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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03493
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: November 9, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03493

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----- r i


HI DUDLEY'S
COR. ROSETTA ST. & MT. ROYAL AVE.



P.O. BOX 5850 -PHONE 2-1306/2-3237


Lritbunp


restored with Postmer of Bahanma ,for postage cMnceamu within the Bahamas) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading NewspaDer


VOL. LXX, No. 292 Friday, November 9, 1973 Price: $ Cents


MAGISTRATE OSADEBI f


SAYS UNCERTAIN


STAND-OFF IMPASSE SNARLS HOTELS DISPUTE


VESCO WILL BE RETURNED TO U.S.


US govt. appoint ex-FNM


chief Wallace


lead Vesco


Whitfield


case


By NICKI KELLY
FORMER FREE NATIONAL MOVEMENT LEADER Cecil Wallace Whitfield has been retained
United States government in its extradition proceedings against American financier Robert Vesco.


Outten gets nod from



PLP general council to



run for St. Barnabas

By NICK KELLY
FORMER ST. BARNABAS REPRESENTATIVE Sinclair
Outten was last night unanimously nominated by "special
resolution" or the National General Council to stand as the
Progressive Liberal Party's candidate in the forthcoming
by-election.


The resolution endorsing Mr.
Outten's re-nomination was
not on the agenda, The
Tribune learned. It was moved
after other business was dealt
with and after one of the
orosipective nominees h.ad le .
Mr. Wenfr Heassie, *..'A
announced yesterday he would
try for the PLP nomination,
said today he did not know the
nominations were to be
discussed at the Thursday night
meeting and left before the
meeting ended.
"A special meeting of the
N(CC was called. I knew a
candidates' committee had
been appointed so I took my
application and submitted it,"
Mr. Heastic said.
After that other matters
were dealt with and Mr.
Ileastie decided to leave. "I
didn't know anything about
nominations being considered
until I read it this morning," he
told The Tribune.
NOT YET
Asked if he proposed to run
anyway, the Wulff Road
businessman said he had not
yet given the matter thought.
lie, however, denied press
reports he had said there would
be dissension in the party if he
did not get the nomination.
"What I said was that there
would be dissatisfaction among
the voters," he declared.
last night's special council
meeting brought forward
from the regular date was
attended by a majority of the
95 council members.
It is understood nominations
for the St. Barnabas seat were
received from three or four
individuals.
QUIlTE LEGAL
The council'ss decision to
deal with the nomination
without notice was
constitutional, The Tribune
was told. In the absence of the
convention the NGC is
regarded as the supreme
authority of the party.
The speed with which Mr.
Outten's nomination was dealt
with however, suggests the
party was trying to avoid open
split at this particular moment.
Although a candidates
committee had been named, it
was moved as a resolution and
agreed that Mr. Outten should
be the party's choice in view of
the fact he had been elected
last year.
Prime Minister Lynden
Pindling, who heads the
candidates committee was in
Grand Bahama. Deputy Prime

MATCHING
TOWEL RACKS
SOAP DISHES
WASTE BASKETS
TISSUE HOLDERS
=ill F1I gH
FREEPORT ONLY
(f&-i i-ri


Minister Arthur Hanna was
present however.
Mr. Outten told The Tribune
he was at home when the call
came at about I a.m. advising
him he had been selected to
run again.
His .:hoicet however, and tu,
publicity surrounding his place
of birth, has not sat well with
some of the constituents of St.
Barnabas.
Elected in September 1972,
the 37-year-old Mr. Outten
disclosed earlier this year that
he had learned only recently
from his father that he was
born at Turks Island. His
non-Bahamian status
automatically disqualified him
from sitting in the Hlouse.
Mr. Outten has now been
naturalised a Bahamian citizen
and is eligible therefore to run
in the by-election for the
district.
'PAPER BAHAMIAN'
Mr. Ileastie this morning
repeated his statement to the
press yesterday that he found
it difficult to believe a grown
person could go for so long
without knowing his place of
birth.
Mr. Clyde Gardiner, another
of the disappointed candidates,
also questioned Mr. Outten's
statement.
"In my opinion the party,
through the Prime Minister, has
created a paper Bahamian and
is determined to shove this
creature down the throats of
the people of St. Barnabas. St.
Barnabas has always suffered in
this way.
"Any Minister, grass roots
supporter of the party or
anyone for that matter who
believes a person could live for
37 years without knowing
where he was born is not
worthy of the magnificence of
Clyde K. Gardiner," Mr.
Gardiner declared. He said he
had no plans to run as an
Independent.


DUE HERE, BUT

SLAIN IN MIAMI

A MEMBER of the Puerto
Rican Crime Commission,
Alberto R. Escudero. was slain
early today in a downtown
Miami hotel enroute to a drug
conference here in Nassau.
Escudero. 53, of Santurce,
Puerto Rico. had stayed
overnight in Miami and was
due in Nassau this morning for
the opening of the
International Narcotics
Enforcement Officers
Association conference at
Paradise Island.
Miami homicide ollicers
arrested Allen Thomas. 31, of
Miami and charged him with
the slaying after reportedly
finding him hiding in the dead
man's hotel room.


Mr. Whitfield will be assisted
by three U.S. Justice
Department attorneys now on
their way to Nassau and three
others who will be arriving
later, Ambassador Ronald I.
Spiers said today.
The preliminary hearings
will open before Magistrate
Emmanuel Osadebay Tuesday
at 2.30 p.m.
Mr. Vesco, who is free on a
$75,000 cash bond, is being
represented by the Hon.
Eugene Dupuch Q.C. and Mr.
Orville Turnquest.
Magistrate Osadebay's views
on the case were published in
The Tribune Herald yesterday.
NOT CERTAIN
The Magistrate, who was
interviewed Wednesday by
Herald writer Rob Elder, said
that it was far from certain
that the fugitive financier will
be returned to the United
States.
Evidence supplied by U.S.
officials "may not be sufficient
to extradite him (Vesco)," the
Herald quoted the Magistrate
as saying.
"This is a matter between
the United States and Vesco.
Our attorney general is in no
way involved," he said.
Mr. Osadebay also revealed
that the Magistrate's court
cashier refused to accept a
cheque from Mr. Vesco when
he posted bond.
CIEQUE REFUSED
"The (court) cashier refused
to accept a cheque," Mr.
Osadebay told The Herald.
"They (the attorneys) came to
me. I told them they had to
pay cash."
According to The Herald
the Magistrate said that a short
time later he was informed the
$75,000 cash bond had been
posted.
Although Mr. Vesco will be
required to appear in court
Tuesday, the hearing will
probably not be decisive, The
llerald said.
After the United States
presents its arguments for Mr.


to represent the


Vesco's extradition, "Vesco
will be given an opportunity to
examine the evidence," Mr.
Osadebay told The Herald.
This could take several days
the Magistrate indicated.
THICK FILE
Documents to support the
U.S. government's request for
extradition are said to number
60 pages. These contain sworn
affidavits from witnesses laying
out the case against Mr. Vesco
as well as copies of a July 20
federal grand jury indictment.
Although the 38-year-old
financier faces three other
indictments in the U.S.
including a $224 million
Securities x c h a n ge
Commission fraud suit the
U.S. is seeking his return on
the lesser charge he embezzled
$50,000 from International
Controls Corporation, one of
his many companies.
Such an offence is covered
under the 1932 extradition
treaty between the United
States and Great Britain to
which the Bahamas has
succeeded.
INDICTMENTS
At heart however is a special
grand jury indictment in May
alleging Mr. Vesco conspired
with former Attorney General
John Mitchell and former
Commerce Secretary Maurice
Stans to obstruct justice
through a $200,000
contribution to President
Nixon's re-election campaign
Obstruction of justice is not
covered in extradition
agreements between the U.S.
and other countries.
The U.S. government has
claimed that in return for the
secret contribution Mr.
Mitchell and Mr. Stans agreed
to use their influence on Mr.
Vesco's behalf in the SEC's
probe of his financial empire.
But the contribution was
returned to Mr. Vesco.
The SEC eventually lodged
its $224 million civil suit
against Mr. Vesco.


CECIL WALLACE WHITFIELD
... lawyer against Vesco


3 UP ON BIG

DRUG HAUL
THREE BAHAMIANS,
arrested Wednesday afternoon
by police drug squad officers,
were charged today before
magistrate Emmanuel
Osadebay with importing
marijuana two suticases of
marijuana, worth $60,000.
Charged are Edith
Collie-Dorsett, an accountant,
Richard Collie, her brother and
Wilfred 'Bill' Munnings. They
pleaded not guilty and the
magistrate adjourned the case
to December 5 allowing them
$3,000 bail each.
According to police charges
the marijuana arrived here
aboard an Air Jamaica flight on
October 25. A tip-off led to
the arrest.
Police tound the two
suitcases at Collie-Dorsett's
apartment and a revolver. She
is charged with having the
drugs on her premises and also
having ammunition. All three
are represented by Mr. Randol
Fawkes.

Recaptured: mother

tipped off police
THE THIRD of four escaped
prisoners was recaptured
Wednesday on information
supplied prison authorities by
his mother.
The Tribune learned that
20-year-old Dugal Farquharson
was taken into custody after
his mother informed prison
officials of his whereabouts.
David Albury, 22 and Victor
Storr 20, were recaptured last
week.
Still on the wanted list is
20-year-old Errol Dean, who
is considered dangerous.
MINARD TO ADDRESS
NASSAU ROTARY CLUB
SPEAKER at the Rotary
Club of Nassau's weekly
luncheon meeting at the
Sheraton British Colonial Hotel
on Tuesday, Nov. 13, will be
Clyde Minard.
Mr. Minard is district
manager of the Royal Bank of
Canada's branches in the
Bahamas, Belize and Grand
Cayman.
His topic will be 'Over 65
years of banking in the
Bahamas."


Hotel union & employers haven'


yet met, but already deadlocked

By MIKE LOTHIAN
THE HOTEL UNION AND THE HOTEL EMPLOYERS' ASSOCIATION are
.completely deadlocked over contract negotiations, without a single meeting held,
.simply because they cannot agree on what is to be negotiated.


Contusing as that may seem,
it is in fact the present
situation, lending a new twist
to industrial relations in the
Bahamas.
The Hotel and Catering
Workers' Union will not go to
the bargaining table until the
Association submits a counter-
proposal on wages, and the
Association does not want to
talk about wages at all until
agreement has been reached on
cost-increasing improvements
in working conditions.
Futher complicating the
stand-off is the fact that the
union's October 3 contract
proposal included a demand
that the 30 to 100 percent
minimum wage increases asked
for become effective on
November I eight days ago.
The union points out that
the existing two year contract,
signed on January 6, 1972,
provided that the wage
increases granted were
retroactive to November 1,
1971.
WAGE DATE
Therefore, the union argues,
the wage proposals were in
effect for two years ending
October 31. 1973. So they
want the minimum wage
increases they are demanding
now to take effect on Nov. 1,
even though the contract itself
does not expire until January.
When the Association
submitted its counter-proposal
to the union on Nov. 1, it
contained no suggestions at all
for increasing the minimum
wages, and Association
executive director Trevelyan
Copper explained in a covering
letter to the union that the
employers felt the conditions
should be negotiated first, the
additional costs of
improvements assessed, and the
wages then negotiated, taking
the cost of the improvements
into account.
MET MINISTER
On Monday this week the
union met with Labour
Minister Clifford L. Darling on
another matter and union
secretary Bobby Glinton served
verbal notice that "a dispute"
existed with the Association.
In a formal notice Mr.
Glinton wrote the Minister on
Wednesday:
"The Bahamas Hotel and
Catering Workers Union
received on Friday the
proposals from the Bahamas
Hotel Employers' Association
concerning 'conditions.' The
Association did not include the
salary section of the proposal


and suggests that the
conditions be negotiated first
and after an agreement is
reached then salaries will be
negotiated.
"The union is also unable to
reach an agreement that the
salaries should become
effective from the first pay
week in November, which
completes the two-year
agreement on salaries
'A DISPUTE'
"'The union therefore
registers a dispute under
Section 67 of the Industrial
Relations Act 1970.
"The Association, it would
seem, is again playing around
with the union," Mr. Glinton
continued, "using the new
approach of holding back the
salary section of the proposal
and paying no mind to the fact
that the (new) salaries must
become effective after the
two-year period.
"You are advised, therefore,
that the union will not
negotiate without the complete
proposal from the
Association...
FINAL WORD
"Please accept this letter as
our final communication to
you on the matters which have
been raised," Wednesday's
letter concluded,
Under the provisions of the
Act, there must be a 53-day
"cooling-off" period between
filing of a dispute and taking
legal strike action.
By their letter Wednesday
the union is apparently laying
the groundwork for legal strike
action any time after
December 30.
A copy of the letter to the
Minister was handed to Mr.
Cooper.
The Association's Mr.
Cooper promptly wrote a letter
to the Minister also dated
Wednesday arguing that "the
union has established no
grounds which would, in our
opinion, justify at this time a
dispute being registered under
the Industrial Relations Act "
NOT REFUSED
Said Mr. Cooper:
"We have not refused to
discuss the claim on wages, we
have merely suggested that we
should first discuss the terms
and conditions of employment.
for 16 aspects thereof involve
increases in payroll costs in
the same manner as would aIny
increase in pay."
In registering the dispute.
Mr. Cooper said, the union
"appear to have overlooked
two major factors.


Prosecution ask conviction in murder case


By Sidney Dorsett
THE PROSECUTION,
closing its case today against
two men charged with the
September 5 shooting death of
e nt e r t a i ier-bartender
Raymond Barry Major at
Perpall Tract last year, called
on an all-male jury to do
"justice to the accused Barry
Major and the community by
returning the only suitable
verdict" a conviction.
Solicitor General T. Langton
lilton, addressing the jury in
the case of Wendell "Red"
Burrows, 25, and Philip
"Polka" Humes, 20, charged
jointly with murder and
abetment of murder, told the
men that "one is not entitled
because of fear or personal
injury to harm or kill another
... and that is the law."
Burrows, a Freeport
bartender who claimed in his
testimony that he was forced
to shoot Major, a Bias Street
father of three, on orders from
an acquaintance Raymond
"Skull" Scavella, "may well
have been a schemer," Mr.
Hilton said.
"Burrows went to Barry
Thompson the next day after
he talked with Major and said
that Major was going to give
Wallace Whitfield a call ...
when Humes told Burrows to
shoot if Major was lying,
Burrows took this opportunity
to cover his own tracks.
"He took the gun and coldly


murdered Major.
shooting Major twice

t A4


After
... he


stepped back ... and fired the
other bullets into him.
"By Burrows recounting
how he says Scavella did it,
Burrows has provided you with
a graphic description of how he
committed the murder and he
has further let the cat out ot
the bag by saying Scavella
passed the empty gun. How
does he, a man with no
knowledge of guns know that
it was empty?" Mr. Hilton
asked.
SIT SATURDAY
The proceedings, which
continued up to shortly after I
p.m. today before the
luncheon adjournment, are
expected to end sometime
Saturday when Mr. Justice
James Smith will make his
summation of the case before
presenting it to the jury.
Heading the jury is former
Bahamas Baseball Association
president Anthony Curry who
yesterday decided against a
defence suggestion for a visit to
the scene of the murder.
In his address to the jury,
which was followed by that of
Lawrence P. J. Trenchard,
counsel for Burrows, Mr.
Hilton recounted the evidence
of his witnesses, Raymond
"Skull" Scavella. Anthon)
"Stick-a-Tone" Con)ers and
Barry Thompson.
Mr. Hilton said that Barry
Thompson, unlike Conyers and
Scavella, was not a witness to
the crime. But he termed


BURROWS 'TOOK GUN AND

COLDLY MURDERED MAJOR'


Thompson an "independent
witness" and said that he had
denied any involvement in the
Murder.
From the evidence of
Scavella, an eye-witness, the
j,.ry heard that "Ray Majom
was questioned for a while ...
upon Major's suggestion
Burrows was sent for to clear
up the matter. After Burrows
was brought to the scene by
Scavella, Major asked him wh)
he had lied on him...
"llumes, not sure who was
lying is said to have passed
Burrows the gun and ordered
him to shoot if Major had
talked," Mr. Hilton said.
Before the first shooting
took place in the presence of
Burrows, Humes, Conyers and
Scavella, he said, "Burrows
acknowledged that Major
begged not to be shot.
NO REASON
Scavella, testified that "it
seemed there was no reason
why 'Red' had to shoot Major.
Scavella said the only reason
'Red' could have been shot was
if ... he shot himself. There was
no second gun" on the scene as
the defence contends. Mr.
Hilton said.
Before going on to Conyers'
evidence, Mr. Hilton said that
questioning in the high court is


more rigid than in the lower
court and although the detence
inay point out inconsistencies
in the evidence of Scavella,
they were to remember that
"Ilumes had made a threat that
if anyone talked the would he
shot."
lIe said that ('onyers'
e evidence corroborated
Scavella's as he had also said
"when they got to the car after
t he shooting, Ilumes
threatened that what happened
to Major would happen to
them if they talked.
"Anthony Conyers supports
Scavella in saying that at
Queen Street it was Phillip
Humes who asked Major to
come into the car. Conyers'
evidence also gives some idea
of the time the shooting took
place," Mr. Hilton said stating
that it occurred around 3 p.m.
"Conyers and Scavella said
that Burrows passed Humes the
gun when they got into the car.
It is clear," Mr. Hilton said,
"that Wendell Burrows...
intentionally and unlawfully
murdered Raymond Barry
Major. Mr. Hilton also
disagreed that the two men
were beaten after their arrest
and contended that the facts
contained in the statements
were given to the police by


"Section 67 (3) of the Act
requires the union, when
reporting a matter to the
Ministry of Labour, to indicate
what action has been taken for
dea:.'g with the dispute"
under the management-union
agreement.
lie pointed out that the
relevant section of the
agreement provides that "all
matters of a general nature
affecting the Association and
the employees of its members
involving working hours, rates
of pay, rules and working
conditions shall be dealt with
by joint discussion
negotiations" between union
and management.
ASTONISHED
Mr. Cooper went on to say
that in his covering letter sent
to the union with the
Association's counter-proposal
"we invited the union
representatives to meet
members of the Association
with a view to endeavouring to
negotiate a new agreement
which would be mutually
acceptable.
"The union, much to our
astonishment, has not
responded to that invitation
but instead has, in our view,
irregularly reported the dispute
to you."
Commenting on Mr.
Cooper's letter to the Minister,
a union spokesman today said
that a union officer had this
week tentatively agreed with
Mr. Cooper to schedule the
first negotiation meeting for
Monday morning, November
12.
However, union's executive
committee subsequently voted
to refuse to negotiate until
management submitted a wage
proposal, and instructed the
officer to cancel Monday's
meeting.
PRECEDENTS
The spokesman also
maintained that there are
precedents which show that
parties to a dispute even
when the dispute arises only
through the exchange of letters
can send the matter to the
Industrial Relations Board for
a recommendation.
It is not known what action
the Ministry intends to take
over the union's registering the
dispute and the Association
challenging the legality of the
registration.
The union has scheduled a
meeting with its membership
for Sunday night to bring the
members up to date on the
dispute.


Burrows and Hum ei
themselves,
lie said that "it was
impossible for the police to
know all that was in those
statements..." I submit that no
force was used against Burrows
at all."
lie also said that if the jury
accepted the statement of
Burrows, the evidence of
Scavella and Conyers, it would
be clear that he committed the
murder with Humes'
encouragement and has come
to court to try and put forward
a defence.
Mr. Hilton said that it may
be argued that it was the shot
to the brain that was more
effective but by admission,
Burrows has acknowledged
himself an abbettor to the
murder "if Ray Scavella had in
fact fired the shot that was
fatal."
Mr. Trenchard, who is to be
succeeded by David C. Bethell,
counsel for Humes, in making
his address to the jury said,
however, that duress is a
possible defence in some cases
of murder.
The case continue


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Friday, November 9, 1973


AUSTRALIAN Actor
Peter Finch, 57, and his
Sj companion of seven years,
A Jamaican beauty Eletha
Barrett, 30, were married
today in a civil ceremony in
Rome's city hall.

ONE OF two men sought
for questioning in the slaying
of nine people in a luxury
rural home was arrested in a
hotel in Sacramento.

A JURY in Santa Cruz,
'nlif. fourd hulking Edmund
Emil Kemper, 25, guilty and
sane in the slaying of his
mother and seven other
women.

THE STATE Department
announced that the US
Embassy in Uganda is being
closed "as a result of an
accumulation of actions by
the Uganda Government
which had created conditions
making it impossible to
conduct diplomatic relations
effectively."

FUNERAL parlors and
several hospital morgues in
Kingston, Jamaica are filled
with corpses because of a
grave diggers strike for higher
pay and better working
conditions.

THE FIRST stage of a $22
million government project
calling for reopening of gold
mines in eastern Venezuela is
well advanced, the mines and
hydrocarbons ministry
reported.

AMERICAN women are so
concerned about breast
cancer that they think it
occurs much more frequently
than it actually does, a Gallup
study conducted for the
American Cancer Society has
revealed.

CARETAKERS at the
Miami seaquarium are
hand-feeding an infant albino
green sea turtle that may be
the only one of its kind ever
seen in captivity.

A BUS carrying a group of
high school students on a
holiday turned over on a
highway near San Salvador
and plunged more than 160
feet into a ravine. Nine
youths were killed and 40
other people were seriously
injured. The bus driver fled
the seen.
Reports from AP


,oASHINGTON The White
House turned down its heat
and ordered the lighting
curtailed as President Nixon
and his family personally
joined in the nationwide effort
to conserve energy.
Press secretary Ronald
Ziegler said the President does
not plan to reduce his travel,
but that his big jet will fly at
slower speeds to conserve fuel.
It is expected that Christmas
lighting at the White House
Offices, including the
President's Oval Office, were
set at 68 degrees. The
afternoon reading in Nixon's
Office, showed the
temperature at 65 degrees, a
spokesman reported.


The White House ordered its
$10,000 exterior 56,000-watt
floodlighting for nighttime
illumination of the President's.
house turned off at 10 p.m.
from now on. Lights
illuminating the two
foundations have been ordered
turned off for the winter
months.
The White House also
announced that the lighting on
all federal buildings and
monuments in the nation's
capital will be reduced 50 per
cent and that night exterior
lighting will be turned off at 10
p.m.
Normally most monuments
and buildings are illuminated
until midnight.


9


MR. HEATH


MR. THORPE


labour Rf "


take a |


pounding

MR. WILSON

at the UK polls


LONDON Prime Minister
Edward Heath's Conservatives
did better than expected in
returns today from four
elections for vacant seats in the
House of Commons. The
Liberals didn't do as well as
they hoped, and Harold
Wilson's Labour party took a
pasting.
The Conservatives held on to
two House of Commons seats
by reduced margins, but
commentators and opinion
polls predicted they would lose
another Tory seat to the
Liberals.
In what one political writer
termed a "demoralizing
setback," Labour were edged
out of a traditional Glasgow
stronghold by a Scottish
Nationalist.
Margo MacDonald, a
curvaceous, tough-talking
blonde mother or two, changed
a 11,000-vote drubbing for her
party in 1970 into a 571-vote
victory in the Govan section on
a Home Rule for Scotland
platform.
Labours share of the vote in
the districts won by the
conservatives also dropped
drastically.
A Liberal victory was
predicted in Berwick-upon
-tweed, a traditionally
Conservative seat from which
the returns were due later
today. A win here coupled
with other special election
victories in the past year,
would have put muscle in its
threat to win the balance of
power in the next general
election by keeping the two
major parties from a majority.
The partial results increased
to Heath's safe majority in the
630-seats, commons. The
conservatives held 323 seats,
Labour 287. the Liberals 10.


the Scottish Nationalist 2, and
small actions the rest. The
speaker is also a Conservative
but he has no vote.
The results:
In Hove, Conservative
Timothy Sainsbury edged out
the Liberals' Des Wilson. The
Tories' 34,287 votes in a
two-way race with Labour in
1970 was reduced to 22,070,
and their majority of 19,648
turned into a plurality of
4,846, with the combined
opposition totaling 24,096.

Some pundits said it was the
Tories, biggest jolt at the polls
since they came to power three
and half years ago.
In the north division of
Edinburgh, the Conservatives'
majority was cut more than
1,000, but the well-heeled
district still went to Alex
Fletcher by a majority of
2,741. Labour's total dropped
4,660 votes; the Liberals
increased 866.
In the grimy Govan distinct
deep in Glasgow's Clydeside
shipyards, Mrs. MacDonald
polled 6,360 to Labour's
5,789. In 1970, Labour got
13,443 and the Scottish
Nationalist only 2,294. (AP).


ISTANBUL (AP) -
Twenty-two people were killed
and 41 injured today when two
passenger buses collided
halfway between Istanbul and
Ankara.
A PROGRAMME of
intensive checks against
hoarding various commodities
and widening price controls
were announced by P. J.
Patterson, minister of
Industry and Commerce in
Jamaica.
LONDON (AP) Actress
Angela Lansbury lost jewels
and furs valued at $25,000 in a
Chelsea robbery


-Memo to-

Anne:

marriage


is tough
LONDON Free advice is
generally more plentiful than
presents for brides-to-be in
the final sprint from "yes" to
"I do."
And for independent.
minded Princess Anne the
advice is coming in from all
quarters.
Ever since the 23-year-old
Princess announced her
engagement to Capt. Mark
Phillips last June, the women
of Britain have commandeer-
ed newspaper columns, radio
shows, letter pages and even
the hallowed houses of
Parliament with do's and
don't for Wednesday, Nov.
14, her wedding day.
How does the future Mrs.
Phillips take to unsolicited
advice?
"Like a duck to water -
hot water," says one
acquaintance. "She knows
what she wants, and nobody's
going to change her mind for
her."
Many, however, have tried.
Some in an idiom ill-suited to
a royal ear.
"Marriage, vintage 1973, is a
whole different ball game
from when her mother did
it," warned a young lady
writer, brandishing her
statistics:
"The divorce rate has
doubled in 10 years. Last
year 74,000 women ended
their marriage. Your chances
of success first time continue
to be dim. Making marriage
work today is tough."
Baroness Summerskill,
Parliament member and
feminist, urged the Princess
to think twice about her
vows.
Speaking in the House of
Lords during a debate on the
exploitation of womea, Lady
Summerskill suggested the
Church of England was
compelling Anne to include
in her vows the promise to
"obey" Mark.
"As Princess Anne holds
the rank of colonel, can a
captain command her to
obey? Lady Summerskill
asked. "Does this not
constitute a threat to
discipline at Sandhurst?"
The Archbishop of
Canterbury later issued a
statement denying coercion.
Anne, he said, had not chosen
to omit the vow of
obedience.
Said a supporter of the
Women's Liberation
Movement: "I don't see him
chaining her to the kitchen
sink. But if she wants to be a
sex stereotype, that's up to
her." (AP).


Judge sends Watergate


to jail


Miami real estate man who
recruited three Central
Intelligence Agency associates
for the Watergate break-in,
received the longer sentence of
1' to 6 years.
The three others, Eugenio R.
Martinez, Frank A. Sturgis and
Virgilio R. Gonzalez, received
sentences of from one to four
years, which U.S. District
Court Judge John J. Sirica said
was "the lowest minimum" he


WASHINGTON Three of
the Watergate conspirators
were today sentenced to terms
of one of four years, making
them eligible for parole in a
few weeks.
But a fourth conspirator was
sentenced to a period of at
least 18 months, meaning he
will have to serve another six
months before applying for
parole.
Bernard L. Barker, the


could give under the
circumstances.
Prior to sentencing a
government prosecutor
recommended leniency, saying
that the men participated in
the break-in out of a sense of
misguided patriotism.
The four men already have
served more than 11 months in
prison.
The arrests were in
connection with the June 17,
1972 break-in at Democratic
headquarters.
James W. McCord Jr., the
first of the Watergate
conspirators to break a veil of a
silence in the scandal, was
sentenced to serve one to
five years with the sentences
on eight counts to run
concurrently
McCord, 53, was convicted
on eight counts of conspiracy,
burglary, possession of wiretap
equipment and bugging.
Hunt, 54, pleaded guilty to
six counts. He was not charged
with possession of bugging
equipment.
The four other men pleaded
guilty to seven counts similar
to McCord's but not including
interception of wire
communications.
The conspiracy count
carried a maximum sentence of
five years, two counts of
burglary could have resulted in
two to 15 years, two counts of
trying to intercept oral
telephone communications
carried a maximum five years
each, two counts of possessing
intercepting devices for oral
and wire communications also
carried a maximum of five
years and actual interception
of wire communications had a
five-year maximum.
All but the burglary counts
could have resulted in fines of
$10,000. (AP).

Bomb scare

PARIS Israeli Foreign
Minister Abba Eban flew to
New York today aboard an El
Al plane that was delayed for
an hour by a false bomb alert.
An anonymous telephone
caller told police at Orly
airport that bombs were
aboard El Al planes leaving at
approximately the same time
for New York and Tel Aviv.
Nothing was found.

Dollar up
LONDON The U.S. dollar
improved strongly in foreign
exchanges today at the end of
a week that has seen it rise to
its highest point since June.
The oil cuts were expected to
hit American industry less than
European. (AP)
Mighty monkey
LAREDO, A monkey
survived a 12,000-volt charge
of electricity after escaping its
cage and scampering up a
power pole. (AP).


Israel and



Egypt



agree step



to peace


WASHINGTON The U.S.
Government said today Israel
and Egypt have accepted a
six-point agreement paving the
way for a permanent
settlement in the wartorn
Middle East.
White House officials
released the text of a letter
from Secretary of State Henry
Kissinger to U.N. Secretary
General Kurt Waldheim, listing
the six points and saying
representatives of the two
countries would meet
tomorrow to sign the
agreement.
The six points do not
include a reported Egyptian
concession lifting the blockade
of the Bab El Mandeb straits
on the southern entrance to
the Red Sea.
This was included in the text
of the agreement disclosed by
U.S. officials yesterday as
Kissinger wound up his
whirlwind tour of five Arab
countries.
U.S. Ambassador John Scali
gave details to Waldheim of the
peace plan.
Scali told newsmen outside
U.N. headquarters he was
taking Waldheim "good news"
in the form of a letter from
Kissenger to the
Secretary-General.
The Ambassador did not
disclose details of the plan but
described it as "a very
important first step" toward
peace in the Middle East.
The text of the agreement,
as given in Kissinger's letter to
Waldheim, included these
points:
"Egypt and Israel agree to
observe scrupulously the


ceasefire called for by the U.N.
Security Council.
"Both sides agree that
discussions between them will
begin immediately to settle the
question of the return to the
Oct. 22 positions in the
framework of agreement on
the disengagement and
separation of forces under the
auspices of the United Nations.
"The town of Suez will
receive daily supplies of food,
water and medicine. All
wounded civilians in the town
of Suez will be evacuated.
"There shall be no
impediment to the movement
of nonmilitary supplies to the
east bank.
"The Israeli checkpoints
on the Cairo-Suez road will be
replaced by U.N. checkpoints.
At the Suez end of the road
Israeli officers can participate
with the U.N. to supervise the
nonmilitary nature of the cargo
at the bank of the canal.
"As soon as the U.N.
checkpoints are established on
the Cairo-Suez road, there will
be an exchange of all POWs,
including wounded."
Kissinger, who helped work
out the agreement during the
last two weeks in talks with
Egyptians and Israeli leaders,
said the two countries had
agreed to sign the pact at a
meeting on the Suez-Cairo road
under UN auspices on
Saturday.
Kissinger's aides had told
reporters travelling with him
that the new agreement would
open the way to full scale
peace negotiations by the end
of the year. (AP).


Businessmen get guns in country of fear


MEXICO CITY The
Mexican Attorney General
admitted some private
citizens, especially wealthy
businessmen, are arming
themselves for fear of
being kidnapped but
offered Government
protection and the law as
guarantees for security.
Attorney General Pedro
Paulada's statements came
only a few hours after a
truck loaded with guns
allegedly destined for
smuggling into Mexico was
intercepted in California.
"It is not through


self-defence on ;,e part of
private citizens that crime
can be stopped but
through the law, "Ojeda
Paullada said in a news
conference following a
meeting with President
Luis Echeverria.
"Violence is not a
formula to resolve the
problems in a country like
Mexico ... only strict
observance of the law can
guarantee life in our
society," he added.
''The Mexican
government's position of
not negotiating with


criminals is the only
guarantee against this kind
of crimes kidnappingg)
and to prevent their
proliferation," he said.
That position was
established last month
when British honorary
Counsul in Guadalajara
Anthony Duncan Williams
and Guadalajara
industrialist Fernando
Aranguren were
kidnapped on the same
day.
Williams was freed
unharmed but Aranguren
was found dead.


conspirators


Athens
owe
Paris
London
Berlin
Amsterdam
Brussels
Madrid
Moscow
Stockholm
New York
San Francisco
Los Angeles
Chicago
Miami
Tokyo
Hong Kong
Montreal
Honolulu
Toronto
Rio
Lisbon
Tehran


Max
cloudy
61 sunny
57 cloudy
59 overcast
55 overcast
57 overcast
46 overcast
59 clear
34 cloudy
54sunny
52 clear
66 cloudy
73 clear
39 cloudy
81 cloudy
67 cloudy
80 sunny
45 cloudy
88 cloudy
46 cloudy
84 clear
64 clear
64 cloudy


I I'd
x te t mu tot^


Bank bandit gunned down


ATLANTA Police shut
and killed a young armed
bandit last night after the
victim had held four female
bank employees hostage four
hours.

The women were upset but
unharmed, officials said.
The man, who was not
immediately identified, was
shot down in a fusillade of
rifle, shotgun and small-arms


fire near a drive-in teller's
window as he left the First
National Bank of Atlanta
branch building.
He was about 25 feet
outside the one-storey frame
building when he was gunned
down.
During the seizure, an
unidentified FBI spokesman
had broadcast over an Atlanta
radio station an offer of safe
passage for the man.
The broadcast, which


officials said they determined
was being heard by the
gunman, had said he would be
allowed to "get out the bank
with the money provided you
leave the hostages behind."
Police had negotiated with
him since about 4:30 p.m.,
when he entered the small
branch about a mile from the
central business district and
demanded $200,000 cash.
(AP).


When it comes to insurance

it's Dominion for Life


... in Nassau

call Nello Coerbell 2-3843

---


,, ~_JL__ __. _-~- -_ _.___ __._.__-___._ _._,_____.__L _~, ~~__ _______ __ I


-AUDEN:

BURN.

ALL MY

LETTERS
LONDON W. H. Auden,
considered one of the greatest
poets of the century, has asked
his friends in his will to burn
all the letters he wrote to
them, according to passages of
the document published in The
Times of London's literary
supplement today.
Stephen Spender, probably
the wrinkle-faced poet's oldest
friend, explained: "Part of the
reason for this is that he did
not want his biography to be
written.
"The request is part of the
operation to make it extremely
difficult to write his
biography."
Spender said that Auden,
who died in Vienna Sept. 29
aged 66, always felt the only
important thing to a writer was
his writings and his private life
was of no interest.
However, Spender added
Auden's request from the grave
was rather superfluous.
"Auden was in no way a
letter writer," he noted. 'The
average letter was about two
lines."
Poet and critic Geoffrey
Grigson, a friend of Auden's
since his days at Oxford
University, said: "I have a large
collection, but if he says they
should be burnt I shall burn
them."
However, The Times noted
that with the growing value of
literary memorabilia some of
the persons who received
letters from Auden may ignore
his request.
Some were expected to
eventually end up in the
archives of Faber and Faber,
Auden's London publishers.
Director Charles Monteith said:
"Any personal communication
from Auden was purely verbal
and never entered in a letter.
But the firm received a number
of letters from Auden and we
shall have to decide what to do
with them." (AP).

I--------


Nixon gives a


not-so-bright lead


IDEAL DEPT.


STORES LTD.



MOVED

TO BIGGER PREMISES

OPPOSITE CITY MARKET'S

ROSETTA STREET WEST OF

G. R. SWEETING & SON STORE.



11OV IOllBE t S ERVE YVO

MIKINI FACILUlS mIAVAILLE

PHONE 2.3819


i


hi


-


- "e ~ -- -e


m












Friday, November 9, 1973


(ght ilribune


NurL us Amicrus JURARE IN VERBA MAGIsTRI
Being Bound To Swear To The LDgmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903. 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G.,D.Litt., LL.D.
Publisher/Editor 1917-1972
Contributing Editor 1972 .
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON.M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
PubUisher/Editor 1972.

EDITORIAL

'English as she is spoke'



By ETIENNE DUPUCH
I MET an American woman casually the other day who had
visited Marsh Harbour, Abaco shortly after the independence
celebrations. She was visiting a fainily who had bought a house in
that settlement.
She told me that she loved the island ... she loved the people.
She was offered a place next to her friend's property ... she was
tempted ... but she didn't buy because the record of the Pindling
government made her feel doubtful about the future of the
Bahamas.
A great deal of interest was aroused in this area when the
prospect of Abaco being separated from the Bahamas seemed
good.
Several people have spoken with me about their intention to
invest in Abaco had the separation been effected. Since then they
have backed away.
I have no doubt that some home makers will go into Abaco
with small investments but I believe that Abaco might have
replaced the Caymans as a substitute for the Bahamas, had the
change been made.
I believe that this is what both the P.L.P. and F.N.M. feared
when they talked about "fragmenting" the nation. They knew
that Abaco would thrive like a lily in spring and so they fought to
keep her tied to the sinking ship.

The American woman with whom I spoke was fascinated by
the language peculiarities of the Abaco people who, like the
people of Harbour Island, drop their "h's" where they are needed
and add them where they are not. Like Marsh 'Arbour, (H)
Abaco. for example.
This is a form of speech brought to the islands by the Early
Settlers in the 1600's and later by the Loyalists who came over
from the Southern United States at the time of the American War
for Independence.
The IHarbour Islanders, for example, say 'Arbour (H) Island.
There is nothing wrong with this form of speech. It must be
good English because they have inherited it from their English
ancestors. And it is still used in some parts of England today.

There a.e corruptions of the language of course, when people
spell words as they speak.
A Bahamian friend of mine told me he was recently driving
through a section of Miami that is settled largely by Bahamians
when he saw a restaurant.
In front of the restaurant was a display card listing the
different kinds of food offered at this place.
One of the items listed was BOLL FISH. He had never heard of
Boll Fish and so he went inside and asked for information.
He found out that this was meant to be BOILED FISH.
I don't suppose it makes any difference in the pronunciation
or spelling of a word so long as the people with whom you are
communicating get the message.

There is a lot of interesting if alarming news coming out of
Nassau these days.
It is the kind of news that makes one feel that everything in
the Bahamas is more topsy-turvy and upside down than ever.
It's kind-a bad when some people are not sure where they
were born ... or, perhaps, even how they were born.
It's kind-a rotten when some of the new freedom leaders can
be accused of harbouring slave labour.
It's kind-a shocking when some people seem able to ignore the
Prices Control regulations.
It's kind-a questionable when no one seems to know what will
be done about a man who collected money on a contract and
then fell down on the job.
Boy, I told you that you were leaving freedom behind on July
10th. What you are now sweating under is glorious independence!
As I said in a recent article, the F.N.M. did the country a
favour when they booted four men out of the party for refusing
to follow restrictive party lines that were highly distasteful to
them.
Now they are free, they will be able to rake the muck made by
some government Ministers and their henchmen.
************


One of the things that should give the Bahamian people cause
for serious pause is the government's venture into aviation.
Already the news about this new enterprise is not good.
I could be wrong ... indeed, I hope I am wrong ... but I feel
sure this enterprise is going to bleed the Treasury white.
It is really stupid of a government to venture into an
enterprise, merely as a status symbol, when they have no
experience to guide them. And especially at a time when most of
the major airlines are in a serious financial condition.
Several of the largest and most experienced airlines in the
world have been so near bankruptcy during the last fev, years that
they have been obliged to cut their overhead operating expenses
drastically
* ** ** ** * *
There has been a falling off of air travel to the Bahamas in
recent months. This is serious because air travellers are usually the
people who have money to spend. Cruise ship passengers are
usually people with limited incomes who are on an all-expente
tour.
Because of this condition I have heard from the underground
at the airport in Miami that one of the major airlines operating
between Miami and Nassau may cancel their flights in the
interests of economy.
I am told that short flights are difficult to make profitable
unless the company can be assured of heavy bookings both ways
on every flight.
I hope this isn't true because the psychological impact of
such a piece of news would be bad on the minds of the travelling
public.

And now for a bit of humour.
I told ).ou the other day how a little dog my wife had planted
on me in my apartment keeps me busy all day often until
midnight tripping up and down the elevator to take him to the
dog's relief station on the lawn.
Believe it or not, he dragged me out of bed at 4.30 the other
morning and I dared not resist because one can never tell how
"short" the call might be.
Other residents in this hotel have dogs butthey seem to
manage better than I do. It is clear that even this simpleToob
requires experience and I suppose, because I have not been a wet
nurse to a dog before, I don't know how to handle the job.
It was provoking because he didn't want to do a thing but
smell around in the grass and sniff the fresh early morning air.
S* ****


AN EXPATRIATE VIEW


EDITOR, The Tnbune
A short while -'o I had no
intention of pi icing this
article, but I ia-ve been
detained here since the expire
of my contract by illness and
other circumstances not
entirely under my control. I
might add that although a
former B.U.T. member this
article is quite my own idea.
Teaching here has been d
unique experience and I am all
the richer for it in more ways
than one. Naturally like all
such view points my
conclusions are largely based
on subjective experiences
which are only partial to say
the least.
However, I believe that some
broad assumptions may be
made.
Firstly, on the whole the
girls seemed more responsive
and diligent than the boys;
invariably it was the girls who
would stay after school for
extra voluntary work. Perhaps
this is because the Bahamas is
still largely a matriarchal
society, but as the male is
normally the breadwinner it is
a serious factor nevertheless.
Soon after I arrived in
January 1970 I was much
surprised to find how
un-Bahamian much of the
curriculum was and still is and
should have thought that more
local topics could have been
introduced as far back as the
turn of the century; books on
indigenous flora and fauna and
local customs; etc. Surely such
things have little to do with the
current political independence.
In 1970 1 was also most
surprised to find there was no
Atlas of the Bahamas. They
were shown as a few dots on
the map north of the
Caribbean. I brought this
matter to the notice ot a
meeting of inspectors and
teachers in South Andros in
the Autumn of 1970 and also
mentioned the lack of English
text books about the Bahamas.
It is all very well to learn about


London .nd their similar
cities, and no one wants undue
pdlochJahsini, but surely the
children aith their limited
e pcriencL should learn
something about their in
island first
There is noA ., good Atljs -1i
the Bahaiims .and I IkCe to
believe rthit I niua hI\e
contributed just a hiliL to it
product ion.
Subjers such as Music and
Art although international in
scope, obviously lend
themselves to some
Bahamianization and English
can have a Bahamian idiom at
times in both poetry and prose,
but as the B.U.T. rightly says
there is much to be done in the
basics rather than the frills.
There seems to be an especial
weakness in the tuir -i .
Arithmetic, which form the
basics of Mathematics ; d
Mathematics in turn is an
integral part of science. One
can sometimes see evidence of
this Arithmetical weakness
when receiving change in the
shops.
However, unlike the Arts,
Mathematics and Science deal
with hard facts and observe i
phenomena and cannot be
given much national idiom.
Reading and comprehension
is also weak in many cases and
I still wonder what is being
done in the lower grades of
school. If a child cannot read
effectively progress in all
departments of learning will be
slow indeed.
Every tew months eminent
people at dinners or
conferences say a good deal
about a future education to
suit the needs of the children,
but comparatively little
appears to be done. The gap
between words and deeds
sometimes seems to be in
inverse proportion.
Any real progress in school
depends on regular attendance
and here there appears to be
the most serious problem, at


leiat in Njsaa On Marngr-..e
Ca\. ian d I cxpecs t on other
I l' inoli IslaIn there vias. an
ell I.. I-nt proc,-dlrl, fo.ir IdealiLng
Sith .ibsenrees ThLi hii dt..ajher
S ni ined r. ,'I i i I i le .' is

l', i i 'll l t i|l l l .1 1. 1I
I T it Ii 1
S r ,:.'. 1 n .-. 1 II1
S j .1. -i happ n.' l .n l
In Nassau, on the other
hand. nothing :pears to be
done. If there are any truant
officers they are singularly
in.i ..ti. i The children come
or don't come to school as
they please and I have noticed
that it is the most backward
children who re invariably the
wocst ll t.. ir- and thus a
vSiou'-, circle is created.
everr the quality or
oiient of the teaching this
iuich is certain r .thing can
he achieved if the children
aren't there. Only the other
: -. 11;M- I spoke to a youngster
selling newspapers outside a
Nais\au tood store. When asked
iwy he wasn't in school he
replied that it was too late to
go,> There had been some rain
previously, hut the time was
only a little after 10 a.m.
In teaching it is nost
necessary to establish a rapport
with the children and with
their parents. This, I believe,
particularly applies to
expatriates.
Teaching is far more than
pickii,, someone's brains, but


i [ii -di '., prices At first
thli Ic : mne tio ilt the homes
tI lli. (1t in11 more
rii.,bole o.n. pupls and later I
i trlende. this t, include the
ti ic-. ..i so'. f the morec

I tri] an.' ,r th ie.-and-hdlft
c.j r I lea hnlung in the
SUN llldan I mhut hae \ illedl
,11 ,,ie.1r a hundred home aind
have had much appreciation
from parents. Nearly all my
Nassau parents lived 'over the
hill' and I have only received
gratitude, never any hostility
and occasional gifts which have
sometimes been embarrassing.
Probably I have received more
genineu parental appreciation
here than itr my own country.
Obviously much
I,. pL rr.hiill; must necessarily
devolve on individual
headteachers and their starts,
but it is the Ministry which
must be responsible for the
overall direction and running
of education: here there
appears to be considerable
confusion and no clear chain of
command. I have had much
help and kindness from
individual administrators, but
from others one encounters
only :.'-iilIi\, bad manners
and obstruction. Perhaps this
attitude stems from a deep
inner sense of personal
insecurity.
It niay well be that
administrators are like
violinists or teachers to some
__ I II t t


EDITOR, The Tribune,
Please publish this letter in
your newspaper, commenting
on the article in your
publication of Nov. 7, 1973.
It stated that "School
children from Rock Sound
protest firing of their
Headmaster. "
(1) I wonder, which
student of the 250 was capable
of drafting such a letter to the
Prime Minister and Minister of
Education and Culture.
(2) Who organised the
demonstration, by telling the
children to stay home; so it can
be said that they are
protesting?
(3) -- Knowing the children
of South Eleuthera they are
not "gravely concerned," nor
care about Peter Fox's
embarrassment. His other
expatriate friends in Rock
Sound are concerned, and
naturally are not 100% for
Bahamianization. That leaves
room for them to slip in and
gather the cream of the crop,
and then say farewell to us
slow and backward people.
(4) The limited I.Q's of
the children in the South:
would not allow their minds to
study the structure of the
Ministry's policies, or criticize
the educational system in our
country.
Only the Ministry is in the
position to comment on the
headteacher's calibre and
records', and would know what
he has done over the years; and


extent the) ari born not
in a de As an. good
a.'iT.nistrator well knows.
adrrnistration entails far more
than sitting behind a desk,
issuing orderir and trying to
look important But unlike
violin playing or even teaching.
administration must necessarily
be j somewhat thankless task.
The re is little praise ,r
recognition whir n things ar,
running smiOlihl hut onl.
larne whin the., gi. wrong. I
think it might he well it
administrators kept in mind
the advice "iven in St.
Matthew, Chapter 18, verses
one to four.
AS Mr. Cvril Curling said in
his presidential address to the
B.U.T. and incidentally I have
happy memories of Mr. Curling
as my first Bahamian
Headteacher, many of the


U,
I II~ I II = [_ . .
II I II III


duties performed hy numerous
people at the Ministry of
Education could be handled
with greater efficiency and
with less cost to the
government by individual
headteachers.
I am convinced that some of
the personnel at the Ministry
of Education would be far
happier doing skilled or even
unskilled manual jobs. There is
nothing degrading in this, as
they include vital social
functions for any nation -
young or old. There was a case
in London a few years ago of a
teacher giving up his job to
become a garbage collector. He
was a married man with a
family and was able to earn
considerably more in his new
occupation. Whether this
change of vocation benefited
Page 5, Col. 5


ENDS
NOV. 10th

ON


ORIGINAL OIL PAINTINGS


20% OFF
MAKING ROOM FOR NEW STOCK


NASSAU GLASS CO. LTD.

MACKEY STREET PHONE: 2-2723/2-8165


IS HAVING A BiiE CROSS DAY!
All goods marked with a BLUE CROSS
are half the last marked price. For example
if a suit was $100 originally and reduced
to $50, if it has a BLUE CROSS on the
ticket, it is now $25. There will be
Blue Crosses on ladies and men's wear.


Sa, Nov.10 -1973


BAY STREET EXTRA SPECIAL:

MEN'S SHOES We
........'*


now realise, like the rest of us.
that he has served his
'usefulness'.
He got a little too big for his
breeches, and instead of
continuing to follow rules and
regulations laid down by the
Ministry; he tried to dictate
and do his own thing.
(5) As for being "a leader"
in the South for 10 years
that's a joke!
What has he done for, or
knows about Green (astli
Whymss Bight. Water Ford,
Deep Creek or Bannerman
Town? NOTHING.
He was just stuck in little
old Rock Sound, which does
not represent the South of
Eleuthera at all.
Dismissing the headteacher
was like bursting the boil, that
would not come to a head: but
just sit there irritating the
carrier.
Dear Children:
Your head is an Englishman
England was over anxious to
get rid of us. The work that he
did was not 'charity'. lie was
well paid. So let us move
Forward, Onward, Upward.
Together; now that we are
INDFPFND-t \T,
Your Ministry knows
more than you and exactly
what it is doing. All for tht
good of you and your country
A voter and Commoner ot
the Rock Sound Constituency.
VAN. PYFROM OLDHAM
Rock Sound,
Eleuthera
Nov. 8, 1973.


I get relief from this chore occasionally.
A friend who takes care of the dog when we go abroad is very
fond of the little critter. When he visits me at my apartment he
likes to take the dog for a walk.
My apartment is on the sixth floor of the hotel.
During a recent visit to the apartment, while my wife was with
me for the weekend, my friend took Baron for a
walk. Suddenly we heard a painful yelp from the lawn below. It
was Baron's voice. He had been hurt.
Later our friend explained what had happened.
Spaced across the lawn are electrical outlets for plugging in
lights for outside parties.
Baron takes delight in sprinkling these electrical outlets But
this time, when he cocked up his back leg ... he was hit ... Barn'
Right on his twin cities.
It had rained and the grass and the electrical outlet were wet.
and it carried a shock because the plug had been damaged and a
raw wire was exposed.
This may be the way to do it because this time ... Baron did his
business.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
I stood tip-toe upon a little hill
And then there crept
A little noiseless noise among the leaves
Born of the very sigh that silence heaves. KEATS


re $7.00


nSow 99


I


gh' rtbunep


Some reflections on teaching in Bahamas


SAYS ROCK SOUND

HEADMASTER SERVED

HIS 'USEFULNESS'


I


- --~~ --rl 1


AW


r


n f i rQ, r L. --.
U W a Ivu










Ehe Qribtmnt


Friday, November 9, 1973


IMOe
M^ j~W


Widow's computer dates

leave her still lonely
DEAR ABBY: If you use my letter, please don't use
my name. I already fe like a first class fool. I am a 58-
year-old widow who signed up with a computer dating
service four months ago.
I was interviewed in person and said I liked classical
music and theater, and only wanted a presentable escort. I
paid them $598, and they guaranteed me two dates a month
with a man supposedly selected by computer whose inter-
ests would match mine.
None of the characters they came up with were even
presentable. All impressed me as men who were looking for
a meal ticket. Some were insulting.
After four months without one suitable date, I asked
this company for a $200 refund. They turned me down. I
saw my lawyer, who said I was an idiot for having gone for
a deal like this in the first place.
I could sue them, but I don't want to publicize my
foolishness. I ask you, are all these mating and dating
services just out to take people? And where does a respect-
able woman go to meet a decent man? BEEN HAD
DEAR BEEN: I've had both bad and good reports on
computer dating and mating services. [Mostly bad, which
is not surprisaig slce people write to me about their bad
breaks-not their pod.] I agree with your lawyer. Respect-
able women meet decent men thru mutual friends, or in
decent places like volunteer organizations, church groups,
and adult education classes.
DEAR ABBY: I am 17 years old and am still a virgin.
This guy I'll call Randy asked me to go all the way with
him. I told him I was saving myself for marriage, and he
said I was foolish because no guy wants a virgin anymore.
Is that true?
Randy signed up for the Navy for four years and he is
leaving soon. Do you think a girl should get that serious
with a guy before he goes into the Navy? He probably just
wants somebody to write to, but I am afraid to get involved
with him knowing he'll be tied up with the Navy for so
long.
Please tell me what to do as I am all mixed up.
IN DOUBT
DEAR IN DOUBT: Slow up, young lady, or you will be
in TROUBLE. Plenty of guys want their brides to be vir-
gins so don't let Randy sell you a bill of goods. He sounds
like an immature, Irresponsible kid you would do well to
stay away from.
DEAR ABBY: I have a very complicated problem. I
am getting married to a fellow named Peter Johnson.
My parents are divorced and my father, whose name is
James Von, is paying for my wedding. [He has not remar-
ried.]
My.mother married two years ago to Paul Johnson,
who is Peter's father. Peter's mother has not remarried.
After talking to two wedding consultants, I was advised
to word my wedding invitations this way:
"Mrs. Paul Johnson and Mr. James Von invite you
to join with them in celebrating the marriage of
their daughter Miss Susan Von to Mr. Peter John-
son."
That is the way I had them engraved. Now Peter's
mother is saying that SHE is Mrs. Paul Johnson, and if the
invitations are sent out as they are now engraved, she will
not attend our wedding-nor will anyone from her side
come.
Any help you can give me will be deeply appreciated.
SUSAN VON
DEAR SUSAN: Peter's mother is wrong. Her name is
now "Mrs. [Maiden Name] Johnson"-and your mother s
Mrs. Paul Johnson. It's as simple as that. And if you can't
convince her and she refuses to attend your wedding, tell
her you'll miss her.
Problems? You'll feel better if yea get it off your chest
For a personal reply, write to ABBY: Box No. 9700, L. A.,
Calif. M6. Enclose stamped, self-addressed envelope,
please.
For Abby's new booklet "What Teen-Ager Want to
Kew," send t to AMgall Van Barem, 1U Lasky Dr., Bev-
eiy .s., CaL U.IL

-Ii-f;lf~


... IT ALL ADDS UP


your reusable but unwanted


items of


clothing, tools,
appliances, clocks,
fans, tc... clear out


your close, garage, storeroom...
all can be of help


to someone else.
Donate them to


ROStMA ST REET
,TWO noO8 WEST OF
MONTNOSE AVE


FNM leader charges PLP discrimination against 40 percent


By NICK KELLY
GOVERNMENTS VICTIMIZATION of and discrimination
against 40 percent of the population was one of the principal
reasons the economy was stagnating, Opposition FNM Leader
Kendal Isaacs declared in the House Wednesday.


Debating the Throne
Speech, Mr. Isaacs said the
government had been
promising to revitalise the
economy for years, but it
seems that those responsible
either did not understand
economics or had other
priorities that had nothing to
do with the economy.
Rather than 10,000 jobs
available, as had been stated by
the government, Mr. Isaacs
thought it might be truer to
say that there were 10,000
people unemployed.
"I am convinced, the trade
unions and the country as a
whole are convinced that there
is a large degree of
unemployment in the country
and try as they may these
people cannot find jobs, and if
the jobs exist they are in a
category Bahamians are just


not qualified to fill."
Another reason for the
government's failure, Mr. Isaacs
said, was its policy of
discrimination against those
who were not members of the
PLP.
DEPRESSING
Such victimization could
have a depressing effect on the
country, he pointed out. "If an
investor feels the government is
discriminating against anyone
who will not bow to its will,
that investor can be reluctant
to invest."
The Opposition Leader said
the country could hardly be
expected to "fire on all
cylinders" if the government
was only encouraging 60 per
cent of the people of the
country.
He challenged the
government to deny that


among the discriminated 40
percent were people of high
skill and expertise.
OTHER POINTS
Touching on other points in
the Throne Speech, Mr. Isaacs
referred to:
The allocation of land
resources "I would have
thought that after six years the
government would have had
concrete plans on this. but
there has only been talk and
not action.
The people as the most
precious natural wealth "The
government regards 60 percent
of the people as their most
precious wealth. I think the
evidence would bear out that
the country is being governed
on their behalf and the rest are
just scraping."
The campaign against
alcoholism drug abuse "It is
not sufficient to prosecute or
imprison. A lot of work has to
be done by example and by
giving the people some
direction to follow.
"If there is this despair and
degree of unemployment then


we are going to find the
workers resorting to some
sort of crutch to survive.
They will resort to drugs and
alcohol."
The unfinished Yellow
Elder subdivision "If nothing
is done about this it will be a
monument to the ineptitude


of Bahamians


and inefficiency of this
government."
The Bahamas as a financial
centre and tax haven "The


government's record over the
last few years ... and if it
continues to act along those
Page 8 Col. 1


ALMOST.
SAN ANDRVS BOWS TO NASSAU!
AND YOUR MANY REQUESTS TO EXTEND
OUR LOW DOWN PAYMENT OFFER
NOVEMBER 24, 1973 IS THE NEW DEADLINE
(But that's it! the next day the down payment increases to $150.)



$3 DOWN
FOR A SPACIOUS HOMESITE
TOTAL CASH PRICE JUST$2995
EASY TE~MMS $35 A MONTH!
(That's only $8.75 per week. including low 7% interest)
NOW WITH A SMALL CASH OUTLAY YOU CAN
FOLLOW THE LEAD OF PROFESSIONAL
REAL ESTATE INVESTORS.
HERE'S WHAT THEY LOOK FOR:
1. PLACE. Location is the key tosuccessful land investment it
determines value and future worth. Today the trend is to the Family
Islands ... to unspoiled, unpolluted, uncongested aras... to a GET-
A-WAY RETREAT... to San Andros!
2. PRICE. In real estate, small dollars can control a valuable
homesite worth many times your cash outlay. To do this, you must buy at
"early bird" prices with minimum dollars for maximum return.
Right now, on San Andros you canl
3. POTENTIAL. Determine where people want to go ... get there
first... buy land ... and wait. As people arrive, profits do tool People
are going to San Andros a place for lovers and wise investors tool
INVEST...VACATION ON YOUR OWN LAND...OR LIVE YEAR
ROUND AT SAN ANDROS...THE DEVELOPMENT THAT'S DOUBLY
BLESSED-AN ALLURING GET-AWAY HAVEN, YET ONLY
15 MINUTES BY AIR FROM NASSAUI
CALL RIGHT NOWI or see Frank Cerey Real Estate Ltd
Berkley Ferguson Real Estate 2-7667 or 2-4815 Bay and Deveaux Streets.
Principal Broker, 2-1238 or 2 4913 Maxwell Woodlsde Real Estate 3.5632
Berwin House on Frederick St. Corner of Bias St. & Blue ill Road


McDeigan & Associates Ltd. 2.4284
Bernerd.Sunley Building on Bay Street
Morley & O'Brien Real Estate
2 2794 Harris Building on Shirley Street
Braynen & Knowles Real Estate 2-16
Sheraton-British Colonial Hotel Arcade
0AW Aunnildle ile cna i nucoe~


Ty Sounders Real Estate Ltd. 7.7162
2nd Floor, Bernard Sunley Building
Grosham Property Ltd. 27662 or 28966
107 Shirley Street.
Cosmopolitan Realty. King's Court
Phone 57477 or 57478,


SAN ANDR VS I5 FOR LOVERS... Dayson Real Estate Company Ltd.
2.1178, (upstairs) Bay & East Streets.
AND WISE INVESTORS, TOO.


I.


HOTEL and RESTAURANT
NASSAU IN THE BAHAMAS
WISHES TO ANNOUNCE THAT THEY WILL RE-OPEN FOR THE
SEASON ON FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9th, 1973 at 7 p.m.

For Reservations Phone 2-2811, 2-2812 52-4039


I g Ilr I


- -


I ___ ____~~


OC.


I






































































i


TWO
representatives
efforts to disco'
of the govern
involvement
Bahamasair
Questions ta
House Wednes
Michael
(Ind.-Clarence 1
Cyril Tynes(






PS

Sailin
London and

THE PACIF
NAVIGA1

d


ORCOMA
ORTEGA








P.O. B3
Ph. 352 96


ienrs iinancal Island) want to know:
in making The total funds paid out,
operational. invested or guaranteed by
bled in the government over a five-year
day by Mr. period.
Lightbourn Whether Bahamas
Town) and Mr. Commonwealth Bank or arty of
(FNM-Crooked its assoicated companies made
loans to government to
J i f bankroll Bahamasair.
Percentage of shares held by
government.
The total amount owed
government by Flamingo
Airlines in landing and parking
!^ Brights.
Why Flamingo was not part
Ig ex- of the Bahamasair merger.
Liverpool by

IC STEAM -
TION CO.

lue Freeport P.O. BOX N1108

NOTICE TO
12th. Dec.
30th Jan. SAVINGS ASSURE

ANCHOR UNI'


0 AS OF NOVE
OFFERED PR
BID PRICE ...
9YIELD ..........
SFr ort2492
91- Freeport


[ihp flrhihimt


Fiuy, imvemooerv, iia


QUESTIONS TABLED ON BAHAMASAIR


PRANCE COaTL

PHONE 5-5521


H O US
have initiated
ver the extent
,- . .


HOLDERS OF
MNCE PLAN POLICIES:

T TRUST PRICES


"MBER 7th. 1973
RICE .............$1.30
..................... $ 1.22
................... 1.57%


& GOVT. INVOLVEMENT


Commissioner, but


"K" LINE

KAWASAKI KISEN KAISHA LTD.



Direct service to Nassau from Japan,
and other Pacific Ports with transhipment:


due Nassau


"FRANCE MARU" 1st. DECEMBER






E.H. MUNDY &CO. (NASSAU) LTD.

Phone 2-4511, P.O. Box N-1893, Nassau, Cable: Mundico


nothing


Anticipated revenue from
Bahamasair over the first five
years.
In other questions Mr.
Tynes has asked Aviation
Minister Clement Maynard to
table a list of all air routes into
foreign countries approved for
Bahamian carriers, showing the
carriers designated by the
Bahamas government to take
up these routes.
He also wants to know what
routes are presently being
negotiated for flights into and
out of the Bahamas, or which
routes government plans to
negotiate in the near future.


KENNETH SEEMING NOW

MACKEY SALES MANAGER
KENNETH LEEMING, former Bahamas consul for Mexico, hb


From Page 3
the community in general I am
not in a position to say.
There appears to be much
unnecessary paper work
emanating from the Ministry
and perhaps this is one of the
reasons why one is so often
kept waiting weeks for a reply
to an enquiry. Some of the
memoranda issued is quite
irrelevant to particular
circumstances. I well remember
in the Autumn of 1971 we
received a pamphlet at a school
on Mangrove Cay giving details
of a course in 'A' level
Economics. I wonder who was
expected to teach A Level
Economics there and am still
to be convinced that Mangrove
Cay needs such a course
anyway.
School building is another
problem. On the one hand
there are a few luxury
carpeted, windowless,
ari-conditioned schools very
suitable for anywhere north of
the Arctic Circle and on the
other the example of Swains'
School, Mangrove Cay, which
was more suitable as a storgae
shed. (Swains' has now been
repainted inside and out
although the second building is
condemned.) I don't know
how many other schools there
are like Swains', but I suspect
there are a few at least. Surely
in some cases temporary
buildings could be utilised.
Whilst on Mangrove Cay I
suggested that some rooms
could be used in my own
house, which was government
property and had previously
been occupied by, the


recently been promoted by
representative to Sales Manager.
Mackey International
Airlines first served the
Bahamas in 1952 from Ft.
Lauderdale and West Palm
Beach. Today Mackey flies
daily -from Miami, Ft.
Lauderdale and West Palm
Beach to most islands in the
Bahamas and complements
Bahamasair.
Leeming has always been in
the airline business and has had
expereince selling, advertising,
marketing and managing. He
was formerly Bahamas manager
of Southern Air Transport. His
career began when he joined
the Royal Air Force at the end
of the last war and was
transferred to the Royal


Mackey Airlines from -sea

Canadian Air Force when the
first jet fighters were shipped
there.
At the war's end Leeming
joined De Havilland Aircraft
company as their test flight
engineer, later becoming
director of aircraft
maintenance and technical
aviation advisor for Latin
America, Bermuda and the
Caribbean.
Later he took a position
with Shell Oil as their airport
manager here.
Leeming gets a lot of
pleasure out of promoting the
Bahamas and believes the
Bahamas has a lot of offer
tourists.


came of it.
Children cannot wait while
new schools are being planned
and built and this matter is
often urgent they do not
need luxury, only adequate
facilities.
I have visited Eton College
in England on two or three
occasions and some people
here might be amazed to see
the very ordinary classrooms
they have. Carpets may be an
American concept of modern
education, but it is not for the
children neither a British one
nor as far as I know a
European one.
It will be interesting to see if
the Ministry of Education and
Culture can develop a coherent
policy as regards curriculum,
building projects, teachers both
Bahamian and expatriate and
general administration. At
present it seems they are a
good example of the Freudian
concept of the ambivalence of
emotions, which is both
puzzling and confusing. It is to
be hoped they soon make up
their minds about these
policies as there is so much to
do and so little time to do it.
I leave the Bahamas with
genuine partial regret and hope
to be allowed to return one
day. I trust that the kernel of
these problems will be
successfully resolved as
speedily as possible for the
children's sake, as it is the
children who matter. After all
they will be the citizens of
tomorrow when most of us
contemporary adults are dead,
gone and often forgotten.
G. F. B. WATTS


I


r

w
r
I
r
1
r
r
I .. ~
-i


KENNETH LEEMING
...gets promoted



ST. ANNE'S BANQUET
A TESTIMONIAL banquet
in honour of the founders of
St. Anne's School, will be held
at the Crown Ballroom of the
Paradise Island Hotel and Villas
tomorrow.
The banquet is being
sponsored by the P.T.A. and
Old Scholars Association of St.
Anne's.
Cocktails will be at 8 p.m.
and dinner at 8.30 p.m.
BAPTIST YPF
MEETING
THE FIRST meeting of the
executive committee of the
Baptist Young People's
Fellowship, formed on
November 3, is to be held
tomorrow at the Bahamas
Baptist Bible Institute,
Gleniston Gardens.
The executive committee
consists of the officers elected
on Nov. 3 and one adult and
one young person from each
participating church.


\ A


SAN ANDROS AWARDS SALESMEN
SAN ANDROS PRESIDENT Leonard Atlas, presents San Andros' top salesman, Curtis
Thompson (42 sales) of Berkley Ferguson Real Estate with a cheque for $200 for his
outstanding efforts. The $200 awards were given Bahamian agents with seven or more
sales during the '$35 down' campaign. Winners included Hubert Rolleof Berkley Ferguson
Real Estate; Cynthia Smith of MDelgan & Associates Investments; Maxwell
Woodside of Maxwell Woodside Real Estate; Frank Carey of Frank Carey Real Estate and
Carl Riley, on-site sales for San Andros Inc. Looking on (right) is Baseball Major Leaguer
Wenty Ford who recently joined the sales staff of San Andros Inc.


When you open a Standard
Deposit Account with
Lombard North Central you
will be assured of a good
rate of interest with complete
safety for your capital.
Your savings ean 9t%
interest per annum which is
paid twice yearly withouter nn
deduction of U.K. tax.Alternat- e an
ively the interest can be
credited to your Account to
build up your capital. Six months' notice of withdrawal is required
but 100 is available on demand during each calendar year.
Time Deposits. Sums of 5,000 + placed for fixed periods of
1,2, 3,4 or 5 years can earn attractive rates of interest which will
remain fixed throughout the agreed period of deposit.



SLombard

North Central
4 0 Bankers
Loambad North Cntil Lhnited is nmber of i Mtieal WrmlUinstr
Bank Group whoee Cwie Masd R m esr ceed 470,000,000.
Head Office:LOMBARD HOUSE.CURZON STREET.
LONDON W1 A 1EU, ENGLAND. TELEPHONE: 01.499 4111
City Office: 31 LOMBARD STREET. LONDON EC3V 980,
ENGLAND. TELEPHONE: 01-6234111
To: The Deposit Account Manager, Lombard North Centrl
Lombard House, Curzon Street London WI A 1 EU, England
Please send mefull details ot your Deposit Schemes
SName


_I _482A
L.m r -mu ........ e. msuu. s as


I


i i


adirF No b 9 1973





I


Friday, November 9, 1973


THIS WEEK, and for the
next three weeks, I propose to
give you details of an actual
hand which contains a point of
general interest, and to follow
it with a hand which was never
actually played, but which was
dreamed up by one of that
curious species, compilers of
Bridge problems.
The hand which follows gave
me much to think about. It
took place during a friendly
rubber; Love All; dealer, East,
who was my partner. After a
straightforward auction, with
no opposition bidding, I found
myself in 3NT. North led the 3
of Spades, and the two hands
looked like this:
WES1 EAST
75 AQ 109
K842 9
A 95 3 2 107
KJ A Q 4 2
My first thought was relief
that I hadn't got a Heart lead.
However, there were many
bridges to be crossed before I
could relax, including the vital
matter of keeping South out of
the lead as much as possible.
Once I had got the Diamonds
set up, 1 could afford to lose
the lead to North, since a Heart
lead from him would establish
my King, but 1 couldn't stand
more than one lead through me
from the other direction.
Accordingly, I resigned
myself to losing at least one
Spade, and went up with the
Ace on the first trick. South. a
canny defender, encouraged
with the 6. I then played.
dummy's Jack of Diamonds,.
covered by South's Queen and
my Ace. A further Diamond
lost to South's King. But now


came the dreaded Heart lead, a
small Heart, which I ducked.
North's Jack won. North now
led not another Heart but
another Spade. The moment of
decision was at hand.
Placing South with the King,
I put up dummy's 10 only to
see it beaten by South's Jack.
When South punched me with
the 10 of Hearts, it was all
over The defence took
altogether four Hearts, two
Spades and a Diamond. I went
3 down, yet I could have made
my contract. Going up with
the Ace of Spades at trick 1
was not my mistake. But after
South won his Diamond trick
and gave North the lead with a
Heart, and when North
returned another Spade, all I
had to do was to play dummy's
Queen. I then could have
claimed 4 Diamonds, 4 Clubs
and 2 Spades. An overtrick!
Here are the four hands:
K843
AQJ6
84
1063


75
K 842
A 9 5 3 2
K J


AQ 109
9
J 1076
AQ42


J62
107 5 3
KQ
9875
Those of you familiar with
the local Bridge scene will not
be surprised to hear that this
formidable defence was


WE SHOULD HAVE DONE IT BEFORE!

Our new i ,i. ho hours for leisurely Christmas
portraits and unhurried passport photos are proving
immensely popular. We invite you to drop in this
evening (or any' n,. 1ny 1t1 Open through the day until
8 p. n.!


P#40TOGIAPNY
on the waterfront at East Bay & William Sts.
Telephone 5-4641









Best taste




on the island.


kt


Howgood it is...


in the Super King Size


1973 L J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.


conducted by David
Richardson (South) and Derek
Parish(North). Note that an
original Heart lead leaves
West with very little to worry
about; he loses 3 Hearts and a
Diamond only. But the
combination of astute leads
and returns in both majors was
difficult to combat effectively.
At least, I found it so.
Now, from the familiar
world of rubber bridge we turn
to the esoteric world inhabited
by the compilers of problems.
Hugh Darwen is one such
compiler, and in his recent
book, "Bridge Magic" (Faber;
2.80 pounds) he devotes a
small chapter to what he calls
"curios," as well he might.
They consist of the freak
results of the extremes of
distribution, and this little
fantasy comes from the mind
of one Mel Stover, of Canada.
AKQ
AKQ
none
Q1098765


86543
97654
K
AK


2
32
AQ1098765
J4


J 1097
J 108
J432


South, by some minor
miracle, has arrived at 3NT,
and by a major miracle makes
it. In the process, heroic efforts
by both sides result in the
discarding of no fewer than 28
points!
In response to a presumed
Diamond pre-empt by East,
West leads the King, overtaken
by East, who continues with
the Queen and 10, forcing the
Jack from South. Meanwhile,
on the second and third rounds
of Diamonds, West, seeing a
remote (but accurate) prospect
of promoting a trick for his.
partner, jettisons both the Ace
and King of Clubs.
This inspires South to do
some fancy discarding of his
own. On the first three rounds
of Diamonds, he throws all
dummy's top Spades. When he
comes into the lead with the
Jack of Diamonds, he plays the
Jack, 10 and 9 of Spades,
throwing all dummy's top
Hearts! Now he plays his 7 of
Spades, giving West the lead.
West can cash one more Spade,
but must then play a Heart
into South's waiting J,10,8.
After the second Heart from
South, the position is:
none
none
none
Q 109


none
976
none
none


none
none
9
J4


none
10
4
3
South plays his last Heart,
and poor East has nowhere to
go. This fantastic sequence of
events could probably never
happen at the table; in the
opinion of this observer, that's
just as well, because life at the
table is quite complicated
enough as it is.
RC.

Regatta

winners

MARSH HARBOUR: Under
beautiful Bahamian blue skies,
with low hanging cumulus
around the horizon, and with
an almost calm, crystal clear
sea, the annual Guy Fawkes
Day sailing regatta was an
outstanding success, November
3, at the Elbow Cay Club,
Hope Town, Abaco.
Sixteen entrants including
sailors from Miami, Nassau and
Abaco started with the 12:30
p.m. gun.
First place was captured by.
"Lost Horizon" from Nassau
(skippered by James Dobbs).
Second place went to "Taino"
from Hope Town (skippered
by H.Bowen White). And third
place went to "Tyro II.. also
from Hope Town (skippered
by Robert Malone).
Over 100 guests participated
in the dinner, and after the
traditional burning of the
"Guy" the guests enjoyed
dancing.

FOR 3 in
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2115]7


Sisters in song


Sister Berthe, (Peggy Bigham) sister Margaretta, (Jill
Froggatt) and sister Sophia (Yonette Thorgrimmson) voice
their doubt in song, in a scene from the Nassau Amateur
Operatic Society's production of "The sound of music"
which will be staged at the Dundas Civic Centre, November
24th to December Ist, Sunday excluded.
The curtain will rise at 8.00 p.m. each performance and
the box office will open on the 17th of November at the
Maura Lumber Co. Bay Street, Telephone: 24003.
Peggy Bigham seen at left in this picture is a stand-in for
Jean Chaplin who will sing the role of sister Berthe, on her
return from vacation.


- I


FACT AND FANTASY 1


REGULAR SERVICE
EX LONDON & LIVERPOOL

DUE NASSAU

ORBITA Ilth NOVEMBER
BOKNIS 24th NOVEMBER
VESSEL 15th DECEMBER
ORCOMA 13th DECEMBER


CR& ,CO IT


I Phone 2-8683 P.O. Box N8168 Bay St. Near Charlotte St.
g ....


WANTED
Production Superintendent to assume full
responsibilities of Bread & Cake Production in
Nassau's largest automated bakery. Applicant
must have at least five (5) years experience in
both Bread & Cake Production as well as
advanced knowledge in Sciences applied to the
bread industry i.e.: Biochemistry, Nutritional
Application, Microbiology and Hygiene
Standards.
A basic University or College Diploma or Degree
in Chemistry and/or Bread Production is
necessary. In addition applicant must have
knowledge of Business Organization, Employee
Relations and all aspects of Personnel
Organization.
Excellent Salary and Fringe Benefits offered.
Bahamians only need apply to:
PURITY BAKERY LIMITED
Market & McPherson Streets
Phone: 22668 or 22669
Ask for: Mr. Albury or Mr. Holland


DISTRIBUTED BY





Bethell Rohberson & Co. Lid.


_ I~ __ __


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Friday, November 9, 1973


Whe ~iinn


Flying treasure hunters


face busy schedule


-.... -

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If so, you need the new


HOSPITAL INDEMNITY POLICY

Now offered by

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hospital a direct payment not based on actual

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or replace income lost by confinement.


ALLYOUR MONEY BACK IF YOU DON'T GO TO THE

HOSPITAL IN TEN YEARS

For complete details, see


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MAXWELL DEAN


GLEN DEVEAUX
BRUCE HANNA
HENSEL NEWBOLD


FRED RAMSEY
LIONEL ROLLE


or call

ABBEY INTERNATIONAL INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED
Harrison Building, Marlborough Street


Phone 2-3930


RO.Box N4728


Abbey also provides Life Insurance and Investment Plans


4.
Pt






Education

talks
DISTRICT education
officers from the Family
Islands who are in Nassau for
the annual conference, are
shown above with Minister,
Livingstone Coakley and
Ministry of Education and
Culture heads.
The annual district
education officers'
conference is being held at
the Ministry of Education
and Culture headquarters.
The conference was
opened Monday morning
with a welcome address by
Director of Education Mr.
Gurth Archer.
The opening address was
given by the Minister, Mr.
Coakley.
Chairman for the opening
session was Mr. Baltron
Bethel, Permanent Secretary.
The eight district
education officers assigned to
the Fanily Islands attending
the session are Mr. Horatio
Bannister South Andrcs; Mr.
Hugh Cottis, Exuma; Mr.
Admiral Ferguson, LoL.g
Island, Crooked Island and
Acklins, and Mr. Elcott
Johnson of North Andros.
Also, Mr. Falcon Major,
Abaco; Mr. Guy Pinder,
Eleuthera; Mr. Teuton
Stubbs, Cat Island, Bimini,
Ingaua, San Salvador and
Mayaguana, and Mr. Geron
Turnquest, Grand Bahama.
Greeting the delegation
was Mr. Leonard Archer,
president of the Bahamas
Teachers Union.


i:-


L
1


of th,- evr't. Treasure hi"'t '*irr, in the
form of photographs of the various
Bahamian islands will be handed out, and
the fliers then take off to identify and plot
the clues.
The search for clues goes on for three
days, and the fliers must return to Nassau
and turn in their answers by one o'clock
Friday, Nov. 30. A festive welcoming party
will be held at the BAHAMASAIR hangar at
the Nassau International airport, and the
remainder of the day will be free for the
fliers.
Saturday evening the ninth annual
Bahamas Flying Treasure hunt will come to
close with a cocktail party and gala awards
banquet at which the winners will be
announced at the Sheraton British Colonial
Hotel.
The winner will receive the deeds to a
hilltop lot at the San Andros
residential-resort development on Andros.
He will also receive the coveted Esso
Trophy. There will also be valuable prizes
for runners-up.
Among the competitors will be several
previous winners, who are not eligible for
the first prize a second time. Also, among
the fliers will be a small group known as the
"fearless fliers", who have competed in all
eight previous Flying Treasure Hunts.


--JUST TRY TO BE KIND
KINDNESS the year round
is what young Thomas Arthur
pictured here with Elizabeth
the Donkey and a perky little a A'St
potcake, is encouraging by
appearing on this year's Be
Kind To Animals Week
poster. Thomas, who works
weekends and summers at the -'
Bahamas Humane Society's
Chippingham headquarters, is -
shown in a pose similar to 7
this on the 1973 kindness '
week poster, which states: a --- ....


"Be Kind To Animals
Week, scheduled for
November 10 18, will begin
at 11 a.m. tomorrow with the
annual BHS dog show in
Government House grounds.


Another major event of the
week will be the "fiesta"
dinner-dance at the Sonesta ..a
Beach Hotel on Saturday,
November 17, at 7:30 p.m.


Abbey offers new hospital insurance


TRY IT-



YOU'LL LIKE IT!


ABBEY International
Insurance Company has
announced the introduction of
a new Hospital Indemnity
Policy which will provide cash
to meet expenses when an
insured person is hospitalized.
A spokesman for Abbey said
that the rapidly increasing
costs of medical care put a
financial burden on the
average citizen and their new
policy is intended to provide
relief when hospital
confinement is required.
This new insurance plan will
pay specified amounts for each
day that the insured person is
in the hospital and for as long
as two full years for any one
illness or accident.
Unlike the typical


hospitalization policies, the
new Hospital Indemnity Policy
will pay the selected daily
benefit for each day of hospital
confinement without regard to
the actual expenses incuirrd.
Coverage is available for up
to $1,350 per month for
individuals and family groups.
A special feature of this
plan, and one that will appeal
to the healthy person who
wants protection, is that if
there is no claim made against
the policy for ten years, all the
premiums paid will be returned
to the insured.
Under this arrangement, if
the insured is hospitalized he
will receive the daily
benefit he selected and if he
doesn't become a patient in the


hospital for ten years ( and
many people go a lifetime
without being hospitalized) all
of the premiums that he has
paid will be returned to him.
The Hospital Indemnity
Policy was introduced at the
regular meeting of the Board of
Directors of the Company held
in Nassau last month. Local
residents serving on the Board
include the Honourable Gerald
C. Cash, E. P. Taylor, R.M.T.
Orr and P. S. Potter.
Abbey International has
been active in the Bahamian
insurance industry since 1968
and offers a complete range of
life insurance policies including
endowments, whole life and
term plans.
The principal contract sold


is the Abbey Investment Plan
which provides an investment
program geared to world-wide
equity investments with
guaranteed maturity benefits
together with death benefits if
the insured person dies before
his investment plan matures.
Both maturity benefit and
death benefit can be
substantially higher than the
minimum guaranteed benefits
as the results of growth of the
Abbey International Fund
which is the investment facility
supporting these policies.
The fund now holds
investments in business and
industry in the Bahamas,
United Kingdom, United
States, Canada, Australia and
Japan.


IESC EXECUTIVE TO ADDRESS THE CHAMBER


WOLFSCHMIDT


THE GENUINE VODKA


THE (.1'1 ST speaker at the
Wednesday, November 14
supper meeting of the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce will be
John A. Brooks, an executive
of the International Executive
Service Corps (IESC),
headquartered in New York.
Thy meeting will be held at
the Sheraton British Colonial
Hotel, with cocktails at 7:15
p.m. and supper at 8 p.m.
IESC is a non-profit
organisation, originated by
David Rockefeller and
supported by subscriptions
from sponsoring U.S.
corporations, grants from the
U.S. Government and
substantial contributions from
foreign client firms receiving
the benefits of its service.
A growing number of local
firms in developing countries
are now joining as voluntary
sponsors.
Its purpose is to assign
seasoned executives to


short-term projects outside the
U.S. to counsel companies
which have requested
assistance on management
problems.
These volunteer advisors, at
present about 8,000 in
number, are either retired
businessmen or executive in
mid-career who are able to
arrange leaves of a few months.
They serve without salary,
receiving only travel and living
expenses for themselves and
their wives while aboard.
Usual term of overseas
service on a single project is
three months.
In the past eight years IESC
has assigned executive
volunteers to some 3,500
projects in 52 countries of
Latin America, Africa,
Southeast Europe, Asia and the
Middle East. It undertakes
about 600 projects per year.
IESC's biggest assest is
service, freely given by staff


Alexander's Last Post


ALEXANDER Barry will
foundd the "Last Post" toward
the end of the annual
remembrance day mass at Mary
Star of the Sea Church on
Sunday, November 11, at 6 30
p m.
Wayne Marshall will give the
drum roll
Flags representing the
following nations will be
presented Bahamas, United


Kingdon, United States.
Canada, Jamaica, Haiti, Italy,
Poland, Ireland, France,
Switzerland, Vatican City, and
the colours of the R.A.F.
Venerable Archdeacon
Foster Pestains. representing
the Grand Bahama Clergy
Association, and Rev. Carroll
Veatch, representing the Grand
Bahama Christian council, will
read lessons.


members in New York and by
knowledgeable executives
serving as volunteers abroad.
Although partially financed
by the U.S. Government, IESC
is run privately and
independently.
Its chairman is George D,
Woods, former head of the
World Bank and now a director
of The First Boston
Corporation.
President and full-time chief
executive is Frank Pace, Jr.,
former U.S. Secretary of the
Army and president and
chairman of General Dynamics,
Inc.


RAFFLE WINNERS
MR. AUSTIN HUYLER has
won the $4800 lot in the
recent raffle for the Mentally
Retarded.
Mr. Huyler was the holder of
ticket No. 20351.
Following are the names of
the other prize winners.
Sabline McKinzey, the new car
with ticket No. 17526; Hard
Luck, two round trip tickets,
ticket No. 11945: Dilly,
Admiral refrigerator, ticket No.
18453. Atina, S200 grocery
certificate, ticket No. 6660;
Darlene Pitt, gold Omega
watch, ticket No. 15226;W. E.
Smith, Royal portable
typewriter, ticket number
$788; Alva E. Smith, Sunbeam
mixer, ticket No. 12352;
Patricia Deveaux, crystal
elephant, ticket No. 09354;


The board of directors
consists of 70 top executives of
leading American corporation
in a wide variety of business
fields.
IESC has expressed an
interest in helping develop
local enterprises in the
Bahamas, through the
combined co-operation of the
Chamber of Commerce and the
U.S. Embassy.
Mr. Brooks' talk will explore
possible ways for Bahamian
businesses to enlist the
organisation's help in specific
projects.


Don Benjamin, two round trip
tickets to Rock Sound, ticket
No. 27638; Barba-a
Cartwright, doll, ticket No.
14990.

RESIGNATION IS
NOT ACCEPTED
THE resignation of Joseph
Delaney as president of the
Glassbottom Boatmen's
Association has not been
accepted and Mr. Delaney has
agreed to remain as president
until a general election_ of
officers is held early in the new
year.
Mr. Delaney, president of
the association for the p#st
three years, tended ib
resignation on Sept. 18.
There are approxta m 90
members in the

4- ".


i


__


I


I b,-1


she STribitnt


A FULL and busy schedule of events is in
store for the 400 or so participants in the
ninth annual Bahamas Flying Treasure Hunt,
slated for November 26 to December 1.
Assembly and registration will take place
at the Grand Bahama Hotel and golf club
November 25 and 26.
"Early birds" arriving on the 25th will be
entertained at a special welcoming party
hosted by the hotel management. There will
also be special rates for treasure hunters on
boat excursions for tennis and golf.
The hotel, whose lobby area was damaged
by fire little more than a year ago, is now
rebuilt, and an additional nine holes have
been added to the sea-side golf course.
The afternoon of November 26 a mini
treasure hunt will be staged on the hotel
grounds, with awards in the form of
doubloons and pieces of eight fake, of
course. That evening the fliers will be
entertained at a welcoming cocktail party
and the official opening of the ninth version
of the popular airborne event. The hotel will
then present one of its famous tropical luau
feasts and calypso entertainment. The first
round of prizes from the Treasure chest will
be presented at that time.
Tuesday morning the serious business of
treasure hunting begins with a briefing by
Hans Groenhoff. originator and coordinator













Whr Grthittit


Friday, November 9, 1973


Students learn about hotels in paradise


THE BAHAMAS Transport Agricultural, Distributive and
Allied Workers' Union, and the Bahamas Soft Drink
Bottlers' Association successfully concluded two weeks of
negotiations. Representing the union were the secretary
general, Mr. Maxwell Taylor and the shop stewards from
the various companies, anci representing the Bahamas soft

Discrimination Al int Bahamians


From Page 4
lines, will not have the effect t
of encouraging thi -
investment."
"What investment will be-
encouraged will benefit only a-
few."
The Development Bank -
"We must see that government t
does not discriminate against t
one type of Bahamian ir-
favour of another, and thatthe
Bank will be there to assist at 1
Bahamians regardless of colou 7
or political belief. Only then
will there be any hope that i t


will achieve the purpose for
which we feel it should be
established."
The control of bribery and
corruption "We don't need
legislation to control the
practice of a former
government. Is this an
admission by the present
government'?"
When Wednesday's House
session suspended, Mr. Cadwell
Armbrister (PLP-Killarney) had
the floor. The House
reconvenes next Wednesday.


SATURDAY MATINEE ONLY
MA TINElE 3:00 & 5:00

I CHANCEE MW RESERVATION"
BOB HOPES warring
BOB HOPE- -EVA MARIE SAINT


I NOW SHOWING
Except Sat. Matinee, Eveniing 8: 30-'Phone 2-1004, 2-1005
Sunday Matinee 3: 00 & 5:00, Evening 8:30
DINO DE LAURENTUS Rsems




I I

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S NO ONE LUDER 17 WILL BE ADMITTED
Reservations not c-laimed by 8:45 will be sold
I on first come, -irst served basis.


I Saturday Matinee Only Now Showing
Matinee Starts at 2:15 Continuous Showings
"THE NARCO MEN" PC:;. from 3
Tom Tryon Ana Castor fro
PLUS Sunday Continuous
"TROG" PG. from 4:30
Joan Crawford
S Michael Gough "DEEP THRUST" PG.
SStarts Saturday Night 8: 30 Tien, Wang
Sunday Matinee Startsati : 15 PLUS
Evening 8:30
"BROTHER ON THE RU"N" R. "TOMB OF THE
Terry Carter Kayle John son BLIND DEAD" PG.
PLUS
I "BONNIE'S KlDS" R All Star Cast
Tiffany Boiling Steve Sancdor
'Phone 2-25 34 PLUS Late Feature
No one under 17 will beadf- tried. Saturday night



I SATURDAY- MATINEE ONLY
MATINEE STARTS AT 2:00
"FRANKENSTEIN MST BE DESTROYED"
I Titarring
PETER CUSHIP*G SIMON WARD
PLUS
"THE MONGOLS
Starring
JACK PALANCEE- ANITA EKBERG

STARTS SATURDAY NIGHT 8:30
Sunday Continuous from 4: 30-'Phone 3-4666
The ultimate im
Martial Arts adventure =
and excitimenmal


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I m i\Ia


PLUS

'COME BACKCHARLSTON BLUE
RAYMOPND ST. JACQUES I
A GODFR Y CAMBRIDGE
RENTAL O.SCRETIONAD VISED


Union talks are over
Driilk Bottlers' Association were Mr. Colin S. Wells,
Caribbean Bottling Company Ltd, Mr. Philip Pinder,
Bahamas Beverages Ltd., and Jerome McSween.v. N-qsau
Bottling.





Candlelight



wedding


LILLIAN Cheryl Nottage,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. D.
Artie Nottage and Mr. Stephen
Aubyn Bennett, son of Mr. and
Mrs. George J. Bennett of
Harrow, Middlesex, England,
were united in marriage on
October 20, at 6:30 p.m. in an
impressive candlelight
ceremony at Trinity Methodist
Church, Nassau. The Rev. Peter
Swinglehurst and the Rev.
Frank F. Poad officiated.
The bride, given in marriage
by her father, wore a gown of
original design, fashioned of
exquisite pure silk traditional
satin in softest candlelight and
appliqued imported French
a lencon lace medallions
re.nmbroidered with crystals
and pearls in various sizes.
HIer gown has a slightly
raised waistline which rose to a
lavish lace yoke and high
mandarin neckline, enhanced
by crystals and pearl bead
handwork and featured long
tapered sleeves with unusually
designed cuffs and peek-a-boo
lace motifs at the shoulder.
Her A-line skirt swept into a
full cathedral-sweep train and
was regally set off by several
magnificent lace medallions,
joined by garlands of beaded
lace and was enriched even
more by aboundantly scattered
elegant motifs and a double
scalloped hemline.
ller long bouffant veil of silk
illusion outlined with lace
motifs cascaded from a
camelot headpiece, enchanting
with its flowerbud style of
close hugging breathtaking
tear-drop lace petals.
Mrs. 1). Barry Nottage was
matron-of-houour. Mrs John
(alpini and Miss Deidre Millar
were bridesmaids. They wore
Dior blue satin gowns with
portrait nicklines, raised
waistline, three quarter-length
sleeves with flounce cuffs
caught by matching bows.
Their matching Camelot
headpieces completed their
pretty costumes.
Miss Tamsin Oke, niece of
the groom, was the flower girl
and wore a blue dress with
puffed sleeves trimmed with
rose bud lace with matching
head-band, designed and made
by her maternal grandmother.
Master James Nottage was
ring bearer and wore a black
velvet suit enhanced with a


Opens 6:30 Show start 7:p.m.
CHILDREN UNDER 12 FREE!
See 2 features late as 9:20
-EXCLUSIVE
NOW thru TUES. *
"IOSEIDON "at 7 & i1:10
"ST. VALENTINE'S" 9:20


,UPIE DOWN






StrmusiraE mI(iiKUnB -^

IYESIE Uk
AU


white ruffled shirt.
Mr. Bryan Toye of London,
England. was best man. The
groomsmen were D. Barry
Nottage and Bradley Bethel.
The ushers were Ricky
Farrington, Larry Roberts,
Raymond Pyfrom of Nassau
and Robert Bennett, brother of
the groom and Peter Collier of
London. Sean Nottage, nephew
of the bride, was junior usher.
During the signing of the
Register Mr. G. W. K. Roberts
sang "Ave" Maria ably
accompanied by Mrs. Ronald
Atkinson.
A reception following the
ceremony was held at the
Halycon Balmoral Hotel.
Out of town guests included
from England: Mr. and Mrs.
George J. Bennette, parents of
the groom. Mrs. John Oke,
sister of the groom, Mr. Robert
Bennett, brother of the groom,
Mr. and Mrs. Alan Bell, Mr.
Bryan Toye, Miss Noreen
Gibson and Mr. Peter Collier.
From the United States:
Mrs. L. W. W. Brown, Mr.
David Brown, Mr. and Mrs.
John Calpini, Master Sean
Calpini. Miss Dana Brown, Mr.
and Mrs. Maurice Cromer, Mr.
and Mrs. Herbert Blate, Mrs.
Paul H. Keil, Mrs. Herman
Bitterman Mrs. Neville Brown,
Mrs. Donald Harper and Miss
Mildred Ospelt.
The n e w I y w e d s
honeymooned in the U. S. and
will make their home in
London, England.
Sir Roland Symonette gave
the toast to the bride,
responded to by the groom.
The toast to the bridesmaids
was made by Mr. Bryan Toye.


SWe' I cu tc it ..or cut ou.

mad'Gt


"YOUR JOB is important,
no matter what you do."
This is one of the basic
philosophies of Mr. I. G. Davis,
president of Paradise Island
Ltd., which stands behind his
company's policy of on-the-job
training programmes for high
school students.
According to Duncan
Rapier, general manager of
Britannia Beach Hotel and vice
president of Paradise Island
Ltd., these programmes are
designed to teach Bahamian
students, early in their lives,
about the hotel industry so
that they can compete for well
paying positions, in the future.
Under the supervision of
George Mackey, Training
Director for Paradise Island
Ltd., 12 C. C. Sweeting High
School male students spend
Wednesday out of the
classroom and at the Britannia
Beach Hotel.
There they learn various
aspects of the hotel industry.
The students are divided
into three groups. This makes
it possible for each group of
students to be placd into
different departments of the
Britannia each week, where
they are lectured by the
respective supervisors.
"This includes accounts, the
front desk, food, beverage and
the commissary, as well as the
pastry shop." said Mr. Mackey,
"the students can then discover
how important all job positions
are to the success of the hotel
industry from manager to
busboy: This also gives the
students a chance." he added,
"to see how closely related one
job is to another and perhaps
help them to determine what
position they would like to
settle into."
He asserted that students
should realize that it is
necessary for a manager or
supervisor to know and
understand the job of a
busboy, a waiter or a cashier.
He also related the problems
that faced him when he
attempted to recruit students
into the programme, who had
already acquired a high school
education or a G.C.E.
certificate.
Many of these students felt
that it was below their
educational qualifications to
work in a hotel. It is the
policy of Paradise Island Ltd.
to give first perference for jobs
at Paradise Island to students
who are veterans of this
programme.


Last year, mostly for
financial reasons, several of the
students continued to work at
Paradise Island, after the
programme ended.
'They've turned out to be
great apprentices." said Mr.
Mackey. Seven of the twelve
students, on the programme,
are also employed with
Paradise Island, as busboys, on
a part-time basis.
Herman Russell, Lester
Williams and Clyde Wilkinson
have worked in LeCabaret's
dining room one year, two
years and three years
respectively.
The Cafe Martinique has
employed Raymond Fowler
and Patrick Woodside for over
two years. Everette Outten has
worked with the Bahamian
club for over two years. Dennis
Forbes is employed by the
Marine dining Room.
Other training programme
participants are: Andrew
Sweeting, Simeon Mackey,
Oswald Hanna and Rufus
Smith.
So far, several of these
students have expressed a
desire to return to the hotel
industry after they've finished
school.
"I would like to go away to
school," said Everette Outten,"
and then return to the hotel
business in a managerial
position."


Simeon Mackey would like
to become a pastry chef.
"The demand for Bahamian
male gourmet chefs is great,"
commented Mr. Mackey, "the
reason that we are lacking in
this area stems from the idea
that the kitchen is a place for
women."
He emphasised that chefs are
"degnified" people and among
the highest paid hotel
personnel.
When Oswald Hanna,
Andrew Sweeting and Simeon
Mackey finish school they
would like to assume positions
in the hotel's butcher shop.
"This area requires
responsible people." Mr.
Mackey stated, "especially


when you consider that
Paradise Island has four
gourmet restaurants and four
guest dining rooms," he added.
"Paradise spends thousands of
dollars each month on meats,
therefore, butcher shop
personnel, must know how
much of the right kinds of
meat to order."
Paradise Island Ltd. also
sponsors an extensive training
programme that sends
interested employees to a local
hotel training school.
Provisions have also been
made to send Paradise Island
staffers, who qualify, to hotel
training schools of Cornell
University and Florida
International University.


Freeport visitors


from Miami via Nassau on
Thursday, 8th & 15th
November at 1:00 p.m. with
250 passengers each voyge, and
the S.S. "Flavia" from Miami
via Nassau at 11 a.m. on the
same dates with 350 passengers
each voyage.
Over the last two weeks
(25th October 7th November)
there were 1230 cruise visitors
to Freeport/Lucaya. The
"Olympia" made I call with
343, "Bahama Star" 2 calls
with 353, and the "Flavia' 2
calls with 534 passengers.


FREEPORT Lucaya will be
visited by two cruise ships
making four calls bringing
some 1200 cruise visitors
during the 14 days period
according to the Freeport
which began yesterday
according to the Freeport
Harbour Co. Ltd.
Calling at report will be
Eastern Steamship Line's S.S.
"Bahama Star". and Costa
Line's S.S. "Flavia".
The S.S. "Bahama Star" is
scheduled to dock in Freeport


THE FROSTED BOTTLE










Distributed in the Bahamas.by BettI Robertlo & Co. Ltd.


A lesson on room keys and reservations is delivered to C. C. Sweeting students by
Coolie Osoria (left), Britannia's reservations clerk. Her pupils from left to right are:
Everette Outten, Clyde Wilkinson and Lester Williamss,


U M P -^.---


Risitli-if -


m


m













Friday, November 9, 1973


-__ _ _ _.__W__ _-._---__
-|


PAN AM IUMBO


OPEN TO PUBLIC


O SUNDAY j

4 PAN Am 363-seat
"-Jmbo Jet" will be open to
tfli public for ground tour
frbm 3 to 5 p.m. on Sunday,
Remembrance day.
V'he jet clipper will touch
de'wn at 2:15 p.m., bringing to
NaSsau on charter over 300
nmsnbers of the New Jersey
St;re Bar Association and their
w'ves for a week-long
4nvention at the Paradise
Island Hotel and Villas The big
plane will return to Nassau the
following Sunday to carry the
legal group back home.
This is the first commercial
\ift of a 747 aircraft to
Nassau.
For ground tour purposes
Sunday, the plane will be
parked at 3 p.m. near the
airport fire station at the
Western edge of the field near
the fuel storage tanks. The tour
of the plane will be
complimentary. No smoking
will be permitted.
Visitors will be guided
through the entire aircraft, the
largest wide-body passenger jet
in operation, including the
spacious economy section, the
luxurious first-class section and
the upper deck, where
first-class passengers are
regularly served meals at tables
during daily round-the-world
scheduled flights.


IMPORTANT TO READERS-

Literally hundreds of gift giving ideas, lavishly illu-
strated, to give you a preview of what Santa has in
store for everyone.


A special Supplement planned to help ease your
holiday chores for a more successful Christmas.


DON'T MISS X h eritbmh SPECIAL '73 CHRISTMAS GIFT GUIDE


tY






at
at


light

and

smooth


1.


CLASSIFIED
1 1 1 IF-, !


NOWn


DISCUSSING THE PROS AND CONS of the airline's new colour scheme are Captain
Seeker and duty officer Oliver Hutchinson. Captain Seeker had just flown VCIO Gulf
Echo is the first VCIO to be painted in the new red, white and blue livery of British
Airways.
The verdict? "We like it", decided both Captian Secker and Mr. Hutchinson. "The new,
brighter colours will really stand out at airports around the world".
Footnote to the keen aircraft spotters: British Airways hasn't lost its speedbird
symbol. It now appears at the front of the aircraft and is partly hidden by the high-lift
truck In this picture.



HERE (ind THER


GIBSON PRIMARY
THANKSGIVING
THE annual harvest
thanksgiving service will be
held by T. Gibson Primary
School, Market Street on
Thursday, November 22 at 10
a.m.
Principal address will be
given by the Rev. Charles
Curry, minister of Wesley
Methodist Church. Mrs. Sadie


Curtis will represent the
Ministry of Education and
Culture and various items will
be performed by the school
children.
Proceeds of the thanksgiving
service fresh and canned
fruits and vegetables will be
donated to the Geriatrics
Hospital, to the Red Cross and
the Salvation Army.
Mrs. E. Y. Noronha is head
teacher at the school.


CARPENTRY COURSE
THE C. R. Walker Technical
College will begin a full-time
carpentry and joinery course
on Monday November 14.
Young men 16 to 19 years
who wish to enter this course,
and students who have made
previous apphcation should
visit the College as soon as
possible for registration, and
bring with them reports from
previous schools.
The course fee is i 1111i


C12426
NOTICE is hereby given that
MAUD (BRENDA) WHITE of
P. 0. Box 5544, East Bay St.,
Nassau, is applying to The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 2nd day of
November, 1973, to The
M i n ister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
O. Box N-7147, Nassau.

C12433
NOTICE is hereby given that
MERWYN EVATT LEE of
Winchester Street, Nassau,
Bahamas is applying to the
M in sister responsible for
:JaIt i it, and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 2nd day of Nov. 1973
to The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

C12396
NOTICE is hereby given that
PAUL JOSEPH of Augusta St.
Nassau, Bahamas is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for naturalisation as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why naturalisation should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
2nd day of November 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship P.
O. Box N7147, Nassau.

C12389
NOTICE is hereby given that
frHOMAS JOSIAH
ROBINSON of Ridgeland Park
West Nassau, Bahamas is
applying to the Minister
..-F ,r-lr,-. for Nationality and
Citizreiship, fur registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
airy reason why registration
should riot be granted should-
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
2nd day of November, 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

C12425
NOTICE is hereby given that
JOHN JOBSON WHITE of P.
O Box 5544, East Bay St.,
Nassau, is applying to The
Mri i sister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
f) registration as a citizen of
Thie Bahamas, and that any
pe son who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
anid signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 2nd day of
November, 1973, to The
Min ister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
O. Box N-7147, Nassau.

C 2436
: IiC F is hereby given that
EMILINE AUGUSTA
ROBINSON of Farrington
Road N.P. is applying to the
fh sister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship.
tIi registration as a citizen of
lhe Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
g!arited should send a written
and signed statement of the
f.-cts within twenty-eight days
homn the 2nd day of November
1,73 to The Minister
itsponsible for Nationality and
citizenship, P. O. Box N7147,
Nassau.

C12435
NO'ICE is hereby given that
BRUCE LLEWELYN BEEN of
P. O. Box F-2430, Freeport,
Grand Bahama Island Bahamas
is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should


send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
2nd day of November 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

CI 2445
NOTICE is hereby given that
V-LLIAM OUTTEN of Blue
H.tn Road, Nassau Bahamas is
ai:pilying to the Minister
.:ponsible for Nationality and
i.it.enship, for registration as
. citzen of The Bahamas, and
thJt any person who knows
.anI reason why registration
stolid not be granted should
ser,J a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
2nd day of November 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N7147, Nassau.


C12437
NOTICE is hereby given that
WILLIAM CARDINAL HIGGS
of Pine Dale, Grand Bahama is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reaosn why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
2nd day of November 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

C12430
NOTICE is hereby given that
SIMEON JOLLY of Cow Pen
Road N.P. BHS is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 2nd day of November
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. O. Box N7147,
Nassau.

C12428
NOTICE is hereby given that
DORIS MAY SMITH of Blue
Hill Road, Nassau is applying
to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 2nd day of Nov. 1973
to The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
O. Box N7147, Nassau.

C12560
NOTICE is hereby given that
CROFTON WHITFIELD
BEEN (sometimes called
BAIN) of P. O. Box F450
Freeport, Grand Bahama is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 9th
day of November 1973 to The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
O. Box N7147, Nassau.

C12555
NOTICE is hereby given that
HYACINTH VICTORIA
LEWIS of Yellow Elder
Gardens, Nassau, Bahamas is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 9th
day of November 1973 to The
Min ister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

C12558
NOTICE is hereby given that
SIDNEY PATRICK RIGBY of
West Street, Nassau, Bahamas
is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 9th
day of November 1973 to The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
O. Box N7147, Nassau.
C12550
NOTICE is hereby given that
CHARLES GROVENER
HALL of Maxwell Lane,
Nassau, Bahamas is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the


facts within twenty-eight days
from the 9th day of November
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N7147,
Nassau.

C12554
NOTICE is hereby given that
VERNICE ESTELDA
DENNISON of Nassau Street
P O. Box 2089, Grant Town,
Nassau Bahamas is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship for
registration as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why
registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-elght days
from the 9th day of November
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.


SECT


C12553 C12511
NOTICE is hereby given that BEAUTIFUL, 3 bedroom, 4
MALCOLM FREDERICK bathroom and large sitting
PIKE of Stella Maris Estate room, all furniture. Reasonable
Long Island is applying to the rent. Contact 7-8328 after 7
M minister responsible for p.m.
Nationality and Citizenship.for C12545
naturalisation as a citizen of 2 BEDROOM apartment,
The Bahamas, and that any. unfurnished, nice location.
person who knows any reason Tenwich Street. Shirley
why naturalisation should not Heigh hne rey 5-3471.
be grantedsHeights. Phone Carey 5-3471.
be granted should send a .
written and signed statement C12505
of the facts within STORE Shelves, closets,
twenty-eight days from the 9th newly carpeted floor, central
day of November 1973 to The airconditioning, first class
Minister responsible for display windows. Ideal for
Nationality and Citizenship, P. ladies store. Phone 5-3364.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.
C12551
C12566 FURNISHED 3 bedroom 2
NOTICE is hereby given that bath apartment -
WILLIAM JOHN SWEENEY airconditioned -'telephone -
of Freeport, Grand Bahama is on quiet street in Eastern
applying to the Minister District. Call 34344.
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as C12552
a citizen of The Bahamas, and THREE Bedrooms, 2 baths,
that any person who knows any unfurnished house Johnson
reason why registration should Road Estates Phone 4-2193.
not be grated should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts within FOR SALE
twenty-eight days from the 9th -
day of November 1973 to The C12432
Minister responsible for OFFICE FURNITURE, can be
Nationality and Citizenship, P. viewed at DOCTOR POAD'S
O. Box N7147, Nassau. OFFICE, COLLINS AVENUE.
CL12421
REAL ESTATE Munroe Calculator $100.00
Table $50.00
C12487 5 Desks at $150.00
SHOP, House and Lot. Computer Printout Storage
Rack.
Hospital Lane. Phone 57879 Rack.
Hospital Lane. Phone 57879 Call 2-7491-2-3 between 9 and
C12471 4:30.
FOR SALE 'C12518
ONE LOT OF LAND IN ONE 8000 BTU room
LITTLE BLAIR. Price $6,000, airconditioner brand new.
call 28156 between 9 and 5 Phone 24319.
54577 after 5.
C12048 I C12527
C12048 MISCELLANEOUS used office
BUY A LOT machinery including manual
in EASTWOOD or and electric typewriters. Phone
WINTON MEADOWS 2-8964 or 5- Mr. Hanna.
Call Frank Carey
at 27667 or 24815 '12387
Frank Carey Real Estate WAREHOUSE and adjoining
Box N4764 vacant commercial lot.
Bay & Deveaux Sts Best offer. Phone 22098 -
5-3581
C12464
WESTERN GROVE 4 C12362
bedroom 2 bath house, fully GARAGE SALE
furnished, airconditioned, wall Silverware
to wall carpeting, beautifully Cutlery
landscaped, completely walled Glassware
in with bearing fruit 4rees on Linen
two lots. Can be seen by Materials
appointment. $85,000. Phone Trimmings
54684. Dresses 16-18-20
C12546 Records
LOT 90' x 140' Highland Park Custom Jewellery
$7,500. Cash or terms. Best Ornaments
price in the west. Phone Carey Electrical Appliances etc.
5-3471. Opposite Olympia Hotel
C53Tel: 24062 Mrs. Petterson.
C 12534 ALSO 20ft. OUTBOARD
1 Lot 100 x 100. Price MOTOR BOAT
$5,500.00 or nearest offer.
Nassau Village near Sea Breeze. C12531
Lot 100 x 150 near Claridge GRAND PATIO SALE
Enterprises Limited about 300 Commencing 10 a.m. Saturday,
feet South of Soldier Road Nov. 10 and daily thereafter:
Eastern District $7,000.00 or Couches, lamps, beds, bicycle,
nearest offer. Vanity set and chest of
Lot 80 x 110 Sandilands drawers, washing machine,
Allotments in the vicinity of A. desk, electric typewriter, rugs,
D. Hanna $4,500.00 or nearest ladies golf bag, misc. golf clubs,
offer, lawn mower, appliances and
2 acres Malcolm Allotment loads more. Cash only, no
$11,000.00 per acre or nearest cheques, no layaways.
offer. Call Whylly Enterprises, Woodland east side of Village
Tel. 24068. Road follow signs.
C12564 CARS FOR SALE
YAMACRAW BEACH
C12528
ESTATES 1968 MUSTANG. Standard
$75 DEPOSIT for 70 x 100 shift, radio. Dark blue with.
lot. Beach rights, priv.~t lake, black vinyl top. One owner,
underground utilities. Priced good condition. Call 7-7205.
from $5800 and $80 monthly.
NO INTEREST CHARGES: C12434
Tremendous savings. Call Pat
Rutherford at 4-1141 or ISLAND MOTOR
Morley & O'Brien at 2-3027 or COMPANY 1970 LTD
come to the Yamacraw Beach USED CAR LIST
Model Home any afternoon.
1967 CHRYSLER
OR RENT 4 Dr. Auto White $1000

11 1970 HILLMAN HUNTER
C12328 4 Dr. Auto White $850
FURNISHED AND
AIRCONDITIONED 2 1971VAUXHALL VIVA
bedrooms, 1 bedroom and 2 Dr. Auto Green $1450
efficiency apartments.
Telephone 5-8134. 1969 FORD GALAXIE
C12325 4 Dr. A/C $1500
ONE EXTRA LARGE two 1970CHEVELLESS -
bedroom, two bath, apartment. A/C 2 Dr. Re. $2600
With large living and dining all
basically furnished Victoria 1 9 6 9 P L Y MO UTH
Court APARTMENTS on SATELLITE $1300
Elizabeth Avenue between
Shirley and Bay Street. 1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
Facilities, phone, laundry, S/W Green $1595


parking, T.V. antenna, 1971 FORD PINTO
airconditioned. Phone 54631 Brown, Vinyl Auto $19
between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.
C 12316 1970 PONTIAC
COTTAGES and apartments LA/ URENTIAN $1
A/C Blue $1950
daily, weekly or
monthly-airconditioned, fully 1971 VAUXHALL VICTOR
furnished, maid service 4 Dr. Std.. White $1295
available. Lovely gardens and
swimming pool. Telephone 1967 MERCUmY COUGAR
31297.31093. Std. Green $900
C12401 1970 FIAT
AIRCONDITIONED one 4 Dr. Std. White $600
bedroom furnished apartment
in Dundas Court, Pyfrom 1969 VOLKSWAGON
Addition, with laundry room Green $1250
facilities and Master TV 1969 MORR. i II0
antenna. Also large parking 4 Dr. Auto Blue tO
area. For information call
5-3928 or 5-4258. 1971 AUSTIM 1100'
C12519 4 Dr. Auto. BUr il Ig
FURNISHED 2 bedroom Trmdetl W lNmwAt
apartment, Rosetta Avenue, Leest O.ttM Plf
Palmdale. For information call Opposite Ikl
32036, TWle-i-r


Tsubn3W


IMPORTANT TO ADVERTISERS-


Wrap up this .

Chritistas Early #it

with the help of ihp ribumth



CHRISTMAS I


gIFTS


SUPPLEMENT -
TWO PUBLICATION DATES NOV. 29th & DEC. 13th. FOR JUST ONE PRICE

ADVERTISING DEADLINE NOV. 22nd CALL NOW... John Cash 2-2768


Mrs. Pinder 2-1986


iu can't



eat it...


$4.80 per 40oz.


Si


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a &. .


I


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FOR RENT I


NOTICE


'`CI


Gk $fit HHP


fir th ai I. it "-"












Wht Drtibtun


Friday, November 9, 1973


CLASSIFIED


R OFS RAC SALE


'C12405
1968 TOYOTA with radio.
Price $850. Phone 3-4099.
C12549
VOLKSWAGEN '66. Reliable
$400 (O.N.O.) Phone 3-2479.
C12571
DAN KNOWLES TAXI
& BUS SERVICE LTD.
5-7704 5-7700
Church Avenue, Boyd
Subdivision 34686
1974 Cadillac 4 Door Sedan
Fleetwood Brougham
1971 Rambler 4 Door Sedan
1967 Ford 4 Door Sedan
1969 Pontiac 4 Door Sedan

C12556
1968 FIREBIRD PONTIAC
400. Excellent condition. Will
accept nearest offer to $2500.
Phone 4-2460 after 3.
C12562
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD
USED CAR LIST


2 Ll Pr iutiu 'D.


SAVE TIME SAVE MaNY

BOOKSTORE HEALTH FOODS
The Christian Book Nassau Drug Stoe 5-4506
Shop 5-8744

BUILDERS LAUNDRY
Richard's Construction5-7080 DRY CLEANING
New Oriental Laundry 2-4406

CAMERAS MENS' CLOTHING
John Bull 2-4252/3 The Wardrobe 5-5599

CARPETS MUSIC
Lee's Carpet Craft 3-1993 Cody's Records 2-8500

CUSTOMS BROKERS OPTICIANS
Martin's 2-31 73 Optical Service Ltd. 2-3910/1
DEPT. STORES PRINTING
Pixie's Dept. Store 2-3173 Wong's Printing 5-4506

DRAPERIES PLUMBERS
Lee's Carpet Craft 3-1993 Sunshine Plumbing
Maintenance Service 5-6251
DRUGS & RADIO & T.V. SALES
PRESCRIPTIONS
PRESCRIPTIONS Carter's Records 2-4711
McCartney's 5-6068/5-2127
RUBBER STAMPS
FLOOR MAINTENANCE Wong's Rubber Stamp
Rug Cleaning & Installation Co. 5-4506
Island Interiors 5-3576/4-2191 SPORTS
Champion Sport Land 2-1862
GARDEN & PET
SUPPLIES TRAVEL
Modernistic 2-2868 Playtours 2-2931/7
R. H. Curry & Co., 2-8681/7

HARDWARE WRECKER SERVICE
John S. George 2-8421/6 Gibson Wrecker Service2-8896


FOR THE ACTION YOU WANT



Shop Nassau Merchants
For Business And Services


ANNOUNCEMENTS

CLUES TO

0b 4 iribunp
I PanAm.

TRAVEL PHOTO
CONTEST
PHOTO No. 28:- This
country's president is known
by his "nom de guerre".
This photo appeared on Nov
5th.
Back issues of tnese dates are
available at The Tribune
offices in Nassau and
Freeport.

MARINE SUPPLIES

C12315
PACEMAKER 44ft. Luxurious
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.
C12444
50' MATTHEWS in mint
condition. Must see inside to
fully appreciate. Call 2-3911.
C11894
1969 31ft. CHRIS CRAFT
Commander. Sleeps six, private
shower, two 230 h.p. engines
with less than 200 hours,
kitchenette, good condition.
Call 24267, 54011.
C12513
25 FT. Bertram Hardtop Sedan
with twin 160 Mercruiser 1/0'
engines in excellent condition.
New sun awning and fishing
chairs. 125 watt radio, head,
twin herths, galley.
$11,000.00. Phone 5-8512.


C12520
BERTRAM 25 ft., 2 Mercruiser
120 h.p., spare new outdrive
and many other spare engine
parts. Stern platform
$4,000.00. Call Romora Bay
Club, Harbour Island.
C12515
17 FOOT Wellcraft with 105
Chrysler outboard. Excellent
shape. Good for fishing or
skiing. Phone 22376 day or
42045 night. Ask for T.
Russell.


MARINE SUPPLIES
C12543
14 FOOT ENTERPRISES
CENTREPLATE sailboat, two
suits sails, good condition.
$400. Phone office 22678.
Home 31357.

C12561
YACHTS AND BOATS LTD.
CHRIS -CRAFT
CONCORDE
IRWIN SAIL YACHTS
AVON INFLATABLES
21foot Normandy cabin cruiser
in fibreglass with a 27 h.p.
Perkin diesel engine. Excellent
condition with all extras.
Sleeps two with head. At our
dock $6500.00 asking.
20 foot Bertram Bahia-Mar
with 200 h.p. Mercruiser
in/outboard. All extras
including trailer. At our dock
at $5500.00 asking.
27 foot Concorde Sedan with
twin 225 h.p. Chryslers. In
exceptional condition and at
our dock. Must be seen.
$13,000.00 asking
AT THE DIVE SHOP
Now, a complete line of masks
for all faces, snorkels for all
purposes and fins from the
smallest to the new U.S. divers
"spoilers", for pros. We are the
exclusive dealers for U.S.
divers, dacor and more that are
recognized as the best. Come
see us. at Nassau's most
complete dive shop, the shop
with the dive flag awning.
P. O. Box N1658
Tel. 24869


ART SUPPLIES

C12324
COMPLETE range OT artists'
supplies. Oils, acrylics, canvas,
easels, etc. Bahamian Paint
Supply Ltd., Bay Street. Phone
2-2386, 2-2898.


I I


SECTION


ii I -- tf -


I i


1 in hr thtk'


1967 CHRYSLER
4 Dr. Auto. White


$1000


1968 PONTIAC STRATO
CHIEF $1100
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
2 Dr. Auto. Green $1450


1969 FORD GALAXIES
4 Dr. A/C
1970 CHEVELLE SS
A/C 2 Dr. Red
1968 VAUXHALL
VICTOR
1971 FORD PINTO
Brown Vinyl Auto.


$1500

$2600


$600


$1995


1971 VAUXHALL VICTOR
4 Dr. Std. White $1295
1967 MERCURY COUGAR
Std. Green $900


1970 MORRIS 1100
4 Dr. Std. White
1970 FIAT
4 Dr. Std. White
1970 HILLMAN MINX
S/W Std. Blue


$1000


$600


$1000


1969 VAUXHALL VIVA
2 Dr. Std. Green $1000


1969 VOLKSWAGEN
Green
1967 TRIUMPH
4 Dr. Std. Red


$1250

$700


Telephone 34636-7-8
Located Oakes Field
Opposite the Ice Plant

C 12568

BARGAINS
A NT


CENTRAL GARAGE
'Thr EaiesrPlace n in uassau to ir ,tt


USED CA

CLEARANCE SALE
STOCK NO. 2218A
1972 HILLMAN HUNTER
white, 4 drs. bucket seats.
console shift automatic trans.
W.S.W. tyres. B$2075.00
STOCK NO. 9025
1972 CHEV. VEGA VAN
green 2 drs. 2 passenger.
W.S.W. tyres automatic trans.
B$2450.00
STOCK No. 8000UA
1969 CHRYSLER IMPERIAL
white, blue vinyl 4 drs. 8
passenger, power brake,
steering & windows aircond.
radio W.S.W. tyres. B$1500.00
STOCK NO. 6016A
1973 VAUXHALL VIVA
Blue, 2 drs. bucket seats,
console shift automatic transs
B$2750.00
STOCK NO. 21348
1968 FORD ESCORT blue 2
drs. W.S.W. tyres, standard
trans. bucket seats B$950.00
STOCK No. 2216A
1971 DODGE AVENGER red.
4 drs. radio, automatic trans
B$1245.00
STOCK NO. 6103A
1967 CHEV IMPALA blue &
white 4 drs. radio automatic
trans. W.S.W. tvres.
power steering B$900.00
MECHANIC SPECIAL
STOCK NO. 2201A
1968 FORD CORSAIR blue 4
drs. standard trans. B$300.00
STOCK NO. 2177A
1969 VAUXHALL VICTOR
5/W,white, 4 drs. W.S.W. tyres,
standard trans B$200.00
STOCK No. 2130A
1968 FORD CORTINA white,
4 drs. W.S.W. tyres, automatic
trans BS400.00
STOCK NO. 2209 A
1965 CHEV IMPALA blue
black vinyl. W.S.W tyres 2 drs.
automatic trans. radio
8$200.00
STOCK No. 6030 A
1968 CHEV NOMARD S/W
tan, 4 drs. automatic trans.
radio power brake B$400.00


COME IN AND SEE US
MAKE US AN OFFER, WE
MAY MAKE A DEAL
CENTRAL GARAGE LTD.
OAKES FIELD PH. 34711-6


S-


SCHOOLS


I I


BUSINESS PROFESSIONAL


DIRECTORY

Save Time



PHONE
By



T iMt k TIi Ilectf Ct i 12196 EX. 5


Interested applicants apply
to: Miss Delone Bowe
Personnel Office of Princess
Properties International Ltd.,
P. O. Box F-2623, enclosing
references and police
certificates, or telephone
352-9661 for interview.

C12563
FIRST NATIONAL CITY
TRUST COMPANY
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED
P. O. Box N-1576
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT
The Trust Company requires
three Chartered Accountants
for an accounting project to
last approximately six months.
Applicants should have a wide
experience of incomplete
records.
A knowledge of trust and trust
accounts would be
advantageous.
Apply to Mrs. E. Lightbourne,
Personnel Dept., 2-4240/9.


HELP WANTED


C12494
LEWIS AUTO SCHOOL
Learn to drive with confidence.
Phone 59805 between 7 and
8.30 a.m. or after 6 p.m. or
35084 anytime.

PETS FOR SALE
C12514
PIGEONS giant homers and
French Mondains. All $15.00.
Call 22376 day, 42045 nights.


HELP WANTED
C12403
IBM DATA CENTRE
SERVICES
Has immediate position
available in Nassau.
SYSTEMS ENGINEER
Successful applicants will be
th roughly familiar with
systems design and
implementation of varied
cm mercially oriented
applications on System/3, 360
DOS and 370DOS/VS.
EXPERIENCE
Position requires a minimum of
five years in programming and
Systems/Analyst work with
experience in COBOL, RPG,
RPG-11 and Assembler
Languages. Must be able to
train and develop personnel
who will be responsible for
installation of computer
systems
IBM OFFERS: Hospitalization
and Insurance programmes,
paid vacation, attractive
starting salary and excellent+
advancement opportunities.
Qualified applicants should call
Mr. McFadden at 32351/4 for
personal interview.
C12530
CAVALIER CONSTRUCTION
COMPANY LIMITED Requires
an Office Accountant --
Applicants should be familiar
with basic accounting
principles. Present enrollment
in Accounting course would be,
beneficial. Contact Mr. A.
Sairsingh at Phone 27680.
C12565
ST. ANNE'S HIGH SCHOOL

Required for January
A teacher of Book-keeping,
Typing and Fnglish.
Examinations are taken in
G.C.E. '0' Level and Pitman
Examinations Institute.
Please send particulars of
qualifications and experience,
along with the names of two
referees to:
The Headmistress,
St. Anne's High School,
P. O. Box 6256 M.S., NASSAU

C12548
2 VEGETABLE COOKS
required: Preparation and
cooking of all vegetables.
Cooking different kinds of
soups and potatoes. Knowledge
of presentation and dressing
for these dishes. Previous large
restaurant or resort hotel
experience of 2 to 3 years.
References and clean police
certificate.
2 ROAST COOKS required:
Responsible for grill cooking
shellfish meats, poultry and
fish. Full knowledge of buffets
and barbecues, menu planning
and pricing. Two to five years
experience in a hotel or large
restaurant. References and
clean police certificate.
1 BUTCHER required: Must be
fully competent and have
previous hotel experience.
Must know all cuts of meat,
must be able to properly prepare
carcass for kitchen and make
portion control cuts to Chef's
satisfaction. References and
clean police certificate.
MALE RESERVATION
MANAGER required for 400
room hotel. Must have at least
2 years experience in similar
position and fully conversant
with reservations and front
office procedures. Must
supervise front desk and
reservations. Handle all
correspondence and compile
reservation analyses.


COMMONWEALTH
FURNITURE
& CABINET WORKS
Design, build and remodel
kitchen and china cabinets -
Living, bedroom Furniture -
Vanifv Book and Showcases
eti
Phone 31120
3 doors South of Nassau
Stadium.
C12418
FOR ALL Your Gardening
Needs, Trimming, Hedging,
Pruning, Beach Cleaning, For
Prompt, Reasonable and
Efficient Service Call 5-7810.
C12326
T.V. ANTENNAS
Boosters for home,
apartments and hotels
Sales and services.
Call 5-9404
WORLD OF MUSIC,
Mackey Street next
to Frank's Place
C12535
SIGNS ... THE BEST
Mackey St. near Shirley St.
north of traffic light, Shirley
St. west of Joe & Berlins.
Heweth W. Neely.

hP (ribunt
CLASSIFIED ADS
BRING RESULTS FAST


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS-FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV. TELEPHONE 21986 EXT. 5


GRAND


BAHAMA


CLASSIFIED


!MIE SUPPLIES I ELP M ITED HELP WANTED


C6472
JOB TITLE: EQUIPMENT
ATTENDANT
MINIMUM EDUCATION ::
Secondary
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 1-2
years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Inspect and service coolers,
dust collectors and fuel oil
system.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. O. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
C12512
ONE CASHIER
ONE RELIEF CASHIER
TWO BARTENDERS
EIGHT WAITERS
ONE DOORMAN
TWO PARKING ATTENDANTS
ONE BAR BOY
ONE BAR PORTER
ONE STOREMAN
Above personnel are required
'for Night Club opening soon.
Only persons with extensive
experience in those categories
are requested to apply. Police
clearance is required
INTERVIEW daily starting
Wednesday, November 7 from
3-6 p.m. at the Anchorage
Hotel. Please apply in person.
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.
C12442
QUALIFIED Gardener with
references: Reliable yardman
Experienced cook with
references:
Tel 7-4142.

C12567
AMERICAN LADY with
broken leg requires nurse for
Bahamas and/or Europe. Phone
7-7911 or 7-7201.

LOST
C12557
PARROT (MACAW) green
in back and yellow at front 3
feet long. Phone 5-3237.
Reward offered.

TRADE SERVICES
C12323

"Pavd CuOmd1
,e *Z d.
Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714

HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING

SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795. 2-3798
Airport 77434

C12353
KEITH REID


C6458
Beautiful sailing yacht, with or
without licences to charter,
37', diesel engine, teak decks.
Freeport 373-2288.


EIITICE

6421
NOTICE is hereby given that
BENJAMIN ALEXANDER
DICKENSON of Freeport,
Grand Bahama is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship for
registration as a citizen of The
Bahams, and that any person
who knows any reason why
registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 2nd day of
November, 1973 to The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
O. Box N7147 Nassau.
C6422
NOTICE is hereby given that
EMILY ELIZABETH
DICKENSON of Freeport,
Grand Bahama is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 2nd day of,
November, 1973 to The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.


HELP WANTED

C6468
GENERAL MAINTENANCE
SUPERINTENDENT must
be experienced in diesel
generators and electrical
generation, also mechanical
experience with o/b motors
and vehicle repair, fibre glass
work, painting, plumbing and
carpentry. Minimum 10 years
general experience with
engineering degree.Apply to P.
O. Box F-39, Freeport.


S


GOVERNMENT

HOUSE

GROUNDS A


.9-


I-"" ............


C6466
MANAGER MARINE
OPERATIONS required by
Grand Bahama Petroleum
Company to act as liaison with
the Borco Refinery in order to
optimize turnaround time of
all Company owned and
chartered vessels and to ensure
the Masters of all vessels adhere
strictly to the port regulations,
with particular emphasis on Oil
Pollution Control. Applicant
must be in possession of a
Foreign Going Masters
Certificate and considerable
experience as a Master.
Interested persons are
requested to apply in writing
stating details of experience
and qualifications to:
Personnel Officer, P. O. Box
F-2435, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.
C6461
ACCOUNTANT: To be in
charge of all Retail Stores at
the Hotel, Commissary, Golf
Shop, Lord & Lady, Liquor
Store, Marian, Stuff-N-Such.
Must be able to set up and
maintain system for all stores.
Police Certificate and Letters
of References are necessary.
Interested persons apply:
GRAND BAHAMA HOTEL,
WEST END, GRAND
BAHAMA, Personnel Office,
between the hours of 9:00 a.m.
and 3:00 p.m. Monday through
Friday. Elon Martin, Jr.,
Personnel Director.
C6465
MACHINIST SPECIALIST
required by Bahamas Oil
Refining Company. Duties will
consist of trouble-shooting,
diagnosing operating problems,
vibration analysis, inspection
of new installations,
supervision and development
of prevention programmes
and personnel. Responsibility
to include maintenance,
repairs and overhaul of rotating
equipment such as pumps,
turbines, compressors and
diesel engines and new
installations.
Interested persons are
requested to apply in writing
stating details of experience
and qualifications to:
Personnel Officer, P. O. Box
F-2435, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.


C6462
(1) EXECUTIVE
SECRETARY TO GENERAL
MANAGER: King's Inn. Must
be well versed in all executive
secretarial skills, typing and
shorthand essential. Must he
capable of organizing office
routine. At least 3 years
previous experience in similar
or related position necessary.
(1) RESIDENT MANAGER:
King's Inn. Resort Management
experience mandatory. Must be
broadly experienced in all
hotel and departmei.. with
particular strength in
Reservation Management,
Marketing, Public Relations,
Guest Relations, Social
Programmes and Hotel Policies
and Procedures.
(1) RESTAURANTSERVICES
MANAGER: Princess Hotels
Bahamas. Responsible for
training and upgrading skills of
all Food & Beverage Service
Personnel. Involved in staff
planning evaluation, salary
administration policy
formulation. Applicant must
have extensive knowledge in
Restaurant Service Field.
Interested applicants please
contact Personnel Office,
King's Inn, Phone 352-6721 or
P. O. Box F-207, Freeport.
C6472
JOB TITLE: EQUIPMENT
ATTENDANT
MINIMUM EDUCATION .
Secondary
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 1-2
years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Inspect and service coolers,
dust collectors and fuel oil
system.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
C6451
SKIN DIVING INSTRUCTOR:
One skin diving instructor to
operate skin diving concession
at the Grand Bahama Hotel on
commission basis only. Should
have own equipment necessary.
Interested persons apply:
Grand Bahama Hotel, West
End, Grand Bahama. Personnel
Office. between the hours of
9:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m.
Monday through Friday. Elon
Martin. Jr., Personnel Director.


Bahamas




Humane Society


DOG


Saturday,


Nov IOtk



a-^



Late entries can be


made on the grounds


the day of the show


-El


-- I


I


ALAnMI A Md U A mm W


IL- -.i Ti- --i


I


I


I


i


I












Friday, November 9, 1973


"Meals will be skimpy this week. Your salary didn't
cover the grocery bill and a divine new dress."


'eaE'SHiE,ALLrUgTr... HEAnRD
SOME SAY "06 AI4Y':

Brother Juiipew


"Better not read the fine print if you want to
keep on being man's best friend."


CROSSWORD

PUZZLE


ACROSS
1. Theory
4. Distress signal
7. Spank
11. Yarn measure
12. Imitate
13. Ponder
14. Knowledge
15. Remiss
16 Unicorn fish
17. Western State
19. Harmonium
20. Skittish
22. At home
23. Entrance
24. Refrigerator


29. Train
31. Dare
32. Alternative
33. Beau--
34. Underneath
38. Search
39. Culture
medium
40. Male turkey
41 Coniferous
tree
44. Vocalized
45. Embezzle
46. Grape
47. Whirlpool
48. Confusion
49. Ordinance


E AO E OE S 1











DOWN
1. Kind 6. Gender
2. Bishopric 7. Goad
3. Free from 8. Lengthy
slavery 9. Diva's
4 Dish of greens specialty
5. Bright colored 10. Hammer head
fish 18. Buckwheat
S 5 tree
S 19. United
- 20. Pitch
------ 21. Cyprinoid fish
^ 16 22. Wrath
----- 24. Pelt
.25. Arcadia
S 27 Triton
~vtW 2W 28. Cereal grass
___ 30. This minute



S A37. Carousal
q, 38.Head
SOLUTION OF SATURDAY'S PUZZLE
DOWN





















covering
S Kind 64. Singing











S syllable
SBishopric 42. Marsh elder
S Free from 8. Bleakngthy
slavery 9. Diva's
4. Dish of greens specialty
5. Bright colored 10. Hammer head
fish 18. Buckwheat
t7 tree
19. United
15 20. Pitch
21. Cyprinoid fish
22. Wrath
24. Pelt
25.Arcadia

27. Triton
1028. Cereal grass
30. This minute

35. Minced oath
36. Go ashore
37.Carousal
41 4 38 Head
covering
46 40.Singing
syllable
49942, Marsh elder
43. Bleak


I OFItCE ionuj


Winning

Bridge
__ VICTOR MOLL?
Today's hand, Uke yesterday
is from Du non Classe d I'xpe
by Jean-Paul Meyer and 'ugene
Conti.
'Dealer outh: Love All.
North
8 7
SAQ6
Z A Q 6
10 4 2
West East
465 A 2
SJ 10 9 7 L K8532
8 74 4, Q1068
South
K Q 10 9 4 3
0-
O AK J O
AK3
South North
2NT
44
West lead the QJ. What's
going to lapppen?
'bhe contract appears to
pnewt no eprobiem. Decarer
ruffs the flsat heart In bti hend
andedri t out the eA. WiMing
witO the ace the d'mond r sm,.
he baiis by caring the 4AK.
If Iast started with Use doibe-
ton tQ, the ditamiod finesse will
not be needed. for the OA and
the 49 wll take care of two
dtamonds.
If th 4Q doesnt come down.
decasr takes the diamond
fnesse. and ce East has the
OQ. ta* WI be weO. I
And yet, wVithaut dotng any-
tUrbi wro), delaa.er wet down.
Wihat (bar[perd?
On the K. Bist canly
dropped his Q!i Now aMl th
had to do to avoid the diamond
finsse was to tae he marked"
1fnesse In chu. Aes....
Thise hand, twht came up in
touamswIent play. is one t the
sjectaoular deals t ate year
selected for tthe final crte ur of
the book, puIlsheld in Parir by
Le Bnrgeur.







word eachf
tor letters
yonu make


er. and there hust be




TARGET: 14 wor ood
word18 woreach



excellent. Solution tomorrow.
YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION :
Lessor es loe loot looterma



ore ose loser o lost oIter
role rooe r oost root oe
only. Bach



ROOTLESS rse rotai the slot
letter. solo nd there mu sorel sortbe



least on e tol toeoer tore
torose list N torso toss. e
word; Dn proper names. TODAY'S
TARGET: 14 words, good ;
1t words, wry good; 88 words.
excellent. sOlutaon tomorrow.

re loe loser low lost ostler
role roose roost root rootle
ROOTLESS rose rote sloe rlot
sole solo soot sore sorel sort
stole stool store tool cooler tore
torose torsel torso tows.


Rupert on Chariot Island-41


Simon readily agrees. but gazes about with a
frown. "Where Is my fiddle?" he mutters.
" I didn't take it with me when we drove away
in the chariot. I must have left It here."
After a hasty search Rupert discovers the
fiddle lying in a hollow. "You are forgetful.
Simon I" he chuckles. So the instrument


changes hands and the fiddler thanks Simon
for his kindness. "My orders are to stay
here for a few weeks to entertain King
Neptune," he says. "Can you spare the fiddle
that long ?" "Yes, you can send it to me
when you get back to King Cole's palace,"
grins Simon. ALL RIGHTS RESME


Chess
By LEONARD GARDEN


.~lr c
..i
f
---
..

...
t B.
Y r
-

.,..


White mates in two moves,
against any defence (by Dr W.
Speckdmann).
Par tdnes: 30 seconds, problem
master; 2 minutes, problem
expert; 5 minutes, good; 10
minutes, average; 25 minutes,
novice.
Chess Solution, Friday Oct 19 -
(9810)
Chess Solution
1 Kt-Q4 (threats 2 Q-B2 or 2
Q-Ktl mate). II 1 .. R--K5;
2 Q-KRI, or if B-K5; 2 Q-R6.
Traps for solvers are 1 Kt-KI?
R-K5! or 1 Kt-K3? B-K5!
or 1 Q B? R-QKtl!
1 2 31+ S G7
r--- ----1




2--rB---




a ---gr--- -


No. 7.275 . by TIM McKAV
Across
1. Torch. (5-4)
u. Lubricate. (3)
10. Cape. (5)
1'. Waves. (9)
13. Necessity. (4)
14. Headgear. (3)
13. Anarchist. (!))
"O. Eastern European. (4)
21 Voracity. (5)
2,. Shelter. (3)
23. Scottlsh loch. (4)
.4. Prophet. (4)
25. Work out. (5)
Down
1. Springs. (9)
2. Railway. (4)
3. In the wood. (5. 4)
4. Potato. (4). 5. Grip. (4)
( Untruthful person. (4)
7. In LetS' nests. (3-5)
8. Grammatical term. (4. 5)
it. Cups, saucers, and so on.
(3-4)
It. l a rae
h I r d.
(r>) A r rac
(5)
17. Starts
thle pro-
ceedings.
(5)
18. owhoy
o 0 W.
(5)
19. A r oor-. IB L I
(t14I ex- 1 1IE o
presslon.
(4) fPitrdty'eo tOtionll


I -CoI~ Com ae


I ,


REX MORGAN, M.D.


3y DAL CUkTS I


CARROLL RIGHTER'S

HtCGHOROSCOPE1
( ~ from the Carrof Righter Institute
GENERAL TENDENCIES: Proceed with
"N / caution to gain the advance you wish in
practical matters. Don't argue. Take the time to get the advice
of bankers, businessmen before acting.
ARIES (Mar- 21 to Apr. 19) If you move or act too quickly,
you may make big errors, but taking too much time to reach
decisions could be just as bad. Be sensible.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Don't blame yourself since
others could be at fault instead. Benefit by improving health
Avoid one who has an eye on your assets.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Keep promise you made,
otherwise you get into trouble. Assist one who is having really
rough sledding and forget own despondency.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Don't rely on a
good friend who has problems, but work own angles. Out to
that group affair, but don't lose your temper or your head.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Solve those problems connected
with new outlets so they become successful. Handle civic
matters efficiently. Save more money for the future.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Study details and figures of
some advanced plan you have and be sure they are exact. Make
new associates who can be most helpful.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Use more modern methods in
handling the routines that have been tedious in the past.
Cement better relations with mate by doing what he or she
likes to do.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Get into all those details
with an associate that will make some mutual outlet very
profitable and put aside anything of a light nature,
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Try to please
co-workers more even though it takes longer, and have greater
harmony. Take the exercise that will improve your health.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) Enjoy amusements you
like and get away from present tensions of business. Reach
better understanding with congenials. Avoid one with a bone
to pick.
AQUARIUS (Jan, 21 to Feb. 19) Handle home affairs so
there is more harmony and health there. Show you're devoted.
Get into details of some new project for greater success.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Shop and do important
errands; get in touch with those who can help you advance.
Use much care in motion. Don't permit some silly person to
mow you down.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY ... he or she will be
one of those delightful young people who has to learn early to
be most careful where details are concerned for true success.
Teach early to take pains with such even at play. Teach also to
keep main goals in mind and not forget them in the mass of
details. Make sure this child gets plenty of rest early in life to
build a strong body. Care in diet is important.
"The Stars impel, they do not compeL" What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


APARTMENT 3-G By Ale. Kotxkel


STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & .overgard1


THINK ILL r 1 HANDLED IT CAREFULLY
15 COLLECTING BUSINESS LEVEL WITH YOU 50 A NOT TO SMEAR
CARDS YOUR HOBBY, .OSEBUD/ BECAU MR. BRENT'S FINGER-
CRAN ? *....I NOTICED I MAY NEED fXU 4L PRINTS./
HOW CAREFULLY YOU TO HELP ME/
Ts-I() PUT MY R05554' I


_ht rtte__ 1U1W


JUDGE PARKER By PAUL NICHOLS
p. MEANWHILE
-- AND vOu LL BE ANWH LL I'M CALLING POR MR.-
I'LL BE IN COURT THIS BACK LATE IT'5 SOME GUY TAKE IT! I t POOLE! ME PON'T LIKE THE
MORNING UNTIL NOON, TONIGHT OR ,,.WON'T GIVE HIS IDEA OF THA LAWYER OF
GLORIA...THEN I'LL GO TOMORROW! NAME! DO YOU YOURS GOING TO SE YOU
STRAIGHT TO THE AIRPORT TAKE CARE! WANNA TAKE -y IN CHICAGO! MAKE URE
TO GET THE PLANE IT? i YOU DON'T GIVE HIM TwHOGE
TO CHICAGO! ANONYMOUS NOTES!

s v


L-


1


j.L


I r & I -I www -W IW I IL V m x












Friday, November 9, 1973


Wilson can


ead McAlpine to this year's title


CLAN McALPINE, BFA league runners up last season should
again be amongst the top contenders for the league title they so
narrowly missed in 1972 and the Knock Out Cup competition.


McAlpine are fortunate to
have the services of national
coach Dick Wilson. Wilson's
superior knowledge of the
game should be extremely
beneficial to a McAlpinp side
which still has the nucleus of
last year's team.
The experienced midfield
player, Dave Jenner will
captain the side this year.
Former skipper Dick Wilson is
presently battling to retain full
fitness after a serious leg injury
half way through last season.
Missing from the lineup will


be defender Norman
Archibald. who played such an
important part in McAlpine's
successes last season with his
tireless running, veteran Peter
Stanham in midfield and Mike
Goodger, who is suffering from
an ankle injury.
However, the double
centrehalf duo of Frank Crozier
and Les Williams are still
present and opposing sides will
again find it tough going on the
way to the McAlpine goal.
Newcomers to the side are
goalkeeper Steve Dale, Gordon


Duncan and former Tropigas
player Jim Lawler.
St. Georges, who gained a
reputation for being the 'iron
men' of the League last year
have been hit hardest by the
exodus of many players from
the island.
Midfield players Fritz
Ftienne, Luis Reynoso and
strikers Larry Minns and Steve
Nicholls are no longer
available.
Veteran Peter Isaacs will not
be available until December.
Regulars Paco Nunez. Pat


Lousin, Bob Isaacs Roscow
Davies and Aldric Williams will
have to work hard to build up
a side which will contain
several new players.
Among the Saints new faces
are Mark Wilkinson, Charlie
Moss and Paul Knowles.
Matthew Williams will be
responsible for coaching duties.
Knockout (up runnersup,
Paradise are once more the
'Cosmopolitan' team of the
Nassau Division.
With a side consisting of
Italians, Greeks, Bahamians, an


Argentinian, Englishmen and a
Scotsman, Paradise's main
problem will be to maintain
consistent form.
Their tendency to adopt the
Latin American style of play
makes them very unpredictable
as was shown last year when
they knocked out Tropigas and
McAlpine on their way to the
final of the KO Cup last
season.
When 'on tune' Paradise are
the most entertaining team in
the league with the explosive
talented forward line of


Juliano lacoppi, Thio Black
and Stan Bocus displaying
considerable individual flair.
With a strong defence
consisting of Nick Kealing,
Broc Barret, Jimmy French
and Jerry Simons backed by
the most agile goalkeepers in
the league, young Mike Halkitis
and Franco Pedrini, formerly
of St. Georges, Paradise
problem is to fill the midfield
with two players capable of
controlling and distributing the
ball as Sydney Coleman and


Tom Johnson did last year.
Former Argentinian
international Oscar Forrule sll
be responsible for taking over
the role of Coleman and


Dynamos, who finished
bottom of the league last
season have lost three players
and will again be fielding an
inexperienced side.
Tony Roach. who proved to
be one of the island's brighter
prospects last season has
entered university; Roy
Gordon has returned to
Jamaica and key defender
Joseph Homy has immigrated
to the U.S.
Filling the gaps will be
schoolboys David Ferguson,
Feron Dillett and goalkeeper
Brian Knowles.
Returning to the soccer
scene will be Michael Dillett
after two years absence, who


DICK WILSON

has reportedly looked good in
practices, as has striker
Winston Phillips.
The side will be captained by
Richard Adderley who will
have the services of the
experienced Rip Rolle, Danny
Lowe and George Shannon to
help him build up Dynamos
and hopefully lift them off the
bottom of the league table.
Rip Rolle will he the
Dynamos coach.
Johnson and if Paradise can
gain depth in midfield they will
be a force to be reckoned with.


RICKY ROLLS STAR


TO 2-1 VICTORY


By GLADSTONE THURSTON
ROOKIE Ricky Lowe,
controlling a soft 133 average,
rolled games of 162, 185 and
156 last night, backing up his
veteran team-members Patrick
Sweeting and Bradley Friesen
as Star Insurance found new
aptitude and stopped
defending champs Esso Tigers
2-1, once more taking second
place in the Madeira League.
Having dropped from first
place in the league to third,
Star Insurance rebounded from
a first game 837-793 loss and
captured the remaining two
873-795 and 868-853 dropping
Esso in a fourth place tie with
Pritchard's Bowling Squad.
Up against the competition
of senior bowler Sydney
French and Merille Rodgers.
Lowe and Sweeting found
themselves battling with splits
and spares in the first game as
Star. after taking a two point
lead in the fifth frame, fell
behind by one going into the
seventh
French who picked up three
strikes over the first three
frames powering Esso in the
lead by two points continued
consistently ending with a
strong 214. As Rodgers
picked up- three more strikes
over the final four frames
ending with a 192, Esso Tigers
held firmly to their lead and
won by 44 pins.
Friesen kept Star in
contention with a two strike
190. Lowe rolled a 162.
Playing with only a
three-member team. Star
stormed into action from the
first frame and held the lead
throughout the game. Bowlers
Terry Chea and Robert Pinder
took a short vacation and leit
averages of 164 and 133
respectively.
Contributing a low 144 in
the first game, Sweeting found
his mark in the second game
and rolled a competitive five
strike 212. Even Lowe was on
the increase and although he
collected only three strikes
came through with a
well-deserved 185. Friesen who
kept Star's hopes alive in the
first game collected four strikes
over the first six frames before
splitting in the seventh and
eighth ending with a 17).


Rookie Ricky Lowe
In the mean time, it was
Rodger's turn to fight against
the splits and spares. In the
battle, he did not fare too well
and ended with a 145.
Defending bowling champ
Jeff Albury rocked his ways
free of a first game low of 146
and tossed in a good 168.
Along with French who proved
to be the most consistent
bowler of the match Esso made
a strong challenge to Star's
command when they ccme to
within two points on reac~iri g
the fifth frame.
However. Fren.h's iomur
strikes rally was broken in the
sixth and ninth frame as he
ended with a 193.
With victory in sight.
Sweeting politely rolled a six
strike 213 in the final game to
go along with Friesen's five
strike 200 lifting Star from a
three point deficit in the fifth
frame.
If Esso together had bowled
as well as French. then Star
definitely would have been in
trouble. French in the final
game picked up eight strikes
enroute to his match high of
247.
STAR INSURANCE
T. Chea 164 164 164 -492
R. Pinder 133 133 133 399
R. Lowe 162 185 156 503
P. Sweeting 144 212 213 569
B. Iriesen 190 179 200 569
I SSO) TIt;lRS
J. Albury 146 168 177 491
B.Cares 125 113 118 356
1. Rodgers 192 145 154 492
K. Russell 160 176 156 492
S. trench 214 193 247 654


Charles Lunn rolled a
193(514) and Roy Parks added
a 227(575) as Guinness
Bowling Squad in a 2-1 victory
over Tinker's maintained first
place in the Madeura League.
Matty Culmer topped the
losers with a 186(457). Malachi


Golf tourney tomorrow


BAHAMAS Golf Association
president Fred lHiggs
announced today that the
South Ocean Golf Club
championship will get
underway tomorrow with a
qualifying round.
Following this, the first
round will be played Sunday,
November 1 1 and the
semi-final on Saturday,


November 17. The final will
take place the following day,
Sunday November IS (36
holes).
The tourney is a
matchplay and with gross and
net divisions, only the lowest
eight scores will quality for the
first round.
Starting time for the
tourney tomorrow is 9.00 a.m.


Mortimer had a 159(453).
Albert Rodgers picked up a
game high of 224 in his total of
548 and Mike Sawyer added a
197(560) as Pritchards
swamped K. C. Auto 887-794.
826-780 and 850-716. Tom
Stubbs top scored K. C Auto
with a 199(487).
*******
Tony Major rolled a
223(590) and Vern Roberts
added a 197(507) as Ileineken
Brewers defeated defending
first halt winners Albury's
Supply 2- 1.
Billy Albury scored a
181(539) for Albury's. Mike
Albury tossed in a 213(534).
MAV.,1IRA I.IA.(; I1 STANDING


(uinres.
Albury's Supply
St-!- Insurance
Isso) Tigers
Pritch; rds
teim .KI
' c'. Auto
Tinker's


W I.
24 12
21 I5
21 IS
18 I8
is is.
17 19
I1 21
10 25


Chargers


offer


Unitas

PITTSBURGH
The Pittsburgh
confirmed Wednesday


(AP)
Steelers
that the


San Diego chargers s have
offered them quarterback
Johnny Unitas in a straight
contract obsorption deal.
"They (the Chargers) called
us with the offer but we told
them we're not interested, said
a Steeler spokesman.
The give-way deal offered by
the Chargers required only that
the Steelers pick up the former
Baltimore Colt star's current
two-year contract, estimated at
$250,000 per season.
The Steeler spokesman
reiterated an earlier statement
by Coach Chuck Noll that he is
satisfied with the quarterbacks
he has Terry llanratty and
Joe Gilliam.
RUMORS spread that the
Steelers were looking for a
quarterback following an
injury to starter Terry
Bradshaw. In last weekend's
game against Cincinnati.
Bradshaw suffered a partial
shoulder separation and will be
out for a least a month,
probably longer.
The San Diego Evening
Tribune reported Tuesday that
Unitas had been offered to the
Steelers.
The 40- car-old Unitas, who
has passed for more yards and
more touchdowns than any
other quarterback in pro
football history, was obtained
by the Chargers from
Baltimore this year.
Ironically, after San Diego
purchased the right to sign him
for a reported $150,000 and
called him "the greatest
quarterback ever," Unitas was
benched in Pittsburgh in the
fourth game of the season


--How the--


Hustlers

mastered


Healey


Till: (CO1IC pitching of
Courage Beer's Lenny Hlealey
has had batters in trouble.
But it came as no surprise to
semi-tinal winners the
Governors Harbour Hustlers
whose hitting attack proved
that even that quality of
pitching can be tamed.
Said player/coach David
McKlewhite: "it took us only
the first three innings of the
first game to get used to
llealey's pitching." As pitching
plays a major part of the game,
when Healey was overcome,
the Hustlers lashed out almost
at will.
For the Bahamas Softball
championship the Hustlers
play New Providence's Ministry
of Works in a best-of-threc
matches beginning tonight at
the John F. Kennedy Softball
Park.
in the lir<,t game beginning
7p.m. again coming from
Ficeport. the Classic Bucks
play New Providence's
Norman's Bla/ers for the
Bahamas Ladies Championship.
Left hander Paul Johnson
who took the win in the
Ministry's 12-6 victory over
Majestic League pennant
winners Taylor Industries will,
probably with Adrian Rodeers.
challenge the Hustlers at their
own the Hustlers at their
Randy Rodgers is on the
disabled list and might not play
any ot the championship
matches.
The Eleuthera squad
remains manager Neville
Cartwright of baseball's Bimini
Braves. "In Eleuthera. they
think nothing but softball. In
Bimini. they think nothing but
baseball." he said. Cartwright's
Courage Beer was eliminated
2-1 in the best of three
semi-finals.
Matching Johnson and
Rodgers on the mound comes
t lie unpredictable from
veteran Glen Griffin and
speedster Tony Petty. Though
Griftin took the loss in the first
semi-final game, he pitched a
commendable three hitter
striking out 13 and walking
only three. TIhe Ilustlers in that
game out-hit Coutrage 5-3.
Petty, steaming on the
following night in his one
hitter struck out eight as the
llustlers evened things up at
one all
And yet like IHealey and
rookie Idward Claude, Griffin
and i'etty have mountain of
bats to silence. "'The winning
line up remains the same," said
Ministry's player/coach Leon
"Apache" K.owles.
He was referring to the
power bats of Sherwin Taylor
who this season has chalked up
a strong.530 average from 27
times at bat The Ministry's
new addition this season. Al
Jarrett will be firing loose from
a .444 batting average.


Brown and Bosfield



show Cougars the way


THE DETERMINED
combination of guards Peter
Brown and Anthony Bosfield
combined for a total of ten
points in overtime leading
defending Nassau League
champs Becks Cougars to a
95-93 victory over Rodgers
Sport Shop and their sixth win
in eight played.
With less than a second
remaining in regulation play
and the score notched at 85 all,
Rodger's guard Frankie Brice
drew a disputed foul off
Brown. Then Cougars' coach
Fred "Papa" Smith in
protection was hit with a
technical foul.
Brice at the line shooting a
one on one situation for the
personal foul, needed to score
only one to give Rodgers
victory. lie missed them all.
Going into the overtime play,
both sides after three minutes
of play were tied at 91 au
when a close out of bounds
play was ruled in favour of
Rodgers. Robert Johnson on
the in bound pass drove it the
length of the court for a layup
moving Rodgers in the lead.
However. Bosfield took an
assist from Brown and hot
from the corner tied the game
again. A Rodgers turnover put
Cougars in control and it was
the final of Brown's 13 assists
that Don Huyler converted
into a field goal giving the
defending champs the edge.
Bosfield in over time scored
eight of his game high 23. Four
assists came from Brown.
Brown who went nine for 21
from the field and three for six
from the free throw line scored
21.
Rookie forward Reggie
Forbes in a fine performance
tossed in 15 points and took
1 rebounds.
Paced by the offensive
attack of Leo Johnson and
Frankie Brice. Cougars found
themselves trailing 22-13 after
nine minutes of play. Coach
Homer Winder with enough
players and to spare
substituted freely as Rodgers
maintained their lead 28-19.
Going into the final four
minutes of the first half,
Cougars found new strength in
Brown and rookie Forbes who
waged a come-back moving
them four behind. Stancil
"Stoney" Ferguson who found
himself at times playing both
guard and forward joined in


the attack and together with
Grathon Robbins another
rookie forward brought the
Cougars to a 46-44 half time
lead.
Going into the second half
full throttled, the Cougars
scored 10 consecutive points
taking their lead 50-49. As
Brown worked the ball
effectively, Bosfield and
Lockhart found their range
from the outside.
Bumpy Johnson who paced
Rodgers in the opening
returned later in the game and
sparked Rodger's come-back.
Along with sharp shooting
Perry Stubbs Rodgers stormed
for the lead but rested at 85 all
when regulation time was over.
BECKS COUGARS
fg rb r tp
Lockhart 8 6 1 18
Robbins 1 14 3 4
Ferguson 3 12 5 6
Brown 9 11 3 21
Huyler 3 6 1 6
Bosfield 10 6 2 23
Rolle I 1 0 2
Forbes 7 11 S 15
RODGERS
Burnside 3 4 0 10
Brice 9 3 3 18
Farrington 0 9 2 I
Brown 0 5 0 0
L.Johnson 7 8 2 17
R.Johnson 4 7 3 11
J. Johnson 8 19 4 20
Stubbs 5 8 3 II
. Johnson 2 II 0 5
Dupuch 0 3 0 0
******
Rookie forward Elisha
McSweeney captured 24
rebounds and scored 26 points
and player/coach Cleve
Rodgers gave 12 assists as the
Classic Pros stopped John Bull
87-71 last night at the A. F.
Adderley Gym.
Last year's rookie Golson
Bain tossed in 14 of his 16 in
the first half and Wilfred
Johnson added eight leading
the way for the Pros' 44-32
half time lead.
Behind the shooting and
rebounding of McSweeney, the
Pros in the second half stepped
up their attack. McSweeney
scored 19 in the second half
when he took 13 rebounds. Pat
Ingraham, who worked the
forward position with him,
added an easy going I 1 points.
Allie Rolle topped John Bull
with 25 going 12 for 18 from
the field. Rookie Leroy
Fawkes added 22 and gave
eight assists.
CLASSIC PROS
fg rb f tp
McSweeney 10 24 1 26
P. Ingraham 6 10 2 15
Bain 8 4 2 16
Rodgers 3 2 3 7


Johnson
Marsh
Longly
A. Ingraham
Symonette
Ramsey


Banr
Stuart
Rolle
Fawkes
Johnson
Cooper
Mackey


JOHN BULl.
2 7
2 7
12 8
10 5
5 5
3 2
0 2


2 In other games played last
0 night, John (ash scored his
4 season high of 23 and Charles
2 Bain in his grand old style
scored 25 points and took 16
4 rebounds leading the Police
4 Royals to a 104-84 victory
25
22 over Nassau Schlitz. Luther
10 Strachan topped Schlitz with
6
0 30 points.


SCHOOL WELFARE CONFERENCE


"FOCUS on youth in a new
nation" will be the topic of a panel
discussion at the Teachers Training
College at 11:30 a.m. tomorrow as
the Parent Teachers School Welfare
Committee conference goes into its
final session.
The two-day conference, which
opens this evening, is for all parents
and teachers of both government
and private schools.
Members of the panel will be Mr.
Leonard Archer, head of C. C.
Sweeting Senior High School; Miss
Jeanne Thompson, barrister-at-law;
Senator Mispah Tertullien, clinical
psychologist; Mr. E. A. Moss
president of the Parent-Teacher
Association, Government High
School; and I-asiuml Preston Moss,
rector of St. Bedes' Church. Mr.
Horace Wright, Senior Education
Officer, Ministry of Education and
Culture,will be the moderator.
Mrs. Juliet Barnwell, vice
president of te School Welfare
Committee, will give the vote of
thanks.
At 9:30 a.m. tomorrow Miss
Carolyn L. Hanna, School Welfare
Officer, Ministry of Education and
Culture will discuss "Partnership -
a new dimension in Education."
A "play group centre," under the
supervision of teachers and senior
students from the secondary
schools, will be set up at
the Bahamas Teachers' College,
where children under the age of 12
years can be left while parents
attend the Saturday morning
sessions.


A variety concert. under the
patronage of Sir M ilio dl Lady
Butler, will he presented at 7:30
p.m. tomorrow at the governmentt
High School.
The presentation will be made by
children from various Ministry of
Education & Culture Schools. Mr.
Clement B-'tlel. senior Iltducation
Officer (Cultural tft.iirs). Ministry
of Education & ( ulitrtr, is the
music director. Mrs. Mildred I)illttt.
Guidance and ('ounselling Iivision
Ministry of I'ducaitin, will evmcc
the prorgraimmn.
The oiinferectii \.ill Ie op ( nedl at
7:30 tonight by tlhe tHon.
Livingtone ('oakles, Minister of
Education and Culture, at the
Teachers Training collegee ()akes
Field.
Canon William Thompson, rector
of St. Agnes Parish, will speak on
"Today's students ... tomorrow's
citizens."
Mr. Baltron Bethel. 'ernlanent
Secretary to tihe Ministry ot
Education and Culture, will be the
chairman.
SOCCER CALL
VALLETTA The Swedish
Football Association is calling
on all Nordic countries to
propose an immn diate meeting
of FIFA's executive committee
to settle the current dispute
between Chile and the Soviet
Union.


POPCORN SPECIAL
At


MORTIMER'S CANDY KITCHEN
East Street

2 Heaps Popcorn 2/.79
Lb. Caramel Corn .80
A Lb. Popcorn Coconut Candy .80
1Lb. Popcurn Peanut Candy .80
% Lb. Popcorn Fruit Candy .80
3 Pks. Popcorn Crisp .50

Also Hot Peanuts, Snow Cones, Cotton Candy


JOHNNIE WALKER sets up the bar for a "Happy Hour" at the Nassau Beach Hotel...with
JOHNNIE WALKER Scotch, of course. The popular JOHNNIE WALKER figure is making
personal appearances all over town and offering free drinks of JOHNNIE WALKER Scotch to
patrons.Yes, JOHNNIE WALKER is"Still Going Strong"and so is his scotch, since 1820, in fact.
Look for JOHNNIE WALKER and share a free drink with him!


M _" w wm *----I__


__ __


i


I1 V A I01NS0 1


NASSA PORTON COIROI INTR


I


Whr Wrtbittit