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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03443
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: September 11, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03443

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VOn1 I M- o- L Ar ao


Tuesday, September 11, 1973.


LIQUIDITY OF 3 MORE BANKS FOUND TO

BE 'UNSATISFACTORY' BY GOVERNMENT






Finance Ministry revoke






licences of 3 local banks,







liquidation will follow


By NICK KELLY
THE BAHAMAS GOVERNMENT FRIDAY revoked the licences of three more private banks as part of an
accelerated campaign to curtail questionable activities among financial institutions using this country as a base of


operations.


FR. ELIAS ACHATZ. O.B.


FR. ELIAS TO

SUMMIT

IN ROME
I A IlFIR Elias Achatz,
U .S.B., Prior of St. Augustine's
S Monastery, will atend the
International Congress of
Benedictine Superiors in
Rome, Italy, from September
1I to October 3. Every five
ears tile major superiors of all
Sthe 210 Benedictine
Monasteries in the world meet
in Rome to discuss affairs of
ithe Order. Fhe topic of this
Cai's C(ongress is "The
E.x perience of God."
'iiscussion will be centred
.alouid prayer and thile gift of
the Spirit.
St. Benedict founded the
BBenedictine order of monks
about the year 500 at
Montecassino near Rome.
St. Augustine's Monastery in
Ndassau was founded in 1946
and became an independent
imonastery in 1967.

NEW OWNER

OF NEW

PROVIDENCE CLUB
I111' NIW Providence Club,
in operation for the past five
years, has been sold to a
company by Mr. William
(Curtis, who recently purchased
B a c k hbea rd 's another
well-known Bay Street
restaurant.
Ihe transaction involved a
transfer of shares of Clubs
Ltd., wilch is owned 100 per
cent by Servac International
I td.
Mr. John Van Gehlen, is the
majority shareholder in Servac,
which also owns Alpina.
Mr. VanGehlen told The
Tribune this morning that the
sale was completed August 1
and that the same staff is being
retained at the Club
Supervisory management,
however, will be carried out by
Mr. Manny Pelecanos, who is
also the supervisor for
Blacklweard's.
1 e New Providence
operates as the City Club
between noon and 3 p.m. daily
and as a late-night discotheque
in th(lie evenings.
Mr. Curtis was represented
in the sale by the law firm of
Christie and Ingraham.



NEW SHIPMENT

BUNK BEDS


OILLY MASIN H INiM
NASSAU FREEPORT


Report that some 50 teachers


not coming to ministry denied


by education secretary today

MR. BALTRON BETHEL, permanent secretary Ministry of
Education, today denied a report that some 50 teachers recruited
by the Ministry had retracted on their agreement to come to the
Bahamas.
"I have no knowledge of his mind," NMr. Bethel
that," Mr. Bethel said. Hie said. The Ministry has been
pointed out that over 50 per recruiting primarily from the
cent of the teachers recruited United States and Canada
thus far by the Ministry had where there is a surplus of
arrived to take up their posts teachers.
and that recruitment was still Areas in which the Ministry
going on Areas in which the Ministry
lie declined, however, to say was short of staff were the
how many teachers of the 170 same as elsewhere in the world,
total needed have been Mr Bethel said lie named
recruited at this time. these as maths, technical
"I v wouldn't like to give that education, the sciences and
figure just as no employer likes reading.
to give out figures," he said. "If we were merely looking
lIe described the for bodies we could pick these
recruitment as going "fairly up anywhere, but we are
satisfactorily. We are still looking for qualified people."
working at obtaining the full he said.
quota," he observed.
np he obs d The permanent secretary
ONE PROBLEM admitted that at present the
One problem was the fact staff situation in some Ministry
that while the Ministry might schools was "quite difficult"
have displayed interest in but not so bad as to make it
recruiting a particular teacher, impossible to hold class.
that individual may have had School heads were doing a
other offers as well. "We then "wonderful job" under the
have to wait until he makes up circumstances, Mr. Bethel said.


'Remarkable wisdom' of


Commonwealth parliaments


THE PARLIAMENTS of the
Commonwealth countries have
a "remarkable store of
wisdom" in today's
fast-moving world scene, said
Britain's Secretary of State for
Trade and Industry, Mr. Peter
Walker, Monday in a speech of
welcome to delegates to the
19th annual conference of the
Commonwealth Parliamentary
Association.
The conference is being held
in London for the first time
since Britain's entry into the
European Community and the
effect of British membership
on the Commonwealth will be
one of the prime talking
points. The first session on
Thursday will be on the subject
of the enlarged community and
the Commonwealth.
The association exists to
promote understanding and
cooperation between
C o m m o n w e a l t h
parliamentarians and respect
for parliamentary institutions.
FOUR REASONS
Speaking in the royal gallery
of Westminster Hall, London,
to the 212 delegates, and
observers from Commonwealth
national, state and provincial
parliaments, Mr. Walker gave
four major reasons why Britain
would be a stronger trading
partner of the Commonwealth
in the years immediately
ahead.
First, British entry into
Europe had coincided with
Britain enjoying a rate of
industrial expansion better
than any other member of the
European community apart
from France. Britain had also
influenced the community to
be outward looking and the
community would begin
negotiations on the general
agreement on tariffs and trade
(GATT) with a view to
extending Furope's trade with


b oth developed and developing
nations.
Second, said Mr. Walker, was
that the massive increase in raw
material prices during the past
year, the biggest in history,
would transform the prospects
of the economies of a range of
primary producers. These
nations would now be able to
achieve faster economic
growth. They would need the
technological advice,
machinery and markets that
Britain could provide.
ENERGY
Third was the discovery of
North Sea oil, which,
"combined with the proper use
of our coal resources and the
faster development of nuclear
energy, puts Britain in a unique
position as far as the provision
of energy is concerned at the
commencement of a phase in
history where the energy
supplies will have a fast
accelerating importance."
The fourth reason, he went
on, was that Britain had started
an investment revival
illustrated by a round of
announcements from major
industries. The steel industry
was embarking on a three
thousand million pound
investment programme; the
biggest motor manufacturer
had announced the biggest
expansion in the history of the
British motor industry;
shipbuilding and aviation and
engineering industries too were
all bringing forward plans for
major modernisation,
Mr. Walker went on:
"Added to this as important
spheres for the future are
supersonic flight, nuclear
energy and environmental
engineering. British technology
in these fields is developing
perhaps faster than any other
nation in the world."


The licences of G.'. Sichel
Bankers Ltd. as well as those of
Atlantic and Pacific Bank and
Trust Company Ltd., and its
subsidiary. Newport Bank of
Nassau Ltd., were revoked
under Section 9 of the 1965
Banks and Trust Companies
Act which empowers the
Governor to revoke a licence
if, in his opinion, the licensee is
carrying on business in a
manner detrimental to the
public interest or to the
interests of its depositors or
other creditors in the Bahamas
or elsewhere.
G. F. Sichel Bankers, a
now-resident bank with a
public licence, was licensed on
February 21, 1967.
Atlantic and Pacific, a
non-resident bank, assumed the
assets of Farmers and
Merchants Trust Co. Ltd. in
November 1972, after Farmers
and Merchants had been
operating here for 12 years.
Under the transfer
arrangement, Atlantic and
Pacific became responsible for
the foreign holdings of Farmers
and Merchants Trust, and
Newport Bank of Nassau
assumed responsibility for the
local funds.
The revocation of the three
bank licences bring to nine the
number of banks whliose
licences have been cancelled b,
government since 1969.
In the case of the previous
seven, the Monetary Authority
and the Ministry of Finance
acted only after depositors
discovered they could not
withdraw funds on demand.
In the present instance, it is
understood, the Monetary
Authority stepped in before
such a situation could arise.
UNSATISFACTORY
An informed source said the
liquidity of the three banks
was found to be unsatisfactory
prompting the decision to
revoke their licences.
The procedure now would
be for the managers of the
banks to apply to the courts
for appointment of a
liquidator, so as to wind up
their business in the Bahamas.
A notice published in the
Gazette this morning said that
Finance Minister Arthur
Hanna, acting on the advice of
the Ministry of Finance and
the Bahamas Monetary
Authority, had, in accordance
with Section 9 of the Banks
Act, revoked the licence of
Atlantic and Pacific and
Newport Bank.
A later notice released b.y
the Monetary Authority this
afternoon included the name
of G.F. Sichel as another bank
whose licence had been
revoked by the Minister of
Finance.
All three banks were
required to suspend business as
of 6 p m. Friday, September 7.
Although the Banks and
Trust Companies Act names
the Governor as the person
responsible for revoking
licences, the fact that the
Bahamas is now independent
requires certain changes in the
responsibilities of the
Governor-General.
Under the Bahamas
Independence Order 1973
there is allowance made for
existing laws to be modified
and adapted to bring them into
conformity with the Bahamas
Independence Act and the
1973 Order.
It is believed that it is under
this proviso that the Minister
of Finance assumed
responsibility, rather than the
Governor-General, for revoking
the licences.


'/ /


4k


FARMING


PROJECT GETS


UNDERWAY
WORK began Monday on
access roads at the
Government's 500-acro' arminiiii
project near the Bacari; plant
oft Carmichael Road. Ministry
of Agriculture and Fisheries
announced.
['he beginning of the project
marks the end of planning
exercises which began early in
1971 with the announcement
of the scheme by the then
Minister of Development, Mr.
Jeffrey Thompson.
Much field work has been
conducted by members of the
staff of the Bahamas Land
Resource Survey, the
Department of Lands and
Sutrverys, and the Ministry of
Agriculture and Fisheries to
reliably assess the land
capability of the area so that
the best use for any part could
be determined. Also, many
meetings were held between
representatives of various
Departments and Ministries in
order to decide on how best to
organize the project.
A very large number of
applications had to be screened
1und individual interviews
arranged so as to ensure that
the lots were allocated as fairly
as possible. The Millar's Road
I ract is the last piece of Crown
Land presently available for
agricultural purposes on New
Providence.
"The present crisis in food
supplies make it imperative
that any land be managed as
efficiently as possible."
explained Mr. Lionel Davis.
Parliamentary Secretary to
Agriculture and Fisheries.
"Consequently, the successful
applicants have been leased the
plots which are most suitable
for their proposed production
programmes, and in keeping
with their agricultural
e x perience and material
resources. It is expected.
therefore, that the Millar's
Road Project will help to
ensure a good supply of high
quality agricultural produce at
reasonable prices.
"In order to reduce the
chance of any disappointment.
the project will be closely
supervised by representatives
of Agriculture and Fisheries,
I environmental Services.
Physical Planning Lands anld
Surveys, the Bahamas
Livestock and Agricultural
Farmers Association, and an\
tenant's organization which
may be formed in future. The
Project offers an excellent
opportunity for cooperative
action and mutual self-help.
Mr. Smith said that if the
land is used for purposes other
than approved agriculture
projects the lease would be
subject to cancellation.

ST. MATTHEW'S CHURCH
SEXTON, 86, DIES
MR. RALPH WARD, 86, of
John Evans Road, died at the
Princess Margaret Hospital at
10:15 a.m. today.
Mr. Wood sexton of St.
Matthew's Church, was born at
Cherokee Sound, Abaco. He is
survived by his wife Violet, a
son Erlin Ward and a daughter,
Mrs. Enola Ward Burke, wife of
Inspector Hugh Burke of the
Prosecutor's Office and eight
grandchildren.
Funeral arrangements have
not yet been made.


WORK BEGAN MONDAY morning on the Ministry of
Agriculture and Fisheries' farming project off Carmichael
Road. Discussing the plans, from left to right, are Mr. J.
Sweeting and Mr. Richard Sweeting of Sweeting Farms; Mr.
Henry Burrows, president of Bahamas Livestock and
Agricultural Farmers Association; Mr. Claude Smith,
Director of Agriculture and Fisheries; Mr. Anthony Hing
Cheong, Director of Lands Surveys; Mr. Lionel Davis, M.P.,
Parliamentary Secretary to Ministry of Agriculture and
Fisheries, and Mr. Clement Pinder, Secretary to the
Bahamas Livestock and Agricultural Farmers Association.
Photo: Roland Rose.


Kidnap jury told accused


Leroy McLean made 'false


entry' when in police

By SIDNEY DORSETT
CHIEF HOTEL SECURITY OFFICER Leroy N McLean
fabricated a story as an excuse for being absent without ordered
leave from the Police Force in May, and also made a "false entry"
in the Criminal Investigation Department diary, the Andrea
Spencer kidnap jury was told this morning.


Revelation of the offence,
which resulted in disciplinary
action being taken against the
accused, was made by McLean
himself, under cross-exam-
ination by Solicitor General
l angton Hilton.
After being sworn in to tell
"the truth and nothing but the
trith," McLean admitted he
imade a false entry on the
morning of May 30.
lie said that on May 29. he
k.as attached to the Freeport
police department and xwas
,supposed to have been on duts
during the night.
"I had left the island for
Miami. I returned on the night
of May 29 on the last flight
froim Miami and never got to
work until about I a.m. the
next morning, May 30."
I ALSI I NTRY
McLean said "1 had left on
the morning of May 29. I
cannot remember what time I
icturned. I didn't have
permission to go. I did make a
false entry in the diary at the
.1.1). office."
Continuing his efforts to
show the character of the
accused, Mr. Hilton asked
McLean if he also tried "to
hide the fact that you had been
to Miami ... by approaching a
member of the public, a Willis
Russell and asking for
assistance "
The accused said it was so.
"I told Willis Russell I had only
recently been promoted and I
had taken a chance of going to
Mianmi without first applying
tfo permission and got ba':k
late for work and that if
anyone were to ask ... I would
appreciate linu letting them
know that he saw me at ,est
I nd," he said.
(ross-examination on the
accused's character began after
Mr. Justice Samuel Graham,
ruling on an application made
by the Solicitor General,
decided that "the jury is
entitled to know the credit of
the man who is making
inputations against the
character of a witness."
Mr. Hilton had applied
yesterday for leave to
cross-examine McLean on his
character because he had
attempted to discredit two
prosecution witnesses, Kendall
Pinder and C.I.D.
superintendent Fletcher
Johnson who were accused of
fabricating evidence for the
trial.
In his submission, Mr. Hilton
had viewed the insinuation
made by McLean against Mr.
Johnson as a deliberate attack
to injure his conduct as a
police officer.


McLean is jointly accused
with police corporal Spurgeoi.
Dlames of tlie IFebruari 15
kidnapping of young Andrea
Spencer, the 4 2-year-old
daugl tIr of ('anadian banker
Po'crt F. Spencer. Dames is
represented by attoii, y
Randol I F. Fawkes.
Ihce are also facing hliu-s
of atitmipted ex.\tortionT assault
with deadly instrumllents
p1s0'ession nf tire Ins iJ d
tlurelar\ .
I he Laccused lost Itis
composure in the l x\ wlic ri
Solicitor General charged luii
with making visits toi Ireepuil
on week-ends during the tnal.
lHe also said McLean stayed
with a Bruce Lightbourne, wholi
McLean had described as tone
ot his friends in an earlier
evidence, while at Freeport.
Mr. Hilton was told ttit
while at Freeport last wedekcn ..
McLean and tIhe accused
Dames met Philip McPhc.
McPhee was supposed to have
been one of the persons to,
whom the story of how )Dames'
face was bruised had been told
on I february 14. one day
before the kidnapping.
But, McLean said he met
McPhee accidentally lic did
not telephone him ias the
Sohlicitor General had asked,
but saw McPhcee when a la.i
came to pick thet up.
I hey had c .ilcd a tia\i to
take them to tile airpl t attend
when it arrived McPhce was
driving it, lie said.
McLean, who arrived late for
court yesterday morning, said
that lie had returned to Nassau
from I report at 9:15 a.m.
that day.
Mr. Hilton told McLean that
he did not see McPhee on
February 14 as he had
testified. lie said McLean had
in fact seen McPhee onil
February 16 and told himi the
story. McLean denied this.
Mr. Hilton also said that
Mc e.t'i was not correct in
saying an International Hotel
security officer Samuel Rolle
had been told of a bruise on
Dames' face on February 16.
lie said that McLean told Rolle
about the bruise on I february
17 when he saw him at the
back entrance to the hotel.
McLean also denied this.
Mr. Hilton also gave notice
this morning that it was his
intention to call two more
prosecution witnesses to give
evidence to rebut McLean's
"alibi."
His reason for just calling
them was because they had
been brought to the court's
attention by the accused
himself, Mr. Hilton said.


POLICE SPOT

CHECKS NET

12 ARRESTS

FOR DRUGS
COUNI[RIN(; allegations
that police roadblocks were an
invasion of privacy, a top level
police officer claimed today
that up to a dozen arrests on
drugs charges have resulted
from the spot checks now in
ef fect.
New Providence
superintendent Avery Ferguson
told The Tribune today that
the roadblocks were not
intended to harass the public
hut to assist in crime
prevention, and that they
would be continued.
In a statement last week
Superintendent Ferguson said
police were looking for
suspicious individuals who
might he carrying drugs, illegal
weapons or other unlawful
goods.
A letter to The Tribune this
week claimed that the
roadblocks were the first step
to conditioning the Bahamian
people for a total invasion of
privacy "'%ith untold room for
harassment and unjustified
persec tion."
I he writer, (Greg Larsen, said
that what caused him to be
great alarmed was that in a
small country, "with a
population which has always to
the greater extent been very
law-abiding," the police
seemed to be setting a
precedent where the Bahamian
populace w0ou(ld become
accustomed to being stopped
on their highways under the
prleext that it was for their
own priotectiolln.
Mr Larsen maintained that
experience in other countries
had shown that such
roadblocks were never
pleasant. "No master what
h;ippensl. \oii co ine out feeling
uiclca and cruninal,." he said.
AridSlRI) M I1HO01)
lie referred to the
toadhlocks as an "absurd
method" of crime prevention.
"Which crime have they
pacencted in the time they
hauve had their loadhlocks set
tip'?" he asked.
Referring to Mr. Ferguson's
"iiiieu'lits in lIthe morning
pipct. Mr. l.alsen pointed out
ihal "11 the salime front page as
tinii ridiculous statement there
irc the reports that a iman w\,as
Iatlcked bh five youths and
'eNwd( of $400 Wednesday
niihit. Another man was beaten
bh three young men Iuesday
night after they found he had
nothing foi them to steal. '
lie wanted to know where
the police were when these
mines \were eing committed
Observed Mr. Larsen: "Do
the ptllice believe that when
the haive developed a police
state they will be safe tromi
iitstices or recriminations? If
this is their behct then they .je
ideed foolish. In a state si'i.h
as the\ are helping to develop,
you are only 'safe' so long as
you are .'l uiil to the
occasioiln.
Mr. Laisen predicted that
after roadblocks would come
curfews and house searches.
It might surprise but not
shock some people to know
where the order t or the
roadblocks came from. tie
declared. In any case it was
time Bahamians stopped sitting
on their minds and swallowing
everything pushed down their
thr oats, he wrote.
"I have been told to keep
rni mouth shut and mind my
own business," Mr. Larsen
'tated. However, he was not
afraid of "anything or
anybody,"' nor was he a
busybody, but the situation
stank to high heaven he said.
and he hoped it was put right
before he had to say more.


HARM TO P.c. CHARGE
MON \., I t RY Ieights
resident Charles Bullard 31,
pleaded not guilty in
Magistrate's Court this morning
to charges of causing harm to
two policemen, resisting arrest,
obstructing a police officer and
using obscene language.
Chief Magistrate Wilton Her-
cules set the trial for October 2.

NEWiil


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-- -, -1 --- a Ali


. XX, No. 236


Pg. e. 1 5 ('erth


Ih p













Whr GributM


Tuesday, September 11, 1973.


NIXON SAYS HE CANT BE COMPELLED
WASHINGTON (AP) President Nixon's lawyers hope to convince the
U.S. circuit court today that President Nixon cannot be compelled to turn
over the White House tape recordings on Watergate sought by special
prosecutor Archibald Cox. The appeal stemmed from the August 29 order
by chiet U.S. District Judge John Sirica that he he allowed to hear the
tapes to determine what, if anything should be turned over to the grand
jury.
" The Appeals Court yesterday rejected a request from the Senate
Watergate Committee for time to present its own arguments as a friend of
the court.
LAST-MINUTE APPEAL BY MITCHELL & STANS
SNW YORK (AP) A last-minute appeal is scheduled todat in the
S federal conspiracy trial of former Cabinet members John Mitchell and
Maurice Stans. The defendants want to delay their criminal trial on charges
of conspiracy, obstruction of justice and perjury.
I'he trial will start on time. however, if the federal panel, after hearing
arguments, immediately rejects the defendants' claim. They say they are
being rushed to judgment without reasonable time for attorneys to prepare
their case.
' The House voted overwhelmingly yesterday to initiate contempt action
against Watergate conspirator G. Gordon I-iddy. Liddy refused even to take
the oath as a witness before a House intelligence subcommittee last July in
its probe of alleged Central Intelligence Agency connections with
Watergate.
Z HOUSE TO CITE LIDDY FOR CONTEMPT
WASHIINGT[ON (AP) 1 he U.S. House of Representatives has voted a
form of contempt action against Watergate conspirator (ordon Liddy for
his refusal to testify before House investigators. Ihe house did not hold
L.iddy in contempt of Congress but rather turned the case over to the U.S.
O attorney for prosecution in the courts.
'The action would make l iddy liable for a maximum one-year sentence
A and one-thousand dollar fine. Liddy is already in jail lor his refusal to tell
all that he knows about the Watergate affair. Liddy was a member of the
1W so-called White House plumbers group. He was convicted of conspiracy in
* the hugging of Democratic Headquarters in the Watergate. He has refused
to tell investigators about his activities.

2 NIXON URGES CONGRESS FOR PARTNERSHIP
WASHINGTON (AP) President Nixon has made a move to get out of
the shadow of Watergate. In a special State of the Union message today, hie
urged congress to join him in what he termed a constructive partnership to
enact his major bills with all speed. He called for swift and decisive action
i on administration programmes ranging through education, revenue sharing.
- and trade to pension and tax reforms.
In his 1 5-thousand word message, the President repeatedly pledged his
cooperation and told the lawmakers their varying perspective can he a
source of greater creativity rather than a cause of deadlock.

CONGRESS RESPONSIVE TO NIXON'S PLEA
WASHIN(;G rN (Al') Responding to the Nixon message, House
Speaker Carl Albert said he feels pretty good about it. But Albert added he
finds nothing startling in it. House Republican leader (erald I ord said he
will be willing to work with the President's proposals.
l ord cited what he termed the President's willingness to iork Nibth
Congress for the good of the nation in the absence of partisanship.Senate
majority leader Mike Mansfield said he wiill call in committee chairmen to,
map strategy on what Nixon recommendations can be handled this sear
Senate Republican leader Hugh Scott said Congress can make reasonable
Progress on proposed legislation if it buckles down.

W NEW ARM OF FBI CREATED
m WNSHINCGION (N\\') .B.I. Director Clarence Kelle\ has announced
She has created a new external affairs division of his agency. It vsill superviSe
F.B.I. dealings with the public and the news media. He appointed a
48-year-old, 22-year I-.B.I. veteran. Robert Iranck, as an assistant director
in.charge of the new division.

^ CAMBODIANS REINFORCE PHNOM PENH
IPHNOM I'l NH (AP) the Cambodian military command reports
government reinforcements from Phnom Peinh have made an amphibious
landing behind Communist lines in tile southern part of Kompong Cham. N
government spokesman says many successes were scored and parts o tile
embattled city retaken.
lBut the spokesman says the ( ommunist-led forces still hold the hospital
i' i the northern part of tho ci(i .Reintorcetments continue to pour il l h
6 river convoy and helicopter.
.& A. MAY RELAX ITS EMBARGO OF GUA, ,: ,. .
WASHINCTON (PT ) -'U.S. Secretary of State'-desTgate Henry iA.
Kissinger said Monday the United States will consult with I atin American
countries to determine whether the time has come tor a relaxation of the
hemispheric embargo of (Cuba.
Kissinger's comment, made during his confirmation hearing before the
Senate foreign relations committee, was the first suggestion of a United
States willingness to reassess the embargo imposed nine years ago against
the regime of I'rime Minister I idel Castro.
Kissinger said. hoisever, that the United States wouldd make no unilateral
move on the Cuba question and would act only in concert with other
members oit the Organization of American States.
\ 1964 () \.S resolution required member states to break diplomatic and
commercial ties with Cuba but seven nations have chosen to ignore the
provision b\ unilaterally establishing relations w, ithl tHaana.
His remarks came amid a growing sympathy in Latin \merna for moves
to ease Cuba's isolation. An unofficial tally last \ies, k suggeN ted that 12
nations a majority i ere in favour of either liftmin the sanctions or
making their .ipplicatiii voluntary.

TWO MORE MURDERS IN U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS
CHIIARItjI It AMAIl11,. St. lhomas (AP) Police said todai that two
persons had been shot and killed on St. Thomas. the capital ro the Virgin
Islands.
The dead were identified as Hlen J. Arnett, 0O, and Jelin. Ortiz. 32.
Authorities said the bodies were found at a public housing project on
Charlotte Amalie.
The deaths brought the number of murders in the 1 .S Virgin Islands to
18 in slight over a sear. I le 16 other killings \were oil St ( ,nr i\. an island
to the south.

FRENCH PREMIER MET BY CHOU EN LA!
Pl-KIN(,. SHt I'l II (.\P) President Georges P3ompidotu ol I rance was
greeted oii the airport runway by Premier Chou F n I ai today\ when tihe
arrived in Peking for an official visit.
The airport welcome was described as solemn, betitting a c.let it state,.
hut lacking the enthusiasm turned on for a visitor Irom a triendls Xsiatic
country.
OCCIDENTAL BOSS BETTER OFF NOW IN LIBYA
NI W YOtIK (AP) DSr. Armand Hammnier chairman ol (ccidelntai (i
Corp., said today his company sulterd rd loss trim iby a's
nationalization of more than hall Occident il's assets m that North Atrican
country
Taking a conciliatory stance contrary to other western companies
similarly affected. Hammer said "it will not cause O)ccidental ans loss and
we are 35 million dollars better off than we were before."
Hammer said in a national television interview that Libya paid his I os
Angeles-based company the 35 million dollars for 5 per cent of the l.ibsan
assets and agreed to sell back to (Iccidental the oil derived from the
exrpropriated facilities, ie also said I ib>a has since increased production
from Occidental's sells.
Under the nationalistic leadership of Col. Mommar Khadaft. libsa
assumed control of Occidental Aug. II, and later did the same with all
foreign holdings. Other companies lodged vigorous protests.
Hammer, 76. who often pursues an independent course, said while he
sympathizes with the other companies, he does not have tile same fear


That nationalization will "leapfrog' throughout the Middle last. because
Occidental's only holdings in the Arab world are in Libya.
"Since we made peace with the Libyans." Hammer said. "they have
increased our production by almost 50 per cent in the last few days, slwhich
I think is important to show that the Arab countries are not really trying
to hold back production."


ARMED FORCES STRIKE



Military junta



topple Allende




in Chile today

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina, Sept. 11 (AP)- The Chilean
armed forces said today they have toppled Marxist President
Salvador Allende and were preparing to remove him forcibly from


his palace, radio reports said.
The announcement, in
communique number five read
over a hastily assembled
official national network.
followed others that asked the
public to remain calm and stay
at home.
It came only hours after the
top military leaders formed a
junta and demanded that
Allende voluntarily resign the
post to which he was elected in
October 1970.
Chile closed its airports and
borders and cut off exterior
communications during the
fast-paced developments in
Santiago. Meanwhile a
segment of sailors and marines
who mutined in Valparaiso
early today apparently held
that vital central port.
Allende, in an early response
to the officers, said, "I am here
and I will remain here
defending the government
elected by the workers... I will
not resign. I won't do it."
Later, however, an air force
plane attacked and silenced
one radio station loyal tc
Allende, and troops destroyed
another, radio reports said.
ULTIMATUM
The network broadcasting
from Chile played lively
martial music as the military's
noon deadline approached.
They gave Allende until that
time to peacefully evacuate the
palace before they attacked,
the radio said.
The communiques asked
that no demonstrations be held
for anyone, including the
armed forces.
More than 600 terrorist
attacks have been reported in
the last 45 days in apparent
connection with a series of
strikes called to protest
Allende's programme to "lead
Chile down the road to
socialism.'"
Chile's economy has been
near the point of collapse in
recent weeks, with crippled
transport, food distribution
and public services.
The armed forces
proclamation ordering Allende
to resign mentioned the
economic disarray among the
reasons for its uprising.


Allende, a 64-year-old
physician turned politician, is
the first freely elected Marxist
President in the western
hemisphere. From the
beginning ot his coalition
government nearly three years
ago, his attempts to remodel
the economy have met
frustrating opposition from the
Chilean congress. Both Houses
are controlled by anti-Marxist
opposition.
"I will not resign," Allende
announced to the nation
minutes after the proclamation
was made. "I will not do it."
Waves of low-flying planes
roared over the presidential
palace while Allende was
addressing the country.
He said over a radio station
owned by his Socialist Party
that navy elements occupied
the port city of Valparaiso and
were calling on him to step
down from the presidential
post he occupied nearly three
years ago.
SANTIAGO CALM
Santiago appeared calm.
The proclamation broadcast
over the opposition radio
demanded that "Senor
President of the Republic
proceed with the immediate
turning over of the high post.'
"The armed forces and the
police are united in initiating
the historic and responsible
mission of fighting for the
liberation of the country from
the Marxist yoke," it added.
Allen d e blamed
"irresponsible elements" for
what he called the "incredible
action of soldiers who go back
on their word and their
commitments."
"I declare my will to resist,"
he continued. "even at the cost
of my life in order that this
serve as a lesson in the
ignominious history of those
who have strength but not
reason.
During his speech to the
nation, he referred to the
overflight of military planes.
"Planes of the air force passed
over me,,e"ingly," he reported.
Then the broadcast was cut
off.


Beef prices remain stable



although freeze lifted, &



housewives still not buying

By The Associated Press
BEEF PRICES were freed from controls Monday for the first
time in nearly half a year, but shoppers iound there was little if
any change at the supermarket counter.


Consuliners and cattlemen
alike seemed to be playing a
waiting game, each trying to
figure out what the other
would do.
"Iverybody in the beef
industry is ... playing it cool to
see what's going to happen,"
said Gilbert Fourmigue,
president of Econo-Meats, a
New Orleans, La., wholesaler.
"It's all up to the housewife. If
they keep buying like they
have been, the price will stay
the same or go higher. There's
plenty of beef available. The
cattle have to come to market
... but I don't think the feedlot
boys are going to flood the
markets."
A spokesman for Jewel 'lea
Co., a large midwest chain, said
business at Chicago-area stores
was normal for a Monday
morning. "There really is no
new beef market established
yet," the spokesman said.
Gary Rush, the meat
manager for a Big Star grocery
in Memphis. ITenn., said,
"people haven't been buying
much beef for a long time now.
And I think they'll buy even
less when the prices go up. If
that happens, it's just natural
that the law of supply and
demand will take over and
prices will go down'
A spokesman for Wrigley's
Supermarkets in Detroit said
most beef prices would remian
the same through this week.
"We don't expect a price hike
on beef for at least a week,"
the spokesman said.
Many cattlemen withheld
livestock from market during
the freeze, waiting for higher
prices later. This created
temporary shortages.
At the same time, consumers
rebelled at the high prices of
other items particularly pork


and poultry and refused tto
buy. The prices came down
again
SUPPLY & )1 \IANI)
With the end of the beef
free/e, most experts predicted
that prices would depend
simply on supply and demand.
If cattlement sell a lot of
animals at once, supply will
increase and prices may go
down.
At the sanme time, if
consumers start buying a lot of
beet and if they are willing to
pay high prices, the demand
may outstrip supply and there
will be no decline.
Supermarket managers said
they were waiting to see what
their suppliers would charge,
not onl11 for beet, but also for
other foods which, starting
Monday, will blie allow ced to
increase in price to reflect cost
increases.
"We are still studying the
regulations," said a spokesman
for Saifew a.\ Stores in
Washington, Dl.C. "we ,ilso
need to know what the
wholesale market is going to
do."
Officials of Giant, another
Washingtion-area chain, inle
Monday afternoon to consider
the implications of the new
rules.
Beef prices have been under
a ceiling since the beginning of
April. Controls on other foods
were lifted July 18 to allow
prices increases in agricultural
costs, but the beef limit was
scheduled to remain until
Wednesday in accordance with
the phase 4 economic
programme. The government
lifted the ceiling at midnight
Sunday, however, partly to
avoid shortages caused by
last-minute buying.


NIXON'S 95-PAGE NIXON'S UNION MESSAGE


BRIEF TO KEEP 'Battle of inflation


TAPES SECRET

WASHINGTON (AP)-
President Nixon's lawyers told
the U.S. Court of Appeals
Monday that an order requiring
the President to release his tape
recordings of Watergate-related
conversations will be a long
step "toward government by
judiciary."
jThe brief, filed in advaLice of
oral arguments Tuesday, asked
the Appeals Court to nullify
the Aug. 29 order by Chief
U.S. District Court Judge John
J. Sirica that the tapes be
turned over to him for
screening what portions the
Watergate grand jury can hear.
Sirica filed his own answer
with the court and responded
also to a cross-petition by
special Watergate prosecutor
Archibald Cox. The prosecutor
asked that the judge's order he
changed to produce the tapes
in their entirety to the grand
jury.
Nixon's lawyers argued that
Sirica's decision, if allowed to
stand, would do great damage
to the constitutional principle
of separation of powers.
"Today it would be the
presidency that would be
lessened and crippled in its
ability to function," said the
brief by the President's
attorneys. "Tomorrow it
Should he Congress."
"Surely this is far too high a
price to pay for the atonement
of Watergate."
Fhe White House argued in
its 95-page brief that "it is the
President alone who has
discretion to determine
whether the public interest
permits (the tapes') protiuction
and that this discretion cannot
be reviewed or overridden by a
court or by Congress."
Cox, in a brief half the
length, quoted a 1952 decision
by the Appeals Court that
"some authority must
determine whether a specific
act is within the official
capacity of the executive and
so immune from interference;
that authority is the judiciary."
Sirica, named as respondent
in both petitions, said lie relied
on decisions as far back as
1883 that the courts may
decide what evidence must be
produced.
Sirica said he was
confronted with a difficult
decision in the historic case
and "attempted to walk a
middle ground required by
insisting on a private review
rather than simply ordering the
entire tapes turned over to the
grand jury.
I he Appeals Court said
earlier it would give the case
priority so that any appeal
from its decision can go to the
U.S. Supreme Court when it
returns from recess on Oct.1.
I lie White Hlouse called
Sirica's ruling "utterly without
precedent" and said:
"As recently as a year ago
such a ruling would have been
unthinkable ..the change in the
climate of legal and popular
opinion ... is the result of
Watergate.
"The hydraulic force arising
out of that sordid and unhappy
episode has led mnten of great
distinction to suppose that the
constitution means something
different today than it meant
throughout all of our
history...."

Connally may run

for U.S. presidency
WASHING; I (ON (AI') former
U S. Treasurs Secretary John
Connally said Moiuldas he is
thinking about running for
President in 19q76.
But ('iionnally said hlie's not
certain "I'm real to dedicate the
rest of mi life to such an
undertakingg"
"If you're asking me if I'm
thinking about the possibility on
running." C'onnally said at a news
citnferensce. "I'm re.iadily to stipulate
thait right nos ."
I lie comment cainle in response
to a question about (Connally's busy
activity on the po itics circuit.


launched Sunida, wsith a speech at
the California State Republican
conenlition.
In the next few s weeks C (onnally,
a I)emocrat turned Republican, sill
travel to San IDiego, Ihouston,
C hicago Austin. Phoenix.
Scottsdale. News York and Dallas.
-\nd that's just for a starter.
I lie former I e;xas (,vernor said
the spIeaking actiity Lame at the
insistencte of "rinenls vwho have
been imnportuning Ine to come
make a speech toi a gathering." He
also said some i those friends have
been asking him to, run for political
office.
"WIha.t do, I tell them?" he
answered the question. "I tell them
I'm not sure I'm ready to dedicate
the rest of my life to such an
undertaking. '
Connall also said he is "telling
them I'm not a candidate for any
of fice.'
But while conceding he is at least
thinking about it. Connally said
anybody \sho' wants to make a
serious run for the Republican
Presidential nomination must make
his decision by 1975.
"And it I decide to run, I'm
going to come out running," he
added, I wouldn't he a reluctant
candidate.


must be priority



for rest of year'


By Frank Cormier
WASHINGTON (AP) President Nixon. in an ambitious bid
to move out of Watergate's shadow, urged Congress Monday to
join him in a "constructive partnership" to speedily enact major
legislation.
Submitting an unusual criticism, the President said
15,000-word State of the Congress has made
Union message, Nixon held out "commendable progress" in
olive branches to the some areas his year but th.
Democratic-controlled Senate action on -, >',wn initiatives
and House as he called for "has been,, iess than I had
"swift and decisive action" on expected.
administration bills ranging FIRST PRIORITY
from education revenue sharing Nixon said "the battle
to trade, pension and tax against inflation must be our
reforms, first priority for the remainde;
Repeatedly pledging his of this year" and called or
cooperation, Nixon told the Congress to hold
legislators that "if we proceed appropriations to his spending
in a spirit of constructive ceiling of $368.7 billion for tht
partnership, our varying fiscal year that began July 1.
perspectives can be a source of 'in our joint efforts
greater creativity rather than a however, I continue to be
cause of deadlock." adamantly opposed tc
Welcoming what he termed ,. attenrrts at balancing the
"Congressional renaissance," over-all budget by slashing the
Nixon said he believes in a defense budget. We are already
strong Congress as well as a at the razor's edge in defense
strong Presidency and asserted: spending. .further cuts wouk
"There can be no monopoly be dangerously irresponsible
of wisdom on either end of and I will veto any bill tha
Pennsylvania Avenue and includes cuts which imperil our
there should be no monopoly national security." he said.
of power." The President at no poin
Responding to the speech, directly referred to Watergats
House speaker Carl Albert, but said, "no subject over the
(D-Okla.) said, "I feel pretty last few months has so stirred
good about it." But he added public commend and reflection
that he found "nothing very at the question of campaign
startling" in the message. practices."
House Republican leader Noting Congress has no
Gerald R. Ford of Michigan acted in nearly four months on
said he would be willing to a presidential proposal tt
work for the President's establish a non-partisan
proposals, citing Nixon's commission on federal election
willingness to work with reform, he said, "in light of thu
Congress for the good of the great interest of the public an(
nation in an absence or the Congress in such reforms,
partisanship." am at a loss to understand wh.
Senate Democratic leader only the Senate has acted ot
Mike Mansfield said he would this request."
call Senate committee lie said the American public
chairmen together to map "might well ask whether thi
strategy on what Nixon interest in reform is restricted
recommendations could be to calling for changes rathe
handled this year. than making changes."
GOP Senate leader Hugh It was the sharpest language
Scott said the Congress could used in his bulky message.
make reasonable ,progress, onl Other measures on whicl
proposed legislation if it would Nixon urged speedy action
buckle down to work. included bills to authorize th


ACTIONS OPPOSED
Besides focusing attention
on the legislation he wants,
Nixon also spotlighted actions
he opposes: red ink spending,
any tax increase, major defense
cutbacks and busing of public
school children to achieve
racial balance.
Nixon stated that if
congress s votes more money
than he wants, he will not
hesitate to veto spending
measures or impound
appropriations.
lie also said he would
"continue to oppose all efforts
to strip the Presidency of the
powers it must have to be
effective" an obvious threat
to veto any legislation that
would restrict his warmaking
powers.
Mixing compliments with


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Alaska pipeline and the
building of deep water tanker
ports. deregulation of natural
gas prices, standards for strip
mining, a variety of
environmental proposals,
anti-crime bills, greater local
control for community
development funds and what
he considers adequate defense
and foreign aid appropriations.


13 INJURED


IN 2 LONDON


BOMB BLASTS
LONDON (AP) I lunchtinie
explosions in two London railroad
stations injured 13 persons Monday
in the bloodiest attacks of a
three-week terror-bomb campaign
blamed on Irish extremists.
Two of the victims were
seriously injure 1 and one w as
reported near death.
Bomh scares forced evacuations
and police searches in half a dozen
other London rai! terminals. liti
only one other explosive device was
fould, and it failed to go off.
More than 40 bomh attacks in
London, Birmingham, Manchester
and other British cities since Aug.
18 had already injured a total of a
dozen people, a figure eclipsed by
Monday's explosions.
Police have blamed the bombing
wave on terrorists of the Irish
Republican Army, which is fighting
to drive Britain out of Northern
Ireland and unite the British
province with the Irish Republic.
The IRA. however, has ret fused
to confirm or den\ it set the
bombs.
Advance warnings of the earlier
blasts had kept the number of
injuries low. But this time there s as
only a three-minute warning on ion
of the station bombs and ni
warning at all on the other.
Police had feared just such .111
escalation. they speculated th,
bombing wave had been
orchestrated to coincide with the
trial of 10 accused Irish terroristN
that opened Monday in Winchester
The 10 are accused of planting
bombs in London last March. fhose
bombs killed one person anil
injured 200.
Some officers in London ha.d
openly predicted that the worst ot
the attacks would come the day the
trial opened. It was moved tI
Winchester for security reasons.
Ihe precautions in Winchester
were officially described as the
tightest ever imposed in peacetime
Britain. But there was little that
authorities could do to protest
L.ondon against an apparently
determined band of extremists.
London's 8 million inhabitants
increase to more than 10 million
during the working day, with most
commuters coming in by rail.
Stations are crowded, presenting
police with an awesome security
headache
Tile first bomb exploded at
King's Cross station without
warning. Witnesses said they sa\ a
youth toss a package into an
unused ticket office. live people
were injured there, iincludinig tllhose
severely hurt.
Ihe second bomb, a larger
device, exploded at a snack bar in
nearby Euston Station less Ihan a
hour later. An anonymous caller
with an Irish accent gave police :1
three-minute tip-off.
I ight persons were hurt at
F uston, including a man alnd (\ile
detained in a hospital viti neck
and foot injuries. T'he others were
treated for cuts and released.
Prime Minister Edward Heath,
visiting Wick in Northern Scotland.
was kept informed of the security.
situation.


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FOR THOSE WANTING TO JOIN
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INTERCONTINENTAL REALTY LIMITED OFFERS
THE CHANCE TO BECOME INVOLVED IN THIS
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BETWEEN HOURS OF 2 to 5 p.m. MONDAY, TUESDAY,
WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY.


to keep

Saturday afternoon,

September 15, openly



TO SEE FREEPORT'S THIRD


TWO MILE MARATHON SWIM RACE




OFFICIAL STARTING TIME 2:30PM.



from: LUCAYAN HOTEL BEACH


to: SILVERPOINT BEACH


PROCEEDS IN AID OF BAHAMAS AIR-SEA RESCUE ASSN.


Trophies will be on display at Butler & Sands Downtown store in Marlborough
Building adjacent to the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce.


THIS PUBLIC NOTICE BY COMPLIMENTS
OF CHARLES TANQUERAY GIN & CO. LTD




/ip


Tuesday, September 11. 1973. P ( rtbtW_ 3

EDITORIAL I Asks leaders to change attitude I FPTFMIIFRFyi SAf I


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
(IFour days ago I quoted passages from a speech on business
and economic growth made by Anthony Thompson, manager of
the Bahamas .Monetary Authority, at the ninth conference of the
Caribbean Federation of Mental Health. Yesterday I told you two
stories of business development in New York and London. Today
I will tell rou how The Tribune grew from a small business into
what it is today.)

In writing a story about anything it is always most effective
when a writer can record his own experiences. And so today I will
tell you the story of how The Tribune grew from a small business
into a major operation.
It was never intended that The Tribune should become a big
business Indeed, for over half a century it was regarded as a
mission, not a business. Now it is both a mission and a business.
When my father launched this enterprise in 1903 he took as his
motto an old Latin quotation which, translated into English,
reads: "Being bound to swear to the dogmas of no master "
It would seem impossible to relate such a bold and challenging
motto to cold-blooded business where the only concern is to turn
a profit, the bigger the better.
The whole purpose of The Tribune was to serve a cause...and,
within thie framework of the then social structure of the islands,
it would be impossible to maintain the standards set by this
motto and make money too. But 70 years lrter we have shuwn
that it could be done ... and it has been done
My father faced his first challenge soon after The Tribune was
launched with a tiny tread!.C press and a case of type. Nothing
could be smaller. But, despite the sma!lncss of the operation, he
had actually accumulated 80 pounds sterling in the bank when an
issue came up that concerned the coloured people of the islands.
l ighty pounds in those days was considered a great pile of
money.

It would be a mistake to regard this newspaper as representing
any race, creed o: colour in the Bahamas. Throughout its life it
has stood for what it considered right and honest and fair. This is
shown by the fact that we are now fighting "prejudice in
Ieseise."
In this case "right" was on the side of the coloured people and
mi father went to bat for them.
One night the leader of the Old Guard power bloc sent for him.
I his man had been his friend and had helped him to make his
small operation profitable.
"Leon," lie said to my father, "you have to make up your
mind where you belong. You are either with us or against us. You
know w lhat that meanss"
My father knew what that meant and so he went back home to
tmy mother with this ultimatum. He felt he could not make a
stand without her full support.
"Leon." she told hinm, "we must always stand for what is right
and fair in The Tribune We will fail the whole purpose of our
eftfot if we start bargaining with anyone on any question."
My father was greatly influenced by my mother who was a
strong woman. They made a perfect team. He was a strong man
but a man with a mission can only survive with the support and
inspir.ition of a strong woman.

On that day the die was cast.
And from that day The Tribune had a struggle to survive.
My mother died in 1909 without compromising her faith in
truth and justice. She was only 36.
And when my father died in 1914 The Tribune had made very
little physical progress...and it was in debt. He was only 44.
Both their hearts, with other complications, had cracked under
the strain.

I was then 15 years of age and my older brother Gilbert headed
the family but my father had made me promise him on his
deathbed tha: I would carry on the work he started. He seemed
to sense that I would have the strength to follow in his footsteps.
I promised him but I didn't want this job. I was afraid of it. I
hlad seen what my father and mother had endured in their battle
fi, just causes...receiving only ingratitude and an exhibition of
cow ardice frotmi the people for whom they made sacrifices.
At the age of 17 I volunteered for service in the British army
overseas and went to the battle line on the Eastern and Western
trionts. I was away three years.
When I returned to Nassau at the age of 20 The Tribune was
hare\s breathing. My brother Gilbert a gentle and kind man
had carried it on but he was an artist and he didn't have the
stomach for this kind of work...and so I took over the editorial.
chair.

All our concern was fixeti on maintaining a strong editorial
policy. No consideration was given to business. We ignored
imoniey even to the point of being contemptuous of it.
And then in 1o29 I met my future wife in Pennsylvania on my
wa\ to Minnesota. We got married on my way back to Nassau.
I warned her of thIe hard life that lay ahead' of her in the
Bahama, if she became my wife. She accepted the challenge.

I lThe town was growing fast. It was leaving us behind. We had to
dio something about our antiquated machinery or drop out of the
race
We decided to install a high speed flat-bed press with rolls. This
was something new for Nassau.
Thie factory sent a man to Nassau to instal it. We provided
labour to do the heavy work.
It wasn't until the installation had been completed that I
realized that we didn't have an operator. I talked with the man
florm thie factory. Hie said he couldn't help but that one of the
labourers who had worked with him on the installation seemed a
likely chap.
This was a six shilling a day man. I hired him. But from the
very start tins press gave so much trouble that it was the first


Ind oml\ time in my life that I felt defeated.
One night I walked out of the office, a broken man, on the
verge of a nervous breakdown.
I told my wife I wa.s through...l just couldn't go through
another day with that machine. I was quitting. My wife went
back to the office and saw the day's work through.
That night she talked with me.
"You need a qualified mechanic for that press." she said;
"Where are we going to find such a person and what'are we
going to pay him with?". I asked.
The next day I talked with a qualified man who was a friend of
mine. lie agreed to come oil the staff at 20 pounds sterling a
x cek.
At that time the highest paid man on my staff was receiving
only three pounds a week. That was also all I gave my wife to run
our household with six young children. And so I hesitated. Three
pounds at that time was worth less than $9.00.
"I don't see how we can do it." I told my wife, "we'll go


EDITOR The Tribune,
I deem it a great privilege to
use your columns for freedom
of expression.
With all due respect to our
honorable Prime Minister
whom I must admit is wise,
shrewd and intelligent, I am
now thinking of the Way our
Prime Minister has used our
Honorable Deputy Prime
Minister as a hatchet man and a
shield throughout his former
portfolio as Minister of
Immigration to destroy the
investors' confidence in this
country through prejudice and
reep hatred for the white man
or our white brother, if you
please:


We quickly made more money, we paid better salaries, and we
got better staff.

When a friend of mine saw the strides we were making he
suggested that I needed a good accounting department.
At that time we didn't have even an ordinary bookkeeper on
the staff. We had a girl who sent out bills and I was perfectly
satisfied as long as more money was coming in than was going
out. And so I laughed at the suggestion.
But every time this friend met me he pressed the suggestion.
"Why don't you have an auditor in to advise you on what you
need?", he urged.
When I inquired and found that an auditor's services would
cost six hundred pounds I decided that this was ridiculous.
But my friend kept pressing and finally I agreed.
I was shocked by the auditor's report which showed how I was
losing thousands of pounds a year through waste, incompetence
and stealing.
I immediately commissioned him to set up an accounting
department at The Tribune. He installed a very high priced
chartered accountant at our office. This man proceeded to save
the firm thousands of pounds a year. This made it possible for us
to engage more qualified staff.

When my daughter, Mrs. Carron, came home 12 years ago
with a degree in philosophy, a degree in journalism and a degree
in law, people were impressed.
Many people said that she must surely be the most highly
educated Bahamian. She probably was at that time because, in
addition to her university work, she had spent a summer in Paris
learning French, a summer in New York on the staff of The New
York Times, she had travelled through the Far East with some of
the world's leading Editors, and she had met many of my
important friends in many parts of the world.
She had indeed a very broad education but when she joined
The Tribune staff I was shocked to find that she had no idea of
business...not a single clue.
But she learned from our expatriate staff, especially from an
English Financial Comptroller we had with us five years ago. This
man had been Financial Comptroller of the African State of
Zambia handling hundreds of millions of pounds a year and so he
also had a grasp of international business and finance.
By the time the government refused to renew his work permit
two years ago he had set uip an efficient department for us...and
my daughter had become a fully qualified business woman. I
realized then that she was more capable of managing the Tribune
than I and so I handed over complete control to her. Today I
write this column for her...that's all. This is why my prese :e in
Nassau is no longer required.

Two ycung Bahamians one black, one white who were in
England taking accountancy, spent their summer holidays on our
staff and had the great advantage of working under this man who
taught them things no university can impart to a student.
With the foundation training one of the young women in his
department received from him, she will enter a university in the
U.S. in September to take an Executive Secretarial course.

I tell this story to show that the government over emplia-
sizes the importance of a university degree.
A university degree is only a preparation for life. At this point
a student only starts to learn how to apply the principles he was
taught at university. This is a testing period because many of
them never learn the practical ways of life...and so they fail

***************
The tribune grew from a small business into a big business by
definite stages.
eThe day my father refused to be bullied and influenced by
the money power group in Nassau....that day he gave meaning t.)
the motto he had taken for his tiny sheet.
The day I met Fr.Chrysostom and he agreed to teach me...and
then took nie as though I were his own son for eight years...was
another important milestone.
eThe day I married an American woman who was prepared to
go through hell and high water with me...and we later produced a
child who has proven to be ready, able and willing to carry on the
high traditions of this newspaper, even at this almost impossible
stage in the affairs of the colony.
*The night my wife convinced me that The Tribune could no
longer carry on with cheap labour.
oThe day my friend convinced me that The Tribune needed a
qualified accounting department.
*The day my daughter married a highly qualified man who has
become a tower of strength to her in carrying out a difficult task
*And the day I realized that my daughter was better qualified
than I to manage the affairs of The Tribune. For one thini
couldn't handle staff today. In my day staff were like my triends
and I treated them like family. They took pride in this institution
and were loyal to it. Today loyalty and gratitude are hard to find
among our people.

This whole procession of facts emphasizes one thing. It is that
the owner of a business needs to gather around him men and
women who are capable of carrying out plans and stimulating
growth.
A business will stagnate...and ultimately die...under conditions
where a government lays down a rule forcing business men to
employ inexperienced ....and sometimes hopelessly
incompetent...people in executive positions.
And so vir. Thompson was absolutely right when hIe said in hiis
speech that "unproved, ineffectual and inefficient management is
the chief cause of business failures in the Bahamas."
** ** ***********
A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
Your sole contribution to tne sum of things is yourself.
-PRANK CRANE .


broke."
"Right now it looks as though we're going broke anyway,',.h HIC.tliHrTSh 4 tt Y n h19' c F eh airliner crashes
replied "we'd just as well do it in.a big way. "' ': '" .jw : ein O l e Mtdisent aneain, killing il 95
And so we hired this man and the first week he nire than- "972Dird iker. e Personsb unaon n
rallder' of WWaierit hl S eak4n. 1962-Soviel Union warns that
made his salary by cutting down on waste. a cknowldtesn his rle but says he any U.S. attack on Cuban or o:1
This experience opened my eyes to the fact that no business will nm tImlicate hitters. Soviet ships bound for cuba
-197.1 -VtOtmor, Soviet. lPrrmier would mean-war.
can get off the ground floor without qualified staff... Lk- I r'sN tnhcrtv r:




'K SMEARED


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BARCLASES
Intraional iffBI









Tuesday, September 11, 1973.


By Abigail Van Buren
S 19733 Y Cicago Tribe.-N. Y. News Sini., loc.
DEAR ABBY: You asked senior citizens what their
biggest problems were. Money? Health? Loneliness?
Boredom?
I can't speak for the men, but I can tell you that the
biggest problems most women have are as follows:
When husbands retire they follow the wife around all
day remarking on how she does the housework, cooking,
etc. and none of it is complimentary.
Also, he never lets his wife go anywhere alone. He has
to tag along because his own interest in sex is waning, and
he starts accusing her of seeing other men. In other words,
they get jealous because they can't perform as well them-
selves.
Men retire, but we middle-class wives continue to do
our regular housework because of our limited income,
which has been worsened by inflation.
Doctors who see senior citizens will confirm the above,
for which there is no solution at the present time. But with
women's liberation, maybe the future will be better for
coming generations.
I can't sign my name because all phone calls and mail
are monitored here, and I'll have to carry this around in
my purse until I can sneak it into a mailbox.
TRAPPED IN FORT MEYERS
DEAR ABBY: Yes, I have a problem. How does a
senior citizen find a place to live? Had my name in for one
project for two years, and the building started to sink.
Applied to get into another and was told they were filled,
and had a waiting list of 500, Something should be done
about housing for us. I'm not ready for a nursing home yet.
EASTERNER
DEAR ABBY: I'm 75, and a widower. I made my first
trip to a foreign country at age 70. At 71, I started making
my own sourdough bread, and now I can't stand bakery
bread. At 73, I started making my own jellies and jams. I
enjoy life because I keep active.
I've sent for a copy of the LIVING WILL, thanks to
you I wish to live, but I am not interested in existing.
F. E. W., KENT, WASH.
DEAR ABBY: I'm a widow in my sixties, nice figure,
and I'm told I'm attractive. Ly problem is finding a GOOD
man. They either drink too much and want sex, or they're
too old. One older man wanted to marry me. He said:
"You buy the house, Honey. and I'll cut the grass." He
could hardly walk two blocks, so I'm wondering how he
could cut the grass. WINTER PARK, FLORIDA
DEAR ABBY: We are both 77 years old, and have been
married 53 years. First we liked each other, then we loved
each other, and now we adore each other. Our problem?
We would like to die together.
HARTWIG AND HELEN IN BERKELEY
DEAR ABBY: Well, you asked for it. My biggest prob-
lem is making ends meet. Medicare and Blue Cross will not
pay even a part of my medical bills. All I have is my








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Senior citizens tell their biggest problems


Social Security and it's not enough. SHORT IN ST. LOUIS
DEAR ABBY: I try not to think about it, but my
children are too busy to come to see me, and if I waited for
them to call me on the phone, I'd never hear from them.
My grandchildren are no better. They send presents once in
a while, but the best present would be for them to visit me
more often. NEGLECTED IN L.A.
DEAR ABBY: I just had my 75th birthday, and my
only complaint is all the talk I hear about "poor old
Grandma!"
I love to read, watch TV, listen to the radio, and
crochet. I don't drive, but I often take the bus to have
dinner out somewhere alone. I find most company [espe-
cially relatives] very tiring. I just love to be alone.
GRANDMA IN PITTSBURGH
DEAR ABBY: I'm 74, wear eyeglasses, false teeth, a
hearing aid, and I walk with a cane. But I'm happy be-
cause I'm a born-again Christian.
I can smell the fragrance of my flowers, and feel the
softness of my cat, and I can eat anything I can afford to
buy.
I'm on old age pension and can't afford a radio or TV,
but I have lots of good books. I can't afford a phone or
even a newspaper but I can avail myself of my neighbor's
in both cases.
I've always been poor, so it's no hardship. Besides, I'll
have a mansion by and by.
GLADYS IN CHILLICOTHE, OHIO
DEAR READERS: If you didn't like this column, you
won't like tomorrow's either. It's more from our wonderful


senior citizens who wrote in by the thousands!


DEAR READERS: Last weekend, in all humility and
with no intended irreverence to Moses, I published my
"TEN COMMANDMENTS FOR WIVES." Here is the com-
panion piece, "TEN COMMANDMENTS FOR HUSBANDS."
1. Thou shalt put thy wife before thy mother, thy fa-
ther, thy daughter, and thy son, for she is thy life-
long companion.
2. Abuse not thy body either with excessive food, tobac-
co, or drink, that thy days may be many and health-
ful in the presence of thy loved ones.
3. Permit neither thy business, nor thy hobby to make
of thee a stranger to thy children, for the most
precious gift a man giveth his family is his time.
4. Forget not the virtue of cleanliness.
5. Make not thy wife a beggar, but share willingly with


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her thy worldly goods.
6. Forget not to say, "I love you." For even t thy
love be constant, thy wife doth year to hear-the
words.
7. Remember that the approval of thy wife is rwth
more than the admiring glances of a hundred strang-
ers. Cleave unto her, and forsake all others. -
8. Keep thy home In good repair, for out of It eeett
the joys of thy old age.
9. Forgive with grace. For who among us does ut
need to be forgiven?
10. Honor the Lord thy God all the days of ty life, and
thy children will rise up and call thee blessed.
Problems? You'll fel better if yoe get It of f yorbt.
For a pwasal rdply, wrie to ABBY: BeS NM. SM, L,. A..
Cant. -im. Mu d uamWc M4ddiAegS

For AbW's now hoaMle, "What iom*gAp Wal t to
Mow." Me d1* Aby. Box *1I. LD .,U ll, Cm. N-.


JNK-~ SMEARD


Tuesday, September 11, 1973.


ABBY


ght (ribtwe










Tuesday, September 11, 1973.


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Matinee starts at 1:00
Evening 9:00
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Glenda JacKson
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Robert Wagner
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Walter Matthau
Carol Burnett


'In Camera'--a powerful & sensitive production


By Elizabeth Nathaniels.
Just as Voltaire is
remembered for that bagatelle
of a philosophical short story,
Candide, so probably will the
great French philosopher of our
time, Jean Paul Sartre, be
remembered for the short
one-act play called Huis Clos.
Translated as In Camera, or No
Exit or Vicious circle). So also,
I hope it will be remembered in
Nassau that the Theatre
Workshop Company made
their debut in two
performances of this
fascinating play held on Friday
and Saturday last week.
The theatre Workshop
Company directed by
Bahamian actor. Cedric Scott,
differs from other drama
groups in Nassau in its aim
towards professionalism, its
members meeting regularly to
practise their art in workshop
sessions.
Their first production was
proceeded by some excellent
songs by Patrick Rahming and
Derek Burrows and dance by
Edward "Pepe" Johnson in the
somewhat incongruous but
intimate setting of the Colony
Room of the Montagu Beach
Hotel, with occasional tourist
sounds of calypso wafting
through from outside.
Here, we were treated to a
stunning performance in which
one of the four actors achieved
an almost totally professional
and satisfying character
portrayal, and an overall
performance which was only
marred by too much music at
the beginning, some
un evenness of character
portrayal, a few forgotten lines
and by the far from perfect
translation of Stuart Gilbert's.
Huis Clos is a one act play
set in hell. The classical unities
of time, place and action are


perfectly observed. The action
and dialogue flow without
break at all. Hell, in Satre's
witty and often cynical way, is
seen as a Second Empire
drawing room, designed
especially for three people who
detest Second Empire drawing
rooms. Instead of being
bothered by an "official
torturer" the three discover a
splendid and diabolical
economy "It's obvious what
they're after -" says the
intellectual Inez" ..an economy
of man power .. or devil power
if you prefer. The same idea is
in a cafeteria where customers
serve themselves."
They are doomed, as they
gradually discover, to spend
eternity torturing each other.
Each feels a kind of hatred and
repugance for one and a kind
of yearning or lust for the
other, forming a perfect vicious
circle.
Garcin, the self doubting
woud be idealist and journalist
turns to the strong and
far-sighted lesbian lnez who, in
her turn despises Garcin and is
only interested in the pretty
empty-headed Estelle.
Estelle, a nymphomaniac
lusts for Garcin who in his turn
despises her.
Each has sinned
spectacularly, but at first the
two weaker characters try to
hide the Jruth of their death
and reasons for their
damnation with euphemism
and half-truth. "I'm wondering
if there hasn't been some
ghastly mistake" exclaims
Estelle, the social butterfly
who has murdered her baby.
EVERYDAY LIFE
The almost terrible
fascination of the play, apart
from its tight-knit structure, is
its similarity to everyday life.
The irony and bite lies in the
uncomfortable closeness to
mundave reality., everywhere
in groups such as families,
people of differing tastes and
ideals are forced to live
together, torturing each other
for life, fearing freedom even


when it is offered to them.
And, just as Candide concludes
that cultivating one's own
garden is the cynical answer to
the terrible realities of the
world, so Garcin's "Hell is
other people" faces up to an
even more cynical truth.
The whole setting is behind
closed doors, hence Huis Clos,
In Camera or No Exit. (The
title was completely
misunderstood by the
programme designer
incidentally who depicted a
photographic camera on the
cover of the programme!) Yet,
at one point, the door opens,
after Garcin has battered on it,
screaming to be let out and
no-one leaves. All of them have
wanted to leave the room, yet
they discover, as Pat Rahming
observed in one of his songs
earlier in the evening
"Freedom is a state of mind."
They all stay, not only because
they fear the unknown but
because they are inextricably
bound together, emotionally
and psychologically. Garcin
feels he must eventually woo
the admiration of Inez and
"save" her was well, lnez seeks
the domination of Estelle and
Estelle lusts for Garcin. With
this witty setting and device,
Jean Paul Sartre explores one
of the central problems of
human existence.
What did the cast of two
Bahamians and two Britons
make of it all? They made a
great deal and studied every
meaning of every sentence,
etchinginto relief every nuance
of irony, pathos and humour.
The nearest to a perfect
professional performance was
that of Angela Scott, whose
lesbian Inez, was superb, in spite
of frequent promptings. Every
twist of her hardened mouth,
her firm voice clearly
enunciating the harsh truth, all
rang true with an inner power
and conviction. She was every
inch the part she played and
commanded the stage
masterfully.
As for the others, while
Dennis Manuel's performance
as the valet was suitably
laconic and down-to-earth (but
were those stutterings and
hesitations intentional or
not?), both Winston Saunders
and Sue Full would, I think tie


for second place, after Angela.
However. Winston Saunders,
powerful actor though he is,
does not really convince us
that he is a South American
journalist, tortured by self
doubt, not merely because of
the oddity of white painted
dark skin, but because his
character portrayal frequently
slips. He forgets his neurotic
twichings, for instance, in
confrontations with other
characters and on one or two
occasions becomes thoroughly
Bahamian and every inch,
Winston Saunders. ("So you
think I'm a member of the
staff, eh?" says he with pure
Bahamian accent and lilt). His
Garcin is too contrived, too
hard-work and the
tremendous efforts of the
beginning cannot be sustained.
I think that here, an
imaginative changing from the
original character would have
been in order. I would have
applauded Cedric Scott, and
so, I think, would have Sartre,
if, as a suitable vehicle for
Wintson's power and passion,
the character of G(;arcin could
have been changed into that of
say a Civil Rights leader or a
West Indian politician. Such a
man could have easily been as
torn by self doubt and as


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generally mixed up as Garcin -
and would have been
beautifully portrayed by
Winston. Admittedly this
transposition is not necessary
in every case, due to race or
character. Cedric Scott himself
has successfully played a
Cockney soldier on the British
stage.


However, lacking a full
cast of professionals, one
should ingeniously make the
best of what one has. After all,
the English translator of the
play saw fit, in the same vein,
to change Inez's French song
into a totally different English
one, rather than attempting a
On Back Page


On Back Pap


Vat 69 and ginger
is a very adult drink.
People say you actually
taste the Scotch.
After all, isn't that what
drinking whisky is for ?

.VAT69


I

Enter The Tribune-Pan Am Travel Photo

Contest!
I I













C tsContest Rules

IThe Tribune will run a total of 30 photo ads
showing a scene from somewhere within Pan

answer blank included in each ad. After the
Final photo has run on November 17th, mail
"e Call 30 entries (stapled or clipped together)
to: Vacation, The Tribune, P. O. Box
N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas, You may enter
more than one group of photos, as long as
you use official Tribune blanks and groups
must be fastened together.
Should you miss an edition of The Tribune
a finwith a Pan Am photo ad, back copies can be
I purchased at The Tribune reception desk in
The Tribune Building, Shirley Street,
Nassau, or The Tribune office, 9B Kipling
1 In case of a tie, the tie will be broken by

additional photos not previously published.
All entries must be postmarked no later than
midnight, Monday, November 19th, 1973.
Employees and their families of The
Tribune, Pan American World Airways andt
their advertising agencies, are not eligible to
enter.
Photo No. 8

City or Scene ................................ Country ..................................

My Nam e ............................. Address .......................... Phone ..........



Contest ends Saturday, Nov.h17th :t,
Winr r may chooe round-tnp for two
to any one of the followin26 European

Where in the world within Pan Am's travel system, m--a.
are the places pictured above? Identify all 30 i AMSTERDAM MADRID
photographs that will appear on various days in BARCELONA MUNICH
The Tribune over the next 13 weeks and you have BERLIN NUREMBERG
a chance to win a round-trip for two aboard a Pan COHGEN PAROS
American World Airways' jet to your choice of any DUSSELDORF PRAGUE
one of 26 European cities served by Pan A m. GLASGOW SHANNON
HAMBURG STOCKHOLM
HANOVER STUTTGART
LISBON VIENNA
)e Tfribunt LONDON WARSAW
* Photo No.8mm ma mm m em alm me em g


I


Matinee Continuous from 1:30, Evening 8:30-
'Phone 3-4666

I "THE GETAWAY" I
Starring
STEVE McQUEEN ALI MACGRAV *
SP L US -


I "SAM WHISKEY" I
btarrnis
BURT REYNOLDS ANGIE DICKINSON

SUGGESTED FOR MATURE AUDIENCES.
_PARENTAL DISCRETION ADVISED.


I


I


Sh GrURRtt








ehr rthbutw


Tuesday, September 11, 1973.


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Tuesday, September 11, 1973.


UhP Gribttu


Bahamas& both Germanys to be admitted


THE 28th SESSION OF THE UNITED NATIONS General
Assembly will convene Tuesday, September 18 when the
applications of The Commonwealth of the Bahamas, the Federal
Republic of Germany and the Gennan Democratic Republic for
admission to membership in the United Nations will be
considered.


The Security Council met on
July 18 and unanimnusl
approved a resolution
recommending to the General
Assembly that the Bahamas Ibe
admitted to membership of the
U.N.
After the Security ('ounci's
vote on the draft resolution
Shad been taken all of the 15
representatives on the Council
FOR 3 in 1
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spoke out in strong support for
the halliaiiai,,' admission to the
wo' d orgaini/ation.
%lemibeLs of the Security
(Cuncil f or th year 1973 are
\ust;all.i Austria. ('hina.
I rmice (;u inea. India.
Indonesi,i Kenya. Panama,
Peru, Sudilaiin, United Kingdom
of i(;eAt lBiitain and Northern
Il animl. I(nion of Soviet
Soc imlist Reipublics. United
StItts t \imcIica and

I he tlt 'pe.ver was the
relm-r'nt'ative loi Kenya, Mr.
I kili. lic' s ld that his
G(oveirnmenil look pride in the


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'I

















F


to United Nations Sept.18


accession of the Bahamas to
independence and Kenya
shared in the joyous moments
of the people and Government
of the Bahamas. He spoke of
the definite affinities between
the Bahamas and Kenya.
"Both," he said, "know the
taste of imperial rule; both
share deeply-felt cultural ties;
both are in the Commonwealth
of Nations."
The Yugoslav representative,
Mr. Mojsov said that the
decision of the Bahamas that
its first important step among
the independent countries of
the world should be its request
to be admitted to United
Nations membership has
confirmed once again that the
Organization has become an
irreplaceable instrument of
international relations.
"By its request to be
admitted to the United
Nations," Mr. Mojsov said,
"the Bahamas has opted for a
constructive role in the
present-day world. My country
is convinced that the Bahamas
will make a significant
contribution towards the
solving of the problems with
which our Organization is
faced today."
COOPERATION
The representative for
Sudan, Mr. La said that his
delegation voted with
particular pleasure in support
of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas for membership of
the United Nations. "The
felicitations of the Sudan," he
said. "will be expressed later
this year at a higher level . .
my delegation looks forward to
co-operating with the
delegation of the Bahamas."
Mr. Anwar Sani the
representative for Indonesia
offered "to the people of the
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas Indonesia's warm
congratulations upon their
attainment of independence on
July 10, 1973."
"My delegation has closely
followed developments which
have finally led to the
independence of the
Bahamas," Mr. Sani said. "The
endeavours of the Government
of the Bahamas to achieve
progress for its people of all
walks of life are well known.
We are sure that independence
will lead to further progress."
Speaking for the government
of the Republic of France. Mr.
de Guiringaud said that the
people of the Bahamas had a
long experience in conducting
its own affairs. An elected
assembly has existed there
since 1841.
"In 1963," he said, "a
governmental type of executive
was established, while broad
powers were transferred to the
elected representatives of the
people, powers that were
expanded even further in 1969.
"At the same time, a


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remarkable Prime Minister, Mr.
Lynden Pindling, was the
driving force for some years in
undertaking an experiment
which has yielded very
concrete and direct benefits to
all the population in terms of
rapid economic development'
of the territory."
Continuing the French
representative said, "By
significant reforms which were
very carefully implemented.
that experiment has made
possible the building of a
homogeneous and prosperous
society clearly capable of
taking charge of its own
destiny and of constituting a
new fully fledged member of
the international community."
- In supporting the Bahamas
application the representative
of China, Mr. IHuang said: "The
Chinese people have long
cherished friendly feelings
towards the people of the
Bahamas. On the occasion of
the proclamation of the
independence of the Bahamas
on July 10, Chou En-lai,
Premier of the State Council of
the People's Republic of China,
sent a message of
congratulations to the lion.
Lynden 0. Pindling, Prime
Minister of the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas, announcing
the Chinese Government's
decision to recognize the
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas. The Chinese
government and people wish
the Bahamas prosperity and its
people happiness and believe
that the friendship between the
peoples of China and the
Bahamas will develop
continuously."
GREAT GOODWILL
The representative for
Australia, Sir Laurence
Mclntyre said that his
delegation followed with
interest and great goodwill the
progress of The Bahamas to
self-government in 169, and
more recently, as a member of
the Special Committee on
Decolonialization. we have
kept abreast of the steps
leading to the attainment of
full independence on July 10
last. We were satisfied then, as
we are now, that the decision
taken by The Bahamas.
Legislature in November of last
year to proceed to
independence during 1973
clearly reflected the wishes of
the majority of the people of
The Bahamas."
Mr. J an k owitoch .
representative for Austria said:
"In the general elections of
September 1972 a clear
majority of the population
opted for independence.
Thus, the small but industr ,c i
people of the Bahamas tou4
the last step in its long struggle
for freedom, independence and
human dignity. We cannot
refrain from expressing oun1
respect and admiration for thi'
splendid achievement, which
has led another people out ot
ancient bonds of slavery into
new eera of dignity."
"Most warmly and happily ,
we celebrate the independence.
of the Bahamas," declared thy
representative for Panama, "it
is always a reason for rejoicing
when a people becomes free ot
colonial ties and lfrerlI
exercises its right to
self determination."
In supporting the
application from the I hamas.
Mr. Bennett, the representative
of the United States ci
America said, "Under thie
experienced leadership ,I
Prime Minister Pindling. the
people of the Bahamas haIe'












The Admi al


de monstrated a sincere desire
to be masters of their own
national destiny and to assume
the considerable
r e spo nsi b ili i t i e s of
in depen dence
"My delegation is confident
that thie Conmmonwealth of the
Bahama-, will play a valuable
anid constructive role as a
number of the United Nations,
The ULnited States looks
forward to welcoming the
Bahama s delegation to the
2Sth session of the United
Nations (General Assembly and
working closely with the
B atlailn as at subsequent
sessions', '
The I ndian delegate, Mr. Senm
said, -The Bahamas enjoys
stable g government and freedom
oft speec,:h and movement and
has an extraordinarily good
record tof lack of violence in its
politic at affairs. T he
(oivernrTient is led by a Prime
Minister who not onl\ has full
commiaid ot the affairs of the
islands but is an outstanding
statesin t ini thle region."
The representative of tlhe
Union of Soviet Socialist
Republics, Mr. Malik, said. "In
w elcotl ing the y(oulng
in depend dent State of tile
C )iomoin Iwe ailth of tile
Bahalmai as a new iimember of
the Uni ted Nations, we cannot


OFFICIAL ADMISSION The United Nations General Assembly will convene on
September 18 for its 28th annual session and among the items for the opening day is the
admission of new members, the Bahamas being one. Pictured here are the Security
Council members, who met briefly on July 17 to take up the application of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas for membership in the U.N. They decided without
objection, to refer the application to the Council's Committee on the Admission of New
Members for examination and report. On the following day the Council unanimously
recommended that the General Assembly admit the Bahamas. All members of the Council
made statements after the vote congratulating the Bahamas on its independence and
extending their best wishes to it. Pictured above at the July 17 meeting are: Kenneth
Jamieson (United Kingdom), president of the Council, making a statement. At centre is
Secretary-General Kurt Waldheim and at left is Viktor L. Issraelyan (Soviet Union).
PHOTO: United Nations/Tzovaras


fail to rcLall the tacit that its
people have had to endure
severe tribulations through
many ears ofl oloniala
domination. In the distant past
these islands were occupied by
foreign Conquiistadores, wlii
partially annIht laItevd tihe
indigenous s population and
partially expelledI it Iroin tile
islands. The constantly
changing' foreign owners and
lords of thins lind plundered the
wealth of these islains and


destroyed the population. As
in the case of many countries
the course of the Bahamas to
Ireedlom and independence was
long and not at all easy, but in
the timal analysis that course
hais been crowned with

I lie final speaker was the
President of the Council, the
representative front the United
Kingdom, Mr. Jaimeson,
reviewed the history of the
Bahamnas leading up to


independence. Hie said that his
delegation "had no doubt that
the Bahamas. which has
unhesitatingly sought to
undertake the duties and rights
of membership of the- United
Nations by sending its
application of membership to
us on the very day of
independence, will be able and
willing to fulfill conscientious-
ly its obligations under the
Charter."


Europe feature in CPA meetings


By I'l t 1R BRA/Il
L ON I)(: l future aid and
trade patterns within the
('cimonc wealth as affected by
Britain's entry into the I uropean
commune ity are expected to
"loom quite large" at the
Co(, nt() mnwealth Parliamentary
Conference opening in London
on Wedticsdlay.
The deputy chairman of the
United Kingdom branch of the
(ommv wealth Parliamentary
Association (C'PA), Sir Bernard
Braine, made this point ait a press
confere nice called thursday to
co insider the agenda and the
representation for this nineteenth
( PA conference.
lie said the subject of the
enlarged luropean community
and the Commonwealth would
take up the *whole of the first
day's Mlinister of State at the
Foreign and Commonwealth
Office, Mr. Julian Amery.
lie ('PA, Sir Bernard stressed,
\ as alln association of
P arlia rnmentarians and not
go( vernu i eints. IIc said the
e xpcctc d 177 delegates, including
24 sp)c.-ikers or other presiding
officers of legislatures, plus some
25 secretaries, from cO
parliani ents in forty countries.
represented a variety of political
parties in their respeeti\ e
parliant ncts.
FIRST A PPI AIRANC( S
I his year Bangladesh will he
represented for the first time and
the Ba llamas also will bhe taking
its place for the first time ,is a
full (co immonwealth member
Other r countries represented
will inc-lude: Antigua, Barbaduos,
Berniila, Beli/e, British Virgin
I slnad s, (Ca man Islainds,
Dominica, (Grenada. Jamaica, St.
K itts, St. Lucia, St. Vincent,
I rinidadl and l'obago and lurks
and (Cai cos. 0.

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A HAlMAiI Pfsentaten Color by DeLure'
S ATiIMKOIM INTERNATIONAL Release
I W t PLUS at 9:15
TOVj N CALLED HELL
TOi MtU 1,'41tftll


O)tiler cLMouItl Ies Iepresenlted
will include: A\ntigua, Barbaidos,
Bermuda, Beli/e, British Virgin
Islands, Cai lan Islands.
Dominica,. (;renada, Jamaica. St.
Kitts, St. Luciva, St. Vincent
Frinidad and l ot aio and I urks
anmd Caieos-
lHeading thle Bahamas
delegation is the lion. A.
l.oftus Roker, M.P., Minister of
I health. Also attending as
delegates Mr. Kendal Nottage,
M.P., and Mr. C tril Fountain

Asked it Uganda amnd its policy,
regarding Asians would be a
talking point, Sir Bernard said he
had no doubt Uganda would be


discussed at some stage.
It reply to a question about
the various forms of government
in the Commonwealth that
excluded certain members from
the association. Sir Bernard said
the w hole question of
parliamentary government within
the Commonwealth would be
considered at length on the last
two clays of the conference, Sept.
20 and 2 1.
Barbados will open the
debate and Canada will provide
the first speaker on the second
day Delegates will consider
such aspects of the problem as
parliament and executive. The
one-party state and


parliamentary democracy: the
role of parliamentary
committees; parliament and
the news media and the status
and role of the member ()
parliament in contemporary'
society.
In addition t., the contcrence,
which will be opened by the
Queen, an extensive prograi'nme
has been arranged fr the views
of delegates. Some 17 v iluntary
organisation not al; of them
con nected with the
Commonwealt h have
combined in the biggest event of
its kind to give the ladies a varied
and entertaining look at litt in
and around London.


ADVLR) I I1i 'lIL N1
JOHNNIE WALKER TAKES HIS "SPIRITS" OVER THE HILL. He is shown using his
monocle to examine a bottle of his world famous scotch. The occasion was a surprise visit
by Johnnie Walker and his escorts from Bahamas Blenders to Larry's Pub. Everybody is
happy when Johnnie Walker enters a bar because all drinks of his fine scotch are on him,
Watch out for .Johnnie Walker ... he may be visiting your favourite bar soon.





Bahamas


Telecommunications Corporation



NOTICE




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TAYOR INIDIUSIRIES LID.
111 Shirley Street
P. 0. Box N-4806
TELEPHONE 28941/5


1~


I


p











Tuesday, September 11, 1973


CLASSIFIED


SECTION


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS-FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV. TELEPHONE 21986 EXT. 5


REAL ESTATE
C1I183
LOT MONTAGU HEIGHTS
125 by 150. Corme see anr:
rake offer. Dial 22033.

111184
20 Acres OLut west 1 -'ii
totnI town. Id,'il foI
commercial venturi. NIlC K
DAMIANOS. 22033 vern'. is
41 197




3 41 P


LI '( t A I IA ', .
-mt O SA i
4 eJoo


t n 'r o v -"5' .


3 4"9'3 (r'Ic:'' 1


LARGE L_. L *i :
Sar
did beaLh i qh '.i A1 ,s -
indergr ound $7/g oi .
"om $80 'niuo h L .--:.
rice w ith siti :". .:'
ch large ti t T.'- .
s inrgs, Cat! Pat Pi .' +
41141 ,1 M rt!,, & s r
2 3027 ,)
YVa''a rw Mlv i .'cri i,', '

Cl 1143
BLAIR ESTS Tf T1 OT I T
SALE Alba, -t ', : -
200' Phone dj, 2 ". :;-
3-2553

Ll1181
66.000 s t.
bedroom I1 .i1
fu! lnished t', il i *t '.
and 120 feet o 'of :*L
at SOUTH' : i!t -
facilties c ."1
c ulti i va l '
$52,000
88.000 sw fe t 't0i -". t
frontage hras t,-. :'.:
Sea-wall. On $4l '
O U T A ,S T =
wsat r-r p fru tai ) Ia ii .'a(' ,
houses. i $35."8 O '0 U ; r-
uip
SEABR 'L Ar'j1 T -
E ST -T' S fi ,e .
$50,., .0 O
HIGH LAND) PARK ,,:-,-
fron, `44 000 0t0 Ja : i
Goo0 buys in -WLST', T .
VILLAS fu! IShe' '.')0
$40,0u0.00 an u; a .; J .a.
;iahts, some r. ltt I I r-

GROVL houses on
sem i-hilltop, hilltop and ilia n,.
We have the houses li .eC
search for purchasers.
w ej seanr:P to ;'


C1I205
2'3303.3 2,32 o


arl e reslt er .

$b ,800.00
Lurpt 'it '

14,000 sq ft P, 1' ,C $ .r000.0)
Lad ge +it t, j !. )t*;.* j 1ij
Spa is ,' i '

Estate 2. 3 :1

FOR SALE OR RENTf

Cl 054
3 Bed ,
He r t. i e
Phi!u P v N ,If;.'" ,A1'" t S
Suth S -r,. ),, ,'

FOR RENT
Cl 1036
LARGE ONE BP rF
apat tme 'a p j* r
$250 Dee .'"

ESTATE :'/7/









poll t' t: i' (.l -


C 11047

Center nil Ring -. 8!' .
ftr Mr P, ti u. i 0

C1103
e? ? BEDROOM A; ,..t


consisting of i ,1 1
room,. kit rihe. ,'i.J Jthl r .
basically f(i rrcanled Twynam
Avenue. Phone 5-818'.

Cli 1051
ONE BE DROOM, furnmshed
apartment, upstairs over
Bucaneer Inn $180 00
including light & water F',
information i all 5-4616
Cl11032
ONE EXTRA LARGE twon
bedrooms two bath, and oner
extra large one bedroomr
apartment. With large living
and dining all ha- i(alt.
furnished Vi tori a C 'ui
Apartments on Elizabeth
Avenue between Shirley and
Bay Street Facilities, Phone,
Idundry, parking, T.V. antenna,
airconditioned. Phone 54631
between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.


C11131
ATTRACTIVE FULLY
furnished house 3 bedrooms. 2
baths off Village Road. $400 a
month. Phone 5-9720 8:30
4:30 p.m.


FOR RENT


C 11037
OFf ICE OR SORE SPACE
Chailotto neat Bivay Inine id'
o.L Lupjrl vv, anlpl' p- r ,t
Iliq nli 1e 4 I, /

C 11172
NIS A T



C; 1* ; ., ,


I t t & ,; .
4. ,I 4 "

































CARS FOR SALE
C1 1 190
AB ,C r,
Budget-priced A cars.
Best value for ycrr o e
1969 VOL KSV' A A
FASTBACK
1973 VAUXH/, .

1972 TCVo \

1972 PONTIAC
VENTURA
1972 TOY TY r


1972 C HI VROi

1972 F -(.LF


1972 CHEVRO LE

.t I I L ' L
19 70 tI;. 1 .A1 C 1


'. T. &
-C c1 .

Or-T


1970 FURE, L FRI,

19G6' PLY'.' T
BARRACUDA
o, ' '
1971 RAMb'LEPR
AMBASSADOR


1970 FORD CORPTI4A
ESTATE it *r *

1971 DODGE AVENGe '

1971 VA 'IXHAl I --
STATICnr ...


19(P9 JA' i I A
1969 FORi LOt ')PIrA

1969 F0ORD THRIN'i :, f

1 70 FORD L bCO-' r

1970 VAUXHALL VIVA


1969 FIAT 124

ABC %)lOTORS
Collins A vi nr
Phone 2-1031
OPEN DN[ONDAY TI FRI.7A'
3:00 a..nto b 00 p.:
SATURDAY 8:00 an. to 5 p.m

C 1 1 59

selling togiethei ii $.50 t .'3t
2 2159 8 a n. : ;'

Cl 1164 19bgb HILLMAN
MINX, $300 ONO
Mechanically sound. body
work needs attention Phone
28541 or 51379.


CARS FOR SALE


t 1 11 3h
ISL AND MOTOR

1970 LTD.
P. O. Box N-640
N\AS,U BAAM AS
USED CARS


1969 CHRYSLER
l4 ') nti Auto Wh'ite
1969 PONTIAC GTO


$950


A ( Vi !,vL. Gree: $2500
1968 JAVELIN A C $1200
1973 VICTOR S/W FE
A, I. R ie 856 rniles $4400
1967 VIVA 2 Ur
.. i $7b0
1970 RAMBLER SST
.I -1,: A t I. Flue $2100
1967 TRIUMPH HERALD
, v" "t, $900
1971 MERCURY COUGAR
- i r:', .svn $3500
1970 PONTIAC LeMANS
'. ,,.1 $2600
1971 FORD CAPRI
* I.: $1950
1969 FORD GALAXIE

'970 HILLMAN MINX
-, .- . ',"h: $950
1973 PONTIAC VENTURA
I . (,o,, $5900
f'O-OP V ,IJXH'\LL
VICTOR $,l0
1)67 Chevrolet Impala $450
Trade-ins Welcomed.
Located Oakes Field
Opposite the Ice Plant
Telephone 34636-7-8

C1 1081


ip


CentralGarage
r r ..1 J





TODAY'S
SPECIAL BUY

1972 PONTIAC
VENTURA II $4250
Also Available
1970 TOYOTO .: ton tick
S in. Mdad sh t goud
S t inew n gleafe onl\
1973 BUICK CENTURY 4
.' autom atic .ir
S ' radio. power
S.' & bikes w w tyie,
., ,. n l.agc. very clean

1972 PONTIAC VENTURA II
. t. tic. 4 doof
Srrf powei steering
& :.' i ,s, w tvie. very good
,. $4250.On
1971 FORD CORTINA 4
or1 c 'idrn, auItomatic yellow.
S'. tn ,d (inditt'n. new
I,.! .) $ 1;) 0.00
1970 HILLMAN MINX
.*. ,t gold. 4 doot.
+ d 'i 't i-'a +. recently
.:):n ted. fine tar $1350.00
1972 VAUXHALL VIVA
- -ion qieen, automatic, 2
S, qo d condition, low
ir ,e c:ar $2350.00
1 9 72 VAUXHALL
FIREANZA 2 dior coupe,
l- o e floor,
i i.,d edition low

1972 CHEVY IMPALA 4
a radio ,
v ,i .. & brakes, blue,
, Hd't... "e $5875.00
f AINIJG AVAI LABLE
I (,'N! ,L AND SEE US
Ja,-', rjold near
V 'lr Earracek s
Ph ni,- 3-471


S", i- ,* recently
-* .* : I. i t.o ri if o n ,
S- 7 7 O.N.O.
S ; . 530.

'.41_S I b! _iL L
i'." t ; -,.iii. i ,. tible,

S ' ' dio. owe
.... & p iv brakes. Make

3 1 t. r to 5



PETS

(r.,: S ,ANTEL 2 ale
C i es,] Call 4 1lb6.


LOST

t C.0. r; t .t. vity of
1 *' *. m+ i; 1 .t jil brow n
S -.,i!,r ,; iloq 1el 23160 day
A 1 t .'. ,1 1 I ;t fet ecl,
L A Mather


[ MARINE SUPPLIES
1 lo
"'/2 lb ft. Thunderbird,
L n'til top, 80 h.p. rv'ercuiyv.
n i'( starter t plus extras.
(.,rvaiin /ed steel trailer. $2000.
['tI",o 2 /480 dlays, 5-4151


* on",-r louekend.


i t i h I ( i ,ASS Wimndsor
* "t iI'iir., *', j'd 'mar tupli and
'f( *r p ,-pul steel ing ,vith
Jit. ', ), ', e r C.p 1 electrom atic.
c, avtt I v anl controls. Trailer,
, n -., al t(.01 etc. All virtually
eow $240U. Call 4-1166.

( 11211
/ I cOOT fibieqlass sailboat,
sails, outboard, other extras -
all good condition value at
$1400 want $1200 but offers
considered. For quick sale call
28711 or 31615.


I MARINE SUPPLIES


C11044
PACEMAKER 44 ft.
Lux irious Cruising Yacht.
Phone 3-2371.

PUBLIC AUCTION
C11195
KIRK S. HINSEY will sell at
the parking lot east of the
Harbour Moon Hotel, Bay
Street, on the 29th day of
September 1973 at 12 noon
the following property:-
ALL THAT piece parcel oc
lot of land situate in the
Subdivision called and
known as "Gleniston
Gardens" and being the
Southern moiety or half part
of Lot Number Four (4) in
Block Number One (1) of
the said Subdivision which
said piece parcel or lot of
land is bounded on the
North by the Norther n
nimoiety or half part of Lot
Number Four (4) in the said
Block Number One (1) and
i running thereon Thiee
hundred and Thirty (330)
Feet rnore or less on the
East by land now or
formerly the property of the
Bahamas Government and
running thereon Fifty (50)
Feet on the South by Lot
Number Five (5) in the said
Block Number One (1) ant d
Sunning thereon Two
hundi ed and Thinty-thi ce
and Sixty-one hundredths
(233.61) Feet and on the
West by Soldier Road and
running thereon One and
Twenty hundredths (1.20)
Feet AND ALSO ALL
THAT piece parcel or lot of
land situate in the said
Subdivision known as
"Gleniston Gardens" and
being Lot Number Five (5)
in the said Block Nuniben
One (1) which said piece
parcel or lot of land is
bounded on the North byv
Lot Number Four (4) as
immediately hereinibefole
described in the said Block
Number One (1) and
running thereon Two
hundred and Thirty-thr ee
and Sixty-one hundredths
(233.61) Feet on the East
by land now or formerly the
property of the said
Bahamas Government and
running thereon One hun-
dred (100) feet on the South
by Lot Number Six (6) in
the said Block Number One
(1) and running therein
Two hundred and
Thirty-nine and Forty-seven
hundredths (239 47) Feet
and on the West by the said
Soldier Road and running
thereon One hundred and
Nineteen hundr edths
(100.19) Feet.
The property is being sold
under the power of sale
contained in an Indenture of
Mortgage dated the 29th day
of January, 1970 and made
between Gilbert Smith of the
one part and The Bank of Nova
Scotia of the other part and
iecoided in the Registry of
Records in the City of Nassau
in the Island of New
Providence in Volume 1567 at
pjes 315 to 320. The sale is
subject to a reserve price and
to the tight for the Auctioneer
or any per son on his behalf to
bid to that pl ice.
F erms 10% of the purchase
pi ice at the time of the sale
and the balance thereof on
completion.
Dated this 5th clay of
September 1973.
KIRK S. HINSEY
Public Auctioneer.

ART SUPPUES ~

C11040
COMPLETE range of artists'
supplies. Oils, acrylics, canvas,
easels, etc. Bahamian Paint
Supply Ltd., Bay St. Phone
2-2386, 2-2898.


NOTICE
C1120/
Notice is hereby given that
SIMON SIMONE-DIT
RIGOBEFRT NOEL of
Po t-de-Paix, Ilart. W. I. is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration!/
naturalisation as a citizen
of The Bahamas and that ahy
person who knows any reason
why r eg st at io ni 'naturalisat ion


should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
10th day of September 1973
to the Minister responsible for
the Nationality and Citizenship
P. 0. Box N7147 Nassau

C 11208
Notice is hereby qiven that
ELLIANA JEAN PIERRE of
St. Louis Dunoid, Haiti W.I. is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalisation
should not be granted should
send a written and signed
statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
10th day of September 1973
to The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.


OTnCE


II


C11210
Notice is hereby given that
SAUVEUR PAUL of Port
de-Paix, Haiti W. I. is applying
to the minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenshio for
naturalisation as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason
why naturalisation should not
be granted should send a
written and signed statement
of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the
10th day of September 1973
to The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship. P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau

C11209
Notice is hereby given that
MARIE CLAUDETTE PAUL
of Poit -de-Paix Haiti W.I. is
applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for naturalisation
as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who
knows any reason why
naturalisation should not be
granted should send a written
and signed statement of the
tacts within twenty-eight (lays
from the 10th day of
September 1973 to The
M in istel responsible foir
Nationality and Citizenship P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.

Cl1198
NOTICE is hereby given that
DOUG LAS E U G E E
DUNCOMBE of 3rd Terrace
West, Centreville, P. 0. B)x
N-711, Nassau, Bahamnas is
applying to the Minisr,'
responsible for Nationality i(n.t
Citizenship, for registration as
a citizen of The Bahamas, o
that any person who knows
any reason why registration
should not be granted should
send a written arid siqno d
statement of the facts .eth,;
twenty-eight days from the
Tenth day of September, 1973
to The Minister responsihio Ioi
Nationality and Citizenship. P.
0. Box N7147 Nassau.


L CARD OF THANKS

Cl11197


CAPTAIN EDWIN BENJAMIN
TAYLOR FAA, A.T.R.,
A.T.P.. born 3rd June, 1944,
was the first of seven
children born to Mr. & Mrs.
Benjamin Taylor of Grand
Turk, Tur ks Island.
He made his 'fiht flight a
duration of one hour on the
5th September, 19o7. In July
of 1968 he made his maiden
flight to Grand Turk.
He later atteifdeli Kendal
Flying School and the
She f f i e l( Sc l'' n ofc
Aeionaut ics, both i 1 [ lor rlda
There he qualified as a
Commercial Pilot ,ith passes
in flying single and multi-
engine aircraft and In
instrument i ating.,
In March 1973 he attained his
Ai line Tiansport Pilot Degree,
qualifying as a Captain. In that
same r' inthu he gained his
FAA, '-.ith ratings of A .T.P.
1932603.
Edwin returned to Grand Turk
in July of 1972 and in August
of that year became employed
with Trans Caicos Airlines. He
worked with TCA up to the
time of his tragic death on
August 15 of this year. At that
time he had completed 2,268
hours and 45 minutes total
flying time.
Many of his friends in Nassau
will remember himi flying with
Colony Air lines.
We, the fanm ly, ,vish to express
our sincere appreciation for the
kind expressions of sympathy
through the many telegrams,
letters, phone calls and cards of
condolence on our tragic
bereavement.

SCHOOLS

C11193


/ I
THE NASSAU CIVIC
BALLET SCHOOL will
commence its Fall Term
session on Monday, September
17th. For information, please
call 5-2353.


SCHOOLS I


C 1124
ENROLL now at the Nassau
Academy of Business in the
following classes:
Typing with spelling
Shorthand
Bookkeeping
Switchboard
Front Desk Cashier
Night Auditing
Telex Operation
English
Mathematics
Filing
French
German
Spanish
B.J.C. Classes
Dictaphone Typist
Call the Nassau Academy of
Business today and join any of
the above classes. Phone
24993. (Located at Shirley St.
opposite Collins Avenue).


IN MEMORIAL
(11203


IN LOVING mernory of our
clear husband and father, Mr.
Hervis E. Butler, better known
a, 'Mule' ,vwhof died 1 llth
September 1972'
'You're on your journey to
heaven's iealeful shore,
-To Ihve l itv i Jesus, the one
whom youo adore,
You'll sing his praises with
loved ones gone hefol e,
You're idling the waves fol
htome.'
'When you have finished your
course and end this race,
When you have anchoreed
within that happy place,
You'll live with Jesus and look
upon his face,
You're riding the waves for
home.'
Sadly missed by his wife. Ruth,
his mother, Olive, 3 daughters,
2 sons, 3 grandsons and a host
of relatives

C11199


5-


In loving memory OT our dear
father Elgin Adder ley who
departed this life 10th
September 1971.
The shock was sudden,
The blov, severe,
To part with one we lov-d so
dear,
L onre but not forgotten
Left to mourn: two daughters,
Mar ina Hepburn and Shirlcy
Seifert, 3 sisters 1 brother and
a host of relatives and friends.

I POSITION WANTED

C1ll 105
EXPERIENCED GIRL
FRIDAY, seeks position ad,
Social Hostess, Head Cashier or
Public Relations. Write Box
5468. Nassau or phone 5-5078.

HELP WANTED
C1 1139
MANAGER for marine store.
Must have some knowledge
of fishing, skin diving,, marine
hardware equipment. Must
have previous experience in
retail sales, stock control
ordering. For appointment call
2-8173.

C 11188
MARRIED COUPLE to
run small Out Island hotel
No children. Minuinmum of two
years experience in food and
beverage, front desk and
bookkeeping, after formal
training. Mechanical knowledge
of motor vehicles, appliances
and diesel generator plant also
necessary. Apply in writing,
including references to Mr.
Moxey, P. 0. Box ES5693,
Nassau

C11163
INTERNATIONAL BANK
REQUIRES
MALE OR FEMALE TRAINEE
Young Bahamian preferably
with some university schooling
who has minimum of one "A"
level and five "0" levels,
including Mathematics and
English, to receive traw!n'g in
various banking departments for
an indefinite period. WillI ten
be assigned specific duties zaid
responsibilities. Starting s,.lary
commensurate with
educational background and/or
experience. Attractive fringe
benefits. Please write to
Personnel Officer, P. 0. Box
N-100, Nassau


HELP WANTED


C11148
CHAIRMANN)
BUSH CUTTER
required to work in
islands. Call 24596&7.


familyI


C11191
TRUST OFFICER
required for newly organised
Trust Company in San Jose,
COSTA RICA. Successful
applicant should preferably be
of Spanish origin and
completely fluent in English
and must have some years
experience in Trust
Administration witt) a
recognized Trust Company in a
Common Law jurisdiction.
This is a senior position which
offers considerable
opportunity for growth and
development.
Salary will be dependent uoon
qualifications and experience.
Applications accompanied by a
personal resume should be
forwarded to:
Mr. Walter C. Dittel, Jr., c/o
Compania Nacional Financiera,
Apartado 4488, San Jose,
Costa Rica, Central America.

C11162
COLLECTION MANAGER
FOR REAL ESTATE
COLLECTIONS OFFICE
The applicant should be not
less then 25 years old and have
previous experience in the
field. Remuneration will
include a generous basic salary
plus performance bonus.
Application should be in own
handwriting giving full details
of education and experience.
Good references are essential.
Reply Adv. C11162, c/o The
Tribune, P. 0. Box N-3207.
Nassau.

C11171
T RRAN S P O RT A TION
ORGANIZATION require
young man early twenties rfo
career position in opetatiorns
division. Successful applicant
should have High School
education vith G.C.E. Maths.
Accounting oir Cler ialI
experience would be heelpf J.
Applications should be made III
writing giving details of age,
education, relevant experience
and present salary to:
ADM I N I S T RAT I VE
ASSISTANT, Navios
Corporation, P.O. Box N-779b,
Nassau.


i


I GRAND B




CLASS

HELP WANTED
C6221
FRONT OFFICE AND
R E S E R V A T I O N
SUPERVISOR: (1) Female
with 5 to 7 years experience as
a Front Office and Reservatior*
Supervisor. Be responsible for
the running of the Front Office
and Reservation Department.
High School education is
required. Salary $125 pet week
with Room and Board
Interested person apply: THE
GRAND BAHAMA HOTEL &
COUNTRY CLUB, West End,
Grand Bahama, Personnel
Office between the hours of
9:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m.
Monday through Friday. Elon
Martin, Jr., Personnel Director.

C6220
EXECUTIVE CHEF: To take
complete charge of kitchens.
Supervise and plan food
preparation of French and
international cuisine.
menu-layout kitchen
maintenance, etc. Certificates
and diplomas of training arind
experience necessary.
CHEFS: To take complete
charge of station; supervise and
direct assistants in preparation
of French and international
cuisine. Certificates and
diplomas of training and
experience necessary.
Apply Oceanus Hotels Ltd.,
Personnel Department, P. 0.
Box F-531 Freeport, Grand
Bahama
C6237
ADMINISTRATIVE F
ASSISTANT President of
large corporation requires
Administrative Assistant w;th
excellent secretarial skills, with
proficiency in shorthand and
typing and at least 10 years
e xperence at corporate
management level. Individual
must have extensive knowledge
bookkeeping, elementary law
with ability to administer and
initiate work, co-ordinate
activities of all internal and
supporting departments to
enable President to accomplish
his functions of planning and
decision-making in a complete
and efficient manner.
Responsible for review of all
correspondence directed to
Office of President and
effection of appropriate action;
administration and
co-ordination of all affairs of
Executive Office and in
absence of President institution
of work on own initiative.
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
Large corporation requires
Executive Secretary with at
least 10 years experience in
similar position with minimum


---T----T- I I


AHAMA




'IFIED

HELP WANTED

typing 70 w.p.m. and
shorthand 120 w.p.m..
Applicant must have ability to
work with financial data and
assist Vice President'Treasurer
in all of his duties.
Responsibilities incl ude
co-ordination with relevant
departments of matters
requiring Treasurer's attention;
ability to handle own
correspondence and initiate
work.
ACCOUNTANT
Responsibilities include the
general super vision and
auditing of the Insurance
sections of the Grand Bahama
Development Company and its
affiliated Companies, also
maintains proper accounting of
employees' loans and advances.
fixed assets, property records
and in general, supervises the
payroll sections of
Development Company and its
subsidiaries.
ELECTRONICS
ENGINEER Inidvidual will
be responsible for Design,
maintenance, installation and
modification of various types
of equipment such as: Wilcox
485 VOR, Wilcox 496 DME.
Scanwell ILS, teletype
communications 60 arid 100
word machines, facsimile, tape
recorders, communications
equipment consisting of 10
watt mobile transmitters arind
receivers, 50 watt fixed station
UHF and VHF transmitters
and receivers, maintenance of
Control Tower Console and all
communications systems prior
to proper inventory. Successful
candidate should possess
enough knowledge and
experience in order to keep a
fully professional maintenance
programme with associated
record-keeping showing that all
services are safe arid adequately
maintained. Please apply to:
Grand Bahama Development
Company, Ltd., Personnel
Dept., Lucayan Building, P.O.
Box F-2666, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.


C6230
Wanted MANAGE R for
Intercontinental Artist Guild il
International Bazaar. Person
must have extensive knowledge
of all aspects of art and
paintings and discerning
knowledge of the works of
different artists and naturally
be able to explain all these
aspects to potential customers.
Must have some bookkeeping
experience in order to be able
to maintain accounts.
Apply to: Interconrinental
Realty, P.O. Box F-260,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
Telephone 373-3020


I I . JLIIA


I


I -- - - - I I


I


TRADE SERVICES
C 11049
T.V. ANTENNAS. Boost-r'
for homes, apartments an
hotels. Sales and services. Call
Douglas Lowe 5-9404 WORLD
OF MUSIC Mackey Street next
to Frank's Plarp

C11111
For all Your Gardening Need-,
Trimming, Hedging, Pruning,
Beach Cleaning, For Prompt,
Reasonable and efficient
Service Call 5-1044.
C 1151
SEWING MACHINE
REPAIRS AND PARTS
ISLAND FURNITURE
Corner Christie &
Dowdeswell Street
Phone 21197,
P. 0. Box 4818, Nassau
C11033

Pinder's Customs

Brokerage Ltd.
Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU. BAHAMAS
P. 0. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-3796
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434.

WANTED

Cl1179
CONFERENCE TABLE 8-10
feet, with side chairs, sofa anci
arm chairs. Call Rehaissance
7-7481.

I FOR SALE
C11165
BED SETTEE recently
recovered plus 4 yards same
material $100, side tables,
lamps, drapes, pictures. Phone
51379.


( Tlt Zributw


Af
Aw,..Zlw












Tuesday, September 11, 1973.



GRAND BAHAMA


CLASSIFIED

II FIEEEPT TEL. 352-UM


HELP WANTED
C6232
Beauty and barber shop
company- (1) In need of a
STOCK CLERK, High School
Education. (2) Capable
HAIRDRESSER, experienced
in all phases of the beauty
trade. Bahamians only need
apply. Modalena Ltd., P.O.
Box F-775, Freeport.
C6235 "
SHAMPOOMAN: Must be
willing to clean entire Hote:
must be willing to work as
shampooman and shampoo
complete premises. For the
above please apply to: Mr.
John A. T. Roker, Personnel
Director, Holiday Inn, P.O.
Box F-760, Freeport, Grand
Bahama. 373-1333.


C6234
COMPTROLLER foi
growing Automotive Supply
Company. Requirements:
Bahamian Male with at least 10
years college and accounting
experience. (Automotive sales,
parts, accessories and services)
through all accounting
functions, cost analysis, trends
and financial statements for
management and outside
accounting audit purposes.
Must be able to do, supervise
and train in all accounting
functions. Responsible to
President. Mail resume and all
references. Interviews by
appointment only. Please no
phone calls. The President,
FREEPORT JET WASH AND
AUTO MART, Ltd., P.O. Box
F-238, Freeport, G.B.I.
tI 1:1


HELP WANTED
C6236
SECRETARY To work in
Personnel Office. Will be
responsible to do typing and
filing and answering letters on
her own initiative. Should be
of neat appearance with high
school education and 2 to 5
years experience. Interested
persons apply THE GRAND
BAHAMA HOTEL &
COUNTRY CLUB, West End,
Grand Bahama, Personnel
Office, between the hours of
9:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m.,
Monday through Friday. Elon
Martin, Jr., Personnel Director.


C6229
REAL ESTATE EXECUTIVE
required to be in charge of
sales registration, customer
service and resales in Miami
and Freeport. Must be
expert i e nced and
knowledgeable in all phases of
real estate profession. Must
have held similar managerial
positions. Must be able to
travel.
Please apply to: Personnel
1Epartment, P.O. Box F-260,
Freeport. Telephone Mr.
Thompson, 373-4048 between
hours of 2 to 5 p.m., Monday,
Tuesday, Wednesday and
Friday.

C11158
ATTRACTIVE POSITION
available for young ambitious
woman with one of Freeport's
leading jewellers. A future is
waiting for the right person --
call in Nassau 5-5499 in
Freeport 352-5464. Or write P.
0. Box 6304, Nassau


"Your mother is here wearing her 'Look at all I've
done for you' look."


Rupert and Miss Samantha-36


" Oh, come on, Rupert, do stop your joking! "
Algy refuses to believe Rupert's surprise.
"You must have blown the bubble yourself! "
But Benjy, still hidden from the pals, has
quietly climbed a bush and is blowing more
bubbles. I say !" cries Reggie suddenly.
" There was only one before-now there are


Wbht rtm 9


CARROLL RIGHTER'S

1OROSCOPE
from the Carroll Righter Institute
GENERAL TENDENCIES: Solid and secure
methods in which much energy is expended but
little risk of chances of any type taken are favored. Think in
terms of your overall aims and what you can do to secure data
that can make them an integral part of your existence.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) Make sure you do not dash off
to some activity you know little about and keep busy getting
your home life more secure and comfortable Plan how to
make your fondest dreams come true.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) If you do not confide your
plans to others, you can do much to improve your monetary
position just at this time. Listen to good advice from a clever
friend. Follow it to your real advantage.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Avoid that nagging associate
and contact a higher-up who can help you with your problems
Then take care of financial problems very intelligently. Show
more affection for mate.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Fine new ideas
come to you now that can make your future more prosperous,
happy, if you do something about them quickly Work at a
measured pace so you do not overtire yourself Show more
broad-mindedness with others.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Come to a better understanding
with both debtors and creditors so your position in life is
improved. Do not spend too much money for entertainment
that you will later regret. Avoid one who has an eye on your
assets.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Come to a better
understanding with associates and improve your mutual
affairs. Know what your true position is with the public min
general. Think along more intellectual lines. Early to bed
tonight.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) If you get to work early
instead of going off on some tangent, you can get out of some
present difficulty. Take good care of your health. Evening is
then fine for light entertainment.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) You want to have a good
time, which is fine, provided you take a friend along who
keeps you from spending too much. Entertain those who have
done you past favors. Show how much you appreciate them.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) You can do much to
improve the situation at home as well as add to public prestige
today. Either entertain or be entertained by the right people
Listen to your radio more.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) You are able now to
secure the information you need, get the errands done that are
important if you start early. Use care in buying and selling
Handle any transportation matters well.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Use especial care where
monetary matters are concerned so you do not make any
mistakes. Use your intuitive faculties since they are accurate
now. These can also be helpful where romance is concerned.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Know what is expected of you
by kin and try to please them more, and this also holds true
where associates are concerned. You are dynamic because of
the Full Moon. Make sure to control your temper, though.


idge
AK Q. 62
0A 7
& K J 4
West East
S K 9 4 3 4A J 7
vJ 9 V 7 4
OKQJ9865 01043
4-- 4 Q 10 5 3
South
Q 8 6
0 10 6 6 F
02
4 A 8 7 6 2
West North East oath
- Pes Poas
10 Dble. PFa I'0
20 20 30 4+
Bdb Hammian. South, mS-ht
have had Yasxborough fir his
10 respo to Bobby Wolffs
double Erv a good deal more
than he had promised, he
umped boldkily to 4 over
Boy's =doe o 20.
Gamo=ao, West, led the 43 to
Belledonina's *A. A diamond
came back.
Declaer appears to be ome
trick slhart, for there is no hope,
of course, of setUw u np the cb.
Hamnan sweged to do wItlmr.
them. He drew trumps in two
rounds, laid down to 4K, dia-
covemrig the 5-0 break, and
ruffed a diamond.
Now cane the key play,
the 4Q !
Opponents could take two
spades, but thereafter they had
to present Bob Hamman with
his tenth trick, either a dia-
mond which he would ruff in his
hand, or a club up to dummy's
4J.
For bmodhure nd entry form
to the Evending Stindad Charity
Bridge Chna (Uth-27th
Auwust) telephone: we
6018.

Chess
By LEONARD BARDRN


One white move made Black
resign immediately thUi actual
play position. ch wa s te
knock* move, and was Black
right to up without further
resistance
Par times: 20 seconds, nchess
master or expert; 2 minutes,
county player; 5 minute club
strength: 10 minutes. average:
;20 minutes, novice


SOLUTION NO. 9762


Chess Solution
After 1 B-B4I Black reatgned
beaue of I! ... OB; 2 QxP
cht KxQ: 3 .-ni mante. Hs
could have topped the mt and
kept ptlauy yf at t a jor a
a x".tIxbrch; K1Jx R C 4
when the qfueen salwpce ,/ft
because the king has an escape
at KKt2.


three! At that moment Rupert's bubble
bursts and his eyes begin to sparkle. I've
just thought of the right present for Pompey's
birthday I" he exclaims. I'll buy him a box
of coloured bricks. That will be much better
than a rattle."


Rupert and Miss Samantha-37


a I LII
"Isn't that strange! The idea came to me
just as the bubble burst! laughs Rupert,
turning to his chums. Oh, yours have gone
now! The bubbles above Algy and Reggie
disappear in tiny splashes, and the two pals
begin to smile. I've thought of a good
present for Pompey! cries Algy. I'll give
him a beaker and plate." "And I'll buy him


a bag of tusk rusks declares Reggie.
"Why didn't I think of that before I The
season for the sudden bright notions is
dawning on Rupert when Algy exclaims:
"Look, here comes Bill Badger! There's a
bubble following him too! He doesn't know
yet "


Rupert and Miss Samantha-38


Algy and Reggie run to tell Bill of the bub:Ila
above his head, but Rupert, hearing the
chimes of the village clock, decides he has
been eway from home long enough. "I can't
stay now," he says though I'd like to know
what will happen when Bill's bubble bursts.
Let's all meet tomorrow." Hey. what's this


about ? demands the surprised Bill. Who
blew that bubble. .. ." But Rupert is already
s amppring away, leaving the others with the
little badger. Reaching his cottage, he loses
nc time in opening his money-box. "There's
just about enough to buy Pompey a box of
bricks," he murmurs. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


By PAUL NICHOLS


I-,.e Comic PageI
== --hJe o i ..C-^^

- ^ Iii il 11 I -- -- -- -


I JUDGE PARKER


Winning Br
Rv VICTOR MOLLO
WRHUOGH te four members of
tally's ikrwkicble Blue Team won
ris year's world ampip
rmn America's Aces, it wean't
through lack of good bcklt
md good ply by odr po
nts. 'Ial was an example
Dealer West : Love All
North
4 105 2


S:be rlbtuw












Tuesday, September 11, 1973.


Wenty Ford wins his debut in majors


for Atlanta.


By Gladstone Thurston
BAHAMIAN RIGHTHAND) HURLER WENTY FORD in his major league debut last night tossed in a neat five-hitter and
winning team with two hits and one rbi leading the sixth place Atlanta Braves to a 10-4 victory over the third place San


Giants.
the Braves, who utilized a
total ot five different pitchers
during their two game loss
I 14-o and 7-0) to the
Cincinnati Reds over the
weekend, found great relief in
their 26-year-old rookie who
kept the (;iants scoreless over
the tirst five innings while his
(.iun took a 7-0 lead. I Ford
spAik out three and gave six
i.ilks during the nine inning
t i u ph.
Opposing veteran pitcher
U.In Marichal, lord played hlus
came with the finesse ot a pri
aInd had no trouble keeping the
S;iaRnts in check over three
m!iiings. His no-hitter vanished
!il the fourth when Spier
tIipped hini fur a single.
tHowever. this did little to deter
tic htirler's performance as .asis
seen in the standing ovation he
receivedd after the game
"1 he fans were beautittal
.uId they pulled tor me all the
\k,i .' said I ord. HIe pointed
,ut' that the organiwationlt \ i-,







AMERICAN L
East Division
Ha I 1 I' 1 4 1
t~itlnni rc '; 5*) ;2
little~i t 7" (' ti 24 "1
New N irk 72 SOO It
til jinukcc -i 7 i 410 I3
i I'tiid 03 ,S4 42' 220
West Division
it.ikljnd ; 2 il nit
kaInsis I. ii s 64 54' 4
.l ilit~if..-(,i (' '.t 4S i .
i *t, 7 I 1 i) 10

Monday's Results
ih sti.,I 4. i.iiltlnitre I
m i nt a i. Neit ei rk t.
I. exl 4


Today's Games
Hit, r.t n I 'lI In 1 1! 1 1 A
.Ointit (\, r I N.til 1 14 1, (0
j) in
Itevelanid iI'errv Is il it N Mt
rk i ;s,)i 7t) 7 30 p
I)ctroi, I I t ri ll.t an li .it
tils ioukee I SItal' 1i : 1 1 1 0 )
Ic\t is (ISeiert n I t .it
\ niilcsil.i (I ie c kcr i. 4 ni
Kmnis I iiti (( irhtr t t
K.illIIm I t'lt (th i ri 0 r ,t ti .it
S),kl.u J (J\hh,)tt 0 >0 I 1 p 1
'lit, .r iI (SR\ tu tt I1 t ,
'.ihii',rniat R n (I ,1 15t. 1 1 p 'il


NATIONAL LE\Gt I
Fast Division


tral "', -. t 4 ,.

u-go 5 4 4"
adelphi.i r. -,4 44s
West Diision

FI.t l, I,,, "

Siut. ,, 1- ii I- (


Monday s Results
'ittshurgh 1it I It h tt 1
.ItuInt 10, 'sn I rniist,, 4
saln I)iego 5. Hliustin .
I oday's Games
Ne ow 'l ri I K tnism.itn 2 4, .it
Phlil.idelphij I ii br.r 12 12 i
p iln.
Los A nl t tit I tit i 'i
llt lin *niti j( rr sli itc s I1 i
p in
S.iltI r.itin u si t Hr.dl i t .
Altlanti Sth tiieltr i -
MI n tre.il i Renk, !1 ] t
I ou I' ( i c st r I 2 i r 2 i1
HI i t,in ( iRobcrts 1 m4 *i 1 -..
ll-n i' Joli s 4 ) 1, 1 I I


happti wSitIh his pe tformance
nld '1 feel real great lhat I've'
1come T llhrolgh." lie said.
Nt) 1 R(O'BLI
P'cking ip his first strike out
in thie first inning I ord had noit
tiuihle gettinP hiinsell started
and ill hough hie also gave up a
wilk. tihe other itwo batters ol
to ki l that ca1ii c to the plate
flted oultt.
ive hits bhak Ito bhck gase
tlie Braves a 3-0 lead in tihe
hotlt m ol the l first. Mike I ur
got things rolling with a dIouble
and sy cored on Darn I I vans'
single. I vanlls iadvan cedt on
A.lron's single n11d scored the
secitild run i]lwhen I)usts Baker
also sent start r Marichal into
the' outfield. Another single
tlcoItlng fr(tom liae\c Jtohlnsoin
d1ov I in Aaronll tor the third
itit 1 1csii ()ILIt itt llly s'iti
(ireyn top kicking Irtin his

.inI pickinIg T up hits seconti
'lliloi !cague strikeout retired
thi, (lintlls lin order in tlie
seci'ind inniuii. I lie i third hatter
filed ,it.
\ \1R \Iter leillaitintlt s'corel ess int
llie ,c,_in ld 111111L2 tile B JveC
ILIM Iped ,'In clit 1 pit, ci 1DonT
('. iltli s tr ti i ItiI \ iii iti

hiomesi \ Bi H ecs all-lut i H.ank
\;iol v,!it' lippied his -i, 1 1 I
I the .i .Ilt' I ()t it in' s ircct
' !i l l ;iteiH to go to lin
BJihe Rulth' hinie riun cord
I ord pl dked ,p hi, bhis Illn thaIt
J 1 I di iI it'' rt .d h,'lt s ittt \s hi I
c.irliet ,. n h n ,l ollhb ed. Ihe
!rmihes h d ri c ne in (c ,

thaI t '5 ihs i I t ll ll ri' I J I

'. 1 r .l t t l .hc _' h ti'

(I : \ti i i l l\ 1 s: t t ,il i.!" l-


ahtp tis.
lc;hics I,, \l' ikc 1lu '" :ind
\ .1 it '.'; / I til t e tI tc ut, i! I -



I or T s ti i' tc st itHnin I ts t-,
the eittIlh hen \ l il\1
I1ppe ) il t! II l II seLi,,1

I ills. \1a.idhi i, l. i 't I I s >,
ril I t i ! I ll iI M! "ll '. cI c I J
Iti te n .I e t I t i. I R i
r I ."e B Itj ti 1 ll I 1

Ii .t ec t l) h 1 nitI i 1 h! i I1 11cI b \
Johi ITns n ".h, kn,, k ]d i1 is 40t i


,ii ltit \e.i i
Iit 1 IS( OtIt I1
1 !ic ( i 11i- ir i.il'i,+
I t t I i i. l t," I, '. i i ., '
S I nth 1 i .


< 1r t 1itr


* I I lit

, Able 11
i, t thit'

's I hri l 'l i


hit Ii \ t I .t I'h'ii .
H l .l~'. \ \ \ t, i, :, i, t' iti tlil





Itt it t I tr'
1 i, ,i l c ; .Ai i l t i ll



Ii .'.' t 't'.,t ~. 5 I 1' i }t'


i t,1!1i' !t


\ , \ ,ii .'i.M it


Ii\ c 't '..l lc, .)T'' i!1/ I i' i
it sih ', tuu I ur.. i c~ lii ld

P~ < i li', l i '+.'


Swing with your legs


WANT YOU TO GET YOUR FOOT
AT RIDOHT LANGEr TO THF t
INTENDED LINE OF FLIGHT
.' ,,..-- -- Ajl ,

/ iS "


r NO WONDER YOU
ARE LOOKING, lAIN!
YOUR RIGMT FOOT IS
TURNED OUT SO MUCH
YOU ARE TURNING
YOUR HIPS TOO FAR,
WITH THE RESULT
THAT YOUR LEFT
ARM BUCKLES,
YOUR HANDS OPEN
AND THE CtUB /
DROPS BLO /W
HORIZONTAL

YOU ARE ALL
&CWSWNG!
TMEREFOR,. YOU
lpgctELATIf COMING
INTO TE BALL .


WENTY FORD ....... fine success in


his major leag


IN CAMERA REVIEW
I-roin Page 5 far too lon,. \With pl
itclil rtai-!i!tl tll. S. I feel a is only excusable if
enl, i. i,, .I T 1 Wa est 1ood. I his music nr
nt. scItn hlas cve'Ii right it butt rammed it
,, lle ,lite a c ikgrilnd it throats lUntil' we wet
chleaigs itle crhaligluin e and almost inipatie
ss,.n,. rut ll character iand play to begin.
n n haractrI liThe excellence
II. \ t I I production lay with
Su I k il, l I i I studied character po
\e.ait. Suie lull. .ts 1 stelle is th close tdy
T' tilhe close study
' sii' ',b\ rsisl\ hlard-ssork'd andy
tl i' Mil' ri Irti' ed and waning hehin
S u. statement.. It swas
c I cltl e indte d an production ini conti
'i ptl\-hl c.idcltt \s iilt arnI stupidti
Iat n l i' s,, t l rather superficial rea
emaile, \ve. But, for )Ine wio %loon oi a Rainb
1i utipposcd t, consider herself Mdonen tn a Raiiah
t ii done bv the Baha'
tliC so,,.l l su iT)L' t1 1 ) thi l ther (.
t ,(". I I' I 'is l' I t tk iti t ('ircle onlh days
tw "l wa. l. *t ., kn \ lhich iiuchli ot the
tile tI >1 '. shi-Se\ .Nhih' LI iif t s ee
ith itbut hi its e tus I s deeper meaning was
aisks, she doesn't euite cell deeper meaning as
ti. ittil iIId ct. h t' cCal lI a With the Theatre
I I \' It' cll tompanv's product

-.t,, l ( tl ('los, everything v
', ,kn. tI Idss' 1but lithe and ih1sc) reyl wit
tIIns,I ,t !.t .kcs th i 11 all sav clarity. T he grouping
Inl,,-.i. ~h l.-,") but \cre gotten styli/ed
un tc h nvincin effect. lhen each
t i lttrin,, \nd ptistations gradually stripped
t.5 ttcirtuis pi ti iticstatiions
all o, ol Ittn s ltik of the p ro t ect ive la
subt rbai n iits' itc rather e iphellisill, down
thaitn o'.Ic (A mlailln trltth, each rbeClTme
I Il e' ti i, h i, i 'arpin 5 stiess ill a ho
Ic plt l.-It. It h the nessln g ill
pt ina, a,, ... ipa t Iro m t, l e s ng all.
\n lt'. S.,.is insistence' on interrogated hi the
the' tnusplrnItLt nciaoit n of I his, amilng other
(, 1 1ns n!1,1c I she called h11 e c1 c llcnit device to
(,.. oin M sIlteid ,t (i arciIn). lay tlh' 1ealing.
itu I !h c it ,in l\ Cie irninute I trI' production
loln mn et litnll cic session at ,\lls conducted
the I' ,'1ini'nrIi \\ Ith str obe drawing beautiful
i'Ich s ciIclin I tIc r mlli, the iignlficient aund
iitcl.i!ret ,I 1 llh cenltur\ allet crescendo, trom a
,i l 1d ia i t' l i ith \tracts ill t It cn d n b h
1lir S1 M\1itlh eC's I austus and culiiniuiting eventui
' klint gs oit laughter along tiltili te absurdity
.ill inti's )b ahl Man. tile attempting t, o
soundLtlt effects were indeed Ialready dead Inic/
Imaginative enough btut lasted ultimate reali/atilon
"'Ilell is other pe rt le
I look ft)r\ uitrd
anticipation Ioi
production ,it
e\citilng routtp.


YOUR GOOD WIND-UP
LEADS TO A REtAXED,
EASY FOttOW-TROUG! /







dill"


i


NOW YOUR
J TURN IS \
AUTOMATICALLY
REDUCED AND
YOUR SWING IS
FIRM AND SOLID.
YOU UAVE A
IEAUTIFUTLY
STRAIGHT LEFT
'ARM AND GOOD
CONTROL OF THEI
CLUB. THIS WILL
REDUCE
YOUR HOOK
\ IMMEDIATELY/


h


ALl WINS SPLIT Brafford & Dumont take 2nd.

DECISION OVER place in Hoerman Cup seniors


NORTON IN 12 Byv GLADSTONETHURSTON


feel real great' he says


a disappointing crowd at the ortum
roaring with all its might, Ali
carried the final round on all three
officials' cards s ith his blistering,
nonstop attack to, the head.
Ali was guaranteed $275,000
against 35 per cent of all income
from the fight, which wsas shown on
closed circuit television to 255
locations in the United States,
S Canada and Great Britain. He
earned his pay.
Norton, getting a smell of big
money for the first time, was
guaranteed $200,000 against 30 per
cent. His previous biggest purse was
$50,000 for the first Ali fight.
S The crowd at the 18,750 seat
l-orum swas announced at 10,500
SI| and the live gate was reported at
, $S525,000.


.


/ -


% -- -- a- "loo 0-1 "I,


4 x 1500m. WORLD MARK
OSLO(AP)-New Zealand quartet
Rod Dixon, Tony Polhill. John
Walker and Dick Quax Wednesday
established a world record for the 4
x 1.500 meters relay race at Bislett
Stadium here with the time of 14
mins. 40.4 seconds.
The national French team of
Vervoort, Nicolas, Jazy and
Vadoux set the old record of
14.49.0 on May 25, 1965.


BAHAMAS GOLF ASSOCIATION'S Reg Dumont and Duke
Brafford together shot a challenging 306 taking second place in
the senior division of the 16th Annual Hoerman Cup Caribbean
Golf Tournament while the Bahamas' regular players compiled a
total of 1296 for fifth place during the four-day match played at


INGLEWOOD, Calif. (AP)-
Muhammad Ali, admittedly weary
and battered, saved his boxing
I helped his career Monday night with a split
n Francisco decision victory over Ken Norton,
whom Ali called "better than any
man I ever fought."
Ali said after a non-stop.
tl o-fisted attack in the 12th and
final round which carried him to
victory, that he had hurt his right
hand in the sixth round anti would
have it X-rayed.
I he last time Ali fought Norton
-" he got his jaw broken and also was
eaten on a split decision.
The last-ditch victory Monday
night at the I orum kept Ali as a
major factor in one that he has
figured in prominently sice he
came out of the 1960 Olympics to
gain the world title in 1964.
Given a 3't-year-old exile from the
ring and loss of his title for refusal
lto go into the Army could not
completely dim Ali's influence on
the fight game.
When asked who he would like
to Fight next, Ali said, "I ain't going
to light anybody. I'm going to
rest."
liuowever, Ali has a tour of
Southeast Asia scheduled to begin
Sept. 27 and a right in October
against Rudi l.ubbers of The
Netherlands in Malaysia.
As for heavyweight champion
G(eorge F'oreman, who was in
attendance, he said he would fight
Jerry Quarry sometime in
November. Quarry knocked out
SIuon% Doyle in four rounds at the
I oLrm Monday night.
DiSAlPP()INTEII)
"I feel I landed the more telling
punches and had the more powerful
punches to win", sail a
disappointed Norton, who stayed
alive in the heavyweight picture
with his strong performance.
Ikefore the fight, All had said
that if he lost, "I1 might have to
qiiit. I'd be finished."
All postponed that decision with
his ripping two-fisted attack to the
lheiad in the final round that lasted
fir almost the entire three minutes
of the round.
Judge John Thomas gave Ali six
points and Norton five on a scoring
sisteni in which the winner of a
tue debut. round gets one point and the loser
none, with no points for an even
round.
Referee Dick Young scored it 7-5
for Ali, while ludge George I atka
gave it to Norton 6-5.
lass, mllsic ITFINAl ROUND)
it sets the IThomas said after the fight that
i he had five points for each man
ot only set going into the 12th and final round
down our of the slambang duel at the -oruim.
ere dizzied Ali seemed to be in serious
nt for the trouble in the I0th and 11th
rounds when solid shots to the
body by Norton turned the former
of the heavyweight champion from a
the closely jabbing boxer into a flatfooted
rtrayal and fighter who looked every one of his
of every 31 years.
o f e he 3 Ith round was particularly
d every grim for Ali as Norton landed five
indeed a punishing shots to the body.
rast to the especially a left that dug into the
ligation of pit of Ali's stomach.
B ut All was not to be denied. tHe
)ow Shawl kept his word that he would
mila Drama average one of the two losses he has
before, in suffered against 42 pro victories.
pathos and one defeat was to Joe Irazier in
1971.
lost. The other was a loss to Norton in
Workshop which lie suffered a broken jaw last
on of Iluis March 31 that was particularly
'as gained galling to Ali.
Ali contended that he beat
h pristine himself in the first Norton fight
IS of actors because lie was out of shape he
d to great weighed 221 then, compared to
character is 2 12for this fight.
All danced and stuck with his
of his outer left hand in the first two rounds
years of like the All he once was. But the
to the hare pattern of the fight began to unfold
ds a kind of in the third round, a pattern that
saw A\li concentrate on the head
X. spotlit, with punches ranging from jal. lto
a chair, iiooks.
mercilessly lHBi It litt RI
Other two. Ali used two-hand combinations
er o. and right-hand leads as Norton
rs. swas an concentrated on the body and then
underline shifted to the head with hooks and
an occasional chopping right.
Both men appeared hurt on four
ais a whole or five occasions throughout the
master fully fight, Ali's eyes reflecting pain from
l\ to a a couple of body punches and two
terrible straight right hands. Norton
an appeared dazed and moved
quiet and backwards several times from
e gin ni n g flurries of punches to, the head with
ally i the short right hands by Ali being
of I stelle especially effective
k ,ll, e i However, neither man appeared
kill the in danger oif going down. Ali bled
, and the slightly from the nose early and
of (iarcin Norton suffered puffiness around
the left eye and a gash below the
left eye which did iot affect him.
ith cger The hiss had toi te disheartening
to Norton, a 28-year-old former
liil' very sparring partner of I razier, who
had spent most of his seven years as
------ a pro in obscurity although lie had
won 301 of 31 fights before Monday
n=,..^ night.
t" But Norton, who fights out of
N San Diego, definitely, kept himself
5/ in the heavyweight picture with a
Solid performance that almost paid
off in a second straight upset.
NON-S101' I INAL
k The upset bid ended when, with


When your peas 'n rice

goes potcake an' yer dog

cut back his nose...









"Don't


give up


the ship!"


Caymanas Golf Club, Jamaica.
Trinidad and Tobago
fashioned a gross score of
1,232 beating host country
Jamaica by four strokes.
Defending champions Puerto
Rico took third place with a
1,245 aggregate, 27 strokes
better than fourth placed
Dominican Republic. Barbados
ended at the bottom of the
ladder with 1,320.
The Dumont/Brafford team
put up a tremendous fight and
were deadlocked with winners
Puerto Rico going into the
final 18 holes when they blew
victory having shot a
six-over-par 78 compared with
75 shot by Puerto Rico.
The Bahamas' best round
was a 78 shot by Mike Taylor
on the first and -econd rounds.
Taylor in the second and third
rounds shot 78 and 80
respectively to lead the
Bahamas with 315. His sc6re
was 15 strokes more than
Trinidad's Edward Grell who
led the tournament with a total
of 300.
Four handicapper Robert
Slatter, on the road for three
weeks prior to his competing,
found Caymanas no more
friendly that the last time lie
competed there in the 1968
Hoerman Cup. He contended
that he just played very badly
being unable to break 80 in his
329 total. His best score was an
81 shot during the third round.
Greeted with temperatures
in the mid 90's. the B.G.A.'s
team arrived in Jamaica on
September 1 in time for three
days of serious training sessions
under the direction of
non-playing captain Donald
Butler.
"The golf course was in
great shape and it appeared
that there had been long
preparation for the
competition, noted former
team captain Fred Higgs. "The
terrain was very mountainous
and rolling with the seventh
Tournament: 1
Trinidad and Tobago 31
Jamaica 30
Puerto Rico 30
Dominican Republic 3
Bahamas 3
Barbados 3
The following are the scores
The following are the scores
Mike Taylor 7
lan Masson 8
Bob Slatter 8
Fred Higgs 8
Jack Moree 8
Basil Smith 8
The best four of the six scor

British champ

whips Rondon
LONDON (AP) John Conteh
of Britain whipped Vicente
Rondon, former World Boxing
Association lightheavyweight
champion from Venezuela, to
defeat in the ninth round of a
scheduled 10-rounder Monday at
Wembley Sports Stadium.
Conteh, 22, the European
champion, had problems getting
through the defense of Rondon,
who proved a cagey fighter, in the
early rounds.
But the Briton shook Rondon
with a stiff right cross midway
through the eight round and it was
all one-way traffic after that.
Rondon wobbled slightly in the
eighth and went deeper into trouble

high on Rondon's head and the
Venezuelan went down for a count
of seven.
As he came to his feet C('onteh
waded in, hurling punches. Rondon
was obliged to hold on
the former world champion
turned his back on the severe
punishment and the towel was
thriiwn


st 2nd 3rd 4th
00 318 308 306
08 309 308 311
08 319 309 308
13 316 320 329
24 323 320 329
26 336 327 331
shot by the Bahamas:
shot by the Bahamas:
'8 79 80 78 3
;4 79 79 86 2
;2 83 81 83 2
84 83 80 84 2
80 82 87 84 2
84 89 81 91 2
es counted each day.


Tot.
1232
1236
1244
1272
129o0
1320


and eleventh holes being
referred to as monsters."
The seventh, a short par
four, from an elevated tee,
with woods below and to the
left for the entire length except
for an opening approximately
180 yards out. The fairway,
rolling to the right with woods
starting about 210 yards from
the tee on the right ended on a
very small green which also
sloped to the right.
The 310 yards 11 th hole was
the one that gave the most
trouble and from the blue tees.
one can hardly see the fairway
- just the tops of a few
logwood and lignum vitae trees
waiting to snag the drive. If the
tee shot strays to the right, a
dense wooded hill blocks tihe
approach shot to the very
elevated green.
"Tensions were high and
nerves were on edge," noted
Higgs as the golfers teed it up
on Wednesday morning and
after the first round. Trinidad
and Tobago had taken a
commanding lead of eight
shots over the favourites
Jamaica, and defending champs
Puerto Rico. The latter team
played without one of their
top golfers Carl James. The
Bahamas then took fifth spot
with a 324.
On the second day, Jamaica
with 617, took. a one stroke
lead over Trinidad and Tobago
while Puerto Rico fell nine
strokes behind with 627. Thle
Bahamas then still maintained
fifth place with a score of A47.
Trinidad and Tobago on the
third day were unable to
capture the one stroke lead
which Jamaica still held on to
with 926 after three rounds.
Trinidad neserthele-, were
consistent in their work and as
the pressure apparently go too
much for the host team they
shot a strong 306 taking the
victory by four strokes.


FOR ADULT


MEN ONLY
It is well known that as years go by many
men lose much of the zest and vigour
they enjoyed when young. Now there
is good news for those who are -
feeling "low" or without zip.
A new vigour medicine is now
being imported, it's called
Pro-plus/He-vite Elixir. Yes,
He-vite is for "he-men". \ -." ..


Put adult happiness back
Into your life

PRO-PLUS


HE-VITE

ELIXIR


a tndBoed in 5co
,ith GOovernme,, S u,,


dTEY SAi






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New



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Phil
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Reduce your hook


II


Amateur golf

championship

tourney set
AMAT IFR OI II RS trom
throughout tlh northern
Bahamas are expected to
convene at the Reef golf course
in Freeport Grand Bahaman on
Sunday for the first round of
eliminations in the Bahamas
Amateur (olf (lub's sponsored
B aa namas Aniateitu (ilt
Championship.
The second round of
eliminations will he held ol
September 23 at t1he Paradise
Island golf course tor those
unable to make it to I report
anti those clininated fom lithe
first round.
:rom each I thei' titt and
second rounds, tlie tiselwe tIop
golfers will be chosen and I they
will compete in an I-S hole
medal pla> toliirneil ti ihe
chan pionshii p title on
September 30 at li'e Paradise
Island golf course.
Travelling expenseI s ()or
inembecis of the B.A.(;.(. will
be S I5 round trip. \assatuvins
are asked to have this paid to
the B.\.(;.('. by I rida\ and
Freepoiterts t Slid;ia.
The King and Knights Club
will hoivst thie i olltei alter the
tournalmlent.

US baseball
NI \\ t()i- K ( \1'1 i ,' ilhri
\iiid. rit rain I),i i tk'n V:irriIIIcr'
could stave Ilank \arn IritTm N11.
7 li...ltii stt iiacli crmiipits kct, tIth
Atlanl(a sluggei r irmin his tite\t
a ppiiiint round tripper.
\aroin p)stcd tis 7 )l i .:lOrttr
hiio r in ti ti l ird iniil Oini. A
( ar t lth rs' i er ', l,';iiii him ikilt
f iir shi)rl (I tllt Ruth's rc.u d
7 14. i n il I nrl c I t,- rlan ill,
mlii sthii "noti u lcd i Ja nis' ri i ,'I
I Is,'\\ I.here in th I 1, 1,r i: tc d

Pillt U S rii pt iti dt ipfei t I ii:iisf!i) S-I .
I h e 'irate-, l1i\i t .th si4ilt
rising silut I 0 ;iiiii \i rt ;iurl ivi
returned t't to inaliiti' 1i i llb list
stvek aind 1i)i trail ti lirsit pl ti
('ardinal'. i ist 1 1 t tilt ill V3an1C.
Williti Stargell e mi tribuhttc linir
hils l, tti I'irata i M s'.
hli tlil A \ lntI ,ni i.t'. ll
4.3. 1 It i lt 'd ,'s- I ,. i. i t' ii tl ti

lill1 i

litikt ,IL tlulci i ml l 111 (I ).ikIl il
\'s ripped tll KaIniIS:i. I it .,\il'.
13-o the Cletel:lnd 3iad,, nipped
thei Ne\s 'i trk iankcrs 32 the
\Mihl\ au kc lhr '\\ crs iChI I thci
I\MiI Irinim ed thle c\a'. .Iaingers
5-4 i d ti lict, ( ',i Ii. \ 0migles
\ hipp ct h t n (li :iti.. V it. S\
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t i .I lt, lit Ai pllll".r Ilt I \ lll '. C ti. 1

I r u;ir \\.t's .

WORLD REICORI)
\N I1 '11 NS .. I \1) lstics..i / ell.,i
,if iulg.irta br ke tin' nrienis S, 8
meter \\i.rlid ri,'ord I rid:i with a
time itf I 57 2 Th' prMnui's retired
iais lih ld by SI est e im e rman Iv.iltck
ithi I ckd.'
tli i ecird i.trite ,tinriltiip tfit' live
tatittil fLritk ,slid I nield lilt c


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