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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03454
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: September 24, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03454

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.1


(Registered with Postmaster of Bahamas for postage concessions within the Bahamas.) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


VOL. LXX, No. 253 Monday, September 24, 1973. Price: I 5 Cents


CERTAIN ZNS STAFF INTIMIDATED BY

CHAIRMAN, ALLEGE GENERAL WORKERS UNION





MP wants inquiry into


report of


ZNS


mai


mowed chairman's


ai who







lawn'


By NICKI KELLY
MARSH HARBOUR REPRESENTATIVE Errington Watkins has called on government to appoint an impartial
committee to investigate union charges that a Broadcasting Corporation employee was required to mow the lawn of
the Corporation chairman during normal working hours.


Govt. orders audit of Bahamas


Commonwealth Bank, says MP

By NICKI KELLY
CLARENCE TOWN REPRESENTATIVE Michael Lightbourn
claimed today that the Minister of Finance has ordered an audit
of Bahamas Commonwealth Bank because no accounting firm
will do it voluntarily for fear of being, ,bpoenaed by the U.S.


Commission suit charging the
fraudulent diversion of $224
million from four lOS funds.
The time has now come, Mr.
lighthourn said, for the
Bahamas government to make
a statement concerning the
activities of Bahaminas
commonwealthh in the country.
The Clarence Town
representative said that in view
of allegations that financier
Robert Vesco another of the
Slept 'nIdants w;', connected
witti Bahamas commonwealth ,
the public should be told the
truth and also whether tlhe
allegations concerning the
bank's association with
government and some PIIP
parliamentarians were true.
BORROWING?
Mr. Lightbourn said it was
his understanding that the
government has been
borrowing money from
Bahamas Commonwealth anmi
or one of its associated
companies by promissory note.
"If this is the case it would
be interesting to know when
these loans were authorized by
the Legislature and for what
specific purpose or purposes. It
would appear that the only
authorization from the
Legislature would fall under
one or both of the two loans
totalling $15 million which
were authorized for Out Island
works," lie said.
"If this country is to ever
get back on its feet we will
need the trust and good will of
the banking fraternity and
related fields," Mr. Lighthourn
pointed out.
"To correct this position the
government will have to openly
explain its relationship with
the Bahamas Commonwealth
Bank. The government must
decide if all banks will get the
same treatment or if BCB will
get its every wish because it
allegedly loans money readily
to PIP bigshots and their
friends 'for any useful
purposes' while the average
hardworking Bahamian cannot
borrow noney because lie
doesn't have the necessary
political pull."


courts.
He said that the Minister has
appointed Peat Marwick
Mitchell to do the audit.
"Since the report is being done
for the government the
accountants do not have to
worry about a subpoena," he
said.
Bahamas Commonwealth is
among 42 defendants named in
a Securities iExchange


L MONTAGiU HOT

SSALE IS OFF
NEGOTIATIONS for the
sale of the Montagu Beach
Hotel to a South African
development company has
fallen through and the hotel's
insurance company owners are
now looking for a new buyer.
A memo circulated to
Montagu staff on September
21 disclosed that the sale to
Gloucester Ltd. had failed to
go through.
Management promised
however to continue actively
looking for a new operator,
and asked the assistance and
co-operation of staff "in the
present circumstances."
The Tribune understands a
meeting between management
and representatives of the
Hotel and wateringg Workers
Union was to be held today to
advise the union of the
position.
Another meeting was to be
held between union and
employees tonight at the
Taxico Union Halal.
"As you arc already aware,"
the memo said, "we have
recently found it necessary to
rotate the majority of staff as a
result of low occupancy of the
hotel, and at the moment we
can only advise that this will
continue until any further
developments occur."
Negot nations with
Gloucester Ltd. were begun
eight months ago by Condotel
(Bahamas) Ltd., a company
wholly owned by British
American Insurance Company.
It could not be immediately
determined why the deal had
failed to go through.
B ritish-American became
involved with Condotel in
1968 when it purchased 50 per
cent of the shares from Mr.
Bernard Perron.
Condotel at that time owned
the Pilot House Club, and the
Nassau Yacht Haven. In July
1969 Condotel purchased the
44-year-old Montagu. Mr.
Perron sold his share of
Condotel to British American
in June 1972.
British-American decided
last year to sell the Montagu and
concentrate its attention on its
insurance business.


SPANISH

DINING-ROOM
SETS

I NAS S Ulll FIINlIE
SNASSAU. FREEPORT


"If this is true then it is an
extreme case of the abuse of
authority and an exploitation
of the labouring class of people
employed by government
departments," Mr. Watkins
declared.
"I feel the chairman should
be able to adequately pay a
full-time gardener to look after
his gardens and not people paid
for by government or by public
corporations.
"As I see it the poor grass
roots who put the present
government in power are being
exploited by those people, and
they cannot now say anything
because they were told by the
present government that they
were being exploited by the
white man," Mr. Watkins
charged.
I XPI. 01I1)
"They can now see," he
said, "that they are not only
being exploited but being used
by their own, and they should
protest these actions most
forcefully."
Mr. Watkins urged the
workers to demonstrate and let
the government see that "they
do no intend to put up with
the present actions of the
present government."
lie thought, he said, that the
labouring class of thie county
slioui.' now take the tbull b
the ioi ns and force the
government "to operate
properly."
SUSP ENDI:ID
"Thi chairman of the
Broadcasting (Comlission and
its secretary should he
susp etn ed while t lie
investigation is being carried
out," Mr. Watkins insisted.
The Marsh Hlarbour
representative's demand for an
impartial inquiry into Radio
Bahamas was sparked by a
stat emen t from t he
Engineering and ( general
Workers Union which is
representing employees of the
govern ient-controlled station
in their dispute with
management,
The statement said that ani
employee of nine years had
received only a two week
vacation during that time, and
that was eight years ago. "'he
employee in question said lie
had spoken to tihe
administrative officer, NIrs.
Pamela (;ranger, Corporation
chairman Milo Butler Jr. and
the Corporation's secretary
Walter Wisdom to no avail,"
the union claimed.
It has alleged further that
the employee was required to
work for Mr. Butler on various
occasions at his South Beach


Mechanical troubles hit


both Bahamasair BAC-111s


MECHANICAL difficulties
hit both of the Bahamasair
BAC 1-11 jets, resulting in
delays of 30 minutes and
almost four hours respectively
in the airline's last two services
out of Miami on Sunday.
One of the jets was found to
be unserviceable due to a
faulty part on Saturday, and
was flown to Miami without
passengers on Sunday morning
for a replacement part to be
installed.
But the part. being flown to
Miami from Texas by an
American carrier, got lost on
the way.
Fortunately, Bahamasair had
an FH-227 on stand-by and it
was able to cover the 3:15
Flight 46 from Nassau to
Miami, the afternoon


Miami-Freeport service and the
4:45 Flight 47 from Miamnn to
Nassau.
Unfortunately, bad weather
delayed the aircraft's departure
from Nassau until about 4:15,
with the result that Flight 47
did not leave Miami until about
5:15. half an hour late, a
spokesman said.
The spokesman could not
explain the fact that several
passengers were utinder the
impression that Flight 46 had
been cancelled, and waited to
get to Nassau aboard Flight 55,
scheduled to leave Miami for
Nassau at 9:30 p.m.
Bahamasair sent off its
second BAC 1-11 from Nassau
to Freeport and Miami at
about 4:15 p.m. Sunday.


estate during normal working
hours and that the
Corporation's mower had been
used to trim the chairman's
lawn.
"I was not even offered a
glass of water by the
chairman," the employee was
quoted as saying.
FIRING THREAT
The union has also alleged
that Mr. Wisdom told the
employee when he was again
asked to cut the chairman's
lawn that he would be fired if
he refused.
The statement went on to
say that the chairman had told
staff working on weekends in
normally off duty periods that
they were to appear in
uniforms. If they refused the
chairman was reported to have
said he would "give them their
walking ticket."
"Over the past weekend the
chairman has sought to
intimidate certain members of
staff," the press release alleged.
The union warned that this
could not be tolerated and if
the chairman persisted in these
tactics the union and staff of
Radio Bahamas would file
Back Page


MR. JOHN CASH


CHANGES AT TRIBUNE


MR. JOHN CASH, 47, took
over today as Advertising
Manager of The Tribune,
following the departure of Mr.
R.H. (Rusty) Bethel to manage
the Hope Town Harbour Lodge
at Hope Town, Abaco, which
opens on November 1.
Mr. Cash, who has been
deputy advertising manager of
The Tribune for the past three
years, like Mr. Bethel came
from a distinguished radio
career.
Mrs. Judy Pinder, wife of
Mr. Theodore Pinder of
Nassau, who joined the
advertising department this
year, is his deputy.
Mr. Cash was born in Nassau
on January 11, 1926. le is the
son of Mrs. Rose Cash, well
known in Nassau for Madame
Cash's Beauty Salon, of which
she was the owner/manager,
before becoming a resident of
Homestead, Fla. Ils father
Edwin B. Cash, proprietor of
the E.B. Cash store on Market
Street, died in Coral Gables in
1963.
Mr. Cash attended St.
Francis Xavier's College,
Nassau, when his family moved
to Miami in 1942 he was
graduated from Miami Senior
High School in June, 1944. He
spent two years with the U.S
Armoured Infantry and saw
action in World War II from
1944 to 1946.
lie attended an electrical
engineering course at the
University of Miami in 1946
ind worked as an electrician.


From 1948 to 1952 he was
circulation district manager
with the Miami News and from
1952 to 1955 he was sales
manager for Miller High Life
beer distributors in Miami, Fla.
From 1955 to 1966 he
worked up from a
disc-jockey/announcer to
station manager of Miami's
original FM (Fine Music) radio
station WWPB-FM.
In 1966 he returned home
and joined radio station ZNS as
an announcer. In 1967 he was
promoted to programme
director followed in 1970 to
radio operations director in
charge of production,
announcers and programming.
In October, 1970, he joined
The Tribune staff as assistant
to Mr. Bethel, who had been
manager of ZNS. He was
responsible at The Tribune for
the daily "dummy",
supervision of advertising
salesmen, the art department
and classified advertising, as
well as for sales for specials
such as The Tribune's recent
80-page Independence Special.
Mr. Cash is married to
Patricia Cash, office manager
of Tropical Exterminators. He
has two sons, William and
Scott who reside in Florida,
and two daughters, Sharon and
Florence, of Nassau. Sharon is
a secretary at Tropical
I xterminators, and Florence
recently joined the IBM
department of The Tribune
after graduating this summer
from high school in Florida.


Accused kidnapper calls all prosecution



witnesses but one liars;case nears end

by SIDNEY DORSETT
ACCUSED KIDNAPPER LEROY McLEAN vehemently denounced the evidence given by
prosecution witnesses who testified in the already six week old Andrea Spencer kidnap case while
making his address to the Supreme Court jury this morning.


McLean, who began his
address on Friday afternoon at
the close of the prosecution's
case by Solicitor General Mr.
T Langton Hilton, said that
there was only one prosecution
witness. A.S.P. Ormond Briggs,
who told the court "the truth,
the whole truth and nothing
but the truth."
SThe case is expected to go to
the jury by Wednesday
following the summation of
the case by Mr. Justice Samuel
Graham.
McLean, a one-time police
officer in charge of the
Freeport Vice Squad and
corporal Spurgeon Dames, who
is represented by attorney
Randol Fawkes, have pleaded
not guilty to the charge,
brought against them along
with four others.
I'hey are accused ot
kidnapping Andrea Spencer.
daughter of Canadian banker
Robert F. Spencer on the
evening of February 15 The
prosecution allege that the
men, armed with a shot-gun
and a revolver accosted Mr.
Spencer, broke into his house
and snatched the child from
her mother demanding
5250,000 for her safe return.
Also addressing the jury this
afternoon was attorney Randol
Fawkes on behalf of Dames.
lie told the court it was very
interesting to hear Mr. Spencer
testify that the shorter armed
kidnapper had a struggle with
him but was not violent
although Mr. Spencer
attempted to strike him several
times.
"Imagine the masked
kidnapper and Spencer would
play fun and games." Mr.
Fawkes said.
RACIAL OVERTONES
McLean, whose address was
interrupted by the Solicitor
General who held that it
contained racial overtones,
demanded to know why
Andrea Spencer was not
allowed to testify.


I'm charged with
kidnapping Andrea Spencer
but I have not seen her and I
do not think you have seen her
either," he said, stating that he
felt it was proper for the
prosecution to have put her in
the box.
Mr. Justice Graham, who
counselled McLean on what he
was saying told him there was
provision in law for a trial to
be held although the person
against whom the offence was
committed was not present.
"Law or no law you haven't
seen Andrea Spencer yet and
that is a fact" McLean told the
jury later. He asserted that
maybe her non-appearance
arose from the possibility of
them hearing a story that
would contradict the one made
by all other prosecution
witnesses.
PART OF DEAL'?
McLean told the court he
felt that the girl's father and
mother had consented for Mr.
Landis Smith, a Trans World
Airline pilot who testified
finding her on February 17,
taking her away. lie said it was
part of a deal.
lie said that Mr. Spencer
called the deal off after it was
obvious he would not be able
to get the $250,000.
lie was unable to accept that
a little five-year-old girl could
untie her bonds and escape all
by herself, he said. He did not
accept Landis Smith's story he
told the court.
"I can better believe that
Smith took the girl to the old
church earlier that morning
and left her loosely tied to
return with the two women -
Maureen Cannon and Kathy
Shreeves feigning that he had
discovered her."
He said that Andrea was
frightened and ran from Smith
as she recognized him. It was
strange that the little white girl
would run from the white pilot
and his passengers, he said.


lie asked the jury to ask
themselves the reason for the
Solicitor General failing to
produce the doctor's report
stating the young girl was
injured by the ropes which
held her.
Hle centred most of his
attack around the evidence of
Crimin al Investigation
Department superintendent
Mr. Fletcher Johnson.
TOLD LIES
lie told the jury that the
witness had told lies. He
reminded them that Mr.
Johnson seemed obsessed with
referring to his notes and said
"there is a proverb, I think it's
Bahamian that says that 'liars
should have good memories'."
lie said he recognized A.S.P.
Ormond Briggs as the only
truthful police witness
produced by the prosecution.
lHe had worked with Mr. Briggs
and knew and respected him
for being truthful.
lIe also said that Mr.
Johnson did not admit that he
was at his apartment for some
45-minutes more than he said
in his evidence. He said that
Johnson might have removed
the shotgun from his
apartment during the
45-minute period and driven
off and discharged it to obtain
the cartridge exhibited in the
trial.
He said that Mrs. Spencer
did not testify hearing a
shotgun being fired off on the
evening of February 15. She
did hear her husband shouting
and somebody pounding on
the door, however, he said.
McLean said too that the
Solicitor General had
attempted to attack his
character. He said the reference
to an incident which took
place while he was a police
officer at Freeport in May
1970 reminded him of the
opening of Mark Antony's
speech at the burial of Julius
Caesar.


NOT KNOWN HOW GOVT. WILL DEAL

WITH CONTRACTOR PRINCE STRACHAN


Govt.trying to close $1m.


deal with London group to


finish Yellow Elder houses

By NICKI KELLY
THE 100 UNFINISHED HOUSES at the low cost Yellow
Elder subdivision may be completed in the next six months
if negotiations between government and a group of London
merchant banks are successfully concluded this month.


The Tribune understands
that between $700,000 and
$900,000 is needed to
complete the houses which
were begun in 1970 and have
been the object of considerable
dispute since then.
An arbitration judge ruled
earlier this year that the
contractor, Prince Strachan,
would have to complete the
houses at the original contract
price plus 25 per cent of the
additional charges resulting
from the increased cost of
labour and material.
To date, however, nothing
has been done, and government
has been forced to seek outside
capital rather than wait any
longer.
An informed source said the
Ministry of Development is
anxious to get construction
moving as quickly as possible
and sees immediate
re-financing from abroad as the
quickest means of doing so.
Reportedly a target date of
September 30 has been set
when it is hoped negotiations
with the banking group will be
completed.
NEXT MONTH
If the talks are successful,
construction on the houses is
expected to start next month,
with the loan being transmitted
through the Central Bank.
Any agreement will be
viewed, however, in the light of
rising interest rates which have
now escalated to 9/4 per cent,
the source said.
Government is hoping to
borrow at under 8 per cent on
an initial sum and review the
position again when the market
settles down. Re-payment
would be made over a period
of 5 to 15 years.
Yellow Elder Phase II. where
the houses are located, can
accommodate 484 low-cost
dwellings, but has thus far only
the first 100 have been built.
There is no shortage of
applicants for the unfinished
houses. The Department of
Housing has some 1500
applications pending, it is
understood.
Although the government is
eager to see the Yellow Elder
houses completed, it is not
known what its position will be
with regard to Mr. Strachan.
Former Puisne Judge Mr.
Hledworth G. Smith ruled in his
arbitration finding that if the
contractor refused to complete
the houses he would have to
pay government damages in
accordance with a formula laid
down by the arbitrator. He was
also required to pay all costs of
the arbitration.
A statement issued by the
Ministry of Health said at the
time that Mr. Strachan had
agreed to accept the
arbitrator's award, and that
details of the extra work were
then being calculated by the
Department of Housing.
ARBITRATION
The matter of Yellow Elder
was put to arbitration in
November 1972 after Mr.
Strachan filed a writ against
the Minister of Health on June
29 of that year claiming
damages for breach of a
contract signed August 25,
1970.
An arbitration clause was
written into the contract. Thus
when Mr. Strachan started legal
proceedings it was possible for
the Minister of Health to go to
court and have the matter
stayed, forcing it to
arbitration.
In March 1972 Health
Minister Loftus Roker revealed
in the House that Mr. Strachan,
who was also associated with
the construction of the Post
Office, had received more than
half a million dollars for the
Yellow Elder project, although
none of the houses were
completed.
In his findings Mr. Smith
found that based on the
evidence he had no doubt Mr.
Strachan had been over-paid
for the amount of work


completed up to the time
construction stopped.
The finding also showed that
in view of the "umcompromis-
ing nature" of a letter writt e n
by Mr. Strachan to the
Ministry of Health "a letter
which amounted to a unilateral
demand for a variation of the
terms of the ocntract in his
favour" the Ministry had the
legal right to inform him that it
considered the contract
terminated and that there was
no breach of contract on the
Ministry's part.
The arbitrator did, however,
state that "some considerable
responsibility must lie with the
government" for the fact that
little appeared to have been
done to resolve the problems
which existed between the
time work stopped in February
1971 and the time the Ministry
of Health became responsible
for Housing in December 1971.


$50,000 ABACO

SUPPLY CO.FIRE


NO ACCIDENT,


SAYS &W

THE ABACO Supply
Company building in Marsh
Harbour was completely
destroyed in a $50,000 fire
early Sunday, and company
president Gordon Hudson
suspects that the blaze was no
accident.
The reasons for his
suspicion: a truck's gas tank
was found with the cap off,
and the entire building
apparently went up in smoke
in less than two hours, despite
the efforts of the Marsh
Harbour volunteer fire brigade.
Mr. Hudson, was in Treasure
Cay attending a Junior
Chamber of Commerce
conference, while his business
burned to the ground.
He told The Tribune that
from what he had learned, the
fire broke out between 3 and 4
a.m. Sunday, and the building
was already destroyed when a
taxi-cab driver left Marsh
Harbour about 5 a.m to drive
to Treasure Cay to tell him.
GAS CAP
Mr. Hudson said the gas tank
cap for a truck parked in the
company's yard was found on
the running board. All of the
trucks carry siphon hoses, he
said, to aid company vehicles
which run out ot fuel.
lie said the mainly wooden
building was worth about
S25,000 and contained stock
valued at about the same figure
for a total damage estimate of
about $50,000. The building
was insured, but not the stock.
All that was left standing, he
said, were two concrete block
walls at the rear of the
building. A Volkswagen bus
parked near the building also
sustained minor damage from
the heat.
Mr. Hudson said that
fortunately most of his vehicles
and heavy equipment were
away at various job sites on
Abaco.
The company holds the
contract for the construction
of the controversial incomplete
Great Abaco Highway. Mr.
Hudson made an unsuccessful
bid in the September elections
last year to take the Marsh
Harbour seat in the House on
the PLP ticket.


-----B^^----

tumuli i ul]


I DUDLEY'S
COR. ROSETTA ST &
MT. ROYAL AVE.

TV ANTENNA INSTALLATIONS
P.O. BOX $850 PHONE 2.1306/Z-3237


( he


EDDIE'S DEPOT. STORE
EAST OF STOP-N-SHOP, BAY STREET

BIG SALE
POLYESTER CLOTH $4.-$5.
TERYLENE & MOHAIR $4.00


- I


Sriitburn




_ __ ______ Ip


2 ____ (rttb w


PERON & HIS WIFE ELECTED IN ARGENTINA
lll-NOS AIRitS (AP) Ihousands ,if Argentinians danced, sang and
shouted in the streets (if Buenos \ires earls today, celebrating the election
of 77-year-old Juan 1). Peron to the Presidency trom which the military,
ousted him 18 years ago.
Official returns from Sunday's election egae l'eron 7.2S6,034 votes, or
6I1.6 per ce.nt in 54,'777 of the nation's 55,47t election districts.
Richard Balbin of the Radical Civic Union ran second with 2,887,5,S7.
or 24.44 per c-nt: trancisco Nanrique hadl 1.440,041, or 12.1) per cent
and Juan t-irlos Coral of thile Socialist VWorkers' Parts thad 1S7,002. or 1.Sh
per cent.
The outcome had never been in doubt the ',ily question was how big
the winning margin would he.
Running with Peron was his third wifte. Isabel Martinez, who when sheet
tal s office with her husband on ,tCt. 12 will become thei western
hemisphere's first woman Vie President. Because of Peron's ate and
uncertain health, she could become the hemisphere's first wornan
President.
"I cannot sa;i anything because ithe people haI. done it all," said Peron
in a briet s terncent to netsmen. 'Now is not tihe time for me to speak but
the tinlc itr mei ti act."
it' adilId that hlie might .i.on make "realistic changes ini Argentina's
economy, 'ut the first order of business is political. After the political
situation is settled, the econmii'c w ill irranee itself."
PRI\ I CHl\RI ES' ENGAGEMENT REPORT DISMISSED
I i\ltN (s \') T1he Nc ,s i the t iorld hicihest circulation sieekl.
s:tt f'ric- (Charles. 24, is about t., Secomile 'encag to society beauty ILad
S.i, Cilsc. 22 ohI dihter -tI the hike and l chess of Wellington.
13uckiighai l' Paii dI 1ismsst iic h .,ccciiunt as "'pure nes\\spaper
speculation."
But the I)uchess ,1 \\i elln, t, id reporters her daughter had been
"flabhereasted and ier' emnbarra.ed" by, the nlI\\spaper report.
"he -.id I a;t\ Jane ihad spent the night v, ith friends in Wiltshire alter :a
dance gienl l, L ord Lufitolk.
""''When I learned .l the newspaper report I rang her, wioke her up," the
duchess said -It is pure tabricat'om and she is terrible\ upset."
SKYLAB 2 ASTRONAUTS PACK 10 COME HOME
HI(I SlIt)N SPACI CfIN11I ( \') Ihtie Skhlab 2 astronauts are
closi';g up their space station, for all thie s world like vacationers closing a
vacation house this first dav Iif autumn. I tie astronauts ivere busy todavi
de-activating tile '. it ii and ''a.lini up their \pollo command ship for tilt
trip 'aIsk tI I arth Tuesda..
astronautss Alan Bean. Jack I ousmina and Owen (;arriott devoted
themselves to, pac king films. minaeintic tapes, lii-medicitl samples and ttiher
items int' tih c'rit that will carry them to splash n in the Pacifit. Ihis
is the 5lth JIas of their planned 5a and one-half dav mission. And all inalor
experiments ihae been completed.
GOLD MEIR GETS NOD FOR PREMIERSHIP
II I .\IV (AP) Israel's dominant Labour l'artv has chosen Ldita
Meir to head its list of candidates in ne\t minthi's elections lie choice
w5as unanimous. It makes it almost certain the 75-year-otd Mrs. Meir will
have anther four sears as Premier.
SYRIA TO BUY U.K. & FRENCH WARPL \NES
BEIi'S L (..It INi)N ( \1) Syria has decided to Ilu\ rititsh arind
French warplanes and other we ipiinr\ the Lebanese newspaper Al Haill \ it
reported Sunday.
S\ ria depends exclusively oni S',viet made weapon.,s tr its armed forces
and the paper added thai as a result it the decision to purchase western
arms. Soviet experts haec begun leaving tihe ,,untry.
Here wsas no official confirmation oi the l IAlass.it report from Snria
Ihe paper said the decision to purchase western arms was "part o ai
major deal ti, implement a plan hi S"rian President iafe/ -\ssad t1
improve the capability\ and striking poaer of thie Syrian armed toree
against Isra-li aggression."
It added that the deciscironi a, taken bheh.re the niayor air battle betlVen
Syrian and Israeli jets earlier this month. tihe Israeli, said tile\ dIo nedl I 3
Syrian jets for the loss of one nt their 'isn

VANDALS DAMAGE ST. VINCENT OBSERVATORY
KINGSTOWN, Sl. VINI N I (I \l Burgdars have broken in,, ,a
volcano oubservatiory on the island of St \'insent, daiiaging equipment inJd
causing the destruction of valuable data. scientist from the I niversiti .,I
thet cWt[ Indies have reported.
ctieloizist iarid Sigurdsscin said lie md his assistant Jdisc .cred the
break in \\hlien tiles climbed Mt Soutriere last \eek on .i routine \sil I the
oiibervatory was established to monitor the \ot anic crater at tile tl opa the
mountain and give earls warning 'if possible future eruptions.
mild eruption began i ll ( to er, It17l extending througti March,

the intruders rfportedlls 1uti metal shutters and bril-'e windowi\s t' ain
entrance tio the observatory Ilhe, ate I ".i supplies ainj damaged ieit triI
and. other ec uliplmenti
Rainwater da e g the break in causethe b k n the I -s if record, used
in forecasting c,,.anitc actisit Dr.L Sigurdsson said.

EUROPE WILL FINANCE SPACE AGENCY
PARIS (Pl') A turopean space agency, based onIt the model o l NA.S.,
will begin activities April 7 next year. the European space research
organization ( SI RO) reported.
The announcement followed a meeting here if .dlegates t ; tlie
Siuropean soace conference.
A conmlrunique alsi, said that three space progranreinr in 'hch i ar pe
is partaiip.itinig ire nt,\i guaranteed lull itinancin li.
'he\ ire the sp.iel.tb liir thile N-\S.\ space siiuttii t 'r,:i.ii''i- iti
1 I I 3s launcher ancd ithl MAROS I maritime satellite,
Wvest i(ernaniy is tIo finance 52,cr per cent of thlt space, prciniline,
Its- cost is estimated at 308I million aiccount units with eaili unit I'r,-1:ntl
v.iduc tl j, I 20 I S dollars. I race will finance 12 .5 pt-r ';il .I thef
Il' lckce t lItl cher (,il st: 445 milli,in accounts unitil co d lrit.ii cc il! c *,niTIe
5S.5 per cent it the \l \.ROSI IS protgrinamme whose i,,t. ci' t ;' .it a7
million account units lIhe additi ,nal costs will be s i,ir,' 1 i their

CHIIEAN CRACKDOWN ON PORNOGRAPHY
SANTI-\(;(). C '111 1 Sept 23 A )| (Chile s ii .: lciltd irs i,:, i has
issued a decree banning porn,,zraplh aIi order "r'str> thi' ir, ,ind
ethical values of Clhilean society .
Chileans have traditionally been free and easy about pubtcishie 1,.\ and
risque mc'ites. including tulls nude tronital views of O if in n e' .-papers.
But decree No. 14 issued biy thle Junta warned that thi'se resposible Ictor
an thiling the government considers to be pornographic shall he prr-.ccutced.
ACTRESS DIANA SANDS. 39, DIES OF CANCER
NI'W YORK (All) Actress Diana Sands, ilo pla\tld ihi hra.t', hut
engaging teen ager in "A raisin in tile snli,' diedd ,t .anLer ridail at a
hospital here. She was a39 and tws ice underwent surgery fhr the Jdsease
I'he daughter of a miller and a carpenter srhie '"is \,lid the e'st
actress in her graduating class at Ness 'i ork',' pertornnic .irtis hiih school ic l
1952.
Critical successes follow ed in '"l iger leer hurrcn' : briciht.' "' Blues
for Mr. Charlie" and "The owl and thle pussycat." aic''> i'thiers. Miss
Sands play s a united d Nations miterpreter in a conii il1 'I"ineticce aby
hoiney baby whichh wi ll be released nc\t minth
She scoriced roles she felt demeaned iblackssnd mlccr-' tili .ce ,-..r\ed
that audiences tended to ignore 'clnur i "'A raisin ini tIhe sin.
"I think that's what I'm tr ine tIo si\ :is ,an a tres th.it v.'re all
hun an," she wsiould say.
hlIe Black Academy l in ie Arts and l letters honoured htier three cars .
agoi "notable and sustained contributions" as a perf ormer.
MUNICH'S OK TO BERFEST BEER FESTIVAL OPENS
MIlNICHI. C('RMANY (APl Munich's lord rmaor I er r Kronawitler
huinunered a hrbass tap into a wooden beer barrel Saturdal to open lihe
world's largest beer 'estival, and then asked lhe l.adies tc leave their hlip ,. t
at hone


DEADLOCK IN NAIROBI


IMF delay money



system reform for



another 10 months

By Bill Neikirk
NAIROBI. KENYA (AP) Deadlocked on key issues, the
world's top finance ministers decided Sunday to eive themselves


another 10 months to fashion
system.
Slie International Monetafrl
I und't committee i, 20i
mini' ters.I select panel wnh i
the job of \i t in' g new
mtincetary rules, g I IIe up !on
trying' g to settle their
diftc'rences tihls week b,eca, use
their efforts appealed tr' hitless
liee W l titlg i s J
ies r ambled egg ;at the
illoment.i one soulrc'e C sI.d
leaving Sunday's ieiceting.
"TI hee is no sign ol ai, of the
real problems being so ,ed
liere."
Instead, the ministers agreed
to put their deputies to work
it onc e ol the ianyi pi onts iti
dispute wait for comproniiscs
to lell, then meet again ne\t
Janiuai.iand next June to giiei
their Stamp nof approval.
ile new systemil is supposed
to be worked o'tl ib July 31.
I Q74.
I lhr a1ilile ti o move aheIad
quickly witi monetary r,'foi
apparently means that ilthei
present system of floating
exchange rates for Ihe world's
inal or currencies will remain in
lci ut for allosit aM lther e .
iInh in turn means
cnilin) ied Ltikeltainly about
prst'c and exchange rates tor
tl av Cllers, traders and
Lconstllers, because lthe inaJor
cun..cees, including the dol!ai,
aCre I iee to range as !t111c ii I
: 'line as the markets \ill|

\,kI;d how lirinl the Jul\ 3"1
deadline is. I'S rI iet sui\
.S, c'e. r I ( ;eorge I Shi lt,
l.nd "It sounds hke a s rit d o!
i c 'tli'i)nhigiuo.iis deadline '1 1U
jn pin tlIs dowa n on that "
\()I A(Ck I I)
I here w .'as nIo effoltl y tihe
inili estel is t i t ,g t cIskl' theli
dlterencles dirii'g a o(hioi r 11
c,:I sed-dei) t ilec'ting at
Nairobi',s new Kenyatta
("o;-it'erence Centre, where the
.ii trial Illse ting of tlhe
I12(-nation fund and the World
Bank is being held beginning
Monday.
Shult/i said it was not
the time and place for hard
'-, i r i2 .;,1, ; '. : nA meet ing
exclusively devoted to the
monetary refotiill question is
needed, lie added
lihe key disputes holding
back i'monetaiy ref' ilm appear
to b'e
llw I il and under 'hatl
conditions n tloll wi lls i change
the oti.i:il value of then
currencIies ll e Il ', nleld States
has proposedllmaking this mo, e
automatic Iu -tr e a tIp ill a
Nation with its rcas-ut Iiulmgn
with llone tronti 'ade would
be expected tO' 'cSalue l its


a new international monetary


money under tighter rules.
I ropeians, notably France,
and other nations believe the
I S. plan is too automatic and
Saint to retain more national
discretion.
'TOO P011 I 115\ I
Johannes Witteveen. the
IMF's managing director, told a
niics conference that earlier
Iolecasts of reaching an
agicelnent oil reform either
during this annual meeting or
i> the spring of 1974 had been
Soo opitmistic-.
The broad p7., kaec of
lltioinI, lie added, was unlikely
tI bie ready until "this tine
next year." After that. legal
details must be worked out
letore the reforms can take
effect, probably by 1975 at the
earliest.
Witteveen's remark meant
the IMF timetable for reform
had probably been delayed by
at least a year. This would
mean that the present
uncertainities in the world
mniney system which have been
eroding confidence in paper
inoncy, hurting world trade
and I-. il biiic itug to inflation
.,re likely to continue for
another \ear.
'I lie former Dutch finance
minister blamed the delay oni
certain reserve" by
Lovernments to compromise oil
national interests and move
lore quickly toward reforms.
ANNOYF)',l M11
File )Dutchl ma n's frank
'ilemarks at his first news
conference since taking over
the IMFl ob in August were'
said to have annoyed some
IMF\ officials. In informal
Inettings with newsmen later
tlisce officials tried to soften
the inlpression of a slowdown
in the IMF timetable.
TIhe monetary reforms are
supposed to revise or replace a
sstein which lasted from 1946t
to \uguIst 1971. when
President t Nixon cut the link
between tile dollar and gold.
'Until then. t i eriil-il of
dollars into gold at a price of
S35 an ounce had been the
basis ,of international exchange
rates for all paper inoney for
27 y ear,,.
In etftect, the reformers are'
tra in to decide how ton
dceteriCline (t1e valliue of Iloney.
a coitplex task that affects
national wealth. employ' iment.
foreign trade and other vital
national lilterests,.
'It will take time to reach a
compromise.'" Witteveen said.
buti reform m iii needed so badly
that it will be brought about."


MARTHA MITCHELL MOTIONS SET THIS WEEK

SAYS SHE WANTS Agnew in process

HUSBAND BACK o d
Nt'\% YORK (AP) Martha organizing defend
Mitchell says she wants her
husband back.
The wife of JohIn N fu d f
Mitchell. the indctedorir fund'for legal bat
U S. Attorney General, said in
a television interview that she Richard P's
feels "abandoned" and By R ardlyle
"mentally tortured." WASHING ION (AIP) Vice President Spiro T. A
"Well I guess he's mad at me lawss will file lotions this scek to halt the investiga
for throwing his clothes out for Agnw forces' close to tihe Vice Ptcsident said on Saturda
one thing," Mrs. Mitchell told A\t the same tithe it was might face problem
Claire Crawford of NBC' newt s dis,'closed Itcit \gInew- i% in thie financing his legal battle.
in the interview taped here pieces', o orhganiiLn1,.1 "an linhison said that he
Friday for broadcast Sunday Agnew deensC'ist lndi 1 to not provide any details
night, finance is legs.l liatte against i lhe del ense fund inimnel
"And then I think Ithe just, ill' ..i l..', in m l ne tion with but that all aspects of th
lie thinks that I'mt just octy l a political kickback ptiobe. would be made public
wrought and that I1 should Word tiat hlle opening lelpal thle organizing effo
have. have some kind ot care". strategy ltr Agnew has leeil completed.
she said in her spacious Fifth decided Uipon followed despitee thie fact that h
Avenue Apartment. "But I'11i published lepilts tha 111 th legal limoves will corn
not, I'm not at all." a it toruci s haitcv been week. Agnew is going
Mrs. Mitchell said the negotiating with tile- Justice w, ith plans for a four-d;
clothing incident involi, d l )ep.l ittinti t ,llon a plan to let to Calitfornia where he h
throwing a "few ties and ta few him plead guilli to a lessr sc h e d u l e d s pe
shirts" into a foyer because "I chaIge and perhaps resign in engilagements.
got Tmad like allny womllan does" exchalinge ini( not being \gnew did not
after no one bothered to prosecuted L on more serious S ictut rd ay's swear
in ifornIi hier aboui t a charges, c'erlttic.itc'y for new Secrel
tpoponement of other tihusband's lie aslinr I'. -( tutIted State I letnry A. Kissinger
trial. :a CI n( lt cssiuil ., s Vhhite HIouse. A spok
Mitchell and forlme sing that Agines.'' "i, engaged sid earlier that Agne\
Conimerce Secretary Niaurice ii pica bargainit.ig that spending the weekend
Starts are under indictment on NA new's resignatio, ,s p :;i t 'it of ity tand was invited
perjury, obstruction alnd the pli" cc're nyl., but it wa
conspiracy ch Iarg, iin I Bi almici; t :; i I cert'i wheIther he
connection wit h Ia secr et Saittila q1 I ted A i,0 \Lite '\% .tttI d.
$2 ,0,000 contribution 1o attorney,. Judah Best,. Is sia\ ing
President Nixon's re-election the reports of plea bariginin. DEMOS SEEK RU
. iilipiill b\ fugitive financier 'v.ere incsoric'c l Mid lthA t he l
Robert L, Vesco. ni'otiin to i l thllt ,i, ,i FOR DELEGATES
The former Attorney would be made iitn HIalli.;, ie
General reportedlI left Ills next week. 'ASIIIN(;GT()N (Al')
apartment two weeks al. 'I le basi s t ass l t' I l' tion ast i haiincan Robert Strauss
Asked:' "Wo' uld ou like Ili c ii n t given. lenic' ralc reform coin
to come back \Mrs. MitJihell lIaw\ers toi c.i-..\ cod l ik aiu S\ ith cceptableT
said: "Of course, of course." not ilmm diately le rea hei d lor selectingi 1976 con
The suggestion of divorce coniiment by thNe Associated l eleCates.
has oInly been I through the Il ess but ohli er s' ilrcei s l !cclf i,lil Ill ;. speech to the coimmi
11edia," M rsi M itchell said. v, ithi lie is's' c.-tli i ,.' 11 le dtlert:iIe stelction and
complaining that "somebody strategy decision to niose to o uisi'ic ctacious in the idi
mimlics tiy voice all the time." stop lhie investigation., srugle nt tli rock the boa
F ate -night telephoeic NOI01 R1FSl(NIN. ;o "lemotrats are not
conversations troll M rs. A ic'.s 1 .c A ;ne.". 1:i1 ir etd c n l trausi said. "Ihei
lehi% I Ientitc rats w\ho would
Mitchell to reporters have b 'en repeated denials o put shed sta s n ci htic knockuover, 1
widely published in Ihe reports in the past week s that o1 f us aire moving in t
past. i A 'ne ', s giStvin tlii d'i1' l o I lirectiotu."
N A SI SIO()R I S J.sie', i;' NiM ish I l,, -o, i. "I think there L rs KS to
1cullt accord itt this room,'
Asked w hy she grant ed l'i \t .,:,,'e p css sc. reter .t i ,,r n accord in th
',aid.I d o' n c 't think the nr
interview, she responded: S iatullda I thalt 111 c'Jea come up with are going t
"Well the reason I agIeed Il. ,rgainiin ic'1port's \\i ,c '!o mie 100 percent. I wi'
was becaLuse of these, these dillt rent" I Ioitl oth, s surprised if any boldy is ecst
nastv horrible stories that these ci.iulatine earlier. ll f he, 1 ut I think
s ecstatic with tileover-allt I
lawyers have put out against It was evident that Agnei itit.-
tile and, number two., that my decided ito diviitlhe the Straiuss told the coumni
mail has now beg in tI s\ cxisteince ot is dctensi.' twind to ai oisd ideulnhgical battle
they're sorry Ilin inc the plans Ill al tort to undercut laele s and not succumb to
hospital, to please take care o thile continuing speculation hliat revisinte the controversial
mti sei ... ie till resigi or coid lct guidelitnes.
"'So i decided it was time for ian\ thin less tlhali ct I Icull I
ine to tell the American public defense of hlii selt in l the
that I am sittingE in m i Maryland kickb'i'cks probe.
apartment. I'i e; pe ..i i Agntc li'as- i eet aI-dvAised that
capable of loing anything I lie is under inmestigationll lo
want to do at to do Ind there's possible v io(lat ionds iof
absolutely nothing wrongng with extortion, brihceic. conspiracy t
ine. except I'm mell and t al x i tiratill li'.s luring tlie S erri t
tortured from the toiture Ii'i time lie \';is ,a c itv exeSecuriitive
being put through" tandgi p i noI l t 1.11I-nd W l
She wats asked whether she lih l l t,.iiul ,it il ^ ce o, W *I!
had ever been hospitalized oi' chiles tch.il ki.ii.Icks o 3 years
a nervous ailment. politicians ,Sc, made bl ,
"I've nevet been comilililted building a ul irchltelural t i inse e expanding
to anttythine ... except the good ,,pi i..i,,, 1i h the .. Ve e e pand
of IIImy country ,'" r. lit1hcll ihe i.:' fle che detci issIcttd i Bonds in
replied. 1 d is bi ,ci t,) h lie bec. l x pansion. Highest
She also spoke of lhe strain siiggested bi 's r e Write for details:
she has felt since theY \_. ,i; ut tIends ,I .\on;', sho ASrL (INTE
scandal surfaced, recogni/ed lc.;l. lacking private 73, Raar
"Well. it's just horrible," she 5 caili. tlhe V'ice Presihlenti
said, 'Y lu gel ,,, ccl s haes ... ..
being mad. You go through
stages oi wanting to hit
so,,ebod I Yo go through W hen it comes to insuran


Alone in her apartment, she it'S Dom inion for Life
said. "I leel abandoned.
abandoned . in a certain wa ,
yes.. ... in Nassau


NAIROBI. KI NYA (AP)
I he noll4- 'oilnlnist world's
richest nations haggled
Satuitda over how mucli
to111te each would put up tto
help tile International
D)evclopient associationn make
its eas-termi loans to poor
natilnts ser a three-n ear
period
I lie iii:llted States stood
tirm oit. its pllan i) reduce' ilts
,,hare to t he association from
it,, present 40 per cent to 33
per cent Sclices sacl the I. S.
dem iand lor ai leswer shaie
would probably stick
I lie asstc. tioni), an adjunctI
oit the World Bank. is
considering a plan to provide
4 5 billion dollars in loans over
a three-year span beginning in
mid.-174.
l'ile US share wouitld e 1.5
billion dollars.
Bank ollicials called the
meeting amicablele" but said
noc a gr eemetv'lt aiCppea.Ied
1tittmineit'lt tie held Ip hope
that an agreement will be
leached later tii s week as tile'
annual meeting of the World
Bank and Internat'ional
Monetary FTLind dlraws to a
close.
A high U S. treasury official.
Assistant Secretary John M
HIenness>, said the United
States would hbe careful not to
make a pledge on the next IDA
replenishmnient until C(ongress
had a chance to look at the
proposal,
.legislation to provide the
U.S. share has always had
rough going in ( ongre"s, as a
result, U.S. payments in recent
years have been late.
At present, thlie united
States is a year behind in its


payments.
It w ill be the fourth
replenishment in lunds for
IDA. which miiakes 50-'ear
interest-tree loans to the
poorest of the poor nations.


In search of monetary reform


NAIROBI, KI' NYA (.A1' the
world's forenimost financial experts
gathered In the heart of Africa
Saitirrdai to protect a long list of
endangered species the dollar, the
pound, the mark. the veil and all
other paper moniue .
I he underIl ing issue in the
debate ma n mc ietac t retorm is
\whether confidence can be restored
in the world's nmalor currencies and
the paper money si stem that has
served lthe world for more than 25
% ears.
Since then, trade and investment
between nations have expanded hby
e o o rinormous animounts. Hig
Inultination il corporations and
banks cmlie billions of dollars
itross iitertcna tional boundaries
inst.ntll .
*\ralhb oil nations have
.icncuMulatLIed ast SUMis oft dollars
aiid siire ire reported using them
to speculate in currency markets
Slide \isl and fast movement of
h'mone .at ross boundaries has
ailre.ads brought down the old fixed
rate Ia stem l, eixchanliging money.
It threatens to complicate
construction of a newi system.
I le Inlernational Monetary
I und. with 126 member nations.
wiill b y tr ing tio isrite tile
monetary rules so tlia a fixed rate
s\ ste mti catn be restored. But
political division is so great that it
appears the task \\ill take another
Sear.
In monetary reform plans under
discussion, values of paper money
could swing more widely than ever
around a centrally fixed rate.
At the same time, negotiators
expect to make the rules tighter soi
that no nation can stubbornly
refuse to change the value of its
currency, either up or down, if
economic conditions demand it.
It appeared there may be some
progress on this key point during


the reform neg. otia tions th.It
resumed Suind.i .
At present, the rlde's inli)r
paper currencies % ire large
"'floating" ag.linslt e. h other, wiith
no official exchange rate
agreement. I )or example. the dollar
can lall rc rise hi an unlimited
amount ihen it is traded in the
world's financial ei tres.
American consumer clearly have
a stake in the discussions:
A fixed rate for the dollar
would keep it fronm dropping
artificially hlow, making I,S. goods
too much of ia bargain in other
nations.



ABBEY

INTERNATIONAL


FUND















$9.95
Offered Price
As Of
Friday Sept.21st 1973


2 SEVENTH-DAY


of TEACHERS FOUND


se AFTER 2 MONTHS


tle


Ngnew's
tion of
y.
s in

could
about
diately
he plan
when
rt is

his first
e this
ahead
ay trip
as two
king

attend
ing-in
tary of
al the
kestman
W was
in the
to the
s not
would


LES



Party
let the
mission
cts it to
ules for
invention

ssion on
party
warned
geological
It.
battling
re are a
I put up
but most
he same
90 per
Strauss
ules you
o please
would be
alic with
e will be
thrust of

issiiners
lines and
what he
ranoia in
delegate


SAN IFRANCISCO (AP) Two
Seventh-Day Adventist teachers
were reported in high spirits
Saturday after a British vessel
rescued them from a two month
odyssey of hunger and death
aboard a capsized sailboat in the
Pacific Ocean.
The survivors, James Fisher. 26,
of Auburn, Wash.. and Robert
Tininenko, 34. of I ongview, Wash.,
told rescuers Friday that
Tininenko's wife, Linda. 24. died
Aug. II one month after the
31-foot trimaran capsized in heavy
seas off ('ape Mendocino in
Northern California.
The cause of death was not
immediately kno'vn and the body
was inot aboard the homemade,
tri-hulled Triton. bound for
missionary work in Central
America.
"The death is under
investigation. But we don't want ti
bring on a relapsed condition by
mentioning it fnow. We speculate
the body was jettisoned." said a
coast guard spokesman here.
The two lived on canned
sardines, peanut butter and
rainwater as they huddled under a
canvas shelter rigged between the
main hull and one of the smaller
pods, the coast guard said.
They were rescued by the British
container ship Benalder "in a wealk'
but unusually good condition
despite their ordeal," said I t
('Cmdr. John Lynker.
1synker said the two were not
even sunburned. "If they had been
exposed all that time to the sun.
they never would have made it.
"They probably used a little
canvas from a sail to catch some
rainwater."'
The wreckage nearly was
bypassed by the ship under the
assumption there were no survivors
The Triton had been the object of a
275,000 square mile search after it
was reported lost in July.
"Their spirits are good, they are
cheerful and coherent. But they're
unable to walk for lack of
exercise." the coast guard reported.
They were rescued about 900
miles southwest of Sail Irancisco,
between San Diego and Hlonolulu
The coast guard said the two would
be taken to Midway Island Monday.
then flown to Honolulu and later to
San Francisco for medical
treatment.
The three left Tacoma, Wash.
July 2 for Costa Rica where I isher.
who also has a wife and children,
hoped to join a church mission.
Both survivors are faculty members
at the Seventh ays Adventist
Academy in Auburn. Wash
Friends said Fisher built tile cratt
himself and had only about 100
hours sailing time on PIuget Sound
near Seattle.
The Triton capsized in heavy seas
about 75 miles off Cape Mendocini
on July II, the coast guard said.
Only 45 minutes before the
accident, the men reported thi*,
were in no danger.
Wilma Fisher, Fisher's wife and
sister of Tininenko, said "it was a
miracle" that kept the two alive.


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erstrasse, CH 6300 ZUG.
ci-rT7t DI ArN


GEOFFREY JONES & CO., LTD.
Cr. Rosetta & Montgomery Sts. Phone 2-2188-9


US will reduce its share to


the poorer nation's this year


-'s


if.


F-


Monday, September 24,1973.


NM











Monday, September 24, 1973.


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
IN THIS column recently I wrote an article on the conditions
at the Princess Margaret Hospital in which I revealed the shocking
inefficiency....bordering, in my opinion, on stupidity....of the
Ministry of Health, headed by the lHon. Loftus Roker.
Since then I have been in touch with the man in Nassau who
perhaps knows more about the critical state of the water situation
than anyone else in the island. His knowledge of the situation
extends far back into the days of the former government.
Recently, Mr. Norman Solomon, a member of the Opposition
in the Hlouse, asked for a committee to investigate the water
problem but the lion. Simeon Bowe, Minister of Works, opposed
the motion on the grounds that his Ministry knew what they were
doing.
In spite of this assurance, the water situation continues to be
critical.
Had the committee been appointed it is possible that the
government might have profited by the experience of men in the
island who have an intimate knowledge of the situation.
I have written down the facts exactly as it was given to me by
my informant and I hand the information on to the public in the
hope that the government might profit from the broader
knowledge that this man has of the problem.

Here is the statement, exactly as it was given to me.
"It must be obvious to everyone that there is a severe water
problem on New Providence.
"Unfortunately the (Govermment equally obviously does not
understand the gravity of the situation.
"The UBP Government were aware of the problem in 1966 and
had at that time, for all intents and purposes, solved it. It was
intended to purchase water from the New Providence
Development Company to take care of the requirements for
1967, 1968 and 1969 and from then on to purchase water from a
company to be formed by Mr. Curzon Dobell who were to barge
water from Andros. Mr. Dobell's company made a very
acceptable quote to Government which was cheaper than that of
the New Providence Development C(ompany. Also, Mr. Dobell
could have supplied sufficient water to take care of the
requirements of New Providence for many years to come.
Further, to a certain extent, the more water used the cheaper
the quote.
"It is not generally known that one-third of the water pumped
by the Water Department is unaccounted for. This was true in
1966. 1 suppose it must be true today as no improvements have
been made to the distribution systems since. This means that for
every three million gallons pumped, one million gallons is lost. 1
understand six million gallons a day is pumped. If this is so,
Government is losing over $2,000 worth of water every day, over
$700,000 a year. The UBP Government had plans to completely
overhaul the distribution system even then. It is now more
important than ever this work be performed, as water is much
more expensive.
"In the Bahamas, in most locations, it is known that wells
should not be pumped at a rate greater than 1,000 gallons per
acre per day. There are abour 3,000 acres altogether from which
the Government can obtain potable water on New Providence.
That means they should at the most pump three million gallons
per day. Government are pumping far more than this, so
inevitably some of the wells have gone salt. This has put an even
greater overload upon the remaining wells. Sooner or later more
wells will become too salt to pump so that the burden on the
remaining wells will be increased. This will cause them in turn to
go salt.
"For next winter there is only one hope and that is if we get
abnormal rainfall for the balance of the year.
"Should we not get abnormal rainfall, very strict and
prolonged water rationing will have to be instituted, probably
starting about February 1974. The question of how our hotels
will be able to stay open and remain operating will arise. It is very
doubtful they will be able to do so as you cannot expect a guest
to pay $40 a day for a room when he cannot flush a toilet, let
alone have a shower. Drinking the stuff will be out of the
question for him.
"I understand there has been a breakthrough in producing fresh
water from salt by means of evaporation. That is in-as-far-as, at
last, it seems an additive has been found which will successfully
prevent scale forming. Nevertheless water produced from such a
plant is still far more expensive than that pumped from the
ground, even though it may have to be barged. Evaporators are
also subject to breakdown and regular maintenance will have to
be performed. However, should Government not proceed as
quickly as possible with the Andros scheme and instead purchase
more evaporators, we can look forward to even greater disasters
than those facing us today.
"Today you can see women and children scavenging for food
on the dump. You will be told they are looking for pig food. If
this were true it still would not be acceptable.
"Today you can see a large Government building being erected
on Thompson Boulevard. Presumably to house more of the
Ministers brothers and their sisters and their cousins and their
aunts, yet Government cannot finish the addition to the hospital.
"We had a successful airline in Out Island Airways. Today
Government is losing millions and have budgeted to lose millions
for at least three years on their ridiculous national airline, yet the
hospital cannot get sufficient supplies nor can we get a steady
water supply.
"We must ask what plans does Government have when the
tourist business collapses, which it must do without a steady
water supply. Will they tell the hotel staff to scavenge on the
dump, because if they do there will be nothing there as the hotels
are the ones which supply the food to the scavengers today.
"Undoubtedly one person will be happy if my predictions
come: true and that is Carlton Francis. He will have achieved his
fishing village status for the Bahamas, but an awful lot of people
are going to starve and the crime rate is going to be fantastic."


PINDLING ADDRESSES U.N. GENERAL ASSEMBLY



Bahamas can make a contribution


to a better world understanding

PRIME MINISTER LYNDEN 0. PINDLING told the United Nations that the Bahamas "can
make a contribution to a better international understanding by sharing our experiences in human


relations in effecting change without disorder, revolution without
stable economic and social order."


Mr. Pmndling made this
statement on the occasion of
the acceptance of the Bahamas
as the 135th member of the
United Nations on September
19. The Bahamas made her
entry into the U.N. with the
German Democratic Republic
and the Geirman Federal
Republic.
Following is Mr. Pindhling's
address:
'MR. PRtSIDEINT:
1 have thlie signal honour on
behalf of the people of the
Commonwealth of The
Bahamas to express to you anti
to all distinguished delegations
the warm-hearted thanks of the
people of the Bahamas for the
admission of the
Comm on wealth 1" the
Bahamas to membership of the
United Nations Organisation;
and to congratulate the
German Democratic Republic
and the (erman Federal
Republic on their simultaneous
admission.
I would wish to thank all the
members of the Security
Council which unanimously
approved the application of the
Bahamas for admission to the
United Nations, those Member
States which have so
generous sly and readily
sponsored our application for
membership and, additionally,
the Special Committee on the
situation with regard to the
Implementation of the
Declaration on the Granting of
Independence to Colonial


('ouint ries
colnllltonll
cotnsnittee
w i i e h
which
promoted
people of
particular
tion aind
has urged


and peoples, more
known as the
of twenty-four,
has consistently
the rights of the
small territories in
"to self-determina-
Independence, and
that steps be taken


to translate these rights into
realities."
1 am also pleased to
acknowledge the friendly good
wishes and welcome the
( l. 11 . 1 .Jlth of the
Bahamas has received from
members of the United Nations
upon assuming its place on
July 10th past in the
Community of Independent
Sovereign States.
I should like to congratulate
you, Mr. President. on your
election to the esteemed office
of President of the General
Assembly, the functions of
wlich I am certain you will
discharge honourably and with
traditional objectivity.
Mr. President, Sir, it was on
12 October, 1492 that
C hristo pher C olu mbus
re-discovered this hemisphere
by landing on the island of San
Salvador in the Bahamas.
Today, 481 years later, the
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas is being admitted to
membership of the United
Nations Organisation having
travelled a long, dark,
frustrating yet fascinating
jou rney thrrouglh the
dehttmanising experiences of
Slavery and Colonialism to
Sovereign Independence.
It was on 29 September,
1729 that the first elected
legislative body, once called
the General Assembly of the
Bahama Islands, came into
existence and met for the fir-t
time in the Bahamas. Today
244 years later, the Bahamas
takes its place and meets for
the first time in this august and
d ist ing uish ed General
Assembly.
It was on the 23 August,
1.65 that a petition on the
Bahamas was presented to the
Special ('o mmittee of
twenty-four of the United
.Ntio ns Organisation. That
petition', 'circulated as
Document A/AC/109/Pet.377


sought majority rule for the
Bahamas and a "positive
programme of preparedness by
which Bahamians can be
trained to assume and manage
their own affairs at all levels."
Today, eight years later, the
Bahamas takes its place as a
member of that organisation,
majority rule having been
established and Bahamians
having been trained to manage
their own affairs.
During all of the intervening
ears of continuous
constitutionally elected
authority, the Bahamas has
undergone constant evolution
in an entirely peaceful
atmosphere, without violence;
and we are proud to have
achieved res'olutit nars political
changes ':. tins method As a
new nation, the Bahamas in its
relationship with tile rest of
the world will aIdhere to its
commitment to ordered,
reasoned, encnmotional and
evolutionary progress,
dominated by the deeply held
religious beliefs of its people
and their commitment to the
Rule of Law.
The entire area of land and
sea over which the Bahamas
claims jurisdiction is
approximately 100.000 square
miles, about 94"' of which is
sea We in the Bahamas claim
this area. with uncharacteristic
immodesty but with accuracy,
to be the most baiuItIui
archipelago in the world.
From our extremities in the
north-west to our extremities
in the south-east, the islands
and cays span 760 miles and a
look at the map will show you
that the proximity of these
islands to each other is
analogous to stepping stones, it
be ing physically and
engineeringly possible to link
up more than one group in the
chain.
Although we who inhabit
the islands ot the Bahamian
archipelago are predominantly
black, we are also of many
other colours and of varied
faiths and all of us have similar
aspirations and expectations as
those of the billions of other
people w.ho inhabit this Planet
Iarthli
Wae wish to live in peace: we
wish to satists the needs, both
spiritual and physical of our
own people: we wish to be
neither dominated nor coerced;
and we wish to create a society
built on the sound foundation
of constitutional authority. We
wish also to be free froumr
interference in the conduct of
our al fairs, but we wish to
enijoi tie friendship and
benefit from the association.
wisdom and experience of
those who wish to be our
friends and respect our
freedom as we want and know
it.
We believe that we can make
a contribution to a better
international understanding by
sharing our experience ir
human relations in effecting
change without disorder.
revolution without bloodshed
and in developing a stable
economic and social order We
of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas are aware that it is
indeed unrealistic to think that
Nation States can exist in
isolation. No man, no nation is
an island unto itself. There is
need tor perpetual
interdependence of the Big and
the small which will guarantee
the perpetuation of the United
Nations as the centre for the
hannonisation of the actions ofu
nations concerned with
international peace and
security, equality and freedom,
economic and social justice for
all peoples.
While man is reaching


bloodshed and in developing a
dramatically into the infinite
limits ot outer spat c and the
fascinating confines of ocean
depths. he is also prosaically
reaching into his own mind to
re-assess his global value-system
which has yet to acknowledge
that a world dominated by
power politics and calculated
alignments of sell interest and
fear is less important than a
world morality as expressed in
the (Charter of the United
Nations. The C.minmonwealth
of tlhe Bahama-s ,utscribes to
the concept of alignments of
States having in common
respect for human rand spiritual
values rooted in thcl belief in
the absolutely indivisible
freedom of the mind of man.
The Commonwealth of the
Bahamas enters the United
Nations in the closing decades
of the 20th century. We came
late. but having arrived, we
pledge to abide b, the
obligations imposed upon us as
a member of the tinited
Nations Organisation: and we
shall not shrink from our
> ihiriilin ,. as anll active
member of this institution. We
have no delusions of grandeur
about the influence an
independent Bahamas may
Back Page


Ihc Impei .al LiteGuardsalc the Agents
.iat Imperial Lite. They are a dedicated
ti.oup of professionals whose business
is se v ing you. Ihe w .nt to thiowy0,ou
It lifeline, A lifeline of financial pro-
tection ,ird seituiit' i o ensure that iOU
.i e lii mi h .1n. horetd to a solid
Io tndtiion Wiotnhcbe w .ay the tide
I II ris


U


NOTICE

I)WES PIPE & STEEl

CO. LTD.
Montrose Ave.


' BAHAMAS

DELEGATION

AT U.N.

TMH BAHAMAS last
Wednesday became the 1 35th
nation to join the United
Nations. Seated in the
General Assembly are from
left: Prime Minister Lynden
0. Pindling, External Affairs
Minister Paul Adderley and
Ambassador L. B. Johnson.
Mr. Pindling addressed the
Assembly following which
the Bahamas flag joined the
others outside the U.N.
building in New York.


BIG SALE



EDDIE'S DEPT. STORE
NEXT TO STOP N-SHOP -BAY


7TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION


WERE


NOW


$6, $30.00
$3, 5$12.00
1 ; :, $5.00
524 $l2 $16.00
$it. $ $10.00 (<
Si $S, $5.00
S?.'- $14.00
$10.00
$10.00
i .. $12.00

$4.00
$1.00
$3.00
m$ ;, $7.00
$5.00


$15.00
$20.00
$12. $18.00
$14.00
$10 or 2 for $16
$6.00

$2.50
$10 & $7
S3, $4, $5, $6.
$4.00


AN ASSORTMENT OF MEN'S HIGH & LOW HEEL SHOES
MENS MATERIALS:

POLYESTER 60" wide, PLAIDS, STRIPES, SOLIDS -all colours
TERYLENE & MOHAIR ALL COLOURS
ALSO


BOYS' SUITS -- (SIZES 6 to 12)


speual tou t-.es I he end result is .in
Imperial I etLi.Uad A man, 01m vmorntn
who is eminently qualified to give \ ou
the best possible instii uc advice. with
your interest and welfare foremost at
all times.
1 Milton H Cleare, Senior Life
Underwriter 2 Gregory A. Sweeting
I F- ., D .iner uSenior I ifeU Inderwriter


WERE $25.00


Get in the lifeboat
LifeGuards. It will
all the way.


$4. & $5 yard.
$4 yard

Now $10.00


with the Imrperial
be Smooth sailing


IMPERIAL IFE


Most lnsui LinCe m gcnts ice.vei 1 r, 1 i nclL. ),runui, .-.. . .... i-HEW mi w -- I- -i
of (ni solsIt i', .mo.thi lnmpetail 4 Mark L. Gates, 5 William G. Simons covers you for lie
Lilc(,u.iids unietgoig intensive speialist 6J. Whitney Pinder, Branch Manager A
i.1immng ihoughout their careers. Often 7 Enoch E. Cunningham, 8C. R. (Kim)
tliy 'e e taken to the Imperial Life Moss 9 W. Peter Rolle, 10W. (Tappy) Davis
Head Office in loionto, Canada, for
Fifth Floor, Nassau Bank House, Collins Avenue at Second Terrace West, Nassau, Bahamas. Telephone: 22508-9


Will be closed for stocktaking
Thui Sept, 27 Fri. Sept. 28 Sat Sept. 29


WE WILL REOPEN MON. OCT. 1ST
FOR BUSINESS AS USUAL


LADIES'
FUR COATS
RAIN COATS (CLOTHES)
SHIFTS
2 PC. NIGHT GOWNS
2 PC. NIGHT GOWNS
NIGHT GOWNS
2 PC. LONG NIGHT GOWNS
ALL DRESSES & PANTS SUITS
ALL SLACKS
BLOUSES
WHITE UNIFORMS
(SIZES 10.12,14,16)
PANTIES
BRAS
SHOES
BOOTS
MEN'S


SPORT COATS $35 00
SUITS $65o00
POLYESTER BAGGIES by WRIGHT
100% POLYESTER PANTS $S )
100% POLYESTER PANTS $i, 00
A LARGE VARIETY OF PANTS
SHORT PANTS
(SIZES 28, 29 30, 32)
POLYESTER SHIRTS s2' & 5i.
A LARGE ASSORTMENT OF SHIRTS
PAJAMAS


Uh fribhum





~bt Urrlbtwt Moi~ay, September 24, 1973.


DROS


IS FOR


... AND FOR SMART INVESTORS, TOO


$150
Down


$


PER MONTH
(only $8.75 a week)
7% interest is included in monthly payment
For a Prime Homesite at San Andros on
Andros . just 15 minutes away by air


For a Giant 10,000 square foot lot.
80 feet by 125 feet ... 1/4 acre.
Heavily wooded with 50 and 60 foot tall pine
trees ... abundant water available.
Future development plans include:
$1,000,000 18 hole golf course ... tennis
courts ... improvements to beach club and
deep water harbour ... fully stocked
quarter horse corral ... roads to every lot
... and more.
Villa programme for vacation or per-
manent home.
When you make your down payment, you
become a member of the San Andros Beach
Club. You are entitled to a complimentary
3 Day-2 Night Holiday on Andros to see the
project.
LIMITED L
TIME
OFFER
Don't miss the boat on these opening low
prices and easy terms. Think of your future.
BUT YOU MUST
ACT NOW!


CALL RIGHT NOW...
2-1238 OR 2-4913
VISIT OUR OFFICE TODAY... 25 Frederick Street, Berwin House
9:00 A.M. to 7:00 P.M. Monday through Friday
Saturday 9:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.


SAN ANDROS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
Principal broker:
BERKLEY FERGUSON REAL ESTATE
P.O. BOX N-4278


teft


BERKLEY FERGUSON
UT


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I


iS


C .
- q


0 I


(he ertlnt


Monday, September 24, 1973.










Muk.iday, September 24, 1973.


PHILIPS


POE MEMO
!I ('I ,




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A new way


of efficient

note-making


Pocket Memo
remembers
everything


PHILIPS


TAYLOR INDUSTRIES LTD.

P.O. BOX N-4806 PHONE 2-8941


IBM COMPUTER GETS LIFTED ON BAY ST
UP AND OVER ---This IBM computer machine was too big for the front door
and so over the balcony it went on September 12 for installation at Island Merchants.
Delivering the machine was Package Delivery Service (PDS). Mr. Ed. White, general
manager of International Business Machines (IBM), was present for the delivery and Mr.
Steve Coakley, managing engineer of I.B.M., directed the operation.
PHOTO: Philip Symonette

FRENCH NAVY TO PARTICIPATE IN 'MESSAGE


GENEVA The French
Navy will be instrumental in
launching 1 00,000
message-carrying capsules for
the world operation, "Message
in the Sea," to be inaugurated
in Panama City on December
11.
The helicopter carrier and
training ship Jeanne d'Arc will
set afloat a batch of capsules
off Cape Horn, while the
Panamanian Navy will immerse
other messages in the Atlantic
and Pacific.
The operation aims to show
the one-world nature of sea
pollution and the
interdependence of nations. It
also has a scientific objective:
to demonstrate how sea
currents carry pollutants to all
parts of the world, leaving no
beach free from
contamination. Many of the


IN THE SEA' OPERATION


messages may take months to
cross the seas. But like the
pollutants that float on the
high seas, they will all
eventually arrive.
The international Union of
official Travel Organizations
(IUOTO) was the first world
body to support this initiative
organized by one of its 88
Associate Members, the French
press group, Femmes
d'Aujourd'hui.
The first postage stamp
commemorating "Message in
the Sea" is to be issued by
Panama and will symbolize the
participation of IUOTO's 109
member countries.
The International Union of
Official Travel Organizations,
to which 109 countries belong,


is a non-governmental technical
body active in every field of
tourism. The private sector is
represented by 88 national and
international organizations, its
Associate Members.
HOUSE SPEAKER RAPS NIXON
DEFENDS CONGRESS
WASHINGTON In a response
to President Nixon's second State
of the Union address, speaker of
the House Carl Albert says Nixon's
criticisms of Congress are in
attempt to mask the
administration's own failures. And,
in a taped nationwide radio address,
Albert defends the lawmakers'
record.
Albert says the Congress had
made an impressive record so far
this year. And he says the record of
Congress will Improve before
adjournment. The Democratic
leader says the President does not
have a monopoly on wisdom


Planned Savings

with the Commerce.Together

we'll make beautiful things happen.


There's always something beautiful
worth saving for. The day you become
engaged, for example. Whatever the occasion,
you'll find that Planned Savings can work for
you.
Each payday, why not put part of what you
earn into a Commerce Savings Account?


Soon, you'll have saved the money you need
for that special occasion. We help your
money grow by adding interest regularly.
That's why we say, "You and the Commerce.
Together we're both stronger".




CANADIAN IMPERIAL
BANK OF COMMERCE


You and the Commerce.

Together we're both stronger.


BAHAMASAIR

STAFFERS GET

TRAINING

IN MIAMI
AN INTENSIVE training
programme for Bahamasair
personnel has started in Nassau
and in Miami, it was
announced by Mr. H. Max
Healey, General Manager.
The bulk of the training is
being carried out in Miami by
Eastern Airlines Training
Centre.
Mr. Healey who was
appointed general manager of
Bahamasair Sept. 1 said the
training programme was part of
immediate measures being
implemented by the airline to
provide better services to the
public.
To date 10 Bahamasair
stewardesses have completed
refresher courses in Miami, The
airline's reservations staff in
both Nassau and Freeport have
also completed a week's course
in that city.
Other courses being arranged
for staff members include
domestic ticketing and tariff
programme, workshops for
supervisors and other
management employees and
grooming and customer
relations training for flight
attendants.
With emphasis placed on
employee proficiency, Mr.
Healey said a management
team has been selected with
clearly defined individual
departmental responsibility.
"Both incentive and
disciplinary measures are being
utilized to increase employee
efficiency," Mr. Healey said.
"The management team for the
first time includes a manager,
employee relations."
Other measures taken to
improve services include the
opening to the new Central
Reservation Control at
Bahamasair House at Nassau
International Airport and the
supplying of name tags to
counter agents. Suggestion
boxes inviting constructive
ideas from customers will be
placed at most airports in the
near future.
At the moment Bahamasair
has a complement of six
aircraft which includes two
F-227 and two BAC 1-11 jets.
The airline expects to take
delivery of the third F-227
within two weeks, and a third
BAC 1-11 is expected to be
delivered by December 12.
"With three jets running by
mid December, we would
anticipate 97 per cent
reliability for the coming
season," Mr. Healey said.
ONE OF STANEK SEXTUPLETS
GETS ASSISTANCE
DENVER (Al') Only one of
the surviving Stanek sextuplets,
Nathan, continued to receive
assistance in breathing today. Two
of the others, Steven and Catherine,
have been taken off their
respirators.
All three had been on respirators
since their birth last Sunday, about
six weeks e ntmue.r


HEAR
EVANGELIST HUGH F. PYLE
Speaking in
REVIVAL SERVICES
September 23 30th AT

NEW IESTIAHI TRCI
Highland Park Dolphin Dr. & Edmond St.


SUNDAY:-
Bible School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Service 11:00 a.m.
Evening Service 7:30 p.m.
SPECIAL MUSIC IN EVERY SERVICE


Mon.- Fri:-
Children's Club 7:00 p.m.
Evening Service 7:30 p.m.
CE NURSERY PROVIDED


E NURSERY PROVIDED


SEPTEEIBR EXTRA SOCIALL I

* Your colour Portraits Sitting with 3 carefully-
posed proofs
* A Briiant 10 x 8 Colour Portrait
* 1 FREE Passport Photo
(Be ready for your New Passport!)


$9.?
COMPLETE


TIIF ALL NEW

ON THE WATERFRONT
E. Bay St. at. William St.
TELEPHONE 5-4641


NOTICE
NOTICE TO CERTAIN DEPOSITORS OF
WELLINGTON BANK LIMITED
(IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION)

WILL the following individuals please collect in
person their dividend cheques from the office of the
liquidator on the third floor of the E. D. Sassoon
Building at the corner of Parliament and Shirley
Streets. Please bring evidence of claim and proof of
identity.


Amanda G. Adderley
Dorothy Albury
A. Bain
Theodore Bethel
Wellington Bodie
Ronald Bosfield
Cynthia Bullard
Barbara Burnside
Cynthia Cartwright
Edna Charlton
Elaine Clarke
Leona Clarke
Charles Coakley
Lerlean Collie
Joseph Cumberbatch
Leonie Cummings
Louise Daniels
Alphonzo Darling
Fred Darling
Doris Davil
Herbert Dean
Malvise Dean
Reginald Dean
Verninchia Demeritte
Barbara Dorsette
Madlen Duncombe
Belmaize Farrington
Benjamin Forbes
Mark Fox
Christine Forbes
Ellen Gibson
Henry E. Gibson
David Glinton
Mary Hall
Adlene Hanna
Martha Hepburn
Moiah Hepburn
Sandra Hepburn
Francina Horton
Donica Hylton


Albertha Mae Johnson
Carol Johnson
James Johnson
Percy Knowles
Dr. S. Kumar M. B. Bs.
Alvin Lightbourne
Raymond Lloyd
Lillian Major
Rosemary Major
Oralean Marshall
Helen McCartney
Caiaphas McKenzie
Evelyna Munnings
Jestina Neeley
Godfrey Nesbitt
Saphora Newbold
W. B. Newbold
Richie Newchurch
Rose Nottage
Virginia Paul
Samuel Rahming
Bernard Rolle
Betty Rolle
Jonathan Rolle
Sarah Rolle
Veronica Rolle
Cleomie Russell
Allerdyce Swain
Enith Taylor
Norris Taylor
Evelyn Thompson
Rosemary Ward
Eavir White
Pearline Whylly
Carolyn Williams
Margaretta Williams
Sylvia & Robert Williams
Annette Woods
Doreen Gibson-Woodside
M. J. Woodside


gh QIribm










bebfribtune


Tourism Minister receives


US flag from Congressman


& presents Bahamas flag 4


THE HON.
was presented
of goodwill


CLEMENT T. MAYNARD, Minister of Tourism,
on Friday with an American flag and a declaration
from the American people by Maryland's


1A









AT FAREWELL PARTY FOR SOM CHIB
GETTING TOGETHER FOR A PHOTO at the Britannia Beach Hotel on Paradise
Island last week were (left to right): Mr. Walter Friedrich, Manager of Bahama Islands
Tourist Office in Frankfurt, Germany: Mrs. Earl Francis, the Rev. Earl Francis, proprietor
of the Grant's Town Hotel and Miss Lorraine Onderdonk, executive secretary of the
Bahamas Hotel Association. The occasion was a farewell party for Tourism Director S. N.


Chib who retires soon.


INNER WHEEL DANCE
ON OCTOBER 13


l)l\N IR d,.i tc.
b tShe Inicnr Wheel
be held on Octobec
30 p ti not ion
5 as previous .


NOW SHOl()\I\(,
At 7:30
NLEARNT S[CR[tOFJT/[
MIMCERS


Warner Comunications Copny0
Plus at 9:30
"WILD BUNCH"
til' m 'sass ii i ts ti


d Announced b\ The Tribune.
The dinner-dance will be :ield
ait Ihe Balmoral Beach Hotel.
Lounge suits will be the dresy.
AGRICULTURE OFFICER
ATTENDS FLORIDA MEET
\n ; ., iultuirail ,tificcr Ilo
lie \m i''. r', st \ rlinculture and
I isi : i. s. itl. [Ro. ise ell
I mis.v last cck Aittcvidcd
iti n I ;it'lii uil eetine'' iue
I ris.i I n' lossgical Soc tiss
hsdJ .i \11L'm Beach.
ir. i snila ison ,.id tlil
t o iscub united. espnt, all
those ); insect control ini
V..rcl.ihlcs. cos l h l e direcil
Na pcL !,I ,,,ls int s s 'dic it thic
p ri '! ::ii l..itnc -(row cr in tle
I he tlicIiie ol the i acting
,it ts sin l p it t insect
,: ntiro() I-tro .t In IIcs 01 the
c n virn in t Incn t.


MARY STAR OF THE SEA SCHOOl


NIGHT CLASSES


*ENGLISH MATH SPANISH
TYPING & SHORTHAND
TUESDAY & THURSDAY NIGHTS


Registration Sept. 25th & 27th at 7 p.m.
If interested call 373-3456 Freeport, Grand Bahama


Sun And...


Regrets

that due to the impending marriage

of Magistrate John Baily

in London,

we will be CLOSED September 24th,

through October 1st.


PHOTO: Wendell Cleare

P.S.N.C. TAKE OVER

GULF CONTAINER
\ Ill \ Gulf Container Line
withdraws from the Bermuda
and Nassau trade in August.
the new multi-purpose vessels
oi the Pacific Steam Navigation
Company will deliver direct
atn container traffic from the
tI.K. to Bermuda and Nassau.
The first PSNC vessel after
(;tlf Container Line's
Manchester Zeal will be Ortega
from Liverpool arrivmte in
Nassau on September 27.
lihe Manchester Zeal will
iease the 'U.K. in August on her
!ast sailing to Bermuda and
Nassau.
I lie developing container
ii. 11,r.. facilities at Berm uda
and Nassau will make it
possible to discharge containers
unitised and breakbulk cargo
frim the same vessel.
Ihe local agents are R I.
('urrm in Nassau.


I Congressman Parren J. Mitchell.
Congressman \lnit.ell, who
is a leader in the US. Congress
Black Caucus. flew to Nassau
Son Friday morning to attend
the annual convention of the
Maryland Public Employees
Council 67 now meeting at the
Flagler Inn, Paradise Island
In accepting the American
flag and the goodwill
declaration on behalf of Prime
Minister L.O. Pindling. Mr.
Maynard, in turn, presented
C'..nI., ,sa, i Mitchell with a
Bahamian flag.
The Minister, in making the
presentation to Congressman
Mitchell. said the flags have
taken on a special meaning for
the people of the Bahamas.
'We in the Bahamas.
particularly at this stage of our
dee.lopmenit, on the heels of
I independence, are very
csiscious of the value and the
itmeaning of the flag," he said.
I lags have taken on a special
ean'.ing for us. On Jul r10, in
a ceremony that still brings a
lump to my throat when I
re. all it, we witnessed the
lowering of the U'nion Jack and
:he raising of the new
Bahalian flag to signify the
.i ttainment o f full
Independence.
"That flag means a great
deal to us. and I tu.c a great
deal of pride person;ily and I
ihink all Bahamians, feel much
the same way, whenl we see iouI
!14' flying side by side with the
Stars and Stripes, the unionn
lack. I'he Maple LIeaf and
tithers.
includeded Mr. Maynard.
SCongressman \hitchell. 1
AGNEW TO DEFEND HIS
CONSTITUTIONAL OFFICE
WASHINGTON (AP) Vice
President Agnew is reported to be
proceeding with plans, as his la\ yer
is quoted as saying, to defend his
constitutional office. A Washiniton
hbriadcast (on W-T-T-(;T V.
iutitetd Agnew's la wyser. Judahl
Best, as makiiig that statement.


thank you for this gesture of
goodwill and offer in return a
Bahamian flag, which
represents the sky, the sand
and the sea and the strength
with which we hope to build a
nation"


PM ON NBC-TV


AIRLINE FIESTA QUEENS
PARTICIPANTS IN the 6th Annual Bahamas Airline
Fiesta at the Nassau Beach Hotel were treated to a preview
of six of the beautiful contestants in the Miss Airlines
World Beauty Pageant during a treasure hunt organized by
Gerry Tinlin, Agency Sales Manager at the Hotel. LEFT TO
RIGHT: Miss Atlanta, Patty Jones; Miss Chicago, Pat Gates;
Miss Indianapolis, Barbara Rooze; Mr. Tinlin; Miss
Washington, Sandy Chamblee; Miss Cincinnati, Mary Ann
Burger; and Miss Winnipeg, Lorraine Tocheri. The Pageant
took place at the Nassau Beach on Saturday.


Prices Commission will soon start a

consumer education programme in Nassau

THE PRICES COMMISSION intends to shortly institute a consumer education programme to
assist buyers in getting a better deal for their dollar "within the framework of a good competitive
business community." Commission chairman Neville Adderley said Thursday.


"It is the intention of the
omissionin at an early stage
to advise on ways and means
which the Commission thinks
will improve the choice-making
capabilities of consumers, and
in general to bring as Imuch
relevant knowledge to the
consumer to help him in
choosing the best product for
his needs at the best price,"
Mr. Adderley told the weekly
meeting of Cable Beach
Kiwanis.
Speaking on the economic c
Aspects of Price Control," he
dismissed as "inaccurate and at
very best platitudes, statements
by businessmen that "supply
and demandd' and
competition' would keep
prices controlled and in line.
Inflation and price control
had become an economic and
political issue worldwide. Mr.
Adderley said. As a result there
was no major country which
did not have some form of
prices policy and price control.
While most businessmen
throughout the world did not
think there was a case for price
control, the extent to which
the laws of supply and demand
controlled prices depended on
how closely the market place
approached the basic
assumption of perfect
competition.
IMPERFI CT
More often than not.


^FLO'S DRESS SHOP
FLO S DRY GOODS & NOTIONS
Johnson Road Phone 41331





Hi! Look! Flo's just decided to come to you and Guess What?
She is making Every Thing ; )
Her Self! Special made
Africian Print Dresses I, :?
THE LATEST STYLES IN
PANT SUITS & BAGS, ."*''
CROCHETTE, HATS ALL COLOURS i '
1A 'S'P i gA!]A J AI iAMiJ

D RACK ON LADIES' DRESSES
==,-----


however. "competition in the
market place is imperfect for a
number of reasons, the most
common being that the
number of :ti .in the indusutt
may be relatiscly small." Mr.
Adderley said.
Secondlyv. commodities or
services were not usuallS
homogeneous and advertising
could often strongly rnili. I.
the consumer to buy at a
higher price.
"1 o the extent that
advertising is correct, it cannot
be blamed on businessmen if it
causes consumers to buy the
product at a higher price.
because, indeed, the advertising
must be paid for somehow.
However, the government
involved must assess to what
extent consumers are being
abused and act accordingly."
In this context, consumer
education played an important
role in alerting consumers to
the pitfalls of aJdk rtil' g and
in how to buy in general. Mr.
Adderley said.
COLLUSION?
The matter of a relatively
few firms dominating ani
industry could lead to
collusion or monopolistic
practices leading to price
fixing, he added.
"T he greatest traditional
economic argument against
monopolies is that they can
control and manipulate supply.
and thus set prices to their
advantage and to the detriment
of the consumer."
It was not surprising
therefore that governments all
over the world had made
statutory provisions to curtail
monopolistic practices. Mr.
Adderley said.
During times of normal price
movements even under
imperfect competition, a "code
of trade morality" prevented a
firm from making exorbitant
profit margins, but in a period
of rapidly rising costs
world-wide, economic laws had
shown that firms tended to
gain more than consumers if
there was no price control.
This was because merchants
normally charged a price high
enough to cover replacement
costs. Mr. Adderley explained.
NEW PRICES
"Therefore if the price of
the goods bought at a contract
price were to escalate further
during the period of delivery,


merchants could simply charge
the new higher price and make
an additional amount caused
by inflation, at the expense of
the consumer." he said.
Meanwhile trade unions
generally made wage demands
after price increases had been
experienced by union
members. Therefore wage
costs of firms brought on by
union demands tended to lag
behind business profits already
made. And the problem was
accentuated in a period of
rapidly rising prices.
Therefore because of the
forces tending to distort supply
and demand relationships or
militate against the working of
the "market mechanism" and
competition, it miight be
advisable for a government to
make statutory provisions for
price control, Mr Adderley
said.


-rp1


-xemntr


Opens 7 p.m. Shows start 7:30
CHILDREN UNDER 12 FREE
See 2 features late as 9:25
EXCLUSIVE -
FINAL 2 NITES*
"SHOWDOWN" 7:30 & 11:40
"MARY OF SCOTS" 9:25


C -# .. I Io a
)WINGG


MNOW S


Matinees 3 & 5, Evening 9:0(
The ultimate in I
adventure and e














ioil
I











Reservations not claimed
on first come, f
PARENTAL DISCRf
SORRY NO PASSE


Last Day Tuesday
Matinee starts at 1:30
Evening 9:00
"LADY SINGS THE BLUES"
Diana Ross PG.
Billy Dee Williams
PLUS
"LEGEND OF NIGGER
CHARLEY" PG.
D.Urville Martin
Fred Williamson
S PLUS Late Feature
Tuesday night.
'Phone 2-2534



LAST DAY T
Matinee Continuous from


OWING
)- Phone 2-1004, 2-1005
Martial Arts
ixcitementi


Iby 8:45, will be sold
first served basis.
ETION AD VISED.
ES ACCEPTED!


Last Day Tuesday
Continuous Showings
from 3:00
"THE TRAIN
ROBBERS" PG.
John Wayne
Ann Margaret
PLUS
"MAN IN THE
WILDERNESS" PG.
Richard Harris
John Huston

'I|^^^^flfl


Monday, September 24 1973.


[ It l l
11tl
O1tb ',\Ill
O October


I
I

I

U

I
I
I

I
I

I
I

I
I


I

I
mn













I

I




I
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ehi


E.H.MUNDY & CO.

(Bahamas) LIMITED

Notice to Consignees.
Universal Alco Ltd. Tropical Shipping Co. Ltd.

With effect from 1st October 1973, the above companies
will be enforcing the trailer demurrage regulations as
stipulated in their respective F.M.C. Tariffs, Rules and
Regulations.
E. H. Mundy & Co (Bahamas) Limited have been
appointed to collect all demurrages incurred.
The free time allowed for the discharge and/or loading of
trailers and the demurrage rates are as follows:-

EQUIPMENT FREETIME DEMURRAGE

Dry Freight Vans (any length) 3 days $10.00 per day
Flatbed Trailers (any length) 3 days $10.00 per day
Refigerated Vans (any length) 1 day $25.00 per day
Extendable Flatbed and other
specialised equipment 2 days $25.00 per day


E. H. MUNDY & CO. (Bahamas) LIMITED,
P. 0. Box F-2492, Freeport,
Phone: 352-9691.


S-


1


1


1


m











Monday, September 24, 1973.


Follow up on 'gift



from God' to teach deaf


By Abigail Van Buren
Si1973 yr cicesao Tribme-N. Y. News Synd., Inc.
DEAR ABBY: A college girl wrote that she felt she had
a "gift from God" to teach deaf people to talk, but she was
"torn" because her parents feared if she pursued that
profession she might end up marrying a deaf person.

IN THE SUPREME COURT 1973
OF THE COMMONWEALTH
OF THE BAHAMAS. No. 15
Equity Side

NOTICE
THE QUIETING TITLES ACT 1959

The Petition of Richard Johnsen of 26 Old
Bailey London, England in respect of:
ALL THAT piece parcel of lot of land
containing Twenty-five (25) acres and being a
portion of a larger piece parcel or lot of land
containing One hundred (100) acres situate at
Cabbage Point in the Southern District of the
Island of Long Island one of the Bahama Islands
which said piece parcel or lot of land is bounded
Northeastwardly by land the property of
William Pratt and running thereon One thousand
Seven hundred (1,700) feet Southwardly by
land the property of the said William Pratt and
running thereon Six hundred and Sixteen (616)
feet Southwestwardly by the Sea and running
thereon One thousand Two hundred (1,200)
feet Westwardly by the Sea and running thereon
Five hundred (500) feet and Northwestwardly
by land the property of the said William Pratt
and running thereon Six hundred and Sixteen
(616) feet.
AND IN THE MATTER OF
THE QUIETING, TITLES ACT. 1959
RICHARD JOHNSEN, The Petitioner in this
matter claims to be the owner in fee simple of the
said tract of land and has made application to The
Supreme Court of the Bahama Islands under
Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have
his title to the said land investigated and the
nature and extent thereof determined and declared
in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court
in accordance with the provisions of the Act.
COPIES of the said plan may be inspected
during normal office hours at the following
places:

(a) The Registry of The Surpreme Court:

(b) The Office of the Commissioner at Clarence
Town, Long Island:

(c) The Chambers of Graham, Thompson & Co.

T in the E. D. Sassoon Buildi'ng. Southwestern
corner of Shirley and Parliament Streets in the
City of Nassau, Attorneys for the Petitioner.
NOTICE is hereby given that any person having
dower or right to dower or an adverse claim or a
claim not recognized in the Petition shall on or
before Friday the Twenty-eighth day of September
A.D. 1973 file in the Supreme Court in the City of
Nassau aforesaid and serve on the Petitioner or the
undersigned a statement of his or her claim in the
prescribed form, verified by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith. Failure of any such person to file and
serve a statement of his or her claim on or before
the said Twenty-eighth day of September A. 1).
1973, will operate as a bar to such claim.
GRAHAM, TIIOMPSON & CO
E. D. Sassoon Building
Sintilli rn Corner of
Shirley and Parliament Sts.
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner.


phDe4


May I comment? Our son, who is one of the finest
speech therapists in the country, married a perfectly nor-
mal girl, but had he married one with a speech defect, we
would have loved her no less.
When I saw our son take a crippled, retarded child on
his lap, and help that boy utter his first audible word, I
cannot explain the feeling that came over me. That boy
looked up into my son's eyes as if to say, "Thank you,"
and my son looked down into the eyes of that child as if to
say, "You are going to learn to talk!" [And subsequently
the child did.]
Let me tell you, all the money in the world couldn't buy
the thrill I experienced at that moment.
Thank you, Abby, for telling that girl that if she feels
she has a "gift from God" to teach the deaf, to pursue that
calling. She will never regret it. PROUD FATHER
DEAR FATHER: Working with the handicapped is one
of the most rewarding of all careers. It takes a special
kind of human being to do it, and I sincerely believe that
those who do are indeed "gifted" by God, and chosen for
the privilege.

DEAR ABBY: I noticed this real pretty girl who just
started to work where I work. She seemed real friendly and
always smiled and said hello when she saw me. [It's a big
office, and we work in different departments.]
I asked her if she liked movies and she said yes, so I
asked her when I could take her to a movie of her choice,
then she said she didn't like them all that much, so I let
the matter drop.
A few days later, I asked her if she would like to have
dinner with me at a nice restaurant, and she said she was
on a diet to lose weight so there wouldn't be much point in
that.
I asked her if she liked music, thinking I could take her
to some kind of concert and she said music gave her a
headache.
Abby, I am 27, and she's about 22, so it can't be that
I'm too young for her. Please tell me how I can get a date
with this girl. I am told I am a nice young man, but I
must be doing something wrong. I'm no run-around, but
I've never had trouble getting dates before.
BATTING ZERO

DEAR BATTING: Wake up and smell the coffee! The
chemistry is wrong. She's not interested, so turn your at-
tentions elsewhere-where they'll be welcome and appreci-
ated.

DEAR ABBY: This may help the young couple who
were "in trouble" and couldn't find a minister who would
marry them because neither belonged to any church:
Every commissioned officer of the Salvation Army is
an ordained Christian minister, authorized to perform mar-
riage ceremonies which will be legal and binding in every
state of the U. S. Because the girl was pregnant, she
couldn't have been married in the Salvation Army's chapel,
but she could have a proper legal wedding.
Please pass this information on, Abby. Many may not
low. *.m pidier a the corps,
F. W.: SOUTH CAROLINA

Problems? You'll feel better If you get It off your chest.
For a personal reply, write to ABBY: Box No. 070. L. A..
Calif. WM. Enclose stamped, self-addressed envelope.
please.

Hate to write letters? Send $1 to Abby, Box 60700, Los
Angeles. Cal. o063, for Abby's booklet, "How to Write
Letters for All Occasions."


Arrived today: Jomrna from
Jacksonville: Deborah K from
Abaco
Sailed today: Joma for
Jacksonville
Arriving tomorrow: Tropic
Day from West Palm Beach,
Bahama Star, Emerald Seas
from Miami


K- moon


TIDES
High 6.30 a.m. and 6.51
p.m.
Low 12.09 a.m. and 12.30
p.m.
WEATHER
Wind: Southeasterly 8 to 16
m.p.h.
Weather: Cloudy with
showers or thundershowers
Sea Smooth to slight
Temp: Min. tonight 70
Max. tomorrow 86

SUN
Rises 5.59 a.m.
Sets 6.06 p.m.

MOON
Rises 5.00 a.m.
Sets 5.19 p.m.

NATIONAL WOMEN'S
MOVEMENT MEET
THE REGULAR monthly
meeting of the National
Women's Movement will be
held on Tuesday, at 8 p.m. at
Mission Baptist Church, Hay
Street. There will be several
speakers including Mr.
Franklvn Wilson, M. P. for
Grant's Town who will
speak on "The Importance
of A-Sue in the Bahamian
Economy": Mr. Cadwell
Armbrister on "The Role of
Youth in Restoring the
Building Industry", and Mr.
Donald Cartwright, president
of the Architects and Engineers
Association, on "Low Coast
Housing".
At this meeting, members of
the National Women's Housing
A-Sue who have completed
their A-Sue payments and
finished the course in Home
Opportunities and Management
Education, will be presented
with Guaranty Certificates.

FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-21571


___________7


CLASSIFIEDSECT


REAL ESTATE


I1


C11387
WHY FRET WE SELL
We need houses our listings
are getting exhausted. Ring or
come in and list with us. This is
our 28th year DIAL 22033.
DAMIANOS REALTY
COMPANY.
C11242


IMPERIAL PARK
3 bedroom house, furnished
large corner lot $32000.


on I


1 Lot 75x100 $5200
'.all 34119 working hours.

C11388
FOR SALE
House Grove Area as low as
$35,000.00. Has 2 bedrooms
one bath basic furniture.
Spacious grounds enclosed.
Dial 22033, 41197 evenings.

C11399
BLAIR ESTATES Lot for
sale Albany Street 100' by
200'. Phone day 2-3041. Night
3-2553.
C11494
FOR SALE
WINTON 3 bedroom 31/2
bathroom with large grounds,
patio, cellar, good sea view.
$85,000.
NASSAU EAST 3 bedroom,
21/2 bathroom with garage on
large corner lot $37,500.
NASSAU EAST 120 x 120
hilltop lot with sloping
approach $10,000. Phone
41466.

C11495
ONLY $75 DEPOSIT secures
70 x 100 lot. You get beach
rights, underground utilities ,
private lake. From $5800 ,-nd
$80 month. No INTEREST
CHARGES compare this
with other subdivisions.
Call Pat Rutherford at 4-1141
or Morley & O'Brien at 2-4148
or 2-3027 or come to the
YAMACRAW BEACH MODEL
HOME.


C11507
FOR SALE
2, 3 and 4 bedroom houses in
the following prestigious
areas:
Westward Villas -Skyline
Heights
Highland Park The Grove
Gleninston Gardens Sea
Breeze
Imperial Park -. Johnson
Terrace
Nassau East- Winton
Eastern Road Camperdown
Blair Estates Golden Gates
Estates
HIGHBURY PARK as well
as where ever you want it.
IN ADDITION
COMMERCIAL AND
RESIDENTIAL lots or acerage
in New Providence and Family
Islands.
Hotel sites and more. If it's real
estate we have it.
CONTACT
DAVSEON'S REAL ESTATE
AGENCY
Corner Bay & East Streets
Phone 21178 or 55408
P. 0. Box N4648
Nassau, Bahamas
or cable
"DAVCO"


FOR SALE OR RENT
Cl11178
FULLY FURNISHED
three-bedroom house situated
1st Terrace, Centreville. Easily
adaptable to professional
purposes. Lot 150 x 100. All
utilities underground.
Air-conditioned rooms. Phonc
5-8311.

Cl 1054
3 Bedrooms, one bath, Joans
Heights, South Beach. See
Philip R. Vargas, West, S.
South Street on Corner.

I m REMT

C11192
LARGE 1 bedroom partially
airconditioned, furnished
apartment. $225 per month
utilities included. Phone
5-8327.
C 11036
LARGE ONE BEDROOM
apartment, nicely furnished.
$250 per month. Call
CHESTER THOMPSON REAL
ESTATE 24777-8.
C11287
FURNISHED two bedroom
one bath apartment near
waterfront with telephone
$195.00 Phone 5-8512.
C 11050
COTTAGES and apartments
daily, weekly or monthly
airconditioned, fully furnished.
maid service available..Lovely
gardens & swimming pool.
Telephone 31297, 31093.
C11332
Unfurnished 3 bedroom house.
Call 56229 for information.
C11362
ONE EXTRA LARGE two
bedroom two bath, apartment.
With large living and dining all
basically furnished Victoria
Court APARTMENTS on
Elizabeth Avenue between
Shirley and Bay Street.
Facilities, phone, laundry,
parking, T.V. antenna,
airconditioned. Phone 54631
between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.


FOR RENT


Cl1189
KIRK S. HINSEY will sell at
the parking lot east of the
Harbour Moon Hotel, Bay
Street on the 5th day of
October 1973, at 12 noon the
following property:-
"ALL THAT piece parcel or
lot of land situate at Winton
in the Eastern District of the
Island of New Providence
aforesaid which said piece of
parcel of land bears the Lot
number Forty (40) in a
Block which is believed to
be Block number Nought (0)
of the said Estate and
known as "Winton" but
which Block is not
numbered on the Plan of the
said Estate which said piece
or parcel of land is more
particularly delineated and
described on the Plan
annexed to an Indenture of
Conveyance of even date
herewith but executed prior
to the execution hereof and
made between Mary
Grosvenor Easey of the one
part and the Mortgagor of
the other part and thereon
coloured pink.
Mortgage dated 3rd February,
1972 Charles A. P. Smith to
Finance corporation of
Bahamas Limited.
Recorded in Volume 1890
pages 68 to 75.
This sale is subject to a reserve
price and to the right for the
Auctioneer or any person on
his behalf to bid up to that
price. Terms: 10% of the
purchase price at the time of
sale and balance on
completion.
Dated 31st day of August A.D.
1973.
KIRK,-IINSEY
Public Auctioneer



Cl11318
NOTICE is heregy given that
KENNETH STANLEY
CHAMBERLAIN of Soldier
Road Nassau. Bahamas is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
17th day of September 1973
to The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.


I 'I I I -- I


I I


Cl 1321
NOTICE is hereby given that
WINSTON MORRIS of Gibbs
Corner is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for naturalisation as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why naturalisation should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty
eight days from the 17th day
of September 1973 to The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.
C 11325
NOTICE is hereby given that
JOSEPH WILLIAM
EDWARDS of Thompson
Apartments, Bay Street, P. 0.
Box N-3701, Nassau Bahamas
is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty eight days from the
17ti day of September 1973
to The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.
C11312
NOTICE is hereby given that
ALEXANDER McCORQUO-
DALE of High Vista, Nassau is
applying to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
Citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
17th day of September 1973
to The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.


C11392
BACHELOR ROOM with
private entrance in Teddar
Close, Palmdale. For
information call 5-1044.
C11328
TWO BEDROOM unfurnished
apartment, Blue Hill Road.
$170/month. Call 5-2986 after
5 p.m.
C11320
TWO UNFURNISHEC
2-bedroom apartments Also
one store on Mackey Street.
Details by appointment. Please
do not call unless genuinely
interested. Phone 28086.
C11371
UNFURNISHED 2 bedroom
apartment, good location off
Mackey Street. Telephone
5-1758.

C11378
1 one bedroom apartment
furnished on Clifton Street off
Mount Royal Avenue. Phone
51851.
C 11396
Unfurnished 2 bedroom
apartment wall to wall
carpeting Stapledon
Gardens. Phone 3-5350.

C11488
2 bedroom apartment,
Centreville. Telephone 5-8679.

C 11489
3 BEDROOM 1 bath cottage,
fully furnished off Village
Road in Tuckaway. Rent $350
a month. Call MORLEY &
O'BRIEN REAL ESTATE
Telephone 2-3027 or 2-4148.

PUBLIC AUCTION
C11026
KIRK S. HINSEY will sell at
the parking lot east of the
Harbour Moon Hotel, Bay
Street, on the 28th day of
September 1973, at 12 noon,
the following property:
ALL THAT piece parcel or
lot of land situate in the
Southern District of the
Island of New Providence
one of the Bahama Islands
and being Lot number two
hundred and fifty-nine (259)
in Kennedy Subdivision.

Mortgage dated 16th January,
1969 Henry James Ellis and
Carnetta V. Ellis to Finance
Corporation of Bahamas
Limited. Recorded in Book
1362 at pages 75 to 81.
The sale is subject to a reserve
price and to the right for the
Auctioneer or any person on
his behalf to bid up to that
price.
Terms: 10% of the purchase
price at the time of the sale
and balance on completion.
Dated 22nd. day of Ausust
A.D. 1973.
KIRK. S. HINSEY
Public Auctioneer.


IL


C11302
NOTICE is hereby given that
JUAN ANTONIO VALENTIN
FERNANDEZ of Westward
Villas, P. 0. Box 5433, Nassau,
Bahamas, is applying to the
M in ister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship for
naturalisation as a citizen of
the Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why naturalisation should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
ot the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
seventeenth day of September,
1973 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship P.O. Box N-7147.
Nassau.

C11314
NOTICE is hereby given that
SHERLYN W. HALL of the
Southern District of New
Providence P. 0. Box 7878 is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
17th day od September 1973
to The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

C11322
NOTICE is hereby given that
MEYER RASSIN of Rassin
Hospital, Collins Avenue, P. 0.
Box N-972, Nassau, Bahamas is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration 3s
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
17th day of September 1973
to The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147. Nassau.

C11301
NOTICE is hereby given that
JOSEPH CLARK of Sutton
Street off Kemp Road, Nassau,
Bahamas is applying to the
M in ister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalisation as a citizen of
the Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why naturalisation should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
seventeenth day of September,
1973 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship P.O. Box N-7147,
Nassau.
C11324
NOTICE is hereby given that
GEORGE NESTOR KLASS of
Imperial Park, Nassau, c o P.
0. Box N4759, Nassau is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
17th day of September 1973
to The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.


C11496
NOTICE is hereby given that
ALEXANDER PIERRE of
Yellow Elder Gardens is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for naturalisation
as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who
knows any reason why
naturalisation should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 24th day of
September 1973 to The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.
C11313
NOTICE is hereby given that
MARY McCORQUODALE of
Blueberry Hill, Fox Hill, P. 0.
Box N-233, Nassau is applying
to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 17th .day of
September 1973 to The
Mi n ister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.
C11326
NOTICE is hereby given that
GARDNER DUTTON YOUNG
of Eleuthera Limited
Apartments, Bay Street, P. 0.
Box 5693, Nassau, Bahamas is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
24th day of September 1973
to The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.


iiii


I


INI


NOTICE


C 11326
NOTICE is hereby given that
GARDNER DULTON YOUNG
of Eleuthera Limited
Apartments, Bay Street, P. 0.
Box 5693, Nassau, Bahamas, is
applying to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
17th day of September 1973
to The Minister responsible -
Nationality and Citizenship P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.
C11331
NOTICE is hereby given that
GEORGE NORMAN
MACLEOD of Eastern Road,
P. 0. Box 657, Nassau,
Bahamas, is applying to the
M minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 17th day of
September, 1973, to The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau.

NOTICE is hereby given that
DANIEL JOHN JOSEPH of St.
Louis du Nord, Haiti, is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for naturalisation
as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who
knows any reason why
naturalisation should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 17th day of
September, 1973, to The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N-7147, Nassau.
C11306
NOTICE is hereby given that
ROBERT N. FORBES of
8 Mile Rock, Grand Bahama.
is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
17th day of September, 1973,
to The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau.

C11498
NOTICE is hereby given that
CLAUDIOUS LEON CLARKE
of Grants Town (General
Delivery) New Providence, is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 24th
day of September, 1973 to The
M i n ister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147. Nassau.


ht : baitNE












Monday, September 24. 1973.


CLASSIFIED SECT
. . .. . .. .. -1-


NoICE


; D \MALONE will sel!
.. I' ',,thern Police Station.
'., S''eet on Thursday
27th 1973 at 10

F L S, MOTOR
S: R AN OTHi R
S,. OPE RTY
-t;" cash
-iARRY D.. Malone
bi ic Aucitioneer.




ti'-. r irt v 'r ,i iphl
r c, c ;it n ?r i
*. **j e without r



ANNOUNCEMENTS

*.; P S AREHOLDERS'
S ; A special
of The
S .. idrtal Life &
.:: .... ,J C, CnO. Ltd w ill
tho w-A d,

+ e Ro-m of the
S ,', i. Kerilp

Sardiev Mon
Se(cretai

CARS FOR SALE

ECONOCARS
used-car values.
.;cl i Cng clean, low-mileage,
h -+ ,del vehicles


J0 AUXHA


1972 M'ORR


-"' L.KSWAGEN MICRO


SVAUXHALL VIVA




?; DODGE AVENGER
-.ed juton 'r miat L
". $I,i O. 00
S9 6 9 LI N C O L N
'_OrT! ,ENTAL 4 dor' sedan,
i radio,
i 0 p et'r cl.
S.. $3.000 00
41 FiAT 600D 2-d oo


,970 TCYOTA CROWN D/L


'970


R M t $ 00.00
MORRIS MINI 1000


S '71 PLYMOUTH FURY Ill



969 iI HLLrMAN MINX dooI'


971 FORD CAPRI -


970 TOYOTA 1000 .oo
: Iaf .. on.

r90 MORRIS 100 *- dooi


!9.3 VOLKSWVAGEN 1300
ETLE dan.
a

:970 FiAT 850 SPECIAL
: ; : / ssio n

F PLY ,OUTTh SIGNET
rnati(


S 9 TOY01 A COROLLA
g.' < *t :, dard



i7i VAUXk' ALL VIVA
.--: l .,dard


S qe969' TOYOTA -dio rsedjn

S 9 RD FALCON
Ii'' r 'AGeON .antomati(

FORD PINTO 2 door



ECONOMY CARS LTD.
Fiat & Toyota
Sales and Service
-. .,.-., i Street
P O. Box N1382,
Telephone 2-1322


P" 'i"r ,' o : ssenger,
.. v,, : $ .h^ 00( Phone


~~-vF i ;T : V OL V8

.'.. Wag o' w-' pa erng,
S.... d a''do/s. 'factory
i c,, df '-on-ed LE cellent
,,,t $-, $. 13 00. CaiB 31606


197O TRIUMPH I SpItfire
$1400 f'Phori r 31206 after 5
tI ";:


Cibp iributn


CARS FOR SALE


C 113b
ISLAND \MO1IRi
CO1IPAN'Y
1970 LTD.
P 0. Box N-640
NASSAU. BAtHAM AS-

USED CARS


1969 CHRYSLER
4 L)' or Auto White
1969 PONTIAC GTO


$9bQ


A C Vinyl. Greer $2500
1968 JAVELIN A'C $1200
1973 VICTOR S/W FE
Au '. Blue 856 miles $4400
1967 VIVA 2 Dr.
Auto OGren $750
1970 RAMBLER SST
4 Dr Auto. BIie $2100n
1967 TRIUMPH HERALD
Whvte $900
1971 MERCURY COUGAR
Aut.. ti',-wn $3500
1970 PONTIAC LeMANS
S War+n -$2600
1971 FORD CAPRI
Auto. Blue $ oh lO
1969 FORD GALAXIES

1970 HILLMAN MINX

1973 PONTIAC VENTURA
2 D. A.C Gree-L $5900
196V VAUXH\LL
VICTOR $i00i
1967 hevrolet Impala $450
Trade-ins Welcomed.
Located Oakes Field
Opposite the Ice Plant
Telephone 34636-7-8


IN MEMORIAL
C 11514


IN LOVING memory o'
dear mother and sister LCo
Hanna who departed '",
September 22nd 1970.


Sleep on mother sloop
take your rest
We love you but Jest
you best
Left to mourn: 2 da
Matia Hanna and
Williams, 2 sisters Rhoc
and Luella Rolle and a
relatives and friends.
Daugh ter it

C 11506





W,


IN LOVING memory o- our
mother and I -.'.i ,, it,.-rI Julia
Hanna who departed this life
September 24th 1970.
How sweet the name of Jesus
sounds
In a believer's car,
It soothes his s1 rorows
H e ,a* h is ., lirlnd s.
And dr ive- away his fears,
Sadly, mnrsed by a son, a
daughter, '-ine grandchildren.
twenty great grandchildren.

ART SUPPLIES


a O '. L T i aj 'j> :,t a r Itt
r.as ls. Ct EI rt h j irit

S Ltd Bay St. Ph ,:1P
2-:3;,r .n-2h'Jr



SCHOOLS
C11124
ENROLL 'ow at thIe Nassau.
Academy' ot BuLsiness in the
follow' rig ctlas'ses
Ty,ping with I,'- .'-)
Shorthand
BookKeeri':
Swit hh, ndi
Front n)PSi a h,
Night Auditing
Telex Oper nation
English
Mathematics
Filing
French
German
Spanish
B.J.C Classes
Dictaphone Typist
Call the Nassau Academy of
Business today and join any of
the above classes. Phone
24993. (Located at Shirley St.
opposite Collins Avenue).


MARINE SUPPLIES

C11350
17 ft. glassfibre sailboat with
trailer and outboard
Half-decked with roomy
cockpit for family sailing
Fully equipped. Call 23095 or
77097 after 6 p.m.


L,


on and

ws loves


augl'ter s An experienced clerk is
Leotha required to process mutual
da Gray fund subscriptions and
host of redemptions, handle inquiries
and investigations. Applicant
MARIA. should be able to type, take
shorthand, and write
correspondence on own
S initiative. Spanish translating
abi'ity essential. Apply to Mrs.
E. L i :,,. ,rne telephone
-- 2-4240.


C 11459
LPGas Operations Supervisor
required for "Bahamas Gas" in
Freeport. The successful
applicant will be required to
supervise LPGas operations
including ocean tanker
handling, gas storage, vehicle
and cylinder filling, and the
design, installation and
maintenance of consumer
facilities. He must therefore
have a sound knowledge of
LPGas safety procedures and
codes of practice, together
with experience in the handling
of liquefied gas and in the
selection of approved
equipment. Please apply in
writing to: The Manager,
"Bahamas Gas", P.O. Box
F-23, Freeport or P.O. Box
N-1553, Nassau.

C11454
PARADISE ISLAND
LIMITED requires night
auditors. *
Applicant should be at least 24
years old with a high school
education and a comprehensive
knowledge of N.C.R. 4200
machine. Responsibilities in
this job include:
The balancing of room counts,
posting charges to guests folio
on N.C.R. 4200, balancing
food and beverage reports,
accepting deposits from food
and beverage cashiers,
balancing and preparing all
necessary reports.
Three (3) years experience is
desirable but inexperienced
applicants with a good
accounting background will be
considered.
Hours are from midnight to 8
a.m. 6 clays per week.
Salary considerations are
negotiable.
Applications should be in
writing addressed to Mr. Philip
P. Smith, Personnel Director,
Paradise Island Limited P. 0.
Box N-4777, Nassau.


C11045
THE RAPID RESULTS
COLLEGE
World-famous postal
tuition for the GCE,
School Cert. aAd
Accountancy, Banking,
Law, Marketing, Company
Secretaryship Examinat-
ions. For details of our
specialised courses write
for FREE copy of YOUR
CAREER to The Rapid
Results College Dept. TNI
Tuition House London
London SE19 4DS.


L --I ,I.E- - -


HELP WANTED
C 11452
QUEEN'S COLLEGE
NASSAU, Bahamas


MARINE SUPPLIES
C 11446
BERTRAM 20 with trailer
ship-to-shore radio, 200 m.p.h.
engine. Good condition.
$4,500 Phone 3-2152

C 11044
PACEMAKER 44 ft.
L'-;urious Cruising Yacht.
Phone 3-2371.

C 11233
CUSTOM YACHT 56 ft.
H a no-crafted Honduras
Mahogany. Twin G. M. 671-M
Diesels, 12 Kw Kholer
generator, Air, Etc. Sleeps 8 int
ovner's party and 2 in crew.
Only 560 hours since new. A
real bargain Call 3-1423.


HELP WANTED
C11437
SCULPTURE FOUNDRY
requires three experienced
technicians: ONE MOLDER
'or rubber molds, piece molds
and wax casting. ONE
BRONZE finisher for fettling,
chasing and patinating. ONE
MODEL-ENLARGER to build
.aige clay models from small
cale models; extreme accuracy
required. Randolph W.
Johnston and Associates, Box
530 Marsh Harbour, Abaco. In
Nassau, call Angelo Roker
3-6693.
C11391
AUTO PARIS COUNTER-
MEN. Must have had at least 3
years experience in auto parts
b u s i ne s s Sal a r i es
commensurate with
experience. Attractive fringe
benefits. Call Mr. Godwin
Wtlght at 2-1031 for
appointment

C11386
RADIO & T.V. TECHNICIAN
5 years experience. Apply:
Allen's Electronics, Bahama
Avenue. Phone 35248, Box
3528.

C11455
FIRST NATIONAL CITY
TRUST COMPANY (BAHAMAS
LIMITED
THOMPSON BOULEVARD
AT OAKES FIELD
P.O. BOX N 1576
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

MUTUAL FUNDS CLERK
with
EXECUTIVE SECRETARIAL
SKILLS


H


I


GRAND BAHAMA



CLASSIFIED


II FIEEPIIT TEIBL. 352-6111


NOTICE
C6275
When visiting FREEPORT.
stay at the:
EL CONQUISTADOR HOTEL
spacious rooms, fully
air-conditioned, from $10 to
$14 per day. For reservations
call 352-8180.

C6279
NOTICE is hereby given that
HEUSEN EMANUEL
HANDFIELD of 214 Cove
House, Freeport, Grand
Bahama is applying to the
M i n sister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 24th day of
September 1973 to The
M in ister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N7147, Nassau.

HELP WANTED

C6280
JOB TITLE: MECHANICAL
ENGINEER
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
College Graduate. Must be a
graduate Engineer from a
recognized college.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3-5
years. Mechanical background.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Co-ordinate the day-to-day
engineering activities in
connection with plant
maintenance, installation and
training.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P.O. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


HELP WANTED
C6254
EXECUTIVE SECRETARIES
with previous experience and
possessing skills in typing and
shorthand;
RECEPTIONIST/TYPIST with
cordial personality, neat
appearance and good typing
skills; also, MALE CLERICAL
HELP, must have driver's
license.
Please apply: Freeport
Secretarial & Employment
Services, P. 0. Box F-1955,
Freeport.

C6274
LABOURER/HANDYMAN -
duties to include pool, lawn
and beach maintenance;
scrubbing of building
walkways; cleaning of sewage
disposal plant and garbage
chutes. Some painting and
minor repairs. Six days a week,
off Monday. Bahamians only.
Call Freeport 373-1192.
C6281
JOB TITLE: CONTROL
ROOM OPERATOR
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3-5
years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Control raw and finish grinding
and burning process in
producing finish cement.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P.O. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


C6278
Wanted: Experienced truck
and forklift mechanic,
minimum five years
experience, reference required,
must have own tools and
transportation.
Apply in person to: Freeport
Transfer Limited.


Brother Juniper


"What I said was, 'push the switch
automatic sprinkler control.' "


HELP WANTED
C 6284
LIVE IN MAID required to
look after two small children
and do housekeeping. $25.00
per week. Phone Freeport
373-1771.

C 6287
Re frigeration and
air-conditioning engineer. Must
be able to design, estimate and
maintain all types of
air-conditioning and
refrigeration units and. allied
equipment. Must have
knowledge of electricity,
certificate from a certified
refrigeration and
air-conditioning school. Over
five (5) years experience in this
field. For interview, call
352-7388 or write to: Food
Fair Stores, P. 0. Box F-2416.


I


C6276
Man to kill chickens in
processing plant two to four
days per week. Other work
available other than kill days.
Contact Bahamas Poultry Co.,
Ltd., Box F-137, Freeport,
Phone 352-7897.


I


NEXT to the


HELP WANTED
C6259
Todhunter Mitchell has
vacancy for female bottle line
workers. Applicants must have
experience in operating high
speed bottling line.
Bahamians only need apply to:
Box F-2444, Freeport.



C6286
Flight Instructor/Charter Pilot
requited. 1500 hours total time
minimum. CFI and CFII and
MEL Licences. Apply to
Lucaya Beach Air Services,
Limited, P. 0. Box F-2524,
Freeport.


MARINE SUPPLIES

C6269
38' Pacemaker Sportfisherman
Twin diesels.
Good condition. $18,500.
George Carnegie, Freeport.
Office 352-8127, Home
373-1589.


k .i, F. t. S>d l.- In 1971. Wo.,d r.kl.net e -rved


I 'P y ,


,' '-,- 3- r -
S, I .: - -

0 H..- .'
Nt -

Uo Br'


the
t' f
SP


I


7-7


Applications are invited from
qualified persons for the post
of Assistant Secretary. The
person appointed must be a
competent typist. Furthur
details of the appointment may
be obtained by telephoning
The Treasurer, Queen's College
3-1666 or 3-2153. Applications
giving full details of person,
qualifications and experience
must be made in writing and
sent to the Principal, Queen's
College, P.O. Box N127,
Nassau.
C11463
BANK OF MONTREAL
(BAHAMAS & CARIBBEAN)
LIMITED has the following job
vacancies:
LEDGERKEEPER: The
individual should have some
knowledge of bookkeeping and
experience in operating an
NCR32 posting machine.
SECRETARY TO THE
CREDIT MANAGER: This
position requires a mature,
intelligent lady experienced
and proficient in typing and
shorhand dictation, interested
and capable of performing
duties related to the credit
function other than those
strictly ot secretarial nature.
Qualified persons may
telephone Mrs. B. Knowles at
2-1690 to arrange an interview.

C11421
COLLECTIONS MANAGER
FOR REAL ESTATE
COLLECTIONS OFFICE
The applicant should be not
less than 25 years old and have
previous experience in the
field. Remuneration will
include a generous basic salary
plus performance bonus.
Application should be in own
handwriting giving full details
of education and experience.
Good references are essential.
Reply Adv. Cl11421,
C/o The Tribune
P. 0. Box N-3207, Nassau.

C 11493
The following positions are
available for the coming winter
season starting November 1st,
1973:
Chefs de Cuisine
Cooks
Assistant Manager
Accounts Receivable & Payable
Clerk responsible for billing of
travel agents, paying
commissions and all relating
correspondence and complete
knowledge of NCR Machine
from trial balance-
Secretary responsible for
composing letters, typing,
filing and promotional work on
own initiative. Neat appearance
with high school education.
For immediate start:
Laundry Manager responsible
for handling laundry and
dry-cleaning and knowledge of
operating and repairing
machinery.
Assistant Laundry Manager.
Applicants must have at least
five years experience and
should apply with salary
request to Eleuthera South
Island Resorts, P.O. Box 28,
Rock Sound, Eleuthera.


JL


_____________._ .... .. .1.


I


--Am


I L-


HELP WANTED
C6281
JOB TITLE: CONTROL
ROOM OPERATOR
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3-5
years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Control raw and finish grinding
and burning process in
producing finish cement.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P.O. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C6280
JOB TITLE: MECHANICAL
ENGINEER
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
College Graduate. Must be a
graduate Engineer from a
recognized college.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3-5
years. Mechanical background.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Co-ordinate the day-to-day
engineering activities in
connection with plant
maintenance, installation and
training.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P.O. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C 11490
LIVE-IN MAID for general
housework. Phone 2-2026
between 10 a.m. and 12 noon
for interview.

C11491
SENIOR BOOKKEEPER
required with R.S.A. Stage 3 or
equivalent and 2 years
experience. Familiar with
maintenance of books up to
trial balance. Apply in own
handwriting P.O. Box N-8787,
Nassau.

TRADE SERVICES

C11151
SEWING MACHINE
REPAIRS AND PARTS
ISLAND FURNITURE
Corner Christie &
Dowdeswell Street
Phone 21197,
P. 0. Box 4818, Nassau

C11033

Piader's Customs

Brokerage Lfd.
Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU. BAHAMAS
P. 0. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-3796
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434.


LL VICTOR
S iltOrniatiw
10 $800 .00
IS MARINA
-.tandard
Oni'. 13,000u
coridtii on


he Tribtuntw












Monday, September 24, 1973


'IF I HAD SOME MONEY, I'D 6UY YOU PEOPLE
A COUPLE GT4-WlI Cads)/*


Brother Juniper


"Well. that locks up the yachting season, skipper."

CROSSWORD c o M R

PUZZLE A BETEONOM
ACROSS C9iL. WLt


Pay up
pe Penthouse

Blieci type
33 lsuify
h Ahead

39 Twist
10 Yard goods
43J dhbot 1ni0on
41 Broker
45 Harassed
417 Wagner
heroine
48 Clues


f*Tamr. tJul


Ap


|MieRj| N e A L
ORA MTELY


AIS STRp p
4TATiRI1AULW
~ACEA EWI WSI
rAA G00P ANAS


SOLUIIUN IOF

DOWN
1. Inert gas
2. Weaken
3 Exist


YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE
4. Mother of
Mankind
5. Barrel
6. Deep blue
7. Mercy ship
8. Gershwin
9. Sell
10. Cyma
12. Ratifies
15. Fictional mine
sweeper
17. Gaming cubes
21. Behold
23. Visionary
25. Hebrew
- teacher
26. Lubricants
27. Bouquet
28. Legal minority
30. Sun god
32. Heart artery
34. Prevails
35. Honey and
water drink
37. Pullets
38. Promise
-41 ...-- Aviv
42 Flower garland
9.26 46 Article


Rupert on Chariot Island-1


Holiday-time haz, come for Rupert, and he
spends the afternoon going around the village
to tell his chums that he is off to Sandy Bay
next morning. Goodbye, I'll be away for two
weeks," he calls out, as he leaves some of
,his pals to their game of cricket. Cheerio,
and don't forget to bring us back some sticks


of rock calls out Podgy Pig. When Rupert
leaves the meadow and makes for home he
notices a slim figure beside a path. ,t's
Simple Simon," thinks Rupert. I've told all
the others, so I must let h:m know that I'm
going to the seaside."
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


Winning

Bridge
By VICTOR MOLLO
FEW sexagenarians are to be
found in the top class of tourna-
ment players. The outstanding
exception is Howard Schenken,
who will celebrate his seventieth
birthday this month. A great
personality, as well as a great
player, Schenken has been known
for years as the expert's
expert ".
It would be hard to say which
is the deadliest weapon in his
formidable armoury. Perhaps
it's the gift for conjuring up
illusions. This is a typical
example.
Dealer West: N/S Vul.
North
J 10 7 6 2
S53
0 872
6 1053
West East
^ --- a A983
Q 6 4 2 K J 9 7
SK 10 9 4 3 K J 6
4 Q642 4 KJ7
South
KQ54
A 10 8
0 AQ5
West North East South
Pass Pass 1 1INT
20 Pass Pass 2NT
North-South had a part-score
of 60 which had a lot to do with
the bidding, but that's another
storv.
West led the 04 and Schenken,
South, outh, could see no more than
seven tricks, for East would, of
course, hold up his *A. What
could be done ?
Howard Schenken found an
ingenious solution. Winning
trick one with the OQ. he re-
turned a low diamond and West,
with two possible entries, con-
tinued the suit. East had to
find a discard. He felt that he
needed his hearts and clubs, so
he let go a spade. Who can
blame him ?


Chess
Il LEONARD BARDEN
















better? Black move) hs to
marxi his king towaids the
white pawn, and his choice is
between 1 . K-K2 and I .
K-K3.
Which is the right square fo "
the king? The win is quite
subtle, so no p r ies today. As
iUsual, W ite moves uP Elhe
bOasd, aznd ds pawn is ti, 'o
squash fro m Queening.
SOLUTION TO 9770 etaoi gt"ru

Chess Solution
1.... K-K2! 2 K-Kt7, R-Kt7
ch; 3 K-R8, K-B2; 4 P-R7 (tif
4 K-R7, R-Kt3), K-Kt3;
5 K-Kt8, K-R3 dis ch; 6 K-R8
R-QR7; 7 K-Kt8, R-RI ch;'
8 K-B7; KxP wins,
Fine gives a win by i .
K-K3 2 P-R7, R-Kt7 oh
3 K-k6, K-B2; 4 P-R8(Kt)
ch, K-B3-but White can
improve by 2 K-Kt7! and if
2 ... R-R2 ch; 3 K-Kt6 or
if 2. .. K-K2; 3 P-R7, R-Kt7
ch; 4 K-R8, or if 2 . R-Kt7
ch:i 3 K-B8! and Black only
has a draw.




H OW many
quewords of
F AfI o1r letters
or more caia
in Umk e
fCh.s o t he
letter% 3 l K 4 lit
h e r e In
mIa k I a
word. e-Kth

onlyl. Each
Ford inuest contain thel irge
letter aind there must be at
least one eight-letter word in
the I.st. No phlrals; no foreign
stord ; no r o e r n3anes.
TOI'si"Si TAIhGET : I; words.
good c: 1 s' ords. very good 26
%tord',, excellent SolU(tio n
tornorrow.
YESTERD.tY'S SOLTIioN :
Else elver ester ever evert leer
leet lest levee lever leveret reel
reeve reset rest revel revet seel
seer sere serie sever severe sleet
sleeve steel steer steeve stereo
terse tree leer verse VERSILET
serset vert vest.


-. CARROLL RIGHTER'S

SI-OROSCOPE
from the Carroll Righter Institute
GENERAL TENDENCIES: The early part of
x Jl the day brings some confusion or muddled
thinking that needs to be corrected by exercising unusually
good judgment, Later a mild, peaceful and happy influence is
ours which makes it possible for most everyone to throw off
any depression and to engage in pleasurable activities.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) Get your work done carefully
so there are no errors. Later, get busy and make your environs
more charming. Improve diet, clothing.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Get important work, chores,
out of the way, then enjoy pleasures Dress to make a fine
impression, and avoid one who is unfriendly to your interests.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Study ways to improve home
situation intelligently. Don't permit another to take you away
from important work. Entertaining at home is best in p.m.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Be conscientious
in work during day, then join congenials for fun. Visit awhile
with some good friend whose interests are similar to yours.
LEO (July 22 to Aug 21) Keep busy with practical matters
today. Get financial and property matters in fine order. Plan
necessary repairs to real estate.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Since you are undecided just
what to do in a.m., complete duties pending. In afternoon, go
after important personal goals. Have a more positive approach.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Do work that makes your
personal affairs as you want them to be. Handle that duty with
another that is pressing. Spend evening at home.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov 21) Morning good for social
meanderings and then getting into business with vigor. You
can certainly please friends in p m. Avoid one with an axe to
grind.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 to Dec, 21) Handle career matters
with care and exactness. State some plan to a higher-up to get
sensible help. Avoid one with an axe to grind.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) Go to right sources if
you want to get into those special outlets that mean much to
you, Cultivate new contact who can give you needed data.
AQUARIUS (Jan 21 to Feb. 19) Find a better system of
bookkeeping to save money and know where you stand at all
times. After a good day's work at business, find right way to
please mate.
PISCES (Feb 20 to Mar 20) Long talks with a partner
cement better relations. You can become well known if you
get into that civic matter of interest to you Think positively
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY ,. he or she will be
one of those delightful young people who likes to start
systems for doing things Upon maturity will be a veritable
machine at work and get much accomplished, and command a
good salary. Have enough youngsters around early in life so
the human quality will be brought out here, also Give spiritual
training. The fields of dietetics, investigation, research all are
excellent.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


ISTEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & overgardi


SDAGWCOD I W AN- -0i..
TO TAAKE OVER, THE O;";.C-E
-1WI iL E I M GON:7 I


n S i o t


i o iil !t itti dep,
13 Somebody
14 Adventure
16 Peer
18 Cuii, rrabl.m e
19 Russia, aI ssritr
20 Bickiron
.2 Neuter
pronoun
A3 Ailting
24. Nut


No. I;.::, l v [TIlM 'lK A
Across
I. It has been used to \trlract
criminal conlesslons. (3. 4)
M. trl.s namnie. (4)
11. Llstener. (3)
1i. 'irln' hlclln (anag.) (9
It. Pond (41)
15. For a letter. (8)
I i. Wlass. (6)
lI. I orn In the kitchen. (3)
I!). ('onch. (4)
Ml. Cravat. (3)
!-. lesh. (3)
!3. Finishes (i)
14. .linoaiss ') mIl)hon or HBeet
hoven (1i)
DoIhi
t sho tIng Ilorumal tenlplra.
tlure. (t))
SNol hiddentil 1iB (!)
3. Dlial 'it s 1 11 ld iioi ha' ,l
appeared. (4.4)
i. l.air. (3)
F. For wet-Meather aear. (4-5)
I. C'on tellhtion. (4)
(o toa Party unimitied. i4-,i
I' S I ngle.
(3) E
13 II it ter
f r uit. L
4. M o t
wicked
(5)
IS. Fasten.-
er. (3) m v
MO P Ilump K DA
(3) VI" tehr.thi t ntton


T7 CIIomic Pae



REX MORGAN, M.D. By DAL CURTIS

BRICE ADAM HAS I HAVE THE FEELING YOU TALKED A WHAT DID VOU
A WAY OF WEAR- LITTLE TOO MUCH TO HIMT K 1O TELL
RATHER GO FOR A OESN T E,JOANI --I DIDN'T TELL
RIDE ANOTHER.NIGH HIM ANYTHING--- 1














JUDGE PARKER By PAUL NICHOLS

THERE ARE TWO THINGS YOU SHOULD LIKE I SAID, SAM WITH WHAT? COUNSELOR, YOU'RE
HAVE DONE! ONE, CALL THE POLICE ...I JUST WORKED THEY HAVE MAKING IT SEEM LIKE
JOT SATISFIED AND, TWO, GET MEDICAL HELP FOR THEM OVER NO MARKS ON A CRIME FOR A
WITH SLADE THESE FELLOWS! WHAT DID A BIT! THEM...AND THEY'RE CITIZEN TO PROTECT
ROBERTS' YOU DO TO THEM? OUT COLD! HIMSELF AND HIS
EXPLANATION PROPERTY!
ABOUT THE TWO -"
MEN, SAM DRIVER

THE TRUT.m

0-24







APARTMENT 3-G By AleS Kotukyv


..... ^L, ^C


hr Xribuntm












Uhr I ribtti


Monday, September 24, 1973.


Southerners pace bowlers 4


skittle Police to take



victory & championship

By Gladstone I hurston
OPENING PACERS John Deveaux and Tyrone "Tack"
Thompson in seven overs each skittled the Police Royals for a
mere 48 runs all out giving the Southerners Cricket Club an
innings and 20 runs victory plus the 1973 Bahamas Cricket
Association Championship Saturday at St. Bernard's Park.


Meanwhile at Windsor Park.
defending champions St.
Bernard's Cricket Club saw
their final ray of hope
extinguished in a ninth wicket
partnership by Alfred
Ingraham and George Turner
whose safe batting gave St.
Agnes Cricket Club ten points
via a four run victory.
"They (the Southerners)
played cricket like a
c, h a n) p o n s h i p team,'
commented skipper George
Deveaux, who last week when
the Southerners took a 48-run
lead assured that he could not
see the victory going any other
wa\.
"With the team work we had
this sear, I felt that there was
no doubt that we would win
the championship," added vice
skipper Peter lall.
The Southerners in
Saturday's second and final
day's play spent thirty minutes
at the wicket and scored 20
more runs going into the
second inning with a 68-run
lead. George Ferguson top
scored with 43. James Peterson
had 3(0.
2 .AST BOWLFRS
Given over tour hoars
playing time to build a
formidable score and upset the
Southerners march for
championship, the Lawmen
stood for only one and a halt
hours against the bowling
attack of opening speedsters
l)evcaux and Thompson the
onl1 bowlers used.
l)eveau\ the skipper's
brother bagged six wickets
for 25 runs. Thompson one
of the Southerners' candidates
for howler of the year took
the other four for 23 runs,
ending St. Bernard's three-year
championship reign.
Police skipper lfdimund
Lewis top scored for them with
23 collecting two fours along
the route. \long w ith Jerruth
Thompson, who had 15. they
were the (only lawnien in
double figures.
Opening with I '()ung,
they both carried the Police to
23 when Deveaux and
TIho mtpson took charge. Seven
wickets then tumbled for the
addition of onli three runs.
Their collapse stopped briefly
when Lewis took the stand
sixth down. lHowever, he
watched helplessly as his tellow
batters fell cheaply I finally, he
went as the tenth wicket off
D)eveaux's howline.
SI\G(T DL(CK
Six lawmen went for duck,
three falling in Thornpson's
three wicket fourth (ovcr in
which hlie gave up one run. Two
more went in Deveaux's
maiden third over,
Without losing a gale this
season, the Sioutherners
cartur ed the maximum of ten
points fromt the Wdt erners, St.
\lhans, (C,irroll\ \Xdventurers,
St. Agnes and the
Police. li he gt si\ points for
a first innings win from
Paradise Isltrid and the Prison
Otfit ers I heir ,il draw came
in their long-t -he-remembered
match against dethroned
Jhian!pi,)Ois St. Bernards.
;oing into the knockout
series, ,t which they are
defending champions, "we fell
quite gotod and teel that we are
going to take that also," said
skipper Dl)eveaux confidently.
"I think we have better
material lor this type of series
than any other club."
Although each i match in the
series lasts only 30 overs of
which a bowler may iowl no
more than six, the Southerners'
howling depth with Thompson,
John Deveaux, George
Dl)eveaux, George I'erguson and
a little of Sidney McPhee can
easily carry them through, the
skipper noted.
No sooner had the
Southerners begun their
celebrations at their club house
than a challenge came from
Freeport, G(;rand Bahama.
Southerners' president Bill
Curtis consented and the date
is to be set soon.


ST. BERNARD'S LOSE
St. Bernards, in a
melancholy disposition, having
had to bat the remainder of
their second innings without
the services of three of their
key playerse-- Francis Scott,
Eddie and Keith Ford were
forced to make a seventh
wicket declaration with only
47 second innings runs scored.
This gave them a 105 run lead


and St. Agnes over three and a
half hours to win.
Accepting the challenge
without anything to lose, St.
Agnes' skipper Tyrone Wilson
set the victory pace with a well
batted 38 until his
courageous innings ended
caught off James Woods'
bowling.
Skipper Woous, the
work-horse for St. Bernard's
bowled 16 overs unchanged
taking five wickets for 28 runs.
He had six maidens.
Opening batsmen Oswald
Foster and Wilson carried St.
Agnes to 44. Wicket keeper
Nathanial Bain joined Wilson
and added 12 more moving
them to 66 for two with three
hours of play left.
Following the fall of Wilson,
St. Agnes against the attack of
Woods, Peter Bethel and
Francis Scott began to grows
fairly unsteady although they
were 76 for four by tea
still 30 runs short of victory.
And then pace bowler Eddie
Ford appeared on the scene. tHe
from the south and Woods
from the north quickly pocked
up two wickets. To make
things look worse for St.
Agnes, Woods claimed his fifth
wicket when he had Basil Ellis
trapped l.b.w. with only two
runs added. Ellis was St. Agnes'
seventh down with 23 runs to
victory.
It was then that the glory of
the Southerners' victory
reached Windsor Park and the
Southerners joined vocally in
their support of St. Agnes.
Encouraged by the
Southerners', Alfred Ingraham
and Linford Powell played it
real safe and at 5:30 one and
a half hours left to play were
93.
Sr. Bernards in that crucial
moment when it was made
known that St. Agnes was one
batter short lost chances of
possibly winning when
Ingraham popped up one of
Scott's spinners. It landed
between the on-rushing Bethel
and Ford coming from
outfield. That same play was
repeated by Powell but the safe
hands of Woods secured the
catch.
It was the ninth and final
wicket partnership that
surprised all. George Turner,
constantly underrated because
he usually bats in the cellar,
joined Ingraham at the wicket
at 95 and defied the bowling of
Ford and Scott.
Nerves were tense as St.
Agnes moved within three runs
of victory. Finally, Ingraham
got fed up with the slow pace
and cracked Scott's leg pitched
ball into Last Street for six
winning runs. St. Agnes
declared. They became the first
team this season to beat St.
Bernards after taking a first
innings lead. Ironically, St.
Agnes had the same situation
against the Police Royals but
lacking the necessary time, the
match ended in a six points
draw.
SO)UTHF RN IeRS'
1st INNING
P. tHjall. I.h.w b Thompson 0
t I)ean,. c b Cumherhatch 8
C. l.aing, c b HIlis 18
J. Peterson. stmp )eveaux. b Ellis 30
1'. Stubbs. c b Ellis I
G. F-erguson c b Taylor 43
M.Bain, c b Taylor o10
S. McPhee, b Taylor 3
T. Thompson, c h Taylor 2
(;. Deveaux, c wkt. b Cumberbatch3
J. Ieveaux, not out 2
extrass 7 byes and 4 leg byes I 1
Total (for ten wickets) 131
Wickets fell at -i 0O. 2 10. 3-60,
461, 5-66. 694, 7 106, 8 -109,
9 121, 10-131
BOWL IN;.
J. Thompson 5 0 IS I
G. Cumberbatch 6 2 17 2
E. Lewis 10 I 38 0
I. Tllis 6 0 35 3
I. Taylor 5.3 1 18 4


AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L 1'ct.
X-Baltimore 93 62 .600
Boston 83 72 .535
)etroit 83 72 .535
New York 77 79 .494
Milwaukee 72 83 .465
Cleveland 68 88 .436
West Division
Sunday's Results
X-Oakland 92 64 .590
Kansas City 85 71 .545
Minnesota 77 78 .497
Chicago 75 81 .481
California 74 81 .477
Texas 54102 .346
X-Clinched Division title
Sunday's Results
New York 9-2, Cleveland 1-1
Detroit 3, Boston 0
Baltimore 2, Milwaukee I
Kansas City /, Texas 4
California 1 5, Minnesota 7
Oakland 10, Chicago 5


Bruce Russell sets offense


record in 45-7 Jets victory

BRUCE 'DICK BROWN' RUSSELL ran a record breaking 248
yards, while Don Huyler churned out 155 yds. on only three
carries leading the Jets to a lopsided 45-7 victory over the BLUE


.14
S~~~~~. V \*t-^^V


THE 1973 BAHAMAS CRICKET ASSOCIATION
CHAMPIONS The Southerners Cricket Club clinched the
pennant Saturday defeating the Police Royals by an innings
and 20 runs. They are from left (standing) John Deveaux,
Peter Hall, George Ferguson, Cedric Laing, Tyrone
Thompson, George Deveaux (Skipper); (kneeling) Mackey
Bain, Harry Dean, Sidney McPhee, Prince Stubbs and James
Peterson (wicketkeeper).


KNOWLES LOSES

N.AMERICAN STAR

CHAMPIONSHIPS


Bob Slatter wins Becks BY ONE POINT


match play over Poitier

FOUR HANDICAPPER ROBERT SLATTER, recently
returned from competition in the 1973 Hoerman Cup
Tournament, was at home in the liquid sunshine yesterday when
over thirtysix holes he ousted Harcourt "Coins" Poitier to win
the Championship Division of the first annual Becks Nassau City
Match Play tournament played at the 6,707 yards par 72 South
Ocean golf course.


Playing through
rain Slatter took a
after the first 18 b
brought his lead t
27.


BOB SLA
... another

RAIN POST

AMATEUR T
THlE Bahamas A
Club sanctioned
Amateur Golf Cl
tournament sche
yesterday had to b
due to rain. This
was rescheduled
Sunday with tee o
o'clock at the Par
golf course.
The tourname:
divided into three
first second and th
net winners in each
Championship
handicap: A Fl
handicap: B Fli
handicap:;
The payment
fees yesterday
honoured on Sunda

ELEUTHERA S
UP HIS 20th VI
ELEUTHERA'S
Glen Griffen pic
twentieth consecu
Saturday when
1973 softball
the Governor's
Hustlers to a 13-2
the Hatchet Bay Bo
Griffin, wh
pitching clinched
for the Hustlers
returned with a
striking out ten wh
base on balls.
Catcher Frankie
their win with
homer in the f
Mark Thompson c
the seventh with
homer, giving the H
thirtyfourth vict
two losses
Mack Johnson t
for the Bombers.


NATIONAL
East Divit
GB
-- New York
10 Pittsburgh
10 St. Louis
161/. Montreal
21 Chicago
25 Philadelphia
West Divi
._ Cincinnati
7 Los Angeles
14, San Francisco
17 Houston
17/, Atlanta
38 San Diego
Sunday's R
Pittsburgh 6-7, Monti
New York 5, St. Lou
Philadelphia 9, Chica
Atlanta 10, Houston
San Diego 11,San Fri
Los Angeles 6, Cincin


an incessant The highlight of Slatter's
five hole lead victory came on the 14th hole
beforee Poitier when he sunk a 50-foot birdie
o three after putt. "I could see it was on
line," said the elated Slatter
who then was three up. "It
went the way it was supposed
to." Slatter won the 15th of
the final 36 holes dornmicd
Poitier four up and three.
Poitier, who played well
during the tournai:-'-t,
eliminating Robert Velton and
-...., lan Masson in the second and
LAI third rounds had a slight edge
*' J and "if the rain didn't come it
/ would have been a better
game," said Poitier. "The rain
really bust me down."
The way Slatter and 'Poiticr
played was that whoever made
TTER the mistake lost the hole. And
r title Poitier, it seemed, made the
most mistakes especially when
ON ES his putting deserted hinm.
STom Blum overcame a o(ne
OURNEY hol setback and picked up his
game on the fourth hole ending
the front nine four up. liHe
oBahamasf picked up one more on the
Bahamas back nine to eliminate Mike
duamponship Wallace on the 14th hole to
eduled for win the A. Flight.
e postponed Milford lockhart, a 10
tournament month rookie in golt defeated
for this William Stirling to win the 1B.
ff times at 8 Flight.
radise Island Playing the second round
with Charles Smith Jr., whom
nt will be he beat one up on the 18th,
flights with Saturday, Lockhart crept into
ird gross and the semifinals with a six holes
flight, victory over Jason Butler.
flight 0-12 Yesterday he dormied Stilling
ight 13-18 three up on the 16th.
eight 19 + Actually, I.ockharl's
intention was to end the game
of entrance around the 13th and 14th
will be holes but the rain caught up
ay. with them on the back nine
TTAR PICKS and "that rcallJ killed mic," li
TR PI said.Ltnable to get his glasses
CTORY free of water, he contended
star hurler that the scores he shot on the
ked up his back nine did not reflect his
itive victory play.
he pitched Stirling, taking advantage iof
champions this, won the I lth, 1 2th and
Harbour 13th placing him one behind.
victory over However, lockhart came back
embers, and parred the 15th and 16th
rose keen both of which Stirling
the pennant bogeyed to wsin that division.
last week, k Beryl lHiggs put together
two-hitter scores of 102, 93, 90 and 108
while giving no to capture the ladies division of
the Becks tournament which
Petty aided was a medal play event. Randi
a three-run Bolstad was second and IFileen
fifth inning. Dean was third.
came back in Duwayyne Ilephuitn
a two run dominated the juniors with 94,
hustlers their 92, 94 and 100 to take that
ory against medal play event. Tommy
Sands was second and Cyprian
took the loss Newrey was third.
The following are the
winners in the senior flighting:
C R. Slatter beat It. Poitier;
A T. Blumi beat M. Wallace
LLAGUE B M. Lockhart beat W.
sion Stirling; C S. Hall beat J.
W L Pet. GB Fowle; D UI. Sawyer beat J.
79 77 .506 Major; E L. Jenkinson beat
77 76 .503 v R. Forhan; F Z. Aitken beat
76 80.487 3
75 80.484 3/, D. McNeilly; G P. Sargeant
75 80 .484 31/ beat F. Farrington; M. Braisted
69 87 .442 10 beat H. Hopkins; I B.
sion d'Ornellas beat R. Johnson and
96 60 .615 J A. Stewart won from the
91 66 .580 5sv second round.
86 70.551 10 The following are the ladies
78 79 .497 18'
75 82 .478 21/z scores: Beryl Higgs 102, 93,
58 98 .372 38 90, 108; Sue Bennett 122,
results 124, 118, 108; Eileen Dean -
real3-4 116, 110 126, 110; Randi
is2 Bolstad 115, 112, 110, 110:
go 7 Diane Shook 106, 116
2 (stopped after two) Stephanie
nnati4 d'Ornellas 155, 145, 149,
150.


L TIRAN yachtsman and
O mopic winner Durward
Knowles and his crew Monty
fliggs capatalized on moderate
to heavy maritime conditions
and sailed their "Gem XI" to
second place in the North


DURWARD KNOWLES
... still top sailor
AmeiIcanI Championship for
Star Class held at Gibson
Island, Marr land. They lost the
championship by one point.
Knowles, who won that
cha mpionship in 1971,
captured first place in the first
and last races of the five-race
series, sailed during September
15-20 l'he\ won the Paul
Masn I rophy for the tune up
race.
A lso representing the
Bahama,,s were Basil Kelly and
his son Stephen Kelly. They
favoured the light going
conditions and sailed their
"Brutui" to a ninth place
overall having finished second
in oi(i' rice.
40 boi,,ts sailed in the light
to h 'i nld shifty conditions.
Ihis. pomintcd out Knowles,
gave ever one a chance to sail
in condition they liked. Tom
Adams of (Chicago won the
championship series.


MP JOINS ZNS
From Page 1
grievances against him with the
Ministry ofl abour and
petition the Minister
responsible, (iIPri e Minister
I. 'ndcen Pindling) for his
rci i oval.
11011 1 ()\('ISSI)NS
TI he union also alleged that
the chairman, the secretary to
the board, board members and
certain section heads were
maintaining suites at the
Corporation's expense in
various Nissau Ihotels, in
I recpoit, ( I;rand Bahama, and
Miami, but these were not
available to statf'.
",s we unlderistoo)d it Radio
Bathamas staff have been
granted cintcessions at a certain
\liami hotel, hbit only members
of thlie bo d, the secretary to
the board, members oft
imanagelic'nit and certain
section heads know oh these
concessions and make use of
them in their travels.
"We\ would( publicly like to
ask at this time that tlhe
Minister responsible (Plrime
Minister Pindling) for
broadcasting investigate these
allegations." the union said.
Radio Bahamas employees
joined the I-ngineering and
(enertal Workers Union in
August in an effort to win
better salairis and working
conditions ironic management.
Last week they threatened a
go-slow if the western gate as
well as the western entrance to
the newsroom was not opened.
They also called for a new
refrigerator to replace the
present faulty one, as well as a
teapot and a coffeepot.
The Tribune confirmed
today that the kitchen has
been re-carpeted and equipped
with new fridge, teapot and
coffee pot and that certain
doors have been re-opened.
The western entrance to the


MARLINS on Saturday.
Russell also set a new total
Bahamas American Football
Association offense record
with his 293 yds. (248 rushing
45 receiving), although he
had two long gainers (77 and
63 yds.) nullified by holding
penalties.
In the opening minutes the
Marlins looked as though they
would upset the Jets as they
recovered a Jesse Ferguson
fumble on the Jets second play
from scrimmage, taking over
first and ten on the Jets 35 yd.
line.
In three plays the Marlins
lost 11 yds. trying to sweep the
ends, and faced with 4th and
21 had to punt.
The Jets took over at the
Marlins' 35 yd. line and Jesse
Ferguson tuned in the 'Dick
Brown' (Bruce Russell) show.
In seven quick plays (five
carries by Russel) the Jets set
up their first T.D. which came
on a 17 yd. pass from Ferguson
to Don Huyler.
The double reverse worked
so well that the Jets on only 34
carries rushed a single game
record 502 yds., and just for
variety Ferguson completed


nine of seventeen passes for
114 yds. and three
touchdowns.
All-Star Flanker, Donzel
Huyler, getting double
coverage caught a single pass;
however, it left Bostwick on
the other side, wide open to
catch four passes for 51 yds.
and one Touchdown.
SWEETING STYM IED
The Marlins only score came
early in the third quarter when
they recovered a Jet's fumble
at the 35 yd. line. A
face-masking penalty gave
them a first down at the Jets'
20 yd. line. Ricky Thompson
carried to the 13 and oin a third
and three, Key hit Gordon Hall
with a 13 yd. strike. Doug
Prudden kicked the extra point
to close end a dismal chapter in
the Marlins offensive story.
Donald Sweeting who was
sensational in his debut against
the Classic Pros gaining 1 17
yds. on 14 carries was
completely stymied by the Jets
defense who held him to minus
8 yds. on two carries, lie left
the game early in the first
quarter and did not play the
rest of the game.


8 Mile Rock Crushers slip


past Stingrays 14-12

THIRD AND TEN from his own 4 yd. line with three seconds
left in the game tied at 12-12 Quarterback Bernard -Porkey'
Dorsett dropped back in the end zone to pass and wasr ailed by
three Crushers for a safety as the horn sounded ending tihegame
and giving the 8 Mile Rock Crushers their first victory 14-12.
The Crushers scored on the over. It took Porkey Dorsett
second play of the game with two plays to sneak over. A
less than thirty seconds fired up Crushers' Defense
elapsed. Featuring a again stopped the extra point
'No-Quarterback' offense attempt.
Victor Smith took the long The Crushers defense did
snap from the offensive centre not allow Dorsett to complete
and raced 70 yds. for the a single oass while they
Crushers first six points. The intercepted two and nearly
run for the point after failed. picked off two others. They
Playing in light rain both teams held Stingray runners to 1 15
kept giving up the ball on yds. on 31 carries. Meanwhile,
missed handoffs and fumbles. Crusher runner gained 1 92yds.
At the half the ('rushers led on 32 carries and their
6-0. Quarterbacks completed 5 of
Garth Major returned the 15 passes for 45 yds.
second half kick-off 50 yds to The score did not reflect the
the 49 yd line where the true picture of the garne, as all
Stinrays took over first and 15 Crusher passes were on
ten. Vogel Williams carried I target but Kelton lumes
yd. to the 50. Garth Major playing the game of his life
took the handoff, was hit hard batted away four sure
at the 50 and dropped the ball. touch-down passes that instead'
Defensive back Vincent Smith fell incomplete. Four other
picked up the fumble and passes could have been caught
raced 50 yds. for the Crushers and the one that Sherman
second score giving them a intercepted sailed past the
12-0 lead. intended receiver who forgot
The Stingrays unable to toturn around.
generate any offense got their Should the Crushers discover
first break when Winston the art of playing conventional
Sherman intercepted a Greg football with the speed they
Newbold pass and returned 39 have in their backfield they
yds. to the 4 yd. line. could be a serious challenge to
In one play Vogel Williams the Nassau Jets.
raced around his left end for
their first score. The run for I MN L INC
the point after failed. The g ll LIgU
Stingrays quickly got another From Page 3
scoring opportunity. The
Crushers returned the kick-off have on world events, but we
to their own 33 and after three believe that this Organisation
incomplete passes set up in and its collective influence
punt formation. The snap hold, promote and guarantee
sailed over the punters head peace and protect mankind
and he was nailed at the 1 yd. from te capacity for its
line where the Stingrays took destruction which some enjoy


building is still closed however.
"We would appreciate if they
would expedite this matter as
quickly as possible for the
benefit of all concerned. There
are still numerous issues and
situations to be ironed out,"
the union said.


on| ur par w e nn eno
capacity to wage war, yet we
realise that peace is not an end
in itself, but that peace
provides man with the
opportunity to share the
wealth of the earth in such
fashion that all its people will
enjoy the objectives of the
Charter of the United Nations.'


ii,


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