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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03478
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: October 23, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03478

Full Text

I


FOLLOWING 'KANGAROO COURT' IN BUSH,

FNM SUPPORTER QUESTIONED, THEN SHOT





Murder witness sa






he saw Maior sho


one (


J




f accused


[ys




t


By SIDNEY DORSETT
A TYLER STREET STONE-MASON testified before a packed Supreme Court this morning that he was ordered
to fetch the pistol used by one of two men accused of the shooting death of a Bias Street entertainer after
chauffering them to the secluded Perpall Track murder site on the afternoon of September 5 last year.


NIXON AGREES TO


SURRENDER TAPES
WASHINGTON (AP) President Nixon agreed Tuesday
to comply in full with the U.S. Court of Appeals ruling
directing him to give the White House tapes to a federal
judge.
The announcement came as the House of Representatives
began preliminary investigation into whether the President
should be impeached.
Nixon's surprise announcement was made to U.S. district
court judge John J. Sirica by Charles Alan Wright, lawyer
for the President.
Wright told Sirica that the President had hoped that the
onimpromise he announced Friday night would end the
lonstitiutional crisis.
"Events over the weekend made it very apparent it did
no.." Wright said.
The announcement shocked spectators in the packed
courtroom who had been waiting to hear how Sirica would
rek'pond to the President's proposal to summarize the tapes
and have his summary verified by a senior member of the
Senate.



'Women's rights not same as


women's lib' says Beryl Higgs


THE ACHIEVEMENT OF WO?
should not be confused with
conventional sense, Mrs. Beryl H
attending last night's opening sess
thie Bahamas Teachers College.
lhat li iahamian women were
seeking, she said, was equLality,
si that we nmay walk
jlon.giside our men as partners,
not as a servant...".
I lie week-long schedule of
livitties is being sponsored by
the rtiusiness and Professional
Women's Association, which is
seeking to promote not only
thlie interests of business and
professional women but also to
assist women in achieving
equality under the law.
I ast night's opening session,I
killed as Theatre Night, used
dramatic skits written by
members of the Association to
underscore the problems of
clgIt imacy, divorce and
c i employ imen c it faced by
Btahamian winixell
A. large percentage of the
audience was male. Ans
ic\ccutxive nicinhber of the BPW
Association said their response
was s) 1 i pat he tic ani d
supportive of what the
A ssoiciat ion w\as trying to
achieve.
'Wh liat we are seeking is to
encotirage citlil rpay for equal
work, equal opportunity in
business .ind Cequal opportunity
to pursue the university
courses we want," Mrs. Janet
Byles said this morning.
INI QUITltlS
In addition she pointed to
t he vaI rios inequities
confronting women here. She
named lihese as rigid divorce
kla s thal itiaiit adultery the
onIl basis for divorce; the legal
discrepancy which allowed
higher maintenance support
ito illegitimate children than
for legal children living with a
separated parent and the
matter of dower rights which
many v womllen sign away
unknowingly.
"We do not want to take


CERAMIC

FRUIT PYRAMIDS


iY NANIN FMUTl
SNASSAU ONLY


MEN'S RIGHTS in the Bahamas
women's liberation in the
Higgs told a capacity audience
sion of Women's Rights Week at


Raymond "Skull" S cavella,
the lernth prosscutiotsn witness
to be called b,, Solicitor
(icncral I l.angon I lilton,
testified lie saw 25-year-old
Freeport hart.C'ndcr Wendell
l.eroy Bitrowtts shoot Barry
Major in the sltoiniAh on orders
from Phillip "Polka" Humcs.
Mr. IIlltoni. opening the
case against li' l wt io iicn
accused o l miuntlrdi arind
aiding and abetting a murder,
yesterday told the all male jury
that "Maoii, a supporter of the
Free nationall Mo\ iei.tn, met
his death when lie told Humes
he would make a call to the
o lticc of (eci1l Wallace
Wttitlield i toget hni some
money or he woulid to go to
the C I.D. and tell.'
1Mr. Itilton also said the
blackmail threat lid to the men
taking the 25-year-old father of
three to the secluded Perpall
Iract area and exeiuting himn
after bholl;ng a 'kangaroo
court".
PLOT TO KILL
The plot to kill was formed
in the Queen Street chambers
of counsel Wallace Whitfield,
Mr. Hilton told the jury headed
by lormen Bahamas Baseball
Assn. President T'ony Curry.
Scavella told lthe court he
remetniteied tic morning of
Septeib cr 5 icniie he went to
the office of Mr. ('ecil Wallace
Whittleld.
'li he attorney, leader of the


over their man's role but merely P.,1 P.'s dissident eight, was
to make women aware of their also the F.N.M. leader during
rights," Mrs. Byles said. the election campaigning, the
This evening at 8:30 p.m. at period of the shooting.
the Bahamas Teachers College. It was there that Scavella
four women lawyers will meit the two accused "close to
discuss various facets of the t)nooni". Ilumes told him to
law as it affects women. collcci his girl-friend's son
Mrs. Janet Bostwick will froi the St. John's
speak on the Juvenile Court: Preparatory School and he left,
Mrs. Ruby Nottage on I)ower returning after discovering that
and Inheritance: Miss the hboy \was not there.
Kendolyn Cartwright on Burrows xxwas at the office
Women's Equity in land and when he returineld. IIe went ill
Mrs. Stephanie Unwalla oil search of Ilitnles. finding himu
women in private and near Jacks clothing store near
international law. Frederick Street, Scavella sail
Tomorrow the BPW will With 11II i uimes w as
sponsor a Careers Day at "Stick-a-to nie". Anilhion.\
various public and private Con(tnyers The, returned tos
schools in New Providence Queen Street because they had
with a number of menminbers election posters to distributed
speaking on their particular At the entrance of the
professions. building he saw Barry Major,.
On Thursday an open air he said.
rally will be held at the QlI STIONFl)
Southern Recreation Grounds "Phillip and Conyers
at 8.30 p.m. when Dr. Doris remained in the car Iitum'es
Johnson will speak oni said that he wanted to talk to
Women's Suffrage. Others Major and Major said 'aman
speaking will be Mrs. Barbara what iou want to talk to tie
Pierre, BPW president, on the about'.'" liiumues said 'aian, I
necessity for Equal Rights for want to talk to you'. Major
w omen; M iss Jeanne kept asking 'what do you want
Thompson on illegitimate to talk to me about.' After this
children;: and attorney Perry conversation, Major came into
Christie on equal rights for the cat, when Major came in,t
women from a nman's lihe sat in the back. Conyers was
viewpoint. in back with hiin," Scavella
The week will end xwith a said.i
cocktail dance atnd fashion 'IHumes said to ime "'Skull
show at the Sonesta Beach drive mein down the road' I
iHotel Friday at 9 p.ni. drove the car down West Bay
I hIe BI' W Asso'ciati )ni Street andit Ih the corrict
presently has 50 micibers, aind h e ft o r e o ui re a c t1
is using this week's activities to I-Need-A-Laundry, IHumes said
solicit new members.


BAN ON BRAVO 'NOT LIFTED'
THl' MINISTRY of Health A spokesman for the
today categorically denied a Ministr ot HIlealth confirmed
Nassau Gaurdian report that the uestiuction ot
the ban on Bravo corned beef approximately 1,000 cases of
has been lifted. Bravo corned beef and iade it
In a front page article this perfectly clear that the
morning it was stated "with Ministry has no intention at
tlhe destruction of the the present time to lift the baln
contaminated corned beef and on the importation and sale of
the action now being taken to Bravo corned beef.
replace them with quality When and if the ban is lifted,
products, the ban on Bravo the spokesman said, the public
corned beef has now been will be informed by the
lifted Ministry.


to turn.
They continued through the
side-track and "when the road
camtne to something like a
junction 1 took the road
leading to the right and I
parked the cair. When I parked
the four oL us got out of the
car." he said.
Scavella said hiumes
continued questioning Major
"Why he talked so much. This
was repeated practically
throughout the ride from
Queen Street to where we
stoppedhe said.
Scavella said Hlumes accused
Major of telling others of a fire
that had taken place. Hle said
he did not know which fire
they referred to and only
found this out later in the
questioning.
"When we got out of the
car. Humes kept asking Major
why he talked so much. Major
kept saying 'man I didn't say
anything about you.'
"Then he started to drift
from the car," Scavella said.
GUN BROUGHT
"When he started to run,
Homes said bring me the gun
out of the car. Hlumes ran
behind Major to see if he could
catch him. Hie did. I went to
the car and the gun was under
the seat. I brought t it to luhine
who already caught Ma.nr,"
Scavella said.
Ile said the gun resembled a
"B.B gun pistol".
Scavella said Major then
suggested that they fetch
"Red" Burrows to prove that
he had spoken about the fire.
"I went to pick up 'Red'
Burrows. lie was at Queen
Street. After I picked up Red I
took him back to the same
place."
lie said a second series o)f
questioning followed and
"Major asked Burrows, 'Wh\h
you lied on me?' Burrows said
something in the sense of 'yes.
you talked'. Major said he did
not know anything about the
fire." Scavella said.
SHOT IN STOMACH'
Scavella said Huiiles gaveC
Burrows the guni and told himi
if Major had spoken to shoot
him. "'Burrows took the gun
from Major ... he started to
walk towards him. As Burrows
walked towards him, I said ...
'cool it man'. Burrows said 'if I
don't do it to him, it would
happen to me'. Burrows
walked towards Major and shot
him somewhere in the
stomach." he said.
Scavella said after witnessing
the first shot, he ran for the car
but got lost because he was
going in the wrong direction.
lIe said he heard only two
shots and said the incident
took place around 12:30 to
1:30 p.in
Sca\ella said he was the first
person to reach the car and lie
drove thie others to a street
near Boyd Road and
Farrington Road and the car
engine stopped.
liumes took over the wheel
and they carried Conyers to an
address in the Grove area. He
was dropped off at the Wulff
Road Theatre he said.
lie told the court that "after
the shooting Humes warned
them 'what happened to him
could happen to anyone of
y'all'. He said this in
connection with Barry's death
and meant if we talked or
squealed, what happened to
Major could happen to us."
he said.


.l4 A- - .





w' .. .. '

' % : .. ... ,_1^"^ ' '' I



$13,000 WORTH OF CORNED BEEF/&
SOME $13,000 WORTH OF CORNED
BEEF AND HAM products packaged for the HAM CONDEM NED
Bravo food company of Argentina have been
destroyed by the Ministry of Health because of refrigeration, but the steamship brought t
contamination, refrigeration, but the steamship brought them
The first 200 cases of corned beef were as dry cargo. When they arrived in Nassau they
condemned to the dump Friday and the were kept in the warehouse over the weekend.
remaining 400 yesterday afternoon in the again without refrigation."
presence of a representative from the Ministry The CUTOMERS COMPLAIN
of Health and the Bravo company. The condition of the canned tepats was
An earlier shipment of 175 cases of ham was brought to the attention of the Ministry of
destroyed by the Ministry several weeks ago. Health following complaints from consumers.
Richard Spradling, Caribbean sales manager Laboratory tesLs confirmed the presence of
for Bravo, said his company was most spoilagebact other ia. a ro pck
concerned about the effect this would have on The Ministry then orderedd all Bravo stock in
its international reputation and was therefore the Bahamas condemn the pad arneo uths inoi
anxious "to do the right thing." against purchasing any of the products until
He explained that the condemned corned they had been advised to do so by the Ministry
beef had been packaged for Bravo in Argentina of Health.
by the Hereford Meat Company. Bravo Bravo, which sells its ,oduan A.tendois
maintains its own packing facilities in Brazil, Argentinewned but with an A;.ercan
Argentina, Uruguay and the United States, and Spradling said the company aso packs a
in addition sub-contracts work to other nuber of private labels fr U S superm.iKsts
packers. It has been using Hereford in its Ard.t o ine
Condemned along with the Bravo and operations for the past year but has now
Lancaster corned beef were Cherry Valley discontinued in view of the complaints nade
cooked ham and Plymouth Rock cooked ham; discontinued packaging view of the complaints madeds.
Mr. Spradling said the problem in the case of against its packaging methods.
the hams lay with the shipping. PICTURED: a bulldozer plows Hunder tie
"They were shipped from the United States condemned meats at the public dump watch-cl
and should have been stored under by a Health official and public dump worker



BWC leader raps taxes, unemployment,



weakening economy, poor housing

By MIKE LOTHIAN


FEARFUL OF "POWER-HUNGRY POLITICIANS whho may tr> to steal the raii'1 oti ithe
people and institute some form of dictatorship," outspoken trade unionist Ildley \\ illiaius l.ist
night call for labour representation in the legislature and demanded the repeal of "the sla\e laI"
Industrial Relations Act.
It is because of that fear that refuse to take. t >r \t ..
the voice of labour -1 wish to God he would "ic aill up'n i
"champions of the people and Icll us where to find those It de'liic \e i l t . .! ,
saviours of democracy" mimuslt obs and how much thev are ill l.'' to 't .,I, '
he heard on the floor of the pavinr g." Mr. Williams \ji,,>'n,' I -t '
I lHouse of Assiembly. commented. "because \ 'cli lI \ t is i '
Mr. VIiliams saud id I have members who would '
G(overnmenii t does not rcpiec l iike them now." !<(ii k'u t.'i \
the Industrial Relations \it. I 1< \' I) I .i ,lt iit' \ii ..
"we will run our on p c ii "
for the House of Assemnibly and tI U n \ o.. it i ,; .on.to
repeal it ourselves. t i i h g l lt "thie righ ts o tm u
Mr. W illiams. president o I tl ,u. H i h t ai ed il ;l .
the I'ngineeri ng. Fuel,c Scrtic I. 1 have i Labouru .
and Alhied Workers' lnion and \limis i has the ,,.., , .
of the semni-poitical B3ahanus it ell \ Workers' (Council, as i.lll. sas that the cannot : ,
delive'nng his hard-hittting c\ rcis their (od-gcivin riglht ve i,' l :
keynote address at the M ondal ol)t ict lttio .. it .i
night session of the unilons'S "'\\' IS lie t tell grat i .1 ,it' ..
convention in u TaxicoUi I'ton p 'illc \'. ,Kitia theni cho)iccs tust ', ,
lall on Wulff Ruoad. he" I' s h pa) in.7 their rents"it Is
M r. W illian s identified h t hl 1 ci toods" Ini x tlite "'l t' 't'I' 'I 'I
problems of tihe black Aind t :'d t ut lit i ,i,ct\ ltt i i' i-t.' '
corilliu nity and olt tilhl ;::c'i ire \o' c s!!n ul n>'t hK I. id : I") '(
Bahamnas as a whole High m'i ,!k t.ilci n&d s \\ li l.k,. \"i k: ""
the list 'Axcre "a political s\st- I' .l id t! c miA d ih' \ nist ;
which n iakes the s ch rictU ,Il,.l;not i ti '-Itimst lhi tihnn 'i
and taxes the poor ltuire and eil Ik' the Alt'j dc'I d. \nil I'c A '
more, a seriously ,Si' k'ii't' t' c l l \t i. eak ''- th
' e c 0 1 I 1 ) r i i l / \ P i ..1H.A ii o r ai ',\ I 'i ,. .,
ulnelnpl yv iiient and Psi i0i' ,I' ( t h ll s utt lli i! I i'\ l '
h o u sin g ." ,kC snlC 1 ) (. S,",1, Kl l^ '1 '* ; It i ,,,


SOLUTION: JOBS
lie said the solution to mtst
oi' tlhe robleni s can h
summarised in twxo words
"jobs" and moneyey"
"With jobs the people ctii
feud foi themselves'. d .t i! !it!
more mIoney the\ can spl'nd
lmore and help hoost i li
profits of the businessmeni .nd
lihell the economy to gpro\.
What is not acknowledged is
that when the little mian is out
of work and broke, the
economy of Over-the-Ilill and
of the entire Nassau is at ,
standstill.
"Nassau is almost dead
economically," he declared,
"and we need a resurrection to
bring her back to life."
He noted that last year
Labour Minister Clifford
Darling had said there were
jobs available but Bahamians
wouldn't look for them, and
that at last week's PLP
convention in Freeport Prime
Minister Lynden Pindling had
claimed there were 10,000
available jobs Bahamians


"sIh ,uIl ihC \ inis cr ltII liic I
Asl li td in thlie l m t oun lihi'
\w 'rkeis ttin h im instiic .
sthen \i tl\ c la1.iw e and i lit
courts \,ill bc called k on i ol
C i 1. l lll1 t \\ ." h c \\,11 ; Il


I IC L 'C r 1. \' I tl. I theII s cI l' ,
Ct, iM1' i C alld 'olitital facts.I
ot sk>ciCt).
SI AVI l AW
"lo leak e any of thin,
indolCne is not to doi the Ijob
properly. We have turned oui
backs on the political life ot
thei1 nation, and as a result
inman law's have been passed
\xtlcth carry us back to slaveIN .
i speak especially of thec
Industrial Rel.itions Act. w Inch
I all the slave law.
"1 .abour demands that this
IChe i pealed, if not, we will run
oui o\wn people for the House
of Assembly and repeal it
ourselves. Labour demands free
education and free health care
along with a free lunch
progranmme tor the children ofI


c l ,I I h. It I :


.1,i : I


d'plo c e s oI tll i t, ,Ii p nies.
I x li h si', 1tAi ti '', tI A )i,'-t
The aiddue'ss w hch inrc
ti ip en I i i he putit t in l
tllowc' lt\ l rsessc lns np "f i l
to union imiembCis,
\l r \VW i 'll: s ,,I II h
Iribluni thil t i]t c I .i bI[ ur
ministerr was last w 'ck !it\c, d
to speak ul ithe c''V'li c lntion
also, but no replt lias been
recciex d.
I here \\ ill I c nt o su siion
rhursdal as ithc hiil ',:xis
previously booked by another
group, hut there will be a
session Friday night and
possibly another ne\tl week,
Mr. Williams said.


2 armed,


masked men


rob bank


of $2,500

B MIKE. LOTHIAN
:O ARMED., MASKED
.\NI)ITS raided the Canadian
Imperial Bank of Commerce on
Coconut Grove Monday
afternoon, stole S2,500 in
cash, lnd destroyed a
tel' -ihone witl' a shotgun blast
to d(klai a; i alerting of police.
Ii -, l I ihe robbers were
Sl 'i., \(ic stocking
'..'s- W ea ii wielded a
,,i c ,'t, hotguin. Here is no
vi, it,,t suggest they were
'.'r. police spokesman
,ld. I hi are believed to be in
i .i! l .' ti lei s.
it i the hank at about
din g up branch
Wj. \\i'lfred Moon, senior
k \ ,rs. Ihan and teller Mrs.
IlHtijt I'.)]. lThere were no
,i ,i t,, in the bank at the

',1HO 1 I IR I)
I i iiipti ted thie teller's
i iwtore leaving
i. c,i i' !ank telephonee
.id i tiiie,,cd i bhook-case with
t tli trom one of the
S . \ o .' was injured,
S.. e'l, at nved minutes later
i. case having been alerted
t n .itarnti s stci'm .
I rtobhcrs made their
..,i. > i an a white Triumph
.,n i'liiile sports car with a
itLI. Llanius top. The car,
l'n inly ) ( i minutes before
h t. cr' t from thile parking
I t lnty Methodist
i thi h on I rederick Street,
.\. I'tIJ h police at about
S p.n., yesterday.
; i.,. 'C,,,.c ,i indoneJd in
I, .).h s ic'idtnt north, from near the
naacrn ncad of the last-West
llix.i\: to I ast Bay Street.
P.I. 110 1 liP
ire as searching for
It \ o i i l lntilt 18 years
e!, i h lip an American
S: t Un int n a beach
i i l . -1 I slai i .
.ii, ,.1 \l% r inlnd Mrs. W ilo
I 1-, '.t Im is at the
t.i< ', tlintish Colonial
I I.; I .'. s 'ailkinig along the
-i, i i ii b t noon yesterday
\ I i e l \ re ai costed by
i \\ \ ,itIlls. who

h i! .! i rs w.as
S' --lh ". :c kind of
i\ ll : t it ;t police
1. ld the o lier
S' 'mt.krti bottle.
S '. :. i lic \ iths $5.
',t in defil he had no
i\ te tem, the
Sin pulled the
1 o l; 1, inUe happened.
S tt il te. w weapon
Spti. faultN or
N.'. i c'il to the
k. n gliig itih the
.w. ' u hilc the
titl i h',ii lnit w ith a
-n !' .'. g d ir pped the
s. . ',iin I is ti !irah bed it
M io ; ; 'tiJ ,i t lict. said.
FUNERAL CORRECTION
S \1 I i ,r,,t es for tile
,,;!. M ". 'lii;;^ M1 inneity w ill
,' *i 4 n' ', it !.)rro.w at St.
N .+ '; I, '. tv'hiorL'lh. Inot
I ) ; i! '1 i h n orrectl

RED CROSS APPEAL
11 Ill ahtimas Red Cross is
I tip., li iit inembers of the
ii!!, or tour single
; iv l l e'. tone double
*,4.l c,- i ,x';l two double beds
it. liet. iliSn of St. James
'. i' \l tt.!in Sl reet
CORRECTION
1K I \WRIN('l P J.
i d ilcoil t appointed
1 ousl st i Wendell Leroy


fI tins. 25. has filed notice of
tpplal to the Court of Appeals
oni behalf of Burrows following
the Supreme Court's dismissal
ot a \xmit of habeas corpus for
Burrows' discharge.
It was incorrectly stated
yesterday that Mr. Trenchard
has appealed to the Privy
Council.


_ K- SMEARED


7 ributt


! DUDLEY'S
COR. ROSETTA ST &
MT. ROYAL AVE.

TV ANTENNA INSTALLATIONS
P.O BOX S850 -PHONE 2.130t/2-3237


by


(Registered with Postmaster of Bahamas for potag. concession within the Bahamas.) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper
VOL. LXX, No. 277 Tuesday, October 23, 1973 Price: 5 Cents


oI


I


c he


I












Tuesday, October 23, 1973


MIAMI (AP) Police said
three boys two aged 13 and
one 12 were charged with
first-degree murder after the
death of a homeless derelict
who was sprinkled with
lighter fluid and set afire.
Officers said the children
also were charged with two
counts of assault with intent
to commit murder for
allegedly setting fire to two
other men in an alley.
The boys said it was kind
of a spontaneous thing," a
police spokesman said. "They
set fire to a cat first.

BELFAST (AP) An
elderly man was killed in a
terrorist bomb explosion that
wrecked an East Belfast bar
and three firebombs were
discovered in stores in
s'-iburban London.
The incendiary devices
v ere found in two big stores
i' the main shopping precinct
m the north London suburb
o.f Wemblev.
DETROIT (AP) The
united Auto Workers Union
is s et to pull its 185-thousand
i~reduction workers out of
I f'rd Motor Company plants
ruid.v if they don't get
S'r cement on a new
ihre.- year contract.
lite key points involved
appear to be related to the
'oihti.iry overtime plan for
workers that Ford officials
reportedly feel was too
lenient from Chrysler in
settling the strike last month
against that firm's plant.
BEIRUT (AP) A
multimillion dollar oil rig in
ihe Persian Gulf off the coast
O! )Dubai has been destroyed
h. fire. according to reliable
+ports.
Ile rig, owned by the
Continental Oil Co. of
Houston, Texas. had been
turning out of control for
Sir or fioe days.

SAN FRANCISCO (AP)
actresss Joanne Woodward
,,'vs she's; all for Women's Lib
, ut thinks the title Ms. (miz)
' f airly idiotic."
[he 43-year-old wife of
.cror Paul Newman, asked if
-nrvone calls her "'Mrs.
"-t- man' replied. "Sure,. the
-rocer.

SAN JUAN (AP) Cellist
'ablo Casals will be buried in
- vault made of black Italian
-.r:tnit-, a few yards from the
"**a.

L \ PAZ (AP) Four
t paunaro guerrillas who
hijacked an Argentine jetliner
surrendered to the Bolivian
a-rr' and freed five hostages,
according to a La Paz radio
nationn.
SANTIAGO (AP) The
Chilean army garrison in
Con. epcion, said four persons
isere executed.
Tlhe four were tried by a
military court on charges
ihev had organized groups
and manufactured bombs and
grenades to attack the armed
forces
NEW YORK (AP) The
Maria Moors Cabot prizes, the
oldest international
journalism awards, go this
year to a Latin American
correspondent for the Los
Angeles Times, a Roman
C:,thiolic priest who is also a
magazine editor and an
A rgentinian newspaper
Oliblisher.


K


Tank clashes



shatter



the ceasefire


FIERCE TANK and artillery
clashes exploded along the
Suez Canal today and dogfights
erupted over the Syrian
battleground despite the U.N.
ceasefire.
The war raged into its 18th
day on both fronts after a only
partial overnight pause for the
precarious Security Council
truce designed to halt the
combat in place and open the
way to negotiations for a
permanent peace.
Egypt called for an
emergency Security Council
meeting to discuss what it said
were Israeli violations of the
fragile ceasefire.
The council president. Sir
La urence McIntyre of
Australia, called a midday
session at U.N. headquarters in
New York.
Egypt and Israel had
accepted the truce appeal
worked out by the United
States and the Soviet Union
and both ordered their armies
last night to hold their fire
unless fired on.
But Syria kept silent on
the U.N. call. and only hours
after it went into effect there
were mutual accusations of
c easefire violations by
Egyptians and Israelis along the
Suez front.
A correspondent for Egypt's
Middle East News Agency said
the Israeli and Egyptian forces
by today were "locked in the
most vicious fighting since the
outbreak of the war."
Syria charged the Israelis
sent about 60 warplanes in
"waves" to bomb civilian
targets today north of
:, .ascus and said Israeli
planes and cannons hit villages
in the eastern foothills of Mt.
IlHerinon.
'Our jet fighters
immediately clashed with the
enemy in the most violent
dogfight and prevented the
enemy planes from carrying
out their missions, forcing
them to drop their bomb loads
in barren mountainous areas,"
a Syrian communique said.
The renewed fighting cast
doubt on whether the
cease-fire could bring a quick
halt to the fourth Middle East
war despite the apparent
agreement between U.S.
Secretary of State Henry'
K issinger and Soviet
Communist Partv chief Leonid
Brezhnev.
There was no sign of any
international supervision in the
battle zones. U.N. officials said
their truce observers were still
in Cairo and Jerusalem, where
they were evacuated when the
war broke out Oct. 6.
Israel charged the Egyptians
with "incessant" ceasefire
violations. The Iel Aviv
command said its forces in the
southern sector of the canal
front had orders to continue
fighting to counter what it said
were persistent Egyptian
attacks.
Egypt said the Israelis
grabbed new positions during
the night, partic'.ilarly in
efforts to expand the Israeli
foothold on the west bank c,'
the canal.
Israeli planes bombed and
strafed Egyptian troops in the
area of the Israeli penetration
about midway up the canal,
Cairo claimed.
[hat "compels our forces to
use force to strike at the Israeli
forces in the positions


occupied after the ceasefire,"
said a communique from the
Egyptian Command.
Meanwhile, Ethiopia, one of
Israel's closest friends in
Africa, broke diplomatic
relations with the Jewish state
today, the State radio said.
Emperor Haile Selassie. in an
official statement, said
Ethiopia had taken the step
because Israel had refused to
withdraw from Arab territory
occupied since the 1967 war.



MOSCOW (AP) Libya
will pay pilots flying for
Israel the price of any plane
they deliver to an Arab
country, the Libyan Embassy
in Moscow said today.
The Embassy released a
statement it said was made by
the Libyan Government and
apparently addressed to
"volunteers" recruited by
Israel to fight in the war.
The statement claimed the
United States, West Germany,
the Netherlands and "other
imperialist countries" are
assisting in the plan to get
volunteers.
The Libyan Arab Republic
is "ready to compensate a
pilot recruited and used by
Israel ... the total price of
any aircraft delivered to any
Arab country," the statement
said.
If the delivered aircraft is
damaged half price would be
paid.


-Man found on rail tracks after sisters death plunge-

NEW YORK (AP) The body of a to commit suicide. deaths from the sixth floor of the found it empty, and then discovered
man wanted in connection with the Police said Williams, 29, had been Winsdor Hotel, in Midtown Manhattan the bodies on a second floor landing
death of two sisters in Manhattan has struck and killed by a passing train early in the morning the same day. above a courtyard.


been found across subway tracks in1
Brooklyn, police reported today.
Police said the man, Johb.
Montgomery "Monty" Williams
admitted to a friend that he had
thrown the sisters to their deaths from
a hotel window, and that he was going


COURT

PLEA

ON TAPES
WASHINGTON (AP) The
Senate Watergate Committee
today asked the U.S. Court of
Appeals to reverse a decision
dismissing its Watergate tapes
suit.
In brief filed with
the Appeals Court, the
committee said: "It has been
suggested in the Press that a
"compromise' of this lawsuit
was reached whereby
appellants would forego this
litigation in exchange for
'summaries' of certain tapes.
This is not correct.
"While the President has
unilaterally offered
'summaries' of certain tape
recordings, there was no
commitment by senators (Sam
J) Ervin and (Howard H) Baker
that, as a quid pro quo, this
lawsuit would be withdrawn.
The committee said. "We
need hardly stress that this case
is of great moment to the
nation. The President is
withholding materials that
appellants urgently and vitally
need to fulfill their legitimate
legislative functions."
Meanwhile, Senator Edward
Kennedy said today that
Congressional talk of
impeachment of President
Nixon was "extremely serious
and I think it should be."


about 3 a m. on Saturday.
Williams had been dating Jenny
Gibbes, 30, an employee of the
Granada Tourist Board, police said.
Jenny and her sister June Gibbes,
26, a stewardess with British West
Indian Airlines, were thrown to their


Police said they believed the sisters
were still alive when they were thrown
from their hotel room window because
a stewardess in the next room had
heard screams and called the manager.
The manager checked the room,


Two Americans and Briton


share Nobel physics prize


STOCKHOLM (AP) The
1973 Nobel Prize for
Chemistry was awarded jointly
today to British Prof. Geoffrey
Wilkinson and German Prof.
Ernst Otto Fischer. The
physics prize went to two
Americans, Leo Esaki and Ivar
Giaver, and a Briton, Brian
Josephson.
The two professors share the
$120,000 prize equally for
their work on hydrocarbons.
The Royal Academy said
they had "revolutionized
transition metal chemistry
during the past two decades
... which is also of considerable
industrial importance."
Professor Fischer was born
in 1918 and educated in
Munich where he has been
director of the inorganic
chemistry laboratory since
1969.
Dr. Wilkinson, born in 1921,
was educated in London. He is
professor of inorgank
chemistry at the renowned
Imperial College of Science and
Technology housing several
former Nobel winners.
Earlier today the Academy
of Science, after deliberations
of record length on four
alternatives, awarded the Nobel
Physics Prize to two Americans
and one Briton for their
discoveries connected with the


THE HARDEST BATTLE: GETTING

THE COUNTRIES TO TALKS


TEL AVIV (AP) Stopping
the guns on the Suez Canal
with a U.N. ceasefire is less
than half the battle.
A longer, more complex
struggle lies ahead even if the
Arabs and Israelis silence their
artillery and ground their jets.
The struggle yet to come is
to get the Jews and Arabs to
the negotiating table. Like the
off-and-on war in the Middle
East, a diplomatic deadlock has
endured for 25 years.
Israel has long insisted that
the only road to peace starts at
the bargaining table. The
Arabs, since the 1949 armistice
agreements at Rhodes, have
incessantly refused to deal face
to face with the Israelis.
"They want everything on a
plate a golden plate."
Premier Golda Meir has
complained.
The Security Council
ceasefire resolution called for
negotiations "between the
parties concerned,"
That phrase was seen as one
reason Mrs. Meir's Government
immediately accepted the
resolution.
But the negotiations, if they
begin, are bound to be long,
arduous, and intransigent.
One sticking point was
contained in section two of the
Security Council proposal
itself. It called for immediate
action on resolution 242 of
1967.
Resolution 242, passed after
the last Middle East war. called
on Israel to withdraw from
occupied Arab territories.
Israel holds 26,476 square
miles of captured Arab land
and claims another 1,000
square miles from the current
conflict but the resolution
deliberately did not make clear
whether all of it, or only part,
should be evacuated.
In accepting yesterday's
ceasefire, the Israelis specified
that resolution 242 should be
interpreted from the stand
taken by Mrs. Meir on Aug. 4,
1970.
In that 1970 speech, the
grandmother Prime Minister
was accepting an
American-sponsored ceasefire,
which lasted until 17 days ago
when the latest war ruptured
it.
"Not a single Israeli soldier
will be withdrawn from the
ceasefire lines until a binding,
contractural peace agreement is
reached," she declared at that
time.
Israel, she said, "will not
return to the (pre-war)
frontiers of June 4, 1967,
which ... lend the aggressor
decisive advantages."
The ceasefire lines, she said
will be replaced only by secure


GOLDA MEIR
'Everything on a plate'

and recognized boundaries,
determined in a contractural
peace."
It meant that Israel would
insist on retaining some
portions of Arab land to
straighten out the old frontiers
and strengthen the Jewish
states defenses.
In any case, Mrs. Meir
said then and many times
since the Arabs must
negotiate before Israel budges
from any of the occupation
zones in Jordan, the Sinai and
the Golan Heights.
The Arab agreement is
interpreted as "withdraw first,
negotiate later."
The word "withdrawal"
to Mrs. Meir is a distasteful
word.
After Moshe Dayan's army
conquered Egypt's Sinai Desert
in the 1956 Suez war, only to
pull back under massive
pressure from Moscow and
Washington, it was Mrs. Meir as
Foreign Minister who
reluctantly announced the
withdrawal at the United
Nations.
"That was not my finest
hour." she said later, bitterly.
Ever since, she has insisted that
withdrawals do not bring
peace.
The ceasefire lines set after
the 1967 war gave Israel
territorial protection the state
had never known before, and
few expect the Israelis to
relinquish them without
substantial alterations. And
few expect the Arabs to accept
such alterations easliy if at
all.
Without the buffer zones
seized in the 1967 war, Israelis
admit with some dismay, the
country could have been
overrun in the Arab onslaught
18 days ago. And the latest war
has given Israel even bigger
buffers.


While Israel maintains that it
has no interest in territory as
such, it has set up more than
42 Jewish settlements in
occupied Arab land in the past
six years.
And before the latest war,
Mrs. Meir's Labour Party
approved a plan by Defense
Minister Moshe Dayan to build
even more settlements and
increase Jewish investment in
the Arab zones.
Few expect Israel to
abandon those settlements
lightly.
And the government has
made clear that even in
negotiations, there are some
areas it intends to keep -
Jerusalem, the strategic mouth
to the Red Sea at Sharm El
Sheikh, the Golan Heights and
the Gaza Strip.
Given Israel's stake in what
it calls "the administered
territories," bargaining for a
withdrawal seems bound to
surpass any haggling ever seen
in a Middle East bazaar.
Already Moshe Dayan has
pointed out that the 750-odd
square miles Israel now claims
to be holding inside Egypt
itself would be good fighting
terrain if Egypt resumes
hostilities.

Am in's

warning
NAIROBI, (AP) Uganda
warned its citizens today to be
prepared for an attack
"anytime" by American. British
and Is raeli commandos
parachuting in from Kenya.
Uganda Radio, monitored in
Nairobi, said any aircraft flying
over Uganda without the
knowledge of the Kampala
Government will be
interecepted by Ugandan
fighters and shot down.
The broadcast quoted
General Idi Amin, the Uganda
leader, as saying any
mercenaries or Americans or
Britons in Uganda without
identity cards should be
arrested and handed over to
the army.
It said two persons from
Rhodesia have already been
arrested.


generation of power through
superconductors at extremely
low temperatures.

The United States, which
last year swept the physics and
chemistry awards with six
winners, this year had
Japanese-born Leo Esaki and
Norwegian-born Ivar Giaver
sharing the physics prize with a
young Briton Josephson, as a
follow-up to last year's award
for research in superconduc-
tors.
The physics and chemistry
prizes were the last to be
announced in this year's round
of Nobel awards with most
attention stirred by a
controversial peace prize going
to American Henry Kissinger
and North Vietnam's Le Due
Tho.
The chemistry prize was
awarded for highly theoretical
work, said the science
academy.
"Chemistry is a scientific
discipline with very wide
applications ranging from
biological-medical to the
technological field. In most
cases it is therefore easy to
indicate potential practical
applications of discoveries
which have motivated a nobel
prize in chemistry," the
academy explained.
"This year the prize has
been awarded for work, the
practical applications of which
are not very obvious it is a
prize in 'chemistry for
chemists'." the academy
continued,


Embezzler

executed
VIENNA (AP) The
Romanian Government has
executed. Ion Tudora, head of a
department in a farm
machinery firm, for embezzling
$125,000 in state funds
through the import of
machinery from the west, the
Romanian news agency
Agerpres reported today.
The agency said a military
court convicted Tudora of
criminal actions that
undermined the national
economy and of betraying the
interests of the homeland.
It said he was executed after
his appeal and request for
clemency were denied.
The report said import
contracts Tudora concluded
cost the state $250,000 more
than they should, and Tudora
admitted receiving half of this
amount.
It did not say from what
countries the machinery was
imported or who got the otl' r
$125,000.
It was the first report within
at least the last decade of
anyone being executed in
Romania for fraud.


Veteran balloon
PITTSBURGH Two men
startled residents of suburban
Greentree when they floated
down onto a rest home lawn in
an eight-storey red, white and
blue balloon.
"We wanted to do
something for Veterans Day,"
said balloonist Tom McFadden.

Toothache tiger
LOS ANGELES (AP) When
Madras the Bengal tigei has a
toothache he gets the best of care.
Madras, who normally jumps
through rings of fire and leaps over
other tigers as the star of a local
animal act, had a split fang
operated on yesterday.
Dr. John Palmer, a Brownsville,
Texas, dentist who has done
pioneering dentistry on wild
animals, and an associate zoo
director. Dr. Don Farst, performed
the dental work on Madras.
They had to strap the 350S-pound
patient onto an operating table
while they repaired the damage.


"Fischer and Wilkinson
widened the basic concepts of
chemistry by their work and
therefore also changed the
structure of chemistry," the
academy said.
Dr. Josephson, is only 33.
But he was just out of his teens
when he began the studies into
superconductivity which
brought him the physics award.
Josephson, a bachelor, said
in an interview he was "quite
pleased" at winning the prize.
Because the Nobel Award
Committee considered his
contribution in the field of
power generation to be a major
one, it decided to give
Josephson half of the
$120,000 prize. The other two
winners will split the rest.
The Welsh-born physicist
declined to say how he will
spend the money.
The basis of Josephson's
research, which he began at the
age of 20, was the study of
electric current passed through
superconductors such as tin or
lead at a temperature of minus
273 centigrade-absolute zero.
Josephson noted that the
power created was so intense
that the electric current flowed
without the need of voltage to
drive it along. The
phenomenon became known as
Josephson's effect.

Oil men

strike
Kuwait (AP) Unionized
oil workers began a three-day
strike today to protest United
States support of Israel. But
production and shipping
operations appeared to be
unaffected,
Four hours after the
strike began, a spokesman for
the Kuwait Oil Company,
which handles 90 per cent of
the country's oil output, said
there was no slowdown in
operations at the oil fields or
loading ports.
The company is jointly
owned by British Petroleum
and the Gulf Oil Co. of the
United States.
The spokesman said the
strike was "not unanimous"
but there was no estimate on
how many workers had struck.

Popular tion

i hreat
BRIGHTON, ENGLAND
(AP) A Canadian medical
expert said today the world's
family planning services
represent only one-third of
what is needed to prevent the
planet's population from
exploding.


Only
world's
knows
control


Williams, a slim six-footer, was a
native of Trinidad. Police said he was a
musician.
A 15-state alarm had been broadcast
for Williams' arrest following the
deaths.


Airliner

crashes

into

Rio bay

RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) -
A Brazilian airliner crammed
with passengers plunged into
Rio's Cunabara Bay today and
sank, but most of the
passengers swam to
safety.
Rio De Janeiro's Santos
Dumont airport, more than 20
persons were plucked from the
plane's fuselage before it sank
after remaining afloat for only
ten minutes.
The plane was a
Japanese-made Samurai with
Rolls Royce engines, bound on
a regular shuttle flight to the
interior city of Belo Horizonte.
First reports, according to
Brazil's Agencia Jornal Do
Brazil, indicated that five
persons had died in the crash,
but Viacao Aerea De Sao
Paulo, the company of the
airliner, said any information
on the crash would be
"premature".
AJB said one of the
passengers aboard was a
Korean, diplomat Massaru
Saito. The Korean Embassy in
Brasilia, Brazil's inland capital,
was not available for comment.
Firemen from the air force
and the entire city of Rio were
mobilized to rescue the
passengers. One of the firemen
told bystanders that several
persons were alive when the
plane sank.
The Brazilian Air Force
immediately dispatched
frogmen to try and hoist the
65-seat airplane with steel
cables to the surface in an
effort to determine whether
any passengers were trapped
inside.
Rio's Santos Dumont airport
lies within less than 2,000
yards from Roi's picturesque
Sugar Loaf mountain. It is now
used mostly for short, non-jet
shuttle flights south to Sao
Paulo or to the Brazilian
interior.
The planes taking off and
landing at the airport must
circle the bay and Sugar Loaf
- and the near completed
multi-million dollar bridge
spanning the bay of
Guanabara.













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II I


Tuesday. October 23. 1973


(he (ribunt
NuLLus ADDIcrus JuAm IN VMEBA MAGISTm
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Publisher/Editor 1917-1972
Contributing Editor 1972.
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972-
Published Daily Monday to Saturday


I EDITORIAL


Was it real?


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
I AM tired of politics and politicians. After many years of not
thinking about ghost stories I suddenly find myself flirting with
thoughts of ghosts this week.
If you are not interested in this kind of story don't read this
column for the next couple of days until I get this mood out of
my system.

As I told you in a previous article, I have never seen a real
ghost but I believe in a spirit world because for several
generations members of my family have been subject to spiritual
influences and I have had a constant close spiritual relationship
with my mother who died when I was ten. That was nearly 65
years ago!
But my father, who grew up in Nassau when the island was
unlighted and mostly bush, told stories about ghosts he had
seen....or seemed to see....although he was never afraid and always
sought an explanation for his experiences.
His first ghostly experience was when he was a small boy. He
was the oldest member of the family and his father had been dead
a couple of years when this happened.
His mother was a beautiful woman. No doubt about that. She
was a beauty. I never knew my mother's parents. They were both
dead by the titne I came along but my father's mother lived with
us until I was a young man. I had to take care of funeral
arrangements when she died.
She was beautiful but careless in some ways. My father told me
that his father often scolded her for leaving the young children
alone in the house at night with a lighted lamp on the table.
One night....a couple of years after he was dead....she went out
and left him in charge of his brother and sisters.
They were all gathered around a lamp on the table. It was a
calm night. No breeze was blowing. Suddenly they were in
darkness.
The light wasn't blown out. It didn't even flicker. It was as
though it was suddenly snuffed out as happens when you smother
a candle.
A baby born shortly after her father died was just beginning to
talk. She had never seen even a picture of her father.
"Papa." she said in a clear voice as the light was snuffed out.
She had never used this word before as she had never been
conscious of the existence of a father.
Was his spirit in that room that night protecting his children
from the carelessness of their mother'.?

Mv father lived in a house on the site now occupied by The
Tribune. It had been built by his father. In his later years all his
children were bom in this house, except for Eugene who was by a
second marriage.
My mother lived in Fowler Street before they were married.
She was a teacher at Victoria School on East Bay Street. This
building was, until recently, the offices of the Ministry of
Education.
My father used to go courting on a tame horse. There was a lot
of bush in this area at the time and so he used to let his horse
loose while he was visiting his future wife. The horse would come
running to him when he whistled for it.
He must have courted until late because he said that he often
fell asleep on the way home. Ile often woke up to find the horse
patiently standing in his yard waiting for him to dismount.
The area of Fowler Street and Poitier Lane, better known as
Fish Alley because it was the settlement of fisherfolk, was then
known as Conchie Joe Town.
Often his friends in that area asked him if he wasn't afraid to
ride past St. Matthew's graveyard after midnight.
Back in those days just about everybody believed that ghosts
came up out of their graves at midnight and roamed around until
dawn when they turned back to their confined lodgings.
And so no one but drunks and reckless youth like my father
dared to be out of doors after midnight.
tle was asleep one night as the horse walked slowly under the
almond trees on the parade.
Suddenly lie was struck violently in the head with what he
believed was a stone and a voice from the tree shouted "Giddap".
The horse was frightened and ran away. lie must have been a
good horseman because he kept his seat and reached home safely.
The only thing that saved his head from being cracked open was a
hard straw hat that was still fashionable even when I was a young
man.
Was this a ghost....or was it someone playing a prank on my
father'?
He never knew.

But the nearest thing to a real ghost in his life took place when
I was 8 or 9 years old. I can place my age because my mother was
still alive. She left us when I was ten.
An old wooden school building stood in the schoolyard
immediately west of our house. This property is now used by the
S Ministry of Health. The old building was destroyed by a hurricane
S and was later replaced with the present concrete block structure.
Incidentally, I saw when thIe hurricane wrecked the old
building. The wind must have been blowing from the southeast
because when the roof was torn off by the wind it went flying
away from our house. Had it come in our direction it would have
wrecked our house too.
But getting back to the story. The school grounds were
enclosed with a wooden paling fence.
A public well was on the corner of Shirley Street and School
Lane in the southeastern corner of the schoolyard. Women came
from all over the neighbourhood to this well to draw water. The
area was lighted with an oil burning light near the well.
My father never smoked or touched liquor but he seemed very
agitated when he came hiome one night. He asked my mother for
a lantern. Hie explained that hlie wanted to see something around
the corner. She lighted the lantern and I went around the corner
with him.


He went up and down the school fence looking for an opening
or a loose paling but the fence was solid.
Back in the house he told my mother what had happened. He
said that walking in front of him was a woman with a bucket. She
was swinging the bucket as though she was in a jolly mood.
Then suddenly....without any warning....right under the light
she disappeared before his eyes. He thought that perhaps she had
slipped through the fence at a moment he was not noticing
her....but there was not a hole in the fence anywhere, nor was
there a loose paling.
What would you sav....was this a real "sperrid" or just a


r U I


A.P. ANALYSIS ON CEASEFIRE


Ceasefire poses its own problems


By Holger Jensen
BEIRUT, LEBANON (AP)
- War brought the Arabs
together. Peace might pull
them apart.
The Arab unity which
emerged in the first 16 days of
the Middle East war seemed to
be coming apart Monday, the
17th day, within hours of a
U.N. Security Council call for a
cease-fire. Allies in arms against
Israel, they found themselves
at odds over peace policy.
Iraq, a combatant on the
Syrian front, rejected any
cease-fire or negotiations with
the Jewish state. Syria was
"studying" the cease-fire
proposal. Egypt accepted it
and Jordan was expected to
follow suit, apparently hoping
the superpowers might force an
Israeli withdrawal from Arab
lands occupied since 1967.
Palestinian refugees and
their guerrilla fighting arm,
who have been a main cause of


Arab-Israeli fro tion for the last
quarter century were not
consulted. But the executive
committee of the Palestine
Liberation Organi/ation made
it clear that it would not
accept a cease-fire abrogating
the 25-year-old struggle to
complete the liberation of the
occupied land without any
condition.'"
FAVOURS K1 'YP I
A cease-tirc iTn place
apparently leaves I gypt in the
most favourable position ot all
the Arab tightin, sliies
Although Israe, l rep. )rt,'i\l
captured 475 square niiles xof
Egyptian territory on the west
bank of the Sue/ C(anal.
Egyptian forces claimed sWei/in
a bigger chunk of the Sitnai
Desert and occupy the east
bank of the waterway,
If President Anwvar Sadat
can hold on to this alnd rIopenI
the Suez ( Canal to international
shipping, he would enhance the


pid esie li, t. n Siai.i
campaign tl I ,l .! i; '
i'' is. .ii K xi xi x ,, .t , i through
s'ith Its i tijii ixlrltiir o succx ss.
A cxi' e-iiri .; pia c poses
iii re pr .'ble ii i o r l' ; ex iil il
llate/ A\lss 0i S(i iii ,oito also
hai', ;, e xi'i..n 0 his
, ntl :. ilin \'hi ii .ded to
sc 'p i'h t im: '

-'. rl\ i! li ,' V. S .. 1 t t r 's
lhase .u:igcl', l 'c |,i'i cd out
ol Ih (t1 lil l. 'i , I, .raeli

, l ,r < 1 i .
still , i ,



1 l xi1ht s t Wi ix. l
S1 ; I ll '. r iJ 'c *t 1 0 'l i c
f l i( ( .x i' I 1l .i l t *' ( ,) l x t
Iighl i h ,"i x'1i l !,t s s is o C
lusA] :in i in l ne l .i 0 sq' iua
itilcs ox i i nt '; .1 ,:liig to0
Israel' i iiili,


Assad !acs ':" added
problem ot what to do with
18.000 Iraqi troops, 100 tanks
and two squladruons of jet
planes, whose government in
Baghdad rejected the cease-fire.
With no territ)r%' to gain or
lose, Iraq can ai:ord to take its
usual militant stand Baghdad's
Socialist Baath Party regime


Hand-to-hand fighting on Syrian front


By Alex Efty
DAMASCUS, SYRIA (AP)
Syria studied the U.N.
Security Council call for a
cease-fire Monday, but the
government radio broadcast
communiques reporting some
of the war's fiercest battles.
The government consulted
Arab Presidents and Kings on
the subject but announced nQ
decision on whether to accept
the sease-fire.
The state-run Damascus
Radio did not report the U.N.
action until an hour before the
cease-fire was supposed to go
into effect.
"This resolution has been
under consideration by the


central leadership of the
Progressive Front at a meeting
this morning aid by their
regional and internititonual
commands of the Baat t I
Socialist Party this aftcrnoont,"
a Damascus Radio nt iadicast
said. It reported I gp put's
acceptance of the measure.
"If Egypt stops liglhinlg."
asked one shopkeeper, "then
how can Syria poi.t l
continue fighting \, itself '"
HAND 10-11 A\N)
Thr ouighotit lilt day.
Damascus Radio it)oadLa,,st war
communiques., including news
of hand-to-hand fighting on the
slopes of Mt. IHermon, about
20 miles souLhwest of the


"!i! x \ i the
' x x ': 'ii 'iil ;i t !' ] l\e

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t itn I L' '. i xi xs *,.i | i x.lal

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i ' .' i t l t h e









ii', i, il lii xx 1 x i's I tn i is ai


Tile r, l\ t \ ti t" \ teacher
j ic 1 ,1NC d e



f 1 I I th e
S lC Ir I i n ,tl I i t h11 is
d It 't. tsl Ic l r L the1
wha,1t ., iH tOw ;tlh about atM
k, 'er\ Sr I\S l lan eacher


WASHINGTON (AP) The
new technology of the fourth
Mideast War has made it plain
desert warfare will never be the
same again.
The classic picture of large
numbers of tanks clashing
freely across the sands and
supported in the air by
low-flying fighter planes and
on the ground by infantrymen
appears to be obsolete.
Those free-wheeling tactics,
witnessed in the 1967 six-day
Mideast War, have been
replaced by the relative caution
evidenced by both sides before
the cease-fire was declared
Monday.
Take airplanes, for example.
Nearly all of the approximately
100 U.S.-supplied F4
Phantoms, A4 Sky Hawks and
other fighters lost by the
Israelis were downed by
Soviet-made ground-to-air
missiles.
Another surprise to the
Israeli tank forces were the
appearance of Syrian and
Egyptian infantrymen carrying


WASHINGTON (AP)
House Speaker Carl Albert
announced today he is turning
all resolutions calling for
impeachment or investigation
that might possibly lead to
charges of impeachment" of
President Nixon over to the
House judiciary committee for
consideration.
Albert said he is confident
the committee will begin its
inquiry without delay and
added: "For the Congress to
act in a reckless or hasty
manner would further
engender disunity.
"In my opinion," Albert
said in a statement,. "'the
President's act of Saturday was
unfortunate. It seems to me to
contribute to divisiveness
among the American people at
a time when the leadership of
the nation should seek unity."
Over the weekend, Nixon
fired Special Watergate
Prosecutor Archibald Cox after
Cox refused to go along with a
proposed presidential
compromise in the White
House tapes dispute. Atty.
Gen. Elliot L. Richardson
resigned rather than fire Cox
and Deputy Atty. Gen. William
D. Ruckelshaus was dismissed.
Albert noted that the
c onfi rmation of Houst
Republican Leader Gerald R.
Ford's nomination as Vice
President is already before the


Soviet antitank w '.iap ns xoi
their backs. By all accounts
reaching the Pentagon. thei
RPG7s. as they are called. were
fired with deadlI accuracy b\
determined Arab troops. 'I lhe
often moved iT1n advance of(l
their own tanks to aimi their
weapons at Israeli armour
In both cases, Israli tanks,,
were frequently slowed bM thi.
fear that they would encounter
the Soviet-made antitank .
weapons even after Arab tanks
had been destroyed in !xil '
numbers, Pentaxgon mnals is
say.
The effect, once againii \v,i
to make the Israeli at tackin
force more cautious and f'earlri
than six years ago.
The late intiodluctioli ,i
similar U.S.-made antiliink
weapon to the Israeli ior.e ir
difficult to assess because lhi
Israelis did not hate them i in
numbers before the shoolt'uxn
began. But their presence is
sure to cause equal caution lxi
Arab armour coimmianJers '
any future Mideast combat


committee and said he wants
the committee to also act
quickly on that.
"The House should not hold
the nomination of the \ ice
President designate hostage "
Albert said, "as it considelt,
matters related to amn
impeachment, he met \ tiih
House Democratic lealets
Rep. Jim Wright of Texas si i
that Albert stressed thI he'
wants Ford confirmed as Vic'
President before there is anm
formal House action >>1
i mpeac h meit. n ho i I d
proceedings go that tar

'Why I resigned'

---Richardson
W A-%SIIIN(;TON (AIt' I h i.
Richardson explained l (ndil thi
contlicting demllands thitI ldil ln .
resign s Attornie, u;t.i lr ,.oiia ]i
the e VWatergate i tlou ts
c)iinfrontingt President Niutn 'i
for the American ie,'xr t
)udge..."
Rtichardsoii, appliiauiit'd for ncirl
two minutes bI enilohe%,s ntI l
i.S. llDepartment oi l lusni c
described a week lit uegoti.iilt s
and contro",ers5 in ithte Jilduic
bheween the White ihnl' I
Special Prosecutor Arichil.ild tl .
over access t o prt'sidentlvi ltu i
recordings.
Richlardson retIold the xt.,ri % i
his ico i It I en-t independence of the iiivestigtion, and Ni\.o 's ordcr
that the Special Prosecutor he firei
In that situation. Rii hard,-il
said. he concluded hie could lsi
serve the nation as a private cituiielli


figment of the imagination?
I am no judge because I have never seen a ghost.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
From ghoulies and ghosties and long-legged beasties
And things that go bump in the night,
Good Lord, deliver us! ANONYMOUS (Scottish)


ARE YOU FREE


THIS EVENING?

Fonight, when you are rested and relaxed, how about
coming around to The Toogood Studio for a Christmas
Portrait that will delight you! We're here to welcome
you between 8 and 10 every evening and we know you'll
like our cool, waterfront studio at last Bay Street
/R.S.lP. 5-4641


TACTICS CHANGE IN MIDEAST


House speaker's ruling on


Nixon impeachment moves


BARCLA S
I n t e r n. aLt i =lonyaaSil


t
t


I


She Bribunt








71i rbn Tedy cobr2,17


V ol'




./


SPECIALIZING IN
BRIDAL WEAR
AND GENERAL
SEWING.
2 LOCATIONS:
STAR PLAZA,
MACKEY STREET.
GLASGOW HOUSE,
ROBINSON ROAD.


NOW

OPEN

"TW -BAR-B-o0"
QUALITY CHICKEN-RIBS -BEEF
BEST PRICES I TOWN
Enjoy yo Meal in our LDnrvRoom or
Take It Hone wE you
Mosko Bldg. Trinity Place & Market St.
Now Open 9:00 a.m. to 9 p.m.
DRIVE-IN SERVICE FROM 6 P.M.
LOT ii REAR OFF MKT. ST.


a Shop Early
Now in stock

d Gibson
Refrigerator-
Freezers


LORANDOS REFRIGERATION & AIRCONDITIONING
BAY STREET PHONE 2-4842 -P.O. Box N-3380


4


SPECIALS


U -=muMMMM=mmmum m


___ ______ I


END OF MONTH SALE
OPENING SALE STILL ON e'


GIRLS'SHOES
FROM $4.00
SOYS'WHITE SHIRTS
& BLACK PANTS
BOYS' POLYESTER PANTS
MEN'S POLYESTER PANTS
2 FOR $20.00
LADIES BLOUSES 2 FOR $7.50
ARNOLD'S DEPT.SIORE
COR. BAY ST. & VICTORIA AVE.


New Orcenf) Lundry
nd and l ne'rsl. 4Vd,
PROUDLY ANNOUNCES THE
0 OPENING OF THEIR NEWEST
S BRANCH STORE OPPOSITE MASON'S
ADDITION ON EAST STREET:
COME AND SEE US AND TAKE
ADVANTAGE OF OUR GRAND
OPENING SPECIAL --- A PAIR OF
TROUSERS CLEANED FREE WITH
EVERY $3.00 ORDER'


Just Arrived!


a lovely assortTlmenlt of
long & short dresses
ALSO -
Short Blouses & Pant Suits
& lDenim Tops


ivow Loced on 6th Twrre CentreMtlte
East of A F t( Motoi


// Tf
/\


THE COMPLETE PAINT STORE


TINKER'S
THE PAINT
SUPERMARKET
Featuring top Brand Name
Paints
From as little as $4.95


also complete lines of
Automotive Paints
& wallpaper supplies


Per Gallon
VISIT THEM ON MACKEY STREET
PHONE 57939 P. 0. Box 5599


-7


NewArrivals!


FOR LADIES:
The latest in DRES & CASUAL SHOES all colours
Beautifully tailored POLYESTER PANTS.
COATS with PANTS to match.
KNIT TOPS large assortment of styles & colours

FOR MEN:
POLYESTER BAGGY PANTS
BASEBALL SHIRTS long & short sleeves (great fall pattern
HATS the latest

REMEMBER YOU ALWAYS $AVE AT ...


John's Dept. Store
ELIZABETH AVENUE


U U U


Paf &Pino9


DRESSES SWMWEAR
SWEATERS ** HANDBAGS
COSTUME JEWELLERY FROM ITALY


COMPLETE CLOSE-OUT SALE
AT BIA
Infants' children's wear Sleepwear *
Lounge wear Shirts Blouses *
Pants Sweaters Men's & Ladies'
underwear Bedspreads Bathing
suits
SHOP NOW & SAVE!
Excellent opportunity for
Xmas gift buying low, low
prices
ArinaU
WULFF RO AT MACKEY ST TEL 28M
WEEKDAYS 8:30to7:0 S0 ATURDAY 8:30toSoo00


THE NATION'S nol0 IN SHOES
PRESENTS

Most Shoes on Sale -
NOT $500
OVER$ 0

HELE'S SHOE STORES
MADEIRA SHOPPING PLAZA
BAY STREET (John Bull Building)


I U


I


Imm mmmi


From the Latest Wearing
Apparel Show
LADIES SHOE'S Back to School for Girls
ClOggS from Spain Italy Brazil
Slack Suits -Pants by
"That Girl" in Polyester Dresses
-Tops Beautiful Styles
MEN'S double knit pants
the AARON SHIRT Mr. Baseball,
in Long & Short Sleeves, Hats For the Swinger

JOHN'S DEPT. STORE
ELIZABETH AVENUE


LAST CHANCE!

LAST WEEK!!

TERYLENE & MOHAIR
$4.00 per yd.


EDDIE'S DEPT. STORE
1 DOOR EAST OF STOP-N-SHOP


MODMK...
Check with

LEES
for
CARPETS
AND
DRAPERIES
PHONE 3-1993


a new look


c COMMONWEAIIH

INDUSTRIAL BANK 110D.

LOANS FOR ANY USEFUL PURPOSE

I 1% on lay call Deposits


NASSAU
Palmdale
opp. City Mkt.
Phone 2-1421


FREEPORT
Churchill Bldg.
Phone 352-8307


NASSAU
Bay Street
opp. Maura's
Phone 2-1154


Konica Autoreflex T
Bring this coupon and get 5% DISCOUNT
1.8 Lens I
(plus CASE)
$229.50
1.4 lens
(plus CASE)
$259.50


BAY STREET


SHOES...


For That
Office
Uniform


THERESAS
P.O. BOX N-370 LEWIS STREET PHONE 2-3175


I


Rachael's Boutique


Tuesday, October 23, 1973


(Sh (Tribmt




II-


Tuesday, October 23, 1973


BDeoAb
a~a.


By Abigail Van Buren
1 7 iMn MicaN Tribgme-N. Y. News Symi., IK.
DEAR ABBY: Another advice columnist keeps insisting
that homosexuals are "sick." She says: "Thousands of
homosexuals have written asking me where they can get
straightened out so they must consider themselves twisted,
or they wouldn't be asking for help. Occasionally I hear
from homosexuals who are at peace with themselves, but
they are few and far between. I believe the majority of
homosexuals would be straight if they were really free to
choose."
What say you, Dear Abby? L. A. TIMES READER
DEAR READER: I say if a heterosexual had been
raised to believe that his preference for the opposite sex
was "sick," twisted, abominable, sinful, and a disgrace to
his family, he would ask for help on how to "straighten
himself out," too.
Homosexuality IS a problem because an unenlightened
society has made it a problem, but I have received letters
by the thousands [not just "occasionally"] from gay people
telling me that they wouldn't be straight if they had a
choice. All they ask is to be allowed to love in their own
way without facing the charge that they are "sick and
twisted."
I say, love and let love.

DEAR ABBY: I am a 57-year-old grandfather, happy in
a third marriage, which, tho turbulent at times, has lasted
for 16 years.
I must comment on a letter you printed about this
virgin who married a widower and objected to sleeping in
the same bed in which he slept with his former wife, now
deceased. So disturbed is she by the memories her husband
must have of that bed, she disposes of it behind her hus-
band's back. And YOU approved of her getting rid of the
bed! Both you and that new wife are out of your minds.
What about the man himself? Were not his lips, his arms,


-7CARROLL RIGHTER'S

IHOROSCOPE
from the Carroll Righter Institute
GENERAL TENDENCIES: Whatever is new,
untried about the future that interests you is
fine, but avoid the past, including legal matters and whatever
limits you The aspects indicate one wants to be cooperative,
but it is difficult to do so because too much emotionalism is
apt to be present. Try to be more objective and smile.
ARIES (Mar 21 to Apr 19) Forget home anxieties; be
with persons you like, or who can help you advance.
Personal aims should be given precedence over business ones.
Keep calm, poised
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May. 20) Listen to bigwigs'
suggestions to get ahead faster Busy yourself with public
and vocational duties Wasting time foolishly would be
foolish indeed
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) If you study those new
interests well, you can make them successful and start
wheels rolling in right direction. You are inspired Steer clear
of moochers
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Work on
unfinished projects which can now bring real benefits. Some
new form of entertainment could be what you need to perk
up your spirits. Be happy
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Listen to associates and go
along with them Bring those new plans to attention of right
persons and get their okay Forget things you can't change.
VIRGO (Aug 22 to Sept. 22) Install that new system to
get all those tasks done efficiently in jig time Keep an eye
on your wallet Much care in driving, motion is important.
LIBRA (Sept 23 to Oct. 22) Meet with interesting
persons who can help make your life more prosperous,
satisfying Drive carefully and keep out of trouble with the
law Evening good for recreation.
SCORPIO (Oct 23 to Nov 21) Avoid tangents, get busy
improving conditions at home and pleasing kin and make life
happier for all concerned Put good ideas across Think, act.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 to Dec 21) Study your
surroundings and see where you can make improvements
Discuss aims with one who is fond of you and get
cooperation Enjoy the social in p.m.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) Plan how to increase
income through intelligent efforts Avoid an associate who
got out on the wrong side of the bed Don't argue
unnecessarily
AQUARIUS (Jan 21 to Feb. 19) You are thinking very
clearly now and can coordinate your efforts best with those
of alies for mutual benefits Get into interests that are
remunerative Advance.
PISCES (Feb 20 to Mar. 20) Contact advisers for pointers
needed to make your operations more successful, personal or
business Romance does not need broadcasting around if it is


to be satisfactory

CROSSWORD
PUZZLE
ACROSS 29. Moon goddess
1. Quahog 31. Weakling
5. Indian ruler 33. Draft
10. Fashion headquarters
11. French schools 34. Account
13. Maple genus entries
14. Unicorn fish 36. Kiwi
15. Tellurium 38. Soldiers
symbol 39. Surrender
17. Referees 44. Ahead
19. Spoil 45. Elaborate
20. Even melody
21. Samuel 46. Pitfall
Clemens 47. Japanese
23. Saulte game
Sainte Marie 49. Blunderbore
26 Prosy 50. Ramble
28. Helot 51. Repetition


SOLUTION OF YESTERDAYS PUZZLE
DOWN 5. British news
agency
1. Study for 6. Skin disease
exams 7. Supporting
2. Honiton beam
3. Venerable 8. Porter
4. Worth 9. That man


Homosexuals aren't sick; love and let love


and everything else also used in making love to his first
wife?
How can she kick this wonderful old love-filled bed out
into the street as used merchandise and yet sleep with the
man who is also used merchandise?
The logic of the female mind I shall never understand.
FRANK IN PHOENIX
DEAR FRANK: Move over. Freud admitted that he
couldn't understand it either. But I'll bet a lot of women
[including this writer] understand it.


DEAR ABBY: May I answer "STUCK," regarding the
nervy couple who drop in at dinnertime regularly several
times a week?
This happened to us, too, and here is how we handled
it: When they appeared at our door we said: "Come in-we
were just about to have dinner, but we weren't expecting
company. Make yourselves comfortable in the living room,
and we will join you AFTER dinner."
A few times of this treatment should get the message
across to the "nervy" couple, and you'll soon be [as my
husband and I are] . "UNSTUCK"


CONFIDENTIAL TO N.C.: No one said it better than
Horace Mann: "Generosity during life is a very different
thing from generosity in the hour of death; one proceeds
from genuine liberality and benevolence, the other from
pride or fear."
Problems? You'll feel better If you get it off your chest.
For a personal reply, write to ABBY: Box No. ISN, L.A.,
Calif. 90069. Enclose stamped, self-addressd envelope,
please.
Hate to write letters? Send 91 to Abigail Van Burs,
132 Lasky Dr., Beverly Hills, Cal. 90212 for Abby's booklet,
"'How to Write Letters for All Oceasmos."


INK-SMEARED


m


- - -- - - - - ---- --________^"______________________ _^___W4,0___ a- -


"---m mmmm


Sbh 1irtbbim









Tuesday, October 23, 1973


Cash for a good driver

\ THOttHTFL I driver who helped a small boy received a
i .irdl and was named Courtes Dl)rver of the \Nionth by the
R 'ad I rttic Departinent in Nassau.
According to Chief Supervisor Wellington Bullard who
witnessed the act. Mr Cvril Baker of Baker's Close Oakes Field
stopped his ear on a bus% street to allow a little boy to cross,
But rhsien the child reached the numiddle of the street, he
tllbie ,iid n fell, scattering his books and lunch.
Mr Bake, immuedliatel% went to his aid, picked up the child and
rather-ed hi lunch and books Then lie helped him across the
street
\in R ..aboe centree. s piet-ured receiving the cash award
mi ..' M\h,'sle\ (htr f Supervisor Bullard is also pictured.


i 1HII H


IT ALL ADDS UP


Vouri


I


TWC


reusable but unwanted

items of

clothing, tools,

appliances, clocks,

ns etc .clear out

.'sets, garage, storeroom .

all can be of help

to someone else.

Donate them to






Bazaar !
ROSETTA STREET
) DOORS WEST OF
MONTROSE AVE


f I





Salem



refreshes



naturally!

Natural Menthol is %vh\.


















*, i -- IIt ri


Extra
long


BANKIN G
ONE BANK HELPS
A ANOTHER: The most
important thing to any bank
is its depositors, so a group of
Barclays Bank International
staff decided to make a small
deposit at the blood bank
recently.

No pass books were
issued but both the blood
bank and the donors were
satisfied.


Pictured are Leon Knowles
,sitting) Mrs. Gene Haynes
(left) and Wendy Burrows.


II ^ ~TAKE MORE ACTIVE ROLE,


ON A BLOOD DEPOSIT


low A


[~4~ -
/


By George! He's off to London


;t() R(; ROGERS, 26,
(pitured) is the most recent
en p locec to benefit from
Barclas s Bank International's
poulc\ to put Bahamians in
si',ategic positions in the bank's
operations here.
Mr Rodgers, who has been
w:thli Barclays since 1965. has
Iert Nassau for London, where
hie will attend an instructor's
curse until November 9.
\n enterprising Bahamian
who has. in eight years, moved
up from the position of
postage clerk to an officer at
IHarcla:ys, Mr. Rodgers came to
thr. b.nk soon after his
gr diuation from Prince
Williams Iligh School in 1965.
(nly three months after his
postage stint, he was
transferred to the savings
department.
For three years, from 1968
to 1I71, he worked for
lBarclays on the Iamily Islands
o A\ndros and I leuthera, and
in 1972 the bank arranged for
hirn to attend a special
banker's course in Jamaica.
Soon after his return from
Jamaica. Mr. Rodgers was


promoted to the position ot
manager's assistant at the Bay
and Dunmore branch of the
bank.


They're almost


up, up

and away
\ ARLI.Y the full quota of
125 aircraft have already
entered the ninth annual
Bah.tmis Fl'l ing treasure Hunt,
with t ,inst weeks to go before
the start of the famed flying
event
FIli ng treasure hunt
coordinator Hans Groenhoff
indicated this week that the
limit of 125 planes will be
easily% reached. le already has
applications from 121 fliers.
I he treasure hunt, which
originates at the Grand Bahama
IHotel and Golf Club at West
Fnd. Randd Bahama November
2,. terminates with an awards
banquet in Nassau December 1.
I'he hunt is akin to an
airborne car rally in which the
aviators are given a set of
photographic clues which they
must identify and plot
accurately on a map of the
Bahamias
I he pictures that form the
clues are mostly aerial photos
ot the various Bahamian Out
Island and cays.
F1his year the clues are
confined to the Abaco islands,
the Berries, the IExumas,
Ileuthera, New Providence and
part of Northern Andros.
'he first prize, for the pilot
who identifies and plots most
accurately the greatest number
of clues, is a half acre. h lf(t^U,
lot at the residential/resort
development of San Andros.
Entries to date include 32
female fliers, and people from
as far away as northern
California and Alberta, Canada.
They range in age from
19-years-old to 84-year-old
Denver Wright, who hasn't
missed a Bahamas Flying
Treasure Hunt since they were


In London he will receive
,pecialised courses ill the
preparation and instruction of
banking material. This will
include not only methods of
instructing, hut also the art of
revising course material to fit
in with various innovations
within the Barcla\s system.
L'poun his return from
London. Mr. Rodgers" special
area of assignment will be at
the Barclais Intcrlnational
training centre in Nassau,
which provides courses for
staff at all levels in thle various
aspects of banking
In this posit ion, he v.,ill be
directly responsiNe to Mr.
I Hugh Sands. wh li has overall
charge of p'- 1sonnel aniid
training at Barclai s
Mr. Rodgers, \ ho also
served as an officer in charge of
advances at the bank's Bay
Street branch in 1)"2. is an
external student within London's
Rapid Results Collr'
lie is studying for tihe
I ns titute ot 1 Bankers
examination, I Iv is married and
has one daughter


set to get


first organized by Mr.
Groenhoff in the early 1960's.
The week's schedule
includes cocktail parties,
receptions, a mini treausre
hunt on the grounds of the
Grand Bahama Hotel, and a

H -- many
\ words of
E W our letters
or more can
Syou make
yo rom the
0 I letters shown
__nhere In
Smoking a
word. each
| [ | letter may
he used
once onlIy.
Each word muat contain the


-II
grand awards banquet at the
Sheraton British (Colonial Ilotel
on the final Saturday evening.
Pictured' Mr (Groenhoft and
his assistant Mrs. t Fanny
Gardiner prepare the chest.


lare letter, and there must he
at least one eight-letter word In
the list. No plurals: no foreign
words ; no proper names.
TODAY'S TARGET : 28 words.
good ; 38 words. ver y good 47
words. excellent Solution on
Monday.
YESTlERDAVS SOITION :
Elver ever heel hele hell hello
helve here hbrl hero hole hove
hovel HOVELLER hover leer
level lever lore love lover over
reel revel role rove veer vole.


L


NEW YORK (AP) James
J. Needham, chairman of the
New York Stock Exchange has
urged corporations to take a
more active role in the current
controversy over how the
securities markets should be
structured.
Speaking to the annual
meeting of the Financial
Executives Institute, Needham
stressed that the imminent
formation of a central
securities market carried
"tremendous implications for
corporate America".
Needham asked for support
for a system that would enlarge
rather than curtail the ability
of U.S. industry to mobilize
new capital
Meanwhile. Paul Kolton,
chairman of the American
Stock Fxchange said it was not
too late for the securities
industry to develop an
industrywide self-regulating
body which could play an
important role in determining
hos the markets would be
structured.
Kolton told the National
Traders Association in Boca
Raton, Fla.: "The alternative
may be to watch regulatory
control of the markets pass out
of the industry's hands and
into those of the government."
At the annual meeting of the
National Investor Relations
Institute. C.V. Wood Jr.
chairman of the Committee of
Publicly Owned Companies,
and president of McDulloch Oil
said:


NEEDHAM URGES


"The time has come for the
chief executive officers of
companies to unite in seeing
that Congress, the securities
and exchange commission and
the securities exchanges take
steps to make it more
attractive for individual
investors to return to TMT
markets."
The dominance by


institutional investors who
manage huge pools of capital
often has distorted stock
prices, and created an unfair
balance, he said.
Wood said the committee
was preparing recommenda-
tions to present to the house
ways and means committee
could help the smaller investor.


ETR


(BUT LOOK WHO'S GETIN'READYTO GO)
Starting December 1, Air With some rollicking Reggae
Jamaica introduces the first (and music. Our special free Rum Barnm-
only) daily nonstop jet service from boozles. Our menu spiced with Ja-
Nassau to Detroit... and a second maican delicacies. A flying fashion
flight daily to Montego Bay and show by a covey of sunny Island
Kingston. stewardesses (we call them our
So when you head north this Rare Tropical Birds). And big, pow-
winter, we'll fly you direct.With- erful jets flown by an elite corps
out any detours to Miami or of million-mile captains. So if
some other city. And all along you'd like that good feeling as
the way, we'll help keep the long as possible, call your tray-
tropical warmth in you just a el agent for Air Jamaica reser-
little longer. nations. Or phone us at 322-1538.


airJamaica
WE MAKE YOU FEEL GOODRALL OVER


Qualified individual required to manage the production of
eggs, grow-out of replacements and egg grading. Also
supervision of feed mixing and medication. For personal
interview please submit, in writing, a detailed report on
experience and qualifications to:-
MR. DONALD J.STEWART
General Manager
Hatchet Bay Plantation
P. O. Box N-3217
Nassau, Bahamas


^


VY"ur C


Whr Grthat









Tuesday, October 23, 1973


MISS BAHAMAS

HOLIDAYS

IN JAMAICA
MISS BAHAMAS 1973,
Agatha Watson, receives a
ticket for Kingston, Jamaica
from Mr. Winston Clarke, Air
Jamaica's airport manager.
Miss Watson spent the
holiday weekend at the
Sheraton Kingston Hotel, one
of her prizes for winning the
coveted Miss Bahamas title.
The first runner-up, Miss
Marjorie Nairn also was on
the trip.
They were chaperoned by
Mrs. Cherry Bethel of the
Bahamas Beauty Pageant
Committee, sponsors of the
annual Miss Bahamas Pageant.
Next month Miss Bahamas
will visit Venezuela where she
will take part in the Miss
Caribe Beauty contest.
Photo: Lorenzo Lockhart.


by Jim Alberse
To a nation already surfeited with s
week's events brought even more.


F.iBU ic dHNIIll


STARTS WE
Matinee 3 & 5, Evening 9













GEORGE C.S
FAYE DUNAW
JOHN MILLS
JACK2PAU

O KLAHOMA CR

PARENTAL DISCA
Reservations not claim
on first come, first



Now thru Friday
Matinee starts at 2:30
Evening 9:00

"DEEP THRUST" PG.
Tien, Wang

PLUS
"MORE DEAD THAN
ALIVE" PG.
Clint Walker
Vincent Price

'Phone 2-25 34





STARTS W
Matinee Continuous fr
'Phont


Hi)RE[


DNESDAY m
9-'Phone 2-1004, 2-1005 U









"' l

co,'

COTT
AY

ANCE

aUlDE

REGIONN AD VISl'D.
led by 8:45 wI., Le sold
t served basis.




Now thru Thursday

Continuous Showings
from 3:00
"SLAUGHTERS BIG
RIP OFF" R.
Jim Brown I
Ed MacMahon
PLUS
"VALDEZ IS COMING" PG3
Burt Lancaster
Susan Clark
No one under 17 will be admitted.




WEDNESDAY
rom 2:30 Eivening 8:30
e 3-4666

A dude
with a plan
g| to stick it to
S The E
"Man!






SHEILALA FRALIER


For one tning, a Vice
President who had piously
proclaimed the need for stiff
morality and stern judges was
revealed as a grafter; he
abruptly resigned in distance,
copping a plea to stay out of
jail. Within 56 hours, the
President nominated the House
Republican leader, Gerald
Ford, to replace Spiro T.
Agnew. In choosing an amiable
workhouse of the House, says
TIME magazine, Mr. Nixon for
once did the easy and
popular thing.
On another front, a federal
appeals court ruled, in often
biting language, that the
President must yield up his
Watergate tapes, serving clear
notice that a serious threat to
Mr. Nixon's own political
survival still looms.
And finally, the full gravity
of the war in the Middle East,
with its dangerous possibility
of enmeshing the superpowers,
became all too apparent.
PERIL
However distant and, as yet,
only indirectly the U.S., the
war between Israel and its Arab
neighbours could hold greater
peril for Americans than the
drama unreeling 'n Washington.
The war inspired a feeling that
the renewed killing would
resolve nothing, yet there was
little the U.S. could do to seek
an end to the hostilities until
the course of battle had
become clearer. The fear of a
big-power confrontation grew
significantly as the Soviets
made pro-Arab noises and
started resupplying the Syrians
and Egyptians, while the U.S.
made noises for peace and
started resupplying Israel.
Inevitably, the ignominious
demise of Mr. Agnew, a
politician whose career had
thrived on a generation of
divisive emotion, commanded
the most immediate attention.
He had defiantly proclaimed
his innocence and assailed his
Justice Department
prosecutors as conspirators out
to get him. Then he turned
about with astounding
suddenness to concede his guilt
in one crime and to bargain for
leniency. He also had the
spunk to resign an action
which won him some grudging
praise by editorialists for
placing the national interest
above his own resigning rather
than waging a protracted legal
battle.
AVOIDED
Overall, the week's events
did little to enhance Mr.
Nixon's prestige. He did
manage to avoid angering
significant political segments
by his selection of Mr. Ford,
although the odd atmosphere
of celebration rather than
solemnity as he made his
televised announcement may
have offended many viewers. A
battle with Congress over
confirmation has surely been
avoided unless some damaging
and unexpected evidence
against Mr. Ford turns up. Nor
is there likely to be any
widespread feeling that the
removal of Mr. Nixon himself
would be much more palatable
now that Agnew is gone. Mr.
Ford does not immediately
conjure up an alternative of
massive presidential stature, for
one thing. For another, the
general fear of impeachment
and its global impact remains a
protective force for the
President.
COCOA OUTLOOK
ROME (AP) World cocoa
production in the 1973-1974
season would total 1,450,000
metric tons, the
inter-governmental group on
cocoa forecast estimated


A ,BARBADOS


ECONOMIC


CRISIS HIT
BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS,
OCT. 22 (AP)- The leader of the
opposition Barbados Labour Party,
Tom Adams, has blamed
government mismanagement on
what he termed the worsening
economic crisis in this
island-nation.
Speaking at the party's annual
conference, Adams claimed that
there had been a flight of capital
out of Barbados at an
unprecedented level. He dismissed
government's explanation that
external conditions were dictating
the policy of banks here.
"There is no significant amount
of capital coming into Barbados
from the United States, for
example, where the rates are
generally lower for depositors,"
Adams said. "The reason is that the
government no longer commands
... "" respect and confidence."
Adams said his party had put
forward a number of suggestions
.--Z for solving the short term economic
. faults of the government. One
such had been the limit on bank
deposit rates recently applied by
the central bank.
"Recommending immediate
medicine for a sick economy is not
enough for an opposition which is
waiting in the wings to take centre
U S stage. He declared: "we have to
formulate an alternative policy in
keeping with the principles of
U S democratic socialism on which the
party is formed."
Adams, whose father, the late
Sir Grantley Adams, formed the
surprise party and later became first Premier
of Barbados and Prime Ministe of
t.incI-,aieu W..* mutes reura ..on,-


te ill-fated west Indies Frederation,
said his party continued to back
West Indian unity. But, he added,
"only unity based on equality".


f [11 "


JAZZING IT UP!
SHARING A MUSICIANS JOKE ... Stan Getz, right,
internationally famed iazz saxaohonist and Peanuts Taylor,
proprietor of the Drumbeat Club, share a musicians' joke
with the club's manager, Casper Conliffe, during a visit by
the sax master, last week. Getz who is here for a short stay
at the Renaissance Health Clinic, seems to enjoy the music
at the Drumbeat and returns almost nightly to "jazz it up"
with the band boys.


ROTARY DONATION TO HUMANE SOCIETY



JIM HAYEK, president of
the West Nassau Rotary Club,
is shown presenting keys to a
double horse trailer to the
Bahamas Humane Society
president Mrs. John Kenning.
The trailer is a Rice English
made two-horse hunter-size
vehicle, electrically equipped
for night operation. Shown
above from left: Cleophas
Adderley, chairman of the
club's community service
committee; lan Taylor
chairman of the Fellowship
Committee; Humane Society
Inspector Jack Rycroft; Mrs.
John Kenning, president of the
Humane Society; Jim Hayek,
Rotary president and Bradley
Roberts, past president of the
club.


I, ,



RECOGNIZED
MRS. BETTY SMITH
(above) of the Hyatt Emerald
Beach Hotel has been named
"employee of the month". She
has been with the Hyatt
organization for the past six
years and is employed in the
Cafe Bama Mama. She
previously worked at the
Esquire Cocktail lounge and
the Royal Elizabeth Hotel.

CALLING ALL

SECRETARIES
ARE YOU 21 years or
older? Is your shorthand speed
80 w.p.m. and your typing 35
w.p.m.? Do you have G.C.E.
'0' level or R.S.A. 11 English
Language or equivalent? If you
do, come forward and let the
Ministry of Education and
Culture help you pursue the
Bahamian Private Secretaries'
Course, and earn a certificate
recognized in the Public Sector
and Private Sector.
Registration and testing will
take place on Monday October
29, at 6 p.m. at the C.R.
Walker Technical College.
Classes commence at the
College on Friday, November
2, 1973 at 9 p.m.


190 dead, 400 missing in



flash flooding in Spain

MADRID (AP) More than 190 persons are known to have
died in tlash Hlooding in southern Spain and another 300 to 400
are feared either buried under tons of debris or ,sept out i 're'a.


police said Sunday.
uhatil iN Cee, saw iiobud\
I a I i iir.iiri saiS id ;i
(62 .iii Ihi Liuner from I a
R abtit
Vi l nniniiiiiri .rw'a\ w itli
InI. \! i s iaw houses with
some oi o'r helped
Iliriht' l (ilCtin trel visti1
ineir ghbit, in' thifi toppled as
thou h i: were liIadC a(
ppl heard cries trom
C\ C1 i lu 11but we onl\ had
l k t i ti nd iun r I 'll ive
i.'! s i rible night Iw,

Somnic 1' i .1:l.S said the
t i S I,,i ' .'. l i r 1 .e I C Iell j l l
, I ,\ i iti (). p-rCi itii \' c r'f1'
k illcd 1 i t' dinge in the
| '110( KI N(
'\V\ t ]will pissa bclton a
i tn i i l '' .is i l ot roip' .t l
pro)peil\ d lal;iageC Lt_ II li,
i i .e o n e o tfltic.'!a l "a !tl .
\ Wlh n i .ii lthe ficts aire put
t 'C'lhieCi it will really I re
"-! ")O k ll" "
['usrtt I tiimbltras,. 55 mile s
illh\\le .1 f \ltirei,. wiit ai
o ,1111 n of ( r .OOt0 i 00 il i.-
PI'it) it a i ish" I'y L IJL I le
. 000 1in i nada Imn. .
ai e-n tt l Itor plal tic,. ll+ .i!l the
\ ln i ^ I; the ll.o dil III.
[I I 'i l l lII ,i-I tinI \ i i s I c I
I IhkLI I ll six [lo tIr ', 1il sonaI
pl.aL's trapped iitindteds ii
their id bltioreiC djwn I crsd
I le !ain \l. i which riine! had
been p i\ irii Ior, i ',ilt' Iatll !
siS io nllhs, oI dI c IIghtl halt
killed lhuil anid 'eCeitabl crops
nii S.pa 'is iMdh'st c ltii vatcIl

13 l0011 S
Resciie prties were slowSlh'
diggini ou t bodies froid t lhec
JChni. ol httuses unisheid fi
at ilatn hre's oit iiud. which ini
soeri places w'ere 20 teet deep.
More than. 2 100 IIe. '. in
( rianaIda. e .i ani.d Murcia
provInc es were still isolated.


Roads w. er .'- t- b't t i ,
avalani che al h ,ni '.;' -:a!i'
r ere disrupt, i
Thouii.' '' ;I htoiC Ci Wt;e
sleep:',i thie nearby hinls and
forests aind iam\ othet t'. t
takin g sheiltI nI bh ilL: I I, th it
escaped tile i .ods
1I he twn ha l .,i I'ii erti
L u bll e ra n K,, di m a I
morgue.
One w m r '.ni' w.is I .rit '.'t di a
lile hx jrnpi: p 'r tt
terrace ,ot her house buLt lr.i
both legs was quoted a- i < ;';.
"'We hfl e lost all we ha.t. B :i
the Lord wanted ulI s i -t. oui
lives and we must lu .rk ilnii
t it."


Carib ship group


wants closer ties
KIN(;,ION 1 '.\l *. (M\P)
t'.irihi't.An hil ppirit '..s ,. t fli.i h.is
,Ile l i ll K i- ig. J n. s'.. "-vi
A iAhll b, J .alli3! "t I ll D iallsporl
llIi111tisr I r I II ttr i )s-r IIr :imrttilm
e txweent titOr asser ri nit aIl ir t
( aribbeth gnit''iiiilerei .
Bell ,u 'i rc tr d that' l it
C, ) i t rtlereI t-C [ ",re r r" .pii
,. !['ll, dUl l11f. sttt'
tO retilucit tlhe rIIed tI liVL t lucti 111:
l '.inCr st alt ;in% purpiose- .te'i\ t th.
lreardivfe oie oi ''gtiig lip the
!iurc.lur an acine ()i'nLc this i
I't"ht'.irir tii. rt it" itt ,if ut r IZlld
i I n. t isi t li I te t I'd .
rel it ir\ed i ltll \l'it' h .t ( lrit l,[ r
:is' ciailtn ilt i t' sp ', hr i ,Ihr:g ,
'rtiirrt'fi/eL aS tireo
l it ti rtis fr:lJ I ',t 1 ,elopi'
A t 'trJ '. fc) ef rn'
as \\k ti ..r i t i tlit njr
ihrlr t ul t i it itif -',-ter r ,
rl ),plc a d i t' r m
p e ii t i iil.; i ifn'sl I 'i' vt erii t, tr
p nph v i iii r c !'.i i > tcrs)- sI
.s i.'1I ft .s ii, t. ar.I t'ir i
imuist h ir t it 'I r i t rt r' hI t rt
Iri) nllitg palt .-f a ')t 5 if!.


ipmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmImmmmImmmmmmmmmmm mmmm w

,. Enter The Tribune-Pan Am Travel Photo
-Contest'


.. A free round-trip for two
,^ can be yours aboard a Pan Am jet to
any one of 26 European cities served by Pan Am.








I/ rr I
// ll

iI -. .17"- *' i / /* i i


City or Scene . . ........... ................ Country .............................

My Name .................... ......... Address . ..................... Phone .......

Contest Rules
The Tribune will run a total of 30 photo ads showing s,( ene fiom somrnewheiir within Pait Am's travel system. N.rme th'
City or Scene and Country shown, using the putute .ind answer blank ini.i.ded in e ach ad. After the final phot o has nI
on November 17th, mail all 30 entries (stapled ot cihpped together) to: Vacation, The Iriburne, P. O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas, You may enter more than one gioup of photos, as long as you ruse official Tritbnei blanks and group'
must be fastened together.
Should you miss an edition of The Tribuine with a, Par Ami photo ad. back copies can be put chiedS ft The Tribune
reception desk in The Tribune Building, Slh lev Stieet, o' ,rssat, or The Tribune off ,e, 9B Kiphrligj ,I ieeport.
In case of a tie, the tie will be broken by additional phlotos not previously published. All erities must bh postmarked
later than midnight, Monday, November 19th, 1973.
Employees and their families of The Tribune, Pain Atr'iicai World Anways and their advertising agencies, are nroi
eligible to enter.


Contest ends Saturday, Nov. 17 th


Where in the world within Pan Am's travel system,
are the places pictured above? Identify all 30
photographs that will appear on various days in
The Tribune over the next 13 weeks and you have
a chance to win a round-trip for two aboard a Pan
American World Airways' jet to your choice of any
one of 26 European cities served by Pan Am.


1T;e Tribune


A.ner may tcoo$se round trip for two
i any one of the following 26 European
.es. tved by Pan Am ^ ft

ASMSTFROAM MADRID
StRICELONA MUNICH
BE LGRADSI HCE
S ABlLIN NUREMBERG



ANOV STUNiC TGART
BRUSSELS OSLO
COPENHAGEN PARSAW
nuSSELDORF PRAGUE
FRANKFORT ROME
(-,LASGOW SHANNON
HAMBURG STOCKHOLM
HANOVER STUTTGART
LISBON VIENNA
LONDON WARSAW


NO ONE UNDER 17 ADMITTED.


I ImI mIImmmmmm m mmI IImmmm-mmmmIImmm-mmllmmml


(9hr Gribum


i":!$!
.,











~Iw ~ribunt


Tuesday, October 23. 1973


CLASSIFIED


SECTION


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS -FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV. TELEPHONE 21986 EXT. 5


NOTCE
C12121
NOTICE is hereby
FLEXIE JUS! IINA
Eight Mile Re. -
Bahama is appi, .
Minister respo:'
Nationality atd .-
for registratot i .
The Bahamas. a '.
person who kno., ,
why reg.strao -,' .
isr , ,. sh '-i: .
and siqi-' .
facts with. ,' .e K
from the :t; .,' .
1973 t .-
responsiobe : 'I. ,
Cit.zpn'-hp P ;. "
Nassiau

C12135
NOTICE
E LE A ZAR .-
FORBE S of t ;
Grand Ba.( t:
the fiiniste
Nationalit '
tor reqis at. '
as a cit:ze
an-d that ai' '
knows at '
registj' A o .
should n t
send a .
statemer'' :'
twenty, 1 :. "
16th day W'
The Mn.tc
Nationsialt '
O. Box N7 14

C12138
NOTICE s : ..
DELL VO4,

z-n
appi. q ,
r'spo;s.Di' n' "-
a ctzen' n '

that an e
any eMar "' ,. :
should .-* 1- .
send aJ v -
state'ner.t ,n ;^,
twenty-eih; i .w-
16th day J' .> *
The M; .
Naticral''y 2 ",
O Box N71.

C12134
NOTICs ,C ,
MiCnAEL A'. '.-
BARRELL
Avenue, '-t
Bahama, n "'
to the Mi' -- .
National * -
for .. -
The Bah a
person whi, -.
why reg MR r
anted .' :
and sqnc
fact' .. + .A. t "
from the L
1973 t
responsib," C)
Citizenship.
Nassau

C12125
NOTICE n '.-
DECILI J .
R idg c e :
Provid ance ,; r
M i n ise
National.t,
for atio,
of The Ba,
person 'hi -
Why niatts :i... ,
be gran : .
w'rtte a-i: "
of the
1 .. 1-., ; I 1" 0 T,
16th day of O,: ,
The Ministe
Nationality a ',
0. Box N7147 '

Ci2139
NOT( E ,
JODHN T-I -'.' '
of P',at .a'e
apply n.. s .
respor ', h .. *;
C itizenshp, r .. : =
a citze' - r,
that an- -
any r";sq;". .i' .
should no,' si;- .
send a ," o -'..
state er- ,;' t*: : +

16th dad .. C-
The Mirst'
Natiunia ty it, r
O Box N14 7 "

C12124
NOTICE .s er' ,.,
STIVENE ri.;
Odte Corne '.; .
is applyirq t .
responsible foi p, ,

as a citizen of . .. .
and that any ;,
knows any r. ,,
naturalisation ,: .


granted shoul.'i
and signed state v-,
facts within t 'v
from the 16th i v'
1973, to lche
responsible foi rio
Citizenship, P. .
Nassau.

C12122
NOTICE is heireb -1i 1 :
HOLSTON WANTi :
WILLIAMS of I '
Rock, Grand h';- ri
applying to t0ie '-i i
responsible foi N tiona:
Citizenship, foi r ist
a citizen of The Baild,-a ,, a *
that any person wvho .,u
any reason why registratr..,
should not be granted stoul.
send a written anid siqne
statement of the facts ,-.ithm
twenty-eight days fino' [hi
16th day of October, 19"i, Ii
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship. r1
0. Box N7147. Nassau.


#oncE


+ , -, s

















o'-
: ,
., :. r + %+






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ii i iii


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i ; t.' eason
Sk now a ii








. od / i f
S . i .r N' r,47
-'a 2 t'' da'
F' + "- --' : t The ster

-- (i -Sit'


" : ;_ 0: N M D O N A L }
f',! J of Owen', Towvn
S h a as s apply i
\ i' ",'V d C't+./ ,'h.'p,


Is'3 h toby qtivc- that
't HENRY xtr'ISON
'n %''ect Gioe. Nassau.
i:.x i, is appi'in, 'W tfIr
,' c. e- resporiib for
i =' f' 'v and Citi_ i shi ,
S -t aion 3 a a *t ien o5
*.r B.,h a js, a!IC: that ary
** /.'" o knows- anl s reason
S,. '',tion lshouid 'not be
j ,d sh uld send .r itten
j stat,:1+o! ."o' the
..- 1h ,'' twenty eqh) days
) tp I 3rtd day of Ocltbe'
S *o 'cThe Mniste-

S : P. 0 B 7147,



0;Vi herby, bvwe" that!
Sf. : E L. I L D A
l0 "./;*, (' ( ilmn 'I A !lcy )ff
p a is ajplyn q ti o the

r i-+: .. ...t' j'.. i a a 'i tii /cn <'.t
S s. a d that a
.ii' a iv rka j t ,so
*r' cs J' s oon l ho d rnot be
d ,ho..d ,d e
d -g;-"d .ttaterme,,t of t!;e
" .v;it'-i twety-eiqht da'.,
,- .d d ay o Octoo ,e


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P i,.a'iiro,,p, . i0iBox N/1;47,






j r a' L tom'e rs


renovat--,
I hax 'k vo in *,x uii patronago
THEL MAt.NAGER & STAFF
ISLAND) T V. sERVICE
S i .' 22618.


*


BUSINESS 6 PROFESSIONAL


DIRECTORY

Save Time


SHOP .:,>

BY

PHONE

T0 list In This Directory Call 2116 EXT. 5

1 Line Pri Mouth 6o 2 line PerMonth 1O"!


> SuTIM[S l MONEY<
FLOOR MAINTENANCE BOOK STORE
S ug Cleaning & Installation flii. hri,-tiain Book Shop 5 8744
I I d i nterinrs 51?" ( 42191
> I.,"..5 bR L, .{^Lt 'I ". t L' LO 1. : '.
'' l 2-317, lrhe W\.ardrobe Mackey St. 5 5599

DEPT. STORES TRAVEL
i '.s' pl l i 't,,re 2 3173 I' sltours 2-293117
S' p pt.S r 2 3 1 H. (urry' & .Co. td. 2-8681/7

SD)IO A I.V. SAIFS M!JSI ,
irter'\ Record., 24711 ( body's Records 2-8500

OPTICIANS HEAL1 H FOODS
' '".i 1 Serv I',de I rd 2 3<. 1)/r'I iaDs-,.ii Irueg Store 3-4871

SPORT SHOP CAMERAS
!i ",, 1 t I ind 2 lS! hil B1ull 2 4252'3
SHOE IOR. DRY Gl000S
i, 1.ris Ki.ul Kxil- 2 42', i Clii.uris Kute Kiddy 2 4264

CARPETS LAUNDRY! DRY CLEANING
'C: :irpi t Cr.ill 3 l '1 \eW ( riental Laundry 2 440,

HARI)DARE GARDEN & PFT SUPPLIES



PLI \11l; R,% PRINTING
Illhi- 'hllh M1 ii t ;,>, Printing C 1mpminv 5-450 61

i REC(KER SERVICE DRAPERIES
, , ,r l,. i i = i 1 1 I j

FOR THE ACTION YOU WANT




Shop Nassau Merchants


For Business And Services


I


F-- - -

SREAL ESTATE


S T
C1.- _____

pat,.', d T T I { '.L -
-;, + i i s / R -!,,


BUY A LOT
;n ELASTWOOD or
WIIiTON MEADOWS
l 'k arev

Frank Carey Real Estate
[ . 1JI /(I4


'/,. 4- J',


$4.I,000
F ..:
$, i'd '-


i -ii -
-IF. 0.

-'
ii-' -
I. -' -'-5'


C1222;
ONE Sr

b thi ; ,
hi-ter -S ,
4 _' i2


tr i: u;n firnis ii-d
3 kitchens, 3
S. *,ai FE ster
r ,i S-. hdiv.,rill
:'= +:3rs please i

Ps











S URY P
.+ -.-'







1t 13 1 ^ **'S i r 1 y i, I r,,|
I NT 1T7 1
tki- c I :- in S '







i ,O vS-..AOv B- -W ,
bro'o,.wT nI

P 0( I. '







furnished. wa!I ll -at wa,
Carpeting, lage p.-., Johnson
Terrace $30,000 ALSO oY
Imperial Park 80 x 100 only
$', i.,1r01i C Phon"' 1905 days
42463 after 6 p.m.


FOR RENT

C11868
BEAUTIFUL two bedroom.,
apart-mont inr Shirlea, partly"
ftirnished 25i a month
inctindi,, watei Call 36896
Catr Lowe. Monday Friday, 9
.3 0 5 p.(1

C11772
ONE EXTRA LARGE two
bedrooms t w-o bath,
apartment. With large living
and dining all basically
furnished Victoria Court
APARTME.ILNTS on Elizabeth
Avenue between Shirley and
Bay Street. Facilities, phone,
laundry, parking, T. 'v.
. it 'i ., li : :itiu ned Pho ne
5.' bet-..een 8 .. anrd 5


C12137
COMPLETELY FURNISHED
One Bedroom Apartment with
telephone, $180 00, Phone
5-8512.

C12171
35729 1 bedroom apartment
Highland Park. Telephone
and water. $160 per month.
C11761
.3AY STREET Store for rent as
of October 15th. For
information call 2-3170.


C! 12131
UNFURNISHED 2 bedroom
apartment, good location off
Mackey Stieet. Telephone
5 1758.
C12214
FURNISHED AND
AI RCONDITI ONE D 2
bedroom, 1 bedroom and
Efficiency apartments.
Telephone 5-8134.

FURNISHED ROOMS
C12211
In quiet neighbourhood at
reasonable rate. For
information call 5-1044.

C12222
FURNISHED two bedroom
apartment in Boyd
Subdivision. Interested persons
call 53912.

C12242
ONE THREE BEDROOM, two
bath, airconditioned and
furnished home, Queen's Road,
Nassau East. Phone 5-4684 or
2-3750.


C11763
COTTAGES and apartments
daily, weekly or monthly
airconditioned, fully furnished,
maid serivce available. Lovely
gardens and swimming Doo!.
rIelephlone 31297, 31093.


CARS FOR SALE


C12157
1965 FORD 12 Ton Pick-Up
Truck. Cash offers invited. Call
3-1426 after 5:00 p.m.
C12205
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD.
P.O. BOX N-640
NASSAU -BAHAMAS
USED CARS
1970 HILLMAN HUNTER 4
Dr. Auto. White $850
1968 JAVELIN A/C -- $995
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA 2 Dr.
Auto. Green -- $1450
1971 FORD CAPRI Auto.
Blue --$1695
1970 CHEVELLE SS A/C 2
Dr. Red $2600
1968 VAUXHALL VICTOR
$600
1969 PLYMOUTH
SATELLITE -- $1300
1969 PONTIAC GTO A/C
Vinyl Red $2600
1971 FORD PINTO Brown
Vinyl Auto. -- $1995
1971 VAUXHALL VICTOR 4
Dr. Std. White $1295
1967 MERCURY COUGAR
Std. Green $900
1969 AUSTIN 1100 4 Dr. Std.
Green $995
1970 FIAT 124 4 Dr. Std.
White- $600
1968 BUICK ELECTRA White
-$1595
1969 VOLKSWAGEN Green
$1250
Trade-ins Welcomed
Located Oakes Field
Opposite the the Ice House
Telephone 3-4636-7-8

C12249

BARGAINS




"' f-'asusr Place 0 l .\ ra F it 'rul,


USED CAR


CLEARANCE SALE

NPH 522 1971 DODGE
AVENGER 4 door,
automatic $1300.00
NPH 191 1968 RAMBLER
REBEL 2 door, automatic
$ 900.00
N9901 1968 TOYOTA 800
2 door, standard $500.00
NPY 165 1969 FORD
CORTINA 4 door,
automatic $800.00
NPY 55 1970 VAUXHALL
VICTOR S/WAGON 4 door,
standard- $750.00
NPF 259 1970 VAUXHALL
VIVA 2 door, standard
$950.00
NPH 403 1970 FORD
CORTINA S/WAGON 4
door, automatic $1000.00
NPF 896 1970 CHEVROLET


IMPALA -
$2650.00
NPS 584
MARINA
$2200.00
NPH 251
AVENGER
automatic


4 door, automatic

1972 MORRIS
2 door, automatic

1971 DODGE
4 door,
$1800.00,


1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
S/WAGON 2 door, standard
- $1400.00
N7467 1968 FORD CORSAIR
4 door, standard $500.00
NPN 191 1972 DODGE
AVENGER 4 door,
automatic $2100.00
NPW 167 1972 VAUXHALL
FIRENZA 2 door, standard
- $2500.00
NPW 169 1972 CHEVY VEGA
- 2 door, automatic
$4500.00
NPB 950 1970 VOLKS-
WAGEN FASTBACK 2
door, standard $1500.00
T7122 1971 MORRIS TRUCK
$1850.00
T6544 1972 FORD VAN
$500.00
NPX 633 1973 BUICK
CENTRY 4 door, automatic
$6000.00
NPX 457 1968 CHEV.
IMPALA 4 door, automatic
$900.00
FINANCING AVAILABLE
COME IN AND SEE US
Oakes Field near
Police Barracks
Thompson Boulevard
Tel: 3-4711.

C12251
1971 DODGE AVENGER, 4
door, automatic. $1095.00.
Phone John Cash, 2-2768 days,
3-1397 evenings/weekends.


CARD OF THANKS

C12232


THE FAMILY of the late
William Alfred Richardson
extend their thanks and
appreciation for the many
expressions of sympathy
received during their recent
bereavement.


I IN MEMORIAL


!1


IN LOVING memory of our
dear father Noel (Ben) Taylor
who departed this life October
23, 1970
Whatever else we fail to do,
We will never fail to think of
you.
Sadly missed by one son Noel
Jr. One daughter Dorothy, and
many relatives and friends.

C12243


IN LOVING MEMORY of Miss
Christine Green who departed
this life Oct. 23rd, 1972.
The shock was sudden, the
blow severe
To part with one we loved so
dear
Time takes away the edge of
grief
But memory turns back
every leaf
Whatever else we fail to do, we
will
Never fail to think of you.
Left to mourn: Her parents,
one sister, three brothers and a
host of other relatives.

ART SUPPLIES

C11770
COMPLETE range of artists
supplies. Oils, acrylics. canvas,
easels, etc. 3-ahamian Paint
Supply Ltd., Bay Street. Phone
2-2386, 2-2898.


FOR SALE
C12140
OFFICE FURNITURE
D-sks, swivel arm chairs,
sccretarv chairs, office tables,
NCR accounting machine.
Contact 2-7491-2-3 from 9 to
4 30.


C 119b5
ACT II RESALE SHOP
BRAND NEWNEARLY NEW
EXQUISITE Gowns, cocktail,
street dresses pants suits
jewelry
DEALERS WELCOME
1352 Washington Avenue,
Mia mi Beach Phone 534-0001


MARINE SUPPLIES

L11762
PACEMAKER 44 ft.
Luxurious Cruising Yacht.
Phone 3-2371.

_11894
1969 31ft. CHRIS CRAFi"
Commander. Sleeps six, private
shower, two 230 h.p. engines
with less than 200 hours,
kitchenette, good (.'i .Jt", ,1
Call 24267, 54011.
C 12245
CUSTOM MADE heavy duty
trailer specially designed to fit
25 ft. boat, 4 wheels and 4
jacks. $1200. Phone 3-1642.


PETS FOR SALE
C 12244
BABY RACCOONS.
Completely tamed, one of the
most interest ng and
affectionate of pets. Telephone
D. Knowles 2-2117 days.
5-3795 nights.


HELP WANTED .

C12241
WANTED LIVE-IN MAID-
over 30 $30 per wk.
(including Bed & Board) For
Interview Tel. 21631 9 a.m.
5 p.m.

C6334
Job Title BURNERMEN (2)
Minimum Education Good
basic education. Experience in
fuel burning process in rotary
Kilns and production of
Clinker. Cement plant rotary
Kiln burnerman.
Minimum Experience -- 3-5
years.
Duties/Responsibilities -
Operate Kilns to produce
clinker by a continuous process
of burning.
Interested applicant contact
Personnel Department,
Bahamas Cement Company, P.
0. Box F100, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.


HELP WANTED


i __ C 12.176


C12165


C117C-
BAHAMAS ANTENNA

SYSTEMS
SOLVING POOR RECEPTION
Same day service for moving
antennas or new installations.
Call Douglas Lowe 23371
51772.
C11776
T. V. ANTENNAS
Boosters for homes;
apartments and hotels.
Sales and services
Call 5-940-
VO.'F.LD OF ;viUSiC,
Mackey Street
next to Frank's Place.

c 1 769

Pinder's Customs

Brokerage Ltd.
Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU. BAHAMAS
P. 0. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-3796
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434.


RELT ESTATE






C12115
$75 DEPOSIT gives use of
private lake & beach rights. All
utilities underground. 70 x 100
lots from $5800. NO
INTEREST. Tremendous
savings. Call Rutherford at
4-1141 or Morley & O'Brien at
2-3027 or 2-4148 or come to
YAMACRAW BEACH MODEL
HOME any afternoon.


I I


I .....


C12176
LOCAL FINANCE COMPANY
requires two young men
interested in learning and
making a career of the finance
business. All applications in
own handwriting to: Adv.
C12176, c/o The Tribune, P.
0. Box N3207, Nassau.

C12177
TREASURE CAY LIMITED
TREASURE CAY, ABACO
Requires Personnel to fill
the following positions:
RESIDENT GOLF
PROFESSIONAL
Applicant must have
previous experience in direct
operation of a first class Golf
Club. IVMust also be of calibre
acceptable to Bahamas
Association of Professional
Golfers.
Preference will be given to
application from qualified
Bahamian.
WAREHOUSE SUPERVISOR
Individual applying must
have previous experience as
Supervisor of warehouse with
sizeable inventory. Purchasing
experience considered an asset.
Bahamians only need apply.
For appointment Please call
Treasure Cay Limited, Nassau,
Telephone number: 2-2415 or
2-8730, or send resume, name,
address and telephone number
to Treasure Cay Limited, P. O.
Box N-3229, Nassau, Bahamas.

C12223
HOTEL MANAGER. Mature
couple. Must have knowledge
of maintenance and repair
work. To manage friendly,
intimate, small hotel in the Out
Islands. References required.
Good salary. Apply Adv.
C12223, c/o The Tribune, P.
0. Box N3207, Nassau.

C12250
FORMS AND SYSTEMS
DESIGNER required by
Business Systems Limited.
Applicant must have several
years experience in form
designing and in processing
orders with specifications.
Remuneration will be by
commission. Please apply in
writing to P. 0. Box N-4841.
C12234
STAFF COOK for six months
to work with Chef in private
home. Must be willing to work
evenings and Sundays when
necessary. Transport provided.
Only experienced cooks with
references that can be checked
need apply. Tel: 7-8117
between 10.00 and 12.30 a.m

TRADE SERVICES
C12118
FOR ALL YOUR
GARDENING needs.
Trimming, Hedging, Pruning,
Beach Cleaning, For prompt,
reasonable and efficient
service. Call 5-7810.


j


T, i t a : ,{










Tuesday, October 23, 1973


____Ubeh ritbimt


HELP WANThO
C6370
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
for busy real estate office,
Fast, accurate typing is a must.
Shorthand an advantage but
dictaphone is used extensi.-, .
Good appearance u .'-d
experience in dealing with
public. Salary commensurat:
to experience. Apply with
resume to: McPherson &
Brown Real Estate, Freeport,
Post Office Bux F-2480,
(352-7305). bahamian need
on v apply.


HELP WANTED
Cb378
QUALIFIED INDUSTRIAL
ELECTRICIANS
Minimum 4 years journeyman
experience. Must be capable of
reading, interpreting and
working from standard; one
line. Schematic, wiring
diagrams, conduit;
construction drawings.
Applicants received in person
only. Apply to: Mr. Rick Penn,
Development Corp., Coral
Gardens, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.


"It'a quitting time. You'll have to wait and
your anger and frustration on your wife."
Brother Juniper


take out


HELP WANTED
C6334
Job Title BURNERMEN (2)
Minimum Education Good
basic education. Experience in
fuel burning process in rotary
Kilns and production of
Clinker. Cement plant rotary
Kiln burnerman.
Minimum Experience 3-5
years.
Duties/Responsibilities -
Operate Kilns to produce
clinker by a continuous process
of burning.
Interested applicant contact
Personnel Department,
Bahamas Cement Company, P.
0. Box F100, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.
C6381
PORTERS: (15) Porters to
wash pots, clean and mop
kitchen area and do garbage
collection. Interested persons
apply: GRAND BAHAMA
HOTEL, WEST END, GRAND
BAHAMA. Personnel Office,
between the hours of 9:00 a.m.
and 3:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday. Elon Matrin,
Jr., Personnel Director.

C6367
AIR CONDITIONER /
ME CH AN IC: ( 1 )
Air-conditioner Mechanic to
repair and install
air-conditioning parts and
compressors.
COMPUTER PROGRAMMER:
(1) Computer Programmer
should have knowledge of
writing programmes for
computer.
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY:
(1) Executive Secretary to
work in Convention Office.
Must be able to take shorthand
and type at least 60 w.p.m. 5-6
years experience is necessary.
Interested Persons Apply:
GRAND BAHAMA HOTEL,
E EST END, GRAND
BAHAMA, Personnel Office,
between the hours of 9:00 a.m.
and 3:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday. Elon Martin.
Jr., Personnel Director.


HELP WANTED
C6380
1 MALE ADAGIO
DANCER: With a minimumof
five (5) years professional
experience as a featured artist
and working in production
numbers. Good references and
Police Certificate required.
Applicants should apply to:
Bahamas Amusements Limited,
(El Casino) Personnel
Department, P. 0. Box F-787,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
C6379
CHEF (BROILER)
REQUIRED: The man for this
position will have proven
experience in preparation and
cutting of meats for steak -
experience as broiler cook plus
the ability to produce sauces
and dressings to written recipes
- apply in person to : BASS.
BAHAMAS LIMITED -
CAPTAIN'S CHARTHOUSE-
Telephone 352-5109 for
appointment.
C6382
DIRECTOR OF GOLF
Individual must have a
minimum of ten (10) years
experience, be knowledgeable
in all departments of golf
operations, administrative
ability as to the hiring and
training of all golf department
personnel for two clubs;
knowledge in buying, selling,
price setting and cost control.
Inventory of all golf
equipment; projection of
annual budget for two golf
clubs; be able to arrange and
set up golf tournaments from
one day events to the scope of
the 1971 Bahamas National
Open. Must plan, carry out and
protect golf events for two golf
clubs; have knowledge of
maintenance of electric golf
carts and work closely with
Golf Course Superintendent;
also the promotion of golf.
Apply to: The Grand Baharma
Development Company,
Personnel Department,
Lucayan Building, P. 0. Box
F-2666, Freeport, Grand
Bahama. _


"Face it, Gabby. No way of escaping civilization.
NO WAY!"


Bahamas Humane Society






DOG SHOW


GOVERNMENT HOUSE GROUNDS


Saturday, Nov 10th.


Entry forms available at:



Animal Clinic- Nassau Street


Eastern Veterinary Clinic- Marathon Estates

Dr.Gordon Leam- Grosvenor Close

Modernistic Garden& Pet Supply-
Madeira Shopping Plaza


H.G.Christie Ltd.- Bay Street


r ~
I,: /~,.,

~


Bahamas Feed Supply- East Bay Street

Humane Society Office- Chippingham


Entries received by



Oct. 31st


FREE TICKET


GRAND BAHAMA


CLASSIFIED

IN FREEPORT

TEL. 352-6608


will receive


REX MORGAN, M.D. By DAL CURTISI
WELL, r DON'T SEE THINK IT'LL DO YOU A OKAY--- IF I'LL I4AVE THE I'M SORv IF I
THAT IT DOES LOT OF GOOD/0 UT IT'S OU THINK NURSE BRING CAED AN
IT'5 IMPORTANT THAT )OU ANY GOO/ IMPORTANT THAT YOU 50--- IT AC / TROUBLE/
TAKE YOUR MEDICATION, TAKE IT U
DR MORGAN /










JUDGE PARKER By PAUL NICHOLSA
.IM NOT AT YOU TELL YOUR CLIENT THAT IF CALL ME -IF YOU TI WON'T CHANGE MYAY
ALL CERTAIN ABOUT 6LADE'S MORAL THERE ARE ANY ARRANGEMENTS CHANGE YOUR MIND... BUT MAYBE I CAN
VALUES, POOLE! HE TELLS ME HE ; TO BE MADE, I'LL BE 6LAD TO MIND USE YOUR SERVICES
OWE YOU 75,000 AND THAT LISTEN TO HM SOMETIMTHE SHO LOSINE DRIVER'
HE WANTS TO PAY YOU OFF! I'M i .ALONE! SORRY,..
ERE TO MAKE THOSE& MIKE NOMAD T' GOT TO BE
ARR ANGE IENTS TIME NO- M OTLY TO M UT WALKED I









APARTMENT 3-G By Alex Kotzkt]

I THINK YOU'VE DO YOU THINK WE'LL EVER RECOVER IF ONLY I HAP YOUR CAPACITY
KNOW HER EET OOT E OVER YOUR FROM THE SHOCK OF LOSING ANN TO OTHER THAN NE, MY FRIEND
NWHEEPEI MQUTAALREADY, BRYANT
JUS' HAVE YWALTER! ONLY
THIS DRINK WM LL
AN' THEN TELL









STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & overgard

MY6IRL FRIENDS COMING TO JEAN./-.LOW )BUNDLE./ .IT'6BUTA PURTY WOMAN rD LIKE

K WEANYWHERE.iN DIN'YUMY VACATION
I- HE E.'


Iwo ISCOM II-


I


I













ghte ribuntr


Tuesday, October 23, 1973


'Volleyball' Tom has high international hopes


TO)l (.RANT (lipicunred lei f
Bahanitmas olIl- tall I federation '
publicity director, is nt w hi li'.ea d id r
greater titiing Beingi nc ol t ive
Bahainian' who are cerltitd c(l ited
States Nlnle'\ball .Association otticiiils.
Grant now plans to become a cerl iticd
international olticial.
consideredd I\ man\ Ito be the Iest
volleyball referee in the Iahaimas.
Grant's control and finesse whiltne
otficiating has been commended ihree
times by international countiric'.
In February last ear. ithe preslenii
of ibL Haitian Vollevball I-ederation
was s O pleased with (Granm'
plerloriiiice that hlie iiiweditl Giant i(
referit'c tit\ international itournaimein


I


Boxi*n Round up
be C S 0 C^^^


Boston faces hard


punching



Bob
B A ll AMAS 'e., .,
cham p H o s o, t .i .., ;' .,
his 0 wo-\ i \: t h
table Novei' h.'tth *. '. .
ctas he, w ,th : .' .
hard-hittttg .on t e I'I
F re e / e in a lI ro :in i, ,,!'. }h '
at the Nc .is i, i j..i ,
manager Rod n i t ,.1 ;*' .,in
v esterda\
;l n der th . .t:I :
ex-b s x. r So,;r, ,. In '

box ing lite i.-' h' h.i.
bee n ,M : t : :
exC\ eption.ili ,. ,, !
IleastiCe
'1 don't thl :- t . ....
go 15 rounds \\i 1 '.i. '
said
"i Ldan s ' .: '
the distance i .
Free/e being r.iL d it ; ;. I
ten in the 'i ,

ago, stoppe.i :. :
heavyweight ip f
Rolle tor tho .

Since tt, th i n
defended h;. p, -.
W hen i.sked i, R, '. .: ..
return bout I.-.t. .. -
a $ 10,000 p rsh .' il t ';)
guaranteed hlii; h! .'
into the nnl 1 It o. ..' .i
however, that t e .:..
arrangement ts *! .
settled.
Free/ ,; *
appearCeni'. '" ,
scene l'i .' .i-
behind ,. -
eventulai :..i. .: .:
last \ear l :
Free/ec .: : -.
unanlimi .
from C.r,. :'t ... ''

six-round i
from l' or :
before he
bout % ,! i .:,
Roy ster

stro n gls a ". ;: ; '
Grant in th 'h .,: "
their schedule ,. :
In Ii,'-.
September 2' h. :.
Sherwin John ,..
round(


held in Haii i N i.i Jmuiiar, during
the Bahama' m'isn.iatnal tournament
this citation i- r d.
(rant offticiiatei[ iitrnt'e tl second
annual v-ilt bs it .o1iitrnaiie ient for
LE glish, spaki,' (:I l-i'can countries
in Trinidad n \ilo i ; "n- the end of
the seric'. in% x% i'h i !. tt .liah nas ladies
national o)llc\ ball l :,! iccessfullt
defended ihO n Prir ntmiIcr's trophy
Mr. Frank ( Ii l.,ii. i rmidad's sports
officer again A i ni WCinded Grant's
per formaniaes
"His conii dlcii.t siftness and
brevity\ in iakinti deil ons, which did
not reflect ianx tr. if! paitiality, was
something irti hw ilc admiringg"
wrote lHylnrd.


"It is therefore with great pleasure
that I take the liberty to commend
him for a job well done and further
wish to state that a referee of his
calibre will surely be an asset to the
promoting of any tournament for
w which his services are
retained."
Grant pointed out that in
Trinidad when he started officiating
"the people did not know what I was
doing. They were not familiar with the
hand signals." he said.
Grant noted that hand signals can
be useful during tournaments in
countries where the referees do not
speak the same language as the players.


"I wish to state that I was
considerably impressed by the manner
in which he performed his duties,"
continued Hyland. "His approach was
that of one who knew exactly what he
was about."
During a banquet in San Fernando
following the tournament, Hyland
pointed out that usually he on such
occasions does not speak of individual
performances. However, Grant was
outstanding in his duty and he was
forced to break his pattern.
The other certified United States
Volleyball Association officials are
Hannah Rahming, Lou Adderley,
Caswell Thompson and Dr. Norman
Gay.


Un beaten Obed


coasts




to win 39


ix t(, \i)Si O\l Till RSTON
\11tt. \SI \S' ..: ,. ii we'l:h king Ilisha ()Obed
i. ll! i'.' S i' i ,- I''i '.1Ii'n i n i nunheaten
Ca e.ie I y r ik,] r-L' ,,und.ed his Puierto Rican


S'i
it "


7;V




p


BOB FRFIF./


Ii-. .t iii
1'. t 't : '
Ill'


Its'
it -' l S . .,
*+.t r . . : .;.t o :, t lh c'



1.' ".' a'. t .e' ,n


''T i lts th I

'= rh t '
' .'. : l uI 'il -


,,t l, nl f:I I. ~ 11)i+ \ L ;, s

'l tp ;;htl n.;- b \ iu \ -'+ ,,,, .- o
111 n It, itt II



It siin, i e ..s It.. .-o
tOl ',iu l- : hi..
() ei+,, t t,,: d \ ,


(II t i, I '.1 + L "
.'h '0 ilt it .




\ i l e' : t 11 ; i : ; l i '
had h .iL li' he I e\ '' ; ,:'




Isu0l t \ i .- l n. i;id e. S .:, .-* ": :


S to'' m 't '


! 1 ._ l .e- ile r t\ f .
'. ll It t 5 '. . ,, i


l0c' .. 'i-t .a1 .1 a c .,
"t e the ,.

ith I, rie\ .'. i i l I~ l l ..t ,l
lighting ,\wa. tron: ci,.! e '
tibe.l po, ;iled ,itt!. { i'. ; il, :
inl\ [ .i'iie;i \is i i'i-.!.v :
.i i *: I ill i .. I; th _\ *A


heel .i t t '' .

Ra.i:i-ey ,'
hot tt


- I
"'ci' tsr "I'
"5 i.


sso in the eighth round
i; ho,.i Raton.
SI,- spectators aIt the Boca
;ewitnies sitlrri ending the
s (nshi; wom end's tennis

diAhae:. slick and good Iat
< his skilb. I he v .i i unable

S\ the first i ''. 'at\. "I ne\ir threw m
S1 1 \ r \i iR lt I
iL' hung on, ()Oled said.
.'I eaiddc ,
il- 'd i:dt '*" :Ind

S' dg li mine hack
Y %k \hL thc rmtnd



III C101 \ fo!
7 '. '11 ll )' he suich

it I had hit lhen rolike
r. .; i s ;. 'e
i s l t tinie in lii career.
i 'i \ ,i erent. '"I hadl
,! '!..e' M i k )un "*!n^ '. \ iin t|o make Ie


I A L., I al s II )po;-t v, ei.
* "' I'a tIu ncel 1c i o n
.. I: I I i. .' l t o t i


Ike I i i .. ,. :- i : ,: i\tU l : :. < '' l' s D)undee, is
oM t iente ', ;l ( > i h ; 1.s i l. :. kiin q !Il
: U C! l C' e L l L 1 ; o : I' " i l hr thit
k id + t ,,. ..i. ,- h <" :i .



a JhAmph tm Hp K.'" t .tlt lt' i -,. ,i ine."
I nder '! e r in ii 01 f]ei- h..; i .. ; .;! l t d :i that I ls it
llip',o\lnLr l ti v. ',';^ that I !n evetr
usc to do 11i 1,r., h=.,, i ,I' it l![ ,., t". lit, Ik !ho ',! t|o
slihp a puni h re r !ie an r there a i;,n s p it rmnng vepliai
I eisich. aii h1 i.; !n. t c her,' a e- < l l I, 1' ,i things Ic .'s
to learn. ( >l'e. p. :' J o 1i.
I ;htini h i -h", mc a ow h ()bed ld
I+I c !ho \ la', pr ket \. tb id t h! ( lo t c
MiJ th (at ,!o i" '1l -\i. n better pioe p t |!t the C(ubain.
U()b t tIr T i;'s ,i':'entll, and takes iC, stI tu. ItI u i ell


High stakes for tip top Bobby


Mll \\ll I .
heas\ ei ' .
Lloyd I ; :
c (n d ill o p *
ten-rountT 1 .


F lrida ,i l
Arena.
l .l ,o \ Cl 's 1

thIs cee % ".. 1
light he. ,
Vinceni: P,-.1 *
IIn I lhe sc (' ; 1
bouitts h j
chanil Rii ""- h i'. '
acc ldcn1t ,1!: i i
makes h .


Anmericani Ir- ] ,: ,i *.
rounder.
Ilaviing t i t ,, .:
postponed l. t '.kee
inclem ent .i h ; I :
stayed v iove : i, \i i : :
continued V ,i k ,Itr L
with I'ndeLi. k i ,:.
(;ypsy Mike \k i It s 7 ,
who returlicit t ';.'1 : -
expected back s- ...
"We are to tak.i,1 i'. !.-
lightly," explained ( ,r," .
respects Shaver's abi \ i :t.m i
he not only fig ht0 ,, ,i ii
division in the hc i 'a I~
--- most of tlhe time biut Sh icr
is said to li at a r\ c 'rirt
lighter, very di: i'cn.ivt- I i.it
easy to hit and a Ilard imnchet .
Currey has seen Sliaver in
action and found outi that the
difference between him and
Lloyd is Lloyd's speed.
This series ('urrey said will
be a very important step for his. ,
22-year-old prospect.
Victory over both Shaver
and Rondon will place himl
right in the mainstream of
contenders for the world title.


tti ti'.









' +. ;. L { i ;: } lI, ,l lli


Si '.\ icgh


I w t tttr I

!i. .[ i' i'l ii.., ,,, ( Iin


ti sI I' l i't i i i ,t'I ii ta I
\l o o I li lt .i tr I. i irn t i

In siit I i t h r(I
it n t 1! t i '. n i it tn Ior
Itght eight Jinh d Ieets
po lar O Il (la l n, t our



rouilS a n K. ( rati t lakes
ion Sheirw in JoIlins Ji in six
rounds t


Bobby Lloy d gloved tip by manager trainer Pat Cuirrey.


Jerry Quarry to


take on
NI W Y()RK ,IAPI
IHeavyweight onender Jerr
Quarry and hia'"'. -hitting
larnic Slhac ers 'ill mei t in a
I 2-roundcl elinat.on bout
Dec. 14 at Madisitn Square
Garden. teddy BHien'nri
president t ot (;ardei Boxing
Inc.. announced today
It will be the third match
arranged between, the two
heavyweights at the t.ird'en
tils year.
Their June tight was
postponed alter Ouarry came
down with a stomach virus and
attempts for a July match
never materialicd after
Shavers su tfered a broken jaw
while sparring with Jeff


shavers


( I"iIrr. N i' ri nked fot urth
b, 1he V rIld Boxing
\ o'.it iii llon .in has scored 28
knocl o units hil'e 1 mplt g a
45 t, 4 r'.1lt
H1 i'!iic'd bl1ne1l\ last year
altet hin'll stopped by former
chtampit n l ihtinn;ti d Ali but
has : soi. totiur straight
trniiipths siisc launching a
onliewhck list Januar. by
stopping Kadlll Neiumann.
Quart'\. whii lights out of
Nesw Y rk hit niow resides in
Manin Del Rey.C(al has since
decisioned Ron Lyle and
knocked out James J Woody
and )l n\ Doyle.


ELISHA OBED


Rolle fights Contehtonight


B 11 A AM AS light
heavyweight champ Baby Boy
Rolle under the tutelage of ring
veteran ( hiirl'' Major steps
into the ring in about the best
shape of his career later tonight
in a 15-round title fight against
British C('ommonwealth champ
John Conteh in Nottingham.
I ngland.
Mental. geared towards 'the
fight Ot his career' so far. Rolle
left Nassau last week for
1England Major who came out
of retirement to coach Rolle
tfor tli.s fight said that Rolle is
Inentall\ and phi sically fit.
Rated number four in the
Brit ish Fitm pire ligh t


heavyweight division, Rolle
was given the title shot earlier
last month when the British
Boxing Commission gave
Conteh an ultimatum to
defend his title against either
former champ Chris Finnegan
or Rolle.
Rolle at first refused the
bout due to the financial
arrangements but reconsidered
his decision after consultations.
In spite of his controversial
decisions against Miami's
Bobby Lloyd and Johnny
"Ilud" Hudgins, trainer Major
and seconder Fred Sturrup
gives Rolle a fifty-fifty chance
of coining out on top.


BLENDERS PLAY TONIGHT


BAHAMAS Blenders who
last weekend were clipped
from the Majestic League
pennant race by Taylor
Industries play San Sal
Arawaks in the first game
tonight 7 p.m. at the John F.
Kennedy Softball Park.
St. Michael's Dodgers meet
T'aylor Trucking in the second
game at 9 p.m.
In softball action tomorrow
night at the J.F, K. Park,


Flagler Inn Buccaneers play
Golden (Glades (7. p.m.) and
raylor Industries meet San Sal
Arawaks ( 9 p.m.).
On Thursday night Customs
play San Sal (7 p.m.) and
Taylor Trucking meet B.F..C.
(9 p.m.).
It is hoped that the New
Providence S o f t b a ll
Association championship
playoffs might begin by
Friday.


Now Oakland


must find a



new manager


OAKLAND (AP) Now
that they've won their second
straight world championship,
all the Oakland A's have to do
is find a manager for baseball's
most turbulent team.
Owner Charles 0. Finley's
angry A's won the world series
and lost their manager in rapid
succession, finishing off the
New York Mets in the seventh
game Sunday, then savoring
the victory for a short time
before manager Dick Williams
formally announced his
resignation.
Williams left for "family and
personal reasons." and claimed
his departure had nothing to
do with Finley, who seems to
live in the eye of a baseball
hurricane.
While Finley shops for a
successor to his popular
manager, who is rumoured on
his way to New York as pilot
of the Yankees, baseball
commissioner Bowie Kuhn is
investigating the Oakland
owner's shenanigans which
often overshadowed the 70th
world series.
Reggie Jackson. hero of the
series, who keyed Oakland's
comeback in the sixth and
seventh games, winced when a
newsman tried to slip some of
the credit for the title to
Finley.
"Please," Jackson said over
and over, "please don't give
any credit to that man. It was
the easiest thing in the world
for this team to lay dlos n
because of that man. Our Ifais
helped us. They knew we were
bitter and they knew why."
The reason for th' A's
bitterness and Kuhn '
investigation was one and the


same. It concerned tile curious
case of substitute infielder
Mike Andrews. who made two
costly errors in the second
game of the series.
Afterwards. Finley tried to
have the player banished to the
disabled list because of a
chronically had shoulder. The
move was blocked by Kuhn.
The players rallied to
Andrews' detense.. In the midst
of the turmoil. Williams told
the team in a clubhouse
meeting that he would be
resigning at the end of the
series, "'win or lose. lie kept
that pledge.
".I he Andrews thing ... Dick
Williams quititng ... who was
responsible I'o all those
things?'" asked Jackso N'. You
know who F*inle',."
With tile clubhouse turmoil
swirling tnadl" aroid them, the
A's fell behind in the series.
three games to two and the
('nderella Me1ts needed only
onte miorc victorv to finish
them otl. Nev York never got
that last one
The ainI reas)onT1 was
Jackson, wlihose bat caie alive
in the final tiwo gami.es Hie
drove int l\ oi rill!s lland s-ored
the third, di l ng .two d" ubles
and a sing!Ce in ()aikl:ind's 3
victors in glame it'. And hie hit
a towering twl r' -riin hlin er after
Bert ('Caillpa;nens alm, had hit
one. helpintt tile A's i theii
S 2 \ic. tori\ i- I 1 the seventh

Jaick ,w l !. n; ,ed the
i 1 \ ri e s i'gai1 st
('incinnati biecaise fl a bad letg.
bit h.2: made ip lor :1 thils tille.


THE BAHAMAS Amateur
Basketball A sociation is no\\
finalising plans to pay a return
visit to Luxembourg this
December.
Tentative plans call for a
B.A.B.A. national team to
leave Nassau at 8:30 p.m.
December 27 returning 1:30
p.m. January 3, 1974.
In an effort to help offset
expenses for the trip, the
association has designated
several upcoming playing dates
as special fund-raising days
when admission to games will
be S1.
The fund-raising dates for
the Paradise League are
October 28, November 4. 1 1

POWERBOAT RACE
TH'11 MIA MI-N ASSAI.
powerboat race, originally
slated to be run on October 1 2
will now be run this Friday
weather permitting.
The race has been postponed
regularly due to stormy
weather.
If all goes well the race will
start at 8 a.m. off government t
C('ut. It is expected the fleet
should not be too seriously
reduced by the successive
delays as the bulk of the
entries are from the Florida
area.


lo, 24, and DeceI mbr 1. I or
the Nassaui I cagie' the\ ire
October 25. November 4, 13,
19. 23. and .0()
TFhe rookies o P Ilinder's
Basketball Club clash with1
defending N\assaIu League
champs Hecks ( ''ni.trs in the
first ,ame to iu f;: 7 7 t'r i it i!.,:
C.I. ( Ibsonl ( \ .
SuLperwash A.aw aak s 1it
Bain I own I Ilie second game
at 8:30.
At the \.l. \dderle. l \ :.
the Police Ro>,.ciis pl .
defending b.isketb.ih l htltp
Kentlck\ ( olonebl in tih ntrsl
game at 30 an d the L \ I Hill
Nangoes meelt tilie ( t.:,s( i. 'ios
In the set-c nl g.ine at 8 30.

HOCKEY ( LIB lMILTING
\L Ii male tswiibers of tihe
l'aradise Island Iio ke. lu(Itu
and ptspetie llmembers are
ulrged t 1o atItlend i meeting otL
th c c>L nh oH I htlrsda itober
25 at St. Jo n College
st mirting 1t :30 p.m.
Thele liiokec\ eaon s\illi oin
otltw lall on .tturd 1."a n i all
IllCllieIC s ailt-teldin/g i lth' !ii.'eting
are retiuest. d ttl o A-ini
menibershitp tees.
A pIa: twice sel'sion ''ti 1 lIlt
ladies division \\ill i hc lht'd at
Haynes Oval at 2' ; t pi.. n
Saturday.


IMPORTANT TO ADVERTISERS-


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with the help of dhe Tribuner



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Literally hundreds of gift giving ideas, lavishly illu-
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A special Supplement planned to help ease your
holiday chores for a more successful Christmas.


Basketball team to


visit Luxembourg


DON'T MISS ehr eribuit SPECIAL '73 CHRISTMAS GIFT GUIDE


II


,111-....., ";. 11-


i I ff