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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03463
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: October 4, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03463

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Mi ROYALAVE.

SYLVANIA TVs
P 0 BOX 50 PHONE 2-1306/2-3237

Segistered with Postmaster of Bahama, for postage concessions within the Bahamas.) Nassau and Baham a Islands

VOL. LXX, No. 262 Thursday, October 4,


HOTEL EMPLOYERS GIVEN ONE MONTH

TO AGREE TERMS OR FACE CONSEQUENCES






Hotel union demands







30 to 100 percent pay


hikes for


hotel staff


By MIKE LOTHIAN
HIKES IN MINIMUM WAGES ranging from 30 to 100 percent are among the demands the Hotel and Catering
Workers Union hit the Hotel Employers' Association with yesterday in the first move in negotiations for a new
contract.


60 to 70 percent shortage



of needed teachers due



here by next January


By NIKI KELLY
ONLY 37 PER CENT OF THE 187 TEACHERS offered jobs
by the Ministry of Education have arrived so far, according to
figures revealed by Education permanent secretary Baltron Bethel
in an address to the Teachers' Union last night.


The majority of the
remaining 1 17 teachers should
arrive during the next two
weeks and the balance in
January. Mr. Bethel said.
The permnaent secretary
also disclosed that a new salary
sca'. and improved working
conditions were part of a
package to be presented to the
Minister of Education for his
approval in the near future.
Mr. Bethel, named to his
post two months ago, spoke
before the largest union
turnout in three years.
Dealing with the problem of
recruitment, he said that 187
positions had been offered to
prospective teachers in Canada.
the United States and the
United Kingdom.
MANY TO COME
Of the 66 positions offered
in the U.S.. 22 had been filled
by arriving teachers. In Canada
84 teachers were accepted by
the Ministry and 47 have
arrived. Thirty-seven teaching
posts were offered to staff in
the U.K. but only one has
arrived so far, bringing the
total number of arrivals to 70.
When questioned at the
beginning of last month on the
number of teachers recruited,
Mr. Bethel declined to answer,
except to say that over 50 per
cent of those engaged thus far
by the Ministry had arrived to
take up their posts.
Although recruitment was

Fishermen warned

of law violation
IT tHAS come to the
attention of the Ministry of
Agriculture and Fisheries that
certain persons are using
household bleach to drive scale
fish and crawfish out into the
open where they may be
speared more easily.
Bleach is toxic to corals and
other animals and plants in the
sea, including fish, and its use
in these areas will destroy the
habitats of crawfish and
scalefish causing long term
damage to the fishing grounds.
"The Ministry wishes to
remind all fishermen, both
private and commercial, that
this practice constitutes a
breach of the Marine Products
(Fisheries) Rules (Chapter 25)
Part 1, Section 6, which
specifically bans the use of
poisonous or stupifying
substances," a release from
Bahamas Information Services
said today.



SNEW SHIPMENT

BUNK BEDS



? NASSAU FREEPORT
INLYNAHIll ~llllll


described as going "fairly
satisadtoril ," Mr. Bethel drew
attention to the fact that there
was a world-wide shortage of
miaths, technical education.
secienhe and reading teachers.
"If we were merely lookin't
ior bodies we could pick these
up anywhere, but we are
looking for qualified people,"
he said at the time.
FLEXIBILITY
The permanent secretary
emphasized the need for
flexibility in the educational
process, but noted that to
implement the plans and
policies in the Ministry's White
Paper on education certain
significant factors ihadi to be
examined carefully.
"'Firstly we have to ensure
that facilities and staff
provided are most appropriate.
Secondly we have to ascertain
that suitable courses arc
available for the academic as
well as the non-academic child
and last but most
importantly, the upgrading in
curricutlum development to
ineet the social, political and
economic needs of thie
Bahamas."'
This was regarded as a
matter of great urgency, he
declared, and noted that
adequate provisions were being
made in order to put these
plans into effect.
Mr. Bethel said he would
from time to time discuss all
the more detailed outline of
the Ministry's plans with the
teachers and hoped that they,
as educators, would direct,
supervise and co-operate in this
national venture at the
maximum level.
DISCUSSION
"Education is. by its nature,
a continuously evolving process
and its evolution tends to be
more natural and sound and its
benefits more widespread when
plans and policies for its
efficient administration avoid
undue rigidities," Mr. Bethel
said.
Flexibilities, lihe observed,
allow "provocative and
constructive discussion" which
was necessary.
The Ministry encouraged
this flexibility and as teachers
they were free to develop this
rapport.
"Our relationship should be
such that constructive
comments and criticisms on
varying educational matters are
welcomed. Strained
relationships are not conducive
to the smooth working of any
institution or Ministry," Mr.
Bethel stressed.
He urged teachers to sit
around the table with the
Ministry to plan together,
discuss at all levels then see
to it that their joint plans were
implemented toward the
desired goal.


The existing contract does
not expire until January 6, but
the union has submitted its
demands three months early
because the workers want the
pay rises demanded to become
effective on Novemnber 1.
It is expected that if pay
increases are not forthcoming
by the start of next month, the
union will immediately register
a dispute with the tLabour
Ministry, setting the stage for
strike action during Christmas.
fhe associationn represents
27 Nassau and Paradise Island
hotels with staffs totalling over
7,000 workers.
LUnion secretary Bobby
(linton delivered thie deniands
to Association executive
director Trevelyn Cooper
yesterday afternoon.
Ilhe demands call for a
reduction in ttie nuinber of
hours in the xork-week mrd
increases in vacation, sick and
o i 'r' nit. leave.
Here are proposals for
changes in the workers'
favour in contract clauses
covering redundancy, severance
and disciplinary action, and the
union also wants to include in
the contract new sections on
transportation and gratuities.
I he negotiations for the
existing contract in 1970 and
early 1971 ran six months over
the August expiration of the
former contract.
Following the January 6,
1971 signing of the current
agreement, union president
David Knowles warned that
"when the contract expires
next time we better have a new
agreement ready to replace it.
[he day the contract expires
next time we xiiil immediately
take action."
SLIM (CHANCi
The sweeping changes
proposed for tile new contract.
and particularly the demand
for wage increases within four
weeks, make tfor onl] a slim
chance that tie negotiations
will be concluded this time
without some sort of pressure
from the workers.
Here was no strike action
during the last negotiations.
although there were I 8 days at
the end when the union was
legally entitled to call for a
work-stoppage under the
Industrial Relations \ct.
Ixanmples of the increases in
miniuimintuin acress diemtanded \Ih
tie union are those for ttaidls
fromm 42 to S0 a week),
food anti beverage cashiers
(IS55 to S110), front desk
clerks (550 to S100), aind
laundry workers ( S50 to 560).
I he union is also proposing
mininlmum wage scales for
engineering and maintenance
workers for the first time.
A spokesman pointed out
that while the proposed
increases are very large in terms
of percentages. ilie \ relate to
the minlntium wages payable in
each category, and tmany
workers actually earn
considerably so that the actual
pay rises demanded are in
effect not so large as the
ininimums indicate.
It was for that reason that
the union included in its
demands a stipulation that
workers will have their salaries
increased either to the new
minimum level, or by $8,
whichever is greater.
Di M.\\I1S
A union spokesman said the
workers want the salary
increases to become effective
November 1 because the 1971
contract wage increases were
retroactive to the beginning of
November, 1970.
Among other demands made


by the union yesterday
*A reduction in the work
week from 42 to 40 hours for
clerical workers and from 45 to
43 hours for domestic, shift
and other workers.
\n increase in paid
vacation from 15 to 21 days a
year after three years
employment, from 18 to 24
days after five year,. from 21
to 30 days alter seven) years,
from 21 to 33 days after ten
years and a further increase to
36 days after 15 Iceais.
*An increase in paid sick
leave from three to nine days
during the first year of
employment, from nine to 15
days after ttn lirst year, froni
12 to 20 days alter three years,
from 18 to 25 days after five
years and from 21 to 30 days
after ten years. In addition, the
workers want payment in leiu
of any sick leave to which they
were entitled but which they
did not take.
e An increase in the notice
given to the union of
redundancy due to closure of
an establishment from two to
four weeks, with four weeks
pay instead of two being
payable to the workers in lieu
of notice.
An increase in severance
pay from two to four weeks
after two years of
employment, froi three to
eight weeks after five years.
and from four to 16 wxecks
after ten sears.
*A reduction from 13 to
nine in the number of reasons
warranting suspension of a
worker. Reasons the union
w ants eliminated are
drunkenness, arguing wx itl a
guest, repealIIed arguCIents itli
other einployees anitl
insubiord i nation.
(R\Al IIl FAC1o(R
Ihe union is also pioposin.,
tlie inclusion in the contract
for the first time of a clause (1,
blanket gratuities.
Soie hotels already add a
15 percent service charge to ,all
food and beverage hills, iand
the union wanllts the service
charge extended to all hotels.
In i a ditilion, when hotel
neotitate blanket gratuities t
cocitmnlion) or tour groups, (tit
union in denianding ti
lmiitlniumt of () O'enits pet bed
I lie union also x, ants to
write into thle Conttact
provision requilim.' hotels nm
Pal .idisc Island andi in thel
Cable Beach and Lyford t a i
area's to provide transportation
to and from work for their
emiploces, and requiring all
h o t e l s to p r os i l'C
transportation direct to the
hiiinms of female employ iCes
coming off-dutl after
midnight.

WEATHER TO IMPROVE
IOI)A Y'S cloudiness anil
"showery activity" is tle result
of a broad I rough of loss
pressure exte nd ing
southwestward from the
western Bahamnas, the
Meteorological office said
todaN.
The trough, which is drifting
very slowly westward, is
affecting the central and
northwest Bahamas, but
conditions are expected to
improve tomorrow.
ESCAPING GAS FORCES
EVACUATION OF TOWN
NI W NORWAY, AI.BER IA.
CANAI)DA (AP) A night of fear
when hundreds of residents fled
their homes turned to optimism
Wednesday as wind started mI
dissipate a cloud of deadlys
hydrogen sulphide gas from a
ruptured well.
Many of the people evacuate.
from their homes during the nigh.


Leading Newspaper


1973 Price: 15 Cents


.A.,


NATIONAL INSURANCE DISCUSSED ON ZNS


NATIONAL INSURANCE DISCUSSED ON ZNS


THE GOVERNMENT'S
National Insurance scheme
has now completed its
research planning and systems
co-ordination and the topic
"National Insurance and its
Benefits' will be discussed at
8:30 tonight overZNS 1.
Among those taking part
are the Hon. Lynden 0.
Pindling, Prime Minister and
Minister of Economic Affairs,
and the Hon. Clifford L.


ROOSEVELT

DENIES STOLEN


SECURITIES TO

NASSAU CHARGE
,AVSIIINGTON (AP)
Elliott Roosevelt denied under
oath Wednesday he helped plot
an assassination attempt
agapiis the Prime a Minister of
the Bahamias. The son of tihe
late president Franklin ).
Roosevelt called the jil,-i'Jinh.,-
"vicious lies" and a "hoax."
lie urged the Senate
Goo eminent Operations
Subcommittee to prosecute for
perjury two men who linked
hinm to a purported attempt on
the life of Bahamian Prime
Minister L.nden 0. Pindling.
"1 completely and
categorically deny each and
every charge made before this
subcommittee." Roosevelt told
a crowded hearing room. "At
the close of this inquiry I shall
itand before thile world
completely acquitted of all the
vicious lies testified to bt
Louis Mastriana and Patsy
I pera.'
Noting that both Lepera and
Mastriana have been convicted
vf stock swindling charges and
are currently serving prison
sentences, the graying
Roosevelt said:
"'I am convinced that
\lastriana and lepera have
riuired tienemselves before this
Si conliiit tee and have
perpetuated a hoax upon the
tiibcommittee to the point that
they should be prosecuted to
the fullest extent of the law."
F FABRICATION'
Rooscvelt, a former Mayor
of Miami Beach, now lives on a
.inch outside Lisbon, Portugal.
afterr Mastriana's testimony
two weeks ago Roosevelt called
Ihe l i' I:. iii. sI,, "an utter anti
Complete fabrication" and
asked to appear before the
si committee.
leperi l.id not testified
publicly before tile con mittee
pr ior to Rooseve It's
appearance, but Roosevelt was
'r.ited access to testiniony
t.iken froii.i Lepera behind
iosed doors so he could
ICspotid.
lollo w ing Roosevelt's
testimony, I epera told the
committee publiclN that he was
involved in three transactions
with Roosevelt in 1969v and
170T involving stolen and
counterfeit securities,
Lepera, who said he was "a
eteramin of many years in tihe
stolenn securities racket." said
the face value ot the securities
involved in the alleged
transactions with Roosevelt
.s as about $440,000.
Lepera said he received the
securities front nt ob
connections and that Roosevelt
disposed of them through
connections in the Bank of
Nova Scotia in New York City
and Nassau, Bahamas.
Roosevelt denied the
accusation in conversations
with reporters.
Both Mastriana and Lepera
were under heavy guard by
U.S. marshals and capitol
police during the hearing.
Subcommittee chairman
Henry Jackson. D-Wash.,
prohibited photographs of
Lepera's face because of fears
for Lepera's life.


Darling, Minister of Labour
and National Insurance.
Other members on this
evening's discussion seated
from left to right are: Mr. J.
Vibart Wills, Public Affairs
Department; Mr. Eirl
Thompson, M.P. chairman of
the National Insurance Board;
Mr. C.A.P. Smith, Permanent
Secretary of the Ministry of
Labour and National
Insurance; Mr. Mervin Lim,


N ,~
'1 'shc*t
I,'I. / -


an employer representative
on the National Insurance
Board and Manager of the
Bank of Montreal; Mr. Enock
Backford, a workers'
representative on the board
and headmaster of AF.
Adderley Junior High, Baillou
Hill Road, and Mr. Byron
Pinder of the Ministry of
Labour and National
Insurance.
Photo: Lorenzo Lockhart.


~9i%

'I

V






I I


MR. LEWIS M. DAVIES shown with his wife, lone

EX-DEPUTY GOVERNOR'S WIFE DIES


MRS. IONE Davies, wife of
Mr. Lewis M. Davies, who was
deputy Governor of the
Bahamas from 1970 to early,
1973. died in London onil
September 28 after a long
illness. She was buried at Old
Bosham, Near Chichester.
Sussex. after funeral services


that were iheil d Scptoiniber

instead tI *i. 'r, friends
we're asked to seid donations
to the C(anccr Research Fund
Iht Davies came to the
Bahamas after spending 14
years in the Solinon Islands,
where \m Davies was chief
seciretar\ .


Judges allow lawyers to file


new habeas corpus affidavits

TWO DEFENCE LAWYERS, fighting for the execution of a
writ of habeas corpus in the case of two youths accused of
murder and abetment of murder were granted an adjournment to
file new affidavits in their application this morning.


Attorneys L.awrence P.J.
Trenchard and David C.
BethIel, counsel for Freeport
bartender Wendell Burrows,
25. and Phillip Ilumnes, 21, first
infornied the Supreme Court
that they were applying for
execution of a habeas corpust
xxrit on behalf of their client,,
at Wednesday's opening of tlhe
October (Criminal Sessions.
The writ seeks the discharge
iof the two xmen from prison.
Both accused, who have
teen imprisoned without bail
since Januiary 1 1, have not had
their case tried during t\w o
Supreme (Court sittings.
Burrows and Humes are
charged with the murder of
Bias Street entertainer anid
h.irtcnidcel Raynmond B. Major
ion Septcember 5. last year.
\lajor's bullet-riddled body
was. tounid 1 ing in the riddle
of a foot-path. opposite a
water trench in the remote
Perpall Tract area by an
electrician who wvas carrying
out a maintenance check on
water ppuiiPs.
The two have pleaded not
guilty to the murder and
abetmlent of nmuitdel charges.
Attorneys Trenchard and
Bethell, who based their
argunments under Section six of
the lHabeas Corpus Act had
filed afftidlavits yesterday on
behalf of Burrows and Iiules
Thev had stated lhat: "Not
having been tried during the
last two sittings of the Criminal
Assizes. nty restraint is now
unjustified and that ... I am
now entitled to invoke the
intervention of this honourable
court to secure inmy discharge
from prison and nmy liberty."
But, Supreme Court Justices
Smith and Thompson
questioned the facts laid out in
the affidavit.
QUERIED
It was queried whether the
two accused were both being
detained at the prison from the
time of their arrest until the
present.
The defence informed them
that one accused had been


temporarily at large but was
eventually re-caiptured. The
other, it was not possible to
say nsiditerini, thhe
ci r clisiitIig c'l.
Staite d J i titce -' ', "this
omtissioni of fact creates a false
Iimlpre'ss,,ion il the iftfitdavit."
lie itI-. Mr. Bethell
iIi',ft in;g his reading ot
LiHunkic' i af idal iti that there is a
nceid l ti more I. I ,l- to be
included in the affidavit. "1 is
is a ui tacriil matterr. it touIchesc
on one oI the basic Iicts ofl the
.case" he said.
Mr. I encihard s,.aid that
there is u1.'no way In whitlIc he
ckiuil pe'rsonall prove ti the
,o .itt tha i lis chient. Burrowss,
i.s liii ii vitivlt lor a ie',5
li ,ttr-o "1i .i 'i i ,tlo ,lau\ xx tent he
ka lc!t 1 1 ,1 ll ',it h t ltic doorI
open .
"'for Ia ev, hours thec
a itistci \\.s, with his cell
idoeir oipen :uiln coiiIpletely
uniatti'lnded." Mr. t ,encliard
saidl.
Mr. Irenchard also told
the court hc un vlerstood that
his client hiad! been arraigned
twice. HIe further said that "my
client Ihias hCeli iLn custody since
January 1 I." and yet he could
not sa\ whether tie had broken
outt 1of c'id14k.
It' iiOLiid i i o lx sax that
BUit mos.s \aIs left tunIattcndcd
for siwie ie, li'.e later said.
MIr. Justice Smith reiterated
his feeling that the fact
concern ing tuig e two accused
not being in custody for a
certain period of time should
have been stated in the
affidavits read to the court this
morning.
Mr. Bet hell, however,
informed the court that "as far
as the affidavits are concerned
... in preparing the papers, our
minds were attending to the
particulars of Section six of the
I labeas Corpus Act ... if
anything was left out, it was
not intentional. It was an
oversight."
The pleas of the two accused
were the first to be taken at
yesterday's opening of the
October Criminal Sessions.


CARPENTER

CHARGED


WITH SHOOTING

SISTER-IN-LAW

A MARSH HARBOUR
carpenter accused of the
shooting death of his
sister-in-law was charged before
Out Island Commissioner Karl
P. Spencer at Abaco Tuesday
morning.
Leroy 'i ,hla- Key, 47, a
neighbour of the deceased,
arrived in Nassau yesterday
under police custody for
detention at the Fox Hill
Prison after being charged at
that island.
A preliminary inquiry into
the murder charge has been set
for November 12 by
Commissioner Spencer. It is to
he conducted at Abaco,
Mrs. Key, the middle-aged
wife of Donald Key, brother of
the accused and mother of ten
children was buried at Marsh
Harbour Evangelistic Centre
following funeral services
conducted by the Rev. David
Cartwright at 2 p.m. today.


C.A.B. DELAY ON

BAHAMASAIR


U.S. LICENCE
B A H A M A S A I R 'S
application to the Civil
Aeronautics Board for a Route
6 licence to fly between points
in the Bahamas and specific
points in the United States is
likely to be heard in
November.
A spokesman for Bahamasair
said today that the national
carrier, which has absorbed
both Out Island Airways and
Flamingo Airlines, applied to
the CAB for the licence about
two months ago and did not
anticipate any problem in
obta ining the necessary
certificate.
Bahamasair is seeking CAB
approval to offer scheduled
service between the Bahamas
and Miami, Tampa. West Palm
Beach and Ft. Lauderdale.
Meantime the airline is
flying on the Route 6 licence
held by t)ut Island. Because of
this technicality Out Island's
name is legally required to be
displayed along with that of
Bahamasair Stateside, it was
explained.
A Bahamasair official
confirmed today that the
airline discontinued its 10 a.m.
flight to Miami from October 1
because of a lack of bookings.
I early morning passengers
headed for Miami will,
however, be able to travel via
Freeport aboard the 10:30
a.m. flight.
the 10 a in. flight will be
rescheduled in a new timetable
on October 28.
Until then Bahamasair will
operate 5 flights to Miami, two
of them through Freeport.

Bahamas Represented at
IUOTO sessions in Caracas

THI BAHAMAS is being
represented at thie 23rd
General Assembly of the
International Union of Travel
Organizations (IUOTO) now
being held in Caracas,
Venezuela.
Representing the Bahamas at
the sessions which are being
held from October 1 to 10 are
Mr S.N. C('hib, Director of
Tourism, Mr. E.A. Thompson,
Permanent Secretary to the
Ministry of Tourism, Mr. John
Deleveaux, Assistant Director
of Tourism and Mrs. Lois
Davies, manager of personnel
and administration.
The talks are being held at


the Tamanaco Hotel.
The International Union of
Official Travel Organizations to
which 109 countries belong, is
a non-government technical
body active in every field of
tourism.
The Bahamas is a full
member of IUOTO.


NEW~im;=

No H1 I

C(llIttnc


I -I


FULL LINE V

ARTISTS' SUPPLIES

BAHAMIAN PAINT SUPPLY LTD.
BAY STREET NASSAU
TELEPHONE 2-2386, 2-2898


.1


I













(hr bribunt


NIXON DENIES HE ASKED AGNEW TO RESIGN
WA.SHINGTON (AI') President Nixoi told a inewIs ult
Wednesday the political ciiorruption charges against Vice P 'reCidlilt
are serious and noIt frivolous But he savs he clever has asked A.
resign. liHe also expressed confidence in Assistant .\ttorneui (ener.i
I'etersen's handling of the Agnew investigatiloui.
Asked it' he has done any contingency planning onll finding a i
Agilievv successor. Nixon said: certain ly not. Anrid Nixon
Attorney) General iliot Richardson has told him the leaks in the
case did not come from Petersen nor a s of lPetersen's aides.
Petersen would be removed it the President did not approve his hasu
the investigation.
JUDGE WARNS JURY IN AGNEW PROBE
B41.TIMNOR (,P1') the judge in the Agnew investigation has
the grand jurN in the case to disregard news stories about it "becau
are often lwhotll% or partially inaccurate." U.S. district court judge
lloftman called in the isurors to an extra-ordinary public hearing ti
tite warning.
1litnianll spoke to the jurors after meeting privately with law\\
Agnei\ and the Justice Iepartment.
BOMB HOAX INVOLVES WATERGATE COMMITTEE
SASH IN.I (ON (tAP' Il ree anonymous telephone bombs
lored ilth Senatei \itergatl hearings to end their morning sessiot
Hut s it Iomtllhs wiere Isouiid. alit'er a search by squads of po0iiC 3 a1
spe1Call trained dogls A quorumti call made it seem natural when ith
Sas clarcd
Dleputi committee counsel Rufus I dminsten arranged for title 'q
call aittr ai anillo 5n5o nus naln's voice had i\arned: 'here's a Ibonil
caucus room." I \ N similar sarniligs follot\I ed. Ithe search took a
and three quarters ltiter tlhe rni n was vacated I he afternoon sessimi
sone Ihour e.irlier thall n usual.
ST CROIX SLAYING SEXUAL, NOT RACIAL
t IttSl IANSI I 1), St'I. K RiIX (\ I') I he slaying tiof two younc
\meritin school teachers over the weekend apparently was sexual
',,oi ra.iuallb. 'iilotiated, St ruil police sources said today The hb5
the tios t'leclivrs, 22-.yearsldht lets Reed. and 26 -ear old ('her
isere found abitt IO \ ards rtrim their car Monda nightt ion a otle
..biout six miles from a beach where they had spent Sunday afternoon
t'iiice arrested anJd ,har's'cd Jalmes Richnmond Kirnon Jr a
20 ieir ,ld inative ol Ismnset.it, ith first degree murder iii 11
sla\ ligs s. iltsce said Kirte ii h i h been it (Is II .S island lfor three it
that his isa had. expired linrt than a \ ar ago
\hlsile ass ,uluipsx report resealcd sits iOdlscatitll of \uaise nal les
sourt's lose tio tile piilici C si il the an apparently had leei attenip
liorte the girls to have s\ujil relations with him. \then theta resist
pulled j pistol anid shot both )it their. the sources said
Police said the buht oIit oe iof ithe girls sas inude
FRANCE ABANDONS ITS GOLD STANDARD)
I'ARRIS (I\l') I race h s.i ahantdoncd its long fight to keep old
cCnltr 'i f \uiorlt l it oill.iar operations, finance minister V.ilers ,is
't stainc iildis.,i Id '].Cdllte'sn a .
lin an i lletErilen w' i thi e new s% paper I.e Monde (,ist.rd l t'l sli
I ration witted urr iities' t i,) rinitatll s.oi ertibl'e into gold '1i
ii s t liptisabtii' nisisltnuL lss r uis." I ranite his larg e part ol its resi-
gold, asid it is lie lr.iditi ii.ila savings inediuiii sr millions ot I retlitth
tili he siht ith worldl d il iit, tar\ reftorn itost in progress ,ouluhI
i'rrenI tel s h eitgL d'tinne in iterins of each other through Spclit il i
Rights (SI)sl), the so-calleCd "paper sold" artificial current\.
I iel noi., ht said, lhi I ren /ch tralnk \as itl practicC deinied
I urnpeanii ei)tioi ns iII terns I 1 its '\.,ha.nge rate againstt llt' \testt I
utscuS hniark. It is torimall) declined in gold but this is "not essenil
said.
I he lretton i\oods \Wre'e ell t i ch h.is ruled world curreiliL'
I',45 \,ias a de.id letter. (,isctard I)'I stdillg said. and io longer appli.
modern cuolditioiiNs
WILL STOPH, NEW E. GERMAN HEAD OF STATE
Ill RI IN (' il') Ireniier \\illi Stopli was elected todas b lth
( sriliain I'arlianieit .is s ttis-ssor to lihe lite \\alter Ulbricht ias 1
slite.
It l,,r Sltid, rinti. 'i. vi liad heei St loph 's first Deputs Pretni
elected to replas.i m tit ii Premier
lhse vote tlr iltlh \:s unl -ni mottn ,us,
Stoph. t, hlad served .aIs 'Premier in the ('Ctinimunist l ast
io.ernment since 19 4. Its ine'w ftormial title is chairman u tit t
so'u1 ll, ,1 largiel c'eriuonui.i plist held hb Ulbrilht until his death A\ul
Stop had been regarded .is a potential rival to i -rich lioneck
berli 'I he uCCsu ieedld UIl ri hlit itl it\, I171 in the powerful posit
head of the ruling Socialist L'Ulit lart\ .
HIonecker. slho controls tit" regime through his party leach
personally congratulated hotlh men after their election,
S "ind 'ern.i,. ait s'. isiso ili s t-.\pert., is regarded as a lo\ al lionecki
Stopli is runitusIr'd te il ailing. actor which reportedly made hitni
to a cCept the higher huti less insfluential post
NEW PANAMA CANAL TREATY NEGOTIATIONS?
WVASIIIN(, I()N (AIl') In what could be a prelude to a resunmp
canal treats negotiations, P;ni:imaiain foreign minister Juan Antonli
\\ ill rleet I rida\ withll Secrtar\ of State Henri .\ Kissings
ambassador at large I llstsorth Bunker, diplomatic sources said Wedt
the meeting i ill lie held i New York. where lack and Kissing,
been attending lthe I' isted Nations G(eneral ssenbl \ deliberations.
ttliunk r. rcct'il\ .ipp ittcl ict U.S. negotiator for 1I new l tan
trcal\ will 'I\ ti, Nci it ork o i, nlI tle dis ussilon.
I'ainiin his t'eei ri t li.ail if the United States for ish.it it reg
loot drig Int iii resumini thi e l ihc egot iatit Nls., which have been stalled
,'irIs thit \ ar
lBunker, I wli rc'iiwned ait aihbaissador Ito South Vietnamin in
a assumed Its %new Jiiies l il-..;t' Itlree weeks ago and. .is part
prepare itos' or tlhe .issinrertlti t pl.ins .a trip to 'Panamat in the near
\ 'neric.is s uis.'s said
WOMAN BURNED TO DEATH BY SIX YOUTHS
it')S10lS (\1'1 Si\ six iit th burned a N young \womln to death
cttn Rs I ui\buiir setctioi i itl er itorinkg her to pour gasoline over I
police 'id iodat
i etln uit igler, 24. w\ ho nioved here Itrs in hicago just tive das at
.iLctsted i\ tile t ouths is s tle arrivedd .l can o ft gasoline lto her stial
I'uesdas night. otfices siid.
sNo one hais. eesn arrested in the slating Police sal the\ believe
i\ere itni esses. hut Ione has tcome torw ard
Hetire she died several hours later. Mrs \aglcer.who l \as separate
her htushb.d. told i''lsu. slie \is beatesi h\ the gang when she first I
'olce said slie told ihem shte ias da/ed bt the attack but that
up a.ind pturt'd hth' .s snu Ihen onie it the youthss threw a match
essgufli!n' her in ilsmuns Slite sutiered second anid third degree hur
.ill htir shd's
sos.li 'e O sir., ,>r IIl.lob rt I Ilgr.iisa told a news conference thh
us, a'pparen't inslic i H however, lhe Boston iharld Amtericai qititei
p, I it so tir t .is s..i ng i \ rs. a teler t olid slfit.ers the souths orderci
Mrs \sigler '. liut" Sie lh J pslite ier assila Idss were blai k R


U. K CHRYSLER WORKERS REMAIN ON STRIKE
I 1 D(1)N (.\X'| Brit.in s eleltricil trade union \ednesd.il
more' s it's numbers t, sinp. work at lthi L'.S.owned I iri slc
isrproration w'ihere indJustri i uinrs alre'.ids threatens thousands o Il
liie union's uall .nila..s thise risliter In.iagemenit made a last di
to es ,i strike I'. lw(i elc.tri.l.ins t thI e .irimpaiil 's actor, ,it 'si e
the' I english Midl.mds
[he unilllon s ies itlls said unless J '-hr'sler mnel thie' demands
('sovenhrk electrIians l,,si r hIlgher pat 201 imnsre elecltrciais at (l'hi
lachlrt In liswo,,d S'.otsland sould be ordered to strike.
\tc.,iusss ilut' i hit ss r list i lts litr lt t'osur tillsiio leaders to s tlitr i
despule ] hursd.tu iii.'hl ,it tlat k[,,ol where ilte opposlit ion .iibour I
i i tg i ls atn i sisintelsslists


I earlier the el,'crikal i trade unih n urgi d tle goi srnment it o ith
('lhrsscr's Itritlish suilsidiars l sit ,uo I ot'I. als I aLid that alter thI collt
Ia.lks wlth lthe lmanagemen'it ths..-\ ehee hc oomling l,)ol~us and a p
transfer i tl the cI mp n t i 's I capital make t hirsler ., legitimate L,
inal onaiali/ation


CHARGES JOHN DEAN


Segretti apologises


for 'dirty tricks'


:id & raps news media
hfi said
duimy ot By Harry F. Rosenthal
WASHINGTON (AP) Donald H. Segretti catalogued
Wednesday his inventory of tricks against 1972 Democratic
w.irned presidential candidates, apologized and said they have no place in


election campaigns.
"I don't call any of the
things I did at that time
pranks." Segretti told the
Senate Watergate Committee.
"I don't think there should be
pranks or dirty tricks or
whatever you call it in the
political system.."
Segretti, a 32-year-old
lawyer from Los Angeles, said
he was recruited for his
activities by Dwight L ('hapin
then President Nixon's
appointment secretary. Segretti
said also he kept in frequent
contact with ('hapin.
lie said he had agents in a
halt do/en states and
personally employed diverse
tactics like phony letters
containing faked charges,
planting a stink bomb in
canIIpaign headquarters,
inse r t i n g classified
advertisements under fictitious
names and distributing signs,
bumper stickers and pamphlets
LInder the names ofs
noin-C \istlent coln Init tees.
At one point he said he paid
1 I persons and later agreed the
figure was 28. lie said his
people operated in Florida,
Net IHampshire, (alifornia,
Wisconsin, Pennsylvania and
Washington, ID).C.
UNLAWFUL
"Were soil aware it is
unlawful to send salacious aind
libelous letters'i" asked Sen.
)aniel K. Inouye, ()D-awaui)
"I'mt certainly aware of it
now," said Segretti., who earlier
this week pleaded guilty to
three tlitsdemieanor coulunts
stemming froIm a false mailing.
Inouye asked about
trudulen use of'f the malls.
"At thai time we just didn't
think ot those things," said
Segretti. I-To a great extent we
got caught uip in the real of the
activity and the /eal of the
campaign. These things were
not done with great
forethought or foresight.'"
Segretti said lie told
then-presidential counsel John
W. Dean Ill about his activities
last October when the
%k ilinugi. 'I1 Post was preparing
to publish a number of details.
After tihe story was published.
the White ltouse dismissed
commnient on the allegations.
Segretti said the original
federal Waitergate prosecutors
asked h tiino questions about
hot\ lie t was paid when he
appa.ired before the grand jury.
although they had discussed it
briefly beforehand. A juror
brought Iup the question,
Segrttli said.
lie corroborated testimony
that ihe' was paid $45,000 in
salary stand expenses, by
Hterbert W Kalmbach, Nixon's
personal lawyer, after being
hired b\ C ('hapin and Gordon
Strath in. another White louse
aide Ile had been friends with
tie two men while attending
tlie UIniversity of Southern
('alitornia
Segretti was the second
witness in the "'dirty tricks"
phase ot the Watergate
hearings.
CBS carried Wednesday's
hearings live after the other
two commercial networks
dropped out of rotating
coverage. But CBS said it did
Inot plan to carry the Thursday
session.
NIXON I(;NORANFI
Segretti said as far as ihe
knows President Nixon was
ignorant of his activities, even
thotigh he kept appointments
secretary Chapin informed
every step of the way.
An apparently phony bomb
threat cut short the
committee's morning sessions.
'lThree anonymous phone calls
warned that a bomb would
explode in the hearing room.,
but no bomb was found during
a 25-miniute police search.
So avoid a disorderly retreat
front the hearing room, a
committee staff mernber
arranged for a quorum call on
the floor of the Senate.
Comtnittee chairman Satt J.
lrvin Jr., Democrat-North


Carolina, used that as a pretext
to recess the morning hearings
early.
IIOUNDED
In his testimony, Segretti
said some newsmen have
hounded him and his family,
illegally gaining access to his
bank credit and telephone
records, trying "to get a story
at any costs," and subjecting
him to a campaign of "rumour,
character assassination,
innuendo and a complete
disregard for ... privacy."
Hle said former White House


counsel John W. Dean Ill
violated the confidential
lawyer-client relationship by
giving the Senate Committee
information and evidence
which Segretti had entrusted to
him.
Segretti said that he had
sought Dean's legal advice,
given him a tape recording in
which he explained his
sabotage operations, and had
handed over documents to a
California lawyer
recommended by Dean.
lie said Dean gave this
material to the Committee.
fHe asked that the committee
not compel him to name
publicly all of the people he
recruited. "Most of these
persons are completely
innocent of any wrongdoing,
Segretti said.
Declaring that his activities
"have been blown out of all
proportion by the news
media," Segretti said his pranks
included:
Sending a letter on Muskie
sta tionariy ''alleging
utn a u thorized use of
government typewriters by his
staff."
Placing of stink bombs
at a Muskie picnic and at
Muskie headquarters in
Florida.
Placing classified ads
asking Muskie if he would
"accept a Jewish running
mate," a reference to the
Senator's statement that a
Black vice presidential
candidate should not be
nominated by Democrats in
1972.
distribution of fliers
inviting the public to a
non-existent open house at
Muskie's Miami headquarters.
Distribution of fliers in
Milwaukee on April F:ool's Da\
advertising "a free
all-you-can-eat lunch with
drinks at llubert Humphrey's
headquarters." The Minnesota
Senator was another candidate
for the Democratic presidential
nomination.
Two of the men Segretti
identified as helping him are
Robert M. Benz and Douglas
Kelly, who are scheduled to
testify before the Committee
Ihursdav.


TRIAL FOR HIGH TREASON


Thursday, October 4, 1973


OTS LIAFZ TLUSil


BREAK RUSSIAN
UK Labour Party seek DEADLOCK


WALT LIPPMANN 'CRITICAL' tO save life of Chile's
NFW YORK (Al') W-- alter
Lippmann. a towering fighre in
American journalism, was in critical om m unit Part
condition at New York hospital y boss


Wednesday after suffering a stroke.
A late morning medical bulletin
said "Walter Lippmann continues in
critical condition." Hospital
authorities defined to go beyond
this statement.
Ihe noted columnist and author
celebrated his 84th birthday last
week. He was taken to the hospital
I'uesday.
SAVED MARINER DIES
IIONOLUILU (A I') James
U isher. one of two men who
survived 72 dais in the Pacific by
clinging to their tapsi/ed boat. died
Tuesday at a Honolulu hospital.
Fisher, 26. o t Moses lake,
Washington, dies of "kidney
complications and infection," a
spokesman at St. Francis Hospital
said. His kidneys stopped
functioning last Friday.
His wife, \ilma, was with him at
the time of death, the spokesman
said. The funeral will be held
Sunday at Auburn, Washington
with burial at Moses Lake.
Washington., his hometown.
Fisher and Robert Tininenko, his
brother in law, were rescued Sept.
21 midway hetsween here and the
mainland byI a BIritish freighter.
The two, along with Tininenko's
wife Linda, set sail July 2 aboard
their 31- foot homemade trimaran
for Southern California I heir
eventual destination was Central
Amierica, where they were to
become missionaries. The craft
capsized July 11 and Mrs.
liniiienko died a month later. She
%ias buried at sea.
tiininenk o was to be released
Wednesday from Castle Hospital.
lhe was scheduled to fly to Los
Angeles here he will undergo
phs sical therapy.
DUKE OF BUCCLEUCH DIES
tIDINBUIKGH, SCO II.AND ( AP)
I[he eighth iDuke of BuccleUtc.
one of Britain's biggest landowners.
died early toda in an I'adinhurgh
hospital lie swas 78 and suffered a
learl attack earlier this tear.
( hirstened \'al ter Jrohnt
%i ontagu- lDouglas Scott, he
inherited the 300 year -old
dukedom from his father in 1935
and sithi it nearly half a milli,,n
acres, spread over eight counties oft
Scotiland.
IEducated at Itoi and t()\lord, hlit
joi' ed the (;renadier (uiards ifn
lql1 aind at tile end ost Wtotrld Wtar I
was ia captain. tHe was a imembller of
the house of ('tCommons from 123
u htil is li father's death in 1935
elevated himl ti lthe Holuse of L.tIords.
Ihe I) uke is succeeded by his
i son. the h Fairl of Dalkeithl. He is
also survived bhv his w\idos' and t1vo
daughters.
RED SKELTON TO WED
SAN I RANCISCO (AlP)
Comedian Red Skelton announced
today that he and Lothian Toland,
a Palm Springs sportswoman, wtsill
marry in the next few days.
Skelton, shhoi recently ended a
second marrigae of 28 years, then
steered his talk from wedding plans
and onto what he called the sad
state of American comedy.
Americans are stu offering fromt
"poverty ofI laughter." the
60 year-old clown asserted, and
berated soung comedians for using
belittling ethnic. humour.


SNATIAGO, CHILE (AP) Chile's military junta announced
Wednesday that Luis Corvalan, secretary general of the Chilean


Communist Party, is to be tried
treason.
Leaders of the British
Labour Party meeting in
Blackpool, England, claimed
Wednesday they had
information that the
57-year-old Corvalan would be
executed before the day was
over.
The Labour Party has
condemned the Sept. II
military coup which toppled
the leftist government of
Marxist President Salvador
Allende on Sept. I I and asked
Prime Minister 'ddward Ileath
to intervene with Chilean
authorities on behalf of
('orvalan.
The British Foriegn Office
apparently did not have any
information on the Labour
Party claim. The British
embassy here .as told to
investigate the matter and
immediately report its findings.
('orvalan, leader of the
('hilean communistss for more
than 1s years and a close
friend of Allende, was captured
by army troops last Friday in a
sweep of a Santiago suburb.
Ile had been in hiding since
the coup and had appeared on
Ile military's list of most
wanted leftist fugitives.
Federico Willoughby,
official press spokesman for
thie Junta, said VWednesdae v he
had no information on the
1 ahour Party claim.
"I have tno information
about that report," hlie said, "so
no commlient can be madee"
(orvalan was taken to the
military academy in Santiago,
reserved for top-rankingg
government and political
leaders of the Allende regime.
after his capture.
SPECIAL, ('FI I
Ile was reported to be in a
special cell at the academy,
located in a suburban part of
the capital.
The Junta-controlled
newspapers said Wednesday
that Corvalan was to be tried
for high treason as well as
several lesser charges dealing
with the caches of arms, many
Soviet-nmade, found at
communist t Party offices in
arns raids after the coup.
But there were conflicting
reports whether his trial before
a military tribunal had h Iceun.


Judge gives warning to Agnew grand jury


BAI IIMORI (AP) Ihe
Baltimore federal grand jury
investigating Vice President
Spiro 1 Agnew was warned by
a judge Wednesday to disregard
news stories involving the
inquiry because they
"frequently are wholly or
partially inaccurate."
U.S. district court judge
Walter I Hoffman, specially
assigned to handle the Agnew
probe, sunnmmoned the jury to
an extraordinary public hearing
- after meeting privately for
an hour and a half with lawyers
for Agnew and the Justice
Department.
lie lectured jurors for 18
n in u tes on t heir
responsibilities in investigating
crimes against the United
States no matter who it
involves, cautioned them to
keep their work secret even
after it is completed, and
directed them to disregard
personal political views in the
interest of justice.
Hot ffman, a Virginia judge
brought into the case after all
nine federal judges in Maryland
disqualified themselves because
of friendship with Agnew. said
news reporters "are integral


R Tir: flip,






_.tL. ... *
LJL-J


and necessa, y parts ot our
lives'" who sometimes stray
from the truth.
Agnew has denounced news
leaks about the investigation
blaming thte Justice
Department sources, and has
labelled "tdamnted lies"
published allegations that he
conspired to extort bribes from
contractors, sometimes in the
guise of political campaign
contributions.
In a speech last week, the
Vice President singled out Asst.
Atty. Gen. Henry Petersen as
the source of damaging leaks.
He alleged that the Justice
Department official was
embarrassed by failure in
Watergate and was trying to
make Agnew a scapegoat to
restore his own reputation.
President Nixon defended
Petersen Wednesday, saying "if
I did not approve Mr.
Petersen's handling of the
investigation hie would be
removed at this time."
Nixon added he had been
briefed on the probe and the
allegations against Agnew "are
serious and not frivolous."
Hoffman took judicial note
of leaked news stories and told


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the jurors 1 8 members of the
22-merntber panel were present
not to be "improperly
influenced" by them. lie asked
to be advised if they felt they
were.
"In the present-day grab for
priority in getting news items,
the news media frequently
overlook the rights of others,
especially where criminal
matters are involved,"
lHoffmtan said.


by a military tribunal for high

Interior minister Army Gen.
Oscar Bonilla, told a news
conference Tuesday afternoon
that Corvalan was still being
questioned.
Under the state of siege in
effect in Chile since the coup,
the military could sentence
('orvalan to death before a
firing squad.
Military tribunals have
already meted out death
sentences to ten persons, the
highest-ranking of whom was
the former Socialist Governor
of Rural Talca Province. ie
was charged with trying to
blow up a reservoir on the da%
of the coup to flood the city of
[alca.
Another nine men
were executed on the spot in
Santiago on Sunday for
alleging attacking soldiers.
Military officials have
warned that extremists caught
in the act of assaulting troops
and even common thieves and
car robbers will be "physically
exterminated" on the spot.
Besides ('orvalan, there are
about 35 top level politicians
and former allende Cabinet
ministers being held on
Dawson Island, in the Straits of
Magallanes near the tip of
South America. 1hey are
awlaiting action by military
t l 'tinals.
CHILE RESENTS
INTERFERENCE
SAN I lAGO, CHI1LE, ( I 3
(AI') while'ss military junta
rebuked leaders of the Britishs
Labour Part) who claimed that
Luis Corvalan, secretary general of
the ('hilean Communist Piart ,
would be executed Wednesday
Ihe Juta's press spokesman,
I ederico Willoughbv. said "we'
regret foreign interference in our
internal affairs, I his is iln internal
affair. Corvalan will io before a
court martial tor judgientl." 1 Ie
said Cu.rvalan will be tried tor ligh
treason.
Leaders of the British Labour
Party claimed at their convention in
,ilackpool, IFngland, that Corvalan
would he shot before the day wast
out.
Corvalan, .Willoughby said. "is a
known, international Communist
agent and it should he expected
that Communists would protest his
arrest."
Willoughby said the 57 -ear old
communist t leader wsas still being
questioned in custody. "The court
procedure has not started
FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157


MOSCOW (AP) U.S. Treasury
Secretary (George Shullt/ I'ct
Moscosw WvednesdaN after failing tI
break the deadlock tflreatenimg
Soviet-American trade relations.
The President's chief economic
adviser was unable to report asn
change in Kremlin police. toward
Soviet Jews. ian issue hlockinir
"keystone" trade legislation in the
I.S. Congress.
Speaking at a press conference ,it
the end of his three-daN visit here.
Shultz confirmed hlie inmpresst,s,
that he had been on the defensive
in his talks with Communist 'Part
chief 1 eonid re/hinev and premier
Alexei Kos. gin.
His principal aim in the talk-.
delegation sources reported,. as to
explain congressional refusal In
auithori/e tariff cuts for Russian
goods included in1 .
Most Favoured Nation (MlN) bill
The Congress is making Mt N
dependent on tree emigration ,i
Russian Jews aind other Soowt
citizens he Soviet position li
been that this is none of A\meric'a'
business.
Shult/ said thel" Je\\isli quesltii
"came up" in his discussions \ilt
Sotist leaIders "in e\plaininog, in
tr\ ing to git"e an understanding .t
%%hat it is that is bothering lih.
people in our Colngress."
This is not", he added. "b\ \\,I,
of anis effort on mi part to tell lti
Soiets how\ to run their intern.il
affairs."'
Asked if the could sa\ whether
Brehiinev and Kos\s gin aosve lia n
reason to expect inlre libcr.i
emigration practice, Snhuilt/
replied:
"'\\ell, I can ohserti' sonii tne ,
You c.i n iohserve tlhal there lii,,
been a much larger grant isl e l
permission to einigraite last \ ,ir
tanri the year before, tlie \ eir
telifore that and so ill.
*So the flows is here. I tlit is tils
obtective. tat is ist coa ot'ri,t
Sen. (Heinra) Jackson and lI
supporters. Ihere is i stilnt, vicd ,
for thenmlt It look at."
Shult/ appeared to li e puitt:
tile responsibility lr .1 conllCCssi,.
on Sen. Jackson, autllhor It ai
amendment linking MI I N intl re,
emiigrat ion
l.ast \ear a l lt ill more t.ih n
.3,000 Soiiet Jews \were allounld l
depart for Israel I lthe rate in i'171
had been about 2?0i 2Il eligraitsI .
tiontithl.
\khhat the Ja, ks% 'I sitlippirtets
seem to i alti is at guaralitee thiat
Jews and Soviets \\ill lhe able
depart with a iltinitiumi of pain ind
e tpense t a d i protvitsil tha i it ttill
Soviets restritt esil iustis their strai
sill suffer.




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This is your opportunity to become a part of the future of San Andros. In
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IF YOU ACT NOW, the price of a choice 80 foot by 125 foot homesite is
only S2995. Only $35 down and easy-on-the-pocket payments of $35 per
month.

Let us tell you about this opportunity of KENYON McDEIGAN
a lifetime.

CALL RIGHT NOW...2-4284
VISIT OUR OFFICE TODAY...
Bernard Sunley Arcade
9:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Monday through
Friday, 9:00 A.M. to 12 Noon on Saturday


San Andros (Bahamas) Limited


Participating Broker:
McDEIGAN &ASSOCIATES INVESTMENTS
LTD. | N4 -
P.O. Box N4503
M iit i i


NOTICE



ISLAND FURNITURE CO.

and


FOX FURNITURE CO.

on the corners of

Dowdeswell & Christie Streets,

have no connections

with any other Furniture Business.


Phone 2-1197 P.O 0. Box 4818


I


__~_


Y


_ __ __ _ _ __ ___ __ ___ __ __ __ ___


I


.. NINOR MAN& AN M-




II --


Thursday, October 3, 1973


he i0ribune
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAcGISTR
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No J.laster
IE-ON E. H. '1)1P('CH, Publisher/Editor 1 903. 1 914
SIR l ETI-NNE l)t)PU('H, OB.1 i.. K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Publisher/Editor 191 7-1972
Contributing Editor I 972 -
EILEEN IMI'tllHi CA(RRON.M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972 -
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207. Nassau, Bahamas.

TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768


EDITORIAL


Nero fiddles while Rome burns


By -I IFtNNE 1)L PUNCH
MOST PEOPLE are governed by their emotions, rather than by
their intelligence.
A study of human psychology reveals that there are only about
a dozen motivating forces that shape the destiny of
mankind....and we all come under their influence.
Perhaps the most compelling human emotions are love and
hate, envy, greed and a desire for revenge. Reason stops when
these influences enter a mnai's or a toman s life.
To some extent all these influences are at work iii the public
life of the Bahamas today.

You know....I've always maintained that the average lahamian
is the finest human being I have come across in lmy travels around
and across the ,world. iHe is gentle, kind and, until recently,
he was unfailingly polite.
I used to think he was also intelligent. In itmany ways he is
intelligent but duinu thlie last seven tears a inajority of our people
have allowed their lives to he govened by man s hysteria.
This is something I catoit understand. None of it makes sense.
But it is there....is large ;as life.... staying vou in thle face from all
sections of the o(lilniuunitv.

These thtoughs :lan ttlrouthIl ni\ mind \\lhen I eiad in The'
Trihbune that people aie now pai\ nm tleir house pioperty taxes
under the threat if bein. taken tot coit to force collecttion.
Sliese pet)ple serec piotccted and shossin a gteat leal of
consideration b\ the t lieo g 'ei'iittiient s \lIo placed the items
used by woikini: people on lie (Customls lice list...alnd the, did
not etncld tile house pipelti t axes to sections of tlle island
where it as tell that property owners mighiht t e ini a position
to pay.
Ilie Ifon ei ovett ient lald d itn thlie police o "no income
tax" but tile\ built a ( usttt s dutyv stitlCtUle in \liichll people o
means paid mosi ot thlie tla\es. titoiiugh the house pr operty tax
and hIear\ Customts dlilt\ on hlxt IV Itelims, including choice foods
and clothing.

P. .P. proxpa:andists led the people sAith the idea tht theM y
were being tover-taxed and lobbed all along the line.
The\ made labour believe that they were undelpaid and had
been made slaves to ihe tiit dslonte.
Now these men ate in power tlien tune ihas changed.
People are being taxed regardless of litheir ability to pay....and
when they cry under tlie burden placed on their backs by their
new masters, they are threatened \wit l a court action.
In spite of the smallness oft tie pension given to the aged and
the rising cost of livnig, labour Minister (Clifford L. ailing has
declared that they contribute nothing lt tlie econton and so
they are not entitled to anI consideration. The next step to a
statement of this kind \would he a recommendation that the aged
be eliminated.
General Workers I tntitI PIesident I)udley \illiains has declared
that h will tae till take the lhtitr sisterr to coirt il tle Minister
refuses to deal with disputes filed by tile t'nion oi behalf of
employees of Bahainasair and Radio Bliahaias.
In spite of all these events....tlie IP.L.P. government still rides
high on thile single emotion that gave theti powv er....t lie finding
force of racial hatreds.
In a public speech on lab I)i Da\ in Mav l)udley Williams
declared that labour got a taune deal from the old white
government than from their present black miasteis but the "grass
roots" thle minds tof lie giceat mass of people have not yet
been reached.
Oh. they feel it all right No doubt about it. Ihey are the
hardest hit so tar.
People ith money in ( the bank i ay be hurt but they won't
starve. It is the little people \\ho depend on day to day
employment to survive wo i le constant l\ on the danlci line.
One small shift inl the econot;t and l tie\ aie out ol woik,
without money and without hope.
I had an intelestlng visitoIr tioi Nassau at Int (.o' ral Gables
apartment this week. liHe traced my address through another
Bahamian who is now living in Mimin. They were b th former
ardent P.L.P's. But these are intelligent ten and so they now
regret the part they played in helping to bring the P.L.P. to
power.
I invited him to have dinner with me and I served it in my
apartment so that we could talk without being disttibed.
He had some very interesting things to say, including a report
that another P.L.P. Minister has acquied a property on
Millionaire Row and would be tioving into it soon.

My guest told inme that there are main Bahamians at hotels in
down town Miami these days. lie moved from a hotel because
there were so many of thett there....and they were bothering him
with their problems.
in the second lihotel to uch hlie moved thete were also
Bahamians. Hle found that soie of these people came over here in
the hope of getting a job and picking up a few dollars before they
returned to Nassau where they haven't been able to get work. He
said one woman was completely stranded. lie had to stake her to
$70 dollars so she could get back home.
"I'm a poor mtan," hlie said. "I can't afford to do this kind of
thing because I have trouble linking ends meet for myself
nowadays."
"I'm really afraid flor thie future of ilt people," he told me.
"fhe whole situation today is taking on lthe appearance of a little
Haiti where Papa Dioc's declared policy was to keep lthe people
poor."
"I have heard," I said, "that Papa l)oc advised certain oft our
leaders to keep the people poor if they wanted to rule over them,
but I find it difficult to believe that they are deliberately trying
to keep the people poor. I think it is simply that the government


don't know what they are doing. They were so blinded by envy
of the men in the former government that they have developed
false values.
"They wanted to live on Millionaire Row. They wan ted to have
all the glamour that money can provide, not realizing that this is
an artificial way of life.
"They have been so anxious to get this empty bauble for


ihr Ortbune


New series of articles



will take a look at



our community today

By DAPHNE WALLACE WHITFIELD
EVERYBODY, but everybody, pays lipservice to youth. We
live in a youth-orientated culture. We are told repeatedly that the
future of our community lies with our youth the leaders and


the citizens of tomorrow.
What are we doing to ensure
a bright new world tomorrow?
What are we doing to help our
children with special problems
:to cope with tomorrow?
What is the government
doing? What are the courts
doing? What are our private
institutions doing? What are
our churches doing? And
perhaps most important of all
what are we as a community
doing?
And are we succeeding in
what we're doing?
Over the next few months 1,
a layman, a non-expert, intend
to explore as much of the
spectrum of welfare in our
community as I can.
At the end I do not
anticipate finding the key to
the brave new world of
tomorrow. My aim is to
acquaint myself and Tribune
readers with the welfare
services that exist in the
Bahamas and how well they
seem to be working.
WE PAY PRICE
For, in the final analysis, it
is we the laymen, the citizens of
the Bahamas, who pay the bills
for the wasted lives of some of
our children.
It is we who pay the taxes
albeit indirect ones to
support the government


services and institutions.
It is we, by donations and
voluntary work, who pr:' 'ui
the private institutions.
It is we who get raped and
robbed and murdered at the
worst.
It is we who are offended by
foul language on the streets at
the best.
It is our community which is
robbed of the productive work
that the retarded, the school
dropouts, the unloved, the
uncared for, the crippled and
handicapped might have
contributed if they had been
given the help they need when
they needed it.
Z.N.S. had a marvellous title
for their series of mental health
programmes: "No Man is an
Island' The messed up lives of
the unfortunate, whether it be
the minor anguish caused by a
slight speech impediment to
the havoc caused by the
criminally delinquent, detracts
from the quality ot lives of us
all.
The problem of alcoholism
in the communiit has received
much airing. Drug abuse has
received some attention, but
schools appear on the whole to
be a bit on the defensive about
it. After all if they made a
thorough investigation and


themselves that they have been blinded to the realities of lite.
"All experience shows that money in the hands )I most people
is a destroyer. We are told in the First Epistle of Paul to Timothy
that 'the love of money is the root of all evil'. This is true. Love
of money destroys men and it destroys nations.
"Money is very important in life. But first a man builds his
own character....and the leader of a nation builds the character of
his own people....before allowing money to enter thie picture.
"It now seems to me," I continued, "that some leaders in the
Bahamas today have beomce vulgar in their pursuit of the emnpty
baubles of luxurious living and it is going to destroy them."
"It is already destroying the people who trusted them and gave
them power," nty guest said.
"You have been nearer the situation than I could ever get," I
told him. "The difference between you and me is that, while I
have always served the people, you have always been right in
there with them. You are one of them.I don't understand how all
this could have happened," I said. "Will you explain?"
"Well, as you know," he said, "the former government were
rotten in some ways and the people felt it was time for a change.
They believed that their own black men would be honest and give
them a better deal. But, as it has turned out, the Bay Street Boys
were Sunday School children compared with the P.L.P. Square
Deal Club.
"Some of us were concerned when they took power but we all
said give them a chance to prove themselves. Things were very
bad last year when Mr. Pindling came forward with his
independence propaganda. Remember he said that 'from where I
sit I can see great benefits in independence for the Bahamian
people'."
"Yes," I said, breaking in, "but he also said that he was
building up the Police Force to preserve order because it had been
the experience of other independent countries that trouble
followed independence."
"True," he said, "but the people were not concerned about
this statement. They should have been but they were not. The\
were blinded by colour. They wanted to give their colour a
chance. Now we have had independence for several months and
all the people see is that these men seem to be only looking after
their own interests."
"Don't be surprised," he added as an after thought, "if the
Bahamnas becomes a Republic and we end up like Haiti with a
President for life."
"Do you really think it is as bad as that?", I asked.
"Yes, it is," he declared. "But how much longer do you think
this can go on?"
"I don't know," I said. "It has to come to an end some time.
But I don't understand how it has been allowed to go this far.
And so I am no judge of the possibilities of the situation. It could
go on forever, as it has done in Haiti, but somehow I still give our
people credit for some intelligence. As an outside guess I would
say two years."
"Oh, no," he declared, "it can't go on that long. Nou....no....no.
Labour is on the march today. I expect to see a serious shows
down before the end of this year."
"Well," I said, "we can only wait and see. But it's all very sad
because I fear the economy of the islands has passed the point ot
no return."
It was an interesting evening. Butt............
** ************ *
FOOTNOTE TO HISTORY: One thing I forgot to mention. MW
visitor told me that in 1969, when he felt the government had
taken the worng turn in the road, he went to see Mr. Pindling.
He says Mr. Pindling told him that the P.L.P. was a black
government and claimed they were going out for Black Power.
"You are right when you say that Hanna is only Pindling's
hatchet man," he said. "These two men think alike. The only
difference is that Hanna doesn't seem to realize that he is being
used. Oh no, he'll never take over from Pindling. The Prime
Minister is a master strategist. Hanna is not smart enough to
overthrow his master. When Pindling goes, his henchmen will go
with him."
"By the time they go," I said, "nothing will be left for anyone
to take over."
"I don't agree, he said, "I think there is still a chance."
Like thousands of other Bahamians today my guest was like a
drowning man snatching at a straw,
I sincerely hope he is right and I am wrong. Now....we can only
wait and see.

A THOUGHT MR TODAY
"Wait and see" was a phrase used repeatedly in speeches in
1910 by Herbert Henwy Asquith, Earl'of Oxford, at a time when
Germany's Kaiser WiNhenm seemed to be casting an envious eye on
the throne of Eigjamd. Fo y r liter the Kaiser launched the
first world war.. : "


exposed this to public scrutiny
they would run the risk of
damaging their image as
educators.
Some method of
investigation and exposure of
the problems will have to be
found without reflecting
unfairly on the heads of the
schools.
-Exposure is the name of the
game in journalism in a
democracy Responsible
I journalists writing for
responsible publications, will
not give an unbalanced
emphasis on the scandalous
and salacious. They will not be
unproductively cruel and
vicious to people. They will,
however, expose problems
which they deem to be in the
public interest so to do.
A JO'RN\t Y
On a modest level with no
claims to be an expert I am
setting off on a journey of
discovery for myselt and for
Tribune readers, maybe
because I am no expert I have
no axe to grind, no vendettas to
settle. I merely like you. the
reader, care about the
community in which I live and
care about its future. I shall
look, ask and dig and the
results I will share with you.
These articles will in no way
be as comprehensive and
in-depth as the subject matter
deserves. In order to give a full
picture on. say what a school
counsellor does, it would be
necessary to spend a whole
school term with hni, her and
then the following term spend
it with h., tic colleague. And
the same with our other
institutions and services
Someone. some time,
somewhere. however did say "a
journey begins with the first
step "
Ihese articles will not be
like chapters in a book, which
are the result of carefully
researched and organized
material.
Rather they will be a ort of
hodge-podge of descriptions of
institutions. results of
interviews case histories.
opinions of experts and
personal impressions. They will
probably raise more questions
than they answer. They will
raise questions about the sort
of people we are.
In a world report on juvenile
delinquency Roul Tunley., an
American writer. came to the
conclusion that his country


I


BIG SALE


EDDIE'S DEPT. STORE
NEXT TO STOP-N-SHOP BAY
TWO MORE WEEKS TO GO!

7TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION


LADIES'
FUR COATS
RAIN COATS (CLOTHES)
SHIFTS
2 PC. NIGHT GOWNS
2 PC. NIGHT GOWNS
NIGHT GOWNS
2 PC. LONG NIGHT GOWNS
ALL DRESSES & PANTS SUITS
ALL SLACKS
BLOUSES
WHITE UNIFORMS
(SIZES 10.12,14,16)
PANTIES
BRAS
SHOES
BOOTS
MEN'S
SPORT COATS
SUITS


WERE


S$10 $8
- $22
$14
-$8


$18 9b $16 95




$16.00


$35.00
$65.00


POLYESTER BAGGIES by WRIGHT -
100% POLYESTER PANTS $18.00
100% POLYESTER PANTS $16.00
A LARGE VARIETY OF PANTS
SHORT PANTS
(SIZES 28, 29 30, 32)
POLYESTER SHIRTS $20 & $12
A LARGE ASSORTMENT OF SHIRTS
PAJAMAS


NOW
$30.00
$12.00
$5.00
$16.00
$10.00
$5.00
$14.00
$10.00
$10.00
$12.00

$4.00
$1.00
$3.00
$7.00
$5.00


$15.00
$20.00
$12.- $18.00
$14.00
$10or 2 for $16
$6.00

$2.50
$10 & $7
$3, $4, $5,$6.
$4.00


AN ASSORTMENT OF MEN'S HIGH & LOW HEEL SHOES
MENS MATERIALS:

POLYESTER 60" wide, PLAIDS, STRIPES, SOLIDS -all colours
TERYLENE & MOHAIR ALL COLOURS
ALSO


BOYS' SUITS -- (SIZES 6 to 12)


WERE $25.00


$4. & $5 yard.
$4 yard

Now $10.00


Pare 6. Col. 6 I..fe



Enter The Tribune-Pan Am Travel Photo











S S-" 1B ,ST ".M APan Am jet to any one of I
^ "-. 126 European cities T
CConteonteulses





~ ,..*." vN oThe Tribune will run a total of 30 photo adsi
"showing a scene from somewhere within Pan
Am's travel system. Name the City or Scene
Sand Country shown, using the picture and
S "" q m final photo has run on November 17th, mail
ilj "i- *9, 'all 30 entries (stapled or clipped together)
i to: Vacation, The Tribune, P. O. Box
N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas, You may enter
More than one group of photos, as long as
youus e official Tribune blanks and groups I


with a Pa Am photo ad, back copies can be
Purchased at The Tribune reception desk in
1. The Tribune Building, Shirley Street,
Nassau, or The Tribune office, 9B Kipling I
Building, Freeport.
.re theIn case of a tie, the tie will be broken by
St l a o aio d additional photos not previously published.
All entries must ube postmarked no later than
I. f-. i-midnight,o hnday, November 19th, 1973.

a3 0iEmployees and the r families of The y
Tribune, Pan American World Airways and
n o. "' Etheir advertising agencies, are not eligible to
Photo No. 16 N I B


C ity or Sce e. ................................ Country ................................... I

M y Nam e ............................. Address ......... ................. Phone ...........





*.ne more tv choose round e r op for fao
must o beofastenedtogetheflo 6Eu r .



Where in the world within Pan Am's travel system, o.ta.d ... e I
are the places pictured above? Identify all 30 AMSTERDAM MADRID
S photographs that will appear on various days in A.CEO MUrIeln i
The Tribune over the next 13 weeks and you have sBERAuR BuE eo
a chance to win a round-trip for two aboard a Pan UMLS OLO I
American World Airways' jet to your choice of any DUSSELDORF PRAGUEt i
one of 26 European cities served by Pan Am. L riOW SmsANNON
HANOVER STUTTGART
LISON VIENNA


My- Name=... =.. =-----.... AP ----.
C~~ idb.PnA.


aL. . - --


__


=71











4 Glhrp Tributrn


Thursday, October 4, 1973


Plymouth Duster: a medium range



car with many big car features

PLYMOUTH'S RANGE OF CARS FOR 1973 moves smoothly from the smaller cars to the bigger ones with even a few station
wagons thrown in for good measure. At the smaller but by no means the insignificant end of the scale is the Plymouth 1973 Duster
a long, lean racey model with many of the features of its larger relatives.


The short wheelbase (108
inches), front torsion-bar
suspension and the compact
body of the Duster model
insures responsive roadability
and parking ease, while
unibody construction makes it
tough and strong.
Th4 torsion-bar suspension
is important in the superior
road handling in the Duster.
'orsion bars twist to help
absorb road shock and to
smooth out a humps road.
With other front-end parts,
these bars resist front-end dip
when braking. To reduce
"squat" when the car is being
accelerated, they are combined
with multi-leaf rear springs,
with the rear axle mounted
ahead of the spring centre.
The unibody construction
means simply that it is
impossible to unbolt the
Duster from its frame.
Pyliiouth engineers feel that
the thousands of welds make
the car body tough and strong
and help eliminate rattles.
D uster has the
extra-protection bumper
system, an electronic ignition
system and an electric assist
choke for a better, easier start.
These are reliable and
consistent since there are no
points or condenser to wear
out. This means no
replacements necessary.
I electronic ignition also helps
elintinate many of the major
causess of an engine innstiring
and so reduces engine
emissions caused by a weak
spark. Excluding the routine
,park plug service, the system
is virtually maintenance free.
The electric assist choke
helps shorten the period of
choke operation which reduces
emissions caused by choke
enrichment during engine
starting and warinLup.
Duster, like all the Plymouth
models, has the fade-resistant
reliability of front disc brakes.
The interior of the Duster is
rich and luxurious and the
materials used are less
flammable for extra safety.


THE DUSTER TWO-DOOR COUPES are available at Bahamas Bus
Ltd., Montrose Avenue.


The steering column and the
wheel are energy-absorbing .is
are the instrument panel. the
front seat back and the
armnirests. Seat belts are
provided for all positions and
shoulder belts for the two
front seats as options.
1he new Spacemnaker Pak
can convert the Duster trc'm u
five-passenger coupe into a
mini-wagon in seconds with a
bie 56-cubic foot cargo deck.
Snap the rear seat back
forward and raise the security\
panel which seals the trunk
area from the passenger
compartment. This makes i
long carpeted space all the was
back to the deck lid tor cargo.
An optional sun root turns the
Duster into an open-air fun car.
Other options inicude
I or q ueFlite automatic
transmission, power steering,
bright bumper guards, air
conditioning, and an inside
hood release.


i ook for the D)uster at ( o.ip iny
Bahaiias Bus and i ruck \venue.


and Truck Co.,


ltd.. on Montrose


US gas stations shutting down


BI\ The Associated Press
RI I. A X- It.) Plhase 4 control
Alrct.ilt haei increased the cost .t
gasoline ti(r mtiiorists in muan .ire-is
(,t the IUnited States. but r.insili
%s h. ,ies.ile pri, vs ma.s ra q ui ti.%
generate pressure lor ,i new% round
ot retail hikes.
Independent operators, ,i
branded servi,.e stations, ini nine
stJate ret )0er tiet weekeiid in I js
egas andl called for an inldetinite.
inatjoniisde shut J n tiM 200.000
stations until all retail pri t
cointro)ls are littfed
Bui C'harles Hinsted president oi
the national ci)ngress of petroleum
retailers, the nlts national group
representing brnided dealers. s id
his )rgani/.tiioi had ii t taken iii
iose in that dtiret. on.
\iid .I shit do',,.n protest in
Houtoiii oer tihe cos t (if t lng
council '. phase on gasoline retailers
dress little support Miondal despite
predictions that 80 per cent ot the
stations would close.
A spokesman for a station
operator's association in Northern
California said its members were
' livid with rage" over the council's


increases I to cntiumiers.
I lie council, in liess rules issued
I ridai rela ed its regulations to
clia'iIge tile base daite' htr ceiling
prices r lrmlist l Ito t,) \las i 15
ind lllowsed dealers it) p.iss alnig all
hoIleseale inLcrelses t) Sept. 28.
I his allowed in reases .- s much
as 2 cents gallon.
But three ni tir cin pailites
a it iItI" i -c e d %% hsle"sll prlte
increases otf trni t\% 'ilthls t* ad
cellt It ['2 tills a ga.t 1I I ser the
%seektnd anid these like. must be
absrbhed hb the dealers
t"he ink is not dr\ regulations and \ e find that Shell
sent up one miniut alter inidight
onl tlie 2 t)il, \Iltch l meitAii s tilhe
de.ilers are not entitled to that
It\, triths ot a ciinl." Hinsted s.iid.
Phillips Petroleum t'Co. raised
%i'hliesale prices hi halt cent a
gain i and Atlantic Richftield set a
I cent increase.
Hinted said the e\ecutne
directors and hoards ol directors ot
the group's state organizations
would discuss the situations during
meetings in Vkashington on
i Wednesday and I hursdas .


LAST CHANCE SALE




ALL 1973 NEW PLYMOUTH CARS







Big 121/



DISCOUNT


Choose from


PLYMOUTH FURY III

PLYMOUTH SATELLITE
2 DR. & 4 DR.


PLMOUTH DUSTER

PLYMOUTH BARRACUDA
PLYMOUTH "CUDA"


(TRADE-INS WILL BE CONSIDERED -WITHOUT DISCOUNT)





BAHAMAS BUS & TRUCK


MONTROSE AVENUE
TELEPHONE 2-1722/3/4/5


AUTHORIZED DEALER CHRYSLER
f INTERNATIONAL


jk - d -


I










Thursday, October 4. 1973


WhP Xrtbutt


POE-CHRllSAS BONUS

3 -5xl1 VIVID CDIII IS

ONLY a
an ideal gift for Christmas


ON Tri WATI RI RRONT
I H.a St at. Wiliham St.
ILI.I'(HONI 5 4641
OPEN EVERY SUNDAY from 2- 5 p.m.


U


THiE EXAMINATION
results of the candidates who
were successful in the London
General Certificate of
Education Examination held in
June of this year were
announced Monday by the
Ministry of Education and
Culture.
ORDINARY LEVEL
PRIVATE CANDIDATES
Carolyn Adderley, English
Language & English Literature;
Florina Adderley, English


FOR SALE



PRIME CABE BlEACH PROPERTY

200 ft. OCEAN FRONTAGE BY 800 ft.
DEPTH TO WEST BAY STREET
CONTAINING 4 APARTMENTS, 2
COTTAGES AND A SWIMMING POOL.

PRICE s250,00O CASH

TELEPHONE 28808 28809
BETWEEN 10 A.M. and 4 P.M.


Po


Pie Chiistmas Sale


LADIES' LEATHHR HANDBAGS
GREAT SAVINGS
REG. $20 $30 ... NOW $8 $15


SALE FROM SAT. OCT. 6 THUR. OCT. 11

THE I

BRASS A I


^LEATHEREL
SHOP LTD. J
'_ Charlotte Street (just off Bay St.) Telephone: 2-3806


Language: Sandra Adderley,
English Literature & History;
Mary Albury, English Language
& Mathematics; Lorna
Alexander. English Literature
& Human Biology; Kan Daisy
Allen, Economics; Millicent
Allwood. History: Claudius
Anderson, English Language;
Oscar Anderson, History;
Sheralyn Anderson, English
Language & English Literature:
Lynn Antonio, Human
Biology: Judy Ann Arahna,
Human Bioloev: Eloise Archer,
English Language; Leroy
Armbrister, English Literature,
History, Biology & Geography.
Phyllis Bailey, English
Language; Flordelisa Bain,
Religious Knowledge; Judith
Bain, Religious Knowledge;
Rodney Bain, English
Language; Lillian Basden,
English Language; Emily
Bastian, English Language;
Marilyn Benehy, English
Language; Ethelyn Bethel,
English Language; Tyrone
Bethel, English Language &
English Literature; Margaret
Bethell, English Language; Ellis
Bodie-Young, English
Language: Gladstone Bowe,
French; Clyde Bowleg, Art &
History; Barrington Brennen,
Human Biology; Ercdericka
Brooks, English Literature,
History, Human Biology and
Spanish.
Valeria Brooks, History &
Human Biology; Marcella
Bryan, Biology & Mathematics;
Virginia Bullard, Human
Biology; Charles Bullen, Art;
Everette Burnside, Biology;
John Burrows, History; Joyce
Burrows, English Language;
Kathleen Burrows, English
Language & History, Michael
Burke, History; Phillip Burke,
English Language: Sheila
Butler, English Literature; Jane
Campbell, English Literature;
Velda Campbell, English
Language; Codwick Capron,
English Language & English
Literature.
Coralee Carey, English
Language; Jeffrey Carroll,
English Language; Lula
Cartwright. Art & English
Literature; Ivy Charlton,
English Language; Ednol
Clarke. English Language &
English Literature; Gwendolyn
Clarke, English Language &
English Literature: Laverne
Clarke, English Literature;
Francena Cleare, English
Language: Kirkwood Cleare,
English Language, History,


English Literature & Biology:
Karen Coleby, English
Literature, Sidney Collie,
Biology. English Language. &
Geography: Vernal Collie,
History, Yvonne Collie, English
Language. History & English
Literature: Clara Cooper,
English Language; Uzziah
Cooper, English Literature &
Human Biology: Angela Cox,
History; Anthony Cox, Biology
& Geography; Peralee Cox,
Religious Knowledge: Doris
Culmer, English Language &
English Literature; Raymond
Culmer, English Literature:
Anthony Curtis, English
Language: Delores Curtis,
History;
Donald Dahl, English
Language; Don Marie Dalling,
English Literature: Charles
Darville, English Literature
Stephen Darville, English
Language; Gethesda Davis,
English Literature &
Geogrpahy; Harcourt Davis,
History; William Davis, History
& Mathematics: Ulah Dean,
English Literature; Velinciamae
Dean, English Language;
Veronica Dean, English
Language; Fredlin Delancy,
English Language; Don
Deleveaux, History & Human
Biology, l'atricia Deveaux,
English Language; Charlean
Diggis, English Language &
Human Biology; Patsy Jane
Dustan, English Language.
Dotlene Eidgecombe Human
Biology & Religious
Knowledge; Rudolph
Edgecombe, English Language,
Geography; & I english
Literature : Stephen
Edgecombe, English Laniuase
& Economics: Verona Elliot,
Enghsh Language: Frank Fllis,
History:
Ednol Farquharson, I english
Language & History; Icelyn
Farquharson, History; Mabel
F a rquharson, Religious
Knowledge; Rowena Faswkes,
English Language &
Geography: Annafaye
Ferguson, History &
Geography: Cynthia Ferguson,
Rehgious Knowledge: Jestina
Ferguson, English Language,
Art. & English Literature:
Marilyn Ferguson, Ilistory:
Renald Ferguson, History;
Cheryl Fernander, English
Literature; Allen Fllowers,
Mathematics; John Forbes,
English Literature; Locksley
Forbes, English Language;
Mildred Forbes, History; Roger
Forbes, Economics; Sybil


Forde. I english 1 ang II u.'
Fit/burn I 'rrc st, t. n hslh
Literature: l)nmse I ad kes.
English Language.
Eulamac (Gita or, I english
Language: \Vann I'atri.k (t, iti(r.
English literature, (,e graphy.
& Religious Know, ledge. Joseph
Gardiner, english Iteriature,
Geography & Art. Joseph
Gaskins, Human Biologi
Religious Knowledge. lslrstor .
Emily (ibson, Ilistor :
Hort e n s e God ig,
Mathematics. Dennis (Gomun ,
British Constitution, I english
Language, & English
Literature: Phillip G(omel,
English Language & ltistory:
Lukel Goniales, I english


Language, Mathematics &
I cononues., Nerissa (Grandison,
english Literature: Alfred
ray, IHuman Biolog : %Mark
Anthony Greene. english
LiteratUure-: Phillip (,reenslade.
English Language. I english
Literature. & ltistors :
Stuart lialbert. E english
Language, Patrick Hlanlan.
English Language: Aluria
Hanna, Hlistory, !Frederick
Hanna, History: Everette Hart,


English Language & History;
Nathalie Hart, English
Literature, Mathematics, &
Geography; Ernestine Heastie,
English Language &
Mathematics: Beverly Hepburn,
English Language; Naomi
HIepburn, English Language &
English Literature: Elsie
Hlepburn, Biology; Olive Herry,
English Language & Religious
Knowledge; Lindie Hewitt,
Page 6 Col. I


BAAA HM LNNN S VC
TFLB F HOBE- 4 16


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1971 VIVA s/w $1,650


1967 TRIUMPH 1300 -$775


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1971 FORD CAPRI, auto.- $1,695


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1968 PLYMOUTH SATELLITE a/c $1,300


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74


6d





From Page 5
English Literature & history;
Cecil Hilton, E english
Literature; Frederick Horton,
Art; Michael Humes, English
Language; Jacqueline Humes,
English Literature, KirtlandI
Hutcheson, English Language;
Vera C. Hylton, Economics
English Language & English
Literature.
Geraldine S. James, Spanish;
Leith M. James, English
Literature & History. Edison
Joffrey, English Literature &
Geography-; lIlanae Johnson,
English Language, English
Literature & tHistory. Eric C.
Johnson, English Ianguage;
Hosea Johnson, History;
Lilly mae Johnson, 1 english


Religious
Ritchie,
Reginald


GCE examination results


youth in thle Bahamas.' me
Rev. Preston Moss, Chancellor
of the Catholic Diocese at a
recent speech to the Kiwanis
Club of Fort Montagu said
that a good percentage of our
youth is "bringing themselves
up" and have "little parental or
adult supervision."
He said that on the whole
much of the adult population
of the Bahamas have rejected
youth. "The attitude of many
of us is one of condemnation
of them (youth). We lack
confidence in them; we accuse
them of being la r .:nd


Language; Luther Johnsoii,
English Language; Oswald L.
Johnson, English Language &
Physics with Chemistry; Sandra
E. Johnson, Mathematics, Ruth
E. Julian, Human Biology.
Alma Kelly, English
Language & Religious
Knowledge.
Cutel A. Kelly, Enghlis
Language; Naomi M. Kemip,
English Literature; Julie IE.
Kenny, Art; Anne Kiddle,
English Literature; Thomas
King, English Language; Lana
Kirkpatrick, Human Biology ;
Glendine Knight, English


Literature, Histort &
Mat hematic,,s. I dr N MI.
Knowles, Religious Kno\w leidge.


George R. Knowtles,
. inda Knoswles,
Literature.
Leonard I aroda,
Language; Val C'. I
English I literature.
Lawrence, E english I
Melvin I ew is, HumanI
Milton lewis, Humani,
Sandra F. L owe,


Language,
& Human
Lowe, F
E v a d n e


English
Biology:
nglishl
11.


Li
1)
Ii


Histor ,
I nghlih

I english
aw. rei d.
t;len\
anguiag
Biology
Blolei\ .
I nglish
terature.
onna i 1.
terattlue',
I o l g ,


When it comes to insurance

it's Dominion for Life


...in Nassau

call Philip Russell 2-3843


THE DOMINION LIFE ASSURANCE COMPANY


Mathematics;Avis Lightbourne,
English Language & English
l-iterature.
Sybil B. Mackey, English
Language; Mary E. Major,
History; -Dorrel S. Marsh,
English Language; Herbert
Marshall, Biology; Arthur E.
Ma\ cock. Spanish; Newton
Mecl)onald, English Language;
Isinac Mclntosh, English
I language & IEnglish Literature;
Gloria F. McKenzie, English
1 language : G wendolyn
\McKen/ie, I english Literature;
\Margaret I McKenzie, History;
Angela A. McKinney, Religious
Know ledge: Bradley Miller,
I english language; EInaimae
\ miller, English Literature.
I tstorn & Religious
K now ledge.
( arnell, L. Miller.
Mat hematics; Iurban Miller,
Religious Knowledge; Quentin
Minnis, I english Literature,
(eogiaphy & Ilistory; Allison
linus, I english Ianguage &
I english literature; Muriel
Mit .hell, I english Language;
1 oud it l Moncur, IEnglish
Language & Inglish Literature;
thheryl S. .Morce, English
I anguaige, MIliired Morgan,
I nglisli language ; Wendell
Mortimer, t cography; Jestmna
Morris. english L.anguage &
ilstor. Altheia Mloss, Religious
Kno letI'dLge linith Moss,
history; Icilad Moss, E-nglish
language. Iris Moss Religious
Knowledge; Rosalee Moss,
IHistory & Religious
Knos ledge, William Munnings,
Biology & IHuman Biology;
)orcen Murphy, English
Ianguaoge, glishi Literature &
Religious Knoswledge.
A rchie Nairn, English
language & Religious
Know ledge; Pearl Nathan,
English Literature ; Marjorie
Nairn, I conomics; Anthony
Newhold, I english Literature:
Dolores Newbold, English
I languagee & Inglish Literature;
Dleborah Newton, English
I literature: Dennis Newton,
II History : Svivia O'Brien,
1 english, l anI guig. English
I literature & History.
Margaret Pearce, English
l language: Iheodore Pearce,
I english Language & English
I iteraturc: Ruth Pearson,
I luiiman Biology; Florence
oit icr, I nghlsli Language; Paul
Pratt, IIstor\ Stanley Pratt,
(h mi cIi L Geogrpahy,
ist r\ & I english Literature.
I n1da Rahning, English
Lit. nature: Mary Rahming,


French; Eulaee Reid,
Knowledge; Charles
English Language;


Ritchie, English Language;
Remona Ritchie, English
Literature & Geography;
Christina Roberts, English
Language; Rowena Roberts,
English Language; William
Roberts, Biology, Chemistry,
History & Religious
Knowledge; Angello Rolle, Art;
Benjamin Rolle, English
Language; Carolyn Rolle,
English Language; Cecilia
Rolle, English Language;
Flizabeth Rolle, Human
Biology; Elvia Rolle, History;
Eula Mae Rolle, History;
Jeffrey Rolle, English
Literature & History;
Glendamae Rolle, English
Literature; Litefield Rolle,
English Language, Mathematics
& Religious Knowledge.
Mavis Rolle, Religious
Knowledge; Michael Rolle,
English Language; Miriam
Rolle, English Language;
MNyrtle Rolle, English
Literature; Nigel Rolle, English
Language; Janice Rolle, English
literature; Maxwell Rose,
English Language; Julian
Russell, English Language,
English Literature, History,
Iluman Biology, Religious
Knowledge.
Miralda McDonald, History;
Ironace Morris, English
Language; Sharma Saith,
Human Biology; Gonzalez I.
Sands, English Literature;
Conwill K. Saunders, Art; Jean
Sawyer, English Language,
English Literature, Human
Biology & Religious
Knowledge; Julieann Ih.
Sawyer, English Language;
Mark S. Sawyer. English
Language & Mathematics;
Micklyn P. Seymour, Biology
& History; Christopher
Sherman, Additional
Mathematics; Kirkwood
Simmons, English Language;
Florette Sinclear, Human
Biology.
Arlean Smith, Religious
Knowledge; Cardinal Smith,
Art, English Language; Coral E.
Smith, English Language &
English Literature; IDianne
Smith, English Literature &
History; Edith Smith, English
Language; Kerlena A. Smith,
Commerce & English
Language; Michael W. Smith,
Economics, English Language
& Mathematics; Ross Smith,
English Literature, Geography
Page 7 Col. 2


6 (She GrtbIrnr


Make your land


your land.



Now you can afford to own a choice homesite on Andros....the Unspoiled
Island....where things are starting to happen.

Just 15 minutes from Nassau, but world's away from the crowds and noise.

The price of a large homesite 80 feet b. 125 feet, for a limited time is
only S2995.

Terms are easy-on-the-pocket. S35 down. S35 per month.


BUT YOU MUST ACT QUICKLY.
In the years ahead you'll be glad you did
it TODAY.
Let us tell you about this once in- a -lifetime
opportunity.
CALL RIGHT NOW...2-1886
VISIT OUR OFFICE TODAY ...
Sheraton-British Colonial Hotel Arcade
9:00 AM to 8:00 PM Monday through Friday
9:30 AM to 6:00 PM Saturday and Sunday






San Andros (Bahama.,) Limited

Participating Broker:
BRAYNEN & KNOWLES REAL ESTATE
LTD.
P. O. Box N8001


CARL BRAYNEN


U U


WHAT'S OUT THERE?


Out in the Family Islands. The third largest barrier reef in the world is off
Andros. There's a candy-striped lighthouse to climb to the top of in Abaco.
And a mile-long cave to climb to the bottom of at Hatchet Bay on Eleuthera.
The golf course on Great Harbour Cay is considered one of the best in the
world. And no trip to Exuma is complete without a picnic on Stocking Island.
Find out for yourself how interesting and entertaining your country is.


Bahamasair and the Bahama Out Island Association have put together a Dis-
covery Holiday to many of the Family Islands. From now until October 31st,
you'll get 20% off on your airline fare and 20% off on your hotel rate.
To qualify, you have to be Bahamian or a resident of the Bahamas. For air-
line reservations, phone Bahamasair at 7-8511 in Nassau or at 352-5771 in
Freeport. For hotel reservations, phone 2-8383. Get out and see the country.


There's a Discovery Holiday for all these Family Islands:



Abaco
Elbow Cay. HopeTown
Guana Harbour Club, Great Guana Cay
HopeTown Harbour Lodge, HopeTown
Treasure Cay Beach Hotel & Villas, Treasure Cay

Andros
Andros Beach Hotel & Villas, NichollsTown
Las Palmas Hotel, Driggs Hill
Small Hope Bay Lodge. Fresh Creek

Berry Islands
Great Harbour Club, Great Harbour Cay


Bimini
Bimini Hotel & Apts., North Bimini
Bimini Islands Yacht Club, South Bimini

Eleuthera
Aquavilla Resort, South Palmetto Point
Arawak Cove Club, Gregory Town
Buccaneer Club, Governor's Harbour
Cape Eleuthera Villas, Yacht & Country Club,
Cape Eleuthera
Current Club, Current
Hatchet Bay Yacht Club, Hatchet Bay
Tranquillity Bay Club, Governors Harbour


Harbour Island
Briland Yacht Club, Coral Sands Hotel
Romora Bay Club

Spanish Wells
Robert's Harbour Club

Exuma
Hotel Peace & Plenty, GeorgeTown
Out Island Inn, GeorgeTown
Pieces of Eight, GeorgeTown

San Salvador
Riding Rock Inn, Cockburn Town


BaHaMasain & Bahama Out Islands Association


From Page 3
in spite of the lip service paid
to youth, in spite of
multi-million dollar businesses
catering to a market of youth,
in spite of money poured into
organizations associated with
the welfare of youth that the
people of the United States
didn't like youth much.
Tunley found that the
American people provided well
materially for their children
and then expected them to
behave well and were
disappointed when they didn't.
In Europe and the Eastern
countries he found that
parents, teachers and the law
expected their adolescents to
get into trouble, were prepared
for it and gratified if they
didn't.
What is our attitude to
-i.


Thursday, October 4, 1973


unappreciative."
As a society we are more
interested in the pursuit things
than of the cultivation ot
human beings in Father Moss's
opinion. Thus he concludes we
have set a rotten example foi
our children to follow.
Is this a valid assessment ot
our attitude to youth in the
Bahamas? If many of us are
failing as parents are the
various welfare agencies filling
the gap? And if they're not is it
reasonable to expect them to
do so within the given
-C - f-9 ._


I I


Q4/











Thursday, October 3, 1973


Reader wants to know


why people smoke

By Abigail Van Buren
Sc 1973 by Chicale Tribne-N. Y. News Synd., Inc.
DEAR ABBY: My wife said she saw a grown woman
walking down the street with a pacifier in her mouth! I
said she must have been trying to quit smoking, otherwise
she'd feel too silly to go out in public that way.
My wife and I were both heavy smokers, but we recent-
ly gave it up because we wanted to experience the joy of
breathing thru clean lungs again and rediscover our senses
of taste and smell.
I said I could understand that woman's walking around
with a pacifier in her mouth. She was replacing one bad
habit with one that was less damaging.
Abby. why do you think people smoke? Is it a nervous
habit? Is it an infantile compulsion to have something in
their mouths to comfort them? Or is it simply an uncon-
scious death wish? QUIT IN CLARKSBURG
DEAR QUIT: Most young people begin to smoke be-
cause they think it makes them look "grown up" or smart,
or to emulate someone they admire. Some smoke to keep
another smoker company. They continue to smoke because
they "enjoy" the feeling of relaxation it gives them lat
first and many say it keeps their weight down. Then they
become addicted. I Nicotine is habit-forming, and don't let
anyone tell you it isn't. I The "unconscious-death-wish theo-
ry" is also valid. Anyone who persists in doing that which
he knows could be his undoing is unconsciously hastening
his end.

DEAR 4'BBY: My husband and I are both retired
We've been married for three years. It's his second mar-
riage, and mine, too. He is good to me in every way. We
enjoy having company, but my friends are not used to
swearing, and neither am I.
If someone says: "Isn't it a lovely day?" he says:
"You're g-d- right it is '"
lie greets people with, "Well, I'm a s. o. b., if it isn't
George!"
Abby, I deplore that kind of language, and I've told
him about it, but to no avail. I don't want to nag mm
because it wouldn't do any good, and would only make him
irritable. I am so embarrassed before my friends.
He reads your column. Maybe you can say something
to make him more careful. If it weren't for this one fault,
he would be perfect. And I do adore him. ASHAMED
DEAR ASHAMED: My advice to you is gently to tell
this otherwise perfect man to watch his language. Nobody's
perfect, and much as I dislike cursing, there are worse
faults.

DEAR ABBY: After 23 years, my wife and I agreed to
a friendly divorce.
I have long owned a choice corner lot which is conven-
ient to my work. It happens to be right next door to a long-
time friend of my ex-wife.
I am planning to build a home there, but I have run
into a slight problem. Rumors are circulating thruout my
soon-to-be new neighborhood about the "wild parties" I'll
be having, etc., so I have made some minor changes in my
house, eliminating ALL windows on the side of the house
facing the neighbors
Do you think I'm making a mistake?
PERPLEXED IN OHIO
DEAR PERPLEXED: Possibly. Eliminating the win-
dows might create the impression that you've something to
hide. Also, on the practical side, consider what it might do
to the resale value.
DEAR ABBY: I was called for jury duty and was
really looking forward to serving, but when I told my
thisband, he said: "You HAVE to get out of it!" I asked
him why and he couldn't give me a good reason, he just
demanded that I get out of it.
Abby, I think it would be a good experience for me.
Furthermore, I regard it as my civic duty. My children are
in high school, and it wouldn't be a hardship for me.
I know you are all for keeping peace in the family, but
I honestly think my husband is wrong in demanding that I
get out of serving on a jury. So how do I defend my
position? Sign me "HUNG"
DEAR HUNG: You're right when you say it's your
"civic duty." I hope your husband never faces serious
accusations, but ask him how he'd feel if he did and were
tried by a judge alone because all his neighbors and fellow
citizens shirked their responsibility to sit in judgment on
his case.
Then tell him to read the Declaration of Independence,
and he will be reminded that one of his forefathers' com-
plaints against the tyranny of King George was denial of
jury trials. If your husband persists in the tyranny of


denying you the right to serve on a jury, declare your own
civic independence. It is one of only two public services a
citizen is called upon to perform; the other is voting.

DEAR ABBY: We met an attractive couple at the home
of mutual friends. They seemed nice and quite eager to be
friendly. The woman called and invited us to their home for
dinner. The morning of the evening we were to go there the
wife called and asked me what size SHOE my husband
wore. I was surprised at such a peculiar question, and
asked her why she wanted to know. She said, "We have
oyster-white carpeting and don't want it soiled, so I'm
providing all the guests with house slippers."
When I told my husband about this I had a hard time
getting him to go. We had a pleasant evening, and all the
guests kind of laughed at exchanging their shoes for house
slippers at the door. My husband was uncomfortable in
those silly slippers and the other men kept passing "looks"
back and forth thruout the evening.
It didn't really bother me, but I wonder if you would
ask your guests to do such a thing? Or is she a kook?
JUST WONDERING

DEAR JUST: I wouldn't, but that doesn't mean that
she's a "kook." To each his own. And in Japan its the thing
to do.

CONFIDENTIAL TO VIRGO IN S. F.: Go back to
school and get as much as you can afford in the way of
education. "Chance favors the prepared mind." [Louis
Pasteurl
Hate to write letters? Send $1 to Abigail Van BarSe.
132 Lasky Dr., Beverly Hills, Cal. WMI2, for Abby's booklet.
**Bow to Write Letters for All Oceasios."


Uhr grtbutt


From Page 6
& History; Rowena B. Smith,
English Language & Religious
Knowledge.
Nola J. Spence, English
Language, History & Religious
Knowledge; Emily Strachan,
Religious Knowledge; Portia E.
Strapp, English Language;
Byron N. Stubbs, English
Language; Leroy M. Sumner,
English Language; Ronald M.
Sutherlani, English Language;
George D. Swann, English
Language; Beryl M. Symonette,
Biology & Religious
Knowledge; Keith Symonette,
Art, Mathematics & Physics
with Chemistry. Vernon J.
Symonette, English Language.
Edward Taylor, English
Language & History; Florence
L. Taylor, English Language;
Lucy A. Taylor, English
Language; Paulette Taylor,
English Language; Thelma
Thomas, Human Biology;
Barbara Thompson, English
Language; Cecil J. Thompson,
English Language & English
Literature; Cynthia Thompson,
Human Biology; Damaris
Thompson, English Language
& Religious Knowledge:
Diana S. Thompson, English
Language; Edwin L.
Thompson, Art; Elizabetih


GCE examination results


Thompson, Human Biology;
Howard W. Thompson,
History; Magnal Thompson
Religious Knowledge; Vincente
Thompson, History;
Christopher Toote, Geography,
Human Biology & Religious
Knowledge.
Althea A. Turnquest,
History; Kevin A. Turnquest,
English Language & Human
Biology; Norma Turnquest,
Geography, History & Human
Biology; Edgar W. Thurston,
English Language & History;
Rodwick Turnquest, English
Language, Geography &
Mathematics; Sandra
Turnquest, Human Biology &
Religious Knowledge; Joyce M.
Varga, English Language;
Joanne 1. Verdon, English
Language.
Bruce Walker, Mathematics
& Religious Knowledge; Inez
Watkins, English Language;
Joseph Walker, English
Language; Floyd Watkins,
Mathematics; Harry Webster,
Geography; Pandora Wells,
Human Biology & Religious
Knowledge; lluewitt Whylly,
Human Biology & Religious
Kn owledge; Mildred


Williamson. Religious
Knowledge;: elma Wilson,
English Language & English
Literature. David E. Wood,
English Language & Religious
Knowledge: Vivia D. Young,
English Language, Iris Zonicle,
Religious Knowledge;
Josephine Zonicle, Biology &
English Language.
ADVANCED LEVEL RESULTS
Barbara A. Ballard.
Economics: D'Anne L. Barret,
History ('O' Level Pass):
Godwin Blydcn, Inglish
Literature ('0' level Pass): Inet
M. Clarke, English Literature
('0' Level Pass); Michael
Cooper, Economics; Hlortense
Douglas, Itnglish Literature
('O' Level Pass). (eta Fraser,
English L.iterature: Stephen
Jones, History: Warren C.
Jones, Art; Evadne Lodge,
English Literature ('0' Level
Pass) Heskert Marshall, Art ('0'
Level Pass); Newton
McDonald, Economics ('O'
Level Pass); Carlton Martin,
Economics; Frit7burn Iorest,
Religious Kniowledge: Sharma
Saith, Zoology; Leon II. Smith,
British constitutionn ('O' Level
Pass): Cecil Thompson, lHistory


('O' Level Pass): Basil L..
Pyfronm. I onomics ('O' Level
Pass).
C. H.REEVES EVENING
INSTITUTE '0' LEVEL
B lone v a Adder le
Geography: Angel J. Archer,
English Language; Rosemund
Archer, English Language;
Dolores N. Archer, English
Language: (;arth M. Beache.
History & Mathematics, Ursula
A. Bethel, Mathematics: Janet
M. Bullard, Commerce; (urlean
P. Clarke, English Language:
Melford Clarke, Mathematics;
Ella J. Collie, English
Language; Veronica I Cooper,
English Language; na Mac
Cox, Commerce: Vernell 1.
Calmer, I english Language:
Kendal P. (urtis, English
Language.
Denver W. Dames,
Mathematics: Pearly Jane
Dawkins, English Language;
Thelma B. Demeritte, English
Language: Reginald Ferguson,
Religious Knowledge: Vernal
D. Gibson, English Literature,
History & Religious
Knowledge; Kesxeda R. Henry,
English literature: C(armen V.


Hephurn, English Language &
Human Biology: Ruby linsey,
Biology & History: Janet
Hutchenson. e english
Language: Merlene I). Kelly,
History & English Language:
Andrea P. Major, English
Language: Vernita Mott.
English Language. Leslie J.
Munroe. English Language.
Henrietta J. Newton, English
Language; Catherine M. Patton,
Religious Knowledge. Ruth E.
Pratt. english Language: Alfred
W. Ramse Religious
Knowledge, Catherine N.
Roberts, I english Language:
Dave Roker. I english Language:
Lozier Roker, History &
English Language: Maril n
Rolle, Religious Knowledge.
Pedro 1). Rolle. Conmm, ine.
Cynthia Sargent, I english
Language, Rudolph IH. Smith.
Spanish: Bett\ Stuhhs, -nglish
Language: I ana 1 'la lor.
Spanish. Joycelhn Verence,
English language. Cecilia -.
Jones. History ('0()' I.eel pass).
Florence M. Rolle. Hiistor\ CO'(
Level pass).
FREEPORT BAHAMAS
- O'LEVEL
Henry A. Adderley.


7


"Happy to meet you...






Im the Helpful Banker


"You 11 find me at any branch




of the Royal Bank"









The Royal The Helpful Bank

ROYAL BANK
Branches throughout the Bahamas.


.5

-____ --" ____--I


I


Geography & History;
Desmond B. Butcher, English
Language; Lucie V. Ceford,
Religious Knowledge; Mavis M.
Darville. English Language &
A r t Marian Darville,
Geography : Arnette Fernander,
English language ; Jacqueline
F owler. English Langu-
age, Geography; Maxwell
Grant. Geography;: Grafton
I ill. Economics; Glenford
Malcolm, !-nglish Language,
History & Human Biology;
Ludell Martin, Religious
Knowledge: Urwin Patrick,
English Language. Franklyn
Pratt. History: Dorcas Rolle,
i-nghsh Language: Marilyn A.
Rollc. English Language;
.Merlene Taylor, Biology.
Pytrom Ila lor, Geography:
S\ Ivia I urnquest, English
language: Sheena A. Tynes,
A.rt Alexander Williams,
Biologs. Cheiristry, English
L language. History &
Mathematics, Victoria Willis,
I nulish i'anguage; Edith
Zonicle. I nghsh Language.
FREEPORT BAHAMAS
'A' LEVEL
D)esmond B. Butcher,
History: Kathleen A. Fryer,
I english Literature: (rafton
Itill. British Constitution ('O'
On Page 12Col.'7


7











DISCOVERY DAY CONTESTANT


S X T F N-ye ar-old
Bernadette Thompson has
entered the 1()'3 Miss
Discovery l)ay Pageant A
student ot Si Augustine's
College she formerly attended
St. Thomas Moore and St.
John's Prep School
Her parents are Mr and Mrs.
James M I hompson of
Maxwell ane and she wants to
become a lawscr like her
father
Bernadette's Ihobbies are
swimming, boating, racing and
dancing S he iImeasures
34-24-3, and w ighlis 1 t Ilbs.
'he contest xill bte hc'd
again this *ear ,at L[. ( .icrct
Theatre on P'iridisc Islnd.
C(uini ttee me1b' ers c'.
I Iva Rolle, Mi aiam ( ul: er. I
RusselJ. Jackie \rTi'brN ster.
A It red Stew, at I h!i'li
Lockha rt and \ hael \a
S\ imonette .
WHIST TOURNAMENT
A WHIiISI tourinaiIment 'li
be held ever luc,,sd.i .i S
p I. for si\ weeks K.'"g'i ;g
October 0 at St nnes'. I t\
illll
Prn/es will bc aw,.irt d d .i d
retreshtmenitsl will be on s.il
Proceeds le inI i L oi t I iilh


1 "
BERNADETTE THOMPSON


Arrived today; San Salvador
I express ,,romi San Salvador and
Rutm Ca% Soutih Andros
I xpress ctroti I-Icithera. Tropic
1l)a, trom tWest Palmn Beach
Sailed todai I ropic l)ay for
West 'ailn Beach
-irimp i tomorrow I SS.
\a.rd Gra, Southwi ard from
St I homa-'." \'xsw la,, tro ( .it
Island
\ard! t ,rs. Soutlh\vard lor
Miam'!
WEATHER


-rn- ,oms-2-CAo s 'Ltro A i n cJ r.I.I


M 3 STARTS FRIDAY
Matinee 3:00 & 5:00, Evening 9:00 'Phone 2-1004 2-10051
* I










Reservations not claimed by 8:45. will be sold
on first come. first served basis.


Now Showing Last Day Friday
Matinee starts at 2 15 ontinuous Sho g
F evening 9 00 fron 3:00
"SLAUGLHTI RS BIG(
RIPOFF- R 'CLAM BAKE" PG
Jim Brown Elvis Presleg
l 1d MacMahon Shelle, Fabares
P S PLLS
"D)LIATHOF A "RIDlE B (liN I
(,I FIGHTER" P( VENGEANCE" PG.(
Richard Vildmark C(huck Connors
Lena Horie Michael Rennie
PLUS Late Feature
Friday night. ',o one under 17 will h
,No one untler I 7 itll e admitted,. admitted


NOW SHOWING
Matinee Continuous from 2. Evening 8:30 'Phone 3-4666


* the Invisible



* fist I

The fight for Supremacy between
the KUNG-FU and KARATE masters


AN AUBREY SCHENCK PRODUCTION
I MOREBDD ITHRR blVE
Di PARD- m LuxeN A
PARENTAL DISCRETION AbVISED.


Olft he ibuttle Thursday, October 4, 1973





DOLLY MADISON ANNUAL


















STARTS FRIDAY,0CTOBER 5TH (Some Advertised Specials Have Slight Damage)
101 Mi NO CHARGE FOR DELIVERY 1


SALE
$350


Reg. Value $575 Save $225


1042
CONTEMPORARY WALNUT SALE
BED ROOM SET $299
Reg. Value $525 Save $226


ASSORTED DINING from $15
AND LOUNGE CHAIRS
(some damaged) AND UP


2700-91 SALE
BUFFET SERVERS L
Spanish Styling Exquisitly made $125
Reg. Value $200 Save $75


ODDS & ENDS
HEAD BOARDS
(asst. Sizes) (some damaged)


from $25
AND UP


ASSORTED PAINTINGS- SALE $25
Value to $200 AND UP



ASSORTED EXPENSIVE
HAND-WOVEN RUGS 40% OFF




Miscellaneous NIGHT STANDS PRICED
& COCKTAIL TABLES, Etc. FROM $25


5-PIECE Extra Quality
DINETTE SETS, SALE
Vinyl Seats, Mica Tops $89.95
Reg. Value $120 Save $30


SHAG BEDSPREADS. SALE
Real Fur Look
Reg. Value $75 Save $32 $43



GIANT SIZE FUR PILLOWS SALE
Reg. Value $15.95 Save $5 $10.95



Miscellaneous STATUES, UP TO
FIGURINES, ASH TRAYS, 50% OFF
etc. 50% OFF


SCRATCH & DENT
BED ROOM SETS


40% OFF


I X'MYOO


%Li



p1 ^ -^ **

?!.^


Large Assortment of LAMPS
Values to $45

from

$10.50 AND UP


Q
0-1
t*,


I


MUSHROOM SEATS SALE $29.95
Reg. Value $35 & $45 & $39.95




ALL ARTIFICIAL TREES 20% OFF




Large Vinyl
BEAN BAG CHAIRS SALE $59.95



ALL MAJOR ITEMS 20% 0FF
IN STORE


mL


-- - I-I --~~--


L


>













Thursday, October 4, 1973


Hilda Barrett now Scotia Bank training officer

"HILDA BARRETT is ideally suited and equipped for the
position," said Victor S. Einarson, manager of the Bank of Nova
Scotia, when he announced her appointment to training officer.
"She not only has a great deal of experience as a teacher but,
what I think is equally important, she has the personality needed


to do a fine job.
"Mrs. Barrett is one of the
growth assets of the bank I
inherited when I became
manager of the Scotia Bank in
the Bahamas" Mr. Einarson
said. "She has that certain
something called dedication
which enables her to put the
extra interest and push in a job
to make it a success. This can
be seen both in her work here
and in her public spirited
performance in community
projects.
"One of those projects, for
instance, is the Nassau
Amateur Operatic Society
where she holds the demanding


The Admiral
says:

"Go with the
leader...
An Admiral!"


Ac^dmircl.

Refrigerators

See them at your
Admiral
dealer's showroom


IAYIOR INDUSTRIES LID.
1 11 Shirley Street
P.O. Box N-4806
TELEPHONE 28941/5


job of choral director. How the
Society feels about her, sums
up our opinion, too. In one of
their programmes, they said,
'The Society is indeed
fortunate in having Hilda's
experience and knowledge at
their disposal. Her considerable
ability is matched only by her
remarkable patience. She copes
with apparently
insurmountable problems with
a sense of humour and
perservcrance. Her wit has
cleared the air in many a tense
moment and her sparkling
personality keeps us all
cheerful.'
"At Scotia Bank, we are
taking the problem of training
Bahamians very seriously,"
concluded Mr. Einarson. "For
in addition to establishing a
permanent staff training
officer, we are building a
classroom for the purpose in
the main branch."
TEACHER
Hilda Barret was born in
Nassau, graduated from
Government High School and
taught Maths, English and
Music for 17 years. She
attended the Guildhall in
London for a year and earned
the L.G.S.M. and L..T..L.
degrees in music there.
Mrs. Barrett joined the Bank
of Nova Scotia in 1970 and
before her present
appointment, was personnel
officer.
Besides her work with the
Nassau Amateur Operatic
Society and two sons and two
daughters demanding her
attention, Mrs. Barrett is the
organist at St. Andrew's
Presbyterian Kirk, was pianist
for the Ebony Musical
Association for over 30 years,
is a founder-member and
adjudicator of the Music
Festival Committee, which has


U


THE




FREE NATIONAL MOVEINHT


will hold a




PUBLIC MEETING

Friday, October 5, 1973.

8:00 RM.


at the



COiUMBUS PRIMARY SCHOOL

Wulff Road and Collins Avenue.



VITAL NATIONAL ISSUES

WILL BE DISCUSSED


By the Leader,

MR. KENDAL G.L. ISAACS,


the Chairman, MR. ORVILLE TURNQUEST

and Others.





COME AND HEAR!


1 j


HILDA BARRETT promoted
Bank of Nova Scotia.
operated music festivals in New
Providence and the family
islands for the past 1 5 years, is
a member of the board of the
Y.W.C.A., a council member of
the Girl's Guide Association
and a member of the Corona
Society.
"I have just returned from a
Training Officer course at the
Scotia Bank's Regional
Training Office in Toronto,"
said Mrs. Barrett, "and I'm all
excited and enthusiastic about
my new job. I really enjoyed
the course and must say I
learned a lot. Of course, we





KISSINGER TO VISIT
CHINA IN OCTOBER
TOKYO (AI') Dr. Henry A.
Kissinger., U.S. Secretary of State
and assistant to the U.S. President
for national security affairs, will
visit China Oct. 26-29, Peking's
Hsinhua News Agency reported
Thursday.
Hsinhua, in a broadcast
monitored in Tokyo said "it has
been agreed upon through
consultations that )Dr. Henry A.
Kissinger, United States Secretary
of State and assistant to the U.S.
President for national security
affairs, will visit the People's





Intimacy


and the


married


woman.


The need to be sure
It's so important for your well
being as a woman to feel sure
about the functioning and fresh
ness of your body
Because douching isn't practi
cal, or even always advisable, cau
tious married women of today rely
on Norforms feminine supposito
nes.

Positive protection tv.ou ways
Norformnns do a two fold job most
effectively They protect you
against embarrassing problems
with their highly perfected germi-
cidal formula And they protect
you against offensive odors with
their rapid deodorant action.

Complete confidence
So simple and convenient, Nor-
formsdissolveat normal body tern
perature to form a protective film.
Theydo not harm delicate internal
tissue.
Next time ask for Norforms, an
ideal way to have the confidence
you need as a married woman.
Sold at pharmacies in packages
of 6, 12 and 24.
Informative booklet, write to:
Norwich International
410 Park Avenue,
New York,
N.Y 10022


to Training Officer at the

covered the job procedures for
tellers, ledger keepers and so
on from the instructor's point
of view but considerable
emphasis was put on public
relations and that's a subject 1
am particularly interested in.
(;ood relations with the public,
the pleasant handling of
people, as you know, is
important to a hank's success.
You can he sure," Mrs. Barrett
added. "that I will lie doing all
I can to make the phrase 'the
pleasant people at the Bank of
Nova Scotia' become
completely trnie."





Republic of China from October 26
through October 29. 1973."
MODERATE QUAKE
IN CALIFORNIA
SAN JOSI-., ('ALII (Al') A
moderate earthquake awakened
sleeping residents from Santa Ctru
to the San I rancisco Bay area early
today.
There was only one immediate
report of damage. At a Howling
Alley here, where the quake
apparently severed a water pipe
inside the building.
the tremor measured 4.25 on
the Richter scale at the tiniversiti
of, California seismographic station
in Berkeley. Research assistant
Jerrs Simila said the quake took
place at 3:07 a.m. along the San
o\ndreas fault near Morgan Hill. 20
miles south o f San Jose.
"An, thing between 4 and 5 is
conisid ered a moderate
earthquake." said Simila.
I he Richter scale is a measure ii
ground motion, -Every increase oft
one number means a tenfold
increase in magnitude. Thus. a
reading of 4.25 reflects .ill
earthquake 10 times stronger than
onie 3.25. A quike measuring 5 'r
more calln iautl.,e considerable
damage.
MIDDLE EAST SETTLE IE NT
PROPOSED BY ISRAEL
INI'Il I) NATIONS (A-P)
Israel todaN proposed a Middle I ast
settlement modeled on lthe
ever closer ties of the nations nt
WVestern Europe.
-"lhie aim should he .i
community of sovereign states in
lie Middle I ast as in the Benelux
and the I uropean C'ommunities."
Israeli I foreign Minister Abba t han
said in a policy speech to the ti S
General Assembly
I-ban put forth the scheme in a;
speech that otherwise gave no sign
ol a break in the long deadlock
betsseen Israel and the Arabs.

ISRAEL CONTINUES TO
PRESS AUSTRIA
)i Rt SAlI M (Ali) Premier
(olid Meir's government, alter
Meeting in an extraordinary sessiiion,
called i on the Austrian goivernmiilne
to ciuonutine to give "tree and
unlimited passage" to Soviet Je\\
irnnligralin' io Israel.
A goerinient st atemente said
Austria's idi, iioni to close llie
Schoenau transit centre to Smset
Jews "constitutes a serious
impairment o tilhe foundations o
morality and international lasw and
is liable to encourage additional
acts of violence."
Observers interpreted tihe
statement to mean Israel will
continue to put pressure on the
Austrians to retract the decision
and will not immediately look for
alternative routes of immigration.
CHARGES INTERNATIONAL
PLOT AGAINST GUINEA
MONTROVIA, LIB RIA (AP)
The Guinean ambassador here,
Toure Benaaud has accused seven
countries of conspiring to
overthrow the government of'
(;uineaii President Sekou [oure
He said the Guinean government
has received a secret document on
the activities of certain (Guineanr
citizens abroad which proved, he
claimed, that France. \sest
(iermanv, Portugal. Israel, South
Africa, Senegal and the Ivoru Coast
were financing a movement to
overthrow Sekou Toure.

TWO KILLED 200 INJURED II
COLOMBIAN BUS STRIKE
BOGOTA. COLOMBIA (AP)
For a third day this capital was
nearly> paralized Wednesday due to
a bus strike that had developed into
violent riots.


ihPe uribtm


CLASSIFIED SECT


No NOICE I NI


C 11644
NOTICE is'hereby given that
JOHN PERCY MOYLE
ROBERTS of Sea Breeze
Ftates P 0 Rox 5379.
Nassau, is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship.
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 27th day of
September, 1973, to The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship. P.
0. Box N-7147. Nassau.
C11649
NOTICE is hereby given that
Mr. William A. Hendfield of
Palm Beach Street, south,
Nassau, Bahamas is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship.
for naturalisation as a citizens
of The Sahamnas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why naturalisatiori should nrot
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of th e fac ts within
twenty-eight days from the
27th day of September. 1973
to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N7147, Nassau.
C11648
NOTICE is hereby given that
Mrs. Eunicie Malcadis Henfield
of Palm Beach Street, south,
Nasscu, Bahamas is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Natiri ality and Citizenship for
naturilisation as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why naturalization should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the f acts within
twenty-eight days from the
27th day of September 1973
to The Minister re',ponsible ior
Nationality and Citizenship P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

C11645
NOTICE is hereby given that
PHYLLIS MERLE ROBERTS
of Sea Breeze Estates, P. 0.
Box 5379, Nassau, is applying
to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should riot be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 27th day of
September, 1973, to The
M i n ister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

Cl 1671
NOTICE is hereby given that
VICTOR PERCIVAL ALBERT
TUCK of Deveaux St. P. O.
Box 4882, Nassau is applying
to the Minister 1 .1 i, foir
Nationality and Citizenship
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written,
arid signed statement of the
icts within twenty-eight days
from the 27th day of
September. 1973 to the
M i n ister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Bo x N7147, Nassau.


C11850
NOTICE is hereby given that
EDMUND ST. GEORGE
RIGBY of Stapledon Gardens,
Nassau is applying to the
Min sister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
vwhy registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 3rd day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible foI Nationality and
C(-tizernship. P 0 Biox N/147,
Nassau.

Cl 1663
NOTICE is hereby given that
FRANCIS (MATHURIN)
LAURISTON of Ridgeland
Park, East P. 0. Box 4457 is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality arind
Citizenship, tor naturalisation
as a citizen of The Bahamas
and that any person who
knows any reason why
naturalisation should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 27th day of Sept.
1973 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship P. O. Box N7147,
Nassau.

Ct 1692
NOTICE is hereby given that
JOSIAH TUCKER of Minnie
St. Nassau, Bahamas is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
27th day of Sept. 1973 to The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.


V I*Rollo


NO TIC h ''ib r",- '-'.:
'\NTHONY WOO 'I 54, BRuL,
Ave,. Fr o rii I t. Gridiin B0, ti'rj,
is applyI i to the M V ist i
repour'Sible for Njtiornr lity arnd
C tizerenshili), foi natural is tiron
s j citizen of The Bihaana,
and that anry ipetsoen who
knows any reason wV.hy
naturalisation should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight djay
from the 27th dav of
September 1973 to The
M inistelr repsp nsibhle f
Nationality aind( Cit /pensr lir i r'
O. Box N7147. N.ass,,'!

C11664
NOTICE is herebv given thli
EUPHIMIA (MATIHURIN)
LAURISTON of Ridgjeland
Park, East P. 0. BuBox447 is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality arind
Citizenship, foi nature alisatnio
as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who
knows any reason why
naturalisation should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 27th day of Sept.
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.


- --


Cl 1678
NOTICEF is Ihi etby (jivti 'tri
WILLIAM l O Y l f I R
JOHNSON, JR ol P. 0 (0
N1628 (or GCoir e o,.,t .
Exuirna) is applil% i, th
M i rl iste) r' i ', h ,)1
National ty Ini! t i t .
for natrii ,. ,' ,
of The iiahali a id,,. I ,i
person who k wi 'r',- ,-'r' i ,i
why natuiahlsa'(i ; !
be grant,, d r 'l (ir j,
w written air i ,! ( ( 'd .. ,
of th e a .(', : (
twenty -ight ;)a -'s 0r 1 i
27th d(ay (' Septo brr [ r ;
to The M i fisti, r e.ipo,,ii j ,it
Nationality arid Cr t i 'ensh p. P.
0. Box N7 14 7. Na, >au

C 11666
NOTICE is hereby giv ,; a'i
JOAN E SAUNLUl PS ,if
Culmer Alley off Kemp rijd
is applying to the M ; r;.. t
responsible for Nat irna'.i'. ,r-id
Citizenship, fs i .'iri ,a .
a citizen of 'The I 1 i,' ",', ,P,
that any pris .'! '
any reason '/r i r ',r i'- -',
should no l . : h'd
send a w i ';'
statement o ifn r .. '
twenty-eight day l i,,i .
27th day of S l t/. l'i7 1
M i nr ister ro' wri, !hl 'r *I
Nationality aut ( it ,r ,
0. Box N 714 /. N, sai

C11674
NOTICE is it .lb r .' .'
CLARITA RIG13Y il1 ',-v,-",
Terrace, Centievillc'. i )|. pl ri,
to the Minist r lespl n ible al
Nationality ,r d Cili.'r'i p,
fo r i ec i t i o '
a citizen of I' i i' .P-
that any person .,Mi r, ,r w'
any reason wihy regis, i ithni
should not be gi amted J.I'rild
send a writt,(i arnd rgIrd
state ent ,f t: ti: i,r t- .i ,
twenty-eight day, f ,i, t.e
27th day of Seip,-rrbtmri 1'73
to The M inistir rr's )l'ii .tir t)i!
Nationality roid ( il'zeo, 'it P
0. Box N714/, Njr,,u

C11689
NOTICE is hereb- giv'' tI-it
ELAINE HAMILTON K-,
West Street, N.iss N. '.
Bahamas is ali- inr' rg L 'tIe
Mii nistei ies oisibtilr f i
Nationality ajid Cl t l t'' I,'
foil registrdti i i iir tui ,ii -ii it'ln
as a citizen of The Ba'imas,
anid that anry person whio
knows any lesson why
re rgis ii ra t1 orn atuid a ll i alio
should nriot be grrnrted slihoild
send a wvitton and siginr-d
statement of tihe fits within
twenty-eight da's from thi
27thi day of Sept. 19/3 t Trhe
Mi istetir esrpo iib, ftr
Nationality arid Citi,-trinsirip P.
0. Box N7147, NassI,'I

C1 1688
NOTICE is hereby given thtil
HUBERT iiAMILTON (,f Koy
West St. Naissi. ,i N. P B.lihafim.
is applying to tl,' r,, irirs toI
iesirirsible f(i Na't'o' altir i-d

natui alS t'ion it r itii.Lri of
The Balia m nd itht aPny
liero' ,0 W o l r 'LV- ,inyv i ri-soii
wiy i egi r ,l! iorri o,,it rli ,atir.lt
shtiould niot be grcji.-t ed sho tild
send j ,vritteri en rid signed
statement of the f'i ts< within
twerint eight days fi om the
27th day of Sept. 1973 to The
M ini r tei i'ls onsible fi
Nationality iand Citi,'ner t, ir P
0. Box N7147. Nassau',

Ci 1661
NO 1TICE is ihoe by give' that
M I C A: I C HAR E
I ARROW of BReah Haven
Ssi., South Be.'c h, Nassa,,
u.aliama's, i' applying i to thl
. i n i rI i ie'sponsii r ble f.
National ,' Jnd Citimons'ip,

Tir 1 liWihrnus, nid ti at a 1
* ;\ i who k' l ws any lei sonr
s' ie'ilisiitationi should not be
iuii 'rd ,LI liilrd senid a wVi ittenii
di ,I 'iiitrt'd st atemieni t r ,f tl i
iJi r'* witiiin twen ty-eilit lday
he m tIn' 27th day of Sept

i i,-+ o n '[)l f01 N ,) 'i'i,'r i.t'-, intd
t. i i.'e l tir .. P (). i N N 7 4 7,
ti, sd i U.


--77':' 1


11655
4OT ICE is hereby given that
JOSEPH WILLIS BAIN of Pine
Dale Grand Bahama is applying
to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
fo ri registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
pescrn who knows any reason
wniy uegistrJtion should not be
granted should send a written
arid signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
tirun the 27th day of Sept.
1973 t-o The Minister
re',ponsible fori Nationahty and
COti/z-wrhip-. 0 Box N7147,

(:l1l b67
NOT ICE is hereby given that
CHILI A BASTIAN of Taylor
Steet, N iss.:u is applying to
the Mii 'r fi f responsible for
Nation I oit-o an- d Citizenship,
foli r dtuaibsation as a citizen
of Tne Bj-.amas, and that any
iier' o.' w'o krows any reason
why 'Iat' a: a-'ti)n should not
be g raitted should send a
v uvirlen and signed statementt
If t e "icts within
twen ty-e'ig' t ddys from the
27t/' day if September 1973
to TI e M nirte i responsible for
NitiLnnjlit, ,u-d Citizenship P.
0O B,.x N7147. Nassau.

S1 1656
NOT ICE is hereby given that
JAM ES ALONZO WALKING of
tigh t Mile Rock, Grand
Bah ma, i- applying to the
r !in-1 iIter r s-ponsible for
Nition ality and Citizenship,
for reqistiation as a citizen of
The Bahamas. and that any
poison who knows any reason
why regist'ation should not be
qianrted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
f rrir the 27th day of Sept.
1173 to The Minister
tesp)onsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. O. Box N7147,
Nassau.

L11' S50
NOT ICE is hereby given that
LEO PAUL of Farrington
Road Box 6156 is applying to
i lo Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
rot nraturalisation as a citizen
if The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
wihy Naturalisation should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts within
twenrty-eight days from the
27tt! day of September 1973
to The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
PO. Box N7147, Nassau.

(Il 657
NOTICE is hereby given that
CA .' RIDGE STANFIELD
GfnEIN[ of Eight Mile Rock,
Gi rn d uRl harna is applying to
th Minister responsible for
Nait .r a ty and Citizenship,
o '-og'.q rationr as a citizen of
Thli Baih mras, arid that any
pIe-s ,' who knows any reason
wh l ,rqi-tration', should not be
.i! 'il -d ih'.'ould send a written
1nd ,ngo(d statement of the
'at f- .vt r twenty-eight days
f t .." 27th day of Sept.
9 sl to The Minister
'sp t',Ibloe for Nationality and
Sit-shi, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nas j ,.


TO PLACE YOUR ADV.

TELEPHONE 219B0 EXT. 5


I p n


--


I


I


C1 1670
NOTICE is hereby given that
MR. JOHN TONY of Lion's
Road, Nassau (formerly of
Haiti) is applying to the
NMinister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for naturalisation as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why naturalisation should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
27th day of September 1973
to The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

C11673
NOTICE is hereby given that
SIDOLES LOUIS of Young
Street, Nassau is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for naturalisation as a citizen
of The Bahamas and that any
person who knows any reason
why naturalization should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
27th day of September 1973
to The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship.
P.O. Box N7147, Nassau.

C11694
NOTICE is hereby given that
BENOIT STANISCLES
ofBrougham Street of Nassau
Bahamas is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for naturalisation as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why naturalisation should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 27th day of
Sept. 1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.
Cl 1896
NOTICE is hereby given that
DAVID FRANCOIS (known as
DAVID FRANCIS) of Alice
Tawn, Eleuthera is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for naturalisation as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why naturalisation should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 4th
day of October 1973 to The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.


C11665
NOTICE is hereby given that
MARY (MATHURIN)
LAURISTON of Ridgeland
Park, East, P. 0. Box 4457 is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for naturalisation
as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who
knows any reason why
naturalisation should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 27th day of
September 1973 to The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

C11887
NOTICE is hereby given that
VICTORIA ELIZABETH
PALMER of Eight Mile Rock,
Grand Bahama is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 4th day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N7147,
Nassau.
C11880
NOTICE is hereby given that
LEONARD RONALD
WILSON of Minnie Street,
South Beach District, Nassau
Bahamas is applying to The
Mi nister responsible for
legistlation as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why
registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 4th day of October
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.

C11875
NOTICE is hereby given that
LELIO LEB RIN of
Port-de-Paix, Haiti is applying
to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for naturalisation as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why naturalisation should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the 'facts within
twenty-eight days from the 4th
day of October 1973 to The
M in ister responsible for
Nationality ;and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.


i


-L


_ _~____ 4 ,,, u ~ re----- -p-


N1OT _L is hereby given that
LL 0T HA ENDED Y
It, N Ur II LD of Peardale
South, Nr P. is applying to the
Mi r. iteir responsible for
N'.' o l' t' and Citizenship,
fil reqistation as a citizen of
1he Balhamas, and that any
pr-, who knows any reason
wlh, 'r t'-'ration should not be
g,jr '.'d shouldd send a written
,i! .i'',0 i statement of the
', I withn twenty-eight days
t th, 27th day of
he p: r 1973 to The
M I' ,ite' responsible for
N-i. -njit aid Citizenship, P.
0 R Nx N.'147.

' 'Otl 's -ereb, given that
(1 P,.' J(IbA THERESA COX
i f FI JOSFPH) of Hospital
%- .'-a u, Baiharnas is
S the Minister
!," : :b io ality and
or t r a naturalisation
d' u'.ren if The Bahamas,
t j' perIson who
'," ', i reasLon why
it li, a ti on should not be
qial'ted should send a written
,id signed statement of the
ftict'- within twenty-eight days
rio ri the 27th day of
September 1973 to The
-" rI rsteM responsible for
Nat' ionality ard Citizenship, P.
0 Box N7147, Nassau.
C 1 1 b062
NOTICE is tereby given that
AL LAN CLAIRMONTE
[STWICK of Montrose
Avrinie, Nassau is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
fior egist action as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
anid signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
form the 27th day of Sept.
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Cit izenshif P. 0. Box N7147,
Nassau.













,hr Zributtr


Thursday, October 4, 1973


CLASSIFIED


SECTION


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS-FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV. TELEPHONE 21986 EXT. 5


NOTICE


'ii' .


i












I .........



















1 ,, .








i
i
i

i
1
, ,T k


'If
'ii

'ii


S '. D 'T




j h, '" , O' C'-

j ji ]rt.; /''.''. sr' d a written
,'d ," t :. ,' d* t < O ti ted
S ht day
'9 .j ** ,, / "'n day '''
ept .'9 D' ; to Tr,,






: P.


















'.1 644
tNOTIC (7 hir ij ,en that
SJOhN PI R P MOYI E
POor PT S ,,.fI'Sea EBreeze
Ft afe P 0 R,.Y 5379.
NissauIt, app v .ing to the
S I n sti rtp n.) sible for
N tioniliy an mid (Citizenship,
for rgrsl'.'ini as a citizen of
The Bahar,.as, and that any
person who knows ,ny reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenrty-eicht days
from the 27th daiy of
September. 1973, to The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N-7147. Nassau.


< 11888
NOTICE I hetebv given that
Mh, HNICI JONt S of I eight
li k Ro', k d Grand Bahania is
.i!;)i; t I o, the Minister
'n*r'r''i) iOlr' 'or Nationality and
( .. 'p.h l' 'h 1 re jistiation aa
S '.' o if I l i ahairT as. and
IJa wv person wwho 1inows
f' it'.rIson why registration
., .' i:d no; be (panted shoLuld
i'. vd a wr it t-n and signed
t J "~/ntl nt of the facts within'
'' A .': i, eight dayb omn the 4th
1, '* Oi lbir 19 73 to The
'I .e' 'e-ip n ible n'f
S t ', and C citizenship. P.
0 H,,x N7117, Nassau.


'


bedrooms two bath,
apartment. With large living
arid dining all basically
furnished Victoria Court
APARTMENTS on Elizabeth
Avenue between Shirley and
Bay Street. Facilities, phone,
laundry, parking, T. V.
antenna, airconditioned. Phone
54631 between 8 a.m. and 5
p.rm.


FOR RENT


T-i' --- I


0 OT IiF is hereby given that
J\NE ANN MORRIS of Light
.',! Rock, Grand Bahama is
jlip L l ng to the Minister
i',sitble for Nationality arid
ie/r)ship, for registration as
a iIi i:'-' of The Bahamas, and
thii ,iii iersorn who knows
r 'easri why registration
Sh ud i not be granted should
.',rd a wn rtten and signed
.'.rteni'nt of the facts within
-'.ent' ,ceaht days from the Ith
a October 1973 to The
ii ister responsible 'or
',ti'' ralrtv and Citizenshp P.
SItox N7147, Nassau.

REAL ESTATE

11337
WtY I RE 7 WI SELL
',0 'red houLses out listings
,ire getting exhausted. Ring or
i;'me in and list with us. This is
S .28th year DIAL 22033.
1.,I.1IANOS REALTY
-,.'' ..4 r 1Y

S1 1/03
0 () PROMPT attention and
o', ,'r vii, i whether vior: .vish
,, a h ,n e, sell or list call
,. a. s ,rt Bil's Real Estate

.,',e .i) offer houses in all
S :s and in all sections
Providur-ne at
rD ti'Llve prices.

F OR SP LF
'i j iON 3 tb droomr 31d :
] with large grounds,
el llar ood sea view.
:'., 000.
N SA J FA ASTF 3 bedroom,
li athronrm w:th garage on
aii L.rii' lot $37.500.
NASSAU FAST 120 x 120
hilt' p lot with sloping
approach $10,000. Phone
41466.


ONLY $75 DE-POSIT secures
0 0 0 I,, Y.. get beach
,,lht Lundergri)un!d utilttleP ,
;'r;vatc lake. From $5800 and
$80 month No INTEREST
HAHARGES ( compare this
.',th other s'ubdivisiorns.
.ill Pat Rutherford at 4-1141
Morley & O'BrLenat 2-4148
2-3027 or cL'me to the
"AMACRAW BEACH MODEL
IrOME

11
S.SAl F'Y OWNER
4 t).' ,,,-; ' 2 bOth house --
S a, i [l. y failed in and
I r. P'l k'rd. o2 bedrooms
i iine'. I, beautiful
;i ir [.i.'c t in exclusive
"S i'r Par l Avernue". Close
Sand( aIll shopping.
,,it pi 1 2 722 (day)
j-. j (n iyh:).


'5 i1 I furnished 2
,. 2 bathrooms house
o ''. ol tainted, close
i, pleasant
...' s. Price $47,000 or
,: . Piho 21 741/2


O)P SALE
f- :i 4 t Ledroor' houses in
S w i'g o'estigous

.'i I/.| Vi'illas Skyline

t ' Par -The Grove
S" Gardens Sea

P ; rk Johnsori
,,' at- Werton
r .'ii i cifd Camperdown
Grtoloden Gates

S',hBUJPY PARK as well
] **'.1u* r" ( I w ant it.

." ';1 f.1 RCtI AL AND
5,. ri) t NIAL Iots or average
''" D,,,' id de"' and Family

S!,t,., ',, ,, if, rm 'ore I t 's real

CONTACT
,/iSr ON'S RE AL ESTATE
AGENCY
Ph .'' Bay & East Streets
PhonrO 21178or 55408
P 0 Box N4648
Nassau, Bahamas
or cable
DAVCO"




Cl1/772
ONE EXTRA LARGE two


items too


C11883
HARRY D. MALONE will sell
at his premises on Albury Lane
five doors from Shirley Street
on the right hand side in the
Eastern District of the Island
of New Providence on Friday
the 19th day of October A.D.,
1973 at 12 o'clock noon the
following property:-
ALL THAT piece parcel or
lot of land situate in the
Subdivision called and
known as Imperial Park in
the Eastern District of the
Island of New Providence
aforesaid having the Number
Eight (8) in Block Number
Five (5) in the said Plan of
the said Subdivision the said
Lot of land hereby conveyed
or so intended to be having
such position, boundaries,
shape, marks and dimensions
as are shown on the diagram
or plan attached to an
Indenture of Conveyance
dated the 5th day of
November, 1968 and made
between Nassau Beach
Properties Limited and The
Bank of Nova Scotia to
George Errol Simmonds
and Gladys Elaine
Simmonds and now of
record in the Registry of
Records in Book 1474 at
pages 250 to 255 and are
delineated on that part of
the said diagram or plan
which is Coloured Pink.
The property is being sold
under the power of sale
contained in an Indenture of
Mortgage dated the
Twenty-second day of July,
A.D., 1969 between George
Errol Simmonds and Gladys
Elaine Simmonds and The
Chase Manhattan Bank, N.A.
and recorded in the said
Registry of Records in Book
1474 at pages 256 to 272.
The sale is subject to a reserve
price and the right for the
Auctioneer or any person on
his behalf to bid up to that
price Terms 10% of the
purchase price at the time of
sale and balance on
completion.
Dated this 2nd day of October,
A.D., 1973.
HARRY D. MALONE
Public Auctioneer
October 4th, 11th and 18th


ART SUPPLIES

Cl 770
COMPLETE range of artists'
supplies. Oils, acrylics. canvas,
easels, etc. Bahamian Paint
Supply Ltd., Bay Street. Phone
2-2386, 2-2898.

CARS FOR SALE

C11826
1968 CHEVELLE MALIBU 2
door coupe. White/ Black
Vinyl. Radio, Power steering.
automatic shift. Good
mechanical condition. $900
O.N.O. for quick sale. Ring
4-2032 evenings, 2-2089 days.


C11839
GTO PONTIAC 1971 -
loaded power everything -
stereo tape perfect condition
- cash offers invited. Call
21667/8 days 31639 evenings.


CARS FOR SALE


C11773
ISLAND MOTOR
COMPANY
1970 LTD.
P.O. Box N-640
NASSAU. BAHAMAS
USED CARS

1 69 CHRYSLER
4 Door Auto White $950
1969 PONTIAC GTO
A/C Vinyl, Green $2500
1968 JAVELIN A/C $120'
1973 VICTOR S/W FE
Auto, Blue 856 miles $440(0
"7 VVV:V 2 V .%
Auto Green $750
1970 RAMBLER SST
4 Dr. Auto. Blue $2100
1967 TRIUMPH HERALD
White $900
1971 MERCURY COUGAR
Auto. Brown $3500
1970 PONTIAC LeMANS
S/Wagon $2600
1971 FORD CAPRI
Auto. Blue $1950
1969 FORD GALAXIES
4 Dr. A/C $18b0
1973 PONTIAC VENTURA
2 Dr. A/C Green $59001
'7J70 HII.LMAN u'i NX
4 Dr. Auto Whit $b50


i i 3 ; I I L i [ *,


C11707
UNFURNISHED 2 bedroom(
apartment, good location off
Mackey Street. Telephone
5-1758.
C11776
2 BEDROOM APARTMENT.
i treville. ele[_ho r,; -3. 79.
5-8679.

C11685
FURNISHED 2 Bedroom, one
bath apt. near waterfront with
telephone $195.00. Phone
5-8512.

C11763
COTTAGES and apartments
daily, weekly or monthly
airconditioned, fully furnished,
maid serivce available. Lovely
gardens and swimming pool.
Telephone 31297, 31093.

C11890
IN BLAIR 2 bedroom house,
fur nished, airconditioned.
Phone day 32261 after 6
p.m. 32048.

C11761
BAY STREET Store fot rent as
of October 15th. For
information call 2-3170.

C11882
BACHELOR ROOM IN Tedder
Close, Palmdale. For
information call 5-1044.


PUBLIC AUCTION

C11891
Bellgrave Auctioneers will sell
at Public Auction, 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday, October 10th.
1973, at Government Nursery.
Nassau Street, MInistrly of
o irks Obsolete Stock.
Including:
Lightening Rods
Flintkote
Paint (assorted enarnel)
Sealer
Tubes & Tyres (assorted)
'.'. .,,!',I11 Tow ers
Syphon Pumps
Pipe & fIlt, ,I


appointment to see
Mr. Mueller.


Ask for


C11876
PHILLIPS STEREO RECORD
Player $55
Hoover Floor Polisher,
Scrubber $30
Electric can opener/knife
sharpener $9
Bureau $40
Large Bookshelves $25
Telephone 58099


MARINE SUPPLIES

C11762
PACEMAKER 44 ft.
Luxurious Cruising Yacht.
Phone 3-2371.


MARINE SUPPLIES
C11669
LUXURY LIVING. 2 St<
Houseboat, 2 bedrooms
baths, excellently furnish
Asking $15,000.00.
ENTERPRISE SAILBC
complete with sails. $275
Call 5-6664 after 5:30 p.m.


C11894
1969 31ft. CHRIS CRAFT
Commander. Sleeps six, private
shower, two 230 h.p. engines
with less than 200 hours,
kitchenette, good condition.
Call 24267, 54011.


LOST
C 11911
LOST in the vicinity of Island
T. V. Service, Dowdeswell
Street one black brief case
containing papers valuable only
to owner. Reward offered.
Phone 2-2618.

IN MEMORIAL
C11874










"9

.



IN LOVING memory ot our
dear mother EMILY AUSTIN
STUBBS who departed this life
Octoher 4th 1967.
"hy will be done Oh Lord!"
Gone but not forgotten.
Sadly missed by children,
grandchildren and a host of
relatives and friends.


ANNOUNCEMENTS

('11871
GREEK PASTRY SALE
in aid of Hall Fund
Saturday, 6th October
Stal ting 11:00 a.m.
In hall behind Greek Orthodox
Church on West Street THE
PUBLIC IS INVITED

(11795
WILL Mrs. M. Moncur
previously of The Bight, Cat
Island, please contact ESSO
STANDARD OIL S. A.
IMITED AT Telephone:
2-8401.

C11702
HAVING A BIRTHDAY v
PARTY. Friends into dinner?
Or would you yourself like to
enjoy some delicious
homemade breads, cakes and
pastries. Call 31340 and place
your or der now for
nlouthlwater iing four layer
chocolate cakes, apple
coconut, pumpkin, and raisin,
pies and delicious white and
brown home-made bread.


HELP WANTED

C11820
LIVE-IN MAID for general
housework. Phone 2-2026 for
interview.

C11752
REQUIRED qualified Pastry
Cooks for Cruise Liners.
Caribbean ships Chandlers,
1177 South America Way,
Dodge Island, Miami, Florida,
33132 U.S. A.

Cl11819
WANTED DRIVER. Must
have in his possession a valid


Trade-ins Welcomed.
Located Oakes Field
Opposite the Ice Plant
Telephone 34636-7-8

C11897


BARGAINS



CENTRAL GARAGE
'I Nti asi cst!'lia n au r, ira,


USED CAR


CLEARANCE SALE

1972 VAUXHALL FIRENZA
Blue, 2 Door Coupe, bucket
seat, good condition, standard
transmission black wall tyre
$2500.00
1968 OLDSMOBILE
TORONADO 2 Door Coupe,
automatic transmission, power
steering & brakes, electric
windows and seats bench frornt
seat, excellent condition, radio
$3800.o00
1 96 8 CADILLAC
FLEETWOOD Like nei,
condition, black with bluer
interior. 4 door sedan
automatic transmission ele(ctic
windows & seats powei'
steering & brakes, ian io
$6850.00
1970 SINGER GAZELLE
white, 4 door sedan, standla d
shift un lthe f Ilo ,
reconditior.ed $1300.00
1973 CHEVELLE MALIBU
4 Door Sedan automatic, adrto
power steering & brakes, w'w
tyres, bench seats, vinyl top,
low mileage $5200.00.
1970 FORD CAPRII 2 dooli
coupe, aLJtomatic (joot
condition new paint 'lob
$1500.00
1970 COMMER BUS Gou(c,
buy $200.00
1965 CHEV. CORVAIR
Mechanic special $100.00
1968 FORD CORSAIR A
good buy $'00.00
A LOT MORE
TO CHOOSE FROM
TO CHOOSE FROM
FINANCING AVAILABLE
COME IN AND SEE US
Oakes FJeld near
Police Barracks
PHONE 34711
Thompson Blvd.


FOR SALE _
C1181/
PHILLIPS S1t ERO Hl-I I
equipment, 35 w. a'nplif ier,
F.M. tuner ? speakers.
Excellent itcndoI td on $185.
Telephone 5 1 '962.

Cl 1 829
PAT I,')-A.LF
Household futr nish rigs
Antenna
Woodland 31668

C11866
COMPLETE Furniture for
3-bedroom house including
Freezer, Refrigerator, Washer,
Dryer. All good condition.
Bargain prices. Call 3-1995 for


Apply in
DAIRY
Thompson
4 and 5


11 /97
TH1I R)YAL BANK OF
CANADA, I REPORT,
GRA 'II) BAHAMA requires
tlo. service's f ur e l-perienced
stenographer Applicants
should have at least G. C. E. in
English language and be a high
school graduate. Shorthand
speed of lOOw.p.rn.and typing
speed of 80 w.p.m. eBahamains
only. Apply in writing to N. G.
Miller, A s s i stant
Manager/Administration, P. 0.
Box F61, Freeport, Grand


Bahama or
appointment
352-6631.

Cl11807
WE NEED a
who can


call for an
at telephone



project engineer
shoulder the


responsibility of the
construction work which has
to be carried out in the
subdivision. It requires
knowledge in road building,
water and power installation,
maintenance and repair of
heavy duty equipment. He
must also be able to cooperate
with and inspect the work of
island contractors employed by
the company in various
building projects. The project
engineer is also required to
handle progress reports,
engineering records and
payrolls. Written application
with three professional
reference to ELIZABETH
HARBOUR ESTATES, LTD.,
P. 0. Box N7804, Nassau.


i I HELP WANTED


C11867
WANTED Live in maid for
general housework and help
with 3 young children.
Bahamians only need apply.
Call 7-7737 or 2-4764.

C11865
LYFORD CAY CLUB requires
the services of a Bahamian for
the position of Assistant Golf
Professional for the coming
winter season -- November
through April. Qualifications
required include at least five
years experience; the
equivalent of A-7 Canadian
P.G.A. rotary; ability to teach
golf to members; and a
pleasant personality.
Please reply in writing to:
Managing Director, Lyford Cay
Club, P. 0. Box N-7776,
Nassau.

C11861
BAHAMAS WORLD AIRLINES
LIMITED
require B 707 Flight Engineers.
Must have minimum "E"
Licence on 707's, current 707
Flight Engineer's Licence, and
Cat. "A" Exam. Min. Time on
707 Panel, 1000 hours.
Apply: Personnel Department,
Bahamas World Airlines,
Limited, P.O. Box N8324,
Nassau.

C11862
BAHAMAS WORLD AIRLINES,
LIMITED
require Flight Navigators
Must have current flight
navigators licence, and Cat.
"A" Exam. and licence for
polar and worldwide operation,
minimum five years
experience.
Apply: Personnel Department,
Bahamas World Airlines,
Limited, P.O. Box N8324,
Nassau.
C 11879
AN EXECUTIVE VICE
PRESIDENT is required for
the Cat Cay Club, Cat Cay,
Bahamas. The successful
applicant will have had at least
five years experience in a
similar type of operation, with
special emphasis on food and
beverage purchasing and
control accounting
and supervision of staff, and
pool and tennis court
maintenance. The practical
iand service, and the knowledge
of at least one foreign language
will be advantageous to the
successful applicant in his
capacity as Executive Vice
President of the Club.
Interested persons are invited
to submit full particulars of


educational
background,
references,
Associates,
N1372.

C11881
A FULLY


and professional
and supporting
to Cat Cay
c/o P. 0. Box



EXPERIENCED


CLUB MANAGER is required
for the Cat Cay Club, Cat Cay,
Bahamas. The successful
applicant will have had at least
five years experience in a
similar type of operation, with
special emphasis on food and
beverages purchasing and
c on t rol, accounting
procedures, training, recruiting
and supervision of staff, and
pool and tennis court
maintenance. The practical
and service, and the knowledge
of at least one foreign language
will be advantageous to the
successful applicant in
management of the club.
Interested persons are invited
to submit full particulars of
educational and professional
background, and supporting
references, to Cat Cay
Associates, c/o P. 0. Box
N1372, Nassau, Bahamas.

FOR LEASE

C1 1806
BAR RESTAURANT
KITCHEN LICENCE -
equipped music and
dancing-light and water
included $250 per week. Phone
21848.

TRADE SERVICES

C11769

Pnl der's Customs

Brokerage Ltd.
Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU. BAHAMAS
P. 0. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-3796
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434.


C11832
FOR ALL Your Gardening
Needs, Trimming, Hedging,
Pruning, Beach Cleaning, For
Prompt, Reasonable and
efficient Service Call 5-7810.


I TRADE SERVICES


C11775
T. V. ANTENNAS
Boosters for homes;
apartments and hotels.
Sales and services
Call 5-9404
WORLD OF MUSIC,
Mackey Street
next to Frank's Place.

C11708
BAHAMAS ANTENNA'
SYSTEMS
SOLVING POOR RECEPTION
Same day service for moving
Antennas or new installations.
Call Douglas Lowe 21371 -
51772.


I I TRADE SERVICES


C11804
CALL
ISLAND INTERIORS LTD.
D. Albury & F. Demeritte
For Your Installation and
Cleaning of Carpets
Phone Number is Now
5-3576, 4-2191.
C11892
RUBBER STAMPS. Made to
order Rubber Stamps, while
you wait. Wong's Rubber
Stamps Co. Phone 34871 P.
O. Box 5206.


Cl1151
SEWING MACHINE
REPAIRS AND PARTS
ISLAND FURNITURE
Corner Christie &
Dowdeswell Street
Phone 21197,
P. 0. Box 4818, Nassau


GRAND BAHAMA



CLASSIFIED


II FREEPSET EL. 352-61


NOTiEI

C6299
NOTICE is hereby given that
TIMOTHY ALEXANDER
WILLIAMS of Eight Mile
Rock, Grand Bahama is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twen ty-eight days from
the 27th day of September,
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N-7147,
Nassaiu.

C6282
NOTICE is hereby given that
REVEREND IAN SAM of 186
Eleuthera Drive, Hawksbill,
Grand Bahama, is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality arid Citizenship for
registration as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person
who knows anry reason why
registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 27th day of
September 1973 to The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N-7147, Nassau.

C6301
NOTICE is hereby given that
ROFOLITA F WILLIAMS of
Eight Mile Rock, Grand
Bahama is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality nd Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why
registration should not be
granted should send a written
arid signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 27th day of
September 1973 to The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
O Box N-7147, Nassau.

C6283
NOTICE is hereby given that
THELMA BARBARA SAM of
186 Eleuthera Drive,
Hawksbill, Grand Bahama, is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship for registration as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
27th day of September, 1973
to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N7147.

C6285
NOTICE is hereby given
that KENNETH EBENEZER
LIGHTBOURNE of Bahamia,
Freeport, Grand Bahama, is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for naturalisation
as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who
knows any reason why
naturalisation should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 27th day of
September, 1973 to The
Miin ister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N-7147, Nassau.


C6300
NOTICE is hereby given that
INEZ JANET FORBES of
Eight Mile Rock, Grand
Bahama is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality arid Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 27th day of
September, 1973 to The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N-7147, Nassau.


C6291
NOTICE is hereby given that
SCOTTIE R. RIGBY of Rum
Cay Road, Freeport, Bahamas
is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows.
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
27th day of September 1973
to The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.
C6290
NOTICE is hereby given that
DOLOURS BEATRICE
HANDFIELD of 214 Cove
House, Freeport, Grand
Bahama is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 27th day of
September 1973 to The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N7147, Nassau.

C6288
NOTICE is hereby given that
RICHARD C. BROWN of P.O.
Box F-1029, Freeport, Grand
Bahama, is applying to the
M minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 27th day of
September 1973 to The
M i n sister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N7147, Nassau.
C6294
NOTICE is hereby given that
REGINALD AUGUSTUS
CHONG of 69 Whymper Lane,
Freeport, Grand Bahama Island
is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
27th day of September 1973
to The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau.
C6307
NOTICE is hereby given that
CALVIN S. MISSICK of East
Indiaman Road, Freeport.
Grand Bahama is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 4th day of October,
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N-7147,
Nassau.


C6275
When visiting FREEPORT
stay at the:
EL CONQUISTADOR HOTEL
spacious rooms, fully
air conditioned, from $10 to
$14 per day. For reservations
call 352-8180.


HELP WANTED

C6316
EXPERIENCED AUTO
MECHANIC with special
training in auto electrical
background and auto
airconditioning. No less than 5
years experience. Must have
knowledge in training
Bahamians. Apply Jones
Automotive Ltd. 352-9344.


M


m


_ --- ----


--


-


I l I I m


-,


1969 VAUXEIALC:.
VICTOR
:167 CHEVROLEI-
IMPALA


- I


-1 ,


- I


-I--


_.__


I
Ij


$'00

$450


dirver's licenrce.
person NASSAU
PRODUCTS LTD.,
Boulevard between
p.m.


Pl is roany other
numerous to list.
All sales cash.


: -













Thursday, October 4 1973



GRAND BAHAMA


CLASSIFIED


II FEEPIIT TEL. 352-161


HELP WANTED
C6315
2 CONTROL ROOM
OPERATORS
Applicants will be responsible
for the monitoring and control
of all equipment for the central
control room. Individual also
responsible for control and
operation of the electrical
panels including those feeding
the 69KV transmission system.
Rotating shift position. Must
know operation of all
equipment and must have
previous training and
experience including work as
equipment operator in a high
pressure power plant, or
comparable steam ship,
evidenced by certificates of a
recognized institute.
4 EQUIPMENT OPERATORS
Would be required to work
shift hours and is directly
responsible to the shift
engineer on duty for proper
operation of the power plant
auxiliaries. Applicant should
hold a recognized station
engineers certificate or
equivalent with at least three
years experience in the
operation of boiler equipment,
water treatment equipment
etc.
ASSISTANT PORT DIRECTOR
Requires experience and
capability to take full charge of
costing and billing in Harbour
Operation. Must know
stevedoring, handling, storage
and harbour charge practices in
line with Marine Accounting.
When required must assist in
berthing ano unberthing
operations and irt Harbour
administration functions.
2 DOCK SUPERINTENDENTS
Extensive experience required
in port operations,
communications, security,
Harbour traffic, docking and
use of meteorological and
oceanographic instruments.
Merchant marine or navy
experience or equivalent
required. Rotating shifts and
night work involved.
SUPERVISOR/OPERATIONAL
MAINTENANCE
For steam generating plant
Technical college or equivalent
education required, plus
extensive experience as fully
qualified millwright including 5
years work with electric power
boiler and turbine equipment.
Experience as supervisor also
required. Must be capable of
preparing and maintaining
critical path diagrams, of
requisitioning materials, and
planning all operational
maintenance.

WORKING FOREMAN
MECHANICAL
MAINTENANCE
Steam Power plant
maintenance. Must have
experience necessary to direct
and do work of analyzing
operations and taking apart
and reassembling equipment
such as pumps, fans, motors,
condensers, valves. Assist in
major repair work.
Apply to: Personnel
Department, Grand Bahama
Port Authority, Limited, P.O.
Box F 2666 or 30C Kipling
Building, Freeport, Grand
Bahama

C6311
T.V. TECHNICIAN required.
Must be fully proficient in
colour T.V. repairs. Must have
own hand tools. Good
references essential. Bahamians
only need apply. Apply:
BAHAMA MUSIC Corp. P. 0.
Box F769, Freeport.


HELP WANTED
C6315
2 CONTROL ROOM
OPERATORS
Applicants will be responsible
for the monitoring and control
of all equipment for the central
control room. Individual also
responsible for control and
operation of the electrical
panels including those feeding
the 69KV transmission system.
Rotating shift position. Must
know operation of all
equipment and must have
previous training and
experience including work as
equipment operator in a high
pressure power plant, or
comparable steam ship,
evidenced by certificates of a
recognized institute.

C6314
OIL CLERKS required by
BORCO to work in Oil &
Marine Accounting on a 24
hours per week shift basis.
DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES
Computing Crude Oil Import
and Refined Product Cargoes.
Reconciling ship/shore figures.
Preparing and distributing
numerous shipping documents.
Completing necessary Customs
Entries. Checking and
completing Bunker Receipts.
QUALIFICATIONS
High School Education
preferably, with Certificates at
'0' level standard in
Mathematics and English
Language; at least two years
clerical experience in
accounting and/or Shipping
Company. A knowledge of
Customs procedures and/or
Customs Brokerage is an
advantage.
Interested persons are
requested to apply in writing
to: Bahamas Oil Refining
Company, Personnel Office,
P.O. Box F2435, Freeport,
Grand P-hama.

C6319
EXPERIENCED AUTOMATIC
Transmission and Tune-up
SPEC I LIST required.
Minimum five years
experience for General Motors
dealer. Must have experience in
all makes of automatic
transmissions with complete
engine diagnosis and
conversant with engine scope
analyser. Apply General
Manager, Five Wheels of Grand
Bahama Ltd. Phone 352-7001

C6317
GREAT opportunities with
expanding real estate firm for
Contract Processor and Control
Assistant some experience in
this field essential together
with shorthand and typing
capabilities. Write Adv. C6317,
c/'o The Tribune, P. 0. Box
F-485, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.
C6306
ACCOUNTANT/OFFICE
MANAGER for general
mechanical and engineering
company. Must be capable of
executing complete accounting
system to trial balance, manage
office business including
payroll, Lustois clearance and
inventory control, prepare job
estimates and assume
responsibility for general
engineering machine shop
operation. Bahamian Nationals
only need apply.
Write: Grand Bahama
Engineering, Ltd., P.O. Box
F-2, Freeport, Grand Bahama,
Telephone 352-6239.
C6303
Modern Beauty Fashions
require BEAUTICIAN with 3
years minimum experience,
certificate and references.
Apply Box F620 or in person.







, El IO |E||.AL A
DA D Y SaBTFPI


CROSSWORD

PUZZLE
ACROSS


I. Opera singer
6. Restored tire
11. Professional
13. She crossed
ice floes
14. Cureall
15. Important
16. Boggy land
17. Game trap
19. Sparoid fish
20. Holy
22. Spitz
24. Nut tree
27. Subtly

1 i 12 11"


29 Unprincipled
31 Oregon capital
32. Family
physician
33 Majestic
35. Zenith
37. Bravo
38. Hubbub
41 Caption
43 Expunged
45 Particles
46. Kindred
47 Concerning
48. Lifetime

is -WYVA


SOLUTION OF
DOWN
1. Meat
2. Spindle
3 Whirl
4 Gender


YESTERDAY' PUItLI
5. Inventive
6. Speed up a
motor
7. Ivy Leaguers
8. Fortress
9. Pome fruit
to 10. Crony
12. Threesome
18. Religieuse
20. Nominal value
21. As a sibling
23. Athletic
building
24. Launching
platform
25. Sentiment
26. Ovenware
28. Coral island
30. Card game
S 34.--- Market
36. Arrange
38. Trouble spot
39. Game animal
40. Excess of
chances
41. Aunt in Spain
42. Superlative
ending
,s5 44. Stout


1 CARROLL RIGHTER'S


OO)OSCOFE
I" T from the Carroll Righter Institute

/N GENERAL TENDENCIES: A very difficult day
which requires much care to prevent
disorganization and lack of poise Refrain from making any
comments that could upset others with whom you must have
dealing Avoid taking any unnecessary risks
ARIES (Mar 2 1 to Apr 19) Take care you don't spoil your
reputation by unwise actions today or it could cost you a great
deal Make sure all bills are paid Evering is ideal for the
romantic side of life
TAURUS (Apr 20 to May 20) Be certain to get your facts
and figures straight before you get into a new deal Steer clear
of a flashy newcomer who could get you into trouble Strive
more harmony at home
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Show that you are
conscientious in the handling of your obligations Smile if
mate tries to get you upset. Talk with business experts if you
are in doubt about anything Be calm
MOON CHILDRt.N (June 22 to July 21) An associate may
be displeased with the progress being made, so try to be more
cooperative instead of criticizing so much Keep alert or an
opponent gets the best of you
l EO (July 22 to Aug 21) You have to use care in motion at
all times today if you wish to attain your immediate goals
Take better care of your health Listen to a good friend's
advice Relax at home tonight
VIRGO (Aug 22 to Sept 22) It's all right to have a good
time but be careful it isn't too costly Exercise patience with
the onc you love Take steps to improve your appearance
Dress in good taste
LIBRA (Sept 23 to Oct 22) You have to use kindness at
home or you are apt to stir up a hornet's nest Quietly rid
yourself of whatever is causing unrest Sidestep one who is
looking for trouble
SCORPIO (Oct 23 to Nov 21) If you do anything foolish
now, you could upset harmony that now exists at home
Travel with utmost care Do something very nice for mate
tonight and comi to a better understanding
SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 to Dec 21) Be sure you don't
commit yourself too heavily or you could regret it Don't
follow a huncl you have at this time since it apt to be
erroneous Get yourself in good physical condition
CAPRICORN (Dec 22 to Jan 20) Don't sever connections
with others just because you are not feeling up to par at this
time Give more encouragement to good friends Avoid a
situation that could lead to trouble
AQUARIUS (Jan 21 to Feb 19) Sit down in the quiet of
your study and think over any problems you may have and
come up with the right answers Try to help others more
Avoid one who gossips too much Be cheerful
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar 20) Meet with good friends and
plan new interests that will be mutually beneficial Steer clear
of the social tonight where arguments could occur Take more
interest in civic matters


No 7.244


TIM McKAY


Across
1. Compassion. 15)
4. In disorderly fashion. (4)
8. Large birds. (6)
12. In debt. (3)
13 Criticism. (8)
14. Unnerve. (5)
16. Employer. (4)
18. Middle. (8)
19. Apple drinks. (6)
21 Look. (3)


Chess
By LEONARD BARDEN


23. Military man. <7i
25. Llghi meal. (3)
26 Paddle. (3)
27. Weight. (3) 28. Still. (3)
291. Watch the pressures in
them, motorists. (5)
Down
1. Iying. (9)
2. Grain of corn. (3)
3. It went, a few hours ago.
(9)
5. Damp. I5) 6 Possessor (5)
7. Cask (3)
Fruilt of clhihingA planul
sometimes used as a vessel.
(5)
0.0 Colt lane (anag.). (8,
t11 Knock senseless. (4)
15. (et up. (5)
17. lie takes
the place T E TO 9
king. (6)
20. I t e.
(3) i5 I-
1. [leg leg R
p e rson- I E
ality.(4 O AKERS
22. God of
love. (4) U J G O R
24. Descrihes S ER EAN 5
a Scots
cake. (3 Vesiterdau't jobiion
-E


(9779,
WHITE to play; what's his bcst
move? This position looks ve:y
sample, yet Yugoslav grand-
master Matulovic failed to s-le,
the puzzle when he had the
diagram in a recent interna-
tional tournament in Zagreb.
Par times: 20 seconds, grand.
master; one minute. che.s
master; two minutes, chess
expert: four minutes, county
player; six minutes, club
sUt-ength; 10 minutes, ave:'age:
20 minutes, novice.

Chess Solution
I R .-B! QxR; 2 B-R5.
threatening 3 Q-B7 mate or 'if
2 . Q-K2 3 Q-R8 mate.
Black would have to try 2 . .
B-Kl, but White then wins
easily by 3 Q-R8 ch and 4 Q B
ch.
In the actual game, Matuloric
missed this combination and
chose the obvious capture
I B- P? He still won, but only
after further mistakes by his


0:Wra m opponent.
t ou r letter
R G or more can
yon- make
from the

r.akin, Winning
word. each
letter may Bridge
be used once :.
Only. Each B i
word must contain the larre
letter. aidtihere msrt be at By VIICYOR MOLLO
least one elht-letter word In the To the veteran the correct
lIst. No plurals; no foreta words: play often comes automatically.
no proper names. TODAY'S Having been there so often
TARGET: 24 words, good: before, he doesnIt have to think.
30 wordh. very good : 37 words. So sometianes he falls asleep and
excellent. Solution tomorrow. may slip up where a less expern-
YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION : enced player, dealing with every
Anion anoint anon aunt fain problem as it arises, would be
faint faun font fount FOUN- unlikely to err. This is a common
TAIN Infant into nation lnton situation:
noun tain unfit union unit North
untin unto. 6 a '8


SA 10 5

West East
KJ93 4 875
J96 c 32
0 10765 0 32
S98 4 A542
South
SA106
743
SAK8
KQJ7
CO T RACT 3NT.
West leads the 43 to East's
d. How should South play?
"he veteran's automatic reflex
is to play low. He needs the
clubs and hopes that the
defender with the &A won't
have a spade left. The reasoning
4a sound-most of the time, but
by no means always, -and cer-
tainly not here.
If East Is left on play, he may
swtch to a heart and that
would probably prove fatal. It is
true that a heart switch may not
look attractive to East but it's
a risk declarer shouldn't run,
especially as the spades don't
look a bit dangerous.
West led the 43 and the 42
Is visible in dummy. Assuming
a normal lead, West cannot,
therefore, have more than four
spades, so the hold up is not
only dangerous, but also
unnecessary.


IJe Comic Pae -


REX MORGAN, M.D. By DAL CURTIS

NO/ HE SAID LIEUTENANT, I THINK GORDY, WHY DID I HAD 10 GET
HE WAS GOING WE'D BETTER GET YOU HAVE A kEY IN HERE THAT
I TAKE IT THAT WAS SOMEWHERE MOVING/ MADE TO THIS NIGHT, DARLING/
DR ADAM' DID HE ELSE TO LOOK APARTAMENTr










0-4N




JUDGE PARKER By PAUL NICHOLS)

YES I OKAY, YOU NOW HAVE FIVE SIT DOWN AND fSAw, YOU'RE AY LAWYER
SAM.. THAT MSS SPENCERS A MINUTES TO TELL ME YOUR START TALKING! YO'J SHOULDN'T BE TREATING
SURE GOT A COLECTION OF PROBLEM...AND THEN ME THISWAY!
B00K5' EVER REA: YOU'REE rE NG OUT! Iy' 1

-o-



ANYOr ,1 -M







APARTMENT 3-G By Alex Kotzky

PROFESSOR, IT S JUST A FEW MINUTES I POUBT THAT I CAN MAKE IT! I SHOULD





T E R GOOD I TO SEY' EVENINGT'PR THOPNK YOU CAN
HAVE YOAN INREE WHERE"















STEVE ROPER & MIKBEE NOMAD by saunders & overgard

*4IN UP YECKEOU'AREI TON G
ERE A EL s L O ALSO TO TELL YOU 4 O'CLOCK ANSHEITHOHT/

iT tER PHONE HER IF NOw UERE E A ECE









ITH, CE A EVENING




A ~s COULD BE KEHAE


I Z 3 4. S G 7

10 11 17



19 20 1 2


--G-


PETER THE HERMIT I
WHEN 1 APPROACHED HE
HAP PISAPPEARED'









GIVE ME YOUR HANP-
WE'RE GOING TO THE .
NEAREST SHRINK' %


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Thursday, October 4, 1973


Margaret Albury was unanimously voted


BASKETBALL


SEASON OPENS


'most valuable player'at Caribbean tourney TONIGHT, 30
2 -.....t ...... .. ... CLUBS PLAYING


lv tiL'ADS I TONEi i nu i ON UI
UNDEFEATED IN THE MAIDEN TOLIRNA\1.NLT of English-Speaking C('aribbean (Counries !,,l t ,ear in New Providence, the
Bahamas Ladies National Volleyball Squad duplicated their performance while successful detfrin their Prime Minister Lynden
Pindling Trophy in the Second Annual Tournament held last weekend in Trinidad.


The National Men's Squad.
who also entered last week's
tournament defending the
second of the two Primte
Minister's Trophies, put up a
courageous battle andi after live
hard-tought sets bowed to tilhe
undefeated Irnnidad National
Squad
For her excellent all-aroundI
pla\ newly elected team
captain Margaret Al burr was
awarded the ( haipionship 's
'Most Valuable Pla\ er' \\ard
Trinidad's Dooshan R.iian sic
got the Men's \M V P
L'nder the direction ol ach
Oswald Moore who I cnt'
coached Paradise Bees to
B a h a m as, V o)l j ll1
F e d e r ati o n I iCag 1i
champ ionship. "'hi I jdie's
National Squad i, i'\pC!v'%-d !o
go Oil tO great tr hi1s ."
remarked tears m' i.nII.ger D[I
Norman (;Ga\ "Ihe have
strength, depth and poien!i
The Bahamas L adies SqLIad are
present\ defending Region VI
Champions.
GOOD MIXI'V RI
Dr. (lay last \e,,r r l,',
coach. pointed orn th.i tn,
team consists a! I \c':',
mixture ot rla\ ers I he!;
sound basic setmters inc 'i: l'r
Barbara Knowles I" r ci'
team captain llajtie \l.'\e\
and 1lsine Thomp so: I heir
strong and depcndile littcrs,,
are Albuirs. Florence R. lieL
Sportswoman of thli 'l
Celestlmte Wilson ladies hlrighf
jump champion tliC si,,t ten
inches Winsome Dai\dS' ns andd
Lulamac Smith. \hl, w\ x
missing last ,e 'i, t thei i 'ai
is back in good iorn', \ilso
contributing good all-.rn,":
plav is Wends Jackmnii t' s i, '
playing her se,.- nd y.N c
Actually the plaI\c ,s Dr.
Gay said, are developing a
versatility in being able to pla3
all positions well
'The remainder of the
Squad (Cora Hlephurn. Iang'
Armbrister. Yvonne Smith and
Janet Bowe are coining flongr
so well that no one on the it a"'
is indispinsible." Dr a\ -.
'"I he squad has worked s '- c
years to attain that. stii
S'RPRIRISI
Showing much IiIp r.ii ,
form with verse goodi ha
pla thie Jamaia n Ic I *1ad
Squad rather surprised th
Bahamas Squadl with their ., ,
development iI the first '.
of the tournamscnt I ridla\
Alburs ear!i in h t g :
found it dilicu! ilt :'
shots in, Later, l hi\ c .
settled down and ,lt.r \i s i .
and Smith carried the i.:.
with \oi\c .nil Krn '.sio ,
supply_ ing the stci the Balh.i-. ,
pulled was\ w h a ch e :ir: :
of 1 5-1 2.
\ contidtlicf 'r w 'ii "tii'ic'' "
Bah!am as' teaj. i r .Ftt sit' .l '
court in the sex ,' set !!.
to the appr(ovil ,-, 'h-'
I r i i ni d ,. d t i n d -
demonstirated control ,i:l
experienced tc.iid -p11 .li\ si) .
clohbbering the Jdlania ansr' ;
taking a 2-0 leat !iln ihcie he'
five match 1 he J' .ii.la.ns :
the tindl sct t,)I d :f
impossible i,, nt'ract I.
Bahamas' ottSnc and hb ,Iw .
1 -,S.


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BAHAMAS VOLLEYBALL FEDERATION'S T,.i,
congratulates Ladies National Volleyball teai: caip:
nominated the 'most valuable player' in the secom i 'in
Volleyball Tournament. The Bahamas' ladies succr .'il!!.
Trophy. (Photo: Rickey Wells)


(): S.ndsl.i\ at iSk ',p e: P'i rk
it S I [ern. an t,. ie BtSi.l.i .
I licd l ,o k ,,n I ti ixJr '.\s I ,'
thlI tir'.nced il in ..'th: -,


III) c to d h l i l !:L ll
S I:'i' s service ; 1ll C ,.\. ;s I ,nnt
!! !1: 11C !,)1 -, l

all r' und pla.i ,nI d he.'r 'ell lle
S i i' e kv [nthe' Ixasn 1 t is

tIn. botr h opi' ;I, n '.::rn
Ii).i 'sisnousls toLed ihe ic h
I'l: ls1,ll i l'5 'Idr 1
I he Bahai.in s \i e: 's : Sqai.iJ
'sho h according to \laNI .i'ic: I)r.
(a. posses there sea'e tipi
depth a-, the Jimdles team, I,t
ofit onr the righIt !o t aInd
ilhout a.ill the i t, .r hl.'.
to pIla s 'wept; I -ns:d.ild b
leaR n 15 .and I -4
THRIL 1I. 1) t A\S
( oachL bh dj. I
h(ll 'pson ;i'id ctiptained l'\
Lerol\ awkes the Baha.inas
thI lled the I rniid,.r ins wiith
shl,)rt sets nd po\ cr!ul spikes
.I O \ Del en'tI s :i'!\ s hr' shior I
scts to \laIk (1i.rkc' Kc\nn
Rolle jnd I' reJ \l"ackc\ ,ill
jl h ; l i h 'i iJ\ a i lCdl i\
I T I I-i Ightl v TI,I roa "rsx ,
,ipPy' .! Iro; & e crowj' d
I h 'eir ls i'! s'.,I on Suiiidai
pitsed them jl''i i's' ihe best is;
Ir i J.iJd the \ Sq .ad and
' s \ Cntested !:lit.h
!,k C d' setsr
X\it. Si; he Bah.amas easial
.i, ih,., irs game 15-4 ba>ll

I' p r ;P .1 I 1 Fri 1 d.


C. C; i u*a- 1 \ I5' 1 C i l t n
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CROSSWORD PC
EEXPE EL I ZAz
PUZZLE E vr L
ACROSS IN N A RI
I P eces 3 Russ ar ree, US
5. Souan 33 Goals PECAN NI sN
9 Arsenic 35 Threetoed AM AL AL
symbol sloth DOC L FTV
1 Metlvietale -6 Moslem pr.esA
2 Naphtha 38 Hole nrone A S
14 Garden flower ,n golf I
6. Trivial error 40 Limousine I TAS A L. LI
7 Palm lily 42 Davenport lNElN YEARs
18 Three in Bonn 44 Boy s nicknameSOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE
?0. Cereal seed 45 Choir voices DOWN
21 Mother-of-pearl47 Debates L C',;e"s 7 Kukia s pa!
3 Legal 50 Fat pullet 2 Cp 8 Moonwalk
document 52 Giant 3 P.ckf"e up 9 Handle
25 There 53 Hebrew letter, 4 Sc on 10 Printing
26 Helot 54 Colors 5 G ac a ages direction
28 Denomination 55 Finest b T.ar'c 13 A tersong
1 2. 3 4 9 6 7 9 o 5 March date
- -- -- i 9 Earl of Avon
1 3 21 Girl's
nickname
I4 5 22 Pacer measure
7 l0 9 24 VAeather
M satellite
21 22 -24 -2'7 Fict.onal
SK// Captain
25 -// r -26- 28 .1930 29 '.)rs
30 Even
S 3 2 33 3 32 Taste for
36 37 3fine arts

Sa 42 -43 4 37 Weigh gold
39 Test
4 47 B - 4 40 Cartoonist
1 41 Drug plant
5o l 43 Hobbies
46. Worn
r s W 48 Seaman
ttm3P .w 0-6 51 A49. Collection
or lime 32 min. AP Newsfotoures 10-6 51 About


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DEFENDING Basketball
Champions Kentucky Colonels
minus two of their key guards.
Eddie and Wenty Ford, take to
the courts tonight against the
newly formed Strachan's Autos
at 8 o'clock at the A. F.
Adderley Gym in the opening
game of the Bahamas Amateur
Basketball Association's
1973-'74 series.
having been given the use of
two gymIs tie A I Adderley
and the ('. I. ibson over
three hundred games have been
scheduled for the 30 clubs
participating. The series is
expected to run through March
1 5.
Mr. Winston "Tappy" Davis,
founder of the B.A.B.A., will
give the key address during
opening ceremonies tonight in
which Mr. Bradley Roberts will
be the M.C. The Minister of
I education and Culture, Mr.
Livingstone Coakley, will also
be on hand to speak.
Featured in this season's
action is the return of girls
basketball in which four teams
A.I .1). Warrirors, Soul
Sisters, St. Michael's Dodgers
and International IHouse of
Music have entered.
I he effect the recent
ianiateur status' rui b has on
the Kentucky Colonels and
defending Nassau League
chanips Becks Cougars is yet to
he seen. I his might mean that
Colonels star centre Sterling
Quant has to work a little
harder in defence of their title.
\cent\ Ford has been retained
as coach of the Colonels.
(Coming from a sensational
decbuLt in their rookie season.
the classic c Pros, fortified with
tlihe addition of six-foot-five-
-1 hes forward 1isha
\cSweenev and six-foot four
Allan Ingrahani will be out to
cnd the Colonels' maratlion
reign. The Pros also have
obtained Van Ferguson from
Pinders Club and rookie
Anthoni Marsh.
Still presenting a good team
although they lost the services
of forward Lionel I vans will be
the strong Fox l Hill Saints.
Playing his first senior season
tIor them will be junior most
valuable player Reubin
Knowles.
T he Cougars, who lose
player/coach Fred "Papa"
Smith and Jason Moxey to the
amrirateurisis ruling', will be up
against strong teams like
Rodgers Sport Shop, Van
Delaney and Superwash
Arawaks. Rudy Levarity and
Reed Basketball Club. and the
rookie team of Pinders Club.
New teams in the Nassau
League are the Supersonics, the
Containers and Bain Town
Squad.
Action in the Nassau League
begins on Sundial afternoon at
2 o'clock at the C'. I. (ibson
(;iy with Becks Cougars going
against Rodgers in thie first
game and the Supersonics
against Arawaks in the second
ga nim e.
GOLF RAFFLE WINNERS
Mr. l R I(,tI'MAN, holder of
ticket number 9356. wson the first
pri/e (it a 19"'3 Datsun Sedan in a
Bahanmas (itl Association raffle
drawn on I ridai iat the King and
Knights Club. This raffle was held
by tie B (; A to help defray
expenses incurred h' international
teams in i97 >.
Miss I. Senmour of Hospital
l ane with ticket number 486 won
second pri/e and Mr. Basil Miller of
Sreeport,. trand iharn I took third
pri/e isilh ticket 852. Q


ti *


CLASSIC PROS team captain Cleve Rodgers (second from left) instructs Anthony
Marsh (left), Elisha McSweeney (2nd from right) and Greg Ramsey on team strategy.
McSweeney and Marsh are playing their first season with the Pros.


OLYMPIC FUSS


OVER PROPOSED


'AMATEUR' RULE

VARNA., BUL.(GARIA (AP)
I he international sports federations
Wednesday suggested reforms for
the O(. mpic (Games, a new code sit
anraturism and a plan for staging
the (ames over a region instead of
a city.
Pierre I erri of I rance, president
oif the international fencing
federati,)n,. laid the suggestion
before the Ohl mpic C.'ongress on its
third day.
I erri said the 20 federations
associated with the Olympics are
ulair"imous in wanting the (OlImpic
rule of eligibility re-ordered thus:
"Ani candidate for admission to
the Oilympic Games must be
animated b' the )Olympic spirit.
I his is he must respect the Olympic
spirit, ethic and tradition and have
alwvas participated in sport as an
avocation for pleasure without
having received any remuneration
whatsoever for his participation
"lis means sof existence may
neither come from nor depend
upon income he might receive from
sport."
I erri said that each federation
should he left to decide its own
rules of amateurism, according to
technical characteristics of its sport.
The present rule 26 of the
(Olympic (Co'de, which deals with
eligibility is complicated and refers
to expenses, prizes, scholarships
and compensation for loss of
income when training.
I'ven lerri's remarks caused
some controversy. The Marquis of
Fxeter. an Olymnipic gold medalist in
1024 and President of the
international track and field
federation for 27 years, said his
federation does not agree with
terri's proposals.
Will I)aumne, vice president tof
IOC and chairman of the organizing
committee of the 1972 ()lympics in
Munich, disagreed with the idea of
spreading the games over an area.
They should continue to be hoIsted
in one city, he argued.
"'The real (lympic w',inners are
the Olympic cities." Daume said.
TI he amended rule as suggested
hb 1 erri. would omit all reference
to financial compensation for loss
of income through training, training
time allowed. scholarships. prizes
and expenses, all points covered in
rule 26 (if the present OlSmpic
code
Ferri said a mnajoirtsy of the
federations favoured spreading the
Olympics over a wider area. The
Olympics could be awarded to one
city which would, through its
national Olympic committee.
nominate other towns in the region
for staging some events.
Part of the programme could
even be held in a neighboring
country, he said.
This would mean smaller
Olympic Villages, less expense for
the main organizing cit more
opportunity for people in the area
.0 see the events.
I-erri said thie federations
opposed other ideas for combating
"gigantism" in the Olyhmpics such
as fewer sports, limiting
competitors to two per country.
continental eliminations )r
separating team and indoor sports
into separate games.


,


YOU MUST
KEP IOTH HANDS
CLOSED ON TUE
IACKSWIN6. IN M
OLDER TO KEEP /
CONTROL /
S THE CLU!
K.194


WEEKEND AMERICAN FOOTBALL

AMERICAN FOOTBALL fans should be well entertained over
the weekend when the Jets meet the Classic Pros, the Hurricanes
play the Stingrays and the Marlins travel to Freeport to battle
with the Crushers of Eight Mile Rock.


','.N. Dr Norman Gay,
>:9,,'est ArlbuIy on being
n'gi ,h- Speak 1ng Caribbean
:indd th' in P imne Minister's

1 I It ile
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t' V S I


A convincing Jets victory is
expected over the Classic Pros.
presently having teething
troubles.
The Jets have shown
formidable form in both their
ga me to date amassing a
monstrous 90 points in these
two games, while holding the
Stingrays and Marlins to 6 and
7 respectively.
hle (Classic Pros have a far
less impressive record, having
lost both their games they
should present the Jets with
little problems and it is' felt
that the Jets miight well top the
record 52 points they scored
against the Mailins last year.
I'he Stii;,ras '; imust be
favourites to ernerge as vilors
when they clash with the
Sre e port I u r r i ca nes,
particularly after their crushing
victory over the Marlins last
week.
Quarterback 'Porky' Dorestt
will be the danger man for the
lHurricanes. In last weeks' game
he set a new total yards record
in one game when he ran 10
times for 113 yards and
completed I I out of 25 passes
for 22 yards.
The Marlins, who will no
doubt be out to redeem
themselves after being blasted
32-0 by the Stingrays, travel to
Freeport on Sunday to clash
with the swift, hard hitting
'rushers of Fight Mile Rock.
However, the Marlins. with
several players nursing injuries
will be hard pressed to stop the
'shotgun' offense of the
Crushers who boast the fastest
backfield in the Association.
ILAM SIANI)IN;S
\\ I. t' l t' A
Nassau Jets
I 'port
ilrric.inei l ) 0 i? 0
I eight tile
Crushers I o 14 12
AIt) stingray s I 2 s5 (is
Blue Marlins I 2 3M 90
Classic r,)s i0 2 13 40
1 I ADIN(i I Ri'SI KS
(0o0 ,iards ,r inIort)
It. Rusell Jets t6 248
It. Dorsett Atl) Stingrai s 25 219
I). Ilusler Jets .1 15S
R. I tmnipson Marlins 31 142
DI. Ssweeting Mlarlins 25-124
I.. ostw\ick Jets i15- 1OS











Be the man


you want to be!

and be
the man
they want
to see!


G.C.E. RESULTS
From Page 7
Level Pass)
R. M. BAILEY SR.
HIGH 'O' LEVEL
John William Armnbrister,
English Language & llistory;
Harry Bain, Geography; Asa W.
Bethel, History: Judy Blyden.
English Language; iDeborah
Barry. Religious Knowledge:
Jane M. Brown, English
Language. I english Literature:
& llistory: Patricia Brown,
English Literature, History &
Religious Knowledge; Gaynell
(ampbell, English Language;
Carlfred Curry, English
Language & History: Fenola
Collie. History; C('layton R.
Cox. EInglish Language,
Geography. History: &
Religious Know ledge; C'larkson
Darville, English Language,
G geography, 11 history :
Mathematics & Religious
Knowledge; Patrick A.
Delancy, History; Eric W.
Lope/. Mathematics: Julie 1).
Major, I english Literature,
History & Religious
Knowledge: Sydney A.
McPhee, Biology, History &
Religious Knowledge: Andrea
M. Miller, i-nglish Language,
English Literature & Historry
Lina F. sMortimer, History'
Cheralie Mortimner, History,
Mathematics & Religious
Knowledge; Jean D. Moore.
English Literature & History;
Rosetta 1.. Nairn,. Art: Hlelen J.
O'Brien. 1 english Language.
English Literature & IHistory;
I- urecka Reckley, History
Brenda D. Pratt, English
Language. 'English Literature &
History: Patrinella Rolle,
Biology, english Literature &
History: Sabrina Russell,
I English Language, English
Literature, Geography &
History, Eloise Skippings,
Geography & History; Jennifer
Swain, english Language &
History: Audrey Vanderpool,
E-nglish Language. English
L literature istor y ,
Mathematics: Crosley Walkine,
English Language; Sylvia
Whylly, english Literature:
Garnell Wood, History.
ELEUTHERA '0' LEVEL
Lillian Brown, English
Language; Ruthnmae Brown,
Religious Knowledge; David
C'arey, English Language &
History: Phillip Clarke, English
Language & History; Samuel
(arey, Inglish Language &
Religious Knowledge; Robert
Deal, I english Language; Sharon
Deal, English Language: Alice
1hall. English Language: Anne
Johnson, 1-nglish Language;
Deborah Johnson, -English
Language: Mary Johnson.
Needlecraft & Dress; Ruby
Mackey, Religious Knowledge:
t d w ar d MacSweeney,
Geography & Religious
Knowledge: Tony Miller,
Religious Knowledge; Muriel
Morris. I english Language &
History; Joycelyn Moxey.
Religious Knowledge; Earthel
Moxey, Mathematics; Janice
Nixon, I english Language ;Olrice
Nixon, Art; Dorothy Rahming,
I english Language; Harold
Rolle, English Language:
Roderick Rolle, Geography &
li human Biology ; Claudia Sands,
English languagee; Timothy
Sawyer, English language;
Patricia Sands, English
Language & Fnglish Literature;
Levada Scavella, English
Language, English Literature &
Religious Knowledge; Shirley
Symonette, English Language:
Arthur Turnquest, Geography,
History & Human Biology:
Carolyn Thompson, English
Language; Juliette Ward
English Language; Millie
Young, Religious Knowledge.


~ II- -~'


The sweepLGA


M


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Keep fit with


DeWitt's Pills








with the strong action
against BACKACHE
and MUSCLE PAINS