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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03435
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: September 1, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03435

Full Text















Irtiuntw


Prli Prdnltlid. I
Exclusive Agentfor
LEGCO
CONSTRUCTION
TOYS, Ih


F detadl Phone 2,


(Reiterd with Postmaster of Bahamas for postage conceions within the Bhm.) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


DECISION MONDAY ON WHAT ACTION,

IF ANY, PARTY WILL TAKE AGAINST MP's





FNM disciplinary tribunal







spend 3hrs.hearing charges







against 3 party dissidents



By MIKE LOTHIAN
THE FNM'S DISCIPLINARY TRIBUNAL spent three hours last night hearing charges of "fragmenting the
party" against three FNM House members, and is to meet again Monday night to decide what action, if any, will be
taken against the dissidents.


Education Minister gives



brief details of massive



building plans this year

By MIKE LOTHIAN
EDUCATION MINISTER LIVINGSTON COAKLEY last night
named 36 sites on 12 islands where school and teachers' cottage


construction are planned under a
said "a large number" of them v
next year.
The Minister did not,
however say which sites
involved school construction,
wh ich involved cottage
construction, which involved
both, and he did not specify
which of tlie works would be
completed
Mil. Coak'icy also said "it is
envisaged that during the year
the formation of the College of
the Bahamas will be a reality."
The Minister was making a
nation-wide broadcast over
Radio Bahamnas last night, prior
to Monday's scheduled opening
of Minister\ schools for the
1973-1974 academic year.
Mr. Coakley told radio
listeners that under the
comprehensive building
programnie financed by the
$S 1 Inullion I- xport-lmnport
Bank of Washington loan,
"schools and teacher cottages
will be constructed and
equipped during tih year with
a large number being
completed in time for
occupancy between Janulary
and April. 1974."
lie named the sites involved:
They were Lincoln Park,
Yellow Elder. L.W. Young,
S.('. Mcl'herson and Oakes
Field in New Providence, Eight
Mile Rock. lHawksbill (reek

BENEBY FUNERAL

TOMORROW
F NI: RAL service, for
Carlton Bencnb i, 14. who was
killed at the Queen Fli/abeth
Sports centre e Sunday when
two drag-racing cars collided
and went out of control, will
be held at 4 p.i. tomorrow at
St. Francis Xavier's Cathedral.
C a r I t o n.
w h o w a s
watching trhe
races with his
I I -ye ar o od
brother G(reg
and a group o
friends would
have been
I 5-\ ears-old a'.irlton Benehy
on September 22.
Carlton is survived by his
parents Fdward and Lilymae
Beneby, two brothers. Greg,
and Stephen, one sister,
Sharlene, three grandparents,
Mrs. Linda Beneby and Mr. and
Mrs. Leonard H. Bravnen
Augusta Street. and many
other relatives.
Interment will be made in
St. Joseph's cemetery.
One of Carlton's friends.
Jack Sawyer, 10, was also
killed in tihe accident and two
others were injured. One of
them, Ellis Pennerman. 19, is
still unconscious
EYE CONTACT
TESTS LENSES

ROBERT T. HIRST
Optomeirist
Savoy Bldg.
FREEPORT
Telephone 352-5906


n expansion programme, and he
vould be ready for use by April

and Holmes Rock in Grand
Bahama, George Town,
Farmers Cay and Barreterre,
Exuma, Lowe Sound, Conch
Sound, Mastic Point. Stafford
(reek, Blanket Sound,
Stanyard Creek, Mangrove Cay,
Kemnp's Bay. l.'ep Creek and
Pleasant Bay, Andros, Grand
Cay, Spring City, Moores
Island and Marsh Harbour,
Abaco, Governor's Harbour and
Green Castle, Eleuthera, Old
Bight, Port Howe and Devil's
Point, Cat Island, Glintons,
Long Island, Colonel Hill and
Majors ('ay, Crooked Island
and Snug Comer and Salina
Point, Acklins Islands.
PART OF PLAN
Mr. Coakley went into no
further detail, but continued:
"What I have outlined to
you is only part of the massive
programmed which your
government t is involved in
developing our educational
system.
"With the understanding,
co-operation and loyalty of all
concerned, this can be the
nost important and rewarding
year in Bahamian educational
history," he said. "I believe
that with the full co-operation
of our dedicated staff and the
support of the public, our
objectives will be achieved."
Those objectives he defined
as gearing the system to
exploitt the fullest educational
potential of all Bahamians, not
only to enable them to realize
their personal goals and
aspirations, but to ensure that
this ComIn nonwealth will
always have a reservoir of
tra i ned and educated
Bahamians from which to draw
in order to fill the needs of a
new, developing and vibrant
nation."
tie said "I am aware of the
obstacles, the problems and the
inconveniences which still
beset us in the field of
education and my Government
is doing its best to alleviate as
many of those as possible
within the limits of available
resources.
lie pointed out that the
1973 budget allocated over
$41 million to education.
Mr. Coakley took the
opportunity of his address last
night to appeal to all Bahamian
students, whether they are
studying here or abroad, "to
take your education seriously
and get the best education
possible, not only for your
personal benefit, but to be in a
position to adequately make
your contribution to the
development of thi:
Commonwealth."
He said the task of teachers
is to guide, train and mold the
characters of students.
He made a "special appeal"
to parents and guardians to
teach children the right
attitudes, good manners and
the basic skills before they are
sent to school, and to see to it
that the children attend school
regularly.


Mike Lightbourn (Clarence
Town) was the only one of the
three who made a personal
appearance to defend his
actions. Sir Roland Symonette
(Shirlea), who is out of the
country, was represented at the
hearing by former FNM
Governor's Harbour M.P.
George Thompson. Cleophas
Adderley (Nassau City) neither
attended the hearing nor sent a
representatvie to speak on his
behalf.
The three parliamentarians
face suspension or expulsion as
a result of the support they
gave renegade Marsh Harbour
M.P. Errington Watkins in a bid
to win House approval of a
proposed referendum in Abaco
to decide whether that island
would become independent
with the rest of the Bahamas
on July 10, or retain crown
colony status.
The three voted with Mr.
Watkins while four other FNM
House members voted with the
Government to defeat the
measure on June 6.
The open split in the FNM's
parliamentary ranks led
directly to the June 8
resignation of Fort Montagu
M.P. Kendal G.L. Isaacs as
Leader of the Opposition.
Mr. Watkins was expelled
from the party on June 11.
In letters dated July 3 and
signed by FNM secretary
general Cliffor Cooper, Messrs.
Lightbourn and Adderley and
Sir Roland were charged with
acting "contrary to the best
interest of the party and its
stated policies."
CHARGES S
Specifically, the charges
were:
"That you, being a party
member and also a
parliamentary member of the
Free National Movement, and
well knowing the party's
decided policy on the manner
of introducing matters in
Parliament, and also knowing
the party's decided policy with
regard to adherence to the
party's line on all matters on
which a position has been
taken;
"Did on Wednesday. Mayi
30, 1973 together decide on
your own without reference to
the parliamentary group and
against the strong advice of the
party Leader, that a set of
questions should be tabled in
the House of Assembly:
"And did on Wednesday,
June 6, 1973 against the
express decision of the
parliamentary group and the
executive committee of the
party, on the floor of the
House of Assembly and in
opposition to the other House
members of the party, support
a resolution of Mr. Errington
Watkins on the question of a
referendum in Abaco relating
to secession well knowing the
party's decided policy on this
question;
"Such actions being
calculated or otherwise having
the effect of fragmenting the
party or bringing the party into
disrepute or public ridicule."
The letter gave the three ten
days in which to submit
reasons why they should not
face disciplinary action.
Only Sir Roland and Mr.
Lightbourn filed replies.
However, the executive
committee was not satisfied,
and last week party vice
chariman Fred Ramsey, along
with Irwin G. Stubbs and
William McP Christie. were
named members of a tribunal
to hear the case.
The hearing was held last
night at FNM headquarters in
the Dugard Plaza, Madeira


Street. Mr. Lightbourn and Sir
Roland's representative, Mr.
Thompson, made statements in
their defence and answered
questions put by the tribunal
members.
Mr. Cooper. present to
re pre sent the executive
committee, also asked some
questions.
Mr. Famsey confirmed
today that the tribunal will
meet Monday night at Mr.
Christie's law chambers in
Sandringham House, Shirley
Street, to decide what action if
any, ought to be taken against
the three dissidents.
Their recommendation will
be forwarded to party
chairman Senator Orville
Turnquest for action.
Contacted today to explain
his absence from the hearing
last night, Mr Adderley said he
would have no statement until
the tribunal's decision is
known.
Mr. Lightbourn, who leaves
Nassau tomorrow for a
two-week vacation in the IU.S.,
did not want to comment ion
the hearing as it was private.
but said:
"I still back the original
principles for which the FNM
was founded, and will continue
to do so. All the FNMN's
problems centre around tlihe
fact th:it the FNM has had nio
leader since the elections."
The FNM, under r the
leadership of St. Anges NM. '
Cecil Wallace Whitfield.
vigorously opposed earl.
independence for the Bahamas
and sought to oust the
Progressive Liberal Party on
that platform during the
Septeniber, 1972 elections.
When the PLP retained the
Government, and Mr. Whitfield
lost his own seat, the FNMN
under Mr. Isaacs' leadership
adopted the position that the
mn ajo ritiy of Bahaniiais
supported independence, and
that the party nust, tirerefore.
droll the independence issue.
and concentrate on einsuruii
t hat t lie in dependef ncert
constitution was a good oni.n
with fundamental rights ot
c i t i ens t ho ro u g hl
entrenched.
Mr. Lightbourn's comment
that the party has had no,
leader "since the elections"
w'as ai thinly-veiled assertion
that Mr Isaacs never fulfilled
the functions of leader.


VOL. LXX, No. 234 Saturday, September 1, 1973. Price: 20 Cents


SIR ROLAND SYMONETTE


Kidnap accused McLean claims



police 'concocted the whole thing'

By SYDNEY DORSETT
THE SUPERINTENDENT OF Nassau's Criminal Investigation Department testified Friday that
one of the two men accused of the February 1 5 kidnapping of Andrea Spencer. 42. told him that


police had "concocted the whole thing".
Supt. Fletcher Johnson said Hotel.
former Freeport C.I.D. Vice IHe said NMc ean told hlni
Squad leader Leroy Mcl.ean they went home shortly after I
told him "I don't know a.m. Mr Johnson said McLeaii
anything about these offences. told him that on Saturday,
I believe you all concocted the February 17. hle went to work
whole thing" when he was in Dames car about 9 a.ii and
charged on Februa r 23i. remained there unt il1 loon. le
Mr. Johnson. who remained also denied gomin onto the
in the witness box this morning Grand Bahama ilighway.
tinder cross-examinl ation by In his interview with
McLean, made this statement McLean, he said he was told
under examination-in-chife by that the accused Dames
Solicitor general l Langton accompanied McLean to
Hilton. "Gregory Scott's place to
He said he charged McLean gamble with M1icLean"
and police officer Spurgeon Mr. Johnson. w\ho said the
Dames with "being concerned two did not communicate
together in burglary, assault while at his office after being
with a deadly weapon, brought from their apartment
kidnapping, attempted following the search, said
extortion and breach of the Dames told li i they gambled
firearms act" after Police Insp. until 10 p.m. on February 16.
Hendersoi Norvillc returned lDaies also told of
from Washington with the accompanying McLean to the
results (f the ballistic expert's IHouse of Lords where they
findings remained to about 1I1:30 p.il.
The accused pleaded not or 12 am. lhe only person he
guilty to the charges of said he spoke with there was
kidnapping the daughter of Inmile Poitier "who had three
Canadian banker Robert F. Amnerican women with himn
Spencer and his wife, Joan, on t\sI young girls and an old
February 15 from their 10 ld',. He said I was introduced
Albacore Drive residence, to them bhut did not make any
Lucaya, Freeport. play i with them." Damres told
The imen are charged w\.ith him
a,,aulting Mr. Spencer with \tr Justice Samuel Gratiha
shot-gun and a revolver before. 'ai! the statement "I're mdI
taking the child away in a car tie of the well known words of
,\\neCd by tie Ro\al Bank (I ( Cal psonioni hrd \who
C('ada and deimandinr' tlc'i.iat such an ocsisti ini
5250.0tO ftr her release. the ,o gnyii s ing 'NW hciever \ o, see
Crown I s contending. IhlA k on the loose. I :niLst he
The a.cusei l Danlies,. silt i trodtiuced "
throughoutI the itril., i"s \1 John.on quotCd Dl). es
represented bi attornc. is "sW ng the\ a.ls o visiid the
Randol IFawkes. Sandpipe r where e hc als, inet
Mr. Johnsonii said Dl)jains. lidi who asked for a rdJe HeI
when charged, denied .1i said he could iot remember
knowledge of the offtniiccs whclthler the\ dropped hui oift
DIITFFERNT TIMIS ,it the International Ho lI n. iat
Mr. John nlsn ols told otf n ( oral ( irdin
interview he haid with the' hoo Dl)ies said hc ddopPwed
accused at different tines In McLean to work on I di\.d
it. he said he attempted t lo I ehruir I,. Mr Jo o said
discover the herera lourTs oi after r taking him ti o .\uk, ,it
tlie men on the night ot the 30 j1 .n ai t. ihe said li het' !,l led
critic. .it hol r ui til 0 i p ill \0lien tie
"M' cLe- an said tic' gr.ii ic s \\cii It)lol\si
a.hout 10 pA Ito 1i:t () p ii A P R I 'N
and went hoine to chng iini i s ke sk hi ho. hv u 'i!
clot hes and it at idth ilies Mi n ,t l' iti l said *s.ii c ' i.'i I see
tlit nigllt-clhibirg.i McleJn ,i:,'I t WV e \,c'it to check ,il' ,I p.rlai
the' went to the lI ,,'i ; Iat icai.onsicld lie p r;: w.is
Ilord.- first and l]iet I t1tlC' nit i n progrc'ss I lie \\ c \\enti
Poitier and remitainliedl ihc-c' et tthe pool loom .; (-.)tueens
until 1 1 30 r 30 p o 12 .i i aa\ .nd shot ti\\o i thiCe
t h e n w e nt to lith e ga s of) pool t itli oie
Siandiplper...for .1 while andi sit\ Johnon w\ho \es i,i.til:ies."
Kendapp "'tr\ Ptinder w urnl \Ir .IJolhinsi s.ouaid
the\ dro\e 'to til.' n .r alitr n oiio.l I het i' ciIu.'s d s.ii.i the\


'All people must have complete freedom


to exercise their right of choice' -K. Isaacs
POLITICAL VICTIMISATION is "a danger to the very root of our parliamentary system of


democracy," former Free National Movement Leader Kendal G.I.


"All the people must have
complete freedom in exercising
their right of choice. It
victimisation comes to be
accepted as a part of the
national tradition, then the
political affairs of the nation
will deteriorate to an
uncivilised level and we will
never be sure that a vote in an
election is the mark of a free
citizen or a mark of submission
to terror," Mr. Isaacs warned.
Mr. Isaacs, FNM M.P. for
Fort Montagu. was speaking on
the role of the opposition in a
parliamentary democracy at
the lucheon meeting of the
West Nassau Rotary Club at
the Sonesta Beach Hotel.
. Mr. Isaacs said in a system
such as ours. where majority
rules. "it is essential to the
working of the system that
genuine efforts be made to
accommodate the opinions of
the minority and to ensure at
least that at all times the


opposition is tree to voice their
opinions and to ha\e them
exposed before the nation wilth
the same facility as the
Gov ernment's views aire
projected.
"If it is true that power
tends to corrupt." Mr Isascs
continued. "then it muust be
true that the oplpostiion have
the absolutely. unshirkable
responsibility o of acting as
watchdogs for the public in the
conduct of their affairs by the
Government of the day.
"The opposition must
always be ready to focus
attention on any tendencie
towards abuse of power and it
must vigorously and openly
criticise the government." he
said.
"It must be particularly
vocal and active when the
abuse of power manifests itself
in the victimisation of
citizens," he added, because
victimisationn is not in keeping


Isaacs declared on Thursda% .
with the high ideals oi our
p.,rltaumi entari \ s\ sterl of
demnocirac and iiin act is a
danger to the ver. root ot ;hat
s% stem."
lie went on to say that wh-en
the opposition crticises.
naturally "it is expected that
Government will defend its
policies. but in so doing will
not trs to stifle the voice of
the opposition.
'I f. ho\ ever, the
Government does not play ithe
game fairly bh. for instance,
refusing to answer questions in
parliament or by delaying
answers to questions or
avoiding issues and stifling
debate, then it must become
the unpleasant duty of the
opposition to come to the
defence of democracy by more
dramatic action."
He conculded:
"There must be opposition.
not for the sake of opposition,
but for the sake of democracy


returned to Beaconsfield and
sta. ed there for a while before
going home about 12 midnight.
He never woke uip until about
6 a.m after his brother called
him to go fishing. Mr. Johnson
said Darlmes told him.
lie said that when he saw
L)amres around 2 p.m. on
February 18 he told Dames
that a 12-gauge spent cartridge
found at the Spencer's house
would be sent off to
Washington along with the
12-gauge shotgun, which was
found at their apartment.
"It the expert was to say
that the spent cartridge was
fired by that 12-gauge
shot gun, what would be your
explanation," Mr. Johnson said
he asked D)ames.
"Well, I wouldn't know
what to say because the gun
was always in our possession,"
Dames replied.
When he saw McLean at
4:10 p.m. that day and told
him his intentions about the
shotgun and spent cartridge
he said McLean said "I hope
the expert cannot prove that it
came from that gun because i
do not know what I would say.
Me and Dames were always
together and the gun was
always in our possession
IThe gun and carnrindge, .long
with four cartridges taken fr'mi
.imlonlg a box of armmunlitionl
tound at i)almnes' apartllrent
and another found it thec old
churchIt were tken to
W a s1in g tn h\ I ns
eInderson \o:t c rc oni
February 20. Mr .1 ohnsusn said.
"'I1 saw McLean ait 7:0 I)p. i.
on February 22 alter Insp.
Norville returned and told hinl
it was confirmed h\ ithe
ballistic expert that the spent
cartridge (was hiredd h\ the
I 2-gauge shot-igun." lr.
.loh n n said.
le said McLean replied "It
the c\pert says tihe ,artrldgc .
was fired from lhe guln. I don't
know what t o sa\ bec.iauls tihe
illi was asl\ a\ s ehotlle Dai ices
11ay bhc abic o thclp. hut we
ser e ailw'na s tgCltlier
Seen oun c1-ebrir. 23. Iames
toldt hiii hlie did i not kiltos'
"lhowt that could halppcn. 1
kno\t tlth gu wSas iin ie l
housee" Mr Johnlson ...id
Mir Johnson said lie then
read ioff tie charges ag.iinsi thtc
accused l anld chi rgc.T id tin It
was then that \McLean made
the inlterence' against thei
police
L'rndcr crioss,-e\allmiltirrol b\
IMcLean, lIr Jotlisont said he
showed himt a pholosl.iti csop\
of a inotec ri i ch h.id Ieen
itfound in t.i bottilr t tl e
Anton Cl nlic h\ tlhe police
Ie s.id hc ,Ie ilso showed himi
a spread, i tken roi the
abandoned t hiluch where
Solung Andrea w.s ,oulnd, some
pieces of a I -shirt. two
neckties and a lie\ cartridge
during the in\estlgatl"

FUNERAL SUNDAY
FUNFRAL services lfor Mrs
I ena Ltow c. wttho died
Wednesday afternoon at the
Princess Margaret Hospital, will
be held 4 p.m. Sunday at
Calvary Bible (Church, Collins
Avenue. pastor David Cole
ol ficat ing
Interment will follow in Old
'Trail cemeteryy .
She is survived by her
husband, five children, her
mother. four sisters and one
brother.
Friends may pay their last
respects at Pinder's Funeral
Home, Palmdale, between 5
p.m. and 6:30 p.m. today and
between noon and 1 p.m.
tomorrow.


WATER CUTS

ARE BEING

REDUCED

--AT LAST!
TIlE DAILY cut-off of
water supplies to New
Providence consumers has been
reduced from 12 hours to
between seven and eight hours
a day, the Ministry of Works
announced.
The supplies had been cut
off from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. daily
for a number of weeks. Now
the supply is being maintained
to between nine and ten
o'clock at night, and is to be
turned back on at five o'clock
each morning.
Reductions in pressure at
night will continue "for some
time to come," a press release
from Bahamas Information
Services cautioned.
The Water Department's
reserves of fresh water, the
depletion of which was cited as
the reason for the long daily
supply cuts. now stand at 22
million gallons, enough to meet
demand for almost three ful!
days, even if all water
production ceased at once.
Water cuts during some
period of each day will have to
continue because demand is
between 7.5 and eight million
gallons a day, while the
Government desalination
plants and the well-fields
together produce a total of
only about six million gallons a
day.
Because of the ever-widening
gap between supply and
demand, nightly drops in water
pressure have for months been
a fact of everyday life in New
Providence, but the problem
became worse immediately
after the independence
celebrations in July.
!n an attempt to provide the
best possible water supplies
during the celebrations, the
Water Department was forced
to draw on its reserves.

'Want right thing

done' over Outten,

says Workers Council

ST. BARNABAS M.P.
Sinclair Outten's sudden
discovery that he was not born
in the Bahamas. but in the
Turks and Caicos Islands, has
pointed up "the need on the
part of all political entities to
research all candidates fully
before nomination and/or
appointment," the Bahamas
Workers' Council declared in a
press release.
"Because research was not
done in this instance," the
BW ( said 'some
embarrassment might have
been caused to the Outten
family, and we offer
condolences and comfort,
because it might happen to
any one in Mr. Outten's shoes."
the BWC( expressed the
hope that the problem "will be
taken care of one way or
another with the interest of the
nation in mind. As to his
tenure of his seat in St.
Barnabas, we feel that the right
thing will be done by all
concerned ."
What "the right thing" is in
the BWC's opinion was not
said
Mr. Outten, 37, revealed this
week that while he has lived in
the Bahamas practically all his
life and has always considered
himself Bahamian, he learned
from his father recently that in
fact he, Sinclair, was born in
the Turks and ('aicos Islands
and brought to the Bahamas
when three or four months o!d.
Mr. Outten said his father's
revelation came where he was
advising his father, a Turks
Islander, on how to obtain
Bahamian citizenship.


The M.P. has already
resigned as parliamentary
secretary to the Prime Minister,
and has sought House Speaker
Arlington GC. Butler's advice on
what to do in connection with
his House Seat.
Only Bahamian citizens are
qualified for election to the
House of Assembly.


.I


- I I I I I I


"~ I I-I' I I I I --I-I- :I Ir I T II TT I I-I I~ II---I ~-I-r I


1 hr












Saturday, SeptemL-r 1, 1973


'GAINSVILLE EIGHT'ACQUITTED
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA (AP)- A federal jury in (ainseville, Ilorida
has found all defendants in the so-called (ainesville Eight Couspiracs trial
innocent. The eight were charged in connection with an alleged plot It
violently disrupt last year's Republican national convention.
The case went to the jury of seven women and five men Iriday after
instructions from federal judge Winston Arnow.
The defendants, their lawyers, and their supporters in the tainseville
courtroom broke into wide smiles as the court clerk began to read the
verdicts. As the last innocent verdict was read for defendant Scot Camil
a gap came from spectators. (e SEE STORY THIS PAGE)
HEROIC RESCUE OPERATIONS ON SUB CONTINUE
CORK, IRELAND (AP)- Rescue workers are fighting heroically against
the sea in a effort to bring two Canadian men trapped in a mini-submarine
from the ocean depths before their oxygen runs out.
Those above on the stormy Atlantic said the operation going on below
was like using a machine to thread a needle in the pitch-black darkness of
the ocean floor.
There were reports unconfirmed that the two trapped men already
are delirious, and are threatened with carbon dioxide poisoning and oxygen
starvation; but a Koyal Navy officer said later the men are all right. He did
not elaborate.
Experts said the 70 degree angle of the sunken sub embedded in the
seabed would complicate rescue efforts. (*SEE SITOR i IHIS PAGE)
50 CASES OF CHOLERA REPORTED IN EUROPE
GENEVA, SWITZERLAND (AP) The World Health Organization
W.H.O. said Friday a total of 50 cases of cholera have been reported in
Europe so far this week.
But a spokesman stressed there was no danger the disease could reach
eipdemic proportions in European countries which have developed sewage
and clean drinking water systems and a generally high standard of personal
hygiene.
The World Health body said by Friday Italy had reported a total of 30
cases of cholera, mostly in the area of Torre del Greco south of Naples. It
said there were ten people sick with cholera in Sweden, five in Britain,
three in France and one each in West Germany and West Berlin.
W.H.O. said many of them are travellers returning from Tunisia and
other North African countries.
The Swiss television service late Thursday broadcast a warning by Swiss
health authorities calling on all Swiss planning to go to the Naples area to
take anti-cholera vaccinations and on those returning from there with
diarrhea to see their doctor at once.
BATTEL ERUPTS BETWEEN BRITISH TROOPS AND IRA
BELFAST (AP) British troops and guerrillas of the Irish Republican
Army fought a gun battle in a Roman Catholic Quarter of Belfast I-riday
night. One civilian was shot dead and two others were wounded.
Official sources named one of the wounded men as James Bryson, one
of Northern Ireland's most wanted men. Bryson, an officer in the IRA's
militant "provisional" wing, was listed in critical condition at Belfast's
Royal Victoria Hospital.
The shootout flared in the Ballvmurphy District when troops reported
a number of men setting up "what looked like an ambush position," a
military spokesman said.
The death brought Northern Ireland's fatality till to at least 880 since
sectarian strife erupted between Catholics and Protest ts in 1969.
CANADIAN R. R. STRIKERS DEFY BACK-TO-WORK ORDER
OTTAWA (AP)- The Hlouse of Commons by a vote of 192 to 24 has
given preliminary approval to a bill ordering wage increases aimed at erring
the nine-day-old National Railway strike and warding off the threat of
strikes by other employees of Canada's II railways.
But union leaders said the 56,000 employees now on strike would not
go back to work unless the pay raise was bigger.
The opposition Conservatives, who joined Prime Minister Pierre Elliott
Trudeau's Liberals on Thursday night in voting for the government
back-to-work bill, were preparing an amendment to include cost-of-living
increases in a settlement. But there was no indication that this would ease
the opposition of the striking clerks, porters and other "nonoperating"
employees of Canada's I I railroads.
Parliament's Lower House was expected to complete action on the hill
Ilriday or Saturday, with Senate concurrence following speedily. Richard
Smith, chief negotiator for the associated nono)perating railway unions,
nations, said the union leaders would urge the strikers to ignore the law it
it was adopted unchanged.
This would make the strikers liable to a two-year prison term for
disobeying a federal statute. Only the leaders would he charged.
"We will not send them back to work lor the nmeager wage increases
proposed in the bill," said Smith
The government's bill provides for two- ear contracts retractive to Jaii
I for the nonoperating workers, the 20.000 shoicratt tradesmen and the
14,500 trainmen.
The nonops would get a wage increase hb stages of 17.2 per cent h, July
I. 1974,with the average hourly wage increasing trom 3 54 it 4.15 dollars.
Ior the shopcraft men and trainmen. the wage increases would he 8% per
cent on Jan. 1, 1973, 6'2 per cent on next Jan. I and I' per cent on July
1, 1974. The average hourly wage for the shop men is nowr 4.05 dollars and
Sfor the trainmen 4.25 dollars.
NUFF DECLARE ALL-OUT WAR ON TRINIDAD POLICE
PORT 01 SPAIN. TRINII)AD (AP') Trinidad and Tobago Prime
Minister Doctor I-ric Williams Thursdas described Carihbean people as "the
world's specialists in disunity and confusion." In a message marking this
country's eleventh anniversary of independence Williams warned "if we of
the Caribbean continue to dither about Caribbean integration from all
accounts the mafia will do the integrating for us."
Referring to escalating crime and violence in the appealed to the law abiding to show maximum cooperation with police
services currently engaged in a campaign "to contain la\wlessness and lthe
disorderly elements in our society." This was taken h\ observers as a
reference to recent upsurge if guerrilla violence,
Early this week a young policeman was ihot dead at point blank range
while on patrol duty and another police officer wounded in iarn armed clash
with guerrillas in the forested Valencia Hills 25 miles northeast of Port
Spain. The number of guerrillas operating is not known but police estimate
it to be "not less than t\o dozenn. Their objectives are still unclear.
Following two recent raids on banks and an attack on a remote police
station an organization call "National Union of Freedom lighters"
(NUFF) declared all-out war on police.
STRONG EARTH TREMORS FELT IN ALASKA
PALMER, ALASKA (AP) An earthquake was felt over a wide area of
Alaska Thursday but no damage was reported. The Palmer Observatory
said the quake registered 5.0 on the Richter scale.
The earthquake's epicenter was 70 miles southeast of Anchorage and
was felt strongly in Anchorage. Whittier, Valdez and Seward, an
observatory spokesman said.
The Richter scale measures quakes geometrically. A quake of 7.0, for
Instance, is 10 times more severe than one of 6.0.
The 1964 Good Iriday quake that caused millions of dollars of damage
in Alaska and claimed more than 100 lives registered 8.4.


DRAMATIC RESCUE ENDS


2 men trapped


in Atlantic mini


sub rescued alive

CORK, IRELAND (AP) Two men trapped in a midget
submarine on the Atlantic Ocean floor for three days and down
to their final hour of emergency air supplies were lifted to the
surface Saturday and taken aboard a rescue ship "fit enough to
play football." the shipowners said.


The dramatic announcement
was radioed from rescue
headquarters 150 miles at sea
to this Irish port and to the
defense ministry in London. It
ended three days of alternative
despair and optimism in a race
against the clock to save the
men, Roger Mallinson and
Roger Chapman, from
suffocating.
"Both men look as if they
are fit enough to play football
and they send their love to
their wives." a later radio
message from Vickers Voyager
said.
Mallinson, who observed his
35th birthday Friday while
trapped in the submarine, is
married and has three children.
Chapman has been married for
a year.
A Vickers spokesman said
both men climbed out of the
submarine without assistance.
He said they would go by
helicopter to Cork and then fly
to Barrow, England, for a
reunion with their families.
Attempts to rescue two men
suffered a hitch Friday night.
but the submariners were
described as "very fit and in
great spirits."
FIRST FAILURE-
The rescue sub had
operational problems and
surfaced without connecting a
cable to the trapped midget
sub, which had a supply of air
estimated as adequate until 3
a.m. EST Saturday.
The stricken sub was left on
the ocean bed, and a
spokesman for the owners of
the minisub said, "attempts to
secure a lifting rope around the
vessel have failed."
A second rescue sub was
reported still alongside the
crippled craft which had
then been on the ocean bottom
more than two days but
spokesmen said it might have
to be brought to the surface
for a battery recharge.
Sir Leonard Redshaw,
chairman of Vickers Oceanic,
which owns the subs, said
operations were going "very
smoothly," but he added "If
these men are going to be
brought up successfully it is
going to be h a very narrow
margin indeed."
Asked the chances of a
rescue in time. Redshaw
replied: "I wouldn't like to
calculate odds."
The rescuers, in two similar
midget submarines, took 11
hours to find the sunken sub
and more precious time to link
a light guideline to it.
The sub that suffered
operational difficulties was
using a remote control robot
arm to try to get a heavy duty
10-inch line through the lift
point on the crippled vessel
and raise it to the surface. But
warning lights on the parent
ship indicated one of its
compartments might be
flooding, and the craft was
hauled to the surface.
The operation was like using
a machine to thread a needle in
the dark on the ocean floor.
One of the trapped men,
Mallinson. was marking his
35th birthday during the
rescue operation. His crewmate
Chapman, is 28.
BAD CONDITIONS
Rescuers reported that even
with powerful searchlights on
the rescue vessels visibility was
only nine feet ahead. Stormy
conditions which produced
12-foot waves and
40-mile-an-hour winds on the
surface hampered rescue
efforts.
But the shipowners, Vickers
Oceanic, insisted the lift
operation had proven itself in
tests under rough weather
conditions. The big question
was, would there be enough
time?
The stricken sub sank 1,375
feet to the bottom of the
ocean Wednesday morning. It
had been laying a transatlantic
cable when a snapped tow rope
sent it plunging into the mud
on the sea bed. At the time
Vickers said the sub had
enough air to support life until


4 a.m. EDT Saturday.
But conditions may have
changed. The trapped men had
first been ordered to maintain
silence to conserve air.
Although radio telephone
contact with them was
maintained, rescue ships,
including a minisub flown in
from Vancouver. Canada, had
trouble pinpointing their
location.
'SING FOR LIVES'
So by Friday the radio
ordered the trapped men to
"sing for your lives." By the


time sonar tracking equipment
finally found them, a new
question had arisen: Had the
men used up too much oxygen
singing?
One of the rescue ships on
the surface radioed to Cork
that they had. Its message
read: "Both men trapped in
small sphere. High
temperature. Both delirious.
Risk of Co2 poisoning and
oxygen starvation. Message
ends."
As the minutes ticked away,
the rescuers could hear them
singing their lungs out, gulping
down precious air, to give
other minisubs probing the
depths a "voice fix" to locate
them.
Aboard the sub's mother
ship, the Vickers Voyager, was
another minisub, Pisces II,
damaged in an earlier attempt
to rescue its trapped sister.
A third midget, Pisces V,
was under water groping in the
blackness for the lost sub.
The Voyager, nerve centre
of the search flotilla, steamed
in slow circles around the
cluster of red and white buoys
that marked the Pisces Ill's
approximate position.
On the surface there were
12-foot Atlantic swells, chilly
spray and near gale-force
winds.
RESCUE FLEET
Nearby was the Royal
Navy's research ship Hecate, a
gray-hulled vessel standing by
on the perimeter of the search
to give whatever help it could.
A spotter helicopter from
Hlecate crisscrossed the zone
incessantly
Completing the triangle was
a U.S. Navy cable-laying ship.
Its battleship gray hull bore
only the number RC3.
Standing by was the U.S.
Navy's underwater search bell,
Curv III. flown to Ireland by
tne U.S. Air Force from San
Diego, Calif., to back up the
rescue team if needed.
This craft, equipped with
television cameras operated
from a command ship on the
surface, was used several years
ago to locate a U.S. hydrogen
bomb lost off Spai".

Premier Chou

accuses former

defence minister
TOKYO (AP) Premier Chou
en-Lai has accused former defense
minister Lin Piao of plotting to
assassinate Communist Party
Chairman Mao Tse-Tung before Lin
died in 1971.
Chou said Lin planned two
coups, the first in August 1970 and
the second in March 1971, then
tried to flee to Russia hut died in a
plane crash over Mongolia.
The disclosures were Chou's first
official version of events preceding
the death of Lin. the heir-designate
to Mao. They came in a key policy
speech to the 10th Chinese
Communist Party Congress on Aug.
28, the last day of the historic
meeting. It was carried Iriday by
Hsinhua, the official Chinese news
agency, and monitored here.
The second coup was launched
Sept. 8, 1971, C'hou said, when Lin
attempted to have Mao killed and
set up a party central committee to
rival another under Mao's firm
control.
Five days later, Chou said, Lin
died in a plane crash in Undur
Khan, Mongolia, trying to flee "as a
defector to the Soviet revisionists in
betrayal of the party and the
country."
On international affairs, Chou,
75, said that Peking's dispute with
Moscow on "matters of principle"
should not prevent the
normalization of state relations
between the two Communist giants.
But he added that both the
United States and the Soviet Union
"are actually extending their
armaments every day. Their
purpose is to contend for world
hegemony."


Surveryor-Engineer
school. Refinery
essential,


GAINESVILLE

EIGHT ARE


ACQUITltOD
By F.T. MacFeeley
GAINESVILLE, FLA. (AP)
Eight antiwar activists
accused of plotting to violently
disrupt the 1972 Republican
National Covention were found
innocent of conspiracy charges
Friday.
The jury of sevL.: women
and five men deliberated less
than four hours before
returning the verdicts which
drew smiles from the
defendants-all members of the
Vietnam Veterans against the
War-their lawyers and their
supporters.
The last verdict to be read
was that for Scott Camil, 26.
named by government
witnesses as the planner of the
group.
U.S. district court judge
Winston E. Arnow asked
attorneys if they wanted the
jury polled. "Not us, your
honour, "replied defense
attorney Larry Turner.
The case went to the jury at
10:30, winding up a five-week
trial. Two hours later, the
jurors asked to see testimony
from the government
informers, but the judge asked
them to do without it because
the items had not been
transcribed from a court
stenographer's tapes. The
testimony involved a 1972
Memorial Day weekend
meeting in Gainesville at which
the plot for violence allegedly
was hatched.
Even before the jury
returned, Stanley K. Michelson
Jr., 23, of Gainesville, accused
of failing to report crimes by
the other seven, predicted a
quick verdict.
The other defendants,
accused of ploting attacks on
authorities with bombs and
guns, were more cautious.
Arnow had spent an hour
instructing the jurors.
"The testimony of an
informer must be weighed with
greater care than any other
witness," he told them. "You
should consider whether the
informer may be prejudiced
against one or more of the
defendants.
"You should first determine
whether a conspiracy existed,"
Arnow said. "Next you should
determine whether each of the
defendants wilfully became a
member, and then whether one
or more of the defendants
committed an overt act."
In asking the jurors to do
without the repeat of the
testimony of William W. Lem -
mer and Charles H. Becker,
Arnow said it would take
considerable time to go
through the tapes and to find
specified portions of what
Lemmer said during his five
days on the stand and what
Becker said in two days.
Lemmer and Becker had
infiltrated the VVAW.
Arnow said the stenographer
who made the tapes had
returned to Jacksonville, Fla.,
and he asked the jurors to
decide among themselves
whether they really needed the
material.
In addition to Carnmil and
Michelson, both of Gainesville.
the defendants were: William J.
Patterson. 24 and John
Kniffin, 25, both of Austin,
Tex.: Peter J. Mahoney, 23,
Hollywood, Fla.: Alton C.
Fodd, 25, Hialeah, Fla.,
Donald P Perdue, 23,
Hollwood. Fla., and John K.
Briggs, 20, Gainesville.

MORE VIOLENCE IN CHILE
CHILI: (AP) One person was
sounded and six new dynamite
explosions were reported I riday
following a call hy the leftist
government to end "The law of the
jungle" in troubled Chile.
Interior minister Carlos Briones
told a news conference Thursday


night that there have been more
than 500 incidents of violence and
eight deaths in the last month, the
result of a wave of strikes and
sabotage.


with Certificate from accredited
and Construction experience


Field Accountant to be responsible for Pay-Roll,
Purchasing, and Cost Control on job site.
Construction experience desirable.

Time-Keeper and costing clerk

Construction Workers Carpenter-Foremen,
Carpenters and Construction Labourers for
recruitment in Freeport with lengthy expectancy for
employment.

APPLY: MR.GEORGE ARNETT,
Hallmark Construction Company
P. O. Box F-682, Freeport --
Phone No. 352-9601
or
MR.GORDON WONG,
Cavalier Construction Company,
P.O. Box N8170
Nassau. Phone No. 35171 or 36011


CONGRESSMAN'S DISCLOSURE OUTBREAK OF


Sales agreement on CHOLERA IN


Nixon's SanClementeTALY SPREADS
NAPLES ITALY (AP)-
SItaly's cholera outbreak spread
proper ty was change Friday from teeming Naples to
the southern port city of Bari,
health officials said. A cholera
fear gripped other Italian cities.
By John Beckler Officials in Bari, an Adriatic
WASHINGTON (AP) Chairman Jack Brooks of a House city of more than 300,000
subcommittee investigating government expenditures on inhabitants, said at least 10
President Nixon's San Clemente, Calif., property said today the persons were known to be
dates of a sales agreement covering 23 acres apparently had beer. suffering from the contagious
changed. disease. About 20 others were
Presidential counselor Bryce employee of the surveying in quarantine.
Harlow replied "there is no ccn-pany that one of President By Friday afternoon nine
inconsistency." Nixon's attorneys, Frank persons had died in the Naples
"The negotiations for the Demarco, had requested the area and more than 150 were
transfer of the beneficial date be changed to Dec. 15. quarantined in a hospital.
interest of the President in the Demarco has denied that the In Naples, where cholera
larger portion of the San date was changed, Brooks said. broke out last week, thousands
Clemente property were begun The copies released by the of irate and fear-stricken
in mid-September 1970 and White House did not show any Neapolitans staged
agreement by the parties had altering of the date but the demonstrations for the second
actually been reached in time original document in the day in a row. The
for a closing of the transaction surverying company's files demonstrators demanded
by Now. 15, 1970," Harlow indicated the date had been speedy government action to
said in a letter to Brooks that erased Rrooks said prevent an epidemic.


was made available to
newsmen.
''The matter was
deliberately set for a Dec. 15
closing, however, to provide
time for precomputing the
prorations ir the transfer. The
transfer of the beneficial
interest was acknowledged by
the trustees on Dec. 24 and
was at that time fully
consumated."
Brooks, (D-Tex.), in making
his announcement at a news
conference, said he was making
no charges in connection with
the apparent discrepancy in
dates and could think of no
reasons for such a change being
made. He said he had asked
Harlow for an explanation.
DEEP REGRET
Harlow, in releasing his
letter, told a reporter that the
answer to the questions posed
by Brooks "was easily available
and the question amounts to
nothing at all." He said, "I
regret very deeply there was no
opportunity afforded me to
furnish the above data for the
information of the media, not
to mention your
subcommittee, at the time you
held your press conference."
In San Clemente. Calif., a
White House official said
Brooks had revealed the
request to Harlow "before the
White House had an
opportunity to examine it."
The official had no immediate
detailed comment but said "an
answer will be forthcoming
from the White House
demonstrating that the letter
from Congressman Brooks
contained false impressions and
allegations."
Brooks said among
documents released by the
White louse Monday was a
sales agreement dated Dec. 15,
1970, for the resale of the 23
acres to Robert H. Abplanalp
and C. G. "Bebe" Rebozo,
close friends of the president.
But evidence obtained by his
subcommittee indicates the
sales agreement was not in
existence on Dec. 15 and could
not have been in existence for
several days after that, Brooks
said at a news conference.
DISCREPANCY
lie said subcommittee
investigators were told by an


Brooks said t was important
to fix the date of the transfer
of ownership of the property
in order to be certain who
owned it when improvements
paid for by the government
were added.
100,000 IN MASS
RALLY FOR PERON
BUENOS AIRES (AP)- A
triumphant Juan D. Peron beamed
and waved to his first mass rally in
18 years Friday, kicking off a
presidential campaign almost
assured of success.
Peron, with his third wife, Isabel,
who is running for Vice President in
the Sept. 23 election, stood on an
open second storey balcony as
tens of thousands of workers and
supporters paraded noisily below.
The 77-year-old former President
looked tired but happy.
Almost every union contingent
paused below the balony, its
marchers jumping up and down like
sweepstakes winners, wildly waving
colourful signs with slogans.
It was a throwback to before
1955 when the army unseated
Peron, calling him a despot. There
was an enormous portrait of Evita.
Peron's second wife who died in
1952 and is still considered a saint
by many Peronists.
Newsmen estimated the crowd at
something over 100,000


CECIL P. WALLACE


An emergency meeting of
city officials and hospital
administrators called the
situation "serious." Summer
sessions of schools were
postponed to Sept. 20.
The government assured
Italians that the outbreak was
under control and rushed over
one million doses of
anti-cholera vaccine to the
Naples area.
But cholera fear spread like
an epidemic, particularly in
this teeming metropolis of 2.5
million persons.
In Portici, a community near
Naples, a crowd numbering in
the thousands prevented mayor
Aldo Crimi from entering City
Hall. They surrounded and
punched his car in a protest
against alleged lack of vaccine
The mayor's car sped away.
In Torre Del Greco, a port
city of 80,000 on the Gulf of
Naples. about 500 persons who
could not be vaccinated
marched on the municipal
building. Police dispersed them
without incident.


CENTRAL GARAGE
announces the
appointment of


CECIL P. WALLACE
as Sales Representative.


Mr. Wallace, formerly manager of Taxico Ltd., invites his
many friends and customers to call him for their automo-
tive needs at ...
CENTRAL GARAGE PHONE 3-4711
or AT HIS HOME NUMBER 4-2765


Bahamas Telecommunications


Corporation



APPRENTICESHIP TRAINING SCHEME


Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons (male and
female) for inclusion in BaTelCo's Apprenticeship Training Scheme
commencing 10th September, 1973.

The successful applicants will be placed in full time training
consisting of class room and laboratory work with alternate periods of
practical training in the field of telephony, radio and teletype.

Minimum Requirements: '0' Level G.C.E. Passes in English and
Mathematics
OR
B.J.C. Passes in English and Mathematics.

Preference will be given to applicants who have also done science or
physics subjects and show an interest in technical work. The pay will be
within the Corporation's established scales for trainee technicians.

Candidates will be expected to be bonded apprentices during the
period of their training. Successful applicants with an aptitude for the
telecommunications technicians field may be considered for advanced
training at University or Technical College abroad.

Applications should b. submitted to the Assistant General
Manager/Personnel and Industrial Relations, Bahamas
Telecommunications Corporation, P. O. Box N 3048, Nassau, Bahamas
to reach him not later than 6th September, 1973.


M. S. A. TURNER
Assistant General Manager/P. & I.R.


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"White Label"




Dewar's




- itnever vanes






"White Label"

SCOTCH WHISKY-by

DEAR'S

Distributed by BUTLI:R & SANDS
Available throughout the Bahamas


HELP WANTED


L --- -- -~~----


I


hit (ribtm











Saturday, September 1, 1973.


hP grttrbmu


ow to catch up with the rest of the world


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
I HAVE had an experience in Coral Gables that I feel I should
tell my readers about because the information may be useful to
some of them at some time in the future.
Before I go into my story I can advise you to avoid riding in an
elevator in an electrical storm.

It happened during the worst electrical storm I have
experienced since I cam to Florida ten months ago.
It started while my wife and I were having lunch. A flash of
lightning was followed by a heavy roll of thunder. The lights in
the room blinked, the TV crackled as though it had been touched
by a spark.
It sounded as though it must have struck somewhere nearby.
Shortly afterwards an ambulance screamed past the hotel.
I wondered if its mission was as a result of a lightning strike.
*****6*i*
A few minutes later my daughter phoned me from Nassau. In
the midst of our conversation a Cuban butted in.
This was the first time that I had experienced a crossed
telephone line here. The interference came from a Cuban who
didn't understand much English.
I told him I was on a long distance call and asked him to hang
up. He asked me why he should hang up.
Impatiently I shouted: "Get off the line".
He understood enough English to shout back: "You get to hell
off the line".
I got to hell off the line because I figured that it would cost
more to argue with a Cuban on a long distance call than to hang
up and have my daughter make a second call.
I decided I should report the incident to the desk and so I went
downstairs to make the report.
The clerk told me that this was the second complaint within a
few minutes she had had about a crossed line.
"It must be the weather," she suggested.
There was no argument against his explanation and so I
returned to the elevator.
Just before the elevator reached the main floor there was
another flash of lightning. The lights in the building blinked
again. Several girls on the elevator rushed out of the elevator
laughing hysterically. They had been frightened by a moment of
darkness in the box. I teased them for being "fraidy cats" as I
boarded the elevator and pressed the starter button.
Everything went well until the elevator was within a few feet
of my floor.
At this moment the heaviest flash of them all snuffed out all
the power in the building. The elevator stopped dead and I found
myself alone in a small pitch black box.
This was a brand new experience for me. Something I had
never anticipated. And so I wasn't prepared for this emergency. I
felt for the alarm bell at the top of the starter panel. I pressed the
button but immediately realized that it was a wasted effort
because everything in the building was dead.
I waited a few minutes, feeling that the power would come on
again quickly. When it didn't I banged on the door with my
walking stick.
Then I heard my wife's voice. She was calling my name. I
answered and told her to go for help.
"It's pitch black out here in the corridor. The phone is dead
and all the exit lights have gone out. I don't know where to find
the steps but I will try," she said calmly. She wasn't excited
Because she could tell by my voice that I was not alarmed.
Then a woman in a neighboring apartment came in the
passageway with a flashlight. She said she would get a message
through to the desk.
By this time I was surprised to find that, although I was alone
in the elevator, the air was already getting heavy. This meant
there was no ventilation in the box and so it was a good thing
there were no other passengers to share the small supply of
oxygen.
A few minutes later I heard voices of men calling. They were
trying to locate my position.
1 told them that I was at the sixth floor. I had a feeling that I
had just reached my destination when the lights went off.
Finally they were knocking on the door.
"Can you get your fingers in the door and pull it open?", a
man asked.
I tried. What I thought was the door yielded. I pulled it open
but I found myself facing a blank wall. This, apparently, wasn't
the outer door.
I reported the result of ny effort.
"Okay," the man assured me. "We'll soon have you out."
I could hear them working just above my head with heavy
-instruments.
A few seconds later the door opened and I found myself
looking up to a small opening about three reet above me.
"Give me a hand," I called.
A hand reached down. I held it and scrambled out to the floor
above.
IWell," my wife laughed, "you've had another experience."
"Yes," I laughed, "and I have learned a few lessons that I can
: hand on to readers of my column."
The first lesson is that you should avoid an elevator in an
electrical storm.
Then you should keep a flashlight in your room. Although
daylight was streaming through the windows in my apartment,
the corridors where the elevators are located were pitch dark.
And so it is advisable to keep a flashlight in your room.
It is also important that you should acquaint yourself with
the exits in your hotel. If the lights go out especially at night
and you don't know the location of the exits you may find
yourself in a serious situation in an emergency.
Governments should require elevators to have some form of
ventilation in the roof...and they should especially require that
the alarm bell does not depend on electrical power.
I wasn't entombed alone in darkness long enough to cause
either my wife or me any concern. But I now know what it feels
like to be shut up alone in the dark in the confined space of an


elevator. I am glad it has happened because I have been able to
hand on advice that I hope may be helpful to some of my readers.
S***,*6**
My wife's comment that I had had another experience did not
mean that she was indifferent to my welfare.
This attitude toward experience has long been a part of our
lives. For a writer every experience adds to his store of
knowledge.
"I would make a trip to hell," I impressed on her when she was
first being initiated into my way of life, "ifl could be assured of
a round trip ticket. "
This comment has become a byword in our personal banter
since an experience we shared in Mexico in 1964.

I was in a fire at sea during the first world war...two train
wrecks, one in the U.S., the other in a tunnel in France during the
first world war when all the lights went out...two forced airplane
landings, one in Haiti and one in Australia...my two-storey house
on Shirley Street was lifted up bodily and carried into the next
yard and cracked down the middle...! was on a vessel on the
fringe of a hurricane in Jamaica in 1916 when a school of sharks
swam hungrily around the boat.
My wife and I were attending a press conference in Turkey in
1964 when Japan was hit by a disastrous earthquake. Our next


The ZNS announcer was telling the nation Thursday
morning that governments in many other countries were
having labour troubles.
Then he added, "And in the Bahamas there is no
difference!"
It could have been that the reporter was merely using a
technique which is quite often employed by newscasters.
Or it could have been that he was making a directed effort
to brainwash Bahamians into shrugging off our troubles just
because everybody else was being similarly afflicted.
In any event it was really a profound commentary on our
situation today. True, we have had labour problems before
together with all kinds of other problems. We had a riot in
1942 and a general strike in 1958 which was perhaps more
of a political demonstration than anything else.
Through it all Bahamians were still able to boast, and
justifiably so, that things were different in the Bahamas,
meaning better than most places, particularly the rest of the
Caribbean.
The late Sir Stafford Sands used to like to rattle off
statistics to prove that the average income in the Bahamas
was so many times higher than in other Caribbean
territories. And there was a young politician by the name of
L.O. Pindling who used to reply with irrefutable logic,
"don't compare us with the rest of the Caribbean. Compare
us with yourselves. The Bahamas is different."
Mr. Pindling was saying that it was true that the majority
of the Bahamian people were far better off than the
majority of their cousins to the south. But, he argued,
considering the wealth which was evident in the country,
Bahamians could have been even better off. We could have
made it possible for the majority of Bahamians to be
relatively wealthy when compared with the millions living
in abject poverty in the other islands.
So it was with many things in this country. Even in our
politics we were different. When the majority of the people
decided that they had had just about enough of an arrogant
and short-sighted ruling clique, they marched up to the
ballot boxes and made the change. The only thing that
disturbed the peace was the sound of cowbells and horns
and laughter.
WE ARE CATCHING UP
Now look at us today We are catching up
with the world in all the wrong things. In the last election
there was an unprecedented spate of violence. Armed
camps were organized in the support of both maior parties.
These camps not only performed defensive action
but some of the soldiers obviously carried out retaliatory
and offensive action as well.
With the election behind us we have the spectacle of a
cynical and hypocritical government preaching love with
their mouths while at the same time practising or allowing
to be practised in their name the most spiteful kind of
victimization of fellow Bahamians and fellow human
beings.
We have a Prime Minister who pompously lectures an
international conference on the importance of freedom, law
and peace while he allows the suffering of those innocent
persecuted children at Inagua to drag on from one
miserable month to the other.
Leaving aside the Constitution and any agreed intent,
human compassion would demand that immediate action
be taken regardless of the race or national origin of the
children. It is incidental that they happen to be Bahamian
and black.
Just a few short years ago there was full employment in
this country and the acceptable challenge was to get more
and more Bahamians trained as rapidly as possible to take
the best advantage of the opportunities. The children in
school were looking forward to a brilliant future and in the
rest of the Caribbean we were regarded as the land of milk
and honey.
Yes, indeed, that was different. Beautifully different. But
to the incredibly twisted minds of some of the ruling party
it was just too much different, too much out of style,
particularly since we were supposed to be a struggling


stop on a round the world trip was Japan.
"Gee," I told my wife when the news came over the radio, "I
wish I were there. I need an earthquake to round out my
experiences. And I just missed this one."
Weeks later we had completed our trip around the world.
Mexico was our last stop on this journey.
There was nothing to suggest that way down in the bowels of
the earth there would be a deep rumble after we went to bed on
the top floor of a hotel in Mexico City on the last night of our
stay in that city.
Some time during the night I woke up to the sensation of being
on a ship in a rolling sea. For a moment I thought I was on a ship.
But when I suddenly remembered that I was in a hotel in Mexico
and not at sea I turned on a light at the head of my bed.
The room was rocking madly. Overhead a chandelier was
swinging dangerously from side to side. Here it was...l had my
earthquake.
My wife was sleeping calmly in a twin bed. I reached across and
touched her lightly. I didn't want to alarm her.
"Honey," I said calmly when she opened her eyes. "We're
having an earthquake."
"Well," she replied without excitement, "You wanted it, I
hope you are satisfied."
She got up. Dressed carefully. Saw that everything was all right
in the room before she would agree to go downstairs.
And then we made a serious mistake. We got into the elevator.
Fortunately the elevator reached the ground floor safely but let
me warn you never to use an elevator in an earthquake because if
the electricity goes off before you get out you may be stuck
somewhere between two blank walls without any chance of
escape.


FOOTNOTE TO HISTORY: When I told my daughter about my
experience in the elevator she asked me if I had difficulty in
getting out of the little hole that was revealed when the door of
the elevator was pried open.
To answer her question I told her a story about two men who
went racoon hunting in a graveyard in Florida. They were not
together.
The first man fell into an open grave. All his efforts to get out
failed. Finally he settled down in a corner of the hole to wait for
daylight when he hoped that someone would come along to
rescue him.
Soon after this another hunter fell in the hole. He didn't see
the first man who sat quietly in his comer of the hole watching
the vain efforts of the second man to get out of the hole.
"It's no use, buddy," the first man finally said from the
shadow of his comer, "You can't get out."
The second man thought this was a "sperrid" talking to him.
He got out that time.
**4* *6**
THOUGHTS FOR TODAY
To die will be an awfully big adventure. -SIR JAMES
BARRIE.
This is the next step.-DUPUCH
This is the next step. -DUPUCH


emerging territory.
OUR HEROIC EFFORT
so we had to get in step with the rest of them. We had to
make an heroic effort to discourage all the hundreds of
millions of dollars which the Prime Minister said was ready
to come into the country so that we could join the long line
of new nations competing for soft loans!
True, we have net yet caught up with the rest of the
Caribbean but we are trying hard. New development money
is at s trickle. The construction industry is at a standstill. The
tourist industry is in bad trouble. Thousands are out of
work and thousands more are leaving school each year with
nothing to do.
Ihe crime rate is rising by leaps and bounds and


Bahamians are beginning to put burglar alarms and iron bars
on the windows and doors of their homes. The newspapers
report the more spectacular crimes and the increase in them
is bad enough. However, it is even worse than that since the
newspapers do not get or do not print details of all the
robberies that occur each day.
The PLP Government is apparently determined that we
should get in line with the rest of the world in all things
ugly. Nothing must go unaffected. As one of them said in
the Senate, we have to get involved in the effort to relieve
the energy crisis!
No matter that these islands constitute one of the most
beautiful spots in the world and that we can contribute to
the sanity and physical well-being of millions merely by
preserving the Bahamas as a bright and beautiful haven in a


polluted world. No matter that our waters abound in the
best uncontaminated food in the world.
Just let us get on with the job eliminating the difference
between us and the rest. One of the best ways to do this is
to turn the Bahamas into crude oil transhipment centres
and oil refineries. In that way we can make a giant stride
forward.
We can sit and watch our incomparable beaches be
destroyed by crude oil. We can let our conch and fish and
lobster be poisoned by the waste from the oil refineries
and if that is not enough we can suck the poisons into our
lungs directly from our atmosphere.
Think what a ring of excitement you would hear in the
voice of the ZNS announcer to whose lot it will fall to
report that the waters in the Exuma Cays have at last
arrived at the same level .f pollution as the Hudson River.
No difference!
Or hear the pride and reverence with which he will
announce that while six people died in Japan from eating
contaminated fish, six also died in the Bahamas from
contaminated conch. No difference!
Perhaps at some future celebration of our national
birthday we will be able to look back and see what a great
Bahamas we would have built. By that time all of our
Ministers should be in Rolls' Royce cars, all of them
bullet-proof just in case one of the unemployed masses fails
to appreciate his great role as a sacrificial offering to the
glory of a nation.
There will be many cheers for the Government and much
applause since the people will no longer be ashamed that
they were different in many ways from the rest of the
world. There will be others, of course-or, rather,
hopefully who will shed a tear of fond remembrance for
the days when the beaches were clean, the conchs
uncontaminated and citizens could vote for the candidate
of their choice without being destroyed.




A MAGNIFICENT

SIDNEY POITIER FILM


EDITOR, The Tribune,
Permit me space in your
valuable columns to put in a
plug for one of the best motion
pictures that, in my humble
opinion, has ever been viewed
from the screen of a theatre in
Nassau in recent times.
The particular film to which
I refer is the Verdon
Productions / First Artists' epic
(and I cannot conceive of this
picture being considered
anything less than epic!)
screenplay "A Warm
December", which was shown
at the Shirley Street Theatre.
Up to this time I had genuinely
held David Leam's "Dr.
Zhivago" and the more


contemporary "Love Story" as
being the most touching
romance-tragedies that I have
had the pleasure of seeing, but
by far. "Warm December" has
surpassed them both and
some!
Being a particularly ardent
Sidney Poitier fan, I must
admit that I had keenly looked
forward to seeing this movie
from the time I had heard that
it was being made in London .
However, I was not quite
prepared for what I saw when I
eventually did get a chance to
see it. This film has what is
commonly called "impact"-
and to what a remarkable
Page 4, Col. 5


. Enter The Tribune-Pan Am Travel Photo

' - Contest!

A free round-trip for two
can be yours aboard a Pan Am jet to
any one of 26 European cities served by Pan Am.
















I









Photo No. 5

City or Scene. ................... ............ Country. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .

My Name. ............................ Address. ............ . .. . .... Phone ..... ..

Contest Rules
The Tribune will run a total of 30 photo ads showing a scene from somewhere within Pan Am's travel system. Name the
City or Scene and Country shown, using the picture and answer blank included in each ad. After the final photo has run
on November 17th, mail all 30 entries (stapled or clipped together) to: Vacation, The Tribune, P. O. Box N-3207,
Nassau, Bahamas, You may enter more than one group of photos, as long as you use official Tribune blanks and groups
must be fastened together.
Should you miss an edition of The Tribune with a Pan Am photo ad, back copies can be purchased at The Tribune
reception desk in The Tribune Building, Shirley Street, Nassau, or The Tribune office, 9B Kipling Building, Freeport.
In case of a tie, the tie will be broken by additional photos not previously published. All entries must be postmarked no
later than midnight, Monday, November 19th, 1973.
Employees and their families of The Tribune, Pan American World Airways and their advertising agencies, are not
eligible to enter.


Contest ends Saturday, Nov. 17th
Winner mIy choose round-trip for two
to any one of the following 26 European
Citis rvd by a n Am.
Where in the world within Pan Am's travel system, | ...--I
are the places pictured above? Identify all 30 AMSTERDAM MADRID
photographs that will appear on various days in BARCELONA MUNICH
The Tribune over the next 13 weeks and you have GRADE NUREMBERG
a chance to win a round-trip for two aboard a Pan BRUSSELS oSIO
COPENHAGEN PARIS
American World Airways' jet to your choice of any DUSSELDORF PRAGUE
one of 26 European cities served by Pan Am. FRA^FORT RON
HAMBURG STOCKHOLM
HANOVER STUTTGART
LISBON VIENNA
Sribune DON WARSAW


IT-


I I I I












, "" ,# .v .v.


SHIRLEY STR
NOW SHOWING THRU
THURSDAY. "Da\ of the
Jackal" matinees at 2.15 &
4:45, evening 9.00. Suggested
for mature audiences, parental
discretion is advised.
STARTS FRIDAY. "The
Mackintosh Man" matinees at
3:00 & 5:00. evening 9:00.
Suggested for n a ture


audiences, parental discretion
is advised.
Act(I I '.Iui! \ '\C "Ian.
it I 'COctoi .i i 1 flustion iiAin
producer John 1 micnItn ll
L I'.lti togetlhicr to take the
Ti T rl iI ri' M.J.kinsiisti MI n." .i Viar!er
1i I I hcr 1.s I id t. i i i.
hiich li started .i :c(1 [ l,'iii
Studio,,,s Vtlh loi.aitin. t itn the
t* K IreLidl d itnd MaI.la
ci -stars F re' ch l I actress
l)n i li iiii S.uI S d, initd IBritisi
acti J.iises Mas'. i'
Ihlie ii, ILi .I, stiry uI ,
hI gh-los-I l e it ie' andI
ii imr IIt .iln ) nlt nrilllgu invi v iii ig
I eI tI L'Ict ot a ti It n 1ic in
ti.i iiin s L.l d tl i rIsCiaC e .t Ii i iN
1p lii1l tl 1i topi polatic,a figui rei
hM os 1. 1, iai .* is pui//l :ii
11orC t)tlid one gI o criIIncnt.
Durin1i li)ci t i ioinL i1 tr i in I.
"Thel Mackintosh Man.'" it
I ) tnd;iin in)ld Irel in l e\Ini !in
pi el} Cd [I1111 \ ,L 'I.' A W.ItI aj
dog ai huge. ferocious. b!hik
( criman Ritt \'riilcr with i
gr ,owl like the liL r otf t !i ;i
and the slct ngth of a bear. !la,,
I I..' d.Lig takes the parl 'i
gu9,,i rd do( I,) t tracks 11mi
chs.i 'r\s \i p siin l t )oss t!k.li
hbl':ik I' th usli n. ii side Jflcr
thi ,;,i i s i ,i K' i fr o i
da, ig'ri'e s t ; n g killer .


NOW SHOWING 7:50 & 11:30




.gadmnitz / MATTEL Productions

"SOUNDER"
A Robert B. Radnitz Martin Ritt Film



SAND AT VET
9:45 ONLY 0----"'
WALKABOUT PG.



NOW SHOWING THRU THURSDAY
Matinee 2.15 & 4:45, Evening 9 00 'Phone 2-1004, 2-1005I
S "MIND-BLOWING SUSPENSE!" I



II









1 AI* 'ON t3"
SA Vt, A A -ECHN! CLP R PG' .
I:S i l f / R \}. T7 RI A .t IFI ( !s -
IPARi \it. iLfR 1ri(0i\ An1)is I).
Reservations not claimed by 8:45, will be sold
on first come, first seed basis.



Now thru Tuesday Sunday thru Wednesday
S Matinee spirits ;i 1 00 Sunday Continuous
LEvening 9 00 from 4.55
EMlondav CoNlainC i uiO I
"WALKING TA\L' R i Crolt 3:00
Joe Dan Baker "TE S(CAt tIPINTERS" PCI
Elo/abeth Ha.rlimlan
loaHutrt Lancaster
PLULS Ossi Davis
PLUS
"THE LAWYtR" R I( BL
"INCRIDIBLI 2 HEADED
S Barry Nc imas TRA\ NSPL .NT P(,
Harold (;mild Bruce i)ern
,Pat Priet.
nn r iu,' */ ^in ~ ~ tPus


U-
NOW'
Sunday Coiitinilcuil
I Moinda; Matlainet (Co






I '-



PG

I
I




S SUGGE:STLID) F"(
PA RENTA !, L
I SORRY NO


THRU TUESDAY
Sfromi 5 00 i pm. Plhoine 3 4666
iitinuiiois from 2 30, Eeninig 8 30


Htcir WIImllLillt[HorIe
/ .Deathofa
unfiqLter"7


)R MA TURI: A UI)/It'NCI:S.
IS('RI:ETION AD VISI:D.
PASSES ACCEF'ED!


NOW SHOWING THRU
TUESDAY, "Cleopatra Jones"
plus "Death of a Gunfighter"
matinee continuous from 2:30,
evening 8:30. SUNDAYS
SHUitoW I%(S continuous from 5
p.m. Suggested for mature
audiences, parental discretion
is advised. Sorry no passes will
he accepted.
Richard Widmark and Lena
lhornme s:ai n Universal's
Ic. lni .ihlour western. "Death
oI .ia (untighter. The action-
,iacked drama which is
mii);:lned with an unusual love
st.1 r centres around tihe
ritiusl o a1 town sheriff to
g-i. in Iinll badge when asked to
do s, hb the town leaders.
Vsidmiark. who portrays the
s seliif. finds himself as a
t.u i 'I in gi n g. ri 'i t .i.g,. 1 A d
marshal in a frontier town
'Oi:llnisii\ who has been kept
in fhic only because of his
knii iw!'dec of the deeds and
nisiei'ids oIt ll the inhibitants.
Vitdmiark refuses to
gix ..ap ls e. he finds hiniself
opit!.I a aist the \whole
p i' .e c ;in a tense and
d!i i.ii s i ti i trintation.i
H'o, ,idm.irk. this represents
allot wh' in a lonI g st-ries of
dia. "' 'ii5 pi, rtrayais since hli'
tirst cIrcn appearance as a
ps,- ',, i:s killer in 'Kiss of
I'e.sIau :n i)47 which brought
him i !"' iHit cinema stardom.
ITh ugh il ihis last role in
'Madidgai' ii" hi was also a police
offic a New York (ity
ctc,' tL;'c -- in many of his 45
viiiVfie h-i ha essayed sadistic,
brut.ii lndiduals outside the
la.. As the marshall he uses a
sl \-'.:!oot, that the late llarry
('irc\ tii.cd as the star iof
esr'irl !ihudred western films.
( ,rev u ', son plays the role of
a Acergy man in "Death of a
(;unfiPhter."
Lena florne takes the role of
a ha'tdyv-htouse madam. The
screenplay of "Death of a


I--



ENTIRELY NEW DECOR

plus PRISCILLA ROLLINS

EDIE McIKEII ZE TIE CITATIONS
Continuous dancing except Thursdays
fro,; '10 p.m. until ...


ISLAND


Gunfighter" is from the novel
by the same name By Lewis B.
Patten and was written by
Joseph ('alvelli.
STARTS WEDNESDAY,
"Showdown" plus "The
Groundstar Conspiracy"
matinee continuous from 2:00,
evening 8:30. Suggested for
mature audiences, parental
discretion is advised.
Packed with excitement, the
Universal/Hal Roach
International fast moving
suspense drama in
technicolour, "The Groundstar
Conspiracy," stars George
Peppard, Michael Sarrazin and
Christine Belford.
''The Groundstar
conspiracy, based on "The
Alien" by L.P. Davies co-stars
Cliff Potts and James Olson.
The film tells the story of a
daring plot to sabotage a
topp-secret U.S. government
space project and was directed
by Lamont Johnson from a
screeniplay by Matthew
How;ard. The movie was
produced by Trevor Wallace
and Earl A. Glick was
executive producer.
Peppard, who po:trays a
h .rd-bitten. implacable
sccuiit\ agent intent on
rounding up the saboteurs no
matter what the cost, cane to
mlition pictures from the
Broadway stage.
(anadian born Sarrazin
t.ikes the role of the tortured
man who is pursued by
security agents who allege he is
responsible for the crime.
The film shot in Vancouver,
British ('olumbia, features Miss
Bclford as the woman who
takes in the fugitive who is
being pursued and eventually
finds they have established a
relationship.
However, her every move is
monitored by security men.
The stunning main location


S

Obre


a


EET THEATRE


*Delft *Cristal de Sevres *Porcelaine de Paris

* French & Belgian Pewter Limoges Figurines

plus many other in-store items

pecials in Jewellery Antiques

y French Watches Lamps & Tables
(many others to choose from)
Swiss made PRICE

10% OFF PRICE

LAFAYETTE DEPT. STORE
in the International Bazaar
Freeport, Grand Bahama


WULFF ROAD THEATRE


SAVOY

THEATRE
SATURDAY NIGHT 9 p.m.
THRU TUESDAY, "Walking
Tall" pli "Goodbye
Columbus" 'OAY THRU
TUESDAY mL,mnee continuous
from 1:15, evening 9:00. No
one under 17 will be admitted.
Plus late feature Tuesday
night.
WEDNESDAY THRU
FRIDAY, "Pete" 'N Tillie"
plus "Winning" matinee
continuous from 1:15, evening
9:00. Plus late feature
FRIDAY NIGHT.
Intrigue and adventure is
clearly brought out and
demonstrated in "Goodbye
Columbus,' written by author
Phillip Roth.
"Goodbye-Columbus" is a
comedy drama stars Richard
Benjamin and Ali MacGraw.
Also featured is a powerful
supporting cast led by Jack
Klugmzn, Nan Martin and a
whole gallery of believable
players.
In the movie, Benjamin.
uncommitted and unsure of
the future arranges to meet
Miss MacGraw, the daughter of
a wealthy Westclhester
self-made businessman.
When the girl's parents
disapprove of their
relationship, they hold their
tongue but go along seeing
each other.
Shocked when he discovers
Ali has not been using
contraceptives Benjamin insists
that she fit herself with a
diaphragm. When he visits her at
school in Boston, she tells him
that her mother found the
device. Based upon her show of
essential insecurity, and with
that as a pretense, Benjamin
makes his exit Goodbye
(ol!ornbus!




U 't pc
I i i ito


for the film is the relatively
new Simon Frazer University
in Vancouver which opened in
1965.



From Page 3
degree!
If ever warmth, humanity,
love, tenderness, sincerity.
devotion and all the other good
and clean e.:thly qualities were
put into a motion picture
well. "Warm December" has
got it, plus an impressive
interlacing of intrigue,
excitement and panoramic
scenery (needless to say, this
picture says a lot for the
magnificence of the English
countryside)
One cannot help but marvel
at the beauty of the racial
harmony, human
understanding and true love
depicted in this story,especially
when one considers the
amount of lewd indecency and
obscenity (not to mention
other, equally disgusting
aspects!) contained in the
nojority of the so-called
"coloured', or 'black' oriented
movies now being exhibited in
our pictgure-houses. I feel that
as many Bahamians white
and coloured as possible.
should make it a point to
see this film and take
p ri d e i n t h e
tact that a Bahamian our
own Mr. Sidney Poitier has
done a magnificent job, both in
directing and playing the lead
role in this monumental film.
In my opinion, the entire cast
of this picture, in particular
Miss Anderson, who played Mr.
Poitier's leading lady, the
youngster who shared the
limelight as his daughter
Stephanie, and the African
choral group whose
performance of a ballad in
their native dialect was a truly
beautiful experience, deserve a
tremendous round of applause
for their efforts.
All in all, I wish to
congratulate Mr. Poitier and his
producers for an exceptionally
fine family-type film. We
Bahamians need exposure to
more and more artistic
productions of this type. as
they set an ideal to which we
all should aspire, for our own
benefit and development.
Thanking you, for the use of
your colomns and thanking Mr.
Poitier and Co. for allowing us
to share in their "Warm
December." Right on!
WENZEL N. RAHMING,
Fire Department
Nassau. July. 20 1973.

FIRST SUNDAY MASS
AT RESURRECTION
CATHOLIC women and
parish guilds will attend the
first Sunday of the month mass
at the Church of the
Resurrection, South Beach at
11 a.m. Sunday. Father Peter
ha Vierge will conduct the
service.
Senator Mispah Tertullian
will address the group.


Cantonese Dining, Tasty Snacks from 7 p.m.
NO COL ER, NO MINIMUM
BRITANNIA BEACH HOTEL PARADISE


Exciting things are

happening at the Fabulous

Trade Winds Bar & Lounge

Paradise Island


~-q Have a -

SUPER SUNDAY SESSION
WITH BALMORAL AND PAN AM

12 -3:00 P.M.

Enjoy all you Ccd, eat from a
Delicious Bahamian Buffet Lunch
for $6.00 per person, plus gratuities
Children under 12, half price.


See a Travelogue of bUMOA & TAHITI
Compliments of Pan American
beginning at 12:00 Noon.
JIMMY THURSTON'S STEEL BAND
plays all afternoon!


OPan Am
& Thr Hlcon

Balmoral Beach Hotel

invite/ you to Somthing I pdoA Todoy


STOCK REDUCTION SALE



30% OFF
SPECIALLY SELECTED CRYSTAL & CHINA

IS BEING OFFERED FOR ONE WEEK ONLY AT CASH & CARRY
LIMITED SELECTIONS

NAMES TO LOOK FOR:-


I- ._L c _I_,__ _ __ ____


I


^f4 .w. .- -. -. i^ .>..^ .i 1


PC -~" I --'- ~- --


drutaS ay September 3


BAPTIST BIBLE

CHURCH H
Soldier Road & Old Trail .
NASSAU'S FRIENDLIEST
FUNDAMENTAL CHURCH m
Exciting Singing Old Fashioned Preaching!
Bible School 10 a.m. -- Preaching 11 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.!
Wed.-7:30 p.m.-Friday.-Youth Fellowship-7:30p.m.
Pastor H. Mills Ph. 5-1339 P. O. Box N3622




Pastr Mils P





BaIIamasaip


Wht Edilittit


li














Saturday, September 1, 1973
k- .


hT t (ibttlbn


CLASSIFIED


REAL ESTATE


C11056
FOR SALE IN bLAIR
ESTATE Lot 100' x 150' -
Telephone 31562 or 2-4726


C11063
FOR prompt attention and
good service whether you wish
to buy a home sell or rent call
Mrs. Evans at Bill's Real Estate
23921. We can offer houses in
all price ranges and in all
sections of New Providence at
competitive prices.

C10973
2%/ ACRES FOX HILL
property, commercial or
residential. Suitable for
Subdivision, or business place
with 2 Buildings thereon.
Contact: DAVSON'S REAL
ESTATE AGENCY, Phone
21178 or 55408.

C11041
HARBOUR ISLAND desirable
elevated lot adjoining
Residency ground 82' x 123' x
93' x 141'. Phone 31252
before 8 p.m.
C10835
FULLY FURNISHED, two
bedroom townhouse available
on six months sub-lease or
longer. Facilities include
air-conditioning and swimming
pool. Quiet, private location.
Phone 5-6131.

C11062
For choice lots,
commercial property appraisals
auctioneering and property
consultant call C. W. Sands at
Bill's Real Estate 23921.
WE OFFER GOOD PRICES
TO OUR PURCHASERS AND
QUICK ACTION TO THOSE
WISHING TO SELL

C11048
FOR SALE fully furnished 3
bedroom house, 1st Terrace,
Centreville. Rainwater tank
with pressure pump. Lot 150 x
100, fully landscaped, all
underground utilities, cash
only $60,000, Phone 5-8311.

C11066
TOWN PROPERTY has .06
acres. Well cultivated grounds
fruited, house laundry, main
house 2 storeys, about five
bedrooms 4 baths, spacious
sitting rooms, separate dining.
Priced so low it would amaze
you available for showing
anytime for action ring the
action numbers 22033, 22307,
evening 41197.
HILL-TOP GORGEOUS
VIEWS situate Out East. 2112
level. Enclosed grounds,
swimming pool, patio,
manicured grounds. Spacious 4
bedrooms, plus ground floor
pool room, plus complete one
bedroom 1 bath living quarters.
Suitable large family. Fully
carpeted, Tastefully and
expensively decorated, without
a doubt, one of the best
offerings. If you like high-class
living in a high class area with
high class house, ring us to
view. Above $300,000.00 No
curiosity seekers please. DIAL
DAMIANOS, 22033, 22305,
evenings: 41197.

WESTWARD VILLAS 4
bedrooms 3 baths, furnished,
newly decorated, and of
course, swimming pool. Ideal
for entertaining. Rights to the
beach. Asking $70,000.00 By
appointment.

SHIRLEY PARK 4
bedrooms 2 baths, furnished,
only $50,000.00 High and dry.
DIAL THE ACTION
NUMBERS 22033, 22305,


HOUSE MONTAGU HEIGHTS
three bedrooms two baths,
furnished, enclosed grounds,
selling for a low as $40,000.00
Four Bedroom house, 2 baths,
furnished. Only $35,000.00.
Off Lakeview Ave., three
blocks from Montagu.
DIAL DAMIANOS 22033,
22305,41197.

SPACIOUS 4 bedrooms 2/V2
baths, furnished house, on two
lots of land, Out East. Spacious
pool 38 by 18 plus (Gunite)
Patio. Well built Bahamian
House. All this for only
$70,000.00 Quiet secluded
area.
HIGH VISTA Corner
Bay and High Vista modern
house with swimming pool
some views of sea. Only
$55,000.00 See by
appointment. Can finance.
DIAL DAMIANOS, 22033,


evenings 41197.

C11104
EAST END lot for sale near
sea. Reasonably price, terms
available. Call 4-1200.

C11042

MOVING?
For Expert Packing &
Forwarding by Sea or Air,
Contact E. H. Mundy &
Co. (Nassau) Ltd., P. O.
Box N-1893. Phone:
2:4511.


APPROVED CARGO AGENTS'


U FOR SALE OR RENT


7


first we've probably got
what you are looking for.
BERNARD SUNLEY & SONS
28618/9, 21356
or your local Real Estate
Agent.


WOLSEY HALL
THE OXFORO CORRESPONDENCE COLLEGE
Whatever the qualitclllllon Nou "anl
Un Irr.rl) >i)gree. PI ofemlonal F-
,irrnminl'lnsr or HIMllr"S Sltulies Wo i \
lill founded in rI M4 gic, on u.
" 1 A gu t ell ll (1l ull 'lll .I unII1 l 1 tl pass
)oufi C .lll l\,I1I mio11 .i l'l e %ll;.l rOI
example 87 ", f \ ol.s'Hall udents
tmllling I'O B A hollom.n degrees have
passed In Ihe 1*1 e,,ni '
* ()\re 7 near oflc\1' enieI. resuLIingI in
Ihe nloi cetii.ilen llnodCen lmelhods of
postal. ie.icl g n ;iitimnail If required.
* I'Ecrson.il lumriiirn i meel oul precise
eqicnoment
* l\% fee% pal.%Ileh" insm llrlnenr
if ,ou %,anL toi L mov hoi to
preparc or a a uccssful future
l rilt for a tree prospectus Io:
D IeptY HU
WOLSEY HALL OXFORD OX2 6PR


'-I


FOR RENT I I


I
C1 1054
3 Bedrooms, one bath, Joans
Heights, South Beach. See
Philip R. Vargas, West, S.
South Street on Corner.

PUBLIC AUCTION
C11002
TO BE HELD ON
SATURDAY 15TH DAY OF
SEPTEMBER 1973
AT 12 O'CLOCK NOON
AT
AUCTION GALLERIES
6TH TERRACE CENTREVILL
SHEPHERD L. KEY will sell
by Public Auction the
following property.
ALL THAT piece parcel or lot
of land situate in the Eastern
District of the Island of New
Providence being Lot Number
One Hundred and Eighty-Three
(183) of Pyfrom Estates
Subdivision bounded on the
North by Chesepeake Road
and running thereon Fifty (50)
feet on the East by Lot
Number One Hundred and
Eighty-Four (Lot No. 184) of
the said subdivision and
running thereon One Hundred
and Five (105) feet on the
South by Pyfrom Subdivision
Phase II and running thereon
Fifty (50) feet and on the West
by lot Number One Hundred
and Eighty-Two (Lot No. 182)
of Pyfrom Estates Subdivision
and running thereon One
Hundred and Five (105) feet
which said piece parcel or lot
of land has such position
boundaries shape marks and
dimensions as are shown on a
diagram or plan filed in the
Department of Lands and
Surveys of the Commonwealth
as Number 385 N.P.
The above property (known
as the property of Eardley
Abraham Hepburn) is being
sold under the Power of Sale
contained in an Indenture of
Mortgage dated the 18th day
of September, 1969 and
recorded in the Registry of
Records in the City of Nassau
in Volume 1521 pages 121 to
142.
The sale is subject to a
reserve price and to a right to
the Auctioneer or any one on
his behalf to bid up to that
price.
Terms: 10% of the purchase
price at the time of sale and
balance on delivery of title.
DATED THIS 25th day of
AUGUST A.D. 1973
SHEPHERD L. KEY
REAL ESTATE AUCTIONEER
& VALUER

C11026
KIRK S. HINSEY will sell at
the parking lot east of the
Harbour Moon Hotel, Bay
Street, on the 28th day of
September 1973, at 12 noon,
the following property:
ALL THAT piece parcel or
lot of land situate in the
Southern District of the
Island of New Providence
one of the Bahama Islands
and being Lot number two
hundred and fifty-nine (259)
in Kennedy Subdivision.

Mortgage dated 16th January,
1969 Henry James Ellis and
Carnetta V. Ellis to Finance
Corporation of Bahamas
Limited. Recorded in Book
1362 at pages 75 to 81.
The sale is subject to a reserve
price and to the right for the
Auctioneer or any person on
his behalf to bid up to that
price.
Terms: 10% of the purchase
price at the time of the sale
and balance on completion.
Dated 22nd. day of Ausust
A.D. 1973.
KIRK S. HINSEY
Public Auctioneer.


FOR RENT

C11086
AVAILABLE Sept. 1st, 2
bedroom, furnished,
airconditioned house near
Montagu Beach, Phone Day
28504. Night 51647.

C11088
TOWN COURT, Nassau
Street. Fully furnished One
and Two bedroom apartments,
swimming pool, security,
laundry and parking facilities
$225.00 to $325.00 per
month. We also have efficiency
apartments CABLE BEACH
$175.00
For apartments check with us


furnished Victoria Court
Apartments on Elizabeth
Avenue between Shirley and
Bay Street. Facilities, Phone,
laundry, parking, T.V. antenna,
airconditioned. Phone 54631
between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.


C11031
2 2-BEDROOM APARTMENT
consisting of living dining
room, kitchen and bathroom,
basically furnished. Twynam
Avenue. Phone 5-8185.

FOR SALE

C11023
ADLER ELECTRIC
TYPEWRITER, in good
condition, recently maintained.
Price $150.00 O.N.O. Call
2-1741/2.

C11068
QUARTER HORSE mare 8
years old excellent condition
for experienced rider or
breeding call 21634 9-5 p.m.
and 41079 after 6 p.m.


FOR SALE


C11090
FURNISHED 2 BEDROOM
apartment on William Street,
near the waterfront. Utilities
included. $225.00 per month.
Teachers preferred, telephone
53043.
C11097
ONE and 2 bedroom
apartments, efficiencies, all
completely furnished.
Harmony Hill telephone
3-1328.
C11100
TWO BEDROOM one bath
apartment. Clean and nicely
furnished, with new carpeting.
One bedroom airconditioned,
situated Rosetta Street,
Palmdale. For information call
5-8201.

C11052
Unfurnished 2 bedroom
apartments, good location off
Mackey Street. Telephone
5-1758.
C11094
1 -- Three Bedroom, one bath
house in Sunshine Park.
$175.00 Per Month. Phone
5-6801.
C11071
ONE Two Bedroom
apartment, fully furnished,
bottom of Sears Rd. Call
34999, evenings.

C11019
FURNISHED THREE
BEDROOM two bath house in
Seabreeze Estates,
airconditioners, telephone,
garage, laundry room,
automatic washer and dryer.
$400.00 Phone 5-8512

C11078
BACHELOR ROOM in
respectable home with private
entrance. For information call
51044 Palmdale.
C11085
UNUSUAL Home on Prospect
Ridge, 3 bedrooms, large patio
and garden $500 plus utilities
34068.

C10671
COMMERCIAL BUILDING,
Montrose Avenue. 3200 sq. ft.,
suitable for store, offices, or
warehouse, $290.00 monthly.
Call 2-8165.

C11036
LARGE ONE BEDROOM
apartment, nicely furnished.
$250 per month. Call
CHESTER THOMPSON REAL
ESTATE 24777-8.

C11050
COTTAGES and apartments
daily, weekly or monthly
airconditioned, fully furnished,
maid service available..Lovely
gardens & swimming pool.
Telephone 31297, 31093.

C11051
ONE BEDROOM, furnished
apartment, upstairs over
Bucaneer Inn $180.00
including light & water. For
information call 5-4616.

C11035
COMMERCIAL BUILDING,
Montrose Avenue. 3200 squ.
ft., suitable for store, offices,
or warehouse, $290.00
monthly. Call 2-8165.

C11037
OFFICE OR STORE SPACE
Charlotte near Bay Immediate
occupancy, ample parking.
Inquire 4-2017.

C11047
ONE & 2 Bedroom apartments,
Centerville, Ring 5-8679 ask
for Mr. Pritchard.
C11101
ATTRACTIVE FULLY
FURNISHED HOUSE, 2
bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, Cmi-.:-
Beach, private pool and sea,
$485.00 Phone 7-7530.

C11103
FURNISHED TWO-BED-
ROOM duplex apartment,
enclosed garden,
airconditioned bedrooms,
automatic washer, $260.00
Phone 5-8512.

C11032
ONE EXTRA LARGE two
bedrooms two bath, and one
extra large one bedroom
apartment. With large living
and dining all basically


Trade-I ns,Welcome
Located Oakes Field
Phone 34636-7-8
Opposite the Ice Plant

C11099
1968 BARRACUDA V8 Sports
A/C P-S P-B, New Respray
$1400 O.N.O. Phone 77518.


MARINE SUPPLIES
C 11006
BARGAIN For Quick Sale,
strong 15 foot boat ideal for
fishing. 20 H.P. Mercury and
Trailer. $700.00, 2-8048.

C11044
PACEMAKER 44 ft.
Luxurious Cruising Yacht.
Phone 3-2371.

C11043

TRAVELLING ?


For efficient friendly
advice on Worldwide
Destinations by Airline or
Steamships. Contact
MUNDYTOIIRS at 24512.


APPROVED PASSENGER AGE
APPROVED PASSENGER AGENTS


I I MARINE SUPPLIES


II


C11003
BAYSHORE MARINA LTD.
P. O. Box 5453
PHONE 28232
28' BERTRAM Flybridge
Cruiser This boat will be
delivered on 30th August and
is supplied with all standard
equipment plus bathing
platform and comfort extras.
Due to the sold out production
this is the only 28' available
before March 1974.
Price B$28,810.00 duty paid.


FUNERAL SERVICES
C11108


C11106
PROFESSIONAL adjustable
drawing board K. & E. drafting
machine, electric sewing
machine. Generator with
change-over switch. Phone
31156-31297.

C11107
PATIO SALE SATURDAY -
SUNDAY MONDAY 15
Year accumulation; records,
tapes, pots, pans, furniture,
electric fire place, stroller, etc.
NEXT DOOR TO Glen Eagles
on Shirley, Phone 31297 or
31156.

CARS FOR SALE

C11095
AT MOTOR CENTRE
WE HAVE
THE USED CAR
FOR YOU
COME SEE US THIS IS
USED CAR WEEK
IF YOU HAVE $200.00
YOU HAVE A DEAL
1970 FORD CAPRI radio A/T
a very clean car in very good
condition at ONLY $2,000.00
you have got to see it to
believe it
1969 RAMBLER AMERICAN
S/W P/S A/T radio new paint
work a clean car at ONLY
$1,350.00
1969 TRIUMPH G.T. 6 new
paint work at ONLY
$1,100.00 the sporty for you.
1971 MORRIS 1100 O.N.O.
A/T new paint work at only
$1,100.00
1971 AUSTIN !!OO A/T radio
in very good condition at
ONLY $1,400.00
1970 CHEVY IMPALA A/T
A/C power windows at ONLY
$1,400.00
1968 OLD'S CUTLASS
3-speed on the floor at ONLY
$1,000.00
1971 HILLMAN MINX S/W
S/T radio a very good runner at
ONLY $1,300.00
1973 FORD MAVERICK A/T
radio low rileage at ONLY
$3,700.00
1970 HILLMAN MINX A/T
radio new paint work at ONLY
$1,200.00
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA A/T
at ONLY $800.00
MECHANIC SPECIAL go;ng
forr ONLY $400.00
MOTOR CENTRE LIMITED
THOMPSON BLVD.,
OPP. DAVIS ST.,
P.O. Box N-3741,
PHONE 56739
C11093
1970 TOYOTA Custom Crown
Station Wagon. Automatic.
Radio. Excellent condition.
$1,500. Phone 4-1283.

C11096
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD
P. O. BOX 640
NASSAU BAHAMAS
USED CARS
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
2 door auto $1695
1967 CHRYSLER NEWPORT
4 door $950
1968 PONTIAC
STRATOCHIEF $1400
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
4 door Std. $1200
1968 JAVELIN A/C $1200
1970 PONTIAC PARISIENNE
A/C $2400
1968 VAUXHALL VIVA
2 door std. $695
1967 TRIUMPH 1300
Std. $800
1969 VAUXHALL VICTOR
S/W std. $475.00
1973 VAUXHALL VICTOR
S/W $4400
1970 RAMBLER SST
4 door $2100
1969 MORRIS OXFORD
standard $995.

1970 FORD MAVERICK
A/C $2150
1970 VOLKSWAGEN
Standard $1300
1964 CHRYSLER
NFW YORKER $800
1971 FORD CAPRI $1950.
1969 FORD GALAXIES
A/C $1850
1970 HILLMAN MINX
Standard $850
1971 CHEVROLET IMPALA
A/C $3500
1966 MORRIS 1100 $500


In loving memory of our dear
wife and mother CHRISTINA
HUMES who departed this life
September 1. 1970.
For what is it to die but to
stand naked in the wind and
to melt in the surn?
And what is it to cease
bicr iing but to free the
breath from its restless task.
That it may rise and expand
a nd see k God
unencumbered?
Only when you drink from the
river of Salance shall you
indeed sinq a new song.
Left to mourn: Husband
Benjamin, one son Clifford,
two daughters Glynis & Janet,
one brother Lernis Brown, a
sister Loretta Fox and a host
of relatives and friends.
C11017


In loving memory of our dear
loving Mother, Consuella Jane
Dawkins, who departed this
life September 1, 1972.
Gone but not forgotten.
Sadly missed by her husband
Vincent Dawkins, one son.
four daughters, one sister and
two brothers and a host of
other relatives and friends.

CARD OF THANKS
C11076
THE FAMILY of the late Mrs.
Fannie I. Claridge Moore
wish to express their sincere
appreciation for the kind
expressions of sympathy on
the occasion of their recent
bereavement.


NOTICE

C11064
Having a birthday party
Friends in to dinner? Or would
you yourself like to enjoy
some delicious homemade
breads, cakes and pastries. Cal
31340 and place your order:
now for mouthwatering foui
layer chocolate cakes, apple
coconut, pumpkin, and raisin
pies and delicious white and
brown homemade bread.


NOTICE


II


C11046
GOODS LEFT OVER 30 days
will be sold. Nassau Bicycle
Company Limited.

C10982
The Bahamas Transport,
Agricultural Distributive Allied
Workers Trade Union, will hold
its Annual General Meeting on
the 25th of September 1973,
at the House of Labour
Wulff Road at 8 p.m. At this
meeting election of officers
will take place. All financial
members are asked to be
present
SIGNED
MAXWELL N. TAYLOR
General Secretary

ENTERTAINMENT
C11080
MOON ON A RAINBOW
SHAWL






.









by Errol John
presented by
Bahama Drama Circle
and featuring

Gwen Kelly
a Douglas Duncombe
Elsa Marshall
Warren Jones
Sheila Tracey
Jeanne Thompson
Patrick Rahming
Godfrey Brathwaite


W .









Mrs. Diana Butler, 83 years,
passed away approximately
4:30 p.m. on Sunday 26th
August 1973, at the home of
her daughter Inez Moxey
Kenningstone Gardens.
She is survived by her husband
Charles C. Butler of Simms
Long Island, four daughters
Inez Moxey, Ell. a Miller,
Arabella Hall, Effie Pratt &
one adopted daughter Sarah
Butler. Three Sons,
Christopher, Alexander &
Clarence Butler. Three sisters
including Mrs. Blanch
Saunders, four brothers, forty-i
one grand children including
Mrs. Sinnidor Brice, Zerline
Johnson, Calvise Horton,
Lilemae Wallace, Baltrum &
Uriah Moxey, forty-eight
great grand children and many
other relatives.
Funeral Services will be
conducted by Evg. Hasket.


IN MEMORIAL
C11067


HELP WANTED


II


i I IC I lI0


C11021
EXPERIENCED Salesman
required. Must have own
transportation. Phone 51071
for appointment.

C11089
WANTED: OCEAN CAY
SUPERINTENDENT We have
an immediate opening for the
position of superintendent of
the Aragonite operation at
Ocean Cay. He must be capable
of full responsibility for the
day-to-day operation of the
Cay, including stockpiling
Aragonite; supervision of the
quadrant ship loader;
regulation of ship traffic in and
out of the harbour;
maintenance of work schedules
and technical records;
responsibility for labour
relations, staff training, staff
living conditions,
transportation for staff going
on or coming off leave;
maintenance of power
generation and distribution
systems; maintenance of light
and heavy equipment.
Experience and education
required, commensurate with
heavy personal responsibility.
Apply in writing to
MARCONA OCEAN
INDUSTRIES LTD. P. O. Box
N-4177.

C 11075
LYFORD CAY CLUB requires
a Club Secretary to take full
responsibility for corporate,
legal and confidential work,
correspondence, etc.,
concerning Club Membership.
Will also be responsible for
organizing committee meetings
and compiling agendas and
minutes: assisting in the
organization of golf and tennis
tournaments, lectures and
various club social activities.
Should enjoy meeting people.
Bahamians only should apply.
Please reply in writing to:
General Manager, P. O. Box
N7776, Nassau.


C11074
AN EXECUTIVE CHEF
experienced in all phases of the
preparation of continental
cuisine. Able to take complete
charge of all kitchen operations
and kitchen personnel,
including training. Must be able
to recruit the kitchen brigade
of French chefs for the season.
Bahamians only should apply.
Please reply in writing to
General Manager P. O. Box
N7776, Nassau.

C11073
Combination warehouse
attendant and delivery man.
Basic education and references
required. Apply in person.
Dolly Madison Furniture,
Mackey Street.

C11070
Fragrance of the Bahamas Ltd.,
requires a President to take
charge of its entire day-to-day
operations. Applicant must
have experience of perfume
and cosmetic manufacturing
and merchandising in domestic
and foreign markets as well as
administrative experience in
this field. Apply to Fragrance
of the Bahamas, Ltd., P.O. Box
F-770, Freeport, Grand
Bahama, Telephone 373-9391.

C11092
CHARTERED Accountants
required by professional firm.
Write giving full details to Peat,
Marwick, Mitchell & Co., P. 0.
Box N123, Nassau.

C11098
ESSO STANDARD OIL S.A.
LIMITED have a vacancy for a
Steno-Secretary. Applicants
should have a Shorthand speed
of 100 w.p.m. and Typing of
45 w.p.m and should have a
minimum of two years
experience as a Steno-Secre-
tary.
Applicants should call 28401
or write to the company at P.
O. Box N3237, Nassau.

C11087
QUALIFIED Librarian
required F.L.A.; A.L.A. or
equivalent degree in
Library Science essential.
Applicants must have
experience in cataloguing and
classification and should )e
able to type. Bahami is
preferred. Applications should
be addressed to: The
Chairman, Fox Hill Public
Library P. O. Box 390 F. H.,
Nassau, Bahamas.


HELP WANTED


I I - C 11072


C11072
OFFICE MANAGER
REQUI RED, experienced in all
aspects of commercial work
relating to the Construction
Industry. Applicant will be
expected to work on his own
initiative, to supervise office
and construction site
personnel. Duties will include
ordering and buying materials
internationally, property
management, cashier, job
costing and site dayworks.
Knowledge of accounting
procedures desirable. Minimum
qualifications, 3 "0" levels
with 5 years experience in
managerial position. Apply in
writing to Sir Robert McAlpine
& Sons (Bahamas) Ltd. P. O.
Box N3919 Nassau.

C6203
JOB TITLE: (FOUR)
GENERAL REPAIRMEN
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Inspects, repairs, replaces,
installs, adjusts and maintains
all mechanical equipment in a
cement manufacturing plant.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Creeport, Grand Bahama.

C11084
JOINER and cabinet maker
required to do Mill Work also
designing work. Call 35470.

C10924


AUTO MECHANICS
.TO WORK IN FREEPORT
MUST be experienced in all
phases of automobile work,
particularly engine overhaul.
Must have hand tools and be
sober, reliable and willing to
work. Good pay to right man.
Paid holidays, uniforms and
many other fringe benefits.
Call Mr. Miller at Nassau
2-1031.


TRADE SERVICES

C 11049
T.V. ANTENNAS. Boosters
for homes, apartments an
hotels. Sales and services. Call
Douglas Lowe 5-9404 WORLD
OF MUSIC Mackey Street next
to Frank's Plarp

C1103'
Plnder's Customs

Brokerage Ltd.
Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-3796
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434


POSITION WANTED
C11059
SOBER, conscientious female
seeks challenging posiiton.
Personnel Relations,
Counsellor, Co-ordinator,
Hostess, Mediator, Group
Dynamics. Ten years
Psychiatric Nursing experience.
Excellent rapport with people.
Natural writing, teaching
ability and experience.
Presently writing two novels.
must work to support four
vounq sons.
Prefer Public Relations in
luxury resort. Desire assume
responsibility, supervisory or
administrative capacity.
Available full-time or tourist
season each year if suitable
both parties. Flexible. Write
Mrs. L. Dillon, 2122 Tupper
St., Montreal 108, Quebec,
Canada.

C11105
EXPERIENCED GIRL
FRIDAY, seeks position as
Social Hostess. Head Cashier or
Public Relations Write Box
5468, Nassau.


DUNDAS CIVIC CENTRE
Thursday, Friday and Sunday
August 30th. and 31st. and
September 2nd (not Saturday)
Curtain at 8:30 p.m.
Admission $3.00
reserved, $2.50
Tickets obtainable
at Rodgers Sports
Shop, East Bay Street.

E BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES -
C11055
GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY to
own your own business -
offered at rock bottom price-
souvenirs, ladies' & children'
wear Tel 53136 or 31562
after p.m.

S ART SUPPLIES

C11040
COMPLETE range of artists'
supplies. Oils, acrylics, canvas,
easels, etc. Bahamian Paint
Supply Ltd., Bay St. Phone
2-2386, 2-2898.

SCHOOLS

C11005
TODDLERS PLAYSKOOL
Well supervised and equipped
to give your child enjoyable
hours of play and education.
Hours: 8:30 a.m. 12:3C
p.m., 11:30 a.m. 3:30 p.m.,
8:30 a.m. 5.30 p.m.
Three sessions available for
your convenience.
NURSERY DEPARTMENT
Fully equipped with staff and
accommodations to efficiently
care tor babies from 3 months
and over. Hours: 8:00 a.m.
5:30 p.m.
Phone 2-8042 for details.
Situated on Rosetta Street,
Palmdale.

C11060 TUITION
HOPEDALE CENTRE, a
private school catering to child-
ren with special needs, physicai-
ly or emotionally handicapped
(retarded, spastic, autistic,
language problems, etc.)
Qualified, degree teachers, for
additional information 35492
or 31990.

C10959
ENTER A NEW WORLD
OF FASHION
Learn to sew with and without
patterns.
You may Register Daily
Monday Saturday 8 a.m. to
8 p.m. at The Elegant School
of Fashions and Dressmaking
Corner Shirley and Fowler
Streets. Term begins
September 3, 1973. for more
information call 53223.

HELP WANTED
C11027
Property Manager required.
Knowledge of American and
British type leases and
negotiation experience
essential. Experienced in
properly management,
commercial and residential.
Basic knowledge of
air-conditioning equipment,
pumping equipment and
electrical installations.
Applicants must be over 35
years of age. Salary in
accordance with experience.
Applications by letter to: The
Manager, Box N-3371, Nassau.


Nassau & The Bahama Islands Leading .Newspap:'r

... brings its readers the fullest coverage of any event in
the Commonwealth. Bahamians who know read The
Tribune, the independent Bahamian newspaper that has
serviced the Bahamian public for the past 70 years.


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS-FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV. TELEPHONE 21986 EXT. 5


I


~irtbuuP


I


-.~--.-


I -


i


, I


I -


=II-901


-1 1 1


SECTION


(Ihe (TribunP












~hi S~trbttw


Saturday, September ', 1973.


GRAND BAHAMA HELP WANTED HELP WANTED


CLASSIFIED

1II FEENf TEL. 3s52-i I


C6215
Assistant to the administrator
and senior bookkeeper
required. Applicant must have
sound knowledge of basic
accounting and a minimum of
five years experience in a
supervisory capacity. Ability to
type and take shorthand arnd
some knowledge of medical
terminology useful. Applicant
should have own
transportation.
The Antoni Clinic, Box
F-2575, Freeport. Telephone
373-3339.
C6212
DIRECTOR OF SALES: ONE
(1); must have ability to handle
and co-ordinate in-house sales
and promotions. Must be able
to produce sales and marketing
material and co-ordinate with
national marketing programme.

CHEF DE PARTIES: ONE (1)
preferably European trained;
must have apprenticeship
papers; must have complete
knowledge of Gourmet dishes
and international cooking;
must have at least two years
experience as Chef de Partie.
POT WASHERS/ PORTERS:
SEVEN (7): must be willing to
clean all pots and pans in
kitchen and also keep kitchen
clean; must be willing to
remove garbage from all areas
in the kitchen; must be willing
to work Midnight shift 12:00
p.m., to 8:00 a.m.
For all the above please apply
to: Mr. John A. T. Roker.
Personnel Director, Holiday
Inn, P. O. Box F-760,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


CARS FOR SALE
C6213
1 9 6 9 CAu .AC
CONVERTIBLE, white with
blue top and interior. Full
power and fact ry
air-conditioning. Excellent
condition. Best cash offer.
Phone Freeport 373-5162.

HELP WANTED
C6214
BADGER PAN AMERICA, INC.
requires a qualified person for
the following position in its
organization, during the
construction of a BORCO
Refinery Expansion Project,
Freeport:
CONSTRUCTION
SURVEYOR Must be able to
use level and transit, keep
accurate and detailed field
notes and calculate quantities
for construction site survey
work. Applicant should have at
least 3-5 years experience in
similar job.
Written applications only to:-
BADGER PAN AMERICAN, IN
P. O. Box F-2452
FREEPORT, G.B.I.
FOR RENT


HELP WANTED
C6210
MALE & FEMALE ADAGIO
DANCE TEAM with a
minimum of five years
professional experience as
feature artists and working in
production numbers. Police
Certificate and good references
required.
Applicants should apply in
person to: Personnel
Department, Bahamas
Amusements Limited, El
Casino, P. O Box F-787,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C6203
JOB TITLE: (FOUR)
GENERAL REPAIRMEN
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Inspects, repairs, replaces,
installs, adjusts and maintains
all mechanical equipment in a
cement manufacturing plant.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. O. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


in Nassau

2-1986 Ext. 5




in Freeport

352 -6608


The Tribune Comics Page


ME TRY IT?
GOS6,I DON'T
KNOW--






,rNi'-.


C6211
MANAGER required for car
rental firm. Applicant must
have 3 to 5 years experience of
Rental Car operation, including
several years managerial
experience; must be able to
work on own initiative without
supervision and be able to
handle customers. Some
experience 6f Customs
clearance; motor maintenance
and Credit Card transaction
useful. References from
previous or present employer
necessary. Salary according to
experience. BAHAMIANS only
need apply.
Applicant should apply in own
handwriting to: HOLIDAY
AUTO RENTALS LIMITED
P. O. Box F-2055, Freeport,
Grand Bahama.


her Bribunp

CLASSIFIED

ADVS.


__


m~2Yi [ IF 7:


E~a: .
IC'c;
'Z



IJ



S~O
-C~LS O i
Mi~i~Cd


--











Saturday, September 1. 1973.


UhP rtibutt?


'~-- ocJs.4


IKN- l-n t* d h L, Inc 191. .or.rh.

"I'm new here. What's the difference between the time
you're allowed for coffee breaks and the time you
actually take?"


*' r PEOPLE JUST RELAX AND WATCN TV. I'LL HANDLE TWE
PHONE IF ANYBODY CRANKY CALLS UP."


"If you had it to do all over again, what would you be?"


CROSSWORD

PUZZLE
ACROSS
26. Cauldron
1. Pipe fitting 27. Camel hdil
6. Correct robe
11. Cauterized 28. Function
13. City electee 29. True
14. Crusader's 31. Offspring
enemy 33. Seaman
16. Astronaut 34. Kind of coffee
Conrad 35. Corrode
17. Earl of Avon 36. Venison
18. Squirrel food 37. Styptic
20. Flower wreath 39. Diamond
21. Boy's nickname necklace
22. Slighted 41. TV lawyer
24. Type measure detective
25. Jo's sister 43. Optical aids


so


E

III i C 11 M 1 "


SSERA
6 ArlP< As DB
ELA 5R NES


Aft Is
l I |S | E
[UTIO.N UpITH~ T Sl n


S44. Glove leather
45. Work hard
DOWN
1. Jewish ascetic
2. Heavy


3. Bundled
4. Algerian city
5. Marry
6. Morning
7. Chart
8. Embroidery
hole
9. Illustrious
10. Three in Bonn
12. Shabby
15. Sister
19. Eva's friend
22. Reflection
.23. Caviar
25. Cameroons
tribe
27. Foment
28. Up to
29. High flier
30. Entreat
31. Rice dish
32. Auricle
33. Stupid ones
34. Los Angeles
football team
36. Impudent girl
38. Stylish
40. Churchill's sigi
42. Compass point


I* dEMMHi -


No 7.216 bIy TIM McKAY
A(ross
I. Found ill thle c(loikroolm.
(4-5)
Trick. (4)
III lIathe (3)
II I.cy A. ralt (Anna.). (9)
12 Girl's name. (.5)
15I (inegtlers. (8)
I,. Paddle. (3)
17 Old Frince. (4)




By LEONARD BARnE1


White mates in five moN
the latest, against any defend
4by I. Kots and K. Kochelhorn
A mate in five may sound ver
difficult, but then to mate wit
a king and a queen should b
very easy As usual, the black
wns are coming down th
board, from top to bottom of th
page.
Despite its apparent simplicitN
this is a teaser which ha
stumped several good solvers i
its time
SOLUTION No 9755 -
Chess Solution
1 Q-Q1, K-Kt4 tif 1 .
P-Kt4: 2 Q-Q4 mate):
Q-KBI ch, K-R4 Iif 2 ..
K-B4; 3 Q-Q3. P-Kt4:
Q-Q4 mate): 3 Q-R1 ch
K-Kt4 : 4 K-Kt3, K-B4 i)
4 . P-B4: 5 Q-R4 mate).
Q-K5 mate
London Express Serf'.c.
n


Rupert and Miss Samantha-30


After a gentle) downward glide Miss Samantha's
flying sofa lands on a stretch of grass close
to the village. "Thank you for that lovely
trip laughs Rupert, jumping off the seat. It
was quicker than coming back by bus." The
old lady looks pleased. "I must be on my
way," she says. Be sure to do exactly as
I have told you. Goodbye, little bear." Once


more she pats the sofa, utters a few soft
words, and away she goes above the tree-tops
and into the sky. Meanwhile, Rupert has
started for the village. "There's still time to
visit Margot's house before I gp home." he
decides. "I must exchange this doll for
Benjy as soon as I can."
All RIGHTS RESERVED


ves
ce
I ).


ie
ie
re
Y.
is
n


Down
I. Fuel entrances. (4-5)
2. Kind of whale. (3)
3 (ive permission. (9)
4. I.e. Ilandles. (Anag.). (9)
SLubricate. (3)
6. Hatred. (5)
7. Children's toys. (5)
H. For un-
seen ol- A 5TO
r rivers. N LR
(3-5) A aL I
WI. Way. (4) Sol ONI
13. Seandln Ei- ON I E
god. (4) H 0 RIS E
14. I o t RANO
(6) U HC D DD
18 S a E AN
(4)





|^33iHH


HIOW many
I -| n words of
1 Vto a r letters
or more can
you 11 make
..~r from the
T letters shown
here? in
makilne a
Sword. each
SE L letter m a
be used once
only. Each
word must contain the large
letter, and there must be at
least one eight-letter word In the
list. No plurals: no foreign words:
no proper names. TODAY'S
AR(GET : 17 words, good: ;
I words, very good : 25 words.
i, excellent. Solution tomorrow.


al YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION :
Hour liourl HUMORIST hurst
hurt mouth mush must oust
rlmous rout rush rust shout
shut smut sour south strum
stum suit suitor thorium thou
thrum thus ttmous tour tourl-sm
truism tulsm tush.


Winning


Bridge
By VITOR iMOLLO
Dealer South,: E W Vil.
2 North
4 v Q 7 3 2
7 3

A 6
SA K 9 5 4
0 K B 4 2
o 10 3
south West North East
1 14I 3V Pass
West leads the 4K. How should
South play ?
ANALYSIS : On his vulnerable
overcall, West probably has the
OA. If he has the 4K too, there's
no problem, but the danger is
that East will come in with it
to lead a diamond through the
closed hand.
How, then, can declarer avoid
losing a spade, a club and two
diamonds ?
The answer is to draw trumps
-they are 3-1-and lead a spade.
Winning with the +Q. West will.
no doubt, switch to a club. South
will go up with the 4A, discard
a club on the 4J and take a
ruffing finesse in clubs. If East
has the 4K, there will be no
club loser. If he hasn't, South
will discard a diamond. Whether
or not West leads his 0A, it will
be his last trick, for dummy's
clubs will take care of two more
of South's diamonds.
West East
KKQ 10 9 5 2 83
V J 108
A Q 3 O J 10 9 8
7 6 2 & K8 54
FOR PILLes i* o tI o einl
Ire. V, ,-8.


REX MORGAN, M.D. By DAL CURTIS


CARROLL RIGHTER'S

-HOROSCOPE
from the Carroll Righter Institute
GENERAL TENDENCIES: Until midafternoon
you are too eager to get your own way and are
likely to use poor judgment in going after your desires, so take
it easy and use tact. Later you find you have a big opportunity
to uncover the information you need and to show you are
mentally aware of how best to make your practical aims.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr 19) Extra obligations you had not
anticipated crop up later in the day, so keep free time for
such Try to please the one you love more in p.m. Avoid one
who is attempting to lead you in the wrong direction.
TAURUS (Apr 20 to May 20) Partners are apt to complain
today, so listen to what is said and make repairs where
necessary, concessions. You have to be more conscientious
where civic matters are concerned. Avoid one who likes to
argue
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Make sure that utilities are in
fine working order at home and you need not worry later. You
can sit down later with a good friend and get the information
you need. Think constructively
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 71) Out to take the
health and beauty treatments you need, so you can make a
fine impression later socially. Get in touch with one who can
assist you with some problem you may have.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Show you understand the needs
of family and will help them in a financial, morale-building
way Make the repairs to property that add to both the beauty
and value. Avoid any situation that could get you into trouble.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Look to a good friend for all
the advice you need to handle routine work and other
responsibilities better Show you understand kin more. Try to
make them happier
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Sit down with some financial
expert and get the lowdown on your affairs, which may not
look good at first, but have real promise in them. State your
finest aims to those who can be helpful in furthering them.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to N ,, 21) Take the time to do
something nice for friends who feel they have been neglected
for some unexplainable reason. Get your appearance improved
so you can make an excellent impression on others later at
social events.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 to Dec. 21) A private discussion
with a higher-up will reveal what your true position is and how
to improve it Handle those credit matters intelligently; get
your career moving faster Think along more logical lines.
CAPRICORN (Dec 22 to Jan. 20) A good pal gives you a
new idea that can easily help you get ahead much faster in
your career. Make some new friend who will improve your
mentality. Forget one who has been a brain-picker for years.
Grow.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Handle responsibilities
efficiently so you and others will be happy. Complimenting
mate in public will do much to increase harmony between
you. Do not permit another to downgrade you.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar 20) If you take a trusted friend
with you, you can get into that new outlet very successfully
now. Secure the information you need quickly Listen to what
new contacts have to suggest and learn much.

20. Noise. (3)
3 L 56 7 1 21. Tend. (5)
22. Follow. (5)
23. Descries. (4)
I i I L D. Pace. (4)
11 > Gape (,5)


ST.EV'E ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & overgard]


'YOU AYMATT YES, 51R. T.HEY AND THEY'VE BEEN GONE A COUPLE
GRDLE WE T LOOKING POFF KERSEY LEFT OF HOURS, SPOFF./- AD THE k'LEFFT
FOR THE LADIES, DIlK ? AT 5UN UP./ WOMAN TOOK YOUR SHOTGUN!.
r 1 di



SI GUE56 MATTY WAS
/ EXPECTING TROUBLE.!-HE
/ HHAD A BIG GUN.--AND MR.
S- RIDLEY HAD A SUITCASE/

'klc


SDAGWOOP -OCK "
WHAT THE BANK
SENT ME.'
~"4M,




. .... ...


.'.". 1 ....




JUDGE PARKER By PAUL NICHOLS

O- NO...CAN'T SAY THAT I YOU KNOW WHAT )YOU'RE TALKING IN PREVENTIVE MEDICiNE, THE
DO YOU ANT'IPATE DO, SAM. I JUST FEEL I MEAN? iTS ABOUT PREVENTIVE PATIENT GOES TO HIS DOCTOR AT
ANY PROBLEMS SLADE? MORE COMFORTABLE LIKE HAVING A MEDICINE...BUT INTERVALS, TELLS THE DOCTOR
IS THAT WHY YOU WISH/ KNOWING I HAVE A DOCTOR BEFORE THERE 15 A SLIGHT WHAT SYMPTOMS HE HAS OR
TO RETAIN ME? i GOOD LAWYER iF YOU GET SICK! DIFFERENCE IN DOESN'T HAVE... AND GETS A
SOMETHING COMES UP! THE COMPARISON! COMPLETE EXAMINATION!
SIN
UIF You HAV
ANY LEGAL
SYMPTOMS,
TELL ME WHAT
THEY ARE...NOW!








APARTMENT 3-G By Ales Kotzky


-F wr





George Foreman slams



Joe Roman to canvas



in 2 mins. of 1st. round

TOKYO (AP) George Foreman knocked out Joe (Kin
Roman in the first round Saturday in the first defense of tl
world heavyweight championship he won by upsetting J
Frazier last Jan. 22.


The end came at the two
minute mark of the opening
round with the Puerto
dIall '.. ir counted out after
bei ng knocked down three
tIllles.
It simrpl was no contest
with the powerful, six-loot
three-inch Foreman smashing
Roman to the canvas with his
devastating right hand.
Romnan. a heavy underdog.
opened the scheduled 15-round
fight by weaving and jabbing.
But the champion waded
through the jabs and smashed
three hard rights to the body.
Ihen, after he missed with
several wild shots, Foreman
knocked Roman down with a
flurry of punches at 1:10 of
the round
20 SI(CONDS
Romanr ,tl up. but 20
seconds later went down acain
from a hard right hand to the
head
Again the 25 year-old
Roman struggled to his feet
onl and again it took onil 20
seconds lor Forem an to put
hin down again
Ihis tinie Roman was unable
to beit the ountI of 10 tI( ll .1I
b\ retecle Ja\ I dson to
Phoeni\. A.r/, at the
15.000-,seat Martial Arts Hall.
which was onls about half


fllced


S51 MILLION


Foreima n's tirst defense ot
the title, for which he was
guaranteed $ 1 million, also was
shown on national television in
Japan and was seen on closed
circuit television in the United


GEORGE FOREMAN
...retains his title

States, beginning about 11:
p m F nd: >
"\c ie Ncr planned, we ji
plcpared,'" ,shouted -Forerna
trainer Dick Sadler after I
lione sided tight I rue chuli
tlist prepare for all possi
tllllL', -
But Roman 's manager. I
)ales, scrcamled he would fil
protest oi,:icerning the ii
knock dow
D)alc contended Forein
hit R iomani on tlhe top o t
hlejd a ter the ti
knockdown
"1 hatS' what put him
queer street." l)aley claims
"lie had dead aim at him w
a i0t k "
I oreinill's record is ni
39-0-0 ( 30 knockout
Romian's record is 47-8-1 (
knockouts)t


MIKE DENNESS i

TO LEAD MCC

IN WEST INDIES
LONDON (All) Mike l)enness.
32 ear old Kent batting star. was
officially named Friday as
I ngland's cricke; captain for the V
upcoming tour of tie West Indies.
The widely anticipated
announcement by the cricket
Ig) council came after they sacked
he previous captain Ras Illingworth
who led the England squad in the
oe just concluded series against the
5\est Indies here, which the home
team lost disastrously.
Denness was vice-captain of the
EI-ngland team which toured India
Pakistan and Sri Lanka last year.
His elevation to what was generally
regarded here as a 'hot set '
position as captain in the (.aribbelh n
came at the end of a personal
disappointing season. Despite
showing excellent batting for his
county, he was not chosen for any
of the six Test matches played by
I. ngland against New Zealand and
the 5 est Indies. I
t lie tirst played for England in HO
1,l69. But apart from the tour of
the 1 ar Fast he was largely A N
overlooked and has only played in Bahama
eight rest matches since his
international debut. tcaln h
Denness has played for Kent captain
Since 1962 and has an excellent Jamaica
/ career hitting average of 32.52 in compete
562 innings. He \'as made captain it o e r in
of Kent last year arid in
characteristic cavalier style he has Tourna
led the county already to two John Course.
PIla er League titles and a success ini The
30 the Henson and Hedges ('up final. Sllmith.
I he New England captain
acknowledge that the tour of the
ust \Hest Indies would be a challenge.
n's "It will. infact, be my second
lhe tough assignment because we had
one in India and Pakistan last
ps rirter when I was vice-captain. LONE
b i' ()hviouslv the West Indies will ir ih
lb uis Saturday
h.i\rs their tails up having beaten us L
2 0 here. I think my experience in
Indi. and Pakistan will carry me in iirmingh
e a good stead. I learnt something of tChelsea
rst the tension and pressure of Test IVertonr
cricket aboard." L eic-ster
)e nne.s.is is no\ autonlaticll \ alls i "n ,
an d n Nex\castl
ar included in the selection panel for Nirsichli
lhe the tour and the complete I-ngland outham
rst party is expected to be announced lottenha
in about one week. Burnile\
StoIe IV
on SAM DAVIS JR. LEADER
ed. \r I T H I R S I 1 I. I ILD Bolton I
ith (')NNIC'TICUT (AP) lankyv ution 6
HIubert Green, playing in stifling Middlesh
heat. show a 63 his career best N'als
olv todi. and took the first-round lead orient )
s), in the $200.000 Sammy )avis Jr. Orient 0
21 (;reiter Hartford Open gol: o)\ford I
tourna' 1. I'reston I


IAL SORS OUDU L


TOP VOLLEYBALL
TEAMS IN ACTION
DEI I NDIING I adies Volleshall
champions Paradise Island Hees
continue to shows that superb form
that won them both pennant and
other titles, and in this weekend',
Bahamas Volleyshall I ederation
action the) again meet the rest ot
the Bahamas national squad tlast
x\eek. the Bees t k Ithree straight
sets froinm the nati.imal squad.
The B1.V I ntminuing their
fund raising dris.e sees thte bees in
action against the reriT.rlinder ,f the
National squad again titight 7 30
at the C. I (;ibson (i.\m. Ini th
second game at 9: 30. tite ideteitling
men's champs. .ardribe Stars tilke
on the remainder of the nleni s
binational squad.
Tliese weekendd games arc part of
the Ifederation's eitiirt tI r.r se
money toI send botih \len iand
Ladies national teams t,, I rinimad
to defend their English Speakiiv'
little later this month.

SOFTBALL GAMES
IIII ALL SI -\R Mrinistr\ -Airkts
coming oft a IO 7 loss to B I i
seek to redeem theinselxesC
toii morrow when the, take oni
Ila lor Trucking 2.00 p.m. at thie
Southern Recreation ( rounds
Defending tMajestict iciagu
Champs Ia' lor Industries clashil
,.ith Coca Cola in the opening g.ainm
tomorroww beginning 10 .am. D)elte
take on D)el Jane in the it2 rno,,
game and I lagler Inn laish \\ith
(;olden ladess in the final game at
4 t'oclock
CRICKET FIXTURES
tlI POI' CI Roals risket
('Ilub. wh o last week took x pomits
from their draw% d ialth iSt sgiies
seek It strengthen their LiMIrenslll
tor top position in the league lheill
thex meet the \\ esterns in a
two.-da. match beginning trlitorro\\i
alle rnion I 30 at \Windsor P'rk
I following the end ot their first
da\ 's pla\ against the Saintis. thr,


IiuLC hiad J cminrlortaible 113 for
t\\r, 1x\ Ihe end of tile match. the
V itcll % \', ere struggling t) save an
oulriligt J'le.l \\hrell these were
[iire Ir r 37 still 14 runs short of
\tir\ \%hilenr slumps were drawn.
In the second match beginning
tIrloiror, PairaJise Island take on
St (;c,rgiees t Ii iines r ()al.
PRESS. RADIO MATCH
t1'1 S1 ) \' i nrhi \ill see a
retaliatory group ,r 'ress personnel
sut t' square it with the Radio menr
ill the .iiannual RAId Press sotthall
Inr slirJuled t. hbe pla ed at
7 I 1) in. a.i It the Ji' il I Kennied
Iirtic Piirk
make up 1,fr the hli11,, contested
ilhi'b rai gina lt ilhe\ dropped
I,, tile rr.rslc.stiie' eri\\ lia rt n ionth
ill thr e sir.ilght set',
ithe ridersrs. wh.ii hl\e dominated
soi thrill in the last t\ outings, are
hoping to push the winxiiiini string
| IThree straight I ,\er the
lstentatl.lous l i 'rIuidcstl rs
I he R.iad Press rinil'e \ill
precede the .riiiiiul New
IPri idence S'itli ll \ss.i 'citlio I
nmen's all star gille .ils. slated dor
I I K iPark
PRO CYCLISTS RACE
I II NI \ t t"hlrmed Nassau
P'rOfessiiiiial (' Cllitn k Associationm
\\ ill hold its tirst r.atc tiiiirrow at
niooi when s1 cyclists are e\pe.tted
to pedal ftl trom ihi\ IHorse
Race I ratk t(i begin a grinding
24 mile route
tihe i ssoi tioiii. premiere.
h iih w\.is t .rcelled last Sundas
irnd re ss lihedulid lir oiiirr \\. will
bei spm ,s,)rd i i.)ntl tl\ (,l.idstone
Scaiell.i. general nianager ot the
liohh)i Horse restaurant and John
Iillet
litih 'axc'ella and Oillet xill he
,ll l.iid ti im ,rrin jt Ihe tiii h li h e
to press ient trophies t)1 the winiiers.
Ihe \clistis x\ill hegin iat Hobbh
iHorse ri.e track then proceed east
'ni \\cst lBi: Street, south Ion
PrspIct Ridge RIll. east on John I
Kelnled\ Drive, and I homrpson


Boulevard north on Nassau Street.
West on Bay Street, South on Blake
Road. east on J.I.K. Drive and
Ihompson Boulevard arid to the
finish line at the Queen Elizabeth
Sports Centre.
HYDRO RACING
Il I-T I-N.-year-old lan Kemp.
remembered for his domination in
the Nassau Power loaL
Association's second race ineet
recently will be on hand to sho\l
\\inning form tomorrow afternoon
when the Association stage their
fourth in a series of outboard h\ dro
races beginning I o'clock at Lake
C'unningham.
Toimm. Brow n, another
I S-ear ild. \sho along with his
cousiil Johiinn shared top hionours
in l tie first rleet \ ill alsoi ie oin
hand to give top competition.
lhe third meet saw newcomer
I \ rone Albury capturing three
\wins. Johnny in that race took two
\wins and Tornmmy had one. Albur\
\\ ill also be ron hand for tomorrow\ '
meet.
Other competitors in tomorrow s\
meet include Billy Albur, Norman
Cove and Rudy Campbell in the
N. .C. Special.


SHAFFF


Sheffield
\,est Brt


- --- --L


DOLPHINS BEATEN

BY VIKINGS 20-17
WITH TWOlrk SECONDS left to
play I'red Conx kicked a 2S 5ard
field goal io secure a 20-17 victor%
i ( for the Minnesota Vikings in a game
That ended the Miami I)olphins'
S 23-game winning streak 'riday
night.
The Dolphins. defending Super
Bowl champions, romped through
opponents for a 17 0 season last
year and ten went on to
successfully contain the Washington,
CRedskins in the .;uper Bowl game.
She Dolphins capitalized on a
somewhat frustrated "Purple Gang"
squad, whose errors, including three
interceptions and two lost fumbles.
caused them to trail 17-3 until the
final quarter in the contest.
Vikings first string quarterback
Iran Tarkenron relieving an
ineffective Bob Berr\ took
command of the second f e half :nd
engineered his offense for \wo
touchdowns to kdot the score at
S 17 17 before Cox's dramatic field
-,', goal to end the game.


ERMAN CUP GOLFERS LEAVE TODAY


F. I HT-Ml IM BtI R
s (olf Association
leaded by non-plaiing
Donald Butler left for
today where they\ will
e in the annual
a n ua n p C olt
ment at Caymianas Golt

team consists of Basil
Bob Slatter. lan


lMasson. Jack Moree, Mike
Taylor. Fred tliggs. Reg
uI)iont and Duke Brafford.
Du ring last year's
tournament which was held at
the South Ocean golf course.
Puerto Rico took top honours
with the Bahamas in second 23
strokes behind. Jamaica was
third.
Pictured above. Mr.


U.K SOCCR RESULT


)ON (AP) Results in
soIccer league games
N(;LISI .I- A(;UI
i)ivision One
ham 0 l)erb 0
I Sheffield United 2
3 Ipswich 0
r I Liverpool I
ter United 2 ()ueen's i'.rk I
e I Arsenal I
2 West 1Ham 2
ptln 2 Wolverhampton I
im 0 Leeds 3
2 C'oventer 2
Manchester ('it I
Division lxTwo
Hlull 0
Carlisle I
rough 0 I. ulham 2
I Aston Villa I
untv I Sundlerlandi 4
Bristol ('its I
Bristol C('its I
Nottingham I- rest 0
S Swindon I
Wednesday 0 Blackpo(l 0
mwich I crystall Palace 0
Division Iiree


iirighton 0 lBournenmouth 2
Bristol IRoers 2 Charlt( On 0
lihestertfeld I (rinmsbx 0
ilereford I Blackburn 0
Htuddersfield 2 Cambridge 1
)ldham 1 Port Vale I
Sherssbh ury 0 \Wre xhaim .
Southport 3 Aldershot 0
Iranmere 2 Pl mouth 0


Walsall 0 Rirochdale 0
York I Ilalifax 1
Division Ilour
Bradford I I)Dncaster I
Brentford 0 I xeter I
Colchester 3 Crew\\e 2
Gillingham I Newport I
Mansfield 2 Northampton 0
Reading 2 I)arlingto 0
Scunthorpe 3 Barnsle 0
Stckport I Peterborough I
Iorquas 2 L.incoiln I
\IWrkinrton 0 Bur\ 0
SCOTI)TflSil 1.1.\(itI
Division Oine
('CIde 2 Fast Iife I
)umbarton I Dundee United 2
I)undee 4 1 alkirk 0
I)lunterr ini e 2 (C ltii 3
ihtbernr ia 2 I'artick
lihbernian 2 PI'rtick I
Morton 2 Hearts 3
Mt ,ther\well 0 Aberdeen 0
(rangers 0 A r 0
Sr Johniistone 0 Arbroath 0

FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157


Livingstone Coakley M.P. (3rd
from right) presents the
Bahamas' flag to members of
the HIoernan Cup team. From
left. Jack Moree, Duke
Brafford, Donald Butler. Mr.
(oakley, Fred tliggs and Reg
Dumont. Not photoed are
Mike Taylor and Robert
Slatter. Taylor already is in
Jamaica working the course.
Slatter is expected home from
Canada today.


NASTASE LOSES BADLY
I ORIST HII.LS. NI\\' YORK
(AlP) A harried. embittered Ilie
Nastase skidded to the sidelines on
an uncharacteristic wave of errors
I ridao and left Stan Smith the man
to beat in the UI.S. Open tennis
championships.
"I don't want to talk I'm afraid
I may say something vere bad." the
27 year old Romanian Davis up
ace. defending champion and
co-No. I seed, said after losing a
two-day second round match to
little known Andrew\ Pattison of
Rhodesia 6 7, 2 6. 6 3 4, 64 6-4.
The contest had been halted
Thursday by darkness with I'attison
leading 5-3 in the decisive set It
tooik the Rhodesian just 4'
minutes to finish the job.


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