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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03483
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: October 29, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03483

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l rtbunt


(R*gasered with Potmaster of Bahamas for postage concetons within the Bahamas.) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


Monday. October 29, 1973


$6.5 MILLION PMH BUILDING PROJECT

PLAGUED BY DIFFICULTIES, BUT--


Govt. signs


3 storey


hospital


extension to


Eve


Wing


By NICKI KELLY
The government today announced it has signed a contract for a $378,000 three-story extension to the Princess
Margaret Hospital Eye Wing, even though the main $6.5 million addition continues to be plagued by financial
difficulties.


Changing travel patterns


blamed for tourist decline
A CHANGE IN THE PATTERN OF TRAVEL over the past six
years has been blamed for the problems being experienced by the
Sonesta Beach Hotel and other such large resorts in Nassau.
Mr. David A. Johnson, responsible for the worsening
president of General Bahamian picture in the Bahamas.
Companies, told shareholders c n e r a I B a h a i a n
at the annual general meeting companies s holds a 45 per cent
T'Ihursday night that the jumbo shace in Leisure Time Ltd.
jet and big competition from owners of the trouble-plagued
IF urope were principally Sonesta.
The Sonesta's financial
SYMO ITE difficulties were one of the
topics receiving the greatest
attention at the meeting.
RITICE S GBC's 1973 annual report
revealed that the company
has written off its original $5
G BC POLICY million investment in the
Sonesta because, with its
GENERAL BAHAMIAN present capital structure, it
Companies' failure to promote was "most unlikely" the
Bahamians to senior positions hotel could be profitable in
in its affiliate enterprises has lor foreseeable future."
been criticized by outgoing In his report covering the
GBC board member Robert H. past six months Mr. Johnson
Symonette. said that at the time the
Mr. Symonette, who refused decision was made to build the
to stand for re-election at Sonesta, the hotel industry in
Thursday's annual general the Bahamas was "very, very
meeting of shareholders, made profitable."
his points shortly after Initially, after the necessary
adoption of the presidential commitments had been
report to shareholders. obtained, a bid of 515 million
Mr. Sy monette said he was made for the Nassau Beach
didn't believe he was unduly Hotel in preference to building
nationalistic, and it was no a new hotel.
secret he had been critical of "They turned us down
the governments's immigration because they said it wasn't
policy. Since, however, the enough money," Mr. Johnson
minutes of the present meeting told shareholders. A few
were likely to be a guide to months later the Nassau Beach
future directors, he felt that was sold for considerably
there must be some Bahamians more.
in such companies as Cole's WORSENED
and ABC who aspired to "At that ime we saw the
holding top positions in their figures and know that their
respective firms, profits were substantial. If we
It was evident in looking had only achieved 50 to 60 per
around the room, he said, that cent of their then profit we
all the top positions were held would have made a viable
by non-Bahanmians. company, but conditions
"We are rather a small group steadily worsened."
when we consider the number While the tendency was to
of shareholders in this country, blame the government for this,
On balance therefore, the new Mr. Johnson attributed the
board should be enjoined to situation to changing travel
see that people are brought on patterns.
to greater seniority in their lie said he had recently
owin companies," Mr. visited Spain and stayed in a
Symonette declared, hotel comparable to the
N[iW BOARD Sonesta for $20 a
The new board comprises day double including three
five re-elected directors: meals.
Senator Orville Turnquest. For the Sonesta merely to
Norman LeBlanc, majority break even and just pay the
shareholder in GB( and a interest it would have to charge
director of Bahamas $55 to $60 a day for a similar
commonwealthth Bank; Robert arrangement.
Albert, Paul S. Potter and The hotel's problems were
Richard Treco. further compounded by
New Bahamian directors are competition from other hotels
Cedric D. Russell and Franklyn in New Providence. None were
Wilson. showing a profit except for
The remaining four new those at Paradise Island, he
directors are E. Idward Barnes, said.
a Canadian, and Messrs. Arthur IMPROVEMENT
McZier, George A. Smythe and Mr. Johnson revealed that
Stanley Graze, all Americans. the Sonesta company wanted
It is understood that Mr. to put the hotel into
McZier, who has been actively liquidation, "but we felt we
associated with the federal should try and keep it open."
government's aid programme He gave as reasons the fact that
for minority businessmen, has the hotel employed a staff of
been named to succeed Mr. 450 and that it had been
David A. Johnson as the new indicated he Emerad Beach
president of GB(. Ilotel would also follow suit.
r. Jonson is ting "We were concerned about
Mr. Johnson is taking up a what this would do to (;B('
new appointment in Spain at an to th economy" e sa d.
p l -f f ---and to the economy," he said.
the end of the year. (;BC has now assumed the
( See story on Page 5) day to day management
responsibilities for the Sonesta.
Since then there had been an
CERAMIC overall improvement of about
$1 million, "but this still
ANIMAL doesn't make the company
profitable," Mr. Johnson said.
In answer to a question
lIIA MI T i from the floor, Mr. Johnson
NASSAU FREEPORT gave the overall occupancy
rate for the Sonesta as 62 to
65 per cent.


The latest hospital project seriously overLiicwded tfo
was disclosed hy Works v ears. trill have only an
Minister Simeon Bowe who enlai gd Onut Pa tient
said it was due for completion D)cpa;rllt nt and no additional
by September 1974. beds in the phase one
A Baha mas Information deve1pnlipmcnlt.
Services release said the NO I XPI.ANATION
contract was with guarantee e NI ,ikcr has failed to give
Builders. The air-conditioned an public explanation of the
building will have a steel frame delays surIrounding Phase one
with concrete floors and roof of the Imulti-million dollar
and will match the existing hospital e tension. And he
hospital buildings in maintained tins silence at the
appearance. recent Progress Liberal Party
The ground floor will Co('tcntiont Fsrecperrt.
accommodate a waiting area, 1TlI' \,inistcr'" onlv
receptionist, secretary's office, reference. to the hospital
examination room, blood relat-df to the rsiinaltion of
donor's room, laboratory, Chief of medical statt D). I). P.
recovery room, special room Duftf.
and supervisor's office. His departnlur had had little
On the second floor there adverse elect on the
will be the haemotology and functioning of the hospital's
serology laboratories, staff. Mr. Rker said.
supervisor's office, doctor's lie then dealt with the cost
office and plant room. of maintaining substitute
The third floor will comprise radio lo gists, since the
doctor's offices, three open departiirc of Dr. Richard
children's wards, two single Moaig 1, remtodelling of the
wards, treatment room. lai: r',i and a proposed
showers and toilets. .campaign against alcoholism.
HOW FUNDED? MP's QUESTIONS
The government statement Tlhe Ministr ( of lHealth
gave no indication how the has consistently refused It
latest extension was to he answer all question relating tl
funded, nor was there an\ the Pirincess Margarci
reference made to the extension.
three-story extension already In JIune this year I tl
in progress which is supposed position of the I hospital
to provide a new Out Patients e\iclsilon programme waS
and Casualty )Departnment. ,iLustioned in the Hllouse O
operating theatres and \scmibli\ ) (larence T"lnI
maternity ward. I p i C s ci tative Mic lha
The first extension was tI I ighlbturn.
have started in February iut Mr. l ilitbourn asked lh I
still at the ground level eight \l1stlci if the work on lth
months later. e\tension had come to an
SThe Tribune disclosed in aln11111 complete standst ill
September and it has neer because of lack of tuiIS. lie
been denied by Health Minister also wanted to klnow lo1
Loftus Roker that phase 11 much mone \had been pali tIh
calling for the maternity wing contractor to date and a lial
has now been scrubbed because the total cost of the prescnil
of a shortage of funds. phase of the extension w:is it
This means that the hospital, he.


100 mph tornado hits



Carmichael Road area

LITTLE Galen Saunders was upset that Hurricane Gilda didn't
pay him a visit 10 ten days ago, but after his experience early this
morning he's certain he doesn't want to see hurricanes any more.
Galen, 12, and his sister houses hit in that storing was
Sloan, 10, were two of 'Henry Mrs. Saunders' brother-in-law
Saunders' four children that who had his house cut in two.
were awakened at 5.20 this Mr. W. C. S. Allen, who
morning by a fierce banging of operates a service-centre on
their window awnings that (armichael Road. estimated
were screwed to the walls. that he lost about $3 to
"We were woken by this S4-thousand dollars worth of
terrible banging noise and banana and young citrus trees
rushing of wind." Galen's in the twister.
mother, Shirley, said today.
"We looked out and saw the
trees bending almost to the '
ground. The wind must have '4
been about 100 miles an hour.
It was really awful," she said. 3
The TV antenna was bent
right in two and the garage wall
was blown down by the force
of what is believed to have
been a tornado. Tree damage in i L.
the Carmichael Road area of
the twister, just a block away
from the Drive-In Theatre, has
been extensive and several
farmers in the area report their
crops badly damaged with
many trees rooted up.
JUST 4 MINUTES
Mrs. Saunders said the storm
lasted only about four minutes,
but it was a frightening four
minutes. So much so that
Galen, who was disappointed
Gilda never paid him a visit, "'
told his mother "Mummy, I '. -"*..-*
don't want to see hurricanes .
any more."
Some years ago a twister hit HENRY SAUNDERS,
the same area and did extensive a tornado passed through
damage to a chicken farm and and surrounding trees we
private houses. One of the Symonette.


r







SIGNING THE CONTRACT for extension to Princess Margaret Eye Wing block.
Seated, from left to right, Hon. Simeon Bowe, Minister of Works and Mr. H. Fowler of
Guarantee Builders. Standing are Mr. E. Patrick Erskine-Lindop, Permanent Secretary of
Ministry of Works; Mr. I. K. Taylor. Chief Quantity Surveyor; Mr. Calvin Cooper,
Director of Public Works; Mr. J. K. Goodhall, project Architect; Mr. H. Quintyn, Senior
Structural Engineer, and Mr. T. Davis ,Assistant Director of Building. Photo: Fred Maura.



TUC chief talks about 'enemies'



in Cabinet, yet seeks government



approval for 'agency shop' law

BY MIKE LOTHIAN
THE TRADE UNION CONGRESS, unable to get its resolution on proposed "agency shop"
legislation debated at the PLP convention earlier this month, is making a fresh bid for Government


approval of the measure through
But Mr. Grant said that
because of labour's "enemies"
in the Cabinet, he did not
know whether the proposal
which would require all
workers on a job site where a
union is the recognized
bargaining agent to pay union
dues would get Cabinet
approva'i.
It the proposal is rejected "I
lon' think it will improve our
relations any," Mr. Grant said.
In a press conference the
T UC president also commented
on the convention addresses of
Prime Minister L.O. Pindling,
Labour Minister Clifford L.
Darling and Tourism and
Aviation Minister CLement T.
Maynard, and discussed the
Government's and the
Progressive Liberal Party's
attitude to trade unions.
Mr. Grant told the press that
'lie TU(-sponsored resolution
never came to the floor of the
PLP's October 15-20
convention in Freeport simply
hecaue convention officials
allotted insufficient time for
resolutions. lie said he
understood there was a total
of 28 resolutions on the agenda
and that 18 of them, including
the agency shop resolution.
never came up for debate.
THROUGH CABINET'?
"The TUC' is planning nowe
to approach this from a
different level." Mr. Grant said,
"through Cabinet or the
Miniister of Labour.
'TIhe Minister was
intormnally advised that \e
would approach it through
him." The Minister has given
no indication of his ovn
feelings about the measure, he
said.
Mr. Grant pointed out that
in Mr. Darling's address at the
convention the Minister made
it clear that the work
of promoting stable industrial
relations is not just his, or the
Government's or the workers'
or the employers', but "ours."
In addition, he said, the







lIL


the Cabinet, TUC president Reg Grant revealed on Friday.


Minister had in the past invited
concerned persons, including
unions, to make suggestions,
and the TUC is taking him on
his word.
"I expect that Mr. Darling
will live up to his word." Mr.
Grant said, and that the TUC
proposal will be considered.
Whether it will pass the
Cabinet is another question.
"I believe we have got
people in the Cabinet who do
not believe in the principles of
trade unionism, like
everywhere else. There are
certain ministries which we feel
handle us with contempt."
lie would not name the
anti-labour ministries but said
the ministries which had
proved the most friendly were
I abour. Development and the
'rime Minister's Office.
"The Labour Minister has
been tairly good," he said.
"\\c'vc had our run-ins, but he
has been tairly good."
lie said Mr. Darling's speech
at the convention contained
"nothing new."
HAVE DOUBTS'
And while "it is good that
the Prime Minister now realizes
that the problem is very soon
going to stem from the
difference between the haves
and the have-nots." he said.
"we did not appreciate the
comment that there are 10.0(N0
jobs available. I have my
doubts about that."
Mr. Grant said the gCap
between the haves andi tlh
have-nots "is becoming imori
obvious inside the part\ than
out. You find certain members
who through their party
relations have become ver
well-off and have begun to
change their views about things
like trade unions. This mnay
not be true of the party as a
whole, but there is a
percentage where it is
becoming more and more
evident."
lie felt that Mr. Maynard
was "unfair" to comment on

,
-;.


..O .r .
"-~J
g.8--_ .




with his youngest son Nies, views the damage this morning after
h his property on Carmichael Road. A tool shed was flattened
re uprooted tearing down electric lines as they fell. Photo: Philip


r
n




















I
'S
e
e
Y
v
2l







It


Price: 15 Cents


3 ARMED


Si MEN RAID


$378,000


the dismissal of Bahamasair
pilot Perry Knowles when the
dismissal is the subject of an
unsettled dispute now in the
hands of the Labour Ministry.
Mr. Knowles was fired after
he ditched a $100,000 aircraft
in deep water off Andros
recently.
Mr. Maynard said at the
convention that he was
"'a'tjified" Knowles yas i'-e1
"for very good reasons."
Said Mr. Grant:
"Any conciliation officer is
now going to feel almost
obliged to rule in favour of the
Government, which isn't fair to
the union (Bahamas Airline
Pilots Association)."
FEAR
The TU(C president was of
the opinion that Government's
attitude of labour is one of
"fear.'
\1.i bc two years ago thei
looked on us as a group with
no particular power. Today
they fear us as becoming a
potential political force. It has
become obvious that they
recognize us as a force and have
called us for consultation on
certain ideas. There has been
some of this anti-labour
attitude, not from the
Government as a whole, but
from certain members of the
Government," he said.


Communications

to Bimini

all cut off
TELEGRAPHIC and
phone communication
between Bimini and the
outside has been completely
cut off following a house fire
at the island last night which
extensively damaged the
Bahamas Telecommunication
Corporation's aerial cable.
The cable provides service
between the tropo radio
station and the main office in
Bimini.
"BaTelCo is now
attempting, to contact the
BaTelCo manager at Bimini
to learn further details of the
damage," a spokesman told
The Tribune this afternoon.


Arson suspected

in $18,000 fire
ARSON is suspected in the
$18,000 fire which destroyed
the Shirley Street Karate
School Saturday night.
Police were called to the
scene at 9.45 p.m. and had the
blaze under control at 11.15
p.m.
It is understood the
one-story building, owned by
M. Lightbourne, was not
insured.
The Karate School, located
west of the Shirley Street, is
run by Donald Wright and Gus
Cartwright.


0DUDLEY'S


SYLVANIA TV's
P.O. BOX 5850 PHONE 2-1306/2-3237


VUL. LAA, NO. 28U


E IE'S DEPTH. STORE
EAST OF STOP-N-SHOP, BAY STREET

BIG SALE
POLYESTER CLOTH $4.- $5.
TERYLENE & MOHAIR $4.00


BARCLAYS,


TAKE $4,000
By NICKI KELLY
A YOUNG BAHAMIAN
banking officer putting in his
first day as substitute manager
of Barclays Robinson Road
branch, was held up by three
masked, armed men today and
robbed of an estimated S4,000
of the bank's money.
Twenty-one-year-old Jerome
Godfrey was posted to
Robinson Road to replace Mr.
Dudley Murphy, who was to
have started his three-week
vacation today. The bandits
armed with shotguns and a
cutlass, entered the bank
shortly after 11 a.m. while it
was raining. On the premises at
the time were Mr. Godfrey,
another male employee and
two customers.
"They said it was a holdup
and told us to get to one side,"
Mr. Godfrey told The Tribune
this afternoon.
He said the men appeared to
be in their early '20s but the
black stockings over their faces
made more specific identity
impossible.
WHITE IAVELIN
According to the bank
manager, the men then leapt
over the counter and helped
themselves to cash in the
teller's drawers. The money
was shovelled into a bag and
the three ran out of the bank
and into a waiting black and
white Javelin parked outside.
Employees were still
balancing the bank's books at 2
p.m. to determine the extent
of the losses.
Mr. Murphy, who was called
to the scene after the robbery,
said he thought the:, might be
about $4,000 missing, and
most of it appeared to be in
U.S. currency.
OTHER BANK
Robbery of the Barclays
Bank comes five days after two
armed, masked bandits raided
the Canadian Imperial Bank of
Commerce branch in Coconut
Grove and stole $2.500 in cash.
The robbers in that case
were also described as in their
'20s, wearing stocking masks
and carrying shotguns. The
Canadian Imperial Bank
robbery took place at 2.30
p.m., October 23.
The men made their getaway
in a white Triumph convertible
sports car which was found to
have been stolen and later
abandoned.

RAINS K.O.

130 'PHONES
THIS MORNING's heavy
rains knocked out 130
telephone subscribers in the
Chippingham area, a BaTelCo
spokesman said today.
lie said the Corporation was
trying to effect repairs as
quickly as possible to reduce
the inconvenience to its
customers.

MURDER TRIAL
THE TRIAL of Wendell
"Red" Burrows, 25, and Phillip
"Polka" Humes, 20, jointly
charged with the shooting of
Raymond Barry Major, 25, on
September 5, last year,
continued in the absence of the
jury today.
Trial within a trial
proceedings began Friday
afternoon with the objection
of defence counsels, Mr.
Lawrence Trenchard and
David Bethell to statements
made to police by Humes.
Mr. Bethell, counsel for
Humes, also applied for the
recall of prosecution witness
Anthony "Stick-a-Tone"
Conyers whom he accused of
making a statement to police
that differs from one produced
in court.
The jury were excused


'1 3


___


I I


OMEGA




M litir'. f


following the call of Sgt. Garth
Johnson to the witness stand
by Solicitor General Langton
Hilton.


I


clp










Sht Wribuntt


Mor


iday, October 29, 1973


THE LATEST Gallup poll
indicates Massachusetts
Senator Edward Kennedy
would be victorious in a
presidential race against
Governor Ronald Reagan of
California.

Guerrillas shot a detective
dead in Belfast their second
victim in a day in which
British troops also came
under rocket fire Earlier a
soldier was shot.

A bomb exploded in the
heart of London's financial
district shattering windows in
the neighbourhood but
causing no casualties.

A 13-YEAR-OLD boy was
feared trapped in a British
trawler that capsized and
sank two miles off England's
south coast.
THE GUYANA
Government has announced
increases in salaries and
allowance for the Prime
Minister, Deputy Prime
Minister, Ministers and other
Parliamentarians ranging from
pay hike of $580 for Prime
Minister Forbes Burnham to
$50 for backbenchers.
A CIRCUIT court judge in
Ocala, Fla. sentenced exotic
animal fancier Samuel
Seashole to 90 days in jail for
threatening a deputy sheriff
with his pet rattlesnake after
his car had been stopped in
the Ocala national forest.

AN ESTIMATED 100
people, including intellectuals
and workers, described as
oppositionists to Gen.
F anco's regime, were
detained by police when they
were to hold a meeting inside
a Barcelona church, according
to political sources.

THE FRENCH firm
Aquitaina Colombie will
invest about $3m in its oil
exploration programme in
Bogata Columbia according tb
a contract the company
signed with the state oil firm,
Cblombian Petroleum
Company (Ecopetrol).

A NEW local investment
capital growth fund was to be
launched by Jamaica Unit
Trust Services Limited today
it was announced in
Kingston.

ARTHUR Williams, 60.
former Parliamentary
Secretary in the Ministry of
Education under the previous
Jamaican Government has
been charged in Kingston
with bribery and corruption,
it was reported.

A JAPANESE expedition
has reached the 29,028-foot
summit of Mt. Everest in the
first-ever conquest of the
world's tallest peak in the
difficult Himalayan autumn
mountaineering season, the
Nepal Foreign Ministry
athounced today.
(Reportsfrom AP)


AFRICANS


FLOGGED

IN S.A.

BISHOP
DURBAN (AP) The
Anglican Bishop of
Damaraland in South West
Africa was quoted as saying
that scores of Ovambo
tribesmen have been publicly
flogged on orders of tribal
leaders appointed by the White
government of South Africa.
The Sunday Tribune, in a
dispatch from Windhoek,
quoted Bishop, Richard Wood
as saying that a White South
African official was present at
tribal hearing at which eight
male Black students were
ordered to receive 20 strokes
each and four female Black
students sentenced to six lashes
each.
Reports of flogging as part
of tribal justice have trickled
out of South West Africa for a
week.
The 350,000-member
Ovambo tribe comprises more
than 45 per cent of the
population of the disputed
territory and all of the flogging
are said to have taken place in
their homeland.
Bishop Wood said floggings
were administered for such
"crimes" as referring to South
West Africa as "Namibia."
the name by which it is
recognized at the United
Nations.
"It is impossible to say how
many people have been flogged
since it began. It runs into
more than 100 that I know of
possibly three or four
hundred," the clergyman was
quoted as saying. Neither
Bishop Wood nor White
officials in Windhoek could be
reached for comment on the
reports.
A State of Emergency has
been in force in Ovamboland
in the far north of South
West Africa since January
1972.
This followed wildcat strikes
by Blacks elsewhere in the
territory.
Thousands of Ovambos were
shipped back to their
homeland. Some wage
increases were granted.

POLICE

RAID

NUDISTS
HOBE SOUND, FLORIDA
(AP) Police using an airplane
for surveillance raided a weekly
gathering of nudists at a public
beach here and arrested 18
people yesterday.
Martin County Sheriff James
Holt said 12 men and six
women were ordered to put on
their clothes and march down
the beach to a group of
waiting patrol cars.
The 18 weie charged with
indecent exposure for bathing
nude at a U.S. wildlife beach,
he said.
Nudists from Palm Beach
and Broward Counties often
used the five-mile stretch of
public beach for gatherings.
Holt said he staged the raid
after a resident complained.


IMPEACHMENT 'YES'
CHICAGO (AP) People favoured impeachment 6 to 1.
answering a Chicago Sun-Times Almost 84 per cent, or
write-in poll overwhelmingly 7,010 of the 8,390 responses,
favoured the impeachment of voted "yes"for impeachment.
President Nixon. The Sun-Times reported that
The poll ballots were printed ballots returned after Nixon
in the newspaper last Tuesday, the controversial White House
Wednesday and Thursday, The he controversial White House
Wednesday and Thursday. The tapes to Judge John Sirica still
,response, reported in the favoured impeachment almost
newspaper's editions yesterday 6 to I.


I'


Cox:Tapes first step to important evidence


WASHINGTON


(AP) Former


Watergate Special Prosecutor
Archibald Cox said the presidential
tape recordings over which he was
fired "were clearly only a first step in
seeking a great deal of important
evidence from the White House"
Cox said that as part of an
investigation of campaign
contributions he would have sought
accounts of a meeting between
President Nixon and former
Agriculture Secretary Clifford Hardin


which dealt with milk pricing.
The White House has refused to
make such material available in
connection with a civil court suit
questioning a milk price hike granted
by Hardin soon after dairy interests
pledged $2 million for Nixon's 1972
campaign.
Alexander Haig, jr., Nixon's Chief
of Staff, would not say whether
accounts of the Hardin-Nixon meeting
would be made available to a new
Watergate prosecutor.


He said the question was
hypothetical because Cox had never
asked for that material.
Haig said he was "confident with a
reasonable degree of goodwill that all
of the information that the next
special prosecutor will require will be
made available to him in the form that
is necessary for him to conduct his
operation."
Cox appeared on the NBC television
show "Meet the Press." Haig appeared
on CBS' "Face the Nation."
Haig repeated that Cox was fired


Emergency supplies get


through to trapped a


not interrupt the delivery of
emergency supplies of food,
water and medicine to
Egyptian troops stranded on
the Sinai side ofthe Suez Canal.
Egyptian trucks with UN
drivers were delivering the
supplies for the Egyptian 3rd


By Associated Press


Oct. 20 as special prosecutor because
he "insisted on a carte blanche ahilit\
in the future to deniand further
presidential tapes and memoranda."
Cox said he had to say "no" to,
President Nixon's attempted tapes
compromise of Oct. 19 as soon as it
was said that as the price of gettinir an
account of the disputed White House
tapes, "I must abandon hli
fundamental of any impartial
investigation that I be free to seek
evidence wherever it was in alccordl
with the rules of law."


Sportscar

gunmen

snatrh


ISRAEL reported that its air
and ground forces shot down
three Egyptian helicopters over
the south west coast of the
Sinai peninsula today.
But it said the air battle did


j,000
URT (AP wo,)
ng two !.ist i-
do-like precision .
lnk station w\a. ,i
iiorning rusli- ,i' i;
today and sp 'it
a reported 1\i.
s more t Aiin1

n wagro ,.-s o:,'

sse State ('elit it
S l'resdiner I,:',
four im ck ru..'
rla tin r n
anld th ree bI ,'i.t
with hI ,i '-


of the station







lk iof :ti m it il i


ig t e c.i r. li'
o a sposrti .a' !
with .1 b1"1
0ot pi r t l.
ibers suicted'd 11:
pursuer in '
g traffic.
ay car biter \5\,0
garage Ieal'I it '

reinforced |(
began a ,


attack


to ac
there ale stolg
feai i ng thli0 t a
of StIlIh police,'
Ct. hIcad ti <:

reduction o ini
director (m.ei al
ma stated that "if
al coinsultait i\e
n adustiiint lii d
position m ta nd


BUENOS AIRES (AP)
Salvage ships, planes and
helicopters today continued
searching for 24 sailors missing
since their navy shio collided
with an Argentine freighter
yesterday and sank in the
narrow Punta Indio channel.
Fog shrouded the River
Plate estuary early today,
making the search difficult.
Coast guard sources
acknowledged they had little
hope of finding any of the
sailors alive.
The captain and 64
crewmen of the Navy ship
Ushuaia, were rescued shortly
after the collision with the


BRIDGETOWN (AP) -It
was a small but moving
ceremony when they laid
Millicent Alleyne to rest in St.
Barnabas churchyard in
Barbados last September 16.
The few mourning friends
and relatives knew the old lady
as "Aunt Millie."
There was just one problem.
Aunt Millie was still alive and
reasonably well at the district
hospital.
Leaving one troublesome
question: Whose body is in the
coffin? The authorities aren't
sure.
It was only last Thursday,


STARNBERG, GERMANY
(AP) Police said a
17-year-old youth with a
morbid fascination for the life
and death of Bavaria's King
Ludwig drowned himself at the
spot in Starnberg Lake where
the mad monarch died
mysteriously 86 years ago.
The youth, identified as
Erhard Schweigert, of
Augsburg, left a note saying, "I
want to be with my king. I
cannot stand separation from
him any longer. Only a few
moments separate us.
A farmer found Schweigert's
body floating in the lake
before Berg castle, where the
mad king spent his last night.
A cross marks' the spot
where the 40-year-old Ludwig
and his psychiatrist were found
drowned on June 13, 1886. It
has never been firmly
established whether the king's


merchant ship Rio Quinto.
They were taken aboard the
Rio Quinto, which had minor
damage and no casualties.
The collision occurred close
to the Punta Indio channel
sector where the British
merchant Royston Grange
burst into flames on May 11,
1972, after a crash with the
Liberian-registered tanker Tien
Chee.
None of the 74 passengers
and crew of the Royston
Grange survived.
Eight Chinese seamen of the
Tien Chee also died in the
accident, part of a series that
has made the River Plate a
graveyard of ships.


six weeks after the funeral,
that Aunt Millie's neice, Gladys
Alleyne, was told by a visitor
to the hospital that she had
seen and spoken to the
supposedly deceased old lady.
Gladys checked, and sure
enough, there was Aunt Millie,
as large as life
Meanwhile, the undertaker,
hospital authorities and health
officials are busy trying to
solve a riddle.
And Gladys Alleyne, just
out of curiosity, would like to
know whose funeral she
attended.


drowing was an accident,
suicide of murder.
Police said Schweigert's
room in Augsburg was crammed
with pictures of Ludwig as well
as with literature about the
monarch, who ruled from 1864
until he was deposed in 1886.

Workers riot
PORT ELIZABETH (AP) --
Eighty African workers rioted
over illicit liquor at a municipal
labour camp and two were
killed, four injured and 40
arrested, South African police
said.

Countdown
CAPE CANAVERAL (AP)
-The lengthy countdown is
under way for the Nov. 1.0
launch of the Skylab 3
astronatus on their journey to
America's first space station.


Clean-up-ocean men agree


LONDON (AP) An
international conference aimed
at cleaning up the oceans
agreed today to ban all toxic
discharges into the Black and
Baltic seas.
Prohibition against dumping
in the Mediterranean was still
being discussed because
geographical and ecological
conditions are different in this
major landlocked sea,
conference sources said.
The marine pollution
conference, sponsored by the
U.N. Intergovernmental
Maritime Consultative
Organization, also agreed in
principle to establish four
categories of liquid substances
which are to be limited or
banned altogether.
The recommendations
were worked out in techincal
committees by experts and
conference delegates, who are


to ban
from the world's major
seafaring nations.
The conference will vote on
the recommendations in
plenary meetings this week.
Major changes are not
expected.
The conference opened
Oct. 8 and ends Friday.
Substances banned from
discharge into the two seas
include "noxious liquid
substances which ... would
present a major hazard to
either marine resources or
human health or cause serious
harm to amenities or other
legitimate uses of the sea and
therefore justify the
application of stringent
antipollution measures."
This category is made up of
13 substances, including


cyanides, phosphorus, carbon
disulphide and others
considered lethal to marine
vegetation and marine and
human life.

Their residues would have to
be diluted and discharged in
special reception areas under
special conditions, according to
the conference proposal.
Substances in the other
three categories, which could
be harmful under certain
conditions to marine and
human health but harmless in
small concentrations, could be
discharged at sea under special
limitations.
All discharges, however,
would have to be made at least
12 nautical miles from the
nearest land and the depth of
the sea would have to be at
least 25 meters, the
committees said.


Army to the west bank of the
canal, an Israeli spokesman
said.
They were being loaded
there on Egyptian barges and
boats that were carrying them
to the troops trapped on the
east bank.
The spokesman said the
supplies were being ferried
from a part of the town of
Suez, at the southern end of
the canal, that is still
controlled by the Egyptians.
"It is going slowly because
they do not have enough boats,
we believe," the spokesman
said.
The International Red Cross
Committee in Geneva
announced that Israel was
refusing to let Red Cross trucks
with medical supplies pass
through its lines to the
Egyptian 3rd Army as long as
Egypt and Syria refused to
supply lists of the Israelis they
captured in the war.
But this deadlock apparently
had no bearing on the other
supply operations.
In Beirut, it was reported
the United States and the
Soviet Union have proposed
the formation of a Palestinian
state to solve the Middle East
crisis, said the authoritative
Beirut newspaper An Nahar.
The paper did not say where
it obtained the information,
reporting only that the
U.S.-Soviet peace plan had
been communicated to
Egyptian President Sadat.
Palestinian guerrillas have

Pilot

dies

in crash
KINGSTON (AP) An
American was killed and
another hospitalized when a
Cessna aircraft of foreign
registration crashed into the
sea off Puerto Seco aristrip in
Trelawny. a north coast parish.
yesterday.
James Wallace Dell, 32. of
dort Lauderdale, Florida, was
killed. David Johns, 34, was
injured.
The crash occurred in the
area of the airstrip owned and
operated by the Kaiser
Bauxite Company in the
Discovery Bay area.
A group of fishermen heard
a plane roaring, then saw it fall
and hit honey comb
rock, which borders the sea,
and b-reak into three parts
ending up in the sea where it
sank.
The fishermen went to help
but by the time they cut the
pilot free he had died.
Johns was pulled from the
sea and put aboard a boat by
the fishermen. He was then
taken to a hospital suffering
multiple injuries.
Identification papers showed
Dell was an instructor and
connected with Skytel
Aviation, Inc. He was a
qualified member of the
Aircraft Owners and Pilots
Association.


2-2188/9k


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On Wheels REMEMBER, WE ARE A
Equipted For Icemaker '1 FULLY AUTHORIZED
Available In Colours SERVICE STATION
FULL WARRANTY SERVICE STATION.
10% CASH DISCOUHI
AMERICA'S NUMBER ONE MAJOR APPLIANCE VALUE

GEOFFREY JONES & CO., LTE

Cr. Rosetta & Montgomery Sts. Phone 2-2188-9


INK-SMEAREDI


rmy $82(
consistently opposed the FRANKFU
formation of a separate
Palestinian state that does not gunmen usi!
include the whole of what is nd command
now Israel, with Jews and held up a ba
Arabs living on equal terms. during the n
At the United Nations it was in Frankllrt
reported about 30 countries away with
are willing or able to millionark
contribute troops to the new $826,000.
UN buffer force for the Middle nle station
East. of three car,,
And Secretary-General Kurt from the lte
Waldheim is trying to draw up Bank to the
a list acceptable to Egypt, headquarters.
Israel and the 15 members of rankfurt s
the Security Council. station.
Soviet ambassador Jacob The driver
Malik nominated employees
Czechoslovakia, Hungary and unharined
Rumania tPolice saiiil
Poland, and Rumania Pcut in front
volunteered for the force. nt
But US ambassador John wa gon. the
Scali objected to any countries transport con
from the Soviet bloc. He said to a halt out
both Warsaw Pact and North ank.

countries should be barred ibacdIin
That rule would knock out d then' br
five other potential sources an then for
Belgium, the Netherlands, opie the bat
Italy, Denmark and Norway, wago' where
all NATO members plus the stored in twi
Philippines and Thailand satchel.
should the ban be extended to Abandoni
the southeast Asia treaty gunmen ran
organization. sped away
employee in ht
Two other countries that But the rob
have offered contingents evading their
antagonized Egypt or Israel heavy morning
while serving in the 1956-67 The getaw
U.N. emergency force. Egypt found in a
would probably not approve robbery scene
Canada's participation and Police.
Israel would oppose helicopters,
Yugoslavia's. a nt
manhunt.

Governments


unwillingness
ROME (AP) The U.N. and said "t
Food and Agriculture grounds for
Organization (FAO) today continuation
criticized "the persistent could. in fa"
unwillingness" of governments wars.
to take international action to In an int
ensure the world's food supply report. FAO
would not be at the mercy of Addeke Boert
weather, interaction
The organization also machinery ol
cautioned against restrictive been in
national policies that could lead
to "trade wars" and further
aggravate the delicate balance
between food and people to
feed.
FAO, in a report to be
submitted to its governing
conference next month,
acknowledge the right of all
nations to take national
measures.
But it also said: "...when the
measures employed to attain W
(national) goals interfere with
other countries' pursuit of
their own goals, national T
adjustment policies become a
matter of international
concern." N(
It contended national
trade policies have become
more aggressive in recent years


CALLTHE


r JONES


BOYS


Search goes on


for missing sailors


Aunt Millie's alive-and buried


YOUTH DROWNS AT

MAD KING DEATH SPOT


01)RA G'S





fE HAVE MOVED!


3 MARKET STREET

NORTH OF LARRY'S


_ _--- __ __ -. __ -- I _1 __ __ __ _,_ _._. __ ----


----


Soldiers

seize

university

building
\ON l VIDI)10 (AP) The
1t 'i nm1 ent has officially
taken control of the University
o tihe Republic for the first
lin,' since it was founded in

PIrecidenT Jtan Bordaberry,
v,hose on, l solid backing is
ili the i' armed forces, decreed
ihe i s lcrvcntion after soldiers
.'Il police sei/ed the
uni\>'r,,isys central building
,,it I s 10 iils Saturday.
I he security forces occupied
ll, Ilull isiiy premises after a
s ,IilL1en was killed by a bomb
i' i' ,*r t ilsl\ k was making.
I li. (;otellin ent claimed
t!ii i po'lie search disclosed
AIn !I aI l. I lllammunition
S:i I s is'ale thie university as
]' ,is lirge amount s of
\ it ,; i ;s i [I.' 1l literature "
Ii' !;\ rmi entl also
i C ; ; I1 d Dc Rn Sam!it:
Ii 'n.'l' .':i i mld ot Ist of ti he

t' i i M11 in sister Nestor
I: 'i -.Il l i \ w ill he tried
ii. i, ii~ t i ir allegedly
S h .;' i 1 i eisit into "a
',i i\l i1 \la st agitation and


S as the last
i tII f opposition
Siho' !.'gm l Bordaberry
v .Sti i'l dictatorial
i i ....' i .1 2 .'sI closing
i'i kis .111i, e popularly
'.eit.',. l',i.i .'l\ i'rlnv n llents.
i r ,' silent :ilso imposed
'i .n 0isliip on the news
imdi i. liii il the activities of
Pl;" .i11 pAil1is 5and on June 30
i.: l Ih i it0 ()00 strong
r *. !: ,:-. s led N a t ional
S It I i, : )iii! of Workers,
wh }l 1, tuck in opposition
it -o ti of congress.


Ca rib bean

talks
I'I)P I ()1 I'P.lN (AP)
1 'itis i Iin Jamaica,
\iiti'i .i Hliibado ,s. (;uyana. St.
\'i n IIt nd St. Lucia are
,itcd 1i ,attend a conference
It ih (,ilthean Association
1t Ih'hiii C Health Inspectors
s I IL'hdled Io ,)pen here today.


(ed over


t on food
I,, > >t, nin te!, hl e ditlficulties of
i I~,l l,, ld have never
i c, hlied their present
dilelsions "


Trpia

Ixerinaor











Monday, October 29, 1973


0hP U0ribune
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. II. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903. 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH. O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.I).
Publisher/Editor 1917-19 72
Contributing Editor 1972 -
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972 -
Published Daily Monday to Saturday
Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.

Monday, October 29, 1973


By ITII \\1 DUIUCH
BOSTON, O(CTOBER 19th. A piopaganda effort by the
P.I..P. governlmlIenlt tio discredit me with meivt inlbes tof the Intel
American Press Association has reacted against thlem.c
This elolrt has served only to ctnfirii ftor members to this
powerful newspaper oigaiii/ation the lact that the governnient
ihas lriid to intimidate this newspaper. Our resistance 1o this
eftlult has earned for us respect. and, iln many cases, openly
expressed adt iin action of ltle fil i stand we hiiave ] aketn.
Yil know ... tlhe menii \o now control the destiny of t' tie
aillaiianl people aret' not o nll irliiliiall bui hl tiles are painfully
stupid irn just about ieve' thing tlie\ t do.
I ;an salln blecausl tihe lfutu re omf tihe islands depends
completely ioni lie iabstlac asset ol co1fidence ;itantd g Ioodw'ill. Adll
inow ... e'ver n a hlaige inlm estl ini tIhe Ilhahalli s whruo has tlled hard to.
helIp tile islaiinds riccently admitted thialt tie nation's reputation
hadi di pped to /Ctil in ithe maikels it thie wortd.

I ,I ittdels of tl iis c'oluin nninl to indelstand what I aitu wlitinn
ahouilt I inurstl icoiunt evnts "concc ninic' Tli T'ribilune since I left
llic Balltni ,tias m11 c lit tt day Septc'iI bci I tli, e\actll 13 montihst

'l u ii o w cll call tile fatre\well article I wrIote oin tliat occasionl. It
as thCien inu ilcnte tiIon to settl;llIc tuieitlt on a fan I planned toi
ht\ in I nglaild.
I \\,as tiempled Ito close down The Trihbun anld forget about it
hut I could lint over ilook lhe claim membilersa of imy stafl iiantl
,t wmli have c ten' with us for 20 lto 45 -ears hlad lil uis otoi
llit l pi tcclrinii.
I ili,, ictl as' i I decided i) sell lt' ; 'ribunl e, I didn't want tto
t n11 l \ \ilin Ilus cot,11liu in bccausl e I would ihavte It tell the ti t th
...- intl hd l liUni l would sii el i te unpleasaTlnt.
I lk ,kcd liti l nid I i II h \l wc ii I !ell \ Iwult t t ionly bl e ti
Ia->sci lle It Bahamin bui \\iho would also m1iinitaillIn a wholesomein
elatioiship with c l in stall. I mfounid tie right people iin an old
la iiin l bankers, inl Virginia wiot hadii owned ai chain ofl
newspapers s i l 'hce gcene lt'ioiu. Tlie inembers of rthe family
lic\ ti Nassiau to see s mand I canl back to Nassau from i rt al
(,ihble it miel tihemi. 'The weic Iinc people. The\ wvcei great'\
lnllpiessced willti utlll IIopet lion i almi we ,v tlc iicp pared ito, w ite a
chiltue on m tl e spot but \Se advised lthemi to c tlea i id c' deal t 'ui, h it
Mi. Pnindlinig ist. And so the\ we til se Mi Pindin.il ;. At their
s.a iie time tlh\ asked us 1 to alvisse themi n l tl h'i imnvestel ntlls
tlile\ might ilakc in the I am: s.
Ihet seemed pleased with ithei interview with MI. Pindlindi
alt wentl back hto Viir ilian tot w ille ai priopoi silion tol til
ovcrrllnient ii m li t inlg tlliei l plans for The Trihb ne.
1 lit'\ sen ai c.i pi t us,. It wa\ s proposal thal t I thought tIhe
'i.'\r Illiiell would welcome. As tfr as I kniow. Mi. Pindlind li has
nvet i replied to tIhese people.
1M\ dlaugI ie. C MI. 'Ca loio ailso ws, tnlt si t ee M 1 indlliiv ; ithal .
Ilrime. Slih nl a \ ,lheCa it' a s it h itt iimpiession tliat lie was reason able.
Bult whlies the Vi IL'iiat peoi plate diu(iu 't ear liona m Mi Pii ngdinl. Mi Nl
(iCanon weiint back t(o see him. lhe siripll told her Ilihen that his
,\t niiientcI had decided lnoll allow all\ fluoreign interests to
pcilte i nicwsptapci in th ilel i ahais. i e seemed to forget thie fai ct
thal bnlli '/ (Guardian and T1i' I'''reep')tl .N'sciri el'
AInIcit iii ln- i t'wIIed
IclIe \was ;a sitl ain i wliis h ihc h tt gItoverinmentIll iielused Ito Iallow
is t lo ni iCg ri clti ipci l stafll t maiaailitn i ttie hic,1h slandald
icaclicd bhy this l iank.lii/alin m and at lhie samllie lim, refused Ito
allow us lo sell to an i l .meic'a cIolpalny thial had thle facilities inu
t i c U.S. t nni na ing lBalhi anl is i o eventually till all lie places int
tle oii ga i/ lon l.
And while talking abuitl not walNing foreigners to ownm
newspapelst in thle Bahalias th'>ey were then and still are lnow
extenidingI plii',itgcs and adtvanltages toI llte tloeigni-ownI. Ied
;ardiiatin that liiave been denied to tlie Bahaliani-ot ned T'ribln'.
* '* * 4: *
I mwondeied at lt tuie sle wlitclher Ihic decision ofth le LgovrciiirnenIt
nol to alhlmw s to sell Ti'e Tribu-ne was based on fear of tthe
pouisshi i l at so l iin e oi t i nin .lilt g with a powerful Amiericani
tii u/alon i l o i a dc,, d iic to tcliih llhis iinwc paper lo lit e points
i\\hee \\e would sell it oti a songti to a member of llheii Squarei
Deal ( lub. Ilis is soiiieIhiini I wouldnC never do, l' cotuise.
Soon aftei his,; tlie head of a highly re spuonsible Bahamii!n i
coilmpan ll e\pi'sscd a desic to bhu\ 7'Ie Tribune. \We agreed to
sell. Atli .lagile 'g onl l!te truns this nil ailsno ( .sx i to see M t.
Puitdling. When lit' lalei pithonetd to sui\ thai tlhe dal was off. -we
kinew lt hn ithatl tie go ciniieni i had no inileilion t allowing ustis
to sell tlo a ii'sponsible pelson w\vo would not lowitem thie standards,
o1 honest and inmtepindenc l ourilnalislm tiha we had maitaiained ill
lhins Ine spapi e.
And sou we settled down th o cainrVing on T77e Tr'ibune as lonin is
possible. his. lof course., mea l that 1 \\uild continue to write
lhlls cotnllliImIi.
Tins also nieanill IhIa I woumild haie lo ahbandon miy deslne ito
setlle chdown quitcll oni a nlruin in I niglaiiid ... and so my linth is
nwun divided between Miami a tlite Ca(.man ltsl I'ids is!ih
t-occasional shlil business visits to Nassau.
Sincet all lius ihas happened andi especially iiCe lhet'
disappointing iperfounnance iof lhe I .N.M. I ihave hIid
deletalions comie to see uite in ('uial (abihlts. These people wanti
iiie back in ltli iahaiutas. The\ feel tihat there is a witlespread
awakening .among l the people llhie\ want ai leader tion whiom lihev
feel they c'an depend. They say they was l mre.
Billu I have ntude it cheai lthal il is ioo late nsow. ThIe dacmaie i'has
slrnk too dteeip . t l tcaep thit nio hulrtman power c'touild curle it at
lhins slage. I pointed out tihat you can desntoy a houtise and lebiil l
il. But when \oui destloy he huin an iiiaind as Ihas been doneic in
thie Bahiamais only a long ipe'lldtl of hardship can restore sanity
hl i people.
This fact is illustrated in thie experience of Arigentina.
Peron destioyed thal pitospeilous couiiltril. lie was dir iven outu
hy i he p'teople over 20 years ago. Nt one Ihas heen able to iepai
theI damage. Peroni has been iecalled to head thle countnlr. And
now lie will piubnably be destroyedt ... because ie will Iail ltoo.
* ***** **


Ai Board of I)irectors ileetling ofi the I.A.P.A. was held inn
Montiiego Bay, Jamaica. in Aplil this year. Some of the members
of the Board urged mlle to attllend. I had lot heen to Jamaica for a
long time. I wanted lo check up on conditions in the island since
it became indeprenldenll andl I tliouighit this was a goodtl
opportunity.
In Jamaica I was called onll to make a report on the situation tof


Phe Xribunt


I Ic Pri 's in Ilie lBaliam as.
I kin thal what I nIust say would no hbe good Io tihe
llinuitnl s. I asked itl I cmild Imiake ain I' ii'i. -record report and was
It .ld ini b,'ai;Cse a ll the rmeetingit s were open ti tile newspapers and
wliail I said mightl he published in blith local and foreign
ii e wspapets.
And so I had no cliice. T1he people ol the Bahallias had freely
Sectccd thleici governllelt. Theil iVer-lllrent hlad ddlibeately ...
ailid see-llingly with a spilfuil purpose ... created the conditions
Oil which I vwi oild he obliged to make an thon es!t statement.
T his I did. And Imy remarks were published in Jamlaican and
I[ .S. iit v\\si.ap1C s..

I lie tgoverilment realized that their spiitefl behaviour had
re.acied seriously\ against them in the world press. They felt the
intedC It try and(l discredit what I had said.
And so theC dug uip an article I wrote before they got control
Io tle goverinuientl in which I advised against Ioreign interests
bcing allowed to contil tIhe coniunuinications media in the
Bialiamus. They icpinted imy article in their newspaper 1The
P I'c ple in an etforlt t label ime as a hypocrite.

I spil:.d that cltlrt by pointing out tht tis question noi
Ik llge aiose because two iof the three newspapers in the Bahamas
weei already (owned by foreigners ... and I emphasized the fact
lhit Ione ot these folreignll owned newspapers had been given
if, oiirabllc treatment by the government treatment that had
been denied thie Bahali ailn-lowned Tribune.
AI the same lime I revealed that I had had plans tto give a
riiillion dollars to education in the Bahanias in thie forin of a
science labhoiator, in Nassau andsclholars!'ips at the University of
A iainli. St. Johnl's Inive sity in Minnesota and St. Donlat's College
in Wales. And I produced evidence to prove that this was not idle
talk.
It migitll interest ur readers to know that Dr. Milton Coplan,
wvio peiforined a maior operation on lme at Dl)ctors Hospital in
lMi:nii in 19060. had talked mlie into including thie University of
liamni in llt plans. Since these plans to help Bahamian children
lizive fallen thimgllh because of tihe action of the Bahamas
g velinlliilent he has asked rie to donate a room in a major
i tllensioln that is being made at D[octors hospital. This I will doh.

I told \mi somteie Imonuths ago that I had received a letter from
tlie Associate 'Publisher iof ioe of Almerica's major newspapers,
eCxplcssilnr appiecialion iI r Iimy writing ability and also adiiriation
Ik hI the colirag we have shown in carrying on the fight for
hilonrstl in phhlic afl'!tirs despite all tlie obstacles we have been
obliced Io 1:.ce. ile concluded by saying that a less dedicated
peirsUon woild have givenn up long ago. 1le, then urged me to attend
I itis ieetlinc in i tsio ,ii.
I\v w islrded at tlih time what had primipted this letter.

A 1 _w weeks ago I received a two paragraph note Irom this
ant 1I i lhad seen irl\ name oil thle list of members who would be
at this mieeing. lie \\ wanted me to know that lie was pleased., it
tlie second paiagiaph lire said lie presumed I had seen a circular
letter sent out 1)\ the Office of Inforimation in Nassau about mylily
st atetilceit in Jamaica to which was attached a copy of the article
I had \wlllien ahibii I foreign ownership of newspapers in the
B.ailualizis.
lie enclosed a copy of the letter, signed h ('yril Stevenson, as
\ ell as tlie copy oif iLv article.
This was the fist time I had heard about it. And so I ploned
imy \ilc in Nassau to) bring rite clippings of i>my articles in whichli I
lha.d rebutted tlie attack by The I'Popil' and I sent this to him. I
askcd hIini whether the Stevenson letter had been widely
circulated anid. if so. how could I arrange for a similar circulation
tlirougli tile I.A.P.A. office.
When I saw him later lie said that I had knocked over all their
pi toipa'aiiiida.
"The\ don't have a leg it stand oii.'" le said. But h liedidn't
kniow horwl far this material lhad been circulated and hows I could
al ranll e a similar circulation.

was fiinklv concerned thliat they should get away with thern

hlt I didn't l ]have lone to waitt.
lie l i on te telageItnda after tlie ciontfereince w5as opened
ri Molday iimominr called for reports in Freedom of the Press inl
areas represented hy l members. FIach country l makes its iown
re poll.
Tomti Slieinan. Managing Iditoi of The nc'eaner, Jalimaica,
ni;ikcs lite report lr the entire British Commionwealthi countries
in lthe (Caiibbean. Included in tlis group are thie Bahamas and
Be11 ritilua.
TI is is a satisfactory arrangement because only The (Gleic'r
and 7he Tribune are members of I.A.P.A.
At tl1ese meetings Shleiman makes the report for all the islands
anld lien calls on me to iake the e report for the Bahamas. I had
in tended only to say thial my' statement in Jamaica had probably
lhad some effect because last month. for the first timie in over five
years lhe government had agreed to allow us to bring in two mncn
fril England. iOne iof these meni had already joined the staff ;ald
another was on llhe way.
Al last I would be able to sao something favourable about the
government in its dealings witlih lhe Tribune.
before I reached thlie microphone one of the members raised
the ilquiestion tof thie Stevenson letter. And I was glad because rnow
the situation was out in the open and I could spike this piece of
gio veliilet propagail da.
I tllci tlhei thie whole sto\r .
As sooun as I gott back to iri seal a member of tlhe Board of
Diiectoirs caine across lo me. le wanted to know whether Robert
Ve'sco owned any part of the press in the Bahaimas. I told himn
Ittit when tlhe Vesco interests took over Butler's Bank tihev got
\vi thi it 20 percent of The (G;unrdian '\ stock and that 70 percent of
it was held by JIohni Perry in Mianii Beach. Pen'rr\ hid bctn a
newspaper mail but hlie hias sold all his newspapers in inAmerica.


Successful heart


Ily MARY KI-LLY
STH WO() Il ART
operations wetre situccetss,,fu and
the children are doing nicely in
the intensive Care unit."
reported Ir. Janies R. Jude as
he returned to Miamini yesterday
afternoon following a busy
weekend in Nassau lor the Sir
Victor Sasstoon ( Bahanras)
Heart Foundation.
lie two heart operations
took place Friday morning in
the operating theatre at
Princess Margaret Hospital. Ihe
surgery> was performed Iby Dr.
J u d c a p r o r i r l t
'Cardcoavascular surgeon ftromn
Miami, assisted by I)r S. Rudra
and i )r \. I'l rchak. Chiet of
Surgery for PIt1 1 Dr. I arl
IFarringlon, rctuirncd tto \assau
specially for lthe surgical event
Io be dn observer. I wo ss\-,car
old children were recipients oft
the liheart surgery IFannii I can
.Jos'eph of HIatc I t I iic Ba .
I'leutihera and I rrtel Butler of
Sears Rioad Nassati.
HIire type strger perlirimcd
is known as a I'D .\ (p itent
d lctis arteri sis). in opt iriaiton
petltorliti'd onl the c outer
chainl r t o the t heart. It I-, not
open hiacrt sI u li ery\ ai thin s m
d11 lictull iand senlious op0rhtrtl l itrc
requires i iiiuthi mort e el.hoiralte
qLuipi lent. suchI as tlie hli rt
Ilud Iting .\ -pass ni clicin,. as
tll i a d tei oitd doctor', wtinl
art lspe c all tr'it Cd i fr 1tit11
delic ate ope)acira tion. It h
Princciess Mararret HospIr ta! is
notr mquippet Cd tor open ihart

I ) wever, it was )r. Jude
iwho ad\vocatled pertl-orini
mnore minor heart opetrationts t
PMIl in order to lcsrn tlhe
financial load oni tie heart
foundation. iue was convinced
the PMI1 surgical staff could
handle such cases and canie to
SNassautl last January to perltorm
the first heart operations on

Harbour. Abaco.
Ill.RF AI' IRMU'R
\ patent (duct ts airleriosis
means the child is getltn too
nuch blood to the heart causing
it to work overtinec il the
punlpiilg of thC blood and
creating a leart murs i lietr the
detect is not c orrccted at tan
eall\ age it cal result in seriLous
d inaget to ilh' heart curtailing
normal growth and activity\ to
the patient and il some cases
could ultimately end in
death. Once repaired the
child can then lead a more
normal life and in most cases
does not have to face any
further surgery as he grows
older.
I)Dr Jude reported that both
patients operated on Friday
morning were considered
rolutine cases and the surgery
should have corrected the
defect, n l'he children uwill sta
in the intensive care unit 1 iort 7
hours and thenn. .1. .o ;
regular hospil al carb e Sor
another week, they will be able
to return home.
For the ne\t si\ to eight
weeks strict attention is paid to
their recuperation and then
gradually the child returns to
Snornial activity.
The need foI-r sur gery on
hoth children was confirmed at
the annual children's clinic last
March, sponsored by The Sir
Victor Sassoon (Bahamas)
Heart Foundation. Although
more than a do/en cases
requiring surgery were
confirmed at the clinic (he rest
ot them were serious enough to
have to be scheduled in Miami,

Jackson Menor.' H hospital
I'lhe children's heart clinic in


March was conducted by Dr
Francisco Hlernandc/ Director
ctf Pediatric (Cadofluogy at the
National Children's Hospital in
Miaini. Assisting hin w.is tDr
Jude and Dr \lauide StCevenlson.
pediatrician at nthe I'itncticss
Margaret Hlospitla
On Saturday Dr tlldc was
joined h Dr. Ra.nin I\enga
troIn St. Iranll is hII il i
Miami tuo tttiittttc I atn adults


surgery

clinic at the P'nicess Margaret
lHouspital. It v.s, organized bs
Dr (ecil B.-thti 1! th te PMit
s',tat a'isist c \ )Dr Jothn
Lunni adndiI I; TI, tent (',ulinlb
It v1' ,-. i11i.;: t (i l 2t, 'c:S
WCl IC1t i L i h 'l aI


I'oi i it ,: !he i ,
tile oitiut I nI e s not
daitomIatltedl, i c t! Ito the


at PMH

uniu ia tin, iit lhe operations
ri' ,ini ; n I trii the specialists'
d i.i ,-is. (Cases needing
l.i -. i Iasstisiit C ale rt'ferred
t, i Assi., ilc ('onlllIiittee
!i i 111 investigation
ih i r',i ucire t onl if
l it .ir it s available
it:i. c t.. niuli. o t -ni is
rc'suitt iif tint
cii .. ris it' I nulI of tile
cli n ltin: and cases
Page6 Col. 6


Godet Jewellery

The only jewellery shop where all repairs on

watches or jewellery are made on our premises.


LOCATED ON GEORGE ST.


OPEN 9-5 MON-SAT


Now \\ lie owns only his stock in The Giurdian. and the l'retie)rt
.\ c *is.
Illis tmuan shook his hiead anid \ went awavy.
Ilie first nmai wiho hiad i;lised the question on the Steveinson
lete tli hen colmmlented tlhat the gCoverlllllment \iwas t beli
coilldelined for refusing to allow mtie to sell to foreign iiintests
It t t liat lie also disagreed with miV attitude on foreign r\ownereship.
I then went back to ithe nmicrotphone. I pointed out that this
qeicslion not longer arose as tlleie cwas, already\ a Iforeigin owned
operation in tile Bahamillas. I went onl to justify miy earlier at itude
lo\,vardcs Iforeigni ownership on ite grounds that a foreigner could
int, possibly be free ill the Bahamas. I pointed oiit
tlihl lliis Ifact was proven iin 100ti when the government made a
serious move in the House of' Assembly to pass a Bill that w, would
int imlidate the press and effectively suppress freedom of speech in
tIhe islands. I successfully Itfo ht land wo\ln this issue with i'
active support of the I\.A.P.A. On this issue that \was so vital to
preIss I'Iredomli, Thie (Guardiaun had condemned Ime and sided with
lhe gove rniinict!
I pointed out that tlhe situation is clear today because ithe
lo reigr-owined (;iuardiirtir is favuried by the h government and is
giv\- rights and privileges denied to The Tribune.
Since radio and TV have recently become allied with I.A.P.A..
I took this opportunity to report on the manner in which the
government abuses its control of ZNS in the Bahamas.

This wasall ... at least I thought so.
But the man who raised this issue put another question to ine.
Didn't I think that Lord Thomson of Fleet would be an asset to
Page 4 Col. 4


II ~ ___ __ ___~ _ ._ ---- -- -


If you win' up in de lion jaw

cause ya can't

hold ya tongue...








"Don't r1 -over .

Veup Y SAri


the ship!"




.BLENDED


_ __


_ I_ _I _Y__ _ ~ ___ __ _ __ _~_~ I__~~_~__ __ __ __










Monday, October 29, 1973


iDewt-A6b




Unless you're trained


don't keep a loaded gun

By Abigail Van Buren
c 1973 b Chicaoe Tribuoe-N. Y. NewS Syi., Inc.
DEAR ABBY: You recently advised a storekeeper
against keeping a loaded gun under the counter in order to
protect himself against possible robbers. Why?
In Switzerland every citizen is required by law to keep
a gun in his home, and they have one of the lowest rates of
homicide and armed robbery in the world! M.C. IN VA.
DEAR M.C. I advised the storekeeper against keeping
a loaded gun under his counter for "protection." because
his wife stated that he had never fired a gun in his life. I
repeat the advice.
You are correct about Switzerland. But their unique
situation requires some clarification. Switzerland has no
standing army-theirs is purely a citizens' army. Every
physically and mentally fit Swiss male is required to take
military training when he reaches the age of 20. He also
must take a refresher course annually until he is 50. Mean-
while, he keeps his guns and ammunition at home.
If you are suggesting that perhaps if every American
had a gun in his home, it would reduce the national inci-
dence of homicide and robbery, I would remind you that
unless one is well trained in the use of firearms, he is
better off without them.

DEAR ABBY: Just a moment, please. What does "Be-
wildered Grandma" mean, saying her granddaughter looks
like "a little old lady from the hills of Tennessee," because
she wears her hair pulled back straight in a bun, no make-
up whatsoever, and funny little wire-rimmed glasses?
What gives people the impression that we people in
Tennessee are a bunch of ignorant hillbillies who still use
outhouses, go barefoot, marry at age 11 and do nothing but
drink moonshine all day?
Tennessee is a beautiful state, and Tennesseans are the
most hospitable, considerate and compassionate people in
this country! PROUD IN KINGSPORT
D)EAR PROLD: Bravo' Now. let's hear it from The
Jackson Sun:

DEAR ABBY A "bewildered grandma" complains be-
cause her beautiful 22-year-old granddaughter doesn't wear
a drop of makeup, and doesn't go in for fancy hairstyles
and up-to-the-minute fashions. I should be so lucky with my
17-year-old daughter.
She is a naturally beautiful girl, with big brown eyes, a
flawless complexion and a gorgeous smile, but every morn-
ing she piles the makeup on so thick she looks unreal. I
never know from one day to the next whether her eyelids
will be blue, green, purple or brown.
I am waiting for the day my daughter grows up, and
realizes, as "Bewildered's" granddaughter has, that the
more natural a girl looks the more beautiful she is.
JEALOUS IN JACKSON, TENN.

DEAR ABBY: Tell that old lady who bumrap1,ed the
folks in Tennessee she doesn't know what she's talking
about. The state of Tennessee has got to be the greatest
because Elvis Presley was born here.
LOVES ELVIS IN MEMPHIS
DEAR LOVES: Sorry, but Elvis was born in Tupelo,
Miss.








RESIDENT MANAGER
FOR FREEPORT APARTMENT
'' Hi ESiD.lNT MA\NAGER required for Freeport
r>p.i'n t CormEplrex. Applicanrts rmst be Bahamian, over
:',i ,r., ild and mechanically inclined Must have previous
r'n, ,) ."' l t experience ,,nd bo capable of directing staff
a,1 n rll tl inini g the a' ..I, .ij records. Salary offered is
ne1iqtiabi and based or previous experience. Use of
apa'tmni 's provided as well. Qualified applicants to send
pll(e ~cr t if ate, summary of educational background and
wri hiitory employment and personal references to:
PERSONNEL MANAGER. P.O. BOX I 2950, FREEPORT.
U-.-


. IT ALL ADDS UP


reusable but unwanted

items of

clothing, tools,

appliances, clocks,

is, etc. . clear out

sets, garage, storeroom ..

all can be of help

to someone else.

Donate them to



andilands#I

Bazaar 1
OSETTA STREET
DOORS WEST OF


MONTROSE AVE


NATIONAL SAMPLE

SURVEY STARTS

NOVEMBER 5
lTIF DEPARTMENT of
Statistics has announced that it
will conduct a Bahamas
National Sample Survey during
the two-week period beginning
Novemberr 5 under the authority
,it section S ( )t of the
Statistics Act.
I lie information on
cI -plo iyent, unemployment,
income and expenditure
gathered in this survey will be
used primarily to make
sitlirates o f national iCnCOlme
and Gross National Product
a id to supply Ngoverniment,
'iLslnesses, trade unions and
other groups with badly
ni cedl e'd in fornlation for
planning and decision-making
ntd tol provide data required
under Article 73 c) of the
I united Nations (Charter to
Shltch the Bahamas as an
Indeperldenlt nation subscribes.
"It is. therefore, of
d.idaralitin ul i importance that
those househo lds involved
io-operate tully with the
c umerator whli en called
ili)OI,-." a release t ront the
department said.
I'his sure y which is
separate and apart tfrom the
Census of Industry also being
conducted, will consist of
households chosen at random
on new Providence, Grand
Bahama. Andros. Abaco,
I leuthera. Long Island, ('at
Island and I\ixui a.
i he total number of
h(fuseholds chosen at random
will be approximately 1000,
and from the information
obtained from these
1 o u seh ol ds, statistical
estimates will be made for the
whole Commonwealth.
"All information given by
households or individuals to
the departmentt of Statistics
will bie kept in the strictest
onfiLdniicc a:nd will not be
disclosed to any unauthorized
person or persons. or other
!iverimenirt' department. or
published in such a manner as
to identify the particulars with
0ny person or household. This
onf identiality is guaranteed
under Section 13 of the
Statistics Act," the release
continued.
''Householders are,
therefore, urged to assist the
I)epartment of Statistics in this
important survey by giving
their full cooperation to the
enumeratorr who will be calling
on them during the period of
tihe survey which commences
November 5" the release said.

'ELECTION DAY'

FOR FACULTY AT

ST. AUGUSTINE'S
ON FRII)AY, the students
of St Augustine's C'ollege
enjoyed a free day from
school but it was iimore than
Sorthwhile for it was
"Teachers' Reflecton Day" for
the faculty and religious of
Saint \ eiiL r' in. .'s.
The "'l)ay". planned and
corrainated by the Religioi
I)epartment. wa., set aside to
deal with fundamental
questions and needs of
education and society, with
special emphasis on the process
of education at St.
Augustine's:
What does it mean to be a
('hristian institution? What
should tie the expectation of
teachers and parents as far as
the contribution of Sairt
Augustine's being a ('Cristian
educational institution? What
is a Bahamian student'? What is
the Bahanmian society'? What
are the needs of Saint
Augustine's students in terms
ol student and community


needs'? These were some of the
questions dealt with by the
faculty.
The conference was opened
by Fr Elias Achatz, O.S.B..
Prior of St. A igistine's
Monastrv. followed by a talk
on the meaning of what it is to
be a (hristian, by Mr. Vincent
Smiles. religious teacher at the
college.
Fhle main address was by
Father Preston Moss on "The
Responsibility of St.
Augustine's College to the
Bahamian Society from the
Viewpoint of an Outsider",
after which there was a
question and discussion period.

COME TO NEW YORK

Dressmaking & Design
Factory Machine
I raining Available
I)a.s i ves. or Sundays
LOW TUTION
i-oreign Students Accepted
Send For 1-20 IForm
LEAI DESIIIAClltENY
11 i. Church Avenue
Brooklyn
New York 11218. U.S.A.


EDITORIAL

Stevenson letter backfires at IAPA

From Page 3
journalism in the Bahamas?
And then I revealed a fact I have never told even Bahamian
readers.
I told the meeting that I was a close friend of Roy Thomson. I
said that Nassau was the first place Roy Thomson came over 30
years ago when he first left Canada on a crusade of buying
newspapers. He thought he had bought The Guardian and he also
wanted The Tribune. I refused to sell. Later he found he had been
double-crossed on the Guardian deal. He had paid out his money
but he found that he didn't get control. This made him still more
anxious to buy The Tribune.
Since then Lord Thomson has become one of the greatest
figures in world journalism. We have continued to be warm
friends. He continued to be interested in buying The Tribune. I
promised him that if I ever decided to sell the paper I would give
him the first refusal.
When I decided to sell I sent him a telegram. He flew to Nassau
to see me. He liked the operation. He wanted it. But he said that
he had been advised not to put any money in the Bahamas. He
said he wouldn't touch the Bahamas under the conditions that
exist in the islands today. It was after this that we made contact
with the people in Virginia.
The reaction at this meeting was absolute. On all sides men and
women held out their hands to congratulate me on the stand I
had taken.
1 will report just two or three of the comments.
Many of the members from Central and South America do not
speak English but the speeches at the meetings are translated for
them. These men became conscious of me for the first time.
The next day one of them came up to me, held my hand, and
managed to stumble out the word "Congratulations". I gathered
later that this was the only English word he knew. He must have
practised it because he wanted to let me know how he felt.
Stan Swinton is the Deputy General Manager of the Associated
Press, one of the largest news distributing organizations in the
world.
"Etienne," he said, taking me aside, "I want to tell you that
you are the most courageous person I know. You and your family
are what newspapers are made of. Tell Eileen and Roger."
Stan Swinton is the man in A.P. who carries on negotiations for
his company all over the world. He deals with kings and princes,
presidents and dictators. He has just completed 15 days of
negotiations with the government of Moscow. And so his opinion
really means something.
Al Dix of Ohio is the senior member of a family who owns
nine dailies and three weekly newspapers in the U.S. I mention
him because this is a remarkable family. There are five brothers
and they have four sons. They are all involved in this family
operation and each one heads his own newspaper. One of them is
vice president of IAPA.
"I got one of those letters," he told me.
Page 6 Col 6


Planned Savings

with the Commerce.Together

we'll make beautiful things happen.


There's always something beautiful
worth saving for. The day you become
engaged, for example. Whatever the occasion,
you'll find that Planned Savings can work for
you.
Each payday, why not put part of what you
earn into a Commerce Savings Account?


Soon, you'll have saved the money you need
for that special occasion. We help your
money grow by adding interest regularly.
That's why we say, "You and the Commerce.
Together we're both stronger".


- CANADIAN IMPERIAL
BANK OF COMMERCE


You and the Commerce.

Together we're both stronger.


INK -SMEAREDI


bth Qrtbtmi


IA


WINES


AND LIQUOR



THURSDAY Ist.NOVEMBER

FRIDAY 2nd. NOVEMBER


Open 9.00 a.m. to 6.00p.m.




SATURDAY 3rd. NOVEMBER

Open 9.00a.m. to 12noon






BUTLER



& SANDS

GRAND BAHAMA

DOWNTOWN STORE (Opposite Savoy Building)
QUEEN'S HIGHWAY WAREHOUSE
WESTEND VILLAGE
r 10


your


fan


your cio


S


R
TWO


I 111 11 1 1111 11


-- -- - - ---- i












Monday, October 29, 1973


Bhr Irtbmbtt


Six new directors join GBC board


DAVID A. Johnson. who
Thursday evening announced
his resignation as president and
chairman of the board of
directors of General Bahamian
Companies Limited, Friday
welcomed tlie election of six
new directors to thie company 's
bbard at Thursday's annual
general n eeti ng of


shareholders
"As I explained to members
of (BC( at our .... i i,,i I
intend to remain on the board
in nim present capacity until
mny suciicessor as president tias
been lound. Meanwhile. I
look forward to contiinine
to work with the other five
direct tors whlo were re-elected


REMOVAL NOTICE

McCARTNEY/ THOMPSON CO. LTD.
CUSTOMS BROKERS & SHIPPING AGENTS

Have MOVI1I) their ()0FI( S lo their Premises
on ('III.SAPI AKl R()OAl).
PYI ROM'S 1)1\L-IOP\llI N.

Their Telephone Numbers are 2-8272 and 2-8151





NOTICE



The Office of DR. GLORIA AGEEB is now
located on the Corner of 4th Terrace East -
Vanderpool Building. Phone 5-9746.


with me on Ilhursda iand I
welcome the strengthen in ol
our board through the \\ id
experience and speciaih/ed
expertise our six new directors
bring with them "
Containing. Mr. Johnsonr
stated: "I shall be very sorr'. to
leave the Bahamas. hut I have
been ofItered and 1 have
accepted atn extremely
ij.llile Ii ,'. and interesting job
as chief executive oPic'er of a
very large leal estate
development n :t np.':. In
Spai n.""
R! -I I I I)
Re-elected directors are
Senator Orville Ttlrnquest,
Norman P. LeBlanc. Robert
Albert, Paul S. Potter and
Richard Treco. New Bahamianr
directors ire Cedric D. Russell,
who has e'nived a highlN
successful business career ini
Nassau and Frankly Wilson a
chartered accountant and
inember ot parliament tfo.
(rant s Town. Tlhe others
include three distinguished
United States citi/en's and a
Canadian with over 30 i ears ol
financial experience.
E. Edward Barnes. a
(anadian, studied it tihe
University of London. ('its ol
London College and largorg,
University. Iei is a member ot
the (Chartered Institute i,!
Secretaries and a hiarteretd


SALB


accountant After service as a
flight lieutenant in the Royal
\ir Force from 1941 to 1945,
Mr. Barnes became a director
and vice-president, finance, of
companies in London, Chicago,
New York and Toronto. From
1961 to 1964 he was director
and general manager of
Mercantile Trust Company,
Mercantile Realty and Victoria
Sloldings and consultant to The
Mercantile Bank of Canada.
For five years after that Mr.
Barnes served as managing
director of North America
Irust companyy in Montreal,
anid in addition to a number of
other directorships he is now
pies dent of Security Capital
Corporation Limited. Toronto,
and of Barnes. Graham and
A ssoc iates i m i te d,
m anage IIment consultants.
Security capital l holds the
majority of shares of GBC.
Arthur McZier, who gained a
bachelor of science and
commerce degree at Loyola
L nirersity, Chicago, lives
presently in Washington, D.C.,
wh~re lie directs a national
programme designed to create
a viable minority business
colnmmunityt. Through Mr.
IMcZler's creative and
innovative efforts a programme
hi.i evolved that in 1972
provided over a quarter of a
million dollars to minority
concerns iiI the U.S. In
addition to his other duties,
Mr. McZier is a lecturer and
marketing expert Mr. McZier's
acceptance of election to the
<;H(' board is subject to
counsel's clearance in the
tlnited States.
Mr. George A. Smythe,
whose home is in Chicago. was
awarded degrees in finance and
business administrations by
Northwestern University after
which he became the senior
partner in a firm of
manilagelment consultants which
bore his name. From 1962
until thie present he has served
as president and chief
e Xe c ltlV e officer of
Intercontlrentual Import and
Export ('C.. Inc., of Chicago.
Mr Simynthl is treasurer of the
(' h i rca o1 con om ic
Development C'orp.. a director
of Friends of the Chicago
Public library and the Chicago
F in ancial Development
(Crorporation. ie is also a
rmeribci of the Chicago
associationn of Commerce
and Industry, the American
M,1 ,nagel cent Association,
Illinois Wholesale Liquor
Deli),drs Association and the
W inc .and Spirits Wholesalers of
rrc'irica.
Stanley Graze, an American
now rIesident in the Bahamas, is
,. professional economist with a
iiin.sler's degree in that field
.i a ed by Columbia
'linsirisity liHe has spent the
.ist I 7 years in the investment
iild in oth )l an advisory and
p or i folo in aag e Inent
.i:lpait\ While in Nassau,
\Mr (;i./e has acted as advisor
o)n hoth investment and
in marige ment problems to
several Bahamian companies.
"It Is apparent from their
bhikgroundis." Mr Johnson
,co:nilented, "that these
vcnlemeneii will bring to (BC's
board .a wealth of financial and
business krInow ledge, which
co1biihiiled with the experience
;nid capabilities of the
i elected board members,
sli' ,ld Lcertainly ensure :t bright
; J ll'-sp 'rrou- future ftor the
I Ii 'i' l of (;enc ral
Hahamian 'C omtIpanies."

SOMETHING

NEW IN

HOLIDAYS
S()II1 I'IIIN new has been
d.hded to a Bahamas vacation.
l-'sildes the traditional sand,
sc.: .. I. siunr. tihe Bahaml as is
now ,i i' linle experience"
dor those p. '!'', who may wish
to explore '''"firent ideas
under relaxed .-onditions
enger'ndered be sw\va;i palms


dii w\arrning suni
It s c.ll. Sun 'n Ideas"
,', :, organized bl' Flmrot
I Onlis limited oin behalf of
John r Fisher International
I cisure Inc. who created the
I \\eek holiday of seminars
that originate out of Toronto
hbegriniiig November 23.
Holiday packages are for a
one week's stay at the Beach
Inn or at the Ocean ('lub,
Paradise I island.
F.ia.h week daily hour-long
lectures will be given by
outstanding intellectuals and
acadeniicians. The theory
behind Fisher's project is that
thinking people might like a
beach holiday but get a little
bored with just frying their
brain in the sun day after day,"
a release from the Bahamas
Tourist News Bureau said.
However, the week also
includes scuba diving, fishing
and sailing and a variety of
other activities.


BARCLAYS STAFF TRAINING CHIEF
DEPUTY GENERAL Cayman Islands, Belize and office in London is anxious
MANAGER (STAFF) of Turks and Caicos Islands, and that every opportunity is
Barclays Bank International Mr. Robert Maclean, manager made available to staff at its
Limited, head office, of the Bay and Dunmore training centres in Nassau,
London, Mr. Stanley G. Lane Branch. Jamaica and the United
Holliman, M.C. left is Mr. Holliman was in Kingdom, to gain the
pictured on his recent visit to Nassau to study and discuss necessary experience and
Nassau at tth bank's training the bank's programme for qualifications to carry them
centre. With him are Mr. training Bahamians for posts to the top of the ladder in
Hugh Sands, staff manager at all levels with Barclays in banking," a release said
for Barclays in the Bahamas, the Bahamas. "Barclays head today.

THEATRE STAFF JOIN HOTELUNION


LABOUR MINISTER
Clifford Darling on Wednesday
determined that the Hotel and
Catering Workers' Union is
entitled to recognition as
bargaining agent for the
non-management employees of
Theatres of Nassau, Limited.
Theatres of Nassau operate
the Shirley Street, Wulff Road,
Capitol and Savoy theatres. A
company spokesman said
today that the company's staff,
including management totals
85.
The union applied to
Theatres of Nassau general
manager Elmer Hecht for
recognition as bargaining agent
on April 4 last year, and the
application was rejected
shortly after. The dispute was
referred to the Labour
Ministry.


Yesterday, a year and a halt
after the application was made,
the union received a letter
from the Minister.
The letter read:
"Whereas the Bahamas Hotel
and Catering Workers Union
petitioned to be recogised as
the collective bargaining agent
for workers employed by
Theatres of Nassau Limited;
"Whereas management of
Theatres of Nassau Limited
have not accepted that
petition:
"And whereas I am satisfied
that the Bahamas Hotel and
Catering Workers' Union
should be the bargaining agent
for workers in the aforesaid
bargaining unit;
"Now therefore, in exercise
of the powers in that behalf as
vested in me under Section 40


THIS EVENING?

Tonight, when you are rested and relaxed, how about
coming around to The Toogood Studio for a Christmas
Portrait that will delight you! We're here to welcome
you between 8 and 10 every evening and we know you'll
like our cool, waterfront studio at East Bay Street.
(R.S.V.P.) 5-4641


Vat 69 and ginger
is a cnry adult drink.
People say you actually
taste the Scotch.
SAfter all, isn't that what
drinking whisky is for

YAIAT 69
ssJ_


of the Industrial Relations Act,
1970, I do hereby determine
that the Bahamas Hotel and
Catering Workers Union is
entitled to be recognized as the
bargaining agent for workers
employed in the bargaining
unit of Theatres of Nassau
from the date hereof and to be
the said bargaining agent
subject to the terms and
conditions of the Industrial
Relations Act, 1970."
The letter was dated
October 24.


DELTEC

DECLARES

DIVIDEND
DELTEC INTERNATIONAL
LIMITED announced Saturday
the initiation of quarterly
dividend payments on its
ordinary shares with the
declaration of the dividend of
$0.10 per share payable on
December 5, to shareholders of
record at the close of business
on November 16.
Deltec International Limited
is principally engaged in
investment and merchant
banking and offers an extensive
range of financial services in
selected developing countries
in the western hemisphere,
Europe and Asia.

FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157



ABBEY

INTENATIONA


FUND












$10.23
Offered Price
As Of
Friday 19th Oct. 1973


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 1973
IN THE SUPREME COURT No. 35.
Equity Side

IN THE MATTER of ALL THAT Piece
Parcel or Tract of Land situate on Prince
Charles Drive, 225 Feet West of Fox Hill
Road in the Eastern District of the Island
of New Providence.

AND IN THE MATTER of the Quieting
Titles Act, 1959.

AND IN THE MATTER of the Petition of
IRENE WILLIAMS.



NOTICE

TO: The Heirs and Assigns of ROBERT
SANDILANDS.
The Petition of IRENE WILLIAMS in respect
of:

ALL THAT Piece Parcel or Tract of Land
situated in the Eastern District of the Island of
New Providence aforesaid containing
by admeasurements Two and One Hundred and
Forty Nine thousandths (2.149) acres bounded
on the NORTH by a Public Road known as
Prince Charles Drive on the EAST by land the
property of Blanco Bleach, Vincent Mortimer
and various land owners on the SOUTH by land
said to be the property of one Richard Sweeting,
and on the WEST by land the property of Walter
Rolle.
Irene Williams, the Petitioner, claims to be the
owner in fee simple absolute in possession of the
said Piece Parcel or Tract of Land and has made
application to the Supreme Court of The
Commonwealth Of The Bahamas under Section 3
of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have her title to
the said Piece Parcel or Tract of Land investigated
and the nature and extent thereof determined and
declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by
the Court in accordance with the provisions of the
Act.
Copies of the said plan may be inspected during
normal office hours at the following places: -
(1) The Registry of the Supreme Court, Public
Square in the City of Nassau.
(2) The Chambers of CHARLES BARNWELL,
ESQ.. Shirley Street/Collins Avenue in the
City of Nassau, aforesaid, Attorney for the
Petitioner.
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN that any person
having dower or a right to dower or an adverse
claim or claims not recognized in the Petition shall
on or before the 30th day of November A.D. 1973,
file in the Supreme Court in the City of Nassau
aforesaid and serve on the Petitioner or the
undersigned a statement of his claim in the
prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith. Failure of any such person to file and
serve a statement of his claim on or before the said
30th day of November A.D. 1973, shall operate as
a bar to such claim.
CHARLES BARNWELL,
Attorney for the Petitioner,
Chambers,
Shirley Street/Collins Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.












Ghr iribunp


Monday, October 29, 1973


CLASSIFIED


SECTION


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS-FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV.-,TELEPHONE 21986 EXT. 5


C12213
NOTICE is hereby given that
JOHN HAROLD BAIN of
Culmers Alley off Kemp Road
is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
22nd day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship P.
O. Box N7147, Nassau.

C12235
NOTICE is hereby given that
GERHART MELZER of
Treasure Cay, Abaco
(Albernarle Way) is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why naturalisation should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
22nd day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau

C 12334
NOTICE is hereby given that
JULITA OLECCIA CLARKE
of Minnie Street, Nassau,
Bahamas is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 29th day of October,
1973, to The Minsiter
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. O. Box N7147,
Nassau.

C12354
NOTICE is hereby given that
LINDEN ALEXANDER
BROWN of Poinciana Avenue,
Nassau is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
foi registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 29th day of October,
1973, to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. O. Box N7147,
Nassau.

C12333
NOTICE is hereby given that
WILLIAM ALEXANDER
CLARKE of Minnie Street,
Nassau. Bahamas ispplying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 29th day of October,
1973, to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. O. Box N7147,
Nassau.

C12350
NOTICE is hereby given that
VICTORIA LOUISE
HENDFIELD of Second Street
The Grove. P. O. Box 682.
Nassau, Bahamas is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship.
to, registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why fegist ation should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 29th day of October,
1973. to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. O. Box N7147,
Nassau.

C12352
NOTICE is hereby given that
RICHARD ALEXANDER
WILLIAMS of Palm Ave.,
Nassau is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be


granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 29th day of October,
1973, to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. O. Box N7147,
Nassau.


C12351
NOTICE is hereby given that
MARION LOUISE SIMMONS
of Palm Avenue, Nassau is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
29th day of October, 1973, to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147. Nassau.


mOm C REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


C12048
BUY A LOT
in EASTWOOD or
WINTON MEADOWS
Call Frank Carey
at 27667 or 24815
Frank Carey Real Estate
Box N4764
Bay & Deveaux Sts.

C12115
$75 DEPOSIT gives use of
private lake & beach rights. All
utilities underground. 70 x 100
lots from $5800. NO
INTEREST. Tremendous
savings. Call Rutherford at
4-1141 or Morley & O'Brien at
2-3027 or 2-4148 or come to
YAMACRAW BEACH MODEL
HOME any afternoon.

C12272
PAY A LITTLE and get a lot
at Bill's Real Estate $75.00
down and $80.00 per month
with no interest is your easy
way to purchase a large lot
with underground utilities.
beach rights a private fake and
many other facilities. For
appointment and information
call 23921.
C12331
RESIDENTIAL lot in Village
Green off Village Road, 100 x
100 Ft. $10,000.00 Phone
4-2113.

C12273
BILL'S REAL ESTATE
AGENCY LIMITED offers
good buys in residential arid
commercial lots, acreage,
houses, commercial buildings
and attractive beach property'
Whatever your requirements,
may be whether buying or
selling call us at 23921 For
prompt dependable .I-fl
efficient service.

C12330
EASTERN ROAD
COMPLETELY furnished 2
storey home on the sea with 3
double bedrooms, 3 baths, two
living/dining rooms, 2 patios,
etc. Beautiful view of the sea
$150,000.00 Phone 4-2113.

C12358
FOR SALE
BY OWNER
2 BEDROOM HOUSE fully
furnished, wall to wall
carpeting, large patio, Johnson
Terrace $30,000. ALSO lot
Imperial Park 80 x 100 only
$5,500.00. Phone 51905 days
42463 after 6 p.m.

FOR SALE
C12296
LOT 18 BI. 13 SOUTH
BEACH ESTATES 60 by 110.
Only $3,800.00 LONG
ISLAND 1,614 Acres ideal
for development Particulars
upon inquiry. 7.14 acres
Carmichael Road with four
bedroom house-plus apartment
plus Sauna Bath. Asking
$75,000 00. FOWLER
STREET short distance from
-Bay. 2,300 sq. ft. space, used
as Laundry, warehousing,
offices can be used as
display, super market, discount
store. Only $45,000.00.
MURPHYVILLE have 3
bedroorns, 2 baths, nicely
furnished enclosed grounds,
car porte. only $38,000.00.
HAWKINS HILL 2 storey, 3
bedrooms enclosed spacious
grounds, only $?5,000.00. See
Anytime. DIAL DAMIANOS,
DAMIANOS REALTY
COMPANY 22033, 22305,
even gs 41197


FOR RENT


ONE EXTRA LARGE two
bedrooms two bath,
apartirment. With large living
and dining all basically
furnished Victoria Court
APARTMENTS on Elizabett-
Avenue between .hirley and
Bay Street. Facilities. phone
laundry, parking, T. L.
l' itr .i i : ,' ltiu 'ne Phionr
5'.i 1 bot .een 8 3 . arid 5


C 117/ 1
,AY STR F T Store for rent .us
of Oct.-.ber i'.th. Fon
mnfor ratiun call .-3170.

C12214
F U R N I SHE D AN D
A I RCON DITI ONE ED 2
bedroom, 1 bedroom and
Efficiency y aoartmen ts
Telephone 5-8134


C12286
2 BEDROOM unfurnished
apartment ariconditioned
upstairs over Mae's Beauty
Salon East Street South. Phone
3-5350

C11763
COTTAGES and Ipartmen;s
daily, weekly nr monthly
airconditioned, fully furnished,
maid serivee available. Lovely
gardens and sv/ir3nming pool.
Telephone 31297, 310.93.


C 12288
OFFICE FORMERLY
occupied by The Imperial Life
Assurance Company of Canada
for rent on Collins Avenue.
Approximately 1,700 square
feet of airconditioned space
with parking facilities for ten
cars. For information kindly
phone Mr. Seifert, telephone
59619.


C12282
FULLY furnished 2 bedroom
apartment Boyd Subdivision,
Churchill Avenue. $210 per
month. Call 35906.
C12164
WHY PAY MORE TO SLEEP'
Polhemus Gardens Motel. $20
weekly and lup. Phone 35380
Chippingham.

C12348
BEAUTIFUL 3 bedroom 212
bath house. Fully furnished.
Large garden. $500. Call 32556
anytime.

CARS FOR SALE
C12251
1971 DODGE AVENGER, 4
door, automatic. $1095.00.
Phone John Cash. 2-2768 dys,
3 1397 evenings'weekends.

C12205
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD.
P.O. BOX N-640
NASSAU BAHAMAS
USED CARS
1970 HILLMAN HUNTER 1
Dr. Auto. White $850
1968 JAVELIN A/C $995
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA 2 Dr.
Auto. Green $1450
1971 FORD CAPRI Auto.
BlIeC $1695
1970 CHEVELLE SS A/C 2
Dr Red $2600
1968 VAUXHALL VICTOR
$6OO
1969 PLYMOUTH
SATELLITE $1300
1969 PONTIAC GTO A/C
Vinyl Red $2600
1971 FORD PINTO Brown
Vinyl Auto. $1995
1971 VAUXHALL VICTOR 4
Dr. Std. White $1295
1967 MERCURY COUGAR
Std. Green $900
1969 AUSTIN 1100 4 Dr. Std.
Green $995
1970 FIAT 124 4 Dr. Std.
White $600
1968 BUICK ELECTRA White
$1595
1969 VOLKSWAGEN Green
$1250
Trade-ins Welcomed
Located Oakes Field
Opposite the Ice House
Telephone 3-4636-7-8

C12259
1968 MUSTANG
CONVERTIBLE, automatic,
air conditioning, $825.00.
Phone days 28733, evenings
42060, Mr. Franklin.

C12355

MOTOR CENTRE LIMITED
WE HAVE THE USED CAR
FOR YOU

1970 CHEVY MALIBU A/T
P'S radio W/W tyres in very
good condition at ONLY
$2.300.00

1972 CHEVY NOVA A/C A/T
P/S P'B radio W/W tyres
O.N.O. in pcifect condition at
ONLY $3.700.00

1972 AMERICAN MOTORS
HORNET A;C P/S radio W/W
tvres O.N.O. with low mileage
your, for ONLY $3,500.00.

1970 FORD CAPRI G.T. New
paint work mag wheels, radio
W/W tvres at ONLY $1.500.00

1969 CHEVY MALIBU Bucket
seats, radio A/T P/B new paint
work at ONLY $1,900.00
1969 MORRIS OXFORD S/W
S/T at ONLY $450.00
1972 CHEVY IMPALA 4-door
hard top vinyl roof, radio P/S
P/B A/T W/W tyres the perfect
taxi for you at ONLY
$4,900.00
1969 RAMBLER AMERICAN
S/W radio P/S at ONLY
$1,350.00

1972 TRIUMPH 2000 radio
P/S very low mileage O.N.O.
W/W tyres A/T like new at
ONLY $4,400.00

1969 PLYMOUTH
BARRACUDA bucket seat
console shift W/W tyres radio
A/C at ONLY $1,700.00

MOTOR CENTRE Ltd.,
Thompson Boulevard
Opposite Davis Street
P. O. Box N-3741
Phone 5-6739


FOR SALE
C12140
OFFICE FURNITURE
rDesks. sivel armn chairs
sccretarv chairs, office tables,
NCR accounting machine.
Contact 2 7491-2-3 from 9 to
4:30.

C117'63
THE RAPID RESULTS
COLLEGE
World-famous postal
tuition for the GC.E,
School Cert. ahd
Accountancy, Banking,
Law. Marketing, Company
Secretaryship Examinat-
ions. For details of our
specialised courses write
for FREE copy of YOIUR
CAREER to The Rapid
Results College Dept TNI
Tuition House London
London SF19 4DS.


SNASSAU


BUSINESS 5 PROFESSIONAL





Save Time


SHOP

BY


PHONE

I lst In This Dloctory

I LIne PhrMooth '!o'


SCall21986 EXI. 5

2 Line Pe Month '10!'


'> SAE 1IM SIIV MO[j Y


lIm


FLOOR A T ANTENAN- BOOK STORE
Rug (Cleaniing & Inst;illaitii l ih. lirtrtin ItIu n Slhop s ,744
1 1 ii,, i rt1 5 v is,15 7 ; 1
I 1I. bRkGLLtS i't:' :T. 'L0 I. .
'a tlin's 2 -31 I hi, \\ r,i trlobe \a,ick,-e\ S St 5 55,

DEPT. STORES TRA\ L
Iixies's Dept. Storer 2 3173 ai\ tirs 2 2931 i 7
John's ltept St.rrre 2 I35o 1. II. ( urr\ & Id 2-,)S 7
R.DIO & 1.\. SA IIS MI Sl
carter's s Recoirds 24711 o1 "'n c Ri Lt rds 2 8500

OPTICIANS IIHE.\L H FOOD ,
Optical Servic-e Ltd 2- 3 10/1 NH Na I s. I ir Stir' 54S),

SPORT SHOP CAMERAS
('hI.mpuI i SpI ir I rid 2 ] ;I1 2 ,1li Bull 2 4; 2 3
SHOE STRE so)IY (ti),)'S
C'lon ris Kut L K ldsd 2;-4l i, Cli.arin kiiul iddi. 2 4264

CARPETS LA l I\)R DRY CLEANING
I ee's (arpet Craft 3- 1u 1 N -\\ )rrw til I .ln tlr 2 44()(,

HARDWARE (,.\ARD1 I' SlI'l' IES
lJohn S. George & t 2 842 r1 \ l cri,,n-i lhomi 2 2>.8

PLUMBERS PilNr fIN(
Sunshine I'lulinhirig M, 1ill Penr.ii, l, ( n111p. ll' -4,i)h
Service Plh,ne 5-625 I
WRECKER SERVICE DRAPERIES
G;ihsoni ( r \\%rcker Scrvice 2- 2 I I 's C a.rprt i .il t 3 'i

FOR THE ACTION YOU WANT




Shop Nassau Merchants


For Business And Services


FOR SALE

C12290
THREE WHEEL SCOOTER
Ernest Smith Phone 22481


ANNOUNCEMENTS

CLUES TO

hbP 0ribunPt
:I PanAm

TRAVEL PHOTO
CONTEST

PHOTO No. 8:- A well
known walk in a Riviera
town.
This photo appeared in
The Tribune Sept. 8th.
PHOTO No. 9:- This
beautiful town hall is in a
country of two
languages.
This photo appeared in
The Tribune Sept. 13th.
Back issues of these dates are
available at The Triburne
offices in Nassau ,and
Freeport.

ART SUPPLIES
C11770
COMPLETE range of artists
supplies. Oils, acrylics. canvas,
easels, etc. Bahamian Paint
Supply Ltd., Bay Street. Phone
2-2386, 2-2898.

MARINE SUPPLIES
A11894
1969 31ft. CHRIS CR F, '.
Commander. Sleeps six, piiv Itt"
shower, two 230 h.p. engines
with less than Z00 hours,
kitchenette, good condition.
Call 24267, 54011.

(C11762
PACEMAKER 44 ft.
Luxurious Cruising Yacht.
Phone 3-2371.
C12356
50 ft. Custom built houseboat
floating home at Mermaid
Dock. Going cheap. Cash only.
Phone 34737.

HELP WANTED
C12284
EXPERIENCED OFFSET
PRESSMAN. Must be
conscientious and able to
produce quality work. Call
Executive Printers 2-4267 or
5-4012.
C12349
BACK HOE OPERATOR with
service experience. Telephone
2-4996 or 5-8725.


HELP WANTED
-CG334
Job Title BURNERMEN (2)
Minimum Education Good
basic edcliali,)to Experience in
fuel bturin' prn ess in rotary
Kilrns and p1 o1rctiol of
Clinker. Cemri ,-t plant rotary
KIIln h I hu ]irw n r
Minimum Iixp,-rnice 3-5
year,.
Duties R-"-,p.oidh cities

i nki i : .. t i j.) pro re,

- ('i? i --s ,' i ;n l.iii 1 c; n t a
I ir !- aIrt-, i 'rf,
Bahamas Ceorin t Company, P.
O. Box F 100, Freepoit, Grand
Bahama.

C12299
COMPETENT SECRETARY
required for established firm.
Dictaphone typist. English at
GCE "0 level or equivalent.
Speed and iacuriacy. Apply in
handwriting to: Adv. C12299,
c!o Tho Tuibune, P O. Box
N-3201, Nassau.

C12262
SALES MAN OR WOMAN
experience preferable but not
necessary. Must have own
transportation. Salary plus
commission. Reply Adv.
C12262, c/o The Tribune, P.
O. Box N-3207, Nassau.

C 12285
RESPONSIBLE male with
valid driver's licence, and at
least 3 years driving
experience, as general
handyman. Must read and
write Refe encts required.
Apply in wrin,.j P. O. Box
920, Nassau

TRADE SERVICES

C12353
















KEITH REI[).
COMMONWEALTH
FURNITURE & CABINET
WORKS. 3 Doors south of
Nassau Stadium. Build or
remodel kitchen china
cabinets Living, dining &
Bedroom Furnitures. Vaity,
book & showcases.


-- -- A


TRADE SERVICES


S117b

Pind her's Customs

Brokerage Ltd.
Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
[;i'SbSAL. bAHtAM Ab
P. 0. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
1 IA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-379b
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434.


TRADE SERVICES


C11775
T. V. ANTENNAS
Boosters for rhom es;
apartments and hotels.
Sales rnd services
Call 5-34C.,
v''OFLD CF viljSi",
;Al33ley Street
next to Franl,'s lace.

C12357
WINDOW AND DOOR
SPECIALISTS We repair:
screens, windows, doors,
awnings, jalousies, glass &
mirror installations. Telephone
54460.

C1 1708
BAHAMAS ANTENNA
SYSTEMS
SOLVING POOR
RECEPTION. Same day service
for moving. Antennas or new
installations. Call Douglas
Lowe, 21371 -- 51772.


GRAND BAHAMA




CLASSIFIED

IN FREEPORT

TEL. 352-6608


HELP WANTED
C6334
Job Title BURNERMEN (2)
Minimum Education Good
basic education. Experience in
fuel burning process in rotary
Kilns and production of
Clinker. Cement plant rotary
Kiln burnermnan.
Minimum Experience 3-5
years.
DutiesI R responsibilities
)Oerate Kilns to produce
clinketr by a continuous process
of br-irriinl.
Interested applicant contact
Per sionnel LDepartment,
Bahamas Cement Company, P.
0. Box F100, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.


Your ad in The Tribune
will bring results


HELP WANTED

C6399
EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT TO
HEADMISTRESS. Must have
at least two years previous
experience. Able to work on
own iniative. Experienced with
children. Shorthand essential.
Apply in writing giving details
of educational background,
etc.. P. O. Box F-2469,
Freeport.

C6396
Two diesel mechanics with five
years experience working on
Allis Chalmers and Caterpillar
line equipment. Successful
applicants must be prepared to
work overtime if required. For
further information contact:
Alvin Swann, Freeport
Construction Company
Limited, P. 0. Box F-2410,
Telephone 352-7091.


From Page 4
"What did lou do with it?"" I asked.
"Threw\ it where it belonged .. in the wastepaper basket," lie
said. "Wec kino\ what you are up against and we are with you all
tire way."
Anthlici man commented on what he described as the "massive
circulation" of this material by the government. I didn't know
this imani's niamie.
But the most surprising comment of all came from my friend
Bill Schchter. Vice President of the Bowater Paper Co. of New
York from whom we buy newsprint. I have recently written an
article about Bill and so you know how close we are.
"I got one of those things too," he told me.
"1\ (God Bill." I said, "why didn't you tell me about it."
'1 don't know." he said, "I didn't think it was important. i
knew that it would have no effect on anyone to whom it was
sent.
Bill sends me anything that he thinks might interest or
concern tie and so he was serious when he said he didn't think
it was important.
"What I don't understand," he later commented, "why did
they send it to nme' I amn not in the newspaper business. I wonder
how thCey got my name and address."
This confirms the fact that the Stevenson letter was given
"massive circulation".

This case is just another example of how juvenile the men who
now control the destiny of the Bahamian people are. They just
have no understanding of anything.
I repeat .. ANYTHIN(;.
By divorcing my mind from my estate in the Bahamas I have
put inyself in a position where the government can't hurt me.
Every time they try they hurt themselves ... and the Bahamian
people. It is possible that one day the people will awaken to this
fac t.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
One thing we must all remember, which sometimes we are
inclined to forget: Freedom can be lost through neglect and
detanult.
We must never forget that the right to freedom of expression
the right to a free press is a right that belongs to the people and
not just to the man who happens to own a printing press.
Unfortunately, it is a right not clearly understood by all the
peoples of our various countries. If the people do not believe in
their own right to freedom of information, then an editor who is
threatened by government will have no allies. The I.A.P.A. must
revive its efforts to help its members as well as non-members in
this educational process. Extract from speech of acceptance by
Robert U. Brown, elected President of) I.A.P.A. today for the
I 73-74 vear.

SUCCESSFUL HEART SURGERY


From Page 3
scheduled for surgery. The
demand for funds each year far
surpasses what the Foundation
is able to dispense.
Dr. Jude arrived in nassau on
Thursdayy afternoon for his


busy weekend for the iieart
Foundation. He was
accompanied by his wife and
eldest son and they were the
house guests of Lady Sassoon,
chairman of the Sir Victor
Sassoon (Bahamas) Heart
Foundation.


HELP WANTED


C640 1
ONE (1) MARKET
MERCHANDISER AND
SUPERVISOR Must have at
least ten years experience in
meat-dairy-deli and seafood
buying, merchandising,
supervising, teaching, training,
sales and profit projection
percentages.
ONE (1) JOURNEYMAN
MEAT CUTTER needed. He
must have at least three years
experience in meat cutting,
able to pass meat cutters' test.
Also he must be sanitary
conscious.
ONE (1) DAIRY/DELI MAN
needed. He must have at least
five years experience in meat
cutting, complete knowledge
of ordering, pricing and
mere hand rising Dairy/Deli
Depa rtment.
ONE (1) CART COLLECTOR
needed. Person in good health
and willing to go after carts
anywhere in Freeport.
Apply Food Fair
Supermarket.
Monarch Investment Co.. Ltd.
(Food Fair) P. O. Box F-2416.
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C6398
BOOKKEEPER: Bookkeeper
responsible for all shops, ledger
and doing daily sales report.
Should hove 3-5 years
experience in bookkeeping.
Please bring along Police
Certif icate.
LOBBY CLEANER: Lobby
cleaner to clean and mop
Lobby Area, empty ash trays,
clean Men's Rest Room and
clean glass. Male preferred.
PLU MABER SUPERINTEN-
DENT: To be in charge of
plumbing, sewer, steam boilers,
water wells, reverse osmosis
water treatment plant. 5-10
years experience.
Interested persons apply:
GRAND BAHAMA HOTEL,
WEST END, GRAND
BAHAMA Personnel Office,
between the hours of 9:00 a.m.
and 3:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday. Elon Martin,
Jr., Personnel Director.

C12276
INTERNATIONAL FIRM of
Chartered Accounnts have
several vacancies for Chartered
or Certified Accountants in
their Freeport Office.
Successful candidates will be
paid excellent salaries and
bonuses. Applicants should
apply in writing to the Staff
Partner, Price Waterhouse &
Co., P. O. Box F-2415,
Freeport, Bahamas.




FIN LEY


FINED
NI- 'W YORK( I \I) O(0 ner
Charles :nrlc i of the
Oakland A's hs been lined Ih
baseball commissioner Bowie
Kuihn for arious riisconducts
during the just-concluded
world series,
The fine was believed to be
$10,000 for three offences, the
most significant of which was
the notorious Andrews affair.
The flamboyant and
controversial owner of the A's.
first crossed Kuhn during the
opening game of the world
scenes when he said the A's had
been refused permission to add
infielder Manny' rillo to their
series roster.
The A's attempted the Imove
after they sold one of their
series eligibles.,, catcher Jose
Mora Iles,
Bu t series roster changes are
permitted only in the event of
injuries and the move to
substitute Trillo for Morales
was rejected.

Finley was enraged by the
refusal and said he would
announce it to the opening
game crowd. The commissioner
wanted the 4's boss not to
make the announcement but
he went ahead with it.
The next day, Finley was at
it again when Andrews. a late
inning substitution, made
consecculive costly errors at
second base in the 12tlh inning.


The owner ordered a post-gamne
medical examination.
Dr. Harry Walk examined
Andrews and then the infielder
met with Finlox and manager
Dick Williams for about 40
minutes.
Andrews was put on the
disabled list.
The Oakland players learned
of Finley's move against
Andrews as they boarded their
plane bound for New York
following the second game.
They reacted angrily and the
next day many of the players
taped Andrews'Number 17 on
their uniform sleeves during a
workout at Shea Stadium.
Andrew's equipment
accompanied the team to New
York and sat unclaimed in a
hotel lobby. The infielder had
returned home to Peabody,
Mass.


---


: I l


Opp


1


I


I I


. ,


, ,


I


I


ME -21


I


L,, -- --I-~ ~--~'----- -- -


- --~- ---~~ --


j


pp










Monday, October 29, 1973


ahPr Xrtbubm


O U HO1U=[eSK


"MAARETS FUNNY. SHE SAYS SHE LIKES JOEY BEST.
AN'TIEN GETS MAO WHEN I SAY '/T. N'A//'

Brother Juniper
-- t l


"In the dark night of the soul it's always three
OR four o'clock in the motrnine."

CROSSWORD IR0 'ME19
P1 1771 F ITU20MVIA11 ILIMD


W
ACROSS
1. Autocratic
ruler
7. Circuit
12. French
playwright
13. Suppress
14. Orange or
apple tree
15. Sommersault
16. Fencing
dummy
17. Frigate bird
18. Shoe size
19. Jupiter gave
her a box
23. Vegetable
caterpillar


Par time 30 min.


_._ LL
25 Unmarried
29. Jai alai
31 Marriage
32. Site of an
Observatory
34. Greek I
37. Moringa seed
38. French fiend
41. Historic
records
43. Fundamental
45. Dignity
46. Countermand
47. Pays the k;tty
48. Practitioner
DOWN
1. Descent


STEMNEUDTILE

S A C IEQ laST
A INTOA NE) E I

ER IL TO
UISUREA D
cdmnIAI g MOEI


YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE
7. Fish tank
8. Close-lipped
9. Paul Bunyan's
ox
10. Capri
11. Friend's word
15. Pairs


SOLUTION OF
2. Facility
3. Surgeon's
instiument
4. Glutton
5 Person
6 Tellurumr
symbol


AP Newsfeatures

Rupert on


Soon Rupert and Simon are on the deck of the
galleon. Before moving away from the rail
they pause to make sure there is ro one about
"It seems safe enough." murmurs Rupert.
"All the crew must have gone ashore with
the captain." Still cautious, they creep towards
a flight of wooden steps leading below It's
rather dark down there." whispers Simon


CARROLL RIGHTER'S


-fHOROSCOPE
from the Carroll Righter Institute

( V / GENERAL TENDENCIES: Make a point to
search for and obtain valuable data you have
lacked in the past. Utilize whatever spare hours you have
today or tonight and make plans for future progress. Make
contacts with those of varied experiences.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) Communicating with those
from out of town and stating your ideas can bring right
response now. You can make a project more successful.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Find the right system for
handling all your affairs and bring more profit into your life.
Make an effort to do what is expected of you.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Contact an associate you have
been at odds with and come to a far better understanding.
Talks with others can be to your benefit.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Being enthused
where your work is concerned can help you accomplish a great
deal. Show fellow workers that you appreciate them.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Accept an invitation extended to
you and take your mate along. Engage in your favorite hobby
during spare time. Be sure to think logically.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) If you are affectionate with
those at home, you find that you dispel the gloom of discord
that may have settled there. Study tonight.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Start regular routines in an
intelligent manner in the morning. Later iron out any
problems with associates. Show kindness to mate.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Begin new week properly by
handling all financial affairs wisely. Listen to what an expert
has to suggest. Strive for more harmony with kin.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Analyze your
situation better and see what should be done to have a more
satisfying and effective life. Dress in good taste.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) See that your life is
better organized so that everything falls into its rightful place.
Try out suggestions given by wise persons
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Entertain a person to
whom you owe some social debt or whose good graces you
seek. Know what your true aims are and reach out for them.
PISCES (Feb 20 to Mar. 20) Handling vocational, credit
and public matters well help you to have order instead of
chaos round you. Don't neglect a career matter.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY... he or she will be
one of those charming young people who will be very honest
in dealing with others and can accomplish a great deal in life.
An ideal chart for investigational professions, the government,
medicine and the drama. Give ethical and spiritual trading
early in life. Sports are a natural here.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


Chess
By LEONARD BARDEN


((hNIhII)
This year's Evening Standard
chess congress will be held on
December 7-9. For details, write
to Chess Congress, Evening
Standard. London, E.C.4, enclos-
ing a stamped addressed 9 x 4 or
9 x 6 envelope.
Grandmaster Ludek Pachman
was the special guest at the
record breaking 1972 Evening
Standard congress. Recently
Pachman (Black. to move)
reached this position in the
Nathanva international and
forced his opponent to resign at
once with a brilliant surprise.
Can vou find it?
Par times: 10 seconds, chess
master: 20 seconds, chess expert:
one minute, county player; three
minutes, club strength; eight
minutes, average; 15 minutes.
novice.

OLUTION 9800 -
Chess Solution
I . R-KRI! and White
resigned. The unanswerable
threat is 2 . P-KKt3: 3
Q RP ch, K-Ktl and Pachman
wins the queen.


L Y
rorwd mus


24. Editorial "I" letter. ani
least one e
26. Opal list. No pit
27. Behold no pirope
TARGET:
6 28. Type measure words. vr
30. Potables excellent.
YESTERDU
33. About Betook hi
S 34. Bark cloth book bookl
r broke lbro
35. Later lobe look I
8 36. Monad oboe robe
39 Emcs root rootle
39. Emcee's tore.
S gadget
40. Froster
42. Enzyme
S 43. Deseret
44.Topaz
hummingbird
10-31 46. Blood type
Chariot Island-31


HUV many
Swords of
S our letters
or more can
v- ot make
f r on the
letters shown
Heree' Inl
In R k I n K a
word. each
S letter may be
used o ce
only. Each
St contain the large
d there must lie at
Ight-letter word In the
rals: no forelln words;
r names. TODAY'S
r2o words. good ; 23,
ry good: 27 words.
Solution tomorrow.
AY'S SOI.TTION :
lot hole holt bolster
let boor hoot hore short
ok BHOOKILET knel
looker loot looter lore
robot role rook ronklet
e rote took tool tooler


" I can't see much, can you? They descend
slowly, and just as they reach the foot of the
steps a harsh voice calls out: Enemies!
I spy enemies! Surround them, men!"
Simon stifles a gasp. "Rupert there is
someone here!" he says. "Quick, let's go
before we're caught! "
ALL RiGHTS RESERVED


Winning

Bridge
By VICTOR MOLLO
Dealer Last : Love All
North
J lu 8 6 5
48643
4-
West East
*K 3 EA
S1072 K95
0 K J6 Q A1083
QJ984 7 6 5 3 2
South
S 9 7 4 2
\ AQ J
074
4 A K 10
West North East South
- 14 14.
34 34 Pass 4-4
Westleads the 4iW. Assuming
the best defence, can declarer
make his contract ?
The reader is invited to play
double dummy, though this is
no made up problem, but a hand
from actual play. Declarer was
Frank Perkins, one of America's
earliest bridge columnists.
Defende.s appear to have fcur
certain t.icks-two trumps and
two diAmonds. Somehow de-
clarer mumt perform the van-
ishing trick upon one of them.
It you have found the solu-
tion, I congratulate you. If -.ot,
and :t wouldn't be surprising .
let's follow Perkins.
He won the first tri.k by ruf-
fing in dummy and took t.e
heart finesse. Crossigr. to the
table with a second club ruff.
he repeated the finesse, cashed
the ZA. and having set up
dummy's last heart, went ciher
to it by ruffing his third club.
On the thirteenth heart.
Frank Perkins threw a diamor.d.
West ruffed, but now his *K
clashed with his partner's *A.
Needless to say, it wouldn't
have heed the defence had
East ruffed the last heart with
hii 4 A.


-It
I I
---
ri.--Ir- - -
rir--r-??"


No. 7.2635 h 'II
Across
I. Describes one
vegetable. !mI)
8. Frank. (4)
10. Mlserl-. (4)
II. Menllnr. (9)
1I. .ltigate. (3)
14. Weary. (4)


7


REX MORGAN, M.D.


1--- ---
MEANWHILE, Ar A TRUCfK 51-. r
OUTSIDE THE CITYn '
SHE suI VK:.T
OW'S KAREN ? \CiARA M*vVt--;,'
i DOES SHF LIKE THAI HU SPI'i
BEING A DOCTORS/ 5L TLlrF Ti A /
STAN /


S~i- ^ li/
I


I JUDGE PARKER


By PAUL NICHOLS


4/
!




Hi


By Alex Kotzky


APARTMENT 3-G


CRAN HAS THIS HERE "BIG TOM" DIFFERENT
RECEIVED WOLFE AND "TINY TOM" TIMES ON
A COOL FOXE -.WHAT TIME DO DIFFERENT
WELCOME THEY GENERALLY DAY.'
AT THE COME IN ?
"r.7 r^


v,- + !'iV *... -I \
A45 3 AS A -
TALED ''
'. .\
L

~~-T


"SOLITUPE" WILL UEAW';
/ME OVER A MILL:'C
DOLLARS FPCM rTT-
HARPCOVER, PAFFP?-:.t
EDITIONS.. ANC 5A- .-
TO THE MOVES. I S1 :
THAT'S A "BUNPLF


S saunders & overgard


I

lb


-
** p


*


-~i






)k;




(


r~- --- ----~-----
/ Bu7iDID



(\ !LA IC lS D PTS I

SUCEIP EPTS

"'^i' I7F f ClPTs RECEIPTS

A\ V T h


-4I


M McKAV -

kind of Z

LL
-J
u.


15. Found in the Dhotoxraphs
unit. (9)
19. Visit. t4)
2I). Idol. (a)
23. Threateningly. (U)
25. Indicate. (6)
2(6 Written In legal fashion
(!I)
Dol% n
I. Telexruuphic alphabet. (5. 4
Zoo aMIlinal (3)
3. DrivlnI back. (!l
4. Leave out. (4)
5.. Blonde. (4)
6. (;lrl'r name. (4)
I. Portuguese river. (3)
I. To do with shlis (5)
12. Glear. (3)
I;. D I s i
16. Title. (4)
or der. K
(4)
18. Slackens.
21 H a pPl.
t e a s.
22. Looked
with
n either
(3) Yelltrdayo/ solution.


.". .. .

, ;. |

i' '' -+-' .-= -,
1 ^ "

'* ^- .. .. .. *I


^i ,:


__ ___


She Comic Pae \


-..


mI


By DAL CURTIS I


- --------


i -- -ilC---------.-4--L-


STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD


m


+












Thr iribunt


Monday, October 29, 1973


-KING CARLO TAKES TITLE-


First home: Dry Martini


By GORD LOMAR
CARLO BONOMI, the suave and
articulate Italian banker and professional
powerboat driver, captured the World
championship of offshore powerboat
racing yesterday by winning the 17th
version of the annual Miami-Nassau race.
Bonomi, driving his "Dry Martini" a
sleek 36' Cigarette powered by a pair of
600 hp aeromarines crossed the finish line
two hours and 39 minutes after the 8
a.m. start off Government Cut in Miami.
At Chub Cay, the final check point
before the Nassau Harbour finish, he was
only five minutes ahead of fellow
countryman Giorgio Mondadori. who
eventually limped home in second place
on one engine nearly three quarters of an
hour later.
Mondadori blew an engine just before
the (hub Cay check point and spent 44
minutes extra finding Nassau larbour.
Bonomi said he "pushed at my own
pace to Cat Cay, and I was only 45
seconds behind my time schedule.
"The seas were not very rough. They
were choppy with three to four foot seas
and there were big swells from that
tropical storm (Gildal that has been
around here," he said.
The race, originally scheduled for
October 12 turned out to be the
imost-postponed race in the history of
powerboat racing, as weather and Gilda
played havoc with the seas. Only 15 of
the original 30 starters actually started
the race. 16 days late.
Ihe seas appeared still rough enough to
take their toll, as by noon only three
boats had made it to Chub Cay. Only
seven boats reached the first check point


Banker shakes


Dry Martini


to victory

at (Gun ('a on tlie eastern rim of the
Gulf Stream.
Going into lite liami-Nassau Race
Bonomi led Britain's Don Shead by four
points for the Union of International
Motorboating title. The final race of the
1973 season for the world championship
is the Key West Race, slated for
November 10.
Shead, driving his 37' I-nfleld
"UNOWOT". powered by similar engines
as Bonomi's "Dry Martini". blew one
engine half way across the (ulfl Stream,
25 minutes after the race start. The
blown engine also blew the championship
possibilities for Shead.
Bononi's time of two hours and 39
minutes was nine minutes off the record
set in 1970 by another Italian. Vincen/o
Balestrieri. former world champion.
The victory lor Bonomi represents the
culmination of a season that could well
revolutionize the image of ocean
powerboat racing.
Sponsored by the Martini & Rossi
liquor firm. Bonomi said the sport has
now changed from amateur to
professional "'and you have to he
professional today to be at the top."
"There is no way to win the world
championship now unless you are a
professiona." stated the outgoing


champion. "I was the first professional
racer sponsored by a large firm, and I
think you will find that from now on
more and more big companies will turn to
full sponsorship in these racing
campaigns.
The tag for sponsorship to the degree
necessary to win a world championship
runs to about $300,000.
First production boat to finish and
third overall was Bill Germain's Fort
Lauderdale based "Mirage", a 27-foot
Magnum with two 320 hp Chris Craft
engines.
Fourth place went to Jake Trotter with
a 28-foot Magnum, "Maltese Magnum",
with two 350 hp Flagship engines. He
completed the 185-mile crossing in five
hours and 36 minutes.
Dr. Roland Molinet of Fort Lauderdale
drove his "Code Blue", a 28-foot
Cigarette with twin 165 hp Mercruisers to
fifth place in six hours and six minutes.
lie was followed by Robert Solovei of
North Miami, who walked his "Tight
Rope", a tiny 23-foot Formula with a
single 225 hp OMC engine to sixth and
final place.
Among the casualties were Mark
Raymond. driving the boat of former
world champion Vincen/o Balestrieri of
Ital!y. I1I developed engine trouble on the
Gulf Streain side of Bimini.
Because of the many delays in getting
the race underway many of the potential
starters scr,atched to save their boats for
tle upcolming Key West Race, the final
race for world championship points and
the first race for the American
championship of the 1974 season.


"r
.... m-


Race organizer Captain Red Crise with Richie Powers and Carlo Bonomi
Race organiser Captain Red Crise with Richie Powers and Carlo Bonomi


s*-. ....
,* *0. i


Brave Bain can't save Royals



from defeat by Strachan's


By GLADSTONE THURSTON
TH11 UNPREDI)ICTABLE
Police Royals, with their game
plan built around the
etfectiventi ss ot onl\ three
play ers !otind themselves in
hot water \ yesterday
Pla' int wi thout the services
ot kev giatd .\nttlhony
S ootdsldtc who is still on the
thsabled list. chief centre
(harles Bain went cold and
forward David Spence was
outplayed forcing them to
retreat n defeat 9045 to the
strong Strachan's Auto
Af'rkans
Lifting Strachan's to their
fourth win against one loss was
a competent 24 rebounds--15
points coming from playmaker
Bertie Johnson.
Player /coach Jerome
Barney. still is good form,
burned a game high ol 24
points and collected 18
rebounds, h.ven former Fox
[lill Saints Lionel "Snake'
I:vans had a good game with a
21 rebound I 6 points
performance.
Ball handler Prince Hepburn
coming from Carter's Hitachi
scored an easy going 16 and
gave five assists keeping
Strachan's alive and kicking
with a well put together 22
point half tine lead.
Courageous in his effort to
keep the Royal's in contention.
Bain who last night took over
the coaching duties scored 10
and captured 16 rebounds. IHe
was five for IQ from the field.
Backing hum up in good
faith. Spence snatched 22
rebounds and scored 12 points.
He too had a low four for nine
from the field and four for six
from he free throw line.
Strachan's systematic game
began to play havoc with the
Lawmen's running game from
as early as midway in the first
half when they took a 14-9
lead.


Fntering the final 10
minutes of play. Johnson,
Evans. Barney and Strachan's
Auto stashed 16 unanswered
points giving them a 30-1)
commandi when the Royals
decided on a time out. Prior tos
that tunn otut It seemed as it
they were unable to do
anything right.
Returning to the coLurt.
Spence tossed in a tree thro\s
enentuiall) breaking the
Afnkans' rally.
And yet. the Ro.als were
unable to get their ganim
together.
When Hepburn and l)avis
took the bench in the final
three ninutc., being adequately
replaced by David Patton antd
Julian Russell. Stracihan's
breezed to a 37-15 first hall
lead.
"l)efence is the ke\ t to this
game." nuotedt Brne\ I le
defence the Rosals were up
against s terdax had theemr
scoring only 18 s)f their 63
from the field and nine for 14
from the free throw.
With Strachan's controlling
the tip oft bIeginning the
second half play. a la. uip Ib
Johnson followed b) a
Barney's jumper started the
Police's disaster.
Each player on Strachan's
securely tilled their position.
Johnson and vans secured the
rebounds their way while
Hepburn and rookie Davis
safely brovghit it down court
setting up the plays around
their six-toot-four centre.
Barney scored 14 in the second
half.
Arthur Forbes then added
some spunk to the Royal's
heart breaking situation, but as
for topping the Mechanics, it
was to not avail. A fast break
activated by Barney and Evans
to. Hepburn and Davis saw
Strachans increasing their
command to 40 with a little
over seven minutes remaining.


Vlliara ('ulnier. Patton and
Anthony Clarke came on in
substitutions and although not
as detective as their precedents
kept Strachain',s awa\ from
danger I cen Bairne i going
linl( the fin l three minutes111111 .
reitte '
it'11t id
I lg rb I t11
Slare I I 4 2
Dt1I, I 2 1 4
S a.ilss 1 2 0 i16
Jiils()on 6 24 2 i5
tiarit'\ I I 1 J 3 24
R&errts 0 0 I o
P'atrlo 2 ', 4
I und 0 0 0 I
licphurin 4 2 b16
tRussell 2 2 0 4
'ulinh r I 1 0 4
I'(M Ito I
r ss I i 1 4
I) Snmith 1 3 2 2
S\. Smith 0 I 3 0
(aish I 0 1i 2

.i I t, 2 I 0
S" slC -. 4 22 2 2
).ll I i) i i 0 0
I ,Iarls\ 0 (1 0
Iorbt s o 1 I 14
Keriillt "'Par Rolle going 13
for 30 Iroml tie ielld and live
for seen froll tile tree throw
ltne scored j gjnlie hi.lh ot 3 1
points aind snatched 20
rebounds leading thle containerr
Saints Fox lill to a 95-81
victory over Superwash
Arawaks.
With strong competition
coming from super shooter
Van Delanes who scored 16 of
his team high ,ft 24 in tile tirst
halt. rookie Rueben Knowles
came to the Saints rescue
giving lIhein a 47'40 lead by the
end ot that hall
The second half saw
Superwash again making an
attack at the Saints strong hold
paced by an II point
performance by Michael
Edgecombe. With last year's
rookie Charles Deveaux coming
into the picture the Saints
midway in the second half
were battling for what looked
like a Superwash win.


Kermit then turned on the
steam and proved nearly
unstoppable in his dnrve for
points. (. Knowles came
through with a clutch I 2 points
eventually moving the Saints
ahead Ior good.
Robert Sawyer took 11t
reboundMs ladi gave seven assists
for the A\trawaks, Rueben
Mounts took 13 rebounds and
scored 14.
ARAWAKS
Ig rh I tp
Dela i e 10 4 2 24
Thurston O 0 0 0
R. Saw\, er I II 2
I dtgeclcom e 10 3 0 21
I 'e 0 I 0 0
C. Turner 4 2 5 8
Mounts 7 13 I 14
Rolle O 3 2 0
,. Saws er 4 8 2 9
clarke 0 2 O O
Icse.iu' 4 1 4 9
:ason m0 I I 0
SMIN'IS
K ernmit it I lt 1. 20 4 11
Kc\n IKdtle I 4 1 2
H Kn is,,Sl.sK I n 16
( I s,\ 2 5 0 4
Dtiineri te 5 1 I I I
I r\ es I I 1 2
I dgecomhbe 4 6 2 9
Hsriirring 3 6 2 8
In other games played
yesterday, Fllis Bodie-Young
snatched an offensive rebound
with four seconds remaining
and put it up giving Heastie's
Supersonics a 70-69 victory
over the winless Bain 'own.
Young topped his team with
17 points and 22 rebounds.
Da id Cleare handled 16
rebounds and gave five assists.
Clement Strachan carrying
the weight of Bain Town
scored a game high of 25 and
took 18 rebounds. Rolle scored
10 and gave five assists.

Six-foot-nine centre Sterling
Quant captured 16 rebounds
and scored 25 points as
defending basketball champs
the Kentucky Colonels
stormed over Bahamas
Commonwealth 92-68


by IVAN JOHNSON
BASEBALL Major Leaguer
Wenty Ford, displaying superb
professional temperament
under pressure, steered St.
Bernards to their fourth KO
Cup Final win by one wicket
over league champions the
Southerners at St. Bernards
Park on Saturday afternoon.
It seemed a certain
Southerners victory was in the
making when Ford strode to
the wicket to join skipper Jim
Wood with St. Bernards reeling
at 79 for 7, needing 115 to
win.
Wood was bowled by
lettarm seamer, George
Deveaux for five and he was
quickly followed by Forbes.
leaving the Saints 30 runs to
win with eight overs remaining
and one wicket standing.
With St. Bernards
wicketkeeper Stewart playing
with a straight bat at one end.
Ford showed great
determination and professional
temperament as he hit an
invaluable 33 not out, which
included three sixes and two
fours, to give St. Bernards
victory in the 28th over.
The game which was
watched by a large,
enthusiastic crowd was set
alight earlier by aggressive
batting from Southerners star
George Ferguson.
Ferguson came to the wicket
with the Southerners struggling
at 50 for 5 off 18 overs against
accurate St. Bernards bowling.
After being dropped off his
first ball by wicketkeerer
Stewart oft the bowling of
Eddie Ford, Ferguson tore into
the St. Bernards attack hitting
two sixes and four fours in a
fine innings of 46 not out. out
of a total of 1 14.
St. Bernards soon lost
opener Keith Ford when he
mistimed a hook off John
Deveaux. But the stylish
Francis Scott then joined
veteran Charlie Wright and
these two took the score to 40
before Scott flashed at a shot
ball outside his off stump and
was caught at slip off paceman
Anthony Thompson for 25.
This brought the hardhitting
St. Bernards left-hander Eddie
Ford to the wicket. Ford,
content to play himself in, was
beginning to unleash his
famous drives and pulls when
disastrously for the Saints he
was run out for 22.
With the exit of Ford, the
Saints fell behind the required
run rate and the middle order
collapsed as they attempted to
get St. Bernards back into the
game.
Peter Bethell was bowled by
George Ferguson for 0 Wardy
Ford was caught on the
boundary off George Deveaux
for I, Ivan Johnson was run out
for 2 with ease following a fine


piece of fielding by
Southerners' promising young
wicketkeeper. James Peterson,
and Jim Wood's stumps were
transformed into a piece of
modern sculpture by Geoige
Deveaux. leaving St. Bernards
at 85 for 9 off 22 overs.
Last pair Ford and Stewart
then played sensibly to knock
off the remaining 30 runs to
give the Saints a narrow victory
in a memorable final.
The presentation match
which lollowsed lat la nes Oval
Sunday, saw a BCA Select XI
defeat the Southerners after
dismissing them for a mere 73.
F olloi w ingi a brieC I
introduction by BCA\ secretarN
[verette I:vans, trophies for
v a rious outstanding
performances during li' season
were presented rto tle players.
Making the presentations


were Mr. Mickey Chea, George
Foster and Minister of Works,
the Hon. Simeon Bowe.
The following prizes and
tropics were awarded:
Southerners C. C. League
Champion Trophy: St.
Bernards, KO Cup Champions;
Louis Yearwood (top
batsman); Anthony Thompson
(top bowler); James Peterson
(best wicketkeeper); Phillip
l)eveaux (most promising
youngster ) G a r f i e ld
Braithwaite (highest aggregrate
of runs) and centurions Fred
Phillips, Ralph Kellman, Rudy
Dean and 'Edmund Lewis.
Umpires Chuck Albury,
I'llington Miller, George King
and Garth Gonzalez received
cash awards and plaques for
their efforts throughout the
season.


Winning end


'()RONTO (A'P) "'I hope
I'm lucky enough to lihae
another one," tiLumner 1 ucLieni
liaurn said after Secretariat's
last race. lie said it without
conviction.
Withl darkness fast lailling on
WVoodb)ine race course
yesterday, Secretariat romped
home a swinneril loi llie tiiial
tine in his blii ll.nl 2i-ri ce'
career.
S\Ve II lake !1m 1
Kentucks s,,iomIe time betorie
Nov. 15." ,sad I Heleln 'lI\eed .
operator r oI Meadlo Stable.
after Secreltaliai's liclor\ iIn
lie (Canadiian Intetnational
('Championshiip on a cold, iwet
and wind\ day.
Secr cta ri t t t ; I iire


contributions will be at the
stud. The triple crown winner
will stand at Claiborne Farm in
Paris. Kentucky, under a
record S6.08 million
syndication.
lie ra" a big race and 1
wanted him to go out that
way." said Ron Turcotte, the
jockey who was part of the
victory celebration but not
part of the race for the first
time since Secretariat's first
two races as a two-year-old in
1972.
"lie's not a horse, he's a
u:achine," said Turcotte, who
missed the race because of a
five-day riding suspension
which began Saturday.


~~,II


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NOW THRU TUESD
Matinee 3 & 5, Evening 8:30-'Phon


GEORGE C.SCOTT
FAYE DUNAWAY
JOHN MILLS ,
;,~ JACK2PALANCE

." ~ OfLLHOMA CRUDE

PA t RI l\ 7'. I)IS('RI:'"I().
Reservations not claimed by 8:4
on first come, first served ba


Now thru Friday
Matinee starts at 1:30
Evening 8: 30
"DAY OF
THE JACKAL" PG.
Edward Fox,
Alan Badel
Plus
"THE LEARNING
TREE" PG.
Kyle Johnson,
Alex Clarke
PLUS Late Feature
Tuesday night.
'Phone 2-2534


m
La

Con


"TR






"TI


NOW THRU FRIDI
Matinee Continuous from 2:30,
Phone 3-4666


AY
ie 2-1004, 2-1005
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45 will be sold
basis.
I

1





















ast Day Tuesday

itinuous Showings
from 3:00
I
















UNITY IS STILL








%MY NAME"G.
Terenc5 will be sold
asis. I




ist Day Tuesday 1





nuo Showincer






HEY CALL ME
from 3:00 -





RINITY IS STILL.
MlY NAME" G.




Terence Hill,
Bud Spencer
Plus
HEY CALL ME
TRINITY" G. 1
Terence Hill, l
Bud Spencer I




AY
Evening 8:30


Adude
with a plan 1
to stick it to


PLUS


Wenty's the hero in


KO cup final thriller


I


Monday, October 29, 1973


B-1~il


Nop Uller t'Unjr 1 iAUmllite1