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The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03471
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: October 15, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03471

Full Text














SIritiunt


Regtred with Potmate of ham f Nassau and Bahama Islands Leadin Newspaper


VOL. LXX, No. 270 Monday, October 15, 1973. Price: 15 Cents


i i
li .


'I
*' f


PLP CONVENTION OPENS IN HOLIDAY INN'S

INDEPENDENCE HALL AT FREEPORT





MP for GB calls for





'new approach' to party's


UNION STAGE

DEMONSTRATION

AGAINST B.E.C.


FOR 3RD. FIRING
FIFTY MEMBERS of the
Engineering and General
Workers Union staged a
peaceful demonstration outside
the Bahamas Electricity
Corporation's Big Pond power
station at lunch-time today to
protest the dismissal of three
workers and a number of other
complaints against
management.
Ihe union, which represents
BIC( staff, is complaining that
there has been no cost of living
increase since 1971. President
Dudley Williams is asking for a
15 cents per hour raise.
lie claims that Mr. Arthur
: i rth, chief distribution
engineer, has failed "to see life
the Bahamian way.
-At present I am considering
making a complaint to the
Immigration Department," Mr.
Williams said. "Either Mr. Firth
do right or go home."
The union leader also
blanmed Mr. Firth, an
expatriate, for the dismissal of
the third BEC worker.
The union is still trying to
get a revision of the coverage
given BEC workers by
Tra ns-Oceanic Insurance.
"With the present insurance, a
worker would have to lose as
much as a hand before he
could get compensation," Mr.
Williamns said.
A meeting of the union is
scheduled tonight at the
I a\ico Union Hall.
THREAT MADE
Mr. Williams said he is
prepared to carry through his
threat and take Labour
Minister Clifford Darling to
.court unless he makes a
statement quickly on the
F1GWU's attempt to unionize
Bahainasair and Radio
Bahamas both government
operations.
Mr. Darling, who ruled
initially that the union was
exceeding its frame of
reference. subsequently
decided to refer the matter to
the Attorney General for his
Opinion.


& country's


problems


By MIKE LOTHIAN


FREEPORT Grand Bahama M.P., Kendal Nottage, r
Inn to an early high point of enthusiasm this morning
approach" to the party's and the country's problems.


Economic struggle drawn along


class,& not racial,lines--VNSP

THE STRULuJL .or ..conomic equality in the Bahamas, once
a racial issue, has now been drawn along class lines, the Vanguard
Nationalist Socialist Party asserts in its October issue of "The


Vanguard."
I he change h;is come about
as "the black f, ends and
relatives of the PI P bigwigs
join the ranks of the national
hoi -gcous'iec." I lie VanguardI
said in its lead story on labour
unrest.
Lab our's disgruntlcliennt and
the milltant prIcriuncemiints
ol soie union leaders indicate
that the first chinks in the
I'l P's political armour are
hcbinring to appear, the paper
said.
"For i he first ti.' in the six
S';,' ,,f PILP gov, miicnt, large
lnt ll s i i .:. arc
threatening to withdraw their
support from the party. 'Ihe
government is succeeding not
only in alienating youth and
the intelligence of professionals
and university graduates, but
also now the working class.
('1 ASS LINES
"This means that the
struggle for economic equality


is being drawn along class lines
rather than racial lines as the
black friends and relatives of
the PL.P bigwigs join the ranks
of the national bourgeoisie."
The Vanguard said union
leader Dudley Williams
appeared to be voicing the
grow ing conviction oit
tho usands of Bahamian
workers that to be successful
the trade union movement
"must be politicized and a
worker-oriented ideology must
be introduced."
The Vanguard si., .s! .Jd that
a co atil)n of worL.l .o.,ilh
and alienated intelligentsia
could provide the effective
opposition "the PLP so
desperately lacks."
The VNSP said it was
already worker-oriented in its
ideology although today it
mostly commanded the
support of unemployed or
underemployed youth.


Policeman says lan Allen


also threatened his life
By SIDNEY DORSETT
A POLICE officer who claimed he was assaulted by architect
lan Allen at the Princess Margaret Hospital on July 20 told the
magistrate this morning that his life was also threatened by the
accused.
P.('. 862 Adam Mackey so," the officer said. le said as
said he first saw Allen on July a result of Allen pointing his
20 at Rawson Square. Allen hands in his face, the handcuffs
was involved in an accident and were placed on him by P. ('.
"seemed drunk" he said. Lotmore.
Allen, represented by the Allen was allowed to use the
lion. I:ugene Dupuch. Q.('., men's room, P. C. Mackey said.
filed counter-charges of assault He said the handcuffs were
against the officer and traffic removed after he made the
policeman 877 Donald request.
Lotmore. "When he came out he asked
Insp. Hugh Burke closed the me if I'm ready for him to bust
prosecution's case after P.c. my arse and he hit me with his
Mackey's evidence this fist on my right shoulder. lHe
morning. threw another blow at me and
P.C'. Mackey said he took I held him we both fell to
Allen to the hospital in a car the ground" I'. C. Mackey said.
driven by Adrian Mortimer, the He said P.C. Lotmore then
owner of the parked vehicle placed the handcuffs on Allen.
involved in the accident. lie who was lying on the floor.
was taken there because of Helping Allen to his feet, P.C.
police suspicions that he was Mackey said he noticed a little
drunk. cut on his forehead.
Upon their arrival, they met He denied that le kicked,
P.C'. Lotmore at the hospital. pushed or beat Allen anywhere
lie said P.C. Lotmore rode his during the episode at the
motorcycle to the hospital, hospital.
arriving there before them Cross-examined by Mr.
WARNED Dupuch, he said he never saw
P. C'. Mackey said he warned Allen before the accident to
Allen about his bad language. know whether his normal
but he continued, manner of walking was
Others present at the time unsteady.
were Adrian Mortimer, P. C He said that he might have
Lotmore, Randy Davis and heard the obscene word used
David Strachan, he said. When by Allen while at the police
he told Allen he would be compound.
charged with using obscene "If you heard a superior
language, P.C. Mackey said he officer use language like that
"began pointing his hands in would you arrest him?" Mr.
my face saying 'I'm sorry, I'll Dupuch questioned.
behave myself I know I was The constable said ihe
wrong." would tell his superior officer
Allen also said "I'm going to about his language should ie
kill you anyway. If I don't, I'll hear him using such words in
get my boys in Fox Hill to do his speech.
SAnd, he said that any officers
NEW STOCK he heard using such would be
ARRIVING reported if they insisted after
he had asked them to stop. lie
EVERYDAY said that Alien had made
reference to his colour when he
FOR CHRISTMAS used the obscenity. He denied
1I MAIN FU F kicking Allen in the head and
N said a photograph of Allen did
NASSAU- FREEPORT not show the bruise he saw on
the night of the incident.


)rodded delegates to the PLP convention at the Holiday
at its opening session with a rousing call for a "fresh


Mr. Nottage, co-chairman of
the 18th annual PLP
convention, said the party's
decision to meet in conference
outside New Providence for the
first time "demonstrates that
we can and must recognize and
accept change.
"We in the Progressive
Liberal Party n.ay wish to take
the opportunity during this
convention to consider this
question of change. 1
respectfully suggest that we
examine the fundamental
philosophies of our party and
decide whether or not they
satisfy the needs of our time in
their present form.
"And, once our phii>.'pl.,y
is right. twe wish to confirni
that the policies by which we
execute such philosophies are
in keeping with the present day
and not frustrated by
antiquated methods."
Mr. Nottage said the party
must recognize that about half
,he Bahamian population is
under 20 years of age.
NEED YOUNGSTFtRS
"We need to re-model our
party structure in a way to
challenge the minds and the
intellects of the young, for it is
they who must join us, wholly
comnlitted, in order to ensure
the continued survival of this
party. I urge your pursuit of an
atmosphere where the young
not only have respect for the
experience of the old, but also
the old must understand the
ideals and be tolerant with the
impatience of the young.
"In this year of
independence." he declared,
"and in this time of changes.
our party should strive for a
fresh approach and new ways
in which to solve our problems
and satisfy our needs."
liHe went on to say that
because the party constitutes
the present government, the
party must "constantly
generate a spirit of leadership."
"It is this party." he said.
"that must set the pace for the
rest of the country to follow.
It is this party that must set
the example for life in this
country. It is this party that
must forge a plan of salvation
for an independent Bahamas
and set a course of progress."
PRODDING QUIl RIES
tHe posed several questions
he said the convention iust
deal with. "Do we want a
country of lazy people who
refuse to work and prefer to
hustle pennies on the street
corners? Do we want a country
where Bahamians refuse to
make the sacrifice in qualifying
themselves for the better jobs
and positions available to
them?
"Do we want a country
where the young and some old
alike, seem to have no respect


KENDAL NOTTAGE, M.P.
... PLP needs remodelling
at all tor law and order' D)o ie
want a country where people
expect to get all the benefits of
the social services and not pay
for it?"
In keeping with theI
convention's theme: "Freedomi
with Responsibility", Mr.
Nottage told the delegates:
"We expect government to be
responsible. We expect the
business community to ibe
responsible, we expect the
citizens to be responsible, \we
expect religious leaders to be
responsible. We even expect
organized labour to be
responsible."
The latter remark \as an
indirect reference to increasing
agitation for better wages and
working conditions by liabour
unions, and to the onions'
sponsored resolution at the
convention, calling tor
legislation requiring all wiorkcil,
who benefit from i union
activity to pay union dues.
The M.P.'s diversion from
his scheduled function
officially welcoming dlc'gates
to Randnd Bahama dre'\s
repeated bursts of applause' and
loud cheering from thle cro\\i
of about 500 who moments
before Mr. Nottage's address
were quiet and serious, anti
appeared to lack much of tihe
spontaneous enthusiasin
marking other PLP gatherings.
P.M. TONIGHT
The delegates in the llolidat
Inn Independence Hall, gave
Mr. Nottage a standing ovation.
and, after the M.P. had
returned to his seat, demanded
he rise a second time for
another burst of applause.
Prime Minister Lynden
Pindling is to deliver his
keynote address to the
convention at 8 o'clock
tonight.
The speech will be broadcast
over Radio Bahamas. A speech
tomorrow night by Labour
Minister ('lifford L. Darling on
industrial relations is also to be
broadcast live.
The convention continues
until Saturday.


--e-
, '* .ft:


NO, IT'S NOT A JITNEY BEING LAUNCHED
THREE PASSENGERS in this Island Jitney bus narrowly escaped injury when the bus
ran overboard off Woodes Rogers Walk Saturday afternoon. Two weeks ago another
vehicle with one passenger also went off the unprotected road-way into the sea, but it-
driver managed to escape. The various jitneys operating in Nassau use Woodes Rogers as
their home base, when not on the road. It has been suggested that a higher abutment on
the Wharf could prevent such disasters. (Photo: Philip Symonette).



Wholesaler challenges union leader's



claim of overpricing food items

FOOD WHOLESALER EMMETT PRITCHARD today challenged ui.ion leader Dudley Williams'


claim of over-pricing and said
flour at a loss.
Mr Pritchard told The
Tribune last week that his fiim
had about 2,800 bales of flour
in stock, but lie could not sell
it at a loss.
A strongly-worded
statement from Mr. Williams
this morning condemned Mr.
Pritchard and other merchants
for refusing to sell essential
food items to the Bahamian
public.
He said the "rich Bay Street
Boys" and the "new rich
Square Deal cliques" were
plundering the Bahamian
people.
Finance Minister Arthur
lianna had the power to stop
this, but did not want to use it,
Mr. Williamis declaltd. "The
Bay Street Boys are still ruling
this country by over-charging
the buying public." he said
NO MF N ION
"Mr. Pritchard does not
mention the years when there
was no price control and he
and the other merchants did as
they wished under the UBP.
Given now under the PI'., they
are getting away with murder.
"This government allows
\lilo Butler & Sons to sell
above the controlled level of
prices. Many others besides this
firm are doing th' same. but
still government hires only two
men to patrol all of these shops
in Nassau."
This was not sensible and
only a token gesture, Mr
Williams insisted,
He said price control would
never work the way it was
being carried out because the
merchants were themselves on
the Price controll board "You
cannot expect them to really
enforce price control over
themselves."
This morning Mr. Pritchard
produced his A\ugust 2I
invoices for Robin lHood flout
showing that landed costs on
the 50 lb. bale oti flour was
some S2 higher than the fixed
price of S7.42 and S2.20
higher than it wsas when the
last shipment was received,
The 100 lb. bale shows a
landed cost of S15.5t but the
selling price is Iixed by the
Prices C'omn mission at S 12 0.
import costs on the bale ha\e
iuned S4. 6 since the last


FNM leader slams 'fat cats' of PLP


WITHt Till: C('ONOMY in
recession, the government
should be prepared to alleviate
unemployment through the
funding of public works.
Instead, it has chosen to slap
on added taxes because it w\as
too broke to do otherwise,
Opposition Leader Kendal
Isaacs charged last week.
Mr. Isaacs. one of four
speakers at the FNM's first
post-election meeting,
criticized the government for
its policy of taxation at a time
when it should he doing its
best to keep the economy
moving.
"In a well-run economy
the government pu.ss :.i: '
moneys when things are good.
When there is mass


unemployment that's lwhen it
is time for the government to,
come forward with public
works and pay for them from
savings made when times were
good."
But the government was
broke, Mr. Isaacs declared, and
instead of public works it had
slapped on taxation at a time
when the people should be
relieved of taxes.
"We know that after the
election this state of affairs
changed for one or two
supporters of the PLP in the
midst of poverty, want and
unemployment. A number (if
fat cats are driving around in
Rolls Royces, flying jets,
opening businesses and buying
houses for millionaires to live


iln.
"There mIust be something
wrong," declared the 1 \\1
leader. "that they are living
off the fat of the land while 9 ,
per cent of the people are
scratching for a living."
The Bahamas, he said, had
always regarded itself as unique
and never compared itself to its
neighbours to the south. "But
now we ourselves are being
compared with these other
places by outsiders and we too
are getting into the habit oft
doing this and saying things
aren't as bad here ... something
which never happened before.
This, "Mr. Isaacs declared, "is
indicative of the government's
incompetence."


he was convinced a court would uphold his decision not to sell


sliu Ipment .
"Does Mr. Williams really
expect us to seii at a loss l' r
IPrtchal dKi .isk'd
Ill LI) IP
Ie Ivwondered il ai\ ouri
would uphold a simiation suol 1
as this. As a result o I tie
( t)om mission, s's delay i in
answering his letter to their .
Mr. Pritchard said his firm had
held up further shipments until
such tinc as new selling prices
wcr.c approved.
Before the 2.800-hale
shipment arrsed on \ugtust 30,
MIr PnI-tchard wrotc tIhe


,

--




a-


C('rommissiont on At.\!iust 24
advising tha t it was due.
!Ie lpo itii' odtil i j prices
were J!letirc nl altllti 'c ." :;
thtoc c riiquested n \Agiust 7
andt 14. ani.! h!hop] fu;llv"" Ithi se
wouldI no\i lastI un lil ihe end ot
thIs l,\ ar
MIr Pl)r tc h.ird noted.
howt v x r, tliat thlie prices.
quoted i; the ('omii-..ie!
wese .ile it re d r1it tromn the
August I coiitrotlled price.
Incildecd \\loh lhis letter was
a com11plt't1'tl d 'rc'cs ( '''IFniiissltnI
frott '-' i, t' I tt'.itakdowsn ofl
cost'. r the .


BAMAMAS ELECTRICITY
CORPORAL ION
ITG POND


B.E.C. workers demonstrating.


BASRA COURSE

FOR YOUNG BOYS

B.\HlAMAS :\Air kit Rescue
A sso'ia tion is to s.irt a
training course tor bo\
hbrtween the agcs ot 14 to lIt
ears.
I hc l iii pist t of the course is
to leach l oun ttrl b(s hitow to
handle hbats breh larc aindl


also htIpec to incide iL' lectures
itn 1 ist Aid and D iviIn'.
It is puioposed that on
completion of the course
cadets will forn part of tlhe
regulate boat crews and also
,isist the (Control Officers in
search and rescue operations.
As part oft the training
course the BASRA boat
"Rotairia"m will start patrols
of the beaches around New
Providence and Rose Island on
Saturday evenings to assist any
boats which imay encounter
engine otr other problems.
Persons wishing to join this
C.'ourTc are asked to write to
BASRA. c;o P. 0. Box N4205.
giving their names and where
they can be contacted so that a
meeting can be arranged to
start the course.


Workers Council to press for


wage increases to combat


rise in the cost of living


I11ll I \II \l IS Workkers
("-t'Il il an!,tli.'t't [odad that
it il;t'ilts tot push ahead flor
a It i'icre.iC's in boti the pub-
hic and pInl\ I l c' sc t
In I n I11 Ici r Dudley
Wiltiams. spokesman to r the
(ot, 'cl sl a ii thie iti Vl\ 1ay his
trgianal; tiot \\l illd withdraw
its plan wias it covernlment
ordc ied tle mllerchants to
frc/eee uall price increases

I ver n moiunth, he said. the
dollar oil I Baha nmian workers
xwas being eroded by the
increase in living costs.
I lie BWC' refrained from
taking antm action to date to let
the giovernlment revise its
po,,iltion and to let others
inediate on the BWC's behalf.
However the workers had been
too patient with the employers
and the government on the
question of wages, and many
unions had let the workers
down.
Issuing a call to all workers
to join the BWC, Mr. Williams


said the Council's fight was
against the "greedy merchants"
as well as the government
which refused to really enforce
Price Control.
"Government, through the
Finance Ministry, allows the
shops to raise prices all the
time, but refuses to allow the
workers to get wage increases,"
he said.
This was an allusion to
Finance Minister Arthur
Hanna's recent statement that
government could not
encourage the private sector to
increase wages as it might be
caught in the same "trap".


ANNU1 II


_ ______ L-I- '


I'DUDLE'S
COR. ROSETTA ST
MT R O Y A L AVE .

SYLVANIA TV's
P.O. BOX S50- PHONE 2-1306/2-3237


EDDIE'S DEPT. STORE
f AST 01 STOP-N-SIHOP, BAY STREET

BIG SALE
POLYESTER CLOTH $4.- $5.
TERYLENE & MOHAIR $4.00


L -- --L- --- ---- --


b hp


I














Monday, October 15, 197,


DESPITE EGYPTIAN CLAIMS IN SINAI


ISRAELI TANK COMMANDER KILLED
TEL AVIV (AP) Israel's military command announced Sunday night
that 656 Israeli soldiers have been killed in action in the first eight days of
the Middle East war. In the six-day war of June 1967 the total number of
Israeli dead was given as 803.
Among the victims listed in the latest fighting was Maj. Gen. Abraham
Mendler, commander of the Israeli armoured corps on the southern front.
Sunday night's military communique said the army had notified the
families of the dead soldiers earlier in the day, as well as the families of
Israelis captured by the Arabs. Ihe number of POWs was not disclosed.
The command said there was heavy fighting along both war fronts and
that its forces fought off a major Egyptian offensive in the Sinai desert,
destroying more than 200 Egyptian tanks. (* SEE STORIES THIS PAGEI-).
ISRAELI GUNS SHELL DAMASCUS
[EL AVIV (AP) Israel's military command reported late Saturday
that "Israeli defense force guns tonight shelled military targets near
Damascus" the first official confirmation that Israeli invasion forces
were virtually in artillery range ot the Syrian capital.
IRAQ THROWS ALL ITS FORCES INTO ISRAELI WAR
BEIRUT. LEBANON (A;') President Ahmed Htassan al-Bakr ol Iraq
said Sunday his country has thrown its "entire military potential" iin th
Arab war against Israel. In a newspaper interview broadcast by the
state-controlled Baghdad Radio, Bakr also said the situation of Syrian and
Iraqi forces on Israel's northern front was good.
"I anm confident of the ability of Syrian and Iraqi forces to take ion
Israel," Bakr added.
He did not make clear whether the "entire military potential" meant the
whole of Iraq's 90,000-man army and 224 combat plane air force.
Western military sources estimated that Iraq has selt 1,800 troops, 200
tanks and two squadrons of MI( 2 I jet fighters to Syria.
Bakr warned the United States that renewed arms supplies to Israel
would "hurt the Arabs much less than America's vast oil and economic
interests in the Arab world."
1 he United States has had no diplomatic relations with Ir:ia since the
1967 Middle East ssar.
Bakr spoke in an interview with Sudan's official news agency. It was
simultaneously broadcast in Baghdad and Khartoum.
EGYPT CLAIMS DESTROYING 150 ISRAELI TANKS
BEIRUT (AP) An Egyptian military communique claims Egyptian
tanks, supported by jet fighters, have destroyed 150 Israeli tanks in a
day-long battle. Israel claimed 200 Egyptian tanks were destroyed. Ihe
Cairo communique saws I.gyptian forces were able toi seize new territory
along the entire Sue/ battle line.
The communique also says the Egyptian air force staged a heavs
bombardment of Israeli anti-tank missile positions which have prevented
Egyptian forces from advancing. On the Syrian front, Syria vowed to
continue fighting until Israel withdraws unconditionally from occupied
Arab lands taken in l0s7. life Syrian government newspaper isucd .a
special edition to dcni Israeli long-range artillery has shelled Damascus. It
says not even ione Israch artillery shell has been fired even \within ten miles
of the capital.
EGYPTIANS USING RUSSIAN STRATEGY
Il AVIV (\I') An Israeli general tonight said the huge fgyptian
offensive launched in Sinai Sunday was held to within three to seven
kilometers from the Suez C'anal or within two to four miles. That
everything the -gyptians are doing militarily is within the framework of
Russian military doctrine.
General Narkis said they tried tt penetrate Israeli defenses around I tc
('anal today and tailed. generall N arkis said he believed the tide already has
been turned even before today. Ihe Israeli general said the tide turned
immediately after the failure of the first Egyptian advance last week.

VICE PRESIDENT DESIGNATE'S HOPES ON WAR
\VAS1INt; IoN I \P) Vice- President-designate Gerald lord has
expressed hope we get a. military solution quickly in the Middlle tast war.
F1ord says you idn't gt a diplomatic solution until there's i military
solution.
Sior1 spoke to newsmenn after white House worship services. I'ord was
briefed on the Middle Fast vesterda.l by President Nixon and .Secretary of
State Henry Kissinger.
Asked about U-S aidl to Israel, F ord said we are certainly meeting tully
all commitments in the on-going proigramme. And lie described the
programme as very substantial. He said it depends on circumstances \\ hcither
there will be an extension.

(CO\11ON MARKET ISSUES CEASEFIRE APPEAL
i PARIS (AP) The nine member countries of the turopean Common
Market issued a joint appeal Saturday night for a cease-fire in the Middle
East.
A joint communique said a cease-fire should open the way to "genuine
negotiations". The nine countries are France, Belgium. the Netherlands,
Luxembourg, West Germany. Italy, Britain, Ireland and Denmark.
BRITAIN CRITICIZED BY ISRAEL
TEL AVIV (Al') A prominent Israeli politician cabled British Prime
Minister -Edw\ard Heath Saturday with a protest against Britain's embargo
on sending arms to the Middle I ast. He called it "the blackest chapter in
the relations between our countries."
Menahem Begin. leader of the right ingi opposition I.ikud Bloc. told
Heath he was questioning British policy "at a fateful time when our youth
is spilling its blood in the face ot an enemy heavily armed by the
Communist empire."
Begin, \iwo headed a Jewish underground resistance organization during
the British mandate over Ialestine, recalled Ileath's visit here fiCe ,ears ago
and the emphasis he put then on his understanding of Israel's security
problems.
"Is an embargo what vou mean hi understanding Israel's securitN
problems'" Begin asked.
I'ie Israelis complain that the ritish halt on all Mideast arms shipments
acts more unfairly against Israel then her Arahb hIes
COMAY APPEALS FOR END TO CONFLICT
LONION (AP) Israel's ambassador to Britain. Micha,.l Coimas has
appealed for an end of the Mid-East conflict and a peaceful settlement.
Speaking to a crowd of tenthousand in London's lrafalger Square. Comas
said British Jews should press their government to move the armed
confrontation to the conference table.
Comay's appeal was one of the most direct by a high Israeli official since
the fighting began October sixth. Yesterday, Israeli Premier c;olda Meir
said Israel would consider most seriously an, A"rab call for a cease-fire. ut
she said Israel will not permit itself to be destroyed.
AMIN AND HUSSEIN DISCUSS MID-EAST WAR
AMMAN, JORDAN (A1') Uganda president Idi Amin arrived in
Amman Sunday where he was received hy King Hussein, Jordanian
television announced.
Amin. who discussed with the King the current Middle Iast war arrived
from Baghdad where earlier in the das hl hhad talks with Iraqi president
Hassan el Bakr on the progress of the war
EBAN APPELAS FOR U.S. SUPPORT
NEW YORK (AP') foreign Minister Abba -Eban of Israel appealed ,i,
Sunday for American support in Israel's war with the Arab states.
"Israel wants your love and your solidarst ." he told a rally of ablojt
35.000 cheering sympathizers in City Ilall Park.
As the rally drew to a close, pro Arab and pro-Israeli youths gathered a
few blocks away there were about 400 Israeli supporters and 250 cheering
for the Arabs confined behind police barriers at some distance from the
main crowd.
At least a dozen youths were led awav in handcuffs.





NEW DODGE 'AENGER'


STATION


I I WAGONS I


LAST ISRAELI


STRONGHOLD ON


SUEZ CANAL


SURRENDERS
ON THE EAST BANK OF
THE SUEZ CANAL, EGYPT
(AP) -- The last Israeli
strongpoints on the eastern
bank of the Suez Canal
surrendered Saturday and 37
tired and bedraggled Israeli
troops were paddled in
dinghies across the waterway
to capitivty.
Artillery battles raged in the
Sinai desert as the Israelis
brought out their wounded
after being holed up in a
canal-side fortress for eight
days.
As the tricky surrender
operation took place, under
supervision of a Red Cross
official, Israelis and Egyptian
missile, believed to be a Sam 6,
hit an Israeli jet overhead and
the plane disintergrate in a ball
of fire and smoke.
Occasionally there were
huge explosions about two
miles away as the Egyptians
blew up points of the Israeli
Bar-Lev line with captured
Israeli explosives.
"They will never use it
again," an Egyptian colonel
said.
The colonel said that the
Israelis had insisted they would
only surrender under the
supervision of the Red Cross.
Roland DueC, of Valais,
Switzerland, a Red Cross
official, supervised the
surrender, crossing the (anal
and hoisting the Red Cross flag
over the Israeli position before
the Israelis produced a white
sheet signifying their surrender.
The first two Israelis to be
paddled across to the west
bank were the 23-year-old
commander, a lieutenant with
curly long hair, dark glasses
and chewing gun. and the unit
doctor.
The Egyptian Brigadier
General in charge of the
operation was not pleased with
the attitude of the Israeli
commander, who slouched
with both hands on his hips.
"Please stand to attention,"
the General said in English.
5 BODIES
The lieutnenat immediately'
complied. Among the
occupants of the bunker were
15 wounded and five bodies.
Dr Nahorn Valban of Tel Aviv
said.
The Israelis carried their
wounded, with some difficulty,
down the steep 30-yard-high
embankment in front of their
position and placed them in an
1:gyptian barge which brought
them to the west bank.
A pretty Egyptian nurse
named Eathma gave a drink of
water to each of the Israelis
who swallowed it thirstily.
In the distance, heavy
artillery kept up a steady
rumble and clouds of white
and dark smoke trailed lazily
across the desert.
It sounded as if the firing
was about 20 miles from our
position at Port Tewfik at the
extreme southern end of the
Suez C('anal.
Egyptian troops helped the
wounded ashore.
One Israeli soldier could not
walk. Both arms, with
compound fractures, were
extended stiffly in front of him
on splints, and he had a ghastly
wound in his throat which had
a crude dressing and from
which blood was seeping. He
was carried away on a
stretcher.
When the missile hit the
Israeli aircraft, the Egyptian
troops burst into shouts of
"Allah Akhbar" (Allah is
Great).
"It is a Phantom," one
Egyptian officer said. But there


was no way of telling the type
of aircraft.
As they were blowing up
bunkers of the Bar-Lev line, an
Egyptian colonel said, "we
made this canal for ships. I
hope we see them along here
again some time."
EMBARRASSMENT
Some of the Egyptian
troops, carried away with the
emotion of finally liberating
this last stronghold, grabbed
handfuls of sand and put it in
their mouths. Others kissed the
ground.
It was an extraordinary
scene, and foreign newsmen
stood aside watching with
embarrassment as an Egyptian
major wept.
As the scene quieted down,
we were able to inspect the
labyrinth of trenches and
bunkers that had enabled the
Israelis to hold in the
stronghold for eight days.
The Egyptians, perhaps
wisely, had decided to bypass
the fortress and surround it.


Israelis throw back



big tank forces after



fierce 7-hour battle
By Harry Dunphy
BEIRUT (AP) Israel reported that its forces on the Suez
Canal front repulsed a new attack by Egyptian tank forces that
made a seven-hour attack Sunday.


The Egyptians claimed
advances in the battle Sunday,
with 150 Israeli tanks and 20
planes knocked out. But the
Israelis said they gave no
ground, and the Egyptians lost
more than 200 tanks and 15
planes.
On the northern front of the
Arab-Israeli war, now in its
10th day, Syrian shelling
slowed the Israeli advance on
Damascus, and the Israeli tanks
were reported 21 miles from
the Syrian capital.
Correspondents with the
Israeli forces reported that
long-range Syrian guns opened
up whenever the armoured
columns attempted to advance.
The Israeli military
command also reported
another naval exploit. It said
its naval patrol boats sank 14
"armed fishing type" boats in
the harbour of Ras Gharib, on
the Gulf of Suez during the
night. Israel said the harbour,
20 miles across the gulf from
Israeli forces on the Sinai
peninsula, was an Egyptian
commando base.
Otherwise, the Israeli
command said, it was a quiet
night on both the Syrian and
Egyptian fronts.
The Egyptian military
command said the fighting
Sunday along the 102-mile
Sinai front "raged with utmost
violence and savagery." Egypt
said its forces made territorial
gains all along the line.
NO EVIDENCE
But in Tel Aviv, the Israeli
command claimed Egyptian
armoured units failed to
penetrate the Israeli defense
line which it said was still
about 2'2 miles inland from the
Suez Canal. Associated Press
correspondent Paul Kohn
reported from the front that he
saw no evidence that the
Israelis gave up ground.
The Israeli command
announced Sunday that Israel
had lost 656 soldiers in the
first eight days of fighting: the
state radio gave an unofficial
figure of 2,000 wounded. An
Egyptian spokesman claimed in
Cairo that Israeli casualties
were much higher. Neither
Syria nor Egypt has given
casualty figures.
Egypt reported intense air
battles over the northern Nile
Delta Sunday and claimed 15
Israeli planes had been shot
down there.Israel announced
that its planes had bombed
three air bases 50 to 100 miles
north of Cairo.
The Israeli tanks punching
into Syria moved up to the
town of Sasa, 21 miles
southwest of the capital. The
Israeli command claimed that
its artillery was shelling the
outskirts of Damascus, but AP
special correspondent Hugh A.
Mulligan reported from outside
Sasa that the Syrians' 130mm
Soviet guns were zeroing in on
the dusty road to the capital.
'MURDEROUS FIRE'
"Keeping the Israeli
spearhead going is difficult
because of murderous Syrian
artillery fire," he said. "The
Israelis are not having much
success in knocking out these
long-range Soviet guns firing
from the front and flanks."
Israeli fighters were reported
attacking the Syrian batteries,
but they were defended by
Soviet surface-to-air missiles.
"The difference this time
around is that the Syrians have
the sophisticated weaponry
and they know how to use it."
an Israeli surgeon told Mulligan
I --------


at a field hospital.
A Syrian communique
claimed the Israelis had been
beaten back on three fronts. It
said Syrian forces destroyed 65
tanks, three artillery batteries
and a number of vehicles and
anti-tank batteries and shot
down five Israeli jets during
Sunday's fighting.
Cairo claimed its armour
struck out against the Israeli
defenders at dawn and
recaptured more of the
occupied peninsula behind
Egyptian warplanes bombing
Israeli positions all along the
front.
"Fighting is still raging with
heavy violence and savagery all
along the front inside Sinai
between our armoured and
mechanized forces advancing
east and the enemy forces
trying to stop them," an
Egyptian communique said
Sunday.
Tel Aviv claimed its jets and
tanks "are inflicting heavy
losses on the enemy and his
armoured forces." Israeli
spokesmen said the Egyptian
advance was stopped short and
the Egyptian tanks were forced
to return to their lines.
CRITICAL PHASE
"In the South we have
entered into a critical phase of
the war," said retired Gen. Haim
Herzog, the Israeli state radio's
top war commentator. "But it
is not yet clear whether this is
Egypt's major offensive."
Israel protested to France
that French-built Mirage jets
were being used in Egyptian
attacks on Israeli targets.
Cairo's air arsenal and author-
itatively reported to contain no
Mirages before the war.
Libya, which has agreed to
merge with Egypt, has
purchased a number of the
French jets from Paris. Israel
has complained they might be
used against the Jewish state
despite a French embargo on
arms sales to countries directly
involved in the Middle East
conflict.
The French foreign
minister in Paris declined
comment, but officials
privately said they were
skeptical of the Israeli charge.
Syrian communiques
reported naval battles with
Israeli boats in the
Mediterranean and said the
Syrians sank two Israeli
gunboats. They made no
mention of the Tel Aviv claims
that Israel's U.S.-built 175 mm
cannons with a 20-mile range
blasted targets near Damascus.
Syrian information minister
George Saddikni said the
Syrians were holding firm. He
said Tel Aviv's claim Saturday
that the Iraqi force aiding Syria
had been wiped out was untrue
and part of an Israeli war of
nerves.


BRITISH CONSUL


SAFE FROM

MEXICAN KIDNAP
GUADALAJARA, MEXICO
OCT. 15 (AP) Honorary
British consul Dr. Anthony
Duncan Williams was safe at
home Monday after four days
in the hands of kidnappers
while police intensified the
search for the other victim of
the double kidnapping.
Williams, 47, was freed
unharmed at 8:15 p.m. CST
(9:15 EST) Sunday, two days
after the Mexican government
refused to meet a demand by
the kidnappers to release 51
prisoners, give them $200,000
and fly them to North Korea in
exchange for the lives of the
two men.
Although brothers of the
two men offered to pay the
ransom money and got
government agreement to let
the kidnappers leave the
country, Williams' brother Luis
Enrique said "no ransom was
paid". He added no other
"special deal" was made for
the consul's release and it came
as a surprise.
The brother of the wealthy
industrialist Fernandc
Aranguren, 36, said he would
stand by the offer both
brothers made over radio and
television before the consul's
release.
Meanwhile 23 police crusiers
with about 100 men were sent
from Mexico City Sunday to
reinforce federal, state and
municipal forces here.
Officially 400 army troops and
600 policemen were
participating in the search for
Aranguren and the kidnappers.
WIFE'S HEART ATTACK
By early Monday, Williams'
wife, Maria de la Luz, still was
unaware of her husband's
release. She suffered a heart
attack Saturday after being
hospitalized for a nervous
breakdown and was under
sedation in "delicate"
condition, Luis Enriuie
Williams said.
Although the consul's
brother said his health was "a
little mediocre," the consul
told the newsmen in a brief
appearance at the door to his
home, "I feel great."
The consul was brought,
masked, in a taxi with two
other men. Police have not
made any arrests.
Williams said the consul told
him he was not held with
Aranguren and only learned
Wednesday he was kidnapped
at the same time in a different
part of the city when
kidnappers allowed him to
listen to a radio broadcast.
Williams was taken from his
home by five armed youths
while Aranguren was abducted
from his car.
The government's firm
policy already met with praise
from one government official.
A Jalisco state government
spokesman said "this proves
that the firm attitude of the
government has been successful
and appropriate."
In May the government
released 30 prisoners and flew
them to Cuba in exchange for
U.S. Consul General in
Guadalajara Terance G.
Leonhardy. Two years ago line
were exchanged


SEAMAN RESCUED FROM SUNKEN BOAT


CALAIS, FRANCE (AP) -
French navy frogman pulled a young
seaman unhurt from a sui.ken
dredger early Sunday after a
three-day rescue operation in which
explosives were used to cut through
the hull.
They said efforts would continue
to free five other men believed still
trapped in the sunken Cap de la
Hague. Two other men were
rescued Thursday and two others
were found dead.
The ship carried a crew of 15,
and the fate of the remaining crew
members was not known.
The rescued seaman, engineer's
mate Lionel Firard, 24, said he
heard the rescue work in progress
and never lost hope during his three
days in a small air pocket in the
flooded pump chamber.
"Only the last two hours were
-- ----- -- ----


very hard," he said. "I held out
during the first two days without
difficulty, although I had nothing
to eat or drink. But on Saturday I
felt I couldn't bear it any longer. In
desperation I drank sea water."
Saturday evening he finally took
some warm milk, floated to him in
a waterproof container.
He was welcomed by his wife
and parents when he landed in
Calais harbour. Relatives of some of
the missing men stood weeping
nearby.


__________________


Ford admits aiding lobbyist


over doctor's immigration
WASHINGTON (AP) Vice President-designate Gerald R.
Ford says the only help he ever gave a Washington lobbyist
claiming numerous favours was to assist a Dutch doctor win
immigration to teach at Harvard University.
Ford has said lobbyist the most honest Congressmen
Robert N. Winter-Berger's he knows."
allegations in a book are one of Winter-Berger said in the
two incidents in his 25-year book that "each favour Ford
House career that might raise did for me involved a
questions at his confirmation contribution by my client, but
hearings. He indicated he can nothing directly to Ford."
answer them all. Ford told a news conference
Ford planned to leave Saturday the only two
Washington Sunday for a brief incidents in his House career
visit with a son, Jack, in Logan, that he believes "will be gone
Utah, and then three into and ought to be gone
appearances Monday in into" at confirmation hearings
Portland, Ore. are the Winter-Berger
He is to address the Portland allegations and a 1970
Republican country club at a Congressional campaign
breakfast, hold a news contribution report.
conference, and speak to a He acknowledged that
convention of the American $11,500 was not included in
Association of Retail Druggists. his signed declaration to the
Lobbyist Winter-Berger's House clerk of all
book, "The Washington contributions to his campaign
pay-off," made allegations because he endorsed the
about a number of Washington contributions to the
politicians. Repu blican National
Ford commented on the Congressional Committee for
allegation Saturday night while other Republicans' campaigns.
flying back to Washington, Officials of the committee
from a visit to Cedar Springs, later turned $12,233 back to
Mich.. in his congressional Ford's campaign to pay
district, campaign debts.
lie said his staff looked for Prospects for nationality
files on all dealings with televised confirmation hearings
Winter-Berger and found only on Ford's vice presidential
one on securing approval of nomination have emerged in
immigration status for the both the House and Senate.
Dutch doctor to teach at House judiciary committee
Harvard medical school, chairman Peter W. Rodino Jr.,
"They knew there are a lot (D-N.J.) said committee
of Dutch in my district and hearings can begin in about
they asked me to help," Ford two weeks and live television
said. "His (the doctor's) case coverage will be permitted.
had merit, so I did. I don't I*[fi A
know what his relationship Doesn't buy Agnew as
with Mr. Winter-Berger was." 'heroic,self-sacrificing'
Aides said Ford helped the s
doctor change his status from LOS ANGELES (AP)
that of a visitor doing research Democratic national chairman
in New York to that of a Robert Strauss said Sunday he does
permanent immigrant. not consider Spiro T. Agnew a
"heroic, self-sacrificing man" who
ANDERSON'S CHARGF resigned as Vice President merely
Columnist Jack Anderson for the good of the nation.
said in July 1972 that Ford Strauss said it wasn't the national
also told him the immigration interest which led Agnew to resign
S hi deaunder the negotiations that
case was his only dealing with included a promise he would not he
Winter-Berger but Anderson imprisoned for income tax evasion.
said he had "uncovered several Strauss commented in an
cases in which Ford went to interview during an appearance at
bat for Winter-Berger's the state democratic conference.
clint r Strauss said he is sympathetic
clients." with Agnew's, personal plight, but
But the Washington Post added: "' refuse to kuy this posture %
quoted Grand Rapids, Mich.. they are trying to put him in as this
Democratic chairman A. brave, heroic, self-sacrificing man
who resigned in the nation's
Robert Kleiner as saying interest."
Democrats made little use of Sen. John V. Tunney (D-Calif.)
the Winter-Berger allegations addressing delegates Saturday night
said impeachment proceedings
against Ford because the should be brought against President
lobbyist indicated at the end Nixon if the U.S. Supreme Court
that "he considers Jerry one of orders him to release the Watergate
ta es and he refuses.


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a2ueen' College



Applications are invited from suitably qualified and
experienced persons for the post of SECRETARY TO
HEAD MASTER OF THE PRIMARY SCHOOL.

In addition to qualifications in shorthand and typing the
person appointed must have qualities for dealing with
children, parents and members of the public in a
sympathetic but decisive manner.

The appointment is of a highly responsible nature. The
salary payable may not compare with that paid to
Secretaries in other similar appointments but the work can
afford a high degree of worthwhile satisfaction.

Applications in writing giving full information of
qualifications and experience together with the names of
two persons to whom reference can be made, should be
addressed as early as possible to The Principal Queen's
College P. 0. Box N127, Nassau.


_ ______ ______ _~_ ___ __I.


I -


lthe Eribttm












Monday, October 15, 1973.


rbPr tribune
NvuLus ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTM
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903 1914
SIR ETIENNE DIJPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt.. LL.D.
Publisher/Editor 1917-1972
Contributing Editor 1972 -
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972-
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

EDITORIAL

Story of Bahamas tourism


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
(This is the fifth and final article I am writing on the
development of tourism and investment in the Bahamas.)

THIS SERIES was inspired by an envelope I received through
the mail from an anonymous sender.
The envelope contained a copy of the Sunday supplement of
the Oakland Tribune which carried on its front page a picture of
Mrs. L.O. Pindling presenting the American "Woman of the Year"
award to Mrs. Jewel Lafontante, coloured Deputy Solicitor
General of the U.S.
This supplement was sent to someone in Nassau who sent it to
me with an unsigned note which read: "Sir Etienne ... thought
you might be interested!"
The person in the U.S. who sent the supplement to a friend in
Nassau also wrote a letter.
The person who sent it to me attached a clipping from the
letter which read: "Just had to send you the Oakland Sunday
supplement. Nassau is perhaps no longer fashionable in the elite
San Francisco society but a big hit in the main black Oakland
outpost."
I will conclude this series today by giving you just a few
flash-backs of incidents to focus attention on the present trend in
the Bahamas.

When the U.B.P. was thrown out of office in January 1967 Sir
Stafford Sands, Minister of Finance and Tourism, was reaching
for his target of one million tourists a year. lie was already near
that figure and expected to cross the line that year when the
U.B.P. lost control of the government.
In one of my articles I told you how Stafford Sands turned
the Bahamas from a short winter season resort into a year round
resort, thereby removing the label of "quality" from the entrance
gates to the Bahamas.
But still he exercised some discretion as to the level from
which he drew business for the islands. There was still enough
standard left to accommodate both quality and mass tourism.
When the P.L.P. took over they continued to press for mass
tourism and they reached the one million objective in a short
time.
Having passed that mark they set their sights for still higher
figures and in the process went out to drag all and sundry into the
islands.
This may have been fine for them because it was getting down
to their level. But, as a result, they spent a lot of public money to
attract thousands of people who had no money to spend.
****************
Last summer one of the major hotels was full. The manager of
this hotel told a member of my staff that this was a new
experience for him because although he had a full house, the
hotel was losing money!
Hotels make their money in their restaurants
and bars. The new type of tourists could not afford to
use these facilities and so they went out and bought chicken in
the basket and a bottle of rum and celebrated in their rooms. And
they left chicken bones and bottles strewn all over the beds and
floor when they checked out.
1 am told that the rooms in the hotels were left in shocking
condition after the Independence celebrations.
I have this information on the highest authorityy but don't be
surprised if the government pressures people in the hotel industry
to deny this report.
You will remember that they did this once before when The
Tribune published statements by investors, made to the present
editor of this newspaper, when the P.L.P. took over the
government in 1967.
This condition, plus the fact that the attitude of our people has
changed towards the guests within their gates....plus all the
oppressive measures instituted by the P.L.P. government....left
little room for quality tourists to feel at home in tile
islands....Nassau in particular.
Whether or not the government tries to discredit this
information they will find it difficult to impress the public
because Minister of Tourism Clement Maynard himself recognizes
that something serious has gone wrong and a committee has been
appointed to try and discover what is crippling the hotel industry.
He has also declared that they must endeavour to bring
"quality tourists" back to the islands. These were his own
words...."quality tourists". By "quality" he meant monied
tourists.
Everyone in tile industry knows the reason....which is,
inefficient service as a result of an irrational immigration policy,


lowering of standards everywhere and in everything, and a feeling
of insecurity in an island where discipline and respect for honest
achievement have been destroyed. All the standards are so low
that it is an insult to be classified as a "great Bahamian" in the
Bahamas today. I resented the recent action by ZNS in including
my name in their list of "great Bahamians".
***************
The same thing has happened to the construction industry in
which thousands of highly paid skilled Bahamians had been
employed.
The people who had money to spend have been driven away by
the irrational behaviour of the government.
Now Minister of Development Carlton Francis has formed
another costly organization in an effort to bring investors back to
the islands. Hie has declared that "something dramatic" must be
done to revive the construction industry.
**********lE*****
In my previous articles I told you the stages by which tourism
and investment activities were developed in the islands. They
were built on confidence in the government....the goodwill of the
people....and a standard of life that had "quality".
All those elements have been destroyed by the present
government,...and, no matter what they may now try to do, they
cannot repair the damage.
Still more depressing is the fact that, even if the government
were changed today, I don't feel that the men who will take their
place will be able to change the position. Most of them think like
the government on the vital question of human relations.
It takes years to build confidence and goodwill....but these


elements in life can be destroyed over-night. Once destroyed it is
harder to rebuild them than it was to create this mental condition
in the first place because there will always be the fear lurking
behind the minds of outside observers that, having happened
once, it could easily happen again.
***************
Before I sat down to write this article I read a news despatch
from Lima under the caption "Peru Military Regime Charts
Uncertain Path".
Peru has been under military rule for nearly five years. During
this time they have introduced many changes. A line in this
article struck me as being applicable to the Bahamas. It read:
"One thing is certain. There is no turning back "
For good or ill....a new image has been stamped on the
Bahamas. The P.L.P. has gone out deliberately to destroy all
constructive elements in the islands and so there is no chance of
seeing men with experience and a knowledge of business and
finance back in office for a long, long time, if ever.
***************
I suppose the "Friends of the Bahamas Club" is an illustration
of the happy relationship that was growing up in the islands
between the resident tourist colony and the Bahamian people.
This group, composed of "quality" men and women in the
resident tourist colony, formed this club as "an expression of
gratitude to the Bahamian people for allowing them to share with
them the good life in the islands".
These people had no desire to take over the country. They
wanted to forge a closer identity with our people. Through this
organization they wanted to help our people to raise their sights
and broaden their outlook on life.
Several splinter clubs were formed by the main body, covering
many areas of social and cultural activity. The Camera Club still
survives. But there is no room for this kind of goodwill
relationship in the islands today.

When the Pindling government was elected they were given the
best press I have ever seen any new government receive. All over
the world they were congratulated in every possible language by
the press, radio and television.
They hopefully brought a fresh breeze to govemment because,
in their campaign, they crusaded against tyranny and
injustice....for honesty in government. And the world believed
them.
All over the world today the communications media have been
disillusioned and disappointed in this government.
The Tribune alone in the world has not been obliged to
readjust its sights on this government because, from the outset.
we analysed their mentality and predicted t; :ourse the
downward course they would take.
First disillusionment for the press came soon after the 1967
election when it was revealed in a Commission of Enquiry that
the Pindling government had been involved with Mike McLaney.
-an American gambler, whom the Commission branded as a
."thoroughly dangerous person who is likely to do nothing but
hamn to the Bahamas".
With this public condemnation of their friend and patron the
government kicked McLaney out of the Bahamas and he claimed
that he had been double-crossed.
A major story blew up in the American press recently, once
again linking the name of Prime Minister Pindling with
McLaney....and with the name of Eliott Roosevelt, eldest son of
the late President Franklin D. Roosevelt, thrown in for good
measure. This came as a result of a statement made at a public
enquiry in the U.S. of the affairs of a notorious underworld
character in America.
A few weeks earlier The Miami Herald, which had always
been a strong supporter of the Pindling regime, published a
feature story linking the names of members of the Bahamas
government with deals allegedly financed by Robert Vesco, who
is wanted in dte U.S. on charges of fraudulently diverting S224
million of 1OS money. And he was also charged in connection
with a donation of $200,000 to the "Elect President Nixon's
Fund".
I have a feeling that even The Miami Herald, which is devoted
to building neighbourly relations with new governments
throughout this hemisphere, is beginning to take second thoughts
about the government in the Bahamas today.
People everywhere are beginning to realize that, despite
holier-than-thou statements made by Mr. Pindling at the
Commonwealth Prime Ministers Conference in Ottawa and in the
U.N. ... under the skin of this government is a wolf parading
around in sheep's clothing.
********+********
Now I will flash back over 30 years to recall an incident in
Bermuda.
Long years before Nassau or any of the Caribbean islands took
the tourist industry seriously, Bemiuda had developed a robust
tourist business.
For the old Bermudians. tourism was strictly business. They
brought into the island people who had money to spend.
The time came when their children began to indulge in the
tourist activities. This presented quite a problem for the island
because the youngsters were trying to live like vacationing
millionaires. And they were losing all sense of responsibility.
Finally, their parents called them together and gave them a
lecture in which they stressed the fact that tourism was a.
business....an intangible commodity which they were selling to
the stranger within their gates. These facilities were not provided
to create an opportunity for extravagant living by the local
people.
That is it....tourism is a business in which a tourist resort tries
to sell its "goods" to people who have money to pay. Without
money to support the effort needed to maintain the
structure ... like any other business ... the enterprise must end in
failure.

The independence celebrations in Nassau were attended by a
large number of representative coloured people in the U.S.


The Tribune interviewed some of these people. They were all
delighted with the overall situation but a couple of the more
thoughtful men had reservations.
One man said he welcomed the change. He was very proud of
it. But he felt that the only way is could succeed was if wealthy
coloured people in the U.S. got together and gave the islands their
fullest support.
Coloured people in the U.S. have made enormous strides in the
last 20 years. From time to time The Tribune has published
records of their remarkable achievements. But the fact remains
that figures show that, if all the wealthy coloured people in the
U.S. got together and poured their resources into the islands, they
could not maintain the structure erected by Sir Stafford Sands.
Sir Roland Symonette and Sir Harold Christie covering a half cen-
tury of dedicated effort.
Another fact that is overlooked is that the successful coloured
families in the U.S. have evolved their own standard of living in
which they too are beginning to understand and appreciate
cultural surroundings. Most of these people today would not be
happy in the company of many of their own kind who are now
flocking to the islands.

And now let us flash back to The Tribune of Tuesday.
September llth, in which was published a letter by Basil Q.
Johnson, Treasurer and Spiritual Adviser to the I.C.Y.A., under
the caption: "Asks Leaders To Change Their Attitudes".
After recording the feeling of disappointment among many of
the people who elected this government to office, Mr. Johnson
Page 9 Col. 3


New US ambassador outlines objectives




of his embassy & its staff in Nassau


THE PRINCIPAL PURPOSE OF AN EMBASSY is to serve as
the "official eyes, ears and voice" of one government in the
territory of another, U.S. Ambassador Ronald I. Spiers said
Thursday night.


Mr. Spiers was the guest
speaker at the monthly
Chamber of Commerce dinner
held at the Sheratoti
British-Colonial Hotel.
In his first public statement
the Ambassador. a career
diplomat of 20 years, discussed
the role ot a I[.S. I inbassy ie
said that the Bahamas
Embassy, as the newest of the
128 Embassies the U.S. has
around the world, has the
responsibility of ensuring that
the Bahamas government has
an accurate understanding of
U.S. positions on matters of
common interest, while at the
same time giving policy-makers
in Washington an objective
view of what is happening in
the Bahamas.
"If a government acts on the
basis of faulty information.
grave mistakes and
misjudgments with far-reaching
implications can be made," he
said.
"What the U.S. or any
government does can be no
better than the validity of the
information on which these
actions are based, and history
shows us numerous examples
of this happening."
A study of the events of
July and August 1914, Mr.
Spiers called it a "veritable
tragedy of errors" would leave
anyone convinced on this
score
Therefore accurate reporting
was a vital function of an
Embassy. It was a function
that required trained observers
of the highest professional
standards who would not let
their own prejudices or
sentiments or the temptation
to anticipate those of their
superiors, influence what they
said. Mr. Spiers told his
audience.
NOT ABSTRACT
lie pointed out that
governments were not abstract
institutions. They were


essentially made up ot people.
with all the strengths a!id
weaknesses that individuals
have.
Therefore, it an Ambassador
and his principal assistants
were to do their jobs properly
a principal objective had to be
to get to know well the people
whose views or positions were
influential on the politics and
objectives of the host
government.
This meant, in addition to
government decision makers.
leaders of the Opposition,
leaders in the press, labour and
business community.
"A good diplomatic officer
must, without being intrusive


RONALD I. SPIERS
... New U.S. Ambassador
or meddlesome, come to know
'his country' intimately," Mr.
Spiers declared.
Thb, Ambassador placed
great importance on the


creation of personal
relationships in diplomacy.
The personal chemistry
which operated between
President Nixon and Chairman
Mao or Secretary Kissinger and
the Soviet Ambassador in
Washington was more
important than a thousand
diplomatic notes, he said.
"The essence of diplomatic
communications has to be
frankness and clarity if
possibly grave misunder-
standings are to be avoided."
Mr. Spiers said he had seen
important international
relationships soured an
Ambassador and. a Foreign
Minister who did not get on
well together, through no fault
of either.
Another function of a
diplomatic mission was to
influence opinion and
Page 7 Col. 7


I I


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Si to: Vacation, The Tribune, P. O. Box
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I-
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Monday, October 15, 1973.


Constable testifies that lan Allen punched fellow


P.C. 877 Donald Lotmore was the second witness to testify
Thursday that he saw architect Ian Allen punch P.C. 862 Mackey
in the shoulder while at the Princess Margaret Hospital's out
patients department on July 20.


Constable Lotmore denied
suggestions by defence
counsel Eugene Dupuch Q.C.,
that Mackey had slapped Allen
and that both officers had
subsequently beaten the
defendant

CROSSWORD
PUZZLE
ACROSS
1. Animal park 29. Where Shannon
4. Chinese sauce airport is
7. Musical sign 30 Drugget
11. Gershwin 31. Brushwood
12. Hasten 32. Form of
13. Roster trapshooting
14. Packages 35. Nissen
16 Alaskan 36 Humdinger
governor 37. Relatives s
17. That girl 41. Castor's
18. Mode slayer
19. Biblical cony 42. Branch
21. Serpent 43. Savory sauce
22. Polish river 44. Sand hill
23.Norman 45. Energy
leader 46. English
27. Outline cathedral city


Allen, on trial before ('hiet
Magistrate Wilton Htercules for
allegedly using obscene
language, resisting arrest and
assaulting a police officer, has
filed counter-charges against
Constables Lotmore and
ALA AASE EOIT

A sUpEIR
|T R|Ap S EISc
IS UNLIES






FIE=NAS N EIY
SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE
DOWN5 Salad
1. Spirit ingredient
2. Medieval 6. I do
money 7 Chalky
3. Crew 8. Heavy


officer & used obscenities


Mackey for alleged assault.
causing harm and using
excessive force.
Appearing for him was the
lion. Eugene Dupuch, Q.C.,
with Mr. Terrence Gate as his
junior.
A Queen's Counsel does not
usually appear in the
magistrate's court. This is the
second tin e since taking silk in
1964 that Mr. Dupuch has
taken a case before a
magistrate. The first time was
eight years ago when the police
tried to seize over a million
dollars worth of liquor from
Bahamas Blenders, Oakes
Field. on the ground that they
had obtained a liquor licence,
but had not paid for it. The
magistrate decided in favour of
Bahamas Blenders.
His last criminal trial was
about ten years ago when he
defended Rudolph Winsinger.
an American evangelist who was
charged with the murder of his
wife. tHe was convicted and
sent to prison for 12 years by
Chief Justice Sir Ralph
Cambell The Court of Appeals
reduced his sentence to six
years. e served four years and
was sent back to the United
States. Also appearing in that
case was the Hon. Leonard J.
Knowles, now Chief Justice of
the Bahamas.)
In I u r sd a ys trial
tunstable Lotmore said he
was il .I to the scene of a
tralTlic a1'ccdent onr the eastern
,idc of RuAsson Square h-ril..
J!ter ) p.I on Jul\ 20
lte said two cars, one of
them parked at the time. were
iniolvcd in the accident. fhe
detendint was the driver of the
second car, lie said.
On approaching Allen for
questioning at the scene,
L. t more testified. the
defendant walked around the
rear of the car "staggering.'
iHe told the policeman that


When your peas 'n rice

goes potcake an' yer dog

cut back his nose...








"Don't


give up


the ship,"


the other car had reversed into
his car.
SCENT
"I smelled a strong scent of
alcohol on his breath and I
asked him whether he had been
drinking," Lotmore said. "He
said 'yes, but I'm not drunk.'
So I asked him to accompany
me to the hospital because I
suspected him of being drunk."
The policeman told Mr.
Hercules that he asked Averill
Mortimer, who had been driving
the other car, to take Allen to
the hospital.
He said Allen refused to get
into Mortimer's car, but "Mr.
Allen was taken to the
hospital." P.C. Mackey
accompanied Allen and
Mortimer to the hospital, while
Lotmore followed on his
motorcycle.
At the hospital, "while Mr.
Allen was sitting on the bench
and I was speaking to Mortimer
in connection with the
accident, I heard Mr. Allen say
to Mackey, 'I don't know why
you brought me here,' and he
got up saying he was going
home.
"So I walked over to him
and stood in front of him and
told him he wasn't going
anywhere. lie then sat on the
bench and I went back to
Mortimer."
Later, Lotmore continued,
"I saw him point his finger in
Mackey's face and say "I will
obscenity ) you up." Then he
got up and started to walk
away again.


SIT DOWN
"On seeing this, I walked
over to him an put a pair of
hand-cuffs on his hands and
told him to sit back down."
Lotmore returned to his
questioning of Mortimer. but
then "1 saw the defendant raise
his two hands to Mackey and
say 'if yo take these off I will
bust your black (obsenity).' iHe
said 'if I don't get to do it my
Fox Hill boys will do it.' fie
also told Mackey that he would
shoot him," the court was told.
Lotmore went on to say that
after a nurse called Allen's
name the defendant asked' to
to to the bathroom. The


policemen accompanied Allen
as far as the bathroom door,
where Lotmore removed the
hand-cuffs before Allen went
inside.
"When he came out,"
Lotmore continued, "Mackey
was leaning against the wall, He
put his hand over Mackey
against the wall and said, 'are
you ready for this now?' On
saying this he threw his right
hand at Mackey and caught
him on his left shoulder. He
drew back his hand again and
when he swung Mackey held
both his hands around his
wrists.
"Allen was struggling to get
away from Mackey, and they
started to fall. They fell down
and I reached down for my
hand-cuffs in my boots, and I
told Mackey to hold his hands
together so I can get the cuffs
on."
Allen was again hand-cuffed
after a struggle, Lotmore said.
DENIAL
He denied that either he or
Mackey had ever pushed,
punched or kicked Allen.
Under Mr. Dupuch's
cross-examination, Constable
Lotmore told the court that
Allen was made to go to the
hospital with Mortimer
"because he wasn't allowed to
drive his own car."
He said also that "I
suspected him of being drunk
and placed him under arrest at
the scene of the accident."
"How did you arrest him?"
Mr. Dupuch asked.
"I touched him on the arm
and said, "accompany me to
the hospital," Lotmore replied.
He said he knew that Dr.
Roger Domesthemes concluded
after an examination that Allen
was not drunk, and confirmed
that the defendant was never
charged with drunken driving.
INJURY
Answering further questions
from Mr. Dupuch, Constable
Lotmore said "I don't know
how he got an injury at the
back of the neck at the base of
the skull."
"Did either you or Mackey
hit him on the back of the
neck with either a karate chop
. or a baton?"


t:j~


MRS. MARGARET McDONALD


"No, we did not."
"Is it not true that he said,
simply in a conversational
tone, 'please take these
(obsenity) cuffs off my hands,'
and Mackey slapped him?"
"That is not true. He said 'if
you take these off I'll bust
your black (obsenity)' and it
wasn't in a conversational
voice."
"And then after Mackey
slapped him, you both beat
him up?"
"We did not beat him up."
His final reply ended Mr.
Dupuch's cross-examination.
Bernard Road resident
Rodney Randolph Davis, who
came to and left court in police
custody, testified Thursday
morning that he saw Allen
come out of the bathroom.
"He asked Constable Mackey
if he want to fight, then he
passed a blow and struck
Const. Mackey on the
shoulder."
Averill Mortimer of
Palmetto Village, testifying
before Lotmore on Thursday
afternoon, told Mr. Hercules
that "the defendant didn't
want to go to the out patients
at the hospital, but he did go
eventually."
Mortimer said he drove
Lotmore. in addition to Allen
and Mackey, to the hospital
that night. Lotmore was sitting
in the front seat, he said, with
Mackey and Allen in the back.
Mortimer said he heard
Allen using obscene language
both at the scene of the
accident and at the hospital.
Twice Allen rose from the
bench and turned to leave, the
witness said, and twice the
policemen stopped him.
David Strachan of Regency
Park, the first to testify on
Thursday afternoon, said he
was in the hospital at the time
of the incident, and he said
Allen was hand-cuffed while
sitting on the bench because he
refused to stop using
obscenities.
"I got mad and asked him
whether, if he was in the
States, he would speak to a
police officer like that."
"If I was a policeman,"
Strachan added under
cross-examination, "I would'nt
have let him talk like that to
me."
"Oh? What would have
done?" asked the defence
attorney.
"If I was a policeman I
would bust him open,"
Strachan said.
"Exactly, some policemen
feel the same way, Mr. Dupuch
said.


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First Oh. HBhm .


MRS. JEANETTE BETHEL


AT TWO MINISTRIES


ANYWAY, IT'S NO


LONGER A MAN'S WORLD


THROUGHOUT THE WORLD women's roles are changing.
They are taking on more and more responsible jobs in what used
to be called a "man's world."


This does not mean that
they are less feminine or are
giving up the things that
women enjoy, they have just
decided to show men that they
are equally as capable in
performing jobs that were for
so long considered 'for males
only.'
In Nassau, two such women
are Mrs. Jeanette Bethel and
Mrs. Margaret McDonald,
Permanent Secretaries in
Government Departments.
They both find their job
challenging, and agree that
there are no obstacles today
for the advancement of
women. What is necessary,
however, is to work hard and
do the job well.
Mrs. Bethel is Permanent
Secretary in the Ministry of
Development. A petite,
soft-spoken woman and
mother of four young children,
two boys and two girls, aged
11 to two years, she has been
in the post since April, 1969.
She says that the male
Permanent Secretaries treat her
as an equal and she adds, "I
don't try to impress them by
being too aggressive. I try to
work as best I can."
Born in Trinidad, Mrs.
Bethel was educated at London
University and the University
of Belfast, Northern Ireland
where she received a Bachelor
of Science degree in Economics
and a Ph.D. degree.
For two years following
completion of her studies she
worked as a Research Assistant
in Jamaica at the University of
the West Indies Institute of
Social and Economic Research.
On her return to England, she
was married to Peter Bethel,
Deputy General Manager of the
Bahamas Electricity
Corporation.
They returned to Jamaica
where she worked with the
Central Planning Unit of the
Ministry of Development and
then came to Nassau in
January, 1961.
DID 1963 CENSUS
The following month Mrs.
Bethel was employed as a
Research Assistant in the
Department of Physical
Planning, then a part of the
Ministry of Works. Two years
later she was transferred to the
Registrar General's Department
where she was responsible for
the 1963 census of the
Bahamas.
In 1967 she was transferred


to the Ministry of Internal
Affairs as First Assistant
Secretary and remained there
until April, 1969 when she
joined the Ministry of
Development as Permanent
Secretary.
Mrs. Bethel finds time in her
busy schedule to read, play
tennis and squash, the piano
and do gardening and cooking
which she loves. A firm
believer in planning, her day
begins at 6:30 a.m. when she
has to prepare breakfast and
get the children ready for
school. By 8:30 a.m. she is in
her office, ready for a full day
of activity which she
thoroughly enjoys.
A WIDOW
Mrs. McDonald is Permanent
Secretary in the Ministry of
Health. A widow, she is the
mother of two children, a
daughter who works and a son
who is a student at St. John's
University in Minnesota.
She was born in Tarpum
Bay, Eleuthera and moved to
Governor's Harbour at an early
age. At 11 years old, she was a
Monitor at the Public School
and was successful in obtaining
a four-year scholarship at the.
Government High School after
a competitive island-wide high
school examination.
After completion of her
studies at GHS, which she did
in less than three years, she
taught at the Western Senior
School. Always being reminded
by her late mother's favourite
phrase "To do increases the
power of doing" Mrs.
McDonald continued to study
privately and also completed a
course in commercial subjects.
She continued to lecture at
Ministry of Education evening
classes until 1957 when she
was transferred as Principal
Secretary to the then Crown
Lands Department.
In less than two years, she
was promoted to Chief Clerk
and Accountant, and was
selected to do a course in
Administration from the
University of Manchester.
On completion, she was
transferred to the now
Department of Public
Personnel and in 1969 was
given a course in Public
Administration with emphasis
on Establishment Procedures at
the Royal Institute of Public
Administration in the United
Page 5 Col. 2


I


CAROLYN MORRISON
Sales Representative

We are pleased to announce the appointment of Miss
Carolyn Morrison as Sales Representative.
Born in Nassau, Miss Morrlson graduated from
Miami Northwestern High School and Helen's School of
Business in New York City. She was employed by
Batelco as a secretary and served both Bahamas
Airways and Out Island Airways as an Air Hostess.
Before joining ABC, she spent a year learning the
automobile business.
Carolyn Morrison's personal charm, educational and
business training combine to make her a young lady
with whom you'll be happy to do business.

Ce in emd met heor



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Collins Avenue Tel: 2-1031


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Monday, October 15. 1973.


By Abigail Van Buren
0 173 b cIagf TribwmN. Y. Ntw SlWn., Ic.
DEAR ABBY: For the last year I have employed an
excellent cleaning woman who has also done my laundry.
She is immaculate, quiet, and hasn't missed a day's work.
She is the sole support of several fatherless children, so I
have been extremely generous in giving her leftover food
and even collecting children's clothing from my friends for
her youngsters.
From time to time I've missed a few items. Panties,
hosiery, towels. Nothing very valuable.
Suddenly she shows up wearing a pair of silver hoop
earrings which looked familiar. I went to my drawer, and
sure enough, mine were missing!
I asked her where she got the earrings, and she said
she couldn't remember. Abby, I know they are mine! Now
I am wondering if I should ask her to give me my house
key and tell her why I don't want her to work for me any
more.
I feel so guilty considering such a thing because I know
how much she needs the money. So what should I do?
WONDERING
DEAR WONDERING: The woman is apparently sim-
ple-minded or she never would have worn in your presence
the earrings she stole from you. Tell her you know she
has been stealing, but if she returns the stolen items and
promises not to take anything else. you will give her anoth-
er chance. If she accepts those terms, keep her. And if she
steals again, send her on her way.
DEAR ABBY: My husband's sister lost a full-term
baby. He was born dead. We sent a sympathy card ad-
dressed to her and her husband. They were offended.
My father in law told me you shouldn't send sympathy
cards in a case like this. Tell me. Abby. were my husband


-
Etrmn-uor


From Page 4
Kinidulm
On her return in Ma:ch.


NOTICE
Unless the vehicle listed below is collected by 31st October
1973 it will be sold to cover expenses: -
Mr. Carter 1968 Morris 1100 NP4461
NASSAU MOTOR COMPANY LIMITED.


RUDAS ORGANIZATION

BAHAMAS LTD.



DANCE ACADEMY

Scheduled to be re-opened from summer recess on
Saturday October 20th, 1973


Classes to be offered are --

Boys Acrobatics (ages 6 & over )
Girls Acrobatics (ages 6-12 and (13 & over)

Beginners Jazz (16 years & over)

Classes are free of charge & limited to 15 in each class.
Please call Britannia Beach Hotel 55441 ext. 266
Wednesday and Friday October 16th and 19th
between 4 p.m. and 6 p.m.


Her cleaning woman is


tops, also light-fingered


and I right or wrong?


UNIONTOWN, PA.


DEAR UNIONTOWN: You were right.
DEAR ABBY: When our children misbehave, which
isn't very often, my husband spanks them severely. And I
mean he really lays a heavy hand to them.
Worse yet, for a long time afterwards he keeps threaten-
ing to give them the same treatment if they don't behave
themselves. This causes the children to feel nervous and
frightened most of the time, which makes them resent him.
I've noticed the resentment growing lately.
Abby, how can I let him know that the spanking alone
is sufficient punishment and his constant threats are nei-
ther wise nor necessary?
And how do you like this kind of behavior from a man
who has two college degrees and a father who used to beat
him up? HISTORY REPEATING ITSELF
DEAR HISTORY: History need not repeat itself. Tell
Father that his punishment is cruel and excessive and it's
damaging the relationship between him and his children, so
to cut it out. And it might not hurt to have your husband
examined physically and mentally. Two college degrees
don't give one immunity from illness.
CONFIDENTIAL TO OLD-TIMER IN PALM BEACH:
Before you put down the youth of today, read this: "Our
youth now love luxury. They have bad manners, contempt
for authority; they show disrespect for their elders, and
love chatter in places of exercise. They no longer rise when
elders enter the room. They contradict their parents, chat-
ter before company, gobble up their food, and tyranunie
their teachers."
[Socrates wrote that in the 5th Century, B. C.]
Problems? You'll feel better if you get it off you chest.
For a personal reply, write to ABBY: Box No. IW L.A.,
Calif. 9068. Enclose stamped, self-addressed eavelpe,
please.
For Abby's new booklet, "What Teen-Agers Wat te
Know," send $1 to Abigail Van Buren, mt Ladky Dr. Bev-
erly Hills, Cal. IlZ.


SHIPPING
Arrived today: Bahamaland
from Inagua and Long Island;
Air Pheasant from Eleuthera;
San Salvador Express from San
Salvador; Captain Moxey from
South Andros; Bahamas Trader
from Cat Island.
Sailed today: Captain
Moxey for South Andros.
Arriving tomorrow: New
Day from Cat Island; Bahama
Star, Emerald Seas from
Miami; Tropic Day from West
Palm Beach


Planned Savings

with the Commerce.Together

we'll make beautiful things happen.


There's always something beautiful
worth saving for. The day you become
engaged, for example. Whatever the occasion,
you'll find that Planned Savings can work for
you.
Each payday, why not put part of what you
earn into a Commerce Savings Account?


Soon, you'll have saved the money you need
for that special occasion. We help your
money grow by adding interest regularly.
That's why we say, "You and the Commerce.
Together we're both stronger".



4O
CANADIAN IMPERIAL
BANK OF COMMERCE


You and the Commerce.

Together we're both stronger.


1971. she was promoted to
First Assistant Secretary and
transferred to the Ministry of
Health on July 1. That year,
she also completed a course in
Administration at the Graduate
School of the University of
Pittsburgh.
Mrs. McDonald said she is
Cius optimistic about future
inpioveinent of health services
in the Bahamas.
"The Ministry has carefully
designed plans for
improvement of the services
and no time is being lost in
implementing those plans." she
said.
Beginning her day at 5:30
a. in. with gardening, Mrs:
McDonald also finds time to
play the piano, read, cook and
do neeldework, all of which
slie enjoys. She is a member of
Ioly Cross Parish and the
Anglican Church Women's
Association.
Mrs. McDonald said that she
does not view her success
personally, but as an incentive
I,) other \ young women
ilnn hin, tie ladder
lt erc is u limited
,sppuortuiitn she added.
She is grateful to her
patents, the late Mr. and Mrs.
Robert (Leecher) Demneritte,
who she said, had a sound
sense of values.
"Anvthing that I do is a
direct result of their guidance,"
she commented.
SUN
Rises 6.07 a.m.
Sets 5.45 p.m.


Commonwealth Of The Bahama lands



TENDERS FOR TREASURY BILLS


The Treasurer hereby gives notice that t
16th October. 1973 for Treasury Bills t, I-
Bills Act 1959 and the public Treasturim
Thursday, 18th October, 1973 as follows


ioders will be received on
he isuoed under the public
Bills Amendment Act


Tuesday,
Treasury
149 o on


Bills denominated and payable in
Bahamian dollars ................. B$4,600,000.

The Bills will be in minimum multiples ,1f S100 and are redeemable
ninety-one (91) days from the date of issue.

The bills will be issued and paid at the lBahamas NMonetary Authoritv. Det,,l,
of payment will be notified to '!. ,. :, l nei .

Each tender nlust he ,' 1 j W.l,,' ,; i,) ii. lr. t l ender" addressed to:

illi BA\KlN(; ANA(; R
Bahamas Monetary Autthoirity
.,u should be delivered to the office of tlie Authority in the E. D. Sassoon
Building, corner of Shirley and Parliament Streets, Nassau before 3:00 p.m. on
Tuesday, 16th October.

Tenders must be made on special forms which may be obtained from the
Bahamas Monetary Authority and the Commercial Banks and must be for
not less than the minimum amount stated in paragraph 2. Tenders must state
the net price per cent (being a multiple of one centl which will be paid.
The Treasurer reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.

Ministry of Finance. Nassau
10th October, 1973


I /


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UPPER FREEZER

o







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STORAGE FREEZER





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Big capacity REFRIGERATOR
See it at your Admiral dealer's showroom


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111 SHIRLEY STREET TELEPHONE 2-8941/5 P.O. BOX N4806


NO LONGER A MAN'S WORLD


I I I r I' I l~i


s


gbt (Brtbtm









Ufrttnrnt Monday. October 15. 1973.


S


By Reducing The


Down Payment


To As Little As


$


FOR CHOICE HOMESITES


We were


almost overwhelmed


by the


en-


thusiastic response from Nassau to our
PREVIEW OFFER to buy choice homesites on
Andros, a GET-AWAY retreat! To show our
appreciation, we're making it possible for just


about everyone to become a proud
on this beautiful Family Island.


landowner


HAVE YOU EVER HEARD OF
SUCH TERMS?

$2,995
$35 per month
ori v $8 75 per .(.;( ':' ',, ,nq per cent interest )
Can you afford to pass that up?

You certainly can't! So you must hurry San Andros is
valuable !and, tal with pine trees, fresh with unlimited
water And who K.nows what the prices will be next Year?
ISLANDS have limited space, and these lots 10,000 square
feet 80 feet by 125 feet' 4 acre are moving fast
Our offer is valid to Bahamian residents only' And expires on
October 29th, 1973.
With your low low down payment you receive a com
plimentary membership in Andros Beach Club. San Andros
Hotel offers tennis, a giant pool, delicious food, a relaxing
bar, and use of a motorcycle with every room.
So, Bahamians don't miss the boat Invest in your future
today, while these terms and prime lots are still available


CALL RIGHT NOW!


or see


Berkley Ferguson Real Estate
Principal Broker, 2-1238 or 2-4913
Berwin House on Frederick St.
McDeigan & Associates Ltd. 2-4284
Bernard-Sunley Building on Bay Street
Morley & O'Brien Real Estate
2-2794 Harris Building on Shirley Street
Braynen & Knowles Real Estate 2-1886
Sheraton-British Colonial Hotel Arcade

Frank Carey Real Estate Ltd. 2-7667
Bay and Deveaux Streets
Maxwell Woodside Real Estate 3-5632
Corner of Bias St. & Blue Hill Road.
Ty Saunders Real Estate Ltd. 7-7162
2nd Floor, Bernard Sunley Building
Grosham Property Ltd. 27662 or 28966
107 Shirley Street


San Andrys is for Lyvers


This offer Expires in 14days


-" -1 3 -. . . . . . ... Ii -d.,I. JP qifN .i.


6 month money-back-on-inspection guarantee.
Life of contract exchange privilege.


San


I


bTep Tribune


Monday. October 15, 1973.












Monday, October 15, 1973.


Community Centre opens at Cat Island


By RUPERT MISSICK
THE FIRST community
centre on Cat Island has been
established. Situated at the
Bight in the former Clinic, the
centre is located in the centre
of what is known as White
Land.
Swings have been erected, a
see-saw has been installed, a
volley ball net has been set up,
a tennis table is now in use and
an outdoor life size checker
board is also in use.


The inside of the centre
itself serves as a recreation hall
for drama workshops, poetry
readings, and other play
activities that require indoor
protection. The walls have
been covered with clippings
from Black Magazines and
paintings and drawings by the
children of The Bight School.
A production is now being
rehearsed for presentation
sometime later this month and
the entire island will be invited


Rolle.
****** C*
The District IEducaltion
Officer Mr 'lcutirn thhs is
presently visif i-' public
schools through u l tlhe isl,.and.
Reports state that 1tli are
biting best at Iernanders
('reek. Bonefish. Shads, Margot
fish and turbot are said to be
biting most

Further reports state that
crabs are presently more
plentiful at Big Sands

Reports ci. tleiii t l the
poor miiailboat sexr ice .iid
many persons complain tlat
their crops are ruined before
the boat makes the live day
jouirnex t, \la i iii.u.i ond
hack.
Hahainasair, the airline that
services the island, is said to
never he oin tuine. .\id lt eni
many woulId-e passengers
complain of waiting for lthors
at the airport only to discover
that there are no available seats
to Nassau.


to attend. Also to take part in
the programme will be students
from The Old Bight School
who are also taking drama
lessons.

Mrs. Shirley Moss, wife of
the Rev. Winslow Moss, of the
Bight gave birth to a son on
September 25, at their home.

Myrtle Simmons of Old
Bight ran into the rear of Mrs.
Shirley Stubbs car and suffered
slight injuries. She is recovering
nicely.

Virginia Hlumes of Smith's
Bay became engaged today to
Edward King and a party will
be held at the school.

A programme was held at
McQuens last Sunday at 9.00
p.m. climaxing the Baptist
(hurch Convention on this
island. Rev. William Smith of
Nassau was in attendance. The
Commissioner Wilton H.
Stubbs was the master of
ceremonies assisted by Mr.
Carlton Rolle and Mr. Mark


PRE-CHRISTMAS BONUS

3 -5x7 VIVID CUOlO PHOTOS

ONLY $59s
an ideal gift for Christmas


ON Tiltl ATI RI RO)NI
I .B St\ t. at. m Sl.
IH LEHl'ONI 5-464 I
OPEN EVERY SUNDAY from 2 5 p.m.


Office Wednesday morning.
Present during the brief
ceremony were Miss Assida
Matthews, of the High
Commissioner's office; and Mr.
Ernest Stiachan, Bahamas
Government Chief of Protocol.
Immediately afterwards the
High Commnissioner paid a
courtesy cali onr the Minister of
External Affairs ard Attorney
General, the Hon. Paul
Adderley. The Permanent
Secretary to the Ministry of
External Affairs, Mr. Oris
Russell was present.
At noon the High
Commissioner called on His
Excellency the Governor-
General, Sir Viilo PR itler,
G.C.M.G.. at Government
House and was entertained at a
luncheon in his honour,
Mr. Pindling is shown, above
left, receiving the L- ttCers
Beside Mr. Pindling is Mr.
Thompson, Miss Assida
Matthews of the Jamaican High
Commission and Mr. Ernest
Strachan, Bahamas Chief of
Protocol.

FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FE TILI I I NGICIIEI
PI ST CONiTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157


AMBASSADOR'S SPEECH
S From Page 3


government policy, he said.
The purpose of this was to
persuade the host country in
its policy forming process to
move in directions favourable
to American interests.
29 MEMBERS
Mr. Spiers noted that U.S.
lnibassies around the world
vary in size from over 500
people to less than a dozen. lie
said that the Embassy in
Nassau would have 29
employees, of whom 14 were
U.S. citizens.
lie revealed that the
Embassy would move to new
quarters on Queen Street at the
end of October, and hoped
that as many of his listeners as
possible would visit the new
SEmbassy building.
Ambassador Spiers said that
he, like most current U.S.
Ambassadors and the majority
of Embassy personnel in
Nassau, was a career Foreign
Service Officer who had
"worked up the ladder".
lie noted that the U.S.
Foreign Service was highly
competitive, and that of
17,000 persons who applied to
take the entrance examination
in 1972, only 150 were
allowed to enter the service.
The Ambassador outlined
the functions of the five U.S.
embassy sections in Nassau. His
Deputy Chief of Mission,
Rozanne L. Ridgway, whom he
described as "one of our
government's most capable and
astute Foreign Service Officers
(and who also happens to be a
woman) "will serve as chief of
staff of the U.S. diplomatic
team.
SERVICES
Four consular officers
headed by Marvin Groeneweg,
will handle over 25,000 visas
per year, plus U.S. passports
and other services for


American citizens.
Mr. Martin Cheshes will
assist U.S. and Bahamian
businessmen and report on
economic trends in the
Bahamas as head of the
Economic and Commercial
Section.
William R. Salisbury is
responsible for the Political
Section, reporting on political
developments in the Bahamas,
maintaining contact with the
Bahamian Ministry of External
Affairs on multilateral issues,
and assisting in negotiations
which are not purely
economic.
Administrative Officer
Douglas Stevens handles
internal administrative matters
for the Embassy, and with
Layton Russell, is responsible
for the moving of the mission
to new quarters on Queen
Street.
Commander Joseph
D'Amato serves as the U.S.
Navy Liaison Officer at the
Embassy, handling ship visits,
overflights and contact with
the U.S. Coast Guard and
Marine Division of the
Bahamian Police Force.
The Embassy "family" also
includes U.S. customs and
immigration officers at Nassau
airport.
Ambassador Spiers summed
up his hopes for the role of the
Embassy, representing the U.S.
government, could play in
working together with the
Bahamas government by
recalling his words to His
Excellency the Governor-
General on September 7:
"Perhaps we can, together,
make a unique contribution to
the practice of international
relationships by demonstrating
how a large nation and a small
one, close neighbours, can live
together in harmony, amity,
and mutual respect."


I


HIS EXCELLENCY Mr.
Adolph Thompson, High
Commissioner of Jamaica to
the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas presented his Letters
of Commission to the Prime
Minister of the Common-
wealth, the Hon. Lynden O.
Pindling at the Prime Minister's


ABBEY

INTERNATIONAL


FUND











S10-1
Of cred i'l ice
as of
Iri lai 5th Oct.. 19731


NOTICE
JONES, BARDELMEIER & CO. LTD. (OCEAN
SHIPPING CONSULTANTS) requires for its
headquarters in Nassau man 30 to 45 as senior shipping
consultant to set up and develop new department
specializing in worldwide container, LASH, and RO-RO
operations. Applicant should have minimum five years
shore experience with company operating these type
vessels. Experience with the water-borne movement of
forest products also desirable. Send resume to BOX
N-7790, NASSAU.


ONCE-A-YEAR I


a-we


at the HOUSE OF VALUES





LADIES'
DRESSES (100'. Polyester) 12.95
SHIFTS 4.99
PANT SUITS and SKIRT SETS 14.95
100% POLYESTER SLACKS (cwffed) 9.95
100% POLYESTER SKIRTS 4.99
HOT PANTS (100%) NYLON DOUBLE KNIT) 3.95
SMOCK BLOUSES 4.99
TANK TOPS from 99c
POLOS AND BLOUSES from 2.99 / -
BIKINI PANTIES 2 for 99c


GIRLS'
DRESSES 4.99
BLOUSES AND POLOS 2 for 3.99
BABY SUN SUITS 2 for 5.98


BOYS'
SHIRTS 2 for 4.99
LONG PANTS 2 for 4.99
PYJAMAS 2 for 4.99
DIAPER SUITS 2.80
POLOS 1.75
SUITS (2 piece set) 4.49
SHORT PANTS 2 for 4.99
TIES 2 for 2.49
BRIEFS 2 for 1.49


MEN'S.
SHIRTS P.P. SHORT SLEEVE 3.95
POLOS 2 for 3.99


MANY, MANY OTHiR SPECIALS Al...*


HOUSE OF VALUES
NASSAU ARCADE TELEPHONE 21060


~uS~


JAMAICAN HIGH COMMISSIONER

BECOMES ACCREDITED


hp 0 bribunp















@ 11$ $11111119


Monday, Octohbr 15. 1973.


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS-FAST


CLASSIFIED SECTION N TO PLACE YOUR ADV. TELEPHONE 21986 EXT 5

II II


NOTICE


C 11960
NOTICE is hereby give that
J OH N W I LL A i D
GALLAGHER of P 0 Box
F290, Freeport is apply ir to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and CitI i' l)ll i,.
for naturalization as i:-t'"
of The Bahamas, arid th.it r'.
person who know any at.i;
why 3iatu.iIIJIlS' sh U L: 1 iot
be granted should s f d a
written and signed stterentt
of the fac ts ithi'
twentv-eight davs on the 8th
day of October 1973 to The
Min ister responsible 'or
Nationality and Cl Z'l-,u. P
O. Box N/14 /, Nassau

C11956
NOTICE is heeb.y r "it
CAROLIE ALMA TC'K R of
Eight Mile RoLk, a.i'd
Bahama is apol) r ',, the
Mi nister r esip or
Nationality and i;,. ihip.
for .-: i a a .nr of
The Bahama.. j, 'h,"' r
person who kiw" j.!', i xison
why registrat1o .' h;ed it he
granted should soej .. !! t,'
and signed statemrei the
facts within t'wentye ,ii; J\ i
from the th da v 0, 'obe
1973 to Th, ". % r'isier
responsible 'or Nato)li! J' Id
Citizenship, P. O [Ro 7147.
Nassau.


C11963
NOTICE is hereb, n;.ri that
LAWSON r-.'.i TH .) vookec
Island Street, New Pi', idence
is applying to thie "'1ni stein
responsible tfo Nat ij,)t!i v arid
Citizenship. 'or iegqisiation as
a citizen of The B.ihar-'is and
that any person who know
any reason whf registration
should not be g',aited should
send a written a:d signed
statement o' the 'acts within
twenty-eight days 'r am the 8th
day of October l'173 to The
Minister respor',ible for
Nationality and L o i.en ; p P.
0. Box N7.147, Na..,

C11958
NOTICE is h i. '?- e-" thatf
LOUVERTUi :
Darling Lane, Nra." is
applying to the %Ministro
responsible for Ntioionr ty a'nd
C t i z e n s h ri f' ,I
naturalisation as a citzern of
The Bahamas, aid that an'v
person who knows any reason
why naturalization sh:ihd rd -
be granted shou Id -'nd a
written and signed si itf'.ni;et
of the facts with"
twenty-eight days front" rhie dih
day of October 1973 Thu
M minister resp'rs.)' "-
Nationality a: d Liti/ .
0. Box N714 7. N.a,.a.:

C11997
NOTICE is hereby ')... Si
NEAREST LOURIAART H'_i
of Marathon Estate,. Ni,.'
Bahamas is applying tIt
Minister responsible :
Nal.".- lui' andu CitiZ "'.h ir;,
for req istratior, as a citii ,
The Bahama' j,. ; -1 ".
person who Klno.' Wi', -'v :
why registration sho":ii i.') ti
granted should .r,, .1 i v'
and signed st!ate.-:,r' ,' .
facts within tweni' *i.:j'' .
from the 8th d., d .' i.i .,:r,
1973 to The -.,s'
responsible for Nat o'lri a'r
Citizenship P 0 Bo, i 7 4 '
Nassau.
C11969
NOTICE is nereb,' g.. ',..-'
JAMES TALE SS of .i,.
Street, New Provii r.f io,
applying to tin .' r
responsible for Natioln.ji!* ,!
Citizenship. for iltraJia ; ',' ,
as a citizen of Tnrc b iia"r
and that a'ny pils .
knows a3ry 'easo 0 v /v"
naturalisation' Inr ).ld rsit oD
granted should send .a wr'te,
and signed staiterne t of thii
facts within, t.ve'ty-eight diya
from the 8th dayv of Octobe
1973 to 7 he Minis'
responsible foi "Nationjiaty ja"
Citizenship, P. O Box N714 7
Nassau.
C11961
NOTICE is hereby given tnat
IAN ERIC M AR T '-
MORTEMORE of P O Boo
N3805, Nassau, Baharma, is
applying to the Mini teI
responsible for N'ationality ani
Citizenship, for register atin .is
a citizen of The Bdhamas. and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts wi'hin
twenty-eight days from the 8th
day of October 1973 to The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship. P
O. Box N7147, Nassau.


C11740
NOTICE is hereby given that
LILLIAN ALICIA BASE N of
Soldier Road, Nassau is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
29th day of September 1973
to The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
O. Box N7147, Nassau.


C12104
NOTICE is hereby given that
ROBERT FREDERICK
KIMBERK of Sheffield
Avenue, Coral Harbour. New
Pro vdnece, Bahamas is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who
knows any reason why
naturaisation should not be
rianted should send a written
ana signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
'rom the 15th day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
CLit enship, P. O. Box N7147,
Nassau.

L.12102
NOTICE is hereby given that
OLIVER THOMAS
KENNEDY of Freeport, Grand
Bahama is applying to the
SMinister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 15gh day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P O. .Box N7147,
Nassa ;.


.12105
NOTI E is hereby given that
V'ILDRED APTER KIMB[ERK
of Sheffield Avenue. Cural
iar bout, New Providence,
Bahamras is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
.vhy naturalisation should not
be granted should send a
writtenn and signed statement
f thie facts withinin
tI.erity-egy'it days finto the
1ith day of October 1973 tc
The I-.nister responsible for
'ationality and Citizenship, P
C. Box N 7147, Nassau.

c 12103
NOT!CE is heiebe given that
ACGNt'S JANE KENNEDY of
Freeport, Grand Baharna is
app ing to to e IMinistei
iesponrsiblP for Nationality and
,trenship, for reli 1 atJui '
'tura'i,.ation as a citizen of
Tne Bahamras, and that any
e" ior0N ho Knows any reason
i\ egistilation. natural isation
hi" it be granted should
c: iitten and signed
-ta.'*':'e-t of the facts within
.*,e't\ anht days from the
:'a' c:a ,t October 1973 to
he ini,;ter responsible for
-; nalit'y and Citizenship, P.
B B.' N7147, Nassau.


Ti CE is hereby given that
LC ,D V ALEXANDER
i.1 4'. B ',0,f V Mount Royal
'-:..; 0. Box N1 130 Nassau
JDpizinrn, to the Minister
- c sibiie for Nationality and
', :.t:i I or registration as
W: o' The Bahamas, and
.: ;.rson who knows
a' *e' : vhy registration
S : be granted should
,- : i, eutten and signed
I: i- ei uof the facts within
,. '. -,t ih d days from the
I't' l:ay 'it October 1973 to
r-'ter responsible for
,i':, Iy and Citizenship, P.
i" B- 47.14 Nassau.


12i! 2
'O-TIC- is hereby given that
TPL.'OR GORMAN of 437
Gr"rjda Avenue, P. O. Box
24 Freeport is applying to
t ic masterr responsible for
'at: a-- alty ,a d Citizenship,
',r registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
Ie so, who knows any
easou wh.y registration should
' nt bi granted should send a
,.v-tter and signed statement
of tr1'e facts within
twenty -.ght days from the
:bth day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nat- nality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.


NOTICE is hereby given that
DELIUS PIERRE (ALSO
KNOWN AS JOHN ALFRED)
of 5th Terrace, Centreville,
New Providence is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for naturalisation as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
-why naturalisation should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
22nd day of September 1973
to The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0 Box N7147, Nassau.


REAL ESTATE

C11739
FOR SALE BY OWNER
4 bedroom 2 bath house -
completely walled in and
landscaped. 2 bedrooni
airconditioned. In beautiful
condition. Located in exclusive
"Shirley Park Avenue". Close
to town and all shopping
Telephone 2-1722 (day)
3-4953 (night).


REAL ESTATE


i,.ILL4


BUY A LOT
in EASTWOOD or
WINTON MEADOWS
Call Frank Carey
at 27667 or 24815
FRANK CAREYEAL ESTATE
FRANK CAREY
Real Estate
Box N4764
Bay & Deveaux Sts.

C12044
SPANISH WELLS residence in
excellent condition consisting
of 112 storey frame house and
masonry addition with guest
room, bath, garage porch,
beautifully landscaped yard
and patio, walled and fenced,
furnished. Must be seen. Price
reduced from &55,000.00.
Entertain offers. Owner P. O.
Rox 26. Spanish Wells.
C1i777
FOR SALE
2, 3 and 4 bedroom houses in
the following prestigious
a-eas:
Westward Villas -Skyline
Heights
Highland Park The Grove
Gleninston Gardens Sea
Breeze
Imperial Park Johnson
Terrace
Nassau East- Winton
Eastern Road Camperdown
Blair Estates Golden Gates
Estates
HIGHBURY PARK as well
as where ever you want it.
IN ADDITION
COMMERCIAL AND
RESIDENTIAL lots or acerage
in New Providence and Family
Islands.
Hotel sites and more. If it's real
estate we have it.
CONTACT
DAVSEON'S REAL ESTATE
AGENCY
Corner Bay & East Streets
Phone 21178 or 55408
P O. Box N4648
Nassau, Bahamas
or cable
"DAVCO"

C12084
HILLTOP SANS SOUCI
302 by 97, Old Bahamian
House, furnished, rented, with
three bedrooms, 2 baths,
grounds partially landscaped.
Magnificent views of Eastern
foreshore. Only $57,000.00.

RIDGEWAY four bedrooms,
3 baths, plus maids quarters,
furnished with pool and Air.
Spacious house for large
family. Gorgeous views and
rights to Sea. Only
$160,000.00
CAMPERDOWN houses on
hilltop, with pool, patio,
magnificent views. From
$115,000.00 and up.

CABLE BEACH Gold Coast
of Nassau. Have four
bedrooms, plus two bedrooms
totalling 7 bedrooms, facing
sea on a cliff. Good bathing,
gorgeous views, furnished,
spacious sitting. Patio and with
Air. Owner a willing seller for
$125,000.00
OUT WEST beach rights to
Governors Beach. Has three
bedrooms 2 baths, main house,
plus 2 storey apartment
containing 2 bedrooms 1 bath,
furnished and two car garage.
Landscaped enclosed grounds,
fruited. Come see anytime
immediate occupancy. Priced
with reason Have house and
income too. Price upon
application.
FOR THE BEST DEALS IN
AN INDEPENDENT
BAHAMAS CONSULT NICK
DAMIANOS, we sell real
estate. Dial 22033, 22307,
41197, 51129.


C12088
HILLTOP WINTON
HIGHWAY. Over an acre of
grounds, landscaped, and loads
of bearing fruit trees. Without
a doubt, the best views of
the Eastern Foreshore and
beach rights. House has three
d ouble bedrooms, three
spacious baths, extra spacious
sitting room with gorgeous
views, separate dining, tile
floors, high ceilings, patio
facing Sea. Laundry room,
garage, plus one bedroom one
bath for live-in maid. All this
for only $125,000.00.

SEMI-HILLTOP WINTON
WITH BEACH RIGHTS
house has 3 bedrooms 2 baths,
plus one bedroom 1 bath,
sitting-dning, ideal for inlaws
or guest. Furnished. Rented
with steady income. Some
views rights to beach. Only
$75,000.00.

OAKES FIELD AREA Have
five bedroom house with two
kiichens, basic furniture -- only
$48,000.00. Unoccupied see
anytime.

HIGHLAND PARK AREA -
Have 3 bedrooms two baths
furnished for only $45,000.00.

HIGHLAND PARK Have
house with 3V1 bedrooms 21Y
baths, elegantly furnished in
good taste. Spacious enclosed
grounds, Burglar-proof
windows. Costing around
$2,000.00. This house was
listed as $115,000.00 now only
$75,000.00.
DAMIANOS DAMIANOS
REALTY CO., 22305, 22307,
41197, 51129 anytime.


"'." 1


BUSINESS PROFESSIONAL


DIRECTORY


Save Time


SHOP -.





L Lsti I llh DIn ctiy C1 219186 EXT. 5

Ii[1hI hrMiont 2 LI2 PerlntI l U10 '

S SAVETiIME SAVE MONIEV

FLOOR MAINTENANCE r BOOK STORE
Rug Cleaning & Installation The Christian Book Shop 5 8744
Island Interiors 53576/42191
CaSTOMS BROKERS Mi EN S CL NG
Martin's 2-3173 The Wardrobe Mackey St. 5-5599

DEPT. STORES TRAVEL
Pixies's Dept. Store 2-3173 Playtours 2-2931/7
John's Dept. Store 2-3156 R. H. Curry'& Co. Ltd. 2-8681/7
RADIO & T.V. SALES MUSIC
Carter's Records 24711 Cody's Records 2-8500

OPTICIANS HEALTH FOODS
Optical Service Ltd. 2-3910/1 Nassau Drug Store 3-4871
SPORT SHOP CAMERAS
Champion Sport .and 2 1862 John Bull 2-4252/3
SHOE STORE DRY GOODS
Cilonaris Kute Kiddy 2-4264 Clonaris Kute Kiddy 2-4264

CARPETS LAUNDRY/DRY CLEANING
Lee's Carpet Craft 3-1993 New Oriental Laundry 2 4406
HARDWARE
John S. George & Co. 2-8421/6
WRECKER SERVICE DRAPERIES
iGibson Car recker Service 2-8891( Lee's Carpet Craft 3-1993
hammmm ----mm-- - -o -
FOR TIE ACTION 100 WANT


Sm Smm m Nmm mm mm M mm amm
Shop Nassau Merchants


For Business And Services


REAL ESTATE
C12115
$75 DEPOSIT gives use of
private lake & beach rights. All
utilities underground. 70 x 100
lots from $5800. NO
INTEREST. Tremendous
savings. Call Rutherford at
4-1141 or Morley & O'Brien at
2-3027 or 2-4148 or come to
YAMACRAW BEACH MODEL
HOME any afternoon.


C 12098
LARGE Select Lot
Nassau East price includes
complete working drawing for
a residence to your own design
and specification only
$8,000.00 financing available.
Telephone 31432.

C12092
MOUNT ROYAL 2 bedroom
fully furnished house,
airconditioned, T.V. and
washing machine. Also
commercial property for quick
sale. $18,000. Phone Swan's
Barber Shop 28881 from 9 to
5.

C12035 FOR SALE
* 1. Desirable hilltop
residential lot Montagu Heights
at the extremely low price of
$11,000. 118 feet by 155 feet.
* 2. Beautifully situated
waterfront lot Eastern Road:
$60,000. 79 feet on Bay Street
by 120 feet deep, with 128
feet of water frontage. Almost
half an acre.
* 3. Excellent buy in
three-bedroom, two-bath
residence off Village Road.
Living room with dining ell,
den, kitchen, laundry, carport,
etc. $49,000 furnished
including new appliances.
H. G. CHRISTIE
REAL ESTATE
309 Bay Street
P. 0. Box N8164, Nassau
Tel: 2-1041,2-1042

C12086
66,000 sq. ft. of land,
,2 bedrooms, 1 bath house
furnished, caretakers residence,
and 120 feet of beach frontage
at SOUTH BEACH. All
facilities. Grounds under
cultivation all this for under
$50,000.
88,000 sq. feet with 350 sea
frontage has two bldgs.
Sea-wall. Only $45,000.00.

OUT EAST we have
water-frontage and lovely
houses. From $85,000.00 and
up.
Good buys in WESTWARD
VILLAS furnished from
$40,000.00 and up and beach
rights, some with pool and
patios.
GROVE houses on
semi-hilltop, hilltop and inland.
We have the houses we
search for purchasers.


Ring NICK DAMIANOS
22033, 22305, evenings 41197
-51129.


REAL ESTATE

C12030
FOR SALE One lot of land
483 ft by 93 ft. adjacent to Sea
Breeze. Price $10,000.00. Call
23214 between 9 and 5.

I FOR RENT
C11868
BEAUTIFUL two bedroom
apartment in Shirlea, partly
furnished $250 a month
including water. Call 36896
Carl Lowe. Monday-- Friday, 9
a.m. -5 p.m.

C11763
COTTAGES and apartment'
daily, weekly or monthly
airconditioned, fully furnished,
maid serivce available. Lovely
gardens and swimming pool.
Telephone 31297, 31093.


C12089
2 BEDROOM 1 bath
unfurnished apartment,
situated on Bernard Road first
house from Windsor Estate Call
4-2184.

C11772
ONE EXTRA LARGE two
bedrooms two bath,
apartment. With large living
and dining all basically
furnished Victoria Court
APARTMENTS on Elizabeth
Avenue between Shirley and
Bay Street. Facilities, phone,
laundry, parking, T. V.
antenna, airconditioned. Phone
54631 between 8 a.m. and 5
p.m.

C12100
SUPERB LOCATION 10
minutes walk from downtown
Nassau and with beach and
recreational facilities, fully
furnished and equipped 2 bed
2 bath apartment,
airconditioned, wall to wall
carpeting, excellent security
arrangements, private maid
service available, reasonable
rent, contact 21841/2

C12040
FURNISHED two bedroom
apartment on Bernard Road -
airconditioned, Master T.V.
antenna, washer/dryer. Rent
includes all utilities and
telephone. Phone 42158.

C11766
THE RAPID RESULTS
COLLEGE


.World-famous postal
tuition for the GCE,
School Cert. aid
Accountancy, Banking,
Law, Marketing, Company
Secretaryship Examinat-
ions. For details of our
specialised courses write
for FREE copy of YOUR
CAREER to The Rapid
Results College Dept. TNI
Tuition House London
London SE19 4DS.


FOR RENT I I


NASSAU


R OFS RAC SALF


-T -3' --


I I CARS FOR SALE


C12046
BACHELOR ROOMS with
private entrance in Tedder
Close, Palmdale. For
information call 5-1044

C 12097
A TWO Bedroom unfurnished
apartment on Meeting Street.
Phone 53748

C12066
4 bedroom 21/2 bath with store
$320.00 per month. Phone
36807 after 4 p.m.

C11761
BAY STREET Store for rent as
of October 15th. For
information call 2-3170.

C11944
UNFURNISHED 2 bedroom
apartments, good location ofi
Mackey Street. Telephone
5-1758.

C11776
2 BEDROOM APARTMENT
Centreville. ,elechone 5-c '7q
5-8679.

TO LEASE
C12091
BAR RESTAURANT
KITCHEN LICENCE
equipped music and dancing -
light and water included. $250
per week. Phone 21848.

ART SUPPLIES

C11770
COMPLETE range of artists
supplies. Oils, acrylics. canvas
easels, etc. Bahamian Paint
Supply Ltd., Bay Street. Phone
2-2386, 2-2898_


MARINE SUPPLIES
C11762
PACEMAKER 44 ft
Luxurious Cruising Yacht
Phone 3-2371.

C12008
42'MATTHEWS 325 H.P.
Chryslers Flybridge, full
electronics double cab.
Shower in beautiful
condition 1963 registered
Bahamas. 665-5403, Miami -
6822 Mindello, Coral Gables,
Florida.

-11894
1969 -- 31ft. CHRIS CRAF'
Commander. Sleeps six, private
shower, two 230 h.p. engines
with less than 200 hours,
kitchenette, good condition.
Call 24267, 54011.


I v WE. - ; I


M


M


|


C12109
ABC MOTORS

BUDGET-PRICED, A-1
USED CARS'. BEST VALUE
FOR YOUR MONEY.
1972 PONTIAC VENTURA
$3,600
1972 TOYOTA MARK 11 -
automatic transmission, radio
-$3,200
1972 CHEVORLET VEGA -
automatic transmission -
$3,300
1972 MERCURY COMET -
automatic transmission, air
conditioned, radio -- $4,000
1972 CHEVORLET VEGA -
automatic transmission, air
conditioned $3,200
1972 MERCURY COMET -
4 -door, automatic
transmission, radio $3,400
1 97 1 RAMBLER
AMBASSADOR air
conditioned, automatic
transmission radio $3.400
1971 AUSTIN 1300 -
automatic transmission
$1.400
1970 VAUXHALL VICTOR -
station wagon, 4-door,
standard transmission $800
1970 VAUXHALL VIVA -
2-door, automatic transmission
-$650
1970 TOYOTA COROLLA -
standard $1,000
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA -
station wagon, automatic
transmission $1,200
1969 FORD CORTINA
4-door $1,100
1970 FORD ESCORT
automatic transmission -$900
1969 FIAT124 $900
ABC MOTORS
COLLINS AVENUE
Phone 2-1031
OPEN MONDAY TO FRIDAY
8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday
SATURDAY 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

C12034
1971 PLYMOUTH VALIANT
- Air conditioned radio -
11.000 miles. $3100. Phone
34527 28293.

FOR SALE

C12117
1 GAS STOVE $300.00
1 Gas stove $150.00
1 Kerosene Stove $50.00
1 Small boat and motor
$375.00
1 3 piece bedroom set
$150.00
Miscellaneous items Used
clothing. Phone 58803
42193.


C 1948
ISLANDD MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD.
P.O. Box N-640
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
USED CARS
1967 CHRYSLER
4 Dr. Auto. White $1000
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
4 Dr. Std. Green $995

1968 JAVELIN
A/C $995
1967 TRIUMPH HERALD
White $775
1971 FORD CAPRI
Auto. Blue $1695
1970 VICTOR S/WAGON
Std. Red. $900

1968 PLYMOUTH
Satellite
Satellite $1300
1969 PONTIAC GTO
A/C Vinyl Red $2600
1968 BUICK ELECTRA
White $1595
1970 ACADIAN
4 Dr. Auto Radio $1600
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA S/W
Green $1595
1971 FORD PINTO
Brown Vinyl Auto. $1995

1970 PONTIAC
LAURENTIAN
A/C Blue $1950
1967 COUGAR
Std. Green $900
1969 FORD FALCON
2 Dr. Auto. $1300
Trade-ins Welcomed.
Located Oakes Field
Opposite the Ice House
Telephone 34636 -7 -8

FOR SALE

C11955
ACT II RESALE SHOP
BRAND NEWNEARLY NEW
EXQUISITE Gowns, cocktail,
street dresses --pants suits
jewelry
DEALERS WELCOME
1352 Washington Avenue,
Miami Beach Phone 534-0001


PETS FOR SALE

C12093
FEMALE Cocker Spaniel for
sale 9 months old. Call
55441- ext. 266, after 7:30
p.m.

HELP WANTED
C12064
WANTED QUALIFIED
salesman with foreign
connections to sell real estate
in Abaco. Commission basis.
Must have transportation.
Housing available. Apply to:
Leisure-Lee Ltd., Box N8300,
Nacssau


lwft OPP,


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Monday, October 15, 1973.


HELP WANTED
C11968
REINFORCING STEEL
DETAILER, Part-time,
experience with two-way flat
slabs, familiar with ACI 1971
Code, after 5:30, 77206.
C6334
Job Title- BURNERMEN (2)
Minimum Education Good
basic education. Experience in
fuel burning process in rotary
Kilns and production of
Clinker. Cement plant rotary
Kiln burnerman.
Minimum Experience 3-5
years.
Duties/Responsibilities -
Operate Kilns to produce
clinker by a continuous process
of burning.
Interested applicant contact
Personnel Department,
Bahamas Cement Company, P.
O. Box F100, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.

C12043
PARADISE ISLAND
LIMITED requires one Chef to
prepare all types of food for
gourmet restaurants. Must be
able to make estimates,
supervise and co-ordinate work
for personnel in kitchen. Must
also assist in the
menu-planning, etc. Must be
able to relieve at any station in
the kitchen. Should have done
three years' apprenticeship at
maior hotel or recognized
restaurants or hotel school.
Experience in preparation of
continental cuisine essential.
Salary commensurate with
experience. Applications,
accompanied by resume,
should be forwarded to:


The Director of Training
Paradise Island Limited
P. O. Box 4777
Nassau, Bahamas.

C12045
QUALIFIED AUTOMOBILE
MECHANICS. Must have at
least 5 years proven experience
with good references. We are
looking for men with the
ability to turn out first class
work on all phases of
automobile repairs. Excellent
conditions and pay for the
right men. Apply to Service
Manager, Nassau Motor
Company, Ltd. Shirley Street.

C12019
EARN FULL PAY WHILE
LEARNING A SPECIALTY .
It pays to specialize. And IBM
will pay you while you train to
become a Customer Engineer.
It's your chance to get started
in one of today's
fastest-growing areas of
Electronics. As a Customer
Engineer, you'll install and
maintain the latest IBM Office
Products Equipment. It's a
demanding job, one requiring
intelligence and skill. You'll
receive continuous training to
update your knowledge. If you
have what it takes, you can be
promoted to a position of even
greater responsibility in this
challenging field of
information handling and
control. What do you need to
get started? Mechanical
aptitude and basic Electricity.
Bahamians only. Why not
begin your specialization
today? For more information
contact: L. Bingham, IBM
Limited. Telephone 3-2351-4,
Nassau, Bahamas.
C12085
LIVE IN MAID Full time
employment responsible for
housekeeping, cleaning,
laundry and serving. Always
two in help. Private residence
on Eleuthera. Full time
employment although owners
in residence part time. Live in
accommodations and meals.
Must be clean, honest and
conscientious. References
requested. Telephone 2-3326 9
a.m. to 5 p.m.

C12083
MARRIED COUPLE TO
WORK AS GARDENER AND
MAID. Full time employment
on Eleuthera, housework,
cleaning, laundry and
gardening. Always two in help
in house. Owners in residence
part time. Full time live in
accommodations and meals.
Must be clean, honest and
conscientious. References
requested. Telephone 2-3326 9
a.m. to 5 p.m.


I


C11748






.e ,

*p t.


ACME PRINTERS
Specializing in:-
Business Forms
Wedding Invitations
Rubber Stamps
Company Seals
Advertising
Public Relations
Rudolph H. Ferguson
Special Representative
Phone 21594 Box 6151

C11775
T. V. ANTENNAS
Booster, for homes;
apartments and hotels.
Sales and services
Call 5-9404
V/ORLD OF .i.ISi.',
Mackey Street
next to Frank's Place.

C1197G
BAHAMAS ANTENNA
SYSTEMS
SOLVING POOR RECEPTION
Same day service for moving
antennas or new installations.
Call Douglas Lowe 23371
51772.


Bicycle Exerciser
Vibratory Belt
KEEP FIT AT HOME
RENT EXERCISE
TELEPHONE
HUBERT WON(A
54506 34871


C12118
FOR ALL
GARDENING
Trimming, Hedging,
Beach Cleaning, For
reasonable and
service. Call 5-7810.


YOUR
needs,
Pruning,
prompt,
efficient


GRAND BAHAMA,


CLASSIFIED

II FIEEPElT TEl. 352-66


C6275
When visiting FREEPORT stay
at the:
EL CONQUISTADOR HOTEL
spacious rooms, fully
air-conditioned, from $10 to
$14 per day. For reservations
call 352-8180.


MARINE SUPPLIES

C6343
37 foot SAILING YACHT,
Mercedes diesel, teak decks,
very comfortable, well
equipped, $12,000 duty paid.
Freeport 373-2288.


HELP WANTED
C6353
JOB TITLE GENERAL
REPAIRMAN LEADER
Minimum Education: Good
basic education.
Minimum Experience: 5 to 10
years. Good cement
mechanical background.
Duties/responsibilities: Direct
and work in inspecting,
repairing replacing, installing
and adjusting and maintaining
all mechanical equipment in a
major producing unit or
assigned area in a cement plant.
Interested Applicant Contact:
Bahama Cement Company,
Personnel Department, P. O.
Box F-100, Freeport, Grand
Bahama


hb tkribunth 9


HELP WANTED
C12114
LIVE-IN MAID. References
required. Apply 31975.

C12i13
LIVE-IN GARDENER/
HANDYMAN WANTED.
Apply 3-1975.


TRADE SERVICES
C11769

Pinder's Customs

Brokerage Ltd.
Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU. BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
VIECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-3796
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434.


For of all the thoughts of tongue or pen,
'he saddest are these. "It might have been".
-JOHN GREENLEAF Whittier
***********
If, of all the words of tongue or pen,
The saddest are these "It might have been",
more sad are these we daily see:
"It is, but hadn't ought to be!" --BERT HARTE




CARROLL RIGHTER'S

'IHORkOSCOPE
from the Carroll Righter Institute

O GENERAL TENDENCIES: There is much
nervous activity ail about as this new week
starts. Yet, if you hold steady to a plan already decided
upon you will be able to accomplish a great deal Handle all
activities in an intelligent manner.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr 19) You can meet with
associates and convince them to go along with worthwhile
plans you have made. Make out vital reports.
TAURUS (Apr 20 to May 20) Think over how to add to
present income. Listen to what an expert in financial matters
has to suggest. Avoid one who wastes time
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Give more attention to
personal affairs. Make appointments to meet with good
friends Show greater appreciation for music.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Use the direct
approach if you want to get the right answers from a friend.
Show more devotion to the one you love.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) A good day to get together
with friends, whether in business or personal life Take time
to be helpful to new associate.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept 22) Bring out your finest
talents in the business world and make big headway Put
more effort in your daily routines.
LIBRA (Sept 23 to Oct 22) Get out of that rut and into
more profitable areas of expression that will make you feel
happier New associates can be helpful.
SCORPIO (Oct 23 to Nov 21) Make sure to pay
important bills so that your life becomes more satisfying
Show more cooperation with mate. Relax tonight
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Find out what
associates expect of you and then state your own ideas and
come to a complete understanding. Be wise,
CAPRICORN (Dec 22 to Jan 20) You can now attend
to all that work you have been putting off Avoid one who
has been harmful to you in the past.
AQUARIUS (Jan 21 to Feb. 19) Taking time out for
recreation can relieve tensions at this time Discuss new ideas
with mate before taking action on them
PISCES (Feb 20 to Mar. 20) You can get kin to
cooperate at home provided you don't pressure them too
much. Take no chances with an opinionated person.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY he or she will
have one of those appealing, yet sensitive natures that will
be helpful to others, The field of religion could be a natural
outlet. A good education will make your progeny
self-sufficient and happy. There is much practicality here,
"The Stars impel, they do not compel" What you make
of your life is largely up to YOU!


HELP WANTED
C6344
SHOP MANAGERESS
required for Scandinavian
stores, Freeport. High-school
graduates: Must have
experience in the control of
inventory, cash and charge
procedures as well as
knowledge of purchasing
specialised gift items.
Mercantile Trading Ltd. P. O.
Box F301, Freeport.

C6355
BROILER CHEF: Must have
three (3) years experience in
first class hotels and
restaurants in preparation of
international Cuisine. Good
references and Police
Certificate required. Applicant
should apply to:
Personnel Department
Bahamas Amusements Limited,
El Casino,
P. O. Box F-787,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
C6348
WANTED FEMALE
CLERK/TYPIST Qualified to
post records, have a knowledge
of the Kardex Card System,
prepare billings, invoice
accounts receivable, filing -
and must have a typing average
of at least 65 wpm. Kindly
apply in writing to Standard
Plumbing, P. O. Box F-2460.


HELP WANTED
C6354
JOB TITLE: MANAGER
SALES AND DISTRIBUTION.
Minimum Education: College
graduate from a recognized
college.
Minimum Experience: 5-10
years international commercial
experience.
Duties/Responsibilities:
Manage the commercial
activities of Bahama Cement
Company, both local and
international.
Interested applicant contact:
Personnel Department, Bahama
Cement Company, P. O. Box
F -100, Freeport, Grand
Bahama
C6334
Job Title BURNERMEN (2)
Minimum Education Good
basic education. Experience in
fuel burning process in rotary
Kilns and production of
Clinker. Cement plant rotary
Kiln burnerman.
Minimum Experience 3-5
years.
Duties/Responsibilities -
Operate Kilns to produce
clinker by a continuous process
of burning.
Interested applicant contact
Personnel Department,
Bahamas Cement Company, P.
O. Box F100, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.


EDITORIAL


Story of Bahamas tourism


From Page 3

states bluntly: "Remember, my political brothers, while the grass
is growing the horse is starving. You cannot put promises in the
pot, especially when many of you and your children are emptying
the steaks into the garbage cans".
******************
I have written all these thousands of words in five articles to
bring a simple message....both to the P.L.P. and to certain
elements in the Opposition F.N.M.
Remember, boys.....I call you boys because I am old enough to
be the grandfather of any of you but I'm not, of course....the
Bahamas is an entirely dependent territory. It cannot survive
without the goodwill and support of the white races of the world
who have the money to support tourism.
This is my message to you: Whatever you may
think....whatever you may wish....however lofty your ideas and
hopes may be.... you can't put blackness in the pot.

I see no immediate hope for stable growth in the Bahamas or
in any island in the Caribbean in the near future.
Some day....long after I'm dead, I'm sure.....reconstruction
may begin on sound foundations. But this will come only after a
long period of privation and suffering.
And it will not be possible until conditions demand that the
best elements in all the races in the island come together and
provide unselfish, enlightened leadership for our misguided
people. It will have to be along the lines I tried to develop in the
Bahamas Democratic League. As so happens with many men, I
lived ahead of the times. But I hope that in my time, I planted a
seed that will grow and blossom in the fulness of time.
It makes me sad to have to say ... this awakening is far very
far off in the future.
****O****UG ******H
THOUGHTS FOR TODAY


SSTEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders


A A, PEAL ?

S OU LET US TAKE
PICTURES OF YOU- WE'LL BE
QUIET AS MICE -AN MAYBE CHAT
A BIT. WHEN WE FINISH WrE FAPE
OUT OF YOUR LIFE LIKE IT NEVER
HAPPENED... AND...


& overgard


..-WE PRCOMISE-
SCOUTS HONOR-
NEVER TO
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ABOUT WHO YOU
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REX MORGAN, M.D. rBy DAL CUt'TIS

I AWAY FR F ARE YDU ALL HE WAS GOING TO KILL
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HAVING HEARD JOAN'S IS NONE AM WANT YO U TO TAL BETWEEN YOUR TV HOWUR AS E KILLED COUNTRY RAI
CRY FOR HELP REL. I FOU ,EX E GON
MORGAN ENTERS I-AC T $
THE APARTMENT LE TME 00,000 A EAR WHY MORE MONEY THAN ME
BUILDING AND EY GO
SUDDENLY
CONFRONTE
BY GORDYO











JUDGE PARKER By PAUL NICHOLS
NO, AM! I WANT YOU TO W TAL IN HERE BETWEEN YOUR TV HIS EVENING, I THOW GHT A LI'RE HER OLD COUNTRY
TO POOLE! TELL HIM I'LL PAY AND YOUV FOOTBALL, YOU COESC TO THE BIG CRrYAN'ALL2
UPON RETURNING BACK THAT A75,000... UT MUST BE MAKING OVER OF A E UDDEN HE'5 LLAKIN"
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APARTMENT 3-G By AZlexKotzkll

IP SHE SHE DIDN'T HAVE TO SAY IT---I KNEW!' WHEN WALTER AND Ti PROFESSOR
ACTUALLY I WALKED IN HERE THIS EVENING, I THOUGHT ARE HERE! CAN'T YOU
ANN TO LUNCH TOrA SAY SHE WERE THE ONE--- COME OVER, BRYAN?
AND I KNEW SHE WAS IN LOVE WAS WF1 THEN BRYAN ROPELL
---BUT SHE DIDN'T TELL ME LOVE ? CALLETT---PAN N SHE
WHO THE LUCKY AN WASN AeCAM E TOOK ONE LOOK '
j AT HER FACE---ANP
THE SECRET WAS
WRITTEN ALL OVER
GLOW!I


I I












ihe Oributr


Monday, October 15, 1973.


N.Y. Mets beat sun, umpire


& A's to tie World Series
B\ Ken Rappoport
NEW YORK (AP) The New York Mets are badlc
home toddav with a split in the first two games of the world
Series after battling the sun, umpire Augie Donatelli and the
Oakland A's.
All three elements gave the game and nailed l t 1.'"k' '
National leaguers fits Sunda New York after Itie \l.i '
before their Mets pulled out a gave up the A's tin, :,'I:
/an\, 10 7. 1 2-inmng victory in Traling 3-2, the IMc'ts , ed
Oakland tour times in the si\th ii"nn r
"I think we'll look better in alter a walk to Clcon .Jknet. .
New York." sas Don llahn. single by John \lilmi' and a i;it
one ot t11: Met outl!,e'ders who\ batsman that loaded lith basis,
had ti deal ilth thie Hlahn beat out an mfi tl ngIle
treacheronIs nn i 1'the Oliklainld for one run. Ilariels.on ,singled
Coliseum o er ;lite i -' ek'eid to right for a another ad then
"'ihe (Colieumin as an a\' tu!l Jerry (;rote and Hlaln both
tough park to lield in on'' it scored on an iileld eiron
tile toughest Ive e\e hten 1:1 After the ',s sco-ce.,l 'helI
Cleon Jones cri'f d il ll. fourth run in a I d .iihl hi\
report. Ihe IMeC i;t telii '' t Reggwi Jack,,son i he .'nlth'
a hall in that tor! ti, 0 1 -, 1 n nd i lie i ,tt; hi'( *a itl .1
the first inningg, gi in,-, lk'' lid 1 t\ o-rtln raill i lhci it;:i ih, lhic
a gift double in i ,i' i rn lets took coni ;!nani l I it
Oakland iiupisint low ot the game.
lhe M\ets weren't \,i!l\ The ftinall pitt
too thrilled ,wil lith e it i;'ig. reach i iI the I 2!h as \ .Nl',
either, lhe> haild rpe singled hole the go-.head n.;i
opportiluniti t<, bieak 1 -( l ne and the \ets pushed ii a rss
in the 10lh nl iinug wi ith lInners'' three nmore s 1n e i \ 'i s
at first and third a.id Lie it bl0\ Oakland second b ,hsim ti
Felix Millan listed a j ha'I to \like AndlCews. It w.As oitie
Rutd ill sho t1 left and i iud five errors made h\ i 1,'
Harrelson attempted to tog up fumbling A's
and score from thid Ihe A's beat the \1i'ts -1 i
But Donatelli called him ut Saturlday's opener.
on a bang-h.ang play at home Trhe errali, Ield11'.'
"'tie nIevC toiihed iiie "" sid produced a tiolal si \ I ;r:o's
liarrelson, talking about the in the game. swiinch a i i "'
close play at home itlh \'s took in the aspect o l ti
catcher Ra \ F sse, affair. Adding It, ill, a" n 11 'l
I)OL'BL Pl \Y atmosphere was the ,m'e I h'C
I he IntqI e doilible play game a irecod lsd I O ii -
killed otff the Mets !or the and 13 minutes ', ;i \ ,
lmomene lt. b.,i the\ Ciweren't Series. Also a ) oti .i i
comnpletelI Jead as it itrned pitcliers wass u,\i Ih\ bii'
outl. lihe\ scored lour rains in a sides, and that ti i ,I \\ .'' d
whack 12thl inning tIo break Series record
the deadlock, I lien, ,eosrge hid th e the \et
Stone canie into the tense ind thei le \ et
to t ind their pliat ii lli, ,.i





uS right -handied sn i,
)Opens o 45 Shb)ws start 7 15
.V one ui ('id r I till iti litl'ttd.
52 itrol~it o li1'I; i ll


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BE ADMITTED.


Strachan's Afrikans show Classic Pros


they can play good basketball

By GLADSTONE THURSTON
LAUGHTER AND JEERS were dished out to the newly sponsored Strachan's Autos Afrikans
following their opening game loss to defending champs the Kentucky Colonels last week.
Yesterday afternoon at the A.F. Adderley Gym when Lionel "Snake" Evans snatched 14 from the
boards to go along with Jerome Barney's 16 in his 23 points game, those same fans froze in awe as
the former Budweiser Eagles stiffled the Classic Pros 76-70.


: -. .'
.- ;. t,

PLAYER/COACH JEROME BARNEY breezes past
Classic Pros' Elisha McSweeny (55) and Hallie Moultrie
(right) to lay up another of his 23 points. Strachan's Autos
stopped the Pros 76-70. Photo: Rickey Wells.


This leaves the ( colonel thel
only undefeated team in the
Paradise league. Thursday at
the (.I. (;ibson Superwash
Arawaks stopped N:assae
League champs Becks Cougars
87-78 giving them their first
loss in nearly four years of
regular season plans.
goingg into last night's action
shouldering their loss to the
Colonels, fine performances bN
Bertie Johnson anld P'rince
Ilepburn proved that Afiikans
are more potent then they
soletilesl appeIr. Johnson
captured 13 rebounds and
scored 14 points Ilephburn, olne
of thie swiftest guards in the


Hurricanes rout Marlins; Stingrays take Pros
By IVAN JOHNSON
THE FRELPORT HURRICANES, with a bruising ground attack, rolled up 310 yards. crushing
the Marlins 15-0 at the Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre Saturday evening.


ta k Sturger, playing in
pl e i o iniiiured star fullback
1)inke\ Bain, turned in a great
performance for his team.
leadiiig lihe lHurricanes attack
i I l I1 3 iyardIs in 18 carries.
IHllthack 1 ugne Davis sho\\ed
,sins ft greatness whileC
S ii ,11 ip 1 ) yards on 14

I iiHi luincanes di Cefhense
s\liich has ,isen up only one
! iIchItIui' n ( points) all
season limited a healthy Marlin
haiklwld tl Ricky 1'homnpson.
i, odi\ie Roberts. Donaldi
S\\ti i;wii ,ind RaN \\rice at 70)
\ar1is in 30 attempts.
\\ki Ii choking the runniingi
, Maiirlins, the
l 1, o' ..':,,, .s alio stopped tlii'
i. ,'rt I\ nce, allowing him
II I., pl. nly 3 of I
sank ani itt 'n

i le Irlurn anes, although
lli \ si ovtel t iC iellied their
, 't iri 11 n s 5 it Ii thui
s i 1c hat ,weaik offense, call
\Is\ ii i their seemiingl
liii I' e.I'nab'le defense to hold
,I t l tlacl. ks. \while they scored
i 11 'i t',\I l tIouc'h owns to
.i i tii h' li n t i o lft a in. .
I arl\ in the lust quarter it
it tAri apparlet that the only
st.. l i'h Marlins could possibly
i. i , ild be throu li a
nisltke tin the part of the
It iii tc ,es,. Il I lIurricanes
,T it1illes heel' lies in their
itiiiw' to handle a kick-offt or

I \r otherr phase of the
I i, ,'ln -n s ga ime is sound,
i;', itku l hlit e passing arml of
uitk/ack ,ack Snmitlh. Smith
II'. l complete anl. of the
Iti p.isses he attempted,
iivic' three of his passes
s' 1' in a illd out of the hands of
I!, ',ci\t'ers. one of them being
i) i ird strike to I ddie Smith
tA.litnhi;e i11 alone in the end

I I It luricanes scores cattme
late in the second and fourth
luI cIii s otn similar plays.
St l~.it eiir. oin a delayed sweep,
an e \ yards for the first
it' tc'lt n. Smith, on another


NEW

IMPROVED


FREE


sweepl ran 47 yards for the
other touchdown. Ricky
Thompson on a pitchback was
trapped in his end ,one for a
safety to round out the
scoring.
ONLY'TIHRAT
The Marlins threatened only
once during the game, this was
on the opening kick-off of the
second half when they
recovered a loose ball touched
'by a Hurricane on the
Ilurricane's 35 yard line.
A face masking penalty gave
them a first down on the
Hurricane 17 yard line.
(odfrey Roberts bulled 1 yd.
to the 16. A Ray Wrice pass
tcl! Incomplete, Ricks
Ihompson then ran 7 yards up
the middle giving the Marlins
4th and 2 at the Hurricanes 1
yard 11ne'.
A motion penalty against
the Marlins made it 4th and 7
at the 14 yard line. Ray Vkrice
dropped back to pass and was
dragged down at the 14 yard
line. ending the Marlins only
scoring threat of the game.
In the other BAFA game
Stingrays quarterback Bernard
'Porky' Dorsett threw three
touchdown passes and a
newcomer No. 31 ran 75 yards
to pace a weak but balanced
attack that outlasted Whitney


Rolle andil tie Classic Pros
18-12.
IThis \was the 'Pros best
showing of the sc:ason anld
although they lost the game
they did \well to hold the
Stingrays to the r eslpectIable
score of 18-1 2. I hll gacie
should have done a lot foi their
moralle.
D)orsett, captili/.ing on tthe
weak pass defense of the Pros.
completed 7 of 11 passes ito
83 yards and thlIee
touchdowns, however tlhe
Classic P'ros held si\ Siingra\ix
backs to 88 yards i 33 rushing
attemIpts, including Ithe 75
yards rolled lip bh No. 31.
\ lnitiney Rolle r.ti 3s, \ ard
oit 8 carries, altliit it'lli :Is a. .i!
the Classic Pros \wre ininus
yards on 17 carries Riole ails
ticauightt ,o si Ireell p.ss'es I
oil individual rtiggeihLiess .loneM
tore through Stingra. 's tacklers
fIor 17 and ( 1 yards
respectively.
Rolle scored both lassieic
Pros touchdowns ion a 3 yard
run and the 01 yd. pass tn
play.
Vogel Williams aind Kelton
HIiiimes caught 1 and 2 \d. 11)
passes in the first lqua:rter aild
Philip Dorsett caught Ia IS aird
strike late in the third quarter
to account for the Stingrays


GET THAT MAN ... fullback Mark Sturgner (No. 40)
storms past Marlins defender Geoff Knowles to score the
Hurricanes first TD during Saturdays BAFA game at the
Q.E. Sports Centre. The Hurricanes won the game 15-0 to
retain their unbeaten record.


league, gave a game high of
eight assists and scored nine.
in a final four minute
showdown when the Pros
threatened to smother them in
;i way similar to what they did
to John Bull, the Afrikans
proved to he formidable in
their defence. Trailing by ten
going into the final two
minutes of play, six-foot seven
Ilisha McSweeney and guard
(.olson Bain each popped two
unanswered baskets each
bringing the Pros two points
behind the closest they were
since midway in the first half.
(onming from a Pros time
out with 10 seconds remaining,
Martin Lundy put the game on
ice when he sunk two free
throws giving Strachan's a
74-70 lead and the Pros called
anotherr time out. In their
de fensive court, Barney
intercepted a pass and tossed it
over to Hephurn who with two
seconds remaining let loose a
3 5-foot rimless on the hbizzer.
I lie Pros' big man
\lcSweeney proved to be the
damaging factor. tHe had a
game high of 27 points.
i vwe ver with stiff
competition under the boards
coming from Barney, l vans
and Johnson, lie was good for
only 1 2 re b ou nd s.
McSweeney's points were made
up of seven for 24 from the
field and 13 for 18 from the
line. Ilallie Moultrie, going
seven lor 13 tromtr the field and
t\wo for eight from the line,
seconded 11111.
"M n:tIl\ .t we were not
r.'iti ;oi that ga!lic against the
( olon ls." pointed out
Strachan,' coach Barney.
"lial guy Quant! just psyched
the gin s outl. T'Ioday, we reali/e
ie Jlist had to do it and the
pl ayer it istl put it together."
Both sides for the first ten
minutes of play battled for the
lead which they swopped
basket Itor b sket until t-vans
fresh tff the bench, took a
runaway shot to the basket
lakingi Strachan's ahead 20-19.
Barine\ then picked off a
defensic rebound and sent the
assist to Hlepburn who saws
theii ahead by three.
Slide Pros, though held by a
Iull court press, never allowed
the hustling Mechanics to get
more than three points ahead
until, with four minutes
rena niing in the first half.
rookie guard Bernard Davis
took to tlie court with valuable
hall handling assistance.
A.ddingl to Strachan's
potency was the clutch
shooting of Bruce Lal'leur who
together with Johnson and
):avis gave their home team a
37-2o first half command.
Only twice for the first 15


!VI III I M I Il


20 YEAR GUARANTEE




STOP THAT THIEF


minutes of the second halt
were the Pros able to clip
Strachan's lead to less than ten.
Strachan's at one time had
them by 14 points.
STRAC('HAN'S AT()
Barney 10 1i I 23
Clarke 1 10 3 2
'vans 5 14 2 10
LaFleur 3 7 4 7
L.undy 2 2 3 7
Davis 2 3 2 4
tlephurn 4 5 3 4
Johnson 6 13 3 14
I LASSIE' 1'(ROS
MlcS weenes 7 12 3 27
Moultrie 7 7 3 16
Rodgers 2 0 1 4
Johnsion 3 5 4
Bain 5 3 4 13
Marsh 2 3 2
Ramsey O 0 1 0
Ingrahanm 0 0
NANG(;(IS I:AS' WVIN
R. III'MES tossed in a game high
of 28 points and took 22 rebounds
leading the Ilox Hill Nangoes to a
99-52 victory o\er Nassau Schlitz.
Schlit" took their third consecutive
loss.
J. (larke in a 21 point
performance taking another ten
rebounds helped the Nangoes to
their first win in three played.
(regory Austin topped Schlit/
with 14 rebounds and 12 points.
Luther Strachan had 16 points.
I-OX HI LL NANG()I-S


Alhury
tumes
Clarke
Knowles
Storr
J. Clarke
Mi. Humes
Gardiner
Francis
Missick
NASSA
Austin
Sweeting
Bethel
Payne
North
Strach .,i"
Wouodside
S. Thompson
Simmons
'. I'homps.','


5
22
(i
13
it
5
8

3
10/
lti


2
.1


POWER BOAT
RACE OFF AGAIN
THE Miami-Nassau Power
Boat race has been cancelled a
fourth time because of weather
and will not take place before
Thursday "at the earliest."
A committee spokesman
said that a low depression area
south of the Bahamas and a
stationary cold front lying
across the middle of Florida
were expected "to clash within
a day or so." The seas remain
rough.
The race, which was
scheduled from Miami to
Nassau on Friday morning, was
postponed to Saturday. It was
then delayed to Sunday, then
Monday. Hopefully Thursday
will now be the day.
When the race does get
underway the boats will leave
Miami at 8 a.m. and
"depending upon the seas"
start arriving about 10:30 a.m.
at the Nassau Yacht Haven.


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