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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03480
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: October 25, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03480

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DUDLEY'S FULL LINE
y" ....* (I-n O ilttARTISTS' IPPLIS
COR. ROSETTA ST & 4 '
MT. ROYAL AVE.

TV ANTENNA INSTALLATIONS BAHAMIAN PAINT SUPPLY LTD.
BAY STREET NASSAU
P.0 BOX WS40 PHONE 2.1306/2-3237 TELEPHONE 2-2386, 2-2898

registered with Postmaster of Bahamas for postage concessions within the Bahamas) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper
VOL. LXX, No. 279 Thursday, October 25, 1973 Price: 15 Cents


'HUMES GAVE BURROWS THlE GUN & TOLD

HIM TO SHOOT MAJOR' COURT HEARS


-witness to


says Burrows


Major -more than once'


By SIDNEY DORSETT
AN "OVER-THE-HILL" WAITER, Anthony "Stick-a-Tone" Conyers, testifying before the Raymond Barry


Major Supreme Court murder jury, this morning said he
was carried out on orders from Phillip "Polka" Humes.


The case for the prosecution
neared its close this morning
with the evidence of Conyers,
one of three final prosecution
key witnesses to be called by
Solicitor general l T. Langton
Hilton.
('onyers, told by the court
to remove his coal-black
sunglasses, testified of being
any eve witness to the shooting
of Major through a track road
enildint in a iul-de- si south of
the I Need-A -Laundry, West
UBa, Street.
IHN follows Barry Thompson,
S,,nv'ted public terrorist out
[t ':,,:n o a $100 cash bond
pcndiing the outcome of anll
appeal, wlio testified all

S:itnips I,. iinderwent a


MUSHROOM

TOUCH LAMPS


NIA AUIISKU Fln1IM
NASSAU- FREEPORT


i-"LA






WENDELL "RED" BURROWS
... accused
heated .it. 'i. !t ,.1I
'tolrney )David (, II iti,--
counsel for the second accuse
Phillhp "Polka" Hlunmes ch:it. d
jointly with Wendell 'Re,
Burrows within the dell .,
Maj or.
B3l r, sv i;lrt"ed v.ll,
nuL uci[C, is ieprescrnteu 'l, \ii
Lawrence lP.J. "'remrichard.
Ilumes is charged within
abetment of murder.
IN PLOT
The body of the Bias Street
e n t e r t a i ner- bar te n I
Raymond Barry Major v..i,
found riddled with hblletl iW
the bush near Perpall Tract
Mr. Bethell. adh)p Il' .
similar line of cioss cx..: 'in.i
tion of Thompson ;ts lit'e lhi.d .
a Tyler Street stone-masi'n
Raymond "Skull" Sc;i\Leli,
charged Th(IompsoI n :
involvement iin the plot.
It was Thompson. lMr
Bethell charged, who gavc
Scavella a revolver and ordered
him to take the accused andt
their victim to the Perpall
Tract area.
Mr. Bethell accused
Thompson of remaining behli nd
at a Queen Street alttoiney's
chamber to await a report otI
the outcome of the ride to)
Perpall Tract.
Thompson denied ih.
accusations and also said thi
he was not the "pay-of It n '
for the Free Natio-nal
Movement's secutinlt fonrc.,
referred to as "' The .Ai
Committee" by Mr Bethell.
DENIED GIFT
Thompson also denied a
$150 gift to this moininmls
prosecution witness ('om ers in
September, last ea:. ilf .',
Conyers' cltlitis w\ere
destroyed in a flirc that


YOUNG HEART


watched the September 5 Perpall Tract gun-slaying which


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<. .

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Ill''+ -.-".
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AN! *iONY n,," :.,ne"
CONYERS i i.sit s





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PATIT.,S ,














PATIENTS


TWO HEART OPERATIONS are to be performed at the
Princess Margaret Hospital tomorrow, sponsored by the Sir Victor
Sassoon (Bahamas) Heart Foundation. Leading the surgical team
will be Dr. James Jude, Cardiovascular Surgeon from Miami.
Assisting him will be Dr. S. Rudra and Dr. N. Pathak of the
Princess Margaret Surgical Staff. Pictured are the two heart
patients, (left) Fanny Lean Joseph of Hatchet Bay, Eleuthera and
Terrel Butler of Sears Road, Nassau. Both children are 6 years of
age. At right is Nursing Officer Daphne Simmons, Children's Ward
Administrator.


,jr. Scavella drove oil I he car
Scavella drove toff in was riot
the same one I liad tused earlier.
It was a -aiilane II ord. deep
blue and black inyl top
heirr drive took them
"down West Ba\ Street as far
as I-Need-A-Laundry. When we
iut there we turIned through
thi corner south. I don't know
-vliy we turned south,"
(otnyers said. At a dead end. he
said they gotl out Irom the car
.- "Pl'olk! sked Major what
le told the accused Burrows.
\Major said he didn't tell
IBirrows an',i thing. Major ran

In Siav ifa. \%aj.or. Iumes
Xl 1 himself were there,

J- I ff!l (;.."V
--a'cId Ili, n told Scavella
cget him thle gun from
unidr the seat of the car.
II umICes caughIt Major. After he
cauehit hint, Scavella took the
gi, to him ." Conyers said.
IJ lmes questioned Major
:!A'atin on what h'.' old Burrows,
:!iud Major itaintained his
denial. Conyers said.
Co:l', ers said Humnies then
t,.Id Scavella to go for Burrows,;
c.I !Sicy both returned shortly
iter yards .
t" \ r Scavella returned
k ,it 1 BH rtows, fIumI es thten
,ked IMajor what he told
B1ir-ows lIe said he didn't tell
B1, rr, v. o1-1 thing aInd thaIt it
u.- urrows wiho ltIod hlit
V.' \L said that Burrows
i e e: person tiho told
.: : .! ir .', -, .,. id i \ ,1i l' it l

\ter that. Ilumes gave
; L\ I the gunl and told hiim
S Ma or. lIe said since
l 1' dd 't tell \eu here is
t!h g".'I. shoot !lnm."
i '!iers said Burrows theii
I,..k lh gn from Humes ,and
M ,!r lie shlot him 11 0oreC

II said lie and Scavella
m'.''g inning toward their car
.J -. rtly afterward. Burrowss

tlitmi" (then warned theltll
h.t thil' s could happen tot
It il lie h iceardi anythnIIg of
,lc inci' 'il t. Conyers said. eli'
,a.d thai lie saw Burrows,
r : iri the guLn to HItinIes
b.i.r the\ drove away from
ilt Qld' r.iod They dropped
1,: i h it 1 c i ove. lie said.
1 I ie c.lsc 1 ln llt c,,es)


NP charged
( \ I)\\1 1 \imbnster, M.P.
i> thel killarney constitlenIIc\.
tit, atraignced in miialistiate's
,k f:rt tis ti morning oil two
0. Il- o issatIlt and
i), IiLr c tion
Mr A.\rmbrister pleaded not
Ltiity to the charges accusing
hifn l assaulting p.c. 478
I I.\w ood Moss on Octobei 5
.id at tile same time,
'hb-lriLcting officers Rose and
SJ. ndcr'i iin the execution of
their d ttes.,
\aeictitate Gceorge liannays
adl)Uir1ned tile hearing until
December 12 at 10:30 a in.
ONE BOAT FOUND
3 STILL MISSING
0\N of four Bahanmian
listing \ 'sscls reported mllissing
ha f been located at A.l'l '
site \o. 7 in the Andros area.
I lhe smack endeavour. with
three men aboard, is expected
in Nassau tomorrow. l'he boat
was reported overdue alf ter it
left Kemip's Bay 17 da\s ago
tor south Ginger Cay.
Still on the missing list is the
35 foot Fuleta with three
aboard.
All three were in the vicinity
of Andros when storm (;ilda
struck the southern part of the
island.


-As


.14- ,


M R S. ALVITA
HAMILTON, on porch with
arms folded, has her head
bowed in dejection last night
after a car driven by an
off-duty policeman smashed
into her Coconut Grove home,
seriously injuring her
two-year-old daughter Keva.
PHOTO: Rickey Wells.


IAN ALLEN

TO APPEAL


CONVICTION
ARCIIITECT lan Allen,
convicted of using obscene
language and assaulting two
police officers, yesterday,
appealed the ruling by ('hief
Magistrate Wilton Ilercules.
Mr.Allen, through his lawyer
Eugene Dupuch Q.C., gave as
grounds that Magistrate
Hercules misdirected himself
on the facts and was wrong in
law regarding his arrest and
transportation to hospital.
Mr. Allen is claiming the
Magistrate was wrong in
finding that he was lawfully
arrested. and that he
misdirected himself when he
found Mr. Allen had
voluntarily agreed to go to the
Princess Margaret Hospital and
voluntarily submitted to an
examinat ion there.
According to the architect's
appeal notice. he contends that
he was forced to go to hospital
and submit to a niedical
c examination against his \\ ill
and without his consent.I
Under the ciiciumstanccs the
detention ,oinsitit t ilniprisoniie.nt and .11 ai tnlnll ', tI
restraint oiln his liberty. Mi.
Allen alleges.
Therefore, He contends, it
was his legal right to resist the
constable attempting to
restrain hint at the hospital.
The alleged assault was of a
minor nature and was a part of
his resistance, Mr. Allen said.
lie contends that it was his
legal right to secure his libertN
and anything said or done to
that end was lawful.
Mr. Allen was fined $80 hx
Magistrate Ilercules on October
I
CORRECTION
THll Tribune reported in
yesterday's murder trial stor\
that Raymond Scavella saw
newspaper columnist Arthur
[lbulkes and attorney Cecil
Wallace Whitfield at Mr.
Whitfield's chantmbers on Queen
Street.
'his was "rong. Scavella
said lie sa Mr. I oulkes there,
but made no mention of Mr.
Whitfield durinIg his evidence.


Vanguard slam PM's



remarks about workers



as 'threat' to country

By NICKI KELLY
BY CHARACTERISING THE ASPIRATIONS of the working
class as a "threat" to the country's security, the government is in
effect laying the groundwork for violent and revolutionary
opposition, the Vanguard Nationalist Socialist Party claimed


today.
'The "threat" claim was
made by Prime Minister
Lynden Pindling in his opening
address to the Progressive
Liberal Party convention in
Freeport last week.
Said the Prime Minister:
"The basic threat to the peace
and security of the Bahamas is
not Cuba or Communism or
Black Power or anything like
that. 1 believe that the threat
to our peace and subility is the
disparity in our own country
between the haves and the have
nots."
Such a comment, says the
Vanguard, is indicative of the
PI P leadership's assessment of
thlie masses.
Instead of tal ing about
threats to seciuril t the
government should he acting to
bring about a social structure
that is flexible enough to
pito ide all Balihanians wilh fi
decent standard it hing, the
V\NSP asserted.
'BELATI I)'
\ party statement today
dtcnribed the PLP's comtention
a:s ,a "belated attempt by the
leadership to place the party
back squarely on its ideological
feet and take the political
initiative."
But the Prime Minister's
comments, it added, was the
ty'ple of governmental thinking
that gave rise to violent
expressions of opposition.
The Vanguard said it viewed
the masses as tlhe backbone of
the nation who had been
denied various rights and
pr, ileges b) people and
organlli/.iations holding more
power than they.
It therefore questioned
whether their striving for the
sanie rights and privileges could
lie viewed as a threat to the
security of the Bahamas.
Anaysiilig the implications
of such gocernmei t thinking,
the VNSP said the fist step
\tas to analyse a threat. Then a
plan to meet that threat was
formulated, usually involving
token social inmptiovement1


together with massive police
improvement.
The culmination w;sa t" then
accuse the masses of becoming
a destructive mob.
While the pattern was clear,
thile Vanguard said, iti nc-d not
happen here it tlhe government
was concerned to "'rot out
corruption and unethical
activities within its owni
ra it ks."
It was this aspect rather than
the conservatism mentioned byv
the Prinme Ministecr ws hicIh
wuli' heraltd th' death-kinell o
lhe I1l.. the Vanguard
asserted.
The VNSP accused the P1 P
of being concerned with
preserving ideas and attitudes
that it represcited 20 ,irs ago.
Thle Lcall bh Prinie Minister
Pindlhng anid G(.rand Bahaima
representative Kendal Nottage
fot updating ;'r itI.' p rftv 's
philosophical po'siti V I' a.iFl .
greater sho"tw of radial /cial was
descibhcd as "borfowedr
I rhi't. in inflclncc.! 5\ thec
Vanguii ard 's clt- w in.lg c t: iSll.
"in any polllical al;il, isi the
PLP would sIhow iupL as a
slightly right olf ciltre
organization it-s past listo r\
notwit standingg" t he
Vanguard said. No amount of
modern rhetoric swufld sutltice
to shift thc "great
nmoney-glutted w eight of tlhe
party to the left."
The onl\ way this could lbe
brought about. tlie Vanguard
said, was to "'i'lhead" p hliS
leaders. order L cI'.ii
redelCtin em nt part\ 1,.
elect radical Tilt'n i l'r ;itn, j
clean utip the hiI'lc.
organiiiation ltroi l tl p tq
bot totmit."
Observed the Vanguard: "'It
is extiemelesy doubtful lhat Mr\
Pindhng will hafe the
inclination or hti capahilith to
accomplish tils l isk \, I
stanic s now the I 1c P h '-', :-I',
a broga ted flci! ;!,! l '> I C
known isi usa i'vij iiit! iaih p it
sti ving for socil i slic.' .id
equality ."


ng


WEST GERMAN AMBASSADOR PRESENTS HIS CREDENTIALS


IllS EXCELLENCY Herr Kurt
Schmidt, Ambassador of the
Federal Republic of Gerinani
to the Bahamas, presented Ins
credentials to the
Governor-General, Sii Milo
Butler, at a short ceremlony at
Government House Tuesday
m morning.
Present at the ceremony
were: Lady Butler, Mrs.
Schmidt, Mr. Ilenrv
Kaufmann, IHonorary 'Corsuil
for the Fed&al Republic of
Germany and Mrs. Kaufmann,
Mr. Oris Russell. Perinanant
Secretary to the Ministry of
1 external Affairs, Mr. Ernest
Strachan Bahamias
Government Chief of Protocol
and Mrs. Beverly Whitfield,
Secretary to the
Governor-General.
Mr. Schmidt told the small
gathering that he was happy to
have served as Council General
of the Bahamas for more than
four and a half years. lie
pointed out that "our two
countries became members of
the United Nations on the


same day" and expressed GOVERNOR GENERAL Sir Milo Butler and Lady
personal good wishes to Sir Butler, are pictured with guests at Government House
Milo and to the Bahamas. following the presentation of credentials by His Excellency
In replying Sir Milo said Herr Kurt Schmidt, Ambassador of the Federal Republic of
that the people of the Federal Germany. Pictured from left: Mr. Henry Kaufmann,
Honorary Consul for the Federal Republic of Germany,
Republic of Germany and the Mrs. Schmidt, Sir Milo and Lady Butler, Ambassador
people of the Commonwealth Schmidt and Mrs. Kaufmann. Photo: Fred Maura.
of the Bahamas have been
linked for many years by ties He said that both the
of friendship. Ambassador and the Honorary
"'All of our contacts with Consul have indeed served their
the people of the Federal country well and have been
Republic of Germany have excellent representatives. Sir
been marked by goodwill, and Milo congratulated them and
we have always been pleased to said the Bahamas looked
have citizens of your country forward to closer ties with
as residents in our midst," he their great country and cordial
said. relations in the years ahead.


shot


U.S. FORCES

'ON ALERT'

WORLD-WIDE

WASHINGTON (AP) -
The United States today
ordered its forces to
worldwide military alert, and
Secretary of State Henry A.
Kissinger declared U.S.
opposition to the
intervention of Soviet forces
in the Middle East under any
circumstances.
Kissinger told a nationally
televised news conference
that ambiguity about Soviet
intentions led President
Nixon "to order certain
precautionary measures to be
taken by the United States."
The military alert was
ordered amid reports the
Soviet Union might send its
forces to police a cease-fire
between Israel and her Arab
enemies.
Kissinger flatly rejected the
introduction of U.S. or Soviet
forces into the area, "in
whatever guise."
"'The United States
does not favour and will not
approve the sending of a joint
Soviet-U.S. force into the
Middle East," Kissinger said.
Kissinger refused to discuss
the details of communica-
tions involving possible Soviet
moves. He said only that the
administration became aware
of possible Soviet intentions.
"We do not consider
ourselves ... in a
confrontation with the Soviet
Union ..." he said. "We do
rot believe it is necessary to
have a confrontation."
He said President Nixon
decided, however, that it was
essential the United States
make its attitude clear.
"It is inconceivable that
the forces of the great powers
should be introduced in the
numbers that would be
necessary..." to enofrce a
cease-fire.
"It is inconceivable that we
should transplant the great
power rivalries into the
Middle East ..." he said.
Specially, Kissinger said
the United States is flatly
opposed to any nation
sending military forces into
the area "in whatever guise
those forces could be
introduced."


J -SMEARED


MEN"


GIRL (2)


SERIOUSLY

HURT IN


ACCIDENT
By MIKE LOTHIAN
TWO-YEAR-OLD Keva
Hamilton of Coconut Grove
Avenue was seriously injured
Thursday when a car
reportedly driven by an
off-duty policeman went out
of control and smashed into
her home.
The impact was sufficient
to shift the entire house eight
inches on its block supports.
Keva and her four-your-old
brother Anthony were playing
in the yard when the accident
occurred at about 6:45 p.m.
Keva is detained at the
Princess Margaret Hospital's
intensive care unit following
emergency surgery last night,
and Anthony was treated for
lacerations of the face and
right shoulder and discharged.
Police said the driver of the
red 1967 Camaro, owned by
Percy Green of Pyfrom Road,
was P.C. 300 Hansel Dames,
attached to the Police College.
lThe licence plate on the car
was N.P.7043, police said, but
the number assigned it on the
licence disc was 7543.
Keva's parents, Leslie and
Alvita Hlamilton, were both
inside the house when the
('ainaro, out of control,
smashed neatly through a
wooden driveway gate without
touching the concrete walls on
either side, and ploughed into
the northerneastern corner of
the light blue wooden house.
lihe corner post of the house
was damaged, and extensive
damage was done to floors and
lower sections of exterior
boarding because the entire
house was shoved aside eight
inches Losing the support of a
number of the concrete block
pylons.
Mrs. Hamilton said when she
and her husband ran outside
they found Anthony standing
up crying, and Keva lying on
the ground just inches away
from the car's left front wheel.
unconscious and bleeding from
a head injury .'
Mrs. Hamilton picked up her
dttighter, and enlisted the aid
of a passing motorist to rush to
the hospital.
She said Keva cried once
while being examined by a
doctor in the out patients
department, but remained
Liunconsciolus. Keva was in the
operating theatre of over an
hour. Mrs. Hamilton reported,
before she was moved into the
intre slve care unit. Mrs.
i iniilton said this morning
K c'a had not yet regained
Coiis.. cio tsness.
She added that when she ran
outside seconds after the
,iccdernt. she knew three more
,it hir eight children were out
li the house and she looked
undiit the car to make sure
i1,,i et l the children was
trapped beneath.
She saw no child, but she
did see "a fresh beer bottle"
which she said was still "wet".
No one in the house had been
drinking beer that day, she
saId
It was reported that two
men were in the car with
I)amtes at the time of the
a, cident, but they quickly left
the scene













Wbht irtbunm


Thursday, October 25, 1973


Calling explorers: how to cope in jungle


The


worl


UGANDAN President Idi
Amin had a vision in which
God directed him to appeal
for an end to the Middle East
war. said Radio Uganda
monitored in Nairobi. The
vision was similar to the one
he had last year which led
him to order the expulsion of
all non-citizen Asians.

A RHODESIAN African
guerilla leader appealed to
President Amin to execute
two White Rhodesians --
allegedly arrested by military
intelligence in reprisal for
the hanging in Salisbury of
three Frolizi members.

A VASE wrapped in an old
sweater, carried in a
cardboard box and thought
by its owner to be worth only
S 240 was sold in London for
S 324,000 as a perfect
example of Ming Dynasty art.

SEVEN crew members of
the Tasmanian coaster Blythe
Star were rescued after a
week at sea in an open life
raft. They were found on
bushland near Dunalley,
Tasmania.

BRITAIN has a three and a
half month oil supply at hand
or on the way and fuel
rationing is unnecessary at
present the Government said.

STATE-OWNED British
West Indian Airways (BWIA)
will begin a nonstop service
from Trinidad and Tobago to
London next April, said
managing director Sven Erik
Savgerg.

THE HOUSE of Commons
m Ottawa decided to limit
capital punishment to killers
of on-duty policemen and
prison guards another five
years.

AN OPPOSITION
par liamentarian in
B ridgetown., Barbados
worried by the serious
garbage problem has
suggested that stiff penalties
should be introduced for
litterbugs-

A JAMAICAN visitor to
Soronto has been charged with
slashing a woman's face and
cutting one of her ear lobes.
Smndy Samuel Bailey. 49, was
charged with attempted
murder.


THIE U. S Phillips
Petroleum Co. has signed a
service contract to develop oil
resources in central Bolivia.


Reports trin mi .1


BRASILIA (AP) -The A how-to booklet or Indian the hundreds of soldiers and
chances are slim, but just in ABC called "Contact with contracted workers who will
case you're caught in the Indians, What You Should Do" begin chopping a new road
middle of the Amazon jungle just rolled off the copy along the northern frontier of
face to face with primitive machines at the official FUNAI Brazil's Amazon jungle starting
Indians, Brazil has just the Indian Affairs Agency. next year.
thing for you. It is primarily intended for Brazil is one of the few



U.S. military alert


'just a precaution'


WASHINGTON (AP) -
Orders putting key U.S.
military units on alert because
of the Middle East crisis are
only precautionary, House of
Representatives speaker Carl
Albert said today after a
bipartisan congressional
Leadership meeting wi:hi
President Nixon.
"The emphasis is on
diplomacy at this time," Albert
told reporters.
At the Capitol later, Albert
was asked if he felt there was
no confrontation with the
Soviet Union. "I would say
that is correct," he said.
U.S. sources said the alert
was ordered because of word
that the Soviet Union might
send troops unilaterally to
enforce the Arab-Israeli
cease-fire.
Fourteen Congressional
leaders met for 70 minutes
with President Nixon and
Secretary of State Henry
Kissinger.
House Democratic leader
Thomas O'Neill. asked if he
was concerned about the
situation, replied: "You bet I
am. "
In Moscow, the Soviet
government revealed to the
Russian people today that
Lgypt has requested Soviet and
American troops be dispatched
to help supervise the cease-fire.
But the Soviet public was
not told of reports that
American armed forces had
been put on alert because
Moscow warned Washington
that the Kremlin may comply
with the Egyptian appeal.
In its afternoon news
broadcast, the state television
network quoted the Soviet
ambassador to the United
Nations Jacob Malik, as saying
that Cairo's request was "'fully
justified".
Unlike the United States.
which turned down the
Egyptian appeal. Malik did not
reject the possibility that
Soviet forces would be sent to
the Middle East.
In Washington, unconfirmed
reports said the Kremlin had
notified the White House that
Russian troops might be
dispatched to the war zone. A
Foreign ministry spokesman in
Moscow claimed he "knew
nothing" of it.
U.S. military bases in
FIurope refused to comment on
the alert,


Tourist boom drops


BARBA13 \)DOS (A P
Ba ;!: dJos" turi smi boom l, so
pi>!:,,.-r cd in the later 1960s
,1id ear!\ 1970s. dropped
.ippr|[ i ably in 1972. a
( ,crin mcnt spokesman said.
I lie sur'.es said that the
nt, ae 1 i1TreCise had
ol'ppied bc,.aui sL t decline in
!In 1'.;-A.thi (l the number of
\:k rlV~I.n's and ( anadians who
tooik hell s.ucations in

I st;:tes o)t spending b\
l urlts i during 1972 put the
'. 1 i 2 1. 120 million in local

I h1 slr\e\ said that an
-n;i tsi s o(f certain factors
suie st that there has been


some degree of under
estimation of the annual
expenditure by tourists to
Barbados."
The 1972 estimates were
obtained using a news method
of calculation.
At the end of 1972, the
number of hotel beds on the
island numbered 7,773
compared with 7,446 the
previous year and 3,250 back
in 1965.
While luxury hotels still
account for the largest portion,
2,231, the growth of
apartment accommodation in
recent years had resulted in
2.145 beds of this type
available.


Emphasis


is on


diplomacy
A spokesman at the U.S.
Navy headquarters for Europe
in London which includes sixth
fleet units in the
Mediterranean, answered "no
comment" to all questions,
even whether he had any
knowledge of any alerts.
Earlier, it was reported the
alert went to Air Force, Army,
and Navy units in the United
States, Europe and the Pacific.
Among the units alerted was
the army's 82nd airborne
division, which has a prime
mission to be sent to crisis
points in event of emergencies.
Units of nation's nuclear
striking force, the Strategic Air
Command, also were in,'ludied
in the alert.
Meanwhile, Egypt accused
Israel of violating the ceasefire
for the third straight day today
in renewed tank and artillery
assaults on the town of Suez.
There were no reports of
fighting on the Syrian front,
indicating observance of the
U.N. Security Council ceasefire
resolution by Israeli forces and
Syrian. Iraqi. Jordanian and
Moroccan contingents on the
Arab side.
The day's first Egyptian
communique broadcast by
Cairo Radio said:
"For the third day in a row
the enemy continued to violate
the U.N. Security Council


ceasefire. At noon today the
enemy repeated his attempt to
storm the town of Suez with
tanks and artillery.
"Our forces intercepted the
enemy attempt, destroyed 11
tanks and forced the rest to
retreat again out of the town.
"Our forces in Sinai still are
in control of the areas they
recovered and are consolidating
these areas against any enemy
attack.
"Our forces on the west
bank of the canal are
well-entrenched in their
positions to prevent any enemy
attempt to expand the scope of
his aggression "

WASHINGTON (AP) -
President Nixon, preoccupied
with developments in the
Middle East, postponed today
until sometime tomorrow a
television-radio news
conference that had been
scheduled for tonight.
THE SENATE Interior
Committee and the Nixon
Administrations agreed to
speed emergency legislation
through congress authorizing
mandatory petroleum
conservation and production
increases to cope with the
cutoff of oil from the Arab
nations.


countries in the world where
primitive cultures live in
isolation inside a modem
nation state.
No one knows for sure how
many original Brazilians
inhabit remote areas of this
huge South American nation
bigger than the 48 United
States. But moderate estimates
put the indigenous Indian
population at 100,000.
And they are different from
you, hence the 10-point funai
booklet.
FUNAI says that for one
you should be vaccinated.
"The Indian does not have
defenses in his organism against
the diseases of the civilized
peoples, so you should be
vaccinated."
Point 2, illustrated with a
cartoon showing an armed
outsider with a dog, oversized
boots, a hat and an
arrow-bearing Indian behind a
tree suggests: "avoid hunting".
The Indian does not like to
see strangers on the land he
loves without his permission.
Hunting provides the Indian
with his food. So don't venture
into the jungle to hunt.
If you sight anything to
suggest Indians might be
around, immediately notify
your friendly FUNAI agent
nearby, and if a tribe pays the
highway camp a neighbourly
visit, don't stare at the squaws.
"They are very jealous of
their wives so don't stare at
them and only speak to the
men," according to point 4,
titled "respect".
You've also got to be
understanding if visiting
Indians help themselves to
your survival rations,
geographical instruments of
tools. They might not
understand your attitude and
become irritated.
Don't panic. Point 6 says
Indians are generously meak
and frequently test the courage
of their civilized friends.


Sacred statue turns up


NEW YORK (AP) A
sacred wooden statue that
disappeared seven years ago
from the West Afr can kindgom
of Kom in Cameroon has
turned up in an art gallery on


Manhattan's east side, the New
York Times said today.
A Cameroon Embassy
official in Washington was
quoted as saying the 64-inch
statue-known as "Afo-a-Kom"
was priceless.


The last U.S.-Russia flashpoint:


1962 with Kennedy and Cuba


WASHINGTON (AP) The
worldwide alert of key U.S.
military units in the current
Middle East crisis is the first
such move of this magnitude
since the winter of 1968.
The North Korean seizure of
the U.S. spy ship Pueblo in
January, 1968, triggered fears
at the highest levels of the U.S.
government that the
Communists might be planning
major moves in Korea, and
possibly against Berlin, to take
advantage of U .S.
preoccupation with the
Vietnam war.
With much of U.S. armed
strength then concentrated in
South Vietnam and off North
Vietnam, President Lyndon
Johnson called to active duty
nearly 15,000 air reservists and
rushed regular Air Force
fighter squadrons to South
Korea.
A powerful U.S. naval
carrier task force steamed into
the Sea of Japan and tense
days followed as the Russians
countered by sending warships
into the same waters.
The Communist offensive in
South Vietnam began soon
after the Pueblo was captured
and Johnson then called up
another 14,500 National
Guardsmen and Reservists,
many of whom went to
Vietnam.
In the fall of 1970, another
crisis arose when Syrian troops
invaded Jordan and the United
States strengthened its sixth


fleet, moving carriers close to
the Syrian-Israeli coastline, but
there was no major
across-the-board alert of U.S.
forces.
The United States, last
landed ashore near Beirut.
The United States, last
landed troops in the Middle
East in July, 1958, when U.S.
marines went ashore near
Beirut.
At the time, the
then-pro-western government
of Lebanon appeared to be in
danger of overthrow.
Drawing some units from
Western Europe, the United
States put more than 14,000
army troops and marines into
Lebanon.
The troops left Labanon
about three months later,
without getting involved in any
fighting.
The last time the United
States and Russia reached a
near flashpoint was in the
autumn of 1962 when the
United States demanded that
the Soviet Union remove
offensive missiles from Cuba.
At that time, the United
States mustered about 340,000
fighting men, thousands of
warplanes and hundreds of
navy ships to deal with the
threat from Cuba, with strong
forces concentrated in the
southeastern United States
prepared for direct action
against Cuba.
At that time, too, President


John Kennedy ordered a
massive airborne alert of many
of the Air Force's 600 B52
navy bombers.
But this buildup was
dismantled when the Russians
backed down and agreed to
withdraw their missiles from
Cuba in return for a U.S.
pledge not to take military
action against Cuba.


Rolling


Stone


flees fire

LONDON (PA) Fire broke
out today in the luxury hotel
suite occupied by Keith
Richard, lead guitarist for the
Rolling Stones pop group.
Agent Leslie Perrin said the
fire was caused by an electrical
wiring fault. Perrin said
Richard, 29, and his
companion, Miss Anita
Pallenberg, were getting a new
room
A spokesman for
Londonderry House Hotel
described the fire as small.
Richard pleaded guilty at a
London court yesterday of
illegal possession of marijuana,
firearms and ammunition at his
Chelsea home. He was fined
$492.


Shopping in a 'nightshirt'


PARIS (AP) Women next
summer may walk through the
streets in what appear to be
petticoats and nightshirts. But
the young girls will still look
cute.
Chantal Thomass, the young
and pretty designer who
dresses other girls the way she
herself likes to look, showed an
adorable collection for her
company, Ter et Bantine.
It's not high fashion, but it's
fun. The yawn percentage at
the show was considerably
lower than it's been during the
week.
What Chantal likes is roses
and lace but not for prints or
ruffles.
Tight jersey dresses belted at
the waist come in black, white
or light green with roses at the
chest and hem. So do short --
which nowadays means just
above the knee party dresses
in lime or mauve voile. The


huge ruffle-cape descends to
the waist.
Chantal shows a couple of
pants, too, in "flour bag"
white cotton. Some come with
roses, others with a white and
pink cape in very thick chenille
which looks like a cross
between ermine and a bathmat.
Everyone cheered at tne
cowboy dresses in black,
mauve, lime or pink
embroidered in roses. One long
slit comes with a bikini top
dripping fringe over the waist
like a belly dancer's dress.
Day dresses in bright
corduroy or cotton come with
contrasting silk fringe too, on
sleeves and pockets.
This designer also uses lots
of lace, but not the way granny
did. Pastel dresses come with
matching lace inserts which
meander around the strategic
places.
Full-pleated smocks have


shoulders and the high
Victorian collar in lace.
There are also a couple of
slip dresses with a generous
bank of lace below the straps.




McAlllstei Hotel
DOWNTOWN MIAMI

Splclll

liulmii lltis
Single $ 9
Double $11
Triple $13
Quadruple $16

Home of the
AMERICAN-BAHAMIAN
FEDERATION.


WOWS THEM

DOWN

WESTMINSTER


WAY
LONDON (AP) Princess
Margaret, Prime Minister
Edward Heath and the other
members of a small, select
audience gave Duke Ellington
a standing ovation last night
as he trucked down the
centre aisle of Westminster
Abbey.
The 74-year-old jazz
master and his band played a
benefit concert in the British
shrine in aid of United
Nations da'-
The programme included
two new Ellington
compositions: The
Brotherhood, an impression
of the United Nations, and
the Beauty of God.
Two newspaper critics
panned the performance.
"Too many homilies and not
enough swings," said Ronald
Atkins of The Guardian.
"Often muffled, confused
an ill balanced," wrote lan
Christie of the Daily Express.
"Westminster Abbey is a
beautiful building but it was
designed without any
consideration for the fact
that one day Duke Ellington's
orchestra would be playing
on the premises."
'This oversight was largely
responsible for the
disappointing nature of last
night's event."
Christie conceded,
however, that "some of the
songs were beautiful
compositions of unusual
melodic and harmonic
structure."
The Guardian's Atkins,
reporting from a seat "tucked
away by Dryden's tomb,"
said the band was
"swallowed by the
acoustics."
And, he said: Not even the
superb Alice Babs, an
orthodox singer who on her
own terms is one of the finest
to work with him, could do
much with a song that asks
"Is god a three-letter word for
love?"
Atkins conceded, however,
that "possibly the venue and
the occasion, a star-studded
celebration," led Ellington to
"play too safe."
Prime Minister Edwara
Heath and Princess Margaret,
sister of the Queen were
among the audience.
The audience, unlike the
professional critics, were
evidently impressed.
They jumped to their feet
applauding when Ellington
trucked down the centre aisle
followed by his dancing
musicians and singers.
The Times of London,
whose music critic did not
write about the event,
recorded a clash at rehearsals
between Ellington and press
photographers.
Ellington, "looking
moody," was said to have
told newsmen: "I can sit here
and do this (pose) or do a
concert."


The billionaire



and thetangled



libel suit


LOS ANGELES (AP) In
the beginning, it was a just a
libel suit involving a billionaire
who called one of his
employees a thief.
But when the billionaire is
mystery man Howard Hughes
nothing is simple.
Federal case number
72-305-HP, set for trial in Los
Angeles shortly, has become
strangely tangled in
complexities of President
Nixon's financial past.
Bulky pretrial documents in
the suit by former Hughes aide
Robert Maheu stacked in
grocery boxes and stuffed in
manila envelopes in the bowels
of the federal courthouse -
have unexpectedly illuminated
areas of Hughes' secrecy about
his political contributions to
Nixon and others.
Of most interest to many,
including Watergate
investigators, is pretrial
testimony by Maheu that
President Nixon's closest friend
Charles G. "Bebe" Rebozo
accepted $100,000 in cash in
1969 and 1970 for the
president.
It has been reported that
Rebozo acknowledges receiving
the money but told Watergate
Committee investigators that
he returned the $100,000 to
Hughes after keeping it in
safety deposit boxes almost
three years.
Nixon says he had no
knowledge of the transaction


until the news media reported
it. Maheu contend it was the
President who chose Rebozo as
a conduit for funds.
But the lengthy depositions
in the case testimony taken
outside the judge's presence by
attorney's for Hughes and
Maheu also arc full of less
detailed references to people
and places associated with the
Nixon administration.
They arc dropped and never
picked up in questioning, and
whether they will be pursued
at the trial, expected to begin
by early next year, is not
known.
The outpouring of financial
secrets from the Hughes empire
results from Maheu's $17.3
million libel suit stemming
from an odd January 1972
televised press conference in
which newsmen asked
questions of a disembodied
telephone voice claiming to be
Hughes.
The eccentric billionaire,
who hasn't been seen in public
for 20 years, called the
conference, his aides said then,
to disclaim any connection
with an alleged biography of
himself. The book later was
branded a fraud and its author
Clifford Irving was imprisoned.
During the news conference,
the voice said to be Hughes
discussed Maheu, whom
Hughes had fired as head of
Hughes Tool Co. Nevada
operations.


Students pick



a gay subject



for homework


DAYTON, OHIO (AP) -
Homework for some 40
students at Wright State
University may be skin flicks, t
"dirty" book or a trip to a gay
bar to talk with homosexuals.
The class is called problems
in human sexuality and its
instructors say it is a healthy
approach to understanding sex
differences among people.
The students, most of them
married women, are enrolled in
the experimental class
sponsored by the Continuing
Education Department.
The lecturers are prostitutes,
pimps, doctors, biologists,
ministers and homosexuals.
But first students are
"desensitized" to what for
most is shocking material by
the showing of a stag film, said
course leader Dr. Gene Wade.
And explanation of the film
is offered and students are told
what to expect.
"If they feel they don't
want to watch it they are free


to leave," he said.
The class is limited to seniors
and graduate students and
many are school nurses,-*
principals, police officers,
psychologists, social workers
and guidance counselors, he
said.
Ellen Murray, assistant
sociology professor and a
partner in the course, had an
explanation for the absence
of men in the class: "Most
males are pigheaded and think
they know all there is to know
about sex ...
"The course dispels false
notions. We think students
become more tolerant of what
they have come to call 'queers'
and 'perverts'. The course
dissipates the stereotype "

Off to Russia
MOSCOW (AP) Canadian
Foreign Minister Mitchell
Sharp will visit the Soviet
Union next month


E'ry day fishing' day but

no e'ry day catch fish,

just...


"Don't


give up


the ship!"


nd BoIlled in S
hsh Government S,,


BLENDED
&^*& lv rtlfrf.


1W


ARE YOU FREE


THIS EVENING?

Tonight, when you are rested and relaxed, how about
coming around to The Toogood Studio for a Christmas
Portrait that will delight you! We're here to welcome
you between 8 and 10 every evening and we know you'll
like our cool, waterfront studio at East Bay Street.
(R.S.V.P.) 5-4641


U


mom-


Thursday, October 25, 1973











Thursday, October 25, 1973


hp Llribunte
NuLLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903- 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Publisher/Editor 1917-. 972
Contributing Editor 1972.
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972 -
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 24532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Thursday, October 25, 1973


EDITORIAL


Haunted houses


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
HARRY CHRISTIE, father of the late Sir Harold Christie. was
the Poet Laurea:t of the Bahamas. He was unquestionably the
most talented writer of his generation in the Bahamas.
Hits short stories were clever and his poetry brilliant. Hie lived
constantly in a world of imagery in which he weaved the plot for
his stories and the theme for his verse.
But he was dead serious when he talked about an old haunted
house on the property southwest of the site on which the
Dolphin hotel now stands at Bay and Nassau Streets. As a youth
S he had heard the story around town but never saw the events he
described ... but he believed them to be true.
Ilaunted houses are always associated with a brutal, unsolved
murder and this was no exception.
The house was a stately old Colonial style building with a spiral
stairway leading to the second floor.
Periodically, Mr. Christie said, a beautiful young woman was
seen descending these steps in a striking snowy white silk evening
gown. 1Her step was slow and measured. Her lips were unsmiling
and her eves were sad.
This wasn't too bad because it happened only after long
periods of time. On some sort of anniversary, I suppose.
But the real horror was that, whenever anyone tried to sleep in
the house, they were awakened during the night by horrible
noises, as though all the crockery in the building was crashing to
the floor and breaking into small pieces.
No one was ever able to explain this mystery and finally the
house was abandoned.
S:* ** *
I wonder about this story. When I was a boy some of my
friends went around haunting houses. They told me that they
attached a long piece of thread to a metal doorknob on a house.
Th ie\ held the cord taut and then rubbed a piece of resin up and
down the thread.
They claimed that this created all kinds of unearthly sounds
inside tile house. They said it was like all hell breaking loose.
The sounds in the supposedly haunted house iust have been
real. The female apparition might have been added by peoplewho
-1 had been frightened in the house, to give the story added flavour.
I have often wondered whether this was a thread-resin job of
some prankster?
llowever incredible stories of haunted houses may be ... and in
many cases the cause of the mystery is finally exposed ... the
possibility of a real haunted house cannot be lightly dismissed.

Several houses were built on the western waterfront just east of
the "'Go Slow" bend in front of The Grove during the bootleg
prosperity in the I 020 s
S"ne mysterious things happened during this uproarious
period in the island's story. There were several unexplained
deaths.
Soon after one of these houses was built its owner deserted it
and never ieturnied to the island. It was reported at the time that
a murder had been committed in this place.
Several people tried to live in it after that but not for long.
The' left fast because. I was told at the time. each new occupant
of the hLouse vW ould find a fresh pool of blood on the floor in the
roomtt whete the murder was supposed to have taken place.
Finally tihe place was shut up ... and deserted. I don't remember
whether it was later torn down.
I had no was of verifying these stories but they are given
credence b\ the fact that the house was finally abandoned.

As I said earlier in this series, ghosts thrive only in thie dark. No
otie talks about ghosts in the Bahanmas these days. People's minds
are occupied ol wilthi political mysteries.
Some of the most interesting ghost stories I have ever heard
were told me by a German Priest in New Munich, a small German
parish in Minnesota, where the late Fr. Hildebrand, one-time head
of the Bahamias mission, was later pastor.
1 spent some of tmy vacations from St. John's University at
New Munich with Fr. Hildebrand.
Father George Scheiffles was born in Minnesota when this
mid-western state was still wild frontier country. His friends
called him "Big George" because he was a giant of a man. His
height was further accentuated by his hair that stood straight up
on his head. This type of hair is known as Hindenburg bristles
because the great German Field Marshal Von Hlindenburg had this


kind of hair.
:Fr. Scheitfles conducted missions in small German towns in
this area. The Germans are not a warm people but even among
them "Big Geoige" got the reputatio-' of being hard and cold.
"'i' G crge'" was a contemporary of mti great friend and tutor
Il-. Cli, sstiom Schlirei er, founder of the Catholic Mission in the
Bahamas. As I have told you in stories about Fr. Chrysostom, as
a child his only companions were the children of wild Indian
families. One of Fr. Chrysostom's earliest memories was of the
last massacre of whites by the Indians in Minnesota.
All he remembered was excited Indians coming in and out of
his father's house all day. The Schreiner family was spared
because his father, a famous hunter and guide who took the first
expedition overland thro,;gh the Rocky Mountains to the gold
rush in California, had always been a friend of the Indians.
That was how dark and wild the country was when "Big
George" grew up in that territory.
IFr. Ilildeliand could never understand whi ... sirce "Big
George" did not maKe friends easily ... he took kindly to me otn
our first ineeting. After that he arranged his schedules so that on
holidays lie could pick me up in his car and drive me over 40
miles distant from the university to New Munich.
Perhaps he liked me because Fr. Chrysostomi had been my
friend but it is also possible that he found in my warm friendly
nature something that he needed and was not given him by the
hard-working, down-to-earth German farming communities which
were embraced in his roving parish.
This dignified old Priest was full of fine stories about ghosts
and pioneering frontier life.
One of his stories was about an abandoned old tumble-down
barn in a deserted farm yard. This old barn was party built of


Thr tribune


QUESTIONS RAISED BY NIXON'S DECISION



Will precedent affect President?


By Donald M. Rothberg
WASHINGTON (AP) -
President Nixon's sudden
decision to yield the nine
Watergate tapes eventually may
provide the answers to two
critical questions raised
throughout the legal
arguments:
*-What is on the tapes?
*-What will be the effect of
the precedent set by President
Nixon's compliance with
a subpoena?
The public will get the
answer to the first question.
People may have to wait awhile
because the tapes will become
grand jury evidence, protected
by strict rules of secrecy.
But eventually their
contents will bhcoine known
through the charges brought by
the grand jury.
For example, it will become
known if they supported
ousted White House counsel
John W. Dean's version of the
meetings in the Oval office or
the versions by other
participants, if perjury charges
are brought.
Such charges customarily
cite the false testimony. The
basis for proving whose
testimony was false would be
the tapes.
One thing prosecutors don't
expect to find on the tapes is
evidence of presidential
involvement in the attempt to
thwart the investigation of the
Watergate break-in.


Members of the prosecution
torce have never believed thliere
was definitive evidence on the
tapes that the President knew
of or participated in thei
cover-up.
HIARID)R
The question It thr
precedent set ma bhe harder ;o
answer. I'hc answer wia\ i'l
collie until sMiil' future
presidential adminiist r.'itn i
Much will depend oi the
attitude ot the pronsccitor-
Will Asst Atts'. (en ii lt,-nr
F. Petersen be iS 'sist !i -
was former sp\ i
Archibald C s\ th i lie ;' .!l
the evidence in White lIouse
files?
Cox has pre.-sd nit, on i !or
the tapes hut In ilcunite'nts
related to i id. ramiic oi
matters under investigation by
his office, i.i.liuding the IT'T
anti-trust setilleCm'iie t nd
allegations ,1 iii.npr rin'ties
in ng v o Ivip n g I n
contributions.
There w. er reps, r!s tilN
President wsi, !1o,' c in Cinedi
about the cc .. it t, ith
conItents l of it1' in:], 's \Al.i
the arguitmll -: !,i L, .k c-rs
presented n ( ,i i i't
emphasis on I p: ,is ,!. ,Lfi
a precedent .oul .
D\Ml M I
"[he dainitue ti the
institution of thl I' I',sulcit will
be severe and ir, [,ihti'i li;s
lawyers argiicd in Ia 1i1l1 i ti:d
with the U.S dis"itnc L >)irl
The P'rcsidnt ii t, i b\ ltie


THE RULES OF IMPEACHMENT


By John Beckler
WASHINGTON (A P) The
House is starting down a
seldom-used road in launching
an investigation that could lead
to the impeachment of
President Nixon.
The power to remove a
President is probably the most
awesome Congress possesses,
and only once has it actually
brought it to bear on an
occupant of the White House.
Although 12 impeachments
have gone to trial in the
Senate, nine involved federal
judges, one a Cabinet officer.
one a Senator, and one
Andrew Johnson a
President. Only four, all
judges, have been convicted.
Two other Presidents were
the subject of preliminary
impeachment steps. In 1843
the House defeated 127 to 84 a
resolution calling for an
investigation to determine
whether John Tyler should be
impeached, and twice during
the depression years the House
overwhelmingly rejected a
single member's effort to
impeach Herbert Hoover.
GUIDELINES
The 12 cases have followed
different patterns but the five
occurring this century the
most recent in 1933 afford
guidelines that indicate the
course on attempted
impeachment of President


Nixon might Ihlo,..
Ant iitpeiachImenl .i an
accusations. 1The C( i, itution
gives the llt'i.j siil,' p ower to
bring such .in aicl, The lirst
step in th.it pri. ,.,% \,is takcn
Tuesday when ics,,l' i ,it s ,t
im peachlll e:ni i;!! ,fltct sinlI =
calling for an insesiL t i'i r to
determine whelthier \i\o', has
comnmited .n% iim.itpchl'd
offense, were sent ti lihIe I .'is
judiciiry comnittice.
The comrmittec's tictioin, is
to investigate the ,si, aI':jinst
Nixon and s end !.,k to th,
House ai resoluhtiPn ciT llins N
either filr it np acihicrt i ,n
recomme ending against t;. t1-
conmmnittee could ails kill i1c
mn:tter by inaction.
SFNATI TIRIAl
If the panel deeCies
impeachment, the iHotise i iit
approve the rstluItiit !-*
majority vote. The aii.u
charges, called articles L ,
impeachment, '.an ,itlur I,
included in the resohltioi .'i 1
adopted sepa rat 'l. l.
impeachment is approved
The ('onstitutin give. .c
Sen.ile tie sole ri:it t i.
imnpeachmint s -i. I !
House. It cai sI c .
committee of 12 Sen.toiis t
conduct the pltceedI
which it might do in I ;
case, but the cntlie Scen;j
would sit as the jii itn :
impeachment of the P'itestlet;


TOA0N IT R


By The Associated Press
TODAY IS THRUSDAY,
October 25th, the 298th day of
1973. There are 67 days left in the
year.
HI(;GHLIGHTS in history on this
date:
1972 A storm sweeps across
the Pacific island of Fiji, leaving at
least 23 dead and more than 80
injured.
197 I United Nations seats
Communist China and expels the
Nationalist Chinese.
1967 U.S. air force jets bomb
the strategic )ounier Bridge at the
North Vietnamese capital of Hanoi
for second time.
1966 I-ormer Indonesian
foreign minister Subandrio is
sentenced to death.


1962 Cuban missile crisis ic.-rs
a clim ax ais the ('.S. V ltit' !t i : t
releases .1in intelliis i>'.' r. rc
shoiw inig rapid S. \wltri n:,.:
buildl-up in l 'ul s.
195o I gypt, J rLLIi il .' \i'
f)rm lunti'ed n ilit.irs i i
1951 \'1et tiniit ll l i ,
arminiStRC iLr unic i t ,iTiiiteit .
1948 Brait lib r
resignation iif (csttih, si
rie istion (,i o f ise Is iiim r ..s ,
I'resident.
1944 See Ind b, '
P'hilippine Sea is under \\,ii
1i4 1 i4;Germain 's lfirs.t sfil.-n ,
against Mosci\. ifils
193i8 Jiapiiiin re iri,,| I..M
a.inkow andt! (hllicc ns,\ ii it .
establishes itself i hilll, ,
Lib a is lce lared pm l t 1 io .il\


metal. Everyone avoided this spot because tiom it c:li' toIc it;
strange languages and beautiful music that couli ;',i c I
accounted for in that area.
This was before the days of' radio bhiadca.iIn. I!; :
suggested that perhaps the metal in the hbati had .ialletI Ii u'..
way that it made a natural station for receiving somii.!t,
distant places.
The one story he could not explain was about ai Pi esti c" \h !.:J
died suddenly. Every morning when a new Priest ppered .
the altar to say Mass the ghost of the dead Ptiest pii nt .1n
appearance He had a worried look on his face.
Finally the living Priest decided to confront the apparition atn
ask it a question.
"Is something troubling you Father'.". he asked the ghost.
The ghost then indicated to him that he had received mone',
from a family to say Masses for the repose of the soui ,i ai dead
parishioner. The Priest had died suddenly\ before lie could ,is\ Ihe
Masses. lie indicated to the live Priest where he wouki lind lihe
itoney in his desk wrapped in a piece of paper on il dii l i,
written all the particulars.
The Priest went to the desk. found the money, said the \lscs.
and the ghost never appeared again.
Some years later "Big George's" body was found in a ditch on
a rugged lonely road. His car had struck a deep rut in the road
and he was thrown to his death.
* ** * *


THOUGHTS FOR TODAY
It sounds like stories from the land of spirits:
(

Black spirits and white, red spirits and grey,
Mingle, mingle, mingle, you that mingle may'
MIDDLETON


Ol t[ RIDGI


THOMAS


looking at the issue on the
narrow grounds suggested by
(o\. who contended he was
not seeking to establish a broad
,re dent.
C\o argued that he had
deimionstrated a need for
'spelcitK conversations on a


particular subject between
specific individuals. This would
not, he said, establish a
precedent that would permit
prosecutors across the nation
to fly to Washington to
rummage through presidential
files.


end of




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RESIDENT MANAGER
FOR FREEPORT APARTMENT
MALE RESIDENT MANAGER required for Freeport
Apartment Complex. Applicants must be Bahamian, over
35 years old and mechanically inclined. Must have previcr,'
management experience and be capable of directing staff
and maintaining the accounting records. Salary offered is
negotiable and based on previous experience. Use of
apartment is provided as well. Qualified applicants to send
police certificate, summary of educational background and
work history, employment and personal references to:
PERSONNEL MANAGER, P.O. BOX F 2950, FREEPORT


NK- SMEARED


11


mpqo









Thursday, October 25, 1973


Test of nerve


for the



car



dealers
EVERY YEAR about this
time, car dealers throughout
the Bahamas become nervous.
They don't actually twitch but
there are frequent involuntary
jerks of the head in the
direction of the unloading area.
There could be a date circled
on the calendar, spaces cleared
on the showroom floor, or a
pile of yet-to-be-used banners
propped on an office corner.
The reason for this anticipation .'..
which mobilizes all car dealers
during October is the advent of
the new car models.
The salesmen at Central
Garage have caught the ailment
but fortunately the cure began
arriving yesterday in the form
of the brand new, elegant 1974
Dodge cars. ventilate
High on the list of popular Stan
vehicles for 1974 are the two CID sla
Coronet models the Coronet CID )
and the Coronet Custom. there a
These are both mid-sized cars rear w
but you don't have to be a drum b
mid-sized person to get in or The
stay comfortable once there. attract
This four-door Coronet is interior
loaded with comfort making blue, g
features such as the Unibody gold. Fa
construction that incorporates possible
strong steel beams in all the ignition


PAN AM RAISES COMMISSIONS


FOR DOMESTIC TRAVEL AGENTS
, PAN AM's chairman, 'Pan Am has also proposed have to be negotiated in IATA
William T. Seawell, announced a plan for sharing agents' meetings. Pan Am will present
at the ASTA convention at advertising costs. Specifics of this new concept to IATA at
Aaplco Mexico a tw-part the advertising proposal will the earliest possible time."
plan with immediate aspects
that make important travel CARACAS PROPOSED COLOMBIA CURFEW
agent profit-building news.
The announcement reads: CARACAS was formally erforcethroughout Colombia
tEffective immediately, Pan proposed at the United t ro
Am is adding one per cent to Nations to host the first for a population census that
travel commissions for first working session of the is expected to count over 25
class and regular economy projected U.N. conference on
travel on all of its domestic the law of the sea. country.


The Dodge Coronet fdr 1974-is now available at Central Garage, Oakes Field.


tion system.
dard is either the 225
ant six engine or the 3 18
V-8 engine. Up front,
are disc brakes. On the
heels are self-adjusting
rakes.
Coronet Custom has
ve cloth and vinyl
trim in a choice of
reen, black chesnut or
ast. sure starts are made
by the electronic
system.


The windshield washers are
all new tor 1974. The nozzles
are now built into the wiper
arms to do a better job of
cleaning with less cleaner fluid.
The torsion bar suspension
gi es smoothness and stability.
OPTIONS
The list of options for the
C,'ronet is just as impressive as
the standard equipment.
Choose from an AM radio,
or AM/FM. or AM/FM stereo.
There is air-conditioning which
not only cools the car but cuts
the humidity. You can have a
trailer towing package, power
steering, automatic speed
control and automatic


transmission.
Every model in the new
Dodge line has the many
features that are unique for
1974. including the unibody
construction and the electronic
ignition system. The Dodge
cars goes through a seven-stage
rustproofing process that
combines deep-dip and spray
processes with final coatings of
acrylic enamel.
All Dodge cars have been
designed with rugged bumpers
for taking the everyday knocks
but many models feature a
front and rear hydraulic
bumper mounting system with
built-in shock absorbers. On


minor impacts, the bumper
slides in, then bounces back to
its original position.
The models also have a
coolant recovery system which
helps prevent coolant loss and
reduce the possibility of engine
overheating..
\11l Dodge passenger cars
built in North America feature
front torsion bar suspension.
These torsion bars used to
provide a smooth ride while
maintaining excellent road
handling characteristics.
The 1974 Dodge Coronet
and Coronet C(ustom are
available now at Central
Garage, Oakes Field.


Campaign to improve road signs


routes, (Puerto Rico, Virgin
Islands. Hawaii, Alaska, Pago
Pago, Guam).
"All U.S. based agents are
eligible to participate in the
new Pan Am bonus
commission plan, which has
the immediate effect of
increasing travel agents'
revenue by more than 14
percent on first and economy
Ip traffic.
"Pan Am will request IATA
approval for extension
world wide. Inc reased
commissions on domestic
routes will be paid by special
monthly checks and must not
be deducted from sales reports.


Be the man

you want to be!


iRENE

PINDER

-vs-


o GIFFORu o
PONMUE PA. *cumh *OVH CHAMPION


U


I THE TRIBUNE ,AOTORING PAGE 71


|A I I


I
t
t


bh (rtmn









Thursday, October 25. 1973


CROSSWORD
PUZZLE
ACROSS
1 Texas shrine 27 Cotton seeded
6 Legal opinions 28, Spanish aunt
11. Auto repair 29 College degre
shop abbr.
13. Nut 31 ,' e
14 Vacancy 33 Steep
16. Farm animals 34 Expert
17 Coty 35. Hasten
18. Little girl 36. Assistant
20 Memorabilia 37 Figure skating
21. Armpit jump
22 Condiment 39, Bit
24 Baseball 41. Loosen
position abbr 43. Climbed
25. Caviar 44. Street signs
26. Affix 45 Threespots


e


SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE
DOWN 4 Mopof hair
5 Japanese fan
1 Greek market 6. Russian assent
places 7. Sherbet
2 Revers 8. Noel
3. Stadium 9. Tendency
7 1 9 to 10. Handle
12. Follow
15. Soldiers
19. Step
Al i 22. March
i - 23. Ohio college
2y town
25. Kind of coffee
27. Cavern
6 28. Adolescent
period
29 29. Melange
S -- 30. Coursers
33 31. Impact
36 32.Pronoun
so 33. Ransack
- 34. Arithmetic
sign
36. At a distance
38. Energy
5 40. Statute
42. Plural ending


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S ELost strata of


our society


needs help to


Mht Wrtbmw


adjust to life

By Daphne Wallace Whitfield
"THE WORLD OF TODAY ... is as different from the world in
which I was born as that world was from Julius Caesar's. I was
born in the middle of human history, to date, roughly. Almost as
much as happened since I was born as happened before," asserted


Kenneth Boulding, an eminent
thinker.
Alvin Toffler in his bestseller
"Future Shock" describes the
effect that the incredibly rapid
technological and social
changes, which have occurred in
the last generation, have had
on people.
Very roughly applied to the
Bahamas this means that the
world in which Miss Jenny of
the Bains Town area lives is as
different to the world in which
her mother lived as her
mother's world was to the
Arawaks in 800 A.D. in the
Bahamas.
"Change is avalanching upon
our heads and most people are
grotesquely unprepared to
cope with it", says Alvin
Toffler.
In this column today with
the above in mind I propose to
conduct an initial examination
of the sort of problems that
Bahamians of the ghetto
over-the-hill areas face -
referring in particular to Miss
Jenny who was the main
feature in last week's Town &
Around column and whose
problems are fairly
representative and to stick
my neck out and make
suggestions for their
alleviation.
Besides the effects of future
shock I shall also keep in mind
what the two youth groups,
whose representatives I
recently interviewed,
recognized and that is that
all social problems are
interrelated.
NO PANACEA
For example, one cannot
isolate one problem such as
housing or even education and


economist and imaginative social

hold them up to be the sole
panacea for all problems.
Granted housing is
desperately needed. Ortland
Bodie Jr., president of
Operation Breadbasket,
advocated running a bulldozer
all through the Bains Town
area.
However, before this is done
alternative housing has to be
found for its inhabitants. And
unless these houses are to be
rentals at equivalent rates to
those paid presently in such
areas low cost housing no
matter how low would be
beyond the reach of there
majority and those who need
help the most.
Even in the unrealistic event
of all inhabitants being
given houses free the good
effects of decent housing might
be completely wiped out by
the demoralizing effect of
"hand-outs".
And, aside but related to the
main theme of today's column,
city planners in other countries
have discovered the damage
done in human terms in razing
whole areas in that they have
also razed more than houses
unfit for human habitation in
the twentieth century they
have also razed neighbour-
hoods with good aspects as
well as bad they have
destroyed a loosely cohesive
group of people with
friendships, traditions of
neighbourliness (what
suburban neighbour would
"adopt" two children to tide
her neighbour over a bad
spell?), warmth and security
that are often missing in a new
housing estate.


OLD MAN ... can he cope with
the future in the Bahamas?

This is not to underestimate
the importance of housing.
Housing should be a priority.
However, I doubt strongly
that it would be the sole
panacea and, unless handled
with human factors in mind,
could create as many problems
as it solves. It is my opinion
that many of the Miss Jenny's
are already suffering from an
inability to understand and
cope with life in Nassau in
1973 and the sort of help they
need is of a human kind even
more than a material one.
ALTHOUGH education is
probably the single most
important area in which social
ills can be rectified again it is
not the whole answer. Children
with harmful home (and I say
home not house) situations,
with inadequate parental care
and guidance will in many
cases be unable to receive the
full benefit from their
education.
SO WHAT is the answer? I
personally don't believe there
is one single answer unless it be
a full appreciation and


MRIA E T


corrected overnight.
They plan to set up a birth
control clinic. Will the women
go to them for help? If they
don't, the president said, we'll
go to them.
Birth control has been a
forbidden topic in the Bahamas
in the past. The two youth
groups recently interviewed
place the bulk of the problems
of youth square in the lap of
an unsatisfactory home life.
Those that reject, condemn
or shy away from a programme
of birth control and education
are not usually the Miss Jennys
who have to raise nine children
on no steady income to be able
to function in the alien life of
Nassau in the 1970's.
Meanwhile the children of
the Miss Jenny: are very much
there in Bains Town and
similar areas.


In the absence of a father to
whom these children can look,
with whom they can discuss
their problems and from whom
they learn to understand and
function in the mainstream of
life in Nassau today substitute
fathers and big brothers will
have to come from those
concerned men who have had
more advantages or at least
have, against all odds,
overcome their dis-
advantages.
SERVICE
Rev. Emette Weir in a recent
speech put forth the idea (if I
recall correctly) of the
conscription of .the newly
qualified Bahamian youth to
devote two years to the service
of their country in some social
welfare capacity.
I personally would hope that
Page 7 Col. I


END





1..
-- ^ ..-. ....... i,


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OF


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TO MAKE WAY FORTE '74 MODELS


SAVINGS OF
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PLUS HIGHEST TRADE-IN VALUATION IN TOWN!

ONLY 10 LEFT

I EIlIII


1969 VW standard, $1250


1967 TRIUMPH 1300-- std., $1800


: ,-. ...
1969 PLY. SATELLITE auto., radio, $1300

--0g


1971 VAUXHALL VICTOR std., radio, $1295


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1971 FORD PINTO automatic, $1995


FINANCING AND INSURANCE ON THE SPOT WHILE YOU WAIT

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g


'74 PONTIACS & WUXHALLS

are on the way


understanding of exactly what
sort of problems individuals
face and a willingness, ability
and power to do something
about them.
And they are not necessarily
big answers requiring the
expenditure of enormous sums
of money.
BACK to Miss Jenny for it is
her problems and her children's
problems that are the problems
of our Community. Miss Jenny
is unmarried, has nine children
and no steady income.
She came from a simple
farming and fishing community
where large families were
appropriate to the way of life.
Children required little or no
academic or technical
education to fish or farm with
primitive non-scientific
methods.
Children also began
contributing to the family
income almost as soon as they
could walk. Children caught
crabs, tended goats and cut
bait. They also had plenty of
safe space outside to roam and
play and grow. Few cars and
little delinquency existed for,
with few valuable material
possessions, there was nothing
to steal or vandalize.
Miss Jenny's children
probably also lack a good
father figure to emulate.
Fatherless children in the
out-islands would in all
probability have had a
grandfather, uncle, cousin or
just the patriarch of the
settlement to guide them and
from whom to learn how to
become a man.
The children of one-parent
families in Bains Town often
only have "Shaft" or
"Super-fly" on whom to model
themselves.
IRRESPONSIBILITY
Ortland Bodie Jr., president
of Operation Breadbasket,
condemns the irresponsible
attitude of many Bahamian
men who procreate children
indiscriminately but recognizes
it is not an attitude that can be


NOTICE



ON FRIDAY,OCT. 26TH...

our SERVICE DEPARTMENT
will close at 12 noon;

our PARTS DEPARTMENT
will close at 4 p.m.

Both departments will re-open
at 8 a.m., MONDAY, OCT. 29th.


AWEMOTORS


E
IIm










Wht Wrthttlit


Thu.....a...Oter2. 1973


CHURCH HALLOWE'EN
THE MEMBERS of Holy
Trinity Anglican Church are
sponsoring a Hallowe'en Fair
on Saturday at" the Queen
Elizabeth Sports Centre this
event is to raise funds to assist
in the building of the church.
Lunches will be served at the
Sports Centre from 12 noon,
and there will be suppers on
sale until late in the evening.


IN PALMDALE ON MONTROSE AVE.
Va BLOCK NORTH OF BARCLAYS BANK,
NEXT TO LOWE'S PIPE AND STEEL.


*ois




P, s '


I


Several attractions for both
adults and children will be
provided.
LIONS HALLOWE'EN
THE NASSAU Lions Club's
children's Hallowe'en party
postponed from October 20
because of Tropical storm
Gilda is to be held 3 p.m.
November 3 at Club
headquarters on Interfield
Road.


ISRAELI CONSUL ON
MIDEAST CONFLICT
MR. RALPH Seligman,
honorary consul for Israel, will
deliver a lecture on the
embattled Middle East nation
at 8 p.m. on Tuesday, October
30 at the Bahamas Teachers'
College in Oakes Field under
the auspices of the Bahamas
Travel Club.


ORDER NOW IN lIME


FOR CHRISIMAS



f .CUSTOM MADE
DRAPES


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Store Hours :
Mon. through Thur. 9:30a.m. 6 p.m.
Friday 9:30a.m. I p.m.
Saturday 9:30 a.m. 9 p.m.



BOX N-8209 TEL: 2-2347
P. O. BOX N-8209 TEL: 2-2347


THE HEA
this week
month-long
volv ement
,


campaign to combat
alcoholism and drunken driving
in the Bahamas.
The campaign will employ
public discussions, debates,
speeches, radio programmes,
newspaper articles, school visits
and messages in churches.
The programme began on
Sunday with pastors drawing it
to church-goers' attention
during services.
On Tuesday Mr. Keith
Mason of the Road Traffic
Department addressed the
Toastmistress Club on "the
effect on society of alcohol
and the role played by law
enforcement agencies to
combat this."
Last night a panel discussion
on "the effect of family and
community efforts to treat and


U


-RINKING
BIRDS^

.VY^ew 75


rehabilitate alcohol
dependents" is to be held at 8
p.m. at Epworth Hall on
Shirley Street. Participating
will be representatives of
Sandilands Rehabilitation
Centre, the Bahamas Christian
Council, the Road Traffic
Department and the
Government High School Key
Club. A film, "Here's to your
health," will also be shown.
On Thursday at 12:30
psychiatrist Dr. Henry
Podlewski will address the
Nassau Kiwanis Club at the
Sheraton-British Colonial Hotel
on "immediate and long-range
effects of alcohol on the
body."
Next Tuesday pharmacist
Pedro Roberts will discuss


"social and economic abuse"
before the Fort Montagu
Kiwanis Club meeting 7 p.m. at
the Holiday Inn Paradise
Island.
MISUSE & FAMILY
At 1 p.m. on Thursday,
November 8 Senator Mizpah
Tertullien, a clinical
psychologist, will talk to West
Nassau Rotary Club members
on "psychological misuse of
alcohol and how this affects
the Bahamian family."
On the same day at 4 p.m. at
the A. F. Adderley High
School members of debating
teams from A. F. Adderley, R.
M. Bailey. Aquinas College
and Queen's College will
participate in a panel
discussion on "social and


economic use and misuse of
alcohol."
DRIVING TEST
On November 13 Bahamas
Medical Association president
Dr. Kirkiand Culmer, Pastor
Roach of the Seventh Day
Adventists' Conference, Noel
Roberts of the Bahamas Bar
Association and a
representative of the Police
Force will try to answer the
question, "should the
breathaliser test of medical
examination be made
compulsory for drivers
suspected by police of driving
while under the influence of
alcohol?"
The discussion is to begin at
8 p.m. at the Bahamas
Teachers' College in Oakes
Field.
A public meeting to discuss
alcohol is scheduled for 9 p.m.
Nov. 15 at the Fox Hill green.
At 4 p.m. on November 16
students of Government High


Sweeting High,
and St. John's
meet at GHS to


debate the question, "are the
facilities in our community
adequate for treating and
rehabilitating the alcohol
offender?"
A number of radio
programmes is scheduled
during the month to deal with
various aspects of alcohol
abuse, and several of the public
addresses by authorities are to
be broadcast over Radio
Bahamas.
NEW BITCO CHIEF
MR. R. L. EDWARDS
executive vice president and
chief commercial banking
officer of the Bank of New
York, has been elected
chairman of the board of
Bahamas International Trust
Company Ltd. to succeed the
late Hugh Wright who died last
July.
Mr. Edwards has been a
director of BITCO since 1967
and is a frequent visitor to
Nassau.


BEC staff help fellow worker
EMPLOYEES OF BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY
CORPORATION collected money and clothing for an
employee of BEC whose home was destroyed by fire during
August of this year. Mr. Nathaniel Gardner is shown above
accepting a cheque from Mrs. Marina Pinder, Personnel
Officer for BEC. Mrs. Gardner and Mr. Hervis Bain, Chief
Personnel Officer for SEC are also shown.
-- ^- -U U ^ -


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Health Ministry launch month-long
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Thursday, October 25. 1973


She (rtbtm


From Page 5
such serviLce would be offered
voluntarily but, without doubt,
those w ho have hAd advantages
are nee''i d to help those who
haven't
Ba,.k jgavi to Miss Jenny
herself. did not want to go
to co-:r- 1; compel the father
of he ; iildren to maintain
them. Yet, if a friendly
sympathetic woman friend-
better educated and familiar
with court procedure helped
her to file proceedings and
accompanied her to court to
give her intelligent and
sympathetic support and
protect her from
embarrassment and
humiliation, Miss Jenny might
indeed be encouraged to
institute "support'"
proceedings.
GUIDANC(L
For not only do Miss


E l'- ---


Jenny's children need a Big
Brother or Father figure, Miss
Jenny herself needs a Big Sister
figure.
She needs guidance to
budget and plan her meals
along economical and
nutritional lines. If one child
does not like corned beef and
if corned beef is an economical
form or protein Miss Jenny
needs gentle but firm guidance
to place th% nutritional needs
of the child above the pleasure
of the child's palate.
A GREAT social worker
here once told me that it was
amazing that out-islanders
survived the trauma of being
transplanted from a simple
rural community to the
pressures and complications of
metropolitan life in Nassau.
In the second half of the
twentieth century in Nassau
children have to be trained and
skilled in a technical field or
qualified in a profession or
have minimum scholastic
qualification not only to live
but to earn respect and dignity
in the community.
Housekeeping, that much
maligned occupation, requires
the use of washing machines,
dishwashers, an understanding
of the myriad varieties of
clothing fabrics and the many
different treatments required
for the variety of furnishing


005 I


'


GEORGE C.SCOTT
FAYE DUNAWAY .
JOHN MILLS ,A
p ., JACK2PALANCE

SKLOHOMACRUDE

P ARIR:.\7AI. DISCRETION Al
Reservations not claimed by 8:4
on first come, first served b


Lat Day Fritda
Ma;-uee s! _--': ;at 22 ,;
Evening 9.00
"DEEP THRUST" PG.
lien, Wang
PLUS
"MORE DEAD THAN
ALIVE" PG.
Clint Walker
Vincent Price
PLUS Late Feature
Friday night.
'Phone 2-2534


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Con

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IV


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SVISED.
45 will be sold
asis.



Starts Friday
itinuous Showings
from 3:00
INITY IS STILL
4Y NAME" G.
Terence Hill
Bud Spencer
PLUS
HEY CALL ME
TRINITY" G.
Terence Hill
Bud Spencer


WULF R.I


materials in today's modern
age.
Mothers working as
domestics in hotels or homes
cannot carry their children
with them as did their mothers
on the out-islands into their
fields. It is just not possible
either for a mother who works
in a menial capacity not only
to provide materially for her
children by herself but to
interpret a society to them that
is alien to her.
For thousands of years in a
world to which change came
gradually over many
generations parents educated
their own children. They
taught the children their place
in society and interpreted that
society to them. A generation
or so ago the function of
the'school was strictly academic
- the 3 "Rs". The schools
were not expected to change
the values of its charges or to
provide welfare and counselling
and the parents taught their
children the appropriate
technical skills for the kind of
life they led.
COMMUNICATION
The generation gap today is
not what it was in more
simpler slower times. In the
past it was a strike for
independence. Today it is also
a break-down of
communication between
parent and child. Today's
world is alien to parents as it is
so different to that of their
youth. The Miss Jennys are
finding themselves in a position
where they're unable to instil
values into their children when
so many of these values are
irrelevant to the world today.
Granted there are immutable
values that transcend
geographical location and time.
But these have to be
translated into a relevant form
applicable to today's world.
Theoretically the schools
can replace the traditional role
of the parents and to a limited
extent this is being done by
school counsellors.
Yet no matter how good the
school is in terms of academic
training, technical education,
welfare and counselling it
cannot replace the warm
continuum of the family -of
the sort of one-to-one
communication and love.
SUBSTITUTES
If the family cannot help
and if the roles of the schools
by their necessary institutional
hiature are limited in what they
can accomplish we need


substitute family members for
the Miss Jennys and her
children.
Substitute fathers or big
brothers, substitute sisters or
neighbours do not necessarily
have to be university graduates.
They do need a better
educational background than
their charges and they do need
to understand and to be able to
function successfully in today's
society.
They do not even necessarily
have to do this "work" full
time.
The time that would be
required from them would not
necessarily be more than a
good father would give his own
children i.e., to be available all
evenings and weekends and to
join the kids in regular
scheduled activities.
From what section of the
community must this help
come?
Not necessarily from any
one particular segment.
Former or present
over-the-hill dwellers who have
in spite of the odds survived to
function effectively in today's
society, who have a reasonably
good basic education and who
care about the frailer ones left
behind would qualify.
The more affluent'
professional is not necessary
excluded so long as he or she
genuinely appreciates the basic
problems of the Miss Jennys
and her children and who is
prepared to spend the
necessary time and patience
required.
In fact I would qualify
anyone who can sincerely say:
"There but for the grace of
God go I".
* ** * *
The above are merely
guidelines for the sort of help
that, in my experience and
non-professional opinion, the
lost strata of our society
require in order to help them
join the mainstream of life in
the Bahamas in the 1970s.
Of course, and this again is
outside the scope of this
column, unless outside capital
can be injected back into
the economy present
socio-economic problems will
doubtlessly escalate into
epidemic proportions and new
problems develop that may
ignite our community that no
numbers of big brothers,
substitute fathers and sisters
would be able to solve.


m 'u'


. **' .% '' s..


TWO OF THE DOGS in last year's Sub-Novice Obedience Class
of the Dog Show. Apart from the Obedience Class, this year's dog
Show will have seventeen other classes which will cater for any
kind of a dog from a six-months-old Potcake puppy to a mature
Pure Bred. The Bahamas Fifth Annual Dog Show will be held on
November 10 at Government House and entry forms are
obtainable from the Humane Society, local Veterinarians
Bahamas Feed Supply and Modernistic Garden and Pet Supply
Limited.


I NO ONE UNDER 17 ADMITTED.


Paradise islandd convention manager,


a girl on the way up, wins scholarship

By Janet Byles
TO COMMEMORATE BAHAMAS INDEPENDENCE '73, the management of Paradise Island Limited established in the latter part of
June the James Crosby Independence Scholarship Awards, tenable at Florida International University to employees of Paradise Island
Limited and members of their immediate families. A successful applicant for one of these scholarships is Bahamian Yvonne Knowles,
Convention Manager of Paradise Island Limited.


The only woman in the
Bahamas' hotel industry in an
actual sales capacity, Miss
Knowles' post at Paradise has
two distinct phases: the
booking of groups to the Beach
Inn, the Ocean Club and the
Britannia Beach Hotel, three
hotel properties owned and
operated by Paradise Island
Limited, and the servicing of
these groups on arrival, which
involves detailed planning of
their meetings and social
activities. Miss Knowles also
administers all group food and
beverage functions for Paradise
Island Limited.
"It's a demanding job," says
this attractive lady, "but it's
also very enjoyable and
working with people, especially
interesting people is inspiring.
P.I.L is a good company with
sou nd management and
because of its unique
diversification of hotels,
gourmet restaurants and
gaming facilities, we are
involved in a more varied form
of operation than in the
average hotel...we've got more
to offer the client, therefore
there's more to sell and this
complex never fails to awaken
interest in the buyer."
EXPERT
Although an expert in her
line. Miss Knowles has had a
fairly recent introduction to
the hospitality trade. On
graduating from Queen's
College, she took commercial
courses in typing and
shorthand and then began in
1956 a six year employment
stint as receptionist and
secretary at the late Sir
Stafford Sands' chambers.
Next, she ventured into the
banking world as executive
secretary for a year. After this
term, she moved to New York
where she worked as a
secretary at Sherman and
Sterling's Law Firm. In '65 she
left New York to pursue
advanced courses in Economics
and English Language at
"University Tutorial College,


YVONNE KNOWLES
London England. While there a
desire to proceed to law studies
at the Inns of Court possessed
her but lack of sufficient funds
at the time prevented her from
achieving this aim.
At the end of her two year
study programme at University
Tutorial College, Miss Knowles
worked for a short period for
the British Sugar Corporation,
London. After a long tenure
abroad, she returned to Nassau
in '67 where she had a four
month acquaintance with the
hotel industry as executive
secretary to Bland Hoke, then
Manager of the Nassau Beach
Hotel. She later returned to her
one-time love, law, at Pindling
and Nottage and operated their
Freeport office as manager for
two years.
With a depth of knowledge
and experience in banking, the
hospitality trade and law, Miss
Knowles was anxious to
re-associate herself with the
hotel industry, joining Paradise
Island Limited in '69 soon
after the second modification
of the complex, as a secretary
in the operations department
involved in accounting and
management function of the
company.
SALES RECORD
Appointed to her present
post two years ago, Miss
Knowles has an outstanding
sales record at Paradise and has
managed group clients such as
the New Jersey State Bar


Association, General Electric
Companies, Kinney Shoe
Company, Standard Register
Company and L'Oreal of Paris
(U.S. and Paris offices). In the
summer of '72 she was chosen
by Paradise Island Limited to
attend advanced courses in
Hotel Administration at
Cornell University.
Miss Knowles sees great
potential for women in the
sales division of the hospitality
trade. "Women lend an easy air
to sales," she notes, "It is often
a very natural thing for
them...and if a woman is
attractive and intelligent she
undoubtedly has a selling
advantage."
On January 3rd 1974, Miss
Knowles will begin a two year
degree course majoring in
International Hotel


Management at Florida
I international University.
Subjects will include
Accounting and Finance, Food
and Beverage Management and
Hotel Administration.
Of this move she says,
"Paradise Island Limited has
confidence in the future of the
Bahamas and its people and as
a Bahamian I cannot afford to
pass up this wonderful
opportunity, I have always
wanted to further my
education and .I'm very
thankful to the company for
making this possible."
One of twelve children, Miss
Knowles is a daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Alex C. Knowles. A
creative artiste in many ways,
she enjoys swimming, bicycle
riding, travel, writing short
stories and gourmet cooking at
her home on East Bay Street.


Bahamian vice- president at San Andros


EDNAL THOMPSON, 33,
(pictured) has been appointed
the new Vice-President and
project manager for San
Andros (Bahamas) Limited
(SABAL), Peter J. Porath,
president, announced
Wednesday.
Thompson is San Salvador
born, educated and trained.
"When Columbus Landings
bought the acreage at San
Salvador, they took me with it.
I built it," says Thompson.
Joseph Stehlin Jr.,
Vice-President and an owner of
SABAL, was then a
vice-president at the San
Salvador development.
Thompson describes his
duties on the multi-million
dollar SABAL land
development at the northern
end of Andros as "making sure
projects go as planned, from
earth works to villas."
Thompson is the son of
Miriam Davis of San Salvador.
He is married to the former
Lilymae Albury, college bursar
at the San Salvador Teachers'


" EDNAL THOMPSON
College. Mrs. Thompson and
their four children expect to
join him soon at San Andros,
where they plan to reside.
Thompson says of San
Andros, "I know the island has
a great potential, because of
assets like unlimited water and
its location, near Nassau and
'Miami. I am pleased to be part
of a development which can
mean so much to the
Bahamas."


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OUR COMMUNITY


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(hp Eributw


Thursd


ay, October 25, 1973


Mike-happy pilot spoils


veteran traveler's nap
By Abigail Van Buren
c 1973 "y Chicago Tribun-N. Y. News Synd., Inc.
DEAR ABBY: While flying from the Midwest to the
West Coast recently, I was enjoying the most peaceful nap,
when I was rudely awakened by a booming voice from over
the loudspeaker which blared, "THIS IS YOUR CAPTAIN
SPEAKING-we are now flying over the Grand Canyon!"
Abby. this wasn't a plane filled with sightseeing yokels
who had never flown before. I am reasonably certain that
most of the passengers had already seen the Grand Canyon
from 35,000 feet
I never did resume my nap, which I badly needed. Be a
pal, and print this. It may wake up some of the mike-happy
pilots Thanks' THE OOOOOOONLY WAY TO FLY
DEAR THE: Consider it done.
DEAR ABBY: You once wrote that there must be a
special place in heaven for second wives. Well. I am wife
No 3, and hope there is more comfort in heaven than on
earth for us This is my first marriage, and 1 never
dreamed it would be like this.
I married a man of exceptional character and ability,.
and watched two of his well-supported ex-wives literally
wipe him out financially when he had a long period of
unemployment. Now he is older than his age, discouraged,
broke, but still emotionally hung up on his "responsibili-
ties" to his "other families." And they still hang on for
dear life !Five children by No 1 are grown, but the sorry
victims of an incompetent mother and an absent father,
No 2 is pitifully mentally ill.! Needless to say. my needs
come last
While my husband slowly rehabilitates himself and his
business. I am supporting the whole ship I love him. and I
married him for better or worse, and feel that's the least I
can do Fortunately, I have a good career
My faith in God is the only thing that keeps me sane.
hut I have all I can do to deal with his guilt and nmy
disappointment How do others handle such problems'.'
NUMBER THREE
DEAR Nt MBER THREE: Those with less character
than you refuse to support "the whole ship," thereby add-
ing to their husbands' guilt. It is to his credit that he feels
a sense of obligation to his 'other families." and to yours
that -ou help him meet it. If you and he feel that the
burden is more than you can cope with. I strongly urge
professional counseling.

DEAR ABBY: I recently attended the funeral of my
best friend, and I have never heen so appalled in my life'
A distant relative of the deceased brought an oil paint-
ing of her three children to the funeral. It was in an ornate
frame, and so huge she had difficulty carrying it.
She went around showing the painting to everyone
Several people acted '..i-.t.hd but no one said anything It
appeared that the only reason this woman came to the
funeral w as to show off the picture
Would you say she was out of line" And shouldn't
someonee have told her so" WAS THIERE IN S. C
DEAR WAS: She was definitely out of line. But I doubt
if anything said to one so obviously insensitive would have
penetrated.
DEAR ABBY Congratulations for standing up for the
snake I had ai pet boa constrictor for many years and kept
him until he became too big to feed, after which I gave
him to the z oi
I have .ichi our children to differentiate between
poisonous and nonpoisonous snakes and encouraged them
to hold snakes in their hands so that this irrational fear of
snakes did not occur in my family.
Snakes eat rodents and insects, and are an important
part of the hilance of nature If we had more snakes, we
would need less dangerous pesticides. Sign me .
HOUSTON LAWYER
DEXR LAWYER: But we might lose a Roman Catholic
priest. Read on:

DEAR ABBY Your defense of the much-maligned ser-
pent was ,ir'! t.iughltt provOkin,. but there is another side
to that story
I am a I,'iim ;,itholi. priest, and I have found that
many otherwise ilente normal" people suffer from herpeto-
phobia -the fear 1 A ,nakes It is no mere prejudice, biblical
or otherwise, but actually a fear as deeply rooted and as
difficult to treat a- claustrophobia (fear of enclosure', acro
phobia [fear of heights or any other phobia.
Most herpetouphiihes will readily agree that their fear is
entirely irrational, but that makes it no less real.
Some herpetuphobes nearly have heart failure just com-
ing upon a picture of a 'nuake it a magazine I know I am
one of them. and have been sinme before I even knew there
was a Bible I have no idea why I am this way, but I do
know that if a.inyne tries to bring a snake into this rectory,
I'm leaving' A HERI{PETOPHOBIC PRIEST
P.S. One fear I do '.t have is signing my name to Letters-
to-the-Editor and the like hut this is one instance where
prudence may 'lict;ute an exception I will sign it but
please don't use my name im sour column There are too
many clowns around here for romifort

DEAR ABBY I am a fairly attractive widow, living on
what is laughingly called "widow 's row."
I have been completely captivated by a retired Marine
officer who lives next door to me He is a widower and
everything a woman could want in a man, but no woman
seems able to attract his attention.


Many evenings I go to sleep listening to him play the
piano. It's the most beautiful music I've ever heard, hut it
sounds so sad.
Those who have known him say that his wife died when
they were both very young, and since then he has built a
shell around himself that no woman has been able to pene-
trate.
Obviously, my problem is. how can I let him know that
I am interested in him? NEAR AND YET SO FAR
DEAR NEAR: Invite him to join you in some special
dinner. If he reciprocates, you may see the start of a good
friendship, at least. After that-who knows?


Bahamas looks forward to New World Discovery quincentennar


S \\ SA L VADOR,
B \11 \MAS Although the
clchriation will not take place
tir arnotlhc! 19 years, steps are
alc'ad.l\ K'lllg taken to ensure.
that the quincentennial of the
dliscovc ot the New World \i\
('hstiopihe Columnbus gets all
tic Aitntion it deserves.
\n1d t0warids this endi the
c' \\ sorld D)is\cvers\
Q)iinciIUntnniail IFrust has beenI
eStabbSlid.d
"'lh cst.iblishmiuent ot the
ttist is ito ensure th ia the
0Oth )cjr ot (.'oluinh buis'
lainfd Ill \will tic a itnis
c<. It lai lliiiVsL rsad \ ," iit
the hli ,n D)r. Di)onis Jotlhllnstn.
Ilr ,It iison. BahaL i i sM
(, \ nI'I) it ie t scflatl or, h1 is bcc n
in!, 1 1 iMi,1 ntal in to tusingi the
jl't t l (in on San Salauator inll
L'c ntl ,irs. A\ lorcinost ivii
\ Iork Dr. Jo(ihnson is
ichi,irIniai it the l)iscovi-cr\ I)a
Iecst val. \nd for their. net I )
D.'. |)r. Johnsonll, a torinicr
ectlurit iI social studies aLi the
Soi.tiltIl I1 'nivcrsity in Baton
Ruo0ge, I .I. c.'nvisagcs a busy
11111c in pI l'paration for the bigi


day October 12, 1 992.
Presently the Bahamian-horn
senator is getting assistance
from Dr. Pedro Grau, a former
(Cuban businessman who now,
lives in Monte Carlo. Dr. Graiu,
who is very enthusiastic about
focusing attention on this tin\
island as the birthplace of
western civilization, has spent
the last 10 years involved in
p r o-Ch ristopher Columbus
ventures.
TRUST FOUNDI)D
rhe establishment of the
trust was announced recently ,
at a banquet held in Nassau,
San d attended by the
(Governor-General. Sir \1li,
Butler lr.
Also present at theic
announcement was Dr. William
Scars. Professor ot
A anthropology at the iloruda
Atlantic University. Dr. Sear,,
has headed serve ral
ant hropological digs anit
surveys in the Bahamias. It is
lr. Sears' theory that thii'
\rawak Indians who migrated
to the Bahainas from South
America in search of a ncsw


home. arrived at San Salvador
only a short time before
(olumbus.
One of tile main tasks facing
organizers of the trust during
the next 19 years is research
and collection of existing data
on the life of Christopher
Columbus. Much interest will
also be shown in compiling
information and discovering
artifacts about the Arawak
Indians. fhese artifacts will be
houses in a museum which the
trust founders plan to build at
San Salvador.
I)IS(OVI RY SIIRINI:
"It \%ill serve as a
heinlsphneic- shrine to the
discoverer C oft thie \c World,"
said Dr. Johilsol.
Membership to tlie trust
already includes such notable
personalitiesas aBahamian actor
Sidney's Poltiei.
in expressing his enthusiasm
tor the venture, l)i. (;Giat
siiiiimed ip his efelmn, with the
is oids: "'Uahanianss c.in lead
the Nes\ World in a
pole-to-pole celebration oft our
common0t il heritage in 19 l ."'


GUESTS AND SPEAKERS at the inauguration banquet of the New World Discovery
Quincentennial Trust launched Discovery Day (October 12) at the Sonesta Beach Hotel.
The estaL'ishment of the Quincentennial Trust is to ensure the continuing focus of San
Salvador and the Bahamas as the place where history began for the New World in 1492,
the year of Columbus' landfall at San Salvador. From left: Dr. william Sears, professor of
Anthropology, Florida Atlantic University; Dr. Doris Johnson, Chairman of the
Quincentennial Trust, Governor General, Sir Milo Butler, Lady Butler, Mrs. Henry Banks,
Dean at Bethune-Cookman College, Dr. Pedro Grau, Honorary Chairman of the Trust,
and Miss Discovery Day '73 Bernadette Thompson. Photo: Fred Maura


Happy to meet you...






Im the Helpful Banker


"Youll find me at any branch




of thle Royal Bank"


The Royal The Helpful Bank

ROYAL BANK
Branches throughout the Biahamain s.


Thursd











Thursday, October 25, 1973


When its Xerox you want, it's Xerox you get!
MICHAEL MINNS, sales ApS w M
manager at Xerox, looked a bit .

whole order of 50 660.
machines rolled up in trucks
"We usually get about 10 a
month, but our new transport
venture-by-sea has proved
uncommonly effective," he


said.
The shipment "valued in six
figures" will be used to
updatee service for businesses
already using Xerox with the
other half available to new
users." Minns explained
He added, "It represents a
substantial investment in the
future of the Bahamas and its
business."
The 660, Minns said, is the
smallest of the Xerox plain
paper copiers, designed for
offices making 700 to 3,000
copies a month. It comprises a
major segment of U.S. use, he


said. (0()s Il'.nt
Nos\ Mlrns is l isils !lil rliil I --' ,'" :
room for 50 o (0, ri tlh \ '! \ lli!'! .', ( :
Copy Serisc Irlit niil r e
('ulliis cinr i', A\ bl ioni' /:'i ,s ,' I


iii,


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,1,I1 .' n P A i rl/\m phourto ad, back copies can be
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CLASSIFIED


SECT


NOTICE MICW -Nm I FOR SALE


C12172
NOTICE is hereby given that
GRANVILLE EMMANUEL
HENFIELD of Lightbourne
Street, Yellow Elder Garden,
Nassau, Bahamas is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twernty-eight days
from the 18th day ol October
1973 to Tte Iv minister
responsible fci Ntationality and
Citizenship. P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.
C12189
NOTICE is hereby given tha-
GEORGE ROTHNIE MYERS
of P. 0. Box 1562, West Bay
Street, Nassau, Bahamas ii
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twent.-eight days from the
18th day of October, 1973, to
The Minister responsible for
Nationaltty and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147. Nassai.

C12190
NOTICE is hereby given that
D I Mv E FP, C I L C U I S
ADDERLEY VEUS of
Coconut Grove Avenue is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for naturalisation
as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who
knows any reason why
naturalisation should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 18th day of October,
1973, to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.

C12188
NOTICE is hereby given that
AGNES ELIZABETH RIGBY
of Balfour Avenue Nassau,
N.P. is applying to th, Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
18th day of October, 1973, to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P
0. Box N7147, Nassau.


C12196
NOTICE is hereby given that
JULIA ALTIDOR of Peach
Street, N. P., Bahamas is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for naturalisation
as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who
knows any reason why
naturalisation should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 18th day of October,
1973, to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.
C12202
NOTICE is hereby given that
DESMOND ORINTO
TULLOCH of Carmichael
Road Western District, New
Providence, Bahamas is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
18th day of October, 1973, to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

C12279
NOTICE is hereby given that
TIMOTHY JOHN
HOUGHTON of Brighton
Road, Coral Harbour is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for naturalisation
as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who
knows any reason why
naturalisation should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 25th day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.


C12181
NOTICE is hereby given that
COLETA R. FORBES of
Mayfield Park, Grand Bahama
is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
18th day of October, 1973, to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau


C12183
NOTICE is hereby given that
MRS. VICTORIA ALBERTHA
BAIN of Balfour Avenue,
Nassau N. P. Box N4168 is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days f'-oi the
18th day of October 1973
to I he Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147. Nassau.

C12186
NOTICE is hereby given that
PU NCHILLA ELIZABETH
WALKINE of Yellow Elder
Gardens, Nassau. Bahamas is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration asa
citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
18th day of Octiber, 1973, to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.


C12254
NOTICE is hereby given that
DESM OND MASON of
Pyfroms Addition, Collett
Road, Nassau is applying to the
M i n sister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 25th day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.
C12332
NOTICE is hereby given that
JAMES ROBERT GREEN of
Seabreeze Estates is applying
to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalisation
as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who
knows any reason why
registration/naturalisation
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
25th day of October, 1973, to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship. P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau

C12293
NOTICE is hereby given that
GUSTAVOUS STEVENSON
OUTTEN of Farrington Road.
Nassau, Bahamas is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 25th day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N7147,
Nassau.
C 12297
NOTICE is hereby given that
CLIFFORD LOUISSANT
ALIAS JOHNNY WHYLLY of
George Town, Exuma,
Bahamas is applying to the
M in ister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship for
naturalisation as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why naturalization should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
25th day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
O Box N7147, Nassau.

C12185
NOTICE is hereby oaven that
ESTHER :. FORBES of
Mayfield Park, Grand Bahama
is applying to the Minister


responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts, with,
twenty-eight days from the
18th day of October, 1973, to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

C12126
NOTICE is hereby given that
LEXANMA GOZANMAR
(ALSO KNOWN AS LOUIS
GEORGE) of Augusta Street
South, N.P. is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why naturalisation should riot
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
17th day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.


C12273
BILL'S REAL ESTATE
AGENCY LIMITED offers
good buys in residential and
commercial lots, acreage,
houses, commercial buildings
ard attractive beach property.
Whatever your requirements
may h' whether buying or
selling call us at 23921 for
pron.p: dependable and
efficient service.


REAL ESTATE

Cl219F
FOk SALE BY OWNER
2 bedroom house full",
furnished, wall to wal;
rarpetmg, large patio, Johnson
Terrace $30,000 ALSO lot
Imperial Park 80 x 100 only
$5,500.00. Phone 51905 days
42463 after 6 p.m.

C 12048
BUY A LOT
in EASTWOOD or
WINTON MEADOWS
Call Frank Carey
at 27667 or 24815
Frank Carey Real Estate
Box N4764
Bay & Deveaux Sts.

C12115
$75 DEPOSIT gives use of
private lake & beach rights. All
utilities underground. 70 x 100
lots from $5800. NO
INTEREST. Tremendous
savings. Call Rutherford at
4-1141 or Morley & O'Brien at
2-3027 or 2-4148 or come to
YAMACRAW BEACH MODEL
HOME any afternoon.

C12272
PAY A LITTLE and get a lot
at Bill's Real Estate $75.00
down and $80.00 per month
with no interest is your easy
way to purchase a large lot
with underground utilities,
beach rights a private lake and
many other facilities. For
appointment and information
call 23921.

FOR SALE
C12269
1 lot off Twynam Avenue --
bearing fruit trees. Tel. 53743.
F.C. Knowles.


FOR SALE
2, 3 and 4 bedroom houses ,,c
the following prestigoiis
a-eas:
Westward Villas -Skyline
Heights
Highland Park The Grove
Glerrinston Gardens Sea
Breeze
Imperial Park Johnsoni
er tace
Nassau East.,- Wintor
Eastern Ronid Camperdown
Blair Estates Golden Gates
Estates
'ICHRURY PARK as well
as where ever you want it.
IN ADDITION
CO M I E RCI AL AND
RESIDENTIAL lot-, or a-'erage
in New Providence ind Frnilv'
Isl.nds.
lot l sites and more. If it's real
estate Mc h,'v it.
CONTACT T
n'AVSEON'S _fEfAL ESTATE
AGE. :Y
Corner Bay & East Streets
Phone 21178 or 55408
P O. Box N4648
'Nassau [1aharmas
or cable
DAVCO"

FOR SALE
C12296
LOT 18 BI. 13 SOUTH
BEACH ESTATES 60 by 110,
Only $3,800.00. LONG
ISLAND 1,614 Acres ideal
for development. Particulars
upon inquirnv. 7.14 acres
Carmichael Road with four
bedroom house-plus apartment
plus Sauna Bath. Asking
$75,000.00. FOWLER
STREET short distance from
Bay 2,300 sq. ft. space, used
as Laundry, warehousing,
offices can be used as
display, super market, discount
store. Only $45,000.00.
MURPHYVILLE have 3
bedrooms. 2 baths, nicely
furnished enclosed gro rnds,
car porte, only $38,000.00.
HAWKINS HILL 2 storey, 3
bedrooms enclosed spacious
grounds, only $25.000.00 See
Anytime. DIAL DAMIANOS,
DAMIANOS REALTY
COMPANY 22033, 22305,
evenings 41197.


FOR RENT
S11 761
2AY STREET Store for rent ,s
of October 15th. Fo'
mfaor ration call 2-3170.


C12214
FURNISHED AND
AIRCONDITIONED 2
bedroom, 1 bedroom and
Efficiency apartments.
Telephone 5-8134.
C11772
ONE EXTRA LARGE two
bedrooms two bath,
apartment. With large living
and dining all basically
furnished Victoria Court
APARTMENTS on Elizabeth
Avenue between Shirley and
Bay Street. Facilities, phone,
laundry, parking, T. \.
a itt-.inia, ,ir.: ;ni itioned.. 'nonc
5. I1 bet',een 8 a. anrd '


FURNISHED ROOMS
C12211
In quiet neighbourhood at
reasonable rate. For
information call 5-1044.

C11763
COTTAGES and apartments
daily, weekly or monthly
airconditioned, fully furnished,
maid serivce available. Lovely
gardens and swimming pool.
Telephone 31297, 31093.

C11868
BEAUTIFUL -- two bedroor.-
apartment in Shirlea, partly
furnished $250 a month
including water. Call 36896
Carl Lowe. Monday--Friday, 9
a.m. 5 p.m.

C12282
FULLY furnished 2 bedroom
apartment Boyd Subdivision,
Churchill Avenue. $210 per
month. Call 35906.

C 12242
ONE THREE BEDROOM, two
bath, airconditioned and
furnished home, Queen's Road,
Nassau East. Phone 5-4684 or
2-3750.

C12180
2 BEDROOM Apartment on
top of Winton Highway.
Magnificent views, private
balconies, $325.00 per month
including utilities. Beautifully
furnished. Call 21631 or 2.

C12286
2 BEDROOM unfurnished
apartment ariconditioned -- -
upstairs over Mae's Beauty
Salon East Street South. Phone
3-5350.

C12288
OFFICE FORMERLY
occupied by The Imperial Life
Assurance Company of Canada
for rent on Collins Avenue.
Approximately 1,700 square
feet of airconditioned space
with parking facilities for ten
cars. For information kindly
phone Mr. Seifert, telephone
59619.

C12292
MALTON HOUSE, Collins
Avenue available for rent
small office suites between 250
and 600 sq. ft. favourable
terms. For information call
21741/2.

CARS FOR SALE

C12298

BARGAINS



CENTRAL GARAGE
"I7/l< F asslrri P/la ir ,.a\ssaui tn TI'rad.'


USED CAR


CLEARANCE SALE


NPF 257 1970 VAUXHALL
VIVA S/WAGON 2 door
standard $500,00
NPG 906 1970 AUSTIN 4
door standard $950.00
NPJ 781 1966 MERCURY--2
door automatic $650.00
NPY 164 1972 SUNBEAM
HUNTER 4 door automatic
$1800.00
NPA 151 1971 AUSTIN 1300
S/WAGON 4 door automatic
$1200.00
NPX 217 1971 DODGE
AVENGER D.L. 4 door
automatic -$1400.00
NPY 168 1970 FORD CAPRI
2 door automatic -
$1750.00
N6580 1966 FORD L.T.D. 4
door automatic $750.00
T6544 1970 FORD VAN a
good buy $500.00
9042 1969 AUSTIN 4 door
standard $550.00
NPJ 108 1971 DODGE
AVENGER 4 door
automatic $700.00
NPX 457 1968 CHEV.
IMPALA 4 door automatic
$900.00
NPK 509 1972 CHEVY VEGA
S/WAGON 2 door automatic
$1850.00
NPR 786 1972 VAUXHALL
VICTOR 4 door automatic
- $2500.00
N9901 1968 TOYOTA 800 -
2 door standard $500.00
NPY 165 1969 FORD
CORTINA 4 door automatic
$800.00
NPH 522 1971 DODGE
AVENGER 4 door
automatic $1300.00
NPY 55 1970 VAUXHALL
VICTOR 4 door standard -
$750.00
NPS 584 1972 MORRIS
MARINA 2 door automatic
$2200.00
NPH 521 1971 DODGE
AVENGER 4 door automatic
- $1800.00

FINANCING AVAILABLE
COME IN AND SEE US
OAKES FIELD
NEAR POLICE BARRACKS
THOMPSON BOULEVARD
PHONE: 3-4711

C12259
1968 MUSTANG
CONVERTIBLE, automatic,
airconditioning, $825.00.
Phone days 28733, evenings
42060, Mr. Franklin.


I


......... wmmdr-


I -I


-1


(hp Oribtutr












Zhe Tribunm


Thursday, October 25, 1973


CLASSIFIED


SECTION


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS- FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV. -TELEPHONE 21986 EXT. 5


C12251
1971 DODGE AVENGER, 4
door, automatic. $1095.00.
Phone John Cash, 2-2768 da&s.
3-1397 evenings/weekends.

C12205
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD.
P.O. BOX N-640
NASSAU BAHAMAS
USED CARS
1970 HILLMAN HUNTER 4
Dr, Auto. White $850o
1968 JAVELIN A/C $b-i
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA 2 L
Auto. Geen $ 1 4 -..)
1971 FORD CAPRI Aut,.
Blue $i69b
1970 CHEVELLE SS A i
Dr. Red $2.~00
1968 VAUXHALL VICTOR
$600
1969 PLYMOUTH
SATELLITE $1300
1969 PONTIAC GTO A r
Vinyl Red $ .;0''
1971 FORD PINTO Br own
Vinyl Auto. $Qci'-5
1971 VAUXHALL VICTOR 4
Dr Std. White $;2'''-
1967 MERCURY COUGAR
Std. Green $900
1969 AUSTIN 1 100 1 St(i
Green $995
1970 FIAT 124 4 [, S'
White $%600
1968 BUICK ELECTRA ..*.:
--$1595
1969 VOLKSWAGEN GLe''
$1250
Trade-ins Welcomed
Located Oakes Field
Opposite the Ice eHouse
Telephone 3-4636-7-8

ART SUPPLIES
C11770
COMPLETE rinne of ai'tst,'
supplies. Oils, ac'ylis. iL- va a.
easels, etc. Bahnar-ian PF ..t
Supply Ltd., Bay Stieet. Phone
2-2386, 2-2898.

FOR SALE


C12281
HONDA 50 197i0 MVd- i ,,
r,.r-,Cli l r L " .' '
miles. $100. Tel .

C12140
OFFICE FUR 'i, :', i
Desks, SWIVlF al r ,
secretary chairs,
NCR rRFccr ,i
Contact 2-1491 2 3 1 f ,,
4-30.

C12287
1 69 6 9 B N L i
TRIUMPH (650) with eo,i
parts. Contact Gar-' K '
Phone: Day 9-5 244130 :) .
57726.
C12290
THREE WELL S1Or" i RP
Ernest Smith Pho :';4 i

WANTS TO BUY
C12280
ONE PARROT o, 'a
Phone 41442 or b i44A .

PETS FOR SALE
C12244
BABY R AC ODO ,
Completely tamed ni .. ,
most interest j
affectionate of pet's Te.,ip
D. Knowles 2 27 /
5-3795 nights.

CARD OF THANKS
C12261
THE FAMILY 1 f tI ,0 :
Albertha lIe, *
died on 23rd r -, h' .
wish to thaxi ",' .1
friends and relat-., 'i
kind expression of-' p. M:v r.
their recent t:"'e. o- 't.
Special thanks to -- har,-
Smith of Zion Bari' Lhbir(
and Butler's Fun""ai un,,i &
Crematoriu m.
TH12 F.3' LY

C 12283


The daughter of the latr-
Mrs. Marguerite Bereby wishts
to extend her many thanks fo,
the expressions of s,ynpathy
she received during her rernti
bereavement. Also, to the Reav
Black who has rendered
wonderful service to one to bep
remembered.


MARINE SUPPLIES
C11762
PACEMAKER 44 ft.
Luxurious Cruising Yacht.
Phone 3-2371.


A11894
1969 31ft. CHRIS CRAF'
Commander. Sleeps six, private
shower, two 230 h.p. engines
with less than 200 hours,
kitchenette, good condition.
Call 24267, 54011.


C 12266
WANTED
sIitable for


Boat t-aIlei
16' boat. Must be


in good condi ton Phoirie'
51962
C12245
CUSTOM MADE heavy dulty
trailer specially designed to fit
25 ft. boat. 4 wheels arid 4
jac-s $1200 Phone 3-1642.


Abati' built boat, 14 feet,
months old. complete wa it
Seagull 'imot,, Contact Nolaid
Dear', WrvhF alel Bnar. Miar,
Street

ENTERTAINMENT
C12258
THE BAHAMA
DRAMA CIRCLE


DUNDAS CIVIC CENTRE


f RFi d R
S 30 p ,n
T,(ket,. $3

Bf RNAR


, ,,n Ii;t :-icj !




i L.T I J L J
SUfI U N i y
D SoUNI r Y


HELP WANTED


L) t! 's o h ' b :t 't"-

it I F' ,


C. 12 .,2
SALES MAN


( i F ' r r 'u. Tni li.i P,




s4,ANTl Li LIV -.FJ ',..AIJ
, 'e O 30 $30 pcm .4'
f d & Boaid) Fu;
** t v, TNi 2 !; 31 '':. m



I ORulS AND SYSTEMS
'j SiG r'E R .oequL ired b)'
S i-,e s Systemsr Li ,htoe.
; c(a t m st have s,%.e!
:, errence '


q ; 1 .. : i l .-c '


. I F. 0 'la '.,': _i. h d I -
; ( Ap:,.i, Ad.,


ci
'1.. tre
i ,> F .;


i i '? "

-:%,' "i i .' ,- ,t .,+ ,!i,
4 1 0 T I''Q ,t H ".


N '
r Oli',1 n it' I .
N 320. '. 1 i '


F) it -I


'it',O 'L F, S' O
AI, )W I ,'.,i F
I'AtMOOt)n IFANFi, i ANr)
1J'NWA'()[ )Y (V ( r[;Q T i '.l (,
LOCAL Y AS ( ROSS &
THIOM,0 S Pt at i '1RI S rTI-t


SLRVIiI S Of
JUA LI If i
A(i O N T -AN I
S! B O). I ) AP L
BSex 1 .i ,t
BAHAMAS


A YO'UN
CAliTF E[ f
OF" 'i

N Au S S A U,


C 12284
EXPE RIENCI D OF F SE TF
PRESSMAN Most be
conscientious and able to
produce quality work Call
Executive Printers 2-4267 or
5-4012.

Your ad in The Tribune
will bring results


NASSAU


BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL


DIRECTORY

Save Time


SHOP

BY

PHONE


To List In This Directory

I Line Per Month 1611


Call 21986 EXI. 5

2 line Per Month 1100!


SAE TIM E SAVE MONEY


munm m m i-.,i
r FI )(R %IAl IF1 N \F 1 ; K(K S Si0I :

I L. A It l I I ,I I, ,I iA 1 ,



1rI I'P1 I l ,l ', R R \\ I -I


oPI I \S o ,RI IR \t )I ,

\t' R s
( lil I \\ III \L Hil I 1I:,







S XR S MI' i )'( 'I DRY I I \
F)in .u iR, l ii)iN Fr Flu

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-I










--r------ -m--m.m.mmm .-.
" I" K r i R iIW \ i l IrI.-IS



FOR THE ACTION YOU WANT



Shop Nassau Merchants

For Business And Services



fl Fcl s itr- ) ,


C 1229


U flA D JJi


YJWr u F3..U


$Ai JJ prJ4 i


HURRTH)

Fl,{BEslTBUT


N15?
.5(Ik $195
\747o
6S F orrI $345
NI TK 40
69 I .Noto $395
NII-
" 0\ lan\lihill $395
16544
'70 Iord ,\ $445
N65 O)
,, ,,od i l,) $895
1>tb I $895

S. .,lili $895

91) MNorri 1100 $895


6, (Fi l. Slti V.iu $995


( I In':"

6.6 '1,Ird ( II





". i \ 1 iii \

- I hu)t \i i,<
\i'\ 4\-




'0 11 0 1 111
'O( N [,

N1'11060
'7I) \Vi' F Iuirk


TRADE SERVICES
1 769

Pinder's Custonms

Brokerage Ltd.
Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
F.NASSAU. ALAHAMAS
P 0 Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY I RUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
iFr 'HANI1CAL HANDLING
ECt-IIP .ENT
IATAC ,I u C ,r',0 ",:--:NTS
CUSTOM '.S ClI LARANCL
& ,f-LI \VcRY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
"5 SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
SXC(ELLENT SERVICE
iF-ASONABLL RATES
S..tNTACT LYIviAN PINDE P
OR JACK CASH
PHOI:\E : 2-3 795, 2-379o,
2-/797, 2-37934
Airport 77434.


I TRADE SERVICES


Cl11C70
BAHAMAS ANTENNA
SYSTEMS
SOLVING POOR RECEPTION
Same day service for moving
antennas or new installations.
Call Douglas Lowe 23371
51772.

C1177
T. V. 8ANTENi'AS
r'costers for homes,
apartments and hotels.
Sales *ndi services
Call 5-34C-.
;-.'2FLD CF .rUSi".
i, .clrey Street
rrext to Frani 's lace.c

You get RESULTS with

0hep ribunt
Classified Ads


I GRAND BAHAMA I


NOTICE
- 6364
1OnFICE is hereby given that
vVILLY CHRISTOPHE SCOTT
(f fr report, Giand Bahama is
applying to the Minister
Oesi()onible for Nationality and
,tiz'enship, for rnaturalisation
n, a citizen of The Bahamas,
iand that any person who
knows any reason why
,' ., .i ....n should not be
;,.ranted should send a written
'( signed statement of the
ta, ts within twenty-eight days
niom the 18th day of October,
1')/3 to The Minis'per
' ;) hi for N atij 'r.' t' a
i L''. ,i.ip P 0 B LoX N/, .l /,
I : a ,i fli


1T.: h0, hereby r,,eln that
.:!A U-ATRICLE FORHFS
,,,gp(, CraAd [a..hama is
.iFp F 'ioFln t') the Minister
p 1 s i b 1 l e f o r
Njtionality ,an1d C;.izenship,
For imijstiration as a citizen of
ThEi I ahamas, and that any
uoerson who knows any reason
why ,iqlistration li )fild rinot be
rantied should send a written
and ,ii'ned statement of the
Iasto with ir twenty-eight days
from the 18th day of October,
19/3 to The Minister
is;.'i-nsible for Nationality and
Cilize.rship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.
C(6375
NOTICE is hereby niven that
OSWALD FRANKLIN
BASSFTT of 6B Daylite 3,
F-ir rplO t, Girand Bahama,
Bi ci.imas is applying to the
MVI ] ril ti responsible for
Nati,..iialit y iand Citizenship,
for i tristi ti o in is a citizen of
The Hahaimas, aind that any
person who kiutws any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 25th day of October,
1973, to The Minister
responsible foi Nationality and
Citizenship. P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.


Sr C6374
NOTICE is hereby given that
PRINCESS LOUISE BASSETT
of 6B Daylite 3, Freeport,
$395 Grand Bahama, Bahamas is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
$495 Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
S$795 any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
$1195 statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
25th day of Octiber, 1973, to
.$995 The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
l.%. 0.O Box N7147. Nassau.


$7


$11

$10


50MORE TO


CHOOSE FROM


70's-71's -72's -73's


You can't beat these

prices in Miami !!

Check the Miami Herald


Then HURRY to


CENTRAL GARAGE
"THE EASIEST PLACE IN NASSAU TO TRADE

Phone 3 4711 THOMPSON BLVD.


I '~" I-


f95


C6383
NOTICE is hereby given that
745 OLIVE BEATRICE HEWITT
of Fi report, Grand Bahama,
95 Baha,,,as ii applying tc the
Mi nistri i responsible for
Nit ionality and Citizenship,
95 tfo registration as a citizen of
95 The Baharas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
arid signed statement of the
D facts within twenty-eight days
rfrom the 25th day of October,
1973. to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.


C6389
NOTICE is hereby given that
UNA KEYMIST of No. 4
Poinciana Drive, Freeport,
Grand Bahama, Bahamas is
fr applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of t4. facts within
twenty-eight days from the
25th day of October, 1973, to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7174, Nassau.


NITCE
C6371
NOTICE is hereby given that
PATRICIA M, McGILLION of
22A Lancaster Place, Freeport,
Grand Bahama, Bahamas is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
b2th day of October, 1973, to
Tr- Mi ,iister responsible f'or
Natiunality and Cituzenship, P.
O. Box N7147, Nassau.
C6351
NOTICE is hereby qiven thal
MISS RAFOLITA T
WILLIAMS of Eight Mile
Rock, Grand Bahama is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
18th day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.
C6376
NOTICE is hereby given that
ALEXANDER THOMAS
BAIN of P. 0. Box F-24,
Freeport, Grand Bahama,
Bahamas is applying to the
Minister responsible fi(
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen uof
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 25th day of October,
1973, to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.
C6362
NOTICE is hereby given that
JEAN BAPTISTE RAPHAEL
BRASSENS of Freeport,
Grand Bahama, is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 18th day of October,
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.

C6395
NOTICE is hereby given that
ERROLL MALCOLM KEELL
of 12 Alamanda Court, P. 0.
Box F-2456, Freeport, Grand
Bahama is applying to the
M i n ister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship.
for registration as a citizen ri
The Bahamas, and that arny
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 25th day of October,
1973, to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.


C6384
NOTICE is hereby given that
VINCENT O'CONNOR of P.
0. Box F-1324, Freeport,
Grand Bahama, Bahamas is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
25th day of October, 1973, to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.


MIII


I!


C6358
NOTICE is hereby given that
ORVILLE JOHN HOLDEN of
P. 0. Box F1851, Freeport,
Grand Bahama is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for naturalisation as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why naturalisation should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
18th day of October 1973 to
The Mirister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Bov N7147, N,,ssau.
C6386
NOTICE is hereby given that
ISMAE DIANA FRANCIS of
P. 0. Box F-1033, Freeport,
Grand Bahama is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 25th day of October,
1973, to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau
C6366
NOTICE is hereby given that
EUGENE ALEXANDER
HAMILTON of Seagrape, Eight
Mile Rock, Grand Bahama,
Bahamas is applying to the
Mi n ister responsible for
Nationality ard Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight cdys
from the 18th day of October,
1973 to The Minister
responsible fuor Nationality and
Citizenship, P 0. Box N/147,
Nassau.

CG377
NOTICE is heoeby given that
ANNETTA REID of 186 Scott
Ave., Freeport, Giand Baham.a,
Bahamas, is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
frorn the 25th day of Octob r,
1973, to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. O. Box N7147,
Nassau.
C6365
NOTICE is hereby given that
HUBERT FRANK SINDEN of
406 Easter Avenue, Lucayan
R idge. Freeport. Grand
Bahama, Bahamas is applying
to the M minister p..n,l.i. for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 25th day of October,
1973, to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. O. Box N7147 ,
Nassau.

C6390
NOTICE is hereby given that
JACQUES JEAN PIERRE
ABOUZEIDE of 133 Inagua
Place Hawskbill, P. 0. Box
F-1845, Freeport, Grand
Bahama is applying to the
Mi n sister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for naturalisation as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why naturalisation should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
25th day of October, 1973, to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
O. Box N7147, Nassau.

C6385
NOTICE is hereby given that
ALICE GERTRUDE FRITH of
Eight Mile Rock, Grand
Bahama, Bahamas is applying
to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of


The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 25th day of October,
1973, to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.


HELP WANTED ]


C6396
Two diesel mechanics with five
years experience working on
Allis Chalmers and Caterpillar
line equipment. Successful
applicants must be prepared to
work overtime if required. For
further information contact:
Alvin Swann, Freeport
Construction Company
Limited, P. 0. Box F-2410,
Telephone 352-7091.


NOE


C6352
NOTICE is hereby given that
HARRINGTON WILLIAMS of
Eight Mile Rock, Grand
Bahama is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 18th day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147.
Nassau.


HELP WANTED
,6334
Job Title BURNERMEN (2)
Minimum Education Good
basic education. Experience in
fuel burning process in rotary
Kilns and production of
Clinker. Cement plant rotary
Kiln burnerrpan.
Minimum Experience 3-5
years.
Duties/Responsibilities
Operate Kilns to produce
clinker by a continuous process
of burning.
Interested applicant contact
Personnel Department,
Bahamas Cement Company, P.
0. Box F100, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.
C6381
PORTERS: (15) Porters to
wash pots, clean and mop
kitchen area and do garbage
collection. Interested persons
apply: GRAND BAHAMA
HOTEL, WEST END, GRAND
BAHAMA. Personnel Office,
between the hours of 9:00 a.m.
and 3:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday. Elon Matrin,
Jr., Personnel Director.

C12276
INTERNATIONAL FIRM of
Chartered Accountants have
several vacancies for Chartered
or Certified Accountants in
their Freeport Office.
Successful candidates will be
paid excellent salaries and
bonuses. Applicants should
apply in writing to the Staff
Partner, Price Waterhouse &
Co., P. 0. Box F-2415,
Freeport, Bahamas.

C6387
Position open for experienced
male with household goods
packing background. Must also
have thorough knowledge of
inventory, shipping and
receiving and building of
lift -vans for overseas
shipments.
Telephone 352-7821 for
appointment. FREEPORT
TRANSFER LIMITED.

C6388
Re frigeration and
air co nditio n ing
TECHNICIAN. Must be able to
design, estimate and maintain
all types of air-conditioning
and refrigeration units and
allied equipment. Must have
knowledge of electricity,
certificate from an accredited
r e f r i g e ration and
air-conditioning school, over
(5) years experience in this
field.
For interview, call
352-8782/7838 or write to:
Standard Plumbing Co.
(Freeport) Ltd., P. 0. Box
F-2460.

C 12289
SYNTEX CORPORATION
REQU I RES THE
F O L L OW I N G : -
MAINTENANCE
SUPERVISOR (Responsible for
Responsible for the
supervision and training of the
Maintenance personnel in the
performance of maintenance
operations in Chemical Plant.
Plans, schedules and supervises
the work of Machinist/Mill-
wrights, Electricians. Utility
Mechanics and Pipefitter/
Welders. Diversified
Maintenance and Supervisory
experience essential.
CHEMICAL MANUFACTUR-
ING OPERATORS.
2-5 years experience in batch
chemical processing producing
fine organic chemicals.
Applicants should apply in
person to Syntex Corporation,
West Sunrise Highway, or write
to P. 0. Box F-2430, Freeport.


C12291
3 CHEF TOURNANT
(Reliable Cook) for 400 rooms
hotel. Successful applicant
must have experience of 2
years in continental cookery
and must be able to prepare
continental dishes. Will be
expected to replace the Chef
de Parties on days off, such aS:
Sauce Cook, Garde Manger and
Vegetable Cook. Interested
applicant please apply in
person to International Hotel.
Personnel Office for interview.
Vincent Russell, Assistant
Manager.


TO PLACE YOUR ADV.

in Freeport
TELEPHONE

352 -6608


CARS FOR SALE MARINE SUPPLIES


M


I I I I


A


I-


i


. I I


I


-1


'.i N-


O( VO()%iA4


7 6













































'Youwt asw NwuaLWR...wTLE vI AS s
PW YIN' ieTMINiE"MIFOR NUTLF OR

CROSSWORD OC 1L IC

PUZZLE OPENING EW S


ACROSS
1. White-sheeted
organization
4. Father of
Mankind
8. Listening
device
11. Jackie's sister
12. Sand hill
13. Peer Gynt's
'mother
14. Transgress
15. Mezzanine
17. Wear away
19. Payola
20. Coarse hominy
22. "Pickled
peppers"
fellow


Par time 32 min.


26. Bubble
28. Classified
section
30. Spawn of fist
31. New lamb
32. Insidious
33. Hang fire
34. Work hard
36. Heroic poem
38. Auricle
40. Chose
43. Triumphant
47. Herb eve
48. Common ver
49. March date
50. Treasure
51. Piece
52. Not one
53. Before


AP Newsfe


I


h


Rupert on







--'' ,' ":_


SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE
DOWN 7. Genus of bee
1. Swiss painter eaters
2. John or 8. Roulette bet
b Deborah 9. Servicemen's
3. Fuel club
4. Revoke a 10. Congeal
legacy 16. Slender finial
5. Plague 18. Flatfish
6. Insects 21. Chum
23. Importance
6 1 1 0 24. Cosmic cycle
25. Color
26. Drone
SI -27. Remiss
29. Colorant
- 7 32. Svetlana's
/ / ^ father
7,. 233. Burst
S35. Male
7l 30 defendants
37. Hopscotch
000 39. Russian
government
group
S - 41. Always
42. Matron
7 3. Poke
44. William Tell's
o home
45. Stake
46. Saul's
S- grandfather
matures 10-27


The two chums grasp the reins between them.
"W-what's next? '" asks Simon nervously.
"How do we make them move?" Rupert
remembers King Neptune's command to his
horses and in a shaky voice he calls out:
" Away, my fine steeds! At Rupert's words
the horses leap into action, surging from the
cave at great speed Hold on, Simon gasps


-CARROLL RIGHTER'S



A fLrom the Carroll Righter Institute
GENERAL TENDENCIES: The last day of
the waning Moon finds you all stirred up to
try to force others to your will and desires, but any such
pressures could be disastrous for you and others, so show
you can maintain patience and do your job well.
ARIES (Mar 21 to Apr. 19) You think that cooperation
means forcing others to do what you like, but this isn't true.
Listen to others; combine ideas, efforts justly, wisely. Avoid
harangues
TAURUS (Apr 20 to May 20) Don't expect fellow
workers to do some of your work because you are loaded
down, or you could get into trouble. Improve appearance,
health
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Get tasks done if you want
time for amusements over the coming weekend Creative
labors could be really enjoyable now Think and act
decisively.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Don't kneedle
kin into making improvements and repairs to your home; do
it yourself. Use your fine artistic sense, but be practical.
Avoid one who bickers
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Schedule time carefully and get
routines done. Don't be shortchanged or lose wallet
shopping, doing errands. Evening is fine for the social.
VIRGO (Aug 22 to Sept 22) Instead of spending more
money, get busy and pay your bills, make collections
Discuss financial plan with an expert before pushing it
through. Drive safely
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct 22) Although you may be under
pressure, be sure you keep self-controlled or others can get
the best of you Plan a wiser social schedule
SCORPIO (Oct 23 to Nov. 21) Instead of blasting others
because you can't gain your aims quickly, get busy and iron
out kinks in your operations. Aid those who come to you
for assistance.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec 21) Use tact with
friends who're not quite up to par, or you could lose
valuable alliances Avoid some party where you are apt to
get into trouble.
CAPRICORN (Dec 22 to Jan. 20) Get into civic work
instead of criticizing bigwigs and you become a better
citizen. Make at least a part payment on bills that are
outstanding
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) You want to step out to
new circles and interests, but first plan where, who and how.
Forget differences with others. Be good to yourself.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Although you want to make
radical changes, keep promises and get them behind you.
Show understanding for mate who is not feeling up to par
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY .. he or she will be
one of those extremely active young people who could prove
very difficult for others to keep up with. See to it that the
energies are channeled in right directions for a big success
ahead, otherwise you could easily have a big troublemaker
here instead.

Winning Bridge


1W VIrTOR MOLLO
Thae dds aaeetst toI= i
cards of a suit can only o
pressed in term of ut l
but It keeps o happen at ir
that, usually on April 1st.
occasionally it occurs In a
lah. when, after a thro
the cards are not shuffled
are dealt three and four
time.
Goulashes are rarely pi
In Britain, but they en]
cet In popularity in P s.
i one .presented ~ a qui


Chariot Island-26


the little bear, leaning back to take the strain
And as the chariot heads for the open sea the
chums glimpse the pirates arriving to carry
out their plot. The rogues howl with rage
when they realise they have been thwarted
" We're too late, Captain growls one. "The
chariot has gone! All our plans are ruined !


Rupert on Chariot Island-27
I I !M--


Drawn along by the two powerful horses, the
chariot bounces across the surface of the sea
with Rupert and Simon clinging to the reins.
They are travelling so fast that the water rises
behind them in a great wake. "We're safely
away from the island." pants Rupert. But
how far will the horses take us ? Can we stop


them ? As if in answer a figure suddenly
appears from the sea-King Neptune himself!
" Stay- I bid you stay! he roars. "Who is
so bold as to ride in my chariot ? Who dares
offend the monarch of all the seas ?" At his
ringing voice the horses slow down alongside
the King.


Rupert on Chariot Island-28


Neptune's fury turns to amazement when he
discovers Rupert and Simon in his chariot.
It is the little bear I he exclaims. ** But how
came you to be in my chariot 7 What brought
you to my island? And who is your friend ?7"
Please, this is Simple Simon." falters Rupert.
A sea-serpent brought him _heotL_ and--oh,
but I must tell you at once about some pirates



(- SMEARED .


on the island. They were planning to capture
you, so we drove your chariot away from
them." It was a timely action." says the King
climbing into the shell. "My thanks to you and
.your friend. Now that I know of the plot I
wiN wreak vengeance on those seardogs. They
.will be sorry for such treachery-! "
ALL mIGHos RESERVED


ill
AD 1s
e x-
im3
Very
Eou-
w-lra,


Le Briageur.
Dealer East:
West
A J -
SAQJ 8 5
4 A 9 5 3 2


Both Val:
East
4 K97 654
0 K 10 7 3
4 K J 8


and West North Fast South
at a 14
7NT
played The immediate Jumtp to 701
a isn;. very subtle, and holding
Were three aces, West cft ea&
z by deduce that South must have al
13 hearts. Against that West has
no defence and any likely
penalty will ehqw a =q profit.
So he do only too willing to
sacrifice. But when dj rny goes
down, the quetsdon arises: with
ever card marked by South's
revealing bid. need It be a sacri-
ice?
North leads a diamond. Win-
ninz in his hand. declarer
ftnesses the 48. Back in lo hand
with a diamond, he finesses the
AJ and cashes the 4K. Another
diamond takes him back 'to the
closed hand, and after cashing
the &A. he reels off the reet of
the diamonds. When he comes to
the last one. duammnv remalnc
with 4 K 9 7 8, wtile Nmoth must
f e a discard rom: 4 Q 10 8
West's 13th trick w4ll be either
his 49 or dummy's 49.

Chess


By t.O MARD BARDEN












(9797)
White mates in three moves,
against any defence (by N.
,Hoeg). This ppaently simple
puzzle, oompcoed In the early
years of th s century, contains
a most unusual surprise on
White's second turn.
Par times: 1 minute, problem
master; 3 minutes, problem
expert: 7 minutes. good: 15
minutes, average: 30 minutes.
novice.
Chess Solution
I P-B7. I/ now 1 . P xP;
2 P-B8(R). K-Q3; 3 R-B6
mate. If l... PxB; 2 P-B& iB).
K-B3: 3 R-R6 mate. I I . .
K-B3; 2 P-B8VKtl. PxB:
3 R-KB7 mate. I 1 ... K-Q3:
2 P-B8,Q) ch. and if K-B3:
3 Q-QB5 mate, or if K-K3:
3 Q-K7 mate. A clever idea-
White under-promotes his pawn
to rook, bishops and knight to
avoid possible draws by stale-
mate.





or more can
you make
S from the
M letters shown
Ishere? In
making a

be based once
only Each
word must contain the large
letter, and there must be at
leat one elit-letter word In the
lst. No plurals; no foreign words;
no Joer name. TODAY'S
n 1 23 words good;
lx- wo4d6 verC pod A ward.
ezelt. oluton tomorrow.
YESTERDAY'1 SOLUTION :
A -able bake
beals b1k lalM
mrale M sle sal
shake shle as ale.


REX MORGAN, M.D. By DAL CURTIS


YE5/ I UNDER- I
STAND OU
GOOD MORNING TOOK GOOD CARE
I'M KAREN CARTER/ OF ONE OF MY
YOU'RE DR MORGAN, PATIENTS LAST
AREN'T YOU NIGHT/ "


I APARTMENT 3-G By Alex Kotxzkf I


STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & overgard


HE KNEW WHEN YOUL
WERE HAPPY..OR EPRESSEP
.. ANP RFACTEP ACCORP1N61WL
'1YOU COMMUNICATEP WITHIN
VHIM... ANP HE. *1N YOU.


-* r


cw~'- WEu.-th
A CUBTO#*2 ~


_ght (riltte


PRO


Z-;M.w


IF YOU'RE REFERRING To
MR PETERSON, HE WAS
MNO PROBLEM REALLY
I THINK HE'S TUST A
I LITTLE SCARED!
CE'E VER'
PERCEPTIVE /
4E TRIES TD
HIDE IT BY
I ^ BEING GRUFF/,


e
y
.













12


~iw ~ribirnt


Rosie's





bowlers


march
ByGLADSI(AM HI fRi .!',
AMOL'R SWqad
b o w l e r R .x, ", ix
fashioned svcorte I' i-
181 for a ri itch ..
last night leadlinl ig I
team to a 0 N1 x :x
second place HlIun i m : r .;,
and a comlixiiiim :
lead in the 7eph\ i

that i gc liii r ,

Saun ri
drolppI. t
p)fMt!."l ;.l" C
t nx -., ) a. i !xnx ; i xx t
irone b
from 30 g,.
Sandy Be .
le a d la s t c ,'k .
average tro'
played
I akmng th -
Browsn and I ..
respe niC
for li .:. 1 ,
ga S:i .
out xof three x '-,
the l.-,n i
.xi rike Ai\i
thL xxx i

adding .
tleJxi' r I), '.
(Cu'rrm xi ,
Furnirinr ..
their -7 ',p,4 :
and hb\ t
trailed bv t
Br w'xsxrx x : {
a hu Ne a' ,
position 1-\
,'o nsrl I t'Lllti \ : :L -


coning t i
and ( 'rai' \!
marcheL .
victor
Robcerti, '
her 144 ,ix :j
with a strong -
second gai "
Bowlin .
way mark. I .
began trailin :, :
frame and bi .I
four points r .
topped them \:i!,t t
Although P:'.
Hayling came 11 P" _
final game w',: :


I'LL QUIT
KOTA KIN\
heavyweight h.i ..
retire from hi. x ',
fight at Nes '1 N :k -
But Ali v5,,
Singapore addl-.'
to beat himi
He said the ,
time because ,
first fougihl linx
Ali said t i '
Foreman. the
inexperienced
''I will defIett0 -
experience \lt.
added.
Referring t i,)
champion Rul i .
had been unxdii;., i!
All said 11 i i.
right hand i :, :
A li is he,- .. ,
Ground tiii ,'


Padres

SAN I l (,) 1 ,
Veteran ix ii '
a I or l i x\
hitting w. i; ,"
lif ti )cI .I %c' .I .I '
to the Sm iS),
reversal !
lxwx1x iiudget |i 1,
Shle P.,di -.
34-year-iold I
Louis Cardixn.ix k
an xindiscl osc l -
substantial lp .
The IPadic, i,.
a tight-mi noi ,l '
the team x xil
closer last x


on



iS ix ., u


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Imperial League champs M1inistr% of Works (from left standing) Leon "Apache" Knowles (manager/coach), Sidney Mc
Shermin Faylor, Sonnyv Hacin, Willie knowVles. Simeon Humes, Paul Johnson, Paul Demeritte, Vianny Jacques, Joe Penr
(knecelin) Fred laylor, Randy Rimlcrs. p':,t Johnson. Boldridge Ellis. Lester Dean, Adrian Rodgers (captain), Al Jarrett an(
Knowvle-, (hat boy).


GOLDEN GLADES IN 14-4 TRIUMPH


SPl'l I S I IR I stI c tk'h l h,'! i .1 1 tiilth latl night andt
-,!i ,K i Itn l ll ils ki 1 t lln I l h (,i tl ci' (;l:idc'. 14 -4
!;i,:i; ',. I!;H kr Inn Bum ,A c' ,! t he .1: K S ithai! Park
n l Bin;; En Shlt l- itl .i ti '. Mi i W ,,l 's n"iH l ,- i:.in l ti ltlt
.i f' :, i h v' lixlu i x:n i xxi; !l .1 : '., i u ti' iii tx i l l t (i iii i (l
SE, o, x ,ti k" nI:' .l'd .'x l x.\ ii Strc ll.

S I 'nd- pl..'. ., the A (;..l i--1 : n, i
W .: .who w l ii *i li \A i , di I m w; u',, i l- n, ck thIN :


K xx c

xx x .


'I' ;'x 'xxx' : lx I ix xxxi'; '.x ix x.xx ~.xl llxi.'
I. lxxx Ii 'lix I '~'' s.x xxxl \ xxxii


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Seeds for


tennis


tourney

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F LOSE-ALI

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S t l e xx '' ,i ix! i .i lxi lt' i
... I j( et w i ". ih ,i. l ) i < Itiw

S' 1l. l .' walbh J .4 4


'I won't release Williams'


CH ICA(;G() .
Controversial own ,
Finley of the work) 'r :
Oakland A's has ig'
controversy by re ...
release manager I[)ic ,,
to the New Yo '
without comIpensa1! .
W without x. *;; '
Finley said, "th r' .
court action."
Finley said he ,; "
Yankees at an A rie,; .
meeting here I -i,,.
denying then pCt i -'; i ,
obtain Williams s as i-i.
Ralph Houk.
Williams announced C ,.
resignation as Oakland inia.iii'e
Sunday just after his \.s xI -
the world series from the V '-,


l ii' l r i i, i


i, ' I ), ;



lxi xi^ .i ~ iiij;

I. n ,, ,. ; l,'.| ,,
l ). i .r t ",,l !, 1 \\ l~ia t
) tlxlrix xxxi .i',k' lx.!ix 1- '1 % h~ l!


i i- managerial 'post
'xi "I said 'al' dulic notx siil
i c i inlecy. "l he' s-I i'e III ,iiii ex
and wanted to knoi\x, xh\ I
q'! .iid told them as recently as two
.,.. ih.i'r months ago. I e extended )Dick
': iiv 'n V ill II a inl x contra it ai
t i xe. i, addirxioial year thiiruigh IY75
ri. trit and rehired hli staff through
l li the next season "
I n i s a d
S : Steinbrenner "' .ix;rdl I m he\i
%k ere 1xi '1ig ):`` i ) talk Ixo
1 1,'. Williams lie xaas out of their
i:L \'.. pi:ture altogx'1elieCr becalisC I
kc, anld refused ,ivht'i pterlission."

dl i anikece lani sh C cllsti Niels Fredborgs
(eorge set a new axixateur world record
missionn for the dead-start kilometer
on the rILIn


'l ; i \ i \ ,: en l
" I h ,


'xsxl,-o-thiee Nes Providence softball championship playo
* ** *
In Il esdas night's action, pitcher Oswald Sweeting pic
his seventh victor uas lahamas Blenders behind the offense
I I enio i "l)oni I" lIckhart and Walter Rand, clobbered
\x.l .aks 12- 1.
I khart, during louir times at bats. collected thr
mI Inliine a lhomer and knocked in three runs. Rand who k
in t iur connected for aI th cc runi hoinier.
In picking up tile xvin, Sweeting gave up three hits and
iit cighl. '. C('adron tioik the loss.
* xx** ** ***
In ltoniight's action it the iJ..K. Softball Park. San Sal Ar
i'l.i ( iistoms in the ltist a.in1xe (7 p.m.) and T'aylor Truckin
3 1 ( . 0 p .m .).
1:,1, Jjni Suints :nid P bil t Pe'arls, both notched for first p
th: l.adi's \Arawa k '.gi settle their differences, tomorl
xI. .) at the J.1 K. Park.
-a - - -


Now secretariat may not r
IO (ROV ) ( \ he i r Vles over the 1 ll,,I rule today on whetl
S" i p nd I urcotte
xUspcif1011 in New
S ', ii ii lcot ttc,. a native of (rantd s spe io in New
S!. .i h ] \Iixxi' ri) s' k il max usually starts the dav af
", i li I l l,,s N s ,-.hp x[i|lk, \cwa Brunswick, ia udgment.
S x If Sec.retariat runs, ar
"1 ; -; '-: , i. ,1 ,,li xx sin'- lie big red would
'U I C Cc tirst --vear-old to w
"*, r., - i- : h' '* : 'e e'er ne in file dl tlre at n
Steal liire a x championship in 20 year
S, rc \av Page, owned bi
Si .:r ot Toronto, won
CI Cr toi 3 -year-old in 1Q53.


.4"'


Thursday, October 25, 1973



Classic Pros



- look for



first victory


THE BAHAMAS American
Football Association regular
series continues this weekend
4 with two fixtures: the Classic
^ Pros play the Blue Marlins and
-. the Stingrays travel to Freeport
to battle with the Eight Mile
Rock Crushers.
The Classic Pros, without a
win to their name this season,
will undoubtedly be looking to
Kinney register on the 'win column'
nerman, when they meet the Marlins at
d Gavin the QE Sports Centre
tomorrow evening.
The Marlins, on the other
hand, can boast only one win
in four games; ironically this
was against the Pros in the first
ff. match of the season. On that
occasion the Marlins won
cked up 25-13.
sive bats In their last outing against
San Sal the Stingrays the Classic Pros'
offense came to life when
ree hits running back Whitney Rolle
knockedd scored two TDs a 3 yd. run
and a 61 yd. pass.
I struck The Pros defense turned
in a good performance while
rawaks holding the Stingrays offense
rawaks to three TDs (18 points)
g meet without the services of key
lay i defenders, Allen Ingraham
lace in (strong side linebacker) and
row 7 'Minky' Isaacs. (middleline
backer).
Ingraham and Isaacs return
U n to fortify the Pros defense
u n tomorrow, and this should
present problems for the
her to Marlins offense.
A The somewhat lenghty
York injury list of the Marlins has
ter the now been completely reduced
and they will be strengthened
id if he bN the return of tightend Pat
be the Knowles, the Marlins second
s.in the leading receiver for last

SF. P. season. (Last season Knowles
it as a caught 14 passes for 227
yards.)


The scene is set for an
interesting tussle as both teams
strive to move up the league
table.
In the other BAFA game,
the Stingrays will find tough
opposition in the Hurricanes.
The Hurricanes still remain
undefeated along with the
Nassau Jets and they won their
last encounter with the
Stingrays 12-6.
Only Stingrays quarterback,
Bernard 'Porky' Dorsett could
make any sort of impression on
the sound Hurricanes' defense
which has only given away one
TD(6 points) this season. In
front of their home crowd the
Hurricanes' defense will no
doubt prove to be even more
impregnable.
Friday game between the
Classic Pros and the Marlins
will kickoff at 8 p.m. at the QE
Sports Centre and Sunday's
match in Freeport will start at
12:30 p.m.
BAFA STANDINGS


Nassau Jets
Hurricanes
Crushers
Stingrays
Marlins
Classic Pros


213
27
22
56
38
25


P A
21
6
64
77
'o0
129


Horse show

triumphs

WASHINGTON (AP) Ann
Moore of Great Britain. riding
the gelding Seven Forty Seven,
and James IHulick of the
United States, aboard Willk
Wonderful, won the major
events last night in the'
Washington Intei n tioaia
Horse Show.


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Together we're both stronger.


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