<%BANNER%> (She tEribuw
Saturday, September 15. 1973.
News highlights
SWEDEN'S KING REMAINS NEAR DEATH
Hr.LSINCBOKC;, SWfcDhN (Al>) Sweden's ^O-year-old Kinj Cusuf's
doctors said the monarch remains near death this morning. They reported
his kidneys and lungs are enduring new crises hut his heart is still beating
strongly.
An announcement this morning from the 31 specialists attending the
monarch said his lung infection is spreading, his kidneys have "practically
ceased to function" and his temperature has risen to 105 degrees.
10,000 EXTREMISTS' HAD ENTERED CHILE
SANTIAGO, CHILE (AP) Chile's new military rulers sty the military
overthrew the Marxist government of Preuilrnt Salvador AllenJe because
more than ten-thousand "extremists" from other countries had entered
Chile. This was the first public explanation of the junta's reasons for
toppling the leftwing government in a coup Tuesday.
The explanation ma made by the junta's minister of the interior.
General Oscar Bonillj, in a nationwide broadcast yesterday. Bonilla said
the armed forces will restore the constitutional go;rnmenl as soon as
possible. He did not elaborate.
NIXON LIFTS NLF-TV BLACKOUTS
WASHINGTON (AP) President Nixon signed without fanfare a bill
banning television blackouts of home professional football games sold out
three days in advance. The measure cleared Congress last night.
It will permit home telecasts of a number of National roothall league
opening games Sunday.
EASTERN AIRLINES JET SKIDS OFF RUNWAY
CHARLOTTl, NORTH CAROLINA (AP) An Eastern Airlines
passenger plane skidded off the runway at the Charlotte North Carolina
airport today after it landed In a driving rain. The plane became stuck in
the mud off the runway pavement.
There were no Injuries among the 14 passengers plus crew members.
CHINESE WINE WITH CHINESE FOOD?
SAN IRANCISCO (AP) for the connoisseur who has trouble deciding
which wine to serve with Chinese food how about Chinese wine'! Chefoo
rer. or Chefoo while are the first premium quality wines to be imported
fr-im the Peoples Republic of China. The 'resident of Huntington Rice
Incorporated, a California wine marketing firm, said the wines are mclluu
"with broad taste appeal."
GOVT. HEALTH DIRECTOR RESIGNS
WASHINGTON (AP) The director of the government's new office .if
professional standards review resigned today. Dr. William Bauer said he is
leaving because the department of health education and welfare had to
give him adequate backing and resources.
Bauer said he will remain until a new director is named. The professional
standards review office was set up to oversee the quality and
appropriateness of health care for medicaid and medicare patients.
AMBASSADOR DENIES EXECUTION REPORT
SAIGON (AP) The Cambodian ambassador to South Vietnam denied
today a report that at least ten Cambodian officers were executed last
wttk. The Associated Press had quoted Cambodian military sources
Tuesday that the officers had been executed for atltftdt) ordering their
troops to retreat in the race of an insurgent attack.
In Cambodia today, righting appears to have subsided around Kompong
Cham, the country's third largest city. Intense cambat had been reported in
the city for almost one week. Today's action centered around the
provincial capital of Kompong Speu. 30 miles iscst ot I'hnom Penh. |>
persons were reported killed by CommutiBt fire and 2 others were
wounded.
BELFAST AIRPORT CLOSED BY EXPLOSIVES
BELEAST (AP) Belfast's Aldergrovc airport was brought to a
standstill today after security forces found explosives in a parked car. They
uii they received an anonymous telephone tip. Arriving planes were
ordered not to land and hundreds of passengers wen stranded inside planes
assailing takeoff. The rest of the airport was evaluated and suspieitius can
were searched.
The explosives svere found in a car parked near the terminal area.
Security forces would not disclose how much explosives were found Moneda Palace was raked by
NIXON COMMITTEE WANTS WATERGATE HEARINGS STOPPECtank cannon fire and three air
COMMUNIST PAPER REPORTS KISSINGER CALLED WATERGATE DEVELOPMENTS H3.30O UAW
MEN STRIKE
CHRYSLER
Allende died fighting 'RACIST' AND
shooting a machine
gun at coup forces
LONDON (AP) President Salvador Allende of Chile died
fighting military coup forces with a machine gun in his hand as
they closed in on his Moneda Palace in Santiago during Tuesday's
coup, the Communist Morning Star newspaper reported Saturday.
The paper quoted Jorge
Timossi, a personal friend of
the late Marxist President and
chief of bureau of the Cuban
Prensa Latina news agency in
the Chilean capital
"It's right on to the end.
Allende's shooting with a
machine gun. This is infernal.
The smoke is suffocating us "
Timossi said these were the
words of Jaime Barrios, a
presidential economic adviser
fighting alongside Allende and
his bodyguards and aides in a
last-ditch stand in the Palace,
words of Jaime Barrios
bodyguards and aides in a
last-ditch stand in the Palace.
Timossi said Barrios
telephoned him at his office
early Tuesday afternoon soon
after the assault on the Palace
GUN IN HAND
Allende died with his gun in
his hands and a steel helmet on
his head soon after, Timossi
reported.
"He lay in a pool of blood
on the carpet of his office," he
claimed. "He died between
1.50 and a quarter pasl two in
the afternoon."
He did not say whether
Allende was gunned down by
coup troops or, as has been
reported,he committed suicide.
Close friends have been quoted
as saying since the coup that
Allende had vowed to kill
himself if his administration
was toppled in a putsch.
Timossi reported the
WASHING ION (AP) The committee for fairness to the presidency
friday asked a federal judge to bar resumption of the Senate's public
Watergate hearings.
The Rhode Island-based group, which claims 40,000 members, also
asked the court to revoke the Watergate Committee's authority to
investigate the wiretapping scandal.
The committee said the Senate bearings have been disrupting American
life by deliberately undermining public confidence in the Nixon
administration, the Justice Department and the courts.
The group's suit also said (he hearings don't have a proper legislative
purpose. It said the Senate is improperly usurping the constitutional
prerogative of the House to begin impeachment proceedings,
The suit also contended that barring further public hearings would
expedite the work of the committee and reduce costs to the taxpayers "by
eliminating repetitive and histrionic questioning." The suit asked for a
preliminary injunction on the grounds that the matter could not be finally
decided before the hearings are scheduled to resume Sept. 24.
NOTHING' TO HAITIAN INVASION REPORT
PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI (AP)- Haitian information minister Paul
Klancet insisted friday there is "nothing nothing" to reports of an armed
guerrilla Invasion of Haiti's north coast.
Manchet mentioned "smugglers" in an interview, indicating that Haitian
troops mistook a contraband operation for an invasion landing.
He did not [JVC details of the alleged smuggler operation but said the
government ssuuld issue a communique later to clarify the affair.
Meanwhile, all national flights within Haiti remained cancelled. The ban
was decreed last Tuesday, a day after the reported invasion of Haitian
esiks toot place .it Mole St. Nicole in the northwest cornel of Haiti.
U.K. CHILEAN AMBASSADOR DISMISSED
LONDON (AP)- Chile's ambassador In London, Alvaro Bunsler. said
today he had been dismissed from his post by the new military regime in
his country.
He said the embassy had been taken over by Rear Admiral Oscar Buzeis,
the naval attache. He said he discovered this when he telephoned the
embassy this afternoon.
"I was told by my secretary that Admiral Hu/eta had taken over the
building and had said that he was the boss," he said.
SKYLAB 2 MEN AHEAD OF WORK SCHEDULE
SPACt CENT! H. HOUSTON (AP) The Skylab 2 astronauts complete
their seventh wick in space early Saturday and officials said they already
have accomplished more experiments than were planned for the entire
59-day mission.
Astronauts Alan L. bean. Jack R. Lousma and Dr. Owen K. Garriott
start their eighth week in space at 6:11 a.m. ST Saturday.
Officials said they have performed already many more hours of
experiment work than was expected of them for the whole mission in tolas
studies, medical tests and secondary experiments.
With 10 days left in the flight, they still have about two hours ol I arth
resources photography to complete to measure up to the pre-mission plans.
Scientists are delighted with the accomplishments so far. particularly the
harvest of unique photographs of the Sun.
Bean. Garriott and Lousma have made telescope photographs of two
major solar tlares. or explosions on the Sun. collecting views that scientists
sav have never before been seen.
A.G. WILL OPEN UP AGNEW INVESTIGATION
WASHINGTON (AP) Sources in Washington say Attorney General
Llliott Richardson will let a federal grand jury consider material from an
investigation of Viee-President Agnew. But the sources say Richardson still
has not decided on whether to seek an indictment.
The Vice-PRcsident has described as lies allegations that he look
kickbacks for awarding contracts while he was Baltimore County executive
and later 'when he was Governor of Maryland.
Yesterday Agnew's successor as County executive hale Anderson -
pleaded innocent in Baltimore to charges of bribery, extortion and
L-nspiracy. Anderson, j Democrat, was the first Marylund official to be
indKtrd in [Jic scandal.

Oiw Friend
Dry Goods Store
FLINT ST. off EAST ST.
18 YEARS IN OPERATION
Will be having a
CLOSING -OUT SALE
Commencing on September 15. 1973 on:
Men's Women's and Children's Apparel
from
40-60% off
COME ONE! COME ALL!
Store opens Monday Friday from
8:00 a.m. to 5:45 p.m.
ind Saturday 8:00 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
STORE WILL BE FOR RENT OR LEASE
For further information
Com* in and sm Mr. Cillender Roberts
Manager & Owner, or Call 28776
Night 42441

force fighters strafed the vast
building at the height of the
assault. Small arms fire was
intense and "deafening at
times."
BURNING FLESH
"The smell of explosives and
oil and burning flesh reached
our office" on the I lth floor
of a nearby building, he said in
his despatch.
It was dated Friday. The
Morning Star said military
control of telecommunications
had prevented Timossi from
filing his report earlier.
"President Allende fell
defending the Government
Palace and his convictions after
demanding guarantees for the
Chilean working class in the
face of the Fascist military
coup," the newsman reported.
He said he called the Palace
by telephone at 9.15 Tuesday
soon after the Moneda came
under siege by coup forces.
One of Allende's advisers told
him: "You say that we'll die
right here. That we will resist
to the end."
Fifteen minutes later
contact with the rest of the
world was cut off when the
telecommunications centre was
occupied by army troops.
Timossi reported.
GIVEN 3 MINUTES
Timossi said the coup
Leaders issued an ultimatum to
Allende to surrender at 11.
They gave him three minutes
to give up.
"But the President once
again declared he would not
surrender and he would remain
in the Palace,' he reported.
After that. Timossi said,
coup forces bombarded the
palace with "all kinds of
weapons, from rockets and 30
mm shells to the artillery of a
Sherman tank. plus the
automatic weapons of the
army.
"The streets were deserted
Some parked cars began to be
used as parapets or else became
heaps of scrap under the tank
treads."
Jaime Barrios called him. he
said, at 1.52 and told him
Allende was fighting alongside
his men
"Augusto Olivares is dead.
The chief sent Fernando Flores
and Daniel Veraga to spejk
with the coup leaders." Barrios
reportedly said. "He
demands a written guarantee
for the working class and the
gams that have already been
made As soon as he gets an
answer he'll decide what to
do."
Olivares was a well-known
Santiago journalist and a close
friend of Allende. Flores, the
President's Cabinet
Secretary-General and Veraga,
junior interior minister, were
captured by coup forces^
"This was his last word. No
one knows what happened to
Barrios," Timossi said
About the same time that
Barrios called him. Timossi said
he received a call from another
person in the Palace who was
now "in the underground
resistance."
The unidentified caller told
him, he said: "After Allende
received the ultimatum he
called in the people under his
orders.
"He asked the lower ranks
of his staff to leave while he
asked the Cabineros
(paramilitary police) guards
and commanders to decide for
themselves. The women left
shortly after 01."
Allende ordered one of his
daughters, Beatriz, to leave,
Timossi said.
Beatriz, one of Allende's
three daughters, later was
flown to Havana aboard a
Soviet airliner with Cuban
ambassador Mario Garcia
Inchausregui and his staff after
they were expelled by the
military junta.
Timossi added: "Two of the
men who stayed behind with
Allende were later reported
seen lying face down in one of
the army barracks. Soldiers
were trampling on their heads
and backs.'
He did not identify the men
or indicate what happened to
them.
"In the streets are the
dead," he reported "The
stench of burning flesh is
growing stronger
"On Bernado O' Higgins
Boulevard a body lies with half
a head blown off."
MRS. ALLENDE
TELLS OF HER
NARROW ESCAPE
MEXICO CITY (AP) A
special plane sent to bring Mrs
Salvadore Allende to asylum in
Mexico returns from Santiago
today but it isn't certain that
the widow of the Chilean
President will be aboard.
Mexican President Luis
Echeverria sent the plane to
Santiago yesterday after the
President's office learned Mrs.
Allende, her three daughters
and four grandchildren had
taken asylum in the Mexican
Embast)
But an Interview with Mrs.
Allende, published in the
newspaper Excelsior, quoted
the widow as saying she would
remain in Chile and not seek
asylum in Mexico.
Sources in the foreign
ministry, which had only shaky
telephone communication with
the embassy in Santiago, said
they did not know for certain
that Mrs. Allende would be
aboard the plane.
"1 am thankful for the
asylum," Mrs. Allende was
quoted as telling Excelsior
reporter Manual Mejido in
Santiago. "But I will not
abandon Chile I am thankful
but I will not abandon my
country "
Echeverria had offered
Allende and his family asylum
under Mexico's policy of
sheltering anyone with
legitimate political problems.
After the death of Allende
was confirmed, the Mexican
President ordered three days of
mourning in Mexico and sent
the plane to Santiago to bring
Mrs. Allende. her family, some
other Chileans and a few
Mexicans to Mexico City.
Excelsior said the interview
with Mrs. Allende was
transmitted from Santiago to
Buenos Aires by telephone and
by telex from there to Mexico
City. Here is the Excelsior
account:
Mrs Allende said she was
not allowed to see her
husband's body but was able to
be at his funeral Wednesday in
Vina del Mar She was in the
Allende residence when it was
bombed and strafed by
airplanes and attacked by-
soldiers
"The last time I saw my
husband W/ai at supper Monday
night." Mrs. Allende said.
She said she went to sleep
and was awakened at 740 a.m.
Tuesday by a call from
Allende, who was at the
Presidential Palace.
"The situation has become
grave, the navy rebelled I am
going to stay here. You stay at
Tomas Moro," Mrs Allende
said her husband told her
"He practically prohibited
me from leaving the
residence," she said.
She spent the morning
listening to the radio and heard
Allende's last message to the
Chilean people Then air
bombardment of the residence
began.
WAR CRIMINAL
WASHINGTON (AP)
Henry A. Kissinger was
attacked as a war criminal and
racist Friday by witnesses
opposing his nomination to be
Secretary of State.
I he Senate foreign relations
committee concluded public
hearings on the nomination
listening to 10 opponents
They were criticizing
principally the Nixon
administration Vietnam War
policies.
The committee is to
question Kissinger in private
session Monday and is
expected to vote Tuesday to
recommend his confirmation
to succeed William P. Rogers.
Former Sen. Ernest
(iruening. (D-Alaska) asked the
committee Friday to judge the
future under the
"Nixon-Kissinger team" by its
past performance escalating
Indochina bombing after
promising before the 1969
election to end the war.
Although Congress
terminated American combat
Aug. 15, Gruening said "the
Nixon-Kissinger team has made
it plain that it hasn't given up
... it will try with American
dollars and hired mercenaries
to perpetuate its domination of
Southeast Asia. And if so there
will be no peace."
Rep. Donald M. Eraser,
(D-Minn.) speaking as national
chairman of Americans for
Democratic Action, criticized
Kissinger's acquiescence in
wiretapping and in the secret
bombing of Cambodia in 1969
and 1970.
He asked that confirmation
be withheld without complete
a ssu ranee that the
administration will keep
Congress informed and not
engage in military combat
without congressional
approval.
Saul H. Mendlovich, Rutgers
University professor, accused
Kissinger of "deep involvement
in the most brutal use of armed
violence against human beings
in the post World War II era "
"Indeed, were an
appropriate tribunal to be
established, Mr Kissinger
would today face charges as a
war criminal," he said.
The "racist" charge came
from the Rev. Douglas Moore,
representing the Black United
Front of Washington.
Moore said Kissinger has met
with Jewish leaders concerned
about the plight of Jews in
Russia, but never with black
Americans concerned about
blacks in Africa.
"This we feel is r.i
Moore said.
Nicholas Camerota Jr.
speaking for the national youth
alliance, said Kissinger, as a
German-born Jew, "cannot feel
a personal stake in the fortunes
of Israel." He said Kissinger
would be at a disadvantage in
negotiating for settlement for
the Arab-Israeli dispute.
Four of original 7
Watergate accused
ask to change pleas
By Donald M.Rothberg
WASHINGTON (AP)- Four of the original seven Watergate
defendants told a federal judge Friday that they were deceived
into pleading guilty and askedto change their pleas to innocent.
In a petition filed with U.S.
district court judge John J.
Sirica, the four men said they
pleaded guilty to keep from
exposing secret national
security operations they took
part in.
They asked for a jury trial if
Sirica allows them to change
their pleas.
Ihe four men, all natives of
Cuba who had been living in
Miami, said in a petition filed
with U.S. district court judge
John J. Sirica that they have
been misled into believing they
were protecting national
security interests in their
involvement in the Watergate
break-in.
They said they were the
victims of "a cruel fraud
initially perpetrated on them
to obtain their participation in
the Watergate activities."
The four, who pleaded
guilty on Jan 15, 1973, are
Bernard I.. Barker, Frank A
Strugis, Virgilio R. (.on/ale/
and Uugenio R. Martinez.
They were arrested inside
Democratic national
committee headquarters along
with James W. McCord Jr.,
who was convicted in the
original trial.
AWAII SENTI NCES
All four have been awaiting
final sentencing by Sirica. He
had sentenced them
provisionally to the maximum
terms pending review
The pleas were to charges of
conspiracy, burglary and
wiretapping carrying a
maximum prison term of 55
years and fines of up to 50,000
dollars.
On Jan. 15. the second week
of their trial, the four men
dismissed their original lawyer,
Henry B. Rothbiatl, who
would not let them plead
guilty. The court assigned a
lawyer for the guilty pleas and
the four men later hired
attorney Daniel Schult/., who
filed Friday's motion.
At the time of the pleadings,
Sirica closely questioned each
man about whether any
promises had been made to
induce the plea or whether
anyone threatened or coerced
it.
To each question, the men
answered no.
"I want to be very careful all
of you know what you are
doing," Sirica said. "If I'm
convinced you are doing this
knowingly, voluntarily and
without coercion then 1 don't
have to accept the plea.*
In the end, he did.
E. Howard Hunt had pleaded
guilty a few days earlier The
other two defendants, G.
Gordon Liddy and McCord,
stood trial and were convicted
by a jury.
DEVELOPMENTS
In other Watergate
development:
Atty. Gen Elliot 1.
Richardson told newsmen he
would give Watergate special
prosecutor Archibald Cox an
FBI summary of national
wiretaps of 17 White House
staff members and newsmen.
Richardson had said he would
give a copy of the summary to
the Senate Watergate
Committee,
The committee for
fairness to the presidency filed
suit in federal court seeking to
bar resumption of the Senate
committee's public hearings.
The Rhode Island-based group
also asked the court to revoke
the committee's authority to
investigate the break in. The
committee hearings are
scheduled to resume Sept. .4.
DETROIT, Sepi 15
( hryslcr prod IN I
can and trucks tialte
when 113,300 United
Workers union men I
United States and
plants after time ran oul
contract talks.
Efforts in settle th<
which both com pain
union bargainers insisted
not triggered by any sal
issue, were to resume Satui
The strike left Chrysli
just 122,000 of its new
and tracks read) foi sal
assembly lines kepi rolling at
its two major competil
General Motors and Ford,
Ihe strike againsl 1
Corp., the nation's fifth larg
manufacturer and No, 3 in
domestic auto industry, do
56 atuo plants in 21 sta
and Canada, Picket lines w
formed immediately alter the
strike was called.
But 14,200 union mi n
at Chrysler kept worki
11.000 of them white c
workers the i \w decided 1
keep on the job since tl
were not involved 111
production. The other .V
.ire at plants which prod
parts for other automak
Ihe current striki
Chrysler hits the Detroit
heaviest because 93,500
firm's workers live in the
of its suburbs Initial un
strike benefit- total 10 '
dollars weekly
While working
members earn an average
5.12 dollars pet hour dui
the first 4(1 hours ol
week.
1 k ned iiing ih
Mack Avenue hint ii
Detroit aftei the strike
called 1 ridaj niehl
erected by friends carr)
pater cups of liquor ai
"I he big three ah
'no voluntary overtime
person should have thi
decide lor In
over!" yelled auto worki
in as he left the (ate.
Warren was referring
of the union's ke\ del
that workers be ill
decide it thev will
COUNTRY WIDE TEACHERS STRIKE IN AMERICA
THOUSANDS of teachers across
the country stayed OH the picket
line and off the job Friday, striking
for higher wages and improved
working conditions.
The state of Michigan was the
hardest hit. The National Education
Association in Washington. DC, said
that as of Friday afternuon there
were strikes in 28 Michigan school
districts involving 22.400 teachers
and 544,000 students
Fh largest strike was in Detroit,
the nation's fifth largest school
district, where negotiations
continued deadlocked. Mediation
began Thursday morning on key
issues including a cost ol living
wages increase and class size, but
there was no report of any progress.
Classes were to resume Monday
in two other Michigan districts. The
268 teachers in Owosso approved a
two-year pact Thursday night and a
tentative agreement was reached in
MontrOMi where 91 teachers have
been on strike for eight days.
Herman Coleman, executive
secretary of the Michigan education
MS O elation, predicted other
settlements would be reached over
the weekend "as school boards
begin ti> realize thai coil i
adjustments must be paid."
Teachers in Kenosha, Wli who
have been striking for eight days,
idling 22.000 pupils, were
Into court I rlda) si tern* m
show cause hearing
LOfVES ALARM SERVICES
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Saturday, September 15, 1973.
QJhp tribune
ulbr (Uribunr
Nullius Addictus Jurare In Vebba Macistm
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEONI II 111 ITCH. PublisheriFdiutr 101)3 1914
SIR I 1II NNE DUPUCH, O.B.I ICC S.G IHmJI D
Publisher/Editor 101 71072
Contributing Editor 1972 -
Mill \ Dl PU( H c M'.KilN.M.Sc. B.A.. LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972
ForMr.Outten: justice or patronage?
Saturday, September 15, 1973.
ki>i mm u bour on the march
La
B) 1 111 NNE Dl I'UCH
\ I Kll\li mine suggested to me the oilier day that I
should write something good about the government lor a change.
I told him that I would like to find something good to say
about the government but '.hat I could not think of anything I
could say that would be the truth. I asked him to suggest a
subject
He pointed out the work they are doing in education and asked
me il 1 didn't considei this worthy of praise.
I agreed that ii should be but I pointed out that education
could be .i dangerous instrument if it is not directed towards a
definite purpose
When a child come out ol school he should be assured of ajob
in which he can use his training. Otherwise the government
succeeds onl) ui creating a frustrated citizen....and, if there are
enough of them, they usually become a menace to the established
social structure.
What they are doing in education would be praiseworthy in an
expanding economy but, while expanding education with one
hand, government polk) has been responsbile for not only
checking the expansion but also of turning back the growth that
already existed when they took over the reins of government over
us ago...thereby destroying the jobs that might be waiting
for the thousands of children who are coming out of schools
yeai in the Bahamas.
Maybe you haven't noticed this but the prosperity the islands
have enjoyed have given our young people the leisure and the
spirit to be very productive with the result that there are more
children of school age in the islands today than adults.
And so the government should have been encouraging the
growth and expansion of the economy to absorb the youth of the
islands. Instead they have undermined the economy and
consequently dwarfed a business movement that gave promise of
becoming a powerful giant
It is really extraordinary how foolish the men in government
have been. It is difficult to understand how men. who claim to be
intelligent because they are supposed to be educated, could allow
then -,\ i inflated that they lose all contact with
ordinary common sense. It is clear that education does not
necessarily give men intelligence.
flic result today is that labour is restless on all
fronts....especially in the public service.
The government encouraged labour to show its fangs while
the) were in the Opposition. They used mass hysteria to destroy
the old government that had provided them with full
employment and the security they had enjoyed tor nearly half a
centuiy .
They apparently expected labour to crawl back in their shells
and be docile boys when the political mission, on which they
spurred them, had been accomplished
Because they have continued to use their newfound strength
for their own advantage the government has been using such
harsh measures against them that at die Labour Day rally it was
ledared that they were better off under the former white
government than the present black government.
And. of course, labour was shocked when Minisiei ol Finance
Arthur lianna publicly declared that the government could not
sneourage a policy for increasing wages because they were the
argest employer of labour in the nation ... and the) couldn't
ifford it because their pay roll was already S50 million, about half
Jie total annual revenue of the country'
The position is difficult. The Government promised the people
10 taxation and lowei puces. Instead, they have had higher taxes
nllicted on them and this has contributed greatly to the steadily-
rising cost of living.
Such a situation would normally call for an increased wage
scale. But because of government policy the economy is steadily
ihiiuking and, as a result, both government revenue and business
turn ovet have been adversely affected. Revenue is falling. And
most businesses are experiencing a serious slump in trade.
This means that, even though the cost of living may be rising.
businesses will find it difficult to increase wages in a shrinking
economy.
j legitimate argument which could be put to labour by
government at a time like this....and they might be prepared to
listen.
But how can government put an argument like this to laboui
when then new political leaders ... in the short period of six
years....have moved from modest living up to millionaire row and
are now luing like bloated plutocrats.
We .ill know that when some of these men were first elected to
the House ol Assembly they couldn't pay their house rent. They
were really down on then shins.
The first thing they did was to vote themselves big salaries. But
even though these salaries are bloated. ...and outrageous when it is
remembered that up to the time they got control of die Public-
Treasury public men gave their services free....still there is a limit
to what even then bloated salaries could do for them
Rut what answei can members of government give labour when
they say that if the politicians luii afford to buy half million
dollar houses, drive around In Rolls Royce cars, with a string of
other expensive can in their garages, and live generally like
millionaires, there must be a lot of money kicking around and
they want a slice ol the pie.
This is a normal reaction to the indiscreet display of affluence
that these formerly poor men have allowed themselves to develop
in the positions of powei which they have enjoyed because the
votes of a trusting people skyrocketed them from obscurity to
the seats ol Influence they have enjoyed tot only .i comparatively
short time.
The terrible tiling about the choice made by the people is that
not a single man in government today can point to a single
achievement on his own merit before being elected to parliament
This is not an achievement, It is merely the result of the whim of
an unthinking people who allowed themselves to be brain washed
with an unhealthy propaganda by their own selfish, self-seeking
people.
A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
In baiting a mouse trap with cheese, always leave room for the
nousc: "SAKI" (Hector Hugh Munrol
THE G0V1 RNMI M wfl] very likely move quickly to
make Mi Sinclair Outten a Bahamian citizen which, of
course, is exactly as it should he. Mr. Outten was elected to
the House of Assembly, apparently unconstitutional!)
the lawyers on both sides of the political fence an
looking into the ramifications of this unusual
Apart from the legal determination as to who is entitled
to the seat in the House for St. Barnabas there is a broader
n involved. Mr. Outten happens to be a member ol
the ruling party and he also happens to be well known and
widely respected in all segments ol Bahamian society
Nobody in any of the political camps will object to his
being made legally what he always was in spirit.
But just suppose the shoe was on the othet
Suppose Mr. Outten was a member of the Free National
Movement rather than a member of the Progressive I
Party. Would there have been such unanimity? Or would
the PLP Government have pounced upon him. ridiculed
him and kicked him out of the country?
It would have been nice if in this independent
parliamentary democracy such a question could have been
dismissed with scorn. But it cannot. If Mr. Outten
member of another party he would have been on the next
plane out since the PLP Government have demonstrated
how uncivilized and tyrannical they can be in dealing with
people who are not in their camp.
So far as they are concerned the flag of the Bahamas
might just as well be the flag of the PIP since it does not
stand for those things which a national flag should stand
for under their administration.
It may be argued that not all members of the PI
dictatorial and cruel hut it is what comes out at the
the pipe that must be judged.
Mr. George A. Smith. Parliamentary Secretary to the
Prime Minister, can make glowing Statements about
freedom and all that. He can talk about how every body has
the right and the duty to Criticize without being regarded
as a traitor but if he is speaking for his Government '
of that can be interpreted as cynical sarcasm or diabolical
trickery.
In other words, let a thousand flowers bloom so that
they can find them and stomp them back into the ground.
Like Mi. Sinclair Outten there are other people from
Turks Island living in the Bahamas who feel exactly like
him. They love the Bahamas. The Bahamas is their home.
They want to stay here. They have Bahamian children.
They are good cii .
But not even God will help them, if the altitude
representatives in the Bahamas truly reflects His own
attitude, if they happen to be suspected of being any thing
but PLP. Their vulnerability will be exploited to the limit
rovemmeni .... it has been
i a number of Turks islanders at Inagua.
will get justice but he will always have to ask
tisticc or political patronage which
him his citizenship. He w'" have to ask and
what woulu have happened to him if he
Arthur r>u!fc*s
writes
tO THE
POINT
\ia with his nine children and a wife
who was n it PI P. like Wellington Smith
The Head of State
About a n Nassau Guardian, in an
editorial, brought up the question of the Governor General
ih sides of the issue, il it is an
..nt about the need for preserving
..il development was brought
out and th i ontinued:
'It is said that the head of state attends to endless
ceremonial affairs, allowing the head of government more
time to deal with more important matters. But Richard
Nixon is head of state and head of government of the most
powerful nation in the world, and he seems to be able to
get all his work done.''
The Guardian failed to draw what is perhaps the most
convincing argument for the preservation ol the distinction
between head of state and head of government when it
mentioned Richard Nixon's presul
The American people are going through a painful trauma
precisely because of the fact that the head of state
and the head of government are one and the same. If Mr.
Nixon was Prime Minister of Great Britain and Watergate
had happened he would have gone in a week.
But in the United States you just do not get rid of a
President like that. Even politicians opposed to a President
would mention impeachment only after senous
consideration and for the most serious reasons.
This is a flaw in the American system. As a result an
entire administration can flounder for years and national
morale can be shattered in the process when a president is
so weakened by scandal or maladministration.
The British had the same problem centuries ago when
the sovereign was head of state and head of government as
well. Some subjects were beheaded for criticizing the king
and some royal heads rolled as well.
Now, regardless of one's attitude towards hereditary
privilege, it must be admitted that the monarchy as it has
evolved is a great thing for the British. Prime Ministers
come and go and even a socialist revolution was carried out
under the unifying symbol of the British Crown.
Here is the Bahamas we might not need a colonial style
governor general but we certainly need a head of state as a
symbol of national unity. What we call him. and his official
something which is not fundamentally important.
Fortunately, even with his background of intense
political partisanship, it appears that the present holder of
the office of Governor General, Sir Milo B. Butler, fully
intends to play his role with distinction and with that the
best wishes of all the Bahamian people go with him.
'WE MUST EVOLVE
TO MEET NEEDS
OF OUR NATIONS'
COMMONWhALTH
parliaments "must evolve to
meet the needs of our
countries and to hear the
ibililies that challenge
us in this age," British foreign
Secretary Sir Alee
Dougtas-lloine declared at
Wednesday's opening of the
Commonwealth Parliamentary
Association conference In
London's Westminster Hall.
Addressing delegates from
the parliaments of 94
Commonwealth nations
including the Bahamas Si
said:
"Memorials of the past
surround us in this hall and
throughout the palace of
Westminster. They serve lo
remind us ol the continuity of
the democratic tradition in this
country.
"But it is not a static
tradition. We are not shackled
by the outlook and practise ol
past generations. Indeed, if
there is at Westminster a
tradition it is one of orderly
change.
"Parliament is the sovereign
institution in this as in all the
countries of the
Commonwealth represented at
this conference. It is central in
our wav ol life. But it is
important to bear in mind that
it can never stand still,' he
said.
"Parliament must,'' the
Foreign Secretary continued.
keep every aspect of it s
working methods undei review
VI the same tune it is in the
nature of our parliamentary
institutions that they are not
reformed or changed by
decree, but evolve through
discussion, in this process we
all benefit from the advice and
guidance ol the learned clerks
of our parliaments who also
contribute greatly to the work
of our Association."
Sii Mac said the purposes ol
the 62-year-old CPA were
two-fold: to "strengthen the
sense of community which we
have in the Commonwealth"
and to "strengthen our
parliamentary institutions
through exchanges ol
information, the pooling ol
experience and the holding ol
seminars on parliamentary
practise and procedure "
Representing the Bali.uii.is.it
the two-week conference are
Health Minister A. Loftus
Roker, (PLP-Nicolls Town),
Kendal Nonage (PLP-Grand
Bahama) and Cyril I ountafai
I NM-North Long Island).
PUBLIC HOLIDAY
OCTOBER 12
FRIDAY, October 12 has
been designated as Discover,
Day and will be observed as a
public holiday. it was
announced today by the
Cabinet Office
REPORTS FROM CPA. CONFERENCE
Europe will help Commonwealth, CPA told
LONDON Briu
determined thai the
European community acts with
helpfulness and industry
towards the Commonwealth,
said Brill.. Ml
Edward Heath Wednesday.
British membership of the
pean community is a
major talking point of the 19th
annual conference of the
Commonwealth Parliament
.lation which was opened
by the Queen Wednesday and
the Prime Minister emphasised
that while Britain was pled]
to its new role in Europe it was
equally determined to maintain
its role in the Commonwealth.
Some 2\Z del
observers from I .ilth
national, state and provincial
parliaments attended the
opening ceremony of the
conference in the hist
Westminster Hall. London, the
oldest surviving building of the
ancient palace of Westminster,
birthplace of British
parliamentary democracy
Underlining his personal
interest in the Commonwealth.
Mr. Heath recalled Ins
attendance 20 years ago at the
CPA conference in Nairobi and
said it made an "unforgettable
impact" on his mind. The
present conference would offer
fruitful deliberati
11 we discuss political
questions we shall seek to
achieve understanding," he
said "On economic matters we
Commonwealth
strengths noted
Till 19th conference <>t it..
Com monwtalth Parliament *rj
\\MKi.ition c.ittu' ai i propitious
time tor Commonwealth --x.hungea
and when the potential tut
commonwealth consultation .mJ
cooperation waa. considerabli
Mr. Arnold Smith.
Secret ai\ irneral > I the
Commonwealth Secretarial Frlda)
Addressing conference d
ji Church Mouse. Westminster,
London, Mr. Smith spoke ol tin'
recent meeting in iitt;i:i ol
C om mon we a 11 h H e ad i il
government i* Mona ol the mosl
significant and fruitful for many
years" It h.id ended on a confident
and positive note.
Commonwealth politlclai
Mr. Smith, would wtlCOfltC the
benefits <>f intcrnatton.il detente to
the extent that they would
contribute to global peace and
se^untv
"hut." he added, ".ill ol > nu will
be une.isiK iware thai dlffei
between the super powers settled
over the heads of the less p .
could turn out to
dandvantageotu to the latter."
Neither did I -'sf Weal leiente make
the most powerful countries in the
World more aware ol (he need
difficulties of the less privileged.
Mr Smith went on: Bverybod)
recognises that some courilm
richer and more powerful than
others Indeed the fact that the
Commonwealth provides in
opportunity for the poor t<>
influence the" rich is one nt ti>
Strength! Hut dtfterences in the
wealth and power do not prevent
the Commonwealth from hen
association of equals."
hope to reach agreement on a
basis o boih
>ns we
seek to lc-itn Irom each other."
we discuss political questions
we shall seek lo achieve
understanding." he said. "On
economic matters we hope lo
On Back Page
CECIL P.WALLACE
CENTRAL GARAGE
announces the
appointment of
CECIL I! WALLACE
as Sales Representative.
Mr. Wallace, formerly manager of Taxico Ltd., invites his
many friends and customers to call him for their automo-
tive needs at . .
CENTRAL GARAGE PHONE 3-4711
or AT HIS HOME NUMBER 4-2765
Enter The Tribune-Pan Am Travel Photo
Contest!

7
A free round-trip for two
can be yours aboard a
Pan Am jet to any one of
26 European cities
served by Pan Am.
Contest Rules
The Tribune will run a total of 30 photo ads
showing a scene from somewhere within Pan
Am's travel system. Name the City or Scene
and Country shown, using the picture and
answer blank included in each ad. After the
final photo has run on November 17th, mail
all 30 entries (stapled or clipped together)
to: Vacation, The Tribune, P. O. Box
N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas, You may enter
more than one group of photos, as long as
you use official Tribune blanks and groups
must be fastened together.
Should you miss an edition of The Tribune
with a Pan Am photo ad. back copies can be
purchased at The Tribune reception desk in
The Tribune Building, Shirley Street,
Nassau, or The Tribune office, 9B Kipling
Building, Freeport.
In case of a tie, the tie will be broken by
additional photos not previously published.
All entries must be postmarked no later than
midnight, Monday, November 19th. 1973.
Employees and their families of The
Tribune, Pan American World Airways and
their advertising agencies, are not eligible to
enter.
Photo No. 10
City or Scene................................Country........................
My Name.............................Address..........................Phone
Contest ends Saturday, Nov. 17 th
Where in the world within Pan Am's travel system,
are the places pictured above? Identify all 30
photographs that will appear on various days in
The Tribune over the next 13 weeks and you have
a chance to win a round-trip for two aboard a Pan
American World Airways' jet to your choice of any
one of 26 European cities served by Pan Am.
Winw may choow round trip *"<
to orw of fh* following ?6 EuropMi
Cum MrvM by Pan Am
tEije tribune
AMSTERDAM
BARCELONA
BELGRADE
HI"LIN
BRUSSELS
COPENHAGEN
DUSSELDORF
FRANKFORT
GLASGOW
HAMBURG
HANOVER
LISBON
LONDON
MADRID
MUNICH
NICE
NUREMBiNG
OSLO
PARIS
PRAGUE
ROME
SHANNON
STOCKHOLM
STUTTGART
VIENNA
WARSAW


Saturday, September 15. 1973.
3Jbr (Erttmnr
9
Will you actuall) carry out your threats in this letter
ii you aren t arrested for sending it through the
mail?'
* Henry would you put the 'Alice., let m whisper
DISHES IN THE ....' SOMETHING IN WUR EAR...*
At last! An endangered species that made it BACK!
CROSSWORD
PUZZLE
ACROSS
1 Fatigue
4 Dull-witted
person
8 Prcpelier
11.Japanese tan
12. Always
13. Samovar
14. Ornamental
clock
15. Divided skirt
17 Predestines
19 Myself
20. Meteoric
fireball
23. Fencing
dummy
26. Dutch uncle
28. Stulm
29. Exchange
premium
31 Doctrine
33. Formerly
Tokyo
34. Committed
theft
36. Digraph
38. Laughable
43. Full-length
movies
45. Palm leal
46. Make a
mistake
47. Swindles
48. Oriental
cymbal
SOLUTION
49. Route
50 Grafted in
Heraldry
51 English river
DOWN
1. Loving
r~ r~ t H g- tr- 7 H r 9 >o
II l 12 i i
M l lb h
'7 '8 t v4
% % % V ft io !i 22
A 1 W * ii ^ 28
*i ^ Y/< Ji M %
lij 3. '4 6 XI % % yA
% % >6 39 to II 12
"6 *1 M*
Hi V4 >n % M6
19 % bo % W
AP N-i'ofurl
BBin TtJlJ
2. Crooked
3. Present
4. Mandate
5. Egg
6. French
composer
7 Maine college
town
8. Exterior
9. Land measure
10. Nurses
16. Tissue
18. Type square
21 Accomplished
22. World War II
battlesite
23. Standard
24. Vanity
25. Collection
of books
27 Golf club
30. Death notice
32. Dessert
35. Elicit
37. High railway
39. Coin
40. Seep
41. Furze genus
42. Vendition
43 Some
44 Generation
CARROLL RIGHTER'S
GHOROSCOFE
from the Carroll Rights* Institute
GENERAL TENDENCIES: This is one of the
most curious of days, astrologically speaking,
and it wavers back and forth between good and difficult
influences, but one can truthfully say this is no Saturday to
take chances or spend more than one can truly afford, so
saving money, counting your dollars and being friendly are
musts.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) Figure out how to get real
estate you have and bank account improved, added to today.
Honesty is the keynote now when dealing with others. Take
no risks where social communications are concerned.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Analyze your appearance
and yourself as a whole now and see where to make
improvements. Don't get taken in by quacks where health
treatments are concerned Stick to the tried and true.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Plan to get all those small
duties out of the way and forget the social, or fun things for
the time being. Not a good day for expanding either. Plan to
assist one in trouble during free time.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Weed out those
friends who are more a hindrance than anything else and use
your time and money more wisely. Let your aims be more
conservative than in the past. Show you are practical.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Try to get into activities that will
put you in a good position with bigwigs, and add to present
prestige. Make sure you do not take any chances in the active
world, or it could cost you a pretty penny. Think logically.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Being interested in new
outlets is fine but make certain to study all phases well, or you
could lose your shirt. Use your good judgment as well as your
fine hunches for best results. Avoid one who puts a dampener
on your ideas.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Ideal day to keep those
promises that have been impossible to attend to during busy
week and pay the bills that are vital. Show you have good
judgment and do not go simply on hunches. Combine both
ideally.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Make sure you keep
confidential whatever has been told you by mate or associate,
or you lose their goodwill. Do not enter into any public
argument, or you come out the loser. Quietly walk away from
it.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Do whatever will
make your surroundings more charming and steer clear of
those who want to waste your time or get you confused. Take
the health treatments that make you feel aces. Evening fine for
entertaining at home.
CAPRICORN (Dec, 22 to Jan. 20) You have to get into
tasks you hardly like part of the day, but then go out for a
happy time and feel better. Use that smile more and you find
others are more responsive. Take any little emergency in your
stride.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Keep busy in the outside
world and do errands, chores, so you avoid possible arguments
that could start at home. Make progress. Stave off trouble at
home in p.m. by the simple expedient of a smile.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Keep busy at the reports and
statements that are important and keep out of trouble today.
Work on monetary matters until they are properly arranged.
Improve hobbies with friends in the evening.
TARGET
word must
Iftter. and
HOW many
words of
four letter*
ir in..n- can-
yon in a k r
from thf
li'llrr-. -Ilimil
he r e ? In
m a k I n ft a
word, each
inter m a y
he used once
only. Each
contain the Inrie
there must he at
N
least one eight-letter word In the
lint. No plur.ii- .mi foreign worrit;
no proper names. TODAY'S
TARGKT : it words, good :
1% words, very good ; 33 words.
excellent. Solution tomorrow.
YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION :
Kifin enrol felon file filer floe
florin flour flue fluor FLUO-
RINE roll rorel foul fuel furl
Ireful lief lien lieu life line
liner lion loin loir lone lore lorn
lour lune lure neroll noil oiler
oriel rifle role rule unflle.
Winning
Bridge
Chess
y VICTOR MOLLO
QUIZ
Dealer South : love All
North
? 53
O 10 4 I
0 k j io a
4> K (J6
South
? A 4 3
0 A Q6
ia 8 7
A J 8 T
North
1 0
3 N T
led live 6 to East's
4>K. The contract was unbreak-
able bv the defence but
taking the wrong new," de-
clarer went down. What did he
do? What should he have done?
ANALYSIS: Wests lead of
the +8 \t the key. There's no
reason to doubt that It's a true
card, and If It Is, the spades
will break harmlessly 4-1 for
with 5. 4', S, 2 on view, the 6 can
only be the fourth highest of
a )ow-oard suit.
Declarer should, therefore,
win the first-trick and drive
out the OA. The defence can
cash ithree spades, but no more.
We* East
? 0 10 88 K J 9 7
OKJ72 0986
0 8 3 2
> 10
What doubtless hanuened
was that, obeying a reflex, de-
clarer held uo automatically
his 4>A and Bast iroimnv
switched to a heart. Now afi Is
lost. If South ducks. West tfins
and goes back to apadeav If
Soil* rises with the OA. he
will lose three hearts when Baa:
comes In wtth the OJL,
Competitors can slW enter
the Open Pairs at the Evening
Standard Congress at 14 XXI hrs.
and QD.0D hrs. today and to-
morrow, and at 14.00 hrs Mon-
day, at the Londoner Hotel.
Welbeck *reet W.V
B* LEONARD AftDIN
:
- i .;
. -' i 1 .
r-i .V.
;- -- a *
: * ;d

_L ....1 __ 1
(7671
White mates In three moves,
against any defence (by A.
Geiiter). An unusually diffi-
cult puzzle. Earlier solvers com-
mented: "a hard nut to crack"
and It took more than one
sitting.'' No par times today,
but reckon yourself solving
expert standard If you work it
out in leu than 20 minutes. As
usual, the black pawns are
ivlng down the board.
I
^Jlte C^ontic J-^a
a$i
JUDGE PARKER
By PAUL NICHOLS |
APARTMENT 3-G
By Alex Kotxky
IF n MEANS THAT HEU
BE STEALING >QJ FROM
ME, I'M MOT SURE! I'M
AN EXTWMEIY JEALOUS
MAN, MiHPyaSPW/
NO. 9787 -
Solution
0 A S 4
4 4 33
TON N
Chess
1 RKKti. 1/ 1 . KQ4;
2 RxP, PK4; 3 BB7. II 1
. . KB4: 2 RQB6. PK4; 3
RKBS. A trap for solvers is 1
BBT! PB4I when there is
no mate.
'-UU-r"-
1 r~L If If" 5 fo"
f-_
Rupert and Miss Samantha42
No 7.SJ7 by TIM MckAY
Acrou
I. Kinr bna.lt. (-:..
7 Have *% aropertr. (3i
8. Land measure. <4>
II. r-'Uul (rah|Min 14.
M, Milk -hi* l.tl
It
I4-S>
As ihe pals leave the shop they meet Reggie
Rabbit. I've bought the tusk cusks for
Pompey." he says And Bingo has thought
ot something too. I was with him yesterday
when he had a brainwave Funnily, it happened
lust as one of those mysterious bubbles
burst over him." Ha. ha! So we've each
had a bright ideal'' laughs Rupert. When
we're all together you shall hear the whole
story.'' The next day is warm and sunny,
and in the afternoon Rupert and the others
arrive tor Pompey's party. They tind Bingo
already there, fixing up a safety swing in the
garden. It's B.ngo s present to Pompey,"
says Edward. He made it himself."
ALL RIGNIS HtSERVED
lit. Milk -hi*
is itetir. (T)
14 ChemlBtB use them
lit Attempt. (Si
a, tkiw. ii.
II Cltlnipalni. (7)
ii Have a lonilni. (V)
23 Canudlan animal, <3l
U. Mr. , remember r t.li
in iirvrr <3i
How ii
I. Iirl|i faat. (4, 51
! lie ixnllltrlt liiallilnlnliii
UN
3. I.....ir (3)
stockbroker*, perhapa. oi
nnaiirlert. (4. at
i. I nusual. (4t
d. Garden county, it
. Short Itrrarroi for cavalr]
use. (I)
Ii South American city. (31
' J';:"- m.ijMTi.is
Hi Urx IOUUF
bird.
Ml
17. II r II mi
mtl
(3)
IH. M I neral
iir in*-
site. (Ill
u. 8 h not.
(41 trir44*'t iiiiblixn
uKJaai3Lr.3..
Ii 3iil^=rj^l -i
LlTi: '-'LMdlSlJU
u'x-y'Hainan
?OC ray *m i^


(Ehr Sribunr
HELP WANTED
C 11262
RELIABLE MAID to care for
infant and two school children
Call 5-6118 after 6 p.m.
C11267 "
TWO TAILORS. Bahamian. I
Coat Maker, 1 Pants Maker.
Ten yejrs experience. Salary
$50 wk. Writer: P. O. Box
N 3405. Nassau.
C11171
T RANSPORTATION
ORGANIZATION require
young man early twenties for
career position in operations
division. Successful applicant
should have High School
education ,vith G.C.E. Maths.
Accounting or Clerical
experience would be helpf..l.
Applications should be made in
writing giving details of age.
education, relevant experience
and present salary to:
ADMINISTRATIVE
ASS ISTANT Navios
Corporation, P.O. Box N-7796.
Nassau
C11191
TRUST OH ICLR
required for newly organised
Trust Company in San Jose.
COSTA RICA. Successful
applicant should preferably be
of Spanish origin and
completely fluent in English
and must have some years
e xper i ence in Trust
Administration with a
recognised Trust Company in a
Common Law jurisdiction.
This is a senior position which
offers considerable
opportunity for growth and
development.
Salary will be dependent upon
qualifications and experience.
Applications accompanied by a
personal resume should be
forwarded to:
Mr. Walter C. Dittel, Jr., c/o
Compania Nacional Financiera.
Apartado 4488, San Jose.
Costa Rica, Central Amenca
ANNOUNCEMENTS
THE LONG ISLAND
SAILING CLUB
nsoring a Steak Supper
and Dance at the LION'S
CLUB on Saturday September
22nd at 8 p.m. A door prize is
being offered, and dancing is
from 8 p.m. until ....
Music will be provided by the
very popular Band, "RANDY
AND TML REVELATIONS".
The public is invited. Tickets
from
Committee members and at the
door. Funds are to support the
1974 Regatta.
WE GUARANTEE AS
ALWAYS, A GALA-TIME.
TRADE SERVICES
C11280
GIRLS between the ages of 18
and 25 wanted to sell Black
Heritage Cosmetics
house-to-house. Work part or
full time. Contact 2-4175
between the hours of 7 p.m. &
9:30 p.m.
C11299
PARTS DEPARTMENT
RECEIVING CLERK. Must be
experienced in automotive
parts. Good pay for the right
man. Many fringe benefits. Call
Mr. Godwin Wright at 2-1031
for appointment.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
'Q A '
C11284
THE WEDDING RECEPTION
of Verilyn Dawn Turnquest
and Fred McKinney which was
to be held at the home of Mr.
& Mrs, Uriah Cartwnght in
Pyfrom's Addition on Saturday
22nd September 1973, will be
held instead at the Blue Hill
Golf Club, Blue Hill Road.
C11033
Finder's Customs
Brokerage Ltd.
Mac key btreet
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU. BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENTSERVHF
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795,2-3796
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434.
C11049
T.V. ANTENNAS. Uoost-r
for homes, apartments an
hotels. Sales and services Call
Douglas Lowe 5-9404 WORLD
OF MUSIC Mackey Street next
to Frank's Place
Cl 1151
SEWING MACHINE
REPAIRS AND PARTS
ISLAND FURNITURE
Corner Christie &
Dowdeswell Street
Phone 21197.
P. O Box 4818. Nassau
Cl 1268
FOR ALL YOUR
GARDENING NEEDS.
ing. hedging. Pinning,
Beach cleaning. For Prompt
reasonable and efficient service
call 51044.
GRAND BAHAMA
CLASSIFIED
IN FIEEPIIT Ttt. 352-6611
HELP WANTED
C6236
SECRETARY lo work in
Personnel Office. Will be
responsible to do typing and
filing and answering letters on
her own initiative. Should be
of neat appearance with high
school education and 2 to 5
years experience. Interested
persons apply THE GRAND
BAHAMA HOTEL &
COUNTRY CLUB. West End.
Grand Bahama. Personnel
Office, between the hours of
9:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m..
Mondav through Friday. Eloir
Martin. Jr. Personnel Oil
C6245
BOOKKEEPER/SECRETARY
for Toui Company with
minimum of two years
experience: certificate for
operation of N.C.R 3300
Bookkeeping Machine: ability
to handle Accounts Payable,
Accounts Receivable, Payroll
and all related procedures,
including Trial Balance.
Applicant should also have
practical experience concerning
Tour and Travel Agencies.
Shorthand and Typing
essential Six days $150.00.
Bahamians only need apply in
writing to: P.O Box F-2672,
Freeport.
C6247
SERVICE MANAGER
required for General Motors
dealership. Mini mum
experience required: 5 years in
the automotive trade, must
have complete mechanical
knowledge with good customer
relationship. Be able to
diagnose mechanical problems,
ability to direct and
supervise mechanical staff,
processing of factory warranty
claims. Apply to: Five Wheels
of Grand Bahama Ltd.
352-7001. Bahamians only
need apply
C6244
CABINET MAKER
applicant must be able to read
blueprints. specifications,
measure and set out work as
required. Build all types of
cabinets, vanities, etc. Work on
own initiative. Glenerik
International Limited
Yellow Pine Street, 352-81861
HELP WANTED
C6241
One PURCHASING AGENT
is required by a
construction Company located
in Freeport. Applicants must
have a minimum of 5 years
experience in purchasing repair
parts for all light and heavy
duty trucks, loaders, graders,
dozers and related road
building equipment by
Caterpillar and Allis Chalmers.
Interested persons should
write: Manager, P.O. Box
F-1641, Freeport. Grand
Bahama.
C6246
1 ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT SALES &
PROMOTIONS: To promote
overseas sales, particularly
retail sales through travel
agents Coordinate on-island
and overseas promotions with
other members of the Bahamas
tourist industry and produce
required publicity to release to
the travel trade media The
individual should have several
years background in the tiavel
industry with valuable contacts
m this field, i.e., overseas
association and convention
planners, retail and wholesale
agents, particularly in the
Canadian market. The
individual should also be an
experienced travel writer with
contacts in the travel trade
media, in order to obtain the
required publicity lor
Freeport/Lucaya. Three
references and Police
Certificate required. Applicants
should apply in writing or in
person to: Mr. Albert J Miller,
Chairman, Freeport/lucaya
Tourist & Convention Board,
P.O. Box 650, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.
C6242
GENERAL TRADESMAN
employee will be requiiecl to
take care of all company
vehicles and equipment
including body repairs, spray
paint, engine repairs and
work at welding and plumbing
- when required.
Glenerik International Limited
Yellow Pine Sheet
352-8186.
I GRAND BAHAMA I
CLASSIFIED I
Saturday, September 15, 1973.
T*< Tribune <0snis P@ig<
HELP WANTED
C6243
ELECTRICAL SUPERIN-
TENDENT estimator for
industrial and commercial,
supervise jobs, layout and
purchase materials, know
Canadian Code, locate |Obs, 10
years experience, college
degree or equivalent.
Glenerik International Limited.
Yellow Pine Street, 352-8186.
C6256
HARBOUR PILOT/DOCK
SUPERINTENDENT
Applicant must possess
extensive experience and
ability m piloting vessels in and
out of Harbour, berthing and
unberthing carqo vessels up to
30.000D.W.T.(20.000 G.R.T.)
Passenger vessels up to 26,000
G.R.T. and piloting vessels in
restricted coastal roadsteads
no restrictions on tonnage.
Individual should have working
knowledge of Meteorological
arrd Oceanographic instruments
for the purpose of recording
various observations and
attending to the instruments.
Minimum certification of
competency by the board of
trade or equivalent as first
mate foreign going and should
be able to carry out the duties
of a Harbour Pilot and Dock
Superintendent in shifts as
arranged by the Harbour
Master.
SUPERVISOR ELECTRICAL
'MAINTENANCE Applicant
will be responsible for the
proper maintenance of all
electrical equipment associated
with the generation of
electrical power. Includes
switchgear up to 69,000 volt,
generating equipment 13,800
volt, (steam, gas and diesel
driven) auxiliary circuits,
motors, metering relaying and
electronic devices. Should have
background as an electrical
engineer. with recognized
apprenticeship followed by at
least five years experience in
electrical maintenance work in
power plants or comparable
installations (such as proceed
industry, etc).
SUPERVISOR ELECTRICAL
MAINTENANCE OUTSIDE
PLANT Extensive
experience required in
maintenance of sub-station
transformers and switchgear.
Must know installation and
repair of capacitors, voltage
regulators and electronically
and mechanically operated
reclosers. Must supervise others
and maintain full records of
work.
Apply to: Personnel
Department. Grand Bahama
Port Authority Limited, P. O.
Box F-2666 or 30C Kipling
Building. Freeport Grand
Bahama.
The Tribune
CLASSIFIED
BRING RESULTS
HELP WANTED
C6252
Required a FIELD
LABOURER for weeding and
taking care of plants. See:
Charles Williams, Eight Mile
Rock
C6255
TEACHER Typing, Business
Math and English. Must have
B.S. degree. At least 5 years of
experience.
TEACHER Shorthand.
Home Economics. Must have
A.A.S. degree. Must be able to
teach shorthand and have had
courses in homemaking. At
least 3 years of experience
required.
Write or phone Sister Mary
Alice, 373-3456, P. O. Box
F-2418, Freeport.
C6254
EXECUTIVE SCCRETARIES
with previous experience and
possessing skills in typing and
shorthand:
RECEPTIONIST/TYPIST with
cordial personality, neat
appearance and good typing
skills: also, MALE CLERICAL
HELP, must have driver's
license.
Please apply: Freeport
Secretarial & Employment
Services, P. O. Box F-1955,
Freeport.
C6253
ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT. Executive
Secretarial skills, some
bookkeeping, personnel and
evaluation. Capable of giving
instruction in secretarial skills
and carry out day-to-day
operations in absence of
executive. Must have minimum
of five years experience and
able to work on own initiative
without supervision.
Apply: P. O. Box F-1955.
Freeport. Freeport Secretarial
& Employment Services.
C6251
HOUSE MANAGER: To
assist General Manager to
received and correct guest
complaints. arrange tours,
work with on and off shore
Travel Agents, running of
public areas of hotel
transportation and rooming
NIGHT MANAGER:- To be
in full charge of Resort
complex at night. Receive and
correct guest complaints, assist
Front Office clerks and
cashiers and Night Auditor.
RESERVATION
MANAGER: To co-ordinate
with Travel Agencies, assign
rooms and room rates, take
and confirm reservations, assist
in Sales and Promotions, assist
Front Office Manager.
PASTRY CHEF: To prepare
all pastries and cakes, with
decorating of same. Run
bakery shop, assist baker
COOKS: To prepare food
according to menu.Apply:
Lucayan Beach Hotel, P. O.
Box F-336, Freeport. Bahamas.
Brother Juniper

Is it true that you've given up doing your funny im-
personations of fellow employees at our parties?"


The Tribune.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03447
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: September 15, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03447

Full Text














tlitute


PriduProducts Ltd.

LLIGO
CONSTRUCTION



For detail Phone 2-4766


Registered with Potmater of Bahamas for postage conesson within the Bahamia.) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper
VOL. LXX, No. 240 Saturday, September 15, 1973. Price: 20 Cents


FNM claim 'blueprint'


that could cause turnaround of economy


By NICK KELLY n
THIF OPPOSITION Free g
National Movement has a
blueprint that could cause a It
turnitromind in the economy o
but will not reveal it until time
loi the 1974 Budget debate,
the party's re-elected Leader
disclosed yesterday.
'\titine.l Kendal Isaacs told
I p s ti-onfteTence that the
Nit-ip,'ntt was being worked oni
til ,t stateltmenitt of the FNM's
Ic iiifi,!. ptticy would be
mitadh iit the appropriate time.
I he pt!s-. conference. called
g t l) iwgi ;iard Plaza
iheidAtqiiailters two days after
the expusiin of three more
iw-niber,: r iterated the party's
posii'-n with regard to the
t I 1 sIont and again
-* l;)Jetii>.'l td their inconsistency |
It ith iegarid ti) independence
a ld hb.ic-'.
Mor. positi ely,. Mr. Isaacs
Cmphasi/ed that he and his
cl, s in the Central
-t'nitl would now return to
t, tatk ,t rehiuilding the party
t'i the pailfuil experiences
I tit pis moliO ths."
Ir, this contest lie urged
.elbt rs i andt supporters
S i. the Bahamas to
ic'dtiitlo e their et torts on behalf
-i the l \M Ci
In qiestlonl-attd-answer r
S. e 4'- ar-old i
s :. es.. ed thita the FNM V
o .- i hoi ld ai convention
w. i" N\vember s
S ti Hi it,r rcb ildin'b
I. ls,.tss refei resl to
: I',.ieprint and tilhe
-'. t ,' reaching tilhe
: tile \ Narni '

\ii '. !!K split inI the party
ii o iave hiarmied it
,'ild tell to what

I \ANl\I.(S
S i.t is that this was a
... . . r t; i ; !r ,; .d .
,h lhe sailt %as right, then it
i.'ttI.r that it was done now
S .,thiei than a couple of years
it. -ri l U'st li bet re the general

\1; Is'. s was not preparcdt
h ,i.iard a view on what Si!
I>, n,i S\ imonctte (Shirleai,
'.li, a.i--l I ighthbot rn (Clarerice
I,. *t I I '( l iophas Adderley
,\ aUl a lnd tErrington
.it s ( \l.trshl Hlarbour) r
u, i. ls> do now that they
S*\ :- o', ge ir eiinbers of the

-1! is difficult to say what
S',-, tIiti lour will play now. Mr.
t ii. his statement, gave
. .;.. -pl ssii that he will be
S' a tew party and it is
Ii l,.'tstanding that
\ -. TL hliave been made to
th ,-,- icl tnetnbers.'
:,g Mr. Watkins'
tlhilt he was a
S !. itr. Mr Isaacs said this
S. ..pl'ied at some time
.cr but it should be
'id thlat between
I 1)05 he was a
th public service
J. \ 5i to 1970 an
S:-,iit member of the

L 16(7 1 was a
S; the P1I'P or at least
Sh !iat I was."
S . lie cswould like to see
S tl .I w th the four
l', ',+ '1' Isaacs said he
S \ .11 ,' that to happen,
ii . I' .' 1 have to change
il, 't i presentt posture
(h r i 'nd the country.
n .I i* as they remain
:i, h., .-tlh their present
ailtip *'.v uild be very
di.it i '- .i that breach.

In his p ic]ied statement
M r. Isa, .. i.1 that since his
re- lect: .x, I -,ader the five
remI ainitt' iniitbbers of the
FN\ I lil iltortn ed the
(io\ern-t(;-ten.M r Milo Butler
that thesa -,nstituted the
mtajortlt os the itembers of the
S tHoulse in opposition to the
S government
S It was nyw l or htim to act
S under Section L2 of the
Constitutimi. Hus section
empowers the Governor-


G" generall to name as Opposition
Leader the member of the
House whIo can command the
sun ort ot the majority of

EYE CONTACT
TESTS LENSES

I ROBERT T. HIRST
Optometrist
Savoy Bld.
- FREEPORT
- Telephone 352-5906


members ii opposition to the
government.
Other questions put to Mr.
saacs concerned the question
f Mr. Sinclair Outten who has


US


since disqualified himself as a
PLP member of the House by
declaring he was born in Turks
Island; the future of labour as a
viable opposition and the


attraction ro t he Vangutid
Nationalist Socialist Part\i tor
voters
The '.".1 executive hie ..i !
was now in the pro)esO ,(I
trying to find out the tacts ot,
the Outten case. Ite was cert in
government must also b,'
seeking legal advise and hli
expected that ..-. rii- ilii-' w uld
break soon.
The party Leader confirmed
he too had heard ilinours
concerning other lHouse
members whose right to sit in
that chamber might be also
open to question. "But the
facts given to substantiate
these rumouttlrs do nlot stand tup
in law.
On Labour as possible the
next Opposition. Mr Isaacs
pointed out that the supporters
of labour were still members o
the PLIP "The\ imai hbe
becoming I'll- i. .! but


th ,e .I, still tied to that patty
ci11o)t it,; \ il tie said
\ ',: tihe Vanguard. it
,iouild .ileh r git,,k or disappear
ti tall, lie e\pc. ted the
II 1 n '.' 1i' l t bilt onl \ ll

S IR \(' ll()\
"I hu i n' ,,o id elicd:its

to till-. phliii)-opu i \i ,,- s a .ic -s t, e
older o0t rsC and tilt
c'irLiiiumi lS iiIc s of the cou' ntry
contnibutc, tto this.
\Mr l'adcI s predicted th tt if'
thing <, did noIt InIp! ove
C ItinIIIt \ i i ll n ,in\ V'o ng
pe.c i'lc' .]!;d idJ ilts \ uldi fiurn
i t t l ,i L1'1urrd
In Ii st it'enwl' l li' said the
1t'\\1 \ ; s I Ip t Bn t I I U wh miIn i is
of all r.ace 's in, we believe'
that it is inl I tlirouighi
brol ith11 ii -I( d ilth t thi' tIult re
p s:L ol ti s -0t tio', Lanl be
>,t't.' LlIt


gave no evidence to


By NICKI KELLY
ATTORNEY GENERAL PAUL ADDERLEY
disclosed Friday that the U.S. government requested the
eturn of financier Robert Vesco three months ago on
raL. charges but to date has produced no evidence to
warrant his arrest and extradition from the Bahamas.


Mr. Adderley made the
statement at a press conference
vesterda\ afternoon to correct
what he called "ill-informed
coniimcnt both inside and
outside the ahilamas in
conne tt on with the efforts
which have so far been made
b\ the United States
Department of Justice to
secure the return of Mr. Robert
I Vesco lto that countryy..
M\lost, t a.,t all, of this
COtl mer' t id "i'b accident or
design neen calculated to
convey the impression that the
Bahamas judiciary had in some
way been at fault "or indeed
las improperly conspired to
refuse to have him returned to
the United States," Mr.
Adderley declared.
As Extradition was a matter
for which he had
re s p o n s i ability, thel
Attonrey-(;eneral said hlie had
to correct such ill-informed
comment "which may reflect
unfavourably on the judiciary
in tlie Bahamas and make
public such facts as are in my
possession which will correct
such misconception."
Extradition, he emphasized,
was a judicial not a political
exercise.
"I cannot sit by indefinitely
and allow the organs of the
Bahamas government to be
attacked in various ways which
have the effect of influencing
people inside and outside the
Bahamas towards the judicial
processes of this country," he
asserted.
E explaining the matter of
extradition between the U.S.
and the Bahamas, Mr. Adderley
said it was based on
long-established practice and
precedent and was regulated by
the Extradition Treaty
between the United Kingdom
and the U.S. ratified in London
on August 4, 1932.
TRI ATY
When the Bahamas became
independent it succeeded to
this Treaty and thereby agreed
to be bound by its terms in its
relations with the United
States.
The process of initiating the
extradition of a person begins
with a requisition for surrender
from one government to
another, he said. After that the
process was a matter for the
judiciary.
The request could be
followed by the issue of a
warrant for the arrest, the
arrest, and the hearing of
whatever evidence is produced
in a Magistrate's Court.
"It is then for the court to
determine whether there is
sufficient evidence in
accordance with the laws of
the Bahamas to justify
extradition.'"
With regard to Mr. Vesco.
the U.S. government, acting on
behalf of the Justice
Department. had followed
procedure and requested his
arrest alleging a charge of
fraud.
The request was made to
then Governor Sir John Paul
and dated June 9, 1973.
On June 15, Mr. Adderley
said, the Governor directed an
Order to Chief Magistrate


support


Vesco


extradition, says AG


Wilton E. Hlercules, requiring
issue of a warrant for Mr.
Vesco's arrest "provided that
the conditions of the
Extradition Act. 1870 relating
to the issue of such Warrant are
in your judgment complied
w,th."
On June 21. the Chief
Magistrate informed the
Governor by letter that in his
judgment he had not been
given sufficient information
and no evidence was supplied
to him to justify his issuing a
Warrant.
INFORM ACTION
"The Chief Magistrate,
acting in his discretion.
requested that he be supplied
with such information and
evidence which would satisfy
him that a Warrant ought to be
issued." Mr. Adderley said.
On June 22, the Governor
co nli tu nic ated this
information to the tU.S. Consul
General "and there the matter
has remained since." according
to the Attorney General. No
further communication has
been received by the Bahamas
government from the L' S.
government, he said.
Elaborating further in
response to questions, Mr.
Adderley pointed out that a
simple request for arrest was
insufficient for the issue of a
warrant.
"Sufficient information and
evidence has to be produced to
justify a warrant. Secondly,
determination whether or not a
person is to be extradited
would depend on evidence
being produced which would
satisfy the Bahamian courts
that an offence has been
committed."
While the U.S. government
had taken the initial step
towards obtaining extradition,
it had not proceeded with the
subsequent requirements, the
Attorney General said.
Asked why he had waited
three months to make his
statement on the extradition
request for Mr. Vesco, Mr.
Adderley referred reporters to
the terms of the Extradition
Treaty which specifies that an
arrested person cannot be held
beyond two months without
evidence being produced for
his extradition.
NOT RECEIVED
Two months had elapsed
since the Bahamas became
independent on July 10 and
the pertinent evidence had not
yet been received, he said.
Limiting himself strictly to
his terms of reference as
Attorney General, Mr.
Adderley refused to comment
on Mr. Vesco's present status
in the Bahamas.
"That is a matter for
Immigration with which I do
not have to concern myself."
Nor would he say whether the
government should initiate its
own investigations into the
financial activities of the
former 10S chairman.


That was a mtitte1 r for the
Minister of IFinance and the
Monetarn Authority. lie told
reporters.
Mr. Add, rl'\"s sdisclosttie
yesterday came on the eve oft
his depirlare for the United
Nation,. ,iid in tile i i -t ol
trial proceedings against loIt;ert
U.S. Cabinet Ministers Jothn
Mitchell and Maurice Stais ion
charges of conlsplirac .
obstruction of justice aind
penury in the matter o a
S200.000 contribution hI MN
Vesco to President Nixo ,
re-election campaign last Scar
S lie secret contribution A,.i'
said to have been deliveleid t I
% rt Stalls three d 'shu all
new election law tiqtuirulig ; li!
di cl i o re iof 1it a
cOn hI ibuttlons took cll 1t
tI he Jtu tice s D-)- paItlnit' lt 1,
allei g it was maIlde b \ 11
Vescio in eKhu ince i;
protection against a Se.,' ci '
I: x c h a n ge ('oIni I i'ssi ).
investigation into his finantii .i.
dealings with the 1()S li:ti.i
fund empire.
Mr. Vesco. who hli. als
bee in dicted in coinI) li It,
w 1lih thle i 2 0 0 .0 t0
contribution, is amoiing -t.'
defendants, charged h'lVth SI t
with violating securittl la \\, :
defrauding four IOS fuind-il


$ 224 miliwin.
Sin, the i 2 S situit,
the -'T- \e',r o,!< New Jersey
tinan, .'i h I P I one into
selt' f-, ipo d e\Ale Iin the
U.S. t)lo avOid arrest
ii the pi ast L ist r hei hasi
cO 'C n'it' he ween -helie
itaali :i .,ind Cost'! Rtia w herec
h ie hai e ortedl i invested
tmeilts '-' million n Almiost as
I irg L' a suIm saind ii hItIve beIen
ploiuighle itIt tlhie Baliantis
h 'its l it h ti h a n!i sI
S IT I, !l,,n'\ I l th Bank, leatltn
v\ t I)I i i W IS (15 associ,!Ie
\ n I' I 1. !,

,1 M,1 \JJ..!: [-\ % 's f le If i'" w

it I i I i 'l r Ia lust
;' i i A 'I t r. t i t\ ,
I I l I I 'I I l .'

I he applhu tion t11 lhe ( .t it

11' l d ,tilt .i W an c\e tra I'tl I."
"'t\ bett e iln thle [ t S id
h l ntl1 did l not appl n

I' 'erouiis alnOllpts t.
t'\ hi ll! i tilt Stilts iin "5.l',i
l Iiten it lhwarted gtiatis,
I.1noun lmdtg his I race Rihliec

It \'sco is helievel to 1 ;-;ese ll. In ( ,,td R ica.


BEC answer union charges

THE BAHAMAS EIECIRKI( 1Y CORPORATION has taken
steps to improve facilities for employees at the Bay Street
accounts office, BEC chairman I'reton II. Albury, M.P., declared


in a press release.
iMr. Albury was reIutitni
charges b I Engineering ian,'
General Workers tnolii
president Dudley \illiams ith,
the chain an t had fhailc, I ,
keep a promise, made dluii'i'
contract negotiations liiit c
months ago, to provide hclleC
eating facilities at the Hais
Street office.
Mr Williams claimed that
the department head hadi
forbidden the 30 to 40 wtoikcs,,
in the accounts section to cal
at their desks, with the result
that the employees had to takc
their lunch in their cais, in ithe
yard or in the lavatories.
Mr. Albury said 131 ( "has
plans to construct a new ofttice
building that will house the
staff presently at Bay Street
and will provide better
facilities both for staff and fo t
the public.
"Preliminary architectural
plans have been approved and
the appointment of consulting
engineers to work along w ith
the architect to produce
detailed plans is imminent,.
Mr. Albury said "The situation
will be relieved, but it can't be
done overnight, Mr. Williams
should know that."
He went on to say he
recognized that there was noi
lunch room at Bay Street and
that BEC has "no objection to
employees having their lunches
at their desks during the lunch


S i'niployees lit' ..!ItIt'1
i J l]s in I a rs 0 1 I I th e \ ,i d .
,,I h atiilIlI ) 'H l ii hitt v- bI ,
; ie u intitoii n ws cuan o l\
S c hl ie that it is % ii iti n '
h!e litnchi houl biut during g tie
) 11 i til w\ toI k ing tille,'" It
\llur\ said.
Slie B131 C stat ii ent also,
Ilelt with the charge ,\It.
I Illiaams tha t ull dcah
'enet its had not been pail tI
:'ie suCsivivors sot two HI t
,mp 1lo\Ces who died recenll\
Ib I lans-(Oceanic lnsiisti an, c
w I l tI agents.
In thie case tol I rte
I astitihasotln, \Who diedi t\t o or
hI rec months aIgo. theiri
difficulty here is that because
\tr. I arquharson did not sign
lih necessary form designating
hi s beneficiary, the chequte was
niadle out to 'the estate of
I rcdrenick IFarquharson.' It is
necessary, therefore, for his
family to take the required
steps to claim the benefit, and
tlis is the cause of the delay in
their receiving it."
As for the case of Charles
Iliggs. who died August I 1,
"the amount of S10000 hias
heen paid to Mrs. H Iiggs,
mother of halveses IHiggs by the
insu race company. In
addition to this $10,000.
which has already been paid,
an accidental death benefit is
On Back Page


''We ,1'o id n rai :s i .
whether it is black I isSm i i :
white racis n c,, l v. ardire ,lliit ii :
to pay *,hI T;, Yr pic
demanded ii :r thaitt Ie ca





f.ue i g '.ft
5..


r


4



I p "


4


FNM LEADER KENDAL iK -A 'i
...patntul experiences in past mnonh-


Over 700 cars stol



so far this year, t



thefts on the incre

By MIKE LOTIII \N
TRL S I1NG SOULS who leave their ,ars unmlocked
warned thai -100 vehicles were si(n i ,1 !h.' n tir. -i\
1973. and skyrocketing thefts iln Jul s it d Vil
probable doubling of the number lor th-e second sh.lt


stt lent be'v.'n ,i it 1 i and lth -
imornin i as ai ie:.iU[ t s lt''.ct.dt
300. with three and ic c h. '
months O1 go b tri.t e ;e) "--
end In the pa ght d '.

disappeared. ThCe IvraisI"-' r
til- first si\ p t
was 1 vehicles a vt .-'.
sux I I s I
I ll ]a l la1' 1 1 1 t : .-a ',
ce n locked ear LJ ttV I I l \ C
i)ro v e lI to b e h C 1 ;1.17- -.' r,. ; '.
lcte .Tm ine sI thiev ,. In ,nj its'-
the several cases Ids'! si c nJ !
.ar stolen fron \t l . i
Villtus cithel raiin 't i l e.s i
stalled on the 1 ,t r f F ni t1- ain
I he thieves ab .i-.i'- I :'
t i r- it sto I pe d. vi l .i t l ,t.
It tlie iara ," of tl -,.- i! "s
hol ste and Mail l a e ( t v, i ..i
ihiit hadl hic n seesircl '. L.i
lhc're war n'. o T' g1 i i:
,,c :1 d e a r s w tI! I d k hv : r,
1' r 'ken anil thi e ni, ',
' e' J trmt insllde ti 0 i .t
Ce sale m h tlianoth'" 1 s:,!Id"
R .,Iu president w, as i's,% :;,' j
'd i" lhe .'rca When ,t -
c hr Ie t, reth-n oi
,i e : tti 'idt th a t h e r l .r t h I .t'Is
C1t '.t,)ICnl
Although lthe police ali
halkIed up an iamnprcssive I'
perccIIt recover% o( tthe
cIiIclcs stolen s(o far this \Seat
I',oIlice inform nation indicates
tmiit not all ot the cars ha'.c
been stolen bh itb1 .-rldcrs, biut
thai a bloodd nulllh.'r hlav heent
snIg tlMd out ot thIe ciAntrt\
anti will never he se ie iti tlhe
H a hl t a an ln1 ,
One senior o hitter t e\t ailcd
that plh'e +ire aware lhat somel
ol tlhe stolen cars ar'e i eing
silppcdi hy htarge to Itaitl
S lie e tihe\ art C s I'ilt alit i il1
tr :ices ol then c rio in l nlti 'e lbe 'in
\ I it 1 5' Ii
\ntitIt ei senior .'- iii .
asked whel her adh n .i;t.si
i r ()io cai i liii'.v *At i
',iis etesdt al d wi whether i ,1Ti ot
thie .ars hLavC the county 'al

iopi ions oi certain tlin.I but
, evildtienCeC \ e caai'I putt
t'il ons in print xxIIil hoitL
t itlences' "
)ON RISt
Sources il thie epa !t1entci
ot Statistics and the I I i.
Bfrani. l of the police lorce hated
revealed tliat thicre swere -44
vehicle tiefts in Janttital (,-3 in
I'ebruars and 77 in Mar,. i tor a
first quarter total ot 184.
I hti second quarter nolchCed
up 21F recorded thefts. wit h
47 in April, o3 in Ma\ anld 100
in June, for a first half tally of
exactly 400 thefts.
The Statistics Departmnent
spokesman said auto thetts in
July totalled 130. and I ra tic
Branch sources saiti 17 -
vehicles have been stolen
between August I and this
moi ning.
I he average number of
vehicles stolen per month has
been 76, compared with June's
106, July's 130 and August to


S l I

t.'l e :J e


I !i ;lit -ii 1!,

1 ) i ,


" i!


Deadly poison cannister


feared adrift in Bahamas
B\ tlIKI 1 I. r-I1AN
xI \O)! 40o' ,N'st IRS of one of the most deadly of
p i'.isous \N.t i s-e io,,'e ihstie t\.o( ships collided in the Gulf of
MeNMo a tmoithi ;ti niiid B:ihtnmians are warned to watch for


some t them l t ihat iilght i h;it


N ss -; ; i- ".. . 1 ,'


T-i Ci l- itMl.' l
S.

-i) )t --ut,, "



L '0 i lestt t i N s a It it






S t i- 5 ti Ie Ii sI
is" M an S1 o- ,'s



ii it-- t- c ide t i-it s
d T' I








o d 11 0
sit n Ist IN

S 1 s [ I s' tl


I' hs't il 1 it l ii t htut I
u st iits. St 1 t lS ith it is
\net knotn which of thied ship








I U S Co'"t (;laid
spok sllt th e p1t tlit d tt tle
t he c Me aia. N,\I gnot first
wstrd of the i iiu'deiit and
tropical ted t'astial litDrei algssed
the southern sGulf te r t the ;tulf
('east But It S authotrisles
ss 'tr'e niot 1oitt itt-d utiiil
the collision.
"It's hard to tell wht aeffec
spuikcssnan eisilthasised that the
a srrel'. c5t ld be ilntwh ul t" iin
the uli. Ie i itt'si that
tropical shitnrm I elia t passed
through the (,ilt ten days after
the collisiout.
"It's hard to tell what effect


dried into the western Bahamas.
thi' hurricane and current
',,uld have," the spokesman
SId the Associated Press.
I he\ could be anywhere.
'A major concern of the
( .ist Guard is that people
.itung the coast swimmers
hdJ boaters might spot one
the barrels, think it is
,'mcihing valuable and drag it
,islire We're also concerned
0h1t comniercial fishermen
,tlshorc could get a barrel
iIngled in their nets, or run
t 1 one" hic. said.
.li added that it is feared
'.i t the steel drums might
htoame corroded in the salt
\,aler and be m1 a weakened
condition if they drift ashore.
BA\ SRA duty officer
\l.iirice Kelly told The
I rnhune that the cannisters
would d conceivably come up
the G(ulf Stream into the
v citern Bahamas."
lie said possible areas of
sightings included Bimini,
Grand Bahama and the west
coast of Andros.
"What we are worried
about." Mr. Kelly said, "is
somebody not knowing what
the\ are and opening one up."
Chemical experts have said
the poison is packed in dry
form, but would readily
dissolve in water if one of the
barrels is ruptured.
The dry chemical could also
be turned into deadly cyanide
gas if it came into contact with
hih acidic water.










t


A.,/'


1 DUDLEY'S
OtR ROSETTA ST &
MT HOiYAL AVE


TV ANTENNA INSTALLATIONS
P.0 BOX 5850 PHONE 2-1306/2-3237


ATTORNEY GENERAL PAUL ADDERLEY
... Defends Bahamas judicial system


1 i gorou sly but not
, irresponsibly.
,,,t is necessary however, to
S : !i t clear that while we are
S i entirely humourless, we
,ille ic it our duty 'n
pi'rlia neit nt to debate
1t c I I igentlt matters of
natlt onrial importance rather
than to provide second-rate

"In so doing .we hope to
,.' n lasting respect rather than
iheap popularity. After all,"
,l1 Isaads declared. "it is good
gou.rnment that we strive for,
1i0t personal aggrandizement."
..iAmong the issue that will
Stiptinle to occupy the FNM's
,tt.Intlion will be the issue of
jp inKil sictimniiation, the
k ss as told
\11 lsaacs said the party was
I dicplc disturbed that the
nernment had allowed "so
miuch cruelty" to be
;'riptrated in their name.
1\1c are disturbed at the
.i|parent public apathy over it
en I tI\t wve hope that that
en i is indeed only
I parent." he said.
C( consideration was now
Being given to what
(finstItutional measures could
hc taken by the FNM to
radl atec "this evil practice."
S eantinie he warned the
g, rLrnment that many of those
,iho were suffering as a result
,i Viltinmization in their own
.,uimtry found that burden
shouiildl e int 'lerible and that continued
o,:, ths f i t a. .on could bring about
pVi-to iPt a ti-lippy results.
of tle \ -car Other "burning issues" were
,'\ .1s unemployment, the
t',rcl iti "i of the health
;, r, ;, r .'.'s, tlhe rapidly increasing
,, i, ,.. kot ot hying, pollution, waste
a. d incompetence in
i',vertnmient and the failure of
thc government to attract the
.ii il needed to revit,ilize the
S I c Hi liamliiiian economy.
i,, i i MI isa:ics concluded by
t ., ng his "unshakeable
.onfidene'" and that of his
.,, colleagues in the future of the
S, ; N\I. "We do not believe that
J;i. should compete in political
S, ilit\ and emotional

behhlieve that we have a
S: . duty to perform always
holioiour and with courage.
I 'i.. ', the way, we believe,
: we will attract the
,* 'it ot the Bahamian
1'' p.i to) our cause."


\ ..MM


cihe




________ __ __ ____ _________________________________________I.


Saturday, September 15. 1973.


SWEDEN'S KING REMAINS NEAR DEATH
HELSINGBORG, SWEDEN (AP) Sweden's 90-year.old King Gustaf's
doctors said the monarch remains near death this morning. They reported
his kidneys and lungs are enduring new crises but his heart is still beating
strongly.
An announcement this morning from the 31 specialists attending the
monarch said his lung infection is spreading, his kidneys have "practically
ceased to function" and his temperature has risen to 105 degrees.
10,000 'EXTREMISTS' HAD ENTERED CHILE
SANTIAGO, CHILE (AP) Chile's new military rulers say the military
overthrew the Marxist government of President Salvador Allende because
more than ten-thousand "extremists" from other countries had entered
Chile. This was the First public explanation of the junta's reasons for
toppling the leftwing government in a coup Tuesday.
The explanation was made by the junta's minister of the interior.
General Oscar Bonilla, in a nationwide broadcast yesterday. Bonilla said
the armed forces will restore the constitutional government as soon as
possible. He did not elaborate.
NIXON LIFTS NLF-TV BLACKOUTS
WASHINGTON (AP) President Nixon signed without fanfare a bill
banning television blackouts of home professional football games sold out
three days in advance. The measure cleared Congress last night.
It will permit home telecasts of a number of National Football league
opening games Sunday.
EASTERN AIRLINES JET SKIDS OFF RUNWAY
CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA (AP)- An Eastern Airlines
passenger plane skidded off the runway at the Charlotte North Carolina
airport today after it landed in a driving rain. The plane became stuck in
the mud off the runway pavement.
There were no injuries among the 14 passengers plus crew members.
CHINESE WINE WITH CHINESE FOOD?
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) For the connoisseur who has trouble deciding
which wine to serve with Chinese food how about Chinese wine? Chefoo
red or Chefoo white are the first premium quality wines to be imported
from the Peoples Republic of China. The President of Huntington-Rice
Incorporated, a California wine marketing firm, said the wines are mellow
"with broad taste appeal."
GOVT. HEALTH DIRECTOR RESIGNS
WASHINGTON (AP) The director of the government's new office of
professional standards review resigned today.. Dr. William Bauer said he is
leaving because the department of health education and welfare had to
give him adequ-.e backing and resources.
Bauer said he will remain until a new director is named. The professional
standards review office was set up to oversee the quality and
appropriateness of health care for medicaid and medicare patients.
AMBASSADOR DENIES EXECUTION REPORT
SAIGON (AP) The Cambodian ambassador to South Vietnam denied
today a report that at least ten Cambodian officers were executed last
week. The Associated Press had quoted Cambodian military sources
Tuesday that the officers had been executed for allegedly ordering their
troops to retreat in the face of an insurgent attack.
In Cambodia today, fighting appears to have subsided around Kompone
Charm, the country's third largest city. Intense cambat had been reported in
the dty for almost one week. Today's action centered around the
provincial capital of Kompong Speu, 30 miles west of l'hnom Penh. 'Iwo
persons were reported killed by Communist fire and 2 others were
wounded.
BELFAST AIRPORT CLOSED BY EXPLOSIVES
BELIAST (AP) Belfast's Aldergrove airport was brought to a
standstill today after security forces found explosives in a parked car. They
said they received an anonymous telephone tip. Arriving planes were
ordered not to land and hundreds of passengers were stranded inside planes
awaiting takeoff. The rest of the airport was evacuated and suspicious cars
were searched.
The explosives were found in a car parked near the terminal area.
Security forces would not disclose how, much explosives were found.


indicate in h s.nd



Our Friend

Dry Goods Stoe
FLINT ST. off EAST ST.

18 YEARS IN OPERATION
Will be having a

CLOSING -OUT SALE
Commencing on September 15, 1973 on:

Men's Women's and Cildren's Apparel

from

40-60% off

COME ONE! COME ALL!
Store opens Monday Friday from
8:00 a.m. to 5:45 p.m.
and Saturday 8:00 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.

STORE WILL BE FOR RENT OR LEASE
For further information
Come In and see Mr. Callender Roberts -

Manager & Owner, or Call 2776

Night 42


COMMUNIST PAPER REPORTS KISSINGER CALLED WATERGATE DEVELOPMENTS 113,300 UAW


Allende died fighting 'RACIST' AND


shooting a machine


gun at coup forces

LONDON (AP) President Salvador Allende of Chile died
fighting military coup forces with a machine gun in his hand as
they closed in on his Moneda Palace in Santiago during Tuesday's
coup, the Communist Morning Star newspaper reported Saturday.


The paper quotc" Jorge
Timossi, a personal friend of
the late Marxist President and
chief of bureau of the Cuban
Prensa Latina news agency in
the Chilean capital.
"It's right on to the end.
Allende's shooting with a
machine gun. This is infernal.
The smoke is suffocating us."
Timossi said these were the
words of Jaime Barrios, a
presidential economic adviser
fighting alongside Allende and
his bodyguards and aides in a
last-ditch stand in the Palace.
words of Jaime Barrios
bodyguards and aides in a
last-ditch stand in the Palace.
Timossi said Barrios
telephoned him at his office
early Tuesday afternoon soon
after the assault on the Palace.
GUN IN HAND
Allende died with his gun in
his hands and a steel helmet on
his head soon after, Timossi
reported.
"He lay in a pool of blood
on the carpet of his office," he
claimed. "He died between
1.50 and a quarter past two in
the afternoon."
He did not say whether
Allende was gunned down by
coup troops or, as has been
reported,he committed suicide.
Close friends have been quoted
as saying since the coup that
Allende had vowed to kill
himself if his administration
was toppled in a putsch.
Timossi reported the
Moneda Palace was raked by


three air
the vast
t of the
fire was
ning at

S11
sives and
reached
Ith floor
ie said in

ay. The
military
nications
ssi from

e fell
'ernment
ons after
for the
s in the
military
reported.
he Palace
Tuesday
da came
forces.
sers told
we'll die
till resist

later
t of the
when the
centre was
troops.


ES
e coup
tatum to
at 11.
minutes

nt once
suld not
d remain
rted.
ssi said.
ded the
inds of
s and 30
lery of a
us the
of the


army.
"The streets were deserted.
Some parked cars began to be
used as parapets or else became
heaps of scrap under the tank
treads."
Jaime Barrios called him. he
said, at 1.52 and told him
Allende was fighting alongside
his men.
"Augusto Olivares is dead.
The chief sent Fernando Flores
and Daniel Veraga to speak
with the coup leaders." Barrios
reportedly said. "He
demands a written guarantee
for the working class and the
gains that have already been
made. As soon as he gets an
answer he'll decide what to
do."
Olivares was a well-known
Santiago journalist and a close
friend of Allende. Flores, the
President's Cabinet
Secretary-General and Veraga,
junior interior minister, were
captured by coup forces.
"This was his last word. No
one knows what happened to
Barrios," Timossi said.,
About the same time that
Barrios called him. Timossi said
he received a call from another
person in the Palace who was
now "in the underground
resistance."


The unidentified caller told
him, he said: "After Allende
received the ultimatum he
called in the people under his
orders.
"He asked the lower ranks
of his staff to leave while he
asked the Cabineros
(paramilitary police) guards
and commanders to decide for
themselves. The women left
shortly after 01 "
Allende ordered one of his
daughters, Beatriz, to leave,
Timossi said.
Beatriz, one of Allende's
three daughters, later was
flown to Havana aboard a
Soviet airliner with Cuban
ambassador Mario Garcia
Inchausregui and his staff after
they were expelled by the
military junta.
Timossi added: "Two of the
men who stayed behind with
Allende were later reported
seen lying face down in one of
the army barracks. Soldiers
were trampling on their heads
and backs.'.
He did not identify the men
or indicate what happened to
them,
"In the streets are the
dead." he reported. "The
stench of burning flesh is
growing stronger.
"On Bernado 0' Higgins
Boulevard a body lies with half
a head blown off."

MRS. ALLENDE

TELLS OF HER


NARROW ESCAPE
MEXICO CITY (AP) A
special plane sent to bring Mrs
Salvadore Allende to asylum in
Mexico returns from Santiago
today but it isn't certain that
the widow of the Chilean
President will be aboard.
Mexican President Luis
Echeverria sent the plane to
Santiago yesterday after the
President's office learned Mrs.
Allende, her three daughters
and four grandchildren had
taken asylum in the Mexican
Embassy.
But an interview with Mrs.
Allende, published in the
newspaper Excelsior. quoted
the widow as saying she would
remain in Chile and not seek
asylum in Mexico.
Sources in the foreign
miniS y, which had only shaky
telephone communication with
the embassy in Santiago, said
they did not know for certain
that Mrs. Allende would be
aboard the plane.
"I am thankful for the
asylum," Mrs. Allende was
quoted as telling Excelsior
reporter Manual Mejido in
Santiago. "But I will not
abandon Chile. I am thankful
but I will not abandon my
country."
Echeverria had offered
Allende and his family asylum
under Mexico's policy of
sheltering anyone with
legitimate political problems.
After the death of Allende
was confirmed, the Mexican
President ordered three days of
mourning in Mexico and sent
the plane to Santiago to bring
Mrs. Allende, her family, some
other Chileans and a few
Mexicans to Mexico City.
Excelsior said the interview
with Mrs. Allende was
transmitted from Santiago to
Buenos Aires by telephone and
by telex from there to Mexico
City. Here is the Excelsior
account:
Mrs. Allende said she was
not allowed to see her
husband's body but was able to
be at his funeral Wednesday in
Vina del Mar. She was in the
Allende residence when it was
bombed and strafed by
airplanes and attacked by
soldiers.
"The last time I saw my
husband was at supper Monday
night," Mrs. Allende said.
She said she went to sleep
and was awakened at 7:40 a.m.
Tuesday by a call from
Allende, who was at the
Presidential Palace.
"The situation has become
grave, the navy rebelled. I am
going to. stay here. You stay at
Tomas Moro," Mrs Allende
said her husband told her.
"He practically prohibited
me from leaving the
residence," she said,
She spent the morning
listening to the radio and heard
Allende's last message to the
Chilean people. Then air
bombardment of the residence
began.


WAR CRIMINAL
WASHINGTON (AP) -
Henry A. Kissinger was
attacked as a war criminal and
racist Friday by witnesses
opposing his nomination to be
Secretary of State.
The Senate foreign relations
committee concluded public
hearings on the nomination
listening to 10 opponents.
They were criticizing
principally the Nixon
administration Vietnam War
policies.
The committee is to
question Kissinger in private
session Monday and is
expected to vote Tuesday to
recommend his confirmation
to succeed William P. Rogers.
Former Sen. Ernest
Gruening, (D-Alaska) asked the
committee Friday to judge the
future under the
"Nixon-Kissinger team" by its
past performance escalating
Indochina bombing after
promising before the 1969
election to end the war.
Although Congress
terminated American combat
Aug. 15, Gruening said "the
Nixon-Kissinger team has made
it plain that it hasn't given up
it will try with American
dollars and hired mercenaries
to perpetuate its domination of
Southeast Asia. And if so there
will be no peace."
Rep. Donald M. Fraser,
(D-Minn.) speaking as national
chairman of Americans for
Democratic Action, criticized
Kissinger's acquiescence in
wiretapping and in the secret
bombing of Cambodia in 1969
and 1970.
He asked that confirmation
be withheld without complete
assurance that the
administration will keep
Congress informed and not
engage in military combat
without congressional
approval.
Saul H. Mendlovich, Rutgers
University professor, accused
Kissinger of "deep involvement
in the most brutal use of armed
violence against human beings
in the post World War II era."
''Indeed, were an
appropriate tribunal to be
established, Mr. Kissinger
would today face charges as a
war criminal." he said.
The "racist" charge came
from the Rev. Douglas Moore,
representing the Black United
Front of Washington.
Moore said Kissinger has met
with Jewish leaders concerned
about the plight of Jews in
Russia. but never with black
Americans concerned about
blacks in Africa.
"This we feel is racist."
Moore said.
Nicholas Camerota Jr.
speaking for the national youth
alliance, said Kissinger, as a
German-born Jew, "cannot feel
a personal stake in the fortunes
of Israel." He said Kissinger
would be at a disadvantage in
negotiating for settlement for
the Arab-Israeli dispute.


Four of original 7


Watergate accused



ask to change pleas

By Donald M.Rothberg
WASHINGTON (AP)- Four of the original seven Watergate
defendants told a federal judge Friday that they were deceived
into pleading guilty and asked to change their pleas to innocent.
In a petition filed with U.S.


district court judge John J.
Sirica, the four men said they
pleaded guilty to keep from
e xposing secret national
security operations they took
part in.
They asked for a jury trial if
Sirica allows them to change
their pleas.
The four men, all natives of
Cuba who had been living in
Miami, said in a petition filed
with U.S. district court judge
John J. Sirica that they have
been misled into believing they
were protecting national
security interests in their
involvement in the Watergate
break-in.
They said they were the
victims of "a cruel fraud
initially perpetrated on them
to obtain their participation in
the Watergate activities."
The four, who pleaded
guilty on Jan. 15, 1973, are
Bernard L. Barker, Frank A
Strugis, Virgilio R. Gonzalez
and Eugenio R. Martinez.
They were arrested inside
Democratic national
committee headquarters along
with James W. McCord Jr..
who was convicted in the
original trial.
AWAIT SENTENCES
All four have been awaiting
final sentencing by Sirica. He
had sentenced them
provisionally to the maximum
terms pending review.
The pleas were to charges of
conspiracy, burglary and
wiretapping carrying a
maximum prison term of 55
years and fines of up to 50,000
dollars.
On Jan. 15, the second week
of their trial, the four men
dismissed their original lawyer,
Henry B. Rothblatt, who
would not let them plead
guilty. The court assigned a


lawyer for the guilty pleas and
the four men later hired
attorney Daniel Schultz, who
filed Friday's motion.
At the time of the pleadings,
Sirica closely questioned each
man about whether any
promises had been made to
induce the plea or whether
anyone threatened or coerced
it.
To each question, the men
answered no.
"I want to be very careful all
of you know what you are
doing," Sirica said. "If I'm
convinced you are doing this
knowingly, voluntarily and
without coercion then I don't
have to accept the plea."
In the end, he did.
E. Howard Hunt had pleaded
guilty a few days earlier, The
other two defendants, G.
Gordon Liddy and McCord,
stood trial and were convicted
by a jury.
DEVELOPMENTS

In other Watergate
development:
Atty Gen Elliot L.
Richardson told newsmen he
would give Watergate special
prosecutor Archibald Cox an
FBI summary of national
wiretaps of 17 White House
staff members and newsmen.
Richardson had said he would
give a copy of the summary to
the Senate Watergate
Committee.
The committee for
fairness to the presidency filed
suit in federal court seeking to
bar resumption of the Senate
committee's public hearings.
The Rhode Island-based group
also asked the court to revoke
the committee's authority to
investigate the break in. The
committee hearings "re
scheduled to resume Sept. 24.


COUNTRY WIDE TEACHERS STRIKE IN AMERII


THOUSANDS of teachers across
the country stayed on the picket
line and off the job Friday, striking
for higher wages and improved
working conditions.
The state of Michigan was the
hardest hit. The National Education
Association in Washington, DC, said
that as of Friday afternoon there
were strikes in 28 Michigan school
districts involving 22,400 teachers
and 544.000 students.
The largest strike was in Detroit,
the nation's fifth largest school
district, where negotiations
continued deadlocked. Mediation
began Thursday morning on key
issues including a cost-of-living
wages increase and class size, but
there was no report of any progress.
Classes were to resume Monday
in two other Michigan districts. The
268 teachers in Owosso approved a
two-year pact Thursday night and a
tentative agreement was reached in


Montrose, where 91 teachers have
been on strike for eight days.
Herman Coleman, executive
secretary of the Michigan education
association, predicted other
settlements would be reached over
the weekend "as school boards


MEN STRIKE

CHRYSLER
DETROIT, Sept 1 I \l'i
Chrysler production of 1 44
cars and trucks halted S -tird v
when 113,300 :nitetd A:u:,
Workers union members stru.-
United States and ( anadia
plants after time ran ,ut ,
contract talks.
Efforts to settle the sqrik
which both ,; ,. art
union bargainers insisted .Ws,
not triggered by any singic
issue, were to resume Saturda..
The strike left Chrysler i
just 122,000 of its new ,a
and trucks ready for sale vhii.
assembly lines kept rolling
its two major compel ili,..'
General Motors and t'ord.
The strike against Clhrvsy-'
Corp., the nation's fifth largec:-
manufacturer and No. 3 in th.
domestic auto industry, cl-se,-
56 atuo plants in 21 statL
and Canada. Picket lines w1-i
formed immediately after ith
strike was called.
But 14,200 union mone Ow
at Chrysler kept workir.
11,000 of them white colli
workers the tAW decidlcd t
keep on the were not involved in ait
production. The other 3 --
are at plants which pr'odui
parts for other automitkn ..
The current strit- ag:in-
Chrysler hits the Detroii air
heaviest because 93.500 ,1 t!
firm's workers live in the ci,
of its suburbs Initial mtil'
strike benefits total 30 i
dollars weekly.
W\ while working.'. 'o,.
members earn an idieracerc
5.12 dollars per hour ,Junil;
the first 40 hours of
week.
S'xcited wsorkeis lei' !i
Mack Avenue stallpine plti i
Detroit after the strike
called Friday nigihtit ,,.
greeted by friends carrin:.
pater cups of liquor and i
"The big three alrcadit, ,I
'no voluntary ove rtion'1. \
person should have the nthc r
decide for hinisell. Sati' -
over!" yelled auto worker ill,'
Warren as he left the gate,
Warren was referrineg
of the union's key dil eoii,
that workers he all,,. tI
decide it they ,i- .
overtime.
CA

begin to realize that c ,st ol Ih;:
adjustments must be paid.'
Teachers in Kenl ,sha.i \,is, ',lih
have been striking f..r eight di%-.
idling 2,00" pupils. were rdoi, L!r
into court Frida ailternomi tor
show-cause hearing.


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NIXON COMMITTEE WANTS WATERGATE HEARINGS STOPPEEtank cannon fire and
tWASHINGTON (AP) The committee for fairness to the presidency force fighters strafed
-riday asked a federal judge to bar resumption of the Senate's public building at the high
Watergate hearings. assault. Small arms
The Rhode Island-based group, which claims 40,000 members, also asault Small arms
asked the court to revoke the Watergate Committee's authority to intense and "deafe
investigate the wiretapping scandal, times."
The committee said the Senate hearings have been disrupting American BURNING FLEL
life by deliberately undermining public confidence in the Nixon "The smell of eplo
administration, the Justice Department and the courts. "e smell of explo
The group's suit also said the hearings don't have a proper legislative oil and burning flesh
purpose. It said the Senateis is improperly usurping the constitutional our office" on the 11
prerogative of the House to begin impeachment proceedings, of a nearby building,
The suit also contended that barring further public hearings would a nearly c ing,
expedite the work of the committee and reduce costs to the taxpayers "by his dispatch.
eliminating repetitive and histrionic questioning." The suit asked for a It was dated Frid
preliminary injunction on the grounds that the matter could not be finally Morning Star said
decided before the hearings are scheduled to resume Sept. 24. control of telecommu
'NOTHING'TO HAITIAN INVASION REPORT had prevented Timo
PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI (AP)- Haitian information minister Paul filing his report earlier
Blancet insisted friday there is "nothing nothing" to reports of an armed presidentt Allend
guerrilla invasion of Haiti's north coast. resident Allend
Blanchet mentioned "smugglers" in an interview, indicating that Haitian defending the Gov
troops mistook a contraband operation for an invasion landing. Palace and his convict
He did not give details of the alleged smuggler operation but said the demanding guarantees
government would issue a communique later to clarif' the affair.ilan
Meanwhile, all national flights within Haiti remained cancelled. The ban Chilean working clas:
was decreed last Tuesday. a day after the reported invasion of Haitian face of the Fascist
exiles took place' at Mole St. Nicole in the northwest corner of Haiti. coup," the newsman
U.K. CHILEAN AMBASSADOR DISMISSED He said ie called th
LONDON (AP)- Chile's ambassador in London, Alvaro Bunster, said by telephone at 9.15
today he had beer dismissed from his post by the new military regime in soon after the Mone
his country. s a e one
He said the embassy had been taken over by Rear Admiral Oscar BuLeia, under siege by coup
the naval attache. He said he discovered this when he telephoned the One of Allende's advi
embassy this afternoon. him: "You say that
"I was told by my secretary that Admiral Buzeta had taken over the right here. That we w
building and had said that he was the boss," he said. rig here. at we
SKYLAB 2 MEN AHEAD OF WORK SCHEDULE to the en d. minutes
SPACI. C'ENTI R, HOUSTON (AP) The Skylab 2 astronauts complete Fifteen minutes
their seventh week in space early Saturday and officials said they already contact with the res
have accomplished more experiments than were planned for the entire world was cut off w
59-day mission, telecommunications ce
Astronauts Alan L. Bean, Jack R. Lousma and Dr. Owen K. Garriott occupied by army
start their eighth week in space at 6:11 a.m. EST Saturday. Timossi re ported.
Officials said they have performed already many more hours of
experiment work than was expected of them for the whole mission in solar GIVEN 3 MINUT
studies, medical tests and secondary experiments. Timossi said tht
With 10 days left in the flight, they still have about two hours of Earth Leaders issued an ultim
resources photography to complete to measure up to the pre-mission plans. Allende t
Scientists are delighted with the accomplishments so far. particularly the Allende to surrender
harvest of unique photographs of the Sun. They gave him three
Bean, Garriott and Lousma have made telescope photographs of two to give up.
major solar tlares, or explosions on the Sun, collecting views that scientists "But the Presidei
say have never before been seen.
A.G. WILL OPEN UP AGNEW INVESTIGATION again declared he wc
WASHINGTON (AP) Sources in Washington say Attorney General surrender and he would
Elliott Richardson will let a federal grand jury consider material from an in the Palace," he repo
investigation of Vice-President Agnew. But the sources say Richardson still After that, Timor
has not decided on whether to seek an indictment. coup forces bombar
The Vice-PResident has described as lies allegations that he took palace with "all k
kickbacks for awarding contracts while he was Baltimore County executive
and later when he was Governor of Maryland. weapons, from rocket
Yesterday Agnew's successor as County executive Dale Anderson mm shells to the artil
pleaded innocent in Baltimore to charges of bribery, extortion and sherman tank, pl
conspiracy. Anderson. a Democrat, was the first Maryland official to be arutmatir weanr
;--o.-Ac we 1on-s.-


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II-


Saturday, September 15, 1973.


h Gribtunt
NuLLruS ADDCTrus JURARE IN VERBA MAGIST-u
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LION f I)t'PI'('CH, Publisher/Editor 1 03 1914
SIR Fill NNE I 'UP'iCH.O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Publisher/Editor 191 7.1972
Contributing Editor 1972 -
LILFFN I)U'i tCARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B..
Publisher/Editor 1972 -
Saturday, September 15, 1973.


By ETII \\I DUPUCH
A IFRII \il uf mine S.i,,L- .1, to me the other day that I
should write ., iig0 ....... l about the government for a change.
1 told him that I would like to find something good to say
about the government but that I could not think of anything I
could say that would be the truth. I asked him to suggest a
subject.
lie pointed out the work they are doing in education and asked
me if I didn't consider this worthy of praise.
I agreed that il should be but I pointed out education
could be a dangerous instrument if it is not directed towards a
definite purpose.
When a child comes out of school he should be assured of a job
in which he can use his training. Otherwise the government
succeeds only in creating a frustrated citizen....and, if there are
,nough of them. they usually become a menace to the established
social structure.
What they are doing in education would be praiseworthy in an
expanding econolu\ but. while expanding education with one
hand. government policy has been responsbile for not only
checking the expansion but also of turning back the growth that
already existed when they took over the reins of government over
six years ag-. du i .'.. destroying the jobs that might be waiting
for the thousands o" children who are coming out of schools
every year in the Bahamas.
Maybe you haven't noticed this but the prosperity the islands
have enjoyed have given our young people the leisure and the
spirit to be very productive with the result that there are more
children of school age in the islands today than adults.
And so the government should have been encouraging the
growth and expansion of the economy to absorb the youth of the
islands. Instead they have undermined the economy and
consequently dwarfed a business movement that gave promise of
becoming a powerful giant.


It is really extraordinary how foolish the men in a. ri-n.'5 ntt
have been. It is difficult to understand how men, who claim to be
:nitll.-hc. because they are supposed to be educated. could allow
their eco to become so ,,ial...i that they lose all contact with
ordinary conmion sense. It is clear that education does not
I,, '. ., i give men intelligence.
The result today is that labour is restless on all
fr.,nt'- ..'p'.,, ill in the public service.

The government encouraged labour to show its fangs while
they were in the Opposition. They used mass hysteria to destroy
the old government that had provided them with full
:mpi. ,i iv and the security they had enjoyed for nearly half a
cent uii .
They ip.ir.. iil. expected labour to crawl back in their shells
and be docile boy s when the political mission, on which they
spurred them. had been accomplished.
Because ihey have continued to use their new-found strength
for their own advantage the government has been using such
barsh measures against them that at die Labour Day rally it was
declared that they, were better off under the former white
government than the present black government.
And. of course, labour was shocked when Minister of Finance
Arthur Hanna publicly declared that the government could not
S....irt a policy for increasing wages because they were the
largest employer of labour in dithe nation ... and they couldn't
afford it because their payroll was already $50 million, about half
:he total annual revenue of the country!

The position is difficult. The Government promised the people
to taxation and lower prices. Instead, they have had higher taxes
inflicted on them and this has contributed greatly to the steadily
rising cost of living.
Such a situation would normally call for an increased wage
scale. But because of government policy the economy is steadily
shrinking and, as a result, both ., ,'.. rirnint revenue and business
turn ovci have been ad.lm'r., I., affected. Revenue is falling. And
most businesses are experiencing a serious slump in trade.
This -means that. even though the cost of living may be rising,
businesses will find it difficult to increase wages in a shrinking
economy .

This i ,a legitimate argument which could be put to labour by
governtilnt at a time like this....and they might be prepared to
listen.
But hfi'v can government put an argument like this to laboum
when their new political leaders ... in the short period of six
years... have moved from modest living up to millionaire row and
are now living like bloated plutocrats.

We all lknow that when some of these men were first elected to
the House of Assembly they couldn't pay their house rent. They
were really down on their shins.

The first thing they did was to vote themselves big salaries. But
even though these salaries are bloated....and outrageous when it is
remembered that up to the time they got control of the Public
Treasury public men gave their services free ....still there is a limit
to what even their bloated salaries could do for them
But what answer can members of government give labour when
they say that it the politicians can afford to buy half million
dollar houses, drive around in Rolls Royce cars, with a string of
other expensive cars in their garages, and live generally like
millionaires, there must be a lot of money kicking around and
they want a slice of the pie.
This is a normal reaction to the indiscreet display of affluence
that these formerly poor men have allowed themselves to develop
in the positions of power which they have enjoyed because the
votes of a trusting people skyrocketed them from obscurity to
the seats of influence they have enjoyed tor only a comparatively
short time.


** ** ** * ** ** ** *


The terrible thing about the choice made by the people is that
not a single man in government today can point to a single
achievement on his own merit before being elected to parliament.
This is not an achievement. It is merely the result of the whim of
an unthinking people who allowed themselves to be brain washed
with an unhealthy propaganda by their own selfish, self-seeking
people.
.*****************
A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
In baiting a mouse trap with cheese, always leave room for the
nouse:- "SAKI" (Hector Hugh Munro)


For Mr. Outte


THE GO\ i RM\ll \T will very likely move quickly io
make Mr. Sinclair Outten a Bahamian citizen which,. I
course, is exactly as it should be. Mr. Outten was elected iti
the House of Assembly. app.ai n.ii iL '.iuC ir. iii.'' .
the lawyers on both sides of the political fence are ibui
looking into the :.m1iiicafi.Ii, ,is of this unusual case
Apart from the legal determination as to who is enli ied
to the seat in the liouse for St. Barnabas there is a broader
question involved. Mr. Outten happens to be a menlcm r 0l
the ruling party and he also happens to be 'v., I known and
widely respected in all segments of Bahaniain society
Nobody in any of the political camps will object to hIi'
being made legally what he always was in spirit.
But just suppose thdie shoe was on the other foot.
Suppose Mr. Outten was a member of the Free National
Movement rather than a member of the Progressive Liberal
Party. Would there have been such unanimity'" Or would
the PLP Government have pounced upon him. ridiculed
him and kicked himn out of the country?
It would have been nice if in this independent
parliamentary democracy such a question could have been
dismissed with scorn. But it cannot. If Mr. Outte n were a
member of another party he would have been om the next
plane out since the PLP Government have demotstiated
hIow uncivilized and tyrannical they can be in dealing with
people who are not in their camp.
So far as they are concerned the flag of the Bahamas
might just as well be the flag of the PLP since it does not
stand for those things which a national flag should stand
for under their administration.
It u may be argued that not all members of the PLP are
dictatorial and cruel but it is what comes out at the end ,tO
the pipe that must be judged.
Mr. George A. Smith, Parliamentary Secretary to the
Prime Minister, can make glowing statements about
freedom and all that. tle can talk about how everybody has
the right and thIe duty to criticize without being regarded
as a traitor but if he is speaking for his Governiiment then all
of that can be interpreted as cynical sarcasm or diabolical
trickery.
Ins other words, let a thousand flowers bloom s,, th:i
they can find them and stomnp them back into the '
Like Mr. Sinclair Outten there are other people front
Turks Island living in the Bahamas who feel exactly like
him. They love the Bahamas. The Bahamas is their home.
They want to stay here. They have Bahanitan t chiiiren
They are good citizens.
But not even God will help them, if the altitude of Ilis
representatives in lthe Bahamas truly reflects I is own
attitude, if they happen to be suspected ofbeinig an, tiliing


but PLP. Their vulnerability

'WE MUST EVOLVE

TO MEET NEEDS

OF OUR NATIONS'

C 0 M M 0 N W A LT I I
parliaments "must evolve to
meet the needs of our
countries and to bear the
responsibilities that challenge
us in this age," British Foreign
Secretary Sir Alec
Dougtas-l ome declared at
Wednesday's opening of the
SCommonwealth Parliamentary
Association conference in
London's Westminster Hall.
Addressing delegates from
I the parliaments of 94
S('o min on wealth nations
includincluing te Bahamas Sir Alec
said:
"Miemorials of the past
surround us in this hall and
throughout the palace of
Westminster. They serve to
remind us of the continuity of
Sthe democratic tradition in this
country.
"But it is not a static
tradition. We are not shackled
by the outlook and practise of
past generations. Indeed, if
there is at Westminster a
tradition it is one of orderly
change.
"Parliament is the sovereign
institution in this as in all the
countries of the
I. .. ,n,.., iltl represented at
'this conference. It is central in
our way of life. But it is
important to bear in mind that
it can never stand still,' he
said.
"Parliament must," the
IForeign Secretary continued,
"keep every aspect of its
working methods under review.
iAt the same time it is in the
nature of our parliamentary
institutions that they are not
reformed or changed by
decree, but evolve through
discussion. In this process we
iall benefit from the advice and
guidance of the learned clerks
of our parliaments who also
contribute greatly to the work
of our Association."
Sir Alec said the purposes of
the 62-year-old CPA were
two-fold: to "strengthen the
sense of community which we
have in the Commonwealth"
and to "strengthen our
parliamentary institutions
through exchanges of
information, the pooling of
experience and the holding of
seminars on parliamentary
practise and procedure."
Representing the Bahamas at
the two-week conference are
lHealth Minister A. Loftus
Roker, (PLP-Nicolls Town),
Kendal Nottage (PLP-Grand
Bahama) and Cyril Fountain
iF N M-North Long Island).


PUBLIC HOLIDAY
OCTOBER 12
FRIDAY, October 12 has
been designated as Discovery
Day and will be observed as a
public holiday, it was
announced today by the
Cabinet Office.


justice or patronage?


b :h '.!u 1 .Hid senseless Government ,,., has been
J i .. .. number of Turks Islanders at Inaguia.
'M; .: "g't justice but he will always have to ask
hI : ; justice or political patronage which
" ii i- citizenship. lie wi" have to ask and
anst i hone '..';, what would have happened to him if he


t 5.


y will be exploited to the hmit





Europe will help Commonwealth, CPA told


i \FIl iv Britain is
determined to .'smire nIt the
F Uropean co//ii ais with
helpfulness .aul inldtstrI
towards the Co('nmmonwealth,
said British t'nre Minister Mr.
Fdw'r-d lHeath WeVdnesdai
British membership of the
European comnlin1l y is
m major t.1'r I Ig point ,f the I '1th
annual conference of thte
Coninmi wealth Parliamentar.
Association which was opened
by the Queen Wednesday. aind
the Prime Minister emphasized
that while Britain wa vis pledgeiL
to its new role illn urope it was,
equally determined to lii ititiA!'
its role in the ('Commoniets' .ilth
Some 212 deiIegate
observ'c from o('lln otiwealth
national, state and prove incitl
parliaments attended the
opening ceremonyy oi the
co/i1 fercice iii tIIhe historic
Westminster Hall. London, the
oldest surviving building of the
ancient palace of W stiiiiin-. r
birthplace of British
parliamentary democracy.
Underlining his personal
interest in the Commonwealth,
Mr. Ileath recalled his
attendance 20 years ago at the
CPA conference in Nairobi and
said it made an "'untrlfri iL,0
impact' on his minnd. 'The
present conference would offer
fruitful deliberations.
"When we discuss political
questions we shall seek to
achieve understanding.," he
said. "()n economic matters wve
Commonwealth

strengths noted
T'lE I9 th conference not ti
Con mnonwealth irlat.ilnient.irt'
Association came at .a proptilonls
time for Commonwealth exchiange
and when the potential ltor
comrnonweilth consul tio dnit a
cooperation was conmiJd,rable. s.id
M r r n o d Sin i t h
Secretary -(;eneral iif thi
Commons alth Secret.ri.it l rid.,v
Addres'smig conference dle' degitam.
at Church House. Westminster.
London, Mr. Smith spoke of the
recent meeting in Ottawa )I
C o 'inmotniNea Ixth Ileads iof
government is "one of the mos,:
significant t and fruitful ftr Intall\
years". It had ended on a confident
and positive note.
Commonwealth politicians, aidt
Mr. Smith, would welcome the
benefits of international detente to
thile extent that they 'oul
contribute to global |isiace and
security .
"But." he added, all of vou ill
be uneasily tht adferetif re,
between the super po%, ers settledl
over the heads of the less psierful
could turn out to iu |
disadvantageous to the latter "
Neither did East West detente make
the most powerful countries in the
world more aware of the needs and
difficulties of the less privileged.
Mr. Smith went on: "EverybodN
recognizes that some countries are
richer and more powerful than
others Indeed the fact that the
Commonwealth provides ati
opportunity for the poor toI
influence the rich is one if its
strengths. But differences in the
wealth and power do not prevent
the Commonwealth from being an
association of equals."


we discuss political questions
we shall seek to achieve
understandingg" he said. "On
economic matters we hope to


"It is said that the head of state attends to endless
ceremonial affairs, allowing the head of government more
time to deal with more important matters. But Richard
i .. 'i is head of state and head of government of the most
powerful nation in the world, and he seems to be able to
get all his work done."
The Guardian failed to draw what is perhaps the most
convincing argument for the preservation of the distinction
between head of state and head of government when it
mentioned Richard Nixon's presidency.
The American people are going through a painful trauma
today "-,:..i,..1. because of the fact that the head of state
and the head of government are one and the same. If Mr.
Nixon was Prime Minister of Great Britain and Watergate
had happened he would have gone in a week.
But in the Inited States you just do not get rid of a
President like that. Even politicians opposed to a President
would mention impeachment only after serious
consideration and for the most serious reasons.
This is a flaw in the American system. As a result an
entire administration can flounder for years and national
morale can be shattered in the process when a president is
so weakened by scandal or maladministration.
The British had the same problem centuries ago when
the sovereign was head of state and head of government as
well. Somine u'jc.-_. were beheaded for criticizing the king
and somine royal heads rolled as well.
Now, regardless of one's attitude towards hereditary
privilege, it must be admitted that the monarchy as it has
evolved is a great thing for the British. Prime Ministers
come and go and even a socialist revolution was carried out
under the nli' i,,.-' symbol of the British Crown.
Here is the Bahamas we might not need a colonial style
governor general but we certainly need a head of state as a
symbol of national unity. What we call him, and his official
1.l, is something which is not fundamentally important.
Fortunately, even with his background of intense
political partisanship, it appears that the present holder of
the office of Governor General, Sir Milo B. Butler, fully
intends to play his role with distinction and with that the
best wishes of all the Bahamian people go with him.





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trI + 1' N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas, You may enter
0 more than one group of photos, as long asn
,. you use official Tribune blanks and groups

SEShould you miss an edition of Th tribune
with a Pan Am photo ad, back copies canbe

I .. iThe Tribune E,,loing. Shirley Street,
Nassau, or The Tribune office, 9B1Kipling



All entries must be postmarked no later than



their advertising agencies, are not eligible to
--m-enter.
Photo No. 10

f I City r Sce-e.. ...... ..... Country ...................................


My Na/cme,


Contest ends Saturday, Nov. 17th


...................... Address . . . . . . . . . . ..... Phone .........


Wi nne r a ,,e andl"p I.., fin-.o
to any one of the following 26 European
Citiet erved by Pan Am.


Where in the world within Pan Am's travel system,
are the places pictured above? Identify all 30 AMSTERDAM MADRID
photographs that will appear on various days in BARCELONA MUNICH
The Tribune over the next 13 weeks and you have BERLIN NUREMBERG 1
BRUSSELS OSLO I
a chance to win a round-trip for two aboard a Pan COPENHAGEN PARIS
American World Airways' jet to your choice of any DUSSELDORF PRAGUE
FRANKFORT ROME
one of 26 European cities served by Pan Am. GLASGOW SHANNON
; HAMBURG STOCKHOLM
SHANOVER STUTTGART
S LISBON VIENNA
je rib3uneLONDON WARSAW
L +::. . :: :.:.::. : . ... ". . . :


Ihope to i'ci- agreel'c.elt on ,i
,,,is t .o:e i .'- .i, to bt o'


hi : :: ::. with his nine children and a wife
v ik .' Smith

The Head of State
Ab u .t'1 7 Il ei Nassau Guardian, in an
,'ditonal. b~ i ,t :!c;i questi-un of the Governor General
.itd i '': t bi th 'ides of the issue, if it is an
ssue
ThPi. ;:::. :t ,ieJ for preserving a sense ol
onti, '. t' .; uii ti'n.al development was brought
out and 'hi ::. i 'I ;.,: i ed:


,hr Oribuur










Saturday, September 15, 1973.


\ l' f


DMr 1I1i 1 DIDLr.
CHURCH
Soldier Road & Old Trail
J()IN IHl CROWD ON SUNDAY.
\\ I CITING TIMI- AWAITS YOL'
Sunday School 10 a.m. -
Preaching 1 1 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday: Prayer Hour 7:30- -
Friday: Youth Meeting 7:30 Pastor -H. MILLS
Phone 5-1339 -
S RI DIFFERENCE P Box N3622

l Nassau Christian and Missionary
lII ALLIANCE CHURCH
Temporarily Meeting At Y.W.C.A. Building
I i I Dolphin Drive at John F. Kennedy Drive.
lU Rev. Weldon B. Blackford, Minister

Wcrshio Hour 11 a.m. Gospel Hour 7:30 p.m.
!1! 1 ING (GUlEStIS \ ILL iBE PRO 'IDED I KFE TRANSPORTATION
H' CALLING (THOMPSON'S) 2-8241.
A FRIENDLY WELCOME AWAITS ALL WHO COME(





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AQU


2 MINISTRY OF

WORKS STAFF TO

STUDY IN GUYANI
fWO MINISTRY OF WORKS
personnel left for Guyana
this week where they will
take a three-year land
surveying course at the
Technical Institute there.
Fhe two are Godfrey Hu,-"
who has been employed Ior
the past six years in the
Survey Section under the
direction of Mr. M. K.
Shaheed, Senior Surveyor.
and Daniel Wilkinson w ho
has been an employee for
three years as a trainee in
the Land Surveying Section
Mr. Wilkinson received an
"in-service" training award
and Mr. Humes is studying
under a Government
scholarship from the
Ministry of Education and
Culture.
The lion. Simneon Bowe,
Minister of Works, said that
he is pleased to note that
these are the first Bahamians
to be sent overseas on
G( over n me nt-sponsored
fulltime courses in land
surveying and especially just
after Independence.
lHe expressed hope that their
performance will be such
that it would inspire and
encourage others to enter
the field of land survey
and to seek professional
qualifications.
The Minister told both
recipients that they should
consider themselves very
fortunate to be given this
opportunity and that they
owc this to the citizens of
the Bahamas and he is
sure that when they return
fully qualified, the citizens
of the Bahamas will be
happy and their
performances should be able
to attract other Bahamians
into the Land Surveying
profession.
lie further said that this is in
.,.I. ine with the Ministry of
Works and the Government's
policy to train Bahamians to
hold their place in
Government service.
They have taken along with
them the new flag of the
Bahamas which they will
present to the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs in Guyana.


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R------ X


THE TWO MINISTRY OF WORKS PEPSiiNMEL who left this week for Guyana to
take a three-year land surveying course are pictuiid ihove before their departure. From
left to right: Mr. M. K. Shaheed, Senior Surveyor H;n. Sinwon Bowe, Minister of Works;
Mr. Daniel F. Wilkinson and Mr. Godfrey Huni t, ei<: Miss L. Knowles and Mr. L.
Ifill, of Personnel.


PROHIBITED AREAS FOR


PIGEON SHOOTING LISTED


AREAS where shooting of
wild pigeons is prohibited has
been brought to the attention
of the public before the season
opens on October I by the
Ministry of Agriculture and
Fisheries.
Areas listed are:
NEW PROVIDENCE:
Waterloo, Adelaide Creek, an
area bounded on the north by
West Bay Street, to the I ast bh
Prospect Road, to the South
by John F. Kennedy Drive and
to the West bv Blake Road and
Goulding Cay.
At Andros4 Joulter Cays.
High Cay, Little Green Cay,
Grassy Creek Cays, cays in the
vicinity of Washerwoman's Ciut
including Dolly Cay, Sister
Rocks and Pigeon Cay, and Big
(;reen Cay.
At Exuma Big Galliot Cay,
Big Darby Island and little
Darby Island and the cays in
that vicinity, Pigeon Cay.
Cistern Cay, the Channel Cays.
Flat Cay, Harvey Cay, the rock
off Hog Cay and the lExuima
Cays Land and Sea Park.
Leaf Cay near Normans
Pond Cay, Peterson Cay on the


southern i'.4
Baham a ; oi!il i
Cav in Ihe e! r
Bottle (.\ :.
t h e I ,i .u p '

I ta t
( li1 -. s [ .1'.
Island .
S l a tl t :, i
tlite e s', '


COP RF

.\ id :: -

Or .t.K ,
nil .


Fistin


EASY JOHNNIE WALKER! That vi-. t Lo.,d
(Blinks) Johnson seems to be saying as J. e ,'.i
pours him a hearty drink of his finch y ovt. i ihi a.hove
picture was taken at the Zanzibar Club du' a . duprise
visit by Johnnie Walker. Has he visited your -,., ite bar
yet? Watch for Johnnie Walker ... he v 'e at your
"hang-out" next.


BISHOP ELDON
AT CONFERENCE
THE RT. REV. Michael
I kdon. Bishop of Nassau and
'he Bahamas, is attending the
n.l conference of the
iinglican Churches of North
\nerica and the Caribbean in
lIornnto. Canada. At this
Snterence matters regarding
churches in these areas, which
-...ud 1 of mutual benefit to
Il will be discussed. Bishop
I ldon will return to Nassau
tomorrow to be chief celebrant
, i mass at Holy Cross Parish


HOLY CROSS CHURCH
PATRONAL FESTIVAL
1Ilie PARISH of Holy Cross.
'I thburi Park, celebrated its
; i' on a 1 festival, the
h.llation of the Holy Cross,
Friday. I lie preacher was
Rev LIouis DI)ames.
lhe preacher at the Family
; \., .t i) a.m. tomorrow will
Rex Peter Mullings of the
I ese of Jamaica.
At 4 p.m. tomorrow there
l e i concelebrated Mass
k lth Bishop Michael Fldon the
i' pal celebrant The
S re richer at this service will be
tih VenerableI Foster Pestaina,
\TJhdeaie f,:(I Grand Bahama
..J the trnner rector of the


LADY BUTLER TO
OPEN CHURCH FAIR
I \WY B I'LFR will open
-H th. luiy Cross Parish fair to be
h.li.l o; i Friday, September 28.
VI h fair will start at 3 p.m.
S.ith the usual attractions. The
. irnial opening will take place
S' 5 .m. lThe fair will be held
I th ie parish grounds in
Iligtbtbrs Park, just off Soldier
R,,"ad.


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Saturday, September 15, 1973.

PanAm prices to Europe are down!


THE COST ot flying to
Europe came down September
1, marking one of the few
instances of price decreases
experienced by the American
consumer all year, Pan
American World Airways
announced.
At the sam time, the
autumn season is an ideal time
to visit the continent and has
long been preferred by veteran
travellers because most of the
tourists have gone and the
natives have returned. As M. J.
Gurney, Pan Amn's Bahamas
Managing Director notes,
"Europe becomes Europe
again. The climate is pleasant,
similar to that of the northeast


United States, and it's even
warmer along the
Mediterranean."
The reduction in air fares
effective September 1 offers
savings of up to 23 in
comparison with summer fares,
according to Mr. Gurney. For
example, the 22-45 day
excursion fare from New York
to Rome drops to $344 from
$411. The 22-day fare from
New York to London falls to
$255 from S332, as do the
rates from New York to
Lisbon.
In many cases, the price of
land packages offered in
conjunction with the tour fares
also came down September I,
providing an even greater
bargain. A full list of "End of
Summer Values" is available in
the latest edition of Pan Am's
World Europe '73/'74 tour
book.


Complete information on
autumn tours and fares to
Europe is available at Pan Am
travel agents and at Pan Am
sales offices in Nassau,
Freeport and Rock Sound.
HAIR AT SCHOOL
CROPS UP IN U.K.
LONDON (AP) Schools
reopened in Britain Tuesday and up
cropped the annual argument about
schoolkids' hair.
Andrew llerp, 14, turned up for
lessons with his hair in scarlet
spikes in the style of pop idol Davee
Howie.
lie was promptly sent home and
told to stay there until his hair gets
back to its normal blond.
Valeri Crawford, 15, was
similarly banned from school in
Bournemouth for sporting yellow
and blue streaks. This too was
apparently inspired by Bowie.
Both kids had the backing of
their parents.
Valerie's mother, Mrs.
Margaret (rawford said: "I
thoroughly approve of her hair.


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By Abigail Van Buren
1 t973 by Chitca TribneW-N. Y. NewI S$yd., InC.
DEAR ABBY: I am absolutely terrified of going to a
dentist. I know I need some work done, but I can't get up
the nerve to go. The only times I've ever gone to a dentist
were when the pain got so bad I couldn't stand it any more.
I have made and broken so many appointments I am
ashamed to make another one, but Abby, I've got to get my
teeth taken care of.
I heard that it's possible to put a patient to sleep before
doing any work on him. Could you please find out if there
is a dentist near me who does this? I live in Beaver Dam,
Wis., but I'd drive 100 miles if I could find a dentist who
wouldn't hurt me.
Please, don't tell me to "grow up." I am a married
woman with two small children who I'd have to take to the
dentist with me, and I'm so afraid my fear will show, and
rub off on them, too. Help me.
TERRIFIED IN WISCONSIN
DEAR TERRIFIED: I consulted an excellent Minneap-
olis dentist, Dr. William B. Nienaber, who suggests that
you contact your State Dental Society in Madison. Ask
them to recommend one or more dentists who use the
"relative analgesia" method of sedating fearful patients
with nitrous oxide and oxygen to reduce their fears.
You are to be commended for your concern about pass-
ing on your fears to your children. Not all parents are so
wise and thoughtful.

DEAR ABBY: Several of us have been having an argu-
ment which we hope you can settle. Which musical instru-
ment most closely resembles the human voice?
Some say the wind instruments. I say the strings. Will
you please ask some of your experts? Thanks.
STILL ARGUING
DEAR STILL: If anyone is an authority on music and
sound, it's the one and only Herb Alpert. He says, "The
cello-in the hands of the right artist."
Another music master, Lawrence Welk, says, "For the
female human voice, it's the violin. For the male, the
cello."
Ernest Fleischmann, executive director of the Philhar-
monic, Hollywood Bowl: "The string instruments, of
course."
The lone dissenter, Doc Severinsen, replied, "There can
be only one answer. The trumpet!!"
It looks like the strings have it.

DEAR ABBY: Being a quiet, shy person, I am in
somewhat of a quandary about a situation that has arisen
where I work.
A divorced man, with whom I have hard y spoken,
keeps sending me flowers [at the office] without signing the
card.
I know he is the sender because I've checked with the
florist. How can I get it across to this man that his atten-
tions are neither wanted nor welcome? I have even told the
florist that I do not want any more flowers from that party,
and to please send them to one of the hospitals. But still
the flowers come!
The situation has gotten entirely out of hand, and I'm


BILL TO LIFT NFL
-TV BLACKOUTS
WASHINGTON (AP)- President
Nixon is expected to sign a bill to
lift television blackouts of sold-out
home football games today. But
even if Nixon fails to sign the bill
today, a number of cities
apparently will be able to watch
National Football League season
openers Sunday.


'Pained' mother seeks


a 'painless' dentist


tired of it.
I would appreciate your advice


DEAR UNAVAILABLE: If you want to nip the situation
in the bud, tell the sender exactly how you feel. Don't
blame the florist. He can't send flowers "to a hospital"
when he's been instructed by the buyer to deliver them to
you. What you do with them after they're delivered is your
business. [P.S. The sender must be an idiot. Send him a
bachelor button!.I
DEAR ABBY: You ask senior citizens to tell you their
troubles. Money? It's not stretching as far as it used to.
Health? Even machines wear out. I live alone and make the
best of it. Boredom? Not really. I sew, play cards, work
crossword puzzles, watch TV, read a lot, and love to write
letters. I also do my own housekeeping and take the bus to
go places I am only 82. I am also your late mother's
cousin. BERTHA RUSHALL MACFARLAND
DEAR ABBY I'm an "older woman" who stands 5
feet 8 inches tall, and I cannot find a dress to cover my
knees! C. P. IN ILLINOIS


DEAR ABBY: I'm
my biggest problem
mattress.


a 78-year-old lady, living alone. And
is finding someone to turn my
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PIGEON TALK
LNI)LR the sponsorship of
the Bahamas National Trust,
Mr. Richard T. Paul, Assistant
Research Director of the
National Audubon Society of
the United States of America,
will give a talk and have public
discussion on the White-
Crowned Pigeon at the
Bahamas Teachers' College on
Friday. September 21 at 8 p.m.
Mr. Paul is an authority on
the White-Crowned Pigeon
and will be remembered by
many for his very interesting
and informative talk on this
bird at the 1973 Flamingo Day
programme.
The White-Crowned Pigeon,
which is protected under the
Wild Birds Protection Act, is
threatened with extinction.
Studies are presently being
conducted on this bird and
during his talk, Mr. Paul will
outline what action is being
taken to preserve this pigeon
and the part the public and
particularly hunters, can play
in this exercise of protecting
this bird from extinction.


WW4

DAY SESSION
AL AND PAN AM

0 P.M.

it from a
Buffet Lunch
plus gratuities
alf price.


See a Travelogue of NEW HORIZONS TURKEY
Compliments of Pan American
beginning at 12:00 Noon.
"THE IGNITERS" STEEL BAND
plays all afternoon!


SPan Am
& r Ho" on

Baomorat Beach HoteL

Invite you to loathing Ipcdol Today


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WULFF ROAD
NOW SHOWING THRU
TUEDSAY, "The Getawav"
plus "Sam Whiskey" matinee
continuous from 1.30.
evening 8.30 Sundays
showings continuous from
4.00. Suggested for mature
audiences, parental discretion
is advised.
STARTS WEDNESDAY,
"Santee" plus "Fuss"
matinee continuous from
2.15, evening 8.30 p.m.
Suggested for mature
audiences, parental discretion
is advised.
Santee stars Glenn I ord,
Michael Burns, and D)anai
Winter in a highly drarnatkc
out t -door spectae I wiih
revenge as its ke -note and love
and courage as its heart
The film in mnagni!'cnt
colour has scceep antd -: oc
and is outstanding in its naitilr,
beauty caught brilhantl\ byl
Don Morgan's Imnematogia-
phy. Santee is aI griplpine
stori that holds :ai l i.i. en
from beginning to end I
addition to its Visuai'i l he'ii ,
Santee is a stor, j bId.l
powAerful and dcield'dk
off-heat. there is a basi d .
rollicking 'esern l[() \I.% h itIt
assort en't of saddle ItraI.1I",
and girl tramnps lined up in the
local bars and brothels. On the
cleaner side there is the vital.
earthly love between Santee
and his beautiful \wile, Valerie
A constant thread of inenace
%weaves back and forth in the
story: why does the older man
teach the younger all his guni
tricks when he kno, s the ho,
has vowed to kill hii '
The movie \\ias i eIc
entirely on location in and


THEATRE
alIoind Santa Fe. New Mexico,
Stie Puye Indian Reservation
near world-famed Pyue Clift
licllings at Pin-dee Pond,
pi, ni eLtue little lake
sul rounded hb towering pines,
iMnisiCed spectacular sites.
tiars Nelson directed Tom
B la k b urn's first rate
sceen p'lia based on an
ir' story by Brand Bell.
1 I' Platt and Deno Paoli
produced the Vagabond
l''ductnon which Crown
l'ternatio1rial is releasing.

i ln lHunter, an extremely
pr i i c author and
screen -t i iter, has written
twientc t-l 'r novels under his
pen na'ie oI I d McBain about
the escapa,.des of the 87th
Precinit in Boston.
\o\\ "'1 ui/' one of the
IC-l. I.'ev'nti novels from the
S th i 'liieint series, has been
I Imad' into a miiajor motion
I l tuiIr starring Burt Reynolds.
a,-k \\ ,,siti, oti Skerritt.
R il tic! \ elch and Yul Br\nner
a- "'lih Deaf Man." It is a
tilm ia\s Javelin Production
tir release by I' united Artists,
it eniteltaiim ent service of
I ran, \ienrica corporation .
I he \laitin Ransohoff
PFr. diluction spent a week
iinulll in the Bouston area.
A.\lon', lie ltc' tions were: the
Bost i ( uni'ion and the
'Puli,. (arden,. I rinit\y Church,
Aqunaic. I aneuil HIall. 'Copps
hill Burn ine aroundnd, a Precint
Stattion in Citi Square. a pool
hIll n Bo,\,lston Street, a
I Li. .1:,ni kct Square and the
lioston elected i line. There
thi arIe tc all Iwho have
lM sit ed lostonl
1 I cli, m :an\ action
sei ii lu. es in tie tilloviec
st Ia k c, s, shoot wings, a
i l btng it nd in cendiar\ scene,
several chases,. r bbery, car
crashes aniiid a mulLrder or two
thrown iln for cod measure.


SHIRLEY STREET THEATRE


NOW SHOWING THRU
THURSDAY, "The
Mackintosh Man' matinees at
3.00 and 5.00, evening 9.00.
Suggested for mature
audiences, parental discretion
is advised.
Starts Friday, "Enter the
Dragon" matinees at 3.00 and
5.00 p.m., evening 9.00. No
one under 17 will be
admitted.
Two leading American
moviemakers, China's most
popular action star and a
popular American film and
television star have come
together in Hong Kong
bringing a fresh look to those
rearingly successful films about
the martial arts. The American
producers are Fred Weintraub
and Paul Mr. Heller. The stars
are the late Bruse Lee and John
Saxon.
The explosive drama of


today's martial arts is "Enter
the Dragon,' by Warner Bros.
An exciting adventure story
about a trio of secret agents
who invade a sinister island
fortress, the film was filmed in
technicolour and panavision.
It also features Jim Kelly. A
very rugged and bright young
black who comes from
Kentucky, Jim has done more
than well at karate. He won the
middleweight championship in
1971 and he is one of the
leading instructors of that art
in Los Angeles.
Actor Bruce Lee stars as a
secret agent with John Saxon
Ahna Capri and Kim Kelly.
He was a major factor in the
international success earned by
martial arts motion pictures.
His uncommon combination of
great physical strength, his fine
looks and real acting style


NOW SHOWING THRU THURSDAY
Matinee 3 & 5, Evening 9 'Phone 2-1004. 2-1005



5 ,C_1

* V








I'( Ik.1 KLTI

whtmver h is has not what you think.
o P From Warn..er Bro. A Warn.r Comunic.ions Company
G'( h(5. WTI ) F O R VA T7 R l A I -)/ [ AC FS '
PAR:\TA I DISCRI T().\ A1) IS/ D.
Reservations not claimed by 8:45. will be sold
on first come, first served basis.



Now thru Tuesday Sunday thru Tuesday
Matinee starts at 2 30 Continuous Showings
Evening 9 00 from 5:00 I
IA V R Monday Continuous
from 3:00
I FrancoNer "WALKING TALL" R.
PLUS Joe Dan Baker,
*"CHAIN GANG UN-MI \" R Elizabeth Hartman
PLUS
Michael Stearnes *-THE LAWYER" R
Barbara Mills Barry New man











THE GETAWAY" I
Sone 7 ,. Harold GoldStarring
SVPhone-25 cJUIN AIl M acRA W



1 "SAM WHISKEY"I


I BURT R DYNOLIS ANGI I I PICKINSON
SUGGESTED FOR MATURE AUDIENCES.

PARENTAL DISCRETION AD VISED.


made him the top martial arts
film star.
John Saxon, who stars with
Lee, portrays a rugged
American who becomes
Bruce's brother in battle. His
screen credits include the
"Appolosa" and "Joe Kidd."
Ahna Capri, who first gained
fame in Germany as a magazine
model, co-stars as an
international beauty who is the
mistress of a sinister island
fortress. Ahna came to
Hollywood from Europe after
several seasons in the theatre in
New York.
Robert Clouse, who directed
"Enter the Dragon' from a
screenplay by Michael Allin has
earned Academy Award
nominations for two film
shorts which he wrote, directed
and produced "Cadillac" and
"Jimmy Blue Eyes."


SAVOY THAT
SATURDAY NIGHT
THRU TUESDAY, "Jango"
plus "Chain Gang Women"'
Sunday thru Tuesday matinee
continuous from 2.30.
evening 9.00. No one under
17 will be admitted. Plus late
feature Tuesday night.
STARTS WEDNESDAY,
"Lady Sings the Blues." plus
"the Legend of Nigger
Charley." Matinee continuous
from 1:30, evening 9.00. Plus
late feature Friday night.
Film biographies based on
popular people have always
been an exciting form of screen
entertainment, and dozens of
films have been centred on
people who have left their
mark on the world.
The odyssey of Billie
Holiday begins when she is a
teen-age maid in a Baltimore,
brothel enjoying stolen leisure
listening to blues recordings.
"Lady Sings the Blues" is the
life-story of the famed Billie
Holiday who became in her
time a stellar attraction with
music lovers everywhere.
Diana Ross makes her
motion picture debut as the
legendary blues singer in the
paramount pictures release.


ORE
Billie Dee Williams, who was
the recipient of critical raves
for his portrayal of Gayle
Sayers in the television movie,
"Brians Song," co-stars with
Diana Ross in the
Mo town-Weston-Furice
Production filmed in
Panavision.
Diana Ross sings many of
Billie Holiday's most enduring
songs in "Lady Sings the
Blues." She sings a few lines
from "God Ritor th,- rBl "


one of Billie's most achingly
real statements about life,
which Diana explains, was
written when Billie's mother
refused to give her some
money she needed at the time.
All the musical numbers
were pre-recorded under the
personal supervision of
executive producer Berry
Gordy and Gil Asky, the film's
musical coordinator.
Prison scenes were filmed at
California's Lincoln Heights
Jail, a long-abandoned


s, s, t .IheCl instit tion





I I N1)NrAil A.










PH N 171 _i1-BLlD.


.aturdav .Sentemhar 1R 1973.


QOhr Olribmn






.-I


Saturday, September 15, 1973.


Ohr rtinntnp


CLASSIFIED


SECTION


CLASSIFIED


ADVS. BRING RESULTS


TO OURAD T EP 29


S-FAST

)86 EXT 5
.~ ___


REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE FOR RENT
(11228 B 1'240 C 611u36
2 BEDROOM ,, I C) I BROOKLYN LARGE ONE E
newly cdiecuratd, ,,iv NUI t hlefi ooin 2 bath, apartment, nicely
furnished across r ,ih!, j (i. l-! ..j ,r -0 di'mnr looms $250 per mon
Shopping Centre, .,,,, .. -p e iv enclosed CHESTER THOMPS
Reasonable. Pt .. :,, 'h-, i t, vo ,, y lVIandscaped. ESTATE 24777-8.
77238. i Call 53811 (day)
rii/ ( u<. l ti C11167
C11128 ON THE HILL, 11
LARGE LOTS aid ( walk from downtown
cIarges. Includes i li 80 Excellent 2 bedi
acid beach nr i lqht- l .' ,\ ;, ., t. I, e I 80 x 120 bathroom and 3 be
underground $i .i .0 k f l edo n Gardens bathroom apartment
underground $/" rl, $ ', 'Jl) Airconditioned, wal
from $80 morn 1 t ) 3 Sandy Point Abaco carpeting. Fully fur[
price with subd. vr ( i 1 appIoximateiy equipped, private
charges inte st Til '' .: '' Price $4,000 00 pool and beach privil
4-1 14 1 or M o rlr X .. 0 0 ,< beach lot .s0 0 C cI10 3t
2-3027 i r i 12 500 0U C11031
Yamacraw Mod' r, '1 to...r: -h ill's Real -2 2-BFDROQM APA
',' r'' I' 1 consisting of livir
Cl 1161 room, kitchen and I


FOR SALl F t-
4 bedroom 2 ,'
completely .w. ,
landscaped. -
airconditioned. ,
condition. Lot r , -
"Shirley Park i. .
to town nd i, :
Telephone .';'
3-4953 ( ,. i)

C 11223
FOr) .
GROVE :
with 2 beo-,, ,
furnished. s in .
SKYLINE 3 hit'-.....
with contents -. ,
lake lights. B
Only $in'. r
ap )pointl e: :
-- Ehitee bo -
furnished. .. .
with beach ir
room. emn
Bvy p
DAMI \1 -
nite.
Cl123b


houses
$4 3,00
bedr,, L .

2. ''


seea; "
$2 ',
3. Out1!- !
Easte,, ,,
g3ou. ,D .
poo; 1
beort ,
d ir ,
dinr-- -

pour + ;-.st,, '. ,
qar ago -
$200,:
4. Atra, trt .

Sti r .t ji
$49,)00 ..,
5. Ex cep ,.
waterf[o t o
ovei lrori-
A pp .' ,.
of b :s r; ,:- i
deep -


i e = .
mP.O. -

Ce Sut *


C11236
TOWER ESTArFS
house 3 Ire--r -
sitting, acni -,
Air ano c
Fornishe ,
$45,000 -
shlould 'e '
of the .,i tii

SEABREEZE ,
baths, s k ,
dining, ki' tr .',
garage, i.a"' .'
grounds; ,
Fxc :er.t '' ,
furnrs ed ,-' ,: -
only $,A.1;:i r '

HILLTOP SANS S;
302 nv i I
House '-: ,
three bef-"-
grounn s a trl v- '. '
Magn .iicent ...
foresho1 u "- .

RIDGEWAY ,
3 b a th s tl0 .
f u r n is h e l . .
Spacior,
family. -
Sights ",
$160,000.;

CAMPER DOv r"
hilltop, -.it t
!nagnr ,n ri, i
$115,000. --

CABLE BEA1. i
of Nassa-.
bedrooms, F:
totalling 7 ,
sea onr a clif .
gorgeous vir-. .
spacious sittir ,
Air. Owner a
$135,000.00


OUT WEST i,
Governors "
bedrooms 2 batnr '
plus 2-stoi ey .i .
containing 2 hidir ,
furnished jinn ,',A r -
Landscaped eri I :
fruited. Corn'-" ,n ,'
im mediate o, C upa L .
w ith reason ll ai., '
income tor '
application
FOR THE 13FSI I 'i ii-
AN INDEP NIX N
BAHAMAS CONSUL NIL
DAMIANOS, we ,I! ,eI
estate. Dial 220 .
41197.


. e

, )


* i i' t'.,, s i r1 h ed o i
;,', r i ;, t $ ', 000

; i ,,t .]' :: $5 200
S ki i liour s.

:1 i0 i1
)LP I[LAN1D desirable
S' 1d ini a joining
'. t ,. : Xui n .d 82' 123' x
1 1 nPhone 31252



S; ,I ~ii : -/ 100 oii the
: N Providence
S eind on Bay


'., .lra ejdv drawn
o' ' "- IX 1two
' tho type
i :q Terrms.


t .". Ie erInaro
fi . -,de %paiir-h
0 a .' 'nr II I I

u t Ahaco.


S I ,! + P', I% A( m
i .r, .. 1 _)l -.
. ,- ir- t i rit s ,' i L i sl a


; '' . ,f.. r x .. T
S.3


PUBLIC AUCTION

'n t-I A lii sell
; lburiy Laiiii'
S "-hirley Street
,-,1: ,i A ,d side in the
n-f the Islandt
." ;d -t A on Fridfay
S W. 1, October, A .D.
S- 0 o'clock 1noon


S Unit Number
,'j ,idira "A" heln q
t f W o at er ronl
usne s 1i


I n" : t I rtel IIl .t i at t

I' f I .i a ( IV I ti e
:l l, : u U ilt I,, thiat
I* -. i 1' I r d 'or e-t e of
i i. }i 1 .' 1 r 7th day

'" .,. i'. Resrcdential
S 1 d v el u rI n Its
..... t ~ihe' one p)a t adid
o't -,sm of tihe othIe
, 7 'I o0 o i)f record in
r of Records inr
t, Of N-assau in
S1 .'. at pages 59?
i i en n!tlI s the
,* -,- '. a in iundivided
e ,' r a ( orrIM onI
; r '' )iippur tenant to
-.i ;lim ii!c Unit Numblei
S .') ibi c t to cert, inl
- !i, ifti ns rest- active
., I t ind stlpulations
. d onl efeired to ini
.... Inadentui' e of
-in dated the 17th
S ,iach, A.D. 197]
e-, latation of
S ir i dated ithe
S ' Febuay, A.D.
d ; d ,,t Irded in the
,' *. ,t'- of Records in
1 4 at pages 1 to

Sr is being sold
: I, iowerI of sale
I n d Ir an Indenture of
t,, de dt dated Seventeenth
i, i, D. 1971 betweenI
S i v I i dd ResidentialI
it ,v iI.rpm ents L. united
i i': the satd
0, ric s in Volunme
,'- ii ,'-; : ti 19 which
-' it;" |In' d vers minin
*"\-f -f nu-w held yni


i (1 a ., rn h ? to I r eseI ve
S .; I right for the
y .ii1' person on
I -a d up to that
S Imn-- 10'% of the
S' 'ic at the tune of
S ,,nd balance on


!, f t ,. 14th day of
'inu,,th, \-. D. 1973.
PAR RY D. MALONE
P ubiic Auctioneer
- In. I ni.- "59th


MOVING?


f t f JpeI I Packing &
I .,ra; ;.' n n r a or A ir,
fi ii r t fi r y & Co.
S ,. : t P.O. Box
S 1 (, C'i ., : 2 45 1 1.




APPROVED CARGO AGENTS
la MMUMLL-


FOR RENT


BEDROOM
furnished.
th. Call
SON REAL


0 minutes
in Nassau.
room, 2
edrcom, 2
s available.
I to Aall
wished and
swimming
eges, good
.842.

\RTMENT"
ig dining
bathroom,


basically furnished. Twynam
Avenue. Phone 5-8185

C11047
ONE & 2 Bedroom apartments.
Centerville, Ring 5-8679 ask
for Mr. Pritchwd

C11051
ONE BEDROOM, furnished
apa tment, upstairs over
Bucaneer Inn $180.00
including light & water. For
information call 5-4616.
C11032
ONE EXTRA LARGE two
bedrooms two bath, and one
extra large one bedroom
apartment. With large living
and dining all basically
furnished Victoria Court
Apartments on Elizabeth
Avenue between Shirley and
Bay Street. Facilities, Phone,
laundry. parking, T.V. antenna,
iiCl. iidr ..i--d Phone 54631
between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.

C11140
ONE BEDROOM completely
furnished, air conditioned riidl
one efficiency apartment.
Harmony Hill, Phone 31328.

C11173
.IJ SSAU LAST close, t' St,
Andrew's School. 3 beoaoornr
2.': bathroom furnished house;
$400 per month. Phone 24520
weekdays; 414b6 evenings and
w.,eekends.

C11050
COTTAGES and apartments
daily, weekly or monthly
airconditioned, fully furnished.
maid service available..Lovely
gardens & swimming pool.
Telephone 31297, 31093.
IsCl1,19- 2w :,. -.
LAPGC 1 bedroom partially
airconditioned, furnished
apartment. $225 per month
utilities included. Phone
5 8327.
L11202
COrv PLFTELY FURNISHED
one bedroom apartment,
air-conditioned, wall-to-wall
Spent ing. $200 per month.
Upstairs Eddies' Department
Stoie. next to Stop N Shop.
Telephone 2-2227 or nights
C 2.94.


2 Bedr ioom, fui nished, situated
at Joans Hleigjhts, South Beach,
$2bO.OJ per month. Phone
Nassau 3-4145.

C11229
2 i3E DROOM apartment,
newly decorated, fully
furnished, across Cable Beach
ShIor pping Centre, pool, beach.
M- thly, weekly. Phone
7:02 77238.

S11 2(06
Unfui nished 3 bediooim hous..
in City. Call 5-4347 after 8
p.m.


C11226n
F URNISHED
ROOM duplex
e r I 5I e d
air -L )n ditioned


TWO-BED-
apartment,
g a r de n ,
bedrooms,


autoniat washer. $260.00.
Phone b 8512.

C112 1-i
2 BE i)ROOM unfurnished
apart!innt nice location.
Tenwiclh Street, Shirley
Heights. Call Mr. Carey 5-3471.

C11035
COMMERCIAL BUILDING,
Montrose Avenue. 3200 squ.
ft., suitable for store, offices,
or warehouse, $290.00
monthly. Call 2-8165.

C 11298
ONE 2 bedroom house,
furnished, airconditioned, T.V.
antenna Mount Royal
Avenue. Tel. 5-8795 or 3-1914.
Available immediately.


C11296
EXECUTIVE home in one of
Nassau's exclusive residential
areas. One to three years lease.
$700 monthly. Phone 31273

WOLSEY HALL
THE OXFORD CORRESPONDENCE COLLEGE
5 eh,1crv the qualifnicati on ,u l aniu
I i( -I 0 and "'A lease. a I ondon
i:nir m r iN [vgre lPlof'iesonr al r x-
,all founded I rn4 gSiv% es wol.
Ai rguaralt of tu itiroirn untuilvoirpass
iii[ esaniiIrIon r atln it I inexIIj o
\t i ourranding e iv' o[uii iir e, o, I or
.xiimr -l e 7 'r,', o olc Hiall udeni%
%ring if(,[ H A honours degrees have
pa c i n ithe h la s Near-i
O\er ear sofepeier'nceresultinging
the mo irivu.ent modern methmidof
P-1-11t hOlighl tl b a mlllt required
*II itn..rir ILirririri I Ilito ect ouri precise
I o fee pa\aMbeh instalments.
1| If )ou uarn to know how to
prepare lor a succemfuiful ture
,inle for a free prospectus to
J1 pt %1 I 1 ORD
WOWSWYUAOKFO OX2 PB


C11287
FURNISHED two bedroom
one bath apartment near
waterfront with telephone
$195.00 Phone 5-851?

FOR SALE OR RENT

C1 1054
3 Bedrooms, one bath, Joans
Heights, South Beach. See
Philip R. Vargas, West, S.
South Street on Corner.

CARS FOR SALE
C11159
2 1970 HONDA VANS
selling together for $450. Call
2-2159 8 a.m. 5 p.m.

C11204
TRIUMPH Spitfire, recently
painted, good condition,
convertible. $575 O.N.O.
Phone 2-4756 8:30 5:30.

C11300
1973 DODGE CORONET
with airconditioning, power
steering like new. $6,000.
Phone 5-7948.

C1 1136
ISLAND MOTOR
COMPANY
1970 LTD.
P.O. Box N-640
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
USED CARS


1969 CHRYSLER
4 Door Auto White
1969 PONTIAC GTO


$950


A/C Vinyl, Greer $2500
1968JAVELIN A/C $1200
1973 VICTOR S/W FE
Auto, Blue 856 miles $4400.
1967 VIVA 2 Dr.
Auto Green $750
1970 RAMBLER SST
4 Dr. Auto. Blue $2100
1967 TRIUMPH HERALD
White $900
1971 MERCURY COUGAR
Auto. Blown $3500
1970 PONTIAC LeMANS
S/Wagon $2610
1971 FORD CAPRI
Auto. Blue $1950
1969 FORD GAJ.AXIE
4 Dr. AiC $1850
1970 HILLMAN MINX
4 Dr. Auto White $950
1973 PONTIAC VENTURA
2 Dr. A/C Green $5900
1968 VAUXHALL
VICTOR $600
1967 chevrolet Impala $450
Trade-ins Welcomed.
"ocai0ted Oakes Field
Opposite the Ie Plant
Telephone 34636-7-8


FOR SALE
C11135
CUSTOM BUILT TRAILER
for 25 foot boat. Especially
built to fit any boat with 4
jacks and 4 wheels. $1400
O.N.O. Phone 31642 after 5
p.m.

C11259
GOLF CLUBS set Wilson Sam
Snead 2 woods, 8 irons plus
bag $60. Tel 31244

C 11194
FOR SALE
WAREHOUSE and adjoining
vacant commercial lot. Best
offer Phone 22098.


S ART SUPPURES
C11040
COMPLETE range of artists'
supplies. Oils, acrylics, canvas,
easels, etc. Bahamian Paint
Supply Ltd., Bay St. Phone
2-2386, 2-2898.


MARINE SUPPLIES

C11044
PACEMAKER 44 ft.
Luxurious Cruising Yacht.
Phone 3-2371.

C11211
17 FOOT fibreglass sailboat,
sails, outboard, other extras
all good condition value
$1400 want $1200 but offers
considered. For quick sale. Call
Friesen 28711 or 31615.

C11233
CUSTOM YACHT 56 ft.
Ha nd-crafted Honduras
Mahogany. Twin G. M. 671-M
Diesels, 12 Kw Kholer
generator, Air, Etc. Sleeps 8 in
owner's party and 2 in crew.
Only 560 hours .since new. A
real bargain Call 3-1423.


LOST

Cl11215
LOST in the vicinity of
Victoria Avenue 1 small brown
Chihauhau dog. Tel. 23160 day
58284 night
A reward is offered.
L. A. Mather

C11043


TRAVELLING?

For efficient friendly advice
on Worldwide Destinations
by Airline or Steamships.
Contact MUNDYTOURS at
24512.



APPROVED PASSENGER AGENTS


NOM NOT


C11186
Notice is HEREBY GIVEN that
BEATRICE LOUISE GREEN
of Kemp Road, Nassau,
Bahamas, is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 10th day of
September, 1973, to The
M in sister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

C11154
Notice is HEREBY GIVEN
that Paul Wilson James Harding
of William St. Nassau is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 5th
day of Sept '73 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship P 0. Box 7147,
Nassau


C11153
Notice is HEREBY GIVEN
that Mary Constance Harding
of William Street. a-ssatr,
Bahamas is applying to the
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why re), i .t,._.,, should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 5th day of Sept. 1973
to The Minister responsible for
Nationality and C ni.-er-r.., p.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

C10982
The Bahamas Transport,
Agricultural Distributive Allied
Workers Trade Union, will hold
its Annual General Meeting on
the 25th of September 1973,
at the House of Labour
Wulff Road at 8 p.m. At this
meeting election of officers
will take place. All financial
members are asked to be
present SIGNED
MAXWELL N. TAYLOR
General Secretary

C11170
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN
that GEORGE DAVID
ROBERTS of Kent Street,
Uleniston Uardens, Nassau,
P.O. Box N3911 is applying to
the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts wrthin twenty-eight days
form the 8th day of September
1973 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N7147,
Nassau.

C11290
NOTICE is hereby given that
ALEXINA McELWEE of Staff
Quarters Geriatric Hospital,
Nassau, is applying to the
Mi n ister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-erght days
from the 15th day of
September, 1973, to The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau.

C11288
NOTICE is hereby given that
GABRIEL WILLIAMSof Quai-
ry Mission Road is applying
to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
,,hy registration should not he
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
frorn the 15th day of
S-ptember, 1973, to The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau.

C 11289
NOTICE is hereby given that
CHARITABLE PIERCE of
Farrington Road, N.P. is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who
knows any reason why
naturalisation should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days
from the 15th day of
September 1973 to The
Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau.


POSITION WANTED

C11105
EXPERIENCED GIRL
FRIDAY, seeks position as
Social Hostess, Head Cashier or
Pu ic Relations. Write Box
54 68, Nassau or phone 5-5078.


T-


C11310
NOTICE is henry !h.
STAFFORD 0 'P' r ,i
Pinedale, iqht Mile Pr i
Grand Baharniia j
the Minister i -, f<
Nationality ,ir, f ,:i- .hipn .
tor registration J -
The Bahamas, irl i; y
person who kiwr s .i;;v .
why registration i<,t,! .1 t
granted should -rd ,1 i
and signed itat Innie .i hfi
facts within tweityv -qit d.I,
from tehe 15t h I ,' ;
September, I'rI73. t. r ',
M minister riesp ;,. i- i
Nationality rand .ian i .. ,-- I,


P.O. Box N


7147, rNi


C11308
NOTICE hen, ...
NORM A C;
OUTTEN c :. of i
Box N-4439, N,,,
is applying t i ,.,
responsible fi) NI ., v
Citizenship, for ]
a citizen of The PI!i ,f
that any per ; ,.
any reason whvy it '. ii ., -f
should not be ni. t-"! ioil. :
send a .vy i t -
statem ent of I l!i. *\:,- *
twenty eiqlit day( -
15th day cr1 Sept .-,- ,;, 0,'
to The Minlste i pu .ii .i, ;
Nationality ,nd v ,itd .,'- |
P.O Box N -7 1 7. ., ,:,,-


C11294
NOTICE I.- .
MERV IN ., .
WILLIAMS f.',.
R o c k G a r .d i '.,r,,- < :<
applying t n.. ..A ,
responsible ' i ,
Citizenship . ; ,
citizen of I h ,- ;
that any pe,,,r .( )! k .vv
any reason -Lt 'r-p 'a i:).
should mn t I : A r ii
send a wvii '.'- ., -A-, d
state ent of ti i h-mni
twenty-eight daiv frn tmim
15th day of Siniri hr- n 1O 9 ,
to The M II ,t- n -. i- .-
Nationality a- : i .
P.O. Box N.'I1.1 A r


C11286
NOTICE is .,
ALEXA'N lit H P -
BAXTER of Gli, .', andenr
Kent St. is applying to ti
M inisterl ri-,t r.( !, for
Nationality ard -t:erin-,
for naturalist ,, a
of The Baham as, a-c, that a.o
person who knowi. n an lrea
why natutalisatiLin, shl-.i. i, )t
be granted should .,-.' a
written anor si()ie(r So *i'
of the facts .t
twenty-eight days fu lr t -
day of Septernheri 197, r
M i n sister r esp i tr '
Nationality and .itre-. ; '
0. Box N7147, NJassia

C11309
NOTICE is herebfy giv,
JOHN WIIL.LIF TrOJS)U,/r.r
of Poit-de-Paix Hait i. ,
applying to thf t .,
responsible for N iatleiol]; v .1
Citizenship. frl nori t:jria. ,
as a citizen of hr h
and that airy II i -ii.
knows ainy ir asi i
naturalisation ,houil '.
granted should sendi a .i r
and signed staternent ;
facts within went -ei .
from the 15th dt i ',
September 1973 to t t
Min ister tespons'b-"
Nationality and Ciii.' ,
0. Box N714 7. rsu

C11291
NOTICL i. .reb .
that R IL it )U \
PALOMEv Ul of I (
South Anier i(a .ir .
the M minister i t o- :t .
Nationality arir i --
for natuiralisatiuii .
of The BJhtm!i-,: .,
person who kiro.s, ir,.
why nar tuir a ilrat i, i .
be grant,,i ,.
written and r ,',:; '
(,f the t,1 ts .s
eight a ys f t i
of Septe nber i '
Min sister rnsp,'-- .-
Nationalityv .m
P 0. Box N /1.17, '



NU TIt t t. t.
R E LJ I i -

Grand B hit: r ; .
the MnViiistel
Nationaity, al)
for registiatiot ', '
The Bahamra. i-! t
person who inio';s ,'
why igyistinti on shv.tr ',
granted sl .)uld .ei' ,.
and signed statement '
facts within tf weintV -eig .' \
from the I ath day '
September 1 ) 73 to
M i niste i OSponsiNe '
Nationality andi Cititenh'o '
0. Box N714/, Nassau


C11258
NOTICE is hereby giver that
MONANE de DEPASSE i
Yellow Elder Gardens, N.P 1is
applying to the Mimistei
responsible for Natitionalitv
and C it I ets-hip, tlo
naturalisation .is a i ti.rw oi
The Bahamas, and that anr
person who knows aniy iteason
why naturalization shIould not
be granted shoit.l i send aI
written and signed statenr it
of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
15th day of September 1973
to The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship n.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.


} NOTICE_ | _SCHOOLS
S 1 19 1
'( Tl <,', t given that
(,1, P I / I)1E SSH '14


iltit ii !
apr, p--



*, l; ,I I .
-Itn !:'
rt ,u +


P.ifotur Avenue
,' '-a thre Minister
S : Nationality and
S i e ration as
,at'amas, and
!, .. who knows
S y registration
h. c ( rarnted should
-r i and signed


+r t ,*' fac ts within
I.twr avs from the
lpt "or : 'r ireber 1973
i ;' r. possible for
n j i C citizenship
S( ,. i / ] a / Nassau


i y ijiven that
St Louis
S, applying to
. ' '.p rnsible for
S i .l C citizenship,
t .. as a citizen
t ,, d that any
E, ,,r ii) s why
r,'i d i' i d not be
ii, ser,d a written
ti. i ert, r of the
'ht. t days
Say' of
i*; L '+ i t ' u the
S , for
'It'Isifup, P
' i r : ** + + ,! ! 1 ( T 'l ,S IV E ip P
( ) l". '+ 7 ; /. 4.i5,ii, .

o i i N ,NA
1"( IC V !'R" N.GIVENL
ti .,if * i; r VI.RNA L
SRoad,
I. , g to
le for
+ .T,; .. i .* ,i;: < r', r /en sh ip .
S I' "'.;[ ,i ,; a citize n of
S r that any
pi", 'I i '. )'.) "s w hy
S'I ii ot he

s :," tte, e nt of the
fu. "* .*;t i tw ,eiy-eight days
i . t ia, (_f September
' M minister
Sina ., ;ty and
Sn P.O Box N7147,



IN MEMORIAL






,, I ,
^Ite1l


1 r ( i, iiK-'rr ji i iOf Oui
j: ,oh.)laor un Johnson
r.... j-Itted this life 14th
eptpober 1972
I .il '.eet vsui in the rmnorning
iJit riSo,- the Eastern Gate,
I :I -- ady, faithful pilgrim,
Lest ,vi h ou it be too late.
.'t t Iiou n: Wife Estella
J I!'- ri s incli Ir'ng Rev

ri i -. ':' V i s. i5 liza I erg ri--o:,
I liza fierrag(oi
i-ar ;' -r:o !'a llr l t i, re O l Teas
wL a':nd a" nost t f relatives.

30 i J


.. .- -

1 r o memory of my wire
- ....' T rnuker who dred
S;' o;b,- 15 I. 1472. Left tc
it'n;,., -,', band David and sor'


CARD OF THANKS


c 7
NURSF LILYMAE BENEBY
othere) and family of the late
(.iltion E Beneby wish to
extend to their many friends,
relatives and the public both
here and abroad, their sincere
thanks for all the cards, letters,
teleqiams and floral tributes
duI ing their recent
ber ea vement.
Spec mi thanks to Father
I singer Kelly and Moss, The
Community Nursing and Staff
of Princess Margaret Hospital,
Mi. & Mrs. Thomas McShane,
Staff and Students of C. C.
Sweeting Senior High, the
Police Cadets, Excelsior
Temple of Elks No. 37 and
Bethel Brothers Morticians.
Nurse LILYMAE BENEBY
and Family


-w
Is,-.
~Fl/&. -


It'i

1


THE NASSAt.' iVi
BALLET SCH' OL
commence its 11 '
session orn MordIay, S .
17th. For irifomil i rat
call 5 2353.

C11 124
ENROLL now ,t .
Academy of Br ,
following clas es:


Typing with '. -
Shorthanu
Bookkeep,'iq
. Switchbaiad
f riont DIsk Cas',-,-
Night Auditing
ielox v ')pe!.nit,' ,
ELnglhsh
Math mI nati
f-ilmq
Frrn- h

Span sh
B.J C Class-s
Dictaphone Tvp:-'t
Call the Nassa, A .A
Business today ar:- .
the ata o V : n.
24993. (Located at Sh
opposite Collis Av,

C11 14
NORH I I hMI Ii
SCHOOl, Inc. has !., r!e
successful hair stylist, ,I .f
the woil t Learn t 'i :t .;
f in cn na ti
peti r nij r li' . ,
a spoI.i p' g
colm)iirnj YCu ar
one of t e- ost gi
f ina nc rla l r e.-' ;,: A
that their -n .
NOR1'H MIAMI I I
SCHOOL, INC. I
125th Street, Mia ,
Dedicated to ri,', -.
hairdressers for r -
profession. nScehoi- i 'r '.
Mr. Thomas. Cali 3..
further information.


HELP WANTED

C11188
MARRIED COUt._
run small! Out :'

years expei ernice i-i
beverage, frunt -
bookkeeping, at+pr
training Ivecha'cr al i-
ft motor vehicles, 1
and diesel ge-nerator I
necessary. Aptjiy n1.
including re'etenc ',
Moxev, P. 0- B


Ci1139
MANAGER for n-' : -
Must have some ,
of fishing, skin divim : n
hardware equip n -.
have pieviou- er1, i-
retail sales, -t -
ordenrng For appo:
2-8173.

C 11237
BANK Of -
(BAHAMAS & A.
LIMITED e,;e.
for its Main "',a-.-'
The Appilcant
h, owledcieabie ,' - I t :

e-peniene i .
I 1 m e r C a
inu t i c ur i enrdc
oxi .anrige busire- .
i an; h u r dianad genlj c
exp lenience l'otil']
management r.- t .a .
staff of at least 2'i i.' ,, .
pe sons shouk i , .'
i enrnnwe in tLi;ie' e
Seisonnel O''cer i
7118, Nassau, Ba : -


AIR CANADA
MANAGE R P F' -..

o [i-]pa iv'u i
Repi esentative f,
o arniese. marriage a ,


oi the Airlines r
COpeorati, n ,) ciuri dirf ,'
and An F eight ,Ac..'. : t ,
Mar keting. F financial I' I .
Lust0omer Sertvices A ) .i :
E tun t 1ons, AdmiIn is'tr, iM ,'- ,-
I son el Services Pliit.
Relations. Must have extend ,iv
background in Transpoi tai:. ;
Tiavel, Tourism Ind ,ii .tr :!d
previous airline expeorir ,- i at
Senior Management Lt-., I:
addition a vast krrnui ,' : ,.
Canada, its business ard o'i.
habits as well as expel -i.ie r.
that country allow ing .Y -
insight into the Canadria v. .;
of life is required. Alppi i
writing w ith qualf,,it i ,
experience and referenti-' I
Air Canada, P. 0. BR-" li.,
Nassau, Bahamas. Replies no r'
be received by September 2:'


IhW Ulrtbunt

CLASSIFIED ADVS.

BRING

RESULTS -FAST


I


.I


I


I 1


i


i




I


I


= i "
i '. (-):
i ,


1
i







+


I


1 r


T












8 ________________________


[ HELP WNTED
C11262
RELIABLE MAID to care for
infant and two school children
Call 5-6118 after 6 p.m.

C 11267
TWO TAILORS, Bahamian.
Coat Maker, 1 Pants Maker.
Ten years experience. Salary
$50 wk. Writer: P. 0. Box
N-3405, Nassau.

C11171
T RANSPO RTATIO N
ORGANIZATION require
young man early twenties fuo
career position in operations
division. Successful applicant
should have High School
education vith G.C.E. Maths.
Accounting or Clerical
experience would be helpft l.
Applications should be made in
writing giving details of age,
education, relevant experience
and present salary to.
A D M I N I S T H A T I V E
ASSISTANT, Navios
Corporation, P.O. Box N-7796.
Nassau

Cl1191
TRUST OF cFIi P1
oeaQ hired for newly organism, .1
Trust Company -in San Jose.
COSTA RICA Successtul
applicant should preferably be
of Spanish onr t andr.
completely fluent r: Enigllsi
ana must have some years
ex pe ie nce in Tru st
Administration r 'vith a
'ecoginised Trust Comrpanyr ,I
Comm!'ion Law u riscliction.
This is a senior position 0,hicIt
o f er s o rsiderab i
opportunity for growth andr
development.
Salary will be deperldent Li i
qualifications and expert iince
Applications accom panied b, a
personal resume should be
for waded to:
Mr. Walter C Dittel, Jr., c o
Compania Nacional F inanciera
Apartado 4488, San Jose.
Costa Rica, Central Amenrca
C 11280
GIRLS between the ages of 18
and 25 wanted to sell Black
Her i tage Cosmetics
houuse-to-house. vWork part oi
full time. Contact 2-4175
between the hours of 7 p.m. &
9:30 p.m.
C 11299
PARTS DEPARTMENT
RECEIVING CLERK. Must be
experienced in automotive
parts. Good pay for the right
man. Many fringe benefits. Call
Mr. Godwin Wright at 2- 1031
for appointment.

ANNOUNCEMENTS
C11284
THE WEDDING RL-c' 'Ti '-N
of Verilyn Dawn Turnquest
and Fred McKinney which was
to be held at the home of Mr.
& Mrs. Uriah Cartwright in
Pyfrom's Addition on Saturday
22nd September 1973, will be
held instead at the Blue Hill
Golf Club, Blue Hill Road.


ANNOUNCEMENTS

C11254
THE LONG ISLAND
SAILING CLUB
IS sponsrul in a Steak SulI)er
.Ird l)ari(e at thu I ION'S
CLIUB on Satuiday S'ptc', i
22ii1 it 8 p.m. A door pii e iIs
beirn offered, and dancing is
'ion cf pn.m. until .


Nusi( will be provided by the
veiy popui t Banid, "RANiY
AND THL REVELATIONS".
The public is invited. Tickets
can be purchased ifrom
(Committee member and at thIl
J01. FuLnds aie to suppJliut the
1914 Regatta.
WE GUARANTEE AS
ALWAYS, A GALA-TIME.


TRADE SERVICES
C11033

Pinder's Customs

Brokerage Ltfd.
Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenuei
NASSA. BAA A, A
P O. hs N3/ 14
irLA\, Y DnTY I TRUC KING
FORK LI IT MENTAL
VMELF4ANIC AL HAND ING
I-QUIPME NT
IATA CARGO AGENTS b
CUSTOMS CLL 'iRANLI
& DELIVERY
\'.COVINC, STORAGE
& PAC KINGu
STE EIL BANDINc,
& SHIPPING,
SPECIAL OLUOTATIONS
EXCELLE NT SE RVICt
RL-ASONABLE RATL S
CONTACT LYMAN PINDI R
OR JAL.K LASH-
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-379l.
2- 197, 2- /986
Altpor t 7743-1.

C i 1049
T V. ANTENNAS. i;,st.1
for homes, apai tments ar,
hotels. Sales and sr vices Call
Douglas Lowe 5-9404 WORLD
OF MUSIC Mackey Street netl
to Frank's Plar c

C1 1151
SEWING MACHINE
REPAIRS AND PARTS
ISLAND FURNITURE
Corner Christie &
D .-.J' .-. ii Street
Pficne 21197.
P 0 Box 4818. NJasi,
C 112,8
F OR ALL YOUR
GARDEN NG Nf DS,
Ti rimm ng, hedging ,
teach ccrijn g, Fo ir Purpt
ieasonabli and t 'Fc rint 'Pr vrc
call 5-104.1


HELP WANTED

C6236
SECRETARY o work in,
Personnel Ofice. Will bI-'
responsible to do typing and
filing and answering letters on
her own i'nitative. Should be
of neat appear a co wth high
school educatio- and 2 to 5
years experience Interested
persons, apply T-+E GRANDE
BAHAMA HOTEL &
COUNTRY CLUB. West F-md,
Grand Bh arna. PR so e..
Off ice between the hi r, o'
00 a m at d 3:00 p
Monday, th' f ,,ah f rda', F ;,
Martin ir Ppr ,.l ur1, :

C6245
BOOKKEEPER SECRETARY
for Towm Company with
minimum no two years
experience, cert*'icat, for
operation of N C R 3300
Bookkeeping Machi li ability
to handle Ac.ounrts Payable.
Accounts Receivable. a t a )11
and all related procedures.,
including Trial E3alance
Applicant should also have
practical experience concerning
Tour and Travel Agencies.
Shorthand and Typingq
essential Six days $150.00.
Bahamians only need apply in
writing to P.O Box F-2672,
Freeport.
C6247
SERVICE MANAGER
required for General Motors
dealership. Minimum
experience required: 5 years in
the automotive trade, must
have complete mechanical
knowledge with good customer
relationship. Be able to
diagnose mechanical problems,
ability to direct and
supervise mechanical staff,
processing of factory warranty
claims. Apply to: Five Wheels
of Grand Bahama Ltd.,
352-7001. Bahamians only
need apply.
C6244
CABINET MAKER -
applicant must be able to read
blueprints, specifications,
measure and set out work as
required. Build all types of
cabinets, vanities, etc. Work on
own initiative. Glenerik
International Limited,
Yellow Pine Street, 352-8186.


HELP WANTED
CG241
One PURCHASING AGt NT
is required b, a tail)',
construction Co'ppanv located
in Freeport App(n ants must
have a mhiniIm i)f y'ji
experience m pjirchasiniq repn'
parts for all I ght and heavV
duty trucks,, lader,, graders,
dozers and relIated road
building eq' iiprn(Iii! by
Cateipilliar in Allis ( harneris
Interested p-eI o. ,s hold
wi ite Mnliagr, 0 Box
f 164i report, Grarnd
Bahama.

C (246
1 AUM INIrSTRAT IV
ASSISTANT SALES &
PROMOTE IONS To piomoet
overseas al'es. particult i I'a
retail sales thiroughji avel
agents ( o Onrdnatr t oi Isljnd(
and ovesr'ea, piomoti,,rs with
other meniber'. of the Bahamaj
touist induIrrtv and prtdu(i
required public ,ty to reiReas to
the travel trde mredIa. The
individual should have several
years ba(ckgrunji dd nr) the travel
industry with valuable tc ictacts
I' this field, ir overseas
association arid i (onveI tioni
planners. retaIl aid wholesale
agents, parti'-ulaJiv I i the
Canadian market Thi
individual sh)ouid also be ain
experienced travel writer with
contacts in the travel trade
media, in order to obtain the
required publicityv or
Freeportt Lucaya Three
references and Police
Certificate required Applicants
should apply in writing or in
person to: Mr. Albert J Miller,
Chairman, Freeport lucaya
Tourist & Convention Board,
P.O. Box 650, Freepoirt, Grand
Bahama.

C6242
GENERAL TRADE _,r ..rj
employee will be required to
take care of all company
vehicles and equipment
including body repairs, spray
paint, engine repairs and
work at welding and plumbing
- when required.
Glenerik International L muted
- Yellow Pine Street,
352-8186.


Whr GribitW


I GRAND BAHAMA I



CL ASSIFIED I


HELP WANTED
CG243
E E LCTRICAL SUPERIN-
TENDENT estimator for
indLustrial and commercial,
supervise Jobs, layout and
puIchase materials, know
Canadian Code, locate jobs, 10
years experience, college
deri ee or equivalent.
Glenerik International Limited,
Yellow Pine Street. 352-8186.

C6256
HARBOUR PI LOT DOCK
SUPF RINTENDENT
Ap p licant must possess
extensive expe l ience and
abilityin piloting vessels in and
out of Harbour, berthing and
unoberth rg carqo vessels up to
30.,000D.W.T.(20,000 G.R.T.)
Paser nget vessels up to 26,000
G R.T. and piloting vessels in
,.iticted coastal roadsteads
t irtstrl( tons on tonnage.
!i JOdual should have working
uw'iedge of Meteorological
rut OC eanogi aphic instruments
!'t he purpose of recording
"P, ious observations and
1tt qding to the instruments.
'/ rirnlum certification of
nlml'etency by the board of
t'adc or equivalent as first
rnuil, foreign going and should
Ie able to carry out the duties
i Harbour Pilot and Dock
SI), r ,inte'dent in shifts as
an'ed by the r Har bour

S'P[ VISOR ELECTRICAL
ru, INTL NANCE Appl ant
wii hi)e i esponrisible foir the
p i peW maintenance of all
electr nal equipment associated
with the generation of
et't'L t!f -al power. Includes
switchgeat up to 69,000 volt,
gemtratiri equipment 13,800
volt, (steam, gas arid diesel
d,1 rei n) auxiliary circuits,
inotots. metering relaying and
eie(tiomic devices. Should have
background as arn electrical
ernqigeer, with recognized
appienrticeship followed by at
least five years experience in
,,ectical maintenance work in
power plants or comparable
installations (such as proceed
industry, etc).
SUPERVISOR ELECTRICAL
MAINTENANCE OUTSIDE
PLANT Extensive
expei lence required in
maintenancee of sub-station
tiansfor mer s and switchgear.
Must know installation and
repair of capacitors, voltage
regulators and electronically
and 1r. ... ,,, .111 operated
ieclosers. Must supervise others
and maintain full records of
wol k.
Apply to: Personnel
Department, Grand Bahama
Port Aithonlty Limited, P. 0.
Box f 'ti) o 30C Kipling
Building, F-ieepoirt Grand
Bahanma.


The Tribune

CLASSIFIED
BRING RESULTS


HELP WANTED

C6252
Required a FIELD
LABOURER for weeding and
taking care of plants. See:
Charles Williams, Eight Mile
Rock.
C6255
TEACHER Typing, Business
Math and English. Must have
B.S. degree. At least 5 years of
experience.
TEACHER Shorthand.
Home Economics. Must have
A.A.S. degree. Must be able to
teach shorthand and have had
courses in homemaking. At
least 3 years of experience
required.
Write or phone Sister Mary
Alice, 373-3456, P. 0. Box
F-24 18, Freeport.

C6254
EXECUTIVE SECRETARIES
with previous experience and
possessing skills in typing and
shorthand;
RECEPTIONIST/TYPIST with
cordial personality, neat
appearance and good typing
skills; also, MALE CLERICAL
HELP, must have driver's
license.
Please apply: Freeport
Secretarial & Employment
Services, P. 0. Box F-1955,
Freeport.

C6253
ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT. Executive
Secretarial skills, some
bookkeeping, personnel and
evaluation. Capable of giving
Instruction in secretarial skills
and carry out day-to-day
operations in absence of
executive. Must have minimum
of five years experience andric
able to work on own initiative
without supervision.
Apply: P. 0. Box F-1955,
Freeport. Freeport Secretarial
& Employment Services.

C6251

HOUSE MANAGER: To
assist General Manager to
received and correct gguest
complaints, arrange tou0is.
work with on and off shoe
Travel Agents, running of
public areas of hotel
transportation and rooming
NIGHT MANAGER:- To he
in full charge of Resort
complex at night. Receive and
correct guest complaints, assist
F ront Office clerks and
cashiers and Night Auditor.
RESERVATI ON
MANAGER: To co-ordinate
with Travel Agencies, assign
rooms and room rates, take
and confirm reservations, assist
in Sales and Promotions, assist
Front Office Manager.
PASTRY CHEF:-- To prepare
all pastries and cakes, with
decorating of same. Run
bakery shop, assist baker.
COOKS: To prepare food
according to menu.Apply:
Lucayan Beach Hotel, P. 0.
Box F-336, Freeport. Bahamas.


Brother Juniper


"This one's for in front of the Pearly (ates."


i l


The Tribune Comics Page


GRAND BAHAMA



CLASSIFIED


II FREEPIRT TEL. 352-6611


MW4 %W


I


04-1"O


Saturday September .













Wbht Wribtnt


22


*At lat' An endangered

CROSSWORD

PUZZLE
ACROSS
28. Stulm
1 Fatigue 29. Exchange
4 0; i: d premium
pe:son 31 Doctrine
SPrpe.e r 33. Formerly
: Japjne fan Tokyo
;2 Aivaj, 34. Committed
:3 Samncar theft
4 Orramenta, 36. Digraph
cioc 38 Laughable
5. Diviac d skirt 43. Full-length
1 7 Predestines movies
S9 Myself 45. Palm leaf
i3. Meteoric 46. Make a
fireball mistake
23 Fencing 47. Swindles
dummy 48. Oriental
26. Dutch uncle cymbal


species that made it BACK!"


BR PPLSHASTE



A H EELg
SOS
FINDEARD

u H EAT



R~ ~ T .
SO F3


49. Route
50. Grafted in
Heraldry
51. English river

DOWN
1. Loving


As the pals leave the shop they meet Reggie
Rabbit. I've bought the tusk rusks for
Pompey," he says. And Bingo has thought
of something too. I was with him yesterday
when he had a brainwave. Funnily, it happened
just as one of those mysterious bubbles
burst over him." Ha, ha! So we've each
had a bright idea! laughs Rupert. When


Bridge
By VIOTh MOU.O
QUIZ
Dealer Soth: Love All
North
452
Q 10 4 3
0 K J 10 9
6KQ6*

4K Q6
0Q887
A J 8 7
South North
2NT 3 IN T
West led the 4 6 to Enat's
4 The onrac was unwxreak-
able by the defetne but
tan the wrong v ," de-
arerent down What did he
do? What should he have done?
ANALSIS: West's lead of
the 46 U the ke. There's no
reason to doubt that t's a true
card. and if it i. tte esades
will bre hanney 4-4. for
with 5. 4,, 2 on view the 6 can
only be the lbortti hiWest of
a four-card uit.
Declarer should, terefore.
win the firt-trsic and dr've
out the OXA. The defence can
cash three spades, but no more.
Weft Ead
4 Q 10 86 KJ97
OKJ 7 2 t 9 9 6
0632 OA54
S109 43 2
What doubtle haaeaed
was that, obo a de-
claer held 1 a eut call
hs 4,A and East rom ly
switched to a heart. NTw I
logt. If South duoa. West
andoe back to dM
Somm wdif th

co8anv o ca efter


day, at a
Welbe.c ,. hat 10.


2. Crooked
3. Present
4. Mandate
5. Egg
6. French
composer
7. Maine college
town
8. Exterior
9. Land measure
10. Nurses
16. Tissue
18. Type square
21. Accomplished
22. World War II
battlesite
23. Standard
24. Vanity
25. Collection
of books
27. Golf club
30. Death notice
32. Dessert
35. Elicit
37. High railway
39. Coin
40. Seep
41. Furze genus
42. Vendition
43. Some
44. Generation


we're all together you shall hear the whole
story." The next day Is warm and sunny,
and In the afternoon Rupert and the others
arrive for Pompey's party. They find Bingo
already there, fixing up a safety swing in the
garden. It's Bingo's present to Pompey,"
says Edward. He made it himself."
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


By LEONARD *ARDEN












(" 767) I
White mates in three moves,
against any defence (by A.
Geister). An unusually diffi-
cult puzzle. Earlier solvers com-
mented: "a hard nut to crack"
and "it took more than one
sitting." No per times today,
but reckon yourself solving
expert standard if you work it
out in less than 20 minutes. As
usual, the black pawns are
M ng down the board.
$ 1ON NOI. 9167 -- --
Chess Solution
1 R-KKt4. If I ... K-Q4;
2 RxP, P-K4; 3 B-B7. If I
. K-B4; 2 R-QB6, P-K4; 3
R-KB6. A trap jor solvers is 1
B-B7? P-B41 when there is
no mate.


No 7.227 by TIM McKAV
t. Fine breIk. (4-3
7 Have as property. (31i
8. Land mlsure. (4)
F. 1tal sport (4. .5)
I1. MtIk hab. (A)
is I. y.
14 Chemists use them 44-4>.
10 Attempt. (3)
to. Ukase. 44)
l1 Glimpsing. (7)
ft Have a longing, (a)
3 (Canadian animal. (3)
24. Mr. Oatles. remember t i(,
Wf% Deary. (3)
Down
t. urip fast. (4, 5)
Slie positively maintainlni
49)
3. Ghoove. (3)
4. Stockbrokers, perhaps. or
financiers. (4. .)
Unusual. (4)
6. Garden county. (4)
9. Short firearms for cavalry
use. (8)
Ul, South Amerlean city. (a)
1 (. Journey.
l. 1. a re
b I r d.
(4)
17.asR eWl
o a a I.
(5)

(4I yeMkf ae'emSw""O


i IK MERE


Z ie Comnic Pa e



REX MORGAN, M.D. By DAL CURTIS


(-.T CARROLL RIGHTER'S

O^ffRDSCOPE
from the Carroll Right erInstitute
N GENERAL TENDENCIES: This is one of the
most curious of days, astrologically speaking,
and it wavers back and forth between good and difficult
influences, but one can truthfully say this is no Saturday to
take chances or spend more than one can truly afford, so
saving money, counting your dollars and being friendly are
musts.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) Figure out how to get real
estate you have and bank account improved, added to today.
Honesty is the keynote now when dealing with others. Take
no risks where social communications are concerned.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Analyze your appearance
and yourself as a whole now and see where to make
improvements. Don't get taken in by quacks where health
treatments are concerned. Stick to the tried and true.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Plan to get all those small
duties out of the way and forget the social, or fun things for
the time being. Not a good day for expanding either. Plan to
assist one in trouble during free time.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Weed out those
friends who are more a hindrance than anything else and use
your time and money more wisely. Let your aims be more
conservative than in the past. Show you are practical.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Try to get into activities that will
put you in a good position with bigwigs, and add to present
prestige. Make sure you do not take any chances in the active
world, or it could cost you a pretty penny. Think logically.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Being interested in new
outlets is fine but make certain to study all phases well, or you
could lose your shirt. Use your good judgment as well as your
fine hunches for best results. Avoid one who puts a dampener
on your ideas.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Ideal day to keep those
promises that have been impossible to attend to during busy
week and pay the bills that are vital. Show you have good
judgment and do not go simply on hunches. Combine both
ideally.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Make sure you keep
confidential whatever has been told you by mate or associate,
or you lose their goodwill. Do not enter into any public
argument, or you come out the loser. Quietly walk away from
it.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Do whatever will
make your surroundings more charming and steer clear of
those who want to waste your time or get you confused. Take
the health treatments that make you feel aces. Evening fine for
entertaining at home.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) You have to get into
tasks you hardly like part of the day, but then go out for a
happy time and feel better. Use that smile more and you find
others are more responsive. Take any little emergency in your
stride.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Keep busy in the outside
world and do errands, chores, so you avoid possible arguments
that could start at home. Make progress. Stave off trouble at
home in p.m. by the simple expedient of a smile.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Keep busy at the reports and
statements that are important and keep out of trouble today.
Work on monetary matters until they are properly arranged.
Improve hobbies with friends in the evening.



NOW many least one elght-letter word in the
words of list. No plurals;no foreign words*
G L four letters no roper names. TODAY'S
or more can TARGET: 22 words, good :
you mak e 26 words, very good; 88 words,
rom t he excellent. Solution tomorrow.
T letters shown
he re ? In YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION :
m a k I n g a Elfin enrol felon file filer floe
word. each florin flour flue floor FLUO-
L A Y letter ma y RINE rol forel f ul fuel furl
L |be used once ireful lief lien ueu life line
only. E a c h liner lion loin loir lone lore lorn
word must contain the large lour lune lure neroll noll oiler
letter, and there must be at oriel rifle role rule unflle.

Winning Chess


By PAUL NICHOLS]


APARTMENT 3-G By Alex Kotzky

YOU CAW BET I MLL!' WILL EYM COME M'KC YES! I FIT MEAM 'TAT E"BU

WILL YO AEk FMO OYOU A OT SURME! MA
AMP READ M,#JWYC
TO ME AMON,
PROFESSOR?


ISTEYE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & overgard


Samantha-42


JUDGE PARKER














Saturday, September,15, 1973.


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J-Lision
n w andil

S ', an


AMERICAN LtrAGUE
East Division
W, L 'Ct. 1GB
lialtinlre 86 59 .593 -
t"itlli 81 67 .547 6't
Detroit 78 69 .531 9
New Yo1 rk 73 74 .497 14
Milwaukee 70 78 .473 17!'
Cleveland 64 85 .430 24
West Division
Oakland 84 61 .579 --
Kaisas Cit 80 66 .548 4V2
ChliLigit 72 75 .490 13
Miinnesota. 71 74 .490 13
('alifornia 67 76 .469 16
Is5a1s S1 93 .354 32V.
Friday's Results
loston 6t, Cleveland 4
Detroit 2. Milwaukee 1
Minnesota 6, Chicago 0
News York at Baltimore, ppd., rain
I exas 1, Oakland 5
Kansas CUit 2, California 3
Today's Games
Ne\s York (l'eterson 8-14 or
Mctiwell "i-7) at Baltimore
(McNalts 16-14), 7:30 p.m.
Minnesota (Blyleven 17-15) at
Chicag o (Wood 23-19), 9 p.m.
Kansas City (Garber 9-7) at
(California (Ryan 17-16), 11 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pet. GB
Pittsburgh 73 71 .507 --
Montreal 72 73 .497 IV
St. I ouis 72 74 .493 2
New, York 71 75 .486 3
Chicago 69 76 .476 41/z
Philadelphia 65 82 .442 9V2
West Division
Cincinnati 90 57 .612 --
Los Angeles 86 42 .581 4'
San I rancisco 81 65 .555 8v'/
Houstton 74 75 .497 17
tlanta 72 77 .483 19
San Diego 54 92 .370 35t-
Friday's Results
Montreal 3. Philadelphia 2
Cincinnati 7, Atlanta 6
Pittsburgh 3, St. Louis 1
l.os Angeles 13, Houston I
San Diego 4, San Francisco 3
Chicago at New York, ppd., rain
Today's Games
San Francisco (Bradley 12-11) at
San Diego (Troedson 6-7), 4 p.m.
Atlanta (P. Niekro 13-8) at
Cincinnailti (Norman 11-12), 7 p.m.


FAVOURITES


IN RYDER CUP

MUIPRFlLLI), SCOTLAND
(AP) Jack Nicklaus, Tom
Weiskopt and Lee Trevino head
a 12-nman contingent of tour-
toughened American veterans
who take on Britain's best this
weekend in the biennial Ryder
( Up matches.
The United States has
nominated the two country
series since World War 11-in
the 13 matches since then
Britain has won one and tied
one and again ranks as the

But it's a thin favourite.
"If we don't win this year,"
one of 1 nland's foremost golf
writers said, "then we should
abandon the matches. This is
our year."
(r.eat Britain's upset hopes
ride primarily on a team blend
of youth and experience and
the facts that (1) Most of the
British players are more
familiar with the match play
format and (2) That the
I hursday, Friday and Saturday
matches are to be held on a
British course, the wild and
windblown Muirfield golf links.
Britain's last victory was in
1l)57 in England. And the
British gained an upset tie the
last time they played at home,
in 1969. In the American's last
loss, 1957 Jack Burke was the
team captain, Hle's returning as
the non-playing captain this
Scar.
In addition to Nicklaus
Weiskopf and Trevino, the
American team is composed of
Arnold Palmer, Billy Casper,
Sloimero Blancas, Chi Chi
'.1.ri:LuIec Lou Grahant, J. C.
Snead, Dave Hill, Tommy
Aaron and (ay Brewers,
To be eligible, a player must
he a native-born American
citizen and a member of the
PCGA. The latter provision
knocked out such youthful
stjandouts as 1U.S. Open
chamIpion Johnny Miller,
Lar nn Wadkins and Jeny
SfHcard,
Ihe British team is headed
by Tony Jacklin and Big rangy
Peter Osterbuis. Others are
Maurice Bendridge, veteran'
Neil Coles,Peter Butler,
Ireland's Christy O.Connor, big
Brian Bares, Bernard (Galacher,
Brian luggett, ('live ('lark,
John Garner and Iddie
Pot land.
The British term is 1ilIlch
younger than its American
i counterpart. Although
'('Cotnor is 49 and is making a
10th appearance, the British
team has eight players less than
30 years old. They average
31.3 ears of age.
The American team has the
30-year-old Weiskopf as its
babh. I everyone else is older.
I heN average 36.1 years of age.
Palmer is the oldest at 44.
But while the Americans are
older, they have relatively less
experience in Ryder Cup
competition, Weiskopf Blancas,
(;irhani. Rodrigues and Aaron
are on the team for the first
time Britain's only rookie is
the '.rriNt'e-Ic.milicrcd Polland,


ATLANTA BRAVES ace
hurler Wenty Ford, the first
Bahamian to pitch in the
Major Leagues, pensively
studies the diamond during
his five-hitter that paced the
Braves to a 10-4 victory over
the San Francisco Giants on
Sunday.
Ford might just face
Bahamian right fielder rookie
Ed Armbrister this weekend
as the Braves are slated to
play a double header with the
Cincinnati Reds tonight and
tomorrow.
Ford in his debut on
Sunday contributed two hits
and an rbi.
Armbrister on Tuesday
drove in the Reds' winning
runs when, with the game
notched at three all going
into the eighth inning he hit a
two-rbi double in their 6-3
triumph over the Los Angeles
Dodgers.
Just before Ford made his
major League debut, Prime
Minister Lyden Pindling
cabled him a "best wishes"
telegram. It read: "It is with
delight that we at home
follow your progress as you
begin your Major League
baseball career. We have
already noted that Ed



C.P.A. TOLD
From Page 3
reach agreement .in a basis
advantageous to both sides. On
social questions we seek to
learn from each other."
In all cases they would seek
to be positive and constructive.
This was the spirit of the
Commonwealth Heads of
Government meeting in Ottawa
last month and it was to that
spirit that it largely owed its
success.
Declaring the conference
open, the Queen said that the
CPA was one of many
organizations which gave the
Commonwealth its abiding
strength and vitality, In their
conferences and other activities
they made it possible for
information and experience to
be shared.
"It is perhaps in this way,"
she said, "that the
Commonwealth functions most
effectively." As a free
association of peoples coming
from the six continents and the
five oceans, transcending all
barriers of race, religion, and
culture the Commonwealth is,
of course, of great significance
simply because it exists."
"It is all the more
remarkable as its members
remain in it because they are
drawn together by common
interests and not because of
any sense of compulsion or
obligation."





B.E.C.
From Page 1
payable in certain cases. In this
case it cannot be determined
whether the accidental death
benefit is payable until the
results of the investigation into
the cause of death are known.
Both Mrs. Higgs and the union
have been told this."
Charles Higgs died in a fall
from the second storey of an
apartment building.
Mr. Albury's statements on
the insurance issue support a
similar denial by the insurance
company yesterday.


Armbrister's early success at
the plate has enabled
Cincinnati to stay right up
there. We hope you can rally
the Braves to a higher
position in the same division
of the National League. We
are all proud of our
outstanding Bahamian
athletes and I send my
personal congratulations and
best wishes for a successful
pitching debut."
Following Ford's victory,
the Hon. Clement Maynard,
Minister of Tourism, added
his congratulations in a
telegram: "Congratulations
and best wishes upon
elevation to the Atlanta
Braves and success last night.
All proud of you," he wired
Ford.
THe Minister also cabled
Armbrister: "I would like to
extend my own best wishes
and congratulations and I am
sure, those of all baseball fans
in the Bahamas. You have
earned your National League
trial and I wish you
continued success "


I


SEPTEMBER EXTRA SPECIAL!

Your colour Portraits Sitting with 3 carefully-
posed proofs
A BriBiant 10 x 8 Colour Portrait
1 FREE Passport Photo
(Be ready for your New Passport!)
III I l i"'.1 V


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Cantonese Dining, Tasty Snacks from 7 p.m
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Soccer result
L -Lr- results^^^^^^^^^^^


* -;t ,- i *-= u-. l i '. a i ult ,- lo I lun


WENTY-- THE BRAVE


': '-2
+=


he taribunr


IONDON (A: sul t -sits
Saturday's Brili: ... gaics,
FNG 1 I L, 1 I -\t 1,'
Divis-ll I
Birmingham I Liv-ii) tl I
Burnley I lcerbh I
Chelsea I Coventry 0
Everton I (ueen's Park 0
Leiceeter I Manchester Citv !
Manchester United 3 West tho
Newcastle 2 Wolvcrhamnpton i
Norwich 0 Arsenal 4
Southampton I Leeds 2
Stoke City I Ipswich I
Tottenham 1 Sheffield I'nited 2
Division 2
Bolton 2 Crystal Palace 0
Cardiff 0 ulhamn 0
Luton 3 Portsmouth 3
Middlesbrough 0 Aston Villa O
Millwall 3 Hull City 0
Notts Country 2 Swindon 0
Orient 3 Blackpool 2
Oxford 0 Sunderland I
Preston 1 Bristol City I
Sheffield Wed. I Carlisle 0
West Bromwich 3 Nottinghlamn 1
Division 3
Brighton 1 Charlton 2
Bristol Rovers 2, Halifax 0
Chesterfield 3 Blacthurti 0
Hereford I Watford I
Huddersfield I Aldershltt 0
Oldham 0 Wrexhinm 0
IShrewsbury 2 Rochdiale 0)
Southport I1 I'tmouth I
Wulsall I BlItintrtiulIth 2
York City 3 l',,rt V.le 1
I)i- isiom 4
Bradford ('its I I'terbrouiteh I
Brentford 2 )om; aster it
Chester 0 I 'eter 0
Colchester 4 Newport I
(Gillingham 0 iarlitingtn I
Mansfield 2 Sw.lnsei I
Reading 2 Burv )
Rotherham 2 Hartltpool 2
Workington 1 Lint lin 1,
SCOt I IS! I \ Atl I'
Division I
Clyde 0 falkirk o
l)umbarton 0 \%r 1;nited 2
l)Dundee Itiundelie I'ited I
Dunfternilinc' I \rlbitithl I
I 'ibernian 2 1 aqt I it 1I
lorton 0 I'artit k I histlc i
%sothersell 2 hIt arts 2
Rangers 0 Celtic I
St, Johnstone tI hborden 2
D ivisijm 2
Brechin 2 St. Mirren 4.
1 ast Stirling I Berwick 0
Forfar 0 ('CIt debhank 2
Kilmarnock 2 limtr se I
(uieel's 'Park I CMildhenbeiithi (
R:ith Rovers 3 O.)en t Sliith i
Stenhoiuseimuir 0 llitllitijlqn I
Stranraer I Ali:. .I


SOFTBALL GAMES
IITH1 unprediit nlatI lI. I
softht;ll siuad wll Alim st mu!ithl
overcame ;a five-ruln deficit ;nilj (tle
ejection of Mt\, ,f tl ir kt-i ph.[.c
in thloir 1 0-7 k .ll t.,' i tic ill T.I
Ministry of ,t o rk'.s : t, i it a in
tomorrow atlternolin \'liiict li he'
clash ill tile third l ckme i'tlh at
thile swoiithern I -trt ';.- Ir,.-1 ,.
id hr Ifir-= 1-
hllahalt i. e tlsldcr. in til ,i l .,
l caglie, lai lr Iihlustr- ioi"in
(ofIf ail 1 1-6 Ih s to (;. ,hn ( !. ls
last 'et. s C t it
th" M vh t .
Inn lut:kanetrs 11it lit(1 fmlld i i;T a l
4 o'clock.
Starting of til t" It r ,t'l i Itt r st i'
t>mlnorrmol inorling at Il 'tlhit tk
w ill he Coca ( al. goiil l : .,;tiist S:in
Sal Ara\s aks. |e'l Jaiu Jt 1I lihi t
Beer meet in thle ssconid rv ite it I1
nowit.


FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
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i