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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03484
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: October 30, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03484

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hi


COR. ROSETTAST 1 I
MT. ROYAL AVE I9

SVYLANIA TVs
P.O BOX 550 -PHONE 2-1306/2-3237

(Registered with Postmaster of Bahamas for postage concesonas within the Bahamas.)
VOL. LXX, No. 283



ilAt


Nassau and Bahama Islands Lea r


Tuesday, October 30, 1973 Price: 1 Cents


ACCELERATED CRIME RATE SWELLS PRISON

INMATES TO TWICE NORMAL CAPACITY





Total breakdown of


discipline


6


DR. NORMAN GAY 5
...takes seat tomorrow


LEADER MINNIS
...also in Senate


PARLIAMENT OPENS TOMORROW


Government names three new



Senators: Sidney Carroll,



Ira Curry & Leander Minnis

By NICKI KELLY
THE GOVERNMENT today announced that MR. IRA CURRY of Exuma and Nassau residents
SIDNEY CARROLL and LEANDER MINNIS have been named as the PLP's three new Senators in


the 16 member Upper House.

B.E.C. MEETS

BIG ELECTRIC

CONSUMERS
BIAHAMXS ItL. ('KCi( r'
CORPOR ATION ,,i,, ucilie a
manager Peter I. Bethl l iliis
mornieii declined coll eit;it iio
a Imliiiec'i 1 Il IC called lot r tlis
aflt ern o i ith vli ll
clectricit\ co nlim n s, tri llt it v,
thotuglt ii !iuhl poi tend ;i rail
increase.
fhice !eenn tollowt on l .'
h : ll i , > lll iii!> ", m Il k' i ;11t.ie;.

5 n i t..
) P0 ihdtiin 's w,.ilrin ti h : i c
Sio r e s s 1 i l i : a !
Party convention i'l I'l'ie)or

tuel pri.t hikes and fuel
shlortaees "w'il he reflected in
thle Bahamas ill higher rates for
electricity and higher airline
I tart's "
1 ie tribune has learned that
the 11ne0 1in1 w\ l,,s schedulelcd lor
two o'clock ills afternoon oi)
the thlild fll i of tlih Post

Street
Ilnl\ilte tl c liCI meii g C\ Ci e
rCpreiseiIIati,,e, it tile I jiIaltiis
IHot cl \ssotciatll)ll tile
Bahlaimas liBusiness Le.agcue. lhe
B ahl 11i 1 ias (' li I niber of
( 'llloticLOe dlnd the Bahamias
Trade iUnion C'ni,'ess
The i 't h~nilii n ,s wcrt sent
out bv t Ie Blord an(d
iainunagement' ot HI 'C Also
altendii g w II \ V, W )rk
M\inii ster Siiaton 1I lhiowe
wI ties poil lollit includeI
c nc r c '.l d el, ie i I (i
S\ectii\c I' '.rd clha riniint
P'rcstot \liNt \ M1 P. relerred
Shlie I r! l ;i ti o Ir Bethel.
lio ,is ,Ki. t!i!' Lcneic ij i iatager
dining the a Is e etrn l sick
leave Oe gllnerli manager
Coburn Sa nds
Asked the purp,"o te otf
today's MnetiIt iL % tBehe I t l
said:
CA\N ( )\OMMI \1I
"I'l sot r\ 1 cannot
conm ent on that. ile Mi tistet
and the board would like to
make a statement. pass somt
information on t io mator
conisuilt'lrs. I cainnolt conlcent'll
further."
BlVC lsl incre.i d it's
rates ion Aiugut 3 1, "1t0.
under pressure of sing tcosis
for generation equipment and
continuing pa' increases ior
BEC personnel. Prior to 1970.
the rates had not been
increased since 1961 I
Besides the skyrocketing
prices of fuel on the world
market as underscored by the
Prime Minister during the PLP
convention. BF(' presently also
has to bear pay increases for its
employees built into a contract
signed with the EI.ngineering
and General Union in June.
and the union is nofw
demanding further pay
increases to offset the rising
cost of living.


ATTRACTIVE
FRUIT

BASKETS


NASSAU FREEPORti
EARED
. . u_ . ..


All are long-time supporters
ol the IPLP. Mr Curry is a PLP
general at I:xunia. Mr. Minnis,
aI well-known Nassau plumber,
is a trustee ot the party, and
hbiiinessmnan Sidney Carroll
w:a the PLP candidate for
(c'l, c e ti,'own in the last

I e anlinotunce lne nt came
S;hiiilt atter I p.m. today as
'owriiinentl and Opposition
lprci' iid for thc olp)ening of the
nli '\ L io rnhI i I Parliament
i,'mo1Irrow morning.
1 lic three new members
\ ie niallt d 11' iconfor ity
w 1 I I t he independence
oi slt 1 iition which has
'l in iiinAted the so-called
Independent Senator" from
IBii; mian p Ulit 's.

Iwo of the three
Independents in the Senate
prior to tlih new Constitution
have already accepted new
appointments and the third is
also believed slated for
top-level government post.
hlle Hon. Leonard J.
Knowles is now ('hef Justice
ol tlie IBaliau s. Mr. L. B.
Johnlsonii as beet nailed
\ In hssi,;tdor t t he It' I Ilted
Slatls andl Mr. Gerald Cash is
ieportedl'c to ie named
Bahamas lligh Comnmissioner
to the Caribbean.
Tomorrow's opening is
likely to be of special interest
in the light of Prime Minister's
acknowledgement at the PLP
convention that the Bahamas is
caught in an economic crisis.
What the government
proposes to do about these
problems is likely to form a
veri ctonsitderable part of the
Speech from the i'hrone policy
idtc iteinl
Io date the government's
response to the need for more
rI c'tenlie has been the
introduction of additional
taxes.
$13.5 in. TAXES
In the nine months that the
II outse met since last
September's general election
the administration has levied an
additional S13.5 million in
t,\es to help meet public
service requirements and
capital development.
Tlie introduction of price
control in M'irch has sent food
ctosls skyrocketing in sonic
casIes and created shortages in
others.
here will also be some
changes in the 38-mnember
House. Three former members
of the Opposition Free
National Movement will be
declaring their intention to sit
as Independents following their
expulsion from the party.
Sir Roland Symonette.
S li irlea); Cleophas
Adderley (Nassau) and Michael
Lightbourn (Clarence Town)
will be joining Mr. Errington
Watkins (Marsh Harbour) who
was expelled by the FNM
several months ago. The
Independents have already
served notice they intend to be
particularly vocal in their
opposition to the government
now that they have been freed
from a party whip.
OUTTEN'S POST.
It is doubtful that Mr.
Sinclair Outten, who
successfully contested the St.
Barnabas seat, will be present.
Mr. Outten has disdosed
that he was born at Turks
Island and has thereby


disqualified himself as
representative for the district
because of his non-Bahamian
status.
The Iribune understands
that Speaker Arlington Butler
will he making an
ann ouncement tomorrow
with reference to the St.
Barnabas seat.
In addition Dr. Norman
Gay, elected as the PLP
representative for Bains Town
in the July' by-election, is to be
svtorni in toniorrow. The
seat \Las formerly held by Sir
Milo Butler. who resigned on
his appointment as Governor
(General of the Commnonwealth
rni Independence in July.


Col. Gamble dies
LT. Col. G. O. Gamble,
(pictured), well-known Nassau
resident. died in London this
morning. lie was flown to
England a month ago to
undergo an operation.
lie is survived by his wife
Patricia, one brother Dr.
Charles Gamble, three
daughters, Susan and Sally, and
one son (harles.
Ilis wife and daughters Sally
and Jane. were in U.K. with
him when he died.
A ('anadian, Col. Gamble
came to the Bahamas over 20
years ago and was active with
the now defunct United
Bahamian Party. lie served in
the Canadian Corps of Signals
during World War II.
Funeral arrangements are to
be announced.


By NICKI KELLY
THE PRISON SYSTEM IN THE BAHAMAS is
crumbling because of a total breakdown in discipline.
And the reason, says a Bahamian officer, is due largely
to the pressures exerted by politicians and expatriate


staff on the administration.
('onmpounding tc problems
are an ;accelerated crimc rate
that ha,' sw elledl prlsoll
numbers to twice the nornial
capacity, the mixtuie of,
hardened criminals with first
offenders, a shortage of guards
and the absence ot alny
rehabilitation progranIIIe tII
prevent rept'at offences.
The 'Iribune's informant
claimed that abuses were being
perpetrated at the prison w lich
were either being covered up
by the adumniist itoii ,r
ignored b\ Ihe 1Ministr of
Home Affairs
lie charged that ti' escape
of prisoners. David Albury
and Victor Storr was tlhe
second bh thsc itwI men silce
lkt nionlti iAccordl(n tt ltie
prison olt icer. Albur), and
Storr escaped in Septemlber but
were caught wtit htu pot 1111
being told of the in.Ident.(See
story this page.)
NO1 IN SI:( URII'Y
lie alleged that dcspite hle
escape attempt the two mien
were never placed under
security following tlhir
capture. They escaped aain
on October 17 "'buit o!.. e
weren't told abhoulIt 1 I! unliis
week," he laimned.
As s s t a In t PI o I I c
commissionerer John ( rawvlev
said today police were
in formed If the escape onI
October 19. He had no
explanatinti however to r tile
delay in iflorunilg (the public.
I"Thest men are dangerous
and it is an injustice to the
public not to war'l theci." the
prison officer said.
UNI'SCOR'l I I)
lie alleged t further Ihat
Dugal Farquharson, w h o
escaped yesterday, lud beent
sent utnescorted t(o i kii][
garbage in anI area p1i ,I1 ti.
to prisoineis
l tie prison ofh eir i. 'ceticd
thial although the pris.'n \1a,
onl0 designed to hold al'o;l
400 inmates, ii hlad ncitrli
twice that number al present.
lie blamed this condition ton
the increasing crime rate and
pointed out that the situation
was likely to become worse
because first offenders \cre
being thrown in with hardened
criminals instead of being kept
in separate quarters.
In addition there was no
attemptl at rehabilitation ., and1 .1
shortage of giuarids lidiatl it
di fcult i to m aintali, diciiplt c
(;OVl. ('ONNHI ( (O\S
L'!t I .I 'i;, the dits ipl in
question was the ;!.t tli.ii ,i
number of prisoiniers h1.id
relatives with government
connections. As a result
attempts b officers to
discipline these lern weie
hamstrung b\ threats ,of
political victimization.
"'It's our word against thatI


lack


of


of the plisonters, and it's alwva
the prisoners' ,'word I that is
accepted." he charged.
The olticecr said that ii. a
ilumlber of cases guards were
ordered bli% tic administration
to stand iI a cell for a number
of hours as a fornt o!
disciplinir i punisti MCen t.
Ic ail s i complaints h
B ahal iln st aff were
coImnpl'etel Ignored. "We are
told tl.t i t we don't like the
10 ) ill -111ti i iii."
VI we an II1\111/1D
Although well over half the
100-uoliie r staff at the prison
is Bahalian, the Bahamians
claim they a re being victimietl
by thile 3t0 r so West Indians.
lie claimed that although a
niumbcl olf highly qualilced
Baliamnias had applied to join
the prisonn service, they were
being screened out by the
expatriate wlio preferred to
recruit l1oer intelligence
Balhatiitis whom the, could
'keep tinder their thin b."
l)eclatid the officer: "I'he\
are Inow itn the process ot
bringing inI about 50 more
expaltii.le by claimiing that
there are no Bahamians
a vailab!'
"B.liaIiiaiis do apply," he
said, "but ;i c' llcVer receive a
repl, to their applications ll e
saidl Bahamian officers on the
prison force were being
disci ininated against by the
c\!atriate whto nearly< all
o. Uplcd thile top positions.
"When w'e do n ighlt dult it's
not[ imadle up by tlune' off. If
tli : I, ian elnml. renII \ in Itu 1
la:r' :\ .cwe .Irc 1' 1 biddenC t to is'
le : ephlne a! lhe prison or)
l.ic lh ie 'ce' ss. i; S\ t ine i'!l.
'i s.t Ie \pc \pilrl icIs ti c li aiind
rr their childciin ito school
.ild w lhen ttith' \\. t it ) pli\
crlck t tilet e' piect uis to do
thellI shift."
), laredd The Tribune's
inflo: ;ant: "The norale of the
1Baha man officers is right
cdu w Some of them have been
ji ti prison 12 to 14 years
tilitt promotions. IInstead of
lie \linistrx of Homein Affairs
c.liiir i n members of tihe
at iid :'iti.llioln,t as IthIe did
,i l i r' c. n s r \ P 1 r vO ll
:0I, 1111011, ".tl leyIC S1t ldiid 1e
i! Ir'ceni storin md erisonr
nilotis. ietx shoulit oie

ttltie 'I tl\ts S hatI is got ng .l'
ItH suid n ie i eltavitir tot
soit of tlhe e\patriate stafl
had become petty to the point
wheite they refused to give
prisoners cutlery with which to
ea,tt their fIood or provide
Bha m iian officers with
necessary rail clothes when
thlc were on duty.


at prison, and






guards, reported


VICTOR STORR DAVID JAMES ALBURY

THESE MEN ARE WANTE


ERROL DEAN


4 prisoners escape from Fox Hill

POLICE HAVE LAUNCHED an appeal for help from the public in locating four men who have
escaped from police custody, three of them two weeks ago. and one two months ago.
I he objects o) the iitanihunii t i.al dly weapon. His ,last known
are Victor Storr, 20. David tddr lre w,,Ja Iwan Jumittinper
James "Chestnut'" Albury, 22, ( trne ad cl a Strect
F'rrol ''Skinny" Dean. a21. and
Duial Farquharson, Alh lr\. a 22-year-old
Sitrr arId .Altbucr. escaped pal: .... ;, -it I lrn's.. slint, xwitl
friiin tlhe tFox Hill Prison on fair coniplexion. black hair and
the night of October 18-1 by brown eyes le has a scar on
forcing thie bars on their cell the right side of his face. Ilis
w'lldtcwl last know, n address was East
S)ea ll, i st d it charge Sitreet ,iiar Wlndsor Park.
of si ,sphi' akug and stealing, lie S .i 'Irving a ltwo- ear
gotl l t'o. i tIro he ('entra l prsO Cn term Iii tin rg ery and
Po()llec StIIioi. Bank Lane. traud i--. i se prec ences.
Ntug1' C1. b' allegedly )IV j tlli-I c m huaIc


I I I Iihi uit i ln dtItt i nIiIt1 1rtt1 a'fl t hi IlIt k hiair
thu I f' lit', 'ri ,m .le rda r an d 'h : l 1 i'sc I
1110' tios li Ik u sidood that DUGAL FARQUHARSON
i .. i,, hi, geli ie.w \ after he Ih' I' lS t ol itto, ' It ... escaped yesterday
w ,t 'il. wilthouit ain es cort. to Ilisli! ,uind .1 seat 5 .t )\ov r ll',s Ig L',
tuii'; r ga:;te outside the etc is said clto fiequtcit the POLICE FIND
re-T l ed .tiea Shl iilub oni Nassau Street.
i. 20, an electrician, is l:tuiharson. a 20-yj-GETAWAY CAR
fi,' fcc si\ inches in height. nme.n was spring a
1hai a Jinddiumt build, dark six- r sentence for LIC OFFICER
c. nplelmn. hilnti n rwn hoshiw and rhbbehrn. Investitigating the 54.000 banl
robber v carried out by threc
c .. and has a small scar near P,,,!t' ,,sa d e has a d rk iyasked robbers at b thte
hi- tt cechroi. ,e wa. s in bro 'pl and I f Robinson Road Barclavs BanI
i ,., t ', p l ll it tat till in t'',i btllth I 1c lect six \esterda\ hla e louI ld thi
s, ,' hotusc tea ini and I s hit sl sr get-a\\a cr secd h the men
sl ..iiA .g illd assault w.itlh a h ( IA. , l e m I


TWO
years ol(
months.
destroy(


Wir I...... -l VA


ROCK SOUND'S $14m. COMPREHENSIVE SCHOOL
funding. Photo montage shows the s
THE FIRST OUT ISLAND COMPREHENSIVE Minister unveiling the dedication
SCHOOl., embteinq ascdemic and vocational training, was Governor-General Sir Milo Butler and L
offkially opeMd it Rock Sound, Eleuthera Friday by the guest book. Shorthand, typing and r
Prime Minister Lynden Pindling. The $277,000 structure subjects are being taught in addition
was built jelotly by private donations and government examination subjects. PHOTOS: Howar


TWO LITTLE GIRLS DIE

IN HOLMES ROCK FIRE
GIRLS, one nine home yesterday, before
d and the other 15 fire-fighters could arrive from
died in a fire which Freeport.
d their Holmes Rock A Freeport Fire
Department spokesman said
S there are no telephones in
Holmes Rock. and as a result
U residents had to dash the
three or four miles to Eight
iMile Rock before the fire
Srserice in Freeport. almost
ten miles away, could be
alerted.
'iThe spokesman said the
SFreeport Fire Department
S received the call at 6:39 p.m.
and the first of three
Sfire-fighting units dispatched
Arrived on the scene within
ten minutes.
,But the four-room wooden
Some owned and occupied by
/ Sarah Jones and her five
-L children was already
Completely destroyed, the
spokesman said, and two of
the children, Jacqueline, nine,
and Valerie, 15 months, were
dead.
The spokesman said Mrs.
Jones left her home to get
some groceries, and she
S believes the blaze was started
by an explosion of the
kerosene lamp she had left
school, the Prime burning.
n plaque andg.
ady Butter ignil g three of the children were
relted commercial( M to get to safety, but
n to the regular Jacqueline and Valerie died
d Glass. anid the flames.


A ( ri1u1iatl In\ estigation
1), rtarittiin supervisor said this
morningm that thc white Javelin,
stolen tromll I slhand Motors
during thie week-end was found
parked along a side-road off
Soldier Road.
Nothing was found inside it,
the officer said.

MURDER TRIAL
THl JURY in the Supreme
Court trial of Wendell "Red"
Burrows and Phillip "Polka"
Ilumes is expected to be
recalled tomorrow morning
following a trial within a trial.
The all-male jury, headed by
former Bahamas Baseball
Association president Mr.
Anthony Curry were excused
from the hearing on Friday
afternoon when defence
attorneys challenged the
admissibility of statements
made to police by Humes.
Mr. Justice James Smith is
expected to pass a ruling on
the proceedings this evening.
Burrows, a Freeport
bartender, and Humes, a
20-year-old waiter are jointly
charged with murder and
ahetnient of the murder of Bias
Street entertainer-bartender
Raymond Barry Major, 25, on
September 5, last year.
The body of Major was
found lying near the aide of a
Pernall Tract f antjath


S" i > PEEI, F9mllE

RUSSELL'S
ORANGE JUICE
available at your
SUPERMARKET


- -- I~-.-~-~. ~---- --- __._ ___


DIoUDLEY'S ,


S
k
e

e
.
s


l he


Sribtunt










Tuesday, October 30, 1973


THOUSANDS STARVING, SAYS FUND


QUEBEC Province's
Liberal government won a
landslide election victory that
Premier Robert Bourassa said
constituted a clear rebuff to
the French Canadian
separatist movement.

THREE people were killed
and 24 injured in an
explosion and fire that
destroyed a bottled gas plant
in Milan.

A ROMAN Catholic aged
34 answered a knock on his
Belfast door and died in a hail
of bullets. Protestant
extremists were believed
responsible.

NAVY divers recovered the
body of a 13-year-old boy
trapped for a day and night
inside a capsized fishing boat.
off Plymouth. England.

JAMES Wymore, 77,
retired businessman and
father of actress Patrice
Wymore, died in a Salina
hospital.

ONE OF Britain's biggest
car companies. British
Leyland said it plans to give
tour cars to Chile's military
junta as a "goodwill gesture."

THE BODY of Jan Palach,
a student who burned himself
to death in 1969 to protest
the Soviet occupation of
Czechoslovakia, has been
explanation of the transfer.
Prague's Olsany cemetery.
There was no official
explanation of the transfer.
COMMONWEALTH
Government officials are
reportedly hunting a site in
the San Juan area for an
international fair in 1977
honoring the 25th
anniversary of the islands'
Commonwealth political
status.

THE GABON Government
has broken diplomatic
relations with Israel, but said
it would restore them
whenever Israeli forces
evacuated occupied Arab
territories.

KLALIS Altmann. the
former Nazi commander
accused of war crimes in
France, was freed from a
Bolivian jail under a supreme
Court ruling rejecting his
extradition.

Pil TRO Nenni. the grand
old man ot Italian socialism.
was elected president of
the Socialist party in Rome.

A BRITISH couple
captured the top prize in the
World Professional Dance
Championships at Madison
Square Garden's felt forum.

ARCHIBALD Cox testified
today in Washington he may
have been the source of a
news leak about a telephone
call from President Nixon
instructing former Atty. Gen.
Richard Kleindienst not to
appeal one phase of the ITT
antitrust case.
Reports from AI'


LONDON (AP') Iwo
million men, wilomen and
children are facing death by
starvation in Ethiopia because
severe droughts over the last
two years have destroyed
harvests and 88 per cent of the
nation's cattle, the United
Kingdom Disasters Emergency
Fund reported.




U.N. f


Between 100.000 and
150,000 already have been
reported dead and the latest
report, on Oct. 23. said about
1.000 people, mainly women
and children, were dying each
week from starvation in
Ethiopia's 13 government-
administered refugee camps.
Arnold Bulnier. speaking on


behalf of the emergency
committee, said that one camp,
at Dessie, had to be closed
because it ran out of food.
Its 10,000 inmates were
turned loose to roam aimlessly
around the barren countryside
in search of nonexistent food.
The emergency committee is
made up of organizations


which have set up a programme
to take in not only Ethiopia but'
also the other six nations
occupying the African Sahelian
belt south of the Sahara.
The other six countries hit
by the drought which has been
sweeping Africa from the west
to the east coast are: Senegal.
Mauritania. Chad, Niger. Mali
and Upper Volta.


brces tighten hold


on MidEast


THE ISRAELI Military Command
accused the Egyptians of firing three
surface-to-air missiles at reconnaissance
flights over Isaeli-held territory in the
Sinai today but said none of the planes
was hit.
The complaint came as U.N. forces
tightened their surveillance of the Mideast
cease-fire. A U.N. official said in Cairo
that Swedish troops have established six
observation posts along the Suez
cease-fire line and are trying to link with
Finns to the south.
He said 53 more Swedes and Finns are
due in Cairo tonight to increase the
special U.N. emergency force to 660.
The Israeli Command said the missiles
were fired at its reconnaissance planes
flying over the mountainous Jidi area
near the bulk of Egypt's 3rd Army-
trapped by Israeli forces on the east side


THE POLICE GE

AND THE

PROSTITUTE OF
MEMPIIIS (AP) NAIR
Authorities here are looking military
for a prostitute with a ordered
penchant for policemen. at the U
Police Director Jay Hubbard out of
said that "less than 20 hours o
officers" had sexual relations engaged
with the 19-year-old woman, US
who was arrested on a declined
prostitution charge and was order br
found to have venereal disease. Uganda
The Police Department's by the F
internal affairs bureau is Charge
investigating the case. Keeley.
Hubbard said he wants to Other
talk to the woman, identified speculate
only as Charlotte, who is could lea
believed to be in her home of the U
state of Arkansas. a comply
At the same time. Hubbard The r;
disclosed that a second of six
investigation is under way security
involving five other officers It said
and another woman with a until t
prostitution record. Uganda.
"This investigation sort ot against t
humped into the other one." spelled o
he said the guar,
lHubbard said that initial the embz
estimates that anywhere G;over
between 70 and 200 policemen responsit
were involved with Charlotte of every
were wrong. Amin.
expelled
"We will be out with his co
something less than 20 ess
Pressure
officers". he said. "Not all of Ugandaa
them were involved while on support
duty. A larger number of these East war.
cases occurred while the officer lie tl
was off dut\ than while he was A mer i
oni duty. diplomat
Hubbard said the policemen
did not extort favors from the
woman, nor did they pay here
"She has a great feeling of
generosity toward the police THi:
officers." he said. Reacting
lie said those officers b o yc o
involved might be guilty of "an govern
interesting form of neglect of ban on
duty." imotunnn


mm


The 1
next Su
Mi nister
will be p
of restri,
Dutch o
At t
minister
need y
ratio I
contingc
measure


ceasefire


of the Suez Canal.
The Israeli Government came under
home front criticism yesterday when it
allowed supplies to reach the isolated
EIgyptian Army without first winning
concessions on the return of Israeli
prisoners of war.
Egypt and Syria have so far refused to
provide Tel Aviv with lists of Israeli
prisoners.
Meanwhile, an Israeli analyst said in
Jerusalem Jordanian troops might have
advanced to near Jerusalem if King
Hussein had decided to attack Israel in
the first 24 hours of the war.
Little stood in the way of such an
attack across bare land after the fighting
began on Saturday, Oct. 6.
The attack would have been contained
and eventually pushed back, the
informant sepculated, but at considerable
expense to Israel.


The critical period came Sunday night
and Monday morning, he said.
Thereafter, the Israelis considered the
situation "under control "
During the three weeks of fighting
on the two main fronts, Hussein's closest
tank brigade to the Jordan river frontier
was five to six hours driving time away,
according to the informant.
Once Hussein had committed about 80
tanks to fight in Syria on Oct. 13, the
threat of Jordan's opening a third front
virtually disappeared.
Israel's forces along the frontier were
described as "well dug in and in a
reasonably conspicuous way so as to
discourage any Jordanian ideas."
Ilussein's decision to limit his
participation to the dispatch of tanks to
Syria was based partly on the King's


delicate
Syria.


T OUT, AMIN



RIDERS MARINES


OBI (AP) Uganda's
government has
US Marine Guards
IS Embassy in Kampala
the country within 48
n grounds they were
in subversive activities.
Embassy spokesmen
to comment on the
oadcast on the official
Radio, and presented
foreignn Ministry to US
d'Affaires Robert

diplomatic sources
ed that the expulsion
ad to the virtual closing
S Embassy or possibly
etc break in relations.
adio listed the names
marines assigned to
duties at the embassy.
;en. Amin gave them
tomorrow to leave
Details of allegations
the marines were not
)ut. The broadcast said
ds were not needed at
assy since the Uganda
nment assumes
ability for the security
lne in Uganda.
a Moselem who
Israeli diplomats from
untry, stepped up
against Americans in
as a result of American
of Israel in the Middle

threatened to jail all
cans, including
s, if US soldiers took a


shooting role in the war.
Last week he warned
Ugandans against the possible
invasion by Israeli, American
and British paratroopers at any
moment.
US Embassy officials advised
approximately 240 American
missionaries, teachers and
businessmen 10 days ago to
leave Uganda in the interests of
their safety.
The embassy also began
what it called a "temporary"
evacuation of diplomatic
families, many of them going
to Nairobi.
State Department officials in
Washington said they received
confirmation from the U.S.
Embassy in Kampala that the
six marine guards were ordered
to leave Uganda.
"We had no choice but to
comply,"one official said.
He said that the question of
whether to keep open the
embassy in the Ugandan capital
is "presently under study."

Three trapped
LONDON (AP) Firemen
rescued three people trapped
on the 1th floor of an office
block housing Scotland Yard's
crime computer today.
The building, Tintagel
House, is headquarters for
records of drugs, illegal
immigration and other crime in
the London area.


relationship with Egypt and



Mouse

mischief

OSAKA (AP) A
mouse delayed 11 of the
world's fastest scheduled
trains, an official of the
Japan National Railways
said today.
The official said a
mouse went aboard a train
during checking time and
gnawed an electric cable,
blacking out a
speedometer lamp.
This also delayed 10
other super-express trains
which link Japan's two
principal business centres,
Tokyo and Osaka, at a
maximum speed of 250
kilometers per hour (about
156 m.p.h.).
"We expected every
possible happening when
we built this line, but we
did not even think of
m o u s e b i t e s
another official said.


Train wrecked

A 15-(AR Santa I:e freight
train was wrecked at the
Ilackberry siding some 15
miles east of Kingman,
Arizona.

Man appeal
SAO PAULO (AP) Radio
Woman, a Sao Paulo station
that wanted nothing to do with
men for four years, has decided
to deepen its voice and take
on 40 male workmates.


Dutch ban Sunday drives


HAGUE (A)
: to the Middle East oil
tt, the Dutch
ent imposed a total
all Sunday pleasure
g.
ban comes into effect
inday and Economics
Ruud Lubbers said it
part of the "first phase
actions" to be placed on
il use.
he same time, the
added, there was "no
et" for outright oil
ning. although
'ncy plans for such a
are now complete.


S h e Governmient
nevertheless announced that
supplies to oil distributors will
be subject to limitations, aimed
at obtaining a 10 percent
economy in current
consumption.
Lubbers told a news
conference the step was made
necessary by the latest figures
from oil companies. which
indicated that supplies are
"diminishing."
Until now. the government
has said it has more than two
months oil reserves in hand and
enough en route to the
Netherlands by tanker to cover


a fu rather month's
consumption.
The ban on Sunday
nimo:oring is expected to save
between six and 10 per cent of
all gasoline consumption in the
;Netherlands and is the second
tine the l)Dutch have enforced
such a prohibition.
A similar ban was imposed
in 1956 at the time of the Sue/
crisis and lasted from Nov. 23
until Feb. 3. 1957.
Doctors. invalids, press,
radio and TV were exempted
then and are expected to get
exemption again.


We're still

friends,


says the

Queen
LONDON (AP) Queen
Elizabeth drove in state
through fogbound London
today to open Parliament and
unveil Government policies
stressing British friendship for
the United States.
New laws in the
programme included
measures to expose the
shadier side of some big
business practices and drives
against pollution,
pornography and sex
discrimination.
Wearing the imperial state
crown and dressed in full
regalia, the Queen delivered
her speech written for her
by Prime Minister Edward
Heath's Cabinet from the
throne of the House of Lords.
The chamber was crowded
with peers, members of the
House of Commons and
dignitaries such as judges.
IMPORTANCE
The speech's section on
foreign affairs laid heavy
stress on the importance of
British-American relations.
"My government," said the
Queen, will... maintain their
support for the North
Atlantic alliance. My
government will continue to
attach high importance to our
relationship with the United
States of America."
Political commentators
took tiis as a significant
gesture intended to assuage
any American disenchant-
ment over Europe's attitude
in the Middle East War.
Informed sources said
Heath still regards good
relations with the United
States as fundamental British
interest and hopes to see
President Nixon in Britain
this year or next spring.
The anti-pornography law
will concentrate on
advertising and public
display.


Nations must


unite tonight



inflation-call


GENEVA (AP) Nations
.should join in a fight against
inflation if they want to avoid
deflationary setbacks in world
trade, production and
employment, the world's
leading trade organization has
warned.
The General Agreement on
Tariffs and Trade (GATT)
added that inflation was the
number one problem for world
trade.
But in its annual report, the
organization warned:
"Although even drastic
deflationary measures taken by
individual countries are
unlikely to have an adverse
effect on the world economy,
they could produce an overkill
if introduced simultaneously
by a number of important
countries."
World exports increased by
eight percent to a total value of
$13 billion in 1972, paced by
the recovery in the United
States, according to the report
It said that in spite of
''endemic monetary
instability." expansion
continued unabated this year.
The report predicted that in
1973, the United States will be
able to reduce its trade deficit
to S1.5 billion, one-fifth of the
total last year "with a
possibility of an even better
performance."
Japan may see "further
reduction of the surplus, even
its complete disappearance."
the report said.
Prospects for other major
trading countries wer outlined
in the report as follows:
BRITAIN "Even on the
favourable assumption of a
stabilization of the United
Kingdom's terms of trade,
significant improvements on
the current account are unlikely
as long as the present


expansionary
continues."


p h a e


WEST GERMANY We'
the continued inflation,
world boom, "there is : Ilk
:hance of a decline in the
German merchandise traj,,
surplus" which in 1973 "'\
substantially exceed the 172
figure, though the lat.
appreciation of the Germ;,i
mark is likely to incrac.i
further the deficit
invisable."

FRANCE "If anything
the trade surplus and ecc:i
more the surplus on curiMir
account could increase furil-,
in the near future."

ITALY "With Ita.,,
products highly competitive,
international markets
present parties, one
reasonably expect a reicv,.
increase of the trade a
current account surpliu in f
twelve months to come."

The report said forecasts we:
based on the assumption li-,
there will be no major p1r:-;
changes and moree iinptirT.
it assumes that the pi',.:'
inflationary explosion i, "!
to be subdued graduliwI.
without sharp seth,; !,
occurring in the interiit uitn,
money and coii)inlodi.l,
markets."

Airline

row
BRA SILIA (A')I
Hundreds of Bra/ilian., hiii
for an export fair in Br- -,
are being forced to stop ,over )
Paris or I.ondon first hecI',,
of an airline row over laittlnihi
rights.


Talks open on troops cutback


VII \\A (AP) The United
States and its NATO allies
opened talks today with. the
Soviet Union and other
European communistt nations
on a mutual, balanced
reduction of troops in central
Europe.
Welcoming the delegates.
Austrian Foreign Minister
Rudolf K irchschlaeger
declared: "The last days and
weeks have shown us all how
necessary it is to reach this
goal."
During the first two days.
the heads of each of the 1l'
delegations will address the
conference.
Former secretary of the
army Stanley Resor. head of
the U.S. delegation, and Oleg
Khlestov, a legal expert from
the Soviet Foreign Ministry,
are to speak tomorrow.
Western diplomats preparing
for the arms talks have been
trying to play down their
differences relating to Middle




Elpia


East policies. But the Nixon
administration made clear last
week that it was highly
displeased at the refusal of
West Germany, Britain and
some of its other European
allies to help the U S. airlift
to Israel.
This so angered Washington
that fencee Secretary James
Schlesinger threatened a
unilateral review of the
200,000-man U.S. troop
commitment to West Germany,
instead of waiting for the
outcome of the negotiations
with the Soviet bloc.
America's European allies
were angered by the failure of
the United States to inform
them it was sending arms to


The lights are going out



all over this Christmas


BETHLEHEM, Pennsylvania Each
Christmas the city of Bethlehem draws
thousands of visitors to see elaborate
displays of lights and scores of decorated
Christmas trees.
But this year the mayor and the
merchants are arguing over whether to cut
back on holiday lights because of the
pendingfuel shortage.
The merchants claim it would cost the
city $200,000 in tourism to save $800 in
lights.
Officials in Austin, Texas, where shortages
of natural gas have affected electricity
production, said Christmas lights will be
turned on as usual on Nov. 21 and will be
burned until Nov. 25, but then will be shut
off until Dec. 14 when they will be relit.
In addition, holiday lighting displays on
bridges across the Colorado river will be
eliminated this year and businesses have
S been ordered to restrict their holiday
S spectaculars.
' A business association in Pittsburgh


announced that because of the energy
crunch, the lighting on 60 downtown
buildings, a tradition since 1960, will be
cancelled this year.
The building owners and managers
association said that although the city has
enough power, the cancellation was intended
"as a meaningful gesture to the rest of the
nation whose energy situation is far more
critical."
Building supervisors in Minneapolis
decided to discontinue a programme of
outlining structures in the downtown area in
lights during the holiday season and the Ohio
public utilities commission urged business to
cancel Christmas displays this year.
McGuire air force base in New Jersey
cancelled its Christmas lighting display, as
*did Vineland. New Jersey.
A spokesman for the Vineland utility
company estimated the lights would
have used up 65,000 kilowatts of electricity,
or enough power to supply 10 homes for a
year.


Israel from American bases o);
their territory and also h\
Washington's placing 1.S
troops in their countries on,
alert last week without
informing them in advance.
However, a White Houseic
spokesman said that "thie St.iate
iDepartment did ronsiilt
regarding the alert

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'he (Uributte












Tuesday, October 30, 1973


(hp bUrtbttn


Shp Iribunte
NutLrus ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. nUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903 -. 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.I).
Publisher/Editor 1917-1972
Contributing Editor 1972 -
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972-
Published Daily Monday to Saturday


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
BOSTON, October 16: I was pleased ... and heartened ... to
read the letter of the Rev. J. Emmet Weir in The Tribune of
October 9th under the caption "The Position of the Church Ilere
Today is Difficult".
It didn't exactly meet the demands of a situation that should
bring a clergyman out of his comer fighting with two holy fists ...
but it was something. It was at least a public acknowledgement
that something may exist in the Bahamas today that deserves the
attention of a disciple of Christ.
I was greatly pleased to see by Mr. Weir's letter that the Rt.
Rev. Michael Eldon. Bishop of the Diocese of Nassau and tlhe
Bahamas, wrote in the October issue of "The Voice of the
Church", monthly organ of the Anglican (hurch in the Bahamas,
that "if the reports we hear and read are correct, it must be a
source of concern to us that the non-Bahamian fathers of
Bahamian families, who nave been long resident in these islands
are being asked to leave the country. These actions do not only
break up the family unit and disrupt family life which is so
essential in the stability and well-being of our country, but it
indicates a lack of mercv and justice. I trust that those concerned
will consider these facts".
Ilere again tiis is a step in the right direction but too short a
step to nmeet-the demands of the situation.
This is not a sectarian affair in which members of the Church
of England alone are concerned. This is a broad public issue that
should concern every civilized person living in tile Blalihaas
today. I use thle word "civilized" advisedly.
It was not enough that this statement should have appeared
onl\ in a monthly church publication with a limited circulation.
It was a statement that should have been written to every
newspaper and magazine published in the islands ... and broadcast
to, the far corners of the Bahalmas in a sermon over ZNS.
This is not, moreover, a situation that allows for the use of tile
worrd "if". There arc no "its" oi "miaybes" or "'perhaps" in tihe
fact that law abiding non-Bahamian fathers of Bahamian families
in tlhe Bahamas have been told ... not "arc being asked" ... to
leave the islands ... and thely hare 'lJl the islands. The homes they
occupied the home te thl made tfor their Bahamrian children
have been deprived of a father.
The facts are there. They can be easily verified. And since the
Bishop feels strongly on the "its" of this situation, I feel that he
should not only instruct the Anglican clergymen in the Bahamas
to launch a crusade against this fonn of inhuman political
persecution, but he should also raise the question in the
Inter-denominational Church councill of which lie must surely be
ail influential member.
There are mtany other areas in which the Bahamian clergy
should raise their voices in the islands today but it would be a
good start if they would tackle this one situation in which the
facts call be easily established.
In his letter Mr. Weir tried to ease the situation for
non-Bahamian clergyme n i the islands. This was not necessary.
Everyone realizes that these men would imperil their position if
thed dared to raise their voices on any public issue that concerned
the present government of these islands.
It has been made abiundantl clear to these men, who are doing
a valuable service in the Bahamals ... many of them for a lifetime
... that they must be silent on public issues. allow do I know this''
It is evident from the tact that these ten have been subjected
to the ridiculous reiuireient of obtaining a work permit to
carry on their mission work inl the islands. This is the big stick
behind a veiled threat.
That's all right. Let them remain silent. Their services are
needed by our people and there should not be any reason for
jeopardizing their position. There are enough Bahamian
clergymen in tile islands to make their voices heard among the
people.
A concerted effort by these men would be an instrument for
huranl justice that no government could afford to ignore. So tar,
alas, only the Rev. Dr. IH. W. Brown has had the courage to come
out of hiis corner fighting for justice in the name of Christ.
Because le has stood alone tile government has been able to
isolate and persecute himi too.
I want to place on record myi pleasure that Bishop Eldon and
Mr. Weir have at least taken a short step in this matter.
The names Eldon and Weir have always stood for something
real and substantial in the Bahia as. Even the present generation
of Bahaiians are aware of the position of trust and esteem held
among our people by Bishop Eldon's father.
But I must tell \ ou about the Weirs. Way back as far back as
I can remember my parents impressed on me that the name
Weir stood for something substantial and reliable along our
people ... the three brothers, Joe, Walter and Charles were highly
respected gentlemen. And it also meant something in tihe
conmmunutity that Dr. C. R. Walker, C.B.E. was a member of the
Weir clan. They were brainy people. They were people whlo were
trusted and commanded respect throughout these islands.
And so I am pleased ... and heartened ... to find that the blood
in these two family strains has not grown thin and cold and that
there is still iron and not gristle in their backbone.

You know ... the ('Church should not be a nainby-palnmb affair.
All tire great men ... the martyrs of the church ... were men and
women whole put on the armour of God and gave their lives on the
battle line of ('hristianr leadership.
The true Christian spirit is summed up in four lines of the
stirring hynl "Onward Christian Soldiers". I am sure you
remember the lines:

Onward Christian soldiers
Marching as to war
With the cross of Jesus
Going on before.
I am always deeply stirred by this hymn. Whenever it is sung I
can picture the army of God marching fearlessly against the gates


of hell. I find myself beating out time with my feat because I feel
an urge to get into the line of march.
But any effort in life is ineffective if it is not undertaken
wholeheartedly and pursued vigorously.
**********
I have told you a thousand and one times in this column that
the Very Rev. Chrysostom Schriener, O.S.B., V.F., Catholic
Missionary to the Bahamas, was my tutor and filled the place of
tmy natural father and mother in my life who left me when I was
young and at a time in my life when I needed a kindly but strong
guiding hand.


INeither US nor Israel has any




missile comparable to SAM-6


NEW YORK Like Spain
more than three decades ago,
the Middle Last has become a
proving ground for some of the
newest weaponry and tactics of
the nmajior powers.
In tact, two weeks or so of
warfare between the Arab and
Israeli armies has already
taught military planners in
both the Kremlin and the
Pentagon that a classic
offensive weapon developed by
the Na/is during the Spanish
Civil War the tank onslaught
with close aerial support
may be somewhat outmoded.
That combination, used
brilliantly by the Israelis in
1967 to win the Six-Day War,
has proved to be far less
effective this time, largely
because of the vulnerability of
aircraft and tanks to the deadly
new missiles.
By far the most decisive new
weapon in the Middle East
fighting to date, according to
TIME magazine correspon-
dents, is the Soviet SAM-6
surface-to-air missile, which
had never before been used in
combat.
The Israelis encountered it
on the Sinai front while their
aircraft were attempting to


knock out the pontoon bridges
placed across the Suez Canal
by the Igyptians.
TERRIBLt TOLL
In the first two days of
fighting, 40 Israeli planes were
shot down near the canal, most
of them by SAM-6 batteries.
The missile was equally
devastating over the Golan


Furthermore, while the
Israelis (with U.S. equipment
and advice) know how to evade
or neutralize the SAM-2 and
SAM-3, they so far have no
effective countermeasures
against the triple-threat SAM-6.
Each of the new missiles has
in its warhead a radar system
which guides the weapon to an


VIEW FROM 33rd. FLOOR


by Jim Alberse


Heights, protecting the Syrians
from the full fury of the Israeli
air force and exacting a heavy
toll of jets.
The SAM-6 is a slin
solid-fuel rocket measuring
19ft. long and 6 in. in
diameter. It's mounted in a
group of three on a tracked
vehicle. Thus, unlike the older
SAM-2 and SAM-3 missiles,
which require a permanent
base, the new SAM can be
moved along with armoured
forces, providing them with an
umbrella of protection which
extends from treetop level to
an altitude of 35,000 ft.


enemy aircraft at near
supersonic speed.
In addition, the SAM-6 is
equipped with a heat sensor
which can guide it to the
aricraft's hot jet exhaust pipe.
Finally, the SAM-6 can be
directed by its operator, who
keeps the aiming dot of an
electronic gun sight on the
attacking aircraft. That is all it
takes to send the missile
accurately along a radar bead
to the target.
RADAR CHANGE
To make matters even worse
for the enemy, the frequency
of the missile's radar systems


can be changed quickly,
making it difficult to jam or
confuse them with electronic
countermeasures.
Neither Israel nor the U.S.
has anything comparable to the
SAM-6.
Perhaps the most remarkable
technological development in
the Middle East war is the use
of military satellites.
U.S. experts believe that the
Russians began specific
observation of the Middle East
with Cosmos 596, which was
launched three days before the
war began. Since then the
Russians have launched five
more spy satellites, bringing
each back to study its film and
electronically gathered data.
The U.S. has two spy
satellites which happen to pass
periodically over the Middle
East. including a 14-ton Big
Bird which can either eject film
packages over the Pacific or
immediately radio its
information back to earth.
Since the desert
battlegrounds are quite free of
both cloud cover and foliage,
the spy satellites can get a clear
look at the fighting below.


By Alex Efty
OBI: IS E MILITARY
HOSPITAL, SYRIA (AP)
Syrian pilots, tank and
infantrymen with amputated
limbs and other war wounds
spoke proudly Monday of the
actions of the Syrian armed
forces in the latest Arab-Israeli
war.
The wounded Syrians were
intcrvie wed by foreign
newsmen at this large, modern
military hospital 10 miles from
D)amascus. It was the first time
since the war started that
newsmen were allowed to talk
to Syrian servicemen about
their battle experiences.
Veterans of the 1967 war
were asked how the latest
fighting compared to the


previous battles.
"Our soldiers were ready to
fight and die to recover our
occupied territories from Israel
and morale was very high"
said a tank lieutenant. His right
leg was amputated just below
the knee and he had wounds all
down his right side.
"We had no trouble at all
from the Israeli air force this
time. They flew too high and
were unable to harm us," he
said. He added that the
Soviet-made T62 tank of the
Syrian army proved far
superior to the British-made
Centurion of the Israeli army
facing them on the Golan
Heights.
ONLY DANGER
"The only danger we faced


An army's plight in the Sinai


SINAI DISEIRT (AP)
Trapped in that inferno of blazing
sun and blowing sand east of Suez,
the Egyptian 3rd army needs
desperately the water that flows
through a pipeline now in Israeli
hands.
Even without a shot being fired,
it would be difficult to imagine a
more hostile environment for a
cut off army.
uit day, temperatures rise to 120
(50C) and the heat can actually be
seen. more visible than a mirage
shimmering in waves off the rolling
dunes and yellow rock
outcroppings. Flies swarm over the
rounded and cover the dead like a
black blanket. Buzzards circle
ominously in the cloudless sky or
sit in a silent row on the ridge line
of the wadis, the rocky beds of
rivers that went dry millions of
rears ago.
Now that Israeli jets and artillery
have blasted away the three bridges
so brilliantly laid across the Canal
in the opening days of the war, the
tgyptians can no longer reach the
sweet water piped from the Cairo
region to the west hank of the
Canal.
hie eastern bank has no fresh
\sater and the nearest oasis is 100
miles further east at Nakhl.
But even for a tank, the trip is


treacherous over the shifting sands
and crumbling dunes. The only
road east is the narrow strip of
macadam, cratered and
pockmarked by three wars in a
generation, leading to the Mitla
Pass. And there is no place to hide
in the vast empty Sinai from the
ever vigilant reconnaissance planes.
Fhis is the wilderness where
Ishmael. ancestor of the Arabs, led
the nomad life of a social outcast
and where Moses, the most revered
prophet of the Jews, wandered for
40 years, yearning for the promised
land.
Out there on the dunes an army
is dying, 20,000 men cut off from
food, water, medicine, ammunition.
gasoline.
But there is no Moses to strike
the rock and bring forth water.
In this harsh blaze of a land.
camel caravans coming across the
distant purple mountains from
Jordan and Iraq always regarded
the last leg to Suez as the m,,-t
gruelling. The indigenous Bedouin
tribes, now vanished since the new
war broke out survived on their
scraggly herds of goats, an
occasional expendable camel or by
throwing up nets at dawn to catch
the tiny succulent song birds
migrating to Africa.


I will never forget one of the first lessons he taught me in the
discharge of my public duties ... especially in the direction of this
newspaper.
"'htienne", he impressed on me, "always bear in mind that,
whenever you take a stand on any issue, you must fight with
every ounce of strength at your command. When you hit your
man, don't hesitate. Let him have it right between his eyes. If
possible, lay him out with one blow. If you are not prepared to do
this on anv issue, leave it alone. Don't ever make an apology for
standing up for what is right and honest and fair. Justice doesn't
comet easily. It is something for which ian honest man must fight
courageously and, if necessary, even die. But always remember
this ... make sure first that justice is on your side".
If vou will read U'pon These Rocks, a history of the Catholic
(hurch in the Bahamas by the Rev. Colnan Barry, O.S.B.. you
will see the strong character of this man looking up at you trom
almost every page of this book.
The letters he wrote to Cardinals, Archbishops. Priests and
strong anti-Catholic elements by which he was surrounded in this
bitterly anti-Catholic stronghold, were crusading Epistles. This
pioneer Priest had to fight to get :. foothold in these islands ...
and he had to fight with almost every breath he breathed to
maintain tile beachhead after he had made a landing.
Thiis s (Christianity in action. This is the kind of Christian
leadership that is needed in the Bahamas today if Christianity is
to become more than a word to which its apostles give only
meaningless lip service.
Anyway, congratulations to Bishop Eldon and Mr. Weir Come
again brothers ... but next time conic on louder and clearer,
remembering always that the position of the church in the
Bahamas is NOT difficult.
Difficulties in life disappear when men march into battle ...
With the cross of Jesus
Going on before.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
If we believe a thing to be bad. and if we have a right to
prevent it, it is our duty to try to prevent it and to damn the
consequences'
LORD MILNER, speech at
Glasgow, Novembe;1909 on the Peers and the Budget.


came trom ground to ground
rockets. The Israeli tanks could
not harm us," he said.
The young lieutenant, a
married man with three
children aged 5 to 9, said he
was wounded when his tank
was hit by an Israeli rocket
after he had knocked out at
least five Israeli tanks himself.
The Syrian wounded were
not allowed to identity
themselves.
A 21-year-old fighter pilot
with curly hair and brown eyes
had his right leg and ann in
plaster casts. Both were
fractured when he was forced
to bail out after being shot
down by Israeli planes on the
third day of the war, he said.
He was flying cover for a
photo reconnaissance plane over
Israeli territory, he said. His
task was to attract Israeli


interceptors and allow the
reconnaissance plane to do its
job unmolested, he said.
MIG'S SUPERIOR
How does the Soviet MIG21
compare to the American
Phantom, he was asked.
"I don't believe in the
superiority of the Phahtor or
the Israeli air force and its
pilots any more," he said. "The
Syrian pilots now have very
great confidence in their MIGs
and feel certain they can shoot
down a Phantom when faced
by it."
He added that at least five
pilots from his group each shot
down five Israeli planes in dog
fights and one had a score of
10. He refused to name these
Syrian aces.
The young MIG pilot said
he and his companions were all
trained in Syria.


By The Associated Pr-ess
TODAY is Tuesday, Cctober
30, the 303rd day of 1973.
There are 62 day-s left in the
year.
Highlights in hi story on this
date:
1971 France and Russia
sign declaration to make
cooperation between th eir two
countries what they call a
'"permanent fact> r in
international life.' '
1968 Soviset cosrnonaut
Georgi Beregovoy brir-gs his
Soyuz 3 spaceship back to
Earth after nearly four days in
orbit.
1964 Rare gers. in d the Star of India sapphL. ire, are
stolen fror thte Armerican
Museum of Natural His~tory in
New York City.
1963-Algeria and NIorocco
sign a peace agree nment in their
border dispute.
1961 Soviet Union ignores
world protests aganisl
exploding a giant nuclear bomb
in the Soviet Arctic, says the
blast is bigger than planr-ed.
1957 Radical sociali-st Felix
Gaillard forms minis try in
France.
1956- Britain and France
issue ultimatum to lgy -pt and


Israel calling for ceasefire;
Cardinal Mindszenty is released
but Russian troops invade
Hungary.
1955 Sultan of Morocco
abd icates.
1 946 Spain signs
commercial agreement with
Argentina.
1938 -Panic caused in U.S.
by radio play by Orson Welles
depicting an invasion from
Mars.
1930 Treaty of friendship
between Greece and Turkey
signed at Ankara.
1 928 -Experimental
transmission of still Dictures by
television begins in Britain.
1 922 Benito Mussolini
forms Fascist government,
becomes Premier ot Italy.
1918 Allies sign Armistice
with Turkey: Czechoslovakia is
proclaimed an independent
Republic.
1914 Germans launch first
Battle of Ypres in World War
One.

1905 Tsar capitualtes to
Russian Duma's demands for
more legislative power.
1899 Piet Joubert wins
battle of Nicholson's Nek
against British in Boer War.


ON




RS


Get



BARCLAYS


behind your business



Cassandra Cooper did
Cassandra started Champion Sports Land 3 years ago.
When she needed money for expansion she went to Barclays.
Today, Champion Sports Land is well on its way to becoming
the most complete sporting goods store in town.




ALWAYS BUILDING SOMETHING
BETTER FOR THE BAHAMAS.


Ceiandre Coopr with Reidrt Matlea M ger of Barclayse lly Dimor Brunch.
Mrs. Cooper's photograp printed with her pemimio.n-


4EAREDn


SYRIAN CASUALTIES PRAISE RUSSIAN EQUIPMENT


lo sto be married to

I, CLCOLM

1b 197 3
nNvember 12th 1

ti l ,It as her Weddig isn

,ME,\AOV .MOST" by ROY L

Ih'rr r 'ice f Crystal Stetware s

L~ O REY" by ORREF

^ i^-- .^L~yien


I_


I ii


IDlhlYQIB


_


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Tihp (ribttm


Tuesday, October 30, 1973


The Tender Trap -ce


drew ood audiences

By Daphne Wallace Whitfield
THE BAHAMAS I)R.AIA CIRCLE played to a packed house at the Dundas Civic Centre on all '" .
three nights of their production of THE TENDER TRAP, over the week-end. .ia


HILDA BARRETT, CHORAL DIRECTOR in the Nassau Operatic Society's
forthcoming production of The Sound of Music coaches her small charges in their singing
roles. Left to right: Karen Stewart, Mrs. Hilda Barrett, Valerie Cavanagh, Michael Morris,
Joanne Brown, Julia Morris and Salina Eldon.


Amateur Operatic Sociely to present


'Sound of Music' from Nov.24-Dec.1


THF NASSAU AMATEUR OPERATIC SOCIETY has set aside


24, to Saturday. December 1.
Sound of Music.
(Ctltao !Ic e1 s" p
a: the 1)undar (I (i'entri

adinittlcd ihail pn c. hs i !n
onh time a el Jidc f tor
children.
\ pec'.cal perfori.na, 'c to
b enet it the tiaaunaa,
Association tor the 'n itally
Mnda \ member 2(t,
1'.. b okiing can be
IesercId 'i ailance 1 2 cats
t.r the price o 10) t i o
\Monday. November 2(i. and
Tuesda, November 27.
the B\o Office -..I. open on
Saturday, November I '. at
\laura L.umber (Company. Bay
Street.
Ken DI)rmmiiond is thie


excluding Sunday. November 25

prodiceir,. ith lJd kallcrg '.,
ji'ss at.intI prod .tl'i. O CIien
I sit cal d3 r3 t .i a
\1, Iilda Barriti choral
direct. ti
Barhara C'hatilerton,. \ho
pla\ ed the lead in the Sociwl "s
producnitns, ot "'I\ 1 l'F
Lad\ and "Cameloii is again
cast in the lead ais Mari;i.
Michael Stewart. one of the
Societ'. s three remainmngs
oiunder members, w\ho I
iimuil' remembered .is I 1mdeC
de Becquce in "South Pacific",
is cast as (Captain von Irapp
Ihie children are Valerie
(' aanagh ( Liesll Michael
Mlorris ( Fredrich I. Joanne
Brown I ouisai, Peter Rabley
S KurIt, Julia Morns Bri gtat),
SalIna I ldon I Marta I Karen


NURSING COUNCIL
COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
wishes to remind the General Public that in accordance
with the Nurses and Mid'ives \ct 1971 Section 14 (bl it is
an offence t:l use uiie inme or li:lc ;f Ai Reeistered ':'.rse
either alone or in combination% with any other words or
letters. or use any name, title, additional description,
uniform r badge, impl ing that she or he is Registered or
Enrolled under the asid Act.


29th October. 1973.


HILDA \ .HO% N M.B.E.
( flail 11hl1
BRENDA L. COX
Registrar


NURSING COUNCIL
COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
wishes to inform the public that MRS. EFFIE DAWN
ROBERTS who has been charged in the Magistrate Court
on Friday October 26th, 1973. is not entitled to be called a
Nurse or practise as a Nurse in the (:0 '"lt '%'i EALTH OF
THE BAHAMAS ISLANDS. as she is not registered under
the Nurses and Midiives Act 1971 of the


( (MMt)1(1 ALTHH OF


29th. October. 1973.


THE iBAIHAMAS
fIL)DA Hi' l l N M.B I
Chairman
BRENI)A L COX
Registrar


a week Saturday. November
for the presentation ol The

S'tcw art I (; rtl1)
Joanine is the > onincL'st child
oi Sidne\ Brown, tll- it Societ's
president, and Karcn, the
youngest t cimid otl tJichael
Stews art


Carson
and Rose
Ahhess~l..


A lbury plas Roll
!Fondas is the Mother


Before going to the play I
was disappointed at the choice
of The Tender Trap especially
coming at the end of Women's
Rights Week.
This dated comedy centres
around the pursuit of an
"eligible" bachelor with little
to offer by beautiful, talented
and successful women with
matrimony on their minds.
I was obviously wrong in my
disappointment about their
choice of play. I have never
been to a play in the
Bahamas so well attended
by an obviously appreciative
audience.
A choice of a more
advante-garde play or a classic
would probably have resulted
in a more sparse attendance
and maybe a less appreciative
audience.
The very professional public
relations and advertisement the
week preceding the production
cannot be discounted as a
factor in three successive nights
of full house.
I take off my hat to the
Bahamia l)rama Circle for
drawing them in which after
all is the first requisite towards
successful theatre in the
Bahamas as elsewhere.
Whether anything is going to
be done about a National
Theatre one thing is sure. The
path from Mackey Street to
the l)undas Civic Centre
building needs to be paved and
lighted. In the dark it is a
treacherous walk from the gate
through innumerable pot holes.
SITS SUPERB
Tlie set construction was
superb. the furniture from
Interiors provided the
appropriate sophisticated
setting for the play and the
scene of New York from the
b alconm deserves special


Deeatk -Ab
-*-***


Door swings both


ways


f:i parents, their kids

By Abigail Van Buren
c 1973 by Chicao Tribune-N. Y. News Synd., Inc.
DEAR ABBY: You recently published the following:
DEAR ABBY: Our brother is 21. He just graduated
from college, and has a job that pays him $100 a week.
Brother wants to live at home with our parents. They think
it will teach Brother a sense of responsibility if he pays
them $75 a month for his room and board.
Since Brother is the oldest of six children, what goes
for him will probably go for the rest of us.
We don't think children should have to pay to live with
someone they love.
Our whole family would like to know how you feel
about this THE OTHER KIDS
DEAR KIDS: How long should an able-bodied, gainfully
employed 21-year-old expect to live with Mama and Papa
for free? Six months? A year? Forever? Circumstances and
opinions differ in all families, however, reasonable people
should be able to agree to terms that will satisfy both the
lover and the lovees.
Abby. let's put it this way:
DEAR ABBY: We are the parents of a 21-year-old son
who has just graduated from college. Now that he has a
nice apartment and is making a good salary, we would like
to sell our house and move in with him.
He thinks we should pay $75 a month for room and
board. We don't think parents should have to pay to live
with someone they love. What do you think, Abby? Sign
this. .. "THE PARENTS"
DEAR PARENTS: That door swings both ways. Par-
ents who are able to support themselves shouldn't freeload
on their kids.

DEAR ABBY: Who wouldn't live at home for $75 a
month if Mom and Dad are dummies enough to offer it?
The kid [correction-at 21, he's a man] is getting a real
bargain.
The real question is: "Do Mom and Dad love him
enough to push him out of the nest now that he is self-
supporting?" And does he love them enough to take care of
himself and ease their burden with the other five? Whether
they can afford it or not, they are doing him a disservice to
let him stay.
The other kids should know that loving isn't necessarily
giving. It is strong stuff when you love enough to say,
"GO!" PUZZLED IN DENVER

DEAR ABBY: I am writing about that girl who found
out when she was 16 that her parents had been married six
months before she was born. She said they were the great-
est, and she didn't hold anything against them.
I am 14, and I want that girl to know that I was born
four days AFTER my parents were married, and I've
known about it for three years because my mother told me,
and I respect her even more for being honest.
You should never look down on a person because she
made a mistake. A friend of mine was born illegitimate
and she knew it, but she never held it against her mother
until her mother denied it.
Lying is stupid. The truth always has a way of coming
out. GRATEFUL


commendation.
In my opinion the best
acting talent came from Calvin
Cooper as Charlie Reading,
who played a very creditable
role of a good time bachelor
enjoying his sophisticated New
York life and Jeannie
Thompson (as one of the girls,
Sylvia) who brings a sensitive
intelligence to her myriad
activities. For Jeannie
Thompson to give credibility
to a role of a girl so different
to herself displays a broad
range of acting ability.
Also the fact that she,
together with Fairie Wilkinson
Kraft (as Poppy) had only just


SCENE FROM THE TENDER TRAP produced by the
Bahama Drama Circle: from left to right: Yvette Bethel as
Julie, who finally gets her man, Louis Isaacs as Earl, the
chemical analyst and Charles Bowleg as Joe the respectable
married man. Photo: Vincent D. Vaughan.


Vincent Vaughan.
over a week to learn their parts
is a feather in the bonnet of
both actresses.
Fairie played a lovely and
vital Poppy even better than
the role she played at the
Nassau Festival of Arts and
Crafts "Wanted" some months
ago.
Charles Bowleg as the
respectable faithful, married
man had a rather dull role as
foil to Calvin's Charlie. It was a
role which I felt inhibited his
natural exuberance.
GOOD PRESENCE
Alice Stewart-Morris and
Yvette Bethel also brought a
lively intelligence to their roles
as Jessica and Julie. Yvette's
stage presence was good and
she moved well on the stage,
her only drawback being an
apparent difficulty to project
her voice which came out a bit
unnaturally squeaky. However,
this was not inappropriate to
her role of Julie which she
played with animation and
verve.
Louis Isaacs fairly flung
himself into the role of Earl,
the chemical analyst, and his
jealous frustration was real
slapstick comedy at its best.
George Plakaris, as the
degenerate Sol, played his
slapstick comedy role with
such credibility that he
completely held the stage the
short time at the end that he
was present.
Whether the cast reacted to
the appreciative audience or
whether it was the other way
round it was a happy fun night
with everyone cast and
audience obviously enjoying
themselves.
Calvin Cooper was almost
sparkling in his role a role
that most men are supposed to
love.


All in
production.


a happy


HOLIDAYS OF DEVOTION
AT MARY STAR
TUESDAY, November 1 is
the feast of All Saints. On this
day, the church honours all of
those who have achieved
Leaven and are therefore
saints, or holy ones.
Holy masses on Thursday at
Mary Star of the Sea, Freeport,
will be offered at 10 a.m. and
at 5:30 p.m.
Friday, November 2 is the
day of commemoration of the
Iloly Souls in Purgatory. Each
priest is privileged to offer
three holy masses on that day.
Father Marcian Peters, O.S.B.
will offer his three masses
starting at 7 a.m. and Father
Brendan Forsyth, O.S.B. will
offer his starting at 5:15 p.m.


f ARE YOU FREE

THIS EVENING?

STonight, when you are rested and relaxed, how about
coming around to The Toogood Studio for a Christmas
Portrait that will delight vou! We're here to welcome
Syou between 8 and 10 every evening and we know you'll
per, s a p t to like our cool, waterfront studio at Fast iay Street.
iper, makes a point to
owleg, in the Bahama (R.S. 1' ) 5-4641
render Trap. PHOTO:


A


A


WINES


AND LIQUOR



THURSDAY 1st. NOVEMBER

FRIDAY 2nd. NOVEMBER


Open 9.00 a.m. to 6.00p.m.




SATURDAY 3rd. NOVEMBER

Open 9.00a.m. to 12noon





BUTLER




SANDS

GRAND BAHAMA

DOWNTOWN STORE (Opposite Savoy Building)
QUEEN'S HIGHWAY WAREHOUSE
WESTEND VILLAGE


When it comes to insurance

it's Dominion for Life


.. in Nassau

call Philip Russell 2-3843


r; :
.'**" J'
~
~ .rs~


iE DINrGi1 LIFE ASSULIFiRANCE CCAPWN'


S. IT ALL ADDS UP




your reusable but unwanted

items of

clothing, tools,

appliances, clocks,

tans, etc. clear out

your closets, garage, storeroom...

all can be of help

to someone else.

Donate them to





Bazaar
ROSETTA STREET
TWO DOORS WEST OF
S MONTROSE AVE


ROYAL MAIL REGULAR FREIGHT THE PACIFIC STEAM

LINES LIMITED U.K.TONASSAU NAVIGATION CO.
For information contact the agents

R.H.CURRY & Co.,Ltd.
PHONE 2-8683 2-8686 P. U. BOX N8168 BAY STREET


L


1 :7 1J











Tusdy Ocobr 0,193


'Retiring rector


installed an


Honorary Canon


Ti11 \i isY RI \. Jam;cs A.
I dd.', I .1).. irtinrg recV r ot
St. Tho0n, I pi c pil ihtiich
( hicago. .nd ;l n i 'h ef
(hicago-Soutth lDe'ant. \\a
installed as an ilhon rary ( ainnt
iif the cathedrall ( hur h Ii St
ltinies. ( hi:,,ii. dthr!iig set isces
ill the ( tit c l (hlir, h ih i!




NOW SHOWING



SINGS
THE
BLUES

AND 1i A:4s O)NI Y
BEST PICTURE I
S WINNER OF 3
ACADEMY AWARDS




| R *:- a~ritN l ,1fu
H n1 I 61ru I7 i 1m I11

Iir


I O 'pen os '. .1 -, t3in 7 p i
C(omne earl0 to )-. \L(. W 'i' S
FIrNAL -




GOLIATH
i *( AND THE SINS OF
SABYLO N((C)1

SUPER ARGO
Ii and the
f FACELESS 61ANT
WN 'GOLIATHand

FR!EEt! TP" A ST-70 CARS
*..sra -T cicsc


()Otober 20.
The Rt. Rev. James W.
.\intgoncmry. Episcopal Bishop
o1 .i,,,Ig., administered the
,,ath of office, and the Very
Rev. James FI. Carroll, dean of
the cathedral l Church installed
(Cannon Fdden.
( anon I dden, who was born
in Nassau, has been rector of
St. Ihomas' Church since
190h. Piiiir to that he served
churches in the Bahamas,
(;crgia. and Texas.
In 1943. he entered the U.S.
Army as a chaplain, retiring as
a lieutenant colonel in 1957.
During his military career he
was chaplain of the 366th
Infantry 92nd Division, in Italy
and was also assistant at St.
James' Church, Florence.
While in the occupation
forces of Germany he was
priest-in-charge of parishes in
Heidelberg, Stuttgart, and
Hleibrunn and organized the
mti',sin at Karlsruhe.
While with the 24th Infantry
in Korea he received two
bronze stars for valor and he
possesses eight other
decorations.
Canon Ldden was graduated
with a Doctor of Divinity from
Bishp 'Payne Divinity School,
Petersburg. Virginia. He also
holds a diploma from Oxford
I niver-ity and is a graduate in
pharmacy ,of the Bahamas
c ;:eral hospital.
lIDuring his service to the
Di)ocese he has been president
i, tlhe Standing Committee,
meiiihber tof the Diocesan
Soutnci, the Catherdral
Chapter, and the Bishop and
I trustees, and a deputy to the
i ,ceral Ctonention oif the
i piscopal Church.
lIe has held board
niE :iberships with St.
cI onlid's lHouse, Lawrence
I.ii Schol it r Boys, the
i iin i of Black Episcopalians,
I nid the Keep Our Land
i 'mlnuinitx Organi/ation.
Canon I dden and his wife,
I :ntle. will retire to Nassau in
ih l Bahamias where he will
assist the Bishop of Nassau and
Slihe Bahamas.
'POT LUCK' SUPPER
The Canadian Women's Club
it Nassau will hold a pot luck
;upper for its members
Monday, November 5 at the
t 1...-... r1F A_ n.. L iQ ...;.L


STARTS WEDNESDAY
atni c & 5. I s iig :30 'Phone 2-1004, 2-100


"'.I/. \ 71l/ /'"1 !., T1O.\ .lI)VISIED
Reservitions not claimed by 8:45 will be sold
on first come. first served basis.


-VYaI


Now lhri I ridav
Matinee stalrsat 1: 30
:vc-ning 8:30
)DAY OF
THE J CK AL" P(;
EdIv ard I- ox.
ad li tl Ba el
P liv
"THE 1 ARNINt
I Rt-L :" P;
Kyle Jolins un
Alex Clarke
'Phone 2 2534


Wednesday & Thurs
Continuous Showin
from 3:00
"MORE DEAD
THAN ALIVE" P
Clint Walker
Vincent Price
PLUS
"REQUIEM FO1
A GUNFIGHTER"
Rod Cameron
Stephen McNally


NOW THRU FRIDAY
Matincr (. lntiniouis trotn 2:30, Evening 8:30
I'loni 3 4666


5 1
I.

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S i pp e sc s 't i ,n a i

Shipping agents discuss containerization


A FOUR-MAN delegation
from the Nassau Association of
Shipping Agents attended the
third annual meeting of the
Caribbean Shipping
Association held in Kingston
Jamaica last week.
The Bahamian team was led
by Mr. C. W, Cartwright,
secretary of the association and
general manager, Bahamas
Stevedoring Services Limited.
Other delegates included
Messrs. D. R. King, F. 1H.
Mundy & Co. (Nassau) Ltd., C.
Farrington, Bahamas
Stevedoring Services, Limited
and M. G. Goodyear, I.. 1.
Mundy & Co. (Bahamas) Ltd.
in Freeport.
As many as 50 delegates
from member and observer
countries attended.
The n t ",inP-, e r..nd ,


in cludet d p'!scentat, in I- I'.%%
furt her i nte im iI :,
tolloh inIIs i, i 1 1 i 1 ii,
SeInli- IIIit 1 11 t 2I C'l,
MontscIait, 'on cliEte' tic t anid
co ntaineriz/ed C:ATlt r! and
doc sinimitatti(in
Ther we cre panel discio s,ions
on coil tainetl /ation :Idt
delegates ,isited the I,'rt of
Kingston on 1 iuesdal .
Voting delegations for the
meeting, to 's'ect otficei s for
the ensuiisil yi ear. ciite from
Be iinuda.; the Bahamas.
Antigua, Montserrat, Trinidad,
Barbados,. I)Diiniica. British
Virgin Islands. St. Lucia and
St. Kitls.
I he Jamnaican Minister of
I'ublic Ltilities, (Communica-
tions and Iransport, lion. Eric
Bell. .i ,11 ; opened the
ton ferenc ie on Monday


THE YOUTH in Action for Christ
evangelistic team is sponsoring a five-day
"singspiration" at Windsor Park, beginning 7
p.m. nightly. The spiritual concert opened
last night and continues to Frida\. In
addition to music provided by groups

BE KIND TO 1
WITH the Bahamas Humane A --.e
Society's annual Be Kind To -
Animals Week nearly here a ..
(Nov. 10 18), Jack Rycroft,
the Society's inspector reminds
us that kindness to animals
should not be confined only to
dogs and cats.
Our kindness to animals '.
should be extended to any '
aninials which we may
encounter: birds, horses. v
racoons. donkeys, ant' even
goldfish. .,
Inspector Ryeroft is ssiowln
here with two of his aniinl t
friends, a tiny monkey and a1
regal rooster. 1
Be Kin In \nilm.l, \\e.k
will .I en \ titlltti e .iiOii.ll 1 II I IS .
Dog Shotm %& in ',.'rhii 4 '
10
anotherr illnii r eve' 11 te ll,
w eek w ill be ihe ~ '. .t "
fiestaa'" on Sjatrd.i.


WE NEED


morning and the guest speaker
at the official banquet on
tuesday was Mr. M. C. Kieft,
retired chairman of the Royal
Netherlands Steamship
Conipany i K \sM i
The Caribbean Shipping
Association evolved out of two
sears ot informal meetings of
s hip ping industry
representatives. The
organization held its first
annual general meeting in
October, 1971 in the Bahamas.
T h e present executive
comprises: President: Mr. Peter
lvelyn (JAMAICA), First Vice
President, Mr. M. J. Blackman
(Trinidad), Second vice
president: Mr. Stanley
Chapman (Barbados),
Managing Committee
Members: Messrs: Roy Mendes
(Antigua) and Charles M.


including The Heralds, the Majestic Choir
and Al and the Visionaires. there will be
several yout speakers. Pictured kneeling are
Robert Colebrooke, left, the main speaker,
and Calvin the Preacher. Standing from left
are Andrew of The Heralds, and Ruth, Hilda
A. and M. Adderley.

[HOSE ANIMALS
'a.-


- SALES REPRES"''TATIVESwho have
determination, resIau.:cefulness and
initiative, .


WE OFFER Guaranteed average income with the
opportunity for high individual earnings.



APPLICANTS Must be Bahamian with transportation
and references.


FOR
APPOINTMENT Please Call Mr. Smith, 23855


~M~ ` i'
f .r


id~


THE BAHAMAS Insurance
Centre was officially opened
last week with Mr. Kenneth
Brierley as general manager.
Company directors are from
left: Jackie Fraser,
vice-president; Garet "Tiger"
Finlayson, treasurer; Derek
Kong, Bruce Brayen: Sydney
Carroll, president and
chairman; Gordon Arnold,
assistant treasurer; Ken
Brierley and Richard
Fontaine, assistant treasurer.
Insurance Centre will offer
total financial coverage. The
firm maintains offices in
Jamaica, British Honduras
and London.

ARCHITECTS

ELECT

COMMITTEE
A SEVEN-MAN steering
committee was elected at a
meeting to temporarily guide
the newly formed Institute of
Bahamian Architects.
Elected to the committee
were Roston Miller, chairman,
Pat Rahming, vice chairman,
Rodney Braynen.
secretary-treasurer, Bruce
LaFleur, Fred Albury. Arthur
Colebrook and David Brazier.
The aims of the Institute are
to promote and encourage the
regulation of the practice of
architects in the Bahamas.
To encourage a high
standard of professional
conduct by establishing a code
of ethics:
To encourage the promotion
of the environment:
To promote and protect the
interests of the community;
To promote and encourage
an understanding of the
architecture profession by way
of public education:
To make available
comprehensive professional
services for all building types
and prices, and
To promote the
development of Bahamian
architecture."
Course
for
secretaries
THE ONE YE AR
day-release private secretaries
course will be held at the C. R.
Walker Technical College on
Friday at 9:00 a.m.. beginning
November 9.
The course will include:
secretarial duties, business
organization and management,
Government procedure and
English.
A certificate, recognized in
both the public and private
sectors, will be awarded to
those who successfully
complete the course.
Candidates for the course
must be at least 21 years old
and must have a shorthand
speed of 80 w.p.m., typing
RSA II and English G.C.E. 'O0
level
Government officers wishing
to take this course should
apply to their heads ol
department or permanent
secretaries.
Preliminary tests will be held
on Tuesday, November 6 at the
C. R. Walker Technical College
at 6:30 p.m.
Candidates from the private
sector should call the C. R.
Walker Technical College
(32291) for further
information.

Democracy

debate
ARE ,WE in danger of losing
our constitutional democracy?
That is the question six
panelists will ask themselves 8
p.m. Friday night at the
Government High School
auditorium in a panel


discussion sponsored by the
Inter-denominational Christian
Youth Association.
On the panel will be
External Affairs Minister and
Attorney General Paul L.
Adderley, Egineering and
General Union president
Dudley Williams. Opposition
Senator Arthur Foulkes,
Vanguard Nationalist Socialist
Party spokesman Lionel Carey,
attorney Jeanne Thompson
and ICYA official Alfred Sears.
Charles Hunt is to be the
moderator.


World dental


leader to


visit Bahamas


ii


GERALD LIA1 III M 1\\.
executive director ol the
International IDental
Federation. the world
organization of dentistry with
headquarters in london, will
arrive this week with Mrs.
Leatherman for a short visit
while returning from the
convention ot the Amnerican
Dental Association in Houston.
Texas.
Membership in the
International Dental
Federation is mostly trade p
of national dental associations,
each of whtmll -n 11.11i'. their
own members to join as
supporting members uo the
federation.
The Bahama Islands Dental
Association under the
leadership of the late Dr.
Oswald Symonette, last year
sought and was admitted to
membership.
During his presidential
vear. it was his aim to have
every member of the
association become a
supporting member of the
world federation.
While he did not live to see
it happen. the Bahama Islands
Dental Association, as a fitting
memorial to I)r. Srinonette's
hard work. this year
successfully accomplished his
goal and as yet, is one ot a few
national organizations to so
report 100 percent
participation.

COMMUNION BREAKFAST
MR. LESLIE Woodside.
president of the Men of Mary
Star. announced that on
Sunday, November 4, the
quarterly commmunion
breakfast will be held at the
Iloliday Inn at 10 a mi. !his
will be a father and son affair.


ONLY ON
ItV DISCONTINUED COLOURS


AND SOME
!llltlV (oFF


OVERSTOCKED O
COLOURS.
SEE OUR
LIST! 20

DON'T MISS THESE S.AINGS

Sandtex
the For big ;~? to
velvet last long! 12
, finish years tested. With
I-ATTJ with the strong adhesion
heart of a n d great
granite opacity!

AVAILABLE IN 21 BOLD FF
AND PASTEL SHADES


SNOWCEM I
-_ CEMENT-BASE, DRIES
TO A ROCK-HARD
SURFACE. RAIN AND
DAMP RESISTANT.

COMES IN
__ 21 COLOURS OFF






MAURA LUMBER COMPANY LTD.
P. O. Box N-8177 -- NASSAU
TELEPHONE 24001-24101
MAURA'S ON BAY AND ON SHIRLEY STREET


i m
c rp I^T-^ r^ ^^^


home of otMrs. Ruth -Smith.


U


i I

B

I

I
I

II



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1
I

I

I

I

I

IE
IIa


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I

I

I

I


I


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_ _- -- ________ -_- c- -- -- --


MEl


-- ------- I ----


i MEOW


Tuesday, October 30, 1973


5


b
i~ I


?i


I



i


I


I


Ohp ~iribttt


Dr. Leathermani has a unique
record of service as director ol
the International Dental
Federation. lie co-ordinates
the activities 75 regular
member association in 66
countries within an annual
budget in excess of $234.000.
Onte of his main functions is
to head up and plan all the
activities ,..ri.l dental
congreeses which meet in
various centres ol the world.
Last year's congress tiok
place in Mexico C(ity v ith three
supporting tmemibers ticm i the
Bahiailas attending this year's
was in Ssydnces, Australia, and
next year it is expected that a
number ot the members of the
Bahama Islands )en'al
Association will take in the
Scientific sessions in lintdon
Although Dr. Leathrc-rnn is
visiting the Bahamas tol a rest
from his strenuous Jduite-,.
some social plans have been
made.
Discussions. as well. ,kill be
held concerning what
participation the Bahaniais may
expect by applying to:
inclusion in a budget otu dental
assistance in triaoiin
programmes provided by thei
W'orlt d lalth ( )r r tin iln
(\% I1PI
Such training could
coinceiabl bhe duv ctd iitw irdt
a comprehecnsie t
dental care tor school chiidien
pregnant mothers aind
indigents.


FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157












Tuesday, October 30, 1973


W41i tW4 4 ___


INOCE


C12270
NOTICE is hereby given that
DOUGLAS HARVEY
PULLEN of Freeport, Grand
Bahama, Bahamas is applying
to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 23rd day of October,
1973, to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. O. Box N7147,
Nassau.

C12246
NOTICE is hereby given that
SHAPHAN HENRY HINSON
of 5th Street Grove, Nassau,
Bahamas is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 23rd day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.

C12247
NOTICE is hereby given that
TRAN VAN MAO of Market
Street South, Nassau is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for naturalisation
as a citizen of The Bahamas.
and that any person who
knows any reason why
naturalisation should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 23rd day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. O. Box N7147,
Nassau.

C12248
NOTICE is hereby given that
BERENICE ELWILDA
THOMAS of Culmer Alley off
Kemp Road is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 23rd day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. O. Box N7147,
Nassau.


C12240
NOTICE is hereby given that
RICHARD THOMAS HALL of
Collins Ave.. Nassau, Bahamas
is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
23rd day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship. P.
O. Box N7147, Nassau.

C12238
NOTICE is hereby given that
JEAN CLAUDE JOSEPH of
King Street, Nassau, Bahamas
is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who
knows any reason why
naturalization should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 23rd day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. O Box N7147,
Nassau.

C12365
NOTICE is hereby given that
PAUL JOSEPH of Cordeaux
Avenue, Nassau, Bahamas is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Natior ality and
Citizenship, for naturalisation
as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who
knows any reason why
naturalization should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 30th day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. O. Box N7147,
Nassau.

C12373
NOTICE is hereby given that
JAMES ELMER BEEN of
J.....1, r1uaa states, Nassau,
Bahamas. is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 30th day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship P. O. Box N7147,
Nassau.


NOTICE


C12374
NOTICE is hereby given that
DOROTHY ELIZABETH
BEEN of Johnson Road
Estates, Nassau Bahamas is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why
registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 30th day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship P. O. Box N7147
Nassau

C12363
NOTICE is hereby given that
VELY PIERRE of Hospital
Lane, Nassau Bahamas is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for naturalisation
as a citizen of The Bahamas.
and that any person who
knows any reason why
naturalisation should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 30th day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship P. 0.Box N7147.
Nassau.

C 12364
NOTICE is hereby given that
COPELAND ROBERTS
BASSETT of Baldwin Ave,
Nassau is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen ,r
The Bahamas, arid that an
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 30th day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. Box N7147,
Nassau.

C12372
NOTICE is hereby given that
MARGUERITE PIERRE
LOUIS of Laird Street between
Market Street and Bailoou Hill
Road Southern District of the
Island of New Providence is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for naturalisation
as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows
any reason why naturalization
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
30th day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
O. Box N7147, Nassau.


C12371
NOTICE is hereby given that
MARIE CARMELLE PIERRE
LOUIS of Laird Street between
Market St.and Baillou Hill Road
Southern District N.P. is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for naturalisation
as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who
knows any reason why
naturalization should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 30th day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality anc
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147
Nassau.

C12273
BILL'S REAL ESTATE
AGENCY LIMITED offers
good buys in residential and
commercial lots, acreage,
houses, commercial buildings
and attractive beach property.
Whatever your requirements
may be whether buying or
selling call us at 23921 for
prompt dependable and
efficient service.

REAL ESTATE
C12330
EASTERN ROAD
COMPLETELY furnished 2
storey home on the sea with 3
double bedrooms, 3 baths, two
living/dining rooms, 2 patios,
etc Beautiful view of the sea
$150,000 00 Phone 4-21 13.

F OR SALE
C 12296
LOT 18 BI. 13 SOUTH
BEACH ESTATES 60 by 110.
Only $3,800.00. LONG
ISLAND 1.614 Acres ideal
for development. Particulars
upon inquiry. 7 14 acres
Carmichael Road with four
bedroom house-plus apartment
plus Sauna Bath. Asking
$75,000.00. FOWLER
STREET short distance from
-Bay. 2,300 sq. ft. space, used
as Laundry, warehousing,
offices can be used as
display, super market, discount
store. Only $45,000.00.
MURPHYVILLE have 3
bedrooms, 2 baths, nicely
furnished enclosed grounds.
car porte, only $38,000.00.
HAWKINS HILL 2 storey, 3
bedrooms enclosed spacious
grounds, only $25,000.00. See
Anytime. DIAL DAMIANOS,
DAMIANOS REALTY
COMPANY 22033, 22305,
evenings 41197.


FOR RENT


SECTION


._U


C12331
RESIDENTIAL lot in Village
Green off Village Road, 100.x
100 Ft. $10,000.00 Phone
4-2113.


C12048
BUY A LOT
in EASTWOOD or
WINTON MEADOWS
Call Frank Carey
at 27667 or 24815
Frank Carey Real Estate
Box N4764
Bay & Deveaux Sts.

C12115
$75 DEPOSIT gives use of
private lake & beach rights. All
utilities underground. 70 x 100
lots from $5800. NO
INTEREST. Tremendous
savings. Call Rutherford at
4-1141 or Morley & O'Brien at
2-3027 or 2-4148 or come to
YAMACRAW BEACH MODEL
HOME any afternoon.

C12272
PAY A LITTLE and get a lot
at Bill's Real Estate $75.00
down and $80.00 per month
with no interest is your easy
way to purchase a large lot
with underground utilities,
beach rights a private lake and
many other facilities. For
appointment and information
call 23921.

C12358
FOR SALE
BY OWNER
2 BEDROOM HOUSE fully
furnished, wall to wall
carpeting, large patio, Johnson
Terrace $30,000. ALSO lot
Imperial Park 80 x 100 only
$5,500.00. Phone 51905 days
42463 after 6 p.m.

FOR RENT

C12214
FURNISHED AND
AIRCONDITIONED 2
bedroom, 1 bedroom arnd
Efficiency y apar tments.
Telephone 5-8134

C12282
FULLY furnished 2 bedroom
apartment Boyd Subdivision.
Churchill Avenue. $210 per
month Call 35906.

C11772
ONE EXTRA LARGE twu
bed t oonis two bath,
apaitmnient. With large living
and dining all basically
furnished Victoria Court
APARTMENTS on Elizabeth
Avenue between Shirley and
Bay Street. Facilities, phone,
laundry, parking, T. ,.
L "tr' i., 11 ito un dcltl Phone
5 bt x ctn 8 a. anr 5


C 12286
2 BEDROOM unfurnished
apartment ai conditioned -
upstairs over Mae's Beauty
Sa,!jn East Street South. Phone
3 5350

C11703
C'TTAGLS and lpartmens
daily, weekly )r monthly
aircondition d, fully furnished,
maid serivce available. Lovely
n rrdros ,nid swirnming pool.
T-lept one 31297, 31093.

C 12288
OF FICE FORMERLY
occupied by The Imperial Life
Assurance Company of Canada
for rent on Collins Avenue.
Approximately 1,700 square
feet of ii conditioned space
with parking facilities for ten
cars For information kindly
pho.ie Mr Seifert, telephone
59619

C12348
BEAUTIFUL 3 bedroom 212
bath house. Fully furnished.
Large garden. $500. Call 32556
anytime.

C12359
One two-bedroom unfurnished
apartment on McKinney
Avenue, Stapledon Gardens.
See proprietor on prer-mise.
$180 month.
C12369
OFFICt SPACE: Ljrge and
Small suites, some fully
carpeted, partitioned and
airconditioned, in modern
downtown office building
Very Competitive rates.
Immediate occupancy. Write to
P O. 3Box N-4665, Phone
2 8560.

C12376
COMPLETELY furnished 1
bedroom apartment ,
airconditioned, carpeted, T.V.


antenna, automatic washer and
dryer $200. Phone 58512.

C12391
1 BEDROOM FURNISHED
APARTMENT, ariconditioned,
situated on hilltop off
Montrose Avenue. $160 per
month Telephone 3-2109.


FOR SALE

C12367
3 piece front room suite
$270
1 mahogany table and 4 chairs
$140 00 Phone 31500.

C12290
THREE WHEEL SCOOTER
Ernest Smith Phone 22481


NASSAU


IN MEMORIAL I


C12385


BUSINESS PROFESSIONAL


DIRECTORY


6. Save Time


BT

PHONE

Ii Lit I Th Directory

1 lie Per Mth '16!


> AVE TIME SAVE MONEY <


FLOOR MAINTENANCE BOOK STORE
Rug (Cleaning & Installation 1 hii Christian look Shop 5 8744
dl.i ririr 5357 i'-12 I I
Lll' I.sR bRiLS :EN S CLOi .':-
lartln's 2-3173 l 'he wVirdrohe .lacke\ St. 5 559q

DEPT. STORES TRA\FL
Pixies's Iept. Store 2-317 3 l.i\ toiirs 2-2931/7
John's Dept. Store 2 3156 R. IH. curr & i ln Itd. 2.8681,'7
RI)IO & 1 VSAIIS ML Sl
Carter's Records 24711 ('ody Records 2-8500

OPTICIANS HEALTH FOODS
Optical Service .id. 2-39 10/1 Nassau Drug Store 54506
SPORT SHOP CAMERAS
(Chanpmiin Sprt l.i nd 2 I80,2 J,hn Hull 2-4252/3
SHOE STORE I)RY GOOl S
Slonaris Kutc Kildd 2-420- ('lonaris Kute Kiddy 2-4264

CARPETS LAUNDRYi DRY CLEANING
ILee's Carpet (rafl 3-I Ni NeX )rientl laindry 2-4406

HARDWARE GARI)EN & '[ T SUPPLIES
John S. George & Co. 2-8421 6 Modernistic 'hlione 2-2.(,8

PLUMBERS PRINTING
Sunshine Ilumbing Maiintenancl long's' s l'rintini (orrmlp. mn s-4S-4
Service I'hone 5-625 I
WRECKER SERVICE DRAPERIES
;ihson ( ,ir \\ rckcr Service 2-88X o I ce's (Carpet (raft 3-1903


FOR THE ACTION YOU WANT




Shop Nassau Merchants

For Business And Services


FOR SALE
C12362
GARAGE SALE
Silverware
Cutlery
Glassware
Linen
Curtains
Materials
Trimmings
Dresses 16-18-20
Books
Records
Custom Jewellery
Ornaments
Electrical Appliances etc. etc. etc
Opposite Olympia Hotel
Tel: 24062-Mrs. Petterson.

BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
C12377
SMALL BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITY Key
Management Consultants Ltd.
have a client wishing to sell a
successful going concern
suitable for a woman willing to
spend a few hours a day
marketing the service offered
opportunity to earn up to
$10,000 a year. For further
information call 24224.

CARS FOR SALE
C12251
1971 DODGE AVENGER, 4
door, automatic. $1095.00.
Phone John Cash. 2-2768 days,
3-1397 evenings/weekends.


C12205
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD.
P.O. BOX N-640
NASSAU BAHAMAS
USED CARS
1970 HILLMAN HUNTER 4
Dr. Auto. White $850
1963 JAVELIN A/C $995
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA 2 Dr.
Auto. Green $1450
1971 FORD CAPRI Auto.
Blue $1695
1970 CHEVELLE SS A/C 2
Dr Red $2600
1968 VAUXHALL VICTOR
$600
1 9 6 9 PLYMOUTH
SATELLITE $1300
1969 PONTIAC GTO AC
Vinyl Red $2600
1971 FORD PINTO Brown
Vinyl Auto. $1995
1971 VAUXHALL VICTOR 4
Dr. Std. White $1295
1967 MERCURY COUGAR
Std. Green- $900
1969 AUSTIN 1100 4 Dr. Std.
Green -- $995
1970 FIAT 124 4 Dr. Std.
White $600
1968 BUICK ELECTRA White
$1595
1969 VOLKSWAGEN Green
$1250
Trade-ins Welcomed
Located Oakes Field
Opposite the Ice House
Telephone 3-4636-7.8


CRS FOR SALE
C12383
1972 Four Door Grand Torino
with Air conditioning; Vinyl
Top; Low Mileage; Beautiful
Sounding Radio and Luxury
Features for those of
discriminating taste. Asking
$5,200.00. Phone 2-8787 or
5-3203.


ANNOUNCEMENTS

CLUES TO

1bp 0ribunp
I: PanAm

TRAVEL PHOTO
CONTEST

PHOTO No. 10:- The
flag of this country is
black, red and gold. It
has no "official" national
anthem. This photo
appeared in The Tribune
Sept. 15th.

PHOTO: No. 11:- A
treaty was signed in this
town in May, 1955, when
the state agreed to
remain neutral.
This photo appeared in
The Tribune Sept. 17.

Back issues of these dates are
available at The Tribune
offices in Nassau and
Freeport.


ART SUPPLIES


C11770
COMPLETE. range of artist-
supplies. Oils, acrylics. canvas,
easels, etc. Bahamian Paint
Supply Ltd., Bay Street. Phone
2-2386,2-2898.


MARINE SUPPLIES

-11762
PACEMAKER 44 ft.
Luxurious Cruising Yacht.
Phone 3-2371.

1194
1969 31ft. CHRIS CRAF'
Commander. Sleeps six, private
shower, two 230 h.p. engines
with less than 200 hours,


condition.


houseboat
Mermaid
Cash only.


,, 1


9. .
* i,


Cl 21986 EXI. 5

2 Line Per Month '10"


WINDOW AND DOOR
SPECIALISTS We repair:
screens, windows, doors,
awnings, jalousies, glass &
mirror installations. Telephone
54460.


Your ad in The Tribune
will bring results


C12366


EXPERT PIANO tuning and
repair. Ten years experience.
Mr. Saunders 42215 for
appointment.


C11775
T. V. ANTENNAS
Boosters for homes;
apartments and hotels
Sales and services
Call 5-340-,
;.'OF.LD OF .vlLISiC.,
,alckey Street
next to Frank's ?lacn.



You get RESULTS with

htl tribune

Classified Ads


6'IT OflBaINawS...-I6
w* A^ / o s w


"L s A PAo
'TAIE SNTWATO
TAKE MS PLACE.


TAKE HIS PLAC.~.
_______________ ______________ _______________ I


CLASSIFIED


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS-FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV. TELEPHONE 21986 EXT. 5


TRADE SERVICES TRADE SERVICES


GRAND BAHAMA




CLASSIFIED

IN FREEPORT

TEL. 352-6608


kitchenette, good
Call 24267, 54011.


C12356
50 ft. Custom built
floating home at
Dock. Going cheap.
Phone 34737.


I I II T


.. .


d


IN LOVING MEMORY Effie
Louise Roberts who died on
October 30th, 1972. One sad
year.
Your name we often mention
Our Thoughts are with you still
You haven't been forgotten
You know you never will
O heavenly father God of grace
Always present in thy place
Take thou this soul and grant
that she may dwell with the
in Paradise
THE FAMILY

ENTERTAINMENT
C12390
DON'T MISS THIS !!!!! R. M.
BAILEY, Sr. HIGH SCHOOL
FAIR. Thursday, November 1,
1973, at 3 p.m. Games, Special
attractions, Supper, Dancing
Fun for the entire family.


HELP WANTED
C12284
EXPERIENCED OFFSET
PRESSMAN. Must be
conscientious and able to
produce quality work. Call
Executive Printers 2-4267 or
5-4012.
C6334
Job Title BURNERMEN (2)
Minimum Education Good
basic education. Experience in
fuel burning process in rotary
Kilns and production of
Clinker. Cement plant rotary
Kiln burnerman.
Minimum Experience 3-5
years.
Duties/Responsibilities -
Operate ',ilns to produce
clinker by a continuous process
of burning.
Interested applicant contact
Fer sonnel Depart ment,
Bahamas Cement Company, P.
0. Box F100, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.

C12299
COMPETENT SECRETARY
required for established firm.
Dictaphone typist. English at
GCE "O" level or equivalent.
Speed and accuracy. Apply in
handwriting to: Adv. C12299,
c/o The Tribune, P. O. Box
N-3207, Nassau.

C12349
BACK HOE OPERATOR with
service experience. Telephone
2-4996 or 5-8725.

C12375
TAILOR with 5 years
experience, coat maker
preferred. Call Gibson
Tailoring 28170.

C12370
QUALIFIED WATCHMAKER
required by Mademoiselle.
Must be capable of running his
own workshop without
supervision. The successful
applicant must be fully
qualified in all stages of
watchmaking and be able to
produce relevant certificate of
competence. First class
references will be required and
applicants should apply in
writing to Mademoiselle Ltd.,
P. O. Box N.4882, Nassau.

TRADE SERVICES
1 70o

Pinder's Customs

Brokerage Ltd.
Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
',ASALN. 1AHA/4I AS
P. O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-3793
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434.


C12357


HELP WANTED
C6398
BOOKKEEPER: Bookkeeper
responsible for all shops, ledger
and doing daily sales report.
Should have 3-5 years
experience in bookkeeping.
Please bring along Police
Certificate.
LOBBY CLEANER: Lobby
cleaner to clean and mop
Lobby Area, empty ash trays,
clean Men's Rest Room and
clean glass. Male preferred.
PLUMBER SUPERINTEN-
DENT: To be in charge of
plumbing, sewer, steam boilers,
water wells, reverse osmosis
water treatment plant. 5-10
years experience.
Interested persons apply:
GRAND BAHAMA HOTEL,
WEST END. GRAND
BAHAMA Personnel Office,
between the hours of 9:00 a.m.
and 3:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday. Elon Martin,
Jr., Personnel Director.

C6334
Job Title BURNERMEN (2)
Minimum Education Good
basic education. Experience in
fuel burning process in rotary
Kilns and production of
Clinker. Cement plant rotary
Kiln burnerman.
Minimum Experience 3-5
years.
Duties/Responsibilities
Operate Kilns to produce
clinker by a continuous process
of burning.
Interested applicant contact
Personnel Lepartment,
Bahamas Cement Company, P.
O. Box F100, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.


HELP WANTED
C6396
Two diesel mechanics with five
years experience working o-i
Allis Chalmers and Caterpillar
line equipnernt. Successful
applicants must be prepared to
work overtime if required. For
further information contact.
Alvin Swann, Freeport
Construction Company
Limited, P. O. Box F-2410,
Telephone 352-7091.
C12276
INTERNATIONAL FIRM of
Chartered Accountants have
several vacancies for Chartered
or Certified Accountants in
their Freeport Office
Successful candidates will be
paid excellent salaries and
bonuses. Applicants should
apply in writing to the Staff
Partner, Price Waterhouse &
Co., P. O. Box F-2415,
Freeport, Bahamas.



ING
^8 V 'WITH TNU






USE

LhP Gribunt

CLASSIFIED

ADVTS.


I, but what
the spare?"


I i I


I I


Ghr Gribtute


a,










Tuesday, October 30, 1973


FmlIl11*a


"Is Women's Lib against a secretary sitting on her
boss's lap if the secretary happens to want to?"


OMAY OKAY. 1m
PUTTING' IT 8ACK I


"f5SToFIT ANYWAY. "


"lou got change tor a


CROSSWORD

PUZZLE
ACROSS
,). Wiy fare
1. Night clubs ?6 Racetrack
6 Lumber / Outlet
10. Pointed arch :' i: mibridge
11. Criminal rverr
13. Poisonous 9 Cr iDib
14. High note 32 A it-fh ativ's
15. Live 3J (Coquetltsr
16. Epochal 3.. Gratis
17. Utter 35 Pd'nm hly
18. Ballet step j6 Pinch
19. Conv, led 37 Stlie ot type
20. Sori 38 Ho'.tiilty
21. Tweak ;0 Build
22. Black 41 UInctuous
24. Stigma 4? Soil


Pl01 1ISIE I E]

SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE

00WN 3. Hang-ups
4. Malicious
1. Shelter 5. Brut
2. Greek market 6. Cunning
place 7. Wood sorrel
7 a 9 W- 8. Roger
9. Land
11. Frail
12. Escritoire
s 17. Underhanded
1& Thespian
,e 20. Famous
S general
/ 21. Vase
S23. Macadamia
24. Close mouthed
25 White wool
26. Scottish river
z- o i 7 27. Ballot
28. Photostat
34 30. Respond
31. Fraction
7 33. Metropolis
- 34. Courts
36. Zero
S- 37. Arikara
39. Note of the
oatues 11.1 scale


Simon bolts up to the dtck hut he is stopped
by a cry from r fPulft. C,ome back, Simon!
there's nothing to be afraid of !" And the
trembling lad stngrs blankiv as a cockatoo
flies through thr doorway of a cabin and
flutters upwards, screeching Sink their boat!
Capture the crew Cutlasses, guns, pieces of


eight!" Simon draws a deep breath and
rejoins Rupert below deck. By this time the
little bear is searching the cabin where the
bird had lurked. Hare's a bunch of keys," he
says. Shall we borrow them ? " Yes, they
might be useful if that prisoner is locked up,"
replies Simon. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


Ih BgrtbUr


CARROLL RIGHTER'S


IHOROSCOPE
from the Carroll Righter Institute
GENERAL TENDENCIES: The morning is fine
for accepting new concepts in your financial
affairs as well as in partnership matters. The afternoon and
evening require much tact to avoid serious arguments. Strive
for more understanding with kin.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) If you do research work in the
morning you can make real progress in present endeavors.
Tonight use tact in dealing with others.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) You have an opportunity to
solve a financial problem early in the day. Use your intuitive
faculties since they can be helpful to you.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Doing whatever pleases
associates in the morning will add to present goodwill. You
can easily turn an enemy into a true friend.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) If you don't waste
time you can gather the data you need before afternoon
Relax tonight and restore your energies.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Morning is a good time to plan a
social affair. Later attend to important duties but don't take
any risks with anyone or anything.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Work family affairs out
properly early in the day. Later iron out any problems in your
business life. Entertain at home tonight.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct 22) Morning is the best time for
keeping appointments. Take time later to solve any
troublesome matters. Go over records for possible errors
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Show that you are clever in
handling financial matters. Care must be taken in motion of
any kind. Take it easy at home tonight.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) The early hours are
ideal for handling personal affairs but the afternoon is best for
business and property matters. Be wise.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) Do some confidential
angling that can help put your project in operation. Steer clear
of a social affair that could lead to trouble.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Do whatever will please
your good friends and show how much you value the alliance.
Think over your personal aims for the future.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Handling career affairs well
during the day is important. Later be careful you don't lose
your temper with a good friend. Relax tonight.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY ... he or she will be
one of those delightful young persons who likes people and
will turn out to be very gregarious. Be sure to include
psychology in the educational curriculum. A great many
individuals can be helped by your good and clever progeny.
There is much travel indicated in this fine chart.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!




THE Make You Very CROSS-word. The one with no numbers
and except for the first in each section, no order to the clues.
One hint by compiler TIM McKAY : The eight-letter words are
easy to place. Solution on Monday.


Clues Across
Brave chap. (4)
Top managerial type. (9)
Criminal. (5)
Not many. (8)
DroQped (4)
Donkey. (X)
Mountain range. (4)


[TAREI


HOW many
words of
fo ur letters
or more can
you make
from the
letters shown L
here? In
making a
word, eac A
letter may be
used once
only. Each
word must contain the large
letter, and there must be at


Chess
By LONARD BARDBN







:4, _a

-t -
oii-a-1



i. i


(no01)
White mates In two moves
against any defence (by V
Karpov). White has several ways
to threaten mate, but all bar one
are cleverly defeated.
Par times: Two minutes, pro
lem master; five minutes, pob-
lem expert; 10 minutes, good; 20
minutes, average: 40 minutes
novice.
(If you find the chess notation
used in my solution hard to
follow, write for my free Evening
Standard explanation bookie
How to Read Chess Move.
Please enclose a stamped
addressed envelope.)


least two eight-letter words In
the list. No plurals; no foreign
words; no proper names.
TODAY'S TARGET: 27 words,
good; 33 words, very good;
45 words, excellent. So I o n
tomorrow
YESTERDAY'S SOL UTION:
Clue cruel crue'ly cull cure curl
curly curse ecru luce lucre lure
rule rulley ruse scull sculler
SCULLERY slue slur sully sure
surely surly ulcer user yule.


Chess Solution
I KtxBP (threat 2 Q-Q6
mate). If I ... Kx Kt; 2 B--Kt3
or If B-Q6; 2 Kt x B. or if B-
52 Q xB, or tl Kt-B2; 2 Kt-
Kt6.
Traps for solvers are 1 Kt-B3?
B-Q6! or 1 Kt Q5)--B6? Kt-
B2! or if 1 Kt (Q5) elsewhere,
P-B6!


Winning


Bridge
By VIlOrR MOLLO
"We nave 28 points, yet we
cant maie nwne trucks ex-
clainmd ithe i~toessor ibit.rly.
" 'Coplete duphcai.ion, every-
thlng wrong . .'
SIncluducig the play,' observed
the Senror Kkb6tzer unloindly.
Dealer South: Both VuL
North
A76
0 653
0J 762
6874
West East
Q 4 3 2 4 10 98
SK Q 6 2 J 10 7
098 0643
SK 3 2 4 J 10 9 5
South
4 K J 6
0A04
0 A K Q 10
^A Q6
South North
2T 20
2NT 3NT
West led the 0 2 to east's V 10.
The Professor held uP the V A
till the third round and cashed
his four diaanoxds, ending In
dummy. The club fnesse lkst to
the 4&K asd atter scou his
fourth heart, West exited wl.h
a club. The 4 Q was the setting
trick.
Since West had to pawt with
a club and a spade," began the
ProfIessor. "I could have thrown
him in with one black honour to
:ead away from the other.
Double dunamy ."
No need for double dummy
play," reported BK. You simply
wln the second heart, take three
diamonds and exit wth the 0 9.
Let West take his hearts. What
ever he leads next presents you
with your ninth trick."
"Why cash only lthee dia-
monds?" endured a Junior
kibl zer.
"In case, depte hs V 2. West
has five heart," replied SK.
"Declarer must have two dis-
cards available, the 46 and a
d.amond."


a e


By DAL CURTIS

Wm -N THE LAB WORK COMES)
iarLOUGH ON WILSON, GIVE
ME, A CALL, KAREN '/7-
,j T ATTAT' .I


By PAUL NICHOLS


;r WASG UNTIL A MINUTE AGO.
' +NK ~MAYBE are's GONE
T" -iS ROOM! i
//V-< /-


'I

W&uA L


Ye C- omW /


REX MORGAN, M.D.

T N TRYFIUWUA TMEANwHif


70 GET THERE,
YOU GOTTA GO TO FRANK'S JOE
PARTY TONIGHT, STAN /
YOU'RE 14IS BEST FRIEND .


4 .
2 45.


COFFEE SHo
7^~ -- -
r DON'T K Nc-M
THE TIME v-:
I'M LATE FOI
OFFICE A PCO
MENTS //




kT


I APARTMENT 3-G


By Alex Kotzky


Si /-. P'E-SMT M i MOTHER
S/ LiKE YOU ,

. I iON'T KNOP \0
\ BUT I HOPE O.! I


Below. (5)
Microbe. (4)
Shout. (4)
Female of deer. (3)
Payments for accommodation. (7)
Showing the qualities of man.(5)
Canine. (5)
Make a mistake. (3)
Clues Down
Hand bead (Anag.). (8)
Sea. (5)
Continuing until death. (8)
Daytrtp. (9)
Replete. (4)
Above. (4) MAlRR5oR AW FAT
Given new
energy.(9) 0 PEN ANA
Shed for R PAIRINGW
cars. (6) S EVt I fL U
impolite. ENLAR E
Tro cal sea. OLINO SL
Co mpanion ECE
fBacchus. ENGROSSED
(5) W I Si
Horsy town. Yuterday'a
(9) Solutlio


STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD


v saunders & overgard


STALk .


Si i.


Rupert on Chariot Island-32


~;r;;
i~i--
:r


i;

t
i
,


i:
II


I




I




I
I

I

I
I
I
I
I
1
I
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
t
I
I
I
I
I

I



I

I

n (
i I I
I
I
I
uv I
I
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~I
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vi )


I--


- ~s3e~.~F~.~z~s~sSs%,-r~-I _I


rs*J01~9**91


iI


i

i


SS i 'v^ l














0


Ministry just hold on to





one run lead over Taylor's


By GLADSTONE THURSTON
SECOND baseman Al Jarrett
cracked a ground out rbi to
first baseman Benny Bain in
the top of the seventh and final
inning driving in Sim Humes
from third for the lead off run
that proved to be the winner in
the Ministry of Works' 6-5
victory over Taylor Industries
in the best of three New
Providence Softball men
championship last night at the
J.F.K. softball Park.
Going into the top of the
sixth behind by two runs, right
fielder Willie Knowles drilled a
two rbi single into centre and
left fielder Fred "Chicken"
Taylor followed with another
run-scoring base hit before
Taylor's. on losing pitcher
John Rolle's rbi in the bottom
of that inning, notched the
game at five all
Homes, who led off the top
of the seventh with a ground
ball to third baseman Phillip
Saunders, was safe on first
when the relay to Sherwin
Taylor dropped.
Catcher Leon Knowles
followed with a fielder's choice
placing runners on first and
second. Both runners advanced
when Paul Demeritte ground
out to short stop bringing up
Jarrett for his game winning
hit.
Protecting their one run lead
was not easy for the
Ministry. With one down, Ben
Rolle who was safe on an error
advanced to second on John
Williams' fielder's choice to
load the bases on Joe Jones'
single.
However, Jimmy Bostwick.
the seventh batter of the inning
flied out to Fred Taylor at left
and pinch hitter Vince Albury


went down swinging for the
final out.
Jarrett from four times at
bat collected three hits and
scored two leading the
Ministry's offence. He was
seconded by Fred Taylor who
picked up two hits from four
times at bat and knocked in
one run. Knowles' two rbi's
came from his sole hit from
three times at hat.
Defensively for the Ministry.
Sherwin Taylor collected a
game high of 12 put outs.
Winning pitcher Randy
Rodgers gave a total of six
assists. Jarrett gave four assists
and two put outs.
John Rolle in a losing effort
led Taylor's with two hits from
three at bats when he knocked
in two runs. Ben Rolle had a
one for four plate appearance
during which time he scored
one and knocked in two.
Defensively Bain topped
Taylor's with 10 put outs.
Catcher Panzy Johnson had
five. !,ive assists came from
John Rolle and three each
from Saunders and Ben Rolle.
Taylor's were the first to
draw blood when an rbi double
by Rolle in the bottom of the
second put them up one. The
Ministry replied in the ton of
Ithe third on Sherwin's rbi, but
raylor's in an all out effort
.moved again in the lead
powered by Ben Rolle's two
run homer

MINISTRY


W. Knowles
S. Haven
S. Taylor
UF. Taylor
S. Humes
L. Knowles
P. )enieritte
A. Jarrett
R. Rodgers


ab r h rhi
30 1 2
40 1 0
3 01 1
4 O 2 I
402
4 1 0 0
40 00
3 2 1 1
4 2 3 1
3 1 1 0


TAY LOR'S
I'. Johnson 4 O i 0
(;. Moncur 4 I 0
B. Bain 2 I 0
B. Rolle 4 1 1 2
J.Williams 4 I I
J.Jones 4 0 i 0
J. Bostwick .3 1 O
I'. Saunders 2 0 O0
V. Albury I 0 0 0
J. Rolle 3 0 2 2
Winning pitcher Margal .
Albury hurled seven torrid
inning during which time she
was peppered for 14 solid hits.
Yet excellent fielding by her
team-mates together with
strong offence carried the
Columbus League champs the
TRIBUNE BLAZERS to an
18-13 victory over Arawak
League pennant winners
PAST PEARLS and a one
game lead in a best of three
New Providence Ladies League
Softball Championship.
The Blazers and the Pearls
meet for the second game on
Wednesday night (7:00) at the
John F. Kennedy Softball
Park. In the event of a third
game, it will be played
Thursday night.
Albury admitted being a bit
tired last night.
Tantalizing her opponents
with slow lobs, Albury
although she struck out only
two -- was responsible for 1 2
pop flies and line drives pii
outs. Four of these were neatly
nabbed by their competent
right fielder Celestine Wilson.

Catcher Eula Smith who
defensively was responsible for
four put outs and two assists
led the Blazer's offensive
attack with a three for
four/three rbi plate
appearance. She scored two.
Second baseman Florence
Rolle added another two rbi's
from a two for five at bat when
she scored three. Left fielder


Winsome Davidson also
knocked in two runs following
five times at hat when she
collected two hits and scored
two.
Although they saw the lead
briefly only once in the game,
Past Pearls were capable in
the defence of their title and
the power bats of Naomi
Bowleg. Pat Saunders and I).
Russell continually kept thiem
in contention.
Bowleg in a two for five
plate appearance knocked in
two and scored two runs.
Saunders who failed to score
during her five times at bat
showed her worth with two
runs batted in. Russel, facing
the pitcher four tires collected
two hits and knocked in two.
Following a two all-tie first
inning which lasted through
the second as both sides failed
to score, the Blazers in the
bottom of the third errupted
for three needed runs. They
were aided by a three base
throwing error on pitcher
Mavis Bowleg and a two base
throwing error by left fielder
Russell.
With one down, Rolle
tapped a bunt miidway between
the plate and the n found.
Bowleg in an attempted
throw out tossed the ball into
the out field. Rolle took the
advantage to move to third.
With centre fielder Barbara
Knowles at bat, a wild pitch
saw her scoring the lead off
run. Knowles went on to pick
up her second hit of the game
with a single into centre. It was
Smith's base hit into left that
touched off Russell's two base
throwing, error. Smith stole
third and scored on Winson's
rbi single.
Undaunted by the Blazers'


attack and the two expensive
defensive fumbles, Pabst came
back strong in the fourth with
four leading runs. Helped along
their route by two of Albury's
six walks, Russell, Evangeline
Bowleg and Maria Strachan all
knocked in a run each.
F vangeline scored her
second nan of the game on an
error by Thompson at third.
Rolle and Smith, ripping
into Mavis' pitching in the
bottom of the fourth for two
rhi's each was the highlight of
the Blazers' eight run inning
Pabst in the following inning
tried to better the Blazers but
was able to come up with six in
their fifth inning rally.
Saunders in that inning
clopped a two rhi single,
The Blazers picked up three
insurance runs in he bottom of
the fifth and two more in the
sixth out scoring their
opponents 5-1 over those two
innings.


BL.A ZE'k S

Moxey
('. Sabala
I. Rolle
B. Knowles
I.. Smith
'. W ilson
1. Thompson
W. Davidson
M. Albury


I'ABST
1-. Bowleg
M. Strachan
N. Bowleg
I'. Saunders
M. Thompson
1. McMinns
M. Bowleg
MNI. Ianna
I). Russell


ab r
3 2
4 2
5 3
5 2
4 2
4 2
5 2
5 2
2 1


Tuesday, October 30, 1973


Basketball


workout


squad:


27 named

IN PREPARATION for their
return match with Luzembourg
Basketball Alstar, the Bahamas
Amateur Basketball
Association last night released
the names of 27 players
forming a workout squad
from which ten will be chosen
to represent the Bahamas in
December.
Beginning 7:30 Friday night
at the A. F. Adderley Gym. the
B.A.B.A. will hold a special
meeting for all coaches to
acquaint them with rule
differences between the
N.C.A.A. and International
basketball and to decide on a
programme of development of
coaches and officials.
Following the meeting the
squad will have their first
workout session.
The following have been
chosen: Jerome Barney
Strachan's, Berty Johnson
Strachan's, Lionel Evans
Strachan's, Sterling Quant
Kentucky, Keith Smith
Kentucky, Phillip Poitier
Kentucky, Charles Bain
Police, Anthony Woodside
Police, Charles Stuart John
Bull. Leroy Fawkes John
Bull, Elisha McSweeney
Pros, Wilfred Johnson Pros.
Cleve Rodgers Pros, Pat
Ingraham Pros, Golson Bain
Pros. Bennett Davis


Cougars, Peter
Cougars, Sammy
Cougars, Mirza
Rodgers' Ellis
Supersonics, Van
Arawaks, Charles
Arawaks. Ruben
Arawaks, Basil
Pinder's. Freddy


Brown
Johnson
Selver
Bodie
Delaney
Deveaux
Mounts
Burns
McKay


Reff, Rudy Levarity Reef
and Reubin Knowles- Fox


Hurricanes stay


unbeaten-


seconds

TI E FREEPORT
Hurricanes retained their
unbeaten record Sunday
afternoon when quarterback
Fletcher Lewis threw a 34yd.
TD pass to Holman McDonald
with five seconds of the game
left to give the 1lurricancs an
18-14 win over visitors All)
Stingrays.
Considering the zest and
enthusiasm that both sides
displayed a draw would have
been a more equitable result
but now the Hurricanes along
with the Nassau Jets remain
the only two undefeated teams
in the BAFA league.
The Stingrays opened the
scoring on a controversial call.
0. Russell fielding a punt on
his own five stepped into the
end /one to avoid a tackler.
broke lose and was finally
downed at the 15yd line.
But the field judge had ruled
the play dead in the end-/one
giving the Stingrays a 2-0 lead.
The iHurricans stormed back.
Bert I)uncanson kicked (:ff
from his 20 speedy running
back Greg Fisher returned the
ball to the Stingrays 40 yd. line
and in three plays the Stingrays
los! 24 ,d0s. to their 16.
l:aced with a 4tlh and 34
Philip Dorsett of the Stingrays'
got set to punt: unfortunately,
a bad snap from the centre
passed himi anI ihe was !ieill]
downed at the 4': line.
After three plays Hurricanes
quarterback Zack Smith
punched over front tihe one for
a D1) to Iake the score 6-2 at
the end of the second quarter.
On the opening play of the
second half Rodney Greene
fnmblhed the kickol't"i u'hih wh s


with


Left

subsequently recovered by the
Stingrays on the Hurricanes 20
d. line.
Following two plays
Stingrays quarterback 'Porky'
Dorsett hit Kelton Humep with
a 16 vd. TD pass giving the
the Stingrays an 8-6 lead.
Late in the third quarter the
Stingrays uncovered the
Ilurricanes 'achilles heel' once
more when the Hurricanes
fumbled away another punt to
give the Stingrays a first down
at the 43.
-Porky' Dorsett then
engineered a TD drive capped
by a one yard scoring pass to
running back Kelton to boost
the Stingrays lead to 14-6.
The Hurricanes came back
gallantly and late in the fourth
quarter Ken Gittens
intercepted a Dorsett pass at
the Stingrays 7 yd. line. In four
plays quarterback Zack Smith
again crashed over from the
one to close the gap to 14-12.
With their large following of
fans urging them on all looked
bleak for the Hurricanes at the
two minute warning.
At this point the Stingrays
had the ball on a 2nd and 11
on the Hurricanes 40 yd. line.
On the next play Dorsett threw
an incomplete pass stopping
the clock.
On a fourth down Melvin
Burnside was stopped at the 30
yd. line, one yard short of a
nirst down. The Hurricanes
took over with 57 seconds left.
Edl Smith ran 19 yds to the
50 yd. line and a first down.
Flecther replaced the tiring
Zack Smith at quarterback. His
first pass was almost
intercepted


Ace golfers set to return for clinics







" i '

VS



B u





7 .to
i iv


ACE GOLFERS Lee Elder and Jim
Weichers and other top American
teaching pros who gave a series of junior
clinics in New Providence during
September are expected back November
2 I. they will continue their golf clinics at
a site to be named later.


As a token of appreciation by the
grateful juniors, these masters of the
course including Al Greene, Bobby
Duvall, Babe Lewis and Johnny Jones will
be the guests of honour at a special
banquet on November 23.
The last clinics which were opened to


U.S. FOOTBALL


Reports of U.S. pro football
games:
Cleveland (AP) Rav
Wersching's 16-yard goal off
the muddied turf with 30
seconds remaining gave the San
Diego Chargers a 16-16 tie with
the Cleveland Browns
The Tying field goal ended a
78-yard drive in seven plays
that was highlighted by a
50-yard pass play from rookie
quarterback Dan Fouts to
Willie McGee
The Browns took the lead
for the first tine on the rainy
day midway through the final
period when rookie running
back Greg Pruitt spun off a
tackler and reversed his
direction, scoring from the
seven-yard line and giving the
browns a 16-13 edge.
San Dieeo 0 10 3 3-16
Cleveland 0 3 3 10-16
DETROIT (AP) Altie
Taylor had his best rushing day
ever and scored one
touchdown as the Detroit
Lions snapped a three-game
losing streak with a 34-0
National Football League
victory over the Green Bay
Packers.
Taylor rushed for 160 yards
in 23 carries, the fourth best
total in Lions history.
His Touchdown came on a
nine-yard run in the fourth
quarter, but Detroit had
already built up a 17-0 lead by


halftime on touchdowns by


Steve Owens and Mel Farr and
Jin O'Brien's 32-yard field
goal.
Green Bay 0 0 0 0--0
Detroit 10 70 17 -27
New York tAP) Ch
NEW YORK (AP) Charley
Johnson threw two touchdown
passes, then Steve Ramsey
came off the bench and
completed a 76-yard scoring
pass as the Denver Broncos
repulsed a second-half New
York rally and beat the Jets
40-28.
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
I astern division L T Its.
Miam 6 I 0 177 80
Buffalo 4 2 0 111 120
Hialiimore 2 5 0 1 17 184
N.Y Jets 2 5 0 102 140
New l"-ngland 2 5 0 101 150
down passes. then S

I ASII RN I)IVISION
W I T Pts. OP
Miami 6 1 0 177 80
Buffalo 4 2 0 111 120
Baltimore 2 5 0 117 184
N.Y. Jets 2 5 0 102 146
New I ngland 2 5 0 101 150
I'ittsburgh 6 1 0 184 90
Cleveland 4 2 I 126 113
.'ncinn.ai 4 3 0 110 101o
Houston 0 7 0 104 250
WI STI.RN DIV ISION
Oakland 4 2 1 132 1 I
Kansas ('it 3 2 1 71 71
Denver 3 3 1 201 166
San Diego I 5I 101 187
SUNDAY'S RESULTS
S)akland 34. Baltimore 21
Chicago 35. Hoiuston 14


New Orleans 19, Washington 3
St. Louis 35. New York giants s 27
Minnesota 10, Los Angeles 9
Detroit 34. (;reen iua 0
Miami 30. New 1n-gland 14
Philadelphia 30. D)allas 16
Dienver 40. New York Jets 21
San Dieg>o I 6.(leveland 16
Pittshurgh 20. Cinciinnati 13
Atlanta 17. San I rancisco .3
NA1IONA1 CtON I RI N(
I astern Division


5\ aisliingtI ll
Dallas
St Louis
Philadelphia
N Y. Giants
(CI N IRAI
tinnesolta
(reen Ba)
Detroit
('h icagoi
WI S I'lI
Los) Angeles
Ati.nita
Saii Iralncisco
Ne\v Orleans


V\ L I Pts
5 2 0 162
4 3 0 204
3 4 0 160
2 4 I 157
I 5 I 1 9
LI DIVISION
7 0 0 13'
2 3 2 72
2 4 I 137
2 5 0 130
RN DIVISION
6 1 0 195
4 3 0 181
3 4 0 138
3 4 0 80


juniors only brought appeals from the
lady golfers. This time ladies have been
invited to participate.
Pictured above are some of the juniors
that took part in the last clinic s. Weichers
is fourth from left and Elder stands next
to him.


Training


starts

AMAI"Tl R boxers, in
preparation for the ir upcoming
(olden (;love 10irn ilatn en t, ;ire
reminded that Irainrling rtesumnes
tolnorrow .atfterrn.ion at the
\assaui Stadioell.
E li mi nations for the
tournament which will be held
,i!1 No\etIIIber 23 in the
(amelot Rootm of the King's
Inn Hotel. will be held next
month at the Stadtilmi.
National coach Bert P'err\
said all ho\cis ar_" shaping up
well and homing fans can hope
for a few upsets during the
finals ii Irep ort Randnd
Bahama.
All time favourites (;ary
Davis. Nathaniel Knowles and
Nathaniel Whyinns will be on
hand to defend their titles.
New boxers that will be
making their dlebut include
heavyweight Wellington
Bullard and Jeff B burnside.


EX-BOXER DIES
C('IHICAO (AlP) iJohnin
C'oulon. 84. the world
hantanwieight boxing champion
from 1910 to 1914. has died.
iHe won his crown by knocking
out Jim Kendricks in New Orleans.


Ickx joins John Player
LONDON (AP) -- Jackie Peterson in the JPS Lotus team
Ickx, of Belgium, a former apparently to replace former
Ferrari driver, has signed to world champion Emerson
drive for the John Player Lotus Fittipaldi of Brazil whose
Grand Prix Formula One team contract expires at' tie end of
next year, a team spokesman the year and who is expected
announced today, to drive a McLaren next
lckx joins Sweden's Ronnie season.


()l'
833
139
197
180
166


Majestic League chamos Tavlor Industries. fought hard but were unable to conquer the Ministry of Works last night.
They are from left (standing) Phill Saunders, Mark Gates, Junior Evans, Jimmy Bostwick, lien Rolle. Vincc
Albury, Arthur Ihompson, Roy Rodgers, Albert Rodgers, (kneeling) Orlando McPhee, John Williams, Gilbert Moncur.
Panzy Johnson, John Rolle and Benny Bain.


Facts and figures of the cricket season


ly IVAN JOHNSON
FOLLOWING the official
ending of the 1973 BCA
cricket season with the knock
out cup final and presentation
game last weekend, the
following statistics have been
realized by the BCA.
The Southerners emerged as
comfortable winners of the
regular league series over St.
Bernards.
St. Bernards, however,
gained their revenge when they
clinched the KO Cup last
Saturday, defeating their
arch-rivals by one wicket.
Topping the batting averages
for the season was Paradise's
prolific batsman. Louis
Yearwood, who scored 282
runs in five innings, including
126 against the Westerns, with
an average of 94.00.
Southerners hostile opening
fast bowler Anthony 'Tack'


Thompson headed the bowling
averages, taking 43 wickets at
7.46 each.
O utsta ending allrounder.
were Police skipper Ednlund
Lewis who finished third in the
batting averages (464 runs avg.
46.4) and second in the
bowling averages (4 1 wickets at
7.79 each).
Rudi Dean, of Carroll's
Adventurers finished fourth in
the batting (292 runs avg.
36.5) and took the most
wickets in the League (46 at
12.39 each).
Mention must be made of
Southerners young promising
wicketkeeper, James Peterson
18, who was awarded the prize
for the most outstanding
wicketkeeper for 1973.
Peterson possesses a natural
pair of wicketkeeping hands
and with his potential should
be of invaluable service to his


club in years to come.
HIGHI- ST INDIVIDUAL S'OR)i S
1. Yearwood (P'aradise) 126 n.().
v Westerns F. Lewis (Police) I10
n.o. v Paradise, I. Phillips (C"s
Adventurers) 101 O St Agnes R.
Dean (("s Adventurers) 107 v
Westerns \W. Kellman (Prison) 121 v
Westerns.
Ilighest Aggregrate of runs (;
Braithwaite (Prison) 478, avg.
34.28
BAI lINt(, AVI RA(I S I OR 1973


Yi'arsood ('aradise
'. I 'rguson (Southerners)
I I e 's (l'olice)
R. )ean ((' Adventurers)
*NO (l 1S 73
11OWl IN(; AVI RAG;lS 1()R 1973


A. lhosnpson (Southerners)
L.. Lewis (Police)
Francis Scott (St. Bernards)
(;. Shannon (St. Agnes)

t.. Yearwood (Paradise)


Most wickets Rudi Dean 46
wickets at avg. of 12.39.
FINAL LEAGUE TABLE
Pts
Southerners 65
St Bernards4
I'olice 39
St. Agnes 36
St Alhans 31
Paradise 30
Carrtll's Advs. 26
prisonn 25
\VWesternsi


I N.. R


0
46
94
78
106


282
293
464
292


R
321
327
308
357


t .S. AV(;

126* 94.00
72 58 6
110* 46.4
107 36.5


AV(;.
7.46
7.97
8.8
9.15


5 2 282 126* 94.00


SIN ORDER TO g6T INTO A 41W0150
PdWVN AT THE TOP OF THE SWINGS,
YOU HOULPD TAKE BACK THE CLUB
SLOWLY AND S l0WMV. THIS GiVESG
VOUR MUBCLcr 7Wm TTO WID UP
S PPOPERLY



POWER

POSITION


Smooth for power
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TMI CLUO DACK

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Wtt aributn


INK-SMEARED


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