of A. D.
Hanna Residence $4,000.00
each.
5 lots 50 x 110 Nassau Village
$3,000.00 each.
All lots have sound title.
Telephone 24068.

C12627
FOR SALE COMMERCIAL
CITY PROPERTY
Marlborough Street opposite
British Colonial. Ground floor
has store, upper floor can be
used as mezzanine or
apartment. Gorgeous views -
approx. 2320 sq. feet. Asking
$100,000.00 ideal for
business. See anytime.
VACANT LOT Cunningham
Lane opposite Dolphin Hotel.
63 x 83. Ideal for parking,
apartment bidg, or home.
Asking $32,500.00.
DAMIANOS REALTY
COMPANY
22033, 22305 evenings 41197.

C 12663
FULLY FURNISHED large
dwelling house on double lot in
Blair Estates. Price $160,000.
Call 32723.


1 FOR RENT
C12316
COTTAGES and apartments
daily, weekly or
monthly-airconditioned, fully
furnished, maid service
available. Lovely gardens and
swimming pool. Telephone
31297, 31093.

C12655
CABLE BEACH area --
furnished bedroom oe
bedsitting room with 4 piece
bathroom and screened in
patio adjoining. Air
conditioned and T.V., kitchen
privileges. Phone 77389.

C12401
AIRCONDITIONED one
bedroom furnished apartment
in Dundas Court, Pyfrom
Addition, with laundry room
facilities and Master TV
antenna. Also large parking
area. For information call
5-3928 or 5J4258.


C12325
ONE EXTRA LARGE two
bedroom, two bath, apartment.
With large living and dining all
basically furnished Victoria
Court APARTMENTS on
Elizabeth Avenue between
Shirley and Bay Street.
Facilities, phone, laundry,
parking, T.V. antenna,
airconditioned. Phone 54631
between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.

C12318

MOVING?

For Expert Packing &
Forwarding by Sea or Air,
Contact E. H. Mundy &
Co. (Nassau) Ltd., P.O.
Box N.1893. Phone
2-4511.


APPROVE AARGO
nl,-Li-IC


FOR RENT
C12579
COMPLETELY furnished one
bedroom apartment,
airconditioned, fully carpeted,
T.V. Antenna, automatic
washer and dryer. $200.00.
Phone 5-8512.


C12328
FURNISHED AND
AIRCONDITIONED 2
bedrooms, 1 bedroom and
efficiency apartments.
Telephone 5-8679.

C12628
1 BEDROOM FURNISHED
APARTMENT Ansel
Building, Crawford Street,
Oakes Field with telephone.
$190 per month. Phone 3-4999
evenings.

C12624
WlILLIAM'S COURT
APARTMENTS 2 one
bedroom furnished apartments,
airconditioned. Call daytime
2-2152.

C12604
OPPOSITE SCOTTISH
SHOP, Charlotte Street. Ideal
for store or office. Ample
parking. Immediate occupancy.
41476.


C12652
SANS SOUCI
house for
information
2-1741/2.


- furnished
rent. For
please call


CARS FOR SALE
C12664
NEW PRO EVIDENCE
LEASING LIMITED have
another list of bargain
automobiles for sale. Low
down payment, financing and
insurance cover arranged
immediately. You are invited
to check the vehicles listed on
our used car lot located on
Gibbs Corner opposite
Laundromat:-

1971 MERCURY COMET -
Air-Conditioned Red/Black
Trim cash $3,500.00, down
$1,000.00
1970 FORD CAPRI 300, GT
Sports cash $1,800.00, down
$500.00
1973 BUICK REGAL 2-Door
Sports All Power -- cast,
$5,400.00. down $1,500

1970 PONTIAC PARISIENNE
Air-Conditioned Real Family
Car cash $3,400.00 down
'W800.00

1971 FORD MUSTANG
Fast/Back -Air-Conditioned
Cood Buy cash $4,250.00,
down, $1,000.00

1970 BUICK Le-SABRE-
/SPORTS All Power cash
$3,400.00. down $900.00
1968 CHEVY CAMARO -
Excellent Shape cash
$1,200.00, down $500.00
1971 DODGE AVENGER -
Automatic Transmission Good
Buy Gold/White Trim cash
$1,850.00, down $550.00

1971 DODGE AVENGER -
Automatic Transmission
Green/White Trim cash
$2,100.00, down $600.00
1972 DODGE AVENGER -
Automatic Transmission -
cash $2,500.00, down $700.00
BARGAIN BASEMENT
BUY AS IS, WHERE IS
CASH ONLY
1970 TOYOTA
COROLLA Automatic -
Good Runner $450.00
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA -
Standard Good Runner
$750.00
1972 FORD CAPRI 1600 GT,
Needs Mech. attention
$995.00
1970 FORD MAVERICK -
Automatic Running Good
Buy $995.00
1965 FORD FALCON -
Automatic Running Good
Trans $175.00
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA -
Automatic Good Runner
$750.00
'1970 VAUXHALL S/W
Standard Good Runner
$500.00
1969 MERCURY COUGAR -
Automatic Needs much
attention $500.00
1968 FAIRLANE -
Automatic Needs, attention
$125.00
1968 PLYMOUTH
SATELLITE Needs Mech.
attention $150.00
1970 RAMBLER HORNET,
, $750.00.

C12662
1970 VAUXHALL VIVA
ESTATE. Good condition.
$1,250. One owner. Phone
daytime 36506.

C12528
1968 MUSTANG. & Jard
shift, radio. Dark blues ,ith
black vinyl top. One o--'ner.,


BUSINESS 6 PROFESSIONAL


DIRECTORY

Save Time







b st1 k IIIhlucty lCi 21 EEXI. 5


1 lIN hSIth PY-


2 i nll h ll *i'U


S SHAE TIME SA VEIHiE


BOOKSTORE
The Christian Book
Shop 5-8744


LAUNDRY
DRY CLEANING
New Oriental Laundry 2-4406


BUILDERS MEN'S CLOTHING
Richard's Construction5-7080 The Wardrobe 5-5599


CAMERAS MUSIC
John Bull 2-4252/3 Cody's Records 2-8500

CARPETS OPTICIANS
Lee's Carpet Craft 3-1993 Optical Service Ltd. 2-3910/1

CSTOMS BROKERS PLUMBERS
Sunshine Plumbing
Martin's 2-3173 Maintenance Service 5-6251

DEPT. STORES PRINTING
Pixie's Dept. Store 2-3173 Wong's Printing 5-4506

DRAPERIES PROPERTY CLEAN-UP
Lee's Carpet Craft 3-1993 Gonzalez Clean-Up Service
3-1562/2-4726

DRUGS &
PRESCRIPTIONS RADIO & T.V. SALES
Carter's Records 2-4711
McCartney's 5-6068/5-2127

ENTERTAINMENT RUBBER STAMPS

Film & Equip. Service 2-2157 Wong's Rubber Stamp
Co. 5-4506

FLOOR MAINTENANCE SPORTS
Rug Cleaning & Installation Champion Sport Land 2-1862
Island Interiors 5-3576/4-2191
GARDEN & PET TRAVEL
SUPPLIES Playtours 2-2931/7
Modernistic 2-2868 R. H. Curry & Co., 2-8681/7

HARDWARE TRUCKING SERVICE
Gonzalez Trucking
John S. George 2-8421/6 Gonalez Trucking
3-1562/2-4726

HEALTH FOODS WRECKER SERVICE
Nassau Drug Store 5-4506 Gibson Wrecker Service2-8896


FOR THE ACTION YOU WANT



Shop Nassau Merchants
For Business And Services


I CARS FOR SALE
C12562
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD
USED CAR LIST


1967 CHRYSLER
4 Dr. Auto. White


$1000


1968 PONTIAC STRATO
CHIEF $1100
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
2 Dr. Auto. Green $1450


1969 FORD GALAXIE
4 Dr. A/C
1970 CHEVELLE SS
A/C 2 Dr. Red
1968 VAUXHALL
VICTOR
1971 FORD PINTO
Brown Vinyl Auto.


$1500

$2600

$600

$1995


.1971 VAUXHALL VICTOR
4 Dr. Std. White $1295
1967 MERCURY COUGAR
Std. Green $900


1970 MORRIS 1100
4 Dr. Std. White
1970 FIAT
4 Dr. Std. White
1970 HILLMAN MINX
S/W Std. Blue


$1000

$600

$1000


1969 VAUXHALL VIVA
2 Dr. Std. Green $1000


1969 VOLKSWAGEN
Green
1967 TRIUMPH
4 Dr. Std. Red


Telephone 34636-7-8
Located Oakes Field
Opposite the Ice Plant


FOR SALE
212387
WAREHOUSE and adjoining
vacant commercial lot.
Best offer. Phony 22098 -


I FOR SALE
C12421
Munroe Calculator $100.00
Table $50.00
5 Desks at $150.00
Computer Printout Storage
Rack.
Call 2-7491-2-3 between 9 and
4:30.

C12653
1 WHIRLPOOL Automatic
Washing Machine,
1 Early American dinette
suite
Call 41235, or between 9 a.m.
and 5 p.m. Phone 21784.

C12645
1-20' Red Meat Case,
1 Vegetable Scale
1 Candy Display Shelf
1-3-6' Metal Shelf
All reasonably priced. Tel.
23819.

C12677
POOL TABLE three quarter
size with pool and snooker
balls, rack, cues. B$650.00
cash. Telephone 24713.

SCHOOLS

C12494
LEWIS AUTO SCHOOL
Learn to drive with confidence.
Phone 59805 between 7 and
8.30 am. or after 6 p.m. or
35084 anytime.


PUBLIC AUCTION


C12590
PUBLIC AUCTION TO BE
HELD ON SATURDAY 1st
DAY OF DEC. 1973 AT 12
O'CLOCK NOON ON SITE
BEAUTIFULLY located 3
Four-plexes, i.e. twelve units
known as Lakeside Park
Apartments.
All those three pieces parcels
or lots of land containing
Forty-Two thousand five
hundred and fifty-two (42552)
square feet known as lots
numbers One Hundred and
Sixty (160), One Hundred and
Sixty-One (161) and One
Hundred and Sixty-Two (162)
Kennedy Drive, Sunrise Park
Subdivision situate at Freeport,
Grand Bahama Island, bounded
as follows:
Northwardly by land the
property of the Grand Bahama
ort Authority Limited and
running thereon Three
Hundred and Fifty-Five (355)
feet.
Eastwardlyv by lot
number One Hundred and
Eighty-Four (184) Kennedy
Drive and running thereon One
Hundred and Twenty (120)
feet.
Southwardly by a portion of
Kennedy Drive and running
thereon Three Hundred and
Sixty-Three and Fifty-Six
Hundredths (365.56) feet.
Westwardlyv bv a Dortion of
Kennedy Circle and running
thereon One Hundred and Five
(105) feet.
The above property (known
as the property of Ely
Investments Limited Freeport)
is being sold under the power
of sale contained in an
Indenture of Mortgage to
'Barclays Finance Corporation
(Bahamas) Limited dated the
13th day of September, 1968
and recorded in the registry of
records in the City of Nassau in
Volume 1340 pages 324 to
339.
The sale is subject to a
reserve price and to a right to
the Auctioneer or anyone on
his behalf to bid up to that
price.
Terms: 10% of the purchase
price at the time of sale and
balance on delivery of title.
Dated this 10th Day of Nov.
1973.
SHEPHERD L. KEY
Real Estate
Auctioneer & Valuer

MARINE SUPPLIES
C 12665
YACHTS & BOATS LTD.

CHRIS -CRAFT

CONCORDE

IRWIN SAIL YACHTS

AVON INFLATABLES

21 foot diesel Romany cruiser
in fibreglass, 27 h.p. Perkins.
Sleeps two and has many
extras including head, radio,
outriggers and more, at our
dock $6600.00 asking.
53 foot Mathews in
exceptional condition. Twin
GM-671 diesels for power with
3unctiary generator. Boat
recently hauled and put Into
perfect condition. Good live
aboard or cruising $15500.00

AT THE DIVE SHOP
WET SUIT WEEK!
Complete colorful stock. No
sleeves, short sleeves, short
pants, long pants, and colours.
Come and try now while we
have a complete stock.
JUST ARRIVED The ultimate
in regulators, the POSEIDON.
Easiest breathing, guaranteed
for life! First time in Nassau.
At Nassau's most complete
dive shop, of course! The shop
with the dive flag awning.

P.O.Box N1658
Telephone 24869
C12657
26 ft. STAMAS late 1969.
Twin 160 H.P. Mercruisers.
2-Berth Cabin, toilet, fish.
chairs, outriggers, many
extras. Good condition except
starboard engine block
cracked. $5,500.00. Call
31273.

C 11894
1969 31ft. CHRIS CRAFT


Commander. Sleeps six, private
shower, two 230 h.p. engines
with less than 200 hours,
kitchenette, good condition.
Call 24267, 54011.
C12676
ABACO DINGHY 11 ft. oa.
fish well, mast, boom, sail,
L/shaft Seagull 0/B, Trailer.
Phone 78057.


NOWOPENI

ANAI IIN IPET IIFPLIEBUI.

WE STOCK WHAT THE NAME IMPLIES

Montrose Avenue opposite St. Thomas More School
Phone 24259


II MARINE SUPPLIES


C12315
PACEMAKER 44ft. Luxurious
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.

C 12646
23 FOOT ALLMOND,
Powered by twin 120 h.p.
OMC's. She's reliable,
economical. Priced for quick
sale at $4,200.00. Tel 36173
(9--5).-



C12667
BICYCLE In good condition
required for tall man. Please
send details to E. W. c/o
V. Watkins, P. 0. Box N7776,
Nassau. Telephone 74271.



C12324
COMPLETE range of artists'
supplies. Oils, acrylics, canvas,
easels, etc. Bahamian Paint
Supply Ltd., Bay Street. Phone
2-2386, 2-2898.

ENTERTAINMENT
C 12623
BAHAMAS MUSIC SOCIETY
PRESENTS
The Executive Committee
in Concert
at
The Bahamas Teachers College
Sunday Nov. 18th at 8.30 p.m.

Admission at the door $2.00
per person
Members $1.00
FEATURING
Classical Guitarist Derek
Burrows
Chellest Marsha Rose
Sopranos Kayla Lockhart
and Veronica Roach.

C12679
THE NASSAU AMATEUR
OPERATIC SOCIETY
will present








The Somii of uNsic
DUNDAS CIVIC CENTRE
November 24th to
December 1 st,
excluding Sunday
Curtain time: 8 p.m.
each performance
Box office now open at the
Maura Lumber Co., Bay Street.
Telephone 2-4003, for
reservations.

C12647


FRIENDLY
BIG AL COLLIE
Manages the new
BRIGDE INN RESTAURANT
Directly across the bridge on
East Bay Street
Serving food and cocktails
For information call 32077
Dress Casual.


I APPRECIATION
C 12669


MR. & MRS. JOHN
KNOWLES who were married
17th August 1973 wish to
thank their many friends and
relatives for gifts and cards
given to them on this special
occasion. Special thanks to all


INNOUKEIENTS


C12675
THE DEATH is announced of
Mrs. Clotilda R. Brice-Aged 67
of Imperial Park, at the
Princess Margaret Hospital at
1:15 p.m. on Thursday Nov.
15th. She is survived by 4
children, Eugene, Kenneth,
Thelma and Rose and 11
grandchildren. A Ministry of
Education Teacher she was
retired at the time of her
death. Funeral arrangements
will be announced later.

CARD OF THANKS
C12658


THE FAMILY of the late Mrs
Dorothy May Plakaris
expresses sincere appreciation
to everybody who shared their
grief during their bereavement.
Special thanks to Fathers
arclan Peters, Pat Holmes and
Lavelle; Drs. Jatala and
Roberts; the Nurses Moxey and
Kehern and the staff of the
Intensive Care Unit.

IN MEMORIAM
C12641
IN LOVING memory of my
husband CLARENCE SELVER
who departed this life thirty
seven sad years ago today.
Many times we've needed you,
Many times we've cried
If our love could have saved
you
You never would have died.
Out of this world of suffering
Into a garden of rest
Which must be beautiful
As God knows best.
Sadly missed by wife Nina J.
Selver.

I ELP WANTED
C12587
IBM BAHAMAS LIMITED has
an Immediate opening for van
driver-stock assistant.
Applicants should be fairly
Intelligent, neat In appearance
and of good character. For
further Information call
32351/4.
c12622
Qualified Bahamian Chartered
of Certified Accountant with
hotel experience required as
Controller for luxury
medium-sized hotel in the
Cable Beach area. The
successful applicant will be
responsible for food and'
beverage stock control, the
maintenance of accounting
records and procedures, and
the preparation of monthly
accounts. Interested applicants
should write in the first
instance to Messrs. Pannell
fitzpatrick and Co., Chartered
Accountants, P. 0. Box
N-4665. Nassau, Bahamas.
C12625
MARRIED couples required as
Managers and Assistant
Managers of Family Island
Resort Hotel and Power Plant
operation, commencing
December 1973. Managers will
bear over-all responsibility for
operation of the hotel,
including dining room, bar,,
dock facilities, water sports
facilities, and power plant.
They must be able to accept
total administrative and
operational responsibilities of
the business, including
maintaining company books
and records, purchasing,
inventory control and all office
work.
The Assistant Managers will
work with and report to the
Managers, and will be expected
to act as temporary managers
from time to time, during the
Managers' absence.
Housing and food provided,
but due to limited facilities
couples with small children
may not be acceptable. Salary
in both cases Is negotiable
depending on experience.
Profit sharing plan available.
Candidates should forward
complete resume stating
educational background and
experience, with two
references from former
employers or character
references, to: Current Yacht
& Diving Club, Current,
Eleuthera.


those woe helped to make It a C12631
success. JUNIOR& ROSIE. E L E CT RON I C S
C12317 E N G I N E E R I N G
TECHNICIAN. S to 10 years
practical experience. Must be
TRAVELLING? dependable, abte to work
(without supervision, pable of
For efficient friendly trdling others. Phone 20M39,
advice on Worldwidea ECTRICAL ENTERPRiJS
Destinations by Airine or LTD.
Steamnships. Contact
MUNDYTOURS at 24512. C12674
QAL.WitD GARVIR
Clu4N7

a m=Q a '"K f1phons 7416P.
IfIc "s.

I! ___,_..


$1250


$700 C12672


R-I 3 goodcn ition.t l l iUt t r'" -I


l, ,I


-M


K


I


r


Saturday, November 17, 1973


I I


IUMII


ug


NOTE


1


ML.S ?flt ig.


ml


-W


MiNCEMENTS


" *' .-


10













ZKhIo Mrfihtm


, Saturday, November 17, 1 3


HELP WANTED
C12659
PARADISE ISLAND
LIMITED requires: One (1)
airconditioning technician with
five (5) years experience. The
successful applicant must be
thoroughly familiar with and
be able to repair central and
window unit systems. Contact
Personnel Phone 55441; P. 0.
Box 4777, Nassau,

C12666
WANTED BY FINANCE
COMPANY, Messanger with
scooter licence. Age 18-21
years. Apply in PERSON
between the hours of 9 a.m.
and 5 p.m. Monday thru
Friday.
NEW PROVIDENCE LEASING
LTD., COLLINS AVENUE
AND SIXTH TERRACE.

C12678
WANTED: WELDERS,
ELECTRICIANS AND STEAM
BOILER FIREMEN at Ocean
Cay to work on the aragonite
project. 20 days on and 10
days off each 30 days.
Interviews by Mr. George Hydes
on Monday, Nov. 19th from 2
to 4 p.m. at McDermott
Associates Ltd., over Perfume
Shop, Federick and Bay. Phone
2-1323.

C12670
WANTED IMMEDIATELY, 3
versatile labourers to work at
the Ardastra Gardens. Must be
sober, trustworthy, courteous
and gentle in the care of birds
and other animals as well as
plants. Character references
required. Apply H. V.
Edwards, Ardastra Gardens
between 11.30 a.m. and 12
noon any day.

TRADE SERVICES

C12578
WINDOW AND DOOR
SPECIALISTS
We stock parts for all types of
aluminum windows and doors,
and repair: Sliding Glass Doors
All types of screens Awning
Windows, Jalousie Windows
and,doors. Phone 54460.
C12326
T.V. ANTENNAS
Boosters for home,
apartments and hotels
Sales and services.
Call 5-9404
WORLD OF MUSIC,
Mackey Street next
to Frank's Place


1 [I


I GRAND


CLASS

HELP WANTED
C6499
BARTENDER Applicant is
required to have extensive
experience in mixing of local
and international drinks.
Should also possess working
knowledge in first class hotels
or bar and be able to work on
own initiative. Police record,
health certificate and good1


references a must. Apply.to:
The Grand Bahama
Development Company.
Personnel Department,
Lucayan Building, P. 0. Box
F-2666, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.


TRA SERVICES
C12323




Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714

HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
- MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING

SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACTT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795. 2-3798
Airport 77434

C12200


41;


ACME PRINTERS
Specializing in:-
Business Forms
Wedding Invitations
Rubber Stamps
Business Cards
Advertising
Public Relations
Rudolph H. Ferguson
Special Representative
Phone 21594 Box6151

C12573
CHRISTMAS SPECIAL
Patio chairs rewebbed like
new. For further particulars
call Stephen 3-1715. No
obligations.

C12660
FOR ALL your Gardening
needs, trimming, hedging,
pruning, beach cleaning, for
prompt, reasonable and
efficient service. Call 5-7810.


IAHAMA


IFIED


HELP WANTED
C6500
TE ACHER /SCHOOL
ACCOUNTANT Must have
B.S. degree. Must be able to
teach accounting and related
business subjects. At least 10
years of experience as
accountant and teacher
required. Call or write: Sister
Mary Alice 373-3456, P. 0.
Box F-2418, Freeport.


Im AND BAHMiA


HELP WANTED
C6501
CATALYTIC WEST INDIES,
LTD., Post Office Box F-2544,
Freeport, Grand Bahama has a
job opportunity available for a
Bahamian in their Refinery
Maintenance Organization,
Freeport for the following
positions:
M A I N T EN ANC E
INSTRUMENT TECHNICI-
AN/TECHNOLOGISTS
Minimum of 10 years
experience in oil refineries or
chemical plants. Must have
qualified from a 4 year course
in a Technical College or be a
Member of Recognized
Professional Instrument
Society. Additional
requirements are: successful
completion of advanced
courses with such manufacturers
as Foxboro, Taylor, Brown,
Bailey, M.H., M.N., etc., ability
to commission and
trouble-shoot Fischer and
Kentighe pneumatic hardware,
Foxboro Electronic Analog
systems, Bechman and
Greenbriar on steam analytical
equipment, Foxboro digital
blending system, steam
generation system, Whessoe
telemetering tank gauging.
Must have had close association
with the start up of new
chemical, petro-chemical and
petroleum refineries and be
able to converse with and make
recommendations to refinery
operations personnel on
control problems that occur
during normal refinery
operations and start up.
METAL TRADESMAN Must
have a minimum of five (5)
years experience in refinery or
associated industrial plants as a
boilermaker/steam-fitter. Must
be fully qualified boilermaker,
with capabilities to understand
and carry out pipefitting and
pump repair work when
req u i red. Boilermaker
knowledge required in
exchanger repair and tube
rolling, layout and fabrication,
tower and tray work, cutting
and burning and rigging and
erection. Experience with Ague
Chem Desal Units and related
refinery specialty equipment.
and burning and rigging and
erection. Experience with Aaue
Chem Desal Units and related
refinery speciality equipment.
INSTRUMENT MECHANIC -
Must have pneumatic and
electronic instrumentation
experience in installation,
trouble-shooting and
maintenance of pneumatic
equipment, automatic tank
gauging, instrumentation
pertaining to refinery
operations. Minimum of five
(5) years refinery or process
industrial experience is
required.

REAL ESTATE
C6491
Florida Corporation seeking
income producing properties
and/or land in Freeport,
Nassau or Out Islands.
Unlimited cash available
Please submit full details with
location, prices, income, terms,
etc. Reply in confidence to:
C.S.N. Drawer G, Miami. Fla.
33164.


A __ ____ ____ ___L __ ____ ____ ___


HEUMjNTED
C6487
(1) ADMI VWISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT "w0 THE VICE
PRESIDENT: Drincess Hotels.
Be responsible for supervising
of secretarial and typing staff.
Handling all confidential
correspondence arnd taking
minutes, orgarmizing office and
appointment -.rchedl.aIe of Vice
President. Typing, shorthand
and use :)f dictaphone
essential. Goo* d command of
grammar, spelling and
punct uatioo n. Previous
experience in hotels or related
areas with sero ior management.
(1) SANITAT ION SERVICES
MANAGER: Princess Hotels.
Re;ponsiblefcar the training of
housekeeping and stewarding
staff. Janitori al services, pest
control, jani trial contract
negotiations vetith the three
hotels. Purchasing equipment
and cleaning chemicals. 3-5
years experier-nce in similar or
related aw-ea essential.
Knowledge of cleaning
chemi cals, equipment,
janitorial ser-vices, janitorial
contracts essential.
( 1 ) IN DUSTRIAL
OPERATIONS hi MANAGER:
Princess Hot els. Responsible
for operation of laundry, the
handling sof commercial
laundry. Supervision of dry
cleaning, flzt work, wash
sections, proc-iuction planning,
staff plann ing and staff
training. 3.5 years experience
in all facets > laundry area and
the ability lto train persons.
Interested a applicants should
contact King's inn Personnel
Office P O. Box F-207,
Freeport.

C6494
Three VVELE ERS with the
ability to pass X-ray test and
read blueprint, wit" at least 5
years experience. Interested
applicant pleasse contact: L &
A Industries, Phone 352-5422
or 352-2600, 'Freeport.

C6493
SAUCE COD K: Sa uce cook to
prepare all types of soups,
sauces, gr-avies, roasting
cooking and broiler cooking.
3-5 years e experience Police
Certificate, F-lealth Certificate
and letters of reference
required.
INTEREST ED PERSONS
APPLY: GF:RANED BAHAMA
HOTEL, WE TEND, GRANC
BAHAMA, Personnel Office
betweenthe thurs of 9:00 a.m.
and 3:0 p.rr-. Monday through
Friday, EIc=n IMartin, Jr.
Person nel Di sector.

C6496
Dental Sectic n- Antoni Clinic
requires REGISTERED
NURSE wit"- dental assistant
training. Applicant must be a
member of r-Jursing Council of
Commonwea lth of Bahamas.
Apply : Box F-257 5, Freeport.

I POSITION WANTED
C6497
Young woman seeking job as
housemaid. IPlease call Mrs.
Lewis at Fr-eeport 348-2963,
anytime.


The Tribune Comlcs Page


I'LL CALL ALL
OUR FRIENDS


HELLO, GUS, WE'RE HAVING A I GUS, WHEN YOU COME,
HOUSEWARMING, TURKEY COULD YOU BRING A
DINNER AND WE'D LIKE J iTTL BUTTER
YOU TO COME OVER L -Z--- Du 'T


' THfOUS I
-ROWV TH V
SHAZ EL-
kCOlffJS,..



a~tf- /


.I6


I "


3 -


Omo-Aft..JI._ &l ..... 1"7 410'"72


II












Saturday, November 17, 1973


h.t b Untmr 11


OKrwFea.t.re .a.t.sie*., 1973. W, .,My
"It's the wall clock you've watched for thirty years.
We thought you'd be lonely retiring without it."
m --


AmiAP" Esjj


"Wouldn't you know: a flat, way out here. . with
night coming on!"


CROSSWORD
PUZZLE
ACROSS
1. Regress 29. Exclusively
4. Spanish 30. Complexion
peasant dance 31. With spirit
8. Relative 34. Enlist
11. Blue grass 37. Golf
12. Spirited instructor
horse 38. Task
13. Expert 40. Dormant
photographer 44. Eastern
14. Possessive 47. Old card
adjective game
15. Ensign 48. Form of John
17. Paltry 49. Food fish
19. Hodgepodge 50. Stein
20. Married 51. Harsh alkali
22. Sprites 52. Obscurity


Winning


Bridge
By VICTOR MOLLO
Dealer Vest: Love All
North
49832
0 J 7 6
4 A 10 7
South
AJ 10 9 6 5 3
0 K Q 10 5
4 52
West North East South
1( Pass 2V( 34
Pass 4*
West leads the OA and con-
tinues wi the 64. How should
South play?
Analysis: On the face of it,
even if the trump finesse fails.
declare has only three losers-
u trump, a diamond and a club.
West's opening lead of the OA.
however, points to a singleton
and the obvious danger is that
should West come in with the
4K. t h e lead
with a club and ruff the dia-
mond return.
South can improve his
chances by giving up the trump
finesse and laying down the
4A. Now he will be safe unless
West started with three trumps.
What if he did? With a little
forethought South can guard
that. too.
West East
4 K 82 47
SA J 6 5 4 ( Q 10 7
OA 0i98432
4 A 0J864 8KQ4932
Going up with the 4A at
trick two. South leads dummy's
VK. Unless East produces tin-
expectedly the VA South dis-
cards his second club and re-
mains In control. Whatever
West returns, South w4ns and
plays the ace and another trump.


p~ 5gp p

TA R T E



AA I DO

SOUTO YESTERDAY' PZL


DOW
1. Home
2. The t
3. Sham
4. Green


Rupert on


Leaving his friends Rupert races down the
steps to reet Mummy and Daddy. Where
have you been all this time ? asks Mr. Bear.
"Oh. there's so much to tell you I" criea
Rupert. But first of all, come and see what
Cep'n Bamale has lent Simon." He leads
the way to the shack, but by this time th
wa'o has stopped and Simon and the captain


IN 5. Scrap
6. Elephant's ear .
ric 7. White poplar
wo 8. Urn
ieful 9. Sherbet
n 10. Jujube
ledony 16. Afflict
t 18. Veneration
21. Wither
23. Pipe joint
24. Stealthy
25. Haggard
heroine
26. Play on words
27. Leading lady
28. Crown U R
32. Young salmon
33. Thousands of
years letter, and
35. Person least two eigh
36. Meal nitt. o N Oer
S 39. Greek portico TARGET:
41. Trees e wordseent. So
42. Rake YJSTERD,
43. Academic g rt rth.
gown riht rout tl
S 44. Lubricate trt togh
45. Shaft truth tutor.
46. Cutting tool
11-20

Chariot Island-48


Q or more can
-- you make
A Itrum the
I letters shown
^ here? In
-- making a
L word. each
letter may
-be used once
only. Each
contain the lare
there must be at
t -letter words In the
us, no tore= words;
name. TODAW's
94 words good;
,r good; $7 words.


hou thug tight tiro
tour tout t X| trio
trough trout trug


are slumped on the steps with their eyes
closed. "I might have guessed I" laughs
Rupert. Smon was playing his lullaby again
-and It has sent them both to sleep I "
tE END
(Another Adventure Tomorrow)
A4t LMHTS MRESfRVE


L


Chess


White mates in four moves,
against any defence (by J.
KUpiblcek). Despite White's
crushing supremacy In material,
he has some difficlty in forcing
a mate-for instance 1 RI--KR7?
would be an immediate draw by
stalemate.
Par times : 20 seconds, problem
master; 2 minutes, problem
expert; 5 minutes, good; 10
minutes, average; 30 minutes,
novice.

Chess Solution
1 R-K6, K xR- 2 K-Kt7
K-Q1; 3 K-B6, k-Bl; 4 R-
K8 mate.


No 7.282 by TIM McKAY
Across
I. They cost the same as
letters now. (4. 5)
9. Old. (4)
II. Tardy patron. (4-5)
12. Speak effusively. (4)
13. Conifer. (4)
14. Emendator. (9)
19). Goodbye composer. (5)
21. Automobiles. (5-4)
23. Consumed. (3)
24. Noisy sleepers do. (5)
2.. Unpleasant. (.)
26. The four highest. (4)
Down
I. Constable. (9)
2. New Zealand city. (5))
3. Soaks. (9)
4. Secures. (4)
3. DIstInxgushInK mark. (1)
6. Time cone by. (3)
7. Sends the money. (6)
R. Certain. (4)
10. Lair. (3) I15. Perch. (5)
16. H o t
d ri u1k.
17. Hnzards. KI 1
(5)
18. T I n v
pa rt.
(4)
22 Part of a
eIrele. SlYIlBM
(3) rotrdiav's solution


| STEVE ROPER


& MIKE NOMAD


31W Comic Pat*


7- -CARROLL RIGHTER'S

^IOROSCOP
trom the Carrll Righter Institute
GENERAL TENDENCIES: You have a big
opportunity to use the energy now generated to
make some long-range plans and a chance to engineer them in
such a way that they can put you far ahead of your present
position. Be alert at all times.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) You are tempted to make
changes in plans, but this would not be wise. Engage in
detailed work connected with it instead.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) The morning can be slow but
later you can accomplish a great deal at your favorite
activities. Show more devotion to mate. Be happy.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) If you are careful in motion,
you find this can be profitable. Show much hospitality to
invited guests. Show that you have poise.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Don't invest in a
worthless venture at this time. Arrange your budget so you
know just where you stand now and in the. future.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) You could be suffering from
frustration but this is only negative thinking. Combine good
common sense with your intuitive faculties.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Forget a worrisome matter
and go out and meet interesting people. Improve your
appearance and become a more efficient person.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) You must.take care of routine
duties if you are to expand as you desire. The evening can be a
happy time with the one you love.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Provided you take no risks
in business matters, the latter part of the day can be very
happy in the company of good friends.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Forget going on a
tangent you have in mind. Bringing your talents to the
attention of others opens new doors of opportunity.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) You may feel like going
back on a promise you have made, but it is better for you to
carry through or you could get into trouble.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Avoid an associate who
can be very annoying. Listen to a new plan with interest which
mate has, and go along with it for best results.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Ideal time to join with a
partner at whatever improves joint interests and forget dull
routines for now. Long talks produce fine results.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY ... he or she will be
one of those charming young people who may suffer from
some health deficiency early in life, but then overcomes it and
becomes strong. Direct the education along humanitarian lines
such as medicine, research whatever helps the public. Give
finest benefits you can afford.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel" What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


APARTMENT 3-G By Alex Kotk I


lv


I JUDGE PARKER By PAUL NICHOLS I


, _


L


Il-li


F 9 RECO 1


I














Saturday, November 17, 1973 Wht ~rttnmw


Jets march




on to title


By IVAN JOHNSON
NASSAl' JITS quarterback
Jesse Ferguson completed 8 of
17 passes for 240 yards and 4
T)S. while running. back 'ari
Bostwick caught b passes for
137 yards and 2 I'DS and
rushed 14 times tor 146 yards
and I FI) as the Jets blanked
the Classic Pros 53-0 at the QlE
Sports last night.
This was the Jets seventh
straight win of the season and
with 11 ust three games
reaimiing thei are certain to
regain their league title.
Despite being without the
irniured Br-ice Russell, the
leagues devastating running
back. the Jets were still in a
different class to the Pros who
seem doomed to remain at the
bottom of tile league table.
Do iHuyler passed the
centui mark whlien clie ran 22
yards for a TI) and caught a 27
yard scoring pass to run his
BAFA league leading scoring
total to a massive 11 I points.
I -arl Bostwick moved into
second place in the rushing
table behind teaminate Bruce
Russell, pushing his total to
413 vards on 62 carries.
However. (Crushers halfback
Sharkie Martin will be looking
to overtake Bostwick again
tonight when the Crushers
meet the Marlins at the Q. 1 .
Sports Centre.
Martin presently has 367-
yards to his credit
Bostwick also i. k the lead
in pass receiving last night as lie


took hi
to equli
last yea


s tall\ of catclihes to 19
al lusvler's record. set
r.STAR 5


STAR S


.sl AR INSt'R \(1. led by Ricky
1 owe, Patrick Sweeting and Bradley
I riesen shut out l inker's Paint 3-0
l-hursday taking a first place tie with
Guilnness Bow ling SLquiad
( rutn i'awal with the first half championship
in tlhe Madeira League fell to the howling
of JetI Alhbry and defending tchanips
I s1o Tigelrs "ho shut them out in three.
goingg intoF lhrusday night's game.
(.1lmnes'. held a t three game lead over
Stji
h lie Insutrance mlien. who for the past
iour games tell in thie slump and seemed
lie iled ouit l the running for first place
honolluls. bounced back I'hursday with
Swv cel ing's match hlih of 210(555) and
Friescn's 205( 550) in their 842-749,
8h7-7)97. 814-757 victory.
Lowe. who is making an impressive bid
tor the coveted rookie of the year award.
rolled a high of I 86(497) for Star.
I hough spotted 70 handicap pins each
game. tinker', were unable to restrain


Hluyler, who caught one pass
in the game dropped to second
place with 17 catches for 492
yards and 14 touchdowns.
Tonight the Crushers, led by
speedy halfback Martin will
battle with the Blue Marlins led
by runningback Ricky
Thompson.
Both teams will be anxious
to emerge victorious with the
playoffs only a month away
ind the fourth place in the
iale still wide open with the
Stingrays having two games to
play and the Marlins three.
On recent torn, the
('rushers should win this game
but Andy Keo is still the best
plat action quarterback in the
leaVei
Scoring tor last night's game;
Jt I S I Biistwick 78 yd pass
troni .1. I erguson (run fail) 6, I .
Bist\sick 16 vd pass (run fail) 6,
1). Itusler 22 \d run (Hluyler run)
7. I Ilistwick 14 vd run (B.
Davis run) 7. (;. Moncur 76 sd
pass (I erguson run) 7, I). Huler r
27 yd pass (Bostwick run) 7 B.
Iavis 5s d run (Bostwick run) 7.
J. I-erguson ) I \ s run (run fail) 6
Total 53


NO MAJOR upsets were
seen in the first round of the
Bahamas squash championship
yesterday as seven of the first


Ferguson

quits two

positions
SPORTS personality
Vincent Ferguson, (pictured)
currently president of the
Bahamas Amateur Basketball
Association and the Bahamas
Federation of Amateur
Sports, has resigned as
vice-president of the Bahamas
Olympic Association and
chairman of the Bahamas
Association of Inter-
Scholastic Sports.
"It is with deep regret that
I submit this resignation.,
Mr. Ferguson said in his letter
to the B.O.A. "But due to
personal reasons I feel this to
be the best decision at this
time."
Mr. Ferguson this year was
serving his second term in
office. He however remains on
the rules committee of the
B.O.A.
In his letter to the BAI-SP
he said: "I firmly believe that
sports and recreation will be a
prime instrument in the
development and
enhancement of our people
for many years to come."
"I hope. therefore, that the
association will find the
strength and courage to
persist in the tremendous
work it is doing."
He said he hoped the
association continued in the
fine tradition established
over the years in promoting
the highest standards of
competition in and among
schools, not only here but
throughout the Bahamas.
Thanking his officers and
fellow members who worked
so diligently over the last
couple of years he added: "I
feel that you have made a
truly significant contribution
to our community for which
you deserve more than a
thanks: but that is all I can
give apart from wishing you
all the very best of luck in the
future."


Tony Lancaster (No. 3)
disposed of Dr. Grahame Barry


McAlpine


By IVAN JOHNSON
THE BAHAMAS
FOOTBALL ASSOCIATION
soccer season continues
tomorrow when 1972 league
runnersup Clan McAlpine
meet Dynomos, and Paradise
the 1972 Knockout Cup
runnersup, clash with St.
Georges at Clifford Park.
McAlpine, under their new
captain Dave Johnson who will
be performing in the midfield
tomorrow, should win their
first game of the season against
Dynamos, who finished
bottom of the BFA league
table last season.
Main strikers for the Clan
will be Mike Coodger and Peter
Simpson whose deadly
shooting will undoubtedly
be Dynamoes main worry.
"Big", moustachioed Frank
('rozier along with Les Williams
will form the backbone of the
McAlpine defense which
should be capable of keeping


the Dynamos forwards at bay.
Newcomers, Steve Dale a
fine prospect in the Clan
goalmouth, Gordon Duncan
and former Tropigas player Jim
Lawler will all be wearing
McAlpine shirts for the first
time.
According to Dynamos
coach Harcourt "Rip" Rolle
Dynamos will be fielding a
weekend side due to three key
players being injured.
Out for tomorrow's game
will be midfield man Gerard
Pierre who has a groin strain,
goal keeper Brian Knowles
presently recovering from flu
and 'utility' midfield player
Basil Bullard who has a knee
injury.
Spearheading the Dynamos
attack will be new skipper
Richard Adderley and Vincent
Phillips while the back four
will be well packed with
experience where Derrington
Rahming, George Shannon,


KEEGAN HITS


c
th
so
p
ri


ci
C


2-


AS LIVERPOOL


CRUSH IPSWICH
LONDON League ENGLISH LEAGUE
champions Liverpool turned on DIVISION I
he pressure in the English Leeds 3 Coventry 0
soccer league race today with a Leicester 2 Burnley 0
ulsation 4-2 win against near" Liverpool 4 Ipswich 2
vals Ipswich. Manchester City I QPR 0
But pace-setters Leeds Newcastle 3 Manchester Utd 2
But pace-setters Leeds Norwich I Everton 3
united marched on with a Sheffield United 3 Derby 0
comfortable 3-0 win over Southampton I Tottenham I
o entry. Stoke City 5 Birmingham 2
Livernonnl's da77lino win ,wa Wolves 0 West Ham 0


spearheaded, by little Kevin
Keegan who repeatedly danced
his way through the Ipswich
defence and scored three goals
to delight the 37,420 fans.
There were 33 goals scored
in 1 1 First Division games a
bright spot on a day dimmed
by a government ban on
floodlighting which forced
clubs to kick off around 45
minutes early.
Leeds, on 28 points, held a
whopping seven points
advantage at the head of the
table, with Newcastle,
Liverpool and Everton on 21
points.
Liverpool have been
struggling to get their big guns
in good firing order all season
but they made no mistake this
time as they joined in the goal
bonanza.
K eegan, always an
opportunist, headed two goals
in the 17th and 22nd minutes
as Liverpool looked likely to
race away.


eight seeds moved safely John Lively (No. 4) of Leeds moved
--through to the second round at Freeport swept Eric Wilkinson fashion against
the Blue Ilill Courts. aside in three straight games. Conventry. I
Bob Montgomery. the men's Keith Parker (No. 5) beat dangerous Lee(
No. I seed trounced Peter Rose Alan Bates 3-0. Allan Clarke, nin
3-0. Ivern Davis (No. 7) smashed Jordan, 65 and I
No. 2 seed Alan Newall Jeff Ball 3-0. 75, scored th
Freeport beat I ddie Bostwick Roger Fryer (No. 8) beat Coventry crum
3-0. Peter Perry 3-1. 35.552 fans.

;HUT OUT TINKER'S 3-0


Star for more than five frames.
Shannondor Evans led Tinker's with a
team high of 174(491). Matty Cultner
had a 179(488):
defendingg bowling champ Jeff Albury
rolled scores of 202. 211 and 235 for a
match high of 648 pacing Guinness' down
fall Up against Guinness' 51 handicap
pins in each game. veteran Sydney French
came through with 194, 192 and 197
adding to Esso's relentless attack. New
corner C. Bethel chipped in a 201(504) as
E:sso took fourth place three games out of
first.
Roy Parks led the way for Guinness
with a 194(5201. Skipper Valdo Prosa
tossed in a 168(484).

Mike Albury rolled a 213(603) and
Perry Cooke added a 176(494). leading
Albury's Supply to a 2-1 victory over
Pritchards.
Tex Lunn scored a 184(524) and
Manny Kastrenakes added a 194(470) for
the losers.


on in imperial
an uncertain
The always
ds forwards,
e minutes, Joe
Billy Bremner,
e goals as
bled before


Lou Parker rolled a 198(529) and
Tony Major added a 202(491) leading
Heineken Brewers to a 2-1 victory over
K.C. Auto.
Robert Cartwright scored a 179(501)
for K.C.

MADEIRA LEAGUE STANDINGS.


Star Insurance
Guinness
Alibry's Supply
Fssi Tigers
Heineken
Pritchards
K.C. Auto
tinker's Paint
MADEIRA LEAGUE
Pat Sweeting
Mike Albury
Bradley Friesen
Sydney French
Jeff Albury
Billy Albury
Valdo Prosa
Mike Sawyer
Terry Chea
Perry Cooke


W L
24 IS
24 15
23 16
21 18
19 20
19 20
16 23
o10 28
TOP TEN AVERAGES
190
1169
189
188
188
183
177
176
174
174


Let Your Christmas Cards Be,

Meaningful This Year..


Have Sawyer's

Studio TakeYour

Family portraits

and use them

inPersonalized

Greet ing

Cards

C Sawyers Studios
SkqJ HOURS I ROM 8.00 -.m. Io 9:00 p-m.
'o DAYS Pt R WF.K
EAST ST. 2Vz BLOCKS NORTH OF WULFF RD.
NASSAU'S LEADING PHOTOGRAPHERS PHONE 2-1646


DIVISION 2
Aston Villa 1 Hull City I
Blackpool 2 Swindon 0
Bolton 1 Notts County 3
Bristol City 2 Sunderland I
Crystal Palace 1 Millwall I
Fulham 2 Portsmouth 0
Luton 2 Sheffield Wednesday I
Middlesbrough 3 Cardiff 0
Nottingham Forest 2 Carlisle I
Orient 2 West Bromwich 0
Oxford I Preston I
DIVISION 3
Blackburn 5 Watford 2
Brighton 0 Chesterfield 0
Cambridge I Aldershot 2
Charlton 2 Plymouth 0
Grimsby I Bournemouth 1
Halifax I Port Vale 0
Hereford 0 Huddersfield 1
Oldham 1 Bristol Rovers 1
Shrewsbury 0 York City 2
Southport 2 Tranmere 2
Southend 2 Walsall I
Wrexham 3, Rochdale 0
DIVISION 4
Barnsley 2 Crewe I
Brentford 3 Chester 0
Colchester 3 Stockport I
Doncaster I Bury I
Lincoln 2 Exeter 1
Mansfield 2 Gillingham 2
Newport 2 Darlington 0
Peterborough 3 Northampton 0
Reading I Rotherham o
Swansea 1 Harlepool 0
Torquay I Scunthorpe 1
Workington I Bradford City o
SCOTTISH LEAGUE
DIVISION I
Aberdeen 3 Hearts I
Arbroath I Ayr United I
Celtic I Partick "t'histle U
Dumbarton 2 St. Johnstone I
Dundee Utd I East Fife 0
Dunfermline 2 Motherwell 4
Hibs 2 Dundee I
Morton 2 Clyde 2
Rangers 2 Falkirk 1
DIVISION 2
Airdrie 3 Queen of the South 0
Alloa I Berwick I
East Stirling I Stenhousemuir I
Hamilton 4 St. Mirren 2
Kilmarnock 5 Forfar I
Montrose 4 Cowdenbeath I
Queen's Park 2 Clydebanl. I
Raith Rovers 3 Albion Rovers 1
Stirling albion S Brechin 0
ENGLAND CRUSH
AUSSIES
LONDON England's
rugby union team hammered
Australia 20-3 at Twickenham
today its fourth successive
victory.
It is 16 years since England
had such a winning run. A
crowd of 45,000 saw England
go into the lead after only 75
seconds.(AP)


'Rip' Rolle and Chris Sherman
will endeavour to hold off the
goal-hungry McAlpine
forwards.
Paradise will be without the
services of skipper Nick
Kealing, presently off the
island, for their first game
against St. Georges.
Kealing's leadership at the
back will be missed but
Paradise should be able to
handle a weakened Saints
forwardline which is now
without strikers Larry Minns
and Steve Nicholls.
Also missing from the
Paradise defence will be sturdy
centerback, Broc Barrett
suffering from a kidney
ailment whose ability to
outjump forwards in the air
will also be missed.
Paradise's back four will
probably consist of Jimmy
French, Sal Arnesano, Jerry
Simons and Tom Mixas with
either Franco Pedrini or young


Mike Halkitis in goal.
Former Argentinian
international Oscar Forrule will
play midfield and the
formidable forward line of
Juliano lacoppi, Stan Bocus
and the diminutive Theo Black
should turn the tide in
Paradise's favour.
Besides being without Minns
and Nicholls St. Georges are
also without Etienne and
Reynoso in midfield.
With the departure of these
four key players St. Georges
will not be the same aggressive
side as they were last year.
Paco Nunez will still be
performing in midfield along
with Pat Louison as will
regulars Roscow Davies and
Aldric Williams.
Three players will. be making
their debuts for the Saints
tomorrow, Mark Wilkinson,
Charlie Moss and goalkeeper
Hugh Franklin.


STRACHAN'S


KEEP UP


THE PACE

By GLADSTONE THURSTON
STRACHAN's Autos Afrikans, showing strong contention for
top honours in this season's basketball action, controlled the
Classic Pros and took a 72-7 1 edge following a six seconds jumper
by rookie Bernard Davis.
Overcoming numerous turnovers that plagued them early in the
game, the Afrikans led by centre Jerome Braney and forward
Berty Johnson settled down never allowing the Pros more than
five points ahead.
Barney going eight for 14 from the field and five for six from
the free throw line scored a game high of 21 points. Johnson
captured 13 rebounds and scored 17.
Rookie forward Elisha McSweeney led the way for the Pros
taking 20 rebounds and scoring 19 points. Wilfred Johnson took
17 points.
With Prince Hepburn and Lionel Evans adding to the Afrikans
offence, 12 seconds to play saw them trailing by one point.
McSweeney in rebounding one of Evans' field goal attempts lost
control of the ball and Davis made use of it to put the Afrikans
on top and a one and a half game lead in the Paradise League.
Davis contributed a game high of nine assists.
default over Nassau Schlitz who found themselves out of
uniform.


Clarke
Davis
Evans
Johnson
Barney
Hepburn


McSweeney
P. Ingraham
Bain
Rodgers
Johnson
Marsh
A. Ingraham


STRACHAN'S AUTOS
fg rb
0 1
3 3
4 8
8 11
8 7
9 5
CLASSIC PROS
9 20
4 9
3 5
5 4
8 2
2 2
2 3


Rookies Harvy Roker and Danny Edgecombe combined for a
total of 37 points and 37 rebounds paving the way for Pinder's
Basketball Club's 7947 victory over Bain Town.
Roker who is steadily finding his home at centre captured I 11
rebounds and scored a game high of 19 points. Edgecombe who
along with playmaker Basil Burns set up the plays took a game
high of 26 rebounds and added 18 points. Burns gave eight assists.
PINDER'S BASKETBALL CLUB
fg rb f tp
Roker 9 11 0 1
Edgecombe 8 26 3 18
Knowles 7 4 0 14
Woodside 4 3 0 8
Burns 1 5 4 2
Mc Fall 3 4 0 6
Coakley 2 t3 2 4
Hamilton I 7 2 2
Thompson 3 5 2 6
BAIN TOWN
Strachan 2 24 3 5
Rolle 8 1 1 1 16
Russell 5 3 1 10
Marshall 4 1 1 I 8
D)orsett I 1 0 2
Larimore 1 4 3 2
Bain 2 5 2 4

Merrill Johnson scored a game high of 30 points and rookie
Leroy Fawkes added 24 Thursday as John Bull upset the Colonels
97-96 dropping them in second place.
Having had to play from a 20-point deficit midway in the
second half, John Bull made use of the Colonels' numerous
turnovers to take an 82-81 lead.
Keith Smith on fivN, consecutive baskets once more gave the
Colonels the command but not for long. With a little over one
minute remaining in the game, the Bulls were once more on top
93-92 and held on to victory.


to beat Dynamos


Seeds safe


Listed Blackon tn ICaribiean) Ltd.








-








WATER PUMPS

P. 0. BOX 6275 -TELEPHONE 2-8488
EASTERN END NASSAU SHIPYARD.


Why Donald's?




I have been shopping at DONALD'S
FURNITURE for the past 10 years
because of the Quality Merchandise,
the wide selection of Furnitures, and
the help that is offered by the
Friendly Staff.


RUTH ROLLE Hotel Maid



STORE HOURS: MON. TO THUR. 8:30 to 5:30 FRI. & SAT. 8:30 to 6:00

DONALD'S FURNITURE &

APPLIANCE CENTRE

Collins Ave. & 6th Terrace Phone 2-1731.


10,r- k


Saturday, November 17, 1973


.
Tat *X.'


(ght (ortbmw