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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03489
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: November 5, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03489

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HDUDLEY'S
C^ ROSETTA ST. & MT. ROYAL AVE.



P.O. BOX 5850 PHONE 2-1306/2-3237


ritlhuur


( .r.d with Pstmator f Bahm. ter potae osoneoM within e Bhm.) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


VOL. LXX, No. 288 Monday, November 5,1973 Price: I Cents


UNION DISPUTE ROCKS HOTEL INDUSTRY AS BAHAMAS REELS FROM WEEKEND ARAB OIL EMBARGO


Huge pay hike demand


ignored by hotels,


so


union files dispute notice


By MIKE LOTHIAN
ITS DEMAND FOR MASSIVE PAY HIKES on November 1 ignored by management, the Hotel Union today
filed notice of a dispute clearing the way for legal strike action just before the New Year and only two weeks after
the start of the tourist industry's busy winter season.


Hotels want to defer wage talks until



costs assessed on better conditions

By MIKE LOTHIAN
THE HOTEL AND CATERING WORKERS' UNION and the Hotel Employers' Association face
long and .;ard negotiation before reconciling the major differences between their respective
proposals for a new contract to replace one which expires on January 6, 1974.


Until the new contract is
signed the hotel business and
the tourist industry as a whole!
will operate in the shadow of*
threatened strike action by the
more than six thousand hotel
workers in the almost 30 New
Providence and Paradise Island
hotels who are association
members.
Even though both sides have
probably grossly overstated
their wants or needs in the
preliminary proposals so that
there will be room fir hacking
down somewhat during the
actual negotiations there are
several areas where the gaps
between opposing suggestions
are so wide that compromise is
likely to prove difficult.
The issue of wages has
already led to the union's filing
notice of a dispute, which
opens the way for legal strike
action beginning sometime
between Christmas Day and
New Year's Day.
The union demanded that the
minimum rates payable be
increased from 30 to as high
as 100 per cent in the various
categories, effective
November 1.
Management prefers to defer
wage talks until the cost of
negotiated improvements in
working conditions can be
assessed.
TIME SPAN
There might be problems in
the parties agreeing on the
duration of the new agreement.
The union's draft proposal
states that the new contract
should last two years. The
hotels' counter-proposal has
left the duration period blank.
Certain to cause trouble in
the hoteliers' proposal that 13
categories of workers be
removed from the bargaining
unit entirely and designated
management personnel.
NON-UNIONISTS?
The categories involved are
assistant maitre d', head
captain, captain/hostess, head
bartender, bar captain, head
bell captain, assistant
housekeeper, night
housekeeper head houseman,
inspectress, laundry supervisor,
senior kitchen steward and
head pool/beach man.
If management has its way
those workers would no longer
be covered by the contract and
could no longer look to the
union for protection or
assistance.
The present contract
stipulates that clerical workers
will work 42-hour, six-day
week and domestic, shift and
other workers are on the job
45 hours over six days.
The union has proposed a
40-hour, five and a half day
week for clerical staff and a
42-hour, six-day week for
others.
The hotels have agreed to


WALL

DECORATIONS


NASSAU. FREEPORT


~ V-








DAVID KNOWLES
.. hotel workers' leader.

the 40-hour week for clerical
staff, but they want to be able
to spread the hours, at their
discretion, over five days, five
and a half days or six days, or
alternatively make it 80 hours
on a fortnightly basis.
The Association wants no
change in the hours for
domestic, shift or other
workers.
HOLIDAYS ISSUE
On paid public holidays, the
union wants to add Whit
Monday, Good Friday, August
Monday, Boxing Day and
Independence Day to the
current list of six paid public
holidays.
Management has suggested
taking the Queen's Birthday
out of the list and adding
Independence Day to retain


the total of six paid holidays.
Management favours
retaining the current scale for
paid vacation, at 12 days a year
after 52 weeks, on the job 15
days after 156 weeks. 18 days
after 260 weeks, 21 days after
364 weeks and 24 days after
520 weeks.
The unions wants to increase
the leave to 21 days after 156
weeks, 24 days after 260
weeks, 30 days after 364
weeks, 33 days after 520 weeks
and 36 days after 780 weeks.
SICK LEAVE
The union is also demanding
more paid sick leave a year.
Management is agreeing to an
increase, but not as much as
the union wants.
Another area likely to prove
troublesome is the section
dealing with disciplinary
action.
The current contract states
that a worker may be
suspended with or without pay
for seven days pending
investigation of any of 13
offences.
The union proposes to lower
the suspension period to five
days, and wants to reduce the
list of offences to nine by
cutting out drunkenness,
arguing with a guest, repeated
arguing with other employees
and insubordination.
Management on the other
hind wants to be able to either
dismiss or suspend an
eriployee for seven days, and
On Page 4 Col. I


Witness denies murder

involvement on recall

RAYMOND "SKULL" SCAVELLA, a prosecution witness
who earlier testified to witnessing the September 5, Perpall Tract
murder of Bias Street entertainer-bartender Raymond Barry
Major, 25, again denied involvement in the shooting when
recalled to the witness stand this morning.
Scavella, recalled by sent for him while Major,
Solicitor General Langton Anthony Conyers and Humes
Hilton upon requests from remained at the scene.
defe*A attrnevs de 4 d


also having a gun on September
5.-
Making the accusation was
attorney Lawrence P. J.
Trenchard, appearing for
Wendell "Red" Burrows, 25,
who is being tried with Phillip
"Polka" Humes, a waiter,
represented by attorney David
C. Bethell.
Scavella took his position in
the witness box after the
testimony of CJ.D. Sgt. Garth
Johnson.
Scavella was asked to verify
the contents of his statement
when recalled. He told Mr.
Trenchard that Burrows
appeared frightened at the
scene.
Scavella denied making
certain parts of the statement
to police but also told the
court he could have "goofed"
during the interview as he was
frightened upon being picked
up by police for the first time
in his life.
Mr. Trenchard charged
Scavella with also having a gun
on September 5 and using it to
get Burrows into the car when


Mr. Trenchard said that
Burrows was frightened, during
the murder, as Scavella
testified, because Scavella was
pointing the second gun at
him. "You see," he said, "if
Burrows had the only gun at
the scene, why should he
worry about anyone shooting
him. I put it to you that you
realise this and that is why you
have changed your story."
Scavella said he did not
know the reason for Burrows'
fright.

MIurdler trial peins
A 25-YEAR-OLD carpenter
charged with the staboing
death of Kemp Road gardener
Leonaid "Pegleg" Smith, 50,
on July 11, went on trial
before Supreme Court Justice
Maxwell Thompson this
morning.
Leroy Miller, alias Leroy
Smith, of St. James Road,
pleaded not guilty as the trial
opened. Appearing for the
defence is attorney S. A.
Harris-Smith.
Crown Counsel Alpin
Russell is appearing for the
prosecution.


There are indications that
New Providence and Paradise
Island hotels may be hit by
illegal work-stoppages even
before the Industrial Relations
Act's 53-day "cooling-off"
period expires about December
28.
"We aren't worrying about
the cooling-off period,"
remarked David Knowles,
president of Hotel and Catering
Worker's Union, after
confirming that a dispute
would be filed today with the
Labour Ministry.
The union's two year
contract with the Hotel
Employers' Association expires
on January 6, and on October
3 the union submitted its
proposals for a new contract,
including a demand for
increases in the minimum
wages ranging from 30 to 100
percent. Although the current
contract still has two months
to run, the union demanded
that the new wage scales take
effect from Nov. 1.
The employers late last week
submitted their counter-pro-
posal which gave concessions in
some areas, rejected other
union demands and suggested
management-favouring changes
in other sections of the new
contract.
The union released the
employer's proposals today.
Management came up
with no counter-proposal on
wages at all. suggesting that
changes in the pay rates should 1
be negotiated only after the
increased cost of agreed
improvements in working
conditions are assessed.
In a covering letter
accompanying the
counter-proposal. Association
executive director Trevelyan
Cooper, laying the groundwork
for a plea during the
negotiations that the hotels are
unable to bear too-great
increases in operating costs,
told union secretary Bobby
Glinton of the problems facing
the hotel business and the
tourist industry.
SEVERE LOSSES
He cited severe financial
losses, decreasing occupancy
figures, increasing travel agent
commission payments, rising
utility costs and strengthening
competition.
He told Mr. Glinton:
"You will recall that
during the last negotiations,
we told you that during the
year 1970 our member hotels
had suffered a net loss
exceeding $1.5 million. For
the year 1972, the loss
amounted to over $7 million,
and with the 12 percent
decline in occupancy
anticipated for 1973, the loss
could reach $10 million."
It was not made clear
whether all the member hotels
are losing various amounts of
money totalling the figures he
gave, or whether large losses
are being incurred by only a
few establishments.
The letter said that average
occupancy during 1971 was 63
percent. The figure rose to
64.3 percent last year, but the
hotels expect it to fall this year
to 58 percent.
LOW OCCUPANCY
"In the first nine months of
1972 the average occupancy
was 69.17 percent, compared
with a figure of 62.87 percent
in the first nine months of
1973," Mr. Cooper wrote.
"During the four winter
months of this year
(January-April) which because
of their higher rates are the
only profitable months, we had
a decline of 13.06 percent
compared with the


BABY DIES

IN BLAZE
A SEVEN-MONTH-OLD
baby boy died in a blaze
which on Saturday
completely destroyed a
four-room wooden house on
Peter Street east.
Dead is Ignatius
Chambers, son of Eula
Norton, who had left her
baby in the care of Nellie
Humes. Miss Humes along
with Marilyn Thompson and
George Burrows, occupied
the destroyed house.
Firemen were called to the
fire at 10.55 p.m. and on
arrival at the scene found the
house completely engulfed in
flames, and the roof of an
adjacent building alight.
The destroyed house,
owned by Austin Leadon, is
believed to have been insured.
The adjacent two-roorim
building, occupied by Robert
Gaitor, was only slightly
damaged.
The cause of the fire is
unknown, a fire department
spokesman said, and police
are investigating.

corresponding months of 1972.
Mr. Cooper went oa to say
that in the past hotels have paid
travel agents from 15 to 18
percent commission depending
on the size of groups, and the
Ministry of Tourism
''supplemented the
commission" by an undisclosed
amount.
But recently the agents
demanded an increase in their
commission to 20 percent to
cover increasing costs, and at
the same time the Ministry
"told the agents that inview
of budgetary constraints and
the need to look in other
- directions for business;, the
Ministry had to revise their
bonus formula, and this
would involve a reduction in
their commission unless they
appreciably increased their
volume of business."
In subsequent negotiations a
flat rate commission of 18
percent was agreed on, Mr.
Cooper said.
DISADVANTAGE
He went on to say that the
Bahamian hotel industry is "at
a serious disadvantage with
other resort areas" because of a
number of factors, including
the "heavy" duty on all
imports.
"A particular example of
our problems is to be found in
the area of utility charges," he
added.
He said the utility charges
on each room in the Bahamas
amounted to $1,224 a year,
compared with Florida's $500.
the Caribbean's $756, Puerto
Rico's $948 and Hawaii's
S376.
Those utility costs, he said,
represent ten percent of total
sales here, but only 5.69
On Page 4

2 OUT OF

4 BACK IN

PRISON

ONLY TWO escaped
prisoners remain at large
following the recapture in the
Grove area on Saturday
afternoon of David Albury, 22,
who broke out of the Fox Hill
prison on October 19 with
Victor Storr, 20.
Storr was recaptured on
Palm Beach Street on Thursday
last week.
Police are still hunting for
Errol Dean, 20, who is five feet
seven inches in height, of
medium build and dark
complexion, and for Dugal
Farquharson also 20, who is
five feet six inches of medium


build and with small scars on
both sides of his face.
Dean, arrested on a charge
of shopbreaking and stealing,
escaped from Central Police
Station on August 30.
Farquharson was serving a six
year sentence for
housebreaking and robbery,
and escaped from the Fox Hill
Prison on October 29.
Albury was serving a
two-year sentence for forgery
and fraud by false pretences at
the time of his escape. Storr
was in custody pending trial
for housebreaking and stealing
and assault with a deadly
weapon.


Oil supplies here


'not critical'


but costs to Bahamians will



be 'significantly higher' shortly

By NICKI KELLY
BARRING ANY FURTHER DETERIORATION in the Middle East situation, Shell Bahamas -


largest supplier of domestic fuel
increased cost.
The statement by general
manager David Pownall came
in the wake of new production
cuts by the Arab oil nations in
their offensive against
supporters of Israel.
Saudi Arabia announced
Saturday it has banned oil
deliveries to any country
known to deliver crude or
refined products regualrly to
the United States. Included in
the embargo is the Bahamas.
Other nations affected are the
U.S., Holland, Canada,
Trinidad, the Antilles, Puerto
Rico, Guam and South Africa.
This morning the
10-member Organization of
Arab Petroleum Exporting
Countries (OPEC) disclosed
they would reduce their
November output a further 25
percent below production in
September and an additional
five percent below this month's
production in December.
The squeeze by the Arabs
has caused a worldwide
shortage of fuel combined with
price hikes at the source
ranging from 56 to 90 percent.
'NOT CRITICAL'
Although Bahamian
consumers will inevitably have
to pay higher prices, the
position for the moment does
not appear as critical as
elsewhere.
Mr. Pownall explained that
Shell supplies approximately
half of the gasoline comsumed
in the Bahamas, about
one-third of the fuel used at
Nassau International Airport
and about half the diesel used
in the Bahamas.
The major exception for
diesel fuel is the Bahamas
Electricity Corporation which
is supplied by the Bahamas Oil
Refinery at Grand Bahama.
The balance of the oil
consumed domestically is
supplied by Esso and Texaco.
Shell supplies are brought in
principally from refineries in
Caracao, Trinidad and
Venezuela, which use oil mined
in Venezuela for their
operations.
HIGHER PRICES
The supply from Venezuela
is continuing unchanged but at
considerably higher prices,"
Mr. Pownall said.
Venezuela announced
November I that it had
increased the tax on oil
production by 56 percent. The
Persian Gulf raised its tax by
70 percent some three weeks
ago and Libya has upped it to
over 90 percent.
"There are two problems
involved here, the physical
availability of oil and its
price," Mr. Pownall told The
Tribune.
He thought that for the
moment Shell should be able
to continue supplying existing
customers in the same quantity
as before, but the present
situation would not allow for
any large new consumers of
any type.
"This however is said
without knowledge of what
politics will dictate in the
Middle East. If the situation
deteriorates further it is
possible we may have to cut
back supplies to existing
customers."
There was no doubt, he
continued, that oil prices
were going to have to rise in
the Bahamas as they have all
over the rest of the world. This


oil expects to continue supplying existing customers but at an


was related, Mr. Pownall said,
to the tax increase by oil
producing countries and
shortages which were pushing
prices up still higher.
'SIGNIFICANT' RISE
The sale of fuel in the
Bahamas is under the control
of the Prices Commission, and
both government and the
Commission are being kept
informed as to prices and
physical availability of fuel,
Mr. Pownall said.
He was reluctant to give an
estimate of the price increases
that could be expected. "We
can however expect them to
rise rather significantly," he said.
For the present Shell dealers
have been given no instructions
to ration the sale of fuel to
consumers. Mr. Pownall
pointed out that local
consumption has remained
relatively static for the past
year of so.
The total consumption for
the whole Bahamas, including
BEC and the airport, is
estimated at five million
barrels. There are 42 U.S.
gallons to the barrel.
Discussing future
repercussions from the present
crisis, Mr. Pownall said this
must be divided into two parts.
In the very short term the
effects could be serious if the
political situation in the Middle
East deteriorated.
NOT SO AVAILABLE
In the longer term he
thought oil would never again
be as freely available as in the
past and that prices of oil
would move steadily upward.
The basic reason for this was
that the governments of the oil
producing countries had now
realized that "there must
somewhere be a limit to the
amount of oil available in the
ground of their countries, and
that they are in a position to
dictate the terms under which
this wasting asset of theirs can
be withdrawn."
Mr. Pownall predicted that
research already done on
finding alternative sources of
energy would be accelerated.
Shale, which has thus far not
been exploited because of the
high costs involved, might now
become more competitive
when viewed alongside the
price of oil, he said.
Both the U.S. and Canada
have vast deposits of this
mineral.
Also predicted was a
comeback for coal whose use
has been restricted because of
its polluting qualities.
"Ways will have to be found
to reduce the pollution from
coal or else the anti-pollution
in the U.S. will have to be
liberalized," Mr. Pownall said.
He did not anticipate that
the development of Alaska
would ease the oil problem for
the U.S. Alaska, he said, was
not likely to produce more
than two to three million
barrels a day, which was not
more than a quarter of the 8
million barrels which was
recently being produced by
Saudi Arabia.

NEEDLE-POINT LUNCH
MRS. BETTY Dalgliesh will
demonstrate needle-point at
the 12:30 p.m. meeting
Wednesday of the Inner Wheel
Club of Nassau at the Flagler
Inn on Paradise Island.


WOMAN INJURED IN FIRE, DIES


MRS. DOROTHY May
Plakaris, 42, of Regency Park,
died at the Princess Margaret
Hospital Saturday from injuries
received in a fire last Tuesday
night in Toote Shop Corner.
Funeral services will be held
at Our Lady's Church with the
Rev. Marcian Peters officiating.
The date and time will be
announced later.
Mrs. Plakaris is survived by


her husband Nicko ot the
Hyatt Emerald Beach Hotel;
six children, Mrs. May Doris
Thurston, Mrs. Vincanna
Godet,Constance Steven, Judy
and Michael; her parents Mr.
and Mrs. Harrv G. Smith of
Prince Charles Avenue;
grandmother Prennina Flower;
three brothers, Sidney, Junior
and Hector and seven sisters,
Nellie, Betty, Thelma, Harriet.
Mildred, Lana and Hazel.


PAN AM, EASTERN

NOT AFFECTED,

BAHAMASAIR


MIGHT BE
AIRLINES SERVICING
the Bahamas have no plans to
cut back on their winter
schedules, despite the present
world-wide fuel emergency.
Max Gurney, Pan
American sales director, said
today that his company
intends to carry through its
projected plans, "unless
something special happens."
According to Mr. Gurney
the tourist picture for
Thanksgiving and Christmas
looks brighter than it did last
year. "More traffic is planned
to come to the Bahamas and
we are putting on more
sections," he said.
The oil shortage is not
likely to affect Pan Am to the
extent that it will U.S.
domestic carriers. Because of
its international character,
PanAni's fuel supplies come
from 'n ..v thm" world.
William H. Bierman,
manager of Eastern Airlines,
said he had received no notice
of plans to cut back locally
although Eastern had reduced
its domestic flights stateside.
It was his understanding,
he said, that bonded fuel
carried by airlines travelling
to points overseas would not
be affected. Such fuel is
purchased in the U.S. because
of cheaper prices and used for
the return flight.
Bahamasair disclosed it had
received verbal notice Friday
from one of its two U.S.
distributors that Libyan and
Saudi Arabian sources had
been cut off and they could
therefore anticipate a
curtailment of supplies.
No indication had been
given however how this
would specifically affect
Bahamasair. "We are
continuing to operate
normally and do not plan a
cutback as long as U.S.
carriers operating here do not
cut back," manager Max
Healey said.

BEC WILL MEET

OIL SUPPLIER
THE BAHAMA'.S Liectricity
Corporation does not expect to
be affected by the Mid-East oil
crisis.
Deputy general manager
Peter Bethel said today that
the Corporation would
however be meeting with its
suppliers the Bahamas Oil
Refinery Thursday "to look
into the whole matter.
lie said there had been
constant price increases this
year nine so far, and most of
these were the result of tax
increases in Venezuela.
"The recent price increases
to BEC consumers are the
result of these higher costs,"
Mr. Bethel said.
BORCO supplies all the
fuel used by BEC. According
to Mr. Bethel oil is supplied in
two grades diesel, used for
the Blue Hill generators, Big
Pond and the gas turbines at
Blue Hill and Bunker-C oil used
exclusively for the Clifton Pier
power plant.
Mr. Bethel said BEC uses an
average of 120,000 long tons
of fuel oil per vear.


EDDIE'S DEPOT. STORE
EAST OF STOP-N-SHOP, BAY STREET

BIGSA.LE
POLYESTER CLOTH $4. -$5.
TERYLENE & MOHAIR $4.00


II I II I


v


L Ih p


L-


4











bht Mrtmwnw


Monday, November 5, 1973


A "GAMBLERS special"
bus carrying a group of
"variety swingers" to the
midnight floor show at a
Reno casino smashed head-on
into a freeway abutment near
Sacramento, killing the driver
and 12 of the partygoers.

TWO earth tremors hit the
Ionian islands and western
Greece within 10 minutes of
each other, causing damage to
scores of buildings and
injuring two poeple.

THE latest Gallup Poll
shows an increase in those
who think President Nixon
should be impeached and a
decrease in Nixon's
popularity. Thirty-three per
cent of those polled believe
Nixon should be impeached.

ONE hijacker was killed
and three accomplices were
overpowered in an
unsuccessful attempt to
divert a Soviet airliner to
Sweden, the Duesseldorf
Daily Rheinische Post
reported.

ERICH SEGAL, the author
of "Lcve Story," resigned
from Yale University last
June 30, according to a list
released over the weekend by
the institution.

GLASGOW firemen went
back to wori- today ending
Britain's first firemen's strike.
They accepted an offer
increasing basic pay to $75.

LONDON'S morning and
evening newspapers did not
appear today because of a
one-day stoppage by
engineering workers.

A FORMER typesetter
who once studied economics
in Moscow has been named
chairman of the
44,000-member West German
Communist Party. He is
Herbert Mies, 44.

PEACE activist Abie
Nathan temporarily has
closed down his floating radio
station in the Mediterranean
for lack of money.

SISTER Gloria, a nun
teaching 38 male students at
the St. Joseph sewing center,
West Hartford, Conn says
"the men are so serious" in
their work with needles and
thread.

THE bodies of all four
victims of the plane crash in
Soufriere mountains, St.
Lucia have been removed
from the scene of accident.

BEGINNING next January
electricity consumed in
Jamaica will pay higher bills
as a result of the 56 per cent
price increase for crude oil
imposed by Venezuela
November I according to the
Jamaica Public Service,
suppliers of electricity.


WHILE snow diminished
over most of the northern
plains a new storm system off
the Washington coast has
swept more snow into
Montana.
(Reports from AP)


Tapes: Nixon gets set




for the next round


KEY BISCAYNE President Nixon has completed a busy
weekend at the Florida White House and his lawyers have charted
the next moves in the case of the presidential tapes.
Nixon's top two legal advisers, J. Fred Buzhardt and Leonard
Garment, arrived here Saturday, but a spokesman said at midday
yesterday they had not met with the president.
Indications were that the two were conferring with White
House Chief of Staff Alexander M. Haig, Jr., who often acts as a
middleman in relaying presidential views to other White House
aides.
The lawyers return to court tomorrow to present more
evidence in the case of the two Watergate-related conversations
that the White House says were not recorded and thus could not
be furnished in compliance with a subpoena.
In Wichita, Kan., Sen. Barry Goldwater. (R-Ariz.), and



Spiro picks up-


all the pieces


FRANK SINATRA SPIRO AGNEW
His friend. 'Brooding'
NEW YORK Where is Spiro Agnew since his recent
resignation under fire as vice president of the United
States?
"Trying to pick up the pieces of his shattered
life....and under a mounting mountain of debt." said
Newsweek magazine in tracing the fate of the man whose
name became a household work as he rose fast to high
office and fell faster.
Agnew still has a government chauffeur pick him up
daily in his Maryland home and transport him to
Washington where he works sorting out 400 cartons of his
papers deciding which to keep personally and which to
move to government archives.
"One close friend says that considering everything
Agnew seems remarkably cheerful and optimistic,"
Newsweek continued.
"But others say he is given to spells of brooding... after
paying $10,000 for income tax evasion, he still has reason
to brood.
"His legal fees promise to run as high as $200,000 and he
still faces crushing mortgage payments on his $190,000
house in Maryland, and the internal revenue service may yet
hit him with a staggering bill for back taxes.
"Official Washington ignores Agnew but he still does
have a few loyalists in his corner. One is singer Frank
Sinatra, who says: 'I'm his friend. "I'll do anything for
him."(AP)

Israel misleads the

public says Egypt


CAIRO Egypt's
Government spokesman
accused Israel today of trying
to "mislead the public into
thinking Egypt is violating the
ceasefire" in order to pave the
way for Israel "to launch a
flash attack."
Ahmed Anis told newsmen
Israel refused "up to this very
minute" U.N. resolutions.
Egypt's military spokesman,
General Ezziden Muhktar, told
newsmen the lines of Oct. 22
were easily definable by
military communiques issued
that day by each side.
Anis said 50 observers from
the Soviet Union, including 20
translators, "have so far
arrived" in Egypt but said they


ENDS
NOV. 10th

______ ON


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columnist William F. Buckley Jr., said Saturday they expect a
startling development in the Watergate affair in the next few
days.
They indicated they expect it to come from the court
investigation into the missing tapes. The two were having coffee
together at the Wichita airport and talked to a television news
crew.
A White House spokesman said Nixon was working Sunday on
the Middle East situation and on future moves to ease the energy
crisis. The president talked during the day with Secretary of State
Henry Kissinger, who left today on a diplomatic trip to Cairo.
The president, who arrived here Thursday for a long weekend
in warm and sunny Florida, has been kept posted on suggestions
in newspaper editorials that he resign, an aide said.
In their Sunday morning President's credibility was so
editions, the New York Times damaged "it might be
and the Detroit News called for impossible for him to recover"
Nixon's resignation. The Times it.
said a "surging torrent" of Brooke said there seemed to
events has stripped Nixon of him to be only three possible
his "capacity to act as chief alternatives to resolution of the
executive." The News said current Watergate-related crisis
three more years of a Nixon in the government.
administration is "too bleak, The alternatives, he said on
too dangerous a prospect." ABC television's "Issues and
Deputy press secretary Answers" programme, are the
Gerald L. Warren responded to president's impeachment, or
the editorial by declaring the that he "limp along" in office,
president "has absolutely no or that he resign.
intention of resigning." In favouring resignation,
"He feels he has much to do Brooke said he had
for this nation in foreign affairs "reluctantly come to that
and domestic policy, including conclusion" because he felt
clearing up the whole there was "no question
Watergate matter," Warren President Nixon has lost his
said. effectiveness as a leader of this
The presidential spokesman country, mainly because he has
said Nixon is concerned about lost the confidence of the
confusion he believes people of this country."
surrounds the disclosure that "And I think therefore in
two conversations were not the interests of this nation that
recorded by the White House he loves, that he should step
taping system, down, should tender his
Meanwhile, Senator Edward resignation."
Brooke called upon President The senator, whose state was
Nixon to resign yesterday the only one of the 50 to vote
saying it would be for the good for Democrat George
of. the nation and the McGovern against Nixon last
Republican Party. year, said his mail was running
Brooke is the first against President Nixon by
Republican senator to call 7,558 to 441 as of last
openly for Nixon's resignation. Wedn esday. They are
The Massachusetts overwhelmingly for
Republican said he believed the impeachment, he said. (AP).


Arabs close ranks


for Kissinger


BEIRUT Arab leaders
sought to close ranks today in a
last flurry of jetliner diplomacy
before the arrival of U.S.
Secretary of State Henry
Kissinger.
At stake is the fragile
cease-fire that stopped the
fourth Arab-Israeli war.
Algerian president Houari
Boumedienne was in Kuwait
after visits to Cairo, Damascus
and Baghdad. Press reports said
he had persuaded Egypt and
Syria to attend an Arab
summit conference in Algiers,
but it was not known whether
Iraq had agreed.
b ivan Col- Moammar


rejected the Oct. 22 cease-fire
that was accepted by Israel,
Egypt and Syria. However,
Egypt and Syria suffered
territorial losses in what they
said were ceasefire violations
after that date and both have
threatened to go to war again
unless Israel quickly pulls back
to the Oct. 22 lines.
Israel's diplomatic effort has
concentrated on the question
of prisoner exchanges and an
Egyptian withdrawal from the
Sinai desert in exchange for an
Israeli withdrawal to the Oct.
22 lines.
Prime Miniter Golda Meir
was jetting to Tel Aviv late


I'


Liz the

auctioneer
FILM STAR Elizabeth
Taylor (above) played a dual
role as auctioneer and bidder as
she helped raise $184,000 at a
benefit for Israeli war widows
and orphans in Amsterdam.
The actress bought a
diamond collar for $2,400 and
sold the pearl necklace she
wore to the auction for $800.
After her stint for
Amsterdam's collective Israel
Action Committee, Miss Taylor
auctioned the hammer which
she wielded during the bidding.
The gavel, along with a kiss,
went for $2,200.
She was accompanied at the
auction by Henry Wijnberg, a
39-year-old Dutchman who
emigrated to the United States
at the age of 18 and now lives
in Beverly Hills where he deals
in used cars (AP).

Car plants

silent
LONDON Production was
at a standstill today at most
British car factories because of
a nationwide one-day strike
called by the engineers union
to protest the Government's
industrial realtions policy.
Newspapers, airline services,
construction work and the
docks were also affected.


h a v e n o t y e t j o i n e d t h e U N K "U . . . . . . l T h e s t r i k e w a s c a l i c o
Khadafy was in Damascus after today after explaining her
emergency force, pending visits to Cairo and Baghdad, position to Washington. Amalgamated Union
instructions from U.N. reportedly trying to She left the United States Engineering workers whi
Secretary-General Kurt consolidate a "anti-cease-fire about the same time as Kissinger over a million members
Waldheim.about U.S. observers, bloc" that would torpedo the embarked for a five-day swing fine of $180,000 levie
Asked about U.S. observers, Middle East truce, through the Arab world, by the Industrial Re
he said Egypt had no objection Iraq, Libya and Kuwait hoping to avert a resumption Court.
to them of hostilities

DUTCH SKATE THROUGH CAR BAN


AMSTERDAM Children
roller skated on the streets and
teen-aged cyclists zig-zagged
down the highways as
dutchmen turned a Sunday
driving ban into an impromptu
holiday.
Whole families of cyclists
went for rides and forgot all
about traffic or exhaust fumes.
In Amsterdam groups of young
people garlanded their bikes
with flowers and rode around
in shouting processions.
The Sunday ban was serious
business an effort to
conserve fuel to help offset an
oil embargo on the Netherlands
by eight Arab nations upset


'Depressed'

CLEVELAND Cyril J.
Rovansek telephoned his father
to complain that he was
depressed and "felt like killing
everyone". The father heard
a gunshot blast, and the
conversation was disconnected.
A short time later, eight
people were dead and a


When it comes to insurance

it's Dominion for Life


... in Nassau

cal Nat Dorsett 2-3843



S -- THE 0MNONFE ASSURANCE COMRWANY


about Dutch policy in the
Middle East.
But the nation took it in a
carnival spirit, and a
spokesman for the national
traffic police called it "an
outstanding success."
"We always drive out of
town on a Sunday," said a
telephone technician with his
wife and two daughters in
Amsterdam's Rembrandt
Square.
"But this time we've come
in from the suburbs on our
bikes. It's the first time my
two girls have ever biked into
the center of the city and we're
having a good day. So who's


angry about the oil embargo?"
Dozens of extra trams and
buses were put on the routes of
major cities. Trains ran with
30-50 per cent more passengers
as only taxis, buses. motorcycles
and vehicles with foreign
licence plates were allowed on
the roads.
Officials said there were
probably fewer than 20,000
cars on Dutch highways, most
driven by foreigners or people
in exempted categories. An
estimated 800,000 Dutchmen
go joy riding on a normal
Sunday.
Police reported 15 hours
after the ban began at 3 aan.


oy tme
n of
ich has
over a
d on it
lations


that 50 violations had been
logged across the country.
Officers in the hague said they
confiscated two cars from
young Dutchmen who defied
the ban in the early-morning
hours.
"It appears that they just
wanted to see what would
happen," a spokesman
said." (AP).


MAN SUCKED


FROM PLANE


IN EXPLOSION
ALJ3UQUERQUE Police began an air search for a man who,
fellow passengers on a jetliner said, was sucked out a window
when an engine blew up Saturday night at an altitude of nearly


40,000 feet.
The passengers on the
National Airlines DC 10 said
the exploding engine ripped a
hole in the side of the
three-engine jumbo airliner,
and a window over the right
wing popped out.
Mrs. Mark Smith, of Las
Vegas, said a sobbing
stewardess told her husband
"she had just served the man a
drink and saw him go out the
window."
The crippled airliner turned
back and made an emergency
landing at the Albuquerque
airport. Ten of the 125 aboard
the plane were hospitalized,
and 15 others were treated and
released. Most were injured
sliding out emergency exit
ramps,
A New Mexico State police
plane and two national guard
helicopters searched the
mountains and plains area
southwest of Albuquerque for
the passenger's body.
The missing man was
identified as G. F. Gardner, of
Beaumont, Texas, National
Airlines said.
The flight began in Miami
and stopped in New Orleans
and Houston, en route to Las
Vegas and San Francisco. It
carried 113 passengers and 1.
crew members.
Earlier, in Miami, National
spokesman Kenneth Turpin
issued this terse statement:
"We have reports that a male
passenger was ejected from
the plane as the result of
decompression."
Another passenger, Miami
Beach lawyer David Drucker,
said he did not see the man fly
out of the window but talked
to others who did. "They said
he was hanging by his belt, and
they tried to pull him back in,
but he went on out.
"I was closer to that engine
than anyone else," Drucker
said. "It was on my right side. I
figured thai was the end. I
heard the explosion. I took a
look and I could see it flying.
"That engine literally fell
apart. I don't know how that
pilot kept it from burning. We
all had our oxygen masks on.
We knew it was going to be an
emergency landing."
A spokesman from Kirtland
Air Force base, Jim Harvey,
said the DC10's "starboard
engine was torn up under the
right wing. The right engine
cowling and everything was
gone. The compressor blades
were visible and torn up."
Clyde Sharrer, director of
the Albuquerque Airport, said
the plane was flying between
38,000 and 39,000 feet at the
time of the engine trouble.
Doctors strike
ROME Italian hospital
doctors started a three-day
nationwide strike today leaving
patients in Italy's 1,500
hospitals without assistance
(AP).


Strikers

stop the

News


NEW YORK The
AFL-AFL-CIO New York
Newspaper Guild today stuck
the Daily News after the union
rejected what management
negotiators called their final
contract offer.
The strike at the News, the
nation's largest-circulation
daily, affects 1,400 editorial,
commercial and other
employees covered by the
guild.
The union's full negotiating
committee voted the walkout
following an all-night
bargaining session.
Pickets appeared outside the
Daily News building 20
minutes after the strike began.
Printers arriving for an 8:30
a.m. shift refused to cross the
lines.
The negotiations collapsed
when the guild rejected an
offer of an annual $13.85 a
week increase in a two-year
contract, a figure for which
three craft unions had settled.
Guild opponents of the offer
said they wanted the same
percentage increase given the
craft unions.
The news said in a
statement that it intended "to
continue publication of the
Daily news" and asked all
employees to report to work as
scheduled. It said it would
continue negotiations with the
guild.
There was no indication
from the New York Post or the
New York Times on whether
they would shut down because
the News was struck (AP).


Athens
Rome
Paris
London
Berlin
Amsterdam
Brussels
Madrid
Moscow
Stockholm
New York
San Francisco
Los Angeles
Chicago
Miami
Tokyo
Hong Kong
Buenos Aires
Honolulu
Rio
Lisbon


57 Fair
68 sunny
59 cloudy
52 sunny
46 cloudy
59 cloudy
57 overcast
61 rain -
34 overcast
41 overcast
52 cloudy
59 rain
68 clear
43 cloudy
82 clear
66 cloudy
80 sunny
71 clear
84 clear
79 cloudy
64 rain


FOR 3 in1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157


NOTICE

BELGRAVE AUCTIONEERS
Will sell at public 'auction at government
warehouse, Arawak Cay, November 6, 1973, at
10:30 a.m. miscellaneous goods (terms cash
only)


Public is invited, come one, come all.


policeman shot eight dead


Cleveland policeman lay
critically wounded.
Police said Rovansek, a
31-year-old University Heights
patrolman, killed his wife and
his two children, went upstairs
and killed a family of four
before wounding the
policeman and taking his own
life yesterday.
Police surrounded the
Rovansek home in the quiet
neighbourhood and sprayed
the house with tear gas before
Rovansek's ederly father, who
drove to the home after the
phone conversation, broke
through a back door and found
the bodies.
The victims, in addition to
Rovansek, were identified as
his 32-year-old wife, Patricia;
his daughter, Kimberly, 7; his
son, Cyril, 8; Jerry Diloreto,
46; his wife, Shirley, 29; and
their daughter and son,


7-year-old Linda and 5-year-old
Michael.
There was no immediate
explanation for the shootings.
Police said three different
guns were used and all victims
were shot in the head.
Cleveland detective William
Leppelmeier said Rovansek had
called his father about 8:15
a.m. and "complained that
everything was down on him."
Leppelmeier said that the
elder Rovansek heard someone
say, "don't shoot," and then
heard a shot. The elder
Rovansek said he immediately
went to his son's home, about
-25 blocks away.
Leppelmeier said the
wounded patrolman's partner
reported that as soon as the
two officers arrived at the
door, Kidner was shot. He said
he heard one more ihot.
immediately afterward, inside
the house.


I I


dr.


-Mumm


I


I


World weallie


I










Monday, November 5,1973


Something to think about


By ETIENE DUPUCH
BOSTON, October 18: I have often said in this column that it
is difficult for me to get a message across to the people of the
Bahamas today because they don't know where they came
from....how they got to where they are today....and how easy it
would be for them to be suddenly returned to the starting point.
The truth of this statement was forcibly impressed on my
consciousness when I picked up the magazine "Sky" in the
pocket in front of my seat on a Delta flight last Sunday from
Miami to this city. -
This magazine carried a story about the origin and
development of the sponge industry that I didn't realize before
because when I was a child this industry was in full swing.
It was the Colony's most important enterprise .... just took it
fro granted....I simply accepted the fact that it had always been
there....and I didn't realize how important it was to our people
urttil it was destroyed by a mysterious plague of unknown origin
that swept out of eastern waters and completely destroyed this
industry on which the entire population of Andros depended for
a livelihood, as well as thousands of families in such islands as
Berry Island, Grand Bahama, Bimini, Abaco, Exuma, Eleuthera,
Crooked Island, Acklins, Long Cay, Long Island, San
Salvador....just about all the islands in the Bahamas with the
possible exception of Inagua and Mayaguana at the South Eastern
end of the Bahamas archipelago.
I am not too sure about Spanish Wellians....they have always
been farmers....or Harbour Islanders who built four- masted
schooners that sailed the Seven Seas in trade before the advent of
steam.

My tutor Fr. Chrysostom Schreiner always impressed on me
that everything in life....the simplest thing....has a past. If you
know the past and can relate it to the present, then you may be
able to intelligently measure the future. This, he said, was
thinking constructively.
For the purpose of this discussion let us cast our minds back to
life in the Bahamas in the early days of this century.
A child bom in Nassau today turns a switch and a light comes
on. He turns a tap and hot or cold water flows. He drives around
on paved roads in the latest model automobile and some families
even commute to the Out Islands in their own airplanes. There is
radio, TV, local and long distance telephones, telegraph, long
playing records, indoor toilets and sewerage, refrigerators, deep
freeze, air conditioning, motor cruisers, inter-island
communication by power boats, radio and aircraft, and so on,
etcetera.
In The Tribune today we have electronic IBM composition,
teletype news transmission that keeps us constantly in touch with
events around the world. We have speed presses and the latest in
off-set printing. I realized from a conversation with a New York
friend yesterday that, in many ways, The Tribune operation is
more modern than The New York Time& Unionism won't allow
the industry to introduce the latest in printing equipment.
, Back in my early days in Nassau the streets of the city were
white. There is a well known poem entitled "The White Streets of
Nassau". The streets were built of rubble stone hammered into
the ground with inand labour and smoothed down with a heavy
hand operated roller. The work was done by prison labour
because government could not afford to hire labour. The streets
: outside the city were bush paths. The city was lighted with a few
oil lamps. Outside the city was complete darkness.
We need not talk about the Out Islands. They were somewhere
out there, behind God's face.
And in The Tribune operation everything was done
laboriously by hand and foot. Today a single operator of an
IBM machine can produce more in a day than a hundred men by
hand typesetting and a press can produce in an hour what a foot
operation would have taken a month to do.

None of the amenities I have mentioned in this article were
known in the Bahamas....and, indeed, in the big cities of the
world in the early years of this century for the single reason that
they did not exist.
I can remember, for example, the day a train in the U.S.
travelled 60 miles an hour....a mile a minute. That was a big story.
I remember the day the Wright brothers flew the first machine
that lifted off the ground....now men travel to the moon.
And when the first telephone conversation was held over a
short distance....now the telephone circles the world.... and there
is radio and TV communication with outer space.
I remember when communication by telegraph through a cable
line linked Nassau with a station in Jupiter, Fla. Now The
Tribune is in 24-hour communication by teletype with news
events that pour into our office from the four-corners of the
earth.
Children born in the Bahamas today simply inherit all these
advantages....they are here....and they take them for granted.
They hear their parents talk in terms of millions and they read
about nations that deal in billions of dollars.... as lightly as people
of my generation husbanded farthings and cents and were
shocked when anyone ventured into the hundreds.

It is small wonder then that people in the Bahamas today have
their heads in the clouds and cannot get their feet back on the
ground again where they might realize how easily all these
advantages might be greatly reduced or completely disappear for
most of them, especially in the Out Islands.
Incidentally, I can remember when Dr. J. J. Culmer was the
only doctor at the hospital and Nurse "Solie" Stuart was the only
trained nurse in the entire Bahamas!


When people got sick they died ....their departure was accepted
as "the will of God"....and they were buried.
It was just as simple as that!
**************


This train of thought was set in motion when I realized for the
first time that the sponge industry in the Bahamas is no older
than I am.
I will quote the three opening paragraphs in the "Sky" article,
whichh appeared under the caption "Sponging Off the Sea in
Tarpon Springs" to give you some idea of what I am talking
about.
"Nestled in the heart of Florida's Gulf Coast, Tarpon Springs
looks like a quaint Mediterranean village," the article reads. "If
you looked in the waters off Tarpon Springs, however, you would
see that it also boasts the largest sponge population on the North
American Continent.
"From Key West on the South to St. Marks on the North.
there are some 9000 square miles of sponge beds. Twice a month,
boats manned by divers depart Tarpon Springs to seek out the
most productive spots in this vast sponge fishing area.
"Sponge harvesting caught hold in Tarpon Springs just before
the turn of the century when an early settler, John F. Cheney.
brought over divers from the Greek mainland and the
neighboring islands of Algina, Halki and Calymos.
"John Coconis, one of the early Greeks in Tarpon Springs.
persuaded Cheney that he and his countrymen were masters of
sponge diving.
'Within weeks of their arrival, a handful of Greek fishermen
embarked on a trip which eventually led to a booming industry.
The venture lifted Florida out of an economic malaise and
suddenly made Tarpon Springs the sponge fishing capital of the


St. Joseph


EDITOR, The Tribune,
Earlier this year, 1973, at
the July meeting of Saint
Joseph's Parish Council it was
suggested that a parish plan, tn'
coordinate Parish activities and
plans for future progress, be
drawn up. The September
meeting of this same Parish
Council was the one at which
"A Proposed Plan" was
presented and met with the
approval of the members
present.
Our Saint Joseph's proposed
Pastoral Plan is the result of
ideas and suggestions offered
and will be presented as a


guide, an outline, for study by
individuals and parish groups.
The name "Parish Pastoral
Plan" was adopted in view of
the proposal by the September
Priest's meeting of the Catholic
Church which approved such a
plan, as is indicated in a letter
from the Diocesan Chancellor,
Fr. Preston Moss, on
September 18th which states as
follows: "... as a diocese we
chose to take the resolution
that each parish develop a
two-year pastoral plan,
effective September 1974..."
We, in Saint Joseph's Parish,.
Nassau, have other special


world."
****** * ****4
This means that the sponge fishing industry later spread to the
Bahamas. This also means that I knew the first Greeks....like the
big and handsome Vouvalis brothers....who came to Nassau and
founded the Greek community that is there today.
One of the largest operations was carried out in a large sponge
shed on West Bay Street opposite the eastern end of the
Esplanade and it bore a sign in large letters "V. Vouvalis" on the
side of the building facing the street.
A remarkable fact is that this building stood until a few years
ago when it was pulled down to make parking space in the area.
One of the old buildings still stands in the back of this property.
Thousands of our young people of the present generation must
have passed that building and read the name "V. Vouvalis"
without realizing what it had meant to an earlier generation when
sponge meant bread and occasionally butter for thousands of
our people.
And then suddenly overnight this industry was wiped out
by a mysterious plague and the Greek community and the
thousands of Bahamian sponge fishermen had to find other ways
of making a living.
This disaster helped to lead to the development of the artificial
and insecure economy that has brought "prosperity" to our
people....and which government blindness and stupidity now
threatens to destroy.
The whole purpose of this article is to focus attention once
again on the presence of sponge beds in the waters of the
Bahamas because no one knows now how soon we may need to
look into the prospects of this industry again.
Recently Andres Dworin, a Miami-Cuban, started exporting
sponges from the remaining building on the Vouvalis site. He
hopes to revitalize this industry.
This train of thought makes me recall that until the end of the
first world war the Bahamas was exporting citrus to Florida. The
citrus groves were destroyed by the blue-grey fly pest.
I was a member of the Board of Agriculture during a part of
this period and helped to fight this pest. It took years to
overcome it. By this time Florida had its won citrus groves and
they were shipping fruit to us.
Why, indeed, we get meat and even fruits from Australia ...
peas from Africa... grouper filets from South America because
our people's ideas of a living wage make these products cheaper
to import from distant lands than they can be produced in the
Bahamas today!.
Interesting fact is that I was a member of the Agricultural
Board and, indeed, myself engaged in a successful farming
enterprise during the second world war when the screw-worm
fly threatened to destroy all warm-blooded animals in the
Bahamas. This pest was introduced to the islands by a boat load
of infected sheep brought to Nassau from Cuba by the late Sir
Harry Oakes.
And I was on the Board of Agriculture which also embraced
Marine Products when the sponge industry was wiped out.
The Board closed the beds to sponging for many years until the
disease had run its course and nature had cured the scourge. All
the specie of sponges came back except velvet, the most
valuable variety.
An interesting fact is that Dr. Walton Smith was a brilliant
young scientist in England when the pest struck the sponge beds
in the Bahamas.
The Colonial Office in London sent him and an older man,
whose name I can't recall, to Nassau to study the plague and to
see whether anything could be done to check its spread.
They found that nothing could be done and it was at this time
that artificial planting of sponges was introduced to the Bahamas.
By this method a sponge clipping was attached to a concrete
disc and placed on the sea bed in waters not affected by the
plague.
Sponge planters were allocated areas like land acreage
which they could call their own for the cultivation of sponges.
But this operation was never big enough to save the industry and
it also suffered from poaching because these "farms" were in
waters that were easily accessible to men in small dinghy boats.
Anyway ... after many years ... the Board, of which I was
still a member, opened the beds to sponging. But by that time
industry had produced a competitive synthetic sponge and.
although some of the Greek merchants returned gleefully to this
business they soon found that the cost of material and labour
today rendered it unprofitable as a major industry.
But the day may come when many of our people may have to
return to the sponge beds to eke out a modest living.... and it is
reassuring to know that the sponges are still there waiting to be
hooked by men who, of necessity, may be satisfied with small
returns for their labour.


In the same issue of "Sky" is an article on the "Inflatable
Building" which is described as a possible revolutionary
break-through in building construction.
The article states that if the engineers prove to be right in their
claims for inflatable buildings, "inflatables may represent the
greatest break-through in structural design since an Egyptian
pharoah commissioned the first pyramid."
The simple fact is that these are rubber "buildings" blown up
by air.
"An inflatable building," the article states, "can be created at
one-fifth to one-half the cost of a conventional structure (or
about $1.50 a square foot). Studies by Goodyear Tire and
Rubber Company of Akro, Ohio, show that inflatables have 25
percent lower maintenance costs than conventional over a
20-year period, and this includes the cost of several complete skin
replacements for the inflatable."
Here are some facts about the inflatable building
The U.S. Pavilion at Expo '70 in Canaida was milatable. I sa-J
thi: building. it was very nimressive. I didn't know before now
thai it wasn't a metal structure. It aJctuall looked like metal.
* The inflatable will stand wind pressure of 75 miles an hour.
The Goodyear Company has an inflatable near Wooster, Ohio
that covers a whole acre and has no support beams.
Harvard University has an air supported field house that
covers 45,000 square feet and serves as a total athletic complex.
Columbia University has a similar facility.

This type of building might prove practical for certain public
facilities in the Bahamas. They have a very practical side. They
can stand air pressure up to 75 miles. In the case of a hurricane a
building could be deflated in a short time and stored away in a
sfe place until the hurricane had passed.


launch Parish Pastoral Plan


reasons for working on the ______ ________
building up of such a Parish
Pastoral Plan. and some of we face our Parish Pastoral mountain we propose t
these are from the historical Plan, and face them we must, in the years ahead. Wi
point of view. Items of local in the knowledge that a in God the Father, in tl
Church interest from past problem is but the "Tip of the of the Son, Jesus Ch
document remind us in Saint Iceberg" while far below the asking the strength ofI
1) "The first ground for the water level lies its cause. So, Spirit, we say: "Let us
foundation of this St. Joseph's with faith in Jesus Christ, we We submit this tc
Church, was turned, Nov. 13, must launch out into the deep, hope and more dedic
1933"Church, was turned, Nov. 13, and in so doing we will seek many toward their owi
(2) -The first Sunday of the causes and seek solutions, and Parish life. This
Advent. Dec 3. 1933. the A Parish Pastoral Plan such written in the name
cornerstone is blessed and laid, as is planned for our work Joseph's Parish Counc
by Fr. Bonaventure Hansen, must rely on the generosity of
O S. B. many volunteers and workers,
(3) "The first Holy Mass such as Church groups, Church WE SHOIL
having been offered on January organizations and individuals
28, 1934." of already proven generosity,
As we in Saint Joseph's and such as are now parish Our new e
prepare to enter into our supporters and willing portraits and a
"Jubilee Year". which we volunteers. We will need many intense pope
begin on November 6th, 1973. of such qualities. We face a immensely po
celebrating the 40th year of mountain of a task. In life you eveningf.(or any
Saint Joseph's Church, what don't hear of people going long 8p.m.!
more fitting Parish Jubilee Gift journeys, taking risks, sharing
could we give to each other work and effort simply to [
than to enter upon a Parish climb a molehill. In Church I
Plan which is a total Parish and Parish life we must climb
building up programme. In the many a mountain to reach our on the wate
Bahamas. in this year of God. Saint Joseph's Parish
Independence 1973, we see Pastoral Plan is one such
three letters "B. B. B."
standing for "Building a
Better Bahamas" and in Saint
Joseph's Parish, in 1973 and
1974. three other letters -
P.P.P." will stand for our
constitution as we strengthen Cause da temperature
and rededicate ourselves to
building up the Body of Christ fall
among us in this part of the
Bahamas which we .
affectionately call "Saint rite On da mark...
Joseph's." The three letters,
"P.P.P." stand for our Parish
Pastoral Plan.
Each group, each
organization, and indeed each
individual in Saint Joseph's has
a contribution to make for
continuing Church growth -
growth of the Church, the "D On't
Parish, the organizations and
most importantly the Spiritual i
Life. Our Parish Pastoral Plan
will be an attempt, in outline
to be heading in the future. th% s'
The Parish Pastoral Plan is a
pointing in a direction, which
we. as a Parish, will later
follow, ift we as individuals and
group so decide to follow, so
decide to work for, and so
decide to build into the future
of children still to be
born.
We will face our problems as


^^Enter The Tribune-Pan Am




can be yours

any one of 26 European

... -..--.......... :........ --
,1 : ,* W. i.., . -" :*-' :.. : ,.*- ".. .'.._: :;.;-"..'/;, ..-*+ ; .** fR' aia ^ a


3 Photo No. 28
I City or Scene ........... .

M, Name ............. .


The Tribune will run a total of 30
City or Scene and Country shown
on November 17th, mail all 30
Nassau, Bahamas, You may enter
must be fastened together.
Should you miss an edition of 1
reception desk in The Tribune Bui
In case of a tie, the tie will be bro
later than midnight, Monday, Nov
Employees and their families of
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I Contest ends Satui


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are the places pictured al
photographs that will appe
The Tribune over the next 1
a chance to win a round-trip
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one of 26 European cities m


o climb
ith faith
he Name
rist, and
the Holy
s begin."
inspire
ation in
n Church
letter is
of Saint
il, in the


nam of the SacredHearts
Fathers now privileged to serve
at Saint Joseph's, Fr. John F.
Sullivan, SS.CC. and Fr.
Michael Kelly, SS.CC., as we
enter our Jubilee Year a
jubilee of prayer and a jubilee
of work for Christ and His
Church.
Gratefully yours for the
space provided,
FR. MICHAEL KELLY.SS.CC.
Saint Joseph's Church
Boyd Road, Nassau.
October 30.


D HAVE DONE IT BEFORE!

evening hours for leisurely Christmas
mnhwried passport photos are proving
,ular. We invite you to drop in this
y evening)! Open through the day until


rfront at East Bay & William Sts.
* Telephone 5-4641


Sand Bottled in S
h Government








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photo ads showing a scene from somewhere within Pan Am's travel system. Name the
using the picture and answer blank included in each ad. After the final photo has run
entries (stapled or clipped together) to: Vacation, The Tribune, P. 0. Box N-3207,
more than one group of photos, as long as youuse official Tribune blanks and groups

'he Tribune with a Pan Am photo ad, back copies can be purchased at The Tribune
ilding, Shirley Street, Nassau, or The Tribune office, 9B Kipling Building, Freeport.
ken by additional photos not previously published. All entries must be postmarked no
member 19th, 1973.
The Tribune, Pan American World Airways and their advertising agencies, are not


rday, Nov. 17th


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above? Identify all 30
ar on various days in
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Winn'r my hoom reunmd np for two
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AMSTERDAM MAODID
BARCELONA MUNICH
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Monday, November 5, 1973


Hopes high for a bumper




time in the Bahamas


MORE FLIGHTS, more
accommodation and more
activities for visitors are on the
cards for the Bahamas.
All indications are that this
season will h- the biggest ever
for the islands, a Bahamas
tourist news bureau release
states.
Several new airline routes
have been set up including
Lufthansa service from the
German cities of Cologne and
Frankfurt which has helped to
open up the European market
along with International Air
Bahama's service to
Luxembourg.
On December 15 Delta
Airlines will introduce a direct
Boston to Nassau flight while
Air Jamaica which, together
with the Jamaican airline's
Chicago to Nassau flights, will
make it even easier for
residents of the populous
American hinterland to come
to the Bahamas.
By mid December, Delta will
be operating three flights daily
out of Boston one non-stop
and the others stopping at New
York and Newark, respectively.
Pan American World
Airways will add a second
non-stop flight from New York
to Nassau effective Dl)ecember
15 and plans to change its
equipment on the lucrative
Mian-Na,,asaiu run from 727's
to the larger 707's creating 40
extra seats per flight.
I astern Airlines is adding
another flight to its
Mi a in i-Nassau schedule
beginning December 2 and, as
in extra bonus, will introduce
a connecting Baltimore-
Philadelphia-Nassau flight.
Direct weekend flights from
both cities to Nassau will be
maintained.
Air Canada will be opening
up a direct flight from
Montirea.l December 15 on
Saturday and Sundays in
addition to its five-weekly
flights tromn Toronto to Nassau
via Freeport
This sear saw the
inauguration of the Bahamas'
own flag carrier Bahamasair
which serves all the major
Out Island resorts and connects
Nassau and Freeport to Miami.
Routes to other American
cities are presently being
discussed with the I S. Civil
Aeronautics Board. Bahamasair
runs six flights a day into
Mi.mi from Nassau ind twoc
flights daily froin -reeport.
The nattionil carrier's Out
Island seo'. !, means that
visitors .,' e .1 'toided quiick


From Page 1
favors increasing the list of
offences to 10 by adding
"fraternising with a guest in
the hotel where employed,"'
"being .n hotel property in
areas t(I whilh their 'i,+ would
11 t nHr .llA \ c;ititle tt'hem to
ha\c .Lne'-,s w'theiTer T n i luti or
n t.'" 1:c i.A ",I nther
just fliahl eason."
I he existing contract
st ipiila tes that w here
red diiidanc min a hotel (,r
depart.iiient affects 20 percent
of the employ ees. the hotel
must arrange a meeting swith
the union( to determine hIow
chest t deil with the matter.
I'he inionu's proposal has left
oul the percentage, stating
siniplN that "in the event of
redundancy arising in any
establishment at any time" the
employer must meet with the
union.
M a n a g e m e n t s
counter-proposal suggests that
the meeting he called when
redundancy hits ten percent.
M a n a g e m e n t s
counter-proposal and covering
letter made no reference at all
to a union demand that the
new contract include a
providing blanket gratuities. A
blanket gratuity system already
exists in many hotels, but the
union wants the system to
become a contractural
obligation.
SFVERAN('t PAY
Management has agreed to
increase the severance pay, but
there is a wide gap between
management's concession and
the union's demands in that
COME TO NEW YORK


Dressmaking & Design
Factory Machine
Training Available
Days-Eves. or Sundays
LOW TUTION
Foreign Students Accepted
Send For 1-20 Form

1113 Church Avenue
Brooklyn
wm York 1121,. U.S.A.


MORE FLIGHTS AND

TWO BIG LINERS

AMONG THE CALLERS


and efficient access to all of
the beautiful Bahamas resort
islands.
Bahamasair uses BAC III jet
equipment together with a
variety of prop-jet aircraft for
short, island-hopping hauls.
Cruiseship stopovers will
also increase during the high
season. In addition to the
regular weekly and bi-weekly
cruises to the Bahamas from
Miami and New York, a total
of 47 extra cruises will be
made to the islands by some of
the most luxurious ships.
The two largest passenger
liners in the world the SS
France and the Queen
Elizabeth II will be among
the new callers. Fifteen ships
currently sail from New York
and Florida ports for the
Bahamas.
A new departure in hotel
accommodations will make its
debut this winter when the
Waterloo Lodge and Tennis
Club opens in Nassau on East
Bay Street.
Once the regal home of
former Bahamas Minister of
Tourism, the late Sir Stafford
Sands, Waterloo has been
converted into a facility for
tennis buffs.
It has 14 rooms, gourmet
restaurant, nightclub and, of
course, tennis courts.
The 26-room, luxury El
Greco Hotel on West Bay
Street facing the Western
Esplanade will be opening in
February, 1974. Named after
the famous painter, the hotel is
designed and decorated in
Spanish style.
The building will
incorporate a gourmet
restaurant specializing in
Continental and American fare,
meeting rooms and walled-in
private courtyards for that
authentic Castiilian flavour.
On Cable Beach in Nassau
the Swank Club is a
well-remembered name and it
has recently opened under new
management after a long
period of inactivity. It features
dinners and luncheons at
competitive prices to the
musical accompaniment of the
Paul Hanna Band.
One of the Bahamas' best
known calypso bands King
Eric and His Knights have set


up their own nightclub on West
Bay Street appropriately
called "King and Knights."
Besides their own
performances there is a
second-string band and a floor
show.
The Anchorage Hotel on
West Bay Street is busily
putting the finishing touches to
a large extension which will
open as a nightclub for the
Christmas season. And the SS
Banana Boat recently opened
its doors with a good band and
a tho roughly Bahamian
atmosphere. It is located in the
over-the-hill section of the city
In Freeport 'several hotels
are undertaking expansions
and/or renovations for the
winter season. The
International Hotel will have
completed a 600-seat
convention hall by December
and the controlling company,
Princess Proerties Ltd., is
planning to spend some $2.5
million renovating'the King's
Inn which it also owns.
The Grand Bahama Hotel
and Country Club at West End
has added 100 new rooms, a
dining room and several stores
to its premises.
The Castaways Hotel is
completing a new nightclub
called the Conchshell which
will double as a 200-seat
convention room during the
day. The Holiday Inn is also
adding a new nightclub able to
seat 300 people plus four more
meeting rooms. This
construction will begin in early
April, 1974.
In the Out Islands there are
many small, but charming,
hotels, guest houses and
marinas in almost every
settlement. The Great Harbour
Cay resort development is
installing complete telephone
facilities for the convenience of
guests and residents, while at
San Salvador, the Columbus
Landings development is in the
process of constructing new
harbour and marina facilities.
Also at San Salvador, Riding
Rock Inn is a delightful new
hostel overlooking the ocean.
The third annual Bahamas
International Open Tennis
Championships begin
December 13 and run for six
days at the Ocean Club on


area.
The union has also asked
for the addition of a new
section in the contract
requiring hotels on Paradise
Island and in the Cable Beach
and Lyford Cay areas to
provide transportation for
employees, and requiring all
hotels to deliver women
workers who get off after
midnight direct to their homes.
T h e hotel i ers '
counter-proposal calls for
hotels to "make such


arrangements as they consider
suitable and reasonable either
directly or indirectly to ensure
that their employees have
reasonable facilities for getting
to and from work."
Management suggests that such
arrangements would be ex
gratis and not a contractural
obligation. The union also
favours retention of a section
of the existing contract which
requires hotels without a joint
contributory medical insurance
scheme to set up such a


Paradise Island. The $15,000
tournament, co-sponsored by
the Ministry of Tourism and
Paradise Island Ltd., will
attract such pros as Arthur
Ashe of the United States,
Richard Russell of Jamaica and
the controversial Ilie Nastase of
Rumania.
Flying enthusiasts will be
treated to the 9th version of
the Bahamas Flying Treasure
Hunt which starts at West End,
Grand Bahama on December 1.
Over 120 private aircraft will
take part in the hunt which is
akin to an airborne car rally.
First prize is a half-acre lot in
the San Andros resort
development on Andros Island.
Racing fans can take
advantage of Hobby Horse
Race Track which begins its
season in January. The famous
race course on West Bay Street
opposite the Nassau Beach
Hotel is where Britain's prince
Charles played polo during the
Bahamas' Independence
celebrations.
British traditions are still
evident in this former colony
which is governed by a
parliamentary system. Visitors
can watch the colorful
Changing of the Guard
ceremony at Government
House every other Saturday
during which time the Royal
Bahamas Police Band will
perform.
One of the highlights of each
winter season, of course, is the
fabulous Junkanoo Festival
which throughout the
country's history has been held
every year at Christmas and
New Year's. Similar to
Trinidad's Carnival and New
Orleans' Mardi Gras, Junkanoo
features costume paiades down
the streets of Nassau to the
rhythmic sound of Goombay
music. There is a small version
of Junkanoo in Freeport as
well. These parades take place
in the early hours of the
morning.
Early in 1974 the Bahamas
will hold its annual Out Island
Regatta in which native sloops
from every island will compete
for trophies. Always an
exciting event, it was shifted to
Nassau this year for the
Independence celebrations so
that Prince Charles could
watch the action.
There is something for
everyone in the Bahamas and
the winter season seems to be
that time to leave the cold
behind and come to these
sunny southern islands the
Bahamas the playground of
the Western World!


*-. .... -
"--S.- -
'-'-'a---


Half million dollar construction under way at the Anchorage Hotel.

New tennis courts almost ready


BY THE time the winter
season rolls around again, the
Anchorage Hotel will be
offering its guests an extra
sports activity and the swinging
music of a popular Bahamian
recording artist in addition to
its existing amenities.
Mr. Rod Campbell, general
manager of the Anchorage
Hotel expects that the night
club and tennis courts which
ade being constructed by
Arnold Cargill Company Ltd.,
will be completed by the end
of November.
The night club dubbed
"Ronnie's Place" will feature
the dynamic Ronnie and the
Ramblers.


"We feel that it will be one
of the finest clubs on the
island," said Mr. Campbell," as
well as a favourite night spot
for tourists and Bahamians."
"Ronnie's Place" will have
seating capacity for 350
people. A spokesman from
Esplanade Holdings said that
the estimated cost of both
tennis courts and nightclub is
one half million dollars.
"Tennis has become a big
sports item for Bahamians,"
said Mr. Campbell "so I am
confident that our tennis
courts will also attract local
players "
Mr. Campbell said that in
the past, the anchorage was
unable to offer a package plan


to its guests, "but now, under
Esplanade Holdings, and with
the advent of the tennis courts
and night club, we are really in
the ball game this season," he
said.
The Anchorage has
undergone complete
renovations and redecorations
of two floors in preparation for
the coming season.
Mr. Campbell recently
returned from Canada, where
he attended a Bahamas
Employee Association teach-in
promotional tour.
"The Canadian travel agents
gave us a terrific reception,"
said Mr. Campbell, "and we eot
quicK response from the trip."
Mr. Campbell said that many


people who had plans to go
other places on winter vacation
have decided to come to
Nassau instead.
He said that it is his
intention to prove the first
class qualities of the ancnorage
to Canadians and Americans.
Esplanade Holdings have
representatives in Brussels,
Paris and Germany and Mr.
Campbell foresees an active
year for the Anchorage.
There are also plans for
future sales trips
"We plan to promote the
Anchorage, in all markets, both
European and North American,
like it has never been promoted
before," confirmed Mr.


AMOURY'S SAY



CHRISTMAS is COMING !!!

-. CLEAN IT NOW


COMPLETE CLEANING FOR HOMES
OFFICES ANn APARTMENTS

WINDOW WASHING

H .CLEANING AND WAXING OF Al L TYPES FLOORS
S. UPHOLSTERY CLEANING


PEST CONTROL AND EXTERMINATING


FULLY INSURED


PHONE 2-8256 TODAY


UNION FILES DISPUTE NOTICE


From Pave 1
percent on Florida. 5.1 percent
in the Caribbean, 5.5 percent
on Puerto Rico and 3.5 percent
on Hawaii.
34 p.c. RISE
He added that at a meeting
with large consumers on Oct.
30, the Bahamas Electricity
Corporation announced that
because of increased fuel costs
the electricity rate for large
consumers was being increased
three-quartera of one cent on
every unit consumed, from 2.2
cents to 2.95 cents per unit.
For the large consumers that
amounts to a 34 percent rise,
Mr. Cooper said. BEC
spokesman have said the
increase for all consumers
averages 16 percent.
"Incidentally," Mr. Cooper
went on, "this substantial
increase in fuel costs will affect
our members in terms of their
own direct use of fuel oil.
Translated into cost per room,
it could mean at least an
addition 50 cents a day, and
will obviously add an extra
burden to our operating costs."
Mr. Cooper referred also to
"the intensifying European
competition with cheap air
fares and package deals."
SERIOUS SITUATION
He added: "You will, we
trust, appreciate the very
serious situation of the
industry. What are the future
prospects? These are most
difficult to estimate" because
of conflicting factors.


He pointed on the positive
side to the depreciation of the
U.S. dollar, which makes it
more expensive for Americans
to travel to Europe and at the
same time makes it cheaper for
Europeans to cross the Atlantic
to places such as the Bahamas.
On the negative side, there is
"the new world fuel crisis
which could seriously reduce
the number of aircraft operating
on specific routes and affect
the number of visitors coming
to the Bahamas," and "the
need to remain competitive in
our price structures if we are to
retain, let alone increase, our
business."
Mr. Cooper summed up:
"All these reasons support
the anxiety of the industry,
not only insofar as its current
and very adverse financial
position is concerned, but as to
its future prospects of tourism
to the Bahamas, and requires
that both parties take a
responsible view of the
situation and particularly of
our joint obligations to
maintain the Bahamas as a
viable economic community.
"We shall be happy to meet
with your representatives at an
early date with a view to
endeavouring to negotiate a
new agreement which is
mutually acceptable."
A union spokesman has
confirmed that a dispute
would be filed sometime
today over the wage iamue.



0M- ECD


Hotels want to defer wage talks




U


(9br izrtbutt


ALMOST.

SAN ANDRIS BOWS TO NASSAU!
AND YOUR MANY REQUESTS TO EXTEND
OUR LOW DOWN PAYMENT OFFER!


NOVEMBER 24, 1973 IS THE NEW
(But that's it! the next day the down payment increases to $150.)


DEADLINE


:3 !DOWN

FOR A SPACIOUS HOMESITE
TOTAL CASH PRICE JUST$2995

EASY TERMS $35 A MONTH!
(That's only $8.75 per week, including low 7% interest)

NOW WITH A SMALL CASH OUTLAY YOU CAN
FOLLOW THE LEAD OF PROFESSIONAL
REAL ESTATE INVESTORS.
HERE'S WHAT THEY LOOK FOR:
1. PLACE. Location is the key to successful land investment it
determines value and future worth. Today the trend is to the Family
Islands ... to unspoiled, unpolluted, uncongested areas ... to a GET-
A-WAY RETREAT ... to San Andros!
2. PRICE. In real estate, small dollars can control a valuable
homesite worth many times your cash outlay. To do this, you must buy at
"early bird" prices with minimum dollars for maximum return.
Right now, on San Andros you can!
3. POTENTIAL. Determine where people want to go ... get there
first... buy land ... and wait. As people arrive, profits do too! People
are going to San Andros a place for lovers and wise investors tool
INVEST...VACATION ON YOUR OWN LAND... OR LIVE YEAR
ROUND AT SAN ANDROS...THE DEVELOPMENT THAT'S DOUBLY
BLESSED-AN ALLURING GET-AWAY HAVEN, YET ONLY
15 MINUTES BY AIR FROM NASSAUI
CALL RIGHT NOWI or see Frank Carey Real Estate Ltd.
Berkley Ferguson Real Estate 2-7667 or 2-4815 Bay and Deveaux Streets.
Principal Eroker, 2-1238 or 2-4913 Maxwell Woodside Real Estate 3-5632
Berwin House on Frederick St. Corner of Bias St. & Blue Hill Road.


McDeigan & Associates Ltd. 2-4284
Bernard-Sunley Building on Bay Street
Morley & 0'T--ien Real Estate
2-2794 Harris Luilding on Shirley Street
Braynen & Knowles Real Estate 2-1886
Sheraton-British Colonial Hotel Arcade
SAN ANDR fS IS FOR LOVERS...
AND WISE INVESTORS, TOO., "


Ty Saunders Real Estate Ltd. 7-7162
2nd Floor, Bernard Sunley Building
Grosham Property Ltd. 27662 or 28966
107 Shirley Street.
Cosmopolitan Realty, King's Court
Phone 57477 or 57478,
Davson Real Estate Company Ltd.
2-1178. (upstairs) Bay & East Streets.


Monday, November 5. 1973


4I


5


-_.-.-y











Monday, Novmber.5, 1973


NORTH ANDROS


LIVESTOCK


SCHEME


PROGRESSING
APPROXIMATELY 200 ACRES of land have been prepared
and are ready for seeding with grass for pastureland in the
first phase of the $10 million livestock production operation at
North Andros.
According to Mr. Claude Greaves who is an agricultural
Smith, Director of Agriculture economist and Earl Deveaux,
and Fisheries, the first of the an economist and a student of
2,000 acres of land proposed pig husbandry. Both are
for the project will be planted attached to the project as
sometime this month and will permanent members of the
be ready for the foundation professional staff. They expect
herd of Santa Gertrudis cattle to undertake further training in
sometime in January of 1974. the United States in their
The Santa Gertrudis breed, respective fields.
developed on the King Ranch It is hoped that most of the
of Texas, was chosen because Bahamians currently working
of its high tolerance for heat, with the project, in addition to
insects and rough conditions others to be recruited, will
and its ability to produce meat become permanent members of
under these conditions. the livestock development.
In addition to the first 200 Remarkable success has been
acres of pasture land in the. achieved in the preparation of
initial phase, an eight-acre the land for pasture. After the
section is being seeded with land has been cleared of pine
appr",,imately 50 types of trees and other plants, the soil
grass for experimental purposes. and soft rock are broken down
Agronomists from universities into a tilth suitable for the use
in the United States who will of modern farm machinery.
by conducting experiments at Larger boulders, or rock which
Andros feel that guinea grass, cannot be crushed are
among other grasses, will prove removed. The result is level
most successful topsoil ready for sowing.
Presently, there are near 30 The pilot livestock project is
Bahamians employed at the a joint effort between the
site preparing the land for Bahamas Government and
pasture and crops. Agency for International
Construction of buildings to Development (AID) to
house equipment and a continue for a five-year period.
combined laboratory and Agreement between the
office will soon start. governments was signed early
The two Bahamian this year.
"counter-part" scientists who A training programme is
are expected to play a maior being developed to prepare
r-!e in the project are Audley people to become livestock and
Bahamians will be trained at
technical and professional
levels who will carry on the
management, research and
development responsibility at
the termination of the AID
project agreement.
OPENS 6:30-Shows start 7 p.m.
CHILDREN UNDER 12 FREF!
Come Early ... See 3 Features
FINAL 2 NITES *
HICKEYY & BOGGS" at 7 p.m.
"CHATO" 9 p.m.







Pfe1.,r^^c^ IVsION ...*
"LET HIM Go" Ii p .m. NOW SHOWING 7 & 11:0I







w^U. r, .rm C e G, x


A Q


CAPITOL


-. .tB' -,

THERE IS PLENTY OF ACTIVITY at North Andros
these days as the initial 200 acres of land is being prepared
for pasture to take care of the initial herd of cattle. At
upper left, Mr. Claude Smith, Director of Agriculture and
Fisheries and Mr. Jack Halpin, Project Manager for AID are
pictured talking with the bulldozer operator who clears the
land of pine and other shrub. L ,er right, the workers pile
together the knocked down k,. as and shrub readv for

I'^


.. .

burning. At middle right, the downed trees are sawed into
section for burning. A lake of fresh ground water which can
be used for irrigation is being studied in the photo at lower
right. Earl Deveaux (left) and Audley Graves, the two
Bahamian "counterpart" scientists at the project study the
remains of a fire heap which will be worked into the soil.
The centre picture shows the final results of soil
preparation and is ready for grass seeding. Photo: Roland
Rose.


PALM TREE


DISEASE


FOUND IN

NASSAU

A NUMBER of palm trees
showing symptoms of the
coconut disease commonly
known as "lethal yellowing"
have been seen in the western
end of New Providence,
Ministry of Agriculture and
Fisheries said Saturday.
Symptoms of the disease are
the falling of coconuts, the
drying from the tips of shoots
and the gradual yellowing of the
branches beginning with the
lower ones.


GIFT TO PMH
OFFICERS OF THE EMPLOYEES ASSOCIATION ot
the Princess Margaret Hospital recently donated 12 overbed
tables and a rolling scale to the hospital. Pictured from left
to right exhibiting one of the overbed tables are: Mrs. Sybil
Bartlette, president of the association; Mrs. Brenda
Saunders, secretary of the association and Mrs. Kathleen
Hepburn. treasurer of the association. Photo: Roland Rose.


WHO SAYS MALES ARE

THE STRONGER SEX?
THE DI)EPARTMENT OF STATISTICS announces the
publication of a Report on Bahamas Life Tables 1962-1964 and
1969-1971. This report has been prepared by Mr. R. R. Oswald,
the United Nations Adviser on Statistics to the government of
The Bahamas.
The report gives an account of the methods used in
compiling the tables. The Life Tables themselves are given
separately for males and females and for the two periods
1962-1964 and 1969-1971.
The expectation of life at birth for females for the period
1969-1971 was 69.3 years as compared to 64-0 years for males, a
differential of 5.3 years in favour of tne temale sex. This
compares with 67.3 years for females and 61.0 years for males for
the period 962-1964, a differential of 6.3 years.
Thus it will be seen that life expectancy conditions for both.
sexes have improved over the interim period 1962-1971, but that
females still have a good 5 years greater expectation of life at
birth. The difference however seems to be closing.
The Report is obtainable from the Government Publications
Bookshop, Bank Lane, or from the Department of Statistics.


The Ministry advises the
immediate removal and
destruction of infected plants
to slow the spread of the
disease. The replanting of the
Malayan dwarf variety of
coconut palm is recommended
which has demonstrated
resistance to the yellowing
condition observed for many
years in Jamaica and other
countries, the Ministry said.
A staff member of the
Ministry of Agriculture and
Fisheries recently visited the
University of Florida where
research scientists are
attempting to find the cause
and control of the yellowing
condition. At present, cause
and control have yet to be
discovered. Additional
information may be obtained
by calling Mr. Roosevelt
Finlayson at the Ministry of
Agriculture and Fisheries,
phone 2-1277/9 or contact Mr.
Sidney Russell or Mr. Robert
Pinder at 3-4618.


- I '(


W L F R .rE wN"I K |


By The Associated i'ress
TODAY IS MONDAY,
NOVIMBER Sth, the 309th day of
1973. There are 56 days left in the
year.
HIGHLIGHTS in history on this
date:
1972 A Japanese man is
captured after hijacking a Japanese
jet with 126 persons aboard and
forcing it to land at Tokyo to pick
up two million dollars in ransom.
1971 European foreign
ministers seek unity with Britain to
deal with the United States on
economic policy and relations with
Moscow.
1970 Vatican issues document
reforming the Roman Catholic
mass.
1967 Express train hurtles off
tracks near London, England,
leaving more than 50 dead and
more than 100 injured.
1966 Death and destruction
toll continues to rise in Italy's
worst floods since the Middle Ages.
1964 (Chou En-Lai of Mainland
China visits Moscow for summit
talks of Communist countries.
1962 West German defense
minister Franz Joseph Strauss is
dismissed over "Der Spiegel" affair;
U.N. General Assembly demands
general nuclear tests cease by
January 1, 1963; Saudi Arabia
severs realtions wil United Arab
Republic.


1961 Nationwide rioting
breaks out in Ecuador.
1954 Burma signs peace treaty
with Japan.
1950 General Douglas
MacArthur reports massing of
Chinese Communists in North
Korea.
1940 Franklin D. Roosevelt
defeats Wendell Willkie for U.S.
presidency. his third term.
1921 Russia signs treaty with
Mongolia.
1916 Central powers proclaim
kingdon of Poland.
1854 Battle of Inkerman in
Crimes begins.
1840 Mehemet All of Egypt
agrees to terms of Treaty of
London.
1817 Third Mahratta War
against British in India begins with
attacks at Poona, Nagpur and
Indore.
1815 Britain establishes
protectorate over Ionian Islands.
1630 Treaty of Madrid ends
Anglo-Spanish War.
1605 "Gunpowder plot" by
Guy Fawkes to blow up British
Houses of Parliament.
TODAY'S BIRTHDAYS:
Philippe du Plessis Mornay,
French author (1549-1623); Jesse
Ramsden, British engineer (1735-
1800); Will Durant, U.S.
philosopher (1885....); Roy Rogers,
U.S. cowboy star (1912....).












Monday, November 5, 1973


Mr. Thompson's reassurance
came in an address to the Life
Underwriters Association.
"National Insurance was
never designed with a view
toward profitability; rather,
the scheme is one which is
government regulated and
one which is intended to
provide very basic human
services for all Bahamians. But
Mr. Thompson never dealt with
any of the regulations that will
apply in the scheme.
At its most simplified level,
Mr. Thompson said, it was a
scheme to establish an orderly
system of social welfare
benefits, providing payments
for sickness, invalidity,
maternmify, retirement and
death of insured persons.
"These I believe, are benefits
that are common to most types
of insurance and, in this
respect, National Insurance is
not unique.
"What this scheme hopes to
do," Mr. Thompson said, "is to
bring together under a common
umbrella, previous statutory
welfare measures such as the
Workmen's Compensation Act,
and the Old Age Pensions Act,
and to extend these basic
services into a comprehensive
and equitable scheme for all
Bahamians.
WOM'T COMPETE
"It is not, however, a
scheme that is designed to
interfere with or intrude into
the free enterprise system of
the insurance industry in the
Bahamas," he declared.
Mr. Thompson noted the
presence in the Bahamas of
some 96 registered insurance
companies and reiterated the
government's promise it would
not stifle incentive,
opportunity and responsibility.
"What in my view has been
established is a national floor
*. ; h should and does leave
looin and encouragement for
voluntary action by each


to supplement and
more than this
for himself and his


MAJOR ROLE
"And it is in this particular
area that the private individual
firms still have and will
continue to have a major role
to play," he added.
In those areas where private
group insurance might overlap
with National Insurance Mr.
Thompson anticipated added
coverage being given to areas
not covered by National
Insurance and which previously
did not exist in group
insurance.
He suggested this might be
the case with maternity
benefits which are covered by


both schemes. What he
envisioned happening was that
the private company might
apply the earnings previously
used for this to another area,
such as loss of income.
"Accordingly in this way we
can see how there can be
mutuality of interest without
competition," Mr. Thompson
said.
The Insurance board
chairman pointed out that an
inevitable result of National
Insurance would be increased
public awareness of insurance
generally.
SOME BENEFITS
He said that many people
viewed insurance as an
investment in their future
against unexpected hardship,
and once they had obtained


Wht Writbnt


National Insurance should complement and



not compete with existing insurance schemes

THE GOVERNMENT'S PROPOSED NATIONAL INSURANCE SCHEME is intended to complement not compete with existing,
privately operated insurance scheme. Nainllojrnmce Board chairman Earl V. Thomjmon emwuhasdie 1Mu'v


individual
provide
minimum
family.


By Abigail Van Buren
0 im3 By CCMC TrfIW-N. Y. NeWS SI., Ic.
DEAR ABBY: Twenty lashes with a forked tongue for
allowing your readers to suggest that snakes make "nice
pets" and require a minimum of care.
Any competent herpetologist can tell you that snakes
are among the most difficult animals to keep in captivity,
for the following reasons: They are susceptible to infections
which often become fatal because amateurs cannot detect a
sick snake until it is much too late. Also, a snake's cage
must be kept absolutely immaculate, with controled
amounts of fresh air, light, and heat.
Snakes show no affection whatsoever. They can be
taught to tolerate some handling, but a snake does not
recognize its owner or keeper.
Most snakes require a diet of live [or freshly killed]
mice, lizards, and insects, which is a problem for most
people.
Abby, if you don't alert your readers to the above facts,
many may rush out and purchase a snake only to have the
poor creature perish thru its owner's ignorance.
SNAKE FAN: FREMONT, CAL.
DEAR FAN: That settles It! No snakes for this house-
old, It's diffealt enough to buy beef without shopplag for
zards, mice, aad ioects. Thanks for writing.


CLASSIFIED


some benefits from the various
provisions in the scheme,
awareness would be given to
other types of insurances.
The effects of the national
programme, because of its
magnitude, would also be
reflected in general benefits to
the community at large, Mr.
Thompson emphasized.
He said it would afford
employment opportunities in
New Providence and the other
islands through its local offices.
Payment of benefits would also
bring with it increased
prosperity, specifically in the
matter of old age pensions.
In addition, employers,
workers and government will
have a voice in administration
of the scheme through their
representatives on the Board


Snake fan bites out


at Abby's 'pet' idea

DEAR ABBY: To bra or not to bra? That was a recent
question. Large, medium, small, or nonexistent-what's all
the fuss about? Any student of geometry knows that curves
are nothing more than wrecked angles.
FLUNKED GEOMETRY
DEAR FLUNKED: And any student of anatomy knows
that some curves have wrecked angels!

DEAR ABBY: That young mother who resented the
way the grandparents "spoiled" her children, reminded me
of myself 25 years ago.
I, too, deeply resented the way my parents spoiled my
youngsters. I almost dreaded letting my children spend a
weekend with their grandparents. Then, one day my wise
sister in law took me aside, and said: "Children need to get
away from that strict parental discipline once in a while-
to be 'spoiled' and made to feel 'special,' and who better
than grandparents should do it? Children need to learn how
to cope with a different set of rules in a different situa-
tion."
She was right, of course. The occasional "spoiling" my
children enjoyed from their grandparents didn't hurt them
one bit. M. S.
DEAR M.S.: Thank you for a letter whica came just in
time to help me Justify spoiling my own grandchildren.


Problems? Ye'll feel better if you get It off your ehest.
Fer a pwomal reply, write to ABBY: Box No. 074e, L.A..
CaW. NM Elade stamped, self-addressed envepe,
Res*e.


IMPORTANT TO ADVERTISERS-


Wrap up tills




with the help of hbrn 9 rtbhtm



CHRIETMAIS ST I






SUPPLEMENT
TWO PUBLICATION DATES NOV. 29th & DEC. 13th. FOR JUST ONE PRICE


ADVERTISING DEADLINE NOV. 22nd CALL NOW... John Cash 2-2768

Mrs. Pinder 2-1986


A special Supplement planned to help ease yeur
holiday chorm for a more successful Christmas.


7


SECT


S|-.I I m- II REAL ESTATE


C12343
NOTICE is hereby given that
JACOB JUNIOR
LIGHTBOURNE of Cordeaux
Ave. P. 0. Box N4386, Nassau,
Bahamas is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 27th day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.


C 12340
NOTICE is hereby qiven that
ROBERT PURITAN OUTTEN
of Turks Island is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 27th day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.

C12341
NOTICE is hereby given that
STEWART DOUGLAS
LINDSAY of P. 0. Box F2,
Freeport, Grand Bahama is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/
naturalisation as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalisation
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
27th day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

C12345
NOTICE is hereby given that
RICHARD N. WYNNS of
Eight Mile Rock, Grand
Bahama is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 27th day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.

C12346
NOTICE is hereby given that
FENWICK FILBERT
HENLEY of Holmes Rock,
Grand Bahama is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not L'e
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 27th day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.
C 12344
NOTICE is hereby given that
MR. SIVDAS ARANGIL of
Millar's (Sam McKinnon's)
Long Island is applying tu the
M i n sister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 27th day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.


C12351
NOTICE is hereby given that
MARION LOUISE SIMMONS
of Palm Avenue, Nassau is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
29th day of October, 1973, to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.
C12352
NOTICE is hereby given that
RICHARD ALEXANDER
WILLIAMS of Palm Ave.,
Nassau is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 29th day of October,
1973. to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.


C12354
NOTICE is hereby given that
LINDEN ALEXANDER
BROWN of Poinciana Avenue,
Nassau is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 29th day of October,
1973, to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.

C12333
NOTICE is hereby given that
WILLIAM ALEXANDER
CLARKE of Minnie Street,
Nassau, Bahamas is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 29th day of October,
1973, to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.


C12342
NOTICE is hereby given that
FLOSSIE IANTHIE SELVER
of Freeport, Grand Bahama,
Bahamas is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 27th day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.

C12334
NOTICE is hereby given that
JULITA OLECCIA CLARKE
of Minnie Street, Nassau,
Bahamas is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 29th day of October,
1973, to The Minsiter
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.
C12474
NOTICE is hereby given that
CONSERVE JEAN BAPTISTE
of Rldgeland Park West Nassau
Bahamas is applying to the
M i n ister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for naturalisation as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why naturalisation should not
ne granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 5th
day of November 1973 to The
Mi n ister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

C12472

NOTICE is hereby given that
GEORGE OTHNIEL
WILLIAMS of Sea Grape,
Grand Bahama is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 5th day of November
to The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147. Nassau.


C12155
NOTICE is hereby given that
GEORGE HARRIS of Taylor
Street South, Nassau, Bahamas
is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 5th
day of November 1973 to the
M minister responsible for
Nationality and Citzenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

C12457
NOTICE is hereby given that
FERGUS MACALVA
PALMER of John Road N. P.
Bahamas is applying to the
M I n sister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 5th day of November
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.


C 12482
NOTICE is hereby given that
SIR JOHN CRAVEN
CARDEN, BT. of Apt. 205,
Sulgrave Manor, Nassau N.P. Is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship for registration as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 5th
day of November 1973 to The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

C12410
NOTICE is hereby given that
MOXEY WILLIAMS of Port
De Paix Haiti and Delaporte,
Nassau is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship for
naturalisation as a citizen of
The Bahamas, ard that any
person who knows any reason
why naturalisation should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 5th
day of November 1973 t.o The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.


C12481
NOTICE is hereby given that
SIDOLES TOUSSAINT
(ALIAS BILL FRANCIS) of
Nassau Street in the Island of
New Providence Common-
wealth of the Bahamas
is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship for naturalisation
as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who
knows any reason why
naturalisation should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 5th day of November
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.

REAL ESTATE

C12358
FOR SALE
BY OWNER
2 BEDROOM HOUSE fully
furnished, wall to wall
carpeting, large patio, Johnson
Terrace $30,000. ALSO lot
Imperial Park 80 x 100 only
$5,500.00. Phone 51905 days
42463 after 6 p.m.

C12420
WOODLAND-3 bedrooms 2
baths furnished, only
$38,000.00.
BUEN RETIRO 3 bedrooms
2 baths, plus garage Apartment
furnished ONLY $47,500.00.
Walking distance to town.
RIDGEWAY 3 bedrooms, 3
baths,furnished, also 4
bedrooms 3 baths, furnished
with pool and water rights. See
by appointment.
WATERFRONT OUT EAST-
3 bedrooms 3 baths, furnished,
2 car garage, maids quarters.
OUT EAST on waterfront.
Houses from $85,000.00 and
up.
HILLTOP Gorgeous views
-2 storey affair. Only
$75,000.00 water rights.
CAMPERDOWN houses
from $100,000.00 and up
IMAGINE house 5 bedrooms
4 baths furnished. Gorgeous
views, ideal Scuba diving
sk iing, swimming.
$125,000.00.
BLAIR house 3 bedrooms
spacious grounds with Air -
Asking $50,000.00.
WESTWARD VILLAS opp.
Cable Beach with rights to
Sandy Beach 3 bedrooms 2
baths, furnished, only
$49,000.00.
DIAL DAMIANOS 22033
evenings 41197.


C12438


2.35 acres CARMICHAEL
ROAD. ONLY $20,000.00.
Ideal for farming or industrial.
Near Nolas.
SOUTH BEACH 60 x 100
ONLY $3,800.00.
CARMICHAEL ROAD 7.14
acres with spacious 4 bedrooms
plus one bedroom apartment,
Sauna. Come see lets make a
deal.
MURPHYVILLE 3
bedrooms 2 baths, Air,
furnished only $38,000.00.
ROSETTA 21z bedrooms
bungalow with some furniture,
only $25,000.00
HAWKINS HILL 2-storey
house, spacious enclosed
grounds only $25,000.00.
LONG ISLAND over 1600
acres. Ripe for development.
LOT MONTAGU HEIGHTS -
100 by 150.
HILLTOP SANS SOUCI -302
by 100. Gorgeous views with
house, contents Asking
$57,000.00.
COMMERCIAL Fowler
Street. 2300 sq.ft. Ready for
business, only $45,000.00.
Ideal show room, laundry,
discount store or supermarket.
DIAL DAMIANOS.
DAMIANOS REALTY 22033,
22305, evenings 41197, 51129.


C12048
BUY A LOT
in EASTWOOD or
WINTON MEADOWS
Call Frank Carey
at 27667 or 24815
Frank Carey Real Estate
Box N4764
Bay & Deveaux Sts.

C12464
WESTERN GROVE 4
bedroom 2 bath house, fully
furnished, airconditioned, wall
to wail carpeting, beautifully
landscaped, completely walled
in with bearing fruit trees on
two lots. Can be seen by
appointment. $85,000. Phone
54684.

C12471
FOR SALE
ONE LOT OF LAND IN
LITTLE BLAIR. Price $6,000,
call 28156 between 9 and 5
54577 after 5.


FOR RENT j
C12416
EFFICIENCY APARTMENT
in Palmdale ideal for
reserved gentleman. ALSO
BACHELOR ROOM. Call
51044.
C12369
OFFICE SPACE: Large and
Small suites, some fully
carpeted, partitioned and
airconditioned, in modern
downtown office building.
Very Competitive rates.
Immediate occupancy. Write to
P. 0. Box N-4665, Phone
2-8560.
C12328
FURNISHED AND
AIRCONDITIONED 2
bedrooms, 1 bedroom and
efficiency apartments.
Telephone 5-8134.

C12325
ONE EXTRA LARGE two
bedroom, two bath, apartment.
With large living and dining all
basically furnished Victoria
Court APARTMENTS on
Elizabeth Avenue between
Shirley and Bay Street.
Facilities, phone, laundry,
parking, T.V. antenna,
airconditioned. Phone 54631
between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.

C12376
COMPLETELY furnished 1
bedroom apartment,
airconditioned, carpeted, T.V.
antenna, automatic washer and
dryer. $200. Phone 58512.

C 12380
FURNISHED 2 bedroom
house, Palmdale,
airconditioned bedroom, yard
enclosed, T.V antenna. $245
per month. Call Mr. Curry
2-3843 days 4-2080 nights.

C12401
AIRCONDITIONED one
bedroom furnished apartment
in Dundas Court, Pyfrom
Addition, with laundry room
facilities and Master TV
antenna. Also large parking
area. For information call
5-3928 or 5-4258.

C12386
LARGE MODERN STORE
PALMDALE and Mackey
Street Approximately 4,500
sq. ft. with connecting
warehouse approximately
2,000 sq.ft. All available
January 1974.
Call C. A. Wells, Telephone
41074 or write P. 0. Box
N405.

C12316
COTTAGES and apartments
daily, weekly or
monthly-airconditioned, fully
f furnished, maid service
available. Lovely gardens and
swimming pool. Telephone
31297, 31093.
C12411
FURNISHED or unfurnished -
4 bedrooms 2 bath,
airconditioned house, Shirley
Park Avenue. Phone 34527,
2-8293.


C 12465
2 BEDROOM apartment on
top Winton -Highway,
magnificent views, private
balconies. $325 per month
including utilities, beautifully
furnished. Call 21631 or 2.

C12475
3 BEDROOMS 2 baths fully
furnished beautifully
landscaped yard in South
Beach Estates. For further
information Call W. Bullard at
36355.



C12377
SMALL BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITY Key
Management Consultants Ltd.
have a client wishing to sell a
successful going concern
suitable for a woman willing to
spend a few hours a day
marketing the service offe
opportunity to earn up to
$10,000 a year. For further
information cil 24224

Fn lau


OFFICE. C


CHAIRMAN OF THE NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD, Mr. Earl Thompson, M.P.,
standing, outlined the Government's National Insurance Scheme to members of the
Bahamas Association of Life Underwriters at the Flager Inn on Thursday, November 1.
Pictured to Mr. Thompson's right are: Mr. Arlington Cartwright, President of the
B.A.L.U., Mr. Ralph Barnett, B.A.L.U. and Mr. J. Shearer B.A.L.U. Treasurer. Photo:
Roland Rose.


=1p


K:


IMPORTANT TO READERS-

LIterly hundreds of gift giving ideas, vaehn IIN-
rirated, to give you a preview of what Santa has In
poer fer everyone.


DON'T MISS Whr Wrtbmu SPECIAL '73 CHRISTMAS GIFT GUIDE


I I -- .


- '-": -4"9"I


i-!












lhte grtmut


Monday, November 5. 1973


FOR SALE


II


C12421
Munroe Calculator $100.00
Table $50.00
5 Desks at $150.00
Computer Printout storage
Rack.
Call 2-7491-2-3 between 9 and
4:30.
C 12362
GARAGE SALE
Silverware
Cutlery
Glassware
Linen
Materials
Trimmings
Dresses 16-18-20
Records
Custom Jewelary
Ornaments
Electrical Appliances etc.
Opposite Olympia Hotel
Tel: 24062 Mrs. Petterson.
ALSO 20ft. OUTBOARD
MOTOR BOAT
C12463
BUNK BEDS. Phone 31750
daytime or 32023 even, 0s.

C12461
STOVE, T.V. Crib, Barbeque,
Lamps etc. Also more. Phone
32108.

C12483
1 NEW MEDIUM SIZE
BUFFET SERVER IN DARK
WOOD. PRICE FOR QUICK
SALE $175.00 PHONE 22694
8.30 A.M'.to 5.00 P.M.

C12476
"CLIPPER" 8 year old
Chestnut Gelding good
disposition -- Owner leaving -
make offer phone 22836.
C12478
AIR-CONDITIONER, 18 BTU,
reverse cycle, excellent
condition. $325 for quick sale.
Call 5-3259 after 5 p.m.

CARS FOR SALE
C 12484
ABC MOTORS

Budget-priced, A-i used cars.
Best value for your monay.

1973 FORD CORTINA
SEDAN, automatic
transmission $3,400
1 9 7 2 PONTIAC
VENTURA $3,600
1972 CHEVROLET VEGA
automatic transmission, air
conditioned $3,200.
1972 TOYOTA MARK II,
automatic transmission
radio $3,200
1972 FIAT 124 SEDAN
standard $1,600
1972 MERCURY COMET,
automatic transmission, radio,
air conditioned $4,000
1971 CHEVROLET MALIBU
2-door $2,900
1971 CHEVROLET MALIBU
automatic transmission, air
conditioned $3.300
1 97 1 RAMBLER
AMBASSADOR, air
conditioned, automatic
transmission, radio $3,200
1971 MERCURY MARQUIS
automatic transmission air
conditioned $3,900.
1970 VAUXHALL VICTOR
STATION WAGON, 4-door
standard $800


1971 CAPRI
transmission
1970 FORD
SEDAN standard


automatic
$1.000.
CORTINA
$1.000


1970 FORD MAVERICK 2-
door, automatic transmission
$2,100
1970 TOYOTA COROLLA
standard $800
1971 MORRIS STATION
WAGON automatic
transmission $1,550
1970 FORD ESCORT
automatic transmission $1,400
1969 FORD CORTINA 4-door
standard $900
1969 FORD Cortina 4-door
automatic transmission$1,100
1969 TOYOTA MARK 11
STATION WAGON standard
$1,100
1970 VAUXHALL VIVA
2-door, automatic transmission
$400


1969 FIAT 124


$700.


ABC MOTORS
Collins Avenue
Phone 2-1031
OPEN MONDAY TO FRIDAY
8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
SATURDAY 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
C12319
TUITION
THE RAPID RESULTS
COLLEGE. World-famous
postal tuition for the GCE.
School Cert and
Accountancy, Banking.
Law, Marketing, Company
Secretaryahip Examinat-
ions. For detail of our
apecialied counts write
for FREE copy of YOUR
CAREER to The Rapid
Remlu Colleg Dept. ViiI
TauO Hoee Loudo.
SW1i 43S


CARS FOR SALE


C124.4-

ISLAND MOTOR
COMPANY 1970 LTD.
USED CAR LIST


1967 CHRYSLER
4 Dr. Auto White


II


$1000


1970 HILLMAN HUNTER
- 4 Dr. Auto White $850
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
- 2 Dr. Auto Green $1450


1969 FORD GALAXIES
- 4 Dr. A/C
1970 CHEVELLE SS -
A/C 2 Dr. Re.


$1500

$2600


1969 PLYMOUTH
SATELLITE $1300
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
S/W Green $1595
1971 FORD PINTO
Brown, Vinyl Auto. $1995
1970 PONTIAC
LAURENTIAN
A/C Blue $1950
1971 VAUXHALL VICTOR
- 4 Dr. Std.. White $1295
1967 MERCURY COUGAR
Std. Green $900


1970 FIAT
4 Dr. Std. White
1969 VOLKSWAGON
Green
1969 MORRIS 1100
- 4 Dr. Auto Blue
1971 AUSTIN 1100


4


$1250

$900


)r. Auto. Blue $1100
Trade-ins Welcomed
Located Oakes Field
Opposite The Ice House
Telephone 3-4636-7-8


C 12454
BARGAIN new 1200
DATSUN automatic
4-door.white. Licensed taxed.
$3200 ONO CASH. Call
31244.
C12470
TRIUMPH 1300 1969 deluxe 4
door Saloon good runner $750.
Owner leaving. Phone Office
22678. Home 31357.

C12400
1 9 69 RAMBLER,
airconditioned, power steering,
low mileage, one owner,
excellent condition. Call
between 9 and 5 3-6211,
3-6646.
C12405
1968 TOYOTA with radio.
Price $850. Phone 3-4099.

C12451
1971 AUSTIN MINI 1000,
blaze colour, standard shift,
one owner, low mileage. Like
new, serviced regularly. New
price $2884, selling for only
$1600. Call 2-2157 8 a.m. to 5
p.m. 7-7893 after .- n or
weekend.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

CLUES Iu

ohr ribunp
IPanAm.

TRAVEL PHOTO
CONTEST

PHOTO No. 20: This
country produced one of the
best known writers of
children's books ... his fairy
tales are known throughout
the world.
This photo appeared on Oct.
15th.


PHOTO No. 21:
country was of


This
great


importance to the New
World.
This photo appeared on Oct
17th.
Back issues of these dates are
available at The Tribune
offices in Nassau and
Freeport.

MARINE SUPPLIES


C12444
50' MATTHEWS in mint
condition. Must see inside to
fully appreciate. Call 2-3911.

'11894
1969 31ft. CHRIS CRAF F
Commander. Sleeps six, private
shower, two 230 h.p. engines
with less than 200 hours,
kitchenette, good condition.
Call 24267, 54011.


C 12469
14 FOOT ENTERPRISE
centreplate sailboat two suits
sails good condition. Phone
office 22678. Home 31357 .


C12315
PACEMAKER 44ft. Luxurious
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.

CARD OF THANKS
C 12485
WE WISH to express our
sincere thanks to all those who
have shown kindness during
the illness and death of Reginald
Russell, for flowers and
expressions of sympathy which
will always be remembered, we
again say thank you.
THE FAMILY


LOST


C12429
Doberman Pincher, Age
months, answers to name
Ralph. Lost in vicinity


Twynam Avenue. Has recent
scar on front left leg. Reward
offered. Phone 22723 Andrew
Rodgers.

ART SUPPLIES
C12324
COMPLETE range of artists'
supplies. Oils, acrylics, canvas,
easels, etc. Bahamian Paint
Supply Ltd., Bay Street. Phone
2-2386, 2-2898.

ELP WANTED
C 12403
IBM DATA CENTRE
SERVICES


Has immediate
available in Nassau.


position


SYSTEMS ENGINEER
Successful applicants will be
th roughly familiar with
systems des ign and
implementation of varied
commercially oriented
applications on System/3, 360
DOS and 370DOS/VS.
EXPERIENCE
Position requires a minimum of
five years in programming and
Systems/Analyst work with
experience in COBOL, RPG,
RPG-11 and Assembler
Languages. Must be able to
train and develop personnel
who will be responsible for
installation of computer
systems

IBM OFFERS: Hospitalization
and Insurance programmes,
paid vacation, attractive
starting salary and excellent
advancement opportunities.

Qualified applicants should call
Mr. McFadden at 32351/4 for
personal interview.
C12398
ELEVATOR ADJUSTERS
Otis Elevator Company require
the services of a qualified first
class adjuster. Require
minimum of 8 to 10 years
experience in all phases of
adjusting as well as graduate
engineering qualifications.
Interested parties please apply
in writing with complete
resume stating qualifications
and requirements to: Otis
Elevator Company, P. 0. Box
N4884, Nassau.
C6435
JOB TITLE: FOREMAN -
ELECTRICAL MAINTE-
NANCE
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
High School and Technical
Graduate.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3-5
years.
DUTI ES/RESPONSIIILITIES:
Supervise the electrical
maintenance activities,
including shop and field forces,
in providing repair,
maintenance, installation,
inspection and testing services
for the entire plant.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
reportr, Grand Bahama.

C12399
OTIS ELEVATOR COMPANY
require the services of a
qualified elevator mechanic
with minimum of 8 to 10 years
experience in installation and a
proven record in supervising
others. Must be able to run an
installation with minimum
assistance from small office
staff.
Interested parties please apply
in writing with complete
resume stating qualifications
and requirements to: Otis
Elevator Company, P. 0. Box
N4884, Nassau.

C6437
JOB TITLE E: DOCK
FOREMAN
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
High School graduate
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3-5
years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Co-ordinate and supervise the
loading of cement, limestone
and other products through
specialized equipment into
ocean going bulk ships, barges,
trucks, etc. for shipment to
meet customer requirements.
Supervise unloading of raw
materials from ocean going
ships and barges into stockpile.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


C6438
JOB TITLE: SUPERINTEN-
DENT POWER PLANT
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Technical and College
graduate.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Co-ordinate and direct, on a
three shift/seven day basis,
operations and maintenance in
the generation of electrical
power for the operation of the
cement plant.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


SECTION


BUSINESS PROFESSIONAL


DIRECTORY

Save Time


BHOP

By ~


b Lit k Tib Ilrutnq

I LIN hri lkt 'I


2 LIn hrlik Ir


> SAVE TImE SAVE Iy

BOOKSTORE
The Christian Book
Shop 5-


8744


HEALTH FOODS
Nassau Drug Store 5-4506


BUILDERS LAUNDRY
Richard's Construction5-7080 DRY CLEANING3
New Oriental Laundry 2-4406

CAMERAS MENS' CLOTHING
John Bull 2.4252/3 The Wardrobe 5-5599


CARPETSMUSC
Lee's Carpet Craft 3-1993 Cody's Records 2-8500

CUSTOMS BROKERS OPTICIANS
Martin's 2-3173 Optical Service Ltd. 2-3910/1

DEPT. STORES PRINTING
Pixie's Dept. Store 2-3173 Wong's Printing 5-4506

DRAPERIES PLUMBERS
Lee's Carpet Craft 3-1993 Sunshine Plumbing
Maintenance Service 5-6251
DRUGS & _______
PRESCRIPTIONS RADIO & T.V. SALES
McCartney's 5-6068/5-2127 Carter's Records 2-4711


FLOOR MAINTENANCE
Rug Cleaning & Installation
Island Interiors 5-3576/4-2191

GARDEN & PET


SUPPLIES
Modernistic


2-2868


HARDWARE


SPORTS
Champion Sport Land 2-1862

TRAVEL


Playtours


2-2931/7


R. H. Curry & Co, 2-8681/7


WRECKER SERVICE


John S. George 2-8421/6 Gibson Wrecker Service2-8896
mmmmmmmmmm-m-m mm- --- m -
FOR THE ACTION VON WANT


mmmm mmmmmmmmmmm-mm
Shop Nassau Merchants

For Business And Services


1 HELP WANTED
C6436
JOB TITLE; MAINTE
NANCE ENGINEER -
UTILITIES
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Technical and College
graduate.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3-5
years.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Supervise and co-ordinate the
day to day maintenance
activities of the Company
power plant, fresh water well
fields and all air-conditioning
and fire fighting equipment.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C 12466
CAT CAY CLUB needs two
CHARWORKERS for kitchen
cleaning, dishes, pots and silver
washing. Must be strong, used
to hard work, sober and
responsible. Salary, board and
room. Respond to Cat Cay
Club, Chalks International
Airline, Watson Island, Miami,
Fla. 33132.

C12443
JOB TITLE: Plant Manager
JOB DESCRIPTION: Manager
of a business at Freeport
engaged in the manufacture
and blending of food
flavourings and essences.
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
High School Graduate with a
knowledge of Elementary
Physic' and Chemistry
DUTIES AND RESPONSI-
BILITIES Total responsibility
for the operation of the Plant
and management of the
business including supervision
of a small work force.
EXPERIENCE: At least three
years in a processing plant
including experience in
Customs clearance formalities;
the importation and
exportation of goods;
invoicing; quality control;
mixing procedures; laboratory
procedures; handling receipts
and payments and operating a
bank account.
INTERESTED APPLICANTS
TO CONTACT: McKinney,
Bancroft & Hughes P. 0. Box
N3937, Nassau Bahamas or Mr.
W.P.C. Adams, P. 0. Box ES
6200 Nassau, Bahamas.


HELP WANTED
C 12442
QUALIFIED Gardener with
references: Reliable yardman
Experienced cook with
references:
Tel 7-4142.


C 12440
EXPERIENCED man to look
after large property and pool.
Good wages and two-bedroom
house provided. Call Telephone
5-1440 between 9.30 a.m. and
5.00 p.m.

TRADE SERVICES

C12353
KEITH REID


COMMONWEALTH
FURNITURE
& CABINET WORKS
Design, build and remodel
kitchen and china cabinets -
Living, bedroom Furniture -
Vanity Book and Showcases
etc
Phone -31120
3 doors South of Nassau
Stadium.

C 12366


-I
EXPERT PIANO tuning and
repair. Ton years experience.
Mr. Saunders 42215 for
. g.nmwt.. _


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS-FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV. TELEPHONE 21988 EXT. 5


I TRADE SERVICES


C12323




Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714

HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING

SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795. 2-3798
Airport 77434


I TRADE SERVICES


C12326
T.V. ANTENNAS
Boosters for home,
apartments and hotels
Sales and services.
Call 5-9404
WORLD OF MUSIC,
Mackey Street next
to Frank's Place
C12357
WINDOW AND DOOR
SPECIALISTS We repair:
screens, windows, doors,
awnings, jalousies, glass &
mirror installations. Telephone
54460.
C12418
FOR ALL Your Gardening
Needs, Trimming, Hedging,
Pruning, Beach Cleaning, For
Prompt, Reasonable and
Efficient Service Call 5-7810.

PUBLIC AUCTION
C12278
BELGRAVE AUCTIONEERS
will sell at Public Auction at
Government Warehouse,
Arawak Key, Nov. 6, 1973, at
10:30 a.m. miscellaneous
goods (terms cash only). Public
is invited, come one, come all.


HELP WANTED


C6446
FEMALE BOOKKEEPER
required with 3-5 years
experience, applicant must be
able to do secretarial work,
Customs brokerage also -
Accounts payables. Interested
persons please call Giles G.
Newbold at Automotive and
Industrial Distributors Limited,
telephone 352-8071-4,
Freeport.
C6411
DIESEL, ELECTRIC AND
MACHINE SHOP ENGINEER
to manage complete general
engineering machine 4hbp
operation. Must have formal
engineering tralnhig and
diploma from recognized
Institution. 5 years experience
in senior supervisory
engineering capacity.
Call or write: Grand Bahama
Engineering, Ltd., P. 0. Box
F-2, Freeport, Bahamas.
Phone: 352-6239.
C6438
JOB TITLE: SUPERIN-
TENDENT -- POWER PLANT
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Technical and Colleg.
graduate.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Co-ordinate and direct, on a
three shift/seven day basis,
operations and maintenance In
the generation of electrical
power for the operation of the
cement plant.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C6436
JOB TITLE: MAINTE-
NANCE ENGINEER -
UTILITIES
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Technical and College
graduate.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3-5
years.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Supervise and co-ordinate the
day to day maintenance
activities of the Company
power plant, fresh water will
fields and all air-conditioning
and fire fighting equipment.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C6445
KITCHEN PORTER: Six (6)
Kitchen Porters. Must clean
kitchen and area around
garbage bins.
LAUNDRY MACHINE
OPERATOR : Must be an
experienced laundry machine
operator, familiar with the
operation of all the machines
in the Laundry Department.
BARTENDER: Must be an
experienced bartender. Must
have at least three years
experience. For all the above
please apply to Mr. John A. T.
Roker, Personnel Director of
Holiday Inn, P. 0. Box F-760,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
Phone 373-1333, ext. 28.

C6453
SHOE STORE MANAGER:
Male, Bahamian between ages
of 21-30 with minimum G.C.E.
education standards. Successful
applicant must have
had a shoe retailing
engagement for minimum
period of 5 years of which last
3 years had to be spent in full
managerial position.
This young man is to assume
full responsibility for operation
of a shoe store, inclusive of
merchandising, stock control,
window displays and
administration. Wages and
commissions according to past
experiences of applicant.
Apply in writing only to:
Manager, Bata Shoe Company,
P. 0. Bos F386, Freeport,
Grand Bahama, giving full
resume of your last 5 years
work history.

C6451
SKIN DIVING INSTRUCTOR:
One skin diving Instructor to
operate skin diving concession
at the Grand Bahama Hotel on
commission basis only. ShouW
have own equipment necessary.
Interested persons apply:
Grand Bahama Hotel, West
End, Grand Bahama. Personnel


HELP WANTED
C6437
JOB TITLE: DOCK
FOREMAN
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
High School graduate
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3-5
years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Co-ordinate and supervise the
loading of cement, limestone
and other products through
specialized equipment into
ocean going bulk ships, barges,
trucks, etc. for shipment to
meet customer requirements.
Supervise unloading of raw
materials from ocean going
ships and barges into stockpile.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
C6435
JOB TITLE: FOREMAN -
ELECTRICAL MAINTE-
NANCE
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
High School and Technical
Graduate.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3-5
years.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Supervise the electrical
maintenance activities,
including shop and field forces,
in providing repair,
maintenance, installation,
inspection and testing services
for the entire plant.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C6432
ASSISTANT BAKER: to work
in Hotel Bake Shop. Should
have knowledge of making all
pastries and also willing to
work shift.
Interested persons apply:
GRAND BAHAMA HOTEL,
WEST END, GRAND
BAHAMA, Personnel Office,
between the hours of 9.00 a.m.
and 3.00 p.m., Monday
through Friday. Elon Martin,
Jr., Personnel Director.

C6413
COOKS: To work morning or
evening shift. Assist Chefs on
any station in preparation of
meals on the menu. Must have
previous experience in hotel
k kitchen or high class
restaurant. Letter of reference
required.
KITCHEN UTILITY
WORKERS: To work morning
or evening shift. Wash and
scrub all kitchen equipment,
floors, walls, iceboxes, etc.
Must be willing to do heavy
work.
DISHWASHERS/POT-
WASHERS: To work morning
or evening shift. Wash and
scrub pots, dishes, cutlery,
glassware, etc.
HOUSEMEN: To assist Maids,
also to do heavy general
cleaning in all public areas and
staff quarters of hotels. Police
Certificate will be required.
MAIDS: To clean ana prepare
guest rooms for occupancy.
Letter of reference reauled.

WAITERS: At least one year
experience In first class hotel
or restaurant. Police and
Health Certificate required,
also letter of reference.


You get RESULTS with

CIgi trmW


MARINE SUPPUES
C6412
37' SAILING YACHT,
Mercedes diesel, teak decks,
well equipped, comfortable.
$10,500 Duty Paid. Freeport
373-2288.

HELP WANTED
C6431
1-MALE PERFORMER FOR
NOVELTY DOG ACT: With
five (5) years professional
experience as a featured artist
working 'with a dog. Good
references and Police
Certificate required.
2-DANCERS, (1) MALE and
(1) FEMALE: Must have
experience in Ballet, Modern
Jazz and Tap dancing. At least
three (3) years experience
professionally. Good references
and Police Certificate required.
Apply in person or writing to:
Personnel Department,
Bahamas Amusements Ltd., P.
0. Box F-787, Freeport.


C6434
TIME CLERK ,
High School graduate to handle
time keeping and learn all
phases of accounting. Apply in
person to:
Personnel Department
Bahama Cement Company
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C6447
RESIDENT ENGINEER -
with management experience.
Qualified to degree standard
with at least 5 years experience
in Oil Industry. Burmah Oil
Bahamas Ltd., Box F-2530,
Freeport. Phone 373-3956.

C6416
CHIEF AUDITOR: Chief
Auditor to be in charge of the
entire Hotel Financial
Department. Male with
college education and a B.S.
degree in Accounting. 8-10
years experience in Hotel
Accounting. Police Certificate
required.

EXECUTIVE CHEF: To be in
complete control of the entire
kitchen and all food area and
purchasing of food stores. Male
with a college education and
10 years experience. Should
have the ability to manage and
maintain food cost and payroll
at hotel standard. Police
Certificate required.
SALES DIRECTOR: To be in
charge of Sales Department.
Would be required to spend
some time abroad to meet with
other Sales Representative.
Male with college education
and 5-7 years experience.
Police Certificate required.
LABORERS (6): To do
handyman work around hotel.
Clean glass, wash windows and
do general labouring-class
work. Police Certificate
required.
REVERSE OSMOSIS WATER
PLANT MECHANIC: Must be
able to repair osmosis plant,
keep motors in running
condition and should have
some experience in water wells.
Male with high school
education and 3-5 years
experience. Police Certificate
required.
Interested Persons Apply:
GRAND BAHAMA HOTEL,
WEST END, GRAND
BAHAMA. Personnel Office,
between the hours of 9:00 a.m.
and 3:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday. Elon Martin,
Jr., Personnel Director.


-p U a-.,.-- a a


Office. between the hours of
9:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m.
Monday through Friday. Elon
Martin. Jr., Personnel Director.

C6452
SUPERVISOR CAPTAIN
Individual should have past
experience working through
the ranks of waiter in hotels or
first class restaurants and
possess the experience and
knowledge of local and
international dishes. Successful
candidate should apply with
good references and police
certificate.
Apply to: Grand Bahama
Development Company, Ltd.
Personnel Department,
Lucayan Building P. 0. Box
F-2666, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.


Apply: Personnel
Oceanus Hotels
Palm Way, P, 0.
Fre-nort. G.R.


Department,
Ltd.. Royal
Box F-531,


8


CLASSIFIED


GRAND BAHAMA


CLASSIFIED

IN FREEPORT.

TEL 352-6608
I ~~~~I IIII I


--- A


1 -1 M Tom 1


ml 11


"mili m m m


J


II I III II II


.


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$0ouu


-A











Monday, November 5, 1973


Wht grtblitU


'iIT HERE 'TIL I RNOOTOW
A" OFUSSHEL LETINW


JUST ME


"It's a sign of

CROSSWORD
PUZZLE


ACRIOS 26. Abreast
1. Scale 27. Arched roofs
6. Stench 28. Was carried
10. Divert 29. Brewer's yeast
11. Passage money30. Slender finial
13. Silica 31. Patch
14. Brawl 32. Hydraulic
16. Chum pump
17. Long journey 35. Scant
19. Yellow bugle 37. Banish
20. Buttress 39. Antagonist
21. Male party 40. Unwind
22. Precursor 41. Utensil
25. Climbing vine 42. Tolerate


0117m --VIA
:0Nmiuu


SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE
BWN 4. Manipulate
1. Exclaim 5. Woven cloth
2. Bowfin genus 6. Volunteer
3. Soft muslin 7. Swarthy
/ 8. Anglo-Saxon
Money
1 9. Concert
S12. Scholar
15. Icelandic
narratives
% yI18. Primary color
20. Amble
21. Water parsnip
22. Seraglio
23. Epic poem
24. Effulgent
25. Pantries
S27.Front
29. Emerald
31. Short note
32. Cranny
33. Danish
measure
34. Canasta play
36. Man's name:
abb-7 3 r.
Feotwes -7 38. Totem pole


rI OFFICE HOUU


Chess
By LEONARD GARDEN












Michael Stean, womid Junior
bronze medallist, will be one of
the es the uardian
Rya tnEchange Asmrance
Masters. which Is part of the
Evening Standard congress.
Came unstuk in this
posdUon from the European
chmpionship, where his
Rumranan opponent (White to
move) has htis queen attacked,
butt found a brill at win. Can
you do as well?
This year's Evenrig Standard
congress faom 7-9 December
includes the record 600 ORE
top prize, and tonamaents for
everyone-fromt masters down
to the London Beginners Cham-
plonship for reader who know
only how the pieces move. Write
for details to Chess Congress,
Evening Standard, London EjC.4,
enclosing a eonped addressed
9x4 or 9x6 envelope.


Chess Solution
1Bx B! wins. I/ ... KtxQ;
2 Kt-B6 ch, K-RI or Kt2; 3
R x P mate. The game ended
1 . Kt(Q4)xB; 2 Kt-B6 ch.
K-Kt2; 3 RxP ch. KxKt; 4
Kt-Kt4 mate.




you mak

from the
letters shown
iiere? In mak-
Ing a word.
ea ch letter
may be used
once only.
Each. word
must contain the large letter.
and their must be at least one
etoht-letter word In the lit,
No plurals : no forelan words
no proper amet TODAYte
words.ergooadr.: o18wo
exele t. olu o l tomorrow.w
AtDt avrtIota Irate Tora
otter ovateovert ralt rate rmU
rmtte riot rite rivet rota mate
ROTATIVE rote. tare tart tear
teat teras tier tretore tort tte
trait treat tret trio trite trivet
treat trot trove vert veto vitta
vote voter.


Rupert on Chariot Island-37


King Neptune helps the three friends into his No matter, all is wall. And It was a goodly
chariot. "Greetings, your Majesty," says the thought to cut that anchor rope, young man,"
fiddler. "I am from the court of King Cole. he adds. Now It will be easy for me to take
I would have been here earlier but for those my revenge on that rascally band." Raising
pirates. T captured me on my way." And his trident he gives a loud command, and
he's te fiddler you've been expecting," Immediately a strong current surrounds the
laughs Rupert. .t's not Simon at all." So drifting galleon.
my sea-serpnt was mistaken," sayp the King. ALL RIGHTS RESERvED


Winning

Bridge


By VI4TOR MOLLO
Many faci ng hands cme
up at te recent European Cham-
pioships n Ostend. Not a few
were nstructive as much by woat
nit have happened aoby &at
whwtia did. Here is one of ihem.
North
KJ9832
705
West East
4Q932 3 10 8754
9 5 QA Q 10 5 4
0983 4
SQJ10 5 3 62

1 7
0 A K Q J 10 2
4A974
CONT 0 : .:LEAD 05
Winning the ret trick wMi
%t1e E10 .Bat iaturned the V4.
Wit, or rather sboutd, decter
make his contract?
'ITe reader may ON to ponder
in the match e Lebanon
IbThis is what happened. South
ruffed high drew trumps, and
crossing to the K plaed the,
QK, ruffing East s A. Next he
led the 6., inserted dummy's 4J
and cowttmued with the f ?J. East
covered-he had no choice-and
South puffed, setting up two
hearts in dummy to take care of
two club lose Te 4A, remained
as an entry.
And &et, despite South's good
ply, e contract shou have
been Woken. We*; missed his
ohane lwhen he failed to rise
with the 4*Q on Southti's 46
backing the suit and so killing a
vital entry.
Did you mnsa this defence? 8o
did the distinguihed ,West wvh
wms playing for Switzerland. As
the cards lie, deodsrer can ruf
two hdbs in dummy, bitx that's
neither here uor theme.


1,

o
o


No. 7.271 by TIM McKAY
Across
I. BrIars. (4. 5)
1. Middle Eust language. (6)
9. Cleverness. (3)
10. Found where road men are
working. (-4)
12. Obtains. (4)
14. Light meal. (3)
1t. Rivevrlde plants. (4)
17. Fail to make a bid. (4)
18. Monarch. (3)
la. apanese ash. (3)
o. Cornish rwort. (4)
2S. Girl's name. (4)
as. Pe(t. (3)
SToo mUch of medielne. (I)
Down
UaiMe r awlninmmers. (.-41
o Lt a slant. (5. 4)
4. EquiPPed with rubber
bullets. perhaps. (4..1)
5. Preerved Ieat (4. 4)
a. Before. ( )
C. Colanders. (9)
Ii. For plumber. (44
has one -- .' .-.
15. 0 I r I'vo -RlLO JUI--
n a I Ie. I IN IAH[M, T
(3)
20. D r Inkl & s
3 W r S. 1, .i l
a ri. aviEii fsx B


wtMr MWr 6
Y E A R G A SO I












PH/EW/ AM X GLAC4.
MONDAV S ONLY
COME ONCE
oA








,





I(I GO HlE TRAr TrIME
I,1 EITHRnM!.* g
El^l4E~


.. .. ..,. S
-- ..... '., . i
.. .- .
,. :- ..


UARROLL RIGHTER'S

-HIOROSCOFE
n^S rs from the Carroll Rightr Institute
GENERAL TENDENCIES: After some strange
\ I "confusion in the a.m., you find later you meet
with powerful people to arrive at a better understanding of
how you and they can achieve results vital to your success.
ARIES (Mar 21 to Apr. 19) Good day for straightening out
problems in business and government affairs. Quietly discuss
with mate how to have more happiness in the future.
TAURUS (Apr 20 to May 20) A good discussion with
business and personal allies will bring about fine understanding
and make the future brighter. You can get much valuable data
from others as well.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Be condstent and steadfast to
get your work done efficiently, quickly. Get right help you
need. Show enthusiasm for whatever you have to do.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) You are highly
skillful now and can accomplish much. Do the things you most
like to do, and you succeed. Show you are progressive
thinking,
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Get new gadgets that increase
your efficiency at work. Collect money, pay bills, straighten
out your budget. Do something charming for mate.
VIR(O (Aug 22 to Sept. 22) Fine new ideas can help make
your life and surroundings more ideal. Get cooperation of
good friends. Show you are a real producer.
LIBRA (Sept 23 to Oct. 22) Sit down with co-workers to
plan how to get work done more efficiently, peacefully.
Improve appearance and wardrobe if needed.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Eijoy amusements with
congemals and get rid of tensions. Dining out with mate and
being romantic makes this a fine evening.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec 21) Get right into duties
to please km and make them happier. Don't waste valuable
tune Be constructive and make this a valuable day, p.m.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) An ideal day to pres,.nt
some new plan to allies that you consider practical,
productive. Await the p.m. for fun and pleasure. Be with close
ties or congenials.
AQUARIUS (Jan 21 to Feb. 19) If you confer with some
influential person you know, you can soon add appreciably to
your present income. Use good common-sense methods and
impress practical people
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) You can get into new
activities, ventures today that are challenging and give you
enthusiasm for work, more success in the coming weeks,
months. Show your finest talents in the outside world
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY ... he or she will be
one of those charming young people born under a lucky star
for whom all things will fall into place easily. There will be an
early desire to amass a fortune and a good education should be
provided and work begun quickly after that. Give spiritual
studies early; teach good manners, humanitarianism.
"The Stars impel, they do not compeL" What you make of
your hfe is largely up to YOU!


.74 Comric/Palo



R REX MORGAN, M.D. By DAL CURITIS
HELlo, FRANK' YEAH, THAT$
RieMT---VARE CAN'T CQi a

AFTEITRO ut "
7 VAW /WliLI.
LEAVING OA "
I'LL lOP CER
AT THE FOR A .
HOSPITAL
FARKIN%
L.T
STANLEY i101
RETURNS
Home...






I JUDGE PARKERBy PAUL NICHOLS

TELL HIM TO CALL HE LOOKS I'M GLAD TO REAR IT! HOW AbOUT A TALL LEMONADE,
AFOR AN APPOINTMENT! REAL MAD, SEND HI IN! DRIVER? IT'LL COOL YOU OFF!
As AUGUST POOLE I'M BUSY! BOSS
HANGS UP THE
PHONE FOLLOWING
HIS CALL FROM
SLADE ROBERTS,
HE IS TOLD THAT
SAM DRIVER
HAS COME TO
SEE HIM!



. .




APARTMENT 3-G By Alex Kotxkg

7NOM, I IO"'T %ANT MO WAR
ABWT IT--- AND IT WOULIP BE
OMRFOR THE CHILMRM IF YOU

WHILE PROFESSOR APAGOCRAS TAKES DIDNT SETHE
MNV1NY TO HER ROANM, ANN CASPER "
ANSWERS A PHONE CALL FROM HER
EX HUSSANP!
MINVY 15 HERE WELL, IT SEEMS THAT ALL
WITH ME BUT 'VE BEEN DOING IS THINKING
W17HMY PARENTS OF YOU ANP THE KIPS LATELY
WITH lTANN! I'VE COT TO SEE YOU!'
RHTNOW I. WANT TO TELL YOU ALL
ABOUT MY NEW JOB!





[ STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & overgard













(IBe n ribt


Monday, November 5, 1973


Bruce leads Jets to fifth win running


By IVAN JOHNSON
'SUPERHUMAN' Jets star running
4, back Bruce Russell rushed 98 yards and
scored two touchdowns to lead the
invincible Nassau Jets to their fifth
consecutive victory as they blanked the
AID Stingrays 25-0 Saturday night at the
QE Sports Centre.
In spite of the watchful eye the
Stingrays' defence kept on Russell the
bustling 5' 8" 186 pounds running
back pushed his league total to 594 yards
for the season.
Running back Earl Bostwick also
played a major part in the Jets win
snapping up four key passes for 67 yards.
Considering the Stingrays were without
the league's leading pass receiver, Kelton
Humes they did well to hold the Jets to
25-0


.lets running
Bostl\ick


Without Humes, Stingrays quarterback
v. "Porky" Dorsette was forced to use a
ground attack that was never successful
against the Jets.
back Earl The Stingrays gained only 64 vards on


31 attempts with Vogel Williams leading
the rushing with 52 yards in 14 attempts.
The Jets scoring came in the first half.
Tony Rahming opened the scoring early
in the first quarter when he intercepted
Dorsett's first pass and returned the ball
30 yards to put the Jets 6-0 ahead.
Following a Stingrays' punt from their
23 on a 4 and 6, Roberts returned the
punt 21 yards to the Stingrays 39.
Four successive 5 yard penalties moved
the ball back to the Jets 41 but Ferguson
then hit Huyler with a 29 yard pass giving
the Jets a 3 & 11 at the 27.
Ferguson found Bostwick with a 10
yard pass and on a 4 & 1 at the 17
Russell stormed through the middle for a
17 yard TD.
The Jets scored twice more in rapid
succession to open their lead to 25-0.
Rahming again intercepted a Dorsett
pass to give the Jets possession at their 39
yard line.
Bostwick carried twice for 15 vards


JOHN BULL j


EDGE IT


OVER THE


ROYALS I
(II \RI I S SI l'ART and Alfred Rolle
inmhm d r1 i a tiital ()fl 34 points and 28 "
ehounL lcahding John Bull to a 73-72 edge
!r th li'cc R,.' als yesterday at the A. F.
\ d hl i el (l \ i
S. I[ i 13 i hi '-s game lughl ot 29 in the
i iht l ( l ;iLha cs Bain together with the
i indtlini i l)avid Spence took an early
I x I cad.
Stl rl and Barr scoring 12 and eight
s[p'C ti\cl in the lirst battled John Bull
i) Ik thic' blind 36-33 3 at the end ot' the
i:1 l halt.
Rinkkc I cerTo I'Fawkes. who had onl\ two
.i -ii a ils in the first half, came to John
oi:!, I i(nit lihn in the second half with nine
iulh pl in lt'. ,s h th teams notched up at
if) ,I1 wi tll t iii nniites remaining. '
tick ,'t b, h\ 1 ia kes and Stuart saw John ,'
1I l i !ll~' lh I. 0 n; their fourth ganie


I nti l Ii eLi.'e I






Kt t. l ,i
r 'ill r
II l l lls'
\I,, nk u
\"l"l


1 h i ii"


I


IIsses.
If
4
7

2
0
I'tI l(1 KROYAIS
2

7
0


3. 1 0
i i, r r I S 3
i all 3 I o
", I2 2 o0

\Veteran (iuard Peter Brown contributed a
seiies lhigli oI 44 points and gave 17 assists as
dcilcinig. Nassau l eague champs Becks
( ,tr.il, decmolishcd Bain l'own 128-59.
l t'it'nell )iavis mid i rookie Regionald
il 's had 24 iehuitm s each. Davis went on
1 re 25 points.
I( L.'nic Stiiralhan topped Bain Town with
S ns aLnd 14 rel hoinds.

I t, iicl "Snake" I v .aiis captured 20 rebounds
,11 d '.ti' ,i\ s ,sist, s w ile Jerome Barney and
I lii, i c leIphurn sc ored l(t points each
S nlii Sliaichin .\A il, to a 66-47 victory
, 'i lhCe \ AIrrii s.


Picture: RICKEY WELLS
Becks Cougars Godfrey Rolle tactically
fakes Bain Town's Johnson before going up
for a final goal.
the field topped Rodgers with 21. George
Farrington captured 21 rebounds.
With Selver and Burnside controlling play
in the opening minutes of the game.
Rodgers held a 12-1 command. Then
Demeritte went on a six basket rally bringing
lie Saints one behind.
I he Saints moved ahead 31-30 in the
latter part of the first half and held on 47-43
in the lead by the end of that period.
SAINTS


k.o ,kic I).\li \l oll\ topped the Warriors fg rh f
S 11, I 1. h II I Is nd'2 I12 t1 I s. DeIneritte I I 4 2
1). Sitlh 2 5 2
*, .'A. Smith 1 2 4
Cash I 0 I
li'lin K.tIIO\\ Ics scored I 2 of 25 rtom the \ Woodi s i 0
; i C )l Rctggic I)cie icrIte added another I1 Bain 14 19 4
N 1 ]Lin the assaii Leaglue leading RitihardIs n 0 0 0
S nliilt Satints to 1, 102-91 victory over SpL'ic' 2 22 3
],- Sport Shop I orbe 4 7 2
1.li; t\ ittnsulm e scoring 10 of 20 from R. Knio'cs 12 I 0
Kermiit Rolle 9 13 I

Mike-Mayer kicks five FGs


\I \\ I \ ,The' last one
ts tlh htixd',st," said Nick
\hik M\li 10th-round
SJultl i- il. \\ Io kicked five
Siwl l '<,.} S nl li lto give tlhe
\ li I .l, iis a cructi l I 5-13
N 11'. l.l I oithall I L.eag ue
\ Ci1 \ s'el tlhe 1 os Xngeles

"I l lsl hi id to make it." said
the ,Lt st\le kicker of
Il l'it ,iia n dI csceni "I It's the
h ii' st kick ol in\ careLer."
\ike li'ANers last tone cIamee
\\ilth oil 5 seconds Ict'l in


the game. a 16-yarder tb'it
stretched Atlanta's winning
streak to four games, a club
record in the team's eight-year
history.
"Nervous?" said Mike-Mayer
answering a question. "I was.
bul I couldn't go out on that
field with any doubts."
Ihe most field goals the
rookie from Temple had
kicked before in a game was
three-once in college and also
against the C('hicago Bears
earlier this season.


The victory leaves Atlanta
only one game behind Los
Angeles in the National
Conference West Division race.
The Rams are now 6-2, Atlanta
is 5-3
PRO GRID STANDINGS
AMI RICAN t(()NI RIR'NC
I astern Division
W I I'ts OP
Miami 7 1 0 201 94
Buffalo 5 3 0 134 147
Baltimore 2 ,t 0 144 215
New i-ngland 2 6 0 124 174


then caught a 26 yard pass at the 22 yard
line. Russell then carried 8 yards to the
14 and on the next down swept to his
left and ran 14 yards for his second TD.

Bad handling of the kickoff by the
Stingrays gave the Jets an advantageous
position at the 9 yard line.
Greg Fisher then lost 8 yards to the I
yard line and a fumble by Dorsette gave
the Jets possession at the 1.
Ferguson rounded off the scoring on
the first down to leave the Jets in the
commanding position of 25-0 at halftime.
The second half saw tight defensive
tactics by both teams which resulted in a
stalemate.
Perhaps the Stingrays might have been
able to worry the Jets defence if they had
had Humes and Burnside but as it was
their offense lacked the necessary force
to upset the Jets and the game saw no
further TDs.


Hustlers' Mark Thompson
home stealing Lee Penn.


Griffin pavesway


Hustlers



triumph


-the















one


player/manager Neville
Cartwright.
"However, taking nothing
from the Hustlers they have a
good hitting and pitching
team."
Having lost two players from
Monday night's line up, "we
were just trying to push that
extra bit of Courage we had
left going," Cartwright said.
Courage were without the
services of right fielder Victor
Russell and left fielder Phil
Carey both of whom were on
the starting line up. This
Cartwright said, made quite a
difference in their hitting
attack.
Actually, Courage found
themselves playing the whole
semi-finals without their full
team that eliminated Hasting
Camobell and the Classic Bucks
2-1 and stopped the Police
Royals 6-0, 3-2, and 9-8 for the
Freeport championship.
Top missing players included
strong left hand hitting/catcher
Bill Gough and defensive third
baseman Bob Fox.
Having seen action only
twice in regular season play,
Cartwright was forced to take
over the catching duties.
Nevertheless, Cartwirght's
performance was good for a
total of 1 1 put outs and two
assists.
Replacing brothers James
and John Sands in the out field
with Paul Davis and Eddie
Johnson while Frankie Petty
caught for his brother Tony
Petty in Saturday night's
action, the Hustlers utilizing a
two base throwing error and
wild pitch moved ahead by one
in the bottom of the first when
Rudy Johnson crossed the
plate.
The bottom of the second
inning saw the Hustlers unleash
their hitting power and
exploded for seven
commanding runs. Catcher
Petty led off that inning with
triple into centre field. His
brother Tony and Davis
followed with base on balls to
cram the corners.
Healey seemed unable to
find the strike zone and issued
his third consecutive walk to
Johnson bringing Frankie
home from third. Sylvanus
Petty touched a ground ball to
second baseman Don Malone
who misgloved it allowing
another run to score.
In continuation of their rally
off Healey Micklewhite cracked
a two rbi single deep into right
field bringing up Kermit
Graham who ended it all with a
three run in the park homer.
Meanwhile. Courage at bat
were trying to battle their way
against Tony who in four
innings kept them scoreless and


q


Picture: RICKEY WELLS
applies the tag too late to the



for





o w lr ***"


I, I


& .st.a..,


v^"*


'.. .,. "4* '.- '





A, -












Hustlers star pitcher Glen Griffin
hitless. Of 14 batters he faced
in those four innings, he struck
out eight. -
Claude pitching his first
championship game could do I
nothing with the bats of the
Harbour Hustlers who came
through with six more runs in
the bottom of the third.
Sylvanus Petty topped that
inning with a two run homer.
Micklewhite followed with
another out of the park homers
and Graham who doubled
scored on Eddie Johnson's rbi
single.
Courage, behind 14-0 broke
loose in the top of the fifth
and helped by two camustlers
errors crossed the plate for two
runs stopping the shut out.
Healey was safe on first.
baseman Micklewhite's fielding
error and moved to second safe
when Frankie's attempted pick
offuwas overthrown.
There he was joined by Leer
Penn who picked up Courage's
first hit of the game. John
Rolle's sacrifice fly scored
Healey and moved Penn tos
third from where he scored oni
another of Petty's errors.
Micklewhite in the top of
the second picked up his
second home run'of the game
as the Hustlers moved out of
reach on Davis' run in the final


4


S Picture: RICKEY WELLS

inning.
All warmed up following
their first victory, the Hustlers
in the final game last night
unravelled a 13 hit attack that
smothered their opponents by
eight runs. Griffin taking his
first win of the championship
playoff series struck out nine
and walked three. He chipped
in the offence collecting two
hits from four times at bat and
scored two.
Yesterday's game
tIUSTLE RS


By GLADSTONE THURSTON
ELEUTHERA'S star pitcher
Glen Griffin in a commanding
four hits/nine strike-outs
attack paved the way for
power hitters Kermit Graham
and Mark Thompson to lead
the Governors Harbour
Hustlers to a decisive 13-5
victory over Freeport's
Courage Beer yesterday and a
2-1 triumph in thie semi-final',
of the Bahamas Softball Se.ies.
Graham and Thompson each
hit two run homers.
The Hustlers, 38-2 winners
in the Eleuthera softball series
meet New Providence softball
champs the Ministry of Works
in a best of three championship
match Friday at the John F.
Kennedy Softball Park.
Freeport's ladies champs the
Classic Bucks meet New
Providence champs the Blazers
in the ladies championship
series also on Friday night.
Unable to do anything but
pop up the pitching of
Courage's Lenny Healey, the
Hustlers dropped the first game
Friday 4-1. Griffin in that
game tossed a three hitter and
struck out 13.
The Hustlers put it all
together in the second game
Saturday night and behind the
eight strike out/one hit
pitching of speedster Tony
Petty and the four-rbi/two run
homer off David Micklewhite's
stick clobbered Courage 16-2.
"The first night, we were
not used to that off-speed
stuff.'" said Hustlers
player/coach Micklewhite. He
was referring to Healey's
tantalizers that were
responsible for nine pop flys
and five strike outs.
"He (Healey) beat us once
but there was no way he could
have done it a second time.
The guys knew what to
expect."
Healey starting in Saturday
night's game was the victim of
six runs including a three run
homer before he retired
midway in the second inning,
being replaced by Edward
Claude.
This meant no real change
for the strong Hustlers who
jumped on the rookie hurler
for 10 more runs and seven
hits.
Going into yesterday's
decider, Healey and Griffin
again opposed each other. Tfiis
time Griffin had the offence to
back him and coupled with
some key errors from the
Courage squad, the Hustlers
took the lead 11-0 by the
fourth inning before Courage
saw their first run home.
"We made a lot of mistakes
on the field and through this,
we made them look good,"
n o t ed Courage's


SBarry Farrington takes tennis trophy


BARRY FARRINGTON


By IVAN JOHNSON
BARRY F1ARRINGTON won the
first Heineken amateur tennis tourney
defeating the lefthanded Steve Norton
in straight sets 6-4, 6-4, 7-5
yesterday at the Montagu Beach Hotel
courts.
The tourney, played in front of a
poor crowd, was a mixture of good
and bad tennis, partly due to the fact
that Norton had earlier in the day
been subjected to a gruelling two and
half hours semi-final with John
Farrington, 15.
The Farrington combination of
father and son proved to be too much
for North but nevertheless he fought


to the bitter end taking Farrington snr.
to 5-7 in the last set of the final.
The match started with two breaks
of serve. Norton broke serve in the
first game, only to see Farrington
reply by breading his serve in the
second.
With both players content to drive
from the baseline the pace of the first
set was slow.
Norton held on gamely to 4-5
before Farrington broke serve again in
the tenth game to take the first set
6-4.
Farrington broke serve in the fourth
game of the second set and took the
fifth game to storm into a 4-1 lead.
At this point Norton was beginning


to show distinct signs of fatigue and it
seemed that Farrington, who was not
playing with confidence at the net,
might run away with the second set.
Norton battled to deuce in the sixth
game and after three deuces clinched
the game to pull back to 2-4.
With Farrington on in full flight
Norton sensibly slowed the pace of the
game and for a time Farrington
appeared a little flustered before he
took the tenth game after another long
deuce tussle and the second set 6-4.
The start of the third set followed
the same pattern as the first Both
players broke served in the first two
games.
On the opening serve of the third


game Norton produced the best shot
of the match a superb forehand
crosscourt drive leaving Farrington
gaping.
Norton broke served in the third
game to go 2-1 up but Farrington
immediately pulled back to 2-2.
At 5-3 to Farrington, Farrington
served with one match point.
The umpire uttered an incoherent
sound in the middle of the rally and
Norton thinking the umpire had called
out left the ball which landed in the
court.
The umpire then declared game set
and match to Farrington. Norton
protested over the call and it was
agreed to play the point again.


ab
P, Davis 4
J. Sands 0
E. Johnson 1
R. Johnson 3
S. Petty 4
I). Micklewhite 3
K. (Graham 4
R. Parks 0
M. Thompson 3
C. Sands 4
J.Sands 3
I'. Johnson I
G(. Griffin 4
COURAG;I'
L.. Rolle 4
E. Farquaharson I
J. Rolle 2
M. Rolle 4
L. Harvey 4
I). Malone 3
L. Healey 3
J. Johnson 3
L. Penn 2
N. Cartwright 2


JOHN FARRINGTON