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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03477
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: October 22, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03477

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tfltt tii


Reitred with Potmaster of Bahama for postage conceslons within the Bahamas Nassau and Bahama Islands Leadin NewsDaDer


EDDIE'S DEPT. STORE
I AST OF STOI'-N-SHOP, BAY STREET


BIG SALE
POLYESTER CLOTH $4.- $5.
TFRYLENE & MOHAIR $4.00


VOL. LXX, No. 276 Monday. October 22, 1973 Price: 15 Cents


'IN-PARTY FIGHTING.... PRESSURE GROUPS, GREED


Hanna


with


& RUMOURS ONLY LEAD TO P.L.P. WEAKENING'


displeased






riinn down'


of PLP policies


By MIKE LOTHIAN
DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER ARTHUR D. HANNA has put on record his
displeasure at "the toning down of our policies and aims in order to satisfy selfish
criticisms of selfish interests "- an obvious reference to the easing of immigration
restrictions.


FINANCES

OF P.L.P.

REVEALED

FOR THE FIRST TIME in
its 20-year history the
Progressive Liberal Party has
ended a financial year with no
outstanding debts, party
treasurer Joseph Sweeting
proudly announced in his
-port 1o the PLP convention
-; .-ccpirt oit tWcdne-.asy.
(.. Swceting int'orimed
'ntention delegates that
d-' ring the pa,;t year
t : 1i2d 122,036.43, and
ex 'pentdi tures came to
S! I l.XIo2.68, leaving a balance
':' cash on hand of S9.173.75.
IHowever. party chairman
in!rew *Dud" Maynard in his
n-i ort pointed out that the
il... aces a $)9,000 bill
of costs from Eugene Dupuch,
Q.C. who acted for the Free
National Movement in the
Noith Long Island Election
Court case which the PLP lost,
and a $53,000 mortgage on the
party headquarters at Gambler
House on Farrington Road.


BON MOT?

--NO, NO!
1I IS DOUBTFUL if
Coconut Grove M.P. Edmund
Moxey was aware of the
double meaning that could be
attached to his statement at
the PLIP convention in
Freeport last week that
"agreeing with the old saying
that an armily marches on its
stomach, it is no less a truism
that a nation moves forward on
its stomach."
Mr Moxey was suggesting
that the Bahamas should
produce enough food to feed
its own population, not that
the nation should advance by
crawling on its belly.

Margot McKinney

dies at home
MRS. MARGOT McKinney
died at her home on Fast Bay
Street on Sunday, October 21.
She is survived by her son,
John Patrick Kelly, her father
Hlerbert McKinney, one
brother Andrew McKinney and
two sisters, Mrs. Mallie
Lightbourn and Mrs. Neil
McTaggart.
Funeral services will be held
at St Matthews Church on
Wednesday. October 31 at 4
p.n1.

FUNERAL SERVICES
FOR ALINE SAUNDERS


I 1 1 R \I services
Aline Saunders were
p.m. today at
Methodist Church.


for Mrs.
held 6
Trinity


In addition to her daughter
Mrs, Bryan Moody, Mrs.
Saunders is also survived by
tw o sisters, Mrs. Emily
VanZeylen of Nassau and Mrs.
IHilda Sturrup of Toronto.



NEW

OIL PAINTINGS


LNAIY NlA FIHITIE
NASSAU FREEPORT


lie told delegates to the PI P
convention at Freeport's
Holiday Inn that "one of the
enemies to the Bahamas'
progress" will come from the
toning down of policies.
"If we compromise on
principles we will surel\ ltill
and \\ill certainly not ehc
worthy leaders," he t Itlt
convention delegates Friday
night.
"Tihe only right way and tiOw
only safe way is to staid
solidly behind our own policies
and programmes and to
compromise with nio one who
st mds in th'.' wa otl progress
of the Bahamas atnd the
Bahamian people." lie
de-lated.
V, t' AK I ,
Mr. lHanna, like Priune
Minister Lnden Pindling at
the convention's Monda\ night
session, warned against
dissension within the party.
"We must not close our eyes
'to tri' pt ...,iai 'Iultuin.s facing
us today," he asserted. "The
constituents complain about
representatives whnoi i hey find
difficult to approach and do
not even see. Back-benchers
feel that ministers are not
carrying out the policy of the
party.
"The fact that we are all in
the same party is sometimes
overlooked, and only few
ministers dare defend the
actions of the Government.
"Such in-party fighting and
development of pressure
groups and greed and runmours
can only lead to a weakening
of the party's strength and
effectiveness."
(QtJI SI11O\S
The Deputy Prime Minister
posed several questions for the
delegates.
"Are we wise enough to
avoid party in-fighting, to
avoid forming cliques with the
sole aim of wiping out PLPs?
"Are we wise enough to
avoid party in-fighting, to
avoid forming cliques with the
sole aim of wiping out PLPs'?
Are we wise enough and brave
enough to give service to the
Bahamas without looking for a
hand-out?
"Are we wise enough not to
sit down with the enemy and
assist in the downfall of PLPs?
"In short, are we wise
enough and brave enough to
grasp this opportunity and
accept the challenge of the
future?"
He recommended to the
delegates a call by India's
President Nehru to the people
of India some years ago:
"This is no time for pett,
and destructive criticism, no
time for ill-will or blaming
others. We have to build the
noble mansion or free Bahamas
(Nehru said India) where all
her children may dwell."
Mr. Hanna, conscious that
the longer he spoke the longer
the election of party officers
would be delayed. kept his
address brief.
PROG RISS
Dealing with finance, tlhe
Finance Minister said that
despite the economic and
monetary problems which have
been experienced even by the
developed nations in recent
years, "we have continued to
progress, although not at the
rate at which we would wish.
Statistics will verify that there
has been growth over the past
few years and that this growth
is still continuing."
lie said he was "deeply
conscious of the need to
upgrade our system, especially
in the areas of supervision of
revenues and the control of
expenditures. I am happy to
report major progress has been


made and is tLntimnnu In t hie j
mtadc in all ;re;is"
F I 1\ \ \ ( l
AHe said experts frnn SE
Initer- tti nati l tMh neta \ I nIl
ire presence ti n i il ,!g .i ii 1i i sit, t
iipt l 'vet 'l ,i iiNl ab loard \ teni ishning

ti mil ( t 'nid H ink and l hl' AI td lt t .ti 1 ,.2 i. ,
''r.liat "nF (t l tlM tst' ". resutllei :, iO ,' ,!eca .,! ,nle
laws and prt t tteures. cre man i mdu the inlir' ofi
r( S li II piiK l !(ii i s i >. I I li < I ) an 1 "l .!1
i t i Cu ib:in \itnie Caili n \\h io \iti
establishment it nit\\ la iliti'C the il'ua itd :in i Ian Oi It, i
conti nue '. uI in "1 t ,ri i-It 0 ,,' i i in J i. I ic
cot ntri ttll cllI l<:i; i i mas ;-r St



i'i t "'i .c 5, \ I I t. 't t 'I ii ; ie i'mi'- [it. I I l t I I t-
A,1 rirt. dnt i (betke 10 It) li t mid
tonly hose which will h,' I' I p l .(Ocp t r i


pattc i \r m i l I i ll t i tt or is
Venclt-Idiat i Mt it- .i oat t ithe t.i W a
i r. tI it a iT I ,IS a l I at'nl ctc s esi i) r e
that tic1mtrt ter- li actimi ly i-ne T-i' i('lig to pii( i t h e
c\plnnti ave ic etts Io trade ith tn i followed a
O w t til rret' b eS: 1e e n I .IS iFd
e h laper ii'n k1 ets a nd ,l I l tI < w1lOtW i I






cw hoti a t ,i ble 1 i it.' anI t } drols t -in t(he cke td
n ( I p. rtetIet m e it mIi i ls the
partic ul \;irl e wit1h ouiar sister a a e i ,






instrumenti al l nIO l)u thies s ll i o 'it
w e mList l rdic nlt. ."



ts Privy Coun ciiil tl Irltover h
tlat sil y < lhat te i r Cn i W O Ini l.



















habeas scorpu r ruling

LAWRENCE P. J. R NC il) citirt s it ti edl ai s-l I
Wendell Leroy Burrows ee25n i lit inailer otnie ittalt tu i
the Priv Council, ollut ing tahe Sitrete (otirt s dsi- ,,s (- I





writ of habeas corpus for the discltartc ift Burrtss.


Burrows is ijintly chargetc
with waited P ilip (P'i olka"
ltllmncs. 20, 1of tlhe lnuinll onI
September 5 listl e.Ir s 'I
I.5.1. supporter Ra\nmmil H
Mallol.
The botdy -of the Bias Strccl
en ie t ain r-hartendt er ,asIs
found in the Perpall I ract area
by ;in electrician. He had heeni
shot.
Mr. Trenchardi ,nd atto ine
David C. Belhel ihad tiledl
separate applications s loi lit
execmilin o) l habeas corpus
writs (,n behalt ofi' te t\w ,
accused when lii the (ct(!ber
(rnminal Sessions peitin..
Mlr. Bethel w\ithttre\ Ilul es
application. lie sait tlhat "it
would appear that I Llic-es
cannot avail himself o- tlic
provisions set dt.iOn ni Iettc
section o of the lHabeas Corpus'
Act insolar as it wais th Ils
own acts line has been p-ieeiileil
Iron l iavinlg -lls ciase -, i l'd
within two sessions ol Ii I
co. ll ititIt I ent."
I' oI I n l wi ng i 11 a rl1 ii e n s
bet wecn attorneII iritllt-ilhadl
and Solicitor General I'.
Langton Ililton, tor lthe
prosecution, Mr. Justice JiInles
Smith, after conferring with
Justice Maxwell I hmpson-
said "ion the facts of theta cast,
the application n should hbe
re fused."
RI EI'SFl. BUT ..
A written decision was
given Friday.
heree is no appeal to lic
Hlabeas (Corpus," Justice S-iitli
and Thompson told attornci-
Trenchard.
Referring the judges to a
defense of the Realm Act case
in 1923, Mr. Trenchard
supported his arguments with


t in ll i'
S ihe n- r l i ,i-

I t- i l-- it l !I I .t t . - i in
an l h l h ; r l 1 [ "


d nt 'l- bs ttake rlni 1. t
lhe uhl.mi'e llnI .!


N-i,

I ia-i,.


~ .~
V.-


THE WEEK-LONG PROGRESSIVE
LIBERAL PARTY convention wound up
Saturday night with a gala banquet at the
Holiday Inn, Freeport, where this year's
convention was held. From left are Mr. Henry
Rowen, representative for Bimini and West
End: Mrs. Ruby Nottage, wife of Grand
Bahama representative Kendal Nottaqe; Prime


Minister Pindling; Mrs. Bowen; Mr.
Mrs. Lynden Pindling, Deputy Prime
Arthur Hanna; Mrs. Earl Thompson, -v
Ft. Charlotte representative; Mr. Ja
Brown, first vice-chairma-i of the
Brown; Party chairman Andrevw
Maynard and Mrs. Maynard. Photo'
Glass.


No ceasefire on Syrian



front and Egyptian gui



still firing after deadli

I 11' c ssO 'natt(/!r'.,,
\ .N. SI LC RIIY COUNCIL DEADLINE for a cease-fire in [ite Middle Iist s ti
M ldiv at 1I 1:50 p .n. EST, but the Israeli state radio claimed that I 5 miinuites :ilttr il
I !\ pliain artillery was firing on Israeli troops on the West bank of the Sue/ Canal.


\
ilt ; ."


liitli-Sankidl Israeli
,ticci said' "There is
,'c tire. l tl t' S I'i;!t'


'I lC cdense departments in
W ,isii :i'! ii l le 1'.S airlift
0il 's i s-iupplies w' Israel would
tni t-ii tt" deispli l the ccase-tire
call.
1 i .id Israel earlier
,iiinoiiuiicedi acceptance oft the
in-place cease-fire but there
wais iin siuch word froin Syria.
TI l Palestine I iberation
()igaii/.tilion rejected tihe
ceas c-ine 'all. acco-iidng to lihe
P1w'.,ii'msi i c\ s agency in
IBei il-. lehbaom This is a
gueiilla ,iganmizatlln l hat
seeks llthe reltIIrIl of Palesltinla
tci iWi-'_\ ivCn to Isr l. in Iw 48
bv illn I unitedd Nations.
lih dceadlne time in the
M Iddlci 1 -s ias 0-50 p.m.
Jlust ahllt tl at hour bel-oe.
RdlI I) Damaiscus said the
Syrian II t\vernm 1 eTi l e wal "
sltid\i ll) he tO .S.- Soviet
cease-i irec t'solutiontm approvcil
e.irltfc in their du\ b\ diec
Sccutits ( council in New 'York.
Itl s ,i\V n xio word -11 its
A t' l c S\ iia is tlIhe hir
m A i ,i p i \ ,! 1 lh c 17 -d a\ ,lId

fit I RON IS
I lie icsolution calls for b tih
sides to siop fighting where
the \\were at deadhne. The
liielis \\ teeTiported c al liier ill
tli. i' t ,-ill ,lib tl 2() m iles


inside Egypt west of the Sue/
Canal. Egyptian troops were
L'ported still 'ii S11,' .it varying
points along the east bank (of
the canal.
Fighting had been reported
throughout the day ion the
Sinai front and along ithe west
bank of the Suez Canal
between Egyptians and Israelis.
and in Syria, where the IsLraelis
faced Syrian and Iraqi forces ias
well as token units 1'-iro:n
Jordon and other Arib nations.
Iraq rejected the ccase-fic'i
not long after word of the
Security Council res-lutio i
reached the Middle East.
Informed sources in Jordaln
said King lussein's government
would go along with the
cease-fire, but there was n-i
official word from Amman.
In New York. U.N. officials
said they were relying on the
"good faith" of the two sides
to stop fighting.
Secretary of State Henry A.
Kissmiger left Moscow,, where
lie worked out thle Security
Council resolution with Soviet
icaders, and flew to lel Aviv
t,); talks with Premier Golda
MenI and foreign minister Abba
hian i () Israel. Then about an
hlti- before the cease-t'ii e
deadline he took off fori
London to confer with British
officials on his w;i\ back to thic
L'nited States.
Thic leader of Lib (',Col.


Demands mount for Nixon to quit


resi-i-n- i tion ni-i-it i---.
t-'11 I d i -i i n! t i-i.i -,

\-,- i at, e tapes (tm-i ;, [; i -i
W .'n Di-t nidL K I",
I ii i ,1 1 t ,' n i


-i -ii t.' \\'t-it -Iii -is-i I 's i 1 i ...
,titet t tit-'- tt t- i' I -il-i
t! is i;ce\\ pain rui I : ...
l'l I \ C told 1 . *
1\'1lntion ofl tf e AC I A 1
T he 1 abo ti o irgp ..an ,'
toted that \Nl on ls tishoutlid :t
or iec i Cmpeacin ed it li'Ie tliil i
I hle "new palnt and InI II .-ii
e\ptiloide SAturda. \ tl'
Ni\on fired Special \\at'e; Il
I'roscciitor Archibald ( \.
\t i t en. I'llot I
Richirdson quit. anti I- i 'i-
\ttl Ge. 1. W illiaII !t
Rtckclshiaus was dismissncI
While White Houis ,li.' -
sotughll to mollify O , i
Senaltoisand Congressmelcn -in- li t
explanations of Nixon's action,
criticism of the titsne
otlntluied to pile up a.


\l theI' \\h it; lo1 .,e \.\1
.-t s.l eiti -td -, ihet lht ; -I- '.,'-i it s
- I-i t' ill 'th -i -r-
li p ietltentt ,as at a net l'' It
'C- h tlt)toret S.iturda 's evelts.
i t I -,i,-. 1 t o a n \ew gallIup poll
ei-' \I,. 1 I t t a J ll ( r) n.\ri
,'rupsnt,' i ldi\ that \ >so )iI
ti'ut" ti i tm-i i u'sii p I ret-ui rn il tir tihe
in ti- t obs tructing tistce.
R I,' i (,i \I1 liugi n ji \icc
I're ld nt. ,evlnd thleis successor

R tep I .eroi Walh-
Se-(,ill . a niteliber of the
I Il e JItiiidraUd Commihttee,
told a nelws conference he
would introduce a resolution
tomorrow\ to impeach Nixon on
grounds of obstructing justice.
WAtVd said there is "a
'lea.ll i anger in the ctLr nt 'ry
Oian I have ever seen belorec in
mn\ public hlt0"
While Washington officially
hoseN' i'i t Ihe Veterans ),d\
lIoida. the offices of mlan\
involved in the tapes affair
hornedd with activity pointing
toward t orin a I aCIItonll


li-n i -: ,%%' ,r W ednes-ida.
Sen. Buch Ba h (i l I-nd I a
ineilber ot tht. Stenait.
Judiciary Comnmittei said lie
\ouild introdtice legislation l to
provide for appointment otl j
new special prosecutiO b\
Chief Judge John J. Sinrca ot
th I; S hDistrin t Court int
\k ishington. Sinrca is the judge
most closely identified with
Watergate court action.
"It this last option falls,"
Havh said, "-we have no
alternative but to impeach the
President and to replace him
with one who recognizes that
even presidential powci must
be controlled." (* See Story
page 2).

MARILYN LETTER
LOS ANGELES tAP) It
was an old letter, addressed to
"Dearest Sunshine." But a
young woman and a car dealer
bid intensely for it.
Fhe i coveted item, dated
April 1952, was sent to
Marilyn Monroe by an admirer
identified only as Sid.


BODY IS


WASHED


ASHORE

THE BODY of a man
washed ashore Saturday
morning has been identified
as Ilhenry McDonald. one of
two N assau residents reported
missing after their dinghy
capsized off New Providence
Thursday afternoon.
Still missing is Joseph
Davis.


I [r Iwo other Bahamians,
SI Rot!im., Barr and Talbot
Shermant of Lowe Sound,
Andro- were towed back to
Nottage; An!ro Friday, BASRA
e Minister reported today.
Vife of the 1 i he two left on a
nies Otis cra sfiing trip Wednesday
l. P, M rs. ;aioa-,;d a 1 3-foot Boston
"Oud" Ld hialer and were reported
Howard missingg Thursday.
another fishing boat, the
40-foot Gator. missing since
thursdav evening, and said to
bi' nt the path of storm Gilda,
was located Friday aground
off Golden Cay on the
tnttheast coast of Andros.
lith- eaptain and three crew
She Am erican vessel were
re'po:ted safe. The Gator is
one of 12 U.S. fishing boats
which left Miami nearly three
s /_ wks o
SStill missing is a
inigle-engine Cessna. overdue
,,nee Thuirsday on a flight
roin Orlando. FIa. to Nassau
H vi I Palm BReach and Freeport.
n e Abard besides the pilot
ar- eliree high school
; !'ui":;, Thti U S. Coast
aii.ird was continuing search
r( Cla,.d


d e adml d l :-


Muatnunar Kti l.sa ". ,A\
quoted ais s:iI' I i
intelvi<, :!" r,
newspaper Le \lc i. P i.
that t-is folunh Mi I l.,i-i
conm lict sinl '4. ;
view aln "'-ip- '
said he dis :c.d! A !,
leaders of I i an- u Si' ...
their object iv'ec
"A ce-ase- ire i;ip1 ) --.'. bl \ 'I, C
Americiansl aiid Rl iisst:'
Never'" li : "o ,
III111 liS t not i- ( :
guia diansllip ,-i l -: p
o' t ihati o tht' c-'ie 'w
I s" iel i s cct ;ii '\ .
the c io lu i. I : I i .
Nations: \t- i ,i' ; '.
s\ t iole t'lt ": l h I' h i . ,-J r 1 1


Lib\ .i did nIi, idi, ;. /
t oI ps tL o tlc w.I :t 1' 'liWr AI! ,'"
ln atiol s' d id l l p i, dl^ i Jw.' ; ".
fiill ficulig tilc \,% 1 7 :
It w as abo i ,l!i i : ,
sunset in tlie M !,. ,' 1 ,
dcadhnc cain0


Ilc l sracl i ) ,i
slaft' Lt. Gen liee .
orid ret d I is i'Ii,
sidJe, ,I tile Su S i
the Sc. iin (' ,
'all Ilie Jd c +. "..

(oSl.l. STS I I.1l S '

M(t.S( i()S' i \l'
nc\\s agein-i s in l i
I roa \ mn T.,i ; !i
announ l 't \i, ', !\

( i---i t -: im '-
i-i-i.t L I: \}


S5 '


STORM GILDA

STATIONARY
TROPICAL STORM Gilda
: -'ilined stationary Sunday
a-'i- t ( i00 i. east of Nassau.
Sh.. National Hurricane
!-' :n Miani said Gilda was
,A ns id poorly organized
:'. i vnds of 45 miles an

I nrasters said G(;ilda would
.."+,titLn to weaken as, she
o', t! i -rt!vhward into the

he seventh name
the -'3 Atlantic
i : .. ed in the
-: r .' a i \\ ednesiay.
i t -i' -il d its main
'. \ crossed over
.. Hi ltursi.i\ killing two
-"" s .itd n-itring 24 others
t',.r tc Pnrovince. (*SFF



BEC REPORTS: 'NO

EXTRA PROBLEMS'
\ \l IBI R ofl broken lines
i t,! -,.- 't : power cuts were
.:)m.i a I le triceity
S r : ,:; t, r l ncif al
; i -.: .' s. -i- ; ,!.,r:l (,id a's
-" .1 ; ; ; rI H. ahaml as.
.i .i:.d Sattirda\ ,
-i i.tt.mn-e w ere still
S-;, :: t i.a nches to avoid
1 I' th e it, .
S t c \ peenced nc
1 1 i i aj"-il problems," a
It ( nik.'-,i-n said. "By
r we believe
r ai \,is e'cstored to most


NIXON MAY PLEAD HIS CASE ON TV


S \sill\i 1; ii -

h\\ a tl -i s ,l 1 N '' s- : -



-it s i i i cr ii i T i 't 'p






anti tna tsi ()n ii c t tV1(hm
\adhat i the ei iIt n' l A





being co-t- ideted to cl-al lit)
thasurro indt-i-s i 3-i0 rc ti i
anThe t imi nge res-i i i I cra!.
(iesn. wanted in R lh i I- 'tai t
dismissal ot Deputs At y.I -in.
William D. Ruckelsliius.
A ninvesig ation.i le television
aNixon said Friday night h as

that ct itusitn auk-s r'p-rtcil.





would produce a written
account of the tapes and have
it authenticated by Sen. John


S"t ni. i- said he would
,lc the tapes
*'. ".. vs, as orderedet d bh U.S.
i mdc JoIn J. Sirica,
d 1wc ,,1dcrcd ('ox to drop
.I l '!m\si, to gain access to

-'u-,cl setting off the
,!'. e, Cent, that led
e night to his firing,
-' .'' l resignation and
! .~im-. ,S disniissai.
On \\ hitc Iouse official
sodl \t\on spent much of
Sunday\ and Monday working
-i!) Ili proposed solution to
I ll Middle Last crisis,
exchanging cables with
Secretary of State Henry A.
Kissinger as Kissinger travelled
to Moscow and Tel Aviv.


i ODUDLEY'S
COR. ROSETTA ST &
MT. ROYAL AVE.

TV ANTENNA INSTALLATIONS
P.O. OX' n-Po- PIONF 2.1306/2-3237


AM ER IC(A N

SH()T


"INK-S


MEAREI


L Th r


w 7-0
.-'^ -<





















0 0


LONDON (AP) A
spectator balcony wall
collapsed at London Airport
during the arrival of the
American Osmonds pop
group yesterday injuring at
least 20 hysterical teen-age
i lls
Xi\ airport spokesman said
the wall broke tinder pressure
o! thousands of screaming
teen agers, sending a ton of
metal and concrete debris
onto still more yelling
youngsters at ground level.
Six girls fell from the
balcony on to the crowd
below Eighteen were treated
; the airport medical centre
.Iad" others were taken to
nearby hospitals.
ST. JOHNS. Antigua (AP)
Ihree fires destroyed two
dwh ellings and razed a
furniture factory in Antigua
a. the weekend, with damage
ri-nated at over one million
S : llars.
MANILA. Philippines (AP)
World chess champion
Bobby Fischer says he
expects ito reign for "at least
10 'ears" and defend his title
annually instead of every
tl' ree years.
B 0 U R N E N MOU TH .
ti. mflind (AP) Sir Alan
('obham, pioneer aviator who
ei the pattern for many of
today's air routes, has died.
He swas 79
Sx-\SHINGTON (AP) An
Impeach Nixon'
demiiionstration developed in
front of the White House
N .Nterdav It was orderly and
po h'e did not interfere.

ROMF (APi The Rome
,dernmnent reports Italians
aY e a vid makers of
international telephone calls.
I hec g government says
ntertcontineni:tal telephone
:l bv Italians total about
l- million minutes.
Mainy calls are personal
-', to Italian emigrants
abroad, particularly in the
incricas.
V\NCOUVER (AP)
? ne people were killed by a
:ire which raced through the
i.-p floor of the Commercial
'iI.l Police described the
i Jn ,s as transients.
1, \V YORK (AP) Five
rmxmen were killed and 36
;tih:rs rescued today after a
,e forced them to abandon a
G:reek freighter in the North
I :anitic.
hle L' S Coast (;uard says
hip "Hayes is still
i.... ti f'.r one missing
an tromi the drifting
! lier ::bout SOO0 miles east
,>' \ew York
,A.N .11 AN\ lAP) Pablo
C -i-,... the s world famous
Sit, ish tcllist. died todaN in
i i j'i;in hospital. He was


'1 \)RI1) (AP) Gen.
I nu cisco Franco and his wife
.'elbtrated their `Oth wedding
:0'n;i, rIary today. The
Y O \airoldl Chief of State
:;;il Li, 7.-year-old wife gave
Spri\al( part, at IIl Pardo
i tee or members of their
t);!!ll!ies.


WASHINGTON (AP)
Impeachment of President
Nixon, an almost unthinkable
alternative a few days ago, is
suddenly a war cry for some
and on the lips of many after
the weekend firing of Special
Watergate Prosecutor
Archibald Cox.
Members of Congress, awsas
from Washington for the
Veterans Day holiday.
expressed shock and disnmal at
the rapid-fire developments
that left President Nixon in
legal linimbt and the Attornce
General ind his deputy out of
their jobs.
At least 28 members ol the
House ot Representatives,
w her I e i m p e a ch m ent
proceedings must begin,
supported initiation of steps to
remove Nixon from office.
M ost were liberal
D)emo, rats, but dozens of
others in both House and
Senate, including some ranking
Republicans, said impeachment
would now be given serions
consideration.
Ihie first formal steps are
expected to come toiniloros
when (Congress returns from
the long weekend.
Several impeachment
resolutions are likely to be
introduced, and chairman Peter
Rodino Jr. of the House
Judiciary Committee will be
asked to launch an inquiry to
deetermine itf grounds tor
impeachment exist.
White House aides Melvin
Laird and FIred Buzhardt
sought to dismiss the talk,
predicting that Congress would
await the outcome of a White
House compromise plan to
release partial transcripts of
Wa t c r gate-related tape
recordings atlth!'nticated b a
senior .senator
It \\as that plan that
precipitated the latest
Watergate crisis when Special
Plroscccutor Archibald Cox
rejected it. saying a summniar.
could not be used as evidence
in court and his acceptance
would block further efforts to
obtain White House documents
hlie needs to make his case.
President Nixon then
ordered Att,,. Gen. Illiot
Richardson to tire his special
prosecutor, and Richardson
resigned rather than comply
The job fell to Richardson's
deputy, William Ruckelshaus,
who also refuse and was fired.
Solicitor General Robert
Bork, No. 3 in command at the
Justice department, thus


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PRESIDENT NIXON

became Acting Attorney
general l and fired Cox. The
\\ atrgate special prosecution
tore was dissolved.
Nixon is under Federal
Court order to surrender the
tapes to U.S. District Judge
John J. Sirica for the Judge's
inspection and decision on
whether to turn them ovcr to a
grand jury as evidence.
Sirica's order was upheld by
the U.S. Circuit Court of
Appeals, and Nixon declined to
seek a Supreme Court review
before the order went into
effect at the end of the week
Sirica, who is out of the city
until tomorrow directed his
staff to research alternatives
for his next step.
'At least five Democrats on
the 36-member House
Judiciary committee said they
would support a move toward
impeachment.
They include Rep. Robert F.
l)rinan, of Massachusetts, who
already has introduced an
impeachment resolution.
Rep. Ogden R. Reid,(D-NY)
a former Republican who
switched parties a year and a
half ago, called for immediate
initiation of impeachment
proceedings. saying: "No
President is above the law," a
phrase echoed by several of
Reid's colleagues..
And at Miami Beach
AFL-CIO President George
\lean. called his Executive


Council into emergency
today to consider der
the impeachment of Pr
Nixon.
Senator Daniel K.
today called for Pr
Nixon's resignation,
Americans "have
enough" and "must be
this new pain and trauma
The Hawaii Democi
the first member of the
Watergate Committee
the president to step
because of the dismi
Cox.
In a speech prepared
AFL-CIO convention,
urged Nixon "to pla
national interest and
above all other concerns
resign from the office
presidency."
The Labour Fede
Executive Co
recommended that
convention appro
resolution calling for
resignation or his impea
if he refuses to step dow
Sources daid there w
one dissenting vote amc
32 council members
for the emergency session
In his speech,
suggested that if Nixon
House Speaker Carl
nest in line of suc
should appoint as h
president "a Republicar
highest caliber -
caretaker or an agent, I
who can lead our people
He said Albert
consider such Republi
New York Govenor
Rockefeller of
Richardson.
Meanwhile, shaken
foundation, the U.S.
Department consider
possibility of mass resign
after its two leader
rather than break a proi
From the top ranks
bot tom. t housan
department employees
stunned and some
considering quitting in
of Elliot Richardson.


PROFILE:

RICHARDSON REFUSED TC

CROSS THE LINE HE DRE


WASHINGTON (AP)
Elliot Lee Richardson, pushed
to a line he drew himself,
refused to cross it this
weekend.
Thus. after holding three
Cabinet posts, he has left the
Nixon administration.
He took over the
De apartment of Health
education and welfare in 1970,
controlling its bickering
baronies and using his quick
grasp of complex detail.
Then, last January, he
became Secretary of Defense
and spent three months
overseeing America's military
minachinery during the
post Vie tna m Cease-fire
problems.
President Nixon then tapped
him to head the Justice
Department, which he left
Saturday when Nixon ordered
him to fire special Watergate
Prosecutor Archibald ('ox and
he refused.
Answering critics who
accused him of subordinating
principle to hold office,
Richardson said in an interview
a month ago "I have drawn a
line in my own mind, beyond
which I will not go; and I work
hard to avoid being forced over
the line."
Saturday night, Richardson,
53, answered Nixon's order: "I
have no choice but to resign."
Richardson cited his promise
to the Senate during his
confirmation as Attorney
General that C'ox, in his
investigation of the Watergate
political scandal, would be
aware that "his ultimate
accountability is to the
American people."
Richardson, descendant of a
lone line of New England


settlers, was graduated
Harvard cum laude. At I
Law School, where C
one of his professors,
editor and president of
review.
He volunteered dur
Second World War for
duty as a private,
commission and was w
on the beaches of Nor
and decorated.
Before beginning his
of Cabinet posts in the
Administration, Rich
was a U.S. At
Lieutenant Governor
Attorney Genera
Massachusetts; a clerk to
Learned Hand of th
Court of Appeals in New
clerk to Justice
Frankfurter of the
Supreme Court, A
Secretary for Legislation
Department of
Education and Welfar
Undersecretary of St.
Washington.


Creativity

call

GEORGETOWN, Guy
A University of West
official has called o
region's intellectuals
creativity and the inn
spirit which he says are I
today.
In a commence
address at the Univers
Guyan Nett
extramural studies direct
the creative urge "seen
behind the ritual
labelmongering.


;ef ire


NG GOES ON


It's Yes to a cea

I B BUThe Associated Press BUT THE FIGHTII
ISRAEL, Egypt and Jordan have
accepted the United Nations resolution on the wester bank of the Suez Canal.
calling for an in-place cease-fire today in Sria i o
the iddle East fightingfierce battle with Israelis for control of a
Ihe Syrians kept silent but were strategic positlan on Mt. Hermon
C,pectid to follow Cairo's lead in heeding overlooking the Golan Heights
the L N. appeal for a halt to the fighting battleground.
on the 17th day of the fourth Arab-Israeli Cairo said Egyptian infantry and tanks
war since 1i948. were attacking the Israeli invasion force
The overall cease-fire was expected to on the western side of the canal n an
be effective at 11:49 from tonight. But as apparent attempt to push them back as
the deadline approached, tough fighting faras possible bere the cease-fire hour.
was reported near the Golan Heights and Cairo Radio announced four hours
before the cease-fire deadline that Egypt


Nixon faces war cr



of impeachment


n in the

e, ABBEY
ate in

INTERNATIONAL


FUND


,ana -
Indies
n the
for
ovative
lacking

ment
sity of
leford, $10-11
or said 1 1
ns lost Offered Price
of as of
Friday 5th Oct., 1973


would stop fighting.
The Israelis agreed to the U.N.
proposal hours earlier in a statement
issued from Tel Aviv.
But both objected to proposals in the
U.N. resolution dealing with the steps to
be taken for permanent settlement.
Secretary of State Henry Kissinger,
meanwhile, flew into Israel for talks with
Premier Golda Meir on the cease-fire deal
he worked out in Moscow over the
weekend with Soviet Communist party
leader I.eonid Brezhnev.
Iraq, which has troops, tanks
and planes fighting with Syria,
said over Baghdad Radio it
would not accept the Security
Council truce, citing a policy
of "refusing negotiations,
peace and recognition of the
enemy."
But the Iraqi refusal was not
expected drastically to alter
the military situation.
session The real test appeared to be
handing whether the Egyptian, Syrian
resident and Israeli forces, engaged in a
bitter war since Oct. 6, could
Inouye now hold their fire with Israelis
resident having taken more Syrian
saying territory and a chunk of
suffered Egyptian territory west of the
spared Suez Canal, and with Egyptians
la." having recaptured some of the
rat was Sinai Peninsula occupied by
SSenate Israel since 1967.
to urge "President Sadat, as supreme
down commander of the armed
issal of forces, has ordered the General
Command to cease fire at the
for the deadline set by the U.N.
Inouye Security Council, provided the
ce our enemy abides by it," Cairo
welfare Radio said.
s and to PEACE
of the The Israeli Government
announcement accepting the
ration's call also set conditions,
u n c i I insisting Israel would continue
the its refusal to withdraw from
ve a the Jordanian. Syrian and
Nixon's Egyptian lands captured in
chmnient 1967 unless the Arabs agree to
vn. a peace treaty.
as only The Security Council truce
ong the resolution was adopted early
present today after an emergency
on. meeting last night.
Inouye In Amman, a highly placed
resigns. Jordanian source close to the
Albert, Royal Palace said the overall
cession, cease-fire was expected to
is vice come about tonight but that
n of the there were likely to be
not a violations "such as happen in
but one these circumstances."

should Arab
cans as Arab
Nelson
Elliot oil ban
to its
Justice
Jd the BEIRUT (AP) Four more
nations Arab states banned shipment
qui of their oil to the United States
nise yesterday, bringing to eight the
to the number retaliating for U.S.
ds of support of Israel.
s were Dubai, Kuwait, Qatar and
were Bahrain announced adherence
wesupre to the boycott, joining Libya,
Abu Dhabi, Algeria and Saudi
Arabia.
Iraq, which has not sold oil
to the United States for some
time, called on the Arabs "who
really want to hurt the United
States" to nationalize all U.S.
interests throughout the Arab
W world.
d from Iraq also nationalized Royal
Harvard Dutch Shell's 23.75 share in
the Basrah Petroleum Co., as
he was "punishment for Holland for
the law its flagrant animosity and its
support for our Zionist
ing the enemy.
in The day after the
o a Arab-Israeli war began, Iraq
ounded a nationalized the 23.5 per cent
rmandy holding in the Basrah compnay
of two American companies,
streak Mobil Oil and Exxon. British
Nixon and French interests in the
haro company have not been
touched.
tourney Before the boycott began,
S in the Arab world shipped about
o Judge 35 million barrels of oil a
e udge month t tthe United States.
Yo .. U.S. Government experts
Felix estimate that the Arab world
U.S. provided six per cent of
assistant America's total consumption.


Monday, October 22, 1973


-Jamaica lashes



Common Market


We'll kill

hostages,

warn

hijackers
LA PAZ, Bolivia (AP) -
Four Tupamaro guerillas who
hijacked an Argentine jetliner
in a bid to get to Cuba
threatened to begin killing
their five hostages today unless
they got a smaller plane to take
them out of the country.
Bolivian President Hugo
Banzer refused the smaller
plane but sent word to the
terrorists that he would grant
them the necessary papers to
leave Bolivia if they released
the hostages.
He said if they made any
attempt against the lives of the
hostages the hijackers would be
killed.
The hijacked Aerolineas
Argentinas Boeing 737 cannot
take off from the small airfield
in the Bolivian city of Yacuiba,
900 miles southeast of La Paz.
The plane is surrounded by
heavily armed Bolivian soldiers
and policemen, who have
refused to provide food or
drinks to the plane since it
landed.
The four hijackers two
men and two young women
released 40 passengers and
crew members yesterday.
But they held as hostages
the pilot, the copilot, a
congressman, a frenchman and
another passenger whose
nationality was not known.
The Boeing 737 was on a
domestic flight between
Buenos Aires and Salta when it
was commandeered Saturday.
The kidnappers forced the
pilot to land at Tucuman, in
Northern Argentina, and
demanded fuel to fly to Lima,
Peru, from where they
intended to proceed to Cuba.
But Argentine President
Juan Peron refused to
negotiate with them and the
plane had to take off with its
fuel tanks almost dry, to
Yacuiba, close to the Argentine
border.


Cabinet


grants


clemency

BANGKOK, Thailand, (AP)
Thailand's new civilian
cabinet proclaimed clemency
today for all acts of violence
during the bloody student-led
uprising that toppled the
military government a week
ago.
A Government spokesman
said a special fund was being
set up to aid victims of the
uprising. He said the
Odinwonal Lottery Bureau
would contribute $500,000
dollars.
The two days of violence
left hundreds of Thais dead
and wounded and caused
millions of dollars in property
damage.
The new Cabinet also
decided to abolish the
anticorruption board of
investigation and follow-up of
Government operations, which
student militants said was one
of the most corrupt bodies in
the old government.


U.S. AND RUSSIA LEAD


AS ARMS SUPPLIERS


WASHINGTON (AP)
International traffic in
conventional armaments was a
$48.4-billion business during
the 1961-71 decade, according
to a U.S. Government report.
The United States and the
Soviet Union were by far the
most prominent arms suppliers,
but the study said there were
54 other countries on the list
of arms exporters.
Peaceful neutrals such as
Sweden and Switzerland were
among them as were a number
of developing countries,
including Pakistan and Algeria.
Arms shipments by the
Soviet Union to Cuba exceeded
those of the United States to
the remaining 21 Latin
American countries combined.
Cuba's arms imports from
Moscow totalled $827 million,
the highest per capital figure for
any developing country outside
Indochina.
The report, prepared by the
U.S. Arms Control and
Disarmament Agency, said that
in constant dollars, would arms
trade increased from

The report, prepared by the
U.S. Arms Control and
Disarmament Agency, said that
in constant dollars, world arms
trade increased from $2.4
billion in 1961 to $5.1 billion a
decade later.
The report takes into


account the international
transfer of such equipment as
surface-to-air missiles, combat
aircraft, naval craft, tanks.
artillery and other weapons It
disclosed that during the
196 1-71 decade:
United States exports
totaled $2 2.7 billion compared
with $14.7 billion for Soviet
Union.
U.S. military deliveries to
South Vietnam amounted to
$5.2 billion, about triple
Moscow's shipments to North
Vietnam.
These countries recieved
arms from both Washington
and Moscow: India. Pakistan,
Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Lebanon,
Ca mbodia, Finland and
Yugoslavia.
SFifty-two countries
engaged in both the export and
import of arms.

Dublin clash
DUBLIN (AP) Hundreds ol
supporters of the outlawed Irish
Republican Army staged
confrontation with police andi
security men in Dublin.
About 800 members of Sinn
I-ein the IRA'S political wing
poured on to Dawson Street to give
cover to their chief of staff David
O'Connell, who had addressed their
annual convention.
They overturned a police car and
tried to set fire to it.
O'Connell wa, smuggled into the
convention at Dublin's Mansion
House. His speech was a warning to
the Dublin Government not to
extradite IRA suspects


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Xht i-fribum


on sugar
LONDON (AP) Jamaica's
Trade Minister accused the
European Common Market
today of a double failure on
sugar policy and said this was
causing anxiety in the West
Indies.
Percival Patterson said the
community had failed to agree
on a sugar policy and had
failed to keep promises to buy
Commonwealth sugar.
Patterson, who arrived
yesterday from talks in
Brussels on the future of
Jamaica's trade with the
community, stressed three
main points at the root of his
anxiety. These were:
That the promise to buy
1.4 million tons of
Commonwealth sugar was in
doubt.
That the Community had
failed to appreciate the
importance of Commonwealth
sugar exports to these nations'
social and political stability.
Cessation of these exports


F AUA


'failure'

would increase the already
heavy unemployment in he
sugar growing regions, he said.
And that, to some
countries like Jamaica where a
full restructuring of industry
was in progress, failure of an
early decision was causing
additional economic
difficulties in decision-making
on the future sugar industry.
Patterson was speaking at a
news conference called at the
very time when the
ambassadors of the nine
community nations were
meeting in Brussels to discuss
several trade problems of
which sugar was one.
"The FEC has failed to
translate their promise into
reality," Patterson said.
He agreed it was now up to
Britain, which had conditioned
her entry into the community
on a "bankable guarantee" that
the Commonwealth will get the
1.4 million tons, to press for
the fulfilment to this promise.


I










Monday, October 22, 1973


ibp ilribunt
NULUus ADDICUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTM
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH,Publisher/Editor 1903. 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Publisher/Editor 1917-1972
Contributing Editor 1972 -
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972 -
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532,2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Monday, October 22, 1973


By ETIENNE DUPUCHJ
SATURDAY I told you a tale to show you how ghost stories
originate. I hope you found it interesting.
At least it rriust have been a refreshing change from the daily
grind of murky politics.
Today I will tell you a few more brief stories about phony
ghosts that live only in shadows created in the dark. This will be a
tale about how a possible ghost story was buried.
**** *c*** ******
As I told you Saturday, believe that a very active spirit world
exists. I believe that there are mediums who can communicate
with the spirit world but I can't say that I believe in ghosts that
walk after dark, because I have never seen one although I have
been in all the dark places where they are supposed to hold their
nightly gatherings.
I have often wished that ghosts did exist because they are the
best material real or imaginary for the most fascinating tales.
**************
My father believed in ghosts. He had seen them and had blood
curdling experiences with strange happenings but lie was never
afraid of ghosts or anything else. The word "fear" was never
allowed in our house. Danger yes....consciousness of danger, of
course. But fear....never. This is the way I trained my children
too.
And so, when I saw what could have been a legitimate ghost
for one to talk about, I knew I couldn't go home "'nd tell my
father that I had been frightened and ran away from the
apparition.

There were some ghostly spots in the island when it was lighted
only by a few oil lamps....later gas burners for the city area.
One of the most spooky spots was the area around St.
Matthew's churchyard.
At that time the small graveyard at the eastern end of the
parade where mothers now take their young children to play, was
enclosed by an awesome black paling fence. It's a pity about that
place. There is no record of the people who are buried there
except for one man who published Nassau's first newspaper.
Malcolm's Park didn't exist at that time but the almond trees
that line the northern fringe of the abandoned graveyard and
adjoining parade ground were much larger than they are today.
They were later battered by a severe hurricane and so badly
stripped that they have never recovered their exuberant
appearance.
The site on which the IBM building now stands was a part of
St. Matthew's church schoolyard.
A large almond tree threw clark shadows over the yard near the
street.
A house must have stood on these grounds at an earlier period
because two large pillars formed a gateway that must have been
used as a carriage entrance. The almond tree stood near this
abandoned gateway.
One of the pillars had been broken off and fallen to the
ground. The other was still standing.
This was a terrifying spot for anyone who was the slightest bit
afraid.

At that time I used to deliver The Tribune in the eastern
district as far as Fowler Street and Poitier Lane. The Montagu
Hotel didn't exist. All that area was bush and, as far as East End,
there were only three or four houses beyond Fort Montagu.
Anyway....this meant that I had to pass St. Matthew's
graveyard two nights a week on my way home which was on the
present site of The Tribune.
I had always told myself that I wasn't afraid of ghosts. But
whenever I approached this place I found myself whistling loudly
and walking fast.
One night....just as I was abreast the pillars in the schoolyard I
saw a vision rise up out of the sea and rush speedily across the
road where it disappeared into the upright pillar.


Boy....l said to myself "foot don't deceive me". And I must
say that my feet didn't deceive me. For the next few minutes I
literally flew through the air. 1 was going so fast I swear my feet
didn't touch the ground.
But by the time I got to the western end of the parade on
Dowdeswell Street I caught myself.
I knew I would want to tell my father about this experience
but I couldn't tell him that I had run away. lie had always
investigated the things he saw and tried to find an explanation for
them. And so I knew I had to investigate too.
I crawled back to the area where this "ghost" appeared. It
seemed to ne like a headless woman, dressed in a flowing white
robe, flying across the street.
I would be lying if I said I wasn't afraid at this point. I went
back....but I was ready to run again on the crack of a twig.
***i*** *******iii
And then I saw it again....and guess what it was?
This was a still moonlight night. A gentle breeze was blowing
that barely disturbed the foliage in the almond tree that stood at
the eastern point of the abandoned cemetery.
But the breeze was strong enough to separate two limbs and
briefly provide a narrow opening for a ghost to pass through.
My ghost was a shatt otn moonlight that flitted through the tree
limbs and danced across the road, disappearing in the stone pillar
in the school grounds every time the breeze separated the limbs in
the almond tree.
And so....a good ghost story was buried.
Rest in peace.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
So, so break off this last lamenting kiss,


Which sucks two souls, and vapours both away,
Turn thou ghost that way, and let me turn this,
And let ourselves benight our happiest day. DONNE


Gohp Ciuibutr I


7^jLt A^t


MP'swife wants'inequities' FNM leader raps Pindling for lack of



corrected in Bahamas life plan to fight alcoholism, illegitimacy


By MIKE LOTHIAN
THE ROLE OF BLACK BAHAMIAN WOMEN must be revolutionis.dl i
which the woman is neither subordinate nor dominant, but a sharer
privileges," attorney Ruby Nottage declared before the PLP convention in


"The role of the black
woman in an independent
Bahamas must be that of
effecting a quiet revolution in
all phases of our private, public
and national life a revolution
wherein the goal is the
attainment of private and
personal development to the
optimum with dignity,
unrestricted mobility within
the public sphere and the
development of a national
pride in our achievements as
Bahamians," she said.
Mrs. Nottage, wife of Grand
Bahama M.P. Kendal Nottage,
was slated to speak on
"Responsibilities of women in
the Bahamas," but she changed
the topic to "The role of black
women in an independent
Bahamas" in order to "refrain
from flabby generalities".
CRISIS OF ROLES
She said that at present "the
young black Bahamian woman
is faced with a crisis of roles to
play in her society. Must she
retain the traditional female
attitude of her mother, or seek
to create a new and different
identity in a very demanding
society?"
She said by tradition the
woman is subordinate, not too
bright, incapable of major
economic, political or social
decisions.
"The time has come,
however, w he n the
independence of our small
nation and the resultant
growth of national pride have
made it incumbent upon the
women of this Commonwealth
to stop and re-assess the values
of our society and the roles
which we play therein, and to
define for ourselves and as
mothers for our children the
responsibilities to be
undertaken therein," Mrs.
Nottage declared.
SENSE OF VALUES
"Of prime importance in my
view is the need as mothers to


.

RUBY NOTTAGE
... role of black women

establish a moral standard rwiil
sense of values for our tou lli
Our children no longer kng,,i
of or wish to eat peas and cgis
or cornbread and rice, btit
want instead steak and all t'he
trimmings. A simple bicycle is
no longer a longed-tor
Christmas present a .la//''d
up roadster with all the extia,
and no less is expected. \s
mothers, therefore, we must
seek to instil a proper sense ol
priorities and values in t111
children, or we shall destr, y
ourselves by materialism."
As wives, she went on, "we
have a responsibility to create
with our husbands family
surroundings that are
conducive to the healthy
growth, both mental an,,
physical, of its members. 1T .
responsibility is ours to stand
beside and give support where
needed to our men as thc\
work and fight to build a
nation on the principles o()
Christian love and
bortherhood."
Thirdly. "in order to build
our new nation in unity,"


Edmund Knowles appointed


Freeport Pan Am director

EDMUND A. KNOWLES. formerly of Nassau, has been
appointed Director for Pan American World Airways in Freeporl.
Grand Bahama, the airline announced today.


Upon graduating from St.
Augustine's College in 1966.
Mr. Knowles joined Pan Ami in
Nassau as an Operations
Representative. He worked in
this capacity until 1967, when
he received an Arthur Vining
Davis Scholarship enabling him
to study at Florida Memorial
College. After successfully
completing four years of
studies there he graduated Cumi
Laude with a Bachelor of Arts
degree in English.
Today Mr. Knowles holds
membership in Alpha Kappa
Mu National Honor Society
and Lambda Iota fau
International Literary Honor
Society.
Among other achievements
during his college career, in
1971 he was Editor-in-Chief of
his college's yearbook The
Arch. He was the founder and
first president of The Dukes, a
social club for young men, and
in 1971 was nominated Scholar
of the Year by Alpha Kappa
Mu Honor Society at the
society's annual convention
held in Orangeburgh, South
Carolina.
"I think the high point of
my attainments in college was
my nomination as a member of
"Who's Who in American


Colleges and tir eCis Itic,
two consecut ive \e t!s
1969-70 and 1 970-( e .
Knowles says. "This ,mra iid
granted an nua 1- ,
outstanding student ,
from colleges and ti im i-,
throughout the United Slit. ,
I'dmund Knowles ret i: ;ud
in 1971 to Pan Am ,-
Operations Representati\, i
Nassau and was later proit !ii',!
to Superintendent I i in.t
and Ramp Services at !t,
Nassau International Aiipi'
lHe acted in this capacity uni:t
his current promotion it
Director-Freeport.


Common market countries


to consider oil ban to others


BRUSSELS (AP) A
meeting of oil experts from the
nine countries of the European
Common Market has been set
for Tuesday to consider a ban
on shipments of oil products to
other countries, including the
United States, because of
production cuts decreed by
Arab countries.
There has been some
speculation that considerable
quantities of heating oil would
be exported from Europe this
winter to the United States
where shortages are in
prospect. The Europeans were
concerned to hold on to their
town supplies, since they are
much more dependent on the
Middle East than Americans
are.
Luxembourg, the smallest
member of the common


market, has already s1) ,'
exports even within the. .11t
Belgium, the Netlhel r ,i.
and Italy have ainnutirun
systems of licensing \o t '
enable their governments I
control shipments.
Under the common mina ke I
rules, such restrictions s!<
not be imposed on tr.I.,
among the nimember countitm t
though exports to the omiiits
world are another nattcl I hit
Luxembourg batn u'1 j
considered without rtstltl it
unusual meeting It thI
Conmmnon Market excutiti,
commission Friday night and it
due to come up 'aI]in
Wednesday.
T h u rsday and li:1ida\
representatives of the Cormmon
Market will meet in Paris sithi
those of the United Statcs,


' uinil.tI.c society in
in police, iniaking and


I c'

'iii 1
I' 1







'I.

I,


11




Ni


PRIME MINISTER LYNDEN PINDLING has been criticized by Opposition FNM Leader
Kendal Isaacs for failing to suggest a plan that would alleviate the more pressing problems of
alcoholism and illegitimacy.


Irt 'in Ihursday. Mr. Pindling's reference to
.- so these conditions at the PLP
,t convention wvat, challenged by
; w,',, ith Ir. Isa.i-s who pointed out
that historically there had
S,, rt, always been a high illegitimacy
h: ..nselves rate in tile Bahlamas and it was
S therefore reasonable to assume
i. \1 I, i that the situation would not be
'- i\ not changed overnight.
1 t ne he I'rne Minister, he said.
,i C. t su-est Ithere the
ioha ne *ss ouild cotme from to
Si t finance I the massive
I 'i that reconstruaclii ot Bahamian
oi;o"') i ) ate sicie t\ l hi ,h % as necessary if
I :, l these cial-> sAcre to be
o' n r 'ptulmon achieved.
"P'nr housing, lack of
I i our education, tneployment and
'i ',, ir'e. generally trustriting conditions
; ; o iics contribute greatly to
,, t ltion ot alcoholism and illegitimacy,
''d, thec and there are no indications
S perts that these conditions will
S'' t change in the near or even
: .. distant future for the
"iic'" thousands of Bahamians who
V, 'r Icd. out are most adversely affected by
t t, '. i:t ',l them," Mr. Isaacs said.
', to \h ls ie observed that only
:, I" k d aIn continued development can
S "i per produce the wherewithal and
n e n v Iro n n Il 1.1.t b N Ihich
,an\ Bahamians, particularly ooung
Smile children, legitimate and
illegitimate, can be properly
,. ; provided for.
t s,' Since the government was
1 ,1d unable to hbring about a revival
t if of the economy, the FNM
l ian wished to test their
S III ,x commitment to liberalism by
i ,t1 ',, challenging the in to introduce
,)r legislation that would take into
consideration the realities of
i the Bahamian structure.
S .. l Noting that a large segment
of the population was among
i f si) those classified as illegitimate,
1,.\(dat Mr. Isaacs declared it was time
:ICe modem social legislation was
rIt ti \ enacted to protect illegitimate
i, tuch children as tar as possible and
tolt to remove any stigma which
: i : is re society traditionally attached
a 'h'' ii,,t-f iale to the person so-called
S scnted I i i birth.
h I-is ti f "oIf such legislation is
properly thought out and


drafted in a manner which is
fair and which is relevant to
the needs of our society at this


Vat 69

isone

Scotch

whisk

ginger ae

cant drown


time, we would be more that
happy to support it," the FNM
Leader said.


I'


lat a.ind iinzcer
Is; .I \ Lr .du!t dirtk
P'cplce s.atn ,,; i:o ua!ik
itaesi the Sctutch
\ttcr ail, in't i ts \ hi t
S J .rinkin \ ,ltsk i -. _r r

'AT 6O)
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(the ariblint M


S


KS


HAVE YOU EVER HEARD OF
SUCH TERMS?

$2,995
$35 per mo.'h
(on!y $8 75per week including 7 per cent interest.)
Can you afford to pass that up?

You certainly can t! So you must hurry. San Andros is
valuable land, tall with pine trees, fresh with unlimited
water. And who knows what the prices will be next Year?
ISLANDS have limited space, and these lots-10,000 square
feet 80 feet by 125 feet 4 acre-are moving fast.
Our offer is valid to Bahamian residents only! And expires on
October 29th, 1973.
With your low low down payment you receive a com-
plimentary membership in Andros Beach Club. San Andros
Hotel offers- tennis, a giant pool, delicious food, a relaxing
bar, and use of a motorcycle with every room.
So, Bahamians don't miss the boat. Invest in your future
today, while these terms and prime lots are still available


By Reducing The


Down Payment


To As Little As


$


FOR CHOICE HOMESITES


We were


almost overwhelmed


by the en-


thusiastic response from Nassau to our
PREVIEW OFFER to buy choice homesites on
Andros, a GET-AWAY retreat! To show our
appreciation, we're making it possible for just
about everyone to become a pro6d landowner
on this beautiful Family Island.


Berkley Ferguson Real Estate
Principal Broker, 2-1238 or 2-4913
Berwin House on Frederick St.
McDeigan & Associates Ltd. 2-4284
Bernard-Sunley Building on Bay Street
Morley & O'Brien Real Estate
2-2794 Harris Building on Shirley Street
Braynen & Knowles Real Estate 2-1886
Sheraton-British Colonial Hotel Arcade
Frank Carey Real Estate Ltd. 2-7667
Bay and Deveaux Streets
Maxwell Woodside Real Estate 3-5632
Corner of Bias St. & Blue Hill Road.
Ty Saunders Real Estate Ltd. 7-7162
2nd Floor, Bernard Sunley Building
Grosham Property Ltd. 27662 or 28966
107 Shirley Street


CALL RIGHT NOW!


or see


San Andrys is for Lvvers
w ml


San Andros (Bahamas) Limited


6 month money-back-on-inspection guarantee.
Life of contract exchange privilege.
III


Monday, October 22, 1973





(Uhe Wribttwm


Royal Society of Arts examination results


EXAMINATIO N results for
the candidates who were
successful in the Royal Society
of Arts Examination, which
was held in June, were
announced by the lion.
Livingstone Coakley, Minister
of Education and Culture.
TYPEWRITING STAGE Ill
C. R. WALKER TECHNICAL
COLLEGE
Mary Culmer. Linda Ann
Jenore and Deborah Johnson-
passed
IYPI.kWRI IGr STAGE 11I
DEADMAN'S CAY
EVENING INSTIT ULE
Hilary Pye passed


C. R. WALKER TECHNICAL
COLLEGE
Palace Gloria Rolle passed
with Distinction.
Winnifred Adderley, Mary
Elaine Albury, Joyce Marie
Brown, Beth Lowe, Joanna
Eliza Miller, Juanita Delores
Nairn, Helena Neilly, Emerald
Alice Nesbit, Anne Ryan,
Judith Gwendolyn Sands and
Linda Turnquest passed.
TYPEWRITING STAGE 1
C. R. WALKER TECHNICAL
COLLEGE
Donna Lee Hanna, and
Judith Gwendolyn Sands -
passed with credit.


Mary blaine Albury,
Dorothy Brenda Armbrister,
Carlson Alexander Arthur.
Eileen Mary Bain, Lorna Brice.
Lilliemae Brown, Joyce Marie
Brown, Marina Diahann Butler,
Tyro ne Lurniss Cargill,
C ydcharisse Cartwright,
Ruthmae Collie. Karen Hlelen
Davis, Enid Gertrude Garland,
Maxine Yvonne Gibson,
Valerie Ingraham, Virginia
Marilyn Kelly L uella
McDonald, Euncie Moss.
Barara Naomi Neely, Marion
Rosemary Stubbs passed.
PRIVATE FREEPORT
Mary Ralph passed.


CAmifLL j

--IE^MKrC W. M


1I


SALES MAN


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15 CU. FT. TBi5 WVa GENERAL ELECTRIC
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AMERICA'S NUMBER ONE MAJOR APPLIANCE VALUE


GEOFFREY JONES & CO., LTD.
Cr. Rosetta & Montgomery Sts. Phone 2-2188-9


I)EADMAN'S CAY
EVENING INSTITUTE
Hilary Pye passed with
credit: Father Philip Bevans
passed.
COMMERCE STAGE 1
C. H. REEVES
EVENING INSTITUTE
Barbara Kalesta Carey
passed.
COMMERCE STAGE 1
PRIVAlE NASSAU
Ena Mae Cox passed.
C 1. REEVES
EVENING INSTITUTE
Barara Carey passed.
C. R. WALKER TECHNICAL
COLLIE. GE
An toinette Lecilia
Richardson passed.
STORE KEEPING STAGE 11
PRIVATE F-NASSAU
Brian Michael Miller
passed with distinction.
STORE-KEEPING STAGE 1
PRIVATE NASSAU
Brian Michael Miller
passed.
GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF
I \GI'(11 LAWS STAGE III
PRIVATE NASSAU
Brian Michael Miller
passed.
MATlHEMATICS STAGE I
C. R. WALKER TECHNICAL
COLLEGE
Christina Marva Zonicle
passed.
SAINT AUGUSTINE'S
COLLE;GEt
Margaret Anne Butler
passed
C.R. WALKER
TECHNICAl (COLLEGE
William Patrick Carroll -
passed with credit.
Theresa Bethel, Joyce Marie
Brown, Eugene Darling, Judy
Crescola Greenslade, Carolyn
li;yler, Eleavar Lowe and
Margaret Strachan, passed.
C. R. WALKER
TECIIINAL COLLEGE
SPANISH WRITTEN AND


ORAL STAGE I
J. M. Adamson passed.
SAINT AUGUSTINE'S
COLLEGE
Sharon Lorraine Carroll and
Margaret Anne Butler passed
oral with credit.
Yvette Christofilis, and
Maceo Coakley passed oral.
ACCOUNTING STAGE 111
C. R. WALKER
TECHNICAL COLLEGE
Iris Clarabelle Brennen and
Deborah Ann Lowe passed.
ACCOUNTING STAGE 11
PRIVATE NASSAU
Milford Lockhart passed
C. R. WALKER
TECHNICAL COLLEGE
Althea Delores Williams and
Carmell Veronica Jennings -
passed.
BOOKKEEPING STAGE 1
C. R. WALKER
TECHNICAL COLLEGE
Darrick Glenville Bethel,
Joyce Marie Brown, Julie Lunn
and Pratricia Ann Miller -
passed with credit.
Cheryl Archer, Sidney
Bethel, Churchill Bethel,
Cynthia Ann Bowe, Paula
Brennen. Persis Virvinia
Farrington. Adline Ferguson,
Carmen Francis, Ruth Menette
Hepburn, Charles Wilson
Johnson, Patrick Louison,
George Lunn, Roselda Sybil
Major, Delglica Annetta
Rahming, Joan Lucretia Scott,
Peter Scott, Stephanie
Sherman, Karen Eloyce Smith,
Janet Thompson, and Enith
Ferguson
C, R. WALKER TECHNICAL
COLLEGE CONT'D
Stephanie Dianne
Thompson, Harold Watson and
Cypriana Wilhemina Wright
Passed.
PRIVATE FREEPORT
Henry Campbell-- Passed.
NASSAU ACADEMY
OF BUSINESS
Beaulah Robinson Passed
with Credit; Florence Taylor
and Eloise Johnson -Passed.
SHORTHAND 80 W.P.M.
SAINT AUGUSTINE'S
COLLEGE
Sylvia Forbes Passed.
C.R. WALKER
TECHNICAL COLLEGE
Bruanne Richardson and
Maxine Williamson Passed.
SHORTHAND 50/60 W.P.M.
PRIVATE NASSAU
Lillie Mae Brown Passed
at 50 w.p.m.
C.R. WALKER
TECHNICAL COLLEGE
The following were all passes
at the various speeds indicated
by each name .
Iva Prenell Williamson at
50 w.p.m.; Maxine Williamson
- at 60 w.p.m.; Mary Elaine
Albury at 60 w.p.m.;
Antionette Armbrister at 60
w.p.m.; Sherry Bethel at 50
w.p.m.; Flossamae Bowleg at
60 w.p.m.; Cyd Cartwright -
at 60 w.p.m.; Karen Helen
Davis at 50 w.p.m.; Rosetta
Davis at 50 w.p.m.; Shirley
Dawkins at 60 w.p.m.;
Ethlyn Farrington at 50
w.p.m.; Sylvia Forbes at 60
w.p.m.; Maxine Yvonne Gibson
- at 60 w.p.m.; Donna. Lee
Hanna at 60 w.p.m.; Valerie
Ingraham at 50 w.p.m.;
Linda Ann Jenoure at 50
w.p.m.; Virginia Kelly at 60
w.p.m.; Sandra Lewis at 50
w.p.m.; Eloise Virginia


Lightbourne at 60 w.p.m.;
Tonia Marina Lightbourne at
50 w.p.m.; Olive Lightbourne
- at 50 w.p.m.; Eunice Moss -
at 60 w.p.m.; Margaret Moxey
- at 50 w.p.m.; Cecile
Jacqueline Munroe at 50
w.p.m.; Catherine Nairn at
50 w.p.m.; Lydia Maria Nairn
- at 50 w.p.m.; Emerald Alice
Nesbitt at 60 w.p.m.;Joan
Rox at 60 w.p.m.; Thelma
Doreen Russell at 60 w.p.m.;
Judith Gwedolyn Sands at
60 w.p.m.; Marjorie Albertha
Simms at 60 w.p.m.; Maria
Ethel Sweeting at 60
w.p.m.; Francina Smith at
50 w.p.m.; Lorraine Smith at
50 w.p.m.: Leeann Thompson
- at 50 w.p.m.; Rosemary
Strachan at 50 w.p.m.;
Elrena Denise Wallace at 50
w.p.m.
SAINT AUGUSTINE'S
COLLEGE
Janet Dorothea Carey
Passed
ENGLISH LANGUAGE
STAGE III
PRIVATE FREEPORT
Elkana Major Passed.
ENGLISH LANGUAGE
STAGE II
PRIVATE NASSAU
Geneth Eliza Brown,
Vincent Arthur and Myrtle
Petunia Jones Passed.
SAINT AUGUSTINE'S
COLLEGE
Kim Outten, Anthony
Galanis, Maceo Coakley,
Yvette Christofilis, Sharon
Carroll and Margaret Anne
Butler Passed.
C.R. WALKER
TECHNICAL COLLEGE
Antionette Armbrister,
Joyce Marie Brown. Sandra
Patricia Lewis and Christina
Zonicle Passed.


BO88S



22188/9 ELLIS STUAR


Cayman Islands to get

new deepwater harbour


BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS
(AP) The procedures committee
of the Caribbean Development
Bank was proposed that the bank's
ordinary share capital be more than
doubled from (EC) $100 million
to (EC) $240 million.
The proposal, agreed to at a
committee meeting here, will be
considered at the next board of
governors meeting in St. Georges,
Grenada next May.
The committee also discussed the
appointment of a successor to Sir
Arthur Lewis as President of the
bank. Lewis. 58-year-old St. Lucian,
goes un leave Saturday prior to his
retirement December 31 from the
post he has held for three years.
He is returning to his position as
Professor of public and
international affairs at Princeton
University. There was a hint that he
may return later to the bank.


however.
Grenada's minister of finance
George Hosten, who chaired the
committee meeting, said that the
suggestion was thrown out to Lewis
that he return to the bank when his
tenure was complete. He did not
say yes "but he did not decline
either," Hosten pointed out.
The bank's board of directors
also met Friday in Barbados and
approved loans totalling
$6,479,756 for projects in aix
member countries Antigus,
Cayman Islands, Grenada, Guyana,
Montserrat and St. Vincent.
The largest individual loan of
$2.34 million will go towards the
construction of a deep water port
In Georgetown, Cayman Island, The
Guyana cooperative mortgage
finance bank will receive $2.76
million.


JANSEL BAHAMAS LTD.


UI


A British Company with property interests in the Bahamas
invites applications from single young men with G.C.E.
passes in English and Mathematics who would be interested
in receiving a course of training in England in Property &
Business Management.
Applicants should be within 18/22 age group, have
Bahamian citizenship and be willing to complete an 18
month course.
Two candidates are required who will receive a salary and
free accommodation during the period of training and
return air fares will be paid.
The successful candidates will be expected to enter into a
service contract provisional on the satisfactory completion
of the course for positions in the Bahamas.
Arrangements will be made for early interviews.
Write to Box No. F.25, Freeport, Bahamas.


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Equity Side


1973
No. 30


NOTICE
TO: (a) All Adverse Claimants
(b) Adjoining Owners, Occupiers and Occupants
THE QUIETING TITLES,
ACT, CHAPTER 133

The Petition of Frank's Bay Limited a company
registered under the laws of the Commonwealth of
the Bahamas in respect of:
ALL THAT piece or parcel of land containing
Twenty-seven and Seventy-eight hundredths
(27.78) acres situate about Five (5) miles
Northwest of the Settlement of Marsh Harbour
on the Northern Coast of Great Abaco Island
one of the islands in the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas which said piece or parcel of land is
bounded NORTHWARDLY by the sea and
running thereon Three hundred and Eighteen
and Five hundredths (318.05) feet
EASTWARDLY also by the sea and running
thereon Sixty-seven and Fifty hundredths
(67.50) Feet SOUTHEASTWARDLY by land
the property of Bahama Coral Island Subdivision
Number Three (3) and running thereon Three
thousand Eight hundred and Seventy and
Sixty-seven hundredths (3870.67) Feet
SOUTHWARDLY by vacant Crown Land and
running thereon Three hundred and Fifty-two
(352.00) Feet NORTHWESTWARDLY by land
formerly the property of Durward C. Archer and
running thereon Three thousand Eight hundred
and Ninety-one and Eighty hundredths
(3891.80) Feet.

The said Frank's Bay Limited the Petitioner in
this matter claims to be the owner in fee simple.
absolute in possession of the said piece or parcel of
land and has made application to the Supreme
Court of the said Bahama Islands under the
provisions of Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act,
1959 to have its title to the said land investigated
and the nature and extent thereof determined and
declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by
the Court in accordance with the provisions of
the Act.
Copies of the filed plan may be inspected during
normal office hours at the following places:

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court.
Parliament Street in the City of Nassau.
(b) The Commissioner's Office at Marsh Harbour,
Abaco.

(c) The Chambers of Isaacs, Johnson &
Thompson, Attorneys for the Petitioner,
situate in Frederick House (2nd Floor)
Frederick Street in the City of Nassau.
Notice is hereby given that any person having
dower or a right to dower or an adverse claim or a
claim not recognized in the Petition shall on or
before the 16th day of November, A.D.. 1973 file
in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner
or the undersigned a Statement of his claim in the
prescribed form, verified by an Affidavit to bt filed
therewith. Failure of any such person to file and
serve a statement of his claim on or before the said
16th day of November, A.D., 1973 will operate as
a bar to such claim.

ISAACS, JOHNSON & THOMPSON,
Attorneys for the Petitioner.
Chambers,
Frederick House,
Frederick Street,
Nassau, Bahamas.


C


Monday, October 22. 1973


RT









6 Xihr grtblntt


Miamian tries to revive an industry that once


made Bahamas famous:



Marine Sponges

By LARRY SMITI/
ONCE THlE BAHAMAS' MAIN CASH INDUSTRY, sponge fishing died over the span of a few
months in 1938 after an unknown disease devastated the marine animals. Since then the industry
has remained dormant until this year when a Cuban exile from Miami decided to reopen it with
S the strange idea of capturing the world market.


AN EMPLOYEE PRESSES A BALE of sponges while
Mr. Andres Dworin looks on. The press is one of those used
when the industry was in its heyday during the 1920's. Mr.
Dworin sees a great world demand for marine sponges and
maintains that the beds have completely recovered from the
disastrous disease which struck them in the 1930's.
PHOTO Fred Maura.
FAITH TEMPLE
SINGSPIRATION
.X SIN(;Sl'lRAll()N sill tic
held at I alth I Templc.
l t P t 'o e saI to d ad le tat 8 p I. .
Wednesday. A ABibk Soc icti
film also will be shown on hoIi
t h e B ib le is d i s t r i b u t e d t )
people of ditterent coutntric .
Here also imll be a short
Bible qti/. \ collection will be
Taken it aid otl the Bible
IF Socictys i ithe \West Indies to
help send the Scripturcs t"


i "Ae'rn1AVTII Cr1AV


nee 3 & Evening 9 'Phone 2-1004, 2-1005
Matinee 3 & 5, Evening 9 'Phone 2-1004. 2-1005


Ti l MASMI ol LkAmra / kuC, lu
is bAck ,o bREAk You up
smashd ou dowm A4d Lkk you ApAt wiT


j- *, A Nol n, ; CGene'. P i e( ReioseiG
/ IAR/ 1, 1). IS(R 1n<)\ 1, lSAP ISl
Reservations not claimed by 8:45. will be sold
first come forst served basis.
SORRY NO PASSES ACC(I- PTI)!


Now Shoswing
Matinee starts at 2 30
t- ending 9.00
"l)D tIP THRL ST[ PG,
I J en \ a.ig
PtI S
"MORI 1)1 1t) THAN
ALIV' P(,.
(Clint h .ii > r
\ incent Price
Plit, late feature
I uesda\ night.


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I


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|


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Now thru Thursday
Continuous Showing's
from 3 00
"SLAUGHTERS BIG,
RIP OFF" R
Jim Brown
Id MacMahon
PLI S
"\-\LDIEZ IS CO()IN(,'
Burt Lancaster
Susan Clark


'Phone 2 2534 \, tndr r I will h adIited.



LAST DAY TUESDAY
ee continuous fromii 2. evening 8 30 'phone 34666

e w, umor and soul
the ving word
- '




x F e- Wn.r P iCTURES Presents WATTSTAX starring ISAAC
S APLE SINGERS LUTHER INGRAM JOHNNIE TAYLOR
EfP k '.G A ( 5ERS F rom COLUMBIA PICTURES A

PLUS





NO ONE UNDER 17 WILL BE ADMITTED


Andres Dworin, 68. has
been buying and processing
sponges for 30 years, first in
hi's native Cuba and then int
Miami lie made what he
thinks might be his final move
to Nassau in April of this year
and began exporting sponges a
month later.
Sponging was first developed
in the Bahamas in the last years
ot thie nineteenth century
ihen Greek fishermen and
businessmen began arriving by
the store (ireece was. and still
is. the centre of the world
sponge trade In 1948 the
disease hit and by the
lolloving \ ear the' sponge
population in the Bahamas
and later other areas of the
('aribbean was decimated.
FIhe colonial Government
frantially sought the services
ol scientists from Britain and
the U.S. and an intensive study
was able. only to determine
that the epidemic was caused
b\ a virus. No cure was
possible, but efforts were made
in the early 1940's to
artificallt restock the sponge
beds. I he programme met with
very limited success and finally
the (Greeks abandoned the
industry\ altogether.
Most. however, decided to
remain in Nassau where they
have formn'J a thriving
conmI,t:iitI replete with its
own little Orthodox Church.
Ihe old sponge market built by
Vousalis & Co. in the late
I 890s fell into disuse and
disrepair and was finally torn
down earlier this year.
I hen came Mr. Dworin. He
leased the old Vouvalis
property, located on West Bay
Street, with the old factory
and pressing machine still
intact: hired eight Bahamian
workers and began the task of
getting Out Island fishermen
interested in the sponge trade
again
(;RFAT 1)1 MAND
todayy there is a great
demand for sponges from
industrial concerns all over the
world," Dworin said
enthusiastically. "You just
can't give them enough. Every
sponge now in the sea has
already been sold. all you have
to do is get them out."
According to Dworin. about
100 Bahamian fishermen have
begun to hook sponges again
and bring them to Nassau to
sell to him. but he hopes that
many more will soon start. His
only complaint seems to be
that tile old native sloops take
too long to get the sponges to
market: "Newer boats with


(SO PROSPEROUS was the sponge industry in the Bahamas
luring pre-war era, that a composer penned the words to a native
tune, the title of which was: "Sponger Monet .Vever Done." But
the inflow of money from hooking sponges in Bahamian waters
came to an abrupt end in 1938 when a virus disease hit the sponge
beds and wiped out the industry within months. After 35 years,
A ndres Dworin, a former Miami sponge broker and a Cuban by
hirth, thinks there is great hope for the revival of the industry.
Visitors dropping in at his sponging house get a pleasant souvenir
... all the sponge they can take home. I


engines are what they need
now." he said.
Dworin's idea for revitalizing
the sponge industry here
originated after the United
States devalued its dollar
earlier this year. This meant
that the price of Mediterranean
sponges (the world's largest
supply) soared by some 30 per
cent in the U.S. market. The
Bahamian dollar meanwhile
remained pegged to the same
value as the U.S. dollar for the
convenience of tourists.
"This means that a kilo of
Mediterranean sponges sells for
$10 and the quality is the
same," he said. "I think that
the Bahamas can now corner
the world market in sponges
and if it takes this chance now
you will never be able to get
them out."
Marine sponges used to be
used for all purposes, but
synthetic products are now
utilized for a number of them.
Dworin, however, says


industries still prefer the real
ting and discounts the
possibility that synthetic
sponges might completely
supercede them.
"Real sponges are a whole
world in themselves," he
affirmed. "They cannot be
compared to the synthetic
product which has taken over
in the home. It would be like
comparing milk with water."
here are five varieties of
commercial sponges in the
Bahamas and Caribbean and
only t h ree in the
Mediterranean. Dworin is
confident that the sponge
population in the Bahamas has
made a complete recovery
from the epidemic that ravaged
it in the 30's although some
old (Greek hands disagree.
Hies operation selects, sorts,
processes and packs the
sponges for export to countries
all over the world, including
Israel, Canada, Britain, Mexico
and Argentina. But roughly 70


MALAYSIAN

SCHOLARSHIPS
l ltt GOVIRNMI1NT of
Malaysia is uttering two
scholarship awards for
post-graduate studies or
research under the
Co in monwealt h Scholarship
and I yellow Plan tenable from
May ne\t year at the
University of Malaya.
(Courses of study are
available in Arts, Science,
Medicine. Agriculture,
I engineering, Education,
'conoimics and administration.
Applicants must be citizens
of a Commnonwealth country
and normally resident in any
part of the Coinmmonwealth
other than Malaysia.
1 lie schlolarships are open to
both men and women who will
not have reached their 35th
birdhda. by January, 1974,
and who are,. or by the time of
taking up an award will be,
graduates of a university or
colleague or holders of an
equivalent qualification.
Applicants must he sound in
health and might be required
to submit a special medical
certificate before proceeding
to Malaysia to undertake their
selected courses of studies.
Applications must be made
on prescribed forms which may
be obtained from the Ministry
of IFducation and Culture, not
later than November 5.
REGATTA DATE
S li> aiinnual .ui o (I uy I'awkes
I ri regatta is scheduled for
S.iturda.i. Novenm er 3, 1973,
starting at 2 p.m. from I ihow (vay
(lub. IfopcI owni. Ahb, o.
A skippers' meeting is to e at I I
1i.i .


Canada offers post graduate courses


UNDER the Commonwealth
Scholarship and Fellowship
Plan, Canada is offering
scholarships tenable from
September next year at
universities in Canada.
The purpose of these
scholarships is to enable
persons of high intellectual
promise to pursue advanced
courses of study or undertake
research in Canada for a period
of two academic years.
The scholarships are
primarily for post-graduate
study or research, but in
exceptional cases may be held
for under-graduate study, and
are open to men and women
who will not have reached their
35th birthday by October next
year.
Candidates should be
holders of a Bachelor's or
Master's degree from a
recognized university or similar
qualifications: but applications
from others who wish to take a
first degree course may be
considered if they have the
requisite qualifications.
Scho lars!'.ps will not
normally be awarded to
candidates who already have a
Ph.D. degree or for clinical
training, nor will they be
awarded to candidates wishing
to undertake a medical or
dental degree.
Candidates must be Bahamas
Commonwealth citizens.
Requests for a preliminary
interview, further information
and application forms should
be made as soon as possible to


the Permanent Secretary,
Ministry of Education and


Culture. The closing date for
applications is November.


IN TROPICAL AGRICULTURE


THillE GOVERNMENT of
Trinidad and Tobago will make
available under the
Commonwealth Scholarship
and Fellowship Plan. an award
for post-graduate studies and
research in Tropical
Agriculture leading to a
post-graduate degree or
diploma, at the University of
the West Indies. St. Augustine,
Trinidad, effective from the
academic year starting Octobei
next year.
The area of study will be
limited to the research and
teaching facilities available at
the University of the West
Indies, St. Augustine.
This award is tenable for
two academic years in the first
instance unless the course of
study is for a shorter period,
with a possibility of its being
extended for a third year, in
the absolute discretion of the
Government of Trinidad and
Tobago, if the candidate's
work attains such a standard
that he is recommended by the
university authorities to study
for the Ph.D. degree.
Applicants must be
Commonwealth citizens or
British protected persons
normally resident in the
nominating country.
Applicants must already have a
first degree or equivalent
qualification in Agriculture
from a recognized institution


of study at the time of
application. your closets, gar
As a general rule, applicants
should not be more than 35 all ar
years of age on October 1, all car
1974. Preference may be given
to candidates between 22 and to SOI
28 years of age.
A detailed statement from Donate
the university or institution of
higher learning from which the
applicant was graduated must
accompany each application
form. This statement must
show the subjects studied in
each year of study and the
results obtained in each
subject. The grades achieved ROSET
must be indicated, if possible.
Applications must be made TWO DOOl
through the Permanent
Secretary, Ministry of MONTI
Education and Culture, Nassau
not later than November 5.


When it comes to insurance

it's Dominion for Life


... in Nassau

call James Cox 2-3843


THE OLD VOUVALIS
Company sign that was
received by the Bahamia
Museum (East Street) when
the original sponge warehouse
was torn down a few years
ago. Also seen on display in
the museum grounds is one of
the first sponge presses used
in the island and a dray that
was used to transport the
sponges from the market to
the packer's warehouse.
PHOTO: Fred Maura.
per cent of his production is
taken up by businesses in the
United States.
The demise of the sponge
industry in the 30's was an
economic disaster of major
proportions for the Bahamas.
Fishermen in the Out Islands,
who had relied on the trade for
their sole livelihood, converged
on Nassau by the hundreds in
search of work. The way of life
of many people was turned
upside down by the disease.
Today, however, the Bahamas
is a country that welcomes
some one and a half million
tourists a year and acts as a
major financial centre.
With Dworin's efforts,
perhaps sponging will again
become an important industry
here. For the time being he
believes a good public relations
any tourist passing by the
antiquated warehouse on West
Bay Street can have as many
sponges as they want free of
charge!


CAREER OPPORTMEITY

FOR THOSE WANTING TO JOIN

THE REAL ESTATE PROFESSION
INTERCONTINENTAL REALTY LIMITED
OFFERS THE CHANCE TO BECOME
INVOLVED IN THIS REWARDING
BUSINESS. APPLICANTS MUST BE OVER 23
YEARS HAVE A GOOD STANDARD OF
EDUCATION. SUCCESSFUL APPLICANTS
WILL BE GIVEN BOTH THEORETICAL AND
ON THE JOB TRAINING

PLEASE APPLY TO PERSONNEL
DEPARTMENT, INTERCONTINENTAL
REALTY, P.O. BOX F260, FREEPORT.
TELEPHONE MR. THOMPSON 373-3020
BETWEEN HOURS OF 1 to 4 P. M. MONDAY,
TUESDAY WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY.


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY

CORPORATION


Dnday, Octat
i7E -


22, 1973


- I,.. ~


- L

LO~i~:4


N qbCE
LEE


SPONGE PACKER, ANDRES DWORIN, takes stock of some of the bales of sponges
being readied for export. Each bale contains at least 1,000 sponges compressed for
shipment to industries all over the world. Mr. Dworin's enterprise marks the first time
that a revival of the Bahamas spone industry has been attempted since a mysterious virus
disease killed off the beds in the early 1930's.
PHOTO: Fred Maura


SC OLRSIP AN FLL WSI


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Mat ini


S'TA
HAY
ALB
0r'


ATULHB


Imm











Monday, October 22, 1973

Cover up Dad's faults


-but not with a halo
DEAR ABBY: Do you think a mother should cover up
for Father so the children won't know what a louse he is?
I've made excuses for my husband ever since I can
remember. It's "Daddy is sick." [Daddy was hung over.]
Or, "Daddy didn't come home for supper because he had to
work late." [Daddy didn't call to say he wouldn't be home.
I don't know where he was, or what he was doing.]
I've said: "We can't afford a new car-or a vacation
this year because Daddy needs the money to put back into
his business," when the truth was, "Daddy likes to gam-
ble."
I ask myself, why should I protect Daddy? When the
kids get older they'll learn the truth anyway.
So, Dear Abby, you're supposed to have all the an-
swers. Can you answer this one? PROTECTING DADDY


IF YOU ARE A


"SMART BUYER"





NOW

is The Time to Buy!

BRAND 1973

NEW 19


DODGE

AVENGERS


BIG 5 PASS. STA.WAGONS


BI 5 PASS. SALOONS







MOTOR UP FRONT UNDER HOOD
WHERE A MOTOR SHOU LD BE!
PLENTY OF HEAD ROOM
BIG ROOMY TRUNK! PLENTY OF LEG ROOM













PRICE
AS
LOW AS


HURRY! HURRY! HURRY!


NOW THRU OCT. 31st.


CENTRAL GARAGE

AUTHORISED DEALER A CHRYSLER

Phone 3-4711 THOMPSON BLVD.


Urbt Ugrtntw _ _ __ _ _ __ _ _ _


DEAR PROTECTING: At an age where children be-
lieve that Daddy is the greatest, what's to be gained by
being brutally factual? I don't recommend crowning him
with a halo-neither do I support your suggestion that he
deserves a noose. Like the Santa Claus myth, children'
illusions about Daddy [and Mama] vanish soon enough.
Don't shove.
DEAR ABBY: How would you feel if you found your 16-
year-old daughter and her 17-year-old boy friend asleep on
her bed with the door closed? ROCKPORT, MASS.
DEAR ROCK: Nervous.
DEAR ABBY: As a minister's wife, I get some really
dumb questions, but when someone hands me the money
for church rental [for nonmembers] and then asks: "Is
there supposed to be a gift for the minister, too?"-well,
that's too much.
Where the church is concerned, some people are unbe-
lievably cheap. A minister must pay for his education just
as any other professionally trained person must. He drives
his car to and from the church for counseling sessions,
again for rehearsal, and finally for the wedding ceremony.
The minister is not part of the rented property.
Would anyone expect the services of a doctor or dentist
for a total of 5 or 6 hours, and then ask: "Is $5 enough?"
Please urge ministers to set up a scale of fees for
members and nonmembers. [The latter seem to think they
are entitled to more than members.] And don't be afraid to
say: "My fee is -!" And then collect the fee, or send a
bill as everyone else does. MINISTER'S WIFE
DEAR WIFE: And to your letter, may I add an appro-
priate, "AMEN!"

DEAR ABBY: My brother is being married soon. His
fiancee asked me to be one of her bridesmaids, and I
accepted.
Today I was informed that all the bridesmaids dresses
were ORDERED, and mine will cost me $49.95, and I will
have to buy shoes to match! The bride didn't discuss the
style or color or price with me, she just went ahead and
ordered what she wanted. I don't know any of the other
bridesmaids as they are her friends, so I don't know if they
had anything to say about the choice.
Abby, I don't like paying for a dress I may not like or
wear again. I have already purchased a shower gift which
cost me $10, and later on there will he a wedding gift. I
think this whole thing is getting out of hand.
How can I bow out of this wedding party without mak-
ing a big stink? GROOM'S SISTER
DEAR SISTER: You may not be able to. Why not wait
until your gown arrives? [You may like it.] If you don't,
simply state your objections. They are legitimate.
DEAR ABBY: I am an 18-year-old virgin and proud of
it. My problem is whether to remain a virgin. Half the guys
I talk to want virgins for brides. The other half want girls
with experience so they know what's going on when they're
honeymooning. What do do you think?
Another problem: One night my boy friend and I were
sitting in his car making out in front of my house. We
weren't doing anything indecent, but a nosy neighbor told
my mother about it, and now she won't let me go out for
a month.


Can you help me?


MISS NO NAME


DEAR MISS: Stay sweet as you are. And endure your
penalty like an obedient daughter. And don't ever make out
in a parked car again. It's dangerous in more ways than
two.
CONFIDENTIAL TO ALL WHO OBJECTED TO MY
REPLY TO "STEVE'S GIRL" [who said she "loved" her
job, but that Steve insisted that after they married she
would work only 8 hours a day, 5 days a week, and no
more. Steve didn't think a woman could successfully com-
bine marriage and a career which demanded more time
away from home than that] I said I thought Steve's re-
quest was not unreasonable, but if SHE did, she should hold
up the wedding bells.
Hundreds of readers wrote to ask me if my answer
would have been the same had Steve's girl demanded that
Steve work only 8 hours a day, 5 days a week.
Emphatically NO! It's a fact of life that working wom-
en who are married must do double duty. After their 8-how
day away from home they are expected to run a house and
raise the children, too. I'm not saying it is FAIR, or even
that that's the way it SHOULD BE, I simply say that In N
per cent of the American homes, that's the way it IS!

For Abby's booklet, "How to Have a Lovely Wedding,"
send $1 to Abigall Van Buar, 13 Lasky Dr., Bevery Hills,
Cal. wI,.


IMPORTANT TO ADVERTISERS-


Wrap up this


Charistunas Early

with the help of Chr Biriblutt



CHRISTMAS


gIFTS ...


SUPPLEMENT
TWO PUBLICATION DATES- NOV. 29th & DEC. 13th. FOR JUST ONE PRICE

ADVERTISING DEADLINE NOV. 22nd CALL NOW... John Cash 2-2768

Mrs. Pinder 2-1986


IMPORTANT TO READERS-

Literally hundreds of gift giving ideas, lavishly Illu-
strated, to give you a preview of what Santa has in
store for everyone.


A special Supplement planned to help ease your
holiday chores for a more successful Christmas.


CLASSIFIED


NOWTE


4-r


C12079
TO THE MANY Customers of
Island T.V. We have moved our
service department to larger
premises, in order to provide
better service to our customers.
Please bear with us until we
have completed our
renovations.
Thank you for your patronage.
THE MANAGER & STAFF
ISLAND T.V. SERVICE
PHONE 22618.

C12104
NOTICE is hereby given that
ROBERT FREDERICK
KIMBERK of Sheffield
Avenue, Coral Harbour, New
Providnece, Bahamas is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for naturalisation
as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who
knows any reason why
naturalisation should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 15th day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.

C12112
NOTICE is hereby given that
TREVOR GORMAN of 437
Grenada Avenue, P. 0. Box
F-2415, Freeport is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any
reason why registration should
not be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
15th day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

C12110
NOTICE is hereby given that
LLOYD ALEX-ANDER
WILLIAMS of Mount Royal
Ave. P. 0. Box N1130 Nassau
is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
15th day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

C12105
NOTICE is hereby given that
MILDRED APTER KIMBERK
of Sheffield Avenue, Coral
Harbour, New Providence,
Bahamas is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for naturalisation as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why naturalisation should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
15th day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

C12103
NOTICE is hereby given that
AGNES JANE KENNEDY of
Freeport, Grand Bahama is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/
naturalisation as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalisation
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
15th day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

C12102
NOTICE is hereby given that
OLIVER THOMAS
KENNEDY of Freeport, Grand
Bahama is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the


facts within twenty-eight days
from the 15gh day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.

C12235
NOTICE is hereby given that
GERHART MELZER of
Treasure Cay, Abaco
(Albemarle Way) is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for naturalisation as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why naturalisation should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
22nd day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147. Nassau


C12213
NOTICE is hereby given that
JOHN HAROLD BAIN ot
Culmers Alley off Kemp Road
is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows-
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
22nd day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

I REAL ESTATE_
C12221
ONE Six bedroom furnished
house 3 kitchens, 3
bathrooms for sale. Foster
Street, Boyd Subdivision
Interested persons please call
53912.
C12170
35729 4 bedroom, 3 baths, 2
kitchens. 72 ft. off road 2
patios. FANTASTIC BUY in
HIGHLAND PARK $65,000.
C12198
FOR SALE BY OWNER
2 bedroom house fully
furnished, wall to wal;
carpeting, large patio, Johnson
Terrace $30,000 ALSO lot
Imperial Park 80 x 100 only
$5,500.00. Phone 51905 days
42463 after 6 p.m.
C12150
Eight lots, situate near
Windson Place at $2,000 each
Lots 70 x 110 Situate
Sandilands near A.D. Hanna,
$4,000 each. Lots Nassau
Village near Seabreeze, $3,000
and $3,500 each. All sound
titles. Call 5-9361
C12048
BUY A LOT
in EASTWOOD or
WINTON MEADOWS
Call Frank Carey
at 27667 or 24815
Frank Carey Real Estate
Box N4764
Bay & Deveaux Sts.
,11777
FOR SALE
2, 3 and 4 bedroom houses ,n
the following prestigious
areas:-
Westward Villas -Skyline
Heights
Highland Park -The Grove
Gleninston Gardens Sea
Breeze
Imperial Park Johnson
Terrace
Nassau East- Winton
Eastern Road Camperdown
Blair Estates Golden Gates
Estates
HIGHBURY PARK as well
as where ever you want it.
IN ADDITION
COMMERCIAL AND
RESIDENTIAL lots or acerage
in New Providence and Family
Islands.
Hotel sites and more. If it's real
estate we have it.
CONTACT
DAVSEON'S REAL ESTATE
AGENCY
Corner Bay & East Streets
Phone 21178 or 55408
P. 0. Box N4648
Nassau, Bahamas
or cable
DAVCO"

FOR RENT
C11761
BAY STREET Store for rent ,.s
of October 15th. Foi
information call 2-3170.
C12066
4 bedroom 2/ bath with stove
$320.00 per month. Phone
36807 after 4 p.m.
C12171
35729 1 bedroom apartment
Highland Park. Telephone
and water. $160 per month.
C11868
BEAUTIFUL two bedroom
apartment in Shirlea, partly
furnished $250 a month
including water. Call 36896
Carl Lowe. Monday Friday, 9
a.m. -5 p.m.
C11772
ONE EXTRA LARGE two
bedrooms two bath,
apartment. With large living
and dining all basically
furnished Victoria Court
APARTMENTS on Elizabeth
Avenue between Shirley and


Bay Street. Facilities, phone,
laundry, parking, T. 'v.
antenna, airccnditioned. Phone
54631 between 8 a.,.- and 5
p.m.
C12222
FURNISHED two bedroom
apartment in Boyd
Subdivision. Interested persons
call 53912.
C11763
COTTAGES and apartments
daily, weekly or monthly
airconditioned, fully furnished,
maid serivce available. Lovely
gardens and swimming pool.
Telephone 31297, 31093.
C12180
2 BEDROOM Apartment on
top of Winton Highway.
Magnificent views, private
balconies, $325.00 per month
including utilities. Beautifully
firnikshprd Call i1Fsi1 nr 9


II


IMPALA
$2650.00
NPS 584
MViARINA
$2200.00


4 door automatic
1972 MORRIS
2 door automatic


NPH 251 1971 DODGE
AVENGER 4 door
automatic $1800.00
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
S/WAGON 2 door standard
$1400.00
N7476 1968 FORD CORSAIR
4 door standard $500.00
NPW 191 1972 DODGE
AVENGER 4 door
automatic- $2100.00
NPW 167 1972 VAUXHALL
FIRENZA 2 door standard
- $2500.00
NPW 169 1972 CHEVY VEGA
- 2 door automatic
--$4500.00
NPB 950 1970 VOLKS-
WAGEN FASTBACK 2 door
standard $1500.00
T7122 1971 MORRIS
TRUCK $1850.00
T6544 1972 FORD VAN -
$500.00
NPX 633 1973 BUICK
CENTURY 4 door
automatic $6000.00
NPX 457 1968 CHEV.
IMPALA 4 door automatic
- $900.00
FINANCING AVAILABLE
COME IN AND SEE US
OAKES FIELD near
Police Barracks
Thompson Boulevard
Phone 3-4711


SECT


IN MEMORIAL |d
C1223Y













IN LOVING memory of o.
dear husband and fate,
SAMUEL G. THOMPSCO /.ho
departed this life on 0 b--r
23rd 1971.
Gone but not for-c-'er
Sadly missed by wife (Tessa)
J ulia ten c hi! r en,
grandchildren, relatvi.s and
fi ends.
JULIA 1tO.'PiO


wME |


-I


FOR RENT J
C12214
FURNISHED AND
AIRCONDITIONED 2
bedroom, 1 bedroom and
Efficiency apartments
Telephone 5-8134.

FURNISHED ROOMS
C12211
In quiet neighbourhood at
reasonable rate For
information call 1044.

C12131
UNFURNISif 2 bedroom
apartment, (jood location off
Mackey Street Telephone
5-1758.____
C12164
WHY PAY MORE TO SLEEP
Polhemus Gardens Motel. $20
weekly and up. Phone 35380
Chippingharn
C12137
COMPLETELY I URNISHiEU
One Bedroom Apaitmnfent with
telephone, $180 00, Phone
5-8512.

CARS FOR SALE
C12157
1965 FORD Ton Pick-UD
Truck. Cash offer, invited. Cill
3-1426 after 5:00 p.m.

C12205
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD.
P.O. BOX N-640
NASSAU -BAHAMAS
USED CARS
1970 HILLMAN HUNTER
Dr. Auto. White $850
1968 JAVELIN A/C $995
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA 2 Di
Auto. Green $1450
1971 FORD CAPRI Auto.
Blue $1695
1970 CHEVELLE SS A/C 2
Dr. Red -$2600
1968 VAUXHALL VICTOR
$600
1969 PLYMOUTH
SATELLITE $1300
1969 PONTIAC GTO A/C
Vinyl Red $2600
1971 FORD PINTO Brown
Vinyl Auto. $1995
1971 VAUXHALL VICTOR 4
Dr. Std. White $1295
1967 MERCURY COUGAR
Std. Green $900
1969 AUSTIN 1100 4 Dr. Std.
Green $995
1970 FIAT 124 4 Dr. Std.
White $600
1968 BUICK ELECTRA White
-$1595
1969 VOLKSWAGEN Green
$1250
Trade-ins Welcomed
Located Oakes Field
Opposite the Ice House
Telephone 3-4636-7-8
C12236

BARGAINS
I

CENTRAL GARAGE
I l it 'stPluacf i ,.\ to 'ra '


USED CAR

CLEARANCE SALE
NPH 522 1971 DODGE
AVENGER 4 door
automatic $1300.00
NPH 191 1968 RAMBLER
REBEL 2 door automatic -
$900.00
N 9901 1968 TOYOTA 800
2 door standard- $500.00
NPY165 1969 FORD
CORTINA 4 door auto-',atic
$800.00
NPY 55 1970 VAUXHALL
VICTOR S/WAGON 4 door.
standard $750.00
NPT 259 1970 VAUXHALL
VIVA 2 door standard
$950.00
NPH 403 1970 FORD
CORTINA S/WAGON 4
door automatic $1000.00
NPF 896 1970 CHEVROLET


THE FAMILY of
William n Alfred R
extend their tIlaI
appreciation for tl
expressions of
received duri cj the,
bereav"e -et.

SFOR SALE

( 119bb
ACT II RESALE


BRAND NEWNE EARLY N E':'
EXQUISITE Gov ,-., c(-kl- ; .
street dresses pi'ts s
jewelry
DEALERS LICO i Vi
1352 W ashii gt. ,, .,oi, .
Miia-ri Beach Phone 3 1-00 1
C12140
(O F IC FF tJ Nr'JIL I !
L)',l' S. ',,"vivel 31 1 ] r
sccretair, chairs. (ftc,, ta. bl S
NCR acconirtig .n.ichi,-.
Contact 2-7491 2-? fr n n 9 -
4:30

LOST
C12239
BLA(CK andai d poodi, : na-e
"Geto" with hro'wn coinon ,rnd
Humane Society identification
tag Lost v i i ',
Campeidown, Sunday night.
Reward. Call 4-1515.

C 11763
THE RAPID RESULTS
COLLEGE
World-famous postal
tuition for the GCE,
School Cert. and
Accountancy, Banking,
Law, Marketing, Company
Secretaryship Examinat-
ions. For details of our
specialised courses write
for FREE copy of YOUR
CAREER to The Rapid
Results College Dept. TNI
Tuition House London
London SE19 4DS.



01 b Tri buntr

NASSAU AND BAllAMA

ISLANDS

LEADING NEWSPAPER


DON'T MISS Uhr ath ibhtw SPECIAL '73 CHRISTMAS GIFT GUIDE




fINK- SM EARED,


/


i


M


C12225
IN LOVING -'rn rv of
C L ARKSUN A I R T
FRANCiS who depa'-,!--: +is
life Octoher 22 W
Time )'ills on 1 ;iit i-c-')o les
stay.
As near and dear a', ve'eclday.
Sadly missed fy Vife, 7
children, 1 grandchild, parents.
5 sisters, 2 brothers and a host
of relatives.

ART SUPPLIES
C11770
COMPLTE i ranc of c r :
supplies. Oils, acrylics. canva- ,
easels, etc. Bahamian Pa -t
Supply Ltd., Bay Street. Phone
2 2386, 2 2898.

MARINE SUPPLIES


I


1


4 ft .
Yach t.


S RAF ,
ix. )rivat.
p. engig nes
0 hours,



NKS










K- ^d.




1i '--.nd I
the v
itt:a, dsoI








SHOP


C11762
PAC E/MAKE P
Luxurious '-i insin;
Phone 3-2371
A 11894
1909 31ft. ClHdlI
Cornlandet. Sleeps si
shower, two 230 h.[
with less than 20
kitchenette. good
Call 24267, 5-10 1.


CARD OF THA
C12232


















CLASSIFIED


SECTION


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV. TELEPHONE 21986 EXT. 5


HELP WANTED
C12176
LOCAL FINANC- .
requires two ,.,. i
interested in ... ,, .,
making o career o! t
business All appi -.. ;*
Ow nti hoinaw rlitr"'- r.' "" :+
C!21 76. c, Tn
0. Box N3207. 7.. n ; a

C12177
SRE AU RE c-' :
TREASURE A
Retiu es 0e oi i '
the t'o ov'r p-
PRC9 '- -

previo t '
opeiat;.' of j
3a pt : p .
Assocoat.co 1
Goiters.
Preference i *
apphcatiw "
Baham anr.
1tAA :tAd :

Supervi O f ,
ii/eable n .
Toex~erie ,, o ,(" ^^ '

T, eas 'Y a : .

2--87JU. "..: . .
address a;-.a +<,' ; **
to Treasuie .
Box N-32:'


C633-1
Job Title '
M, ini rcii ,. .


basic edicj:. .- ,
fuel bur h 'r li m ,
Clinker Ce'-t t .-
Kiln burnerm, ar
Minimum F
years.
DuLties R-Dpo < -
iperate
S'f b ,ri'n -


Bahars'. c n ..- .
O lr. : -


C12223
HOTEL MA -.
couple. Must M :
of ma m'e''i ,'- -
work. T_ : ,
itmate, sria; -:
sisands. P-'ere
Good salaI, -v
C12223. c o 5
0 Box N320

C12234
STAFF COCCr
to work V;th2l
home 's' r

Otly O '. ; :
,ete e ,e 'i r:.


TRADE SE" '.

FOR
G A R D ELN
Trimrmin g : ; -g 1

service Cai! c 7-


SOLVING %O .
Same day ,.
antenna s .-r .,. -
Call Don :, .
Cl On77






Lj'


Pider' 9 Cu

Brokerage Ltd.



P
HEAVY L !T .
FORK L ,
MECHA II'_

IATA CA,
CUSTO.VS L ,
& O
MOVIN," .

STEFL
& S -! ,
SPECIAL L .
EXCELL[N. -.. i.
REASON NA;;L, l .- ,
CONTACT L, '. T i ,ji
OR JA A S,
PHONE: 2 3/1', 2-1/9.
2-3797, 2 i -
Airpoit 774 1


TO PLACE YOUR ADV

TELEPHONE

21986 EXT 5


AkSSM "A


BUSINESS PROFESSIONAL


DIRECTORY

Save Time



BY



1o List In This Director Call 21980 EXT. 5

I Line PrMoth 60 2 Line PeMuth 1O!1

SVE TIME SAVE MONEY

FI OOR IMAINTEN-ANE BOOK STORE
< t in.i l & In tailiii1n | 'rn lb r s Book Shi> s"-t4

Si l i; I 7 ( L01 ,
S" ~ 3 r \,r.noI.t r \druobe la )ke%

bIt'l STORlLS' TRAVEL
SI ur 2- 2 1 31
T! t, 2 S i rr\ & ,. L 2-Ilj



,:_i'l it 1 \\_ ,l i \L i 1 i I otl '


i)PORT SHOP ( \1l I< AS

-. '. \ I !!IDKY GOODS
.. i i j i ir te Kiddy 42 4

S\RI i \1)NI1 1)RN ( l I \\l\i,

t \RI)VARL I (,\RlX )\ & PET SPPLLIES


t!il W, P_______ RIN FING.
-n '. : h t .- i, rini 1 imp ii-

1r k' l l \ l I I III'\PERIES


FOR THE ACTION YOU WANT


m mm ) .m.mmAmm mm mmmm mm

Shop Nassau Merchants

For Business And Services





GRAND BAHAMA



CLASSIFIED

IN FREEPORT

TEL. 352-6608


HELP WAN1


; ,; . -' 4 5q t b -




--on &
S. ; L t eepur t
-2480
nee,.



it4
4 i


.. 2 t,.; or
i' thaa
= ^ + + ;' 41, .p rn 5 -
: r essa'


:+ : 3 ,ncl Office,
,' ; -: .; :00 a.m .
Monday
= r .c;.; r' M artir



GALL SIP RTARY
d Snut nnd .i typing
s' rl re nci .c ,perie e i
L-epusaton ot contracts and
"'e' legal d.,-n'ients also
Accua Ly in typing
= n ts a:nd letters
ppiy to: Gaiand Bahaina Port
th rity L '!rilted, French
Sii ing, ,,.. Street,
4 0. Box N-8199, Nassau,
iiahamas for interview and
,insferation.


HELP WANTED 2
C 381
17 .RS: (1 ) Porters to
vi sh pots, clean anid mop
i ,,. do garbage
S ll-t o; I tested persons
-I Gplv: GR/AND BAHAMA
HrOTFL, i.E- ST END, GRAND
BAHA.MA Personnel Office,
between the houit s of 9:00 a.m.
and 3.00 p.',. .. Monday
t*rou]:in F L,, v. Elon Matrin,
Jr., P- s Lir-i.tor.


OULiit : !NDU5i HI lAL
t RPICIANS
'.i -- its journeynian
e.xper-ice- V .It be capable of
readint-j, tel pieting and
-.o.0.rk iini f ,om standard; one
i IC t S': ineti'ijtic. wiring
I J u i i '. m1s c onduit :
; on St i ict on drawings.
Applicants received in person
,'. Apply to. M4. Rick Penn.
Developr'ient Corp., Co0at
a der.. r ep iort. Grand
Haha.i


IndivILual miist have a
minimum n of ten (10) years
exper'rice, be knowledgeable
in all depart ments of golf
o peratic, ns, administrative
abilt y a' to the hiring and
tiairn of all golf department
pers n'el t.or two clubs:
knowledge in buying, selling.
price setting and cost control.
I veontory of all golf
equipment. projection of
annual budget for two golf
clubs : be- able to arrange arid
set up golf tournaments from
one cay events to the scope of
the 1971 Ba ham3as National
Open Must plan, carry out and
protect golf events for two golf
clubs; have knowledge of
maintenance of electric golf
carts and work closely with
Golf Course Superintendent;
also the promotion of golf.
Apply to: The Grand Bahama
Development Company,
Personnel Department,
Lucayan Building, P. 0. Box
F-2666. Freeport, Grand


HELP WANTED
C6380
1 MALE ADAGIO
DANCER: With a minimum of
five (5) years professional
experience as a featured artist
and working in production
numbers. Good references and
Police Certificate required.
Applicants should apply to:
Bahamas Amusements Limited,
(El Casino) Personnel
Department, P. 0. Box F-787,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
C6379
C HEF (BROILER)
REQUIRED: The man for this
position will have proven
experience in preparation and
cutting of meats for steak
experience as broiler cook plus
the ability to produce sauces
and dressings to written recipes
apply in person to : BASS.
BAHAMAS LIMI TED
CAPTAIN'S CHART HOUSE
Telephone 352-5109 for
appointment.

CG334
Job Title BURNERMEN (2)
Minimum Education Good
basic education. Experience in
fuel burning process in rotary
Kilns and production of
Clinker. Cement plant rotary
Kiln burnerman.
Minimum Experience 3-5
years.
Duties/ Respo nsibil cities
Operate Kilns to produce
ii nker by a continuous process
of burning.
Interested applicant contact
Person nel Lupartment,
Bahamas Cement Company, P.
O. Box F100, Freeport, Grand
Ba hama.

C6373
(3) UPHOLSTE RERS required
with at least 5 years
experience. $3 50 per hour
Apply to: Island Fashions Ltd.
(352-9727)


USE

Shp Tribuor

CLASSIFIED


ADVTS.


"Never judge a man until
you've walked a mile in his
sandals . .


SUCH INCIDENT
OFF MOZAMBIQUE A
SWIMMER FROM
A CAPSIZED BOAT
WAS BEING

SHARKS


A PAIR OF LARGE PORPOISES APPEARED,
CHASED OFF THE SHARKS, 9SCORTEIC
AND FINALLY HELPED TH6 EXHAUSTEP7
SWIMMER BY PUSHINSM AS SHE TRIED TO
CLAMBER UP ON A FLOATING BUOY .


iTNK-


1'r -


LP
















ii ~ I ~


"Is this the pit stop for the rat race you're always
complaining about?"


'WHAT wo UX?I HEARD
WILSONS O SUBWAY OVERA '


Brother Jumnper


"Hit the road, buster.

CROSSWORD

PUZZLE
ACROSS
23. Blackjack
1. Legendary 24. Rightful
bird 27. Billfish
4. Detonator 28. Irritate
7. Resorts 29. Elevation
11. Flurry 30. Moby Dick's
12. Japanese fan pursuer
13. Skin 32. Prosperous
14. Specify 33. Conductor's
16. Zenith stick SOl
17. Ballad 35. Cash drawer
18. Musicians' 36. Operatic prince
society 37. Solemn
19. Tapestry 40. Rotate
21. City in 41. Snaffle
Arizona 42. Eternity
22. Seed covering 43. Tractable


Th season's over."

LAR0TY RIATA R
AT R STR

DE E L S
Iu TE SpEA
EAER RA
MA ,.7ETE
0AIL 5la L
II rLR T I 5ERS
)LUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE


44. Greek long E
45. Turf
DOWN
1. Sign of the
zodiac
2. Lyric


3. Plotters
4. Commemorative
items
5. In a dither
6. Join
7. Paroxysm
8. Sins
9. -- mater
10. Phase
15. Labor
18. Arctic bird
19.Appendage
20. Macaw
21. Wild ox
23. Sphere
25. Einstein's
birthplace
26. Culbertson
28. Form of John
29. Dutch painter
31. Corneous
32. Michelangelo
statue
33. Nibble
34. Huge toad
35. Tease
37. Lincoln
38. Low
39. Conclusion


ghg Sriliw


SMondaOUR


and poise here.

Chess
By IBONIARD BARDEN











(9794)
Paul Benko, U.S. gmrandrter,
sat for so long admiring his
own position as Black here that
he oversteped the time limit!
Benko has strong doubled rooks
but it Is net Clear how he makes
progress. Ca you work out the
best plan for Black ?
Par times: 10 seconds, chess
master; 40 seconds, chess
expert; 2 mnlrtes, county
player; 4 minutes, club
standard; 7 mdnutes, average;
20 minutes. novice.
SOLUlION No 9794 --
Chess Solution
I .. R-BS!; 2 BxR, RxB:
3 Q-K3 (if 3 Q-B3, P-K5
forks queen and rook). KtxQP!
threatens both 4 . KtxQ ch
and 4 . Kt-B5 ch followed
by Kt x R. So White would
have to return rook for minor
piece by 4 R x Kt, B x R ch after
whiclL Black is a pawn up with
a boi advantage in position.




nUoW mary
four letters
or more tanl
you" a e
rom t r
letters shown
here. In
making a
word. each
letter may
be used once
only. Each
word must contain the larIe
letter, and there must be at
least one elght-letter word In
the list. No plurals ; no foreign
words no proper a m e .
TODAY'S TAiCET : 1to words
good IS words. verp good to
words excellent o I u lon
tomorrow.
tOTnitDAY's8 SOLUTION :
Cerous chose chooser chorus
chose choose case cosber course
crush eae es horse
hose house ot-F&MIMSeheous
rooe rose rouse ruse rash Woere
scour shoe shoo shore sore sour
source such sure user asher.


Rupert on Chariot Island-25


We mustn't let those pirates capture King
Neptune, Rupert I" Simon's eyes are wide
with anxiety. How can we stop them ? The
sight of the chariot has already put a wild plan
I intS Rupert's head. If only we could drive
the chariot away," he says. I wonder if we
- dare try it." His usually timid chum surprises
him by saying, Why, of course, that's the



-SMEARED1


answer I" A few moments later they are in
the huge shall, preparing to fix the harness to
the white horses. Luckily. Simon's lullaby has
made the creatures quiet and easy to handle.
and they wait obediently until all is ready. I
don't know what will happen when we try to
drive them," says Rupert.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


Bridge
,By VICTOR MOLLO
A good card player can some-
times take liberties in the
bidding. That is the firm belief
of Tim Seres, one of the world's
foremost tedhnictans, as may be
seen from this hand at ruobe:
bridge, reported in Australian
Bridge.
Dealer West: E/W Vul. (N/S
30).


West
4 Q 109
Z? AJ 4
0 Q 8 5
6A K5


North
4A 4
0 Q10 7 6 5
064
4Q 863
East
( 9 83
0 A 10 7 3
4 J 10 7 4 2
South
K J 7 5 3 2
K 2


West North East
1NT Pass Pass
Dble


Jhe Comic Pg.


South
3 4


The leap to 34 was dashing,
but 24 wasn't enough for game
and Seres probably reasoned
that If he showed a bold front,
he would be less likely to be
doubled.
West led the 4K, noted
Dalt's 42 and o down the QA.
IR lorks as 9 decked nmut kmse
five tricks, three aces and two
trumps, but appearances can be
deceptive.
On the VA Beres dropped the
VK! West continued with the
05 to East's OA. Winning the
diamond return, Seres crossed
to -the VQ and ruffed a club.
Going back with a diamond ruff,
he ruffed another club. Next
came the #A and a heart ruff.
That left him wth K J; >J.
West's last three cards were all
trumps, so he had to ruff the
OJ and lead a trump into
*K J.
















I. PIlayeaa n television ion
oI'.si9. M. M

1. One In 5 Ust. (4)
9. Girl's name. (4)
10. Marlaner map be slad of one
or these In a storm (4-)
It. #orne by tree. (4)
14. startiuee. 44)
L1. Militar barrI er. t9i
1;. Conlstellation (a)
IB. IBlemish (4)
19 riste note Is reaunant .,an
ma the this. (4-4)
tl. Sandhll. 44)
ft Walerloated IS)
Down
I. MStrnas Doints. 44-5)
1. Wihked (4)
3. LylII hack In relawsn
fa1h1on. ( )
4 Walk. (4)
5 Temperins. (9)
6. sprin surprised is. s)
H. Knot. (3)

1:t la'ades
Is. outnlend
(3)
IN4 t1 arden

to. Clue the on-
as we n
12) aI lel. g (4


Monday, October 22, 1973


a"


CARROLL RIGHTER'S

:jHOROSCOPE
f from the Carroll Righter Institute
7/ \ 'z GENERAL TENDENCIES: Until sundown
\ you have to contend with some pretty
annoying conditions, but by doing your job well, you find
conditions improve later and you can arrive at correct
answers to whatever investigations you then put in motion.
All through the night interesting chats can be held if you
wish,
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) Get at all those duties staring
you in the face and they are soon over. Do nothing to
undermine your health. Be happy with loved one in p.m.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) If you give more attention
to your appearance, you can get ahead faster and be happier
with close ties. Be practical and control your temper. Think.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Do something constructive
about the situation at home. Improve surroundings so you
can entertain more. Avoid one who does not appreciate you
in p.m.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Shop early and
keep important appointments so the evening will be free to
spend with the one you love. Get routines better organized.
Expand.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Get bills and statements out of
the way early and do something about adding to present
income. Get advice from financial experts. Dine out in p.m.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Get at all that work and
complete it so that tonight you can enjoy some hobby with
another. Avoid a situation that could lead you into trouble.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Handle personal tasks
cleverly, early, then the evening can be a very happy one.
That monetary problem can be solved satisfactorily now. Use
your head.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Organize personal aims
better to reach them easier, more effectively. Evening fine
for social pleasure. State fondest aim to a good friend who
can help you attain it.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 to Dec 21) Gain the help and
respect of higher-ups and make your life easier, pleasanter.
Labor in a more exact and thoughtful way. Help a bigwig do
philanthropic work in p.m.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan 20) Have all the right facts
and figures to get that new activity working successfully.
Show a bigwig your finest talents in p.m. This can lead to
something excellent,
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Make arrangements to
pay any debts either on time, or with a loan. Some
government bigwig can help you be more serviceable within
your community.
PISCES (Feb 20 to Mar. 20) Talk over differences with
an associate for more successful operations. Plan how to put
your finest talents across with the public in general. Be
active.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY. . he or she will be
one of those charming young children with plenty of ability
at detail but is apt to not understand or to forget the real
goal or purpose behind them, so teach early to focus on
such, then the efforts will pay off handsomely. A good
college education could bring forth a very successful person
here. Give as much affection as you can to your intelligent
youngster, who will need it more than most. Both precision


REX MORGAN, M.D. By DAL CURTIS

I'M NOT TALKING r'VE GONE WELL, I DON'T WANT IS IT BECAUSE Y'OU FIG4J ir 1
WHEN LADTO NO E ROB OL REAT EN HIM OUT OF PROFESSIONAL FOOTBMEDICALL! A WOMAN UNDERSTAND YOUR


















ME HED ACCEPTED A R G FT OF ADVICE, BUT, MORE IMPORTANT, HOW WOULD PASSIONS.E. BUT IF YOU THINK
URSE ISTOLD UNABLE SHOULD TOI'M ONLY HIM UCH A BEIN, YOUR JUEMENT










THENEW DISTRMEDICT ATTORNEY! INTERESTED TIDY SUM? IS BAD, COUNSELORS


STORE'S JUST O E- IT AY OT BE APPARENT ARKEREAN WOMEN LIKE TO

TA ENS THE LEAST THAT WOULD DO FIRST MEET HIM BUT HE INTERESTD IN TALURES ON
WHEN LADESSOR BRAN MA BGREARFECT HIM OUT OF PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL I CAN UNDERSTAND YOUR











$75,000 FROM YOU, POOLE... DRIVER! CAN'T COMPARE EDGE O HISTORY IS INEX HAUSTIBLE ROBERTS A FINE UAAN
ITHE DiICT ATTOR NEY! INTERESTEDSUMCOUNSELOR!
TN HiM, N,
oYOU
S/0-22"









APARTMENT 3-G MByAlez K oteg .






WORLD--- I WE'V BETTER
THAT GO HOME, WALTER 4










SSTEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & over guard


I















Ther (ribtune


Mc


onday, October 22, 1973


B\ (GL\iS).ONE THIRSION
filt STURDY conibh'nati t
't! rgard John "Kolong" ali.ce
3.nd forward .\rlrfi'linoil
i.iboth Huimes proved ito be )
the xita! lorce behind ilahaliii's
( onuiioxnwealth Bank I.-irrnoi
20 point lead attin thet first
4'-

li


hali and the
v lctry over
Classic Pro,.


I e ga i -
IJeiie\ (l I
H\ .iiacet


i otaliner Saiints' rookie Reubeni knowiles drixvc
ill .ioi'ic. knowiles contributed 2(0 points ito t
\ictorx over Heastie Supersonic \esterda\ .



/ ik ings do mi



Eagles to



stay unbeate1


. : .' .'- ".. !, ' i' ,..'. : : : + '" i. i P l ,. ; '
,: ' : t, .' to' \t ,

: ,, i ,, i ..." ,. }l:It \ +, l
: .' ",':' ', !," crp~V.it
"- :" : .:' c', ',. l~ t :' ',' .-'- :: \\ c g ': i 'i


\I I I \\

' t


I . . ..: , ,.


tt


ti i -


ir eivntui !l i,.;4 :'';iierouls turnovers, including
tit d'uie i it.'-1i 0l1l-n halls, gave a game high
Six assists and chipped int a
i! of 13 points.
1lluime who carried the
J- \ I w eight of the Warriors for
.: ir three quarters ol the'
i.. L ;.n tossed in a team high of
2 points though he captured
n1!\ iltitle rebounds.
(I 'tache Randolph Swaiby
xx:is oj ire than satisfied wxitls
lis t. te m onll seven of whihl'
turned up N yesterday to whip
h lh' llk represented Pros.
S I his year they are giving
'' ood defense and the\ are
sh ti'ting,. he said of the last
*,1a-ton's fifth place finishers.
"'\\ e hae one good offelslxe
1,tit in Wilkinson Kerrington
itld o'ttC goiod defensive man in

t lh ol Il these players are
'nit''tent' rookies coming in
i 111 the a\\' rriors jitnior.
\;ialk\ last season, what
i.' rally lacked was tihe big
:in ito asMst ltunlies.
SI\ otot-seven forward
I1 li.ha Ili McSwceneo was the
hiih 'nan flor the Pros with a
.tline high o 31 points and 30
.'iioiinds. Pat rIngrah nlim last
A..i)\ rookie of the w ar
I i" :biuted 11 points.
I he Prot probably figured
S,t! thih tlinal live minut esits
'.i \iilchi took charge of
In'!l H1ull miht have broken
i. \I, jtIlnur, 111t defeat. '1hev
ri' ', IT\ i cht shocked wxheii
1 ,id nti wtork,.
l',i\'o!r cuac (Cleve Rodgers
;icint'Itl oit lthe Pros figured
till n ihi t li tlti t 'th1 re 'ti going t-' ce
he S.a i-. 134 n I .' JiO t .~Ii l" Ihat is tie
e \\ iSll r' i lrke last season was
to- 1w r e nrower.
'- "i I It i ,r didn't chslIeI

n...... l:li'i" iiiii di
ii (-i L 2 11+g sta
I Ile st started
S. :" ;. ll end of ;the
,,,'; i + .' n i ,,tarted pla\ r:.g
'- li.! 'ir i lie beginning we
O. i \l i,\ butlsted that gaime
S,].' i \\ whenever a tC nl
t ,: il i \ our a i pants
Sifin ished." lie


Ii''' I.;

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11 i m K 1 i

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It'l' II'~ I,'. ,- \1'
SItai~.t t ', '''L t + +''+1 -
I I .. i S c

Ne w i l t- l i -i t' 1 u ,
n u'\ it : ' '


Taylor's take pennant


I t 1 u Ii il u lu ,h i, ,ut |
'l ;! i 111. I f I t 1 lie st' r ie

J lll ,i i n li i ll" 1 l h ste l rtid ,
i li, i idu itir- I l, 0 ti-,-tr\
ct' l- r i .'ktt 1 srI m -thi


t ul, re l i t . i l
1 i l A l ( IV


n--ik theId lt- d 2 ill t htt i, e tII ri
n it IIanl d tuin l tit Iti l Me n lh'iaderr
' i t1 it'h ni'id till i l WIret-e ti
Ii f Nt' t n Ii I Iod g er
N Ist ott itt-ut I t Iu ,Il Ii I t O.t'n' II
sj red tIIhree I'll runs in li lr'
N 'i tI '
It inel Neils led the Blenders
l (tALk witlh t\% itruns and tune rhi


nixo runs
' .it, her I trlo ut t I li I o l,,, t 'J
I 'lueriid l.' n tutu. !i ioit, 1. s -ie



jine d h hin ,l t iilh l r,,IhII
Irn,!i threesdn i\lgi Ini I tts
S hJtirt it IuIlte"





garite tfrIm Sr St 11Itel s it )d gers
, edted I h


S: t 1sc\ al ic'klig tilhe
: . (1 points lead
.i he sel c on.ll half, the
1 ;,1i i.ii (pp)ronents a

*i ,c'noed to be most
S '. the H warriors who
tJ o clutch
: tle P'r,,s t break

tie x n,, c lieth given the
'.. ,.-. penetl.ile proved
S i bik shots by
.. + .' ; it .. th e l ilt nline
i d the
i . * ; :*'. 1 2 p ', t s i.+ th e

1'!' I'' l ;:i ,ihli lnn then mlincd ill
our laItax xxter
t '.. ,i t t' I lc`\ 1 WI rs

* t i l- xi x r i; tie bt 'hir nd
/" ' I,' 'i -' I li hi itiltheis

i }! 1, r*,* illti e snatched
.i a d .111,t C ,t tlhe
a \, '. S v, \ l _. Pros:,\ 1, l ayed
et l i P I I . -
.. ,h 5 still :; the


.k 's, et: s the lead
:' : she if "nined
\! :,. .
S. [ .. !, : d, i\;''.t n ; ng ed
xx .I ot t
I i c ilwent

'\ .!if ..... '.'.id )Shoo ting
S : \ fronl
r 55 t \ it ,!!, i s uset s
Sit t, i tul free
SI ::.' i'i i ~t ':wt'!! w as

I: .- .. 1 i ll
:I cd hlI e
t', '* ,<' - t -- rieii111i11
i] ::L' r:! I -'. .1' h ii '' thtrowi s.

1 L* '. i so .ir.ds oi
: . 'l ball toi
!' : lhi Pros to
n, rl on the


N:.


Though diminutive in size, John "Kong" Wallace (35) proved
nearly unstoppable during yesterday's Warriors 64-63 victory over
the Classic Pros.


buzzer as the a .air i. ,
reinained undefeated ini tour
ga rnmes.
Although up against thie
giants of the Pros
McSweeney, Moultrie and
Allan Ingraham the Warriors
we re undaunted and
immediately took a 12-4 lead
early in the first half. This they
increased 20-6 with 12
minutes gone.
Gary Cooper and Wilkinson
substituted at various times
until six-foot llubert Williams
came late in the first half. This
added strength and helped the
Warriors to a 30-16 lead as
they held on 37-24 by half
timle.i
SARtRIOIRS
Ig rb I tp
Ilumes 12 9 I 27
Cooper 4 I I
\Wallace 4 2 3 i3;
S\ ah)\ 3.1 7 2 6
\\iltrins 0 2 3 0
otll! 3 9 ( 0 7
Wilkinison I 4 2 2
I'RO iS
M1i.Swveente 14 30 2 31
,\ Ilgrah.tl.im 2 o10 0 4
Moultire 3 13 0 6
Rodgers I 2 4 2
Johnsin 1 0 2 3
Marshl I I 0 2
I'. Ingraham 5 6 4 II
.ongly 0 I I 0
Ramisey 0 0 0 0
Bain 2 6 0 4
Guard Reggie Derneritte in a
16 for 28 front the field
performance scored a game
high of 34 points and gave
seven assists leading the
Container Saints to a 134-81
victory over Ileastie'"
Supersonics in yesterday 's
game at the C. I. Gibson Gym.
Assisting the Saints to their
fourth consecutive victory in as
many played was the 26 point
seven assist perporniance of
rookie Reuben Knowles.
knowlcs in four games scored a
total of 104 points
With Denmeritte tossing in 17
in the first halt together with
Rahming's 12 it helped the
Saints to a 58-36 lead at half
tnice. And then Kermit "Par"
Rolled turned on the steam and
popped 14 points to go along
with Knowles' 16 and
Demneritte's 17 giving them a
53 point victory.
Mark Clarke topped the
Supersonics with 15 points and
13 rebounds. Rookie David


IN THE SWIM FOR $2,000
11 \\l \S \ir-Sea Lewis 2 10, David Raworth
S \ ion s s the 151. Janice Malcolm 138.75,
S' I lihe i- m F1reeport (;Greg Beiser 137, Hugo Ribot
:' 'c' l tt Sellptenbher 118. lHuck Ryan 94,
2' '200 in Robert Butler 94, Bernard
S" i \SRA.\ Butler 94, Jeffrey Thompson
\ '': itiut'\t still to 82, Kenneth Ilendley 75,
t'abit tihe same Joe Thompson 56, Michael
.. t' t.i l Ine BASRA De Busk 53, Claudio
I .' : ,7..'is i, delighted. ('olucci 44. Carla
I trs,:, particularly (,iamfortone 41, Tracey Jagr
wxilit I- 'i.bk those swimmers 40.50, Kate Treves 34,
i, 1..iJ t or them for the George Graham 22, Caroline
S"' '' t' !hirdl consecutive Driscoll 26 Family Woerner


I i. : i kind ot lo)al
lppo t !iit the whole
S"; ; ., wslicI BASRA
St ci' s ii.i i dal i et
\ lete of i appreciation will
lt' s t to ali ll swimming
tunild-misers their names are
listed below.
I'Peggy Olsen 242. Shawn


(Becky Katherine, Bill, Jim) -
25, other 13, Bahamas
A m u s e m e n t s sports
Association Team (M. Harris)
212.50, Kiwanis of Lucaya
for Woerner family 58,
Dolphin Swim Club (6
swimmers) 103.00, Total:--
2163.75.


('leare popped l -
.AlU IN
1g rb t tpp
Kermit Rolle 7 12 4 IS
Ke n Rti lle 6 t 2 1 1
R Ki \l>es 12 3 3 26
(;. Kinowles 4 5 I 8
C. -ox 5 1 3 10
llemeritte 16 I 34
I lies I1 2
I dgecombe 4 5 I
Ralhming 6 3 12
Mackey I 0 1 2
Cash 0 0 0 0
SU'NI RS iN It'S
Young 5 14 0 9
Clarke 6 13 2 15
AlburN 2 1 2 4
Bethel 5 8 2 10
Scott 6 I10 0 12
Cleare 7 2 3 16
Bullard 4 7 1 8
Demerit I I I I 2
Bain 0 2 o
Dais 2 0 I 4
In other gaines played
yesterday. Prince Hepburn
tossed in 17 points and loinel
Snake EIvans snatched 15
rebounds pacing Strachan's
Autos to a 62-34 victory over
Nassau Schlit/. Helping the
Mechanics to their victory in
four played was a 12 rebounds
10 points contribution from
player/coach Jerome Barney.
Bertie Johnson scored I 1.
(. (Gator topped Schilt/ with
eight points. 11. Romer was
next with six.
Churton I'oote scored 20
points and Ridy Levarity
snatched 16 rebounds and
scored 15 points giving Reef
Basketball Club a 70-54 victor-y
over Rodgers Sport Shop.
Frankie (rice topped Rodgers
with I 1 .


LONDON (AP) Mick
Jones scored his sixth goal of
the season Saturday as Leeds
maintained their dazzling
unbeaten run at the top of the
lnghsh soccer table with a 1-0
win over league champions
Liverpool.
Leeds now have 21 points
four points clear of Burnley
and Derby iwho share second
spot.
Derby, playing their first
game since volatile manager
Brian ('lough resigned, beat
formidable rivals Leicester 2-1
And mercurial George Best.
another headline grabber, came
back to top grade soccer for
the first tine in a year and
helped Manchester United to a
1-0 win over Birminghamt
before an excited 48,937
crowd at Old Trafford.
Another big crowd, 44,911
fans, saw Leeds push on
relentlessly at the top with a
well-deserved, hard-fought win
over Liverpool, who always
prove a tough nut to crack.
The goal, a superb leader by
Jones from a Peter lIorimer
cross in the 33rd minute, was
the highlight of a game which
flowed from end to end.
At Derby, there were
demonstrations b'y the crowd
in support of Clough. The
former manager, who resigned
after a much publicized row
with the club directors, stood
and waved to his fans.
But he left the stadium
moments after the start and
missed Kevin Ilector's


OAKLAND (tAP)
Overcoming dissension, a
murder threat to Reggie
Jackson, and Jon Matlack., the
Oakland A's captured
baseball's world championship
for the second straight Near by
beating the New York Mets ,-2
in the seventh game yesterday.
"We finally did everything
together to win this thing.'"
said Reggie Jackson, the most
valuable player oft the series
who unleasIhed a two-run
homer in a four-run third
inning and made a couple Ioi
splendid fielding plays.
The A's were rocked xwitlh
internal unrest after owner
(Charles 0. Iinley tried to put
ors thie disabled list second
baseman Mike Andrevws, x\ho
made two errors in a game
earlier in tihe series.
I or six gaines, their usually
explosive hats were mufIitled lor
the almost part bI tihe
powt erihouse New S olrk
pitching.

Jackson, probably O akL.ind's
best all-around player, \kas
per orming under hazard usi
conditions. His lile had been
threatened by a letter wvritei,
whio promised to murderr himt if
he played. Jackson was
protected by h BI B t 'ie
throughout the week.
And if all that wasn't
enough. the A's had to face tthe
Mets' most effective pitcher iIn


fourth-minute goal which piut
Derby on the road to victor\.
A crowd of 34.203, tine
biggest of the season at lDerby's
Baseball Ground, saw Leicester
fight back well and the visitors
equalized in the 58th ininute
through Frank H ortlinrlgton.
Four minutes later lohn
McGovern got D)erbn's xwinneri.
George Best, who a yea
ago said he would never plax
soccer again, found his return
to the L'nghsh lFirst Di\ision
hard work and he went off 15
inuinites before the end of their
game against Birnumingham.
But while hIe was on the
pitch he showed the bumper
48,s37 crowd flashes of Ithe old
brilliance that put him among
the world's top stars.
Manchester nimted.'s
goalkeeper Alex Stepney
scored the only goal of tlie
match with a penalty in tile
67th minute after
Birmlinghamn's John Roberts
handled from a corner. It was
Stepney's second penalty goal
of the season.
Jewcastle 2 Chelsea 0
Newcastle striker Malcoln
MacDonald won this game. lie
scored from the penalty spot
after being tripped in the area
in the 64th minute and in the
final 60 seconds he ran onto a
through ball and made it 2-0.
Norwich I Tottenhan I 1
Alan G ilzean headed
Tottenham in front right on
halftime after Norwich had
sustained penalty of pressuIe.
All seemed lost for the home


thlie dvcidt ine 11c latli-k
1 h e i c Ia d t h it l it i
left-handei had gixen 1ip onln
one earned Iruin in toret than
three weeks and none in the
National I cagUe ptlaintb t orI
the world series.
I lhe 's faced tFo SeWvcr in
gainc No. (i Jacksont doiiLled
runs i tlihe tirst and thiii and
later scori d aInother thil t is thel
A 's ti l !ltI .' series iIt tlret
games ,Iap)c wxili a I \ Citoi
Satu d.i\ .
I hat swet i' t slta'e loi
Sunday '\ s de li iin c'ani .i th
pro ,albl\ 0.. () ,pel i an t ,o
the i' iii l). lean. ridini n t!ith
o illittc ilt.'




sen itl I. ;\I B h' rifhl u ltli
stt lr iit f-kItt




catwalk It Asi 1 \I a I 0
lead.
A it cl ,!, ) lj CN b I'\ i Il in Iand
Rus t Siiiiul p .- tilu.ed a \i\o.
Y .'rk i ] i 'tc -;\ II i .' i i in
.I Ie l < i I\ e 1 ie \ ,







i i s rS '0 | I .l' '. -ii
inAI
\ IC 'I' \\ '" ,ll I: i .

Im s i a n tit+' .x(rml,.l+c


JETS TROUNCE CRUSHERS


B3 \ tiA MAS \ meitcall
Loti ball League Chalr pit ,,.
the Nassau Jets, recorded
another convinc'ii g w'il whnxl
thi.y bii!c d the I ls e '" rt b

I' r e port V d:i d ,
afternoon.
I-he I, s 'tI re t' ,, ".
supposed to pla\ lite t'reep- t
Hurricanes. lHowever.Oit rl rlMl
in Freeport i t w'as dlisco\CVered
thal ithe llurricani s haid
expected tie gancm to be
postponed duc to the weather.
Meanwhile the 'rushers had
been unable to fl\ to NassautL
for their 'ixture against the
C'lassie Pros and since the Jets
and (Crusicrrs werc scithieduled toi
play in two weeks time it was
decided that a gai between
the Jets and Crushers would he
played. This means the Jets
will now play tile IIurrlcan,,s t
two weeks.
With the Jets playing into a
strong breeze in the first lall
the Crushers were able to holdd
off the nmachine-like runiiing
backs of the Jets for most ufL
the Ist. quarter and took a 2-0
lead with a safety w'ihell Paul
Johnson was tackled in the end
/one after a bad snap.
Late in the first quarter thei
Jets opened their scoring when
quarterback Jesse Fergusoni
capped a 32 yard drive in 4
plays with a 1 yd. run for a
'1 1).
coing into tlhe second
quarter the Jets soon llmade the
score 12-2 (Cardy \ iFerguson
intercepted ontt the ushers 43
yd. line ald ion a first down onii
the Crushers .39 I erguson hiti


pass
O ne m i; 'tu l but,,', e i p .' i.ti






1 1i,, i c .



i1.'slxxV hu '' '



rm t h I









t i I i i I I i I ! ; i ) t w
o i r llr-.' R, 't' .\ I t i .

, d. ; 0.; I .


I e s r C t % .. ,I' i t 1 :,

elld' /kt i tit







"tl l a i \1 1. thnl .' W hp
scInnm.' e \ It i. i' i'i i .i

ran 34 ds
I a eint 1t I k Is '

It rttttiitl d t 'n, 'tt ix 'h'


team w ith i .c,! .


I t cii 'oli rescue' ii- .1 hit .
Norich
I vc t,,n I ti r-I:ti lI ',\ l
4 1 1 I
tl e ( le:i n' --i
the penllt,, spot m i .:1 |h
ill t l itt I t' t t u \, ; t, \ i l rI \
atter hat l in t ll latI 1 j t C i' t ''t
KeithI \c- tou tHitnt \ c i stil'
bac k an d hot c'l u : d t, c:
but cluldn'i n hie. r thit.I li u h th
ttlicicnl lhoilne dltle'sI
Aisecii, I l ix h it
S2.334 1
Both leWaIs s'ih( et le'vI
attacking thei) s I '. \; s.c '
paid l th |I i ,, i t I i ll i t II
)2nd nllul c 1w r hl1e M | i
I almheit air 40 \ 4 airds ,'!nd
scored the Ipswic.h 11 l ivix ih It

Si \ ipsoi sil\ t cI .l ad p Cit t I iL
the I olldoln chlit' ,e\'cll nli.il -
trm tuni e w h lici he l,.ed ,
cor neir
(t enri\ 0 IW est IIiiL i
I is \\a.. \\ est I ail's It''
win I o tl ie seasl .i. ,ichII \eCis
tlinr i ugh Ito lt iuntlliii(c Ii tlle\
hun John Silc I cs l tl lit, .1
('C de Best piss
i i)pson pl it iln on I l l ira
ipoinist


Seeds
Iurn lc


I ti i it

I t ;


I op Seconul i)tsttin pi, es
MildlesOirough 1 2 7 4 I II
Notts i'ountill 1: 7 2
Britol (.it i2 t I 3


Pros crash to




the Warriors


Oakland are




the champs


,the






!iPl










l1i6


Jones keeps Leeds on top


L.


- ,