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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03469
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: October 11, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03469

Full Text







S4 DUOLEY'S '


TV ANTENNA INSTALLATIONS
7 7ox. 77 7 -


-1


"" Postmaster o Baham concession within the Bahamas.) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper
V OL -'X, No. 267 Thursday, October 11, 1973.


\ \\ HITI'E '0 I)PRI(:ES COMMISSION....IT'S GRIM,

"IU I 'I'HFY .1i I)ON'T SEE THE URGENCY OF IT'


Shortages






wholesaler-






not going


continue as


say


to sell at


re






loss !N


By MIKE LOTHIAN
C-HOR rAGES OF RICE, FLOUR, GRITS, mayonnaise and Wesson oil are likely to hit Bahamian consumers
. ..v: h wliolesaiers chum they simply cannot sell those items at Government-controlled price levels without taking
" o(ItS loSS.


I I'


1 1-',i ,i ,.l tohl thelie n

I I'l 'I chird ;il his CoIst
,1 ( ninil 'l,:i' of Robin
C, ] ; i o o1 t S"2 over
', it h he l is akIllowcd


S' ~.' about


i ,,, -r o !!he legal


S. !, l ;t)


. I not


Mr. I'ritchard said his flour
protblcri will probably worsen,
s lihe has contracted orders for
shipments he will have to
accept and pay for, but which
lie will not be able to sell at the
controlled price.
"I'm going to have flour
coming out of the roof," Mr.
Pritchard said. "The evil of it is
that I could have bought it
much cheaper three months
ago, but I held off hoping
they'd change the controlled
price, and the cost just went up
and up.
Mi. Pritchard went on to say
that he had heen worried about
miits as well. tie said he
irccntly was notified of a price
increase by his source, and lie


er consumption down



? t hn third in '72


Sli!' F I \R'S Il I R (i\stl.
S ., ih let s i lhan in 1972.
S I' 1 I. S t l n tl- t l' .


I . . : ;i ,: . l o I IIc> l b y


, : 4 5 st


S, I:r i gu i ii rc
, ill i l

l.. i t ri t



II t I
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S : t i d the
S . I. l

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S = ., i \! !'. ..



PI -NcR rO)W\T RACED
', LTPON- F iDTO'SAT.




.~ i ~ ~~: !- It .1 W il "\
'.! ii ,I.I: Si .i ll~li



CHARGED WITH THEFT
F ROM PARADISE CLUB
S i 1 i R I I f t .. .
, '!. \ i;\ n;s. 24 \ ;ItI| , : "i tI l SI l ii4 ( ,, :', !

S' r i o i th iril
m t I (i', h lh \plir 4It ,
f : ,h. iiit mI l iS I i \t i it \P1 l 1h4,



k r )I s[ iis t o to o u r saIle.
S ive tour stafl a rest
A- I will be closed i
:>,,i & Saturdav
i) i o v rs ,1
w e 'ckenld. See you
I onday!

I11Y MADISON FURNIUSA


i hl'l'l "t ,,
iI l'lmolsimg
i: ',.. im. l increasec

'i.' '.." ''l lons ii I 70'o. It
i\, l ,i '.10n ithiei in 1 171


NPI' i lI\ is expected to be more
according to Bahamas Blenders

to 1,748,981 and rose slightly
in 1972 to 1,904.925.
Beer is not the only liquor
to suffer as a result of duty
raises. Total case sales for al.
beverages arec offt 20 per cent.
Mr. Symonette said.
The combination of idut.
and first cost has now made
tlie price of liqueurs, a
tourist favourite so high that
it is above the price in Nc\\
York.
"Items we used to sell to
A\mericans are now virtually
cut off because of duty and
freight costs," Mr. Symonette
said. Some of the higher priced
liquors are off hy as much as
50 per cent
Asked what the public is
substituting as a popular drink
in place of beer, Mr.
Sy molnette mentioned the
"pop" wines. Overall, however,
tie felt that less product was
being consumed.
Bahamians have not yet
taken to the quality U.S. wines
which are markedly cheaper
t h d an their I uro pea n
counterparts. "'They 'Ill come
around to it though, when they
eiali/e they are good value for
money.'" he said.


General Workers convention


will rap govt. & private sector

(,1 1\ I 1'\1 1% 1 AND THE PRIVATE SECTOR can anticipate
rough trcatlment trom the lEngineering and General Workers union
xlwhen it holds its aiinnua convention this year.


I '.' '1 iiln ion which
open- li n OI( ctI "ber 21 will de.il
v liih c ph ipo' .ilia s s steili, lhe
' ri 1, >i\ ii miiieinpl t im ent.
.*i ii I ,.' Ii llnu ration
'. nt f ,l lhc hi0hi cost of
Si' iI ", tlhe l io-nmispiraI,: '" to
i' P .' Control int the
i t, .""t', thle n ich, ;andIl the
"'rim .ilisinf" 01 the poor
;, !i kk s vs \ ages,, 1unoiin
1 i i t id \Dud'c illaijms said

I I W iliiils s.aiL the
col0 \ IllO n'l \ ill ,is (' dcal v itll
R it I Bh i ha ina.is aind
iahil1i:ini.is !r is well is the
H ah 1 11 .i s I l i c i y
("or i oril tion.
(C ciu l vauIW ilie liiiI leiil ivgdi
i tniiii ti 7 1or l1ii0 Lllnlin has t been
invIdstIl i sp ak ioii tlie legal
positl on between Ilie iunioni


and the Ministry of Labour.
Representatives from industry
and employees of those
industries have also been
invited.
ilhe convention will be held
at the faxico Hall on Wuliff
Road. On Monday, October 15
nomulation of officers will be
held. A Lchurch service will be
held October 21, the union'ss
birthldat .
Sessions will be held nightly
froin October 22 through 2(6,
excepting the 25th.
Fhe *theme of this ye('sa
convention -is "The Probleims
of the Black Commnunityl."
lThe union is continuing a
large membership drive in
Nassau and many workers have
already joined. Mr. Williams
said.


wrote the Commission
informing them and applying
for an appropriate adjustment
in the controlled selling
price. But his sources have
subsequently told him the
price is going back to the
earlier level. "I think grits will
be all right," he said.
Rice was another matter. "I
haven't got a grain in my
warehouse, and I haven't had
any for a month. I have some
coming that I'm expecting
momentarily, but there's no
way I will be able to sell it."
Hie said the rice is costing
him $14.86 for a bale of five
12-pound packages, and the
ceiling selling price for the
same item is S 11.81.
"It's grim." Mr. pritchard
said. "They just don't seem to
realize the urgency of it all. I
think what's bothering them is
that when and if they change
the controlled prices the public
is going to be shocked. When
they sec rice jumping from
$11.81 to $16.62, which is
what I've asked for, the public
is going to say what's going on
here."
le said "I wouldn't be
surprised" if other wholesalers,
like Pritchards, are finding
themselves unable to sell
controlled items at the
Government price.
Ale\ Pinder of Ronald A.
Albury wholesale told The
Tribune that "we haven't hati
any new prices on the
controlled list andi
,..neulien ln there are items
which we cannot import." lie
cited flour, grits, Wesson oil
and rice as examples of the
problem.
"It's just plain ridiculous.
Flour, percentage-wise, would
cost us 30-35 percent more
than we can sell it for. We're
talking about an 80-85 percent
increase in the cost of flour
since January, and only one
change in the selling price since
March" (when price control
was introduced).
lie said the August I
revision of the controlled
prices is "outdated."
lie said the difference
between the buying cost and
legal selling price of Wesson oil
"is so ridiculous I haven't even
checked, but it's close to 100
per cent. We're not bothering
with it. We're just taking
Wesson oil off our books for
the time being."
lie said rice prices were in
the same position the
product costs the wholesaler
more than he is allowed to sell
it -for.
"The only -way out is to
import a brand which isn't
listed under the price controls,
which is what we're doing
and which doesn't help the
poor man which is what price
control is supposed to be
doing."
Grits, too, costs the
company more than they can
sell it -for, so they are .ot
buying any.
Price control was slapped on
a number of bread-basket food
items on March 28. By )uly
numerous wholesalers said.the
Prices Commission -was not
responding to changes in prices
at the source's, and claimed
they' were being forced to stop
the importation of certain
items because of the difference
between .buying and selling
prices. .
Almost half of the
controlled pieces were devised
on August 1, but wholesalers
charged that the revision was
based on already outdated cost
figures.


H.E. AT ST. AUGUSTINE'S
FLAG-RAISING: Governor-General Sir Milo Butler this
morning attended the official flag-raising ceremony at St.
Augustine's College, Fox iill, and told the students the
important role they had to play in "building a nation". The
youth of the Bahamas "are very important", Sir Milo said.
"There are more than 74,000 young people between the
ages of five and 24 years out of a population of under
200,000. What you do now will reflect your behaviour in
the coming years". As Sir Milo runs up the flag, Mr. Edward
Cox directs the school chorus and the students in singing
the National Anthem. Mr. Lou Adderley, headmaster,
(right) Lady Butler and two students look on. After the
ceremonies the students went back to classes and Sir Milo
and Lady Butler were taken on a tour of the campus.
PHOTO: Douglas Pyfrom.



James Crosby claims complete


defence to Hartford's 'false


& misleading statements'

JAMES M. CROSBY, chairman of the Board of Resorts
International Inc. Wednesday described the legal proceedings
instituted by Huntington Hartford against Resorts International,
certain of its Bahamian subsidiaries and certain of the company's
officers and directors, including Mr. Crosby, as "wholly without
merit and replete with false, inaccurate and misleading
statements."


lie said that in the opinion
of counsel, the defendants have
a "full and complete defence"
to the actions and would be
vindicated when they were
tried in court.
Mr. Hartford, founder of
Paradise Island, won a
preliminary injunction in
August against Resorts
International, restraining the
island's present owners from
issuing additional shares in
subsidiary companies of
Resorts in which Mr. Hartford
has a stock interest.
LOAN
A further injunction also
restrained the New York Bank
of Commerce of disposing of
the collateral securing a $1
million loan made to him.
The bank however was not
restrained from calling the loan
or Resorts from calling the
guarantee.
Mr. Harford is claiming that
Resorts and the Bank of
Commerce are engaged in a
conspiracy to take advantage
of his "illiquid position" to
wipe out his stockholding in
Paradise Island.
In view of Mr Hiartford's
claim of illiquidity, it was the
defendants' opinion that the
legal proceedings instituted by
him and the allegations made
were designed to postpone the
"day of reckoning on his
loan," Mr. ('rosby said.
ALLEGATION
Referring particularly to
'Tuesday's Tribune article on
the litigation, the Resorts
chairman said that even Mr.
Hartford's allegation regarding
the financial statements of the
casino and his alleged
entitlement to a share of the
net prQfits was liinited, to the
assertion that. such financial
statements ere". false and
designed to defraud Mr,'
Hartford,
There was no allegation as
reported by The Tribune 'that'
"by the same action". the-
casino's profits had .been.
"understated for Bahamas
government tax purposes.".
Mr. Crosby emphasized, that
no such allegation could be
truthfully made and that The
Tribune -statement. in. this
regard.was false.
S' CASINO'
Contrary to the allegations
in Mr. Hartford's complaint, he
noted, Resorts International
Inc. does no render financial


statements concern
casino to Mr.
Pursuant to an
executed by Mr. liar
int ernationally
accounting firm
Waterhouse andt
certified the share
profits, if any, to v
Hartford was to be en
Such certificate
binding upon the pa
Crosby pointed
e emphasized furtht
Resorts agreement
Hartford concerned
profits, whereas cas
were determined by
receipts of the ca
consequently had n
do with the account
Hartford.
In commenting i
Hartford's all
concerning the
Company, Mr. Crosb'
event since its incep
seven years ago, the
has been independent
and operated and
Resorts nor an)
subsidiary has or hav
interest therein. "Al
has been known
Hartford since the a
from him of Parad
over seven-and-a-half
''Con se q u ent
allegations in this
with the entire con
vsholly without in
('rosby asserted.
TOLL
Mr. llartford ha
that Paradise Islam
being deprived of h
income rightfully di
that Mr. Crosh as
and director of Para
Ltd., had violated hi
trust through
ownership of th
company:
A derivative suit
.to the bridge names
,one ot the defehdaqit

NO TRIBUNE
TOMORROW
TOMORROW,
Day, is a public ho
Tribune will not be'

UNION FOOD Si
The Engineering ar
Workers Union will h
sale outside union he
on East Street tomo
12 noon.


ning the
Hartford.
agreement
rtford, the
known
of Price
Company,
of the
which Mr.
titled.
es were
parties, Mr.


Price: 15 Cents

LESLIE HANMIOil'S DOG

FOUNI SHOT, AS--



Police report record spate



of break-ins in the West

By NICKI KELLY
A RECORD NUMBER of 20 break-ins nearly half of them in
the Prospect Ridge, Westward Villas, John F. Kennedy orive
areas were reported to police Monday afternoon.


Police have evidence that the
house-breakings in the Western
district were committed by
teenagers said to have been
using a red car.
Among the homes entered
were those of Mr Leslie
Hammond, retired chairman of
the B ahamas Monetary
Authority, and Mr Vibart
Wills, director of the
Government Public Affairs
Department.
Mr. tHammond's home on
Sandford Drive was entered
sometime between 12 noon
and 2.15 p.m. when no one
was at home.
Mr. and Mrs. lHamrnond are
presently in London and two
teachers. Mr. and M~rs. John
Stanton have been living in the
house.
The gardener was reportedly
on the premises until noon. At.
2.15 p.m. the Hammonds'
maid returned to find the front
door open. When she went into
the kitchen she found the
family's large German shepherd
dog covered in blood.
As she ran out of the house
she was followed by the animal
which got into the car with her
and refused to go back inside
the house.
The maid called Mrs. Stanton
who in turn called the police.
They found the house
ransacked. A quantity of
jewellery belonging to Mrs.
Stanton and valued at $605
was missing.
DOG SHOT
Police said a forced entry
was made through the
bathroom window. It appears
that the dog was shot when he
attempted to attack the
thieves. The bullet pierced his


ear and went through the top
of his skull.
lie was attended by Dr.
Gordon Learn who said the
animal was now in satisfactory
condition.
At 2:15 p.m. Mr. Wills of
Marlin Drive, The Grove,
returned home to find that his
house had been broken into
and a toaster and quantity of
food stolen.
Entry was made by
removing two louvres from the
kitchen window.
At 2:30 p.m. Mrs. Patricia
Albury, also of the Grove.
called police and reported ttlu
two men one of them
carrying a shotgun were
prowling around the house of
her neighbour, Mrs. Joe
Darville. The men were
frightened off by Mrs. Albury's
maid.
FOOD & SODAS
At 5:50 p.m. Mr. Archie
Carroll of Westward Villas
returned to his house to find
the kitchen door broken open
and food, sodas and $80 in
cash stolen.
At 5:45 p.m. Mr. Lavern
Lockhart of John F. Kennedy
Drive discovered the sliding
door of his home had been
forced and the house
ransacked. He was still unable
to say what had been stolen.
At 7 p.m. Mrs. Yvonne
Wallace, also of John F.
Kennedy found one of the
doors of her house had been
forced and a .22 automatic
rifle stolen.
Police said all the houses had
been ransacked.
The remainder of the
break-ins were "over-the-hill"
they reported.


Ian Allen up for assaulting


policeman, files counter charges
By MIKE LOTHIAN
BERNARD ROAD RESIDENT Rodney Davis, giving evidence
this morning at the trial of architect Ian Allen on charges of using
obscene language, resisting arrest and assaulting a police officer,
testified that he saw Allen hit P.C. 862 Mackey on the shoulder.


out. Hie The offences are alleged to
er that have been committed between
with Mr. 9 p.m. and 9:20 p.m. July 20
d casino at the Princess Margaret
sino taxes Hospital's out patients
the gross department.
isino and Allen, represented by
nothing to attorney I ugene Dupuch, Q.C.,
ing to Mr. has filed counter-charges of
assault against Mackey and P.C'.
upon Mr. 877 Lot more.
legations Davis, uhiO arrived and left
Bridge court in po(ie custody, was
y said that the last of three witnesses
(tion over called hy prosecuting Inspector
company Hugh Burke before the
tly owned luncheon adiournmennt.
I neither Davis told 'Chief Magistrate
V other Wilton iHerculcs that he Nas in
e had any the out patients department
I of which when the two policemen
to Mr. arrived w\ilh Allen.
acquisition lie said hlie saw Allen
ise Island standing up "making noise,"
years ago. and he heard one of the
I y h s policemen tell him to be quiet.
regard as 'Allen was then handcuffed,
plaint are DIavis said.
erit," Mr. RlMOVt-
According to Davis, Allen
then asked to be taken to the
bathroom, and the policemen
s claimed accompanied him to the
d Ltd. Is lavatory down the hall from
bridge toll the main waiting room. The
iue it, and handcuffs were removed for
an officer Mr. Allen to use the lavatory.
dise Island "When he (Allen) came out
s fiduciary the bathroom door," Davis
personal testified. "he asked Mackey if
e bridge he ready to fight., then he
.. passed a blow an] struck
pertaining Constable Mackey on the
Resorts as shoulder.
*s. "Constable Mackey said 'if
you don't behave we will
handcuff you and take you to
the station.' Then they started
to wrestle."
Columbits Davis said the second
liday. The policeman held onto Allen, and
published. Mackey "kicked the
defendant's .foot" and both
Allen and Constable Lotmore
ALE fell to the floor,.with Allen on
nd Grieneral top.
lold a food Davis told Mr. Hercules that
adquarters he offered to assist the police
rrow fron- subdue Allen, but the offer was
refused. He said Mackey then


got the handcutfs on Allen, at
which point Allen said.
according to Davis, "I give up.
I'll cooperate."
Davis said "I didn't see
either of the officers hit the
man.
Cross-examined by Mr.
Dupuch, Davis said he did not
see a doctor in the area at the
time of the incident, and that
he did not see the policemen
push Allen down twice.
BRUISE
Shown a photograph of
Allen's head which showed a
bruise on the upper right side
of the forehead, Davis told Mr.
Dupuch he had never seen that
bruise, and that, owing to the
manner in which Allen fell on
top of Constable Lotmore, it
was "impossible" for Allen to
have received the bruise then.
Cross-examined further,
Davis said Mackey is a "friend
of mine," and that he and
Mackey went to school
together. lie denied having
seen Mackey since the July 20
incident.
The. first witness called by
Inspector Burke this morning
was Dr. Roger Domesthemes,
who said he was on duty in the
PMII out patients department
at the time in question.
lie said he heard a "loud
noise" outside his office and
went to the door to see what
was happening.
"I saw two policemen
struggling with a man. The man
was the defendant.
"I saw the two policemen
push the defendant to the
ground twice, and put a pair of
handcuffs on him. One of the
Page 14, Col. 8


INK-SMEARED


.". ribtt..


UI


II I I I rr _... _


S:I


FULL LINE

ARITISTS' SUPPLIES

BAHAMIAN PAINT SUPPLY LTD.
BAY STREET NASSAU
TELEPHONE 2-2386, 2-2898


f. "


0









Thursday, October 11, 1973.


NIXON SEEKS SUGGESTIONS FOR VICE PRESIDENT
WASHINGTON (AP) President Nixon reportedly has told Republican
and Democratic political leaders that he wants by tonight ant suggestions
they have on a nominee to succeed Spiro Agnew. Nixon also has sought the
advice of Congressional leaders on procedures for picking a new Vice
President. After talking with Nixon last night, Senate Democratic leader
Mike Mansfield said Nixon expects to nominate a successor later this week
or early next week. (*SFE STORY THIS PAGE])
Agnew resigned yesterday afternoon shortly before he faced federal
judge Walter Hof'tman in a Baltimore courtroom. That's where A\gnew
pleaded ro contest to a criminal tax evasion charge. Hoffman said he
reg.1rded e.gnew's no contest plea as an admission of guilt Hoffman then
sentenced Agnew to three years unsupervised probation and fined him
ten-thousand dollars.
Agnew's resignation and plea were his part of an agreement reached with
Justice Department officials who agreed not to pursue charges ot bribery.
extortion and conspiracy against him.
AGNEW WAS GETTING KICKBACKS, A.G. CLAIMS
WASHINGTON (AP) Attorney General Elliot Richardson scheduled a
news conference today to discuss the government's case that prompted
Agnew to resign. Yesterday the Justice Department released a 40 page
document outlining all the evidence against Agnew. including charges that
for ten years Agnew sought ai.'l accepted thousands of dollars in cash
kickbacks from consulting engineers in Washington. Agnew said he was
innocent of all charges except for tax evasion.
According to the document, Agnew received halt the kickback funds,
with the rest being split between two of Agnew's associates. Richardson
said the evidence shows a pattern of substantial cash payments when
Agnew was Governor of Mars land. Richardson also said there is evidence
of payments by engineering firms continuing into December 1972. almost
four years after Agnew became Vice President
ISRAELIS STRIKE ACROSS SUEZ CANAL
TEL AVIV (AP) The Israeli command says its commandos have struck
across the southern sector of the Suez Canal The commandos attacked
convoys and rear echelon I-gyptian forces, then returned to Israeli
territory. Egypt continues to hold the east bank of the (Canal and has
pushed the Israclies back three to ten miles into the Sinai Desert.
'Israel also reported that its gunboats shelled oil installations in two
Syi.an ports. And Israeli jets this morning reportedly attacked Syrian
armed forces in the Golan Heights sector.
Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir said in a telecast last night that Israel
had recaptured the heights driving the S rians back behind the ease tire
line setablished in 1967, but yesterday heavy artillery and air doels were
fought across the plateau.
Israel has not disclosed how the commandos made their first raid of the
war into Egypt. But there is speculation that they came and went across
the Suez Canal by helicopter a method that has been used on such raids
in the past. (eSEE STORIES THIS PAGI )
BRITAIN BANS ARMS SALE TO MID EAST
LONDON (AP) Britain banned arms sales to Middle last countries
VWednesday. The F foreign Office said the ban was due to the Arab Israeli
war.
Diplomatic sources said the government felt it would be inconsistent to
accept arms orders while urging a cease fire.
U.S. RESUPPLY DEPENDS UPON ISRAEL'S LOSSES
WASHINGTON (AP) The U.S. appears to be laying the groundwork
for a major resupply effort should Israel suffer continuing heahy losses in
its war with Syria and Egy pt. State D)egartment officials say that a massive
airlift of Soviet supplies to the Arabs reportedly under way might
bring about a decision soon
Officials stress that these are concentrating on a diplomatic drive to find
a consensus with the Soviet Union and other powers for at least a cease fire
to end the fighting.
Meanwhile, witnesses reported that a Boeing 707 transport plane bearing
Israeli marking was loaded with air to air missiles at a na y base near
Norfolk, Virginia. tOfficials described this as a patchwork resupply effort
and not the major rescue operation Israel would need should it lose ground
to the Arabs.
Other observers said Israel undoubedtl%, had asked Washington to, step
up delivery of I -4 Phantom jets and other weapons promised in contracts
for shipment this year and next.
MYSTERIOUS ON-LOADING OF MISSILES AT U.S. AIRBASE
VIRGINIA BFACH. VA. (AlP) A Boeing 707 with Israeli markings on
its tail seclen was loaded with missiles and bombs at Oceana Naval Air
Station today, the Norfolk Ledger Star reported
While the arms Sparrow and Sidewinder air to air missiles were
being put aboard, sailors covered the Israeli marks with paper and masking
tape and then painted the covering, thle newspaper quoted witnesses as
saying.
Earlier today, a C141 aircraft fron the U.S. Military Airlift Command
landed at Oceana and taxied to a point near the Israeli plane. The U.S.
plane pulled alongside the aircraft and began off-loading bombs directly
into it, the Ledger-Star said.
Capt. Robert C. Mandeville, commanding officer at Oceana. would not
" Lcomment on the loading.
A source at the air station told the Norfolk newspaper that another
Boeing 707 with Israeli markings was loaded with arms last Saturday.
The Sparrow and Sidewinder missiles are used aboard 1 4 Phantom I I
jets, Israel s chief fighter planes, which are manufactured in the United
States.
PRIVATE TALKS CONTINUE AT U.N. ON MID EAST
UNIriT) NATIONS (AP) Ihe Securnts Council, peacemaking organ of
the United Nations, had no plans to meet Wednesdayy in its search for peace
in the Middle East.
Private talks continued between member countries but there swas no
announcement on the next formal session of tIle I1 nation council
U.S. ambassador John A. Scah talked for several minutes with the
Soviet Union's Jacob Malik in the General Assembl W\ednesday.
U.S. spokesman had no comment but diplomats said it was possible Scali
expressed concern over a reported Soviet airlift of military equipment to
the Arab countries.
The Securtiy Council president for October. Sir Laurence Mclntsre of
Australia, adjourned the Council meeting alter a tumultuous session
1 uesday night because there were no more speakers listed.
SLAPPING INCIDENT AVERTED AT U.N. MEETING
UNITED NATIONS. OCT, 11 ( \P It uba's foreign Minister and his
aides tried to storm the General Assembly rostrum last night to attack the
Chilean ambassador
U.N. Guards and delegates from other nations including Nicaragua,
Paraguay, Uruguay,. Bolivia and Chile slopped I foreign Minister Raul Roa
a few yards from the podiun.
Later Roa told the Assembly he rushed at Chilean ambassador Raul
Bazan "soely and exclusively to give him the slap that he required."
Bazan had called Prime Minister I del Castro "an tilmpotent leader with
expansionist goals" and Roa "a man swho chess the cud of hatred and
knows nothing of dignity."
Bazan said Castro "used to \atlch e\ecuitns and invited diplomats from
other countries to watch."
At that point, Roa and his aides rushed do\in a side aisle toward the
front of the chamber shouting "son of a bitch and "tag" in Spanish.
Nicaraguan delegates rose from their seats and shouted the same words
back at the Cubans.
The Chief U.N. security officer' It Col Hiarold A. Trimble of Canada,
said the incident was "potentially the most serious" minoment in his five
years at the United Nations.
The Assembly hall was only about one quarter full with mostly Latin
American delegates present. 'he president of the Assembly, Leopoldo
Benites of Ecuador, asked the delegates "to forgive this incident, which is
unheard of in the history of the United Nations."
THREE HIJACK PHILIPPINE PLANE TO HONG KONG
HONG KONG (AP) Three lihpinos hijacked a Philippines Airlines
plane during an inter-island flight thursday. took airlines president
Benign Toda hostage during a stop at Mlanila, then forced the crew to fly
the plane to Hong Kong.
The hijackers, described as 19 and 20 years old, told Ilong Kong


authorities they would negotiate only with civil authorities here. They said
they "wanted no police anywhere around the plane."
There was no immediate indication of what the hijackers wanted






FINAL CLOSING-OUI SALE

STARTS SATURDAY




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GIRLS'DRESSES from $3.00
LADIES' FLANNEL NIGHT DRESSES $3.00
BOYS' SCHOOL SHIRTS (tan, sizes 14 & 16) $1.75
BOYS' LONG PANTS (white, sizes 8 & 10) $4.00
MEN'S MESH UNDERWEAR (Colours) $1.00
SWEATERS from $3.00

COME SEE OUR BARGAINS AT ...



Next to Kelly's Bakery, Market St. off Bay.


ARAB-ISRAELI WAR: 6St. DAY



Israel claims recapture of strategic



Golan Heights from Syrian forces as




PM tell nation 'we will win the war'

TEL AVIV (AP) Israel has recaptured the strategic Golan Heights Plateau from Syria and
Jewish forces were pushing back the Egyptian Army along the Suez Canal, Premier Golda Meir
declared Wednesday, but the Soviet Union was pouring in new arms to fuel the Arab onslaught.


ISRAELIS BOMB

SYRIA'S AIRPORT,

LULL IN

GROUND BATTLE
By Ronald Thomson
TEL AVIV (AP) A
military spokesman in Tel Aviv
reported Israeli bombers
inflicted Wednesday heavy
damage on the Syrian capital's
airport, which he said was
closed to civilian traffic after
the war began last Saturday.
Ihe airport, he said, has
become a base for Soviet-built
Sukhoi 7 and Sukhoi 20 fighter
bombers to libe launched against
Israel.
But there was no claim of
specific damage to the planes.
Western experts have never
heard of the Sukhoi 20 model,
described by the Israelis as a
new Soviet swing-wing aircraft
I three were reported shot down
in Israeli terntory two days
ago.
Other targets listed as hit by
Israeli planes:
IN [I' (M 1 a radar post
at Baltim on the Mediterranean
O0 miles east of Alexandria, air
force bases at Khusna and Abu
Ilaiuinad located in an arc 27
miles north t of Cairo. Pilots
reported "accurate hits.'"
0 IN SYRIA, naval
headquarters at Minat al Bayda
on the Mediterranean north of
Latakia, fuel installations at
I loans, 85 miles north of
D)amascus, and a power station
at katina in the same area.
Again. the government said,
the pilots reported hitting the
targets accurately.
Ilerzog, to whom Israelis
listen avidly for his assessments
of the way the war is going,
told his listeners sternly:
"I he public must appreciate
that sometimes our army lets
certain things happen and
invites mistakes on the part of
the enemy."
Ileriog was clearly
attempting to reassure those
who fear that something may
hase gone wrong with Israel's
military strategy.
In three previous wars over
the past quarter century the
Israelis have become used to
lightning thrusts in an
atmosphere of daring drama
with always the same end -
speedy victory over the Arabs.
"()n the fifth day of the war
I fear the public is not seeing
things properly," llerzog said.
"Perhaps we have been too
pampered to grasp the swing of
things ... I want to advise the
public that not everything
which seems slow response is
without logic."
I he former intelligence chiet
said the Syrians threw 1,400
tanks into the Israeli-occupied
(olan Heights at the start of
the war, broke through the
Jewish lines and threatened
Israeli-held villages.
IABLIFS TURNED
"But now the tables have
been turned in a most fateful
manner," Ilerzog said Israeli
radio said Wednesday Israeli
forces were finding more and
more Syrian tanks abandoned
intact by their crews.
While warplanes zoomed
over the Suez C('anal front,
ground fighting appeared at a
virtual standstill after the
Israelis abandoned their
"Bar- Lev" line of fortifications
to Egyptian soldiers who
stormed across to the east bank
of the waterway.
By Israel's own admission
the Fgyptians have established
a line up to three miles from
the ('anal while some strike
elements penetrated as far as
six miles into the Sinai
wilderness.
Maj. (;en. Shmuel (onen,
Israeli commander on the
southern front, warned his
men: "T he war could be a long
one. This is the most difficult
battle we have faced since our
War of Independence in 1948


... it is unlike our other wars.
We are faced by an enemy
enjoying numerical superiority.
The Igyptian forces are armed
with the most up-to-date
Soviet equipment..."
On the surface the Israelis
seemed unperturbed by reports
that the Iraqis have thrown
100 tanks and many thousands
of men into the war against the
Jewish state.


After five days of fighting in
the new Middle East conflict,
Mrs. Meir told her embattled
nation "there is absolutely no
doubt about the result of the
war we will win it....
"We have moved to the
offensive almost everywhere,"
she declared in a television
appearance after a day of
deadly Israeli air attacks across
the Syrian and Egyptian fronts.
"Our goal is peace," Mrs.
Meir announced, but "we want
to hit them, force them back
across the line and push
them beyond the lines" to
prevent any renewed Arab
attack.
INTENTIONS
The declaration indicated
that Israel planned to advance
beyond the cease-fire fronts
that ended the 1967 mideast
war, which left Israel holding
26,000 square miles of
captured Arab territory. Mrs.
Meir did not elaborate, and left
Israel's territorial intentions
unclear.
Despite Soviet rearming of the
Arab forces, "the enemy in
Syria is beyond the cease-fire
line and we are pushing him
back." Mrs. Meir said. On the
Egyptian front, "our forces are
standing very close to the
Canal and here too we are
pushing back the enemy.'
As the fighting passed the
102-hour mark, the 75-year-old
grandmother conceded that the
war would last longer than the
six-day conflict of 1967.
The Soviet Union had been
"incessantly" arming the Arab
states ever since 1967, Mrs.
Meir said, and "even at this
moment we have reason for
saying that the weapons to
Syria especially are flowing
all the time."
SOVIET AID
The Israeli leader spoke a
few hours after officials in
Washington reported that
.Soviet transport planes were
ferrying "very large tonnages"
of military equipment to Egypt
and Syria.
There was no evidence,
however, that the Russians
were replacing the more than
170 Arab planes which Israel
estimates it has shot down
since the war erupted
Saturday.
The Israeli air force smashed
throughout the day at strategic
targets deep inside Syria and
IEgypt, claiming a kill of 20
Arab jets.
Immediately after Mrs.
Meir's television interview, TV
screens showed ground crews
loading bombs and rockets
onto Israeli Phantoms for a
renewed air offensive. An
uneasy lull persisted in the
tank and infantry fighting on
both fronts.
Mrs. Meir appeared totally
confident of the war's
outcome, but her face was
solemn as she warned of more
fighting ahead. Wearing a white
dress and a necklace, she
looked strong and energetic,
physically unaffected by the
strain of war and nine
emergency government sessions
in five days.
ARMS CAPTURED
Israel, she said, captured
"huge quantities of arms, tanks
and other things," mostly on
he Syrian front but also from
Egypt in the Sinai Desert.
The cool, firm and
authoritative address was a
morale booster for anxious
Israelis accustomed to lightning
triumphs in two previous wars
against the Arabs and a
victory over colossal odds in
the 1948 fight for

U.S. CONSIDERING

REARMING ISRAEL
WASHINGTON (AP) The
United States appears to be laying
the groundwork for a major
resupply effort for Israel should
that nation suffer continuing heavy
losses in its war with Syria and
Eggypt.
But knowledgeable officials
stress that no decision has been
made. They say the United States is
concentrating on a diplomatic drive


to find a consensus with the Soviet
Union and other powers for at least
a ceasefire to end the fighting,
and more preferably for a
framework for a lasting negotiated
settlement.
"We're in close and continuing
contact with the government of
Israel," said Robert J. McCloskey, a
state department spokesman. At
the same time, he said that a
massive airlift of Soviet supplies to
Egypt and Syria, reportedly under
way, "would tend to put a new face
on the situation" both for Israeli
forces in the field and for the
United States.


Independence.
This time Israel's offensive
has been held back, and in the
fifth day, the Israelis still face a
challenge matching the
challenge they faced in the
opening minutes of the 1967
war.
The Syrian and Egyptian
armies were still evidently
intact behind their lines, and
Iraq Wednesday announced it
was putting its air and ground
forces into action against the
Jews.
ARABS REINFORCED
Minor contingents of Arab
reinforcements were also
reported from Sudan,
Morocco, Kuwait Tunisia and
Algeria on the battle fronts. So
far Israel has officially
refrained from even
mentioning the Arab
reinforcements possibly
considering the reports
insignificant or untrue.
But Radio Israel broadcast
that King Hussein was calling
up reserves in neighboring
Jordan which joined the war
against Israel in 1967.
Western-armed Jordan so far
has cautiously stayed out of
the fighting, heeding Hussein's
past warnings of Arab
weakness. Its only action has
been to fire at passing Israeli
jets.
Now, said Mrs. Meir, "wt
face the armies of Syria and
Egypt but the missiles, the
planes, the tanks, everything
that a Syrian or Egyptian
soldier holds, comes from the
Sovier Union."


ININIIARY .K.


Agnew fined $10,000:


CINSIL KIINAPPEixon w s

IN GIABALAJARA Nixon wants strong


GUADALAJARA, MEXICO
(AP) Armed men burst into
the home of England's
honorary diplomatic
representative in Guadalajara
Wednesday morning and
kidnapped him before the
horrified eyes of his family.
Police said at midday they
had no word from the
kidnappers who wore ski masks
and carried machine guns, nor
did they have any word on the
fate of Dr. Anthony Duncan
Williams, the Mexican-born
consul for Great Britain in
Guadalajara.
Williams, 47, was preparing
to leave his home when the
gunmen burst in at 8:30 a.m.
He was to attend a meeting
between a British commercial
delegation and Jalisco State
Gov. Alberto Morozco Romero
at the Governor's office.
An unconfirmed report said
one of Williams' sons tried to
defend his father but the
kidnappers beat him up so
badly that he had to be
hospitalized.
Four men entered the home
while another guarded the
front door, police said.
Williams' wife, Luz Martinez
Gallardo Williams, and four of
his sons were also in the house
when the kidnapping occurred,
police reported. The Williams
family lives in the exclusive
country club gardens section of
Mexico's second largest city.
This was the second
diplomatic kidnapping in
Guadalajara this year. Terrence
Leonhardy, the U.S. consul
general, was kidnapped in May
by leftist terrorists and held
four days before being released
unharmed after payment of an
80,000 dollar ransom.
In Mexico City, Francisco
Trew of the British embassy
said Williams is a Mexican
citizen born of a British father.
He is not a career diplomat,
Trew said, but is England's
honorary representative in
Guadalajara.


ISRAELIS' 2- PRONG AIR & SEA


ATTACK ON SYRIANS; EGYPT


CLAIMS ENCIRCLING TANKS

BEIRUT (AP) Israeli jets and naval gunboats launched a
two-pronged offensive on Syrian airfields, seaports and oil outlets


Thursday and Egypt claimed i
Israeli tanks in the Sinai Desert.
Telephone reports from
Damascus said air raid sirens
sounded in the Syrian capital
for the third straight day and
military communiques claimed
Syria shot down 41 more
Israeli jets in the first two
hours of air action.
Egypt claimed its armoured
units in the Sinai beat off
Israeli counter-attacks in raging
battles that began Wednesday
afternoon and continued
through the night until
Thursday morning.
The enemy threw large
numbers of tanks in an attempt
to check the advance of our
forces," said a military
communique from Cairo. "Our
armoured forces clashed with
the enemy in a fierce four-hour
battle and inflicted heavy
losses on the enemy in tanks,
half-tracks, lives and
equipment.
"The enemy then retreated
eastward and our forces
pursued and encircled part of
the enemy retreating forces."
A Syrian military
communique made no mention
of Damascus being bombed,
saying only that Israeli
formations "began raiding
some of our airports and
positions. Our jet fighters and
air defenses engaged enemy
planes in continuous battle
since 0700 local time and have
shot down a total of 41 enemy
planes by 0920.
Israeli jets first bombed
Damascus on Tuesday, and
returned Wednesday to raid the
city's international airport.
291 LOSSES
The latest Damascus
communique raised to 291 the
number of Israeli aircraft
claimed shot down by Syrian
and Egyptian anti-aircraft
defenses since the start of the
middle East war last Saturday.
Earlier Syrian communiques
said Israeli gunboats raided the
country's biggest commercial
seaport, an oil terminal and
naval bases on the
Mediterranean coast north of
Lebanon.
The Israeli command said its
commandos struck across the
southern sector of the Suez
Canal and attacked "convoys
and rear echelons of the
enemy, then returned to Israeli
territory. Israel did not say
how the commandos crossed
the 200-foot-wide waterway,
but there was speculation that


its armour encircled retreating

they came and went by
helicopter, the method used on
such raids in the past.
Israel said its navy hit oil
tanks and other installations at
the Syrian ports of Latakia,
Banias and Tartous and "large
fires could be seen." A
communique claimed that two
Syrian missile boats were sunk
and others that tried to
intercept the raiders fled.
Syrian said Israeli boats
attacked the port at Latakia
and the oil pipeline terminal at
Banias and "were engaged by
our naval forces and coast guns
for two hours." The Syrians
claimed three of the Israeli
boats were sunk and that "the
attack also resulted in the
sinking of the Greek
commercial ship Murghot."
Israel also reported that its
jets went back into action at
dawn on the Syrian front,
attacking Syrian armoured
forces in the Golan Heights
sector.
Premier Golda Meir said in a
telecast Wednesday night that
Israel had recaptured the
Heights, driving the Syrians
back behind the cease-fire line
established in 1967.


PAN AM P.R. FLIGHT
WARNED OF SICK PASSENGER
SAN JUAN. P.R. (AP) Seven
passengers, aboard a Pan American
flight from Portugal, were sent to
the hospital today immediately
after arrival in San Juan.
Jack Fernandez, director of
airline passenger service, said:
"We're investigating what
happened. Right now we don't
know. Before the flight landed, we
got a call that there were sick
passengers aboard."





McAllisthr Hotel
DOWNTOWN MIAMI



ialdiam lata

Single $ 9
Double $11
Triple $13
Quadruple $16

Home of the
AMERICAN-BAHAMIAN
FEDERATION


VP to replace him

By Carl P. Leubsdorf
WASHINGTON (AP) President Nixon says he plans to
nominate a strong Vice President who shares his foreign policy
views, a description that fits Democrat-turned-Republican John


B. Connally.
However, key Congressional
Democrats are warning that
nomination of the former
Texas Governor could set off a
new political storm in the wake
of Spiro T. Agnew's dramatic
resignation as Vice President.
One Congressional
Republican source predicted
that Connally would be
rejected by the Senate, if
nominated by Nixon.
Democrats control Congress,
which must approve Nixon's
choice.
Besides Connally, who
switched to the GOP last May,
two other possible 1976
Republican presidential
contenders are being
mentioned as replacements for
Agnew, Govs. Nelson A
Rockefeller of New York and
Ronald Reagan of California.
On Capitol Hill, there
appeared to be considerable
sentiment for selection of a
respected senior Republican,
such as former Secretary of
State William P. Rogers, Sen.
Barry Goldwater, former Sen.
John Sherman Cooper and
Senate GOP leader Hugh Scott.
Nixon indicated Wednesday
night at a White House meeting
with Mike Mansfield, Senate
majority leader and House
Speaker Carl Albert that he
plans to move quickly,
probably by early next week.
Agnew resigned Wednesday
afternoon shortly before he
faced U.S. district court judge
Walter E. Hoffman in a
Baltimore courtroom.
Agnew pleaded no contest
to a criminal tax evasion charge
that he filed a false joint
income tax statement for 1967
that reported income of
$26,099 and taxes of $6,416,
when in fact his income was
$55,599 and he owed taxes of
$19.967.
Reading from a prepared
statement held in trembling
hands, Agnew told Hoffman,
"I did receive payments in
1967 which I failed to report
for the purposes ot income
taxation ... at no time have I
enriched myself at the expense
of the public trust."
Hoffman said he regarded
Agnew's no contest plea as an
admission of guilt.
Hoffman sentenced Agnew
to three years unsupervised
probation and fined him
$10,000.
AGREEMENT
Agnew's resignation and plea
were his part. of an agreement
reached with Justice
Department officials who
agreed not to pursue charges of
bribery, extortion and
conspiracy against him. Atty.
Gen. Elliot L. Richardson had
personally directed the federal
investigation of Agnew and


S


described the evidence as
damaging.
After outlining the federal
case against Agnew,
Richardson made an official
plea for leniency for the
former Vice President.
Hoffman responded that he
usually imposed short jail
terms in cases like these as a
possible deterrent for others.
but in this matter would accept
the agreement made between
the Justice Department and
Agnew.
Apparently Wednesday's
scenario was agreed upon
Tuesday night in a 40-minute
meeting between Nixon and
Agnew in the Oval Office.
But Agnew's formal
resignation went to Secretary
of STate Henry A. Kissinger
and was delivered by an
Agnew's attorney at 2:05 p.m.
EDT, Wednesday.
STARK WORDS
It read, starkly: "I hereby
resign the office of the Vice
President of the United States.
effective immediately."
In a longer letter to Nixon,
Agnew said he was resigning in
the best interests of the nation.
"It has been a privilege to
serve with you," Agnew wrote
"May I express to the
American people, through you,
my deep gratitude for their
confidence in twice electing me
to be Vice President."
In his letter to Nixon,
Agnew said he had concluded
that he must resign "in the best
interests of the nation"
because "the accusations
against me cannot be resolved
without a long, divisive and
debilitating struggle in the
Congress and in the courts."
The White House later
released Nixon's "Dear Ted"
response.
In it, the President said
Agnew's departure "leaves nme
with a great sense of personal
loss."
"You have been a valued
associate throughout these
nearly five years that we k-*
served together," Nixon wrote.
"However, I respect your
decision, and I also respect the
concern for the national
interest that led you to
conclude that a resolution of
the matter in this way ... was
advisable in order to prevent a
protracted period of national
division and uncertainty."
"As Vice President."
Nixon's letter continued, "you
have addressed the great issues
of our times with courage and
candor. Your strong patriotism
and your profound dedication
to the welfare of the nation,
have been an inspiration to all
who have served with you as
well as to millions of others
throughout the country."


Our client requires a man of
strong character with a good
background in business and
financial management at
executive level to control
considerable property interests
(B.$5,000,000) in Freeport,
Grand Bahama.
Experience must include a
broad knowledge of credit
control but above all he must
have the personal qualities to
give firm leadership to existing.
staff and to be able to deal
with and obtain the respect of
people at all levels. In view of
the autonomy of the post, real
initiative and exceptional


integrity are
requirements.


priority


This is a tough job but
successful achievement will be
well rewarded. Initial salary
B.$25,000 plus incentive
scheme, Company car and
fringe benefits in accordance
with the best modern practice.
The contract will be for 3
years.
Write giving age and full details
of qualifications, career to date
and salaries earned to:
P. 0. Box F-2457,
Freeport,
Bahamas.


DIRECTOR & GENERAL MANAGER
FREEPORT BAHAMAS


ANOTHER BIG



SALE


REDUCTIONS UP TO




1/2 PRICE

AT


AQUARIUS BOUTIQUE
CHARLOTTE STREET


OCT 5-12


____ ___~


--II TI~ II- --.--I L- ~I---I


Thursday, October 11, 1973.


hr tsribunttP


I











Thursday, October 11, 1973.


UhI 0ribuze
NULUUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEFON F. IH. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903- 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH,O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Publisher/Editor 1917-1972
Contributing Editor 1972.
I-ILEEN DUIPUCIH CARRON.M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972 -
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Thursday, October 11, 1973.


By ETIENNE DUPUCHL
(This is the third article in a series I am writing on the
development of tourism and investment in the Bahamas)
THE THIRD stage in the growth of tourism in the Bahamas
developed in a conflict of ambitions in the House of Assembly in
1949.
I am not sure whether Sir Harold Christie or the lion. Sidney
Farrington was chairman of the Development Board at that time.
As the manager of Pan Amrterican World Airways in Nassau from
its inaugural flight, Sidney Farrington was an important factor ina
the development of tourism in the Bahamas.
After the death of Sir Geroze Johnson it was either Harold
Christie or Sidney Farrington or Sir Kenneth Solomon who
headed this Board. Sir Asa Pritchard also had a spell at this job.
At that time Stafford Sands was a young and ambitious
member of the House. Hle never allowed anything or anyone
to stand in the way of anything he wanted. lIe wanted control of
the Board. 1ie was too young to expect this kind of recognition
and so his only means of fulfilling his ambition was to "throw a
monkey wrench in the works".
That year lie raised the question of steamship subsidies. Hie saw
no reason why steamships that served the Bahamas in the tourist
trade should be subsidized.
Everyone in the tourist business feared that the New
York-Nassau service by the Munson Line would stop completely
o- r its standard reduced without a subsidy. It seemed that this
young man was courting disaster for the colony.
The matter was referred to a committee of five of which I was
a member. I fought for a retention of the subsidy. But the vote
was 3-2 against. I think the other man on the committee who
supported the subsidy was Harold Christie.
But already Stafford Sands was making his power felt in the
House. In a back-stage lobby he succeeded in gaining the support
of a majority of the House to kill the steamship subsidy.

Shortly after this the new Boards were appointed by the
Governor for 1950 ... and Stafford Sands' name appeared as
chairmnanif the Development Board.
It was at this point that Howell Rees resigned as Director of
Publicity for the Board and took a position as Vice-President of
Kelly-Nason Advertising Agents in New York who handled the
Board's account. He felt he could not work with Stafford Sands
but, up to the time the P.L.P. took over the government in 1967
and changed the Board's representative, Howelt Rees directed
promotion for the Bahanias in the offices of Kelly- Nason.
1 also severed mty connections with the Board at that time. I
stopped doing publicity for them. I just couldn't stomach this
overbearing young political giant.
As the wheels of time turned and brought changes ... many
years later Sir Stafford Sands and I found ourselves working
together. But this is another story for another day and time.

But whether anyone liked him or not, Stafford. Sands quickly
proved himself to be a brilliant tman. lie will probably go down int
history its the most brilliant Bahamian of this century ... which
means the most brilliant of all times because this has been the
most exacting century in the story of these islands.
The first thing Sir Stafford did was to squeeze a very large
appropriation out of the House of Assembly tor the work of the
Board. And he immediately not only : subsidized steamship
services but also air services which soon made Nassau a great air
centre of the world'

Up to that time Nassau was a "quality" resort and people still
thought in terms of stall money.
Frank Christie who was with his brother. Harold, in the real
estate business, may not remember this conversation but he said
in a committee room of the House one day that it was his
ambition to bring wealthy home owners to Nassau and when he
had an income of a thousand pounds sterling a year from taking
care of these properties he would consider retiring.
A thousand pounds a year seemed to be the high aim of people
during that period. Thaddeus Toote, a successful coloured
merchant, retired when lie had an income of a thousand pounds
a year from a large grocery business and the rental of small
properties.
Dr. F. A. Iolmnes owned the City Pharmacy. On t his death
earlier in this century the property and business passed to his son
Frank and two daughters. Frank Holmes died in 1928. Some
years later the sisters sold this property for an amount that would
yield them an income of about a thousand pounds a year.
This also happened to William Hilton, a dry goods merchant.
who owned the building two doors east of Dirty Dicks on Bay
Street.
A few years later these buildings would have brought more
than ten times as much and values had so changed that the
Holmes sisters and Mr. Hlilton had difficulty in making two ends
meet.
Recently I said that the Hlon. C. O. Anderson retired as
Postmaster General of the Bahamas on a pension of 800 pounds a
year after over 40 years of service. Hils daughter. May, phoned the
office later to correct this figure. The salary of the office was 800
pounds. The pension was just over 400 pounds. But even this was
considered big money in those days and his friends asked himr
what he was going to do with all that income.
Today in Nassau a thousand pounds a year is the wages paid to
a good Haitian labourer!

Stafford Sands was not concerned with "quality" tourism. He
wanted money. His personal ambition was to be a millionaire.
And so he talked the hotels inatopening the year round. They
agreed to try it as an experiment but no one except Sir Stafford
believed Nassau could be made into a year-round resort.
But Sands went out for the working class summer trade. He
pointed out that, with the pressure of high taxes in the U.S.
Canada and Britain, there would soon be too few millionaires to


support a quality resort.
He proved to be right and the Bahamas was launched on the
gravy train.

At an earlier period Nassau had become the centre for escapist
capital. It still is in some measure.
A business man would arrive from New York by the s.s.
Munargo in the morning with a fortune in stocks and bonds in his
brief case. A lawyer would quickly form a company for him with


By The Associated Press
TODAY is THURSDAY.
OCTOBER Ilth, the 284th
day of 1973. There are 81 days
left in the vear.
HIGHLIGHITS in history on
this date:
197 2 The U.S.
government places restrictions
on its pilots carrying out
attacks in the Hanoi area after
three foreign missions in North
Vietnam are damaged.
1971 President Sadat of
Egypt arrives in Moscow for
talks with Soviet officials ona
Middle East problems.
1969 Russia launches
two-man spacecraft, Soyuz VI,
into Earth orbit.
1968 Reports from
Calcutta say a cyclone which
struck the Bay of Bengal left a
half million persons homeless:
Panama's President Arnulfo
Arias takes refuge in the
U.S.-controlled (anal Zone as
Panamanian troops seize
control of the country.
1963 U.N. condemns


hre Tribune


Israelis can repulse Arabs, but cost will be heavy


By FRED S. HOFFMAN
WASHINGTON (AP) U.S.
military analysts believe the
Israelis can push Egyptian and
Syrian forces out of the Sinai
Peninsula and the Golan
Heights area, but at a very
considerable cost."
Defense Department ani
other I.S. government analN sts
are not saying the tide has
turned for the Israelis, as some
Israeli generals claimed
Monday.
"The Israelis are proceeding
about as expected, but they are
behind schedule, one official
said. "The Arabs are doing
better this time than they have
in the past."
The key to swift Israeli
victory in the 1967 war was its
mas'ery of the air, gained in a
surprise preemptive strike
catching much of the Arab air
force on the ground. This air
dominance permitted
coordinated warplane and
armor assaults that decimated
Egyptian tank and infantry
units.
Sl-RIOUS PROBLEMS
This time U.S. sources said,


I AP r-IEW ANALY IS


the Israeli air force has had
serious problems trying to
knock out Soviet-huilt-
surface-toI air missiles 'an
both lt the I gplian and tS\rran
tronts.
Until these missiles are
neutralized, Israeli warplaness
cannot range freely against
i'gyptian and Syrian arinuoir
and infantry formations.
Sources said that about .i'
of the approximately 40 Israchi
warplanes lost through MoriJta\
night fell to sruface-to-a i
missiles. principally the lethal
SA6, designed to deal with
low-flying airplanes.
The Igyptians and Syrians
are reported to have lost about
100 warplanes, somei on the
ground when Israel attacked
five F g ptian airtields ani
some Syrian fields.
If the reports are aciurate,
eachti side would have lost antre
than 10 per cent of its air
striking power.
According to Itelli ence


a s s s n ts rea c h in
\,' stii, )tun. t lhe t1 l-ptiam,,
hawe pl, cr tatcd tt Ic S-at 1 ltm1
;tn ir n l.rii ti on i t t nit'na trl a a
1l i' I alaCbI t t 1 inialt i 1 1- 1 it
ii In t -hn t at 'tit I tilt

in kr\ pIote.s lhl,,ugh hsi h
gnilc;,.

it I L' 'ctla 1 S \ ,rIn aitd tl
h~iv.- ",,.I 70' ,0.000 micn anJ
hlt't\CtI.'n tI )(1 00 itl s i nk( t l ,kN .

.i t tat Ca'l I t)2 i ii t b.it Ilc
S 'it I i t t'. C 1 S ri t.l .

Ihk t n k i 1otl b itt I I brilate'

it t ' 1 at tt 1 a t ,,ll a . ,
t h I 11 I p n lic l 'l l .
'is i .t ii t'ta 'i
ti I.a ;11 !ll I a tt



tt a 1- '.tt


missiles an l art ilen ,N t h,
\Cest side it,, i t t i S e/ ( 1i-l ,ai
he tsupreNed. ,,uhIl Ita a
islate. en elop J' .l) nip atN h.
ii\". I I-'yptuan (la l i spins ,ii i(e
SIna!.
BIl .A\\K I oSSt S
On tilhe STrin tr ml .
c pcrts 'sid, ll5C S\ aditl
divisions and an i t intttI iatd ( i,
tanks oppose tthe I.laehs..
Armoiitr losses mln !it l s it -
have been heajv\. 5 ith lt pIC lrt,
to the Pentla.i, ap;.iki nt at
300( Stian tanks anid ibait
150 Israe i tank,, k iit,, (itt
thitigh Mondatlay nit'ht .
Sources said thlat in law ar-lA
stages tt a h I i hltn1 lHIe
Israeli air i toi i cdn to stlno
Syrian t1- akt liN (aut sh ill t h
(;olan lei,,'hlts hil,,tat, h arti ia' .
F4 P'hantnii \44 '\k h liv i .
. tnd other atlghtla laibi s tN o
lthe Sue/ trait.
()ine' lepoi. .iippir' nt \
l t.o1d t I on a itn l t t '
I g ptian soit n e ,. s I d ithe

,i N tait ~t i ti ilea deep in t


aInatil. p- ib I iItncluding thIie
vital itA niti tita1 pais'i,, ailnd to
lbtold t ,, all fanaI il until a
cc.a c airLI
kkle i I kst R IR S1I 1)
Blit tti" -a l.N' ttittt.' said
the I a p tti hat been
I oi J ilc ,,d b1 a I ga ptian
Prcsid in t A\itn ait L laa's vitic
that his armies c:;n r' claii the
entire Sinai.
Soli!'. I .'. aitil a l)t tiL s say
that the ,atiltcoti n,, tltid hinge
tit the stating pa i\n 'l )It the
opposing lorccs tli long
thie% _a i ia nta;in thtt fighting.
Still i anc\i'l tltitN' lI lti\ tie
Is i A li alh,) 'd ltll h e i11 l c .s to
hi.' Nu 1 pit t. a
I he h nii tintOlI tialinn on
nit .a n s in I nlpt I tI p tlan
trI .' if I tit' l 'l -t I j d av s
h'ttOr, taht ilt ta k \N 'i t'
aIunched. BtH I lthe\ dta not
t tilea att ''I'i- iS
until lte \ Il-- in.ii d I tla i t ali
a la 11- at N j h 1,(r,, it-
a ii i h - a t S t t i cNl i a l t tM N'r .> i ,

\ r' tl. nt i l 'a S\nr ald
I i i. I I rai'liN s Ncnlt out
h ia a tt r a ia .iti' N ta. ls,. a


\'hen ou have to tell a

errybody dat D)inah

soon to be ver

daughter-in-law...


"Don't

give up


the ship!"


Be the man

you want to be!
and be the ,
man they
want to -
see









Kee witwh

DeWitt's Pills


with the strong action
against BACKACHE
and MUSCLE PAINS



a-i


bnd taolie011d inS
,ffish ~ovPern ,,. r









BLENDED
ernTc \X/HIM ,Y


jx i **am UIin -, I, oe -


expect the UNUSUAL at



J'onntbitlle ones
BAY & GEORGE STREETS


check out our new stock !

1jV*';


repression m South Africa by
106-1 vote.
1962 Pope John \\'II
opens Second Vatic,.an Council.
1 94 5 Negotlatiois
between Chiang Kai-Shek of
Nationalist China and Mao
Tse-Fung of communist China
break down and fighting for
Manchuria resumes.
1933 Latin American
countries sign Rio de Janeiro
non-aggression pact.
19 15 Execution of British
nurse dith Cavell in Brussels.
1828 Russians occupy
Varna in war against Turke\ .
1797 A Dutch fleet is
defeated h\ the British off
C('naperdown, IHolland
1771) Polish nob anlan
Castiim r Puiatski it killed int
lighting for American
Independence at the Battle of
Savannah. Georgia.
1776 During the
Revolutionary War (Colonial
forces under Benedict Arnold
are defeated by the British on
Lake Champlain.


local directors to whom he supposedly handed the stocks and
bonds to be registered in the Bahamas. They then handed them
back to him for a receipt. And when the Munargo returned to
New York in the afternoon the man took the stocks and bonds
back with him and deposited then in his safe. By this
arrangement they had been removed from U.S. taxation.
Some Nassau lawyers got rich on this business. This is where
Sir Kenneth Solomon made his fortune.
When Stafford Sands got into power hie took this movement ;
capital ftirther. lUp to that time the Royal Bank of Canada wi,
the only bank in Nassau. Sands promoted Nassau into one of the
great financial centres of the world. Today everN majoi baiak in
the western world is represented in some form in the Bahamas.
There are some small banks too.

When the second world war ended over 5000 Bahaiin,
laborers were oni contract in the 'U.S. Tie Bahamas goveasntan't
was concerned because it was expected that when the rletmuncd
the colony would be faced with a serious unemployment problem
that no one would be able to solve.
Fortunately, the U.S. continued to need this labour aftie the
war. The time came when the islands were so prosperous thai oamn
people found it more profitable to stay at home thai go to tt,, (h
U.S.!

But the leaders of this period especially Stafford Sands
were not wise men.
Stafford Sands was brilliant in business but lie was constantlI
making stupid statements which revealed a shocking lack oa
human understanding. This main was clever ... but not wise in .atl
of his human relations.
ihe was a perfect representative of the materialistic age in
which we live todav... and which has become a cancer in the
bosom of the American people.
lHe felt that as long as the people were making moinie amind
had food in the pot they would be satisfied. lie could not
understand the Biblical injunction that "linan cannot live CI bhiad
alone".
Man is composed of baod and spirit. The spirit is the molre
important element. But because of thlie constant demands of th
body for sustenance man is always conscious of its needs ... and
then its wants.
But a full stomach brings the spirit to the fore. The late Bert
Minns always said that "-as soon as you take the wrinkle out ot
their bell they turn fool".
People don't necessarily "'turn fool" when their physical needs
and personal wants have been satisfied. It is at that point
Ital their vision is broadened ... a full helly is not enougLh. Secret
cravings of thle spirit foi a larger place on the human stage come
to the surface.
Stafford Sands and the men who ruled Nassau when I
succeeded in breaking down racial barriers in 1956 could not still
understand the subtle undercurrents that were already eroding
the fringes of their power. I warned them but they regarded me as
an enemniy ... they accused me of trying to create something that
didn't exist.
They refused to believe at that critical stage in the life of the
Bahamas that if they did not step out of their "ivory tower and
lead reform a humanat tidle would sweep in and drown them ais
completely as the floods at the time of Noah and his Ark ended a
human era.

(To be continued Saturday)

A THOUGIII FOR TODAY
Thin Noah spoke him fairly, thin talked to himt savairely.
An' thin he cursed squarely to the glory or the Lord:
'Divil take the ass that bred ye spalpeen! 'an' the Donkey wint
aboard.
KIPLING


- - ,- - - - - --


I0ODY N ISOR


The Admiral
says:

"Go with the
leader...
An Admiral!"

Admiral.

Refrigerators

See them at your
Admiral
de.:'er s shoo room

IAYIOR INDOUSIRIES 11ID.
Ilt Shirley Street
P. C. Boy N-48C6
TELEPHONE 28941/5


I -- I I I ---


_ ~


L... 0-6Z 11 Z fe% I +r


mmm-..i


I


-1


I


m Flia+riPs@m+&rl in tfta Hsaftarnzaa 1hu Hdp


I


fil'lI-1 tqnn Am COIiI










y4 nGhml' &iCi__t Thursday, October 11, 1973.


Many new features inbothMalibu & Caprice by Chevrolet


THE TWO AMERICAN CLASSICS, the Caprice and the
Malibu, top the 1974 line of Chevrolets now available at Motor
Centre Limited on Thompson Boulevard.


THE 1974 CHEVROLET CAPRICE CLASSIC, on sale at Motor Centre on Thompson
Boulevard, exemplifies the new luxury built into Chevrolet's 1974 line.
PHOTO: Andrew Toogood.


FOR COMFORT AND HANDLING, the 1974 Chevrolet Malibu Classic, now available at
Thompson Boulevard, is the car to look at.


The Chevelle Malabu Classic. a
striking example of
Chevrolet versatility,
combines luxurious styling
with mid-size handling.
The Caprice Classic goes a
step further, adding lavish
comfort and exceptional
Elegance to the winning
combination.
New features of the Chevelle
Malibu's 1974 exterior
include the new grid-pattern
grill and the distinctive
stand-up hood ornament at
the front, the vinyl roof and
the stylish coach windows.
all riding smoothly on the
Chevelle's wide stance.
Comfort on the inside is
ensured by the wide foam
bench seat with individual
backs separated by a fold
down arm rest, and by
fl o w -through power


Motor Centre on


PHOTO: Phillip Symonette


L~I-.--L~--- ---I--ULy I --


for seats and door trim.
Luxuries standard with the
Caprice Classic include a
luggage compartment light
and an electric clock.
For riding comfort and safety
there are the seat belts that
come with each passenger
position, the fold-down
armrest in the middle of the
front bench seat. the smooth
suspension of full coil
springs cushioning the
movement of the steel
belted radial tires and the
Cruise-Master control that


automatically maintains
your speed and immediately
disengages on braking.
Variable-ration power steering
makes steering easy, and soft
touch power disc brakes to
ensure quick, smooth
stopping.


Standard equipment under the
hood is the Turbo I ire
400-2 V8 engine devel1pnLg
150 horsepower.
No matter how you blnk at
them. the 1974 (C'piLce
Classic and the 1974 Malibu
Classic look andi lidc ui,Ce
good cars.


THE


CLASSICS


a better way from


CHEVROLET


WE

TRADE


J.F. KENNEDY DRIVE

NEAR COCA-COLA


1974


FINANCE,


INSURANCE

AVAILABLE
















PHONE 56739

NASSAU, BAHAMAS

BOX N3741


rn j


INK-


NOTICE
Unless the vehicle listed below is collected by 31st October
1973 it will be sold to cover expenses: -
Mr. Carter 1968 Morris 1100 NP4461
NASSAU MOTOR COMPANY' LIMITED.


.


THE TRIBNE MOTOING PAG


ventilation. Cut-pile nylon
carpeting covers the floor.
Wood-grain vinyl accents
around rectangluar dials add
simple beauty to the
instrument cluster.
F.er. thing, even the
soft-rimmed steering wheel.
with cushioning in the
centre is colour-keyed to
complement the entire
interior.
For safety, there are seat belts
at every passenger position,
and side-guard steel beams
inside the double-panel
doors. Front disc brakes
with the new audible lining
wear indicator and forward
mounted steering gear for
precision handling are
additional passenger
protection features.
Under the hood, you have a
wide range of engines to
choose from. You can pick
the economical 250 Six, or
opt for the 454 V8 for
special driving requirements.
For durability there ame the
front and rear retractable
box-section bumpers, inner
fends to resist corrosion.
new ly calibrated shock
absorbers and a sealed side
terminal batter ,
BLUZZER
An ignition key \ arnine
bu//ei. a steering coIlumn
lock and an inside hood
latch release are st lndard
anti-theft features.
If the Capiice Classic strikes a
potential buyer as luxurious,
that is because Chevrolet
designed it that wvav. A lie\\
roof resign has given Caprice
the long, sleek look of
fut uristic artist s
conceptions. I lihe overall
graceful styling is augmented
by tie bright-accented
vertical bars on the
grid-pattern grille.
1 he 174 C(aprice interior,
co mpletely colour-keyed
like tlie Malibu, offers the
new elegance of velvet-look
knit cloth mixed with vinyl


-O ..


.. ~


',CI


I





*


Even a scoundrel c

By Abigail Van Buren
o 1973 Iy ClcuSe TrtIbm-N. Y. News Synd., Inc.
DEAR ABBY: I am a 19-year-old girl who never had a
date.
Well, I met Ralph, this really nice kid at work. He's 24
and on the quiet side. He's not very sharp looking, but he
has nice manners and I think he has good character be-
cause he's always talking about his involvement in church
youth activities. Ralph asked me if he could meet my
parents and ask their permission to date me, which I think
is rather unusual for a guy these days, don't you?
I invited him over, and my mother said: "He has such


an look you in


eye


nice manners, it's too bad he isn't taller."
My father said: "I never trust a guy who doesn't look
you in the eye when he's talking to you, and this guy is one
of them."
Abby, I like Ralph, and want to go out with him. Do
you think my father could be right?
DAUGHTER VERSUS FATHER
DEAR DAUGHTER: Yes. And he could also be wrong.
There are plenty of scoundrels who can look you squarely
in the eye and lie like blazes if there's enough to be gained
by it. Get to know Ralph better before making any judg-
ments.


DEAR ABBY: A few months ago my sister told me her
son had committed a crime and was in prison. [She gave
me his address so I could write to him.] She said I am the
only person she's told, and to please not mention it to the
rest of the family. My sister never told me what her son
did or how long he's in for, and I didn't want to question
her, fearing it might upset her.
I wrote to my nephew, but didn't have the courage to
ask him any questions. I did ask him what I could send
him. He answered immediately, and told me not to send
him anything because he couldn't accept anything. Can this
be true?
Should I write to the warden and ask him what my
nephew did and how long a sentence he's serving? Also, it
doesn't seem reasonable that my nephew can't accept any-
thing from the outside. CONFIDENTIAL, PLEASE
DEAR CON: If your nephew advised you that he cannot
accept anything, believe him. Don't ask the warden for the
particulars of your nephew's crime. If your sister didn't
choose to tell you, and your nephew doesn't volunteer the
information, refrain from asking. It will come out [and so
will he, hopefully] eventually.
DEAR ABBY: We're trying to teach our 3-year-old
daughter table manners at dinner. I say that dinner is a
place to be thankful, unwind, enjoy dinner, and have a
pleasant conversation. My husband says it's the place to
teach our daughter good manners. I agree, but how do you
discipline her and let her enjoy her meal without everyone
getting upset?
We're going 'round and 'round. Please help us. MOM


Arrived today: Tropic Day
from West Palm Beach
Sailed today: Oceanic for
New York; Emerald Seas for
Miami
Arriving tomorrow: Mardi
Gras, Skyward from St.
Thomas
WEATHER
Wind: Generally fair,
isolated showers likely!
Weather: East-northeasterly
10 to 18 m.p.h.
Sea Smooth to slight
Iemp: Min. tonight 73


Max. tomorrow 85


TIDES
High 8.07 a.m.
p.m.
Low 1.39 a.m.
p.m.
SUN
Rises 6.05 a.m.
Sets 5.50 p.m.
MOON
Rises 6.01 p.m.
Sets 6.32 a.m.


NOTICE


Pin's Night Cib 9Restaurant
IS

CLOSED

]j\AJ a3~fJODQ


You can't


beat it...

at $4.80 per 40oz.


0-00



^~~ -Y ^.


and 8.24
and 2.22


-1


-SMEARED


__ _- ___ _-- _~_ ~_______ ___ __________ _C i ---- ~TF~--- ~- ---C~C~~ -~---i~-C- --~-JC---- -- ------- -- --- - ----*-- - --- ---i~~-


- --


T!


_. ___ .,. -------- .___ ___ ____. _.__L~ _______ ._r _-- ____


J


Thursday, October 11, 1973.


ihep ribunm










UtP ribunt


Thursday, October 11, 1973.


Interiors to sell new house items by Nassau Plastics


By DUAPHNE WALLAC WHII'ILLD
IN FERIORS on Market Street are buying from a new factory Nassau Plastics off Village Road with the result that they
(Interiors) will offer the public tables and decorative accessories for the home (such as toilet paper holders, tissue dispensers,
photograph frames, telephone stands, shelves, salad bowls, decorative boxes, cosmetic holders for the vanity, soap dishes, wine bottle


proudlY annouces


NASSAU PLASTICS.

TOGETHER we have designed & produced a collection


OF


ACRYLIC accessories & furniture just for You!


COME SEE US SOON
AT
OUR SHOWROOMS AT

INTERIORS LTD.


IA


. .


KING & MARKET STREETS
P 0 BOX 4631 NASSAU BAHAMAS
TELEPHONE 21631-2.3


What's more, besides the
obvious and patriotic plus of
buying Bahamian and
promoting local light industry,
the goods themselves are
superior they are much
thicker and therefore less likely
to crack to their imported
counterparts and they will sell
at approximately the retail
price in Miami for such goods.
There is presently a limited
supply of such goods at
Interiors, but by mid
November Nassau Plastics' new
manufacturing venture will be
in full swing and Interiors will
be full of these locally
produced items.
Meanwhile, Peggy Hall,
proprietor of Nassau Plastics
for the last twenty years, is
visiting various factories in
England and Europe to get
ideas and look at new
techniques while her capable
manager, Helen Taylor, looks
after the signs part of the
business.
Peggy is excited about her
venture into the manufacturing
business. Dealing with heavy
electrical equipment doesn't
phase her as she was a flight
mechanic during the war.
BIT OF SHOCK
To see Helen and her staff of
almost all ladies working at
heavy-looking machinery is
quite a shock at first. What you
might see at Interiors as an
elegant lamp began at Nassau
Plastics as a huge sheet of
acrylic. The basic shape of the
article must be cut first by a
big electric saw. Then the edges
are trimmed by a machine







....... ..
-* 'f


AN ATTRACTIVE AND HANDY
WAY TO STORE AND DISPLAY
WINE.


called a router, finished and
polished by a buffer. After this
the article-to-be is shaped by
the heat of a bender and then
put in a wooden form to hold
until it cools. For round
shapes, such as salad bowls, the
acrylic is heated and shaped by
being blown with compressed
air.
In this day and age it is a joy
to find someone who loves and
takes a pride in their work
which Helen and her almost all
female staff undoubtedly do.
Most of the staff have been on
the job at Nassau Plastics for a
least six years.
Helen has been there for
fifteen years. Her sister, who
has worked there even longer,
first introduced her and Helen
hasn't looked back since.
NEW, DIFFERENT
"It's something new and
different every day." Helen
said as she also spoke of the
"creative joy" of the work.
She admitted that she didn't
realize before that women could
operate such machinery but "It
wasn't hard to learn" and "it
was something you enjoy
doing" she told me.
While Helen was at Nassau
Plastics she married Theodore
Taylor, an auto mechanic. He
was so impressed by her work
that he paid her the supreme
compliment from one
p professional to another.
"You'll be an auto mechanic
one day." he told her
admiringly.
Helen's expertise and her
husband's respect for her work
has paid dividends in their
domestic life. Helen is not
chained to the ktichen sink. In
fact she told me "I am more or
less the handyman around the
house" and consequently her
husband happily takes over
many of the household chores.
Their children, Ted, 8
Daron. 6, and Linelle, 4, are
also very proud of their
mother. Numerous buildings
display Nassau Plastic signs and
even many car licence plates
are products of Nassau Plastics
so everywhere her children go

PASSPORT OFFICER
TO VISIT FREEPORT
AN OFFICER from the
Passport Office in Nassau will
visit Freeport, Grand Bahama,
on October 19 between the
hours of 9 a.m. and 5.30 p.m.
for the purpose of interviewing
citizens of the Bahamas for
passports.
The officer will be located in
the Government's
Administrative Office, in the
Sun Alliance Building on
Pioneers Way.


AN UNUSUAL MOD OBJECT D'ART FOR COFFEE TABLE


they excitedly point out these
signs and ask her "Mummie,
you did that?"
Now the interiors of private
homes will be enhanced by the
delightful designs of popular
cube tables and sundry


nick-nacks. Nassau Plastics will
not be a retail outfit for these
delightful accessories which
will be sold exclusively by
Interiors.
A thrilling joint venture
indeed!


FOR VANITY.


THIS SPEAKS FOR ITSELF.


HOUSE PLANS?
)0- !00' -'r N-dt2 wiet ho- of home designs
Wt F AT LOW COr FAST SERVICE
BAHAMAS HOME PLANNING SERVICE
TEL EPHON E-7 141 60 1


_ __


holders)in durable acrvIic.


V-11


lmlder tm durable acrylic.











Thursday, October 11, 1973.


Ihpe Wribunt


ITy
"' V


l~aw


MISS PORTIACAMPBELL

who is t t ,married to

M R. AMES SMITHi

on October 13th, 19"73

has chosen as her ed hi

L OD by ROYAL DOULTON

and her chi e' r Sih' rC is

LAXU L by PILGRIM


PAN AMERICAN HOSTS

LOCAL TRAVEL AGENTS
A GROUP OF LOCAL TRAVEL AGENTS left Nassau
on the weekend for a familiarization trip to London to
improve their sales techniques. The group flew to New
York by Pan American, which is hosting the trip, then on
by Boeing 747 to London. The travel agents will also act as
goodwill ambassadors for the Bahamas in their various
meetings with travel associations. They expect they will be
better able to serve their clients after familiarizing
themselves with the European market. Chet Benjamin (2nd
from left) marketing sales manager for Pan Am,
accompanied the group. Seeing them off was Max Gurney,
sales director for Pan Am in the Bahamas.

WELL-KNOWN MASON & TAILOR

ALFRED RICHARDSON DIES


MR. William Alfred
Richardson, 73 died Tuesday
at the Princess Margaret
Hospital after a lengthy illness.
Funeral services will be held on
Saturday.
A resident of Hospital Lane,
Mr. Richardson operated a
tailor's shop on East Street for
a number of years before his
illness. lHe was also a member
of the Southern Cricket Club
and a member of the Elks, the
past Fxalted Ruler of Eureka
Temple.


Services for Mr. Richardson
are to be held at 4 p.m.
Saturday at Wesley Methodist
Church, Blue Hill Road, and
will be conducted by the Rev
Charles Curry.
Burial will take place at the
Western Cemetery.
Mr. Richardson is survived
by a son, Arthur, one daughter,
Mrs. Dorethea Neely, and two
sisters, Mrs. Olive Albury and
retired civil servant Mrs. Naomi
Blatch.


THE ULTIMATE DOUBLE


YOU TAKE a trip to the
States, and while travelling
around on business, you find it
necessary to take a train from
one small town to another.
Sitting facing you is a
serious-looking young man
engrossed in a book. In the
other corner is an older man,
gazing thoughtfully out of the
window. You exchange a few
words with both, and find
them courteous and friendly.
Presently another man makes
his way along the corridor and
puts his head in. "Anyone here
care for a game of Bridge?" he
asks.
Eagerly you nod your head.
Your two companions also
seem to find the idea to their
liking because they both smile
and prepare a makeshift table
from their suitcases. The
newcomer produces two decks
of cards, the cut for partners is
made, the modest stakes
agreed, and the game begins.
The time passes very
pleasantly. Apparently your
companions are good players,
and you find the bidding and
play sharp enough for your
taste. In fact, you are enjoying
yourself so much that it comes
as a stab of regret when you
look at your watch and find
that you have only another ten
minutes left before the train
reaches its destination.
The man who suggested the
game initially also thinks so; he
has just returned from the
bathroom, and on hearing you
say there'll be time for just one
more hand, he registers obvious
disappointment. He deals the
cards, and you notice nothing
out of the ordinary as he does
so. But the auction which
follows is very definitely out of
the ordinary. This is the hand
you are dealt:

none
K J97 5 3 2
QJ 10
QJ4

The dealer, whom you know
only as Hal, sits on your right.
You are wondering to yourself
whether to pass or to bid a
fairly orthodox 3 Hearts, when
you are amazed to hear Hal
open the bidding with I Heart.
This is very much to your
liking, but of course there is no
possible action you can take at
this stage, so you pass. Your
left-hand opponent says 2
Diamonds. Now your partner
comes to life and bids 2
Spades.
"Three HEarts", says Hal
without hesitation, and with
even less hesitation you
double. It'll be nice to bow out
with a big juicy penalty, you
tell yourself. But the auction is
not yet over. Your left-hand
opponent, looking worried,
passes, but partner is not yet
finished. He bids 3 Spades.
And, wonder of wonders, Hal
goes on to 4 Hearts!
You have been brought up
to regard inflections in the
bidding as unsporting and even
unethical, but in this crisis
your one thought is to prevent
partner from producing
another Spade bid and thus
depriving you of a rich
heritage. Your double of 4
Hearts can be heard right down
the train.
There is no more bidding,
but Hal has apparently taken
exception to the tone of your
double.
"You really think you can
beat my contract," he observes
somewhat cooly. "Care to have


a side-bet on it?"
You take another look at
your hand. At least three,
maybe four, trump tricks,
Spades to make when partner
gets in, a couple of stoppers in
the minor suits. It's a bonanza.
"Whatever you like", you
say crisply. You take a look in
your wallet, and find that you
have $600 on you. What a pity
it's not more. You'd really like
to take thousands off him. Hal
matches your $600, and your
partner holds the stakes, which
become yours simply if the
contract is defeated
irrespective of the number of
tricks you make in defence.
You never felt more confident
in your whole life.
"Your lead", says Hal, when
the money is out of the way.
You would like to lead a
Spade, but partner will have to
await his moment. The best
attacking lead you can find is
the Queen of Diamonds. You
are not displeased when
dummy shows:
752
none
A9874
A 108 6 4

Hal takes the Diamond lead
in his own hand with the King,
leads another Diamond to
dummy's Ace, then ruffs a
Diamond. Now he plays the
King of Clubs from his hand.
follows with a small Club to
dummy's Ace, and ruffs a
Club. So far he has taken six
tricks, and your hand has been
stripped of everything except
your seven trumps.
Hal now leads a small Spade.
You have no option but to ruff
it, and feeling a little disgusted,


you return a trump. Hal takes
this, and leads a further small
Spade. Again you have to ruff,
and again you must return a
trump. For the third time, Hal
plays a small Spade, and now
thoroughly alarmed, you ruff
with your 9, and are left with
the King and Jack, one of
which must be led into the
waiting Ace Queen tenace held
by the complacent Hal. The
full deal was:

7 5 2
none
A 9 87 4
A 108 6 5


none
KJ9 753 2
QJ 10
QJ4


A KQJ 1098
none
9 73


643
A Q 108 64


Feeling like someone who
has swallowed the contents of
an over-full ashtray you pay up


your $600, thankful that you
have enough left in small
change to get you to the
airport. You make your way to
the exit door, and along the
platform to the barrier. You
take a last look round, and
what do you see? Hal is giving
$200 each to the other
members of the gang, and they
are chortling their way into the
bar, where they are going to
celebrate one of the oldest
tricks ever played on the
innocent in the world of cards.
You have just been yet another
victim of the infamous
Mississippi Heart Hand, created
exactly 100 years ago, and still
being perpetrated, not on
steamboat passengers who like
whist, but on any gullible
Bridge player who does not
know enough to realise when a
hand is being planted on him.
If you must play with
strangers, beware when one of
them goes to the bathroom just
before his turn to deal!
RC.


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Thursday, October 11, 1973.


National Youth Parade Discovery morning


HORACE K. WRIGH IT. chairman of the National Youth
Parade to be held Frida\ morning. has announced final
arrangements for the e ent
All participating groups ill forn at the F astern Parade
no later than 9:30 a.ni. under the direction of Kerinti Ford,
parade marshal. First unit w ill step oft at e\actl\ 10 a.m.a
proceeding West on Hsi\ Street to Has nes Oval Here the
head of the column ws\ill a\iait the arrival of the Gmo\ernor
General and Lad\ Butler it 10 45 a.in w, ho will then
review the parade from the ( Ilftord Park .ralidst.lrld .nd
dais.
Following the march lwst the National ilntheli will
be played and brief a.ddrhess, will he delivered h\ the
Governor General ind ltheli on l.iviiigston (oaikle \
Minister of Education and iiulture Miss I)iscmern I )a .ind
her court will then be presented ind .a vote of thanks will

SAN SALVADOR DISCOVERY DAY


WEEKEND PROGRAMME ANNOUN


MR. t. \ C \i'i..
rxe' ntive (' iii.'
pro rat~il ','; ,il il'e.
landing i l o l'i.intil' : .
On t'rida\, th,. ^ i h,
tlarbou r O hIc: s., l"
bic\ ic lace., i ;' a ', :
School and .ji s,.' ili .: .,
San Slls.ad'i \ 'V i


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Sl I'. I, \


.: lIi c b c .i .. ,: .


Seconlar\ stl o,1 -,' .; "c p
The ot'tk;:,i! I)i .. |', i),i\ .'c ,e ,ii "sr c ( ,i: '
M o uimtlll e t. [ on B,! \ \. iil i ,s t I i i'-:'
t 1'oi l vJ hi .1 I i t n '1 *;io
(Grah mn l k's L l. 11 k2':

s \ .!l0. i i'i ;]' 1 '\! l lc r ( i il s e n ,iss ', ; i! i ,s,'



sp rt 'l c i ,n li e liii .i \ i n Stl\ j i i.lc iT' s' ',,lic '
S:I i ;(i '.\ s a td ...! U Tl 'is' [ i nii cl'i' I' I n l ilNK. '.'5
tor Piati! nii ;r Rick ilic s inn 5 n1 ,1 1 \ .i' N lio il?
Ia tit Jurie. Pe riLin .i (i K. sriic d s till lln
.Imc.ilco "mllt!'t' H1 }iI el

t '' p .. lie i l, 'IC .i ), Its i, l l c \\ l l '-i t' l( l l t ,I!, \ S:1
Saleiado )iscoveC \ l).i\ s[c'ia l", \ nitt f '\ Ic',i
Thomllpso nl and pIt. c;,:ed !\ ilIcn Jo(" s c \lUs ,\ i!
bvy Pal land Derrick i lie \\i H mll i uididc 'n k l.i ;i
\W atrcl*l Jolncs. lP tildo!I (IIll, .!i ,j .l,'.iiiiiie i I, ,".;',.
D iIiciii l w i ll llt lh th e p 1i ;,i [i!^
Ihe St Pl (.i )111:Crn ii' ^!, lMt \\ li ,l d ,!Iliflh J AJ !tit
se'n icc a :il !0.3 1 !i', 1. F lic'c \\ ht., i! h s!m J !i ,,liI! h i! \ l ls
al .(0 p in a Iftel wlich a 'i'lc i .Ind c u\il!SIh" hbo
passengers will leave lo1 \as;uit at o 1 itn.


he given by Senator Dr. Doris L. Johnson., chairman of the
Bahamas Discovery Day Festival.
The ceremonies will end with displays of bands and
uniformed groups, presentation of awards to groups and
final march past.

In addition to Mr. Wright other members of the National
Youth Parade are the Misses Madge Edgecomb, Idell Bain,
Hortense Hanna. Anita Dillet, Beverly Smith, Angela
\lbur. Mrs. Louise Mackey, the Messrs. Kermit Ford.
Seymour G Cole. Alfred Knowles. Wilfred McKenzie,
Joseph Danrville. John Lennex. Anthony M. Brown, Ralph
H Hanna, Mrs Drucilla ,dderley, Mrs. Lily Mac Brown.
Mrs. Rose Dais. Mrs. liamie Astwood. Acting
Commissioner of Police I) T Hann' "qd Col. M. Oaklev
Bidwell


CED PRESLEY GR+NTFD DI\ORCF
\IFTER oYRS M\1RRI\tlF
S \ \ \ .











.. ., !: +.II I >'r .. n



or, s I ri fh u rhe tiller for'irs5 d IIa
.'.'Ilrei U .r ""+ilarrie t \ .I% "7

1 '77 I is \ eg .iNes aa.. where
S he music str is pert, orming I lhe

utt- hi p th.t ,e.: while Presle\
'.s ,stat ion .ed wi iithe ar nil n

ILOTO MEET IN GENEVA
BEGINNING OCT. I
S'A .lRV 'AS (' A'V I'n.i rot
I t 0 ) to.li prepared a, pac kage
dec r srisn railmedi .it rsilSing
immediate problems iand planning
t1,or e.n\ipa ri ison of worldwide
i suri ll.
ti If (, iaie liasesd ltII, I ) begall
us 3 ird general assemrnbly here on
S I, l I .ind \\as scheduled to turn
out .1 fact filled study ot worldwide

\ spokemIan for the assemllbly
sad itie meeting has been ia success
although thilel \irab israeli conflict
tliret a shadow on the conference
tblf Juringi anida 's sessions.
Iif, conference. held behind
losnl diJor. sidestepped a
p' i pI t 1,1i i to censure Israel
1t I IC 'fe isis e a i g'led fighting soin he
%MIddle I pistl according t ttihe
Ie isseil> however. resumed
itr e s l Inl1 1 esdai\ discussing
ii, uirism development
Sprl. i o tmi made ht delegations
S tr ni tlhe S7 countries participating
\ii ng sIme of the major issues
It il2 /,tJ 1in thl e assembly were
ihti relaline to thie world
I if r ir\ situaIIii. the possibility
o sl sr ir tires and the training
t p'-.r iel o hr the tourism
I he frequent fluctuations of
thle J itL is i lln important factor for
lithe, iris in Jdustra and must be
.irei ull\ sdii(wed to determine what
t l it \ s ill iae in this field.' ;in
l It s 1 ur ,ce said
THF ( \SF OF THE SEIZED
ROL SERS
V. \11M I IN(, iI (A s) IThe
.1Upr'e i, courtt agreed I uesdai to
he % li whether police officers
irolidl th, constitutional rights of
Itwo thil men bs taking their pants
lS or (*\dence
I lie court t agreed to hear the
go, erii meant' challenge of a .S.
Lirut .oirt decision that ti he
officers erred because the\ did not
tt in siearcth is\arrant before
asking (he t\wo meni for their
t trouisisers
oli officers in Lebanon, Ohio,
,.irre sLteI .id jailed the men
Srlrw ite tli l Mai 19 70 break-int it
the I ch1t'inil post office anid oni ti
tie t lo\ inic dl ioughti nesw paints for
the ll nd r, ille.i sted the pants the
c At llheir trial, the prosecution
s1ugti ti ntfusiroduce as evidence
p',aiit trAcS found on the pants
A lleedl s ranchingg paint from tile
post ottlLeC inidoiws
dIe elidinig the officers, the
S 's goterniiienti la\. taeirs contended.
lithe secure did not subject
respondents to ais personal
hunilriti tioii (as would the seizure
i of trousers itnimeiatels following
arrest on a.i public street)."
JAPAN TO HELP DEVELOP
Q SIBERIA TALKS
M)l, S( I)w (A I') J apantese
hl'ri rite Minister Kakuei tintaka tew
lit i i t i11s i tl odays to cap his
I iiropean siittimit tour with three
dis it rluks thai may decide
i whe their Japan will help develop
Siheria.
,Mouscuow is ,nrrious to import
plJaupanee aild Alnieri i1n .e uipment
.rietand tecliliologs toi unl ock tihe
tui iral wi health oi the Siberian
ss \lilerness, but Japan tirst wants
iassurinces thle Soviets will return
g four islands in the Kuril chain
seized at the end of World War It.
I he islands are an emotional
issue in Japan aii will certainly
S( omiTiinist parts s iet Leonid
Iltrelitnev. li ut there were mostly
,smiles as li naka fnd l foreign
SMinister l1asi p shi sitr ira were
",sIc ed it Vnt ukAIu) J Airpnirt.
lreriier Alexei Kosygin and
I oreigni Minister Aindrei Giromn yko
greeted \ inaka and his party as
they debarked from a special Japan


narlines 1t in sunti ., brisk fall
Scather. Ilhe t\\o premiers stood
Seniil\s side b\ side to hear their
national anthems .dJ reie \ troops
from tthe \',os carrsl'-toin.
I an. a .i nr, isi parts t % re then
Silsked in l .ir i\an i tI b' hla.ck
limousines along iag bedecked
L eninsky Prospekt to their quarters
in the Krenlin s Teremnno Palace.
I rnaka. was to spend the rest of the
..in relating and sghtseeini' before
Spending official talks Mondaid .
POSSIBILITY OF STRIKE
AGAINST FORD
DETRoIr (I1'1 The Te united
-\uto Workers has set Oct. 19 as a
tentative deadline for reaching
agreement on a tnes contract w\ith
I ord Motor C'o ,\ith the possibility
,rt a strike three days later if the
contractt talks fail, a union official
said.
Union vice president Ken
Hannon said the decision to move
ahead with a possible strike
deadline against For hinges oni
settlement of 22 local contracts
w ith Chrysler Corp.
Six key tChr sler planrits have
been targeted tor strike deadlines
next week. according to union vice
president Doug Iraser.
At the close of the union's F.id
council meeting vsesterda\.


Expert on Arawak here to




speak at Discovery banquet


DR. WILLIAM Sears,
internationally renowned
professor of anthropology at
Florida Atlantic University
and recognized authority on
the Arawak Indians who
greeted Columbus in 1492,
will be the speaker at the
New World Discovery
Quincentenniel Trust
inaugural banquet at the
Sonesta Beach Hotel
Ballroom Friday evening.
l)r. Sears has over several years
conducted excavations on
San Salvador and other
Bahamlian islands.
uncovering a quantity of
Arawak artifacts. These have
pcrimitted advanced
reconstruction of the
civilization of the
pre-Columbian Bahamians.
Entitled "The Origin and
Dispersal of the Arawaks,"
Dr. Sears' address will be
illustrated with
slides of his "diggings" in
the Bahamas and the
archeological results of his
research here.

Senator Dr. Doris L. Johnson,
chairman of the Bahamas
Discovery Day Festival and
acting chairman of the New
W o rld Discovery
Quincentenniel Trust will
preside at the banquet.
In addition to Dr. and
Mrs. Sears, guests of honour
will include the Governor
(cnieral and 1Lady Butler.
lion. and Mrs. Livingstone
Coakley and Dr. and Mrs.
Pedro Grau. Dr. Grau is
hlonorary chairman of the
Quincentenniel Trust, which


he will formally launch on
this occasion.
Executive committee for the


Festival consists of Dr.
Johnson, chairman, Mrs.
Beryl Francis-Culmer, and


Kermit Ford, Horace K.
Wright, C. N. Williams and
A. C. Hanna.


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--~ -~


C------ - -- --I-------~-- ~---' II--- -- ~--~I-- I---


I






Thursday, October 11, 1973.
r;cj
.- .


*U/


I fs.
I".'


lP~'I


I

-V


4 /
- ....


rK


t *


FIESTA FOR HUMANS: Planning decorations and other arrangements for the
upcoming "Fiesta Dance" of the Bahamas Humane Society are Mrs. Veronica Adderley,
the Society's chairman of the event, Bernard Perron, Food and Beverage Manager of the
Sonesta Beach Hotel, (left) and his assistant, Ralph Williams. The Fiesta dance is to be
held Saturday, November 17, in the Sonesta Grand Ballroom.

'Annual Kindness Week' closes

with Humane

Society's Fiesta
"MOST COLOURFUL EVENT OF THE SEASON" was the
prediction when plans for the Bahamas Humane Society's Fiesta
dinner dance were revealed today by Mrs. Veronica Adderley,
chairman, and Miss Lorraine Onderdonk, co-chairman.


Saturday, November 17, is the
fiesta dinner dance date,
closing out "Be-Kind
to-Animal's Week activities
that begin with the Society's
annual dog show at
Government House on
November 10. Owners of prize
winning dogs will be especially
honoured at the dance.
Fiesta time is the theme of
decorations by Mel Doty for
the big ballroom of the Sonesta
Beach Hotel. where the Fiesta
Dance will be held from 7 p.m.
to I a.m. (and perhaps a bit
later).
Comfort is another and
important theme too, as dinner
jackets, ties and ball gowns are
on the taboo list. Patio dresses






Intimacy
and the
married
woman.


The need to be sure
It's so important for your well
being as a woman to feel sure
about the functioning and fresh
ness of your body
Because douching isn't practi
cal, or even always advisable, cau
tious mamed women of today rely
on Norforms feminine supposito
nes
Positive protection two ways
Norforms do a two fold job most
effectively They protect you
against embarrassing problems
with their highly perfected germi
cidal formula And they protect
you against offensive odors with
their rapid deodorant action.
Complete confidence
So simple and convenient, Nor-
forms dissolve at normal body tern
perature to form a protective film.
Theydo not harm delicate internal
tissue.
Next time ask for Norforms, an
ideal way to have the confidence
you need as a married woman.
Sold at pharmacies in packages
of 6, 12 and 24.
Informative booklet, write to:
Norwich International
410 Park Avenue,
NewYork,
N.Y 10022


and pants outfits are "the
thing" for the girls and men
can try to outdo each other
with brilliant sports shirts.
There will be prizes for the
most colourful; most
decorative and loudest outfits.
"It is a fun party but a
money making affair too, to
help pay for the work the
Bahamas Humane Society does
throughout the year," Mrs.
Adderley said. "Tickets are
$15.00 per person which
includes a sumptuous buffet
dinner: We hope also to make a
bit of money on refreshments.
"We are happy to
acknowledge one big gift one
of our favourite dance bands,
Stuart Bradley and his talented
Sonesta Beach band the
generous offer .of Mr. Robert
Souers, generaltmanager, of tbq,
SSonesta Beach 'Hotel. It should,
be night of colour, gaiety and
just wonderful fun."
Mrs. John Kenning,
president of the Society, called
attention to the tremendous
growth in the Society's
activities and responsibilities
and the growing need for
additional public support.
"As the human population
grows larger and larger, we
continually expand all facilities
needed by humans," she said.
"But we sometimes forget that
our animal population grows
just as fast sometimes faster,
the result: BHS is much, much
larger and more important than
it was just a few years ago.
Much of the Society's work is
done by volunteers, there is
only a small paid professional
staff.
"Our costs go up and up,
salaries keep pace with
inflation; medical supplies now
cost 100"' more and more of
them are needed. New
equipment must be purchased
for expanded activities and
then more again to replace
equipment worn out through
the years.


ABC appoiti eut
EDWIN L. Wright has been
appointed manager of the Parts
Department of ABC Motors, it
was announced today by
Bernard L. Miller, president of
the Ford dealership.
Mr. Wright joined Kelly
Motors, predecessor company
to ABC Motors in 1962 as
parts receiving clerk. He has
served in that department ever
since, being promoted to senior
counter man in January, 1973.
He is a native of Deadman's
Cay, Long Island but was
educated in Nassau at Eastern
Junior and Senior Schools. He
is married to the former
Cypriana Sair of Nassau. They
have six children.
Mr. Wright's hobby is
baseball.


SALVATION ARMY
Territorial Commander,
Colonel John D. Needham
was guest speaker at the
Church on Mackey Street
Monday night. The function
was attended by His
Excellency the Governor, Sir
Milo Butler and Lady Butler.
The gathering was a civic
welcome meeting of Nassau
Citadel Corps. Col. and Mrs.


Needham and Sir Milo and
Lady Butler are shown above


attending h,,
PHOTO: Frd .,


Happy to meet you...



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-A











Uihp eribtunt


'u


Thursday, October 11, 1973.


Do we do enough to




help those in need?

By DAPHNE WALLACE WHITFIELD

THE BAHAMAS IS A YOUNG NATION in more ways than one.
41% of our population is under 14 and at least 50' is under eighteen.


What organizations and
institutions exist in our
community to cate' to our
youth with problems and those
in trouble'?
In the private sector there
is a number of organizations
and institutions sonime ot them
relying solely on charitable
contributions and somc who
are partially (in varying
degrees) saub sdized bhx
government.
I'd like to take pains to
point out that the following is
not an exhaustive list oI such
there may well be other
service-orientated organizations
that cater to the sweltare ol
youth that I know s nothing
about or which has slipped min
mind at the moment and I
would be ver hiapp> to
interviews representatives ftrom
such organizations neglected in
the following list:
The Children's i nergnet .
Hostel, Ranfurls Holnes tor
Children, Stapledon SJiool tor
Retarded Children. School tlor
the Deat, School for the Blind.
Hopedale (ienitre. ni-t'icrious
pre-schools, da\ ,are centres
and kindergartens. Red (ross.
Sassoon IHeart I obinidiaton.
C r i p p I Itee. id Ai 11 sr
(' o 0 11 1 t t e .C tbAi i a j i as
Paraplegic .Association and
various organization is linth hasle
come on the hiori/on in r: cent


years. Kiwanis sponsor and give
assistance to the Ke clubs,
attached to the schools in
Nassau.
here ire ntumLeroLus church
organizations such as the Drumr
and Bugle ('Corps, the Boys
Brigade, the Girls Brigade and
numerous choirs but as lar as
I know there are no
service-orientated ri.re i It, i s
run by the churches.
Under the umnibrella so the
Minister t ot I education and
culturee in the division oft
student services there are
school welfare, guidance
counselling and speech theiapx
departments.
tnder the Mintstr ot
Labour and National Insurance
there are the child care i division
and the probation service and
under the Ministr> ot Health
there are thie coInrnumit.
nursing services and the child
guidance clinic at Sandilands.
Under the Ministr. of lHome
Affairs there are the Boys andi
Girls Industrial Schools and the
detention part ot the prison.

\t1' NAL RI t \RI)ADATO\
in children is one of the most
heart-rending problems inm
so)ciet\ .
According to the experts 3
of arty population is retarded
It the popitlatiIn oit i
Bahamas is nowl approximnatec\


170.000 then roughly 5,100
persons will be retarded and as
at least 501' of our population
is under 18 then in all
probability at least 2.550 of
our children are retarded.
What happens to these
children I will pursue in a later
article in this column.
Meanw while besides
retardation there are other
heartbreaking problems
children that are pho sically or
emotionally handicapped but
not necessarily retarded
children who are spastic or






DOLLAR WEAKENS ON
EUROPEAN MARKETS
LONDON (At') The IU.S.
dollar fell on Furope's main money
markets Wednesday and dealers
cited the Middle Fast war as the
main cause. The price of free
market gold recovered from its
recent stagnation and rose to its
highest le\el in almost a month.
Dealers reported substantial sales
of dollars late in the da) The% said
much of the selling was from
Middle ast holders of American
currency. Much ot the money came
into London in search of high
interest rates.
Dealers said the dollar also
declined through fears of an
escalation of tihe Arab Israeli war
and the possible cutting off ot oil
supplies. I \change dealers said
speculators believed Britain was a
better place to have money than
most because of its i)%n ill deposits
in the North Sea.
The pound closed at 2 42 t 5
dollars in London, almost one cent
better than Tuesdai and a
significant improvement at a time
when the pound has been floating
downwards.
In I rankfurt the dollar closed at
2.4022 S\est German marks, down
fromI 1 uesday 's close of 2.4125
marks. In Paris the dollar was at a
two month low against the French
tranc on the financial market with
one dollar buying 4.20 I rench
francs as compared with 4.31
I uesdas.
Gold in London rose hb 4.50
dollars an ounce since Tuesdai to
reach 103.50 dollars. In /urich the
price was the same but the increase
over Tuesda. was tour dollars.
(;old is a traditional hedge for
speculators when major currencies
such as the U.S. dollar show
weakness. Gold has drifted below
the 100 dollar-an ounce mark in
quiet dealings over the past two
weeks while the dollar
strengthened.
ARGENTINE GOVT. TAKING
OVER PRIVATE TV STATIONS
BliFNOS AIRt:S (AP) The
government is taking over all three
private television stations in Buenos
*ires. the broadcasters said
\ednesdai.
the three owners of private
channels said government Press
Secretary Fmilio Arabs told them a
decree would be published soon
naming official controllers.
"I think this is a move to
nationalize the broadcast media,
including the radio stations that are
still in private hands." said Hector
(arcia. owner of Channel II.
Fhe move would coincide with
the lapse of licences which permit
the three to operate television
channels. There has been
disagreement over the actual
expiration date, and the
government said the three owe
750,000 dollars in unpaid taxes.
Instead of renewing the licences,
the broadcasters said, the
government had decided to take
,,ver the stations.
Buenos Aires has four channels.
()tie is already owned by the state.
Fihree nf the capital's 13 radio
stations are privately owned. The
other ten were taken over by past
governments
There are dozens of private and
sltiate-runi broad ast stations in
various other Argentine cities.
Antonio Hernandez. president of
Argentine television Broadcasters
Association. said:
"The measure is juridicially
preposterous because it did away
with the licences by decree when
the federal justice had not reached
a decision so far on the legal ways
to order the licences' dissolution".

VESCO IN WATERGATE
NEWS AGAIN
WASHINGTON (AP) The
chairman of the U.S. Senate's
Watergate Committee said
Wednesday he has been served with
subpoenas to give evidence in the
Vesco case trial of two former
cabinet members, and that he will
attempt to comply.
Sen. Sam J. Irvin Jr., Democrat
of North C('arolina, said subpoenas
were issued to him to produce any


COMMONWI -L Ill (I01 1ll BA\lI1\\AS l17''3
IN THE SLPRI \Il CO('RT No. 30
Ftquit1 Sille

NOTICE

TO: (a) All Adverse Claimants
(b) Adjoining Owners, Occupiers and Occupants

THE QUIETING TITLES,

ACT, CHAPTER 133

The lPetitioln o!I Frik ,s Ba1\ I inlelt d. conIpanl
registered under Id ,! l, s the ( ii C lll onwealth
the BLaham11as n r1sIpelt ot
A-\I Ill AT piece or parcel of land containing
Twentl\ -se,, .:ri S\Cnt--ce1ht11 huntidredths
j J2". iC -, --ittial i bI o t -i\ei (5 ) m miles
North\wsct i t1c Settle ,'ent of \larsh Hdarbour
on the NorthiOrr ( < i of (Grct Abacc Island
one (it tle islind'l i', tle ( rol oiinw :eilth of the
Bahamas w, which -aid piece or parcel tof land is
hounded N\( )RTI I\\ %RI0)! Y h\ the sea and
rmilini' ther' on I ,.n: ; undred and I ighteen
an'd I lie !l !dil edtih i 3 I (.I5 ) feet
I AS 1W\VAR)L iY i ''hd the sea, and running
thereoil Si\' '-,e\ i : d I illt\ hun dredths
if' 50) 1 ct Sto t( I 1 l \SI \\.\RI).LY bh land
1the property oi, l? j!,!; ( ( r*o Islhnd Sutdivdision
\1.IIler1 I hreI i r i .io l 'Ti:; !1 c thlereon TIlree
tli oiisaiIl I hil it inilIr.d an.ld Se\eInt\ aInd
Si\t\ -se'en htiunidredtl i ( 3.-O.07 Feet
SOL'tt\11\ \R I)1'I \ \aih.-' ('row\i i Land and
rLIIinIIn thIereon! liii 'C h1i dtrd and Fiftyt-two
(352.0 I D eet N(OR I HI\\1 S ITWARI)LY by land
formcnrl tIli prope )it\ i l)irtardi (". Archer and
rtinI7nr i thcrieo l e ii C i1 1 ind I. ihlit hnindred
adlt inllet\ I d i ili t' hu1 ndredths
(3,1) 1 .(80 ) > -ce t

c ,, said 1l rat i s I, 1 K I :.I t. lie IPetitioner ill
this Imatter claims t h ,' ,oCr Ill fee silnple
abolite i i polss-ess'M; i'.- ices' s or parcel of
land aitd li,,as madC appli t o lie Supreme
Court of the "-aid Ball. i. ll.inds under the
provisions (f Section 3 of te (uictlinrI'i Titles Act.
]()5) to lia\e it- till, t1, t i la' iil nd investigated
and tie nature aid eStnt tliinot dtleterinited and
declared Ili a ('ertii.at I il to he granted b
the (oirt ir i i ce ird in \ I 'oi the provisions of
thle Act

Copies ot l til!d pl itn,i+ h,' inspected during
tior alt a l it 0i li.ur-,ia ti. 'W iliie places:

(a) I lie ReP. t it t1he Siupreme (Court
Panrlai tent S[ K 'It tilt I, ( it of \assau.
hb) I lie (ontniss i neA sH (if)ice at \irslil Harbour.



) I lie C'haicrhers Il ackaacs. Johnson &
hI oini|lsoti. A\ttorci'y s for the Petitioner.
it uate Ii n -rederick louse (2nd Floor)
Frederick Street ill the (it, of Nassau.
Notice i hereby .iein that any person having
dower I oa ririht to dlx cr or anll adverse claim or a
claim not recognized ii tile Petiolln shall on or
before the lI th day of membere. A.I).. 1973 file
in the Supremine Coirt anl serve on the Petitioner
or the undersiglied a State icent of his claim in the
prescribed form. ,enritild h\ an Affidavit to be filed
therewith. Failiuric of a1\ suLch person to file and
serve a statement ot his chl ill oil or before the said
16th day ot November, A.I)., 1973 will operate as
a bar to such claim.

ISAACS. JOHNSON & THOMPSON,
Attorneys for the Petitioner.
Chambers,
Frederick House.
Frederick Street,.
Nassau, Bahamas.


UNIONS QUESTIONED ABOUT
POLITICAL DONATIONS
WASHINGTON (AP) The
Senate Watergate committee has
begun investigating presidential
campaign contributions controlled
by the nation's largest labour
unions.
The panel's investigators have
sent questionnaires to top officials


OUR COMMUNITY ITI
.... ...... .. .... ..... . . ..


autistic or who have sesec
language problems but who arc
also not necessarily retarded.
What happens to these
children in the Bahanma"' \ic
their lives irredeenuabl,
blighted?
They need not be necessawilt'
so, says Miss Arlene Davis \whOs
has recently opened a si\l
private school in Oakes I .
for children with special ncc',

HOPEDAL.I ('NTI RI
The school which is callff
the Hopedale Centre is \ses
small at the moment just te I






of more than 80 large unions
those claiming 50.000 or in-,r
members.
The questiounarieis ask .lamiin
other things, \whether ainr tuinI
were illegally ao ile)d trni i unii
treasuries. I eder.il las .ill,\\,
individual union i mcnibers
donate to a central tund t cntrnlled
by union officers, 'but prohibits use
of union dues iin poilitiiAl
campaigns.
Acco i p a I ini: th
questionnaires are letters indicatiini.
tha subpoenas might he used to iit
the information it it isn't prmo idcl
voluntarily, .


hi!dren in thie ace bracket 3
1 All these children hat e i
,,ie ph\ siteal or ps>, ecological
probicm.
1 Ja h chl id t i st i of i ill has a
ps, chtolhogical test "naini i ot 1
k no ,w the ir level ofI
I 1unctioriiig"'', sas \Miss D)avis
Sli i herself mlajiored ill
p-ychology at i lork t'niversiti ,

.\rmed r ilhi ; ls intoi iationi
1\ ss l)a is thilen practises
' "b'e li.\ 10 il nm odi ficiationl
ailningi"'. I his appears to oil
dowin tot rc'\arding children tirt
ca1) 1 behliaviour.
I tie rewards swill dillcr
according Ito lth needs It the
in li' idual child e.g., one child
likes candiy andi swkingilg,
another building, another has
the need for lots of loving.
Soite oif tle children arc
rctarfdeId anil somrCe are not aind
I.O.s range from i around 50( to
1 (i) this lattc Ibeing axeragc.
(ine chlild \\lo doesn't speak
lut hais an l .(l iof 100 builds,
;,. ',* ills arid M iss l)a, is
anticipates eventually getting
hiin into a normal school.
SPI'I I ('11 1Ill RAPY
\ specl.'i therapist comes inl
three times i1 week for a lack iof
ability to communicate is one
oI thle iia.r11 probleills witl
imlany of these children.
M.Ins ,hii!iren with tirese


sort of special problems, Miss
Davis explained, have little or
Ino interaction with their
brothers and sisters and if so it
is mainly negative.
I thie family situation is of
overriding importance and Miss
Davis plans to have
management meetings for
parents and maids who are
charged with looking after
these children in the home so
that the rearing at home can
reflect the training at Hopedale
Centre.
the curriculum consists of
sell care and grooming, some
Socat ional training, an
intellectual group, articulation
and speech therapy.
She uses Montessori
equipment, Sesame Street
books and films. Dlr. Seuss
books, blocks, leggo. crayons.
memory gaines and such biut
regrets that there is a lot o
other equipment she'd like to
get.
Miss Davis hopes to expand
and get more equipment. more
subjects on the curriculurtil and
in particular would like to hl vc
a workshop. She has another
trained teacher beginning in
January.
V I IA NI I)
Miss Davis urges parents
ith children with special
problems to seek help at the


earliest possible time. The
younger the child is when
he/she receives help the better
chance that child has of leading
a normal or at least a
reasonably productive life.
The Hlopedale Centre one
cany afely say is fulfilling a
vital need in the community.
Yet this is a private school.
Considering the small ratio of
qualified personnel to children
(at the present ten children to
Miss Davis, a helper and a part
time speech therspist) the fees
are reasonable, Vet they'd still
he too much for many parents
of two and often one-parent
families.
The Stapledon School has a
waiting list of 1two hundred.
So how many children with
special needs out there are
there who, for lack of
professional help, are doomed
to a t\ilhighit existence'?
\ conservativCe estimate
from one l prolessiot'al was that
there ire probably about 100
of these children in ordinary
da\ care centies long past tilhe
ie of SI IchI institutions that
cannot be inicorporatedt into
the rn iniIsti eair of education.
And just as had. if not
worse, ho \\1 any of these
children ari kept at home by
others or grandmothers who
don't kroo\s how to help trherf?


'BE CAREFUL

OF CHILDREN'

WARNING GIVEN
AFTI:R the injury of two
young children in traffic
accidents, road traffic
authorities warned motorists to
exercise more caution when
driving in areas where children
were likely to be.
Jacinta Knowles, 5, a Uriah
McPhee Primary School
student was taken unconscious
to the Princess Margaret
Hospital after being hit at
Kemp Road and Williams Lane
about five feet away from her
school. The accident occurred
at 7:50 a.m., Tuesday when, it
was reported, the Exuma
Street child had just got off a
bus to cross the street on her
way to school. The car
involved was no. 839
reportedly driven by Roland
Ferguson of Kennedy
Subdivision.
The child is listed in "fair"
condition at the hospital.
Also in "fair" condition at
the hospital is Gregory Laing,
7, of Lewis Street, who was
injured 7:30 p.m. Saturday
when involved in an accident
with car NPA 378, driven by
Alexander Williams.
A Road Traffic spokesman
said drivers should be more
alert when travelling in areas
where children are likely to be.

FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE- FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157


iNK-SI


II I iU'


information the Watergate
Committee has relating to the
Vesco case. Lawyers for former
Atty. Gen. John N. Mitchell and
former Commerce Secretary
Maurice H. Stans requested the
subpoenas.
Mitchell and Stans are accused of
conspiracy and obstruction of
justice in connection with a secret
200,000-dollar cash contribution to
President Nixon's re-election
campaign from fugitive financier
Robert L. Vesco.


DISTRIBUTED BY






Itci-e Iokerson & (l,. Ltd.







Thursday, October 11, 1973.
GERMANY BACKS EUROPEAN MONETARY UNION
L[ONDON (AP) Prime Minister I.dward Heath Sunday won West
terman backing tor a F uropean ( Common Market advance toward
monetary union even before Britain st()lps floating the pound sterling.
Fhe British leader, at the end oft two day talks with Chancellor Willy
Brandt of \\est G(ermany, told newsmen' "We agreed that the pegging of
sterling is a matter for Britain to decide. VWe will only do so when we think
it is appropriate. It is purely a British decision."
Brandt also pledged cooperation with Britain to speed up the work of
the nine nation community which has a backlog of crucial decision to take
by the yearend. It is due to set up on Jan. I a luropean monetary union,
I MU. ()On the basis of old rules each member country should, by that time,
have pegged the value of its currency in a fixed relation to those of its
partners.
in the present state of Britain's ailing economy there seems little chance
that the Heath government will he able to do so by the start of 1974. The
pound has been floating since June last year.
the British and (German leaders spent most of their time discussing the
problems of the Common Market. Brandt had come to the meeting
knowing Heath was expecting help from him. The help Heath needs is to
be able to demonstrate to a skeptical British public that the Common
Market does hold some tangible benefits for this country.


NOW SHOWING
Matinee 3:00 & 5:00, Evening 9:00-'Phone 2-1004, 2-1005

u. is bAck .o ba, k you up
I .A ^ S Mih you down nd kick you pA*AT witk

I. *I
:". Color A Notional General Pictures Release ( G
PARI:'Ar 1. DI)ISCRETION A ,1 lShtSI)
SORRY NO PASSES ACCEPTED! 1

I Last Day Friday Last Day Friday
Matinee Starts at 2:45 Continuous Showings
S Evening 9:00 from 3
"VALDEZ IS COMING" PG. "FUZZ" PG.
Burt Lancaster Burt Reynolds
Susan Clark Yul Brynner
PLUS PLUS
"THE CREMATORS" P(;.
All Star Cast "SAM WHISKEY" PG.
PLUS Late Feature Burt Reynolds
Friday night. Brt y
'Phone 2-2534 Clint Walker

FRIDAY ONLY
Matinee continuous from 1:45. Evening 8:30
'Phone 3-4666
I "STANLEY"PG.
f Starring
CH('RIS ROBINSON ALXI ROCCO0 I

"GUNS OF THE STRANGER" PG. I
I Starring


ihte rtibtt 717


NOEL
) ........ 4 1

'S ^ ^ 4^ y -'1^-' p


t .o


CHRISTMAS CARDS TO
HELP MENTALLY RETARDED


TIHOSE who want
something original and artistic
and Bahamian in Christmas
cards and who wish to kill two
birds with the same S and
contribute to a good cause at
the same time will be
interested in knowing that the


new set of colourful Christmas
cards from the Bahamnas
Association for the Mentally
Retarded are now ready for
sale.
There are four cards, all
designed and donated by local
artists, Berta Sands, Crofton
Peddle, Helen Astarita and
Jenny Dunn.
They will he available from
the same sources as last year,
volunteer sales people, sotnme
local shops and the Stapledon
School


* NOW SHOWING *
AT 7:00 & 10:25
SANTEE PG
Starring
GLEN FORD
AND at 8:50
TODAY WE KILL
TOMORROW WE DIE


P/.- i. 1: l,)1IS'RI"T.Il,-)l t17,17i) ;_ _ _ _





THE FREE NATION


Will Hc
k A


PUBLIC


IR


N'


qAL


@RISTMAS


^.

y
s C t" ."l" .







^ - -ar^]?^.
^.g^ ,
^<
^*y'


i,


MOVEMENT


Id A


MEETING


THURSDAY OCTOBER 11,1973

At The


COLUMBUS PRIMARY SCHOOL


WULFF ROAD AND


COLLINS AVENUE


Vital National Issues To Be Discussed


*UNEMPLOYMENT


*THE ECONOMY


*COST


OF LIVING


*TAXATION and MORE!


Speakers will include:
The Leader, MR. K. G. L. ISAACS
The Chairman, SENATOR ORVILLE A. TURNQUEST
The Vice Chairman, MR. FRED RAMSEY
Senator ARTHUR A. FOULKES
Chairman for the evening: SENATOR HENRY BOSTWICK


COME AND


AR!


(THIS MEETING WAS POSTPONED FROM LAST WEEK BECAUSE OF INCLEMENT WEATHER)


IIIIII


COME ONE. COME ALL

& HAVE YOURSELF A BALL
AT OUR

DISCOVERY DAY MATI NEE
Friday Afternoon 3:00 to 6:30p.m.

:ADMISSION $1?

Music By

The T Connection
AT


The Show Club
Bay & Deveaux Sts.


nanldAl M NO91 i


[ALSO EIf
...J OEoKID j


_ ._ _____ ___~__ _ 1L, --- -- -- - -- -'-C~ -, ----- -t-----~... ~---iil~.-i-L~ -


r


I


lu


SMEARED 1
-- ------ *-


I -












U~iw ~ribUuvo


Thursday, October 11, 1973.


CLASSIFIED


SECTION


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS-FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV. TELEPHONE 21986 EXT. 5


C 11886t
NOTICE is hereby given that
I ULLER EBENEZER
PALMER of Eight Mile Rock.
Grand Bahama is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration ja a citizen of
Fhe Bahamas and that any
person who knows any reason
wny registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed stater-nent of the
mits within twenty-eight days
ti ., the 4th day of October
to The Minister
ini o p ble for Nationality and
,t --,hip. P. 0. Box N7147,



S is heieb. qivre that
JONATHAN JONE-S of Eight
., '- ,k. Grand Bahamna is
!' to '" t Io ,e %M minister
-ble for Nat Nona i.ty and
; .. -'hap, foi regostri t i on as
c' of The Bahamas, ana
.it an'. person who knows
n ''so" why registration
'. rn'ot be gra -ted should
tten and signed
'-" t the 'acts within
h '. t days orn the 4th
.. to tri 1973 tri The
respoi sible fo n
aity anld Ci tize'rish-ip, P.
,. 7' 14 7' Na-.-N4 ,


i is riertebiv ge,' that
i Sr 'E SYL AST ER ,' t FPRS
t .' '- L 1 1er Garden- F. 0.
t 7 4, '-rssau 5 is pppyling
'- ', ni e'rstee' fsooi rsi im' for
r _' ': !' .'" y C itli.'" ',ship ,
n Ii ) a iS x ta Izenr of
p't' X, 'ama a> ::n tlt any
'. .'in i'ho in r~w an' -' eason
-,' st'riSatno ins 'L.Ilr i 't be
.'a',te,! snrt. ij se' i a writtenn
,jr 1i,:, ed stite' ,nrit of the
t i'nt .-, i, ''t ays
S 4t Lv day of O'ctober
l 39 to the sister
e por iiie .+'i Nat ona, iti and
..., s .i P c 77 14 7,



n i'. I g. s erib qvye" that
'yk(0 "Oi S (ki'cwn as
I P IANCIS) of Alice
o>,vr, Lliieuthera is applying to
't' ^! it iep, ornisible for
N j'h' ivit arid Citizenship.
n. -'tira sait on as a citizen
T;' lh' {ahai.as, a nd that any
who r n-ows any reason
,vh' natural isation should not
t m' -i'-tpd shoou!d send a
'n'*tn" ri'id signed statement t
h e ftict within
'', -'ight clays -om the 4th
Oct' ober 173 to The
XI n, '1 ,i respoun s ble for
40!1i[ A iity and Cr i eniship, P
I .. /1l.1 7, Na aidu.


'r'* i n i ',pr'b' give P tha'
S J US FORD P ,
G d E3ahar'- a s
r t tNat. nal'' n
.. r re istrat .on a,
STilt, Bahamnas. a'm:
;j */ ',ini who kno.S
'- ., vhy/ regis trat ,n
t tx t I anted should
: a tein and siwied
tJt"- ifirit of thir facts witnir
a . ri qi : n: )t+ 'IP -e'4
'" *, r, with "

a ( Octoer 1- 73 to Th.

N'a' a ,, 1, Jnd Ci t i Z 'n Stin ,.
0 1, 74 7, Nasau


Ov
' n :' n I -, O-"Nn S iv."" it<"

ri.,1 r, : "' rla t an ia

' i : *; v i -' g i, t i i' n a
,s .' -r af ia'n sty and
ti." . n p,:N'',oIn vho kirin)W
Shv registrath orn
h ,* .... * .' gra nrted "hoe ,id
"h,;r Ar, t- n arild siqrned
, .. ,; I n' the facts w i'n 'i
,/.' ': g 'h d' ys rorn tho 4th
1 1 O t i il 1 'i/3 to The

i', 'li a ,1'd ( 'ei r'shi P
0 '.- i' 14 7. Ninsau


NOT ii .'. hn-bi' giv 'm thati
V FOPIA f LI//iL TH
pAL P,! F i Ef ghtJ Mm!P Rui. .
G', .i I h [aha "ia i apply ring to
'fin '1 ,',t'. resp onsible ,
N at! m jlty aid ( itizenship,
i r '1'O '..r, 1r at a a ci t izen of
ll' h ii. h rn ajs, arnd that anv
p'sonn whio krniows any reason
vihy r listriition should not be
Jrin te' should send a written


aini d i sgipnd statemr erit of the
fdtai I.thlin twennty-eight days
from the 4th day of October
19/3 to The Minister
responsible for Na tonality andc
i .' i, *i,, P.O. Box N7147,
Nd SS cU.

(.116848
NO TICE is hereby given that
ALFRED 3F NJAMIN
WILLIAMS of Hfamptonr
Street, West. is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Natimonality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Piahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 4th day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N7147,
Nassau.


C11880
NOTICE is hereby given that
LEONARD RONALD
WILSON of Minnie Street,
South Beach District, Nassau
Bahamas is applying to The
Minister responsible for
registration as a citizen of The
Baharnas, and that any person
who knows any reason why
registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 4th day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P O. .Box N7147,
Nassau

C12042
NOTICE is hereby given that
LEWIS COLIN HANCHELL of
Ridgeland Park, Nassau,
Bahamas is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 11th day of Oct.
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship. P. 0. Box N7147.
Nassau.

C11850
NOTICE is hereby given that
EDMUND ST GEORGE
RIGBY of Stapledon Gardens,
Nassau is applying to the
Min sister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twentv-eight days
from the 4th.day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nat onality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.

C11875
NOTICE is hereby given that
LELlO LEBRIN of
Port-de-Paix. Haiti is applying
to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for naturalisation as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why naturalisation should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 4th
day of October 1973 to The
1 sister responsible for
Natonalit arind Citizenship, P.
). Box N7147, Nassau

C12036
NOTICE is hereby given that
AN NA D E L PHINE
HANDFIELD of Owen's
Town. Andros, Bahamas is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
,end a written and signed
-taternent of the facts within
twenty-Right days from the
;ith day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nat' or,ality and Citizenship P.
0 Box N7147. Nassau.

C12037
'OTI ICE is hereby given that
WASHINGTON NATHANIEL
L OX a Owen's Town, Andros,
Bahaman is applying to the
M nistei responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
foir regitration as a citizen of
Thii BIahamas. and that any
per' who knows any reason
why registration should not be
grated should send a written
mnd s-q'ged statement of the
fact', within twenty-eight days
fiom the 11th day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship P O. Box N7147,
Nassau

C12050
NOTICE is hereby given that
HERBERT JOHN BAIN of
Gibbs Corner, Nassau is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for naturalisation
as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who
knows any reason why
naturalisation should not be
granted should send a written


and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 11th day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.

C12051
NOTICE is hereby given that
EDOUARD NONHOMME of
First Street, The Grove, Nassau
N.P. Bahamas is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why naturalisation should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
11th day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.


C11877
NOTICE is hereby given that
JANE ANN MORRIS of Eight
Mile Rock, Grand Bahama is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 4th
day of October 1973 to The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau

C 12049
NOTICE is hereby given that
THOMAS W. WILLIAMS of
First Street Coconut Grove is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
11th day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship. P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

C 12032
NOTICE is hereby given that
SAMUEL RICHARDSON
BASDEN of P. 0. Box F-1594
Freeport, Grand Bahama is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationaliv and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas. and
that any person who knows
any reason why registrat on
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
11th day of Oct. 1973 to The
Min ister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship P.
0. Box N7147. Nassau

C12031
NOTICE is hereby given that
JULIA MA R GART T
BRANDON of P. 0. Box 49:1,
Nassau Bahamas is appiving tu
the Minister responsible fow'
Nationality anrid Citizeriship.
for naturalisation as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why naturalisation should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the fac ts within
twenty-eight days from thi
I 1Ith day of Oct. 1973 to The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

C 12047
NOTICE is hereby given that
IANTHE VERLINA
ROBINSON of Kennedy
Subdivision, Nassau, Bahamas.
is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for naturalisation
as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who
knows any reason why
naturalisation should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 11th day of October
'73 to The Minister responsible
for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.

C12053
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN
that MR. LEE ALEXANDER
FRITH of Pinedale, Grand
Bahama is applying to the
M i nister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eiqht days
from the 11th day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. O. Box N7147,
Nassau.

C12027
NOTICE is hereby given tha1
JAMES WILLIAMS of
Marathon Estates P O. Box
5720 Nassau Bahamas is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows


any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
11th day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N7147, Nassau.

C 12033
NOTICE is hereby given that
ALICIA DENISE BASD[EN of
P. 0. Box F-1594 Freeport
Grand Bahama is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eiqht days
from the 11th day of Oct.
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship P. O.Box N7147,
Nassau.


BUSINESS 6 PROFESSIONAL


DIRECTORY


Save Time



BY



S li [Ist Hi Sis Ulrutiy CA1216 1EXI. 5

I L tr hth $5l1 2INf Pelonth '3"


> SVE TINE SAVE MONEY


Smm n -mmmmm m mmmmm mm mmim
FLOOR MAINTENANCE BOOKSTORE
Rug Cleaning & Installation rhe Christian Book Shop 5-8744
I"l.,d interiors 5 3.57 42 IT
CSTOMS BROKERS \fEN'SCLOTHING
11'.irn i' 2-31 3 The Wardrobe Mackey St. 5-5599

DEPT. STORES TRAVEL
Pixiess Dept. Store 2-31 3 Plaitours 2-2931/7
John's Dept. Store 2 3156 R. H. Curry' & Co. Ltd. 2-8681/7
R-DIO & T.V. SALFS MUSIC
Carter's Records 2471t Cody's Records 2-8500

OPTICIANS HEALTH FOODS
Opticl Serrvce Ltd 2-3910,1 Nassau Drug Store 3-4871

SPORT SHOP CAMERAS
C(hamnpiri.,n Sp,.r I and 2 182 John Bull 2-4252/3

SHOE STORE DRY GOODS
Clonar.is Kute KJdd. 2-42t4 Clonaris Kute Kiddy 2-4264

CARPETS LA DRY DRY LENIN
I cc's (arpet Craft 3-1993 New Oriental Laundry 2-4406

WRECKER SERVICE DRAPERIES
(.ibsonl r \\ recker Service 2-8896 Lee's Carpet Craft 3-1993
mm mm mm mm m mm lm m -

FOR THE ACTION YOU WANT




Shop Nassau Merchants

For Business And Services


N- 1NO1TC

c 2039
j01 ICE is hereby given that
'L11 MFNT1 HlGCS of Infant
V',. z Ruod, Nassau,. Bahamas is
I;f. c j 0g to the M minister
I' .pnnmbli ifor Nationality and
i.'i'Hsh p, fto, registration as
S i of The Bahamas, and
'an' l'y person who knows
VV ,'"enisn why registration
d n'Lt be granted should
' wtten and signed
,'.. 't of the 'acts within
.. d ays from the
Ocotber 1973 to
i '!;, 'isteC responsible for
'. !, m and Citizenship, P.
( i4 .7, Nassau.


ANOTIrCE i, hereby given that
MAGI1 CHRISTINA CAPRON
of Wulff Road, Nassau is
applv ing to the Minister
iesponm iil f mfoi Nationalityand
Citizenship, for registration as
a cmierin of The Baharnmas, and
thlt any prison who knows
Ji r e uli why registration
r,td in,'t be granted should
sa d a w,'ttern and signed
5s' i 'rmni. t nof tie fats within
twv'-ty-(tqhnl days from the
S1ih dav of October 1973 to
The Min lister responsible for
N.'4> io-ait and Citizenship, P.
O Boxi N-7147, Nassau.

C I 04 1
NOTICE r., ,heeby given that
GLADYS JESSIE PERRY of
Box 6340 Nassau is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for rnatIralsation as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any
tle'ison who knows any reason
wh.' natuiailsation should not
be gi a'nted should send a
written andI signed statement
o' the facts within
twvventy-eight days from the
l lth dao Of October 1973 to
The Mi'o ,ter responsible for
Njtionali't and Citizenship, P.
O Box N7147, Nassau.


REAL ESTATE

C l '048
BUY A LOT
in EASTWOOD or
WINTON MEADOWS
Call F rank Carey
at t /G67 0o 24815
SRPANK CAREYEAL ESTATE
FRANK CAREY
Real Estate
Box N4764
Bay & Deveaux Sts.

Cl173j
IFOR SALE BY OWNER
4 bedroom 2 bath house -
completely walled in and
landscaped. 2 bedrooms
airconditioned. In beautiful
condition. Located in exclusive
"Shirley Park Avenue". Close
to town and all shopping.
Telephone 2-1722 (day)
34953 (night).


IIEAL ESTATE_

FOR SALE
2, 3 and 4 bedroom houses i,1
the following prestigous
areas:
Westward Villas -Skyline
Heights
Highland Park The Grove
Gleninston Gardens Sea
Breeze
Imperial Park Johnson
Terrace
Nassau East- Winton
Eastern Road Camperdown
Blair Estates Golden Gates
Estates
HIGHBURY PARK as well
as where ever ou want it.
IN ADDITION
COMMERCIAL AND
RESIDENTIAL lots or acerage
in New Providence and Family
Islands.
Hotel sites and more. If it's real
estate we have it.
CiNTACT
DAVSEON'S REAL ESTATE
AGENCY
Corner Bay & East Streets
Phone 21178 or 55408
P. 0. Box N4648
Nassau, Bahamas
or cable
DAVCO"
C 12044
SPANISH WELLS residence in
excellent condition consisting
of 11/- storey frame house and
masonry addition with guest
room, bath, garage porch,
beautifully landscaped yard
and patio, walled and fenced,
furnished. Must be seen. Price
reduced from &55,000.00.
Entertain offers. Owner P. 0.
Rox 26. Spanish Wells.

C12030
FOR SALE One lot of land
483 ft by 93 ft. adjacent to Sea
Breeze. Price $10,000.00. Call
23214 between 9 and 5.

C12035 FOR SALE
* 1. Desirable hilltop
residential lot Montagu Heights
at the extremely low price of
$11,000. 118 feet by 155 feet.
* 2. Beautifully situated
waterfront lot Eastern Road:
$60,000. 79 feet on Bay Street
by 120 feet deep, with 128
feet of water frontage. Almost
half an acre.
* 3. Excellent buy in
three-bedroom, two-bath
residence off Village Road.
Living room with dining ell,
den, kitchen, laundry, carport,
etc. $49,000 furnished
including new appliances.
H. G. CHRISTIE
REAL ESTATE
309 Bay Street
P.O. Box N8164, Nassau
Tel: 2-1041,2-1042


REAL ESTATE


II


C11916'
GREAT HARBOUR CAY
BERRY ISLANDS
12,000 square feet private
building plot near 15th green
and beach. Valued at $12,300.
Must sell. Leaving Bahamas.
Telephone 77901 evenings
McKenzie, Box N1109.

FOR SALEOR RENT

C11965
FOUR BEDROOM furnished
Executive home on Eastern
waterfront with swimming
pool. For sale or rent.
CALL BERT L. ROBERTS,
LTD. For appointment to view
2-3177 or 2-3178.


FOR RENT

Cli761
BAY STREET Sttre for rent as
of October 15th. For
information call 2-3170.


C11930
FURNISHED 2 bedroom, one
bath apartment near
waterfront with telephone.
$195.00. Phone 5-8512.

C11776
2 BEDROOM APARTMENT.
lentreville. ":elep.honrc 5-8,379.
5-8679.

C11944
UNFURNISHED 2 bedroom
apartments, good location off
Mackey Street. Telephone
5-1758.

C11763
COTTAGES and apartments
daily, weekly or monthly
airconditioned, fully furnished,
maid serivce available. Lovely
gardens and swimming pool.
Telephone 31297, 31093

C11868
BEAUTIFUL two bedroom
apartment in Shirlea, partly
furnished $250 a month
including water. Call 36896
Carl Lowe. Monday-Friday, 9
a.m. -5'p.m.

C11772
ONE EXTRA LARGE two
bedrooms two bath,
apartment. With large living
and dining all basically
furnished Victoria Court
APARTMENTS on Elizabeth
Avenue between Shirley and
Bay Street. Facilities, phone,
laundry, parking, T. V.
antenna, airconditioned. Phone
5z631 between 8 a.m. and 5
p.m.

C11964
OFFICE SPACE ROBERTS
BUILDING
Corner of East & Bay Streets,
Airconditioning included,
120 sq. ft. $ 90.00 per mo.
271 sq. ft. 135.00 per mo.
360 sq. ft. 180.00 per mo.
975 sq. ft. 400.00 per mo.
OFFICE AND STORE SPACE
Out Island Traders Shopping
Centre from as little as
$208.00 per mo. Large and
small areas available both on
the ground and first floors. If
you are starting a new business
we will give a month's free
rent.
APARTMENT -- Oakes Field
One bedroom unfurnished -
$140.00 per month.
APARTMENTS Out East
1 & 2 bedrooms, fully
furnished and partially
furnished, air-conditioning,
swimming pool from as little as
$200.00 per month.
EFFICIENCY APARTMENT
Within walking distance to
Town. Air-conditioned & fully
furnished. $150.00 per mo.
TWO BEDROOM
APARTMENT Within
walking distance to Town.
Air-conditioned & fully
furnished. $250.00.

BERT L. ROBERTS, LTD.
2-3177/2-3178

C 12046
BACHELOR ROOMS with
private entrance in Tedder
Close, Palmdale. For
information call 5-1044.

C 12040
FURNISHED two bedroom
apartment on Bernard Road -
airconditioned, Master T.V.
antenna, washer/dryer. Rent
includes all utilities and
telephone. Phone 42158.

ART SUPPLIES

C11770
COMPLETE range of artists'
supplies. Oils, acrylics. canvas,
easels, etc. Bahamian Paint
Supply Ltd., Bay Street. Phone
2-2386, 2-2898.


CARS FOR SALE

C11975
1971 VOLKSWAGEN fast
back, automatic shift. Phone
42193 58803. $2,000
(ONO).

C12055
1969 VOLKSWAGEN Station
Wagon Automatic Call 3-1995
Ask for Mr. Mueller.

C 12034
1971 PLYMOUTH VALIANT
- Air conditioned radio -
11.000 miles. $3100. Phone
34527 ,28293.


CARS FOR SALE


C 1948
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD.
P.O. Box N-640
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
USED CARS
1967 CHRYSLER
4 Dr. Auto. White $1000
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
4 Dr. Std. Green $995

1968 JAVELIN
A/C $995
1967 TRIUMPH HERALD
White $775
1971 FORD CAPRI
Auto. Blue $1695
1970 VICTOR S/WAGON
Std. Red. $900

1968 PLYMOUTH
Satellite
Satellite $1300
1969 PONTIAC GTO
A/C Vinyl Red $2600
1968 BUICK ELECTRA
White $1595
1970 ACADIAN
4 Dr. Auto Radio $1600
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA S/W
Green $1595
1971 FORD PINTO
Brown Vinyl Auto. $1995


1970 PONTIAC
LAURENTIAN
A/C Blue
1967 COUGAR
Std. Green
1969 FORD FALCON
2 Dr. Auto.


$1950

$900

$1300


Trade-ins Welcomed.
Located Oakes Field
Opposite the Ice House
Telephone 34636 -7 -8

C12052
AT MOTOR CENTRE
WE HAVE
THE USED CAR
FOR YOU
1971 DODGE AVENGER.
O.N.O. A/T radio at ONLY
$1,650.00
1972 CHEVY IMPALA. Af/T
P/T P/B radio a/c vinyl top
w/w tyres O.N.O. at ONLY
$5,000.00
1969 V/WAGON. Radio at
ONLY $1,200.00
1970 ZODIAC R.H.D P/S,
leather upholstery at ONLY
$2.500.00
1972 DODGE AVENGER.
O.N.O. in very good condition
at ONLY $2,300.00
1969 CHEVY MALIBU,
2-door. bucket seats, radio at
ONLY $2,000.00
1970 CHEVY IMPALA. New
paint work a/S P/H A/T radio
w/w tyres at ONLY $2,700.00
1969 MORRIS 1100. At
ONLY $800.00
1972 DODGE AVENGER. S/T
at ONLY $2,000.00.
1969 RAMBLER AMERICAN.
S/W radio P/S w/w tyres at
ONLY $1,400.00
1970 FORD CORTINA. S/W
S/T radio new paint work at
ONLY $1,300.00
MECHANIC SPECIAL going
for $300.00
WE TRADE
FINANCE AVAILABLE
MOTOR CENTRE LIMITED
THOMPSON BLVD.,
NEXT TO COCA COLA
PHONE: 56739


MARINE SUPPLIES
-11894
1969 31ft. CHRIS CRAFT
Commander. Sleeps six, private
shower, two 230 h.p. engines
with less than 200 hours,
kitchenette, good condition.
Call 24267, 54011.

C11953
50' MATTHEWS, beautiful live
aboard, lavishly furnished.
Complete with beautiful
stereo. Phone 23911. See at
Nassau Yacht Haven.

C 12008
42' MATTHEWS 325 H.P.
Chryslers Flybridge, full
electronics double cab.
Shower in beautiful
condition 1963 -- registered
Bahamas. 665-5403, Miami -
6822 Mindello, Coral Gables,
Florida.

C11762
PACEMAKER 44 ft.
Luxurious Cruising Yacht.
Phone 3-2371.


FOR SALE

C12011
1972 Honda 100 and TV
antenna. Call 28240.

C11955
ACT II RESALE SHOP
BRAND NEWNEARLY NEW
EXQUISITE Gowns, cocktail,
street dresses pants suits
jewelry
DEALERS WELCOME
1352 Washington Avenue,
Miami Beach Phone 534-0001

C12056
1969 VOLKSWAGEN Station
wagon Automatic Call 3-1995
Ask for Mr. Murller.

PETS FOR SALE

C11974
CROSSBREED PUPPIES
Mother Shepherd Father
Doberman. Phone 42193
after 5 p.m.


(Sh bZIribun


NOTICE INI E II In E


HARRY D. MALONE
Public Auctioneer
C 11883
HARRY D. MALONE will sell
at his premises on Albury Lane
five doors from Shirley Street
on the right hand side in the
Eastern District of the Island
of New Providence on Friday
the 19th day of October A.D.,
1973 at 12 o'clock noon the
following property:-
ALL THAT piece parcel or
lot of land situate in the
Subdivision called and
known as Imperial Park in
the Eastern District of the
Island of New Providence
aforesaid having the Number
Eight (8) in Block Number
Five (5) in the said Plan of
the said Sub.diviion the said
Lot of land hereby conveyed
or so intended to be having
such position, boundaries,
shape, marks and dimensions
as are shown on the diagram
or plan attached to an
Indenture of Conveyance
dated the 5th day of
November, 1968 and made
between Nassau Beach
Properties Limited and The
Bank of Nova Scotia to
George Errol Simmonds
and Gladys Elaine
Simmonds and now of
record in the Registry of
Records in Book 1474 at
pages 250 to 255 and are
delineated on that part of
the said diagram or plan
which is Coloured Pink.
The property is being sold
under the power of sale
contained in an Indenture of
Mortgage dated the
Twenty-second day of July,
A.D., 1969 between George
Errol Simmonds and Gladys
Elaine Simmonds and The
Chase Manhattan Bank, N.A.
and recorded in the said
Registry of Records in Book
1474 at pages 256 to 272.
The sale is subject to a reserve
price and the right for the
Auctioneer or any person on
his behalf to bid up to that
price. Terms 10% of the
purchase price at the time of
sale and balance on
completion.
Dated this 2nd day of October,
A.D., 1973.
HARRY D. MALONE
Public Auctioneer
October 4th, 11th and 18th


I HELP WANTED
C11931
WANTED MECHANIC AND
Body man. Call Gibson 2-8896.

C11970
One Tailor with 3 years
experience with design and
dressmaking. Call 36133 ask
for Sylvia Sands.

C11910
FEMALE to act as
Representative for Tour
Groups. Must have three
G.C.E., transportation and be
prepared to work odd hours.
Phone 2-2606 for
appointment.
C12019
EARN FULL PAY WHILE
LEARNING A SPECIALTY .
It pays to specialize. And IBM
will pay you while you train to
become a Customer Engineer.
It's your chance to get started
in one of today's
fastest-growing areas of
Electronics. As a Customer
Engineer, you'll install and
maintain the latest IBM Office
Products 'Equipment. It's a
demanding job, one requiring
intelligence and skill. You'll
receive continuous training to
update your knowledge. If you
have what it takes, you can be
promoted to a position of even
greater responsibility in this
challenging field of
information handling and
control. What do you need to
get started? Mechanical
aptitude and basic Electricity.
Bahamians only. Why not
begin your specialization
today? For more information
contact: L. Bingham, IBM
Limited. Telephone 3-2351-4,
Nassau, Bahamas.


-


Ii


I I I L &


-


-- i- .iil~----~


P 1 J i


I


PW


PUBLIC AUCTION
C11636
HARRY D. MALONE will sell
at his premises on Albury
Lane, situated five (5) doors
from Shirley Street, South on
the Right hand side on the
19th day of October, 1973 at
12 o'clock noon, the following
property:-
"ALL THAT piece parcel or
lot of land being Lot
number Forty-five (45) in
Block Number Three (3) on
the Plan on the Subdivision
calledd and known as
"Regency Park" which said
Plan is filed in the Crown
Lands Office of the Bahama
Islands as Number 417 N.P.
in the said office."
Mortgage dated 29th
September, 1966 George
Hubert and Arimelda Louise
Wilmore to Finance
Corporation of Bahamas
Limited. Recorded in Volume
1102 at Pages 17 to 23.
The sale is subject to a reserve
price and to the right for the
Auctioneer or any person on
his behalf to bid up to that
price.
Terms: 10% of the purchase
price at the time of sale and
balance on completion.
Dated this 26th day of
September A.D. 1973









Thursday, October 11, 1973.


HELP WANTED
C11968
REINFORCING STEEL
DETAILER, Part-time,
experience with two-way flat
slabs, familiar with ACI 1971
Code, after 5:30, 77206.

C 12022
COOPERS & LYBRAND have
vacancies for Bahamian
Accountants whose
qualifications make them
admissible as members of the
Bahamas Institute of Chartered
Accountants. The positions
offer a good salary and
working conditions and
extensive experience in
auditing and other financial
areas. Applications should be
sent in writing to the Staff
Partner, P. 0. Box N596,
Nassau, Bahamas.

C12007
BOOKKEEDE R/ACCOUNT-
ANT required for large
insurance agency. Experience
of final accounts preferred but
applicant must be capable of
producing monthly trial
balance. Experience with
computerised accounts would
be an advantage. Possibility
exists for future advancements
to a managerial position.
Applications in writing to:
THE MANAGER P. 0. Box
N4870, Nassau.

C6334
Job Title BURNERMEN (2)
Minimum Education Good
basic education. Experience in
fuel burning process in rotary
Kilns and production of
Clinker. Cement plant rotary
Kiln burnerman.
Minimum Experience 3-5
years.
Duties/Responsibilities -
Operate Kilns to produce
clinker by a continuous process
of burning.
In terested applicant contact
Personnel Department,
Bahamas Cement Company, P.
0. Box F100, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.

C12043
PARADISE ISLAND
LIMITED requires one Chef to
prepare all types of food for
gourmet restaurants. Must be
able to make estimates,
supervise and co-ordinate work
for personnel in kitchen. Must
also assist in the
menu-planning, etc. Must be
able to relieve at any station in
the kitchen. Should have done
three years' apprenticeship at
major hotel or recognized
restaurants or hotel school.
Experience in preparation of
continental cuisine essential.
Salary commensurate with
experience. Applications,
accompanied by resume,
should be forwarded to:

The Director of Training
Paradise Island Limited
P. 0. Box 4777
Nassau, Bahamas.

C12045
QUALIFIED AUTOMOBILE
MECHANICS. Must have at
least 5 years proven experience
with good references. We are
looking for men with the
ability to turn out first class
work on all phases of
automobile repairs. Excellent
conditions and pay for the
right men. Apply to Service
Manager, Nassau Motor
Company, Ltd. Shirley Street.


GRAND I


CLASJ





C6333
NOTICE is hereby given that
CHRISTOPHER ROBERT
OLIVER GRAHAM
HORRIDGE of Poinciana
Drive, Freeport is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration naturalrsation
as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who
knows any reason why
registrationnaturalisatior
should not be granted should
send a written nrid signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
11th day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.


C6332
NOTICE is hereby given that
SH I R LEY ELIZABETH
HORRIDGE of Poinciana
Drive, Freeport is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registra tion/naturalisation
as a citizen of The Bahamrnas,
and that any person who
knows any reason why
regist ration /naturalisation
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
11th day of October 1973 to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.


I l1t, Wribun


r,


C11151
SEWING MACHINE
REPAIRS AND PARTS
ISLAND FURNITURE
Corner Christie &
Dowdeswell Street
Phone 21197,
P. 0. Box 4818, Nassau

C11775
T. V. ANTENNAS
Boosters for homes;
apartments and hotels.
Sales and services
Call 5-9404
WORLD OF MUSIC,
Mackey Street
next to Frank's Plact

C 11892
RUBBER STAMPS. Made to
order Rubber Stamps, while
you wait. Wong's Rubber
Stamps Co. Phone 34871 P.
0. Box 5206.
C11976
BAHAMAS ANTENNA
SYSTEMS
SOLVING POOR RECEPTION
Same day service for moving
antennas or new installations.
Call Douglas Lowe 23371
51772.
C11832
FOR ALL Your Gardening
Needs, Trimming, Hedging,
Pruning, Beach Cleaning, For
Prompt, Reasonable and
efficient Service Call 5-7810.

IN MEMORIAL
C12021


IN FOND and loving memory
of our dear mother, BERNICE
DORSETT, better known as
(Mama Lue) who departed this
life four sad years today.
Time takes away the edge of
grief,
But memory turns back every
leaf.
Sadly missed by her daughter
Nettilee, sons Leonard and
Bert and a host of relatives and
friends.


3AHAMA


SIFIED


I NOW

C6327
NOTICE is hereby given that
JOHN C. SMITH of Eight Mile
Rock, Grand Bahama is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 4th
day of October 1973 to The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

C6341
NOTICE is hereby given that
JAMES BASSETT of Freeport,
Grand Bahama, Bahamas is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written nd signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
11th day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.


C6275
When visiting FREEPORT stay
at the:
EL CONQUISTADOR HOTEL
spacious rooms, fully
air-conditioned, from $10 to
$14 per day. For reservations
Call 352-8180.


(Wtthe ribtf


--T


TRADE SERVICES


Pnlaer's Culstem

Brokerage Ltd.
Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU. BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-3796
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434.


1. Stupefy
7. Chesterfields
12. Xl
13. Species of iris
14. Weaken
15. Vaults
16. Singing
syllable


28. Leucothia
29. Cheer
30. Exasperation
31. Hindrance
32 Hovel
33. Original sin
34. Together
36. Copper symbol


17. Pear 37. Theater
18. Esparto 39. Bullfighter
21. Large vessel 43. Masonic
22. Undergoes doorkeeper
25. Cruise port 44. Pleased
26. Only 45, Back street
27. Hickory 46. Shrine


C6337
NOTICE is hereby given that
HERMAN CLIFFORD
OUTTEN of Jones Town,
Grand Bahama is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 11th day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.
C6340
NOTICE is hereby given that
ELLA ROSINA MISSICK ot
Turks and Caicos Island British
West Indies is applying to the
Mi n ister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why naturalisation should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
11th day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

C6335
NOTICE is hereby given that
AN WAR BACCHUS of
Freeport, Grand Bahama is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/
naturalisation as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why 'regi-, ration/naturalisation
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
11th day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

C6336
NOTICE is hereby given that
JULIA LOUISE OUTTEN of
Eight Mile Rock, Grand
Bahama is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 11th day of October
1973 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.
C6307
NOTICE is hereby given that
CALVIN S. MISSICK of East
Indiaman Road, Freeport,
Grand Bahama is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 4th day of October,
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N-7147,
Nassau.



CROSSWORD

PUZZLE
ACROSS


SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE
DOWN 5 Bristle
6 Compass point
1 Fourposter 7 Army officer
2 Ivy Leaguer 8 Metals
3 Honey 9. Spider
4. Soft palate 10. Overturn
a 9 s o 11 Draft
Headquarters
S 17. Corpulent
18 Seed
Covering
--- 19 Trade
S20, National sport
152 21. Bicuspids
23. Breeze
24. Stalk
26. Whodunit
-- 33. Gold
35. Pointed arch
^ 33 36. Arrive
'- 37 Musical
direction
- e 40 14 38 Sesame
39. Make edging
40 Telepathic
faculty
41 Unit of
reluctance
eaoures 10-13 42. Keats' forte


13


NOTICE
C6339
NOTICE is hereby given that
RICHARD EMMANUEL
MISSICK of Turks and Caicos
Island, British West Indies is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
11th day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.


C6344
SHOP MANAGERESS
required for Scandinavian
stores, Freeport. High-school
graduates: Must have
experience in the control of
inventory, cash and charge
procedures as well as
knowledge of purchasing
specialised gift items.
Mercantile Trading Ltd. P. 0.
Box F301, Freeport.

C6334
Job Title BURNERMEN (2)
Minimum Education Good
basic education. Experience in
fuel burning process in rotary
Kilns and production of
Clinker. Cement plant rotary
Kiln burnerman.
Minimum Experience 3-5
years.
Duties/Responsibilities -
Operate Kilns to produce
clinker by a continuous process
of burning.
Interested applicant contact
Personnel Department,
Bahamas Cement Company, P.
0. Box F100, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.

C6338
FREEPORT FLIGHT
SERVICE invite applications
for GROUND EQUIPMENT
MECHANIC having the
necessary technical schooling,
knowledge and at least 7 years
experience to take charge of
the following: Tankfarm
electrical and pumping
equipment, fuel and oil tenders
hydraulic pneumatic systems,
aircraft ground support
equipment line and preventive
maintenance. Interpret
electrical diagrams have own
tools and willing to work odd
hours. Assume total
responsibility. Send
handwritten resume with past
experience and previous
employers to: P. 0. Box F359,
Freeport.


MARINE SUPPLIES

C6343
37 foot SAILING YACHT,
Mercedes diesel, teak decks,
very comfortable, well
equipped, $12,000 duty paid.
Freeport 373-2288.




C6342
NOTICE is hereby given that
MYR TIS IANTHY
HAMILTON of Eight Mile
Rock Sea Grape Grand
Bahama, is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalisation
as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who
knows any reason why
registration/naturalisat ion
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
11th day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147. Nassau.


HELP WANTED
C6345
HEAD AIR CONDITIONING
MECHANIC Replies to calls
concerning air conditioning
failure, diagnosis problem,
determines solution and takes
immediate steps to correct the
failure. Repairs refrigerators,
ice machines, large central air
conditioning systems
and window units, determines
quality of air conditioning
required for a specific place.
Where necessary repairs duct
work to ensure proper
discharge of cold air, and
supervises and trains Assistant
Airconditioning Mechanic.
Apply to: Grand Bahama
Development Company
PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT
Lucayan Building,
P. 0. Box F-2666,
Freeport, Grand Bahama


_ L~


Ijke Comic /age



REX MORGAN, M.D. By DAL CURTIS 1

OKAY IT DON'T LOOK LIKE WAIT A MINUTE / THE WHAT'RE YOU OPENING
--ILL NOBODY HER UGHT WAS ON / MAYBE THE WINDOW FOR ?
I TOLD YOU I HEARD HAVE A MISTER/ SOMEBODY WAS HERE/
A WOMAN SCREAM/ LOOK
YOU'VE GOT TO OPEN
OTHE APARTMENT R5 -- / ""A
FOR ME












WE'RE GING TO MEAN WHI L I / N LEEAVT GO RY THAE S
PLEASE, GORDY, APARTMENT' TIS 15 THE APARTMENT V TWEY MUST BE OUT
LLET ME GO BUILDING WHERE BARBARA BACK SOMEWHERE
SMITH AND JOAN
LIVED, DR MORGAN1



- L -









JUDGE PARKER By PAUI NICHOLS

S5S TT A-SE NATNY P, YO TELL. ME W HEN WHATTE I, GOING TO P -T DO YOUU ME AN
NOW, ON THE PLAY -A'JE' CC..D' I ,ET I..AND ILL SEE THAT ABOUTYOUR 5E A REAL / .'T GONG TO BE A
YOU'RE REFERRN C 0 SEE ONE OF "OUR WE C -AVE YOU RIGHT GAME TOU3H ONE .'ROUGH ONE? ACCORD
i...I FAKE TC HE RAC- CE EG CN5 IN THE HUDDLE'! SUNDAY? AREI! MSS ABBE'" 7 NG TO THE
TAiLBACK THEN CE E | WYOU GOING TO WOULDN'T DDS'AAKERS
|OUT TO THE RGNV- E WIN IT? WANT TC MAKE 'YOJ RE FAVORED
A PASS TO THE '-" A PREDICTION Y TWENTY
END! POINTS











TAKE IT EROM ABBEY AS USUAL, REMEMBER, YOU] 'IF YOU DON T MIND, WE'LL
I YOUR TEA, AE,AM .,THEY RE I T WAS A DELIGHTFUL LET ME KNOW LEAVE SLADES' CAR HERE
FAVORED TO WN UNDERRATED! I LL EVENING! GLADE AND WHEN YOU WANT ...AND ARRANGE TO_
1BY TWENTY PON' BE HAPPY Y GEE1 I LL HAVE TO LEAVE TO ATTEND A HAVE IT PICKED UP
GLADE.' WHAT MAKES J6 TAKE T 3"Y BECAUSE WE HAVE PRACTICE SESSION TOMORROW.! I WANT THAT'L
YOU SAY !TIL BE ONE P NT i A COUPLE MORE MAAM! HIM TO DRIVE INTO /BE FINE!
A TOUGH GAME HOURS WORK TO TOWN WITH ME'!
l) / 00 TCN GHT!












APARTMENT 3-G By Alex Kotzky


PONE ARE A GOURMET COOK, ANN' I CAN WALTER-- I WANT TO APOLOGIZE FOR
S HIS HOTEL--- TELL THAT BY THE AROMA WHICH 15 AL- STOPPING IN WITHOUT CALL-U
BUT HE HAP JUST i READY STIMULATING MY SALIVARY ING FIRST--- BUT I THOUGHT I
WERE ONE TO INNER CREATIONS -----MIGHT TALK YOU INTO GOING
YO I CAN BE PAID NO TO THE THEATER WITH ME!
GREATER
BRYAN2(?COMPLIMENT--


AT THE







NC p','AL RT T 1 WON'T APOLOGIZE FOR MY BEHAVIOR IF YOU WILL OPEN THE WINE
T ECA THAT HE AND THAT A ALTER--- BUT I WILL ASK YOU PROFESSOR START
ANOM THE 'EMN AN AERE N TO JOIN US FOR DINNER IF YOU HAVEN'T SERVING!
BEL T THE A L- AY VOU TRE P ALREADY EATEN IMMEDIATELY,
THAT 'U E T O HERE,
AND THE WOULD.
PROFE 5 ACCEPT THE
HAVE MET INVITATION

WALTERZ I









STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & overgard


#200 FOR A'72 '"E NOPE."-I'VE IT'D-COST MORE TO PUT NAVY BEAN, MIGTER.'"-"I'LL THINk ABOUT
YOU'VE GOT A GREAT "JUT GOT THAT CAIR ON THEHIGH- 27 YOUR OFFER ....TF I RUNOUT OF--UH---
EN6E OF HUMOR, r SENSE. 'AY THAN TO PUT IT THEN, MR. IMPORTANT MATTERS TO
MY FRIEND. ON THE MOON MELLON? OMEM6 THINKABOUT
t -7TELLS 5E '
I i. YOLzL 8fE '


1


_- L. Y









41t4 Aft4j4


-w h ribtune


HURRICANES

LOOK SET TO


S. RETAIN THEIR

over Cincinnati Reds 7-2 FINE RECORD
FINE RECORD


Baliyfoy Rle will try t1


Sal i..mpossible possible'


SHring back British tiuy


-~


to move to World Series

By Hal Bock
NEW YORK (AP) Tom Seaver, with ninth-inning help from
relief ace Tug McGraw, pitched New York's cinderella Mets to
US. baseball's National League championship Wednesday,
beating the Cincinnati Reds 7-2 on the strength of a wild four-run
fifth inning in the final playoff game.
A huge Shea Stadium crowd Don (;ullett to face
that started chanting, lefty-swinging John Milner.
"We're No. 1, We're No. 1." Milner walked on a 3-2
during the big outburst, spilled pitch, however, loading the
onto the field despite the bases. I'd Kranepool, playing in
presence of dozens of place on injured Rusts Staub,
policemen, creating a was due to bat but now it was
tumultuous victory scene when the Mets' turn for some
McGraw recorded the final out strategy and some sentiment
in the minth inning, to give the as well.
Mets their third triumph In this Manager Yogi Berra sent in
best-of-five series and put them Willie Mays. his retiring
in the World Series tor the superstar, to bat tor the
second time In five left-handed Krancpool. who
years. The game was delayed had delivered a two-run single
several times in the Reds' ninth in tile first inning. Anderson
because of demonstrative fans. then switched to Carr.'!! as the
The wives of the Reds' crowd gave Mays a tremendouscs
players and some of the team's standing ovation.
officials were escorted into the MAYS11
Cincinnati dugout during the The 4-ear-old l \h
uproar while man\ tans l ade 42-vear-old Mai a gho
chanted, "Let's play ball'" hai not feared it a gaae
WORLD SFRII-S since Sept. 9. swung at
The Mets will tace the ('arroll's first pitch and
winner of the American League chopped it in front o the
championship series between plate. no more than 30 feet up
the Baltimore Orioles atnd lthe third base line. It wasn't
Oakland A's. The World Series the hardest hit hallt f his
begins Saturday in the career burt at wass lr last tlhe
American League ciat,. right place
S" arrol! rushed off tile
Cleon Jones contributed
Cleon Jones c. o n t mound but Ils throw to tlhe
three hits to the Mets' attack. ti t
including a double dunng the plate a\as not in time toa get
freakish fifth when a string of Itlan.lo slid h
i nm field single.
strange hits and misses helped
New York in its decisive ralls. Ihat r made it 4-2 andl, after a
The score was tied 2-2 when t'rt rce play at the plate left the
Wayne Garrett opened the base'a still loaded, )D.In Itahn
Mets' fifth with a double, hit a stift fl\ ball that fell in
ending an 0-for-19 hitless shlart centre field. \ lner
string. Garrett had not hit scored on the play bhut cnire
safely since opening the first IieClder esar (aernunaota
game of the playoffs with a recovered quickly and thrcw to
single last Saturday, second tor a forceout.
The Mets decided to pla ifor Iihen Bud flarrelsn, samn'.ltd
one run and Felix Millan past third lor the ',turth rtun it
bunted. teds' starting pitcher the itintag a an a-2 'lad. Ilah
Jack Billingham qticklk v, ast throaan at aut trI tag t, reach
bounced off the mound and third on the plans tfor athe 1 narI
grabbed the ball. iHe fired to out a t the inning
third base and the throw .A ,ni tatl'. S ,ea\e
seemed to be in time to get the doubled and scored anathcer
sliding Garrett. But rookie run on Jones third hit a! the
third baseman Dana l)riessen, eanie I Ihat -a%.ie ScjaCr a
apparently thinking it was ,s lasi -Iun hIlgeaC
force play. never tagged th Ie h e Mlets,, a Sea\er r
runner and both (;arrett and I Irk lclad a tile rt itnnaini '
Millan were sate on the a hen hstl ht \ \hillan and Jne s
fielder's choice. ar nd walk t, \Ilr Ini ladcd
A HIUGI HO1011 tihe hbass asith ',tne turt.
That put the Reds in a hulce Kranepool. \hA hIad notm
hole and they never climbed ,staI ted I .I a ;:Ie n-1 almost a
out of it- 'mrn th l drillda the I rst lrptchI
Jones doubled off the lett hIe sav. tor .a smgle and a 2-4I
field wall on Billingham's ne\t adl.e
pitch, scoring (Garrett and l Rea ls ':ti those runs
giving the Mets the lead. a., k ipt.e Jat .d time.
That finished Billingham and10 21
Clay Carroll rode in from th c(a "rim a ra a I aal ra a -a 2 7 I
\% c,\' l ,i-, () aI 04 1a i X-7 I t I
bullpen to relieve. iamliiam n. a ullctt (5). arr ill
But Cincinnati imanageCr ). ,rnslnrt\ ( ) a i ndi aicn ia .
Sparky Anderson changed lus .. r. .r ,r;. (t) aIad (araite
Blind, sending in left-hander '. .,acr a a. I -tsriiianahr O-i.


ST. BERNARD'S LOOK SET TO


REGAIN CRICKET K.O. CUP

FORMER BAHAMAS CRICKLI ASSOCIATION'S Knockout
Cup champions, St. Bernard's showed devastating form when
they romped to a comfortable 8 wicket win over the Westerners
in the first round of the BCA Kt) (up Series last Saturday at
Windsor Park.


St. Bernard's have won the
30 over Knockout Cupl for thc
last three years and on last
Saturday's showing the y look
all set to make it tfour
consecutive years.
The Westerners won the toss
and elected to bat. llowsever
with tidy pace howling Iron,
opener Peter Bethel, %i rnh
eventually finished with 4 tor
19, the Westerners struggled toI
score freely during thet
innings and were dismissed torn
the not very formidable total
of 62 in 29 overs.
Bethel was given grood
support by Wardy Ford, 2 lor
9 and off spinner Francis
Scott, 2 for 7.
Keith Ford, 23, and Charlie
Wright, 23, wasted little tmne
in tearing into the Westerners
weak attack and with the
tempo set by these two St.
Bernard's took only 9 overs to
pass the total of 62 with the
loss of only 2 wickets.
In the other two gaines
played cricket fans were well
entertained by two exciting
finishes in spite of several
interruptions for rain, as the
Southerners this year's new
BCA League Champions.
scraped home by 7 runs against
the Prison Officers and the
Police defeated Carroll's
Adventurers by two wickets
with three overs to spare.
At St. Bernards park the
Southerners managed to total
the respectable score of 102
For 9 in 30 overs. Leading


alt 'r. ;,'; the Soutliherners
vea \..' t'cI MSlePhee 20 noti
S.irt ,eorge Fergauson 1 ).
\NI li- Bj amn 1 and James
l'etcrs',n 12.
(ot it ers' Skipper Atlileson
(,r aette .3 asi 21 and llarry
llamrltaan 3 for 31 \were thie
It lf cers ntain icket takers.
When pla\ was stopped due
t, bajd light the Officers had
replied with 57 for the loss ot
atnly 3 wickets in 13 overs and
a possible victory and major
upset seemed in sight.
With the continuation of
play on Sunday Neville Taylor
played an invaluable innings ot
43 tor his team but the
Southerners kept cool under
pressure to dismiss the gallant
Officers for 95. just 8 runs
short of a victory.
Ferguson 2 for 7, George
)eveaux 2 for 14 and Iy rone
I hompson 2 f'or 25 all turned
in good bowling performances
for the Southerners.
At ltaynes Oval. the Police
under the astute leadership of
skipper 1-dmind lewis
c clinched a well-deserved
victory over (Carroll's
Adv enturers.
Fleeting to hat first the
Adventurers wasted no time as
they rattled up 81 in a mere
17.3 overs, an innings
appropriately summed up as
'short but sweet.'
Fred Phillips 17. Clive
Bethe 17, Rudy Dean 14 and
William Delancy 10 each
contributed mini 'whirlwind'
innings for their side.


By IVAN JOHNSON
FOLLOWING their win
against the Stingrays last week
the Hurricanes are hot
favourites to retain their
unbeaten record for the season
when they meet the faltering
Blue Marlins on Saturday night
at the Queen Elizabeth Sports
Centre.
The Hurricanes, sporting the
finest defence in the BAFA
League (6 points given up in
two games), which is well
supported by the prettiest
cheerleaders, are reportedly
'up' for this game as they were
upset after the Marlins
defaulted to their crosstown
rivals, the eightt Mile Rock
Crushers last week.
The lHurricanes record in
their last two games is certainly
impressive. They held the
Classic Pros to minus 56 yards
rushing and only allowed them
to complete two passes for 9
yards, while shutting the Pros
out 15-0.
In their second outing
against the Stingrays they
surprised football fans when in
wet conditions they defeated
the Stingrays 12-6.
The Stingrays were foiled
completely by the superb
defensive play of the
Hurricanes as they bottled up
the Stingrays running game and
intercepted 5 of 'Porky'
D)orsett's passes (a single game
record).
Only. quarterback Dorsett
was able to rnn effectively and
this came late in the fourth
quarter with the Hurricanes
expecting Dorsett to pass with
his side being down by 12
points and deep in his ownr
territory.
IN TI'ROUBL
I'he Mar!ins, on the oiliter
hand. started the season with a
victor,,. beating the Classic
I'ros 25-13 but since then they
liaae been in deep trouble after
beana trounced 45-7 by the
Jets aInd 32- by the Stingrays
1and last week lost by default to
thie Iight Mile Rock Crushers
h. ten they claimed' that they
cul(lid not afford the expense
of lhe trip toi I report.
I heret'nre one ruiast assumeC
that morale in tile Marlins
canIp is low particularly with
thie worres or t a long casualty

1t,, ceer. ke\ players
I.ckes I loumpson and Donald
Sacctianga will return to the
lineup on Saturda'. Both were
at nursing leg injuries. The
presence of these two should
.tunpro\c the \larlins firepower
It a tle strong defense of the
lrLarriaancs should prevail
In thle their 13 \AFA game the
Stirnra.s clash with the Classic
I' ()s. \\ho la\c so far been
unable to record a win this

Last week the Jets really
blasted the Classic Pros when
llhc hammered therm to the
tune ot 71-0 to set a new
B\I \ record for the amount
ft points scored in a local
r are
NON-PLAYl RS
I lie Pros \will be without the
services of key players Allen
Ingraham. Minky Isaacs and
l)aae Blake The chances of a
I'r asvictory is therefore
e\xtrerel\ slight against the
might l tlhe Stingrays.
althoughh probably still
reeling trom their defeat by the
Ilurrcanes the Stingrays, led
Ib\ the league's top
quarterback Bernard 'Porky'
IIorsett, night well be thinking
an terms of bettering the Jets
record total for a game, a
not beyond the Stingrays,
particularly with the Pros in
suLch poor form.
Kickoff time for this game
will be at Sunday. 1.30 p.m. at
the Queen Fliabeth Sports
C('entre.
HAt-A STANDINGS
\V L PF PA
Nassau Jets 3 0 161 13


.Freeport
Hurricanes 2 0 27 6
8 Mile Rock C. 2 0 14 12
AID Slingras ; 3 56 77
Blue Marlins 1 3 38 90
(lassie Pros 0 3 13 111
WBA CHAMP SICK
I'PANAMA I IY ('A') World
Boxing Association (WBA)
leat lier eight champion trn.esto
MNar.el has ;i cracked vertebrae and
\inll ha v to postpone all his
scheduled fights, his manager
Hiarmoidio Iaa sai' toda it .
Ica/i did not tr i' hot ior when
Marcetl was injured but said his
doctor re comnmndcd his training
he suspended at least a montli.
A fight against Sammy Gooss of'
the United State-se scheduled for
(ht. 22 in P'hiladlphiai will be
postponed I. a/a s.iid.
lta/a said a title fight against
Leonel Herniandee of Vene/uela for
which no date had been Wset
probably would bie hfield before
December wchen Marcel planned to
retire.


LIGHT HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMP Baby Boy Rolle being
helped on the heavy bag by trainer Charles Major during
workouts at the Nassau Stadium.


A few surprises already



as BABA series opens

By GLADSTONE THURSTON
THE FIRST WEEK OF ACTION in the Bahamas Amateur
Basketball Association's 1973-'74 series has produced quite a few
surprises. It can be noticed that teams which ended low iin the
standings last season are showing up better. This means that die


top teams will have to stay in a
series which ends on March 15.
Moreover judging from the
calibre of competition in both
Paradise and Nassau Leagues it
seems unlikely that any team
will end the series undefeated.
Steady performances by
Rodgers Basketball Club on
Sunday showed defending
Nassau League Champs Becks
Cougars that the road to
victory is paved with stiff
competition. The Cougars were
fortunate to take that game by
one point.
Rodgers, with less than four
minutes remaining in that game
held an easy 63-59 lead before
they allowed Peter Brown
through on two layups to tie
the game.
Coach Homer Winder who
firmly believed that they could
have won that game attributed
their loss to too many
turnovers. However, it was still
too far away for him to say
what might be the outcome oft
their second encounter.
John Bull, Sunday repeated
tile same message to the Classic
Pros before losing 71-66.
Although they looked
excellent on paper the
Pros were unable to satisfy the
majority of cheering fans that
they have the material to be
the undefeated Paradise League
Champs. However, it should be
noted that the Pros were not
out in lull force.
ROOKIES
tfhe big difference in both
leagues is undoubtedly coming
from the rookies. This was
remarkably shown during the
Reef/Pinder's game. Rookies
Danny Edgecombe and Basil
Burns completely monopolized
Reef midway in the second
half of their game breaking up
a twelve point lead.
Another instance are the
performances of the
Kentucky Colonels' John
Martin, John Bull's Leroy
Fawkes, and Fox Hill's Reubin
Knowles. In games played so
far all these have shot in
double figures.
Nevertheless, the veterans of
the game Peter Brown.
Sterling Quant. Jerome Barney
and Frankie Brice are all
performing well but not up to
the expected standard. It is
true. though, the season is still
young.


the best of shape throughout lhe

As an interesting note. the
Trustees of the Ameri, n
Basketball Association pa s'd
the controversial no-foul a tlc
Monday for regular seoa'
gamines and playoffs a'
1973-'74. The rule reads: "\,
player will be disqu.alit d
because of tile number o!
personal fouls hlie Ha\
accumulate. When ma pla 1.
coltmmits hifs seventh t
succeeding fouls, the offended
team will retain possesioatn o
the ball after the oltiended
player attempts a itreeO thto,
which he is awarded."
This rule was tricd in lth.
exhibition season and J'i:t
('hones of tith (arolina CO u uga
got 12 and 10 afo ls 11:1
consecutive nights fo the Tla 1 's
fouls charged to a player in the
exhibition season. N. other
player got more than sr's:'
fouls.
In B.A.B A. ation a ,s nit:ht
at the (C.I (iibsm (;\ t .
Superwash Arawa.k 1 take ,i
Becks Cougars in tIhe tir g.rt'a'
at 7:30, and Rodgera' merCt ti'
Supersonics in tihe second a n! '
at 8:.0. At the A I \ddl'lea
(;ym tonight, the a\\ rriors pal.
Nassau Schlit/ in tihe irs gaam
at 7:30, and thle IPolic Roils
play Fox lHill Sainit at 30


Grich broke a 4-4 tic whena
he led off the eighth inning
with a 385-foot hoIenr ,,.' A's
reliever Rollie Fingers
Etchebarren had 'ied the
score one inning earlier with a
three-run blast off left-hander
Blue.
The A's. deI endIrn Woarlad
Champions of hisewbt. \will
pitch 21 -game winner Jim
"Catfish" Ilunter here
Thursday.
The Orioles are expected to
start 23-year-old Doyle
Alexander, who will be making


STAR SEEKS


TOP SPOT


TONIGHT
11ll NEWLY F(
SI \R Insurance
Squad who, headed I
caiplain Bradley Frie:
league leading bow
Sweeting have been
imp rcssive performance
sae.ison. vie to tak
possession of first place
Slihen they meet
Sippl i m tlhe first
M1adeira League position
roli otfs Last week, S
tleCd .a 2361610) and
liid a.1 203( 561)) in lead
to' a 2-1 victory over
and a le tlor first place.

In other roll-offs
S;tiness meet Pr
a alendn!g achamnpionr
I igers lake ion K.C. A
I ean, ken Brewers


I nke 's laint.
10P TEN

. itd, \Ilbur\

a i a> l'r, as
nSii t'\ I rech
I trr\ t li rca
aps' "atrn' a rcaa I


BOWL
1 8
21
2 1
2 1
20
15
Is


\IADEIRA LEAGUE
STANDINGS

[\!bm )ll\ "s
S'ata I nsuraance
a 'i am! lamass

I sar
K C Autro
II ,'iaekenc
I mnker's


ioer

trailing
of Vida
ty Andy
League


his tirst plain off appearance.
Oakland manager Dick
Williams commented, "I said
before it began that this would
he a good series and it's been
just that. We have a lot of faith
in 1lliT ter "
Manager I arl Weaver said
that Palmer "would be
Sainlahble for relief duty
toda la.
Williamns also planned to
have all his pitchers ready for
the bull pen if needed.
"Why not, this is it," he
declared.


RENTOKIL PESI CONTROl Si

TENT FUMIA',
RODENT CON,
INSECT CON ,
LAWN SPR A Y

NASSAU
FRELPOR

Rentokil Laboratorief :













W I-
TV" .

REPAIRS
EXPERT SERVICE

CALL
WORLD OF A U
PHONE.5940


SWIMMING MATCH ON SATURDAY
THE DOLPtHj- Aft AQUATICS CLUB members seen when they represented the
Bahamas in Miemi Springs In August of this year. The Dolphin Swimming Club will
display their talents this coming Saturday, October 13 at 9.00 a.m. when they are due to
meet the Freeport Aquatics' Club at the St. Augustine's Pool. It is hoped that the contest
will become an annual event.


ITNK-SMEAREDI


14


IETS TAKE NL PENNANT



Cinderella Mets nut it


__r _____ ~ ~ ___ ____ I ~ ___ __ I_ .


Orioles beat Oakland t



AL playoffs to 5th. dec

OAKLAND (AP) The Baltimore Orioles, after
Oakland 4-0 and appearing helpless against the pitching
Blue, beat the A's 5-4 Wednesday on late home runs b
Etchebarreti and Bobby Grich to send the American
playoffs to the deciding fifth game.


i


_ I Ilj~ C


L~L--_ --- --- -- I -----'. ----- -- - l-L,,._ ~ - --- -- --- -~r~--~-~ ~-- -- `;i


.g


r


By GLADSTONE THURS TIo
RING VETERAN CHARLIE MAJOR is ,al dl
how Bahamas light heavyweight ch nmp tabh !t'
through over 40 fights without having been kiio,
boy had had someone to take an active intlret l11 mn I
beginning he would have been a world beater, .', i '.I
Rolle leaves Nassau next
week for Nottingham, England IAN ALLEN
where he will continue training
for his October 23 British Fromnt Pa I
Empire light hcavyvweight title pli '
match with chaimpt John dfiend'.II?
C('onteh. a.'t a a
Major, who came out f
retirement to train Rolle for ,
this prestigious event, found him ilhe.',
the local champ "very asn'i
co-operative and said he's \ -
h taking his new exercises was ', :
without grumbling." Rolle in ,1on ,!--
preparation for this fifteen pt h, ,
rounder is going :hr. i, 'I .
exercises that are new to him. ,'!
With the help of Assistantl i' ;.
Police Commissioner John .
Crawley, the medicine ball libs
been added to Rolle's workout a 1i
ORMED sessions which, among aotheis. ai -
Bowling include abdominal exercises., ii \
by team Visiting chiropractor. Dr. \ II
sen and Charles W. Turner of \e\ ;olh,
ler Pat York, was also on hand to treat I
making an injured knee Rolle sustained ali
ces this in his last bout with Miamiaain ra '!i
ke sole Bobby Lloyd.
tonight Rolle's "fight of his career" '
Albury's came late last month when the tdei.
of the British Boxing Commission I
an nights gave Conteh an ultimatum to .i
Sweeting defend his title against either a' a'
Friesen former champ Chris Finnean .',1a
ling Star or Rolle. With the help ot hfel local
Albury's contacts Rolle was given thIe pi':
shot that would guarantee him aa '.-
over 52,500. !
tonight. NEW SITUAI llN 1 l.a ii
itchards, One thing Major noticed il.ai,
s Esso about Rolle is that he l "hast a l d
ruto and a great body. His bod\ is the i
tackle type that can take .a a viciot ,
beating and within about three
ERS weeks be as good a ,
198 new."
191 Basing their opinion ,i! I li
191 Rolle's recent perl'foarn anjI,,
I 187 many boxing tans view this :
179 title bout as an imnpos,,ible
5 179 venture. Rolle in all coniidene ,' t".
177 informed them "I anm gaaian to
174 make the impossible for mec
Slven Major gives Rolle .a
JE fifty-fifty chance of coama;ae .'ii' a
,out on top. 'l don't wan t 1 t'
W 1 see him overconfident tlhoualh i ;
because he is going into i a '
14 '7 different situation."
14 7 This Rolle realizes and '
13 8 does everyone else.
1I 10 TRINIDAD WIN AGAIN ', a
10 11 'PORII 1 SPAIN. tI RIN It) \
8 13 (A. ') Trinidad beat Martini,|ui,. .
7 14 39-10, ill a fast paced math io the '
7 14 'aribbean rughN s t al'.ll .'
tournament at St. \aInns 'r nl a ro
here I ueisda,.
Martinique dralrcl irst bla.,,.. '
ke aiduring the first five ainutCs n th .
aIanie when Kclistah sCoir .c ;
penalty. But I rinitlad strut k ba,' I
ake and led 20-100 at half-tite ,id
maintained the initiative until the -
1 - close.