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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03467
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: October 9, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03467

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TV ANTENNA INSTALLATIONS
P.O. BOX S8SO PHONE 2.13062-323 7

gistered with Postmaster of Bahamas for postage concessions within the Bahamas.) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


FORMER P.I. OWNER CLAIMS BRIDGE

TOLLS NOT PAID TO PARADISE ISLAND





Huntington Hartford slaps






$10m. suit on Paradise






SIsland, Crosby & Davis


By NICKI KELLY
HUNTINGTON HARTFORD, originator of the Paradise Island development, filed suit in New York yesterday
claiming that Paradise Island Ltd. has been deprived of bridge toll income rightfully due it, and that Mr. James
Crosby, as an officer and director of Paradise Island Ltd., had violated his fiduciary trust through personal
ownership of the bridge company. h


Named as co-defendant with
\Mr Croshy were Resorts
International Ltd.. Paradise
Island Bridge companyy Ltd.,
Paradise Island Ltd., Island
IHotel ( company Ltd. L. .
l)avis, president of Resorts
International, (Charles 1I.
Murphy, a New York attorney
and two corporations having
shares in the bridge company.
The lawsuit is an offshoot of
an earlier action in August
when Mr Ilartford won a
preliminai mininction against
R1 c s I r t I I international
iestra itig tihe present owners
I, e land fIiomn withdrawing
, rainte I' s a S million loan
iin thli N'sew York Bank of
(' in c i ', midd i roT IIIn all
.;W di .ittng M% t liartiord's
interest in Paradise Island Ltd
In '!,nLdaI 's suit Mr
I Im ;. )rd alleges that since
IP ;a, tis Isliand ltd. was and is
tic' t icr ,;" most of the
pIope '111 Paradise Island
t'dt ;'o t. I' 'i' 'Oct i fi i .i
\i'l its development, clearly
h rigight to construct and
operate the bridge was and
r 'e inj s ia n % lu.rable asset of PIL.
Sllovev,. Resorts. Mr
ios a.ind thelie other directors
Ot I'll. e\cludling liiiselt. as lie
had been e\cludled troini Board
micetiii'ng. conspired and
cut tineCtd to conspire tot
dleptn c I'll. and himscltl, as the
-,le !iii tirIty stockholder ot
Ilo issunet and to divert it to
Mi C(osby for his own
personal benefit, Mr. Ilartford
said.
In ordei to accomplish their
conspiracy he charged, Mr.


HUNTINGTON HARTFORD
... alleges fraud & conspiracy

Crosby and the other
de fen'cdants "falsely and
fraudulently" represented that
PIL's lender would not permit
PIL to incur any financial
obligations in connection with
the constriction, neralion '
and maintenance of the bridge.
Mr. Hartford said he had
reason to believe, however,
that, had Resorts of PIll's
directors made a bona fide
effort to secure the financing,
I'll. would have been able to
secure it. but Mr. Crosby
simply desired to appropriate
the bridge to himself.
HOLDS STOCK
The right to construct and
operate the bridge a valuable
corporate asset belonging to
PIL was usurped and
diverted to Mr. Crosby, who
formed the Bridge Company
and who, with certain


'Air






JAMES CROSS
... in Paradise Bridge I

associates, holds a
capital stock, Mr. liar
in his affidavit.
Hle alleges that
onenine of the bi


v.- .,r. alleging tnait existence oi tine
1 $2 bridge toll has discouraged
and continues to discourage
both casual use of the island by
tourists and potential land
purchasers, since the cost of
access particularly when the
trip must be made several times
a day, as is likely with residents
S makes land purchase
prohibitive.
This discouragement of land
purchasers spoils the entire
economic climate for PIL's
ability to develop Paradise
Island. Mr. Hartford said.
'DISGORG(E'
The derivitive actions seeks
to recoup the bridge for
BY Paradise Island and compel Mr.
hassle Crosby and the Bridge
Company to pay the fair rental
11 of it, value for the bridge site,
rtford said account for and "disgorge"
their profits and pay damages
since the for interference with PIL's
ridge Mr. ability to develop the island.


Crosby and his associates have
operated it for their sole
benefit.
Since 1969, when the cost
of construction of the bridge
was completely paid off, these
"'usurpers" had been operating
the bridge at a profit profit
which nghtfully belongs to
PIL, Mr. Hlarford's affidavit
said.
Additionally, PIL leased the
bridge site, another valuable
corporate asset, to the Bridge
Company for $1 Bahamian per
year when the actual rental
value is significantly higher, it
was claimed.
Mr. Hartford is further


Young steel-worker up for murder tells of


fight with girl-friend over another man
By SIDNEY DORSETT
A YOUNG STEEL-WORKER on trial in Supreme Court for the March 25 slaying of his
l9-year-old girlfriend told an all male jury today that Diane Knowles was fatally injured in a fight
they had along a foot-path off Strachan's Alley because she had gone out with another man.


Michael Bethell, represented
by attorney Alva
Stuart-Coakley who accused a
police detective of beating her
client for not making a written
; statement, said lie sought
' assistance for his "dearly
loosod" girlfriend, but found
lher dead when lie returned
S\d i a friend.
Bethell, whose trial opened
before Mr. Justice James Smith
yesterday pleaded not guilty to
the murder charge. Hlie ended
hIs testimony this afternoon,
I denyfmsg an allegation by
(town Counsel Janet Boslwick
that he took thlie young inmother
o three for a walk because he
was angry over her
unafithfulness and killed her.
Speaking slowly as he
stammered his way along, the
steel-ws orker, a resident of
Abraliam Street, of St. James
Road, said lie saw his girlfriend
twice on Sunday, March 25.
le first saw her that
morning as she had slept with
hinm the following night.
Theirs was a very close
relationship, he said adding
that on the morning in
question she said she was going
to her mother's for a change of
clothes but would return
shortly afterwards. It was
around 1 1.30 a.m. to 12-noon.



SALE l

20%- 50% OFF



MACKEY ST. NASSAU


at the time lie said.
liHe never saw tier until
around 5.30 p.m. that day and
when he inquired what had
kept her, she gave him no
answer. lIe said they did not
argue about it.
TO1 FAt11FR
She asked him to
accompany her to her father's
house on Kemp Road and they
went there ten minutes later
only to find that her father was
not at home.
"Oin our way back we
walked through Strachan's
Alley. On reaching the track
road she said she wanted to
urinate ... I asked her what
she wanted to see her father
about," Bethell said.
lie said she asked him if he
wanted to know everything. "1I
said I asked you what took you
so long in getting thlie clothing
... you didn't answer. Now I
amn asking what you wanted to
see your father about and you
still didn't give any answer. I
asked her what is all the secrets
about."
She then told him that she
had gone out with "this fellow
and lie gave me $5. She didn't
say why. After she said this I
asked her how long that was
going on and she said a long
time."
lic testified that they
quarreled and he slapped her.
"When I slapped her, she fell
down and I heard her say 'Oh
Lord my back." lie said she
got up and ran about 25 feet
through the track road and
when he spoke to her, she did
not answer.
She was breathing hard and
fast, he said. iHe was upset over
what she had told him earlier,


he said.
He said he went to a
long-time friend, Walter
"C('alkie" Barr, and told him
about the incident. They
returned to the spot and after
checking her pulse, he said Barr
told him he believed she was
dead.
lie said he then decided to
go to the police and Barr
suggested they go to another
friend, 'ugene Cartwright, who
had a car. After asking for a
ride and telling Cartwright, he
said they returned to the spot a
second time as Cartwright did
not believe what was said.
Leaving the spot, they
started for the police station
stopping at the Alpha Hotel for
three beers. In the bar, he said
he was involved in a fight with
James Wallace who struck him
on the forehead with a stone
causing a wound.
He said he went to the
police station afterward with a
cousin of his. Richard Penn. At
the police station, he spoke
with an officer and at the
C.1I.D., with Sgt. Alfred
Bullard.
lIe met his two tnenus at
C.1.1)., he said. lHe testified
that Sgt. Bullard beat him up
after he refused to give a
written statement. He asked
that attorney Nigel Bowe be
called for him.
DENIAL
The police officer, testifying
earlier as a prosecution witness
denied the allegation put to
him by defence counsel
Stuart-Coakley.
Bethell being cross-examined
by Mrs. Bostwick denied killing
his girlfriend with a knife.


Moreover, the action also
seeks an accounting and
damages for fraud against and
waste of the corporate assets of
PIL and the Hotel Company.
Mr. Hartford claims that
since 1966 Resorts has charged
in excess of $26 million to PIL
and substantial sums to the
Hotel Company, allegedly as a
result of expenditures incurred
by Resorts to further their
respective businesses.
In fact, however, PIL and
the Hotel Company charges
were not incurred to further
the development goals of PILt
or the Hiotel Company, but
solely to benefit Resorts and
its separately owned
properties, particularly the
casino complex.
These acts, as well as other
acts of misfeasance by Resorts
and PIL's directors, have
inured to PIL's and
consequently to his detriment,
Mr. Hartford alleges.
Evidencing this wrongful
charging, the affidavit said, is
the fact that since 1967,
Resorts' retained earnings.
which are derived principally
from its Paradise Island
operations, have increased
from $11.3 million to $18.7
million while for the same
period PIL shows an
accumulated deficit of $13.9
million.
"Resorts has been using the
ability to charge my minority
interest to inflate and distort
its own earnings," Mr. Hartford
has charged.
Although evidence has not
yet been produced to support
the allegation, the former
Paradise Island owner says he
has reason to believe that the
principal of one of the two
corporation shareholders in the
Paradise Island Bridge
Company is a close friend of
President Nixon.
In the suit filed in August,
Mr. Hartford alleged that the
profits from the casino
operation on Paradise Island
have been fraudulently
understated and as a result, the
defendants Mr. Crosby and
Resorts International have
been diverting moneys due Mr.
Hartford from the casino
operation and by the same
action have understated the
casino's profits for Bahamas
government tax purposes.
He claims that Mr. Crosby.
Resorts International and the
Bank of Commerce of New
York are engaged in a
conspiracy not only to dilute
Mr. Hartford's financial
interest in Paradise Island, but
also in a conspiracy attempt to
ruin him financially "for
malicious reasons."
Mr. Hartford is asking for
punitive damages totalling $10
million.


'Bunny' Thompson couldn't believe

she'd won Discovery Day title


TEARS ROLLED down the
cheeks of petite Bernadette
Thompson last night, as she
was chosen Miss Discovery l)ay
1974 from among thirteen
contestants at Le Cabaret
Theatre on Paradise Island,
climaxing al evening ot
entertainment for the capacity
crowd.
"I just can't believe it. I iLst
can't believe it," she repeated
several times as outgoing 1973,
Queen G(ladys Johnson placed
the crown upon her head. She
is the first Miss Discover l)Day
in an independent Bahamas.
Miss fhompson entered the'
contest because she lelt "that
it would be a wonderful
experience for any girl to want
to represent her country and I
feel quite capable of doing so."
She proved that she was
quite capable as she maintained
her composure throughout the
night. She paraded as an
Arawak Indian, which
represented her original
costume depicting an era in
Bahamian history. As well as a
hot pants outfit and the flag
tableau which epitomized the
colours of the Bahamian flag.
Entered as Miss Finco and


sponsored by Finance
Corporation of Bahamas
Limited, Bernadette brought
the second consecutive winner
to linco in the past two years.
Last year's queen Gladys
Johnson was also sponsored by
IFnco
Standing 5' 71" and
weighing 1 20 pounds with
statistics o.f 34-24-36, she
became an early crowd
favourite. She is the daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. James
Fhomnpson of Maxwell Lane
and the grand daughter of
Supreme Court Justice
Maxwell Ihompson. And
following the family tradition
she wants to become a
barrister-at-law. She worked in
her llther's law firm this

A filth former at St.
A uguistine's College. she
formerly at tended St. Thomas
Moore and St. John's Prep
School I er hobbies are
swimming, boating, reading
and dancing.
She was encouraged to enter
the contest by her classmates
who call her "Bunny." She was
one of three contestants from
her school.


PM & LABOUR MINISTER'S

SPEECHES TO BE BROADCAST


FROM PLP CONVENTION
By MIKE LOTHIAN
THE PROGRESSIVE LIBERAL PARTY has noted the
"apparent labour unrest in the nation today" and as a result is
arranging to have Labour Minister Clifford Darling's speech to the
PLP convention in Freeport Monday night broadcast live over


Radio Bahamas.
Also slated for live radio
coverage is Prime Minister
Lynden Pindling's keynote
address on "freedom with
responsibility," also on
Monday night, according to
convention chariman Larl V.
Thompson, M.P.
Mr. Thompson told a press
conference at the PLP
headquarters in (iambier
House, Farrington Road that
"you will be interested to note
that we are arranging to carry
the Labour Minister's speech
live as well as the Prime
Minister's so that the nation as
a whole will know the
Government's feelings on the
apparent labour unrest in the
nation today."
The "apparent labour
unrest" has stemmed largely
from recent efforts by the
Engineering, Fuel, Service and
Allied Workers' Union to
broaden its spectrum of
activity by seeking to represent
employees of Bahamasair and
Radio Bahamas.
Mr. Darling's ministry is
attempting to block the
diversification, and the dispute
appears likely to end up before
the courts.
At the same time,
Engineering Union president
Dudley Williams is pressuring
Bahamasair, Radio Bahamas,
the Bahamas Electricity
Corpo ration and Shell
(Bahamas) Limited for pay
increases. The first three are all
controlled by Government.
New fuel has recently been
added to the labour fire with
the Hotel and Catering


Workers' Union's demands for
substantial pay rises by
November 1.
There have been several
labour demonstrations in
recent weeks.
Mr Thompson and PlP
chairman Andrew. "Dud"
Maynard yesterday denied
suggestions that labour itself
would have no voice at the
convention.
UNIONISTS
It was pointed out that
several official delegates to the
convention will be trade
unionists.
Mr Maynard defended the
party's decision to hold the
convention in Freeport for the
first time at considerable extra
expense. lie referred to the
"spirit of 73" which he said
called for "togetherness
throughout the country.
"It is in this spirit of
togetherness that we are going
to Freeport. The party is going
to a section of its supporters."
Mr. Thompson added that
the Freeport branch of the
party had made a bid for the
convention. "and the party has
acceded to that bid. The
expense does not concern the
party in the least. We think we
have the financial support we
need."
Mr. Thompson vehemently
denied rumours that delegates
to the convention will have to
pay their own way. "Delegates
have never had to pay, and
they won't this year," he said.
he added that the party was
trying to negotiate reduced
On Back Page


O


VOL. LXX, No. 26C Tuesday,October 9, 1973. Price: 15 Cents


PILOT REPORTEDLY AT FAULT

IN LOSS OF BAHAMASAIR PLANE



Dismissal of pilot



'final' says general



manager of Bahamasair


By NICKI KELLY
AS FAR AS BAHAMASAIR IS CONCERNED, the matter of
23-year-old pilot Perry Knowles's dismissal has been concluded
and is final following a meeting between Max Healey, general
manager of Bahamasair, and Captain Paul Smith, president of the
Bahama Islands Airline Pilots Association (BIALPA).


MP CALLS FOR

GROUNDING

OF BAHAMASAIR

MARSH Harbour M.P.
Errington Watkins today urged
Government to ground
B a hamasair while an
"international and impartial
body" investigates the safety
of the flag carrier's aircraft.
Mr. Watkins' call was
sparked by the ditching of one
of the airline's Aero-Com-
manders, the forced wheels-up
landing of another, and
mechanical difficulties
experienced by both of the
airline's BA 1-1 I1 jets, all in
less than three weeks.
Mr. Watkins charged that the
dismi ssal "without
explanation of the ditched
plane's pilot showed that there
existed in the Bahamasair
management an attitude
"similar to the Government's
dictatorial attitude in the
country today."
iHe said the pilot, Captain
Percy Knowles, has the right to
know the results of the inquiry
into the ditching.
It is understood, however,
that the pilot was given the
results of the October 4
hearing and was asked to
resign.
Mr. Watkins referred to the
problems which have hit
Bahamasair equipment in
recent weeks, and said "I feel
the government t should ground
all of Bahamasair's equipment
and appoint an international
and impartial body to
completely investigate the
safety status of their
equipment.
"Bahamasair is the national
carrier and they carry people,
not cargo," the M.P. said. "I
feel in a matter as serious as
this the pilots should bring the
airline to its knees, and until
the workers stand tip united
and act as one solid body to
protect their rights, in my
opinion, management, like the
Government, will continue to
trample them."
FOR GOVERNMENT
Asked what he would
suggest as a replacement of
Bahamasair in vita; inter-island
communications if its aircraft
were grounded, Mr. Watkins
said "that would be
Government's headache. But
surely the public should know
the standard of the equipment
they have to fly on, rather than
to wait until some disaster.
How long can your luck last?"
None of the recent incidents
has caused injury.
Capt. Knowles ditched his
$100,000 Aero-Commander in
deep water off Fresh Creek,
Andros on September 26.
There were no passengers, and
Capt. Knowles was picked up
unharmed, by a tug from the
AUTEC base on Andros.
Three days earlier both of
the Bahamasair jets had
mechanical difficulties which
threw the airline's Nassau,
Miami and Freeport flights off
schedule.
Seven persons escaped injury
on September 30 when a faulty
wheel locking system forced
another Aero Commander to
make an emergency wheel-up
landing at Nassau International
Airport.
Capt. Mark Thompson, the
pilot, was highly praised by
management for his handling
of the emergency.
In a press conference last
Friday, Bahamasair general
manager Max Healey
maintained that while the
airline does not have enough
qualified aircraft mechanics,
maintenance was "more than
adequate" and in fact "safe
and reliable".


Mr. Healey said he was not
prepared to make a statement
but would only say that he had
had a "satisfactory
conversation with Captain
Smith as head of the
Association and I consider this
matter concluded."
Captain Knowles, pilot of
the Aerocommander ditcheId at
sea on September 2(, \as
dismissed by management
yesterday after he allegedly
refused to resign.
Although Bahamasair \vts
not prepared to comment, I iie
Tribune understands that a
hearing held October 4
reportedly found Captain
Knowles to have been at fault
in the loss of the $100,000
aircraft
The plane sank. thus making
it impossible to determine
what in-flight difficulties muy
have developed if any.
An informed airline source
told The Tribune several days
ago that it is believed gas was
removed from the Aero
Commander the night before
Captain Knowles took it out
on its last test flight.
This was supported by
evidence that another
Bahamasair's planes had been
tampered with and fuel
removed.
A check of the fuel gauge by
a pilot is considered routine
before flight.
Captain Knowles has
reportedly maintained that his
fuel tanks were full when he
took off and that both engines
quit on him while out over the
water.
The young pilot was engaged
by Out Island Airways in
November 1970 and was
absorbed into Bahamasair
when that airline was formed.
lie was first officer on the
Otter and checked out in the
Aero Commander this year.
He had not worked for the
company without pay for nine
months as was alleged in the
morning paper. It is
understood that pilots seeking
to build up time are allowed, at
their own request, to fly in the
co-pilots seat, although not in
the employ of the company.
Captain Knowles was on an
early morning test flight in the
Aero Commander when be was
forced to ditch 15 miles off
Fresh Creek, Andros.
He was reportedly asked by
Bahamasair management
yesterday to resign, but refused
to do so. He was then given a
letter in the afternoon
terminating his employment.
During the day Captain
Smith met with Edward
Albury, assistant general
manager, and chief pilot tenry
Pyfrom to ask that the
company reconsider its
decision.
BIALPA represents the
majority of the 60 pilots of
Bahamasair.

Seven-year-old

accident victim

SEVEN-year-old Russell
Strachan of Ridgeland Park,
was reported in fair condition
at the Princess Margaret
Hospital today after being
involved in an accident with
car NPC 860, driven by Ivy
Kemp of Kennedy Subdivision.
The accident occurred on
Wulff Road near Peardale at
3:30 p.m. yesterday.
Young Strachan is suffering
from head injuries.

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ISRAEL FIGHTS 'WAR OF THE LAST JUDGMENT'
TEL AVIV (AP) Israel's military chief has announced that Israeli
tanks have forced the Syrian army to retreat and pushed the Egyptians
back to the Suez Canal. But he says Israeli forces stopped short of crossing
the Canal themselves. He says the counter-attack continues.
Israeli chief of staff, Lieutenant-General David Elazar, says Israel's forces
are moving trom Israeli territory against the Arabs. He says the next few
days will disclose the direction and the results. He says a few Syrian and
Egyptian units are holding out inside Israeli territory. But he said the
attack a&ainsa them will continue until, in his words, "we break their
bones." He calls the war that exploded Saturday the War of the Last
Judgement. (eSEE STORIES THIS PAGE)
BBC SAt S MEIR PERMITS ACROSS BORDER PURSUIT
JERUSALEM (AP) British Broadcasting Corporation correspondent
Michael Elkins in Jerusalem says Premier Golda Meir's government has
decided to permit Israeli forces to cross the Suez Canal and to cross the
Syrian border in hot pursuit. Officials on the scene declined to confirm the
London broadcast.
EGYPT, SYRIA CLAIM ISRAELI ATTACKS REPULSED
BEIRUT' (AP) l-gy pt and Syria claim they have repulsed massive Israeli
counter-offensives on their fronts. And they say reinforcements from other
Arab nations threaten to escalate the war.
Iraq and Algeria announced their planes already were in action over the
Golan Heights and the Suez ('anal. And they promise other reinforcements
will be sent. Morocca announced it is sending more infantry units to Syria
to join its small contingent already fighting on the Golan Heights. Military
alerts also are in effect in Jordan and Saudi Arabia. But neither of those
nations has committed troops to the front.
TERMS IT 'TREACHEROUS PEARL HARBOUR ATTACK'
UNITED NATIONS (AP) Israeli foreign minister Abba IFban accuses
Egypt and Syria in the U.N. General Assembly of launching a "treacherous
Pearl Harbour attack" that proved Israel correct in refusing to withdraw
from occupied Arab territory without a peace agreement. Syria and Egypt
say their armies fight for the Middle East armistice lines in self-defense
against an Isreli attack. The exchange before the Assembly comes as the
deeply divided Security Council takes up the new Middle East conflict at
the request of the United States.
EGYPT CLAIMS BIG SUCCESSES AGAINST ISRAEL
CAIRO (AP) Egypt claimed it shot down 24 Israeli Phontom and
Skynawk jets and captured a number of pilots and 45 soldiers today.
A military communique carried by the Middle East news agency claimed
Egyptian troops were continuing their advance into Sinai successfully. "
The communique admitted Egy pt lost 10 jets in Monday's action in
addition to unspecified losses in other equipment and men.
The Egyptians also destroyed 36 tanks and an unspecified number of
halftracks, the communique said. Egyptian air defenses and warplanes
engaged Israeli jets over Port Said city and the northern sector of the Sue/
Canal, the communique said.
"Our troops in Sinai forced the Israelis to retreat, inflicting great
casulaties on them,' the communique claimed. It came seven hours alter
an earlier one and was the second of the day
SADAT SENDS SPECIAL MESSAGE TO HUSSEIN
AMMAN, JORDAN (AP) Jordan's ambassador to Egypt Abdul
Moneim Rifai arrived in Amman Monday on a special plane from Cairo,
carrying a message from President Anwar Sadat to King Hussein, a
government announcement said.
The brief statement gave no details, But the message was certain to have
dealt with the latest round of Arab-Israeli fighting.
Jordan's armed forces remained on alert but King Hussein has refrained
from sending them into action.
Hussein has made no statements on the fighting but has kept in close
touch with his military and civilian leaders as well as visiting army units
along the Jordan River ceasefire line.
Jordanian anti-aircraft gunners reportedly downed two Israeli jets in
brief action Monday.
KUWAIT CALLS URGENT OIL NATION CONFERENCE
KUWAIT, OCT 9 (AP) Oil rich Kuwait called today an urgent
conference of oil-producing Arab nations "to debate the role of oil" in the
Middle East war.
A government statement said Kuwait oil minister Abdul Rahman Salem
el Atiki had been authorized to communicate the Kuwaiti proposal to
Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Libya. Algeria, Qatar and Abu Dhabi.
He said Kuwait was prepared to host the conference ot oil ministers to
determine how oil could be used as a weapon in the current conflict.
Since the war broke out Saturday, there has been a number of Arah iLlls
for a halt to oil shipments to the United States, but little action.
On Sunday Iraq announced it was nationalizing minor shares held by
two American oil firms, Exxon and Mobil, in the Basrah Oil Co.
ISRAELI & ARAB CHARGES BEFORE U.N.
LNI liD) NATIONS, N.Y. (Al') Israel and the Arabs aiccuscd each
other before the U.N. General Assenbly today of launching the nesw
mideast war.
At the request of the United States, the Security Council also took up
the conflict. A meeting was set for 2:30 p.m. EST. The United Nations was
deeply divided on what to do about the fighting.
Speaking before the 135-nation assembly, Israeli foreign minister Abba
Eban declared, "there is not a single man or woman inside or outside of
this hall who doesn't know in his heart" that Egypt and Syria started the
war.
He charged their attacks will go down in history "as one of the basest
acts of which a government can have been responsible "
Syria's deputy foreign minister of state, Zakaria Ismael, charged that
Israel had launched 'massive attacks ot such proportions" that Israel must
have premeditated theinm.
He declared that "the salient feature is that they constitute an
indiscribable challenge of world public opinion and the international
community."
The gallery was packed to hear the Israeli and Arab speeches.
SAUDI ARABIAN WARNING TO THE U.S.
BEURIT, LEBANON (AP) Saudi Arabia's defense minister sa\s lhi
country will not meel future I .S. oil needs unless the U.S. governnctib
"forces" Israel to withdraws from icsupied \rah lands, a Beirut Magaz/ne
reported today.
Prince Sultan bin Abdul \ziz told the Beirut magazine Al Diyar that
King Faisal did not threaten to stop the flow of oil altogether.
But he added that the United States had asked Saudi Arabia to boost its
oil production to meet U.S requirements.
'Here. his majesty said 'no' unless the United States responded
favourably to the legitimate Arab demands, stopped its support of Israel
and forced it to withdraw from occupied Arab lands and to repatriate the
Palestinian people in their homeland." the defense minister told the
magazine.
He said if the United States failed to follow the conditions. "Saudi
Arabia's refusal to raise production will remain firm and we shall in the
meantime continue to build up our forces for the battle of destiny against
Israel.
REP. CAMPAIGN SPIES TO TESTIFY TODAY
WASHINGTON (AP) Two private detectives reportedly Republican
campaign spies are scheduled to testtily before the Senate Watergate
Committee today. Michael McM.inuvsa has been identified in news reports
as the spy who infiltrated Minnesota Senator Hubert Humphrey's campaign
for the Democratic presidential numinatmion last year. lie also reportedly
posed as a volunteer security agent at the D)emocratic national convention
The other witness is John Buckley. Watergate figure Gordon Liddy has
testified Buckley turned over photographically stolen documents from the
campaign headquarters of Maine Senator Edmund Muskie.
The federal investigation of Vice-President Agnew moved into federal
court yesterday. The Justice Department sought to convince judge Walter
Hoffman that its case against the Vice-Presideniit is legitimate. Agnew's
lawyers have complained that intentional news leaks from the Department
have destroyed the inquiry. The D)epartment offered judge Hoffman a look
at the evidence and said Agnew's counsel were trying to confuse the issues.
IRA GUERRILLA LEADER TWOMEY GIVEN THREE YEARS
DUBLIN. IRELAND (AP) A special Dublin court sentenced guerrilla
leader Seamus Twomey, once the British army's most wanted man in
Northern Ireland, to three years in jail today
Twomey, 53 who earlier this year was said to be Chief of Staff of the
Irish Republican Army's provisional wing, was jailed for 12 months as a
member of the illegal organization, and drew a three year concurrent term


on a charge of handling stolen money.


PUBLIC AUCTION

Bellgrave Auctioneers will sell at Public
Auction, 10:30 a.m. on Wednesday, October
10th, 1973, at Government Nursery, Nassau
Street. Ministry of works obsolete stock.
Including : -

Lightening Rods
Flintkote
Paint (assorted enamel)
Sealer
Tyres (assorted)
Tubes
Windmill Towers
Syphon Pumps
Pipes & fittings

Plus many other items too numerous to list.
Come one Come all Builders, Contractors, Htc.
All sales cash.

There is plenty here for you...


MAJOR ESCALATION ON 4TR. DAY OF MIIDLE EAST WAR



Israeli jets bomb Damascus & knockout



Lebanese radar station, while Egypt



claims heavy air losses by Israel

By HOLGER JENSEN
BEIRUT (AP) Israeli jet bombed Damascus and other civilian targets in Syria and hit a
Lebanese radar station in a major escalation of the Middle East war Tuesday.


EGYPT'S MAJOR

MISCALCULATION

ON TANK FORCE
LONDON (AP)
Intelligence reports reaching
British authorities from the
Middle East Monday indicated
Israel has won almost total air
superiority despite heavy losses
on the Syrian and Egyptian
fronts.
As a consequence, expert
informants said, both Syria and
Egypt look as if they have lost
the huge tank forces they
committed to the battle along
with a good part of their
surface-to-air missile defense
systems-
Authorities acknowledged
being baffled at the Fgyptian
tactic, which they said was to
send a big tank force across the
Suez Canal without adequate
air cover.
A It could be their
surface-to-air missiles were
immnobili/ed because of the
departure on Friday of Soviet
military advisers." one source
said. "Or it could be that the
Israel air force has taken out
those sites."
In either situation, the
informants here said, Igyptian
military authorities appear to
have made a major
m1iscalculatio n.
I n fo r min a t i o n from
diplomatic authorities in
London suggested that the
Israeli air force, despite
considerable initial losses, had
virtually shattered Syria's air
defense system including
missile installations.
TANKS DI STROYED
As compensation for heavy
warplane losses, the Israelis
appear to have destroyed most
of the tank force that the
Syrans had committed to
battle, these sources said.
There have been
unconfirmed reports from Tel
Aviv Syrian forces are now in
retreat and that Israeli
detachements have counter
attacked on the Canal front
and are even fighting on its
west bank.
"On the basis of our
information., one authority
said. "we would not be
sptiised at either of these
developments and indeed have
been expecting them."
Israel last Friday detected a
large scale pullout of Soviet
personnel from both Syria and
Egypt. This suggested to the
Israeli leaders the imminence
of an attack from which the
Soviet Union wanted to
dissociate itself. In such a
situation both the Egyptians
and Syrians would have to
operate their surface-to-air
missile defense system on their
own.
"We have been waiting for
word about the use of these
missiles," the informant said.
"Thus far no such word has
come in and it therefore seems
as if the missile sites either
have been immobilized by the
departure of the Russians or
taken out (destroyed) by the
Israelis."

CAIRO IN AIR

RAID ATTACK
ATlHENS, GREECE (AP)
Associated Press correspondent
C.C. Miniclier reported in a
telephone conversation from
Cairo today that "we are in the
middle of an air raid."
Communications went dead
immediately thereafter.
Miniclier reported that the
air attacks began at 4:10 p.m.
(0910 EST).
It was the second report of
Israeli attacks against the
capitals of its Arab adversaries.
Israeli jets swooped over
Damascus earlier Tuesday and
bombed the Syrian defense
ministry and the Syrian radio
broadcasting facility.
There were no reports of
what the Cairo targets were or
whether any casualties were


inflicted. Communications
between the Egyptian capital
and Athens were cut off. It was
not known whether the lines
went dead because of the air
raid.
Associated Press
correspondent Elias Antar
reported front Damascus that
more than half a dozen
ambulances carried dead and
wounded away from the Syrian
defense ministry and the state
radio station.


Egypt and Syria also
reported massive Israeli air
attacks on their advancing
troops in Sinai and the Golan
Heights and airfields in Egypt
but said they were repulsed
with heavy losses to the
Israelis.
Egypt claimed its troops
destroyed an Israeli armoured
brigade in the Sinai desert,
pushing Israeli forces nine miles
east of the Suez Canal. It said
the Israelis were "massively
fleeing in disarray."
Residents of Damascus
witnessed a spectacular
dogfight over the Syrian capital
after Israeli bombing strikes on
the defense ministry and the
city's radio station. Associated
Press correspondent Elias
Antar reported many civilian
casualties in Damascus.
T he Damascus
correspondent of the Beirut
newspaper An Nahar said the
entire family of the Pakistani
ambassador and the wife of the
Indian ambassador were
wounded and the wife of a
United Nations official was
killed.
Damascus residents saw at
least three planes falling in
flames, and one of them was
later found to have Iraq
markings. Syrian military
communiques said four Israeli
jets were shot down over
Damascus, three were downed
during Israeli bombing attacks
on the central Syrian city of
Hornoms and more than 10 were
downed over the Golan front.
RETALIATION THREAT
Damascus threatened to
retaliate for the bombing of
homes and the capital, warning
in a radio broadcast that
"Israel will have to bear the
consequences for attacks on
civilian targets."
The Egyptian command
issued a communique Tuesday
afternoon saying "enemy air
formations attacked our
advanced airfields. Ouir air
defenses shot down 16 enemy
Phantoms and Skyhawk jets
and four Israeli pilots were
taken prisoner."
Ihe communiques from
Cairo and Damascus raised to
191 the number of planes
claimed to have been shot
down by Arab air forces, Iraq
and Algeria have already
announced that their jets are
fighting alongside Syrian and
Egyptian aircraft against the
488-plane Israeli air force.
Reports of Israeli armour
crossing Lebanon's southern
border coincided with a
de fense ministry
announcement that Israeli jets
hit a Lebanese army radar
station of Braouk Mountain,
18 miles east of Beirut.
A communique said nine
Lebanese soldiers were
wounded. "Our air defense
system went immediately into
action against the raiding
planes which had vanished
right after the straffing," it
added.
Lebanon has told Israel
through foreign intermediaries
that it is non-combatant in the
Middle East's fourth
Arab-Israeli war, just as it was
in 1967. Israel conceded that
its jets struck the Lebanese
target but did not say why.
CONFLICTING CLAIMS
Israel reported today that its
forces had driven the Egyptians
back to three bridgeheads on
the east bank of the Suez
Canal, but Egypt claimed its
troops had pushed the Israelis
nine miles back from the Canal
and sent them "massively
fleeing in disarray into the
Sinai desert."
The Israelis also said they
had sunk three Egyptian
missile boats in the
Mediterranean and damaged
two in the Red Sea. There was
no immediate Egyptian
comment on this claim.
On the other front of the
fourth Arab-Israeli war, the
Golan Heights taken from
Syria in 1967, the Israelis said
they had chased all but a few


pockets of Syrians back across
the cease-fire line they crossed
Saturday. Syria was silent.
Egypt's first military
communique of the day said:
"Our troops are advancing
along the entire confrontation
line, reaching a distance of 15
kilometers this morning inside
Sinai and destroying all the
positions in which enemy
forces were dug in.
"The enemy suffered heavy
losses in lives and equipment.


*


Enemy forces are massively
fleeing in disarray, leaving
behind their fortified positions,
arms and equipment. Hundreds
fell into captivity."
Foreign newsmen were
barred from the battlefronts,
and there was no way to check
the conflicting claims.
Egypt said its troops
captured the town of El
Qantara, on the east bank of
the canal, and raided the
oilfield on the Sinai Peninsula
that Israel captured from
Egypt in the 1967 war.
3 BOATS SUNK
An Israeli spokesman said
Israeli naval units sank three of
the Egyptian missile boats off
Damietta, 40 miles west of the
mouth of the Nile. He said
there were no Israeli losses.
Meanwhile, the Israeli air
force "attacked and hit" two
other Egyptian missile boats
off Ras Mohammed, the
southern tip of the Sinai
Peninsula, the spokesman
reported. He gave no details.
Israel also said its planes
broke up Egyptian attempts to
move tanks over the pontoon
bridges spanning the Suez
Canal and shot down an
Egyptian helicopter that was
trying to land troops at Ras
Sudar, on the Israeli-held east
bank of the Gulf of Suez. The
Israelis said another troop
helicopter was driven off and
escaped
Egypt also claimed that
Israeli planes attacked the city
of Port Said at the northern
end of the Suez Canal Monday
night and inflicted civilian
casualties.
An Israeli spokesman said
the attacks lasted all day
Monday but insisted only
missile batteries and other
military targets around the city
were hit. He said the
anti-aircraft missile batteries
were knocked out.
A senior Israeli air force
officer interviewed on the
official radio said Israel had
command of the skies as the
new Middle East war went into
its fourth day. But he said the
Egyptian and Syrian air forces
"are still basically intact."
"We did not attack and
eliminate then on the ground
as in the six-day war" in 1967,
he said.
AIR LOSSES
Each side's claims in the air
war differed widely, as did
most of their other claims.
Egypt and Syria said they
brought down 60 more Israeli
planes Monday for a three-day
total of 160, or a third of
Israel's 480-plane air force.
The Israeli command said its
air losses were far less than
those of the Arabs. The Israeli
air force officer on the state
radio estimated Arab losses at
85 to 90 planes.
The Arabs lost 387 planes
on the first day of the 1967
war, but Israel attacked first in
that one and caught the Arab
forces on the ground.
Naval action also was
reported, with Israel claiming
that an Egyptian minesweeper
"went up in flames" in a battle
in the Gulf of Suez.
BIG TANK BATTLES
CAIRO (AP) An Egyptian
soldier wrapped explosives round
his body and used himself as a
human bomb against an Israeli
armoured counter attack, "Al
Ahram" editor Mousa Sabry
reported Tuesday.
"Al Ahram" said the tank battles
in Sinai were the biggest since the
Second World War, with hundreds
of tanks and armoured vehicles
swirling through the desert heat and
dust.
"The battle is vicious, long and
comprehensive. It can reach every
factory, every school and every
village", Sabry continued in a front
page editorial "Today we erase the
degradation of three million Jews
who put to shame 100 million
Arabs. We do this by confidence,
steadfastness, patience and the
stand of one man to the last drop
of blood.
The writer in Al Ahram said "we
have crossed over defeat by crossing
over to Sinai, whatever the
outcome of the battles, the leap is
more important..."


Tuesday, October 9, 1973.


IUN Security Council


split on war solution

UNITED iNAfIONS, N.Y. (AP) A special session of the
Security Council on the new Middle East war adjourned without
decision Monday night after the United States split with the
Soviet Union and China on how to stop the fighting.


ISRAELI ARMOURED
BRIGADE DESTROYED
CAIRO (AP) Egyptian forces
destroyed an armoured brigade and
took Its commander prisoner during
an advance under an air umbrella, a
military communique broadcast by
Radio Cairo reported Tuesday.
The communique said the action
took place Tuesday morning during
"the advance of our troops under
our air force unbrella."
Teh announcement also said that
Egyptian troops were "now 15
kilometers deep in Sinai." An
earlier communique said the
Egyptian forces had destroyed
enemy positions and "inflicted
heavy material and human losses on
the enemy. Enemy troops have fled
in advance of our troops, some
abandoning their weapons.
Hundreds have been taken
prisoner."

BITTER HAND TO
HAND FIGHTING
BEIRUT (AP) Egyptian forces
reported they captured the Sinai
town of Kantara East after three
days of bitter hand to hand fighting
Monday, as fierce battles raged with
Israeli forces for control of the east
bank of the Suez Canal.
Egypt also announced that Israeli
planes bombed the city of Port Said
on the western side of the Canal at
its northern entrance, and said
there were a number of civilian
casualties and that some houses
were destroyed.
The Egyptian communique said
this was the first time Israel had
bombed an Egyptian city since the
war broke out Saturday. It warned
"the enemy must bear the
consequences of this operation."
In another communique the
Egyptians said their forces raided
Israeli oil installations on the east
coast of the Suez Gulf in Balaeem
and set them ablaze.

TURKEY PUBLICLY
PRESSURED BY ARABS
ANKARA, TURKEY (AP) -
Arab ambassadors, in an unusual
press conference Tuesday, publicly
pressured NATO-member Turkey
to materially support the Arab
cause in the Mid-East conflict.
The foreign ministry, however,
issued a statement indicating no
change in Turkey's hands-off
policy.
Ambassadors of Egypt and Syria
read statements asking for Turkish
support in liberating Arab lands
from Israeli occupation. Envoys of
Iraq, Lebanon, Tunisia, Kuwait,
Saudi Arabia and Jordan looked on,
The envoys asked for material
support of a nature to be decided
by the Turkish government.
The answering foreign ministry
statement said Turkey views the
war "with regret and anxiety" It
asked for a speedy end to the
fighting and a just peace.
Moslem Turkey supports the
United Nation's resolution of
November 1967 calling on Israel to
withdraw from occupied territories.
But Turkey also maintains friendly
relations with Israel.
MIDDLE EAST FORCES
HERE is the lineup of forces in
the Middle-East fighting, as
estimated by the authoritative
International Institute for Strategic
Studies in Britain:
ISRAEL:
REGULARS: 30,000, backed by
reservists who can swell the total to
300,000 within 72 hours.
Warplanes: 488. Tanks: 1,700,
along with 1,000 half-tracks, 3,000
armoured cars and 450 armoured
personnel carriers. Undetermined
number of guided missiles mounted
on weapons carriers. Warships: 13
missile-armed fast patrol boats, 3
submarines, 9 motor torpedo boats
and 23 small patrol boats.
EGYPT:
REGULARS: 298,000.
Warplanes: 620. Tanks: 1,955.
Undetermined number of
Soviet-made antiaircraft, surface to
surface and antitank missiles.
Warships: 12 submarines, S
destroyers, I corvette, 12
submarine chasers, 12
minesweepers, 19 missile-carrying
patrol boats and 36 small motor
torpedo boats.
SYRIA:
REGULARS: I 32 ,000.
Warplanes: 326. Tanks: 1,100.
Twelve batteries of Soviet-made
antiaircraft missiles and and
undetermined number of antitank
missiles. Warships: 3 minesweepers,
2 submarine chasers, 6
missile-armed fast patrol boats, 12
motor torpedo boats and 2 coastal
patrol vessels.


U.S. Ambassador John A.
Scali asked Israel, Egypt and
Syria to halt military
operations and to "return to
the positions before hostilities
broke out."
Urging against debate on
who is to blame for the new
war, he said the return to the
old positions would be "the
least damaging way" to move
from confrontation to
negotiation.
But China, one of the five
members of the council with
the right to veto, said: "If the
council is to adopt any
resolution at all, it must
condemn all acts of aggression
by the Israeli Zionists and
demand the immediate
withdrawal by the Israeli
Zionists from all the Arab
territory they occupied."
Chinese Ambassador Huang
Hua branded as "preposterous"
Scali's proposal that Egypt and
Syria return to their positions
before the outbreak of fighting
on Saturday.
The foreign minister of
Egypt, Mohammed Hassen
el-Zayyat, said Israel had
struck first.
Going into the background
of the outbreak, he said the
Security Council, except for
the United States, had
favoured demanding Israel's
withdrawal from Arab territory
taken in the 1967 Middle East
War.
"But the collective will of
the council was paralyzed and
rendered inoperative" by an
American veto last July 26,
Zayyat said.
Scali and Zayyat addressed
the council shortly after
Secretary General Kurt
Waldheim asked the council to
pass on an Egyptian request for
withdrawal of the U.N.
military observers along the
Suez Canal to Cairo.
Normally there are 90 U.N.
observers in 17 posts along the
canal. Some of these observers
reported the Egyptian crossings
as the new war broke out early
Saturday. They reported no
Israeli crossings.
Scali said the United States
"received indications" that
hostilities were imminent
shortly before the outbreak.
I t"immediately undertook
intensive diplomatic efforts" in
a futile attempt to halt the
impending conflict he said:
The U.S. envoy asked the
council in the coming days to
"restore in some measure its
historic role of constructive
ameliorator in the most critical
explosive area in the world."
Scali asked the council to
apply three principles:
Halt military operations
"so that additional human
suffering may be avoided and
the search for peace may
proceed."
"Have the parties
concerned return to the
positions before hostilities
broke out" because this would
be "the least damaging way" to
work from confrontation to
negotiation.
Adhere to principles
already accepted as the way to
peace in the Middle East and
avoid destroying "the
foundations so laboriously
achieved in the past for
negotiations.."
Britain's Sir Donald


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Maitland told the council its
first objective "must be to
secure the earliest possible end
to the fighting ... We should
not allow ourselves to be
deflected from it by engaging
now in attempts to apportion
blame."
In the General Assembly
Israel referred to reports of the
U.N. military observers in
accusing the Arabs of a
"treacherous Pearl Harbour
attack."
The outbreak proved Israel
correct in refusing to withdraw
from occupied Arab territory
without a peace agreement,
Israeli Foreign Minister Abba
Eban said.
Eban said his country is
fighting to assure that no Arab
forces "are allowed to remain
anywhere inside the ceasefire
line" of 1970.
"The replacement of the
ceasefire line must be done by
negotiation and peace, not by a
treacherous, unprovoked Pearl
Harbour attack," he said.
He said the latest eruption
of war in the Middle East
proves that "we must take
Egyptian and Syrian
statements of hostility at their
face value."
Eban said that if Israel had
yielded to Arab demands for
return to occupied territory\
without insisting on first
negotiating secure boundaries,
the Jewish state "might have
been swept away in a frightful
massacre. How right we were
to insist on negotiations."
Saudi Arabian Ambassador
Jamil Baroody took the floor
to declare that Israelis were not
indigenous to the Middle East,
most had come from Europe
and Eban himself was from
South Africa.
"The Zionist dream has
become a nightmare," he
declared.

4TH. ASSASSINATION

IN ARGENTINA

BUENOS AIRES (AP)
Another labour leader was shot
to death Monday in the resort
city of Mar del Plata. It was the
fourth assassination since the
return to power of Juan I).
Peron.
Police said that Julian Julio,
secretary of a local union of
bus drivers, was shot down hy
two gunmen in a bus terminal.
His assailants escaped. Two
other union men were
wounded.
Julio had been a close friend
of Marcelin Mansilla, secretary
of the regional branch of the
general confederation of labour
who was similarly ambushed
and killed last week.
The national head of the
giant labour confederation,
Jose Rucci, was shot to death
Sept. 25. Police blamed a
faction of the Marxist People's
Revolutionary Army, the ERP.


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Tuesday, October 9, 1973.


G ht ributn
NuLuUS ADDICTS JURAmE IN VEBBA MAGISTM
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH,O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Publisher/Editor 1917-1972
Contributing Editor 1972.
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B..
Publisher/Editor 1972 -
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532,2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2.2768

Tuesday, October 9, 1973.


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
SOMEONE in Nassau sent me through the mail a copy of a
supplement to the Oakland Tribune a coloured publication in
the U.S.
Featured on the front page of the magazine is a picture of Mrs.
Lynden Pindling presenting the "Woman of the Year" award to
Mrs. Jewel Lafontant, Deputy Solicitor General of the U.S. This
is an American Award.
The presentation was made at a luncheon at the former home
of Prime Minister and Mrs. Pindling on Soldier Road. The caption
under the picture read: "First Lady of the Bahamas Presents Our
'Woman of the Year' Award".
This supplement was sent to the person who mailed it to me by
a friend in the U.S. with a letter. The anonymous person who
sent it to me clipped a section of the letter and attached it to the
supplement with this comment. "Sir Etienne....thought you
might be interested!"
The clipping from the Oakland letter read: "Just had to send
you the Oakland Sunday Supplement. Nassau is perhaps no
longer fashionable in the elite San Francisco society but a big hit
in the mainly black Oakland out-post."
The handwriting on both notes is strong and clear but I cannot
decide whether they came from two proud coloured women or
from white people who may understand what this change could
mean to the economy of the islands.

I decided that I should write an article on this situation but
after I got started I felt that this was probably an opportunity to
give a brief outline of the evolution of labour and tourism in the
islands. This will take several articles to cover.
Most people in the Bahamas today only know the Bahamas as a
prosperous area. It is possible that if they were told the
background story they might have a clearer understanding of the
possibilities of the future for the islands.

Tourism was introduced to Nassau at the turn of the century
by H. M. Flagler when he built the first Colonial Hotel, a massive
wooden structure, on the site now occupied by the
Sheraton-British Colonial Hotel. The new Colonial is a sturdy
stone structure. As most readers of this column are aware, the
original Colonial Hotel was destroyed by fire in the 1920's.
Flagler served his hotel with a small steamer, the s.s. Miami,
which made weekly trips out of Miami to bring patrons to his
hotel in this island during about three months of the year, known
in the business as "the winter season". The season ended with a
gala Washington's birthday ball on February 22nd.

Before coming to Nassau Flagler pioneered in opening up
Florida which, up to that time, was dominated by the swamps of
the Everglades, inhabited by Indians, rattle snakes and alligators.
The Indians still regard this extensive acreage in the Miami area
as their special habitation. They are now resisting a proposal to
drain the swamp and develop it as a tourist retreat.

The tourist business in Nassau during that early period was
small but it was nevertheless important because it put what was
considered at that time a considerable amount of money into
circulation. But most of our people continued to be engaged in
many small enterprises mostly farming and fishing - that
yielded them a modest living. No one was rich in the way people
think of wealth today.


Way back in the days when I was a student at the Boys Central
School, then the leading public school in the colony, T.W.
Sweeting was a famous schoolmaster, his name was a household
word. He was far from clever by today's standards in education
but he produced boys who were well grounded in the three
R's ....reading, writingg and 'rithmnetic. But most important of
all....they were well disciplined. Parents in those days expected a
headmaster to cane their children and T.W. Sweeting always kept
a bundle of well-chosen canes in his desk. He walked around the
classrooms with a couple attached to his belt, ready for use at any
moment.
When he died his place was taken by the late Wilton G. Albury,
M.B.E., a Harbour Islander and a fine teacher. Mr. Albury later
became quite a famous Inspector of Schools. When he retired
from the Public Service he worked with me on The Tribune.
You see I use the words "worked with me" instead of "for".I
have always felt that my staff worked "with" me as members of a
team, instead of "for" me as ordinary unconcerned employees.
My staff has always been a part of me, like my own family.

I was just a boy of around 12 when Mr. Albury became
headmaster of the B.C.S. He and my father were friends and so I
felt close to him.
One day I stunned him with a question.
"How much is a million?", I asked.
For a moment he stood and looked at me in shocked silence,
trying to think of the correct answer.
There was no answer to a question of this kind back in those
days when very few people even thought in terms of a hundred.
"Boy," he finally said, placing his hand gently on my head, "if
you started counting now and you lived to be as old as
Methuselah you wouldn't reach a million. So forget about it."
The Old Testament tells us that Methuselah lived nearly 1000
years, the oldest man who ever lived.


Life in the islands just rolled along in its simple way until 1919
when America went dry and Nassau experienced a boom in
bootlegging liquor to the U.S.
Money flowed freely in the islands during this period. And
then America went wet again and this flow of prosperity slumped
immediately.
During the period of prosperity people had lost their old roots,
as a great many people had become involved in the construction
business, building pretentious homes and large business houses


Whe ribtmne .



The position of the church here today is difficult


EDITOR The Tribune
THE CHURCH in the
Bahamas is under attack!!! On
the one hand there are those
who complain that the Church
is not carrying out its
traditional prophetic role of
speaking out on all the social
and moral problems of our new
nation. On the other hand,
there are members of the
younger generation (as was
evident in the "Young
Bahamian Show" on
Saturday), who are extremely
critical of the Church in the
Bahamas today.
Now, that the Church has
the responsibility of speaking
out on moral and social issues
is a cardinal tenent of the
Christian faith. For, the
Church if it is to serve the'
nation must be truly the
Conscience of the nation. And
the constant prayer of those
who profess to be members of
the Church must be:
"May her voice be ever clear,
Warning of a judgment near,
Telling of a Saviour dear:
We beseech Thee, hear us"
So, it was that the prophets


I i 1 '' 10 ll iF L IT0 k\ I


of ancient Israel were not
afraid to condemn the evil
practices of their times, and
throughout the long history of
the Church there have been
those saints who have always
been willing to speak out
clearly on moral issues. There
have been times, however,
when it has been extremely
difficult for the Church to
carry out this prophetic role.
And, it seems that in the
Bahamas today, although the
Church has a large membership
and Church attendance is at a
comparatively high level, there
are circumstances which make
it not at all easy for the
clergyman who would exercise
a prophetic role in our society.
In the first place, we have
become so politically
orientated in all our thinking
that there is the unfortunate
tendency to interpret everything
that is said in partisan rather
than prophetic terms.
Everyone is so politically
sensitive, so "thin skinned", so
anxious to put everyone else in


and warehouses for the newly rich bootleg "aristocracy" of the
island.
R. G. Collins was one of the bootleg millionaires of the period.
He built the house which is now the headquarters of the Ministry
of Education. His property extended on a wide front, from the
western boundary of the Ministry of Education's property to a
point east of the Rassin Hospital, and then south almost to Wulff
Road.
It was the largest estate in the heart of the town. After Mr.
Collins' death, this vast property was broken up in lots and sold
by a real estate broker. Now thousands of people live in this area
and it is one of the most important shopping centres in the island.
** ********* ****
Mr. Collins conceived the idea that he might relieve the
unemployment situation by building a ten-foot high wall around
his property and planting a citrus orchard on the land. The going
wage for labour then was two shillings a day. But, so as to make
sure that most of this money didn't go into the grog shops, Mr.
Collins paid a shilling a day and provided the men with a mid-day
meal which was served on paper torn from cement bags.
This was intended as a helpful gesture to relieve starvation in
the island but it later gave agitators a good vehicle for
propaganda.
This low-wage scale was not broken until years later when
Percy Christie, then one of the representatives in the House of
Assembly for the Western District, succeeded in getting the House
to adopt a Minimum Wage Bill, fixing the minimum labour wage
at four shillings a day;
As I told you in a recent article, a liquor merchant sitting next
to me in the House the night the Bill was passed, leaned across
and whispered in my ear: "That's more money for me." Hie
chuckled happily at the thought.
How correct was his prediction is borne out by the fact that
for many years now an alarmingly large percentage of cases in the
prison, the Princess Margaret Hospital and the Sandilands Mental
Hospital are traceable to over-indulgence in alcoholic beverages.

Just about the time Nassau was entering on this new phase in
its social and economic evolution, the Hon. Sir Bede Clifford was
appointed Governor of the Bahamas.
He looked around for a solution to this terrible slump in
business in the island and came up with the idea of promoting the
tourist business. This was in 1932 and he stayed in the islands
until 1936 when he was appointed Governor of Mauritius.
Sir Bede appointed Sir George Johnson chairman of the
Development Board. The Board had practically no money and so
Sir George took his daughter Sylvia, on his staff as his "right hand
man". Later he added Miss Leone Lightbourn, now Mrs. Richard
Wightman and the late Mrs. Harcourt Kelly to the staff.
If I remember correctly, Sir Bede brought out two men from
England. I think they were military men. One was to be his
A.D.C. and do part time work for the Development Board, the
other was supposed to be a photographer. Neither of these men
had a clue to publicity and promotion. It was during this period
that I did a great deal of writing for the Board.
Later the House provided enough money to employ Hlowell
Reese, an able professional journalist. We worked closely together
and today Mr. Reese, who has retired and is living in Tampa, is
still one of my warmest friends.
But great credit must go to Sir George and his daughter for
laying solid foundations under the tourist business in Nassau.
Unitl the P.L.P. gained control of the country in 1967 public
men gave their services free and without any desire for reward.
This meant a great sacrifice of time. I know it in nmy own
experience. My wife maintains that the only time The Tribune
prospered was during periods when I was not a member of the
House and could devote all my time and thought to the business.
Sir George Johnson, who was a dentist, went still further.
Every minute he took away from his practice meant loss of
income. Because he had no professional staff on the Board he had
to take hours every day from his practice of dentistry to devote
to the business of tourism, mainly in correspondence and in
writing advertising for foreign newspapers. He couldn't afford to
close down his practice completely and move to the offices of the
Board but he used a room in his own office for the work of the
Board.
Few men have made such a great personal sacrifice in the
service of his country and, were it not that I revive his name in
this column from time to time, his contribution to the welfare of
the Bahamas would be forgotten by the older generation and
completely unknown to the youngsters of today.
Sir George appreciated the help I gave the Board at that time.
He wrote me a letter placing this fact on record. I still have that
letter in my archives.
After his sudden death his daughter, a charming and
remarkably able young woman,left Nassau and made her home in
Boston. She is now living in New York.
Sir George had two sons, Harcourt and Mervyn. Harcourt
became an Anglican Priest with a parish in the U.S. He died
suddenly some years ago. Mervyn is a retired member of the law
firm of I-Higgs and Johnson and lives with his wife at The Folly,
west of Fort Montagu.

(To be continued tomorrow)

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
The worth of a State, in the long ran, is the worth of the
individuals composing it:- JOHN STUART MILL


a particular "political bag" that
many Ministers have become
supercautious in what they say.
For, if a Minister is to be a true
prophet, it is essential that he
be not classified in any
particular political camp.
If he commends the
Government on any particular
project, or decides to remain
silent when there is some
problem, he is suspected of
being a "PLP Minister." And
this tends to be the consensus
of the public especially in the
Family Islands where the
Ministers still wield
tremendous authority. If. ,n
the other hand, he says
anything which might be
interpreted as even remotely
critical Government, he is
branded FNM!
The dilemma of the Church
in this situation is compounded
by the fact that many of its
full time workers are
missionaries (i.e. expatriates).
They are deeply aware of the
wave of nationalism which is
sweeping the country at this
time. And are naturally
reluctant to speak out on social
issues, believing that the
Bahamian clergy should take
the lead in this direction.
Many Ministers, then, have
to walk as it were, a
"theological tight rope",
engaging in general statements
which will offend neither
political camp. This, however,
does not excuse the Church
from speaking out on some
social and moral issues. And.
contrary to popular opinion.
the Church has not been
completely silent on the
problems facing our country.
The Rt. Rev. Michael Fldon,
Bishop of the Anglican Church.
had this to say in the October
issue of "The Voice of the
Church" (monthly organ of the
Anglican Church in the
Bahamas):
"If the reports we hear and
read are correct, it must be a
source of concern to us that
the non-Bahamian fathers of
Bahamian families, who have
been long resident in these
islands, are being asked to leave
the country. These actions do
not only break tiup the family
unit and disrupt family life
which is so essential to the
stability and well-being of our
country but it indicates a lack


of mercy and justice. I trust
that those concerned will
consider these facts".
Here the Bishop argues on
the basis of a fundamental
doctrine of the Church the
sanctity of family life. Those
who have Bahamian families
must indeed receive special
consideration in the
immigration policy of our
nation. And if it is not on the
basis of justice and mercy, it
should be on the basis of
self-preservation.
For, any effort to weaken
family life must in the long run
weaken the building up oi the
nation. For the family unit is
the basis of the nation And,
we cannot possibly build ai
better Baharas unless we try
to strengthen and respect
family-life the building up of
sound and strong family life.
This leads us to consider ai
matter related to this whole
question of our attitude to
non-Bahamians amongst us As
we read the newspapers every
day we see many advertisements
by non-Bahamians who want
to become citizens of our new
nation. Everyone is entitled to
his opinion on this
development.
However, I must confess


that it is si Oll' ihaI distIt Iu ng
that there is a nuilmber of
IHahnliIII n', who .are n t at .ill
pleased aihot puuuoplc w h hi havc
bet'.' amongst us for years
applying to becoin' ,ili/ens.
IndeeJ. so c' cner niied
that at lasi tIh 're i ;ia plt.css to
which ni -Bahltian ill s can
become hona tide citizens of
the country ratlh'r than having


some nebulous relationship tc
out country called "Bahamian
status". And so there are those
who avidly examine the ads in
the papers to see who else is
applying to become Bahamian.
Now, it seems to me that
this is hardly the right attitude,
We need to exercise much
Page 10, Col. 6


DIRECTOR & GENERAL MANAGER
FREEPORT BAHAMAS


Our clIent rui'(I'Iesi a in:;m otf
strut c:li:ir iiitel \v ;It i g iood
background 111i business andl
t'li vi c i l i nk;i i' i <'c n lI : lt
e x'ct ivt lexel 1t, cuoitIol

I .S5 )(),00(J() 111 I reepoitr
(.rad anId hiamti.
l.xpericiCe tIllst l li ultdcl
broad kinowIldgCe 'f credit
control buti above ill he must
liiavce tlhe personal qualities to
give t'i- mn le.ic slc hl p to xlic liiiing
: ,ta l I Id t i'-c able to deal
with and oibtin tile respect ot
people i t a ll i 't cl, IIn view ot
the aiti lnomiti\ It llh p 't., rea
initiative anid e\ccptlinhil


integrity are
requhiteiements.


priority


This is a tough job but
successful achievement will be
well rcwsarded. Initial salary
B13.$25,0IK) plus incentive
scheme, Company car and
fringe benefits in accordance
with the best modern practice.
The contract will be for 3
years.
Write giving age and full details
of qualifications, career to date
and salaries earned to:
P. O lixm F-2457.
1 reep, 'rt.
BI:ihaina s


LARGE DEIVELOPMENI CORPORATION

REQUIRES



QUALIFIED SALES REPRESENIATIVES





We are offering experienced and energetic
Bahamians the opportunity of earning a guaranteed
minimum salary, plus commission. Applicants must
have transportation and references.


For appointment, please call Mrs. Curry, 2-3850.


BARCLAY
Ieao


- I I II' I


i .









I1 Wrn Tusdy Ocoe 9,193


IU


NOW

OPEN

4"T10I -BAR-B-0Q"
QUALITY CHICKEN-RIBS -BEEF
BEST PRICES IN TOWN
Ep yvour Meal n our D1,r Room or
Take I ne wth you,
Mosko Bldg. Trinity Place & Market St.
Now Open 9:00 a.m. to 9 p.m.
DRIVE-IN SERVICE FROM 6 P.M. -
LOT iNi REAR OFF MKT. ST.


Gibson
AIR CONDITIONERS
LORANDOS REFRIGERATION & AIRCONHIIONING
BAY STREET PHONE 2-4842 P.O. Box N-3380


"000 13f-
1000 B I L
12000 BFU'U
14000 BTL'


isoooff I I
20000 B'3L
24000 BI L


i t, It/,l\ ,."t': R )ldin' t. r;'( i 5 Y ar I'jrrajil ,: (' l2) rc.ss 'rot
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AUTOMATIC AIR SWEEP
\ti*rised \'Vjnes sweep the cool air, overhead. from \jll to) \all.
where it settles naturally for maximum comfort.
-ir S-eep is S, different and so effective, it is patented. Only
( ihson has it.


END OF MONTH SALE
OPENING SALE STILL ON
GIRLS' SHOES
FROM $4.00
SOYS' WHITE SHIRTS
& BLACK PANTS
BOYS' POLYESTER PANTS
MEN'S POLYESTER PANTS
2 FOR $20.00
LADIES BLOUSES 2 FOR $7.50
ARNOLD'S DEPISTORE
COR BAY ST & VICTORIA AVE


New Orlent'fa L undry
p znd C'en s, Vcf
PROUDLY ANNOUNCES THE
OPENING OF THEIR NEWEST
BRANCH STORE OPPOSITE MASON'S
ADDITION ON EAST STREET:
COME AND SEE US AND TAKE
ADVANTAGE OF OUR GRAND
OPENING SPECIAL -- A PAIR OF
TROUSERS CLEANED FREE WITH
EVERY $3.00 ORDER'


4


SPECIALS


HlimiIIIli lm mIImmI m1l 1m


From the
Apparel


Paula


Cadies '


men' zaismon


DRESSES ** SWIMWEAR

SWEATERS ** HANDBAGS

COSTUME JEWELLERY FROM ITALY


I U


EDDIE'S DEP! SORE
1 DOOR EAST OF STOP-N-SHOP







GRAND GIVE AWAY

SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE

LOW-LOW- PRICES


U U


AGATHAS

WE HAVE MOVED!
AGATHA'S IS NOW LOCATED ON
6th TERRACE CENTREVILLE
EAST OFF ABC MOTORS
WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF
LADIES' &CHILDREN'S WEARING APPARELS
THIS WEEK'S SPECIAL:
"STAY-UPS" STOCKINGS 95c


THE COMPLETE PAINT STORE

TINKER'S
THE PAINT 'IE
SUPERMARKET
Fauing toIBan lNm


Featuring top Brand Name
Paints
From as little as $4.95


also complete lines of
Automotive Paints
& wallpaper supplies


Per Gallon
VISIT THEM ON MACKEY STREET
PHONE 57939 P. 0. Box 5599


I I I I IU


PauL &/g0os


DRESSES ** SWIMWEAR
SWEATERS ** HANDBAGS
COSTUME JEWELLERY FROM ITALY


Arima's
r sn I ts au lt. Of Ih [ lretlyll
ft =SI to 0 0 be t 9 1v. t fimCHN
All Ready-To-Wear Items MUST 601
INFANTS I CULDENS o SUITS 9 DESSES P FMTSo SHIRTS
LAoi uLOUSESe SOSS 0oPITS
SWUTERS O N. wISnls MIUS TOWELs
SBES ADS 0m anOS 0 .P TUIWUIa S ORINANTS
REDUCTIONS ON DRESS FABRICS
Make Early Start For Gift Shopping A,
Buy Now and Save I
ABSOLUTELY NO EXCHANGE OR REFUNDS

WULFF RD ATMALKEY ST TE280
WEEKDAYS 830t1700 SATURDAY :30to800


SPECIAL OF THE WEEK

j& NOW

.oo $120


Helen's Shoe Stores
Madeira Shopping Centre Bay St.


Latest Wearing
Show


LADIES SHOE S Back to School for Girls
cloggS from Spain- Italy -Brazil
Slack Suits -Pants by
"That Girl" in Polyester Dresses
-Tops Beautiful Styles
MEN'S double knit pants
the AARON SHIRT Mr. Baseball,
in Long & Short Sleeves, Hats For the Swinger
JOHN'S DEPT. STORE
ELIZABETH AVENUE
imm m mm mmm mmmmi- mm -mm mmmmm

LAST CHANCE!
LAST WEEK!!

TERYLENE & MOHAIR
$4.00 per yd.


EDDIE'S DEPT. STORE
1 DOOR EAST OF STOP-N-SHOP


O a now look

Check with
LEE'S 4

CAIPEIS .

DRAPERIES ^,, .^


I COMMONWEALTH

INDUSTRIAL BANK
Loans for any useful purpose
CONSOLIDATE
PUT ALL YOUR BILLS IN ONE
7% on 7 day call Deposits


NASSAU
Palmdale
opp. City Mkt.
Phone 2-1421


FREEPORT
Churchill Bldg.
Phone 352-8307


0n (t.ul BAY STREET
jWij bUIIU PHONE 2-2657.


NASSAU
Bay Street
opp. Maura's
Phone 2-1154


2-4252. 2-2559


-.I -.


NewArrivalds
From Switzerland and England
THE LATEST IN POLYESTER MATERIAL
in a variety of colours
PRICED FROM .4 0 per yd.

Rachaels Boutique
GLASSGOW HOUSE, ROBINSON RD.
BOX N9149 -PH 53364


OIDAY WIEK-EN SPECIAL
NURSES' SHOES $8.00
LCLOGS (small sizes) $5.00
OTHERS GREATLY
REDUCED!!

THERE$SI
LEWIS STREET
Box N-370 Phone 2-3175


-- I


NOE --L-- --- --- _-L - A------ --------------) -_ ~_ _~_~ -


Tuesday, October 9, 1973.


Tuesday, October 9, 1973.


Uhe lribmun


C&'fiuwj












Tuesday, October 9, 1973.


eOa&b -6


By Abigail Van Buren
c 1973 by Chicago rr bine-N. Y News Synd., Inc.
DEAR ABBY: I am a 45-year-old married woman who
fortunately survived breast cancer three years ago. My
right breast was removed, and altho I wear a padded bra
and look normal in clothes. I haven't totally adjusted to my
loss, even tho my husband has been very kind and under-
standing.
I suppose I will sound vain and silly that's why I
haven't spoken to my doctor about this but I would like to
know if it is possible for a plastic surgeon to reconstruct an
artificial breast and successfully make it part of me?
MRS. J.
DEAR MRS. J.: I have discussed your problem with my
Plastic surgery advisor, Dr. Eugene Worton, who advises
me that every case must be evaluated individually. Wheth-
er it would be possible to do a reconstructive operation on
you would depend upon the type of surgery you had [the
size and location of the removed tumor. lHe suggests you
contact a qualified plastic and reconstructive surgeon, and
discuss it with him.
DEAR ABBY: How does a woman let her friends know
she is available? I am being divorced, and a woman my
age can't afford to waste much time. so I'd like to have it
known that I am in the market for a new husband.
What do you think of having some cards printed say-
ing: "I AM AVAILABLE!" and without going into detail I
could add: "My divorce was final March 10th" and then
something cute, like: "The line form', on the left Then
my new phone number.
I suppose this would seem rather for.waird a few years
ago. but Abby, times have changed What do -.uu think?
AVAILABLE
DEAR AVAILABLE: Times may have changed, but
men haven't. When they play for keeps the3 avoid aggres-
sive women. I recommend a more subtle way to get the
word of your availability around.
CONFIDENTIAL TO C('AN'T HEII FVE IT IN TEX-
AS": I couldn't believe it either, so I wrote to the State Bar
of Texas and inquired. The reply.
"Dear Abby: You wrote that a woman had written to
you saying that an unmarried woman cannot own property
in Texas and wanted to know if this is true
In the words of my patient andl long-suffering secretary:
'An unmarried woman CAN own property in Texas--and
the more, the better!'
Cordially Yours,
Davis Grant, Offic" of Gen. Counsel
DEAR READERS: Even if statistics hore you, please
read this. I ran it last year and had hundr-ds of requests to
repeat it. The information may come in handy if you re
ever on a quiz show. It could even save your life:
Q. When was the Chicago fire?
A. Oct. 9, 1871. Exactly 101 )ea rs ag" today
But let's get more current, shall weN Diid you know that
last year more than half a million fire occurred in the
United States? More than 12,500 lives were lost Even more
tragically, a large percentage of deatnh- wore children,
elderly persons and invalids who had tI'mn left alone for
just a few minutes.
The chief causes of fires, in order of wte toll taken,
were:
1.1 smoking, 2.1 electrical wiring, 3.1 heating and cook-
ing equipment, 4.1 children playing with matches, 5.1 open
flames and sparks, 6.1 flammable liquids, 7. ', suspicion of
arson, 8.] chimneys and flues, 9.1 lightning, 10.1 spontane-
ous ignition.
The total fire loss in 1971 was a:m *-u[imted $2.845
billion. [No misprint-that's two billion, eight hundred forty-
five million dollars.]
Now for some tips that could save your, life
Be sure your cigaret is out '.V' he too And
never leave matches or lighters .i" a the reach of chil-
dren.
Don't overload electrical outlet? with to, many appli-
ances.
Don't run cords under rugs or over radiators where
they may get damaged. And replace a cord if it is frayed.
Never leave small children alone in the house. Not
even for a few minutes.
Have your wiring and electrical installations done by
a professional.
Store oily rags and paints in a cool place in tightly
sealed metal containers.
Never use flammable liquids for dry cleaning in-
doors.
Never smoke in bed.
Have a fire drill in your home to be sure everyone
knows what to do in case of fire.
Invest in a compact, easy-to-use fire extinguisher
and keep it handy in your kitchen, or he a sport and buy
one for your cottage, car, boat and the back bedroom, too.
NOW, in case of fire:
Most fires occur between midnight and 6 a. m., so
always sleep with your bedroom door closed. If you suspect
fire, feel the top of the door. If it's hot. don't open it.
Escape thru the window. But first alert the rest of the
household.
If you can't open the window, break it with a chair.
Cover the rough edges with a blanket and sit on the window
ledge with one leg hanging outside and one inside, and wait
for help.


The phone number of your fire department should be




IOP MANAGEMENT POSITION
OPEN AT

rJAf-Tri B 3AY PLANAflIJOI
Qualified individual ie(qIu eco hit,. l u(hi t0li o of
eggs, grow-out of replaceineiit> ,md ec jiading. Also
supervision of feed mixing and neditatiorn. For personal
interview please submit, in .,. ii i Ja detaileI report on
experience and qualifications to:
MR. DONALD J. STEWART
General Manager
Hatchet Bay Plantation
P. O. Box N-3217
Nassau, Bahamas




-SMEARED.


Tihe Gribunir


Artificial breast? See

taped on every telephone. If it isn't, don't fumble around
trying to call them. Oall from a neighbor's house.
If you live in an apartment building, use the stairway.
Don't take a chance on the elevator. If it fails, you're
trapped.
Once out, stay out. No treasure-not even the family
pet--is worth risking a human life.
It took less than three minutes to read this column.
Was it worth it? I hope so. God bless. Have a good day!
ABBY


your surgeon

CONFIDENTIAL TO R. IN L.A.: Forgive. That is the
cure, for forgiveness is the fragrance of a violet on the heel
of the one who crushed it.


* -~ -- '- ~,ae'-~


Arrived toldai I ropic Day
troin West Palm Beach:
Bahailia Stari, I mcrald Seas
Irmii Miami


WEATHER
Wind: iast to east-south-east
5 to 14 m.p.h.
Weather: Mainly fair


Problems? You'll feel better if yon get it off your chest. Sailed todai: 1 ropic Day Sea: Smooth tc
For a personal reply, write to ABBY: Box No. 69700, L.A., tor West Pa'iln, Bich Temp : Mdi
Calif. 90069. Enclose stamped, self-addressed envelope, TIDES 73 Max. toinorr
please. Iligi 4.32 i.m. iiand 4.48
Hate to write letters? Send 1Si to Abigail Van Buren, pi1. SU
132 Lasky Dr., Beverly Hills, Cal. 90212 for Abby's booklet, I os) 10.33 a.m. and 10.58 Rises 0.05 a.m.
"How to Write Letters for All Occasions." p.m. Sets 5.50 p.m.


Slight
n. tonight
ow 87









6 (hrit


Tuesday, October 9, 1973.

Engineers vote to form a national


Awnce -1872


JOHN CHEA & SONS.


PINDER'S FOOD MARKET


CARNATION MILK


LISTERINE


RIBENA


SOFTWEVE TISSUE
(DOUBLE PACK) 2


CRACKER JACKS
4 FOR 590


LARGE 3 FOR 79C


7 oz. 9C


LARGE $1.99


ES 8
FOR /


COLGATE TOOTH PASTE
SUPER SIZE $1.19


ZEST SOAP


BATH SIZE 3


FOR 99C


BLANCO BLEACH
(GALLON) 99C


LAY'S POTATOES
CHIPS
6 PK. 2 FOR

99C
LIBBY'S
GREEN LIMA BEAI
14 OZ. 2 FOR 83


.S CHOICE ROUND STEAK
,B $1.89
U.S. CHOICE RIB ROAST
LB $1.89
NATIVE FRESH PORK


LB.


PRODUCE


LETTUCE
HEAD 59


TOMATOES
lb. 49t


THE BAHAMAS Joint
Group of Professional
Engineers on September 26
voted to dissolve the externally
regulated organization and to
endorse the Bahamas
Institution of Professional
Engineers as its successor.
The Joint Group was
sponsored by the U. K.'s
Conference of Engineering
Institutes (civil, mechanical
and electrical), who envisaged
that the local group would
continue only until the
formation of a national body
to maintain equivalent
professional standards and to
extend the facilities available
to engineers.
The Joint Group has found
its successor in the BIPE, and
at its annual general meeting
last month resolved to wind up
its affairs "to end an era of
external regulation of the
engineering profession in the
Bahamas," according to Joint
Group secretary Chris J.
Mitchell, deputy chief
distribution engineer at the
Bahamas Electricity
Corporation
The Joint Group was formed
in 1961 "to afford a meeting
place for all engineers of
professional standards, to
promote and encourage the
acquisition of engineering
knowledge and to arrange visits
to works of engineering
interest."
The BIPF was founded on


I 11L CA RIBBEAN
Association of Industry &
Commerce (CAIC) will hold a
board of directors meeting and
its Annual General Meeting in
Nassau from October 11 to
13th.
'The board meeting will e-
officially opened by the lion
.\. 1). llanna Minister ot
Finance. and Mr. Al\tfred
Maycock, chairman of the
B a d ainm i s D)evelopimeint
corporationn \\ill address tie
A.(i.M. ( hairminan ot both
meetings \will be Mr. Aaron J.
Matalon, president of their
Mr. Maalon leaves Jamaica
Mr. Matalon leaves Jamaica


professional body here


May 11 last year, and,
according to Mr. Mitchell's
press release, is "principally
concerned with the obligations
of the engineering profession
to the public, and the
promotion and development of
essential technological and
industrial skills to service both
the tradition and the modern
demands of the Bahamas
economy."
Mr. Paul E. Hanna was
recently re-elected president of
the BIPE. the Joint Group's
statement said.
Mr. Mitchell told The
Tribune that when formed the
Joint Group was made up
primarily of expatriates, but
more recently Bahamians have
dominated the organization.
The Joint Group appointed
a special committee in 1971 to
examine alternative proposals
for the future of the
organization. The committee,
which reported last month, was
headed by BEC general
manager E. C. Sands. Also on
the committee were engineers
Peter Bethel, Paul I lanna,
George ('ox, Aurtlhur lFirth,
George Moss and Anthony
Dean.
Following the committee
report, Mr. Mitchell's
statement said, "the Joint
Group at its annual general
meeting resolved that the


Bahamas Institution of
Professional Engineers
was constituted and functioning
in a manner that would
preserve standards set by the


Joint Group over
years. A similar
support of the


the past 12
proposal in
engineering


division of the Bahama,
Society of Architects and
Engineers was rejected."
Joint Group members were
advised to record their names,
academic qualifications and
professional records with the
BIPE.


on October 10, and will be
prece iedeL d I Mr. Lrban
Archibald, executive officer of
the Association.
L'p I'or discussion is a
number (t topics relating to
the econoirm of (aribbean
,.o u entries, including the
anticipated effect the
(aribbean commonn Market's
Common Fxternal tariff will
have on the region's trade arind
manufiiaeture. NhM-. MNlavcock is
e\pe>cted to address the
imeetinr on the Bahamas
oL e itlllle nt promotional
programme to encourage
industry.


Enter The Tribune-Pan Am Travel Photo
IS
Contest!




A free round-trip for two
can be yours aboard a
... .Pan Am jet to any one of
26 European cities
S" -served by Pan Am.

Contest Rules
The Tribune will run a total of 30 photo ads
showing a scene from somewhere within Pan
Am's travel system. Name the City or Scene
and Country shown, using the picture and
answer blank included in each ad. After the
final photo has run on November 17th, mail
all 30 entries (stapled or clipped together)
to: Vacation, The Tribune, P. O. Box
N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas, You may enter
*more than one group of photos, as long as
you use official Tribune blanks and groups
must be fastened together.
I Should you miss an edition of The Tribune
with a Pan Am photo ad, back copies can be
purchased at The Tribune reception desk in
5 The Tribune Building, Shirley Street,
Nassau, or The Tribune office, 9B Kipling
Building, Freeport.
In case of a tie, the tie will be broken by
additional photos not previously published.
0 All entries must be postmarked no later than
midnight, Monday, November 19th, 1973.
Employees and their families of The
Tribune, Pan American World Airways anc
their advertising agencies, are not eligible to
enter.
Photo No. 18
City or Scene................ .............Country..................................


I
I
*U


My Name.............. .......... Address....................... .Phone ...........



Contest ends Saturday, Nov. 17th X
SWinner nmy choose round trip for two
I to ny one of the following 26 European
Where in the world within Pan Am's travel system, Ct 'aed b n 1... ..1Am, I
are the places pictured above? Identify all 30 AMSTERDAM MADRID
photographs that will appear on various days in BARCELONA MUNICH
The Tribune over the next 13 weeks and you have i BERADELIN NUREMBERG
a chance to win a round-trip for two aboard a Pan RUSSGEN OSLO I
COPENHAGEN PARIS
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one of 26 European cities served by Pan Am. GLASGOW SHANNON
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OCT 5-12


CARIB ASSOCIATION OF INDUSTRY

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NATIVE FRESH
PORK LEGS $1.29


DAISY CHEESE
$1.09
FROZEN FOOD
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(10 OZ. PK) 2 FOR 59S


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Tuesday, October 9, 1973.


SBAHAMIAN
SUPERMARKETS
If it's value you really want,
you really want SuperValue I


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SPECIALS FOR THE WEEK OCTOBER 10th THROUGH 14th, 1973.


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WHOLE FRYERSIb. 5
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CUT-UP FRYERS .890
VALLEYDALE (WHOLE OR SHANKS PORTIONS)
SMOKED HAM per lb. $1.19
VALLEYDALE
SMOKED HAM BUTT PORTION Ib $1.29


U.S. CHOICE
CHUCK ROASTIlb.


U.S. CHOICE
CHUCK STEAK


per Ib


U-S. CHOICE
RIB STEAK
U.S. CHOICE
1 IDELMONICO STEAK
I03U .S. CHOICE
GROUND CHUCK
CANADIAN AGED WHITE
$1.49 CHEDDAR CHEESE


per Ib


$2.19


per Ib $2.59
per Ib $1.39
per Ib $1.39


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16oz. 2/79t


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4-oz.FL
(ALL FLAVOURS)6/99


1/2 GAL. 990

2rollpak 69b


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COFFEE MATE


16oz.


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BORDENS MILK


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McKENZIE
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MORTON
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Tuesday, October 9, 1973:


8 _gihg grtbigt


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ASSORTED
NAPKINS


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QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED
PRICES GOOD WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 10,
TNRU SUNDAY OCTOBER 14,


BAHAMIAN GROWN
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FRYERS


DIXIE DARLING
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DINNERS

3PKG


ARROW
ALUMINUM FOIL

2LL FT.
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FRESH GROUND
HAMBURGER Lo..99
FRYER QUARTERS ...... L.99
U.S. CHOICE
ROUND ROAST ............ L.99
NATIVE PORK tB.1.19
160Z. WO.
BOLOGNA 1.29
W.O. SMOKED
PICNIC HAMS ............... L .99


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~tbr i~rihUtnw


Tuesday, October 9, 1973.


PM'swife talks toExuma ladies about duty The position of the church
From Page 3


BAHAMIAN women have a "great responsibility in shaping the
attitudes of our families towards themselves, their fellow
countrymen and their (.od". Mrs. Marguerite Pindling told the


Exuma Ladies Garden Cluob's
George Town. Exuma, Friday.
The Prime Milnstc'-. 'a.'
said she wanted to sh ,i '











The Admiral
says:
"Go with the
leader...
An Admiral!"

Admviri.

Refrigerators

See them at your
Admiral
dealer's showroom

TAYLOR INDUSTRIS[ID0
I 1 1 Shirlev Str'ee
P. O. Box. N-g4806
TELEPHONE 289,4 i 5


annual installation banquet at

o i her iJdas 'i w shat she
":c eiiedi is tlie unique role of
: i mi.! \o n in building
Sil B.aha. iin ni thn .
-"" .ii 1 .\ ill perhaps .agree
i ;' thit ril igencratlio
hdN bhe groa iicponsiblit. to
,ii 'j s e pLNo e. m andi
S : -, i t h 1 H ah l i ialn
A, .a:.; j; c a. nd ioight to be
[ 1 ; i. iii I i th c hurchl andi
in :'hi' ^,',, iiiiinit\ ," Nits.

:: ,110111c the i iie, the
S h sister,
;,] : : r .atint lhas an

Sgrcat
"-;".", | mi' it\ n l npllg tlh e
I li! t, n .t latniiliies
'. . t .- s, their
%na their
S !.i i- v c lci ii stratec
; / ,. : : ! ; I < i I It
;: :.- : : po rtaint
S: ~ / m: ii- ,lildrc andu



S i\ '. or i[,ithcn te
S: ::'her

"1 tI -. i ni

Y:n K- h real
nher- is
r eil
Si'.


&responsibility in nation


progressive in thought and
deed and demonstrates it in the
manner in which she cares for
herself and her family and the
manner in which she shares in
the improvement of her way of
life.
"As a general rule, the
women of The Bahamas have a
reputation for being
industrious and having a keen
sense of -' spt ii, ihilii for
sharing in the improvement of
her way of life and the
standard of living of her
family. Some of the proudest
mothers in this country today
are those who had such a sense
of pride and purpose that they
were able to produce for the
nation the leaders of today.
"Leading examples are
women like mothers of His
I xcellency Ambassador
Livingstone Johnson and
F du cation Minister, the
lo noura ble Livingstone
(oakley. Their sacrifices
produced nien of this calibre.
Ihey were upstanding and
outstanding women and it
remains to be seen whether we
of this generation who have
been blessed with so niuch
more than our mothers had or
even dreamed of having. could
accomplish half as much as
they did. The opportunities
open to us are great in this land
of ours and we women must
work hard it swe are to make


HE BAHAMAS BY


ethel obertson o. Ltd.


these opportunities a reality.
BETTER LIFE
"Whether we work by
ourselves or whether we work
side by side with our husbands
strengthening their hope and
bolstering their faith, we can
provide for our children a
better way of life than our
parents and ourselves enjoyed
or endured," Mrs. Pindling
continued.
"In the church. Bahamian
women have always shouldered
their responsibility. We m1ay
not have been in the pulpits
but those who occupied the
pulpits knew that success
depended largely upon the
women. There is a falling-oft of
interest in the church today.
We young mothers do not
regard the church as important
in our lives as our mothers did.
This may well be why so many
of us are not as strong as our
mothers were: we do not seem
to have as great a reserve oft
strength to draw upon in times
of stress and crisis.
"We need to rekindle that
interest in the church and .\e
may find that it has answers
that the psychiatrist cannot
give.
"In the community, the
responsibilities of Bahamian
women loom larger than life.
As far as community work is
concerned, this is the one area
where Bahamian women hliae
not been known to take the


lead. Our mothers were
prepared to take a back seat
and did take a back seat in this
aspect of lthe life of our
country I believe that they
mnas not have been sufficiently
equipped, economically and
educationally, to take a
leadership position but our
generation of women will not
have that excuse. We will not
have any excuse at all. 'I am
sure that it is this realisation
which led to the formation of
the I xuima ladies Garden
(lub. You looked around your
coinimuit, you saw that there
were some things that needed
to be done,. ou realized you
had a i, '. l isilili[t to do
something about it and you got
together to do something
about it. Tonight, everyone
knows that you are doing
something about it, and again I
congratulate you.
"I his land is our land! We
Bahamian women must love it
and cherish it. We must join
h:inds and hearts with each
o)tller andi with our leaders and
pledge ourselves to build our
country in the home, in the
church and in the coinmlunity.
I wish your organisation much
success in the years ahead. You
have started a great work. You
have come out of your shell
Iand blossomed forth truly
liberated. Move on now
forward, upward and onward,
lo'gether."


Half acre at San Andros is


Flying Treasure Hunt prize

A "CROW'S NEST LOT" on a high ridge of the San Andros
development on Andros will be the first prize in the annual


Bahamas Flying Treasure Hunt.
'he popular aviation event is
slated for November 2(, to
December I, and is spotinsorcd
by the Bahamas ministry y of
Tourism. Aircraft from all over
North America will compete in
the treasure hunt and several
entries have come in from
I urope, according to Ilans
Groenhoff, organizer of the
event.
The first prize lot. half an
acre in size, has a commanding
view of the 7,000 acre
development on NNorth Antdrrts
1 lie development includes
the 24-rooni San Andros Hotel
and air s'iip on a large tract of
land clc.ered with 60-foot pine
trees The area is divided into
subdivisions, and the rldg'e lot
offered as first pri/e is located
in a subdivision called lv.wn
lHouse I states.
I he first place pri/e gois to
the flier who identifies the
largest number of the 18 aerial
photographic clues and plots
them almost accuratel, in terms
OI lTongitude and latitude I ihe
winner also receiveCs the I sso
I rophl .
Last year's winner, Robert
Worley of Arcanuml. Ohio, won
a golt course lot at I reassure
Cay. Abaco. Hle and his wife,
flying in a (essna 210.

FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157


identified 15 of 18
photographic clues.


---------Ye-1- - I


more charity and
"broadmindedness" in regard
to non-Bahamians who have
lived here for ten years. For,
they have a positive
contribution to make to the
building of our nation.
There is very little value in
"digging up" the past of
everyone in public life in the
Bahamas to see whether he or
she was born here. A person
who comes to live here at a
very early age and takes his
place in our society is entitled
to charitable treatment. The
whole affair re Mr. Sinclair
Outten seems rather trivial and
it is certainly a case of applying
"the letter rather than the
spirit of the law.
I call upon all my
fellow-Bahamins, therefore to
exercise Christian charity in
approaching this matter of
citizenship for non-Bahamians.
That so many want to become
citizens of the Bahamas is a
tribute to us. And argurs well
for the future of our new
nation.
Finally, it is the
responsibility of Government,
the Church and the Society in
general to create the
atmosphere in which not only
Ministers but all citizens will be
free to speak out on all issues
as "they see it". It was
heart-warming to hear Mr.
George Smith, the young
progressive Member of
Parliament for Rolleville,
Exuma, call for greater
dialogue and free expression of
opinion by all our citizens.
This is essential for the growth
of our country.
Let us remember that the
role of the Church is essentially
positive. The Church must not
be caught up in partisan
statements for in its
membership are members of all
political groups. And in the
Bahamas today the call of the
Church is to carry out its
prophetic role not so much by
condeming what is being done
(or not being done) by
Government or any other


organization; but by urging its
members to live up to the
ideals of Christ.
At this time of nation
building, the Church has to
help men to truly realize the
ideals of our national anthem.
They must be helped to"lift


'ii








''ii


slit
'it


I


up" their eyes to the rising sun
of new opportunities, to take
up the challenges of
nationhood, to make sacrifices
for the progress of the nation.
More than anything else, the
Church needs to help our
people "to pledge to excel
through love and unity".
Rev. J. EMMETTE WEIR
October 7, 1973.


DR. PEPPER

SOFT DRINK

7 TINS 99

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72C


LIPTON'S TEA BAGS


NEW ZEALAND

LAMB LEGS


100's $1.42



LB. $1.35


NEW ZEALAND

LAMB SHOULDER CHOPS LB. 990

U.S.


PORK CHOP

ARMOUR STAR

TURKEYS


MILK MAID

CONDENSED MILK

SAWYER'S TOMATOES


No. 2


RIBENA FAMILY SIZE

SAWYER'S PIGEON PEAS

SUNSWEET PRUNE JUICE


MAXWELL HOUSE

INSTANT COFFEE


No. 2


LB. $1.45



LB. 69C


30C

46

$1.98

36f


40 OZ. $1.10


S1.32


CENTREVILLE FOOD MARKET
STORE HOURS
MONDAY THROUGH THURSDAY 8 a.m. 8:30 p.m.
FRIDAY & SATURDAY 8 a.m. 9 p.m.


SUNDAY


R.C. COLA


8a.m. 10a.m.


6 CANS FOR


BLUE CHEER IGiant Sizel $1.09

COLGATE TOOTH PASTE Super Size Tube $1.35


FLORIDA CITRUS PUNCH

CUCUMBERS

CABBAGE

BLANCO BLEACH


/2-GAL. $1.09

each 20C

lb. 25C

ors. 35C


-I U.S. CHOICE

SIRLOIN STEAK lb. $2.09

IMPERIAL CORNED BEEF 12-oz. (CAN


OPEN ALL DAY

FRIDAY OCTOBER


JIM DANDY GRITS

10-LB. PKG. S1.69

DANISH LEAN MEATY SPARE RIBS

lb.$1.09


... IT ALL ADDS UP


your reusable but unwanted

items of

clothing, tools,

appliances, clocks,

fans, etc... clear out

your closets, garage, storeroom ...

all can be of help

to someone else.

Donate them to



Saidilands i

Bazaar
ROSETTA STREET
TWO DOORS WEST OF


MONTROSE AVE


U.S. CHOICE

SIRLOIN TIP ROAST lb. $1.99

U.S. CHOICE

SHOULDER ROAST lb. $1.49


950


12.


SPECIALS GOOD FROM OCT. 10 13th


REG. 1 LB. TIN


I I II I' I I I -


- ~~~~-- ~-- ~


I


M- mw


I -


-- -----~-Y-- '-I---' ---I--Y~--- -1~'~-'--1-~1 I-'-YI"'I- ~'~i'"~'- -'~I -- -~--'--~~-~~~------ '------"' ~`- ---- ----~---- - --------


-~--i~ -1-


,^--
s---


A


. . .-. .... #,


Jt










Tuesday, October 9, 1973.


bhe t rrirtbun_ 11


Bernadette Thompson crowned Miss Discovery Day,


BERNADETTE Thompson was crowned Miss Discovery Day 1974 last night at Le Cabaret
Theatre on Paradise Island. She competed with thirteen other beauties for the title.


BEADS, BEADS
costume chosen by


Nothing but beads was the Indian
Karen Vedla Smith, 18, Miss Fashion Bou


First runner-up was Valaria
Carroll, Miss Pixie's; Second
runner-up was Althea Williams,
Miss Arnold Cargill Enterprises,
3rd runner-up Diane Maycock,
Miss Flamingo Airlines, and
4th runner-up Judith Bastian.
Miss San Salvador. Miss San
Salvador also walked away
with the Miss Amnity and the
Miss Popularity titles. Miss
Photogenic went to the
reigning Miss Queen's College,
Caroline Rolle.
The contest got underway
promptly at 9 p.m., when the
contestants displayed "original
costumes" of their own choice.
Quite imaginative were some of
the designs especially the
Queen Isabella of Ann Marie
Smith (Miss Nassau High
School) who wore an elegant
red and white satin costume.
Another attractive and
eye-catching outfit was
Carolyn Rolle's pirates
costume which was made of
black and yellow satin, with

utique.



.. I


Miss LI Toro, Adeline
Ferguson, wanted her man to
be "tall, dark, handsome,
wealthy and intelligent."
Miss Flamingo Airlines,
Diane Maycock, felt that the
numbers racket should be
legalized, as a large number of
Bahamians participated in the
game. She added that it could
represent a form of income for
government.
Miss Austin Knowles
Construction, Stephanie
Knowles, said that woman's
liberation is an ideal
opportunity for women to tell
men how they should behave.
iHer two-part answer brought
tremendous applause from the
audience as she told them that
women should not do away
with the bra, as it added to
their feminity.
A surprise beauty was Radio
Bahamas' Greg Lampkin who
performed in a brief skit as
Miss Missfit 1973, his/her
measurements were an


idealistic 31-31-3 1,
Pandora Gibson's portrayal
of her childhood on the
settlement of Hatchet Bay.
Ileuthera. also proved popular
ith lthe audience.
FIormer Discovery Day
Beauty queens Darnell
Chipman 1970. and Pamela
Isaacs 1971 were also present.
Last year's queen Glady 's
Johnson thanked the Discovery
Day Pageant Committee for
giving her a "truly great year."
The panel ot tmiiges included
Mrs. Kayla Alleyne, Mrs Agnes
Richardson. Mi. Wesley
Bastian Mrs. ;Gwen
Forbcs-Kelly Mr. \h i1 ,nii
Allen, Sister Madene Russell
and Mr. I dwin Woodruff.
Music was provided by the
Chris Iox Orchestra.
Patron of this year's ., iu i, i
is Dr. Doris Johnson, president
of the Discovery Day Festival.
The theme of this year's
festival is "Discovery of Our
Heritage."


beats out 13 other girls


%JOE i--

THE FINALISTS Bernadette Thompson, Miss Discovery Day 1974. with the four
runners-up in the Miss Discovery Day contest last night. From left to right they are:
Judith Bastian, fourth; Althea Williams, second; Bernadette Thompson, the winner;
Valaria Carroll, first runner-up; and Diane Maycock, th rd runner-up.


YE STE RL








TA.HEYER got the HEYER DUPLICATOR CQ.

off the ground, the same y'ar that the

WRIGHT BROS. also got off the ground.....


COSTUMED Ann Marie
Cyn-Dees in Elizabethan dress.





a0ti ve

FI p.
5.30 p.r


Specilising in
ihes & Island Seafood

Social Hour
n.- 7.00p.m. daily


Complimeota horss d'oeuv7S
with all popular drinks $1.00

Late Night Snacks until 4am

DANCING
Fabulous Paul Hanna
9.30 pm 2.30om
except Monday




WAN%4 BI


BI E Brl UMLA nr11 W AY ST, rtWE 7-74195
-E I


black leather hoots and pirate's
hat.
A new feature of the
contest, which turned out to
be one of the more exciting,
was the parade of beauties in
attractive yellow, black and
aquamarine capes. Designed by
Rachel's Boutique, the colours
represented the colours on our
national flag, and carried
emblems of the national bird
of the Bahamas, the
chicharnies of Andros, the
yellow elder the Bahamas'
national flower, sheep farming
in Long Island, and the fertile"
soil on Eleuthera.
The Flag Tableau assembled
the contestants also appeared
with umbrellas with the
colours of the flag. During this
period Bahainian recording
star, Priscilla Rollins sang her
award-winning Independence
Morning song. The girls,
surprised the audience when
they began to twirl their
umbrellas as Miss Rollins sang
the words "land of the rolling
sea.
each contestant was asked
a question by Master of
Ceremonies Carl Bethel, Radio
Bahamas Productio'n Manager.
III"


From one Bahamian


to another...here's


great news for you.


Now vou can afford a large homesite on Andros ......the Unspoiled Island....
where things are starting to happen.
This is your opportunity to become a part of the future of San Andros. In
the years ahead you'll be glad you did it TODAY.
IF YOU ACT NOW, the price of a choice 80 foot by 125 foot homesite is
only $2995. Only $35 down and easy-on-the-pocket payments of S35 per
month.


Let us tell you about this opportunity of
a lifetime.
CALL RIGHT NOW...2-4284
VISIT OUR OFFICE TODAY...
Bernard Sunley Arcade
9:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Monday through
Friday, 9:00 A.M. to 12 Noon on Saturday


San Andros (Bahamas) Limited


Participating Broker:
MeDEIGAN & ASSOCIATES INVESTMENTS
LTD.
P.O. Box N4503


KENYON McDEIGAN






7'


V-^ A 0
v. .'


'~II:i 2


!.. . . .



S. .. Under the leadership of ARTHUR J. HEYER,
son of the founder, the HEYER DUPLICATOR CO. has
prospered and sales are now at a record high. There are good reasons for this, of course. You see, Heyer makes
precision engineered stencil and spirit duplicators which are reliable, trouble-free and long lasting. That's why
wise office people buy a Heyer every time. Heyer machines are work-proved. Cost is modest.


-.-r N 1C


HEKTO-PRINTER


HEYER DUPLICATORS, ACCESSORIES AND SUPPLIES

AVAILABLE IN THE BAHAMAS EXCLUSIVELY AT


L II L..


OFFICE SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT


STREET EAST OF RAWSOI


N SQUARE P. BOX N-3737
FREE PARKING IN REAR OF STORE


U _


PHONE 2-2657, 2-4252, 2-4253 BAY S9
ORDER DEPT. (DIRECT LINE) 5-8959


I


I I


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_.JC I3 I-.-1 -







~ihi~~ribur ~ay, ctobr 9,1973


~N
4 43
/, -' j 4.. .
: ,- ... .


NOT DOG ROLLS
RK3/87
PURITY BAKERY
HAMBURGER ROLL

* :^J '^'S"^ ^ -


RICE
20 LB. BAGS
AVAILABLE


I SPECIALS FOR WEEK ENDING OCT. 10-11-13 & 15 FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE, OUR STORE HOURS ARE:
QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED MONDAY THROUGH THURSDAY 8:30 A.M. 7:00 P.M.
_, FRIDAY & SATURDAY 8:30 A.M. 9:00 P.M., SUNDAY 7:00 10:00 A.M.
pip-w--------------------------------- ---------------------------


U.S.CHOICE


PORIER HOUSE STEAK


U.S.CHOICE


SIRLOIN STEAK


U.S. CHOICE

CHUCK ROAST


LB.


U.S.CHOICE

SHOULDER ROASTLB.
GLADSTONE FARM
WHOLE FRYERS LB.
GLADSTONE FARM
CHICKEN BREAST LB.
GLADSTONE FARM
CHICKEN THIGHS LB.
NATIVE
PORK LB.


TULIP MINI

SPARE RIBS
U.S. CHOICE

PORK CHOPS


1.29

1.59


.85


1.19
1.19
1.19


LB .85

LB. 149


LB.


U.S. CHOICE
CHUCK STEAK
FRESH GROUND

HAMBURGER
HAMBURG
BOILED HAM I-B.


DAISY CHEESE
DEVON BACK
BACON
ECONOMY
BACON
OSCAR MAYER
BACON
OSCAR MAYER
WEINERS
ENGLISH PORK
CHIPOLATOLS
NATIVE CONCH


NATIVE SALT COD


GROER SECAL


8-OZ.


LB.


LB.2.


239


CAN COKE


12-OZ.


6/990


LB1.59

LB. 1.09


1.69
.99
1.49
1.09
1.99


ALL MEAT LB. 1.55
8-OZ. 3/ 99


PER PKG.


.99


VI


r HATUEY OR REGAL
OR CARLSBERG
MALT TONIC,
6PK.
L $1.19


AVAILABLE!!!


~mmmmmmmmmmmI


CRACKER JACKS


1 OZ.


BISCUITS LEMON PUFF, MILK CHOC.,
MALLOWS, CUSTARD, MARIE, SHORTCAKE


CARNATION
MILK

4/99


/


RAFT


MARCAL
JUMBO TOWELS


9/99 DIAMOND DELUXE
3/99 DELUXE PLATE


650


MARCAL ALL COLORS 200 CT.
FACIAL TISSUE 2/890
MARCAL
KINASSTD. COLORS


CUTRITE
WAX PAPER


75 FT.


3/87C


MACARONI DINNER 3/990


mmmmmmmmmMMes
NEW ZEALAND
BUTTER 2 LB.


EATWELL
TUNA


BORDENS
YOGURT


ANY FLAVOURS


LIBBY'S
FRUIT COCKTAILS
3AGGIES
SANDWICH BAGS


100 CT. 99


303 2/99


150 CT.


SMA
POWERED MILK 16-oz
BERMUDEZ
BISCUITS MIX OR MATCH


FRENCH MUSTARD
LIBBY'S
SLICED BEETS
FOX'S GLACIER MINTS


WISE
POTATO CHIP
OLIVAND OIL


9-OZ.


TWIN PACK
48-OZ.


.87


ORN ON CO


1.65
7/99
2/69


4 EARS


590


303 3/87
10-oz. .79


.79
1.99


E FREH AIReFOD


3/990
3/99S


RAINBOW FARM
EGGS


X-LRG.


89C


immmmmmmm ii


MINUTE MAID
ORANGE JUICE


f mmmm mm mmillmmi


3 LB. BAG
APPLES


BIRDSEYE
BROCOLLI SPEARS iooz.690


12-Z 89


FAS35iF3SSPRODUCE


990


NATIVE
CABBAGE


2/2-3 LB. AVG. EA.


590
HEAD


I uls


IN


7 OZ.


2/88


mII


ibh Tribunt


sday, October 9, 1973.


[ FROZEN FOOD BUYS 71


/"


* \


CREST


I












Tuesday,October 9, 1973.


Uaht Wrti Prn


Underwater Club promotes new




safety campaign govt. approved


THE BAHAMAS L \11h I6% \ TER CLUB has launched a Port Authority-approved water safety campaign high-lighted by the posting
of signs warning against motot-boating too near to shore, and by the distribution of leaflets spelling out Government safety
regulations.


Underwater Club president
John Hudson said the safetv
-programme is tile result of the
March 11 accident in which
British frade (omiissioner
John Burn i ai s sriuislv
injured while snoriklin- -lI
Brown's Point. lie ihis ee. n
unconscious eveir s. ec. I he
driver of 1he bo:i; crr
identified.
Mr. Burn and hiins -', -i
son Chl isitphe \'.ere
swimming in aboitl si of
water \ when thi otn'. saw
a red sipeC tdhoi v.i ni I l' ii
them.
The cliild \va.,- i s t
warn the hoidi 1, ul' it
continued on it o', -.. i i,.i i
over Mr ii.rn
suffered d i : .
shou ldei i
concussion . i;:tl
to the Prii. -
Hospital
Surgei v.a :
both MarIch i tini ;
On the ai c '. hP 'll hwf
of stall ,i ,..; ,
Mr. Burn wa.. ; ;. ,p
in the t K. n I ; \pri
1 3 H e rem w t;,'. n l i ", r '
and in s- i ., i ili.n in ,I
hospital ii H ,. i- i,,:. Kew'hi
I he wh phit- b;- hii
distributed tl i:l, ''ii
black and t. i :; ,
B ah a in i i t :1!:
Indep end t'. ,. '
boating t !' i!iing i
least 200 !. K .. ,.. :, I
point o h.i -
be liable i; p .--. 'in' ,i
to a fine (li up i.' 5 i :'
convicted.
SAI I i\' \ i li I
The leaIlets t,:irc hIt .-1,h
"Safety lnoti.e io ;,i
operators, V.w liteC -k r- n'-I --4 ;!
divers -


MOTO I OATr,
-\ ,,1 **o ,
\KWW g00 FEET



OF T ,4 p


-.t

1.


SAFETY SIGNS .... John Hudson, president of the Bahamas Underwater Club, posts
one of the club's safety signs at Brown's Boat Basin.


I'le first sentence reads:
"Violation of governmentt
regulationss relating to water
spnils ma. lead to a fine of up
iT 50(I() Ii, worse, it may lead
Ito onene's death of injury."
The leaflets go on to list the
i. oven tie nt r les.
-"BOit operators must drive
it ai sale speed and in a manner
w inli doe,, not endanger the
saei or property tf others.
SBoat operators nmay not
drive a boat or manipulate a
'vater sk!er in a wilful or
,ve kless lashion, or without
due care .and attention or at a
iOd r m a manner likely to
endaliger any person or
propelti .
'Baitos may notl he operated
hulim 200lL feet of the shore
line inless approaching a dock
u-. beach,
Pi-,nsi under age 16 imnay


Salem




refreshes




naturally!

Natural Menthol is why.
S,Soittm i(cws i l nturiral menthol,
not the artist lal kind. That's why
-,ialem rt'cn r tastes harsh or hot.


sa I


SExtra
- long


0"
oI? if oiO 'o*"a c


I


not operate boats except in
special circumstances.
"Boats over 15 feet in length
or with engines exceeding 10
h.p. must be registered with
the Port Authority.
"It is illegal to water ski in a
reckless manner or within 200
feet of the shoreline.
"Water skiers must wear a
flotation device.
"Any boat towing a water
skier must have a lookout (over
the age of 16) in addition to
the driver.
"Do not dive in harbours.
channels or shipping lanes
without adequate lookouts and


safety precautions.
"Use appropriate safety
devices.
"Fly the dive flag and use
safety floats; give other boat
users the chance to see you.
"Mechanical spearguns may
not be used to spear fish; only
Hawaiian slings and pole spears
are legal.
"Fish may not be speared
while using scuba tanks or
other underwater breathing
devices.
"Crawfish may not be
taken between April 1 and July
31."


Freeport YMCA plans


'swim-a-thon' to raise


$3,000 for swimming

SWIMMING in the Freeport YMCA's "swim-a-thon" at the 'Y'
pool October 18-20 are expected to cover a combined distance of
over 200 miles in their bid to raise $3,000 for new equipment for


the Y's community pool.
The swim-a-thon was not
designed only for fund-raising.
here are to be special features
intended to attract crowds of
spectators and sponsors.
There will be 12 youngsters
from the Eight Mile Rock
School who have only recently
learned to swim and who will
be attempting to swim the
greatest distances of their lives.
Also swimming will be a
group of young beginners, who
will be attempting two widths
of the pool sometimes with
the aid of floats at $20 a
width.
'There will be the water
ballet group, the Seasprays,
who will do their entire
distance by sculling
swimming on their backs with
their arms paddling always
underwater. A number of the
group are attempting 25
lengths by sculling, following
the lead of their instructor.

Health outlines n


Melanie Taylor.
Competitive swimmers, who
train hard every week, will
contribute by holding
competitive relay races. One
group is expected to cover no
less than 600 lengths, or about
54 miles.
According to a Y press
release, "If all the swimmers'
efforts are pooled, their total
swim would easily take them
to the U.S.A. and probably
half way back again."
Also swimming will be
members of the aquatics staff.
including the aquatics director,
the executive director and one
or two of the Y board
members.
To make certain as many
people know about the
swim-a-thon as possible, signs
and posters have been tacked
up all around Freeport
advertising the event.


ew phase


anti-inflation curbs for UK


LONDON (AP) Prime
Minister Edward Heath,
struggling to contain rampant
inflation in Britain, outlined
proposals today to broaden
and extend curbs on industrial
profits, and ease restrictions on
workers' pay raises.
The Conservative Prime
Minister presented his
proposals for Phase 3 of
anti-inflation curbs at a news
conference at Lancaster Htouse
near Buckingham Palace.
Heath emphasized that his
proposals were still being
negotiated with representatives
of industry and trade unions.
The curbs are to go into effect
at the start of November and
last until the autumn of 1974.


3


It was doubtful that the
proposals will satisfy either
union leaders or industry.
Best news for workers was
the easing of Phase 2 curbs on
pay raises of one pound
$2.40 a week, plus four per
cent on base pay for each
employee.
The proposed new limit is a
seven per cent increase on the
average salary in a firm or
group of firms. The total
increase would be then divided
up within the firm or group by
collective bargaining between
management and unions.
Union leaders have
demanded in recent talks with
Heath a return to free
collective bargaining with no


government-imposed ceiling on
pay raises.
The government increased
the number of firms obliged to
seek the approval of the
national price commission
before raising prices.




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ONLY 5?5
an ideal gift for Christmas



ON THE WATER RONT
1:. iBay St. at. William St.
TELEPHONE S-4641


OPEN EVERY SUNDAY from 2 5 9* *


[INK SMEARED


CLASSIFIED
I Y -


NOTI


II


C11811
NOTICE is hereby given that
GEORGE JOHNSON of
Robinson Road is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who know' any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 2nd day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.
C11810
NOTICE is hereby given that
JEFFREY HENDFIELD of
Eight Mile Rock, Grand
Bahama is applying to the
M i n sister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 2nd day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.
C11823
NOTICE is hereby given that
CHARLIE JOHN of Wulff
Road, Nassau Bahamas, P. 0
Box 5053 is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for naturalisation as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why naturalisation should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
2nd day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

Cl11813
NOTICE is hereby given that
RUFUS AUGUSTINE
HENFIELD of Eight Mile
Rock, Grand Bahama is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
2nd day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

C11844
NOTICE is hereby given that
MARTIN DIGBY RATCLIFFE
of Tower Heights, Eastern
Road is applying to Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for naturalisation
as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who
knows any reason why
naturalisation should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 2nd day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.

C11821
NOTICE is hereby given that
MICHAEL RICHARD BOYCE
of 456 Grenada Ave, Freeport,
Bahamas is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 2nd day of October
1973 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship P. O. Box N7147,
Nassau.

C11814
NOTICE is hereby given that
MILLER ALPHONSO of
Winsor Place, N. P., Bahamas is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for naturalisation
as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who
knows any reason why
naturalisation should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the


facts within twenty-eight days
from the 2nd day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box
N7147,Nassau.


C11815
NOTICE is hereby given that
ALBERT ALEXANDER
LATTICE of Owens Town,
North Andros, Bahamas is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
2nd day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
O. Box N7147, Nassau.


urn


C11816
NOTICE is hereby given that
JOSEPH LEONARD
HANDFIELD of Owen's
Town, Andros. Bahamas is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, fpr registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
2nd day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.
C11812
NOTICE is hereby given that
PRIHILLA JOHNSON of
Robinson Road is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 2nd day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau

C11808
NOTICE is hereby given that
OGELUS JOSEPH of Nassau
Village, N. P. is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why naturalisation should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
2nd day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

C11825
NOTICE is hereby qiven that
NICHOLAS CONSTANTINE
BINNIE of Hampstead. St.
Mary, Jamaica is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for naturalisation as a citizen
of The Bahamas and that any
person who knows any reason
why naturalisation should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts withir
twenty-eight days from the
2nd day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

C11994
NOTICE is hereby given that
CYRIL URIAL DELANCY
of Owen's Town, Andros,
Bahamas is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
9th day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau.

C11995
NOTICE is hereby given that
MARIE AURELIA PILE of
Ludlow Street, P. 0. Box
5512, Nassau, Bahamas is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for
naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why naturalisation should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
9th day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for



C11980
NOTICE is hereby given that
STANLEY RICHARD
JONES of Eight Mile Rock,
Grand Bahama is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts within


twenty-eight days from the
9th day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
P. O. Box N7147, Nassau.

C11983
NOTICE is hereby given that
OSWALD MORRIS MOORE
of Winsor Lane West, Nassau,
Bahamas is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
foi registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 9th day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.


NOTE


C 11.98.5
NOTICE is hereby given that
GROVENOR ACNEAL
WILLIAMS of Eight Mile
Rock, Grand Bahama is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 9th
day of October 1973 to The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.


C11986
NOTICE is hereby given that
HARRY CLIFFORD ROKER
of Eight Mile Rock, Grand
Bahama is applying to the
Minister, responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 9th day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.
C11973
NOTICE is hereby given that
NANCY ISADORA
HANDFIELD of Eight Mile
Rock, Grand Bahama is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 9th
day of October 1973 to The
M in ister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

C 11809
NOTICE is hereby given that
ROSYLN VIONEL of Eight
Mile Rock, Grand Bahama is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight from the 2nd day
of October 1973 to The
Min ister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

C11971
NOTICE is hereby given that
OKEL TRAMMEL WILLIAMS
of Eight Mile Rock, Grand
Bahama is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 9th day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.

Cl1984
NOTICE is hereby given that
JANE ELIZABETH BAIN of
Kemp Road, Nassau,
Commonwealth of Bahamas is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within-
twenty-eight days from the 9th
day of October 1973 to The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

C11988
NOTICE is hereby given that
HAMANIES McNEIL
ROBINSON of Eight Mile
Rock, Grand Bahama is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a -vritten and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days front the 9th
day of October 1973 to The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
O. Box N7147, Nassau.


C11987
NOTICE is hereby given that
WELLINGTON ROBINSON of
Eight Mile Rock, Grand
Bahama is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 9th day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.


SECT


MNOE


C 12003
NOTICE is hereby given that
ANSEL RHODES COLLINS of
Ridgeland Park, Nassau is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 9th
day of October 1973 to The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.


C 11828
NOTICE is hereby given that
CYRIL GEORGE BERNAnRD
of P. 0. Box F2666, Freeport,
Bahamas is applying to the
M in ister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 2nd day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality a d
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.
C11972
NOTICE is hereby given that
ANN MALVINA HIGGS of
Eight Mile Rock, Grand
Bahama is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
9th day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau.

C11979
NOTICE is hereby given that
SAMUEL EBERNEZER
RIGBY of Owen's Town,
Andros, Bahamas is applying
to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
9th day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau.

C11993
NOTICE is hereby given that
HORACUIS THEOC of 133
Scott Avenue, Freeport is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for
naturalisation as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why naturalisation should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
9th day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
P. O. Box N7147, Nassau.

C11978
NOTICE is hereby given that
JOHN JOLLY of Fight Mile
Rock, Grand Bahama is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
9th day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
P. O. Box N7147, Nassau.
C11992
NOTICE is hereby given that
MARK DAVIS FRANCOIS
of 155 Hawksbill, Freeport,
Grand Bahama is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for naturalisation as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why naturalisation should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
9th day of October 1973 to
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau.


C11981
NOTICE is hereby given that
ALPHEUS JAMES
JOHNSON of P. 0. Box 916,
Pinedale, Grand Bahama is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
9th day of October 1973 tc
The Minister responsible foi
Nationality and Citizenship
P. 0. Box N7147. Nassau.


60I


I ,- I I .&.- I a


-r-


. .












01hp rthrbunt


TuesdayOctober 9. 1973.


CLASSIFIED


SECTION


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS-FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV. TELEPHONE 21986 EXT. 5


NOTICE is hereby given that
R E MELLE WILSON
I1ALCOLM of Pink Sands,
Harbour Island is applying to
the Minister responsible for
atonalityy and Citizenship,
oi niaturalisation as a citizen
.f The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
..hy naturalisation should not
h- granted should send a
vritten and signed statement
I, the facts within
verity-eight days from the
'h day of October 1973 to
h i Minister -esponsible for
it .nd Citizenship,
S N7147, Nassau.

S19 l 7
iNOTICE is hereby given that
-,WB-LLA MISSICK of
j unt Mile Rock, Grand
S ja- n is applying to the
'. responsible for
-a.-. ality and Citizenship,
:i station as a citizen of
Bahamas, and that any
S r who knows any reason
., registration should not
granted should send a
'-,ten and signed statement
S 1' t he facts within
S.entv-eight days from the
'9th Iay, of October 1973 to
ine Minister responsible for
t;ia lity, an d Citizenship,
i' 0 Rox N7147 Nassau.

4l: 1 ,1
i'f is herehy given that
J.,Vi S ALLEN MALCOLM
Ptn- oSands, Hatboh r Island
1 yi ;lyinq to the V sister
ible foi Nationality
S Ctlienship, for
j '.' I'alisjtion as a citizen of
i te a;iiihamas, and that any
a "*".j who knoos any reason
S rturisation should not
y!a* inted should send a
S.tten and signed statement
f he facts within
S' ,''. 'ilht idavs frorn the
S. j of October 1973 to
S r i ster responsiblee for
S.:'tionalit' and Citizenship,
7x 7147, Nassau.

S. hereby given that
S :. AS I.IVINGSTON
S NNF of Port-de-Paix,
i"' applying to the
.te responsible for
niatior ality arid Citizenship,
naturalsation as a citizen
I i he Bahamias, and that any
pe soic who knows any reason
why naturalisation should not
be granted should send a
aintten andl signed statement
tr the facts within
t.'enty eight days from the
9thn day ao October 1973 to
The Minister responsible foi
Nationality and Citizenship,
F' i B,'. N7147, Nassau.

( 11990
NOTICE is hereby given that
RIl HARD LAWRENCE
''AL COLM of Pink Sands,
Haibouur Island is applying to
the minister r responsible for
Mahronality and Citizenship,
'.)r naturalization as a citizen
Jf The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
ah'y ttatucalisation should not
he granted should send a
si itten and signed statement
o'f the facts within
twenty -eight days from the
9th day of October 1973 toc
The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship.
P O. Box N7147, Nassau
C11827
NOTICE is hereby given that
CH'ARLES CORNELIUS
RiGBY of Podoleo Street, N.P.
is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
C tizenship, for registration as
a ct zen of The Bahamas, and
thIat any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 9th
day of October 1973 to The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P
O Box N7147. Nassau.

C12001
NOTICE is hereby given that
JOHN PETERSON ARTHUR
.) Windsor Lane West,
Nassau, Baharnas is applying
t; the Minister responsible
''ot Nationality and
Citizenship, for naturalisation
as a citizen of The Bahamas,
andl that any person who
inows any reason why


naturalisation should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight
'lays from the 9th day of
October 1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P. 0. Box
N7147, Nassau.

C11938
THIS is to inform the public
that the land at Blanket Sound
and Stafford Creek, Andros is
owned by Melbourne Brown
and cannot be sold without my
consent.

Signed:
MELBOURNE BROWN

FOR RENT
C 11868
BEAUTIFUL two bedroom
apartment in Shirlea, partly
furnished $250 a month
including water. Call 36896
Carl Lowe. Monday-Friday, 9
a.m. 5 p.m.


REAL ESTATE


FOR SALE OR RENT)

C 11965
FOUR BEDROOM furnished
Executive home on Eastern
waterfront with swimming
pool. For sale or rent.
CALL BERT L. ROBERTS,
LTD. For appointment to view
2-3177 or 2-3178.


FOR RENT
C11761
BAY STREET Store for rent as
of October 15th. For
information call 2-3170.

C11776
2 BEDROOM APARTMENT.
treville. elo[ honrt i -c .
5-8679.

C11930
FURNISHED 2 bedroom, one
bath apartment near
waterfront with telephone.
$195.00. Phone 5-8512.

C11772
ONE EXTRA LARGE two
bedrooms two bath,
apartment. With large living
and dining all basically
furnished Victoria Court
APARTMENTS on Elizabeth
Avenue between Shirley and
Bay Street. Facilities, phone,
laundry, parking, T. V.
a4ten. a, ai aiijniitioned. Phone
54631 between 8 a.m. and 5
p "'.

C 11949
1 3 bedroom 2 bath
fu r n s hed house ,
ai reconditioned, carpeted,
walled in, front lawn, fruit
trees $3 75 per month.
Also 1 bedroom furnished
apartment, airconditioned, and
carpeted $175 per month.
Both on hilltop Montrose
Avenue. Telephone 3-2109.

L11944
UNFURNISHED 2 bedroom
apartments, good location off
Mackey Street. Telephone
5-1758.

C11964
OFFICE SPACE ROBERTS
BUILDING
Corner of East & Bay Streets,
Airconditioning included,
120 sq. ft $ 90.00 per mo.
271 sq. ft. 135.00 per mo.
360 sq. ft 180.00 per mo.
975 sq. ft. 400.00 per mo.
OFFICE AND STORE SPACE
Out Island Traders Shopping
Centre from as little as
$208.00 per mo. Large and
small areas available both on
the ground and first floors. If
you are starting a new business
we will give a month's free
rent.
APARTMENT -- Oakes Field
One bedroom unfurnished -
$140.00 per month.
APARTMENTS Out East
1 & 2 bedrooms, fully
furnished and partially
furnished, air-conditioning,
swimming pool from as little as
$200.00 per month.
EFFICIENCY APARTMENT
Within walking distance to
Town. Air-conditioned & fully
furnished. $150.00 per mo.
TWO BEDROOM
APARTMENT Within
walking distance to Town.
Air-conditioned & fully
furnished. $250.00.

BERT L. ROBERTS, LTD.
2-3177/2-3178


FOR RENT


C 11763
COTTAGES and apai tine,
daily, weekly 'or monthly
airconditioned(, fully id nis!oth i,
maid serivce available. I lovely
gardens and swirnmin I pool.i
Telept-one 31291, 31093.


C 11739
FOR SALE BY OWNER
4 bedroom 2 bath house
completely walled in and
landscaped. 2 bedrooms
airconditioned. In beautiful
condition. Located in exclusive
"Shirley Park Avenue". Close
to town and all shopping.
Telephone 2-1722 delay )
3-4953 (night).

C11916
GREAT HARBOUR CAY
BERRY ISLANDS
12,000 square feet private
building plot near 15th green
and beach. Valued at $12,300
Must sell. Leaving Bahamas
Telephone 77901 evenings
McKenzie, Box N1109.

I7 / /1
FOR SALE
2, 3 and 4 bedroom houses in
t he following prestigious
areas:
Westward Villas -Skyline
Heights
Highland Park The Grove
Gleninston Gardens Sea
Breeze
Imperial Park -. f Johnsor
Terrace
Nassau East- Winton
Eastern Road Camperdown
Blair Estates Golde'i Gates
Estates
HIGHBURY PARK as well
as where ever you want it.
IN ADDITION
COMMERCIAL AND
RESIDENTIAL lots or icerage
in New Providence and F,'am ilny
Islands.
Hotel sites and more. If it real
estate we have it.
CONTACT
DAVSEON'S REAL ESTATE.
AGENCY
Corner Bay & East Streets
Phone 21178 or 55408
P 0. Box N4648
Nassau, Bahamas
or cable
'DAVCO"


be arranged for you.
you to inspect o rii
Gibbs Cur nter
SLrperAash 0111
salesman 'WOODY'
happy to see yOu


We invite
'st( k onr
opposite
ft ienkily
will be


I 1 969 CHEVY
MALIBU2-Dooi Spoi t. Don't
miss This Bargamil cash
$ 1 675 00, Down -pamtint
$500 00
2. 1972 CHEVY VEGA 2 Door
Sports, Auto Trarnsmistsion,r
Ai r-cdonditioned 'sh
$3,250.00, Down p,rli ,'-;t
$800.00
3. 1970 VAUXHALL VIVA
Automatic, First Class 3Barqain
cash $1 ,? ) 0(0 ),
Down-payrent $400.0{0
4. 1970 WOLSELEY 16 to0.
Au t omni a t i c G o o d
Transportation. Cash Buy
$550.00.
5. 1970 FORD MAVERICK
Automatic Just look at this o
a Buy Cash $1,95U.00, down
payment $ 500.00
6. 1972 DODGE AVENGER
Automatic, Red with Black
Trim cash $2,450.00,
Down-payment $700.00
7. 1971 TOYOTA COROLLA
Automatic, Red/Black trim
cash $ 1 4 5 0 0 ,
Down-payment $500.00
8. 1970 FORD PINTO Stick
Shift, Value for Money at
cash $ 1 8 7 5 00,
Down-payment $600.00
9. 1970 OLDS CUTLASS
Air-Conditioned, White/Blue
Trim Real Sportmanr',
Dream cash $3,975.00,
Down-payment $1,000.00
10. 1970 M.G. MIDGET Fast
& Ni`py little English Stick
Shift Sports Car Just had new
Paint Job required Will Sell as
is cash $750.00.
11. 1970 FORD MUSTANG
Sharp Motor cash 2,950.00,
Down-payment $750.00
12. 1968 CHEVY CAPRICE
Blue with ue with Blue Trim, We will
take the first cash $850.00
13. 1966 RAMBLER
AMBASSADOR / Good Wheels
at cash $400.00
14. 1969 FORD FAIRLANE
Not Running But Look At The
Price- cash $225.00
1 5. 1968 RAMBLE R
JAVELIN Running, No Point
in Description at cash
$275.00
16. 1970 FORD TORINO A
Real Fire Cracker We won't
Have this one for sale too Long
/ New Paint Job A Real
Beauty cash $3,975.00,
Down-payment $1,000.00
17. 1971 DODGE AVENGER
Automatic, Bargain Buy cash
$1,775.00, Down-payment
$500.00
18. 1971 TOYOTA CORONA
Automatic cash $2,175.00,
Down-payment $600.00
19. 1969 MORRIS 1100
Automatic, Nice cheap Family
Car cash $1,475.00,
Down-payment $4LO.000
20 1971 CHEVY MALIBU
Automatic. Green/White Trim
cash $3,750.00,
Down-payment $900.00
21. 1970 FORD CAPRI
Automatic, Compare this
Value cash $1,400,00 ,
Down-payment $500.00
22. 1970 HILLMAN HUNTER
Automatic. This Got to be a
Good Buy at cash
$1,25000. Down payment
$500 00


For the discerning motorist
who likes to own and drive a
high class machine. We have for
sale a.....
1973 FORD THUNDERBIRD
finished in a deep maroon
laquer by Ford, with white
cushioned vinyl roof, and
white leather tux upholstery
completely and absolutely
powered with press button
sliding sunshine roof Both
bucket seats power operated
AM FM and any other channel
you might desire, Effortless to
drive........and effortless to buy,
the price an effortless
$8,500.00


r ASSM


BUSINESS 6 PROFESSIONAL





a .Save Time


SHOP ^^& ^


BY

PHONE

IT list In bish Dirctirf

1 Line Pi Moth 'I"


Cdl 2190 EXI. 5

2 LI[ PPrNith 'H"


PUBLIC AUCTION
C1189i
Bellgrave Auctionee s will sell
at Public Auction, 10:30 a..11.
Wednesday, October 10th,
1973, at L-overntimnt Nui sery,
Iassau Street, r,''i stio v of
\\ orks Obsolrto stork.
Including:
Ligihteninq Rods
Flintkote
Paint (assorted ena'iiel)
Sealer
Tubes & 1 yTes (assoi teId)
V. itnd'ill Towei s
Syphon P'umps
Pipe & fittings
I' t r i r^ , o'er if 5 t, }
ilnumerous to list
All sales -ash.

CARS FOR SALE

C 11967

NEW PROVIDENCE
LEASING LIMITED are
offering for sale "ANOTHER"
list of their used at bargains.
Low down parents and
immediate irsulairoi (i over c.an


CARS FOR SALE

( 11839J
GTO PONTIAC 1971
loaded power everything
,teie a 'tape perfect condition
cash offers invited. Call
.1667 8 days 31639 evenings.
11 /5
lI/1] VOLKSWAGEN fast
lb.i k. automatic shift. Phone
4 i1'u 58803. $2,000
(ON( ).
C 1948
ISLANDD MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD.
P.O. Box N-640
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
USED CARS
1967 CHRYSLER
.1 !)! Af ilo -. 'Nhite $1000
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
')1hi Std Gree't $995

1968 JAVELIN
$995
1967 TRIUMPH HERALD
WT i*.- $775,
1971 FORD CAPRI
/A t. .i. $1695
1970 VICTOR S/WAGON
Std r edl $900

1968 PLYMOUTH
Satellite
Siitl ite $1300
1969 PONTIAC GTO
A C VinvI Rod $2600
1968 BUICK ELECTRA
While $1595
1970 ACADIAN
4 hri Aut) Radio $1600
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA S/W
GCirii $1595
1971 FORD PINTO
lrnwnt Vinyl Auto. $1995

1970 PONTIAC
LAURENTIAN
A ( Hilui $1950
1967 COUGAR
S1'd Green $900
1969 FORD FALCON
2 )r Auto. $1300
Trade-ins Welcomed.
Located Oakes Field
Opposite the Ice House
Telephone 34636 -7 -8

ART SUPPLIES

( 117/0
COJMPL TF range of artists'
supplies. Oils, acrylics. canvas,
easels, etc. Bahamian Paint
Supply Ltd., Bay Street. Phone
2-238, 2- 2898.


LOST
( 1191 1
LOST iii the vicinity of Island
T V. Service, Dowdeswell
Street one black brief case
c-ntaining papers valuable only
toI owier. Reward offered.
Phoie ?2618


[ PETS FOR SALE 1


L, 11974
CROSSBREED PUPPIES
Mother Shepherd Father
Doberman. Phone 42193
after 5 p.m.


FOR SALE

ACT II RESALE SHOP
C11955
BRAND NEWNEARLY NEW
EXQUISITE Gowns, cocktail,
street dresses pants suits
jewelry
DEALERS WELCOME
1352 Washington Avenue,
Miami Beach Phone 534-0001


PETS

C11998
FR EE PEDIGREE
POTCAKE PUPPIES. Really
beautiful. Must go to animal
lovers. Phone daytime 5-3811
and night time 3-1471.


MARINE SUPPLIES
C11762
PACEMAKER 44 ft.
Luxurious Cruising Yacht.
Phone 3-2371.

C11953
50' MATTHEWS, beautiful live
aboard, lavishly furnished.
Complete with beautiful
stereo. Phone 23911. See at
Nassau Yacht Haven.
;11894
1969 31ft. CHRIS CRAFT
Commander. Sleeps six, private
shower, two 230 h.p. engines
with less than 200 hours,
kitchenette, good condition.
Call 24267, 54011.

HELP WANTED

C11931
WANTED MECHANIC AND
Body man. Call Gibson 2-8896.

C11910
FEMALE to act as
Representative for Tour
Groups. Must have three
G.C.E., transportation and be
prepared to work odd hours.
Phone 2-2606 for
appointment.

C11970
One Tailor with 3 years
experience with design and
dressmaking. Call 36133 ask
for Sylvia Sands.

C11968
REINFORCING STEEL
DETAILER, Part-time,
experience with two-way flat
slabs, familiar with ACI 1971
Code, after 5:30, 77206.


C 11924
BECOME A CHARTERED
ACCOUNTANT
International firm of Chartered
Accountants can offer
interesting career opportunities
for University Graduates.
School leaves or persons with
some commercial experience
who have passes in G.C.E. "0"
level in five subjects including
Mathematics and English
language will also be
considered. Please write for
interview, giving full personal
details to the Staff Partner,
Peat, Marwick, Mitchell & Co.,
P. O. Box N123, Nassau.


GRAND BAHAMA


CLASSIFIED

II FIEErIT .TEL 352661-


"Put your money where your mouth is."


We make things happen.
The Tribune opens doors ro
homes, apartments, hotels,
stores and offices by providing
latest up-to-the-minute news
both local & foreign...


real estate P. rental offerings...
job opportunities.....

As a result, The Tribune now
reaches 33 1/3% more readers
than any cther daily distributed
in the Bahamas. That's a lot of
doors. And they're opening
more every day.


door opener



bargains for sale or wanted..
l heg public notices...


_~~ __ _ __-_--c- ,- -~__ __ __


I


isort n uuilllln


i


I LL' H Ir Itu I
C6334
Job Title BURNERMEN (2)
Minimum Education Good
basic education. Experience in
fuel burning process in rotary
Kilns and production of
Clinker. Cement plant rotary
Kiln burnerman.
Minimum Experience 3-5
years.
Duties/Responsibilities -
Operate Kilns to produce
clinker by a continuous process
of burning.
Interested applicant contact
Personnel Department,
Bahamas Cement Company, P.
0. Box F100, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.

C11752
REQUIRED qualified Pastry
Cooks for Cruise Liners.
Caribbean ships Chandlers,
1177 South America Way,
Dodge Island, Miami, Florida,
33132 U.S. A.


TRADE SERVICES

C11769

Pinader' s Customs

Brokerage Ltd.
Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU. BAHAMAS
P. 0. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-3796
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434.

C11715
T. V. ANTENNAS
Boosters for homes;
apartments and hotels.
Sales and services
Call 5-940,o
WORLD OF MUSiC,
Mackey Street
next to Frank's "lace.

C11892
RUBBER STAMPS. Made to
order Rubber Stamps, while
you wait. Wong's Rubber
Stamps Co. Phone 34871 P.
0. Box 5206.

Cl1151
SEWING MACHINE
REPAIRS AND PARTS
ISLAND FURNITURE
Corner Christie &
Dowdeswell Street
Phone 21197,
P. 0. Box 4818, Nassau

C11832
FOR ALL Your Gardening
Needs, Trimming, Hedging,
Pruning, Beach Cleaning, For
Prompt, Reasonable and
efficient Service Call 5-7810.

C11976
BAHAMAS ANTENNA
SYSTEMS
SOLVING POOR RECEPTION
Same day service for moving
antennas or new installations.
Call Douglas Lowe 23371
51772.


C6275
When visiting FREEPORT stay
at the:
EL CONQUISTADOR HOTEL
spacious rooms, fully
air-conditioned, from $10 to
$14 per day. For reservations
call 352-8180.


HELP WANTED

C6334
Job Title BURNERMEN (2)
Minimum Education Good
basic education. Experience in
fuel burning process in rotary
Kilns and production of
Clinker. Cement plant rotary
Kiln burnerman.
Minimum Experience 3-5
years.
Duties/Responsibilities
Operate Kilns to produce
clinker by a continuous process
of burning.
Interested applicant contact
Personnel Department,
Bahamas Cement Company, P.
0. Box F100, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.

C6328
YOUNG MAN OR WOMAN
for Assistant Shop Manager.
Must have minimum of five
years' experience with precious
gems and Asian goods, three of
which must have been in
supervisory capacity. Other
requirements: ability to
educate trainees; know
inventory control; display
techniques; balancing of cash
credit card procedures. Must
have excellent appearance,
legible handwriting, good
spelling and linguistic ability,
accuracy with figures. Must be
willing to work hard, including
warehouse time. Business and
personal references covering
last five years required. Written
resume only to Calcutta
Limited, Box F-847, Freeport,
Grand Bahama.


HELP WANTED
C6319
EXPERIENCED AUTOMATIC
Transmission and Tune-up
SPECIALIST required.
Minimum five years
experience for General Motors
dealer. Must have experience in
all makes of automatic
transmissions with complete
engine diagnosis and
conversant with engine scope
analyser. Apply General
Manager, Five Wheels of Grand
Bahama Ltd. Phone 352-7001

C6329
TWO (2) Field Engineers (Job
site Freeport) required as soon
as possible 4 years college
education minimum five (5)
years experience in Industrial
Power and process piping.
Ability to design and layout
piping systems and sub
assemblies. Ability to develop
and co-ordinate project
schedules. Estimate costs of
furnishing and installing piping
systems. Note: One (1) of the
above individuals must also
have experience with
accounting principles, payroll,
billing and insurancee
procedures.
BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT
COMPANY
ireeport, 373-1735 Rick Penn

C6331
EGG PRODUCTION
MANAGER, with a degree in
Poultry Science. Minimum of
five years experience. Apply
Bahamas Poultry Co. Ltd. P. O.
Box F-137, Freeport.
352-7897.



READ
THE TRIBUNE

NASSA U AND BAIHAMA
ISLANDS LEADLVNG
NEWSPAPER


FLOOR MAINTENANCE BOK STORE
IKhi (Ileaning & Installation Hie Christian Book Shop 5-8744
SI i h 't[ r -t 5 57('42 1 1
L LlG'1IS BROKERS 'EN S C THI
'.1irtii 2 2-317.3 Ilh' Wardrobe Mlackey St. 5-5599

DLPIT. STORES TRAVEL
I'i' -,'s I, loI. Strce 2-.173 Playtours 2-2931/7
.'l,,li i'' p. Stlrc 2 3156 R. II. Curry'& ('o. Ltd. 2-8681/7
R \I)1() & I.. SALES MUSIC
( ,rtr sn Records 24711 C ody's Records 2-8500

OPTICIANS HEALTH FOODS
lu al (S,' I (d 2-3910/1 Nassau lDrug Store 3-4871
SPORT SHOP CAMERAS
i .I1ii.'ii Sp ,r( I .idl 2 I 8H2( Jihln Hull 2-4252/3
SHOE STlORE DRY GOODS
hi in K uti lKidili 2-42t4 Clo. iaris Kute Kiddy 2-4264

CARPETS LAUNDRY DRY CLEANING
I 's t arpct' Craft 3-1993 New\. rentaltl Laundry 2-4406

WREL(KER SERVICE DRAPERIES
,soii I .11 \ rcl.ker Servic 2-8896 Le' e's Carpet C'raft 3-1993
mmmm----- -m -m -mm mekr -
FOR THE ACTION YOU WANT


msi mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
Shop Nassau Merchants

For Business And Services


> SuV Il[ SAlv[ lMN[t <
UMM ILIIII M L IIIE I


I


I


I


I


---- -~


Tuesday,October 9, 1973.


immj


Brother Jumper


"*^ p
,,

, ;IWhi"0u












Tuesday, October 9, 1973.


Wht ~rihuut


'I suppose the boss asked you not to tell whether or not
he gave you a raise. How much was it?"


"NOW // /' WHEN I AIM IT INTO
MR. WILSON'S BEDROOM....


OFFICE HOURS


IZ


REX MORGAN, M.D.


By DAL CURTIS1


CARROLL RIGHTER'S


from the Carroll Righter Institute
GENERAL TENDENCIES: An excellent day
and evening to get all your constructive and
cultural activities in good shape, so add color to your
surroundings. Reduce loftiest desires to a workable formula
for success. Evening favors social matters, popularity and
general prosperity, so get busy and do the things that bring
you peace, happiness.
ARIES (Mar 21 to Apr. 19) Get into confidential
activities that put your life on a more solid basis, then join
with mate at recreations. Clear deck for bigger future
interests
TAURUS (Apr 20 to May 20) Get important work out of
the way, then be with good friends and have fun. Plan new
future social activities which can help business. Dress well.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Handle civic duties cleverly,
wisely, and gain the support of higher-ups Pay bills and
improve credit rating Avoid one who is jealous of you.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Get into new
interests that will make you happy, industrious and
successful. Show you can hold your own under pressure.
Follow intuitions which are accurate today
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Listening to your intuition can
be most helpful now, even in keeping you out of danger.
Evening is happy with mate Check on all your facts. Avoid
crowds.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Find out what is expected
of you by associates, then come out with your own ideas
and reach fine understanding. Smile more for better results.
Grow.
LIBRA (Sept 23 to Oct 22) Ideal day to get your home
or place of business beautified. Plan your wardrobe. Make
sure it is clean and well pressed.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) You can be happy at your
work and recreational activities. Show more affection and
make mate feel more at ease and happier, with better
understanding
SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 to Dec. 21) Give attention to
home conditions and handle family affairs with real wisdom.
Some new interest needs to have bugs taken out of it Be on
time.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) Use a gentle approach
communicating with others today for right results. Reading
is helpful. Become a more knowledgeable person. Have fun
tonight
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Get into all the facts
and figures of some financial plan to avoid mistakes. Be
practical, not just a visionary. Avoid one who makes you
nervous
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Concentrate on gaining your
finest aims and put wheels in motion especially in p.m
Reach a better understanding with mate Avoid unfriendly
person.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY, .. he or she will be
one of those youngsters who has to understand early the
value of religion and the importance of ethics, otherwise the
success possible in this chart will be greatly lessened. Your
child will have fine intuitive faculties and can use them to
help kin as well as for personal success The fields of
psychology would be excellent here, as well as the ministry,
some government connection.


fHE Make %tou tery C'RO.S-word. The one with ito 11 mlillher
and except for the first in each section. no order to the cities,
One hint by compiler TIM M.cKAY : You can easily place thip
slh-letter words. s-oliutson on Monday.


our rat race works on the same principle
as your treadmill."


CROSSWORD i ALTABE

PUZZLE VASSALu iciT
ALP RIB TOTE
ACROSS 3! AAALOOF ULA
SPlet ia SERENE 6 ASSY


Inlet
fashion
Naho'or
Doily
Behold
Occasion
Likeness
Undertook
Cut of meat
Size of type
Thoroughfare
Clay pigeon


PAS 6 A UT
NEA TOR ELIN
C NCH RIFLED
WARE ENA EL
LE EROSE


SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE
DOWN 5. Gemstone
1 Stunt 6. Clique
2. Spoil 7. Locale
3 Chattered 8. Domineers
4 Italian town 9. Shoshonean
l |- 1 | 10. Carson
11. Frost
17. American
Indians
19. Thailand
20 Besides
22. Signified
24 Condiment
2 2112S 26 25. Solo
- 26. Insect
s29 Single-handed
33 35 Suppress in
pronouncing
37 39. Flirt
41. Masculine
42 Sigmold
43. Corpulent
S' 44. Former
President
45. However
S 47 Ike's
battleground
,otures 10 ll 48. Ottoman title


(Ines A're..s
'inee inure (anlla.) (t)
lied In tIhe garden (4-:)
SMine. (3) 'lsertalit.
Raw nietal. (t3i
I'liaeed in. (4)
Callise of hlrnll. (4)

Chess
By LEONARD BARDEN


I -~' t
:~ Liit
-s~ -

5.'

I


(9783)
"I leapt wit delight" rot
post expert C. W. Wa-burtc
(Black, to move) about this posi-
tion where le made the obvious
queen check 1 ... Q-Kt3 ch and
his opponent replied 2 K-R2.
Wh did Black do an imitation
of Nureyev when he received 2
K- R2 the postman, and is
tihe a convincing win after 2
K--RI?
Pear times: 10 seconds, grand-
master; 30 seconds, chess master;
I minute, chess expert; 3 minutes
county player; 6 mniinutes, club
stasdmd; 12 minutes, average;
25 minutes, novice.
After I . Q-Kt 3 ch: 2
K-R2, Black announced mate
in three by 2 . Q-Kt8 ch: 3
RxQ, P-BR (Kt) double check
3 K-RI. R-R7 mate.
2 K-RI is no better because
of 2 . Q-Kt6 with the
unanswerable threat of 3 . .
Q X RP mate.


Rupert on Chariot Island-14


Rupert has met sea-serpents before and
knows they are harmless, but when he looks
up at the towering creature with Simon
dangling from its mouth, the little bear's legs
begin to quake Don't take my friend
away," he begs. Please leave him here with
me The sea-serpent cannot open its mouth


to speak while holding Simon, but it smiles
kindly at Rupert as it swings round, its body
swishing up and down through the water.
" Don't go I Don't go I" pleads Rupert, but
already Simon is being swiftly carried away
from the shore.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


Posed. (3)
Part of a fish. (3)
Domesticate. (4)
Inquallfied. (9)
shower. (4)
Mlt hod. (6)
Cliues Down
ilriver%., tron and so on, (4. 5)
Wate. (3)
Creatlons (anat.). (9)
Small niurerv rhyme lady. ti6)
Termnlin. (4) Before (3I
C('iio e into tlis cotuntrvy (E9)
C ito llevioitns
of live b l |Vh
fish. ( A9) A II
H ea d ri ear.
(3)
Free from
d e d e- T llll
Stions. l(3)
Easv to wsee. A P J
Mliddav. (4) L O '
0) )





E V I' words of
E V f 4rifr teler.-
Sor more can
I I fromt tile
I" I Itelrere ? ilt
11 1a i ai ii gi
tI A J lord, eacht
SIA Y letter tnl
Slide uIIell onHe
) onlyv. Each
asord must (titain the large
letter, anild there must he at
least onell eight-letter iord In iht
list. No pllurals lio foreign ai si '
no proper iltames. TOIDAI"
TARGET 31 words. good ; 38
words. very good; 46 worlds.
excellent. Solution onil .olod.
YESTERDAY'S SOl.l TIO.N :
Itleef beer beet itefore bere
bereft beret bootee bore felor
fore forte free FREEBOOT fret
oboe orfe reef reloot relt robe
rote tore tree.


Bridge
By VICTOR MOLLO
The doyen of Britain's team,
now playing in the Europea.n
COhampioiship m Ostend, is
Claude Rodrigue. StiU in his
early 40s, Rodrigue played In
his first inteMation&a im 1956.
'Claude was sitting South on
the hand below, which came up
1m a recent rubber at the
Eccentric Club.
North
A 4J
A K J
4 A K J 10 6
West East
*J 10 9 8 6 2 Q 7
S9 5 4 76
Q8 0 10 9 64
7 3 Q98 42
South
SK53
Q 10 8 3 2

CONTRACT 7 (: LEAD 4 J.
There are 12 top tricks.
including a spade ruff in
dummy, and declarer looks to
the clubs for the 13th.
Ftrst, Rodrigue tested trumps.
When both opponents followed,
he laid down the A and ruffed
a club. After two rounds of
spades and a spade ruff, he
ruffed a club high and drew the
outstanding trump.
Dummy's last four cards were
0 K 2 end. K J, while declare
retained the 0 A J 7 5. Crossing
to the 0 K Rodrigue cashed
the 4K and led the 0 2 East
oUowing with the 04. dlaude
pr mptly went up withe 0 A
and dropped West's 0 Q.
Why didn't he finesse ? That
a4peae to be the correct play,
aa drpig e OQwas
a certatoy. ast's at card was
known to be the 4Q. so he
Wouldn't have the 0 Q.


I\ E HEARD HE'S A -
VERY GOOD PLAYER
EAH--HE?
REALLY'
BLASTS EM


J Comic age


"You'll notice


6 Gdzelle houndt
I? Billiard shot
13 Amorous
14 Protfes, ioi
15 Cylindfrical
16 Recap
18 Poster
19 Posed
21. Branch
23. Male party
27 Unfavorable
28. Place
30. Coffee make


JUDGE PARKER By PAUL NICHOLS

wELL, LETS SEE 0O YOU 'EAN TO LETS JUST SAY' YOU GENTLEMEN iT'S ALWAYS BEEN
ABOUT HOW LONG A GAVE \E ELL ME vOU BLEW I MAPE SO6ME ARE EITHER M(Y PHILOSOPHY THAT
TIME DID IT TAKE THE MONEY $75000 N TWO BAP BUSINESS COMING TO THE NEXT MEAL MIGHT
YOU TO SPEND THE EXACTLY T\\0 'MONTHS ? HOW DID INVESTMENTS'/i DINNER NOW BE MY LAST, MISS
$75,000 THAT POOLE MONTHS AGO' YOU MANAGE THAT OR FORGET SPENCER' I[ PON T
GAVE YOU, SLADE ITA'A rK? 'NA ABOu't 5As0

APARTMENT 3-GBUT I REA K t











APARTMENT 3-G By Alex Kotxky


fhr e rtibmw


I












Tuesday, October 9, 1973.


01hr iribut


METS L[AD PLAYOFF Sti i BAHAMAS I


New York Mets whack Cincinnati Reds TEAM LOSE


9-2 in brawl-filled


, chaotic game


\ \\' 'lFk i t l iI (1 Si lt ;,:ashetd i.' t o' i1 u,, s and the New York Mets whacked
, ill t d i . i : .i f baseball's 1973 National League

: . ; something that has
, \Tver ht.itppened in either
Sr l.iloty I r World Series history.
But the Mets pleas finally
Sam ed the crowd, and pflavy

1. I cti e \ c i t e m e n t
Sie . I orshadoxved a lust\ Met
lackk speirhealded i\ Staubh.
hli r.in uip an1 early and
J i 1, IsC edge in the gaiine


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B '. .. l,,* t' . ,. ; ,

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I NI it'
I




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AtFf
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Bia
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D ?rNM AA*K "r3!m*itEmiE


AS1 D)/A r xi E xv


M .i t' t ( ,*,










*-
S.1 ^

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S The fi
I the KL





I 'moR

* "


Sthe invisible

r,4 fist


Eight for Supremacy between
ING-FU and KARATE masters
OMLY ONE UVE8I


AM AUBREY

E DEAD THAN RhnRlUE
COLOR ind Aptints
CLINT WAL:' Li
R I v 7 :.l/. 1 l.S ( / ii '. I / '


I


I

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I




' I

I


S a 1iU b. whose homer
, 1coun1ited 1,)i the only runs
'"ci the irst eight innings ofi
thii \let victor.\ Sunday,
,lxxx 'aidCed agxi lnl i t the first
i giIII against (Cincinnati
-*.ilcii Ross (.inmsle\
Ihen. in the second inning,
fie' %Ici s ganged up ion
mi m .csle\ againn. scoring tiv e
il',",s ltile !'si three onl Stalub's
-..*eolit w home rull ll.
lcx\ ( \ .rote opened the
,'.ind. ,I alkinig on four
p' I,il iI. t nlxi I latiIn t siiglcdI and
. c"noi I I jI re',oll lined out.
l,,'xs ,i;ln hunteili d andi heat it
, i .i ,mnLce when (;rinislc\
S.' i i\\ ii ing the hall.
(,, ttcl t' sacrifice fl\ scored
x x. x rii alid I icli\ M illant
I'.J lor anolhcr, finishing

Inc' StaiiLIb hit the sit\ xliar\
I I. i i n i iight field for
.. 10, 1 i' r luns d u i i x-0.
I t 'is wo Iba k inl the
: ; : ,' 1 n i1 hom er
. ,' iJ'I.'s I pinch hiltcr
,: Sitlil. Roi ct .am t 1oc
'. 1 ,,,i H it th lie M ets hats

i iI o )ip ic d th lie games
l .'' it no 1 t ie t am e's


S-. il .i l th e title H1\ a!
' :, ','' i n e xi. tkxixx' In ii
i1 ;- 0 .lI 'r\ ( ro e am


,: i ,' "P ', in lthe loutrt-h
." I e,;\ 1 all] n \\alke'd.
,>l,,]';ded il ami J.ohn
,,, .; M" le. ill kinL,! it 0-2
i :..; i 1, 111 Red, into deep


COUNT
EASTWOOD
DGHP I




'CLINT.oil .
EASTWOOD
J40E KIDD



inI~riWTU 1TWUrn K-TR


S! ,! I fild t, I tarrelson .
1 .' .t wii J. ,m id the relax
,1; li. th 1 ,' x h lc plitu
i, ,' i.nli tHarrelsoin started
i.liw ,- ih ixIxir iii i tuni led ti)
t! .,,il \ itli \1>t third hasemian
%' i rrelt qujt kl jumping iIn.
liU,,, ,lu,'ixuts' emptied ailniost
x'] i ',lhi sl\ .1iid Ihe hullpens
i , ', l ,| iiji.kl\ 1 iII \a \ ge pileup at
0 mid le lxi thle diaim onild.
I h '.hr,, t \ ,\I isted at least I tIe
*iiino t.lrctfe lie umpires \%ere
.ilt h i, xr''.riat the teams.
lii i' niidst tf the brawl. Met
r, ih';c r I tI// I 'apra was involved


a w1w ww m IWE ma W. -- - -- --- -- -- -


discuss the situation.
I tie pelting continue
bottom oi the fifth inning
Mets at hat and with tv
Reds left the field, sum
manager Anderson.
cleared the bench and se
into the locker room.


IUGBY Veteran coach Steve Pinder TWO BAFA TEAMS STILL


Rugby
ing in the
urney lost
day when


s m'aets ihf os klat prosp ects UNDEFEATED,


By GLADSTONE THURSTON
VETERAN COACH STEVE PINDER believes in keeping his
team well fortified so as to skillfully face the competition of the
time. From twenty years experience in the game, Pinder has
always found his answer in the south.


TO TRINIDA
rHE BAHAMAS
Union, presently play.
Caribbean Rugby Tou
their first game yesteri
they were d
convincingly 18-3 by
team, Trinidad.
According to
Trinidad started fa
Brian O'Farrell si
country ahead with a I
pass to Dave Barth
who got past several
defenders to score.
The Bahamas h
immediately with a
through skipper Johi
but minutes later,
Bailey put Trinidad c
again and from that
was an 'all local' affair
The Bahamas are s
to play three mor
before returning hi
Sunday.
On Wednesday, Oct
they play Guyana, fol
Martinique on Friday
12 and Barbados in
game on Saturday, Oc


SECRETARII

BREAKS REI

IN GRASS
NI W YORK (APt
loved the turf," train
Laurin said after a St
k workout last Frida
Monday Secretariat
showed his affection
grass with a smashing v
the Man o'War St
Belmont Park.
Secretariat turned
ion the grass into a
stiow, heating Tentan
lengths and smash
Belmont turf course
2 24 4-5 for mile and
"lie was just be
relaxed today." said
Ron Turcotte after Si
made amends for his L
to Prove Out in the W\
just nine days ago.
I 'te race belon
Secretariat almost
beginning to end
lentami twice made
take away the lead.
"I let hin go on hi
the front stretch a
break and he went
lead," said Turcotte
lentani came to hiun
backstretch 1 just ch
hi in and he pulled out.
lentanm also made
challenge as they tu
homie. but the Tripl
winner shook it off t
out to win easily. T
veteran campaigner on
finished 7/'- lengths
third-place Big Spruce
I lie first money of
tr nu a gross purse of
boosted Secretariat's
to '1.224, 053 and m
past Cougar II and I
into sixth place on th
thoroughbred monei
list.
% ,iii a crowd ofl
cheering him on, Se
carrying 121 pounds


I IN STADI

throwing punches at sev
('uincinnali reliever Pedr
wound up wearing a Met
peace was restored. Bort
the hat froim his head w
his' tedmnmates pointed
ito r il. tearing it, then
then, after the Redg
tilix plate umpit
tielekoudas called Man
ietr, iif the 'sems ant
Sunders, 1 f the Reds t(
Meanwhile, the
hutlpen i rew evacuated
the left field stands be1
tie i diti debris. The
1.i4 irld Series in li(
w'as pelted with garbage
int i r o> t it baseman Ma
'Snid.rson walked doi
hield line with the u


UM
eral Reds.
go Burbon
s hat after
bon tugged
ien oine of
it out, bit
threw it to
s took the
'e Chris
ager Yogi
A Sparkey

as fans in
gan pelting
a scene in
ntroit when
e M'edwtick
e by angry
hard slide

tmpires to
;d in the
ig with the
v'o out the
imoned by
Anderson
nt his club


defeated For the past six seasons lhe
the home was working with the older
players hoping that they would
reports come through, but they did
st when not. So, this season hlie tell bick
ent his on a scheme that won Pindei's
blind side Basket ball ('Club the
holomew, cha mlpionship toi ts (
Bahamas consecutive yiers duriniii
mid- 1050's.
it back With the help ol iluiini
penalty coach John I il,. 'iin lci,
n Lively, during the lBaliians A\inalte
Charley Basketball Association (ldrail
out front chose nine competent rookii-
stage it to go along with tlih other .i\
seasoned players that mike li
scheduled his fifteen nimember rnstcr.
e games Working with thliese i ome on "it reminds nme (0i the i ini
when I used to work \xilh tihe
tober 10, fifteen and sixteen c.i iOld',
lowed by and within tihie scaislni \\c
October had the chIa mpIii)inshPi .
the last recalled Pindci.
tober 13. Iitiler's SiIual lake ,'n 01RC l
Basketball ('lu i n the i ,isl
IT gaie tonihii t 7.3 0 i hli' t .1
S | ( ;ih so n (( i y I ll I l i t' t t i l l l t sl v,
meel Bain il \ n in liih'' i',xLinit
gJI A 8ORD'30, Iln 1n ll(
I ,\..F. Adderley (,\nii I, n\ lill
D nhh|Saints pla, the l.( .t[. W3ariii
DUT at 7.30tandi Kent.titks \ I's
n10et John Bull in lic Hit > l
) "Hle game iat ,:3().
er Lucien I I \\1 Sill I I
secretariat Actualls. Sticx sii hit c l
y. Then rebulild lis t[ s ii tin i th l
really season ibeforie list hiuil lit'
for the players then dc iicl liln,
victory int the retortix iii li I tl!
takes at Pindiler's to tlnii thI l 'ii
Supei\\wash .\r\\ ks. "\t i i.i
his debut time. the plaic',s < ix u il 'l ",c
one-horse getting rid of in ,,iiist (; iti lId
n bv five players so the\ driedi 1', ,il
ling the le\'xx on snslr. ii I'l record in always figured Ithat \, u i liihac.
a half. build on what \()i t hivi.'" lihe
beautifully said. "You ha\e ICi 0 ild \,ill
A jockey team to what you x\.int it."
secretariat With his old I tI', ti. i'
upset loss pointed out that thie\ \ 'irc 111i
oodwiard not playing to the colinpctittilo
of other teams. IIe ionld iin,
ged to even get a godod 1 iltntitixMi' ,t
front practice sessions. With itlli klii
although of competition placed il bids to team is ;at loss \\ith :i sIl\\
ga ime. This i Il i cr i se
is own in
after the MERCURY SEEK
to the
"When MlERCURY ()W1.I\( ;
n on the SQUAD, in dCtceiiC' fi their
hirped to one gaie cad I ovcr sex'ltiid
place C'ity Market take (
another third place Iline, lin( iglt ,
rned for o'clock in lliahamans l(O\\'l n
e Crown Association action ait ilw t'lai/.
and drew Lanes.
entani, a Citv Market'. co linii g i 1: j
the turf. 3-0 victory tver 11nc" 1' ii
ahead of 16-5 reciordl pxla, I,11ic
Furniture ard thii d )ii l:!,''
SS68.160 Nassau (GIuardliin imeeit 1,1st
SI13.600 place Sawyer's I ood
eSrnings Though credited i ith
oved him outstanding perlorinancis h\
Daimascus Plaia League leading bIo VlcI
e all-time Larry d'Albenis, texii C.il, taiiin
y-winning Cedric Saunders and xFletiiini
George Friesen, Meri ur\ \i\11
f 35,878 have to take the edge in lhri c
secretariat in order to maintain thl"i lir-t
including place lead. In tihei last
the turf meeting, In e c,) stp11` ld
5 2-5. Mercury 2-1.
Only an upset cani sill) the


(it. Market
I ixtexi
Nissalu guardian
Iliome IFurniture
Sawi Fcr I'iood


W L
17 4
16 5
13 8
10 11
4 17
5 16


PM & LABOUR


From Pase I
fares for supporters whio waxti
to go to the convention
Party secretary general
Clemwith Dean said there aire
321 official delegates \peetied
for the five-day comnenlion atl
Freeport's Holiday Inn,. ial(,ii
with about 50 obsersve-
delegates.
Other major speakers during
the convention, Mr. Thomipson
said, include Health Minister A.
Loftus Roker: 'ducantion
Minister Livingston N
Coakley: External Affairs
Minister Paul L. Adderley onil
"Bahamian responsibilities inl
international relations"
Development Minister ('arlton
E. Francis on "pIartinership
responsibilities for inves tent
and development": 'ourismi
Minister Clement T. Maynard
on "our new flag carrier":


IlHnoCe Affairs Minister
A i nt hony Roberts on
"'responsibilities of local
govern ment"; Transport
Minister Darrel [I. Rolle on
"responsibilities in maritime
a f tairs": Works Minister
Simeon L. Bowe on "building
with responsibility"; Deputy
Prime Minister Arthur Ilanna
on "the Ministry of Finance
and the challenge of
independence": Senator Dr.
Doris Johnson on "the
hist orical evohi tion of the
Bahamnas" and St. Barnabas
M.P. Sinclaii S. Outten on
"Government and its
responsibilities.'
The 1-ieeport convention is
the first political convention
held since Independence Day,
and the first political
convention ever held outside
New Providence.


The meaning of "straight back"


2 RECORDS SET


FOLLOWING BAFA games last weekend the Nassau Jets, last
year's BAFA League Champions, remain undefeated along with
the Freeport Hurricanes.
Already two new BAFA records have been set since the start of
the season on Sept. 9. Defending champions, Nassau Jets,
surpassed the record for the number of points scored in a game
when they whipped the Classic Pros 71-0 in a very one-sided
contest over the weekend and Stingrays quarterback, Bernard
'Porky' Dorsett set a new total yards record two weeks ago oi
342 in a game against the Marlins.
Heading the rushing is Jets star running back Bruce Russell,
who has completed 183 yards in ten attempts, Stingrays
quarterback 'Porky' Dorsett lies in second place having completed
84 yards in 11 attempts.
NASSAU JETS RUSHING
NAME \tt ComnipYds. I1) Int
B. Russell 10 183 3
E. Bostwick 2
D. Huyler 2 4 2
B. Davis 2 1 0
J. Ferguson 2
G. Blyden I 0 0
PASSING
NAME Att ('Colpi itls. I 1) Int
J. Ferguson 11 4 30 2 0
RI-(' IVING


inoinentuni taxes the energy of
tlie older players.
One of the things that
hindered Pinder's building
prolgraine for the past couple
seasons was the fact that they
did not have a junior team to
di.\s on, and when they did
hive a junior team fate had it
thit most of his top juniors
vl o uld get basketball
schoidrships before they got a
chance to play senior. His
toi nier juniors include Sharon
Storr. L.arry Forbes, Drexell
Martin. Sammy Johnson and
\llan Ingraham.
ROOKIE SQUAD
P'inder seems to be pleased
it ilh his rookie squad this
.season. "I feel more confident
lhat I was two or three years
ai'. We have the staying
xoxiei, we can keep up with
the top teanis niore." he said.
I'indier's will be beginning
loiliit's game without the
xcriics of iotheir six-foot three
ciitre I erriston Lockhart who
is iIdelined with an injured leg.
lxxcxvei. they will be relying
on theii rookie centre Harvey
Rktci. Wentel Major and sharp
shootlir D)anny Edgecombe.
RI)(kle guards Terrance
"Kino\" Siith and Basil
"1'ssah" Burns, both coming
ii tniIm Iuniors first runners up
\ria\\ak C(lub, will be the
sl ix.l hands for Pinders
'mi iii.
Kcit' pin the rookies together
\\ix tc' assistant coach John
I ,,Il x liho last year coached
.hll3tn Bull. Actually, he and
ln'iiexi \work with the same
pll\x cis iout on Christie Park.
iinder teels no fear taking
is ) oi>kies in action against the
Rcclirs Iast year Pinder's
i,,ik ixx froun Reef.
\ ;ci erCtheless. Reef is
xi',i ie t tliis year. with the
idlition (of lFreddy McKay
litiin Iudweiser I ages, Eric
\,ii ke\. ,Carlton F erguson and
lokilc tIrotliers Kenneth and
\I, hai.1 I rotnman. Six-foot
tlhiti Rudil\ Levarity has been
Ictiin id at centre.

TO AVENGE FINCO
Marketeers from either taking
the lead tonight or tieing for
first place. Team captain
IBuirnice Sands, Billy Roberts
and Ronnie Turnquest all
:averaging well over 150 per
gniin' can ver\ well take on
iihni xciiurniture by themselves.
\Nvertheless. the
pe i!, r mance of Miguel
()brcgon, Jiimmy Roberts
and Ilerbert Roberts cannot be
overlooked. Though averaging
in tlihe low 150's the near 70
handil.cap pins that will be
rieditcd then tonight might
rte rm a hurdle for the
SIarketeers.
SI \NI)INGS


RI C YDS
1 10
1 3
1 2
STINGRAYS RUSHING
.1t (omnp ds. 1I

12 5
1 1 X
PASSING ;


RECEIVING


23 2 4(
RFC' YI)S
1 8


7REEPORT HURRICANES RUSHING
21
7


PASSING(

R Ftl(IVING.


5;

4


13 10
Att Compx'Yds. 11)
S 1 1' 0


CLASSIC PROS RUSHING
ATI YI)S
13 12
3 31
17
2 10


PASSING


NAME
C. Bowe
A. Forbes

WILL PLAY 0
BAHAMAS American
Football Association president,
Jeff Williams, confirmed today
that the Marlins lost their game
against the Freeport Eight Mile
Rock Crushers by default last
Sunday.
The Marlins refused to fly to
Freeport to play the game


Att (CompYds. 1 I1) Ill
5 0 0 U 1
1 0 i) 0 1

N 'AS NORMAL'
claiming that they could niot
afford the expense of the trip.
Martins player Andy Ke\
told the Tribune this inorning
that his team were 'quite
happy' with the penialtl\
imposed (on them hby the
Association and would play ioni
'as normal' in the BAFA series


HIPY HOUR

EACH FRIDAY
4:00RM.-6:30RM.


STARTING OCT 12th.
At the
Thatch Hut


featuring
FRED CALLENDER & HIS BAND














MODEL END


SALE

BRAND 1973
NEW

ROVER "2000"
FOUR DOOR SALOON









STK. No. 5009

$5999.00


CENTRAL GARAGE
PHONE 3-4711 THOMPSON BLVD.


- - II .. .^,-lI~ Y,,4-LI-~---.~~.L-.- -iL_-_--- -- ---- ------Y- ---~~------~


I I '~


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A-A-4--Y- L- M -Yh*


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LINE SCORES
N 10NAL I LEAGUE
\\ 1 l1 0


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S l .1 in I i r ixr illin liani
x' x'' ] ,Ix [ ("xx ) .in,] i lltutu \\
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'L x I ' "l \ i S (e;l \ I
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HOW FIGHT BEGAN
S .i K ( \1') Both
I xl ', gIl ouits enemptied ini a
r''i i x'xn in i hrxix l tietw ren the
1. I t i "t e .111C Nei" ,York
x tti i ir'd gamee of their
; I iu pla oilt series
S' ii t' hia beui'ixtweeni Pete
I,; .1 ti xiitHarrelson a.is the ets
i 111 ini ing eVnIding Idouble
hi* .. l l xid te 1 lIhak i
, i x ;!I l ilx' 1e ml .1 ij lltJ h b
S i x I 111 sigled ani \v'id s on
-he lilx j \twMorgan
\"xx Yrk s Johnn


I


i

I

I

I
i

I
*


jl, .1 j, -


NAME
D. Huyler
E. Bostwick
P. Aliens
I. Burrows
NAME
C. Barton
G, Major
V. Williams
B. Dorsett
B. Dorsett
NAME
K. Hlumes
G. Fisher
F
I). Bain
Z. Smith
J. Harris

Z. Smith
NAME
No. 40
NAME
W. Rolle
li. Bullard
A. Forbes
E. Laing
1. Cleare