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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03433
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: August 30, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03433

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(Ul.ed with Postmaster of Bahamas for postage c ine-ons within the Bahamas) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


VOL. LXX, No. 232 Thursday, August 30, 1973. Price: I 5 Centa


BATELCO UNION CHAIRMAN LOSES BID TO

BECOME FIRST WOMAN UNION PRESIDENT HERE






Darling retains Public







Service Union Presidency


By MIKE LOTHIAN
AGGRESSIVE BATELCO UNION CHAIRMAN Willamae Bridgewater last night lost in her bid to become the
first woman president of a union in the history of Bahamian trade unionism when incumbent Thaddeus L. Darling
defeated her 291-214 to retain the presidency of the Public Services Union.


The presence of Mrs. unable tot campaign before inembers eligible to, votet.
Bridge water's name on the the voting, held at the PSU's lhe clectlionl date coincided
ballot became possible only incomplete headquarters with government's making tihe
hours before last night's building on last Street South tirst payment to titvil servant,,
election, when her monith-old i'r. Darling cornered just under an interim Wage increase
suspension from the PSt' was under 58 percent ol the votes agreement.
lifted without explanation cast. I he te' nporar.,,t lease a ot
Mrs. Bridgewater could not The 505 ballots counted S3112 a year for sailar1d civil
offer for election while under represented less than 17 per servants and ten cents an hour
suspension, and was therefore cent of the almost 3,000 union for others was annllmncd oni
August 2, retroactive to June
I. The first payment under the
llninn dIom nd ll die ne iro' agreement was iad yesterday.


there were no ballots with the
names of all the candidates
available, so the ministry
officials were able to accept
nominations ianld otes for only
one post at a tneil
When it became clear that
the voting for president would
take the meeting well into the
late hours, the ministry
officials annouin.ied that both
candidates had agreed that,
whoever won the election, they
would be willing to accept a
directive by resolution to name
a subsequent tine and place
for the election of the
remaining eighlit otice rs
A 1 1 tl 0 I t n t o
that effect was iiade and
seconded. A proposed
amendment, that instead the
election be completed last
night by one session of voting
for all the remaining posts, was
defeated. The original motion
was carried unanimously.
Last night's election: was
held almost a full month after
the union's constitutional
deadline.
The union's constitution
stipulates that 'an annual
general meeting shall be held
during thle month of July."
'UNFINISH1FD BUSINESS'
Mr Darling said to day that
the election was late "because
we had a lot of unfinished
business, and we just couldn't
tido it within the time period
So we made sure we were not
more than four weeks late."
MI rs. Bridgewater was
suspended as a member o(f thet'
PSU ind as chairman ofi tlhe
Batelco branch of cthe P'St b\
ret'solution passed at rti
executive meeting on Jul\ 2(,
She was not invited to that
meeting although she' w,.i J
member of the executive I
committee
I he grounds for sutspension1111
included "that yourt conduct
and behaviour is nuot condl.cuiv
and in keeping with the l':bhl,
Service's Union," and "-t h,,t
your conduct suggested and
confirmed that you regadedl
voourself as leader ot anl
independent and autonomous
organisation." The suspIensit.on
let ter also a Ill e e l
misapplication of union funds
An appeal against the
suspension was filed by 20
1inion members immediately
When Mr. Darling failed toI
reply to the appeal letter b\
August 3. Mrs. Bridgew.iter
appealed the suspension
directly to Labour Minister
Clifford L. Darling.
The appeal has not yet been
heard either by the union of b%
the Minister. Although thl
suspension was "rescinded"
without explanation yesterday.i
Mrs. Bridgewater has so f.ar
been given no opportunity to
reply to the charges against
her.
Mr. Darling said this
morning that while Mrs.
Bridgewater "was not
conforming to our policies"
and it was the PSU's opinion
that disciplinary action was
needed,. "later on we
reconsidered because the
elections were coming uip.
"We felt she was very active,
she had potential and she was a
good unionist." The PSU did
not, he said, want to "deprive"
Mrs. Bridgewater of the right
to run for election if she
wanted, for fear that later on
she would say that she could
have won if she had not been
blocked from offering because
of the suspension.
Mr. Darling said he felt that
the fact that the suspension
was lifted only yesterday had
no effect on the election
results, although Mrs.
Bridgewater was unable to
campaign.
"This isn't politics," Mr
Darling said. He said officers
were elected to union posts on
their own merits not on
campaign speeches.


FINAL PROSECUTION WITNESS

EXPECTED TOMORROW



2 shotguns & ammunition



found at apartment of



kidnap accused by police

Bh SIDNEY DORSETT
TWO S11 I ( I1 N' and i quantity of ammunition were found
at the Freeport apartment of policeman Spurgeon Dames and
Inlernalional Hotel sectrits department head Leroy McLean
when police executed a searchh w arranl during investigations on


SM 7- -
THADDEUS DARLING WILLAMAE BRIDGEWATER
re-elected . reinstated



BaTelCo union may have



no choice' but to split if



PSU 'attitude' not altered

By MIKE LOTHIAN
THIE IBAHlAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS ('ORPORATION
branch of the Public Services Union will have "'no choice" but to
split with the parent hbody if the PSU does not alter its "attitude"
that BaTelCo workers do not belong in a union of civil servants.


February 17 into the kidnapping
St) I k t Is i it 'I
S o tO s ll led s1( k llltC in l
[ it' "l 1is i 5 o l D) a lt t t iit"t
suttpeitlltndent t\It l It hI,!
Johinson tii e I 23dictI wI it ,s ,o
tle ailleld b tihe pr se, notit it li
the two week-o, \ lndr'.a
Spencer kidnap trial beani'
hlietil heloie MI .nIk tii,

Mr tilllohnsoi lealslo d l Ilt il
S itnes bIo1 \ untlt lkttI tihll''
alI ernoonll when hie w is

It it'cSS a Is 'SI n I !i ii. 'I
against charges il kidalt l,
bulgla\ attellmptd adtolttin
of 0.250,)000 rlansoII money\ ,
Ss s a u I I t Ith dt ei i d I \
mIl l millents and po -ses iwn ofl

A\tlolIlne\ RaIndlt I I aw, kks is
appeal ng on behalf I t lice
, ia. s d tt I es,li" tl .t h.l g.'ed
w ith %1,- eC.11
itI .ItIlll on saoid he I,, enit toI
I),iiit apaIitml ent alot1 ing 'ithi
othl I police othtlicl', \\ hl,,
tmlei nll.l til tlie e w ith a l i l oill
I ich 1 7tilI AssIstaI t P'tl~ ,
S pe rI n11 t e n de t It a u I
I'homipson also a witness llsI
1mo1 11in g, le lt I lll th,, tile
otieir i lltlris to tiit k toi
the Ik l lit tI 'Ic t t i : ,t()k itm
D les anJlis l Mi ',.I1, MI
Johlnsoln siil
lie siidr I Daies w tilt I he I first
to be brought Ill anld the\i
sid tIcti d Ilit t' \iIT rdit 1 l 11 tll 1lil.
efecuned te e wtrrai tn iun.i
IIli irn ing hliit tllte\ w i it
searching IlIo t I IeA.IIs
I)ames said ht, had no guns
alnd ttle tilled t1 o IIl) an '
when til ,e\ siit, l d i In ,s tc T it
Johlinson sali
PI..t\ S (01 I
SI5p1t JothIl -,on itnl "tIduIrin
tile seirch. M, ls.i n w. s also
brought t thkIe prc IsI [ I
heard Dialll s i,!\ t iirig tithe at
look ing lol nitIs I1 don't l ra\
any guns I plti\ I It 1 leaned .
hlie saidl "repti'd .I nig did
\ou tell huni ljioiutt lie two
guns we h cad at A te hIousep'
)dames diul 'lt epla ta o

.caing tI tal-" .!p. Ied e t

Mr Johnsoii t aidt tIIe t IIl ers
accom)panIed liltl'' .I. i- d i k ,,ill
apart tfn elit i i h om i ei!' 1!, I t
I hieIc, M Itliet
the o oIertI c ti 1i the
from thle Iftrot ai on tc
Mr. Joylnn anin! \L.eanad
also "spointi'I t go woo)d.lin
cupboard in I he 1- i'hLiv i II
said thait w\%Is % lu'th h-' \\wouldl
find lihe tw(o turns
"I wenit Intilo t he Lc p 111 board
andt loiil t\I\< sitotVU 1ns Onec
was a I -'tai.e lr,,Nwning
auLto atic andil inti second w ias
ao I ( ol -gaI It lit lester
shotgun," sald MI1 JoilIsOll
W iile searhi l I ,i t hell in the
closet, lie it illou)L sevene1 I 6-gauge
cartridges in a paper bI'J 10
cartndges lto .ia 1 !lngeC
shlotgun Il a h \ anh d ,il a lo one
box of 1l-gai;-Ce cartiliduies with
25 inside.
(1 O(VI S
Also l ilult! .t tle a'ipai tm entl
was a pair ot blTown i',oves', lhe
w\ l ness s' I l
Supl Jolhnson said ]ie
t Ind the gloves Ill a dIIrawer in
the room D)alnes occupied anild
also witi l theill were tel
1 d-gauge cartridges
IlI ideintiled thet articles he
mentionIed when aIskeId to do
so bv So sliitor generall
1 angton Hilton One box of 12
gauge cartridges originally

the coutll onl twelve were
ididde tit because insp.
tenderseon Norville had taken
four of them to Washington for
the balhistics expert.

A.S.P Thompson told the
court of having come across a
bottle containing a message to
Mr. Robert Spencer at the

lhe said the police found the
bottle after a caller contacted
the Royal Bank of Canada
Assistant manager Mr.
Littlejohn and instructed him
to collect it.


of ..ndrea Spence.
\1; I tlmpson said he had
hi' nt'essagc' lnt'oed Irum the
ittr,, anIld is ped copy of it
iks ics nt to \ l Spencer. 1li
'l ,i p ce tldog was used
thiln p li' 1'tho| investigations.
ut hlie Jl not know it had
cici bein in itoduced to the
,lth, k,tl tl. tl at ol ir Spencer
to Ill. tiles taken from
lilt' ,I I s;t'is' 1ap.i tnm ent.
I hle dotgs did serve a
puipos I iit, not know if they
e\el .,iighl tilthe scent of the
kitlnl.ipei ." \ir Thomnpson
si tl iu ig c"o-(ss-exanuination
t Ir I t \\ kes
Mr I holpson, who said he
i, 1 pied ,. concealed position
ill tlthe' .ilt'i t ithe ransom
nltiit'\ pickup site on February
I 7. aind that lie saw Mr.
SpJI'Ic.C l ti)mo 1 t11 lllmoney at
S.a inII
lie toll MIr lFawkes he did
ntt know tlit Mi. Spencer said
lie icniltted ltle S250,000 at
5 O n. ii in his evidence in
ctltirt
\i I lihimipson said it was
ntt ticetI. that Mr Spencer
reini d tii til ll moncy at 5.05
Sin tilt' e lime given in his
t Ist el] )i
litHe "ld lie had interviewed
Kaith Shlecves, Maureen
'annonan d Mr. Landis Smith
who returned the young child
It hler parents after finding her
When he saw them at 12.30
p in on IFebruary 17. he did
not ask them about their
it hereabouts on February 15 as
lie id inot think it necessary to
do so I(he final prosecution
witness. Insp. Orniond Biggs, is
expectedd to be called to give
lIdeCncc l:Frda.\, alter which,
thi l efetlse will be called to
prlsenlt its case.

HAITIAN IS

SENTENCED

TO DEATH
I.\1 1 1A\ bus- boy Willie
J inhi i ittetd yesterday by a
Slit in't' ( tiltt jury before
( lm t Justice Leonard J.
K 1to its was sentenced to
di, ll) t i the murder of his
ili... l-niatec W illie Charles, on
.MXli i 5
Ihe deflente,. conducted by
Atiitroi ne J R,,v Henderson.
pie'ss d t i, a t1 acquittal in his
.itiliess tio the tury which
inlludied t\,wo woImen Attorney
Ilenderson maintained the case
ais ,one of self defence.
John. who pleaded not
gill\ tI ( tle charge, was
i.ut d of stabbing Charles at
thlen I ret'poit apartment on
tli' e.l\ nmorningof February 5
lie tic'tencle urged the jury
to Aticepi that his client had no
intention of killing his
itlo -im mate who had caused
hi in It be the object of ridicule
ait girl tri nd
Johnl. who had attempted to
run awa\ after the incident,
probably did so because he felt
no one would believe his story,
attorney Henderson said.
lie asked the jury to
tnsideLtr thlie defence's case and
"gisc him the benefit of the
loublt to live down his remorse
in fr.edom."
{'rown counsel Fred
Watermani, conducting the
Iprosecultion in the three-day
trial accused John of
intentionally stabbing his
roo m-mate.
lie did it because his
room-mate had told guests the
accused wore only one pair of
underpants, he contended.


onl[ lea illed of thile proposed
AMeindiimniil whe n they arrived
iind s"i. lic wgellda
Wthen ,I BaTeIl('co brant I
eprersenitatIvLe asked M l
D),irluig to give detail's of the
prop)oscd amendment, the'
prcs ident ipoitedl\ replied
"'Whalt I ain proposing hias
nothing to doit, with BaTeICo
hlich is rnot ,I part of us. Thi,.
onili cotiUcns civil scwr\ice."
\Mr )Darling reportedly
packed tIhis briefcase and left
tlie meeting when a Bal'cl(o
reprtesentati\C demandedI to
know \\whI\ it the\ were not
lnisidleed ai part of lithe I'SU,
they were paying their dues,
duiectl to l)lhie parent bmdi\.
Asked bl The liibune
whet her the statements
attributed to lhin at tlhe Jull
25 meeting were correct Mr.
Darling refused Io i1 nswert'r
dittctly. Hle said Bai'Tel(o was
Ionly a branch of the union,
and that the PSU t institution
wais nlot binding on tlie iiranch,
wnh lie said h (Iad it own
on' st itut ion.
Mr I)arling had nto ctinmmient
when asked whetherli BaTel(C
womkers would be allowed to
ott' on l lite I tproposei t
a Inki. ldfilenft.
N) VO) II1
In late tlhe iuIne nliH iClt has
lnolt mie to a vote
Mr. Darling called a meeting
of tlhe executive C,itonmittee off
the PSU on July 2it. Although
Mrs. Bridgewater is a member
of the committee sithe was not
notified.
At the meeting thle executive
passed a resolution suspe'ndingi
Mrs. Bridgcwatcr aI ,a i mcibt'r
and a branch lAtimniil ti totr lt'
yea r.
The grounds gieni were that
hter ctndutct '"is nolt conduciveC
and in keeping with the Public
Service Union." and that her
conduct, suggested and
confirnied "that she regarded
liherself s head of aln
autonomous body.-
She was charged additionally
with miisappl atitl s of union

M rs. B il Idge w a ter
imme' diately apple ialcd teli
S11ispenSiO ,ilid 20 tullIl)ni
niembers signed ai petition to
force an extraointhari general
Meeting to ihea.r thle t ase. In
accordance with provisions iof
the PSU.
APPIA L
When Mr. l)aring hald not
replied to ithliei the appeal tor
thle petition by Augtust 3. Mrs.
Bridgewater addilessed an
appeal directly Ito Labotur
Minister C(lifford L Darling.
No hearings had been held
either by the union or the
Minister up to shortly after 5
p.m yesterday. when Mrs.
Bridge'watle received a letter
from acting PSU general
secretary Brenda Rolle. stating
simlipli that the executive hiad
rescinded" thle suspension
Mr Darling said today the
sulspenslion was lifted to enable
thie branch chairman to run for
election as president of the
PSU.
The election, held last night,
ended with Mr. Darling the
winner by a -) I 2 14 vote.
Ironically. the PSU was
originally founded largely
around a necleus of employees
in the then telecom--
munications department.
When the department
became a corporation, the
union's constitution was
amended to allow the BaTelCo
employees to maintain their
PSU membership.


UIIUII UUiIIUIlU lull uilO luOUlu


on BEC's insurance company

THE ENGINEERING AND GENERAL UNION is prepared to
institute proceedings culminating in strike action against the
Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC) if demands are not met
for "full disclosure" on the ownership, head office and ability to
pay of Trans-Oceanic Insurance Company.
IlTras Oceanic provides information on Tlrans-Oceanic.
insurance coverage for the 60 "We are now prepared to
BFC employees, after taking demand full disclosure, or file
over from Travellers Insurance, grievance with the Labour
a major U.S. firm, 1on May I1 Ministei (Clifford Darling) and
this vear. take a strike vote," Mr.
Union president Dudley Williams declared in a press
Williams said he will write B (' release.
this week asking flor the union's action was
Parked by the difficulties
I experienced by Mrs. Leroy
Back-to-school igg, in trying to collect
ST a $2,.000 insurance payment
Section Today flow, the ugust 11 death
y of her son Charles, 21, a BEC
BACK TO SCHOOL, The employee.
Tribune's annual supplement According to Registry
on tips for and news about records, Trans-Oceanic, with
students, is included in head offices n Puerto Rico,
today's edition.
Students will want to get was incorporated in the
this special issue to read Bahamas on March 10 last year
about themselves and their in the law offices of Hanna and
friends. Stewart-Coakley.
The Tribune learned that the
ACCIDENT VICTIM telephone ilnuber and post
RAYMOND Everard, 48, of office box of Trans-Oceanic are
the Towers of Cable Beach, is the same as those listed for
in "satisfactory" condition GAC Eleuthera Limited, which
today at the Princess Margaret is developing a imulti-million-
Hospital after being involved in dollar residential resort at
a traffic accident with a car FlIeuthera.
driven by Jacqueline Clarke, The development is located
19, of Kennington Gardens. in the Rock Sound
In the car with Miss Clarke constituency, which is
was eight-nmonth Ricardo represented by Mr. Preston
Turner. Albury, chairman of BEC.


The teniporar icre.se wsas
granted to tide iSl scrvants
over until a (Govcrnmnent
committee completes a full
review.
Last night's elec'ti n nol sy
but fairly ortlCi1 .I was
conducted by Ministry of
Labour officials Also present
but only to otbscrvie was
Labour Ministry permanent
secretary C.A.P. Smlith.
TAKFS L ADI)
As officials called oft the
candidates' nanmest written on
each ballot, it earlv became
clear that Mr Darling had a
slight but definite lead
As the counting neared the
end after I I p in. and
"Darling" was heard
increasingly more often than
"Bridgewater." pandemonium
broke out with unionists
rushing to congratulate an
obviously happy Mr. Darling.
Mrs. Bridgewater was taunted
by Darling supporters.
When the final result of
291-214 was announced over
the public address system, it
could barely be heard above
the noise of the celebrating
Darling su pporters.
MIr. Darling won a brief
period of relative quiet to
express his thanks to his
supporters and to pledge to
continue serving the union
with "'honesty, purpose and
loyalty." liHe has served in
various capacities for 14 years.
four of them as president.
Last night's meeting was to
have seen the election of a full
slate of nine officers. However,


L BEAUTIES GET PRIZES
MISS BAHAMAS 1973 Agatha Watson was the guest of
honour at a party held last night to give contestants in the
Monday night pageant their prizes. Among Miss Bahamas' prizes
BEDROOM SUITES were all expenses paid trips to Europe, Montreal, Jamaica,
Freeport, Treasure Cay and the Miss Universe contest. Sitting
with Miss Bahamas is Mrs. Curzon Dobell, wife of her sponsor.
0L MIIIN FINIIUR Standing from left are second runner-up Miss Blackbeard's Wendy

Boutique Francina Bodie.


A lilt between parent bodv%
and branch lias been
developing t lesii ,isi e t Ma\ .
alltt lal u li to a li aid last nlighl
whSt cll B ia I' I( ,t branch it
iliiii iiian Wila a B',, ridgewater
Inmaile an uliisiu'csful bid t o
oulit PSI president haddeus
.L Darling.
itr l)arnlig siid todua that
an\ movie to scpalate lhec
Ba I1(o branch fiom llthe PSI
woilld have to comie froml the
b r1 n i ie luiit.slie d
speculationI t11 t the parent
bodt\ might initiate a split
I here is ino lltentiot n of
kicking them nut,." Mr Darling
saidl. "We are the patent botil
and they are ouil memberslilt and
we '\ill treat theinm as tottd as.I
we treat ain other blanclhes. It
thely don't want to he with us
Ihrt're arre other a venutles ftor
theIn to followw"
Said Mrs Bridgewater:
"It all depends on the was
things go. If the relationship
bet ctl tlie parent body and
tlhe hrainhc doesn't improve I
don't see that swe will have ,n\
other choice," but toi seek
separation .
'TITUIDF'
Slt' ascribed the necti tit
improve relations to thit
"attitude" of members ofI tle
parent body "that \\ eI
shiouldnit be there tbcautl'se t\c
aren't civil servants.'
She chllarged that the feeling
among PSU iimemibers thalt
Co'rp()orat ion workers slIoIild
not be ai part of the union hlad
beiilt fostered by members tt
the 'St's \executiveC
She said a branch meeting to
disctiuiss tile Isse wotiuld be litld
by early lext week.
IThe first evidence of tliscorld
between tile two groups- cme
in earl\ May.
On Mai 7 some 350
BaTel('Io staffers demonstrated
outside tlie Corporat ion's
administrative offices on
Tholipson Boulevard to
protest management's alleged
refusal to negotiate the
up-dating oif a wage agreemlentl
which had expired ten llmontlis
ibe' fore.
)During the deimonstlaitonl
Mr. Darling told fhe Iribune
tha lie i had had no uka ihec
demonstration w\vas Ito tlake
place.
In a press release issued 'on
1ai\ 14. lthowever, the hb,inch
refuted Mr Darling's claill that
he hlad no prior knowledge oIt
the demonstration.
"lie was informed b\ the
branch chairman," the release
said. The statement added thliat
'-it was due tot the president's
lack of communications aInI
disregard for the branch that
the staff found it necessary to
demonstrate in suppirlt o their
branch."
It was speculated that the
parent body became \war\ of
thie BaTelCo branichu wIhen.
dluinng its dispute with
management, the branch
display yed highly etticient
organisation and solidarity, and
won pledges of solidarity from
virtually every miaior trade
tinion i in thle coulnutr\y
(;GI-NERAL MI :. IIN(;
The conflict snow-balled
beginning July 25. when Mr
Darling called a general
meeting at short notice to deal
with several matters. including
a constitutional amendment
allowing elected officers to
retain their posts for three
years, instead of the one-year
terms presently allowed.
Those attending the meeting


f DUDLEY'S S:
COR. ROSETTA ST I
IMT.ROYAL AVE.

SYLVANIA TV's
P.O. BOX 850 PHONE 2-13062-3237


irtibunt


II I I


chl












f____h bribmun


EGYPT AND LIBYA POLITICALLY MERGED
BEIRUT, LEBANON (AP) Cairo radio has announced It Vpt and
Libya have merged into a new political union. The announcements s.as the
new Arab State will be based on the principles of the 19S2 I Igoptaun
revolution led by General Nasser and the 1969 Libyan revolution .Id fhy
Moammar Khadafy
It says a new unified political command has been formed, headed by
presidents Sadat of Egypt and Khadafy. Their respective '-!+-, in th-" nes
command were not specified. The announceenit'n said a constitutional
assembly will be formed Sunday to draw up a constitution for the news
state. It has not yet been given a name SIE S IORY I y S ,'A(; )
STATE DEPARTMENT DENIES RUMOUR
WASHINGTON (AP) The State Department has denied it plans a new,
diolomatic initiative to settle the Middle Eastern problem Assistant
Secretary Joseph Sisco had been quoted in Amman, Jordon, as saying the
U-S will soon move toward indirect talks between Israel and the Arabs
A spokesman in Washington says Sisco did not discuss an, new
initiatives or the possible role of the U S in negotiations
WALDHEIM CONTINUES HIS MIDDLE EAST TALKS
BEIRU (AP) iU N Secretar (General Kurt Waldheim rlelt tor Israel
Wednesday saying his talks with Middle I ast governments were certainlyl
helping the United Nation's quest for a peaceful settlement of the'
Arab Isreal conflict.
'1 had .1 useful, frank and helpful exchange of view with the Lebanese
leaders" he told newsmen at Beirut Airport befte boarding his blue and
white executive jet.
Waldheim will stop in Nicosia. Cyprus, on his way to Isreal, the third leg
of his Middle Fast tour,
Waldheim h:-d a working lunch with Lebanese P'resident Suleiman
I ranjieh, a one hour conference with Prime I akieddin Solh and a tio hour
working session with I foreign Minister I uad Naffa during his 24 hour stay
in Lebanon.
ECHEVERRIA ORDERS 10,000 BUILDINGS RAZED
MEXIlCO CITY (AP) I)emolition crews in Mexico are levelling
thousands of unsafe buildings today as others search for more bodies in
rubble left by tuesday's earthquake in the southeast part of tihe country
Close to 500 bodies have been recovered so far, and officials predict the
death toil might top one thousand.
President I cheverria loured part of tile 300 square mile area of Puebla
and Veracru/ States by bus yesterday lie ordered the demolition of some
ten thousand buildings still standing but considered unsa.le in more than 50
towns. Contact has not been established yet with about ten villages in the
quake area.
CONSPIRACY CASE TO JURY TODAY
-.LORII)A (AP) The federal conspiracy trial of eight anit war activists
in (;ainesville, Ilorida is expected to go to the iurv today after final
arguments. Seven of the defendants are accused ol plotting to commit
violence during the Repubican National conventionnm at Miami Beach last
year. The other is charged with hiding knowledge of such ai plot All aire
members of the Vietnam Veterans against the war
GIRL PARTLY DEVOURED BY ALLIGATOR
SARASOTA, I .ORIDA (AP') I lie father of 16 year old Sharon
Holmes is xwing I-lorida and concessionaires at a state park for 4 5 million
dollars, claiming their negligence resulted in ,an alligator's fatal attack oni
htis daughter.
The teenl-ager was mauled to death by a 10-foot gator while swimming
with her father Aug 16 at Oscar Scherer State Park in what game officials
say is the first documented ctase of such a death in American history.
Brunto Holmes filed suit Tuesday in Sarasota County circuit court.
Reptile experts said the practice of feeding alligators at the park caused
them to lose a natural fear of people and helped increase the likelihood of
such ani attack.
The girl's mutilated and partially devoured body was found on the lake
bank several hours after she was pulled under the water. The alligator was
standing guard over tihe bods when it was found.
VANDALS ATTACKING ROME'S MARBLE FIGURES
ROMI (AP) Vandals are now. hitting Rone 's fountains, hewing big
marble chunks off the unguarded marble figures
A tourist left the figure iof a I riton lailess on the fa.irmne-d liaroque Irevi
fountain after leaping onto it t tuesday
Vandal's atis also decapitated te Of tihe syrnbolic figures r( tthe
monument to (,othlie rising from tlie founrtai in tin' Villa Borghese
gardens.
Technicians are trying to keep up with tile vandals I iperts are using big
rictal holts it remount the marble shells broken off from thie 17th century
fountain last week in Santa Maria in I rastevere.
Authorities have ordered greater surveillance following these attacks
LASER BEAMS TO HELP THE BLIND
SAN DilEGO (AP) Twentieth century technology is coming to the aid
of the blind with the development of a cane that emits laser beams to
detect obhsticles.
J.M. Benjamin, president of Bio;ic Instrument Corp. developer of the
cane, said Tuesday that one of its three lasers detects overhead dangers
such as low branches and doorways, another emitted at waist level picks up
walls, automobiles or approaching people and the third at ankle-height
warns thie user of curb edges and steps.
WCC APPROACH BREZHNEV ON SOLZHENITSN'S BEHALF
(;i.Nl.VA, SWITZIERLAND (AP') Some 25 churchmen and laymen
.iattenuig a meeting of the World Council of churchess Wednesday urged
Soviet party chief Leonid fre/hnev to let novelist Alexander Solhetnitsyin
live with his family in Moscow.
rhey signed a telegram stating their belief 'that restrictions oif freedomni
of imoveminent and other human rights i in any country are most serious
obstacle's to real detente, cooperation aid peice.. "
It asked that (tie order prohibiting the writer to live with hlis faniily iin
Motosw be rescinded. Solthenitsi n has stated that this would be his i"ost
urgent wish.-
Signers % in lauded Bishop Itanns lij'e. Ot llaniover. a president of ltilt
World Co 'until,. Bishop Jlimes K. Maitthews Of Washington 1.i I fishOp
Kurt Sci.irtfof West Berlin atd isfthop Oliver rtmikins tf Bristol.
Ilc privately proposed telegram snas sent one day after the World
Council s police making central committee, had voted against inserting a
critical reference it) Easterr I rope ill a docunlent on violence areas
throutghiiut the wotrid.
A spokesman said the World Council. whose member churches include
several last luropean Orthodox congegations, had noi i official part in the
telegram.
HEATH REFUSES AMIN REQUESTS FOR LOAN
LONDON (AI') Prime Minister Ildaird Hleath has refused a request
for a loan froin Ugandan President Idi Arnin and an invitation to come to
Kamipala tor talks, the British gosernient said Fhursday.
Heath s refusaLs. the 1 torcigni Office said, ciamnie in reply to 1 Inessage
frem Amin Aug. t0 elements
In that message Amin asked iHeath for .1 Iritish loan that could be used
to pay compensation to the estimated 30,000 British citizens Amin
expelled rom Ugguanda last sear
Amin ilso said the question of compensation could only be discussed by
Anmin .ind I 'ea.ti persorually, an d onti) in Ktnimpala.
eaitli's answer, delivered in Kampala M ind.i said Heath could not
acc'R plt thie itivitui'h't t tht.,r t n..il i to ilisuss the cotnmpensation
question .it the summit level Heath said the problem could be discussed
through diplomiiatic channels either in London ior Kaimpali.
leath's reply also expressed cmncernt over thie hardships suffered by the
Ugandan Asians expelled and urged that their funds frteni in Uganda
should he returned to them outside thle country.


THINK SCOTCH



DRINK SCOTCH





AINSLIE'S SCOTCH


5-DAY STAY ORDERED


EGYPT-LIBYA


Thursday, August 30, 1973.


REBUILDING TO TAKE YEAR RED CHINA


Judge demands tapesBECOME MERGED Mexicans fear toll


but Nixon refuses


to obey, will appeal

WASHINGTON (AP) The Watergate trial judge Wednesday
ordered President Nixon to turn over for the judge's private
inspection tapes subpoenaed by the Watergate prosecutor, but
stayed the order for five days to permit appeal.


District court judge John J
Sirica said in a ruling, certain
to be appealed, that Nixon
must "produce forthwith lor
the court's examination in
camera" the tape recordings oft
Nixon's conversations with key
aides implic.tlcd in tlte
Watergate investigation
lie ordered the Itve-day
delay and added that he would
extend the stay indefinitely if
the completion of appeals
requires it.
Sirica's order was the first
time in history that a judge has
commanded a President tio
produce materials over his
objections. Nixon has claimed
that to disclose the documents
and tapes would violate the
confidentiality of the
presidencyi.
MIDDLE (GROUND
Sirica called his course a
middle ground between the
two conflicting claims of the
President andl of the Watergate
prosecutors, who want to
examine the tapes in their
investigation of the Watergate
affair
lie said that without
discrediting the strength of the
Watergate grand jury's claim to
the information ie could not
"as matters now stand, rule
that the president claim of
privilege is invalid."
Instead. Sirica said in a
23-page opinion which
accompanied his order for the
tapes, "the court has
attempted to walk the middle
ground between a failure to
decide the question of privilege
at one extreme, and a
wholesale delivery of tapes to
the grand jury at the other '
COURT ORDER
Here are excerpts from tihe
text of U.S. District Court
Judge John J. Sirica's decision
Wednesday ordering President
Nixon to turn over to him for
examination the subpoenaed
Watergate tapes.
"Ordered: that Respondent,
President Richard M. Nixon or
any subordinate officer ... is
hereby commanded to produce
forthwith for the court's
examination in camera, the
subpoenaed documents or
objects which have not
heretofore been produced ito
the grand jury
.. the court has found it
necessary to adjudicate but
two questions for the present:
( 1) Whether the court has
jurisdiction to decide the issue
of privilege, and (2) Whether
the court has authority to
enforce the subpoena duces
tecum by way of all order
requiring production for
inspection in camera. A third
question, whether the materials
are in fact privileged as against
the grand jury, either in whole
or in part, is left for
subsequent adjudication.
the availability of
evidence including the validity
and scope of privileges, is a

MITCHELL AND

STAINS TRIAL


STAY DENIED
NEW YORK (AP) A
federal judge Wednesday
ordered the case against John
Mitchell and Maurice Stans to
proceed as scheduled in ruling
on a defense motion that
Watergate publicity precluded
a fair trial for the two former
cabinet members.
U.S. District Court Judge
Lee Gagliardi directed that the
trial begin Sept. 11 as
previously scheduled,
declaring:
"The mere existence of
publicity before trial does not
trigger automatic dismissal or
continuance."
Mitchell, President Nixon's
former attorney general, and
Stans, former commerce
secretary, are accused of
perjury and obstruction of
justice.
The government said they
sought to impede a Securities


and Exchange Comnmission
investigation of financier
Robert Vesco, in return for a
secret $200.000 cash
contribution to President
Nixon's reelection campaign
last year.
Attorneys for the two men
had argued that publicity
about the Watergate affair,
including the nationally
televised hearings at which
both Stans and Mitchell
appeared, would hinder their
clients' chances for a fair trial.


judicial decision. Judical
control over the evidence in a
case cannot be abdicated to the
caprice of executive officers.
"The burden here, then, is
on the President to define
exactly what it is about his
office that court process
commanding the production of
evidence cannot reach there.
IMMATERIAL
"That the court has not the
physical power to enforce its
order to the President is
immaterial to a resolution of
the issues. Regardless of its
physical power to enforce
them, the court has a duty to
issue appropriate orders.
"I he grand jury's showing
of need here is well
documented and imposing
Ironically, need for the taped
evidence derives in part from
the fact that witnesses have
testified regarding the subject
matter, creating important
issues of fact for the grand jury
to resolve.
"It the interest served by ai
private is abused or subverted,
the claim of privilege fails.
"The president contends
that the recorded conversations
occurred pursuant to an
exercise of his duty to take
care that the laws be faithfully
executed. Although the court
is not bound by that
conclusion, it is extremely
reluctant to finally stand
against a declaration of the
President of the United States,
on any but the strongest
possible evidence. Need for the
evidence requires that a claim
not be rejected lightly. The
court is simply unable to
decide the question of privilege
without inspecting the tapes."
Under normal legal practice
in the District. of Columbia.
the five days' stay would be
normal, whole working days.
putting the deadline at next
Thursday
NIXON REFUSES
The president's lawyers now
are considering the possibility
of seeking an appeals court
review of Sirica's order, as well
as looking into other possible
means of supporting the
President's position.
A White House statement,
issued shortly after Sirica
handed down his ruling, said
the ruling was "inconsistent"
with the President's position
that to release the tapes would
violate the confidentiality of
the presidency necessary to the
conduct of the office.
"The President consequently
will not comply with this
order," the statement said.
It also hinted that an
attempt may be made to
bypass the appeals court and"
go directly to the Supreme
Court with the matter.
BRIEFS ARGUED
In the suit brought by the
Senate Watergate committee.
both sides submitted briefs to
Sirica Wednesday.
Lawyers for Nixon argued
that the federal court has no
jurisdiction to decide whether
Nixon must turn over the tapes
to the Senate panel. And they
called the Senate attempt to
get the tapes "an
unconstitutional attempt to
interfere with the
co n fidentiality" of the
President's talks with advisers.
Lawyers for the committee
countered that their suit seeks
no wholesale invasion of
Nixon's files, but "seeks only
tapes and materials relating to
criminal activities in the
presidential campaign and
elections of 1972."
The committee lawyers said
Nixon disregarded the
confidentiality himself by
making the tapes in the first
place, and again by checking
one of them out to Il. R.
Ilaldeman in July, nearly three
months after Haldeman had
quit as White House chief of
staff.
Committee lawyers also said
the federal court has full
authority "to resolve the
precise issue presented here


the validity of the claim of
executive privilege."
And they said "the supreme
court has made clear ... the
conduct of the President is no
more immune from judicial
review than is that of any other
executive officer."
Nixon's lawyers said he
"owed no duty, either
individually or as President of
the United States to the
committee which in any way
could give the court
jurisdiction in the matter.


STATE SATURDAY from earthquake


CAIRO (AP) President
Anwar Sadat and Libyan leader
Moammar Khadafy agreed
Wednesday on a merger of
their two Arab nations to begin
Saturday.
An announcement broadcast
by C('airo Radio said the merger
would take place in steps
beginning with the formation
of a 100 member
constitutional assembly to
draft a charter for the new
North African state.
The announcement gave no
name for the new shtae but sait
it would be based on the
principle of the 1952 Egyptian
revolution and the 1969
Libyan revolution.
According to the
announcement, Sadat and
Khadafy would jointly remain
in power "to shoulder their
responsibilities until full
merger is completed." This
apparently would take place
following a general referendum
in which the new charter
would be presented to the
people of both countries No
date was set for the
referendum.
The n e w Constitutional.
Assembly was to be made up
of 50 members of the lgyptian
Parliament and 50 members
from the Libyan Popular
Revolutionary Committees.
The statement also said the
two sides had agreed on a new
common currency called the
Arab dinar to replace the
I-gyptian pound and the
Libyan dinar.
The two countries were also
to exchange a resident minister
in Cairo and Tripoli, the two
capitals, to follow up their
merger procedures.
It had appeared that Sadat
and many EFgyptians hail
cooled on the idea of a merger
because of Khadafy's insistence
that the new state would be
ruled by Islamic law. There are
nearly seven million Christians
belonging to the Coptic s,:ct in
I gypt. Libya has a population
of two million. Egypt has a
total population of about 35
million.
Libya's rich oil reserves have
produced for it a minor
economic boom while Egypt
has remained in financial
hardship as a result of massive
expenditures for armaments
and a virtually unchecked
population explosion.
The assembly also would
nominate a candidate for the
President following the
acceptance of the New
constitution Khadafy has said
he was prepared to step down
in iavour of Sadat for the
Presidency.
The announcement also said
the new state would issue a
new currency Saturday to be
called the Arab Dinar replacing
the Egyptian pound and the
Libyan Dinar.
A temporary free economic
zone on both sides of the
present Igypt-Libyan border
would be established, the radio
said.

PERU TO TAKE OVER
LIMA, P'ERU (AP) President
Juan Velasco has disclosed that his
military regime plans to take over
all copper mining properties in Peru
belonging to the Cerro Corporation,
a D)elaware based outfit, whether
the company likes it or not.
lIe claimed that both the miners
and his administration were upset
with the company for not providing
workers with adequate houses and
failing to comply with a number of
other Peruvian laws.
The President, an army general,
made the announcement in a
surprise talk with newsmen shortly
after the new Australian ambassador
to Peru, Alexander Dunn, presented
credentials during a ceremony at
Government Ihlouse on Wednesday.
The action would affect six


may be over 1,000

By Alfonso Chardy
MEXICO CITY, Aug. 30 (AP) Reconstruction of devastated
areas hit by Mexico's severest earthquake and worst floods in half
a century will take at least one year, the Mexican President said
early today.
"The reconstruction work will villages were accounted lor.
be costly and hard and will The wounded count was put at
take about a year," President 3,575 by the federal
Luis Echeverria said in Orizaba, government.
one of the more than 80 towns Early Thursday, the federal
in eastern Mexico hard hit by government said 414 were dead
the worst earthquake in in Puebla state and another
Mexican modern history which 300 in the state of Veracruz.
combined with floods in past Besides thousands left
months history which homeless in the quake-stricken
combined with floods in past area another 500.000 homeless
months to claim more than were receiving government aid
1.000 lives, across the country because of
The President. who toured damage suffered by floods
affected zones all day from Mexico's worst rains in
Wednesday, said reconstruction 60 years.
would include both earthquake Floods accounted for 142
zones and flooded areas, deaths during the past month
including the city of Irapuato across 11 states and property
in Central Mexico, where flash damage was estimated in the
flooding two weeks ago left millions of dollars.
more than 20 persons dead. By Thursday morning a
At the same time, the critical situation was obvious in
President ordered demolition central Mexico around Lake
of more than 10,000 structures Chapala where some 6.000
in the tremor disaster area in American wherees live. Waters
the states of Puebla and overran the banks of Mexico's
Veracruz which were heavily largest man-made lake to flow
damaged but still were standing into streets of Chapala
and threatened to collapse. In Southern Mexico the
A strong earthquake that River Grijalva overflowed its
registered 6.5 on the Richter banks 24 hours ago while rain
Scale early Tuesday morning continued
across a 200-mile area in Villahermosa, the capital of
southeastern Mexico left an Tabasco state in southern
official death count of 527. Mexico, had three sections of
However, officials indicated the city overrun by flood
the death toll could be doubled waters and 1,500 persons
when all casualties in small homeless
CHILEAN SHOPS Wooden caskets were sent
along with food, medicine and
S CLOSED other supplies to the affected
REMAIN CLOSED areas. Most of the victims were


FOR 3rd. DAY
SANTIA(GO, CHILE, AU(;. 30
(AP) Nearly all of Chile's private
shop owners locked their stores
again today, for the third straight
day, to protest stern measures
decreed by the leftist government
against striking truckers.
Both the truckers and Marxist
President Salvador Allende
appeared unyielding in the 35-day
old strike that has withered to a
trickle the distribution of
foodstuffs, heating oil and gasoline.
Tension wrought by the prolonged
strike exploded Wednesday in the
town of Rancagua, 60 miles south
of the capital.
Leftists attacked the opposition
newspaper 'El Rancaguino' with
stones and clubs. I)oors and
windows were smashed, some
equipment damaged and employes
fled. forcing the publishers to
suspend today's edition.
One man. collecting signatures
on a petition demanding that
Allende resign, was shot and
wounded as leftist and rightist
militants battled through the town
of 40,000 residents.
Members of the rival Christian
Democrat Party claimed bullets
were fired at their headquarters and'
demanded that Rancagua be
declared an emergency area with
police reinforcements.
Interior minister Carlos Briones,
who took office Tuesday in the
22nd. Cabinet reshuffle by Allende
in less than three years, issued the
tough decree Wednesday night
against some 40,000 striking private
truckers,
U.S. COPPER MINES
copper fields belonging to Cerro's
subsidiary in Peru, the- Cerro De
Pasco Corporation, which produces
approximately one-fo'rth of this
country's raw copper.
Velasco claimed "the miners are
disgusted with the company and
the company in turn is afraid to
deal with the workers. The miners
have nowhere to sleep. IlHousing
conditions are downright inhuman.
'We are a revolutionary
government," he added. "We
believe in humanism and that is
why we feel obliged to take action
against Cerro De Pasco."
Peruvian miners have been
agitating for months against the
company and pressing the
government to confiscate it
outright.


to be buried Thursday.
LOSES FAMILY
"My father died a while ago;
my mother early in the
morning, said. a red-eyed
17-year-old boy in Orizaba,
Antonio Chavez Morales, said.
"I am the oldest, after me were
Pepe, 15, Rosita. 12, and
Juanito, 8. But now they are
not after me. They are there,
buried under the rubble of
what was my home."
"Only my aunt Elvira is left.
My neighbours told me to go
pray, but I could not. The
Concordia Church, where we
always went, is in ruins," he
said. He said he spent two
hours trapped among the
rubble of his home before he
could get out.
In Ciudad Serdan, flowers
that two days ago decorated
the city for the potato fair and
the day of St. Andrew, today
were placed on the caskets.

FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157


RE-ELECTS MAO


AS CHAIRMAN

TOKYO (AP) lh,
Communist Party of (Chin
held its 10th national congrc,,
over the past five days and
re-elected Mao Tse-Tung &s
Chairman, Peking's outii. ..1
news agency announced
Wednesday.
The meeting, eight month,
ahead of schedule, ostensibly
had the task of filling vacancee.
in the party hierarchy since thi,
last congress five years ago an,,
of revising the constitution to
conform with Lin Piao's tal
from grace.
Lin Piao, named in the old
party constitution as the.
successor to Mao, has been;
accused of leading a plht
against Mao for control of the
Chinese leadership. Chinese
officials say the former defense
minister was killed in a plane
crash in September 1971 while
trying to escape to the Soviet
Union after the plot wa<
uncovered.
The congress formally
expelled Lin and his colleague
Chen Po-Ta. the official
Ilsinhua news agency reported.
The resolution described Lin a,
a '"bourgeois careerist
conspirator, counter-re-
volutionary double-dealer, a
renegade and traitor."
Ilsinhua reported the
congress in a broadcast
monitored in Tokyo about one
hour after it alerted that an
important new announcement
could be expected.
In addition to re-electing
Mao, who will be 80 il
December, the congress named
Premier Chou En-Lai, Wang
Hung-En, Kang Sheng, Yel
Chien-Ying and Li Teh-Sheng
as vice chairmen and Chang
Chun-Chao as secretary-
general.
The full Presidium chosen
by the congress is composed ot
48 members, Ilsinhua said.
The agency said on Aug. 28
"after serious and lively
discussions," the congress
unanimously adopted Chou's
political report and Wang
Hung-En's report on the
revision of the party
constitution. It did not give
details of the revision.




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One (1) 1969 Fiat Van No. 409



These vehicles can be inspected by contacting
Mr. Cleare, Transport Office, (telephone
22221) who will make arrangements for the
vehicles to be seen.

Sealed tenders marked (Tender for Vehicle
should be addressed to the Hospital
Administrator, Princess Margaret Hospital.
P.O. Box N.3729 to arrive not later than noon
10th September, 1973.


J. A. THOMPSON, Jr.
Hospital Administrator


-- --- --- ---~ I __ ___~__~ __ _ __ ___ ~__~ __ ~__ ___


" ---~- --- ~---- -- -i--- ----' --- --- -- ------ - ---- - --- ------- -Y












Thursday, August 30, 1973.


w p S ribuntt
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON. 1.. )UPUCH.PublisherEditor 1903.- 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.t).
Publisher/Editor 191 7.1972
Contributing Editor 1972 -
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972 -
Published Daily Monday to Saturday


Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Thursday, August 30, 1973.


EDITORIAL

The bell tolls


By ETIIENNE DUPUCH
IN ONE of his articles "To The Point" in The Tribune on
Saturday Arthur Foulkes gave an interesting analysis of the
strange even mysterious relationship that exists between
Prime Minister Pindling and his Deputy Arthur Hanna.
Mr. Foulkes should know these two men well. In a fever of
enthusiasm he helped to create the Pindling-Hanna power that is
now well on the way to destroying the breadbasket of a blind,
trusting Balhanian people.
In his article Mr. Foulkes emphasizes an unexplainable
relationship that has existed between these two men ever since
they were students together in England.
In one of his public statements, when he ignored all the other
members of his government, the Prime Minister himself referred
warmly to this student-days relationship and seemed anxious to
emphasize that this was an unbreakable bond.
This statement came at a time when it was generally felt that
Mr. Pindling was seriously thinking of dismissing his Deputy.
You know...it is something strange...it sometimes seems as
though they are bound by a tie that is a dark, deep secret
between themselves...and themselves alone.

People who deal with Mr. Pindling come away with the
impression thai he is an intelligent reasonable, rational man. Mr.
Foulkes himself fell under his spell for a long time.
But when the chips are down Mr. Pindling's apparent
intelligence fades into the background and we find him not only
supporting, but carrying out, radical...and seemingly
irrational...policies that originated in the Hanna corner.

Is this strange relationship motivated by fear?
If so...who is afraid of whomn...and why?
If this is something that goes back to school days in England
then it is something entirely between these two men. But if it is
based in politics...why should this situation arise for Mr. Pindling
whose popularity alone won the last election for his party?
4** ************
There is no doubt about it that, because of his oppressive
policies against expatriates and white Bahamians and their
friends, Mr. Hanna carries weight among the unthinking masses
who like to feel that they are now a master race kicking
foreigners and white Bahamians in the pants.
Is Mr. Pindling afraid of this supposed popularity? How long
will this popularity last when the truth begins to dawn on the
stomachs of the masses'?
Many of our people have declared that they don't care what
happens so long as "we colour" are in charge. Some of these
people are so rabid in their racism that nothing will shake their
deep-seated hatred.
But there is a point at which a great many people...hopefully a
majority...will be shocked into their senses. Hunger is a great
persuader.
But if and when that time comes...where are the men and
women with the experience, strength and ability to save the
country from complete ruin? Have we sunk to the level where the
people will find that they are faced with changing the devil for
the witch?

The first glimmer of light might be filtering into the minds of
many people since Mr. Hanna declared that he was against any
move to increase wages...in spite of the fact that the cost of living
has spiralled alarmingly.
Even the dullest minds among our people must have been
startled by the revelation that the government's payroll is now
S50 million, which is about half the nation's total annual revenue.
It is because of this shocking situation that Mr. Hanna is now
taking cover.

Maybe people will begin to realize that the money well is
drying up...fast.
Labour unions are demanding higher wages from industry and
at this time Mr. I lanna has made it clear that the government is so
"deep in the mire" that it cannot afford to support any policy for
increasing wages.
*>|k* 4ul(* ** ** I
This is serious...very serious...because the government is faced
with only a few alternatives.
Does this mean that government will have to start pruning its
staff...which is loaded with family and friends of some
politicians...and thereby further swell the ranks of the
unemployed'?
I was at the Immigration Department some time ago and just
about everybody I spoke with there was either a Hanna or had a
Ilanna connection.
a Does this mean further taxation in a desperate effort to stave
off the inevitable?
You will ask, of course, what I see as the inevitable.
The inevitable in this situation is a steady decay on all fronts
and...short of a miracle...ultimate collapse at all levels.
The signs are everywhere to be seen. The revelation made by
Mr. Hanna is nothing more than an alarm bell.
As we all know, the construction industry is dead. This has
thrown thousands of highly paid skilled men out of work. Some
of them haven't had a job for two to three years.
I met the wife of one of these men in a food store in Nassau
recently. She told me that her husband had been out of work for
over two years.
In reply to mv question as to how she managed, she said that
she "cooked things at home to sell".
This is a worthy enterprise but, as the money market grows
tighter, the number of her customers will fall off too.
Figures of tourist arrivals show a small increase in the overall
total. But there has been a big drop in air arrivals. The total figure
has been sustained by a large increase in tourist ship arrivals.
These people have very little money to spend. The spenders come
by air. Tourists who arrive by ship are on an all-paid package deal,
most of which stays with the ship. They have little or no -
money to spend in the shops in the island.


PShe (ritbtt


Royal So

TilHE EXAMINATION
results for the canadiates who
were successful in the Royal
Society of Arts Examination
which was held in May are as
follows:
ARITHMETIC STAGE I
Saint Augustine's College
Maria Armaly, passed with
Credit; Mispah Dames, pass
MATHEMATICS STAGE I
Saint Augustine's College
Oscar Phillips. passed:
Stephanie Anne Marie
Rahming, passed: Charles
Russell. passed; Godfrey
Waugh, passed.
SHORTHAND STAGE I
50 W.P.M
Saint Augustine's College
Phyllis Albury, passed;
Sabrina Lunn, passed. Frances
Southard, passed; Gail
Strachan, passed.
SHORTHAND STAGE I
60 W.P.M.
Saint Augustine's College
Maria Armaly, passed;
Sherrine Johnson, passed:;


Paulette Percentie, passed.

SHORTHAND STAGE 11
80 W.P.M
Saint Augustine's College
Sherrine Johnson, passed
ENGLISH LANGUAGE
STAGE 1
Bahamas Academy
Valeria Brooks, passed;
Charles Darville, passed: Joseph
Gaskins, passed: Vaden Higgs,
passed; Sandra .Lowe, passed,
Glendamae Rolle, passed;
Winifred Rolle, passed: Julian
Russell, passed; Pandora Wells,
passed; Virginia Zonicle, passed
Saint Augustine's College
Teresita Baker, passed;
Valdrina Brooks, passed;
Carolyn Carroll. passed; Joan
Rolle, passed; Renee Smith,
passed.
ENGLISH LANGUAGE
STAGE II
BAHAMAS ACADEMY
Lorna Alexander, passed;


city exam results


Lynn Antonio, passed. Valeria
Brooks, passed: Charier
Darville. passed with
distinction: Sandra Turnquest,
passed. Pandora Wells, passed.
ENGLISH WITH LITERATURE
STAGE I
Saint Augustine's College
Mispah Dames, passed:
Carolyn Carroll, passed:
Christopher Eldon, passed:
Caroline Hamilton, passed;
Ruth Major, passed. Raymond
Sherman, passed.
SPANISH STAGE I
Bahamas Academy
Lynn Antonio, passed with
credit (oral only ): Charles
Darville, passed (Oral only).
Joseph Gaskins, passed (Oral
only); Edward Taylor, passed
(Oral only): Sandra Turnquest,
passed (Oral only):Pandora
Wells, passed with credit (Oral
only)

Saint Augustine's College
Valdrina Brooks, passed
with Credit (Oral only);
Janette Davis, passed with
Credit (Oral only);: Julia Lloyd,
passed (Oral only); Linda
Darnell Pinder, passed (Oral
only): Stephanie Rahming.
passed with Credit (Oral only);
Charles Russell, passed with
Credit (Oral only); Sandra
Russell, passed with Credit
(Oral only); Linda Woodside.
passed (Written onlyv.
EXTERNAl CANDIDATtES
Urban Miller, passed (oral
only).
ENGLISH LANGUAGE
STAGE II
Saint Augustine' College
Donna Bethell. passed with
distinction- Valdrina Brooks, I
passed, Janette Anne Davis,
passed; Ruth Major, passed;
Oscar Phillips, passed;
Stephanie Rahmiing. passed:
Joan Rolle, passed: ('harles
Russell, passed: Sandra Russell,
passed; Arlene Sasso, passed:


/0 Something else has happened that seems strange.
The other day I noticed a building being erected in wood on
the back road to the airport. The structure was not only of wood
but it seemed very frail. I was told that this was a government
building, probably a school.
Is this type of construction cheaper than stone'?
If it is cheaper it must mean that the government is now
reduced to the point where it is pinching pennies.
If not....is it because one of the Square Deal boys had
something to sell?
Whatever the reason...experience in this termite-ridden country'
has shown that it is folly to build anything in wood.
And, of course, the hospital expansion job has bogged down.
When Health Minister Loftus Roker embarked on this
undertaking he trumpeted the belief that his government had the
money to do the job.
If so...why has this work bogged down'?

The public needs answers to many questions that,
unfortunately, the opposition are not asking.
But one thing is now crystal clear. It is that Minister of Finance
Arthur Hanna, who now controls the public's purse strings, lhas
sounded the warning bell.
Remember the poem by Donne For Whom hie Bell Toll, '
He tells you not to ask for whom the bell tolls because...it tolls
for you!

FOOTNOTE TO HISTORY: I record scraps of casual
conversations I have with people as I move from place to place.
both in the Bahamas and abroad.
All of it so far has been pessimistic.
Recently I met a Bahamian in the airport in Nassau who was
bubbling over with enthusiasm.
He came up to me with hand extended. Hle knew me. I didn't
know him. But he appeared to be most friendly. It was obvious
that he was pleased to see me.
He reminded me that years ago he had won a prize in a Tribune
competition. This must have been a long time ago because he said
he had been living in the U.S. for 27 years.
No...he was not an American citizen. lie felt that lie had been
wise in not changing his nationality.
Hle didn't appear to be very prosperous and so I asked him
what he did for a living in the U.S. lie did not answer this
question. Instead, he told me his plans for the future.
"Man," he said, "I am surprised to see how Nassau has
changed." He swung his arms outward to point to the airport as
an example of growth. "This place is booming. Money is
everywhere. I am coming back home."
"What do you plan to do here?" I asked. "Have you any family
in Nassau'?"
"Yes," he said, "my mother lives in a shack in Grants Town
but we have plenty land on Eleuthera. I plan to raise cattle on our
land."
This will be a very good thing. If he raises cattle and cultivates
the land he will at least have food for his family...when the bell
tolls.
In this equable climate a family can survive as long as it has
food in the pot.

Here's an amusing bit on government efficiency(?)
Several years ago I pulled down a small house I owned on Bay
Street. The lot is still vacant.
This house had been hooked up to the government's water and
sewerage service.
When the house was pulled down I wrote the department a
letter infonning them that this service would no longer be
required.
Periodically I still receive a statement from the department
informing me that the current consumption for the past thirteen
weeks of the-house-that-no-longer-exists was nil; that there was
no water charge; and that there was no sewerage charge.
The statement ends by making this entry: "Total amount due
00."
How long does it take for a government to get a fonner
customer's name off the books?
This kind of thing is a waste of somebody's time in the
department...a waste of paper...and, worse still, a waste of my
time.
I have a lot of free time these days...but, even so, I have no
time for foolishness.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
Today is yesterday's pupil. --FRANKLIN


Linda W, 'odside pde sscd
EX I F RNAL (CA \1)
DA TES.
Ruth Ilephurn. passed leCIn
Livingstone. passed
1YPl1WRIIN(,
SI A(;I 1I
Saint Augustine' College
Maria ArmalI passed.
Teresita Baker. passed. Donna
Bethell. passed. Deborah Ann
Carew. passed. Vi,_tor (Carroll.
passed; David Dean. passed.
Sabrina Lunn. passed. Kimi
Outten. passed, Rcnee Smith,
passed Frances Southard.
passed. Paula Sandiland,
passed. ;Godithr Waugh.
passed
EX 1 RNAL C ANDIDA IT S
Cynthia Cartwright. passed.
Yvonne Strachan. passed with
Credit
FYPEWRI TINC,
STAGE 11
BAHAMAS ACADEMY
Lynn Antonio passed.
Saint Augustine's College
Maria Armnaly, passed: Paula
Sandiland, passed'
BOOK-K-I PING(
ST AGE I
I \Il R\ \L CANDIDIAITS
Ruth Hepburn, passed
Deborah Balfour, passed
ACCOUNT tING
STAGE II
EXTI RNAL CANDIDATETI
Anne Kiddle. passed
STATISTICS
STAGE II
EXTERNAL CANDIDATES
Gaynell Nicholls pass.


iHISTORY TO A


By The Associated Press
Today is Thursda). August 30th,
the 242nd day of 1973. There are
123 days left in tile year.
Highlights in history\ on this
date
1971 Anti ,,vernlment
candidates make substantial gains in
South Vietnam elections for new
Lower oIvluse. tbut overnmnienlt
maintains comfortable majority
1963 The so called "Ilot line"
between Washington and M stOM ow
desipied to reduce the risk of
accidental war g"es in to
operatlim Kenneth Abralhas. \who
alleged he wa-s abduitled froin
Bechuanaland 1bh South Afric.an
police. Is released.
1960( last GerlIall\Il Ilposes
partial blockade t' Berlin.
1957 All African federal
etXCutive counllCIl is forinled ill
Nigeria.
I1 5 1-oreign ministers ,of
Britain., Greece and Turkey meet in
.London o nl the Cyprus aind I it
Mediterranean problems.
1953 Hungary and Yugosl.i\ i
rtesule diplomatic relntilons
1951 I:.S. and the Philippines
sIIIn a mutual defense pact.
1945 U.S (Ien. Doi td .
MacArthur arrives in Japan 1to si st I
up occupation headquarters.
1944 Russian forces enter
hucharest. Romania.
19.12 N.i/i erllnll o (;lering i. s
chcted President of t ennmiti i
ReichstIMag
1928 itdenpendenite l India
league is tIrnied in lidi.l.
1914 (;erni. n ories l.ike
.Almiens in I rince during World \\. ir
I.
1898 Anglo-German.ll setre
.greenmlei il l future of AI ric. ,l
territories of I'ortugal. swsierr'ie
Britain is to obtain lease utf Delaoa
Bay and (Germany is to receive parts
to Mozinambique and Angolaa.
185 I (iompul.sor tiuIian
(litholic education begins in
Ield aii state schliools.
1862 Tile 'olifederates ire
%ictorious in the second hatt e I
Bull Ruiin in Virginia during ihe
Aintriit .ail Civil War.
10,8 Under British i pressure.
I rench withdraw troops trumn
Portugal.
I1780 Btenedict Arnold ll.ikes
scret pronisi ito Blritisi t,
surrender American fort ait est
Point. New York.
1757 IRussians defeat Prussians
i (Gross Jagerndorf, I aistl GCenri:il
a.ind subsequent\ occtup\ I ast
Prussia.
1655 iCharles X of Sweden
takes Wvarsaw, Poland.
1645 I uitc h and Anmericii
Indians make treaty of peatc .it
New Amsterdam.
1640 Scots capture Ne\\wcastle,
I nglaind, from British force.
1528 Irenchi army capitulates
ait Aversa and is suhsequiiently
expelled from Naples and (cenoti ill
Italy.
1526 Suleiman I Siultan ol
iUrke,. defeats IHungarian ,rin\ .11
Battle ofMohac.s. at which I mils II
Sitl Hungar is killed.
I', days birthdays. Margueri ie
Itelauny. naroolle l)e Stial.
I rench Author (1687 1750). Mar.i
W. Shells. British Author
(1797-18SI). Ernest Rutherford.
Britishi Scientist ( 187 I 1937)
luey Pierce I ong. meritt an
politician (1893 1935): ) filedd
Oueen of Greece, Anne Marie
(1946--): Shirley Booth. American
actress (1907--).
Thought for today The one
person who has more illusions than
tie dreamer is thie maln of tion
.O(scar Wilde. Irish winter
(1854-1905).
KIDNAPPERS RELEASE TWO
ASKED S5 MILLION RANSOM
BLtl NOS AIRES. t!(;d 29 (.\'P)
A government official's wile and
daughter of an Argentine industrial
were released by kidnappers today.
but it was not know if all\ ransom
was paid. police sources said.
Reportedly a five million dollar
ransom m waS sought by a gang i of
men and women %iwho abducted
20-year-old Mercedes Sola at a
plush suburban country club on
Sunday. The official's wife. Mabel
M. De Lagoniarsino, waIs held
hostage by armed men who entered
her house in Ramos Mejia to the
west of thie capital Tuesday. After
robbing the house, they took along
Mrs. Lagomarsino and later
demanded a ransom from her
husband, an official in the Ministry
of Public Services.


FAMILY ISLANDERS WHO WIN


I a ll tI ,in . .. i- ..
being r nt :. :;- it
attend S ni : 11:. ..
Nes\ lr> l n Pils;d
pert onn ; c . -
J tl II I ( f I .

hb\ llthe \inisr't, I ;
.anid ( ul itr
St id. Its ar iv
111 to N[ dvsaL1 as .1 if ,t
p1 Issil lc, :.i;diiI r'prt i i t .
licadte', hll i as \\1\ as p ,N I .L
their bith ctll nr n. "
ILJ ihI llan s Jni .'ri r
.videtli..' e t the '. ,
til tc l111v ft el stlrlt .i
I following .r i th a. h 1 1
' Ci sttuldc lts \L h !lIN '1 *
,I.w ardeit d s lh!,,11snh !"-
(' ( S\ 1, I I \i ,
SI Nm )R 111 ,
I hers, \ ljC : I", I ;1-,!1
RI'k. Andris
Pail nick l.i .. A rthir'i 1, ;, ,
(Catl Islind
St h I 1 11 .in 1 ( ;
D)'adidiian's ( a l ngI l!.I l k
I)e.-\c i An ( h I1tic \t < -,
I oo\n. \nIii s n I
( roper i impc'' I [i'\ *,
Abia o. I h'liih ( n ', '
)oplper's I n *\bh. h
K ay l i .l. I'c I
W illiams I aI ni I \tina I
Ruthl Gi(!het. Ness lIn'ht
( 't I slliul d > we lk I' C ', I
Hiirnt Rock. \ndins.
I'sthwIlln' Mcl ntos hi. t ,I
I s\vw n \ l'1co .ln reIc
M kultrie, I,.imui
MaydeniL P'i:d.'td r tligh R,..k,
( ;riand HBahaii
FI elni k In Rt r.ts. Ilh h h R,,k
( Randd Hl, i.n i S ndrlri R',!e.k
I ligh Rock X\ndr, M\til
Rolle, Pormpt Ki A\ k ii.
V rliene Ruslcl. I'iO\ Ivrn .
Abaco.
Ila,'el Siindlcrs. .ihl l \I i!


SCHOLARSHIPS
1 I. ,, (',!..'i I.h m \t iil .,rd
s ,. l r t ,n \ I, P| ',, nt .

S.. I II igi Ro. k.
.? I .f'd I i iu npson.


\ '; ;. f I lli I \\ il iiiIto ,.
I . li \ ,t \ .khlll
R h i.1.1 \Sr h1 i 'il ,
\ ll r, 1 i ii ( ,it Islandi
( .1 ar, !c \i rd wIg t er,
ltih R k, (,r rand tH ih i


\ ,.' 1 C '1 ( ,1i rI \\ r i g o

l)-,i :. iI (In j t. l eand i ,i
\ K ci\ ni!l \\ B al i ) a i ,'
SI 1 I r'hsl.ind \,h
( a I eI
irr; lld l)i\ s i, Ii h R.,,, k

lcrr.>\ Kttnip. Hitgh R,..k
( t .i : ,l i h ll hl o.I
Rondl.ilt'e Mlarshall Orange
i r i'ck ( 'i t Isliand. I red
\It Kett/c L.ong l a \ (\ts,..
tm ld .i I lnil>r M itchell. litli
Ru. -. ('iGjnd Baih i am l-t i !;
,t. ss. N s\v Iighl. (')it ( sliand
lia.sil P inde, t, ih Ru k,
S I, ind Bt h miS i. L: n, Pn, tlt.
t.iai, mi In iII l'to I le lth,0 II




IIR nlL i R utcli'u. .adin is




a it [ KC 1)i L Ni ot l itia
( l.i lm i mg Isl., nd. ii i'
R ol \d %1'r l. Newg la ( .'..
\ Ilr" > ( n ra r RIl f
\ I le i,i I'DI I N\sdr si, i
1 lih I l Sn tlh Ila '.."
V\ 'i,,lni Stlrachain. ( liien e
I i)',. *' 1 i ._' Isl ni l
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I h'
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GOOMBAY SPECIALS





Slacks values up to...


$25 now $6!
sizes 28-32 only




A number of suits,
jackets and shirts,
reduced for clearance
at

50 %off !





DISTINCTIVE
SHOP

Marlborough Street, opposite the
Sheraton-British Colonial Hotel


I I' I I I











~ht Thursday, August 30, 1973.


The Austin Maxi has got a lot inside

IF YOU ARE PL \ pNIN(, ON BlYIN(, a station aigon, but have second thoughts about Ih
purchasing one mainly because, wour famil is too small or vour driveway can't accommodate one, @0 BsAyt ,,01 RIG PA
then the onIly solution to your problems is the new Austin Ma\i I 750 or 1500, the new Maxi that
. -- - 1,_ . .


Ifromi the N1side, tic Ma\i
still looks l I s much like it
always did. But, after a lot of


A a i . yo. j I
A > M4,v 1, .,,tr-,, -t ,-
vle -^"3


By STANI 1Y JOHNSON
NEW YORK (A'P) Stifling
heat gripped much ()I t the east
coast and midwest Wedncsday.
bringing on another 5 per cent
voltage cut in New York state,
scattered curtailments of auto


th iight alld hi ildi w .i itt i as
dis Oe c t l lit i li i.' r lly
could not inip ,te' oni( tleI


productiL n a ind ;1ir pollution
problem s ii tie' Washinliptoii-
Balillaiorre alcli
l.vcn iIn the re tlatiely ci (ol
Piacilic i n tl west. a severe
drought lowered hydroelectric
production, and Oregon (;ov


ENTIRELY NEW DECOR
pins PRISCILLA ROlINS
', EDI' E McENZIE & THE CITATIONS
Continuous dancing except Thursdays
fro, j10 p.m. until ...
Cantonese Dining, Tasty Snacks frorn 7 p.in
NO CO',ER, NO MINIMULiV,
BRITANNIA BEACH HOTEL PARADISE ISLAND


pi't'pea.inl,e it the car vCer
mu hI l apart Ir(ii a few little
things, like a new grille, new














..








MIDWEST
loi MIi (Call called for a
solh ntr.i\ 10 per cent cut in
pOt'el i|S'
In i response, Portlanid
tele ision station K(;W IV
i1o Ied its daytlione newss
(opratiolnsl' outdoors I lite
stating C mstimated it sied .35
kil watt lihours dail hy usingig
nal ural light
I lic p)wc'i criiss was most
se iou s iin \Ne'w York state.
whlicec temperatures soaring
intl lic '),, made for a massive
use I'or ,i seCco d da i In a row, a
5 p,'r ctlii voltage cut was in
el Ite l as deCnaii d renmaiile'd at
ici'id1.ui peaks. The state power
pool Mn'et a demand 'luesdas
loh 20, .2 ,,000 kilowatts,
lighest in history and said it
expected demand to go still
higliel
general l Motors reported
that operations at its Linden,
N.J.. plant were curtailed as
somenic f the 1750 workers left


nas just recently been introduced on the market


fhlr ic s beca i-Of' thC heat. e




CHEVY NOVA


S Only A Few Left!
























Factory fresh, 2-door and 4-door, all equipped with radio,

air conditioning, automatic transmission, power brakes.



Finance and Insurance Available






I* ** TR
IIMB1B


THOMPSON BLVD. opposite DAVIS STREET just WEST of COCA-COLA -
PHONE 5-6739 P.O. BOX N3741


with silver chrome strips
running both sides and across
all four doors.
The interior of the car
features a rich new deep pile
carpet running throughout the
car, mould and shaped to fit
tight. A new redesigned fascia
finished in walnut veneer but it
is scratch proof, and doesn't
need polishing. All the dials
and controls have been


repositioned so you
dials at a glance an(
switches without str


can see the
d reach the
etching.


wheel trim, and the odd new
door catch.
If they had changed the
shape of it they would have
made the car less practical, and
that would have made it less of
a Maxi.
The Maxi now has
deep-padded seats with a two
inch back-rest to give more
comfort all around.
Because all the seats are
adjustable the Maxi will
quickly convert into a different
kind o! car. It has plenty o)t
roini for five people and l'jts
of space at the back i'or
luggage. If you remove the rear
parcel shelf, it'll take more.
With the back seat folded
forward, you've got yourself an
estate big enough to take
anything from a chest of
drawers to a pram or
liwnrnower. You can also drop
all the seats back and they
formi a full-si.zed double bed.
making the Maxi a sleeping car
which could become useful it
iou ever gel stuck for
iaccominoda tion.
('HOI('E
Just in case you're engine
C11SCIsioUs you now have a
choice. A new Maxi with the
pivoven 1500 c.c. engine or a
new Maxi with a new 1750 c.c.
Both engines are built for
c~,onoiny reliability.
Only now with 1750, there
is much more power and
acceleration. This new engine
develops 84 blip at 5,000 rpin
and will take you from 0-60
lust in 13.9 seconds.
Whichever engine you
choose, you'll get a new
id-operated gearshift along
with it. This rod-operated box,
coupled with a new short
gaitered racing stick, gives
smooi)th and positive changes,
with maximum 'fuel' in all
gears. But yet it still has the
fainous Maxi overdrive fifth
gear to help you save fuel on
longer runs.
The car is strong and ngid
with long life built into the
body design. It is smooth and
has clean lines with a spacious
interior. Combined with the
new "British" look are new
safety standards and excellent
road performance.
The Maxi also has its own
distinctive grill badge and the
entire exterior has the look of


l -dUt- d andu sminallier ano
easier to handle.
The interior also feature
fully r'., hning front seats, rear
bench seat f()lds back or
forward to make a double bed
()r extensive luggage
comnpart ment
These handsome Austin
Maxi models iarte available at
NASSAl' M O)(R COMPANY
LIMI Te I) ,,n last Shirley
Street.


B





I I|
B aHc Mcj

N[ ISI VION HO


SPECIAL

AUSTIN 1300 ESTATE


"doubles up on space"





5-




b -.lii ^


I


L


I





I.*


AVAILABLE IN STANDARD& AUTOMATIC
AT AT
$2892 $3174


INSTRUMENTS
The car's instrument panel
contains a full set of switches
and instruments all of which
are clearly marked. The
switches are grouped together
in a related sequence and their
functions can be easily picked
out at night.
Parts that make up the
instrument panel are. :A
speedometer with a mileage
recorder, water temperature
and fuel gauges. Warning lamps
to show low oil pressure and
fuel gauges, headlamp and
mainbeam flashes.
There is also a new steering
wheel with a new two spoke
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Thumndy, August 30, 1973.


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COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 1973
*IN THE SUPREME COURT No. 19
Equity Side

NOTICE
THE QUIETING TITLES ACT, 1959

The Petition of Anna Edwards in respect of :-
ALL THAT Tract of land situate Six hundred
and Twenty-eight (628.00) feet Southeastward
of Blue Hill Road in the vicinity of Seven Hills
in the Southern District of the Island of New
Providence and said to contain Four and Eight
hundredths (4.08) acres which said tract of land
is bounded on the NORTHWEST by vacant land
but said to be the property of the Estate of Dr.
C. R. Walker and running thereon Six hundred
and Thirty-five and Fifth-four hundredths
(635.54) feet on the NORTHEAST by vacant
land and running thereon Three hundred and
Thirty-eight and Eighty-seven hundredths
(338.87) feet on the SOUTHEAST by vacant
land now or formerly said to be the property of
the Estate of Rupert Dean and running thereon
Six hundred and Forty-four and Forty-five
hundredths (644.45) feet and on the
SOUTHWEST by a Reservation for a Road
Thirty (30) feet wide leading to Blue Hill Road
and running thereon Two hundred and
Ninety-six and Seventy-five hundredths (296.75)
feet.
Anna Edwards claims to be the owner in fee
simple in possession of the parcel of land
hereinbefore described and the Petitioner has made
application to the Supreme Court of the Bahamas
under Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959
to have her title to the said land investigated.

Copies of the filed plan may be inspected at:-
(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court
(b) The Chambers of the undersigned.
NOTICE is hereby given that any person having
dower or a right to dower or an adverse claim or
a claim not recognized in the Petition shall before
the 18th day of September, 1973 file in the
Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the
undersigned a statement of his claim in the
"prescribed form, verified by an affidavit to be filed
therewith. Failure of any such person to file and
serve a statement of his claim on or before the
18th day of September, 1973 will operate as a bar
to such claim.
CALLENDERS, ORR, PYFROM & ROBERTS,
Chambers, Mosmar House,
Queen Street,
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner.


I


Is a 73-year-old


swinger harmless?
DEAR ABBY: I recently became very much attracted
to a gentleman who proudly admits to being 73. He's a
snappy dresser and is full of fun. I am a middle-aged
woman, but this man leaves me in the dust when it comes
to dancing, tennis, golf, and any other physical exercise
you can name.
He seems very much interested in me. My question: At
his age, is he harmless?
JOYCE
DEAR JOYCE: If you mean what I think you mean, if
he's "harmless" he won't be able to do you any good. But
whether he can do you any good without doing you any
harm will depend on YOUR condition.


DEAR ABBY: You were wrong when you advised
against reporting the fraudulent welfare recipient. If some-
one told you that he had witnessed a robbery, would you
advise him to "judge not"?
Welfare agencies welcome legitimate complaints, and
each complaint is objectively investigated. The complainant
may remain anonymous if desired, and his name is never
revealed to the client. However, vague statements such as,
"I know 10 people on welfare who drive Cadillacs and have
$1,000 in the bank," are stupid and useless. A person mak-
ing such a comment usually cannot name a single person
who even comes close to that description. Complaints
should be as specific and factual as possible.
We find that most complaints are not well-founded be-
cause the complainant is trying to "get back" at the recipi-
ent, or that he has drawn a wrong conclusion by not know-
ing all the facts in the case. But it is worthwhile to investi-
gate each complaint.
If fraudulent and ineligible cases can be eliminated
from the welfare roles, more resources will be available to
help those who are truly in need, and the burden will be
lighter on Mr. Taxpayer.
WEST VIRGINIA SOCIAL WORKER


DEAR W. V. S. W.: Thank you for your fair and helpful
letter. Your answer was much better than mine. I believe
all witnessed crimes should be reported, but encouraging
every American to "inform" on his neighbor for an as-
sumed wrongdoing would lead us uncomfortably close to
becoming a police state, and that I abhor.
DEAR ABBY: I get so riled up when I read those
pathetic letters signed, "Neglected Mother," or "Forgotten
Father." They are from old folks who are not wanted by
their children. Abby, I wonder if they have ever stopped to
ask themselves why?
One day, many years ago, I came home from work and
found my four children watching TV. When I poked my head
into the room, they didn't even say hello. I was hurt and
angry. Then I said to myself: "You fool! If you can't make
yourself more interesting than that damned TV set, it's
your own fault."
I admit, I used a bit of bribery in the form of pepper-
mint candy and a few minor toys, but within a few days
when I entered the house, there were hoots and hollers:
"Daddy's home!"
Old people should consider that their loneliness could be
caused by themselves. Many are excused for being difficult
because of their age. Why? No one has a right to be
difficult whether he be young or old. Old age doesn't give
one the license to complain all the time [we all have
troubles], to talk all the time and reminisce too much
[other people like to talk about themselves, too], or to
expect constant attention.
Old people should make an effort to be good company.
They should also have a hobby, so they can enjoy being
alone.
I am 60 years of age, and if I grow old and nobody
comes to see me, I hope I am wise enough to realize it's 99
per cent my own fault. CHARLIE IN ROME
DEAR CHARLIE: Loneliness for you? I'll bet against it.


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Thursday, August 30, 1973.


VETERAN BAHAMIAN TEACHER & NATIONAL ANTHEM COMPOSER LOOKS BACK TO 'GOOD OLD DAYS'


It was tough, but dedicated teachers laid firm foundation for nation, says Timothy Gibson


IN A MODERN BAHAMIAN
teacher for each subject.
I it c e tealc Sers i re .ail'd
t] iII t i

,1 i i. I nI i ) h i ( fI h Is t hI
', .il' l' l t lh i BI ll l h t 1. 1 r ','
\,ii iii iil A hettIt ,i nJ i d
w, lutl s hdd nll t C IIrt
,LosI i ll I lwlns all of1 t it l luit

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1 ii i It ii ll h i l


By DONITA ROLL
CLASSROOM. in most cases beyond the primary level, there is a


stipulaltilon as It h)ow manll l
students should bhe in i a gade.
It wert accoirditig to lthe
n mlihn cr (1 students iI that
particular school
"( Of course said Mr
(;bson, '"if the sclhoo(l was
argc tlihen tile clawsss would he
lArtg' But it the school' was,
mll.il their Llasstes were sinall
IlHRIl R's
ir (ih,somi and his ,.asinutes
were taght the three R's
i't.dig ng 'rtii and rithimetic
I heL ,urri-ulunl alsio incluuded
hItiory, getg!tji| agrit culture,
i1" g-.ihie '. N1 t1n)l re. drawing,
ilis" t tiItd in 'ti'e cl ases
Ix''kk'eiing
Ih ie ,llh,, systetim, at that
t eI', I .C lled !or j one b(h ok
"st'CI s t r ecdh subicct t-ior
instn1cL I hec Ro'val Reader
lcI t took nscriL,1 ( 1-7) was, used
I to' t ch I nghiis t o all grades
In It hllmet w s taughI ffronit
I he I o( I t II s J uL nIor
\rithllI tl (ook ,,k
l1 e s'iool -\tlla.i us did not
"\i t-t ir ti ulanr ai tivities
d(lutring those S cLool ]days"
"Butl we made tune tor them


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1973
\Nt, 17


NOTICE

I) the heirs o(f Lewis Philip Arthur
\Vecvehurchli Bruee Altred Newchurch and all
ail\ cise ,laii ants.

Ilillni i Adderlev of W'iltl Roa;d. Nassau. Biallhin .is.
claimts to be llie i owner io the uiinticumbered tIc
si (ple o' I Al tII Alt piece o)r Iparcel < I land silwuitc
2,5 I'eel itor ei oI, lss iistl o K iiip Road in the
Islnid 1 New 1'iM)ildence IIloindcd Nortlihwardl)
Ih\ ,.irious i)tccuti nts I astiwv rdlyv b land said to he
the proipcrt\ oil m oe goods Southwardly partly by
Illl Ri i ttl jaid aiiitl' h\ vsituiiis occutlpalts ;iind
\ s l;dl\ |Irl\ by l .anld lie llroperty of the said
Ilill'An AddeCrlc\ and partlly h \irionis occupants.
111ttl l is applied i th lic ( iurt to ILavC his title to
siJch lilnd iiin'slitrl'.itd undlcr sweliom 3 of 1 lie
(.)liet n' l it les AtI.
( opw,'s o( the plan tiled herein imay hc inspected at
the R'cistryv of the SItiprerite ('i urt and at the
oiIe0 oil Richard .1. B. ( 'irrt. Attorney lor tthe
PIe liiI icif l l B1i\' Strcl., Najssau. tk laiiiau s.
Am person lia'n doer cIr oa rili toL dower or an
adverse claiin shall bheorc 31st Aiugust, 1973 file
in lthe Supreliie ( ourt and serle on the Petitioner
or lis itl ni\ a statellcient'i ot Ils claim in the
press, iied Iorirm enried KI ,in affidavit to he filed
threw ilII.
Iiili ,e ot(f n\ su cl per's n to file and serve a
staitelment ol his claim on or before the 31st day of
Sn\i;'lsl. ()7 1 will operate ;is a i- bar to sIch claim.
1LI-(ION A)DDU*RLI Y
PetitioIner


before school in the morning,
at recess time and after
school" said Mr Gibson.
O(h yes." said Mr. Gibson
with a nostalgic, smile, "we
played rounders, baseball and
we danced. Oil' there was loads
of dancing. We loved ton
dance," he said
Mr Gibson said that learning
music and singing were
necessary parts of school lite in
thwse days.
"Our school inspector, who
I can remember so well," tie
said.'" was an tld I-nglishmlan,
wh o came to the Out Islands.
oice a year to inspect our
schoolwork All of the school
children were afraid of him.
When he came the first thing
that hlie would ask Ius for was ai
song.
Mr Gibson said that they
would spend a great deal of the
school year learning songs that
they felt the inspector would
like to hear.
"I The good thing about
singing," lie said "was that it
eased a lot ofi the tensions
caused by the student's tear of
I fie inspector. It was
psychologically sound to sing.
After all, this iman determined
in a, lot of cases if you would
pass t to tie next grade," said
Mr. Gibson.
KNFW MUSIC '
Mr (Gibson said that all of
the teachers knew music. They
had to know how to read it
and teach it.
"By the time that I was in
my teens," he added, "I could
read any music that was
written.
Mr. G;ibson felt that it was
not fair that an inspector, who
only came to the Out Island
once a year, could determine
the future of Balianian
st uidents,
''lite knew absolutely
nothing about the students."
said Mr (Ihibsion.
However, in some cases, tihe
inspectoi did act on the advice
)Ii the headmaster or class
teacher.
hlie students, in those days,
didn't have to wear uniforms
to school, Nowadays, it's
omp ilsory aind often very
strictly enforced.
"We wore whatever we had,
and "many of the students
never even had shoes to wear
to school," he recalled
"Anyway coining to school
bare footed was a general
thing. Those who came in
shoes were considered the'
uppity kind," he said.
Many of the class mlonitors
never wore shoes, lie said
MONITORS
Monitors, were thliose who
grown out of the classroom
and were selected to help
teach class. Usually they
would be the students who had
successfully passed their final
exam in grade six or seven.
Monitoring was the first
stage of becoming a teacher. A
monitor, if successful, became
a pupil teacher, a student
trainee teacher and, finally an
assistant teacher.
The final step would he
headniastership. Hlow fast you
nt'oved up the teaching ladder
depended upon the availability
of funds from the Board, but
also on your academic
standing.
However, Mr. Gibson said


ij'
-- -





MR. TIM(
that if you were qualified for a
promotion, but there were no
funds to pay you, you had to
remain where you were.
If your academic standards
were high and you passed
certain exams then you were
eligible to come to Nassau for
teacher training at the Boy's
central l School.
This was considered a big
break. The pay scale for
teachers in Nassau was higher
than on an Out Island.
As far as Mr. Gibson
remembers, there were no
expatriate teachers in the out
island schools. The majority of
them were male natives. He
had no fenimale teachers.
School leaving age at that
time was sixteen. If by that
age the student had not
completed the last grade, he
wasn't always put out of
school. It was just customary
for the student to leave on his
own and learn a trade.
Woodwork and sewing were
also a part of the curriculum so
that if the student was not
academically inclined he could
work with his hands.
PASSED) OUT
There was no elaborate
graduation ceremony like
schools have now. You simply
"passed out" Report cards
were not given out.
"In fact," said Mr. Gibson,.
"the idea of report cards never
came to the Out Islands until
1930 or 1940 "
Although many older people
say that this generation of
students is thie worst, Mr.
Gibson said he could not
whole-heartedly support ihat
accusation.
"I can certainly say that
students had less distractions in
those days, especially on the
Out Islands." he said.
"But I really can't say that
there was an era when students
were more disciplined or
showed more attention."
"You'll always find those
students who are just not
interested in school." he said
"You'll find this in all
schools throughout all years.


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OTHY GIBSON
Each era has its share of what I
call dead wood," he said.
Mr. Gibson did, however,
praise the discipline of his
school days.
SILENCE
"Sometimes when one
passed a classroom, they never
knew for sure that students
were in the room unless they
looked in," he commented.
lie said that there was
almost one hundred percent
parent to teacher co-operation.
"I feel the parents really
knew what going to school on
an out island was all about,"
Mr (;ibson said.
"In those days there was
only one school on each
settlement. If a student was
expelled from that one, he had
no place else to go. Today,
especially in Nassau, there are
many schools and students
stand the chance of
transferring."
In the good old days
students would think twice
before telling parents they
were beaten by a teacher. They
knew that would mean another
beating from mother or father.
Parents always took side of the
teacher. So that if a teacher
beat a student it had to be for
a good reason.
In those days there was no
Parents Teachers Association
(P.T.A.)
In sminall settlements,
everybody knew everybody. In
a lot of cases Mr. Gibson's
for example students were
related to teachers. But this
never made school life easier
for the student. In fact things
were rougher.
TEACHERS
"My brother, Mr. C. 1.
Gibson. a former headmaster
on Long Island and C'at Island;
and one of my first cousins
were my teachers. I got more
beatings from them than did
the other students," said Mr.
Gibson.
"In those days you got a
beating (one cut in your hand,
for comining late. When I came
late, I thought that my big
brother would let me off, but


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instead he gave me four cuts,"
said Mr. Gibson.
"There was no headmaster's
office so you got your cuts in
front of the class," he said.
In some schools today,
corporal punishment is still
employed.
"There are some diehards
who beat and overdo it," Mr.
Gibson said, "others have
abandoned corporal
punishment and adopted other
means of punishment.
"But maybe it's not always
good to spare the rod and spoil
the child," he chuckled
At 70 years, Mr. Gibson is a
former educator (teacher and
headteacher), musician,
songwriter, composer.
husband, father and
grandfather. The son of
Evangeline and David Gibson
of Tarpum Bay he taught at
Scrub Hill, Long Island, was
acting headteacher at
Sandilands School, George
Town School, Exuma, Tarpum
Bay Eleuthera and the Western
Junior School, Nassau.
His wife is the former
Rosena Hilton and they have
three daughters and seven
grandchildren. He moved to
Nassau from Eleuthera in
1938.
He is looked up to by many
Bahamians who lift up their
heads to the rising sun. He is
the composer of
"Bahamaland," the Bahamas
national anthem.
While looking back over his
school days Mr. Gibson
expressed a sincere
appreciation for his
educational experiences:
"When I look back fifty


years ago, I could have nothing
short of a deep and abiding
sense of respect and admiration
for those dedicated teachers,
who though poorly equipped,
academically and


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professionally, gave willingly o(
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firmly rests the structure of
our present educational
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WESTINGHOUSE


LAFAYETTE DEPT. STORE
in the International Bazaar
Freeport, Grand Bahama


-SM

K-SE


I I I I '


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Thursday, August 30. 1973


Zhr Tribunt


Camperdown Ranch keeps children


Sin the saddle during holidays


PATRICIA BETHEL.L


11, on Big


Deal, at the Camperdown Ranch.


Elm j


I SOUNDER"
AND AT 7:50 & 11:30
F N CARARCCNOONING "WALKABOUT" P.G.
WFREE- nC
Ao [IRCON D lIE D


Matinee
r


NOW SHOWING
2: 15 & 4 45, Evening 9 "Phone 2-1004,
"MIND-BLOWING SUSPENSE!"


2-1005
I


J k, ALAN HAD-L E ')N HiRfTTTON
S A UNIVERSAL RELEASE TECHNICOLORP PG_- 4
S GG( ST1Dl. FOR AL4 TLRE .1 LUDI.\CFS
PA R t.\7TA I. DISC'RtTIO.N .-D 'ISI).
Reservations not claimed'by 8:45, will be sold
on first come, first served basis


Last Day Friday
I lMatinee starts at 2:
Evening 9:00
"5 FINGERS OF1 DEATH
Hang l.ng PG
Okada
PL US
S"THE SCALPHUNTERS'
Burt Lancaster
S Ossie Dl):vis
PLULS Lite Feature
Friday\ n light
"Phoine 2 2534



NOW S
Matinee Conti"" iois
*Phoi



Ilk









SUG ,G STDFOR
g PAR-VT-I DI
S*SORRYN POA


Last Day Friday
Continuous Showings
from 3:00

APACHEE GOLD" G.
Lex Barker
Pierre Brice


PLUS


"THIEF OF BAGDAD"
Steve Reeves
Georgia Moll


SHOWINGG
s from 2:30. Evening 8:30
ie 3 4666


-.-- .-c TAMARA DOBSON




UNIVERSAL PICTURE TECHNICOLO"
.-I T 'Rl: .4 U'DIF(.'ES
ISCRl:TION .4 DI 7SE'D.


ASSES ACCEPTEIP'


C \\IPI R)DOW\ Ranch,
w hich started out as a small
cl..,ig in the bush on the
property of tPierr DI)upuch t'wo
cars ago, has matured into anll
attractive riding ran ih ith
stables and stall lor at least tk o
do/en horses.
Mrs. Benson M\l)Derimott a
nmcmber of the I astern
I questrnn Societ\ once said.,
"(amperdown Ranch is the
truition ot a dream. Rita Pugh,
(herl P troiii. Bobbh Ptrom,
I t loothe, G(ordon U)'Brien.
Mar, O'Brien, BassellI
Donaldson and Pierre )upIuh.
All horses people. 11A
interested in enclouraging
health sports and interest in
the young All interested in
promoting the marvellous traits
'which horsemanship and horse
and ownership and care instillt
in 5 youngsters
"Pierre made the land
available, plus hours ot his tune
and muscle and brain,"


continued Mrs,. \I )ctinott.
"1 ver\one helped It was a
r -I iInitiit lI tort, w ith t
Ioi niiiiinitt, spirits high. I he
results she added, "'is
( JiIampeidotitn a ', ot see it
todai."
['he iirnIh is equipped w ith at
large Ileared rIding ring
pairtialli en, closed s ith a chain
link teice, and surrounded on
the two other sides bh .a
, oodein raiil t enr e Bleachei
border the so'(ith side ol t iI,
ring, anid part w as .along i
w est side opens tii the '".I"
ring.
Covered redwood stables
stretch aloiing the north side ot
the iniig and include cross-ties
tor w% ashtniir dtownIt horses 1 hi
stables include a separate feed
roomii aind a tack rooiim toi
storing saddles and gear. At the
back ol the main ,stable are halt
a dIeo/ additional stables. each
opening out into its ow% In
corral.
iManl children troim the


, tin ,1H.- i!!t..i lllm 2 -,. h>' i.l fr
I lk I x i 11, o nI Id II
ai ol tit. k I c n'w. ll t'. ,
ret iurnlmr h' m h,,u .lt pl !l !p.il.' i
111 riding .i n j ', t tp the it' j!.tb
h l.ll\ d l l I I
% i ..t his l ld

Bc I I ct II I I I i tI
R iiil i I t.
Sela mon, hr hnh tii i .1 its
Benson [iiatm s ot )andiii
Il l \ I (I 1 K I
S, \ I rd I I .t .. | ;
th ddlcsu ir t di \ g t S hc i,
'onse e .s Hutral ii ,:l .id h i ds .1 a


a l re er II t IaiiipiIoi s
[1\11 \ tio hias been h ide ii.
h o rses -r appiiial' lel, ten
\cars, has mho\ n ipn e "iln.
coinpetitionil at schoi>|, and in \M
the siurrnunding tow ns. She hlas ,11
\won seueral ibbons and holds rai(
a rescr\e cha pitnlship. ,,
"Plau bo is le\\ 's horse .it so
('almn pe rdow n. tl"


At Fx '
s IIhV.uI . K

I, I ,


' a it unt girl at Foxcroft School in
1 .. , ,MId \\hM in w ill
it, e 1 his thud ear .il
I "... ic Q uebec, ( at idh.l
Sf \ i -i -ss illi ,i il .it hi li
' 1 i i ,i I t u t e l I


Middleburg, Virginia,


ill ( an idi as nil t ,is ti di
lite w inlt r m nit 'i I t lie
tiunti\ .
t\ ei ie has Ba k ''led high
l a.I ind i llcg \\ i :,i sa id tie
('oliiliioed on Back Page


"Happy to meet you...




I'm the helpful Banker"


I
I

I

I

I


I
I
I
I
U


"Yu'll find me at any branch



of the Royal Bank"


The Royal i The Helpful Bank
ROYAL BANK
Branches throughout tle Iliri


-ARED
I


I


I
I
I
I
I
. 1





I
U
I
I
I


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r-


*


AIf^ CONDMONED^
rAM^L^ PA R K I ^^G


f












Thursday, August 30, 1973.


he ____ribunt


REAL ESTATE


C11061
ATTENTION doctors if you
are now paying rent on your
office accommodations may
we introduce you to a good
real estate investment at a low
asking price. Situated on a
corner lot in a good area in
Palmdale The lot contains a
two bedroom stone residence
which could easily be
converted into office
accommodations and is selling
at the low price of $25,000.00.
For information call Bill's Real
Estate.
C11053
WESTWARD VILLAS 3
bedroom 2 bathroom, House
completely furnished,
a irconditioned, landscaped
yard, walled all around for
safety, garage and an extra
room with bath and shower for
a general maid. Selling at a low
price of $40,000. Owners
leaving the island. This house
was valued at $55,000 one year
ago. For information call
Neville A. Hanna at Plot Realty,
Company Ltd. P. 0. Box'
N1492, Telephone 22460.
C10973
21t4 ACRES FOX HILL
property, commercial or
r esidential. Suitable for
Subdivision, or business place
with 2 Buildings thereon.
Contact: DAVSON'S REAL
ESTATE AGENCY, Phone
21178 or 55408.
C10888
FOR THE DEPOSIT of $75
you can sucure a 70 x 100 lot
near the sea and a private lake.
All utilities underground. No
interest charges. From $5,800.
Lakefront lots from $7500.
Excellent swimming. Call Pat
Rutherford at 4-1141 or
Morley & O'Brien at 2-4148 or
2-3027 or come to the
YAMACRAW BEACH Model
Home.
C11062
For choice l ots,
commercial property appraisals
auctioneering and property
consultant call C. W. Sands at
Bill's Real Estate 23921.
WE OFFER GOOD PRICES
TO OUR PURCHASED S AND
QUICK ACTION TO THOSE
WISHING TO SELL
Cl11056
FOR SALE IN BLAIR
ESTATE Lot 100' x 150' -
Telephone 31562 or 2-4726
C11063
FOR prompt attention and
good service whether you wish
to buy a home sell or rent call
Mrs. Evans at Bill's Real Estate
23921. We can offer houses in
all price ranges and in all
sections of New Providence at
competitive prices.

C 11066
TOWN PROPERTY has .06
acres. Well cultivated grounds
fruited, house laundry, main
house 2 storeys, about five
bedrooms 4 baths, spacious
sitting rooms, separate dining.
Priced so low it would amaze
you available for showing
anytime for action ring the
action numbers 22033, 22307,
evening 41197.

HILL-TOP GORGEOUS
VIEWS situate Out East. 21/2
level. Enclosed grounds,
swimming pool, patio,
manicured grounds. Spacious 4
bedrooms, plus ground floor
pool room, plus complete one
bedroom 1 bath living quarters.
Suitable large family. Fully
carpeted, Tastefully and
expensively decorated, without
a doubt, one of the best
offerings. If you like high-class
living in a high class area with
high class house, ring us to
view. Above $300,000.00 No
curiosity seekers please. DIAL
DAMIANOS, 22033, 22305,
evenings: 41197.

WESTWARD VILLAS 4
bedrooms 3 baths, furnished,
newly decorated, and of
course, swimming pool. Ideal
for entertaining. Rights to the
beach. Asking $70,000.00 By
appointment.

SHIRLEY PARK 4
bedrooms 2 baths, furnished,
only $50,000.00 High and dry.
DIAL THE ACTION
NUMBERS 22033, 22305,
22307, evenings 41197.

HOUSE MONTAGU HEIGHTS
- three bedrooms two baths,


furnished, enclosed grounds,
selling for a low as $40,000.00
Four Bedroom house, 2 baths,
furnished. Only $35,000.00.
Off Lakeview Ave., three
blocks from Montagu.
DIAL DAMIANOS 22033,
22305, 41197.

SPACIOUS 4 bedrooms 21,2
baths, furnished house, on two
lots of land, Out East. Spacious
pool 38 by 18 plus (Gunite)
Patio. Well built Bahamian
House. All this for only
$70,000.00 Quiet secluded
area.
-


HIGH VISTA Corner
Bay and High Vista modern
house with swimming pool
some views of sea. Only
$55,000.00 See by
appointment. Can finance.
DIAL DAMIANOS, 22033,
evenings 41197.


FOR SALE OR RENT


C10771
3 BEDROOMS, one bath,'
Joanrs Heights. South Beach.
See Philip H. Vargas, West, S.
South-Street on Cornre

FOR SALE OR LEASE

C 10995
FOR SALE OR
LONG TERM LEASE
Fine, elaborately furnished
house at Skyline Heights. Four
bedrooms and baths. Main
rooms designed for
entertaining. Suitable for
diplomatic or executive
residence. 11/2 acres, beautiful
garden planted for privacy.
Phone 77205 or 28162 for
appointment to see.


I FOR RENT
C10677
OFFICE OR STORE SPACE
Charlotte near Bay. Immediate
occupancy, ample parking,
Inquire 4-2017.

C10653
ONE EXTRA LARGE two
bedrooms, two bath, and one
extra large one bedroom
apartment. With large living
and dining all, basically
furnished Victoria Court
Apartments on Elizabeth
Avenue between Shirley arind
Bay Street. Facilities, Phone,
laundry, parking, T.V. antenna,
airconditioned.
Phone 54631 between 8 a in
and 5 p.m.

C10676
LARGE ONE BEDROOM
apartment, nicely furnished.
$250 per month. Call
CHESTER THOMPSON REAL
ESTATE 2-4777-8.

C10652
2 2 BEDROOM APART-
MENTS consisting of living,
dining room, kitchen and
bathroom, basically furnished
Twynam Avenue. Phone
5 8185.

C11014
2 BEDROOM, 1
STUDY/BEDROOM, 2 BATH
HOUSE, SANS SOUCI
FULLY FURN ISHED'
CENTRAL AIRCONDITION-
ING- NICE GARDEN TELE.
21690 before 5, evenings
42295.
C1 1013
TWO BEDROOM furnished
apartment, with phone in Blair.
Phone 32197 six to nine p.m.

C 10962
ONE BEDROOM, furnished
apartment, upstairs Ove'
Buccaneer Inn $180.00
including light & water. For
information call 5-4616 2-408/

C10757
ONE & 2 Bedroom apartments,
Centerville, Ring 5-8679 avk
for Mr. Pritchard.

C10877
COTTAGES and apartment-.
daily, weekly or monthly
airconditioned, fully furnished,
maid service available. Lovely
gardens & swimming pool.
Telephone 31297, 31093.

Cl1052
Unfurnished 2 bedroom
apartments, good location off
Mackey Street. Telephone
5-1758.
C11019
FURNISHED THREE
BEDROOM two bath house ii)
Seabreeze Es t a tes,
air conditioners, telephone,
garage, laundry room,
automatic washer anrd dryer
$400.00 Phone 5-8512

C10980
A THREE bedroom fully
furnished house corner Mount
Royal and Madeira $250.00
per month Call 5-8954
evenings.

C11071
ONE Two Bedroom
apartment, fully furnished
bottom of Sears Rd. Call
34999, evenings.

C 11083
One bedroom apartment, fully
furnished, air conditioned,
wall-to-wall carpeting, laundry,
master TV. Good water
pressure. Off Shirley Park
Avenue. Phone 2-3750 or
5-4684.


C11094
1 Three Bedroom, one bathl
house in Sunshine Park.
$175.00 Pen Month. Phone
5-6801.
C 11078
BACHELOR ROOM in
respectable home with private
entrance. For information call
51044 Palmdale

FOR SALE
C 11068
QUARTER HORSE mare 8
years old excellent condition
for experienced rider or
breeding call 21634 9-5 p.m.
and 41079 after 6 p.m.
C 11025
HOUSEHOLD GOO
INCLUDING BABY CRIB and
mattress, Headboard and Bed
Frame, TV Antenna, Washer
and Dryer, End Tables, Dinette
Set, Rugs. Call 31647.


FOR SALE


C 10986
1973 SUZUKI 50 cc, as new.
Owner leaving Call
2 2125 or 77385

1 10?3
A L L t L t C T R I C
SYVPI WPl IT. R_, i good
Sound ittiO', ire cntIt maintained.
Proce $150 00 0 N.O. Call
2 i /41 2


PETS FOR SALE
C11001
Purebred DALMATIAN
puppies, 8 weeks, had puppy
shots. Males $125, Females
$100. Phone 3-1230, 3-2033.

E BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES-
C 11055
GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY to
own your own business
offered at rock bottom price
souvenirs, ladies & children'
wear Tel 53136 or 31562
after 7 p n.

CARS FOR SALE

C 1069



S/

CentralGarage
l III t / t(VI 1 Iw "l *t \n Sa I( t11 I' ril,
TODAY'S
SPECIAL BU Y

1970 CHEVROLET
IMPALA
$2500.00
1970 CHEVROLET IMPALA $
Also Available
1971 PLYMOUTH s/wagon
white. 1 cdoors, automatic
radio. a: condmitioned, power
steering & brakes a good buy
only $3450.00
1970 FORD CORTINA 4
door sedanr, greon, standard
shift on the hmndile, a good buy
$975.00
1970 CHEVY IMPALA 4
door sedan, aiutomiatic, green
with white- vinyl top, radio,
air conditioned, full power
steering, brakes and windows a
very clean car only $2500.00
1969 TRIUMPH 2000 blue,
4 door sedan, automatic, radio
ar conditioned, reconditioned,
repainted and ne-upholstered
good condition $1475.00
1972 CHEVROLET IMPALA
w/w tyre, radio, air
conditioned, power steering &
brakes, 4 d )ooi sedan,
dutoratic $5875.00
1972 SUNBEAM RAPIER 2
door oupe, automatic, blue
radio price r educed to
$3350.00
!972 CHEVY VEGA 2 door
sedan, radio, aim conditioned,
brown, a good buy $3800.00
FINANCING AVAILABLE
COME IN AND SEE US
Oakes Field near
Police Barracks
Phono 3-471
C11011
AT MOTOR CENTRE
WE HAVE
THE USED CAR
FOR YOU
1969 SUNBEAM RAPIER S/T
radio at ONLY $1,100.00
1970 CHEVY IMPALA A/T
A/C P/S P/B at ONLY
$1,900.00.
1971 HILLMAN S/W radio at
ONLY $1,000.00
1969 RAMBLER S/W A/T
radio P/S at ONLY $1,400.00
1969 TRIUMPH G T. 6 at
ONLY $1,000.00
1970 HILLMAN MINX A/T at
ONLY $1,000.00
1969 M.G. radio low mileage at
ONLY $1,100.00
1971 MORRIS 1100 A/T at
ONLY $1,100.00
MOTOR CENTRE LIMITED
Thompson Blvd.,
Opp. Davis St.,
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone 56739


SECTION


CARS FOR SALE


-....T


C11079



BIG SALE

AT CENTRAL GARAGE


1973 DODGE DART4 DR.
BIG "6" ECONOMY ENGINE, P/S P/B
FACTORY AIR COND., RADIO PLUS
MANY CUSTOM FEATURES

SAVE T $1,OOO
v ', <-; ':-, w .-.'a"n, r a sa ,... .'. ,4"

1973 BRAND AVENGERS

SAVE Tu $500?o


1973 BRAND ROLLS ROYCE

SAVE $3,0000



CENTRAL GARAGE
TELEPHONE 3-4711 THOMPSON BLVD.


I .I.


I MARINE SUPPLIES


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS-FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV. TELEPHONE 21986 EXT. 5


HELP WANTED


I I


1 -i _ _ _ _ _


C10688
PACEMAKER 44ft. Luxurious
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.


. 0-- -- 0 -


C10911
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD
P. 0. BOX 640
NASSAU BAHAMAS
USED CARS
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
2 door auto $1695
1967 CHRYSLER NEWPORT
4 door $950
1968 PONTIAC
STRATOCHIEF $1400
971 VAUXHALL VIVA
4 door Std. $1200
1968 JAVELIN A/C $1200
1970 PONTIAC PARISIENNE
A/C $2400
1968 VAUXHALL VIVA
2 door std. $695
1967 TRIUMPH 1300
Std. $800
1969 VAUXHALL VICTOR
S/W std. $475.00
1973 VAUXHALL VICTOR
S/W $4400
1970 RAMBLER SST
4 door $2100
1969 MORRIS OXFORD
standard $995.

1970 FORD MAVERICK
A/C $2150
1970 VOLKSWAGEN
Standard $1300
1964 CHRYSLER
NFW YORKER $800
1971 FORD CAPRI $1950.
1969 FORp GALAXIE
A/C $1850
1970 HILLMAN MINX
Standard $850
1971 CHEVROLET IMPALA
A/C $3500
1966 MORRIS 1100 $500
Trad-lnsWelcome
Located Oakes Field
Phone 34636-7-8
Opposite the Ice Plant

C10975
1963 FORD TRUCK, Flat
Dump, $1,600. Phone 3-1519.
C10900
1968 CADILLAC convertible,
newly painted, new top, air
conditioned, radio, power
steering & power brakes.
$3,500 cash or nearest offer.
Call Playtours, Mr. MacMillan
or Mrs. Moree 22931 9 a.m. to
5 p.m.



Cl 1064
Having a birthday party
Friends in to dinner? Or would
you yourself like to enjoy
some delicious homemade
breads, cakes and pastries. Call
31340 and place your orders
now for mouthwatering four
layer chocolate cakes, apple,
coconut, pumpkin, and raisin
pies and delicious white and
brown homemade bread.

CARD OF THANKS
C11065
MR. CLAYTON Algreen
husband of Enid Algreen and
all the "Grist Family" wish to
extend to their many friends,
relatives and the public both
here and abroad, their sincere
thanks for all the kind
expressions of sympathy in
cards, letters, telegrams and
floral tributes during their
recent bereavement Special
thanks to Father McKernan of
St. Thomas More's Church,
also Kemp's Funeral Home for
all their cooperation.
Again we say thank you.
CLAYTON ALGREEN
AND THE GRIST
FAMILY

C11076
THE FAMILY of the late Mrs.
Fannie I. Claridge Moore
wish to express their sincere
appreciation for the kind
expressions of sympathy on
the occasion of their recent
bereavement.


READ THE TRIBUNE


4


DUNDAS CIVIC CENTRE
Thursday, Friday and Sunday
August 30th and 31st. and
September 2nd (not Saturday)
Curtain at 8:30 p.m.
Admission $3.00
reserved, $2.50
Tickets obtainable
at Rodgers Sports
Shop, East Bay Street.


C 11006
BARGAIN For Quick Sale,
strong 15 foot boat ideal for
fishing. 20 H.P. Mercury and
Trailer. $700.00, 2-8048

Cl11020
14ft. McKee Craft Whaler, 2-6
gal. tanks, 35 Lhiysle-
Outboard, 2 Anchors with
50ft. Rope, and trailer. Hotton'
e-painted. $1 .000.00 (.il r.'r
Black 3-1308
C 11003
BAYSHORE MARINA LTD.
P. 0. Box 5453
PHONE 28232
28' BERTRAM Flybridgo
Cruiser This boat will be
delivered on 30th August and
is supplied with all standard
equipment plus bathing
platform and comfort extras.
Due to the sold out productio,
this is the only 28' available
before March 1974.
Price B$28,810.00 duty paid.

S SCHOOLS
Cl 1005
TODDLERS PLAYSKOOL
Well supervised anri equipped
to give your child enjovablei
hours of play and edur tl tion.
Hours 8:30 a.m. 12:3(
p.m., 1 1:30 a.m. 3:30 p.m.,
8-30 a.m. 5.30 p.nm.
Three sessions available for
your convenience.
NURSERY DEPARTMENT
Fully equipped with staff arid
accommodations to effticerntly
care toi babies from 3 months
and over. Hours: 8:00 a.ni.
5:30 p.m.
Phone 2-8042 for details
Situated on Rosetta Street
Palmdale.

1100GO TUITION
HOPEDALE CENTRE.
private school catering to cthiu
ren with special needs, physical-
ly or emotionally handicappeci
(retarded, spastic, auttisi .
language problems, etc.)
Qualified, degree teachers, foi'
additional information 35t4i?
or 31990.

C10959
ENTER A NEW WORLD
OF FASHION
Learn to sew with and without
patter ns.
You may Register Daily
Monday Saturday 8 a.m. to
8 p.m. at The Elegant School
of Fashions and Dressmaking
Corner Shirley and Fowler
Streets. Term begins
September 3, 1973. for more
information call 53223.

ENTERTAINMENT
C11080
MOON ON A RAINBOW
SHAWL
Im ----


HELP WANTED
Surveryor-Engineer with Certificate from accredited
school. Refinery and Construction experience
essential.


Field Accountant to be responsible for Pay-Roll,
Purchasing, and Cost Control on job site.
Construction experience desirable.

Time-Keeper and costing clerk

Construction Workers Carpenter-Foremen,
Carpenters and Construction Labourers for
recruitment in Freeport with lengthy expectancy for
employment.
APPLY: MR. GEORGE ARNETT,
Hallmark Construction Company
P.O. Box F-682,
Freeport Phone No. 362-96UI


MR. GORDON WONG,
Cavalier Construction Company,
P.O. Box N8170
Naccau. Phnna No 3171 nrofr3l11


HELP WANTED





SII TRADE SERVICES I


--r


C11018
HANDY Man to work in yard.
Experience in farming
essential. Salary $40.00 per
week. Phone 4-1364.

C11021
EXPERIENCED Salesman
required. Must have own
transportation. Phone 51071
for appointment.

C10923
AUTO MECHANICS
ABC MOTORS LTD.
MUST be experienced in all
phases of automobile work,
particularly engine overhaul.
Must have own hand tools and
be sober, reliable and willing to
work. Good pay to right man.
Paid holidays, uniforms and
many other fringe benefits.
Call Mr. Williams at 2-1031.
C 10988
PARADISE ISLAND
LIMITED requires an
experienced acrobatic dancer
and a chorus-line dancer for its
Le Cabaret Theatre show.
Successful applicants must be
willing to attend regular show
rehearsals and perform a
i-night, 13-show week. Salary
om me nsu rate with
experience. Only experienced
dancers need apply. For
interview appointment contact
Mr. George W. Mackey at
5 7511.

C10922
VEHICLE SERVICE
WRITER (MALE)
ABC MOTORS.
MUST have these qualities:
Thorough knowledge of all
phases of automotive repair
;,,d maintenance; sober;
ambitious; pleasing personality;
legible handwriting. Paid
holidays, uniforms and many
other fringe benefits. Call Mr.
William- at 21031.

C11058
Two experienced dress or shirt
makers. Apply Linda's
Children's Fashion corner of
Wulff and Market Street,
Phone 3-4958.

C',0989
GOLF PROFESSIONAL AND
CONTROLLER WANTED
FOR RESORT GOLF CLUB.
Must be able to assume general
control of golf course and shop
operation. Knowledge of
proper stock control and
overall golf course management
and maintenance also required.
Salary commensurate with
experience. For interview
appointment contact Mr.
George W. Mackey at 5-7511.

C6203
JOB TITLE: (FOUR)
GENERAL REPAIRMEN
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Inspects, repairs, replaces,
installs, adjusts and maintains
all mechanical equipment in a
cement manufacturing plant.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
C 11072
OFFICE MANAGER
REQUIRED, experienced in all
aspects of commercial work
relating to the Construction
Industry. Applicant will be
expected to work on his own
initiative, to supervise office
and construction site
personnel. Duties will include
ordering and buying materials
internationally, property
management, cashier, job
costing and site dayworks.
Knowledge of accounting
procedures desirable. Minimum
qualifications, 3 "O" levels
with 5 years experience in
managerial position. Apply in
writing to Sir Robert McAlpine
& Sons (Bahamas) Ltd. P. O.
Box N3919 Nassau.

C11073
Combination warehouse
attendant and delivery man.
Basic education and references
required. Apply in person.
Dolly Madison Furniture,
Mackey Street.


[


GRAND BAHAMA




CLASSIFIED

CARS FOR SALE I HELP WANTED


C6197
FIVE WHEELS OF GRAND
BAHAMA LTD.,
BOX F-555,
FREEPORT,
G RAND BAHAMA
OFFER
GRAND PRICE REDUCTION
OF VEHICLES
NOW IN STOCK
NEW PONTIAC
PARISSIENNES, 4 door
sedans, factory air, radio,
automatic, power steering
$5,900
NEW PONTIAC
PA R ISSI EN N E S
BROUGHAM, 4 door sedan,
factory air, radio, tape, power
windows, power seats,
automatic, (4 ONLY) $6,900
NEW PONTIAC ASTRE
HATCHBACK, 2 door sedan,
factory air, power steering,
automatic, radio, (3 ONLY)
$4,750.
NEW BUICK GRAN SPORT,
2 door sedan, factory air,
radio, tape, automatic, floor
console, rally wheels, 12 vinyl.
(CHOICE OF 3) $6,950
NEW CADILLAC DE VILLE,
4 door sedan, fully loaded, all
power.(CHOICE OF 2)$10,700.

"CALL US NOW"
Tel: FREEPORT 352-7001

HELP WANTED
C6209
RETAIL SHOP MANAGER,
male, for shop in Bazaar that
sells Far East products and
precious jewellery. Must have
thorough knowledge of these
items. Responsible for shop
inventory, requisitioning of
stock, daily balancing of cash,
sales slips and charge slips.
Apply in writing to:
CALCUTTA LIMITED, Box
F-847, Freeport, Bahamas


C6199
KEY PUNCH OPERATOR (1)
Key Punch Operator to operate
L.B.M. machine. Should have at
least 1 year experience on I.B.
M. Key Punch, preferably
I.B.M. 5496 Data Recorder.
Salary will be based on
experience and ability.
MAITRE D': (1) Maitre D' to
run large Dining Room area,
with at least 8 to 10 years
experience.
Interested Persons Apply:
GRAND BAHAMA HOTEL,
WEST END, GRAND
BAHAMA, Personnel Office
between the hours of 9:00 a.m.
and 3:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday. Elon Martin,
Jr., Personnel Director.

C6203
JOB TITLE: (FOUR)
GENERAL REPAIRMEN
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Inspects, repairs, replaces,
installs, adjusts and maintains
all mechanical equipment in a
cement manufacturing plant.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C6210
MALE & FEMALE ADAGIO
DANCE TEAM with a
minimum of five years
professional experience as
feature artists and working in
production numbers. Police
Certificate and good references
required.
Applicants should apply in
person to: Personnel
Department, Bahamas
Amusements Limited, El
Casino, P. 0. Box F-787,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


Wbe



Ctributn

Nassau & The Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper
... bnngs its readers the fullest coverage of any event in
the Commonwealth. Bahamians who know read The
Tribune, the independent Bahamian newspaper that has
serviced the Bahamian public for the past 70 years.


CLASSIFIED


__ ___


-----~----~-- r 1 I rr i


&


I I


l I i


JL


C 11074
AN EXECUTIVE CHEF
experienced in all phases of the
preparation of continental
cuisine. Able to take complete
charge of all kitchen operations
and kitchen personnel,
including training. Must be able
to recruit the kitchen brigade
of French chefs for the season.
Bahamians only should apply.
Please reply in writing to
General Manager P. 0. Box
N7776, Nassau.
C11027
Property Manager required.
Knowledge of American and
British type leases and
negotiation experience
essential. Experienced in
properly management,
commercial and residential.
Basic knowledge of
air-conditioning equipment,
pumping equipment and
electrical installations.
Applicants must be over 35
years of age. Salary in
accordance with experience.
Applications by letter to: The
Manager, Box N-3371, Nassau.

C11070
Fragrance of the Bahamas Ltd.,
requires a President to take
charge of its entire day-to-day
operations. Applicant must
have experience of perfume
and cosmetic manufacturing
and merchandising in domestic
and foreign markets as well as
administrative experience in
this field. Apply to Fragrance
of the Bahamas, Ltd., P.O. Box
F-770, Freeport, Grand
Bahama, Telephone 373-9391.

C11075
LYFORD CAY CLUB requires
a Club Secretary to take full
responsibility for corporate,
legal and confidential work,
correspondence, etc.,
concerning Club Membership.
Will also be responsible for
organizing committee meetings
and compiling agendas and
minutes: assisting in the
organization of golf and tennis
tournaments, lectures and
various club social activities.
Should enjoy meeting people.
Bahamians only should apply.
Please reply in writing to:
General Manager, P. 0. Box
N7776, Nassau.


C10661

Plader's Customs

Brokerage Ltd.
Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-3796
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434

C10637
T.V ANTENNAS Boosters tor
homes, apartments and hotels.
Sales and services. Call Douglas
Lowe 5-9404 WORLD OF
MUSIC, Mackey Street next to
Frank's Place.

C10972
LAWNS, HEDGES, BEACHES
For all your gardening needs,
trimming, hedging,D prunina.
beach cleaning, for prompt,
reasonable and efficient service
call 5-1044

C 10638
PATIO AWNINGS
AND CARPORTS
HURRICANE AWNINrS
SHUTTERS, PANEI-S
John S. George,
& Co. Ltd.,
For free estimates and prompt
service call 28421.

S ART SUPPLIES

C10683
COMPLETE range of artists'
supplies. Oils, acrylics, canvas,
easels, etc. Bahamian Paint
Supply Ltd., Bay St. Phone
2-2386, 2-2898.


II_ I


by Errol John
presented by
Bahama Drama Circle
and featuring
Gwen Kelly
* Douglas Duncombe
Elsa Marshall
Warren Jones
Sheila Tracey
Jeanne Thompson
Patnick Rahrning
* Godfrey Brathwaite


I


I


4


rl












Thursday, August 30, 1973.


U~h~ Wzituw 9 -


S K.. f.tum 5f,.c... Infc. 1 w1 M rita MMI.*n.
"I thought the least I could do was to share my lunch
with you."


i'


'SOMEBODY HIT A HOME RUN WITH TgiE 8ASES LOADED
JUST WHILE THE UBAR WAS CUTIN' MY HAIR /"

Brother Juniper


"I resent being regarded as
ticket,

CROSSWORD

PUZZLE
ACROSS
1. Ski resort 23. Exult
5. Talks 26. Choler
10. Inflate 27. Small stream
11. Obnoxious 28. Celebrated
13. Before time 32. French friend
14. Parsley 33. Horned viper
camphor 34. Diva's forte
15. Bowfin genus 35. Amuse
16. Greek letter 37. Persian native
17. 106 38. English
18. Dais novelist
20. Urials 39. Radon
21. Charged atom 40. Guide
22. Perfume 41. Lunch time


a mere male chauvinist meal
girls."






P AXEL NNE
El LE AYL
N L




U A AR

1 12K S L N N 6
LE110L 5 5 A.NIYI


SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE
4. Pigpen
1. Cottonwood 5. Pit
2. Lemur 6. Western Indian
3. Magnificent 7. Onassis
8. Cough drop
7 8 9 9. Wooded
- - 10. Endure
12. Believer in God
- 16. Paronomasia
19. Nonsense
17 20. Movie script
O 22. Hindu title
20o 23. Alumni
S- 24. Restricts
25. Biblical
- mountain
26. Devilkin
so 3 28. Compound
ether
S- 29. Muse of lyric
poetry
30. Curtain
material
9 31. Mirror backing
- 33. British
composer
S 9-1 36. Prior to
oure 9- 37. Hostel


Thursday, gs


*y VICTOR MOLLO
EVERY DAY ordinary players
graduate into the better-than-
average class and books, pre-
viously too advanced for them,
come within their reach. An
example is Terence Reese's The
Expert Game." Many players,
who would greatly enjoy the book
today, have missed' it. or when
it came out they weren't ready
for it and lately it has been out
of print. Happily, a new
edition appears today (Robert
Hale, 1-90).
Here's an example of what
Reese calls a "second degree
assumption."
West East
SK Q10 6 4 A 9 5 2
0 8 3 V J 7 6
0A 4 OQJ83
4 K J 7 5 462
After three passes, you open
14, sitting West, and finish, first
in 3., then in 4+. North leads
the VK and continues with a
low heart to South's VA. The


Chess
By LEONARD BARDEN


I:- --




--------------nrr
.....


Kavaiek (White, to move)
sacrinced rook for bishop and
pawn to reach this position
against Ljubojevic in an all-
granamaster duel at Las
Palmas. What did White play
next, and who has ithe better
game ?
far times: 20 seconds, chess
master; 1 minute, chess expert:
2 minutes, county player; 4
minutes, c!ub strength; 6
minutes, average; 10 minutes,
novice.




Chess Solution
1 Q-Kt5 ch, K-B1 (not 1 .
K-RI; 2 Kt-B7 mate); 2
Kt-Q7 ch! QxKt (not 2 .
KtxKt; 3 Q-Kt8 mate); 3
Q x R, Q-Q7; 4 Q-K5 leaves
White a clear pawn up. Kavalek
won the game 20 moves later.


Rupert and Miss Samantha-28


Miss Samantha tells Rupert to settle himself
on the sofa and then, sitting beside him, she
pats one of the arm-rests, calling out: Next
stop Nutwood At her command the sofa
leaves the ground, rising and moving through
the air at gathering speed. Ooo, do you
always travel about on this ? gasps Rupert,
trying to hide his nervousness. "W-we're a


long way up, aren't we ? You're perfectly
safe, little bear," replies the old lady. Just
sit back and enjoy the journey. My brother
Santa always uses a reindeer sleigh, of course,
hut I prefer my odfa It's much more
comfortable."
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


43 comes back. Should you play
the 4 or 4 ?
If the OK s right, you are in
no trouble-In 34. Assume, then,
that it's wrong. Had North the
tA, in addition to the OK and
the VK Q, with which he is
marked on his lead, he would
have probably opened the bid-
ding. So, placing South with the
4A, you go up with tit 4K.
Turn to 44. This time the OK
must be right or you stand no
chance. South has already shown
the VA. Had he the 4A and
OK, as well, he might have made
a third hand bid. So you place
North with the 4A and play the
41-in 44*.
"The Expert Game is not for
beginners. The average club
player will learn a lot from it.
The advanced player will learn
a lot more.
SFOR PULL details of the Evenlng
ttNdard *r August Dank Holiday weekend write or
phone : U.ide. Grand Met e.. 7
Stratford PlCo, W.1 (29 ii.


No. 7,214 by TIM McKAV
Across
1. i wicket-keeper should liavc
them. (4, 5)
9. Urchin. (5)
10. Top of the suit. (3)
11. Hold on. (4, 5)
12. Listener. (3)
13. Roof Item. (4)
15. How I'd tout (anac.). (2. 7)
19. Metal. (4)
20. Droop. (3)
21 Like that old love affair.
(4. 4)
42. Scottish town. (3)
23. Relish. (5)
24. Negative voters. (4)
253. Military dining-room. (4)
Down
I Wise man. (4)
2 Indian city. (4)
3. Illonde. (4)
4. Vacancy. (9)
'. What you often have to do
to the bail. (3. 2. 4)
i. Indigo. (4)
7 Carpl). (3)
Tennis groups. (4)
14 They prod Iuce nillltar3
mtussic. (6)
15. K I nd
or hbed. P STEIR
16. W l d oloIIM S
party. BRO 'S L A E
(4) E P 02
17. A o. B 5 g E n"M"
18. WVa t.er
Im 0 V e- l
ments. Pc
(5) LISA t C)DIUIK
201. Floating
(lni. (4) Saturday'sA olution


IOW many
io words of
SR D i r letters
or more can
y O n iI nk e
r r o in t ht
letters sho wn
It e r e ': In
mi akin g a
tt ord., eaC'h
let ter in a
0ie used once
onl.. Each
word must contain the large
letter, and there must be ait
least one eight-letter word in the
list. No plural:ni no foreign words:
tno proper names. TODAY'S
TA.UET : 18 w or d s. good;
23 uords, rery good; 28 words,
excellent. Solution tomorrow.
S.ITUlltAY'S SOLUTION :
Abed albele iable abrade alder
alee arable area baaed bade bale
baled hare hared head beadle
hear beard feared bedel beer
here blade blare blared blear
cleared bled bleed brae bread
bred breed dale dare deal
dealer dear debar deer earl
elder ladle lead leader leer read
ltEADAiAI.E real rebel reed reel.


I .e Co.mic /ae



| REX MORGAN, M.D.


-Ii

By DAL CURTIS


7_ CARROLL RIGHTER'S



S I from the Carroll Righter Institute
GENERAL TENDENCIES: You start out with
\\1 excellent judgment and the desire to extend
your interests far beyond present boundaries. Later, you feel
just great and very romantic, but there is a decided deceptive
condition present just as likely to be within yourself as from
outside
ARIES (Mar 21 to Apr 19) Important to make new
arrangements with both associate and with mate in p.m. if you
want the future to develop more satisfactorily Stick to the
truth since your mind is too tired to do much angling, anyway.
Then you come out on top
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Put that good taste to work
and make your abode, business place more attractive. Show
co-workers the better side of your nature. Your health needs
more attention now.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Try not to let your
imagination run away with you when dealing with the one you
love, or there could be some bad misunderstanding. Enjoy
regular recreations instead of jumping into new ones that
could be far from anything you might like
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Try to get dull
routines tuned up so they are more efficient, but first study
how others have done so for best results. Make your home
more attractive in some way. The right painting could work
wonders
LEO (July 22 to Aug 21) If you state to others how much
you appreciate them, you get excellent backing from them
now, and your life becomes more worthwhile. Buy the
clothing that makes you look like a new You. Thrill the one
you love
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept 22) Plan how to improve any real
estate you may have, as well as how to add appreciably to
present prosperity Buy and sell with more wisdom and show
you know how to handle money. Avoid extravagance.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct 22) You are highly charming and
can accomplish much in the world of activity right now, so get
an early start Accept invitations in p m. of a social nature.
Dress well and wow 'em'
SCORPIO (Oct 23 to Nov 21) Some investigation will give
you the answers for which you have been searching for some
time Don't be afraid to show your devotion to those you
really love, otherwise they feel neglected. Increase happiness.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 to Dec. 21) Instead of being so
blunt with others, use tact and show more affection if you
want more harmony, happiness Being more willing to go out
socially is good. Dress well and within your means.
CAPRICORN (Dec 22 to Jan 20) Try not to give others
the wrong impression in the outside world, or you could ruin
your reputation right now Use wisdom and you can make big
headway with the influential. Stick to own knitting in p.m.
AQUARIUS (Jan 21 to Feb. 19) You have new ideas and
want to make new associates, which is fine provided they are
the right ones, so be selective Make those plans to travel that
are important. See to it that your wardrobe is right.
PISCES (Feb 20 to Mar 20) Making certain that you keep
promises to others in a most honorable and exact way is
important right now Do whatever will put your mate's mind
at least partially at ease Then mend your ways.

Winning Bridge


I APARTMENT 3-G ByAlex Kotzk ]


I EVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & overgard.


TO THE SUPREME CC


-. I'
,t, I'
t.
I,'
I.


, 3o
in


DELIVERING MILK
EVERY DAY FI'ALLY
- GOT TO M
r-A






vi c 04,


SYES-- MORE WHAT PO CCASIONALtV. I REMEMBER YOU1 BUT HE DID
T YOU'RE OR LESS' YU /MEAN? GORPY AND I WENT \ COMING UP THERE GO UP-- JUST
NO, WHAT YOU'RE SAYING ACK UPON THE ROOF TWICE--- BUT I BEFORE WE
S THAT ONCE YOU MEN \ TO SEF THE GIRLS TRY DIDN'T SEE GOROY/ BROKfE UP
TO MAKE PEACE WITH THE GAME
GAME, YOU STAYED IN T HEA/THY WErRE
THE APARTMENT / UPSET BECAUSE WE
SGTA RTPD THE GAME












UDGE PARKER By PAUL NICHOLS


,,= m


9 ,


,


Sht (ribunr




t


10 Uhr l nibutw


Thursday, August JO, 1973.


Defending Zephyr champions,



Thompson's Dept. Store, show


Home Furniture their strength

By GLADSTONE THURSTON
THE TRIO OF GLORIA BETHEL. Kay Albury and team
captain Ivy French compiled a total of 1,163 points to go along
with 834 attained from the average of two absent team-mates as
the defending Zephyr League Champions, Thompson's
Department Store, defeated Home Furniture 2-1 during last
night's Bahamas Bowling Association action.


IIn defeating IHome I-urniture
.77- 64,, 6 50-649 and(
S(70-672, Thomilpson s w'on
tihr, r tiurth against tw lo -,,scs
'lh r. !c'.ltirng a thiee wal tic
IS\', Hi t I )imce ilurriture a nd
iit p i V.ilu HoI r e I uniture
,n list wee'kc s o()pen ingI gaIIec
AeLc'I Udecated in three.
i'. m .' ns dropped oI I' I

\1Is,Itics by the dealt' tdingl g
1,,IIII l i ITs in the lirsl gam ele
I.v. rI e Ic tuiLtuii e tak'inA a
Pi ) int le ad I v'e tic le t i rst
:. i l riiues BOc lic arid I ici,. I
;I i ie tic il t1 I ranie i a rf e
SI lith c'ithth Ir st c iaincd
i It ithes c gamrn e II11it pushed
i one la i p rl tit la ied.
I ,,. ing a ', a 1xt l t, a 1r e
.,.ii', IkBetheil anrid Irr c ti ,gain
di,] tIrtwo unp i mi an t strikes
i Ll i thell rl )seved Itcihe three
nl-. in lie lead. Adtdirng to
p ... i' 's surge was A. hury 's
'! al alime st rikc' her
S nl I tlie game.
IA[I NI l I)
I in t.alknted )vowllllg o t
tI I., i,, ; it l rvi llc ind Jr)i iii
l. ',liiif k ptil Thit 'lpsom i n
!,'.. ,tiid thiclencrid t i trake
ti r, clil iIn thie Lenl h frlirne
I li,, np > 's. ](),h wvc lc i h. tld on(
,:il lIeth.l el''s l t) w nit to a
in rin"g V.auVse ir1ench liad a
12!
H'. i B3riiwn in hlic second
';u: i fe to s'cd in I a strong 137
uIt Ih s trigctihcr with
j l. !I", 15' and l )Irvillc's
... i, i th t 1i. khnu oIl thii rI
I t I ) sti',p the dcl 'Ienld ing

Si!l thlic were unable to
l., i) led by French
,d 1 11 trimn Bethel. Tlhe
iiil,',es o)t Ann Rogers and Pat
cwec1ting lnus ten pins gave
I h,iir'sini's ,1 welcome 149
,iId I 21 respectivel). This and
Kai\ AlIbur's 91 enabled thenic
t1 Itke ,a nre: point edge and a
' 0 I.,Ld.
l.ii .lllc. who last night
n, 1 Svid ihersel onie o(f t he
innistays ,in liice Furnitiure's
,i1ud ciintrnbuted a spaikling
!0 1 in thie final game This
,in. via three strikes and five
,pIrces. Tpping tins was a
Sli.h ll'iiUin g 156 coming tri in
Siiwn. lBrown's score was
,ii 'lic.ited by Bethel and
Sicin, li's 140 was only four
IrIls more than layhn g ;as
I !i i s )lii's lrror pied their
S, l i Ill si\ pla ed.
II iMt I'S% )N 'S


5, IIht- l n
S ilturi
I I i t'li


I,,t
(4471
(447)
(2)92 1
(3i7)
(424)


ti()M i i i
ir)ar lc 145
ii' der 1 2
irnin I 14
ll Ia% ISil


R Ni l I 'iRi
124 16 1 (4 0)
I I 1s o ( 11 3)
1 14 1 1 141)
I 17 I S'n (427)
1 '; 142 (4 )


( competitivee hr s,,wlingI by
'1o otisie I homll siin Aind Anni'
Rus.sell revc ngld Super lie's
1-2 lo ss' t, 'I Iroill ,s n i' list
week and, with atddd hielp
cominirfg front Annettte Russell.
defeated Matira's 3-0 1I share a
three-way tic tIrr first plac,'
'Thmilpsion al ai iname li.ghli
of 460 as thc' s'-tpped hlie new
Maura's 01 -588 6,3-0hS anl d
050-025.
Russelli had .a highti t 437 I
go alirng with Ani'ittc's 280
I or r M aur r's, I .ili Iniilr
last icair helped d iThompson", to
chadmpl(o ship viclIy wa.s Ill,.'
top scori witllh 4031 Brendai
Alhury hd ai 3 1

New Orienital who l.ist wirk
were l iunnlitated with ai tihr'c
game loss, I(n II tI n' IIt'Vtit I rt
took theim all back frm
A IT(oriiv s laIsl night iI :i
75 3-073 71-3- 7S. 7 )" 4 o4,8
victory gli Ig thirn sIle'
p'osse "inrnl i t t sc ,'Id place
Roisi Sn.iinidcrs tsswed in a1
gained high oi 501 tio ( the
winners as, JeLirnIIe Louis bhackcd
her ip withll 474 Donna IFryeis
scored 470 for New Oriential

With tile liahairas seeking to
revenge' a 2,700 pins loss to)
Mi' anii etii lici tIrins year, itet
second leg of t le Nt ssia MIaiti
Bowling lFurnaincent will he
played lridai night ( o'clock
at the Pla/a Lanes. The second
of the three game series is
scheduled for Sunday morning,
10 o'clock and the second at 2
p.lml.
Representing the ladies 'A'"
division ltola Pinder. R,,si'c
Saunders, Jeannie Louis, Joani
Hayling and I.leanor Darville
In the ladies "'B'" division aic
Anne Russell. Joyce Waugh.
Iv\s French, l)Donna Frycrs and
Karen Pinder.
9-HOLE GOLF TOURNEY
SI1) PRIl('IHARI). givsni 4
strokes, rounded tlIrC Soutit
Ocean's challenging back nine
in 44 to win the South O()cean
olt ('lu b's nine hole tlag
tournament.
took second place, Martin
Austin was third and QucIntcll
Chaspall was fourth
InI the longest drive contest,
Austin won it on tlie 1i8thi hole
with a 305 yards drive FIred
Iliggs won the 14th hole
contest with a 310 yards drive
from the tee.


THOMPSON 'S TEAM
CAPTAIN IVY FRENCH ...
expects a lot from her team



ATP FIND NASTASIE 5.000

c \ It i 't K (t \1') t ll
cmrg i 't i ,t i c '11.1N l h l
v'ag .n \ i / it ),'- t.1i nitl' .1
rltl s t,,I pl ,,r
N,t",,ic', lit, i'r hR(tIIaII n It'sh
is Ni 1 trt c'N I .,lniin r' iili S(,I'
S niith ait IlhI I nt' It .1
Aus tr.lii.in R K,'lhid \erc It n. I1
,iind Ihnni 'ctisp,'iirt'd mrn .ll *\ I I
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T. 8


Ladies' and Menti',
TENNIS WEAR


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TRAINING SHO-ES


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TEAM NAMED
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1 "i
S .t... D i 4 ii 7
Stllu i' I 1( I I


JANE McCORQUODALE
....Bahamas swim champion

ILLINGWORTH

SACKED AS

MCC CAPTAIN
LON)DON (AP Ray
1li r vwoirthr was sacked
\,c'lisrdly ais I n gind's cricket
1 i[ iain follhowilg the licity
ict .ut handed out bh the West

Mike Deness., tri-orn Kent
itl gi star ard vi -cciapain o if
i.' I nglislh sItlIuad that toured
I'ldi and Pakistan last winter,
v. i-, idels tipIped as the man
lea1d lngland o)n thle
ci' ii ,ln ng vrsit lo the
( i b|)C;li ).
S ical a innounlicemlent
",i lilingworth's disiisssil and
!;.ir ruiil n l action( of )Det'nness wsas
' i ed ro)I t h e selectOi s
I tita>i.
Biit Illingworth said he
v,.itild notl he clading tlhe team
ii l 1 sails forl the West Indies

I ..,,,il i, on If ingland's
III, t suiiC esstiiI captains iII
-i t Sears, h:l(i a dramatic
' iI'r)'otf fortune against the
\A.. t Indies who arrived inI
H it.11 n as underdogs The
l'. is won an exciting and
I.I. .'ill balanced l 'Firstl Test.
's.' tlihe second and
CIn pIcl'e y sove rwhe lmed
I :'.n'td in the third and final

Sca iln co lfi that I was
Id I would not he taking tile
I 'lind Ict aml t tlI e "' .:s:
iin'l I. said I lini gworth,
,ti' Islls\ I ami very sorry and
disappointed. But I have
1i Itl ,1 long rlun ais captain."
In Illingwortht's 31-matchi
'.n .is capt:iin. I'ngland have
n',, 1 2 liimes, with 14 draws
,iitl t i c defeats.


Swimming is important


to Jane McCorquodale

JANE MCCORQUODALE, 15, can't exactly remember when


she first learned to swim.
She does realize, however.
that she owes a lot of thanks to,
her father and Miss Betty Cole.
"My father taught me the
basics of the sport." she said
"and Miss ('ole, my swimming
instructress, improved myr
strokes and made me taster,"
said Jane.
Jane is the daughter of
Alexander and Margo
McCorquodaie. itl Hgh Vista.
Jane is a fifth lormi student
at St. Augustine's College. She
began her educate ion and
swimming career at Xavier's
College.
M l DAL) IS
While at Xavier's. Jane won
medals and ribbons for first
and second places in
inter-school house and
inter-school swimming meets.
Jane stated that her strong
points are 100 metres back
stroke and relays.
Now, Jane is a member of
the Dolphins Swinuning (Club,
a local swimming group, under
the supervision tfI Miss ('rile.
Jane said that the clubI is pIlen
to school children, whio can
swim.
The Dol)phins recently
returned from Kentucky and
the Carolinas.
In North Carolina, they
competed in thle Seyimou r
Jolinson Air I icc' Base
Invitational AAI Swim meerLt.
While in Ashland, Kentucky.
thle Dolphins nimet competitors
in the Breezeland Invitatio,nals
Swi i imm ing Championship.
COMNI TUITION
"The colipetition at hothl
swim meicets was really great,"
said Jane "but Rocky Adderley,
of the ten and under group,
came home with second and
third medals and fourth Iand
fifth ribbons," said Jane
During April, the Dolphins
swimming group beat tle
Janaica YMCA group by 160
points During that time, Jane
won five gold medals (for five
first places) and two ribbons
for the relay.
At the Bahama Nationals in
May, she won four gold medals
and one silver medal secondd
place).


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.l i~,['s, iii r)i\'.ll~ u tt # ) I I I nunI


'I his surniner Jane has
assisted in teaching many
children to swim free of
charge
She is looking forward to
more swimming meets, this
coming school year, which is
her last at St. Augustines.
She now has to start
working towards the Bahamas
Nationals, which come up inf
October.
After graduating from High
School. Jane is not sure of the
part swiniming will play in her
life.
She plans to be a nurse or
physical therapist. Whichever
profession she chooses, Jane
hopes it will lead her to people
who need swimming for
rehabilitation purposes.
"I think that I would love a
job like that," sihe said.
If her training requires
college abroad, Jane said that
she will keep her eyes open for
a college with an active
swilmilng teanm.
YAN(EY DURHAM DIES
I'I iLA I[ i.i'T i A. \I(i 30 (AI')
tamed t)oxing naniager Yancey
Diuriamin \wiisei fighters included
former la irc. n igit champion Joe
i'ra/irr. light Iheavs i'eight champ
Hlihh Ioster and middleweigh t
contenCdlr Willie Minroe. died here
todas tollmvinig a stroke.



CAMPEROOWN
From Page 7
plans ito enter law school in
either Canada or I n gland.
Patricia Bethel, II, is another
active rider at tih' ranch ldunng
liher summer vac;ition. She is
lhe daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
John Bethell ic rf Lake
('inninghain. Nassau.
Patricia las continued her
interest in riding in Lausanne,
Swit/ciland whlc'r she is a
student at Mount-Choisi
School.
"I have been riding norses
since I was three years old,"
said Patricia who wants to
Iecoime a lihousewife and a
riding instructor. "Big Deal" is
Patricia's horse at ('amperdown
Ranch.


FIGHTERS IN


GOOD SHAPE


FOR WORLD


TITLE FIGHT
TOKYO (AP) World
heavyweight champion (;eorge
Foreman and Puerto Rican
challenger Joe "King" Roman
were reported in good
condition Tuesday and
confident of victory in their
championship bout in Tokyo
Sept. I
Spokesman for both boxers
continued their vocal strategy
while Japanese sports writers
splashed reports on their
training activities for the first
world heavyweight title match
ever held in Japan.
While Foreman took it easy
Tuesday in his hotel, Roman's
trainer Al Braverman told a
sports reporter that the
25-year-old challenger will
keep his distance from the
champion in the early rounds
of their fight, but when he
makes his move "he will eat
Foreman up."
'Joe in our strategy which is
known ot everyone, will try to
box the first or six rounds,"
Braverman told Kent Nixon,
Stars and Stripes sports writer.
"If he sees Foreman at any
given time getting tired, Joe
will move in on Foreman and
lie will eat him up."
Braverman, a professional
boxer, sparring partner and
trainer for 25 years, expressed
confidence that Roman's speed
would offset Foreman's reach
advantage.
J apanese boxing
commentators have compared
24-year-old Foreman to an
elephant, his arm to a log and
his punch to a battering ram.
Foreman told an earlier
news conference Saturday:
"'You tell Roman I'm going to
hit him so hard I'll knock his
head off."
Foreman later said he was
not underestimating the
challenger. "Anything can
happen in a fight," Foreman
said. That is why, he said he
arises at 4 a.m. to go to the
Olympic Stadium Park to do
his road work and train in a
hot gym. He said he would
resume sparring Wednesday.


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