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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03427
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: August 23, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03427

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O DUDLEY'S (I
COR. ROSETTA ST. & MT. ROYAL. AVE.
P.O. BOX 5*50 PHONE 2-1306/2-3237 "" "


ingenuity, intelligence, initiative
Bahamas."
In a nation-wide broadcast
over Radio Bahamas, Mr.
Francis officially launched the
BBB (Building a Better
Bahamas) programme designed
to attract foreign investment.
Mr. Francis said that now
the independencece lebrations
are over, "we must settle down
to the important task of
building our new and proud
nation. In the process of
building we would, in our
circumstances, need strong and
responsible partners," he


Fatker clarifies

accident report

COMMISSIONER Kirkwood
Taylor, in recounting the
circumstances surrounding the
death of his three-year-old son,
told The Tribune this week
that the child was killed when
he managed to get out of his
mother's parked car and was
hit by a passing vehicle.
Commissioner Taylor had
told The Tribune that his wife
had left three of their children
ages 3, 9 and 10 in her car
while she crossed the road to
speak with a friend. However,
he failed to mention that in the
car with the children was his
wife's cousin, Rudolph Minnis,
aged 20.
Funeral services for young
Darron will be held at Central
Gospel Chapel at 4 p.m.
tomorrow.

URGENT POLICE CALL
MR. INGLIS LOWE or
anyone knowing his
whereabouts is asked to call
the Nassau Police urgently at
either 2-4444 (Extension 23)
or at 2-3333.
The police would like to see
Mr. Lowe on an urgent matter,
according to a police
spokesman.


NEW SHIPMENT
ANTIQUE
SATIN DRAPES
AND SHEERS
l NASSAU F IREEPORT
NASSAU FREEPORT


and industry to build a better

pointed out, "if we are to
secure the smooth and peaceful
development of our nation."
The Minister said the
Government's ability to
recently float a $30 million
loan locally, expressions of
long term interest in he
development of the Bahamas
by various corporate citizens,
and development projects
outlined by the Ministry
already, "all point to the
determination of various
sectors to build a strong and
lasting foundation in our
country."
He said that "spirit of
investment and development
has come about as a result of
the awareness of stability in
our nation, and as confidence
continues to mount in the
ability of the Bahamian people
to manage their affairs with the
usual degree of professional-
ism."


Despite the advances,
however, "I believe that iL is
time for us all to make a new
effort, to make a fresh
resolution to do all we can to
support the new nation.
"No matter how great from
.the outside is the degree of
investor and development
confidence in us, a certain
amount must be done by us,"
he continued.
OUR COUNTRY
"We cannot lay any blame in
the future at the door of
someone else. This country is
now ours to develop smoothly
and peacefully.
"We should, therefore, say
all we can to uphold our
country, do all we can to uplift
our country and be all we can
to solidify our new nation
state.
"We must exert every effort
to build a better Bahamas in
the spirit of '73.
"As your Minister of
Development, Agriculture and
Fisheries, I again ask you,
young and old alike, be you
housewives, students, farmers,
professionals or what have you,
to join me and your
Government in this new
campaign which requires your
support, your creative effort
and, last but not least, hard
work," he said.
The Minister foreshadowed
his launching of the campaign
at the August dinner meeting
of the Chamber of Commerce
last Wednesday.


ii hl


IFNS--FANSS w ANS
R egistened with Postmater of Batrham for postage coneions within ue Bah.m.) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper
VOL. LXX, No. 227 Thursday, August 23, 1973.


'TPERE IS KNOCKING AT OUR DOOR, AN OPPORTUNITY

TO BECOME GREAT NATION IN HUMAN RELATIONS FIELD'


'We sit poised on threshold




of possible great future in





human relations -- Solomon


By MIKE
THE BAHAMAS can be "a great nation in the field
country can be brought "to its knees" by its failure to
Wednesday.


Mr. Solomon described the
Bahamas as "already an ideal
example of bi-racial tolerance
and understanding," but he
warned that the nation must
"effectively and permanently
defuse the time-bomb which
gently sputters even now"
among the religion-shy youth.
He was speaking to members
of the West Nassau Rotary
Club at the Sonesta Beach
Hotel.
Mr. Solomon, the St.
George's and Dunmore M.P.,
said the key to better race
relations in the Bahamas is
children, coupled with more
knowledge and understanding


of each other.
Mr. Solomon opened with
the assumption "that there is
no one here who would
seriously argue that there is no
racial problem in the
Bahamas."
He thought that basic
physical differences between
white and black people was the
primary cause of racial
difficulties.
But, "on top of this sort of
physics; difference, there has
got to be a marked difference
in mental outlook. It is
absolutely impossible for a
people who have, so to speak,
just emerged from an


LOTHIAN
of human relations" if it solves the race problem, or the
do so, FNM parliamentarian Norman S. Solomon declared


historically recent background
of enforced deprivation, to be
identical to those who enjoyed
the favours of a capitalistic
democracy."
He said that deprivation of
many basic rights produced
by-products a different
moral code and a different
concept of marriage and
children were cited which
many people tend to sneer at.
"But those who sneer have
never faced the problem of
hungry children and a totally
inadequate income. They don't
understand why people steal
and tolerate stealing because
they have never been that poor
they never even knew
anyone that poor. And in not
understanding promiscuity
they merely exhibit their
failure to realise that when a
simple uneducated man who
could not afford the
conventional insurance policy
he could, until recently.
accomplish much the same
thing by raising many sons and
daughters.
"Nor can the average white
man understand that he so
stripped his black brethern of
self pride and self respect that
he drove him from woman to
woman in search of his lost
manhood; from bar-room to
bar-room in search of that
self-confidence which he could
otherwise never reach."
The Opposition M.P. went
on to say that despite the
handicaps "I can in honesty
and with knowledge state that
I know of no other country
where a people who ought to
have serious and erupting
problems are so successfully
co-existing in a multi-racial
society, with far more peace
and good fellowship than many
of those who live in a uni-racial
atmosphere.
"Ninety percent of the
credit for the excellence of our
sociological rapport is due to
our black society's ability and
willingness to forgive, if not
forget, the sins that were
visited upon them yesterday.
MODERATION
"Of the remaining ten
percent, some portion must be
awarded to the Government
which, although it used with
deliberation the racial issue to
come to power, has since 1967
made a genuine effort to act
with moderation and justice in
the arena of race relations."
He added, "perhaps some
small credit must be saved for
the odd white Bahamian who
popped up here and there and
made some positive effort to
bridge the gap which must be
closed if this nation is to attain
the rare potential which lies
within its reach."
Mr. Solomon said the
forgiveness offered to the
white men "who really did not
always treat black people as
humans" is largely due to "that
strong religious root which
anchors the average black
family so strongly that even
the gales of inequality which
passed over their heads could
not budge them from their
faith that tomorrow would be
better."
He went on to say:
"It is an especially grave
warning to our country that
young black Bahamians are in
ever-increasing numbers leaving
the church and its discipline, to
find their reason for being in
activities which theii
grandparents, and parents too,
perhaps, would condemn out
of hand as the wages of sin.
"Beset on all sides by a new
way of life which he doesn't
quite know how to handle,
tempted by new thrills which


adversely affect his judgement,
spoiled by political propaganda
which he cannot recognize as
contrived and without reality,
the up-coming young black
Bahamian will be neither as
gentle nor as wise as his
forbears.
"They are almost certainly
not going to reap from life the
harvest of easy living they have
grown to assume would be
theirs as one of the natural
sequences of events which
would follow the appointment
of a black Government."
If the disappointment is
"too unpleasant, too hard to
accept, too unfair, too much of
a let-down, blind rage may
strike out at the nearest
symbol of nurtured hatred ...
whitey. Stranger things have
occurred," Mr. Solomon
warned.
However, if sanity prevails
and "we continue to co-exist
without that tawdry symbol of
barbarism, violence, how can
we effectively and permanently
defuse the time bomb which
gently splutters even now?"
The only answer, Mr.
Solomon declared, is to
"remove the differences which
now separate us." He was
convinced that such a solution
is practical, viable, and
absolutely certain, "even if it is
undoubtedly a long-term
programme."
He said differences cause
fear.
"The only way to overcome
this fear is by acquiring
knowledge, and the only
possible way to acquire
knowledge is by mutual
association."
UNDERSTANDING
fle said knowledge will lead
to understanding.
Back-tracking, Mr. Solomon
recalled the "prophets of
doom" and the "prophets of
paradise" who claimed to
foresee different futures for
the Bahamas following the
coming to power of a black
Government in 1967.
"Six plus years later both
sides have come to understand
each other better because each
side has learned much about
the other. The prophets of
doom have either gone (and are
surely regretting it) or have
shut up. The Government has
come to accept that there will
be no miracles and what
looked so easy from the
outside was not so simple after
all.
"Today, we sit poised on the
threshold of a possibly great
future in human relations. On
that threshold there is a door
which must be unlocked, and
the key that will fit the door is
a collective unit known as
children."
He noted that today
everything in the public and
semi-public area is integrated.
However. "there has got to
be, and there has got to be
now, not tomorrow, a positive
and conscious determination
on the part of both black and
white Bahamians to make their
private social life as integrated
as their public life. And it is
not just a white responsibility.
"I say to you again," Mr.
Solomon concluded, "that at
this moment in the Bahamas,
already an ideal example of
bi-racial tolerance and
understanding, there is
knocking at our door the
opportunity to become a great
nation in the field of human
relations. If we do not answer
that knock, opportunity will
move on. And as we all know
from bitter knowledge, the
same opportunity seldom
knocks twice."


THE GAPING HOLE in the
ceiling of Colin Major's house
in Nassau East left by a
lightning bolt that struck
yesterday afternoon.


OUR TOURIST


FIGURES UP


A BIT FOR


INDEPENDENCE
THE INDEPENDENCE
celebrations have been given a
share of the credit for pushing
up the July visitor totals to
160,173, 6.23 percent over last
July's arrival figures.
But the overall increase was
largely the result of a 13.04
percent increase in sea arrivals.
Air arrivals for the whole
Bahamas were up only 2.29
percent.
On a cumulative basis, the
first seven months of 1973
have brought a total of
955,345 visitors to our shores,
up only 0.34 percent over
1972's 952,073.
The small cumulative
increase is due entirely to sea
arrivals which are up 11.49
percent over 1972. Air arrivals
for the Bahamas dropped 4.48
percent in the first seven
months of this year.
A Ministry of Tourism
spokesman said the relatively
poor showing in the first four
months of 1973 was
anticipated.
However, "traffic from the
U.S. market started to pick up
in May and continues to do
so."
MAINTAINED
"It is expected that a
reasonable growth rate will be
maintained in the balance of
'73, and advance bookings of
major Nassau/Paradise Island
and Freeport hotels support
this somewhat optimistic
view," a Ministry release said.
"However, in view of many
variables in our principal
markets, one would have to
review the position from
month to month."
Despite Nassau's being the
centre of the independence
celebrations, air arrivals at the
capital during July were
57,299, up only 0.59 percent
over July last year. But sea
arrivals logged an impressive
61.77 percent increase from
34,964 in July last year to 56,
560 this year.
The jump in sea arrivals
resulted in a 23.86 percent rise
in the sea and air arrivals total,
from 91,925 last year to
113,856 this year.
Cumulatively, Nassau has
received 6 12,717 visitors so far
this year, a 5.15 percent rise
over 1972. Sea arrivals at the
island were up 26.26 percent,
but air arrivals dropped 6.53
percent.
In spite of the celebrations
Freeport reported a drop of
30.96 per cent in air and sea
arrivals for July. Air arrivals
went down from 29,133 in
July last year to 27,834 this
year. Sea arrivals dropped
84.43 percent from 14,439 to
2,248.
In the out islands, air arrivals
for July were up 33.14 percent
from 9,512 to 12,664. But sea
arrivals were down 38.24
percent. Despite the drop in
sea arrivals however, the
arrivals total for July were up
6.17 percent from 15,289 last
year to 16,232 this year.


F


Price: 15 Cents


Ju


10.16 inches of rain


in past 48 hours


MORE RAIN has fallen on
New Providence in the last two
days than during the entire
month of June, adding well
over a quarter of a million
gallons of fresh water to the
Water Department's reserves,
flooding roads and stalling
automobiles.
A Meteorological Office
spokesman told The Tribune
that between 7 a.m. Tuesday
and 7 a.m. today 10.16 inches
of rainfall were recorded. He
said that was "by no means" a
record, as without checking he
could recall more than 17
inches falling within one
24-hour period some time ago.
Record or not, it was more
than the 9.48 inches recorded
during the whole of June, and
more than 30 percent higher
than the 6.4 inches combined
total recorded for January,
February, March, April and
May.
The 10.16 inches of rain
translates into some 338,000
gallons of water falling into the
Water Department's reserve
water tanks.
The Tribune was today
unable to contact any Works
Ministry or Water Department
spokesman to reveal the
present level of the reserves.


They stood at 11.2 million
gallons on August 12.
CUT OFF
Since the reserves were
depleted during the
independence celebrations, the
department has been trying to
get them back up to 14 million
gallons and meanwhile has
been cutting off supplies to
consumers for 12 hours each
day.
The Ministry and the
department have not yet
explained the fact that on both
Tuesday night and last night
New Providence consumers
have been pleasantly surprised
to find their supplies
practically normal right up to
the time they have gone to
bed.
It is not known whether the
improved supply is in any wa.,
connected with the rain
storms, which coincidentally
began on Tuesday and
continued through Tuesday
night, all Wednesday and most
of last night.
Works Permanent Secretary
Pat rick Erskine-Lindop
yesterday said the Ministry had
not changed the cut-off times
and he could not explain the
improvement.


Judge disallows questions by one of



accused in Spencer kidnap case

By SIDNEY DORSETT
TWO CALLS MADE TO THE HOME of former Freeport Royal Bank of Canada general
manager, Mr. Robert Spencer, on February 16 came from a saloon and a hotel in the Lucaya area,
a Grand Bahama Telephone Company official testified this morning.


Mr. Lowell Brown, president
and general manager of the
Grand Bahama Telephone Co.,
said he was personally involved
in tracing and recording the
telephone calls to the Spencer
home following the kidnapping
of 4V2-year-old Andrea Spencer
on the night of February 15.
Brown, of medium height
and build and wearing a light
suit with green striped shirt
and green neck-tie, said a call
made to the home of Mr.
Spencer on February 16 at
7.15 p.m. came from the
Holiday Inn Hotel.
He said a device used at the
Lucayan telephone exchange
traced the call to a pay booth
in the hotel's lobby.
A second call on February
16 at 11.45 p.m. was traced to
a pay booth at the Britannia
Pub, he said.
However, a telephone call
just before I a.m. on February
17 was not able to be traced as
it was not made from the area
handled by the Lucayan
telephone exchange, he said.
Despite this, he said, an
attempt was made to trace the
call manually. They did not
find out the place the call came
from as it was too short, he
said.
Mr. Brown, slightly balding
at the temples, remained in the
witness box to the luncheon
adjournment this afternoon
and was cross-examined by
ex-policeman Leroy McLean.
ACCUSED
McLean, who once headed
the Freeport Criminal
Investigation Department's
Vice Squad, is jointly accused
of kidnapping the little girl on
February 15 along with police
officer Spurxeon Dames
Dames is represented by


attorney Randol Fawkes. The
two pleaded not guilty to
charges of kidnap, attempted
extortion, assault with deadly
instruments, and possession of
firearms.
Led by the Solicitor
General, Mr. Langton Hilton,
the witness said that the
recording and identification
system used by the Lucayan
telephone exchange was an
automatic one.
Hie said that a special device
was installed to the Spencer's
residential telephone on
February 15 and tested about
9.30 p.m.
When calls were made to the
Spencer home, automatic
machinery provided them with
a punched card which could be
interpreted by referring to
their records. By this method,
they could determine where a
call going into the Spencer's
home was coming from.
The card was punched with
a binary coding system from
which coding information was
taken, Mr. Smith said. He said
after the coded information
was taken from the punched
card, they would refer to a line
card that gave the location of
the telephone in numbering,
from which the call was placed.
He also identified certain of
the cards the ones tracing
the calls from the Holiday Inn
Hotel and Britannia Pub as
he gave evidence.
An adjournment was made
in the hearing this morning
after the witness told the
Solicitor General that one of
the cards did not relate to one
of the calls.
He testified that after the
first call was made on February
17, the Freeport police
department was contacted to


notify them of the place it
came from
if NOlRFDS
Employed by the telephone
company ftr almost two years,
Mr. Brown revealed under cross
examination by McLean that
"between ihc 15th and 17th of
February several hundred calls
were made tu the Spencer's
residence."
le said his company also
traced sNeiral hundred of the
calls made.
lie said the company has
retained all ol the punch and
line cards used in tracing the
calls.
lie told Mclcean the police
decided which ot the punch
and line cards should be given
them but that he could not say
whether they examined all of
the cards.
McLean also questioned Mr.
Brown on whether any of the
telephone calls were traced to
the Lucayan Towers.
Mr. Brown said he could not
say. (Mention of the Lucayan
Towers was first made
yesterday by Trans World
Airlines pilot, Mr. Landis
Smith, who said he lived at the
condominium. Mr. Smith and
two women had returned
young Andrea to her parents
on February 17th after finding
her near a deserted church.)
Mr. Brown said that an
On Back Page


/


Development Minister Francis


challenges Bahamians to


'build abetter Bahamas'

DEVELOPMENT MINISTER CARLTON E. Francis last night
challenged the Bahamian people to "use every means ..


5 'BADLY


SCARED' BY


LIGHTNING,


HOUSE STRUCK

THREF children and two
adults narrowly escaped injury
Wednesday afternoon when
lightning struck a house in
Nassau Last causing serious
damage.
Sitting at a dining table
directly under the point of
impact were Cindy Cartwright,
nine years. Kevin Major, five,
Cindy's cousin, Kevin's
one-year-old baby brother and
the children's grandmothers,
Gwendolyn Major and a Mrs.
Campbell.
According to Cindy's father,
contractor Earnest Cartwright,
the lightning bolt struck the
television antenna atop the
house at about 2 p.m. It
knocked the antenna down,
blasted a one-foot diameter
hole in the wood shingle roof,
knocked a two-foot hole
through the sheet-rock ceiling,
narrowly missing Mrs.
Campbell, and was drawn to a
ceiling light fixture, whose
shade it destroyed.
The electrical current from
the bolt followed the television
cable down the slope of the
roof, tinder the eaves, inside
the house and into the
television set, leaving a black
scar in its wake and doing an
unknown amount of damage to
the set itself.
The five persons in the
house at the time escaped
without injury, except for
some scrapes on Mrs.
Campbell's shoulder from
flying splinters.
They were "badly scared,"
though, Mr. Cartwright
reported.
The same bolt of lightning
is said to have invaded a
neighbour's kitchen as well,
but without doing any damage
or injury,
The house hit by lightning is
owned by Mr. Cartwright's
brother-in-law, Colin Major,
who was off the island at the
time


~lri~fl~ltP












Whte aritbm


Tuesday, August 23. 1973.


ROGERS RESIGNS REPLACED BY KISSINGER?
SAN CLEMENTE, CALIFORNIA (AP)- President Nixon held his first
news conference Wednesday in more than five months, lie announced the
resignation of Secretary of State William Rogers and his intention to
nominate Henry Kis&inger to succeed Rogers. Nixon said he has no
hindered his ability to govern. The President said he will not turn over
Watergate-related White House tapes to the Senate Watergate Committee or
special prosecutor Archibald Cox.
President Nixon told his nationally broadcast news conference from the
Western White House that he accepted with regret the resignation of
Secretary of State Rogers. Nixon said he hopes Rogers will remain available
to him as an adviser. He praised Rogers as a man who could look hack on
"one of the most successful eras of foreign policy of any administration."
Rogers' resignation comes after weeks ot speculation that he would be
replaced by Henry Kissinger. who was conceded to be the main torce
behind the Nixon foreign policy. (e Sl.I STORIES I HIS PAG()
NOT TAPING ANYMORE SAYS NIXON
SAN CLIF.MENTI, CALII ORNIA (At) President Nixon said he
considered that a directive to Patrick ;ray to investigate Watergate
thoroughly was adequate response to the warning (,ray said he gave the
President in July of last year. Asked about a possible compromise on
making available tapes of presidential conversations to Watergate
investigators, Nixon said he didn't think it would satisfy the public mind to
have a select group of officials hear the recordings.
He said the President simply could not conduct his office if the privacy
of tapes or written documents was invaded.
The President said he didn't ask Jon Mitchell who was involved in the
planning of the Watergate wiretapping because he thought that it the
former Attorney General knew, he would tell him. Mitchell already has
testified before the Watergate Committee that he deliberately kept Nixon
in the dark about Watergate because he believed the President would
disclose everything and harm his chances for re election.
Nixon was questioned about his police, of taping office conversations.
Nixon said he personally didn't find the taping appealing but that he
instituted the policy because he thought it 'would he helpful in the area of
national security to have the conversations for future reference. Nixon said
he wasn't taping any more and that he %sas just as happy that he wasn'tt
NIXON REAFFIRMS HIS CONFIDENCE IN AGNEW
SAN CLMI-F".ENTE, ('At. I-ORNIA (A') -'resident Nixon declined to
comment on what action he might take if Vice-President Spiro Agnew is
indicted. Nixon said his confidence in Agnew has not been shaken by the
Maryland investigation involving Agnew in allegations of kickbacks and
political corruption.
Nixon said he would not comment on the specific allegations that have
appeared in news reports about the federal grand jury probe in Baltimore,
but he said he deplored the leaks which he said he felt had led to unfair
persecution of the Vice President. (* See Story This Page).
WIRETAPPING DURING KENNEDY ADMINISTRATION?
SAN CLEMENTE, CALIIfORNIA (Al')- President Nixon said he accepts
full responsibility for the climate that allowed the WAatergate scandal to
develop He said there were wiretaps on news organizations and news
people during the Kennedy administration.
Nixon said he agreed with such wiretapping because he felt vital national
security interests were involved.
WHOLESALE & RETAIL TRADES TO ABSORB COSTS
WASHINGTON (AP)-The Cost of t iving Council today proposed
regulations for controlling food prices in Phase I-our that will require
"substantial cost absorption on the part of wholesale and retail trade." Ihe
regulations also will require retailers to maintain the same price markups
over their costs of purchasing products from wholesalers to the same
markup or profit margin that existed during a past base period.
GAUDET SURRENDERS TO SECRET SERVICE AGENT
ARROYO HONDON. NEW MEXICO Iiormer Nesv Orleans policeman
Edwin Gaudet surrendered to a secret service agent in northern New
Mexico today. Gaudet, who was escorted to the authorities hb his wife.
immediately was arrested on a charge of threatening President Nixon.
PIONEER II STARTS 7-MONTH JOURNEY TO JUPITER
MOUNTAIN VIEW. CALIFORNIA (AP)--The Jupiter hound spacecraft
Pioneer-Two has begun a seven-month journey thriouih ISt6 million mile
wide astrobelt. The Craft is now one-third of the was ion its trip to Jupiter
and is expected to reach there late next year Pioneer Ten crossed the
astrobelt last year and now is 50 million miles lroni Jupiter
IRISH COMMUNITIES COMBED FOR TERRORISTS
LONDON (Al')-Armed Scotland Yard detect ies combed Irish
communities in Britain Wednesday for the phantom terrorists behind a
wave of incendiaries and letter bombs. But just who %was responsible for the
abortive five-day blitz remained a mystery .
The would-be bombers struck again in I ondon, but not on the same
- scale as Tuesday's attempts to terrorize the capital
Two unexploded devices were found cigarette pac- firebombs in
Dickins and Jones, a leading department store and a to,.hN trapped hook
in a package delivered to the Conservative PIart% t entrail headquarters near
the FHouses of Parliament. Both were defused h a.1 Scotland Yard homl-
squad.
A nationwide police alert was declared
Wednesday's bombs brought the tally ot terror since Saturdai to 15
firebombs detected in London stores, eight letitr ln)mhs. a suspected
mailed incendiary that started a fire in the government 's Central iltice of
Information, a gasoline bomb in Aldershot. jnd a h,,ni that exploded in a
North London shopping precinct.

FOUR DEATHS IN BRENDA'S WAKE IN MEXICO
MFXICO CITY (AP)-.-lour persons died i\hen tillir lhmic -,ll.ipsed in
the village oif Victoria. Tabasco under the force (I tr)ipi.al storm Brenda
that entered land there Tuesday.
Official reports of the governments of lahasco ,ind Campeche States.
those most affected by the storm, said the four deaths were the ionl ones
in the two state areas -of 175,000 square kilmini'ters with ,a population of
nearly two million..
Brenda reached hurricane force in the (,olt but when it entered lind had
diminished and carried winds of 55 miles per luiir. I lie storm had carried
winds of 87 mph with gusts of up to II imph. l3renda dissolved today.
A spokesman for Tabasco State Gove r rMano In rujillo said that "in
Frontera the winds bless' the roots iff hall fll ii hiies "' I r1 m ter. i is on the
Gulf coast 45 miles northeast of the Taibj,oi state capital if Vill.uliernims.i.
SPACEWALK TO REPLACE STABILIZERS
SPIAC CI C'INNTR'., HOUSTON (AP1') Sky lah 2's astronauts
concentrated on medical and solar astronunts experiments \,ednesday
while Mission Control worked up ai plan for a I rida. space ssilk in whicil
two of the spacemen will attempt to replace a set of troublesome
ga roscopes
If the main gyroscopes should fail. the space station might lose its
stabilit, and spin aimlessly in orbit, eventually tumbling out of control.
'There was no danger to astronauts Alan L. Bean, l)r Owssen K. Garriott
and Jack R. Lousma because they could take action to stabilize the vehicle
if there were a failure.
Space Centre officials said the space walk will start about SOOMT
Friday and that installation of the spare gyros should take about an hour.
Other tasks will extend the outside excursion to about four hours.

COMMUNIST SAY U.S. BEHIND ABORTIVE COUP
VIIN'T'IANI". LAdS (AP) 'the Communist.backed Pathet Lao
reported today that talks with the Vientiane government on a coalition
government for Laos are deadlocked, but said they will keep on talking.
Soth I'etras, the Pathet Lao permanent representative in Vientiane.
claimed that Monday's abortive right wing coup was aimed at sabotaging
the negotiations and repeated earlier Communist charges that the United
States wsas ;it least partly responsible lir the coup attempt.


NIXON DEFENDS HIS POSITION, MAKES DISCLOSURES Newsprint & toilets, beside.

NIXON SAYS Rodgers resigns & NIXON'S FAITHother ins, i short supply

Ur wnu'T a IN other things, in short supply


nr nun i


RESIGN
By Gaylord Shaw
SAN ('LI MI ENTE,
C ALIFORNIA (AP)-
President Nixon stoutly
defended his actions in the
Watergate Scandal Wednesday,
declared the case is "water
under the bridge" and said he
will not resign but rather will
get on with the "people's
business."
Standing in the hot
California sunshine for 50
minutes as he held his first
news conference in five
months, the U.S. President
also:
announced that the lone
remaining member of his
original Cabinet, Secretary of
State William P. Rogers, has
resigned effective Sept. 3 and
that he will nominate
Presidential Assistant Henry A.
Kissinger to succeed him.
Voiced confidence in Vice
President Spiro T. Agnew's
integrity, assailed "outrageous
leaks" on the investigation
involving the Vice President,
said he personally had ordered
an investigation of the leaks
and would fire anyone found
responsible.
But the bulk of the
questions asked at the
nationally televised news
conference held on a parking
lot at the Western White House
office complex dealt with
ramifications of the Watergate
Scandal that has plunged
Nixon's popularity in the polls
to the lowest point of any
President in 20 years.
MAJOR POINTS
In responding to the dozen
Watergate-related questions,
the President made these
majorpotmts:
He predicted that two
former high-ranking aides, H.
R. Haldeman and John D.
Lhrlichman. would eventually
he exonerated for their actions
in the case.
Said he taped
conversations of White House
meetings and telephone calls
because lie wanted an accurate
record, agreed that such taping
"is not something that
particularly appeals to me," and
said it wouldn't he done again.
[i' repeated he would not turn
our the tapes to Watergate
investigators unless ordered to
do so by the Supreme Court.
Insisted he tried to "get
the truth out" in the months
follow ing the June 1972
hugging of Democratic
National Headquarters but thial
until \larch of this year was
told bh since-fired White House
counsel John W. Dean 111 that
there was not "a scintilla of
evidence" that anyone on the
White House staff was
involved.
No cotllpromise on release
of presidential tape recordings
would satisfy the public, and
lie docs not wish to release the
tapes in Jan form.
lie permitted Hlaldetan
to listen to a tape to help hin
"be correct" in determining
what was said at a crucial
conversation with John W.
Dean III
Disclosure of the break-in
of the office of Daniel
I llsberg's psychiatrist was
withheld front the Pentagon
Papers jury for 10 days because
the break-in had yielded no
evidence.
HIe will definitely not
design and has not considered
that step, but instead will try
to serve Americans by "making
their lives better at home for
themselves and their children."
On the question of his tape
office conversations Nixon
said he personally didn't find
the taping appealing, but that
he instituted the policy in June
1970 because "in the area of
national security affairs it
would be helpful to have them
for future reference for release
only at the discretion of the
President."


Nixon said he wasn't taping
any more "and I'mn just as
happy that we don't."
The president say s he tapes
his own recollections most
nights before going to sleep.
Asked whom he delegated to
investigate Watergate, Nixon
said in June he talked to ('lark
D. Macgregor, who was then
about to become chairman of
the Nixon Campaign
Com('mtittee.
lie said Macgregor believed
the account of Jeb S.
Magruder. then the campaign
deputy director. who then was
denying involvement but
subsequently admitted he
played a key role in the affair.
In the White House, said
Nixon, responsibility was given
to domestic adviser John D.
Fhrlichmnan who the President
said delegated the job to White
House counsel John W. Dean


Kissinger takes over NOT SHAKEN


as Secty. of State

SAN CLEMENTE, CALIF. (AP) President Nixon Wednesday
announced the resignation of William P. Rogers as Secretary of
State effective Sept. 3 and named Henry A. Kissinger as his


replacement.
Rogers will return to his
private law practice in New
York.
Nixon said Rogers wanted to
leave at the end of the first
four years of his administration
but was kept on because of
pressing business.
These included the end of
Vietnamn War, the US-Soviet
agreement and the European
Security Conference.
Kissinger, Nixon said, would
remain as a Special Assistant
for National Security Affairs.
Nixon said he hoped the
Senate will act quickly to
confirm Kissinger's nomination
because of important matters
involving foreign travel in the
near future.
Kissinger will continue in his
dual role in order "to have
closer coordination between
the White House, the National
Security Council and the
Department of State," Nixon
said.
Rogers, 60, is the last
remaining member of Nixon's
original Cabinet.
WITH REGRET
Nixon said he was accepting
his resignation with regret and
said he hoped Rogers would
remain available as an adviser.
Rogers could look back
on"one of the most successful
eras of foreign policy" of any
administration, Nixon said.
Rogers was "one of the
major architects" of that
foreign policy, the President
added.
Rogers resigned after weeks
of speculation that he would
be replaced by Kissinger.
Although he never
acknowledged it publicly,
Rogers is known to have been
unhappy about his role.
He was overshadowed
throughout his term by
Kissinger, who was conceded as
the main force behind Nixon's
foreign policy
DISSATISFI FD
In addition. Rogers in recent
days has publicly made clear
his dissatist action with the
Nixon administration's
involvement in the Watergate
affair saying there was no
national security reason for the
so-called I Plunibers"
operate ions.
ih'i"' "Plumbers" was a
special investigation unit
created by President Nixon to
curb news leaks.
Two members of the group,
I. Howard Hunt and G.
Gordon Liddy, directed the


Back to nature


WILLIAM RODGERS
...last of Nixon's Cabinet
1971 burglary of the office of
the psychiatrist of Pentagon
Papers defendant Daniel
Ellsberg.
Hunt and Liddy also
directed the 1972 Watergate
burglary.
Rogers' tenure was marked
by a low-keyed operation with
Kissinger getting most of the
attention in bringing about a
new U.S. relationship with
(Commnunist China and the
negotiations of an arms
limitation agreement with
Moscow.
The State Department's
morale has suffered noticeably-
under Rogers' administration
despite efforts by the secretary
to assure department officials
they were involved in policy
matters.
Kissinger, however, made
clear he was directing foreign
policy for Nixon and that his
National Security Council stallf
was the main vehicle for
dtcc-ision making.
lThe only major area of
foreign policy left to Rogers
was the Mideast, where he
helped bring about a cease-fire
between the Arabs and Israel.
However, there has been no
major progress in recent years
toward Mideast settlement and
Rogers has been under
increasing pressure in that area
Rogers is a long-tinie
confidant of Nixon and is
credited with a major role in
helping the President through
the "'si\ cri-scs" that marked his
pre-White House political
career
Prior to serving at State,
Rogers was Attorney General
in the .i se nho wer
administration and was counsel
of several investigating
committees before that.


e on Acali


w

w



)

w
w


w


w


w


w


w


w

w
N


d


By Louise Cook
Associated Press Writer
YOU JUST CANT WIN.
No matter which way you turn these days,
bound to be a shortage.


SAN CLEMENTE. CALIF.
(AP)-President Nixon declared
Wednesday his faith in the
integrity of Vice President
Spiro T. Agnew has not been
shaken by Agnew's
involvement in an investigation
of alleged political corruption.
And Nixon said he deplores
news leaks about the probe.
Nixon refused to speculate
on whether he would ask
Agnew to resign should the
Vice President be indicated by
the special grand jury in
Baltimore which is conducting
the investigation. Nixon said
such speculation would be
totally inappropriate.
"I want to set the record
straight," Nixon said at a news
conference. "I had confidence
in the integrity of the Vice
President when I selected him
as Vice President .... my
confidence in his integrity has
not been shaken. In fact, it has
been strengthened by his
courageous conduct and his
ability."
Nixon the.- said he felt it
would be improper to discuss
specific allegations made
against Agnew but lashed out
at news leaks about those
allegations and promised he
would immediately fire any
government officials found to
be the source of those leaks.
OUTRAGEOUS
Nixon termed the leaks
outrageous and unfair and said
he had asked U.S. Attorney
General Elliot L. Richardson to
personally try to determine if
the leaks had come from the
grand jury or the prosecutors
in Baltimore or the Justice
Department in Washington.
"The leak of information
with regard to charges that
have been made against the
Vice President .... convicting an
individual not only trying
him but convicting him in the
headlines and on television
before he's had a chance to
present his case in court is
completely contrary to the
American tradition," Nixon
said.
"Even a Vice President has a
right to some, shall I say,
consideration in this respect.
WARNING
"Any individual in the
Justice Department or in the
prosecutor's office who is in
the employ of the United
States who has leaked
information in this case to the
press or to anybody else will be
dismissed from government
ser% ice.'"
L;i,' ,>hc'n asked if Agnew
would resign itf the grand jury
indicted him. Nixon said:
"The Vice President has not
been indicted. Charges have
been thrown out by innuendo
and otherwise which he has
denied to te personally and
which he has denied publicly.
And to talk about indictment
and to talk about resignation
.... would be totally
inappropriate."


it seems there's


First it was gasoline. Finding
a service station that was open
and had enough fuel became a
standard part of a summer
spin.
Next it was beef. Everything
from hamburgers to steaks
disappeared from the
supermarket shelves as
cattlemen withheld their
animals from market to protest
the continuation of the ceiling
on beef prices.
The chicken supply declined
at the beginning of August,
reflecting earlier cutbacks by
poultry farmers who didn't like
the freeze on their products.
In recent months, scattered
shortages of more and more
items have been making the
headlines. The problems cover
everything from toilet seats to
telephone poles and many of
them seem to overlap.
The gasoline shortage, for
example, has caused problems
in the petrochemical industry.
This means polyester products
may be in short supply. The
lack of beef also means a lack
of leather for shoes.
Many farmers and industry
spokesmen claim last year's
U.S.-Soviet grain deal is
responsible for current wheat
shortages. And people who do
have grain to ship say they
can't get the freight cars to
carry it because they're tied up
with you guessed it the
Russian wheat.
NO TOILETS
Lynn Krause, President of
the Chicago home builders
association, said recently:
"Toilets are impossible to get.
They're just not available and
it looks like we'll have to wait
about three months."
The reason for the shortage
is simple: demand is greater
than supply. James Harff.
director of public affairs for
Kohler plumbing fixtures.
commented: "We're at full
capacity in both of our plants
and we plan to open a new
pottery in Texas. The entire
plumbing industry is faced
with a tremendous demand."
Boston Edison Co. and New
England Telephone Co.
reported a shortage of wooden
poles. Joseph Lepore, division
head of inventory control at
Boston Edison, said: "We use
about 5,000 poles a year of
various sizes ... thus far the
shortage has caused some delay


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I--?w


"This was a deliberate part
of the project." the leader and
organizer Mexican
anthropologist Santiago
Genoves said in an interview.
He said inhibitions were to be
avoided because they were a
result of "our poor sexual
education".
The toilet, in the raft section
of the 12 xl7-meter raft, was
nothing but a wooden platform
positioned out over the water
with a hole cut over the middle
and two rolls of toilet paper
hanging from the side.
Thus crewmtembers went
through the bathroom in view
of everybody else. "I was the
first one to use it" Genoves, a
former member of Thor
Heyerdhall's Ra raft trips said.
To get a bath they went
through the shower which was
merely a tube-like wood and
plastic container also sitting
out over the water from the
left side of the raft that could
be submerged by moving ropes.
It was also in full view out in
the open.
SLEPT TOGETHER
The crew slept together in a
small 3 x 14 mneter cabin in
the centre of the raft, where
they had sleeping-bags and
where the radio equIipment was
also housed.
Other features of the Acali
included a light raft on the
front part and a kitchen
alongside the cabin where
cooking pans and pots were
kept and eleven neatly
arranged drinking cups hung
from hooks. Drinking water
was kept in a metal and plastic
container on the starboard
side.


The raft trip, sponsored by a
Mexican television station, was
carried out to see how men and
women of different
nationalities could get along in
an isolated environment, it was
also an effort to study human
friction and violence.
Genoves. who grew a beard
and long hair. said the most
"'nauseating thing" was
watching oil pollution in the
Caribbean.
NO COMMENTS
Only Geno ves made
comments because organizers
claimed the project was not
finished and tests still were
being conducted. Genoves
declined comments on whether
only of the crew members had
had love affairs.
Genoves. who supervised
the project during the
four-month. 4,650 mile
Atlantic Ocean crossing from
the Canary Island last May 12
to this Mexican Caribbean
island Monday. said results of
the experiment would be
revealed later.
Sources said the crew,
mostly married young women
and men from different
countries, went about the raft
naked or wearing bikinis and
bathing trunks.
Chores included cooking and
washing dishes, piloting the
raft. making ocean pollution
studies, psychological tests and
keeping radio watch.
All assignments were given
out by Genoves through
notices written in English and
posted regularly on the door of
the sleeping quarters. The
assignments list was ili! clearly
visible here today on the door.


raft in aid of science
By Alfonso Chardy
COZUMEL, MEXICO. (AP)--To avoid inhibitions" among the
six women and five men aboard the Acali raft, designers set up an
open-air toilet and shower where the crew took care of its
physical needs in view of everybody else.


BaHaiaSaIR

INVITES APPLICATIONS


From young men and women desirous of a career
in the airline business. Qualifying applicants will
receive both on-the-job training and posting to
courses abroad. Openings are available under the
following categories: stewardesses, reservations,
traffic and ticketing, and operations and dispatch.


Applicants should be recent graduates and possess
a miminum of 5 G.C.E. "0" levels. Opportunities
also exist for university graduates wishing to
pursue a permanent career in the Bahamas National
Flag Carrier.


Applications in writing only should be made to
Bahamasair, P. 0. Box N-4881, on or before
September 10, 1973.


I


- I~ I- -I- -- -~- - -I --~'- ~---~ -~~-I -- --- -,~- - -~- 1. .__ ... _ _,,


Tuesday, August 23, 1973.


in new work."
A telephone spokesman said
the company "has been
experiencing a significant
shortage of wooden poles and
in some cases our suppliers
have been unable to meet full
contract commitments."
The reasons for the shortage
are numerous, according to
Robert F. Shepherd, New
England sales manager for
Koppers Inc. which produces
poles at its plant in Nashua,
N.H.
One factor, he said, is the
need to replace poles washed
out by Mississippi River
flooding in the spring. This has
put a strain on producers and
has created a shortage of
freight cprs.
While you've been reading
about the shortages of other
items, you may not have
noticed our local newspaper
getting slimmer. That's because
of a shortage of newsprint.
Strikes at some of Canada's
big paper mills and railroads
have slowed the flow of
supplies to U.S. publishers and
many newspapers say that
declining inventories have
forced them to cut back
distribution or reduce the
number of pages they print.
Field Enterprises,
publisher of the Chicago Daily
News and Sun-Times, cut its
newsprint consumption by 5
per cent last week and
announced plans for a 10 per
cent cut this week.
A spokesman said the paper
would effect the savings by
trimming production waste.
g ving out fewer
complimentary copies,
eliminating some financial
tables and tightening the space
allotted to news stories.
The seven struck plants
supply about 15 per cent of
the newsprint used in thi
United States, but the
walkouts come at a bad time.
Increased worldwide demand
has strained available supplies
and the fall season is the
newspapers' busiest because of
heavy advertising sections.
Demand from the rest of the
world has caused problems
with many items in addition to
wheat and newsprint.
The price of rough rice at a
wholesale market in Crowley,
La., jumped to its highest price
since .World War 1.












Thursday, August 23, 1973.


(h U rtrbtmt


Iwh Cribune '
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Publisher/Editor 1917-1972
Contributing Editor 1972.
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972 -
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Thursday, August 23, 1973.


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
AN INTERESTING case is now before the courts in Florida.
A politician has won an action against The Miami Herald
because that newspaper refused to print a reply to an attack made
on him by its editor.
A commentator on a TV station in Miami has defended the
right of the newspaper to exercise some judgment in publishing
copy submitted to it. The commentator saw the court's decision
as a dangerous infringement on freedom of the press.
The bone of contention seems to be that the politician claimed
that the editor should have printed his reply exactly as it was
submitted, regardless of its contents.
Ordinarily such a demand would not be difficult to meet in the
Bahamas where libel laws require a standard of responsibility to
be maintained. If the copy submitted was libellous then the
newspaper could not print it.
But in the U.S. where libel laws are so wide open that they
seem hardly to exist at all, it is feared that such a ruling would
leave the door open to all manner of abuse.
And so newspapers are concerned with having their columns
exposed to this danger.
It is unfortunate, of course, that some newspapers are a closed
door. They do not encourage free and open discussion and often
a man finds himself frustrated when he goes to a newspaper with
what he feels is a just case for public airing...and is turned
away.
I don't feel I have to tell my readers that The Tribune is a
champion of press freedom but I also feel that it is an abuse of
freedom to attack a man and then deny him the right to reply, as
some newspapers do.
The Herald will appeal the decision of the court but it might be
a good thing at this time for newspapers in the U.S. ... in the
absence of hard and fast libel laws ... to consider the whole
situation in relation to their attitude towards their readers.
I regard the press as a public organ of communication in which
every level of thought in a community should enjoy the right to
full expression within the limits of the law of libel.
We have our own point of view' in The Tribune. We fight for it.
We stand solidly behind it. But we recognize the right of anyone
to disagree with us. Indeed, we invite criticism of our policies
because it is only by the fullest expression of all points of view on
any public question that we may hope ultimately to approach the
truth, even though we may not find the truth absolutely.
Sometimes it takes a long time for a community to find the
right road and it is only by persistent search for truth that we
may hope one day to reach a high goal.
We stand four-square behind freedom of the press. But we
condemn abuse of this freedom by closing the columns of a
newspaper to full expression from the opposite point of view.
If newspapers want to gain the confidence of the public...then
they must be fair in dealing with their readers. But, on the other
hand, the courts should not put the press in an impossible
position.

"When Immigration turns down a work permit for me I keep
ny mouth shut; when you are turned down by Immigration you
write editorials about it," a "friend" of mine remarked cynically
to me the other day.
This man keeps quiet because he is afraid...he wants to hold on
to any small favours he might be able to squeeze out of
Immigration.
This man is prepared to crawl on his belly, hat in his hand, in
the hope that his new masters might look with favour on him
one day.
This man, who was an important figure in the Bahamas under
the former government, is trying desperately to ingratiate himself
with the government by crawling on his belly.
This is how a people become slaves....they are prepared t)l
prostrate themselves, in the dust, in the presence of tyranny.
If more people had the "guts" to protest the government
would have to be more careful.

A merchant admitted to me the other day that there were
many times he felt he should write a letter to the press but "I am
afraid that Immigration might squeeze me still further," he said.
"I know I am a coward," he added, "and I am ashamed of it
but I feel that I will be crushed by the government if I speak
out."
This terrible condition is hurting thousands of people in the
Bahamas today who should be providing honest leadership for the
Bahamian people.

Yes, it is true that I protest against unfair treatment. I can do
this because I refuse to be afraid to stand up and be counted as
long as I have any part to play in the life of the Bahamas.
I not only refuse to be afraid...l feel that it is my duty to keep
people informed of what is happening to them...because when the
poisonous policies being pursued by Government really take
effect the patient must surely die.
Right now ... the Bahamas is dying slowly from economic
strangulation. The recent action of the Minister of Finance in
exercising his power on price control is a clear example of
government's lack of understanding of vital situations.
***********************
The government has laid down a hard and fast rule that
business men must train Bahamians for senior jobs. They are told
that they must employ Bahamians.
Tile Tribune has always followed a policy of training
Bahamians for senior jobs but, as fast as we find a Bahamian to
fill a position, he or she leaves for one reason or another.

I will give you an example of how it works.
We have a modern newspaper press that is capable of producing
the special Independence Day issue in colour that we published
,on July 0Oth.Both in editorial content and in physical production
*this issue would do credit to any country in the world. Any


MAN IN THE NEWS


Dr. Henry A. Kissinger

By Jay Perkins
WASHINGTON (AP) Henry Alfred Kissinger, the German refugee who became the Nixon
government's chief international trouble-shooter, officially was named Wednesday to the Secretary
of State post some politicians felt he already occupied.


Appointment of the
50-year-old former Harvard
University professor
culminated a rise in his
political fortunes that began in
1955 when Kissinger served as
a consultant to the Eisenhower
administration.
Long thought to be the
second most powerful man in
the current government,
Kissinger was considered the
architect of the agreement with
North Vietnam to end the war
in Southeast Asia as well as
the man who succeeded in
bringing China and the United
States to a new understanding.
His influence with Nixon
was so strong that Senator
Stuart Symington,
Democrat-Missouri, said in a
Senate speech that "Kissinger
is the Secretary of State in
everything but title."
Born Heinz Alfred Kissinger
he changed his first name
after coming to the United
States Kissinger was raised in
a devout middle-class Jewish


family in the Bavarian city of
Furth.
If confirmed by the Senate,
he would be the first Secretary
of State in the nation's history
who was not a natural born
citizen.
His family immigrated to
New York City in 1938 after
Hitler came to power. Kissinger
became a naturalized citizen
after he was drafted into the
army in 1943. He served in the
84th infantry division and the
970th counter intelligence
corps and saw action at the
Battle of the Bulge.
Kissinger enrolled at Harvard
College in 1946 and was
elected to Phi Beta Kappa. He
received his Bachelor of Arts
degree in 1950 and his
Doctorate in 1954.
In 1957, he wrote his best
known work, "nuclear
weapons and foreign policy."
That doctrine became national
policy in 1961 when Kissinger
served as a consultant to
President John F. Kennedy.


government would be proud of such an institution.
This press needs a highly skilled operator at its controls.
We have a young Bahamian pressman who was originally
trained on this machine under a highly skilled man at The
Tribune. This young Bahamian had ambition. He went to a
technical college in the U.S. and completed his training... for
which we paid a large part.
When he came back to us we made him our chief pressman.
But now he is leaving again. He doesn't want to be a pressman
any longer. He wants to be an accountant. And so he is going
back to the U.S. to take a course in accounting.
I glory in this young man's ambition. But what does The
Tribune do for a trained pressman?
This press is a very complicated machine. When we were
printing the Independence Special the trained pressman ran into a
problem with the colour pages.
The staff almost had to abandon colour after spoiling
thousands of papers. But before going all-black they phoned me
at my apartment in Coral Gables. This was late at night.
I phoned the night staff at the factory in Chicago and was ablo,
to trace one of the experts on this irachine at his house, in the
hope that he might agree to fly to Nassau early the next day to
see this job through for us.
He then phoned The Tribune office in Nassau and was able to
tell them over the phone what to do to correct the trouble
And so ... even with a local man trained in a technical school in
the U.S. we sometimes run into trouble. Believe it or not, this
little affair cost us several thousand dollars.
Until a few weeks ago we had a highly trained Canadian
secretary who had been on my staff many years. He is past
middle age and may now find it difficult to get a start in another
country.
We were training a fine young Bahamian girl, whose parents
came from Andros, to fill his place. She is going to the U.S. in
September to take a course that will qualify her as an Executive
Secretary.
We were happy about her plans and encouraged her to pursue
this ambition. But Immigration has refused to renew the work
permit of the Canadian until this girl can complete her training.
He was forced to leave at the end of June and the Bahamian girl,
whom we had prepared to take his place, goes away to school in
September. This leaves us stranded for a competent secretary.
When Harcourt "Rusty" Bethel retired as manager of ZNS he
came to work for us as Advertising Manager. He is a Bahamian
and so we felt that this position was securely filled. But now he
tells us that he intends to return to his home in Abaco to manage
a hotel. And so he is leaving too.
Fortunately we have a Bahamian in the organization who can
fill his place. But who is to fill the place of this man when he
moves up?
The senior woman in our IBM department recently left us to
take another position. Fortunately Sammie Haven, who has been
with us for over 45 years is in charge of this department and has
been able to fill the gap.
Business in the Bahamas is small by comparison with modern
operations in a big country. There is no pool of skilled labour on
which to draw in an emergency and so a business in the Bahamas
should be in a position to keep a string of "seconds" if it is to
maintain a high standard.
No Bahamian business place can afford to maintain such an
overhead. And so standards must be constantly lowered.

Yes, I do write about these difficult problems in my
organization. I don't expect my protests to do us any good
because just about everyone else in the Bahamas is afraid to speak
out. And so the government can safely crack the whip over their
backs.
Immigration says we must find a Bahamian. When we ask ...
where? The reply is: "That's your problem ." Business suffers
Standards fall and desirable foreign investors are afraid to risk
their money here.

I write about these conditions because I refuse to be afraid,
but also because I feel that it is my duty to inform the Bahamian
people of what is happening to them. I say "happening to them "
because I am prepared to face anything that may happen to me.
But most of my people will not be able to take care of themselves
if and when a crisis arises.
And that's the tragedy of it all.
If business men could get together and unite in their
interests.....as labour does ... they would have some bargaining
power but most of them are scared. The wealthiest of them, who
thought money had power, are scared to stand up like men and
fight against this tyranny that is bound to destroy them all in the
end.
****************

FOOTNOTE TO HISTORY: Since writing this article a girl
trained in our IBM department has given us notice. I understand
she is moving to an Out Island with her parents.
And the Jamaican head of our photographic department,
whose work permit runs out in a few weeks time, is leaving to
take a job with the new government printing department.
So ... there you are. How fast is a business expected to train
highly skilled staff?

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he
was yesterday.
-ABRAHAM LINCOLN


Kissinger was named
associate director of Harvard's
Centre for International Affairs
in 1958 and held that post
until 1960.
lie continued teaching at
Harvard and was named full
professor in the government
department in 1962. He held
that position while serving as a
consultant to Kennedy and to
President Lyndon B. Johnson.
Kissinger serncd as foreign
policy adviser to New York
Governor Nelson Rockefeller
in 1968 when Rockefeller
made his unsuccessful bid for
the Republican Presidential
nomination. He was named by
Nixon as his National Security
Adviser shortly after Nixon
defeated Senator Hubert H.
Humphrey in the Presidential
race.
There is no question that
Kissinger is close to Nixon.
He normally meets with the
President each morning to
discuss things that have
happened in the past 24 hours
that could affect foreign
policy. Hle usually sees Nixon
three or four times daily.
As National Security
Adviser, Kissinger also heads
the National Security Council
as well as overseeing the
activities of 46 assistants and
105 administrative personnel.
He is credited with playing a
role in the Nixon government's
initiation of Strategic Arms
Limitation talks(SALT)with the
Soviet Union as well as with
the White Ilouse's decision to
return Okinawa to Japan.
Kissinger also has played a
role in the U.S. decision to
renounce chemical and
biological warfare and in the
decision to deploy a limited
antiballistic missile system
instead of the full deployment
favoured by the military.
Despite his drafting of much
of the White House's foreign
policy, Kissinger was not
answerable to Congress as a
presidential aide. Ife repeatedly
declined to testify before
congressional hearings, citing
executive privilege.
Divorced in 1964, Kissinger
has built up an image while in
Washington as a man about
town, frequently escorting
beautiful women. He is most
sought after as a dinner guest.


- 3.


Moving spirit at St. Joseph's


EDI TOR, The Tribune.
On Friday morning last I
was shocked to hear that Mr.
Theodore Richardson. choir
master of St. Joseph's capable
choir, had passed away in his
sleep. I just couldn't believe it
at that time. However, when
the news was confirmed the
first idea that came to my
mind was that Teddy was all
right with his Maker because of
his good works in St. Joseph's
parish. I then offered a prayer
for his soul just in case. Then I
wondered who will replace
Teddy in the parish. He was
choir master, cantor, member
of the parish council, an all
round indefatigable worker in
the parish and a strong Roman
Catholic.
Teddy was dependable and
punctual. Whenever he
assumed responsibility that
work could be left to him as it
would undoubtedly be done.
Further he carried his
responsibility with such ease
and grace. When I saw Teddy
in action, many times 1 wished
I could be like him. There he
was, unobtrusively and
smoothly performing for his
God. How did he do it? I don't
know, but he did it so
constantly and so well. He gave
his services all around in the
parish.
If our Pastor made a plea for
funds Teddy was the first to
arrange a programme to raise
money and his efforts
invariably were successful.
He kept his choir together
with his presence and active
with his persistent and stable











McAllistei Hotel
DOWNTOWN MIAMI



likiiili litis
Single $ 9
Double $11
Triple $13
Quadruple $16


leadership at regular choir
practices.
He gave motivation to the
Parish Council by introducing
practical and feasible ideas.
In short Teddy was a moving
spirit at St. Joseph.
If the Pastor wanted
anything special told to the
congregation he would call on
Teddy to tell them and Teddy
would perform as if he was a
professional He was adept at
this job which he always did in
a spirit full of witticisms and
levity and this endeared him to
the people of St. Joesph.
Above all and to his lasting
credit Teddy was a good family
man. No one can have anything
better said about him. This is
his highest testimonial.
Teddy was a young man


who gave a lifetime of service
to his Church. We of St. Joseph
never expected that we would
be denied the opportunity to
say thank you to Teddy when
he would have reached the
good old age to retire But
God's will must be done.
However, I am sure that on
Sunday people from all over
the Roman Catholic Diocese
and elsewhere will come to St
Joseph's Church on Farrington
Road where he had given most
of his services to our Holy
Mother Church to pay their
last respects to Teddy who has
earned our warm thanks and
gratitude.
M. J. THOMPSON
P.O. Box NI101,
Nassau,
August 22, 1973.


Bahamas

Telecommunications

Corporation


NOTICE


1914 PHONE DIRECTOR

The Bakhamas Telecommunications Corporation
wishes to inform the public that the closing date
for the acceptance of WHITE PAGE LISTINGS in
the 1974 Telephone Directory will be 30th
September, 1973.

A form for your listings can be found in your
current Telephone Directory immediately
following the White Page Listings. Please complete
the form ONLY if a change or additional listings
are required and return as early as possible to:-
BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS
CORPORATION
ATTENTION: COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT
P.O. BOX N3048
THOMPSON BOULEVARD
OAKES FIELD
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
In connection with YELLOW PAGF
ADVERTISING, Agents of the Corporation will
conduct their annual sales campaign throughout
the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, beginning
Monday August 20th and throughout September.
During this period they will canvass all local
business firms for advertising matter.
A.E. CURLING
General Manager


Home of the
AMERICAN-BAHAMIAN
FEDERATION


L I I L k 10


-- ----i --- -- ------ -- -- ------ I-


3 .










,hWrhb Tud.A 3 1973.


Morris Marina Estate will be available here


by next month

IF YOU'RE LOOKING FOR A FAMILY CAR with the luxury
of a saloon but with the added benefits of extra room, or a fleet
car to be used by salesmen to carry a heavy load of products in
the back, but which must allow a good degree of comfort for long
distance travelling. -


Or an all-purpose car for
small businesses, shops,
professional people who
require from time to time to
carry their businesses to the
customer...
Then the car that you're
looking for is non-other than
the Morris Marina Fstate,
which is due in Nassau at the
end of this month.
The Morris Marina I state is
a valuable addition to the
Marina range, retaining the
stylish appearance of the


compete against Maxi or 1300
Countryman. There are wide
differences between Marina
IEstate, Countryman and the
Maxi in terms of engine
c o nfiguration, drive
dimensions, payload and
loadspace.
Indeed, anyone who requires
a medium-sized car with ample
luggage carrying capacity and
accommodation for five people,
plus the opportunity to
convert the car quickly into a
large load-carrying vehicle, is


4. Ad.


.4.q


I TRIBUN MOTOI


saloon variants and designed to
have a wide market appeal,
both to private and fleet
buyers.
The attractive concept and
features of the Marina E state,
which includes the high level of
trim and comfort of the saloon
models, act as an aid in selling
the whole Marina range.
It is an additional model
that complements the current
model range and does not


looking for the Morris Marina
E state.
COMI'PTITIVI
The Morris Marina Estate is
a highlI competitive car that
compares verve lavourably with
its main rival, in the mediuni
estate car class.
The Marina Istate retains
the excellent interior features
and controls of its
saloon/coupe counterparts.
Major interior features include.


padded safety fascia with
three-dial dashboard, rocker
switches and controls.
Full air flow ventilation,
padded two-spoke steering
wheel, two speed windscreen
washers, mounted on one stalk
with 'flick wipe' facility A
lar"g lockable glove box on


THE NEW MORRIS MARINA ESTATE is an attractive car with ample luggage
carrying capacity and accommodation for five people, plus the opportunity to convert
the car quickly into a large load-carrying vehicle.


fascia, and full width parcel
shelf beneath the dashboard,
The car is also equipped
with individually contoured
seats and rear back seat of
simulated breathable 'knitback'
expanded vinly. Fold-forward
rear seat allowing 1654 litres
158.4 cu. ft.) of load space
with a payload of 408 kilos
(900 lb.)
The door-mounted ashtrays,
and one fascia-mounted front
ashtray. Deep pile carpets in
passenger area, and tough
hard-wearing and washable
material in load-carrying area.
FEATURES
It is also equipped with a
steering column lock standard,
interior courtesy light, and rear
luggage area courtesy light.
Instruments on the car
include, a speedmeter,
tachometer, water temperature
gauge, fuel gauge and warning
lights for oil pressure, main
beam, direction indlioeatrc oni
hazard warning.
Anti burst door locks, twin
sou n visors, centre
floor-mounted handbrake and
gearlever with gaiters. Door
armrests front and rear,
interior bonnet release, wheel
trims and a door-mounted


THE MARINA ESTATE, has crisp aerodynamic lines and
features an attractive grill with a single horizontal bar
matching the body colour and mounted onto a recessed
blade fluted background.


driver's mirror.
The Estate is also equipped
with a 1798 cc 'B' engine of
82.5 bhp at 5,100 rmp and
13.7M Kg torque at 2,900 rmp
(99.4 lbs/ft at 2.900 rmpl.
Acceleration 0-100 kmihr
(0-60 mph) in 14.7 sees, and a
top speed of around 153 km/hr
(95 mph).
Its transmission has a 8"
diameter diaphragm spring
clutch and a 4 speed all
synchromesh gearbox, then
through a 'split' propeller shaft
with centre bearing to a
differential and 'banjo' type
rear axle.
The Marina Estate is
equipped with a front-torsion
bar type suspension with a
rear-semi elliptic with
telescopic shock absorbers. The
rear suspension is uprated from
the saloon to contend with the
vehicle's carrying capacity.
Brakes are front disc/rear
drum with servo assistance and
the tyres are radial ply tyres
155 x 13 and they are standard


specification
CRISP IIN[S
The body of the car is based
on the 1.8 saloon, the state
has clean, crisp aerodynamic
lines ilih modern stule and
attractive interior design and
layNout. The attractive grill of
the I .,S saloon is retained, i.e.a
sini lC h,,ri,, Ital bar matching
the hod\ colour a(il mounted
onto a recessed bIladc fluted
background.
I hie following' colour and
trim combinations are available
on the LsIate: (Glacier White
with Navy or Ochre, Green
Mallard / Li nmeftlower. Teal
blu / ()ch re B la c k
TuI(l l' ..,-.hIi Rose, Damask
Red/'Spanish Rose, Blaze/Navy,
lar vest (..I1 i Inl, and
Midnight Blue with Navy.
I'he Marina I state is a
product of Britisl Ieyland
International, and will be
available at the end of this
month, at Bahamas Bus and
Truck Company Limited
located on Montrose Avenue.


QUEEN'S COLLEGE
NASSAU

HEAD OF MUSIC required in the High School for
September 1973. Applications are invited
from suitably qualified and experienced
teachers of music to teach the 'subject
throughout the High School up to G.C.E.
'O0' Level. The school has a modern and
well-equipped music room.

Salary Scale B$5,400 x 200 $6,800 x 150
$7.850 with allowances for Degree, Diploma of
Education and Post of responsibility Further
details regarding the appointment may be obtained
by telephoning 3-1666 or 3-2153.

Interested persons are asked to send letters of
applic-ition giving full details of Person,
Professional Qualifications and Experience and the
names and addresses of two persons to whom
reference can be made to:
THE PRINCIPAL,
Queen's College,
P. O. Box N127,
Nassau.
so as to arrive 'ot later than 1st. September, 1973.





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DURING AUGUST ONLY!

2V2% DISCOUNT IN ADDITION TO THE 10% DISCOUNT ADVERTISED ON Z.N.S.


A BIG 12 V2% DISCOUNT


ON ALL AMERICAN CARS


ALL MUST GO.. .TO MAKE WAY FOR THE 74's


ALL CHRYSLER VEHICLES CARRY A 12,000 miles
comes first.


1973 Plymouth



DUSTER


or 12 month warranty, which ever


Duster is that neat little car that's
small enough to go anywhere, yet
big enough for five passengers
rather than four. Rugged unibody
construction coddles you in solid
comfort. Torsion-bar front
suspension gives road car handling
characteristics. Big, economical
Slant Six or 318 V-8 engine runs on
no-lead or regular gas.


AUTHORIZED DEALER I CHRYSLER
INTERNATIONAL



BAHAMAS BUS & TRUCK


MONTROSE AVENUE --- TELEPHONE 2-1722-3-4-5.


A Il I


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Tuesday. August 23. 1973.


Whr Grthittit


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PHONE 5-6739 P.O. BOX N3741


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q,.4" w" 1. -



FIRE DESTROYS FOUR-ROOM WOODEN HOUSE


FIRF' Monday morning
destroyed a four-room wooden
house on Fleming Street, off
Baillou Hill Road, and caused
slight damage to the adjacent
Knights of King George lodge
building. Firemen were called
to the blaze at about 11 a.m.,
but were unable to save the
house, owned by Mr. and Mrs.
Nathaniel Gardiner.
It was reported that the
house was insured and damage
was estimated to be some
$12,000.
The cause of the fire has not
yet been determined, but it is
known that the occupants of
the house were not at home
when the fire started.
Slight damage was done to
the roof and eastern portion of
the lodge hall. It is not known
whether this building was
insured.

5 BAHAMIANS
OFF TO CHICAGO
CONFERENCE
ON MANKIND
A five member delegation
from the National Youth
Congress (N.Y('.C) left for
Chicago today to represent the
Bahamas in a conference on
mankind which will extend
over a period of two weeks
August 24 to September 8.
Members of the delegation are:
Melvin Seymour, Ivy Brown.
Beatrice Moxey, Greta Brown
and Kirkwood Seymour.
I'his conference on mankind
will have representatives from
approximately one hundred
countries and will be held in
conduction with the QIth
International Congress ot
Anthropological and
1Fthnological Sciences. It also
will be the first international
event of such nature
International hliarnon
necessitates understanding
among the peoples of the
world. Because understanding
hinges on communication it is
important that today's young
people achieve this
communication. Personal
contact is an important means
of achieving this goal.
F'he "Mankind Conference
73" is concerned with future
international relationship. It is
designed to create a better
understanding among young
people of the world through
exchange of cultures and
discussion of world affairs as
the\ relate to young people.
I The delegates to the
conference will be able to
derive further advantage
through their involvement in
the oth International Congress
of An thropological and
Ethnological Sciences.
"It is also the hope that P
continuing international youth
organisation would be set up as
a result of this conference, that
future conferences he held
where new problems wil!
continue to be discovered and
delineated; and that the hopes,
goals and vision of the future
will be changed by new
generations, seen and acted
upon in conjuction with advice
and views of the older
generation," Mr. Carlton A.
Martin, president, said.
The Bahamas delegation will
discuss matters in relation to
religion, culture, causes and
effects of urbanization and
industrialization, education,
family relationship, war and
peace, conservation and
ecology and future direction of
the conference.
With the aid of various
Page 9, Col. 7


Monday at 10 a.m. a fire destroyed a 1970 red and car, which was completely
which was caused by electrical white Chevrolet Impala owned destroyed, was said to be
shortage in the wiring, by Van Wright Pearson. The insured.
o GOOMBAY EXTRA\ANGANZA

JUNKANOO CLUB
7 Big Nights
Friday Aqugt 24bh thri. Aspt e@3M.
TWO BIG SHOWS
NITELY
SHOW TIVIE I I:PM. & I:A.M.


JOHNNY
NASH
SINGING HIS GOLD RECORD HITS
"I CAN SEE CLEARLY NOW" "STIR IT UP" "MY MERRY GO ROUND"
p. STAR STUDDED JUNKANOO SHOW
PICK POCKET PEARL JOSE "THE SILVER PRINCE"
PRINCESS EILEEN BILL BONAPARTE e KING PEDRO
Your Host: IVAN SIMMS
Dance to the Soulful Tunes of
D. Clark & The Mighty Five
ADMISSION $700 PER PERSON
For Reservations Call

0 ^ m3 ma_ medl


Scotch Whisky


lMOTOjETj


r.


r.1


"Thursday, August 23, 1973.


j


Oi U UNIRI^^^^^^^










6 hTilr ~ribtuw


Thursday, August ; 1973.


SUPERMARKETS Agriculture & fisheries
A.G.M. OcT. 23,


HOTELS OFFER

NEW TOURIST


DECLARE DIVIDEND can improve our balance PACKAF DEL F


THE annual general meeting
of shareholders of Bahamas
Supermarkets, Ltd., operators
of 10 City Markets stores in
Nassau and Marsh Harbour and
Winn-Dixie store in Freeport,
will be held in the Nassau
Room, Sheraton British
Colonial Hotel on Tuesday,
October 23, at 6 p.m.,
according to an announcement
by the Board of Directors.
At a special meeting held
Friday, August 17, the Board
of Directors of Bahamas
Supermarkets, Ltd.
recommended a final dividend
of 15 cents per share for
approval by the Board of
Directors at the annual general
meeting. If approved, the final
15 cents dividend will be
payable on October 31 to
shareholders of record of the
company on October 23. With
payment of the final dividend,
total dividends paid for the
fiscal year ending June 30
would amount to 50 cents per
share.
The Board previously
declared interim monthly
dividends of 3 cents per share
payable on August 30 and
September 28 to the
shareholders of record on
August 15 and September 14,
respectively.
Formal notice of the annual
general meeting of shareholders
and copy of the annual report
of the company for the year
ending June 30 will be mailed
in early October to all
Bahamian shareholders of the
company.

FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE- FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157


U U U W W Ur


of payments' says Francis
By MIKE LOTHIAN
IN VIEW OF RISING FOOD PRICES and declining food
supplies, now is a "propitious" time to "mobilise the potential in
agriculture and fisheries" to improve the Bahamas' balance of
payments position, Development Minister Carlton Francis
declared Wednesday night.
Agriculture and fisheries trade."
development was just one SHORT TlIRM
aspect of development He said short-term objectives
activities covered by the should be to concentrate on
Minister in a wide-ranging bringing unused farming land
speech at the August meeting under cultivation, to
of the Chamber of Commerce under cultivation, to
in the Sheraton British converting farm land already in
Colonial the Sheraton Betl.use into a more productive
"Beyond the industrial and d source, to apply modern
business community as techniques to reduce the
presently shaping up," Mr. drudgery of pot-hole farming
Francis said, "we must not to improve the farmer's
only keep an eye on but give education and skills, to
all our efforts to mobilise the introduce appropriate methods
potential in agriculture and of irrigation, and to organise a
fisheries as it is recognized in grading and marketing system.
our fam ily island "Beyond the short-term
communities." goals that can be achieved,
He noted that agriculture is there is a longer term objective
not at present a "strong sector to develop agri-business
of the economy," employing (professional commercial
only about 6.7 percent of the farming) as it should be and to
country's potentially promote an agri-industrial
economically active complex for the Bahamas."
population. He pointed out that the U.S.
However, "since more than AID agricultural research
80 percent of our present food project on Andros is now in its
supply is imported for a second stage, and there are
national food bill of some S60 proposals tor a pork-processing
million (per year) and our plant on Andros and a feed and
tourist population hopefully flour mill at the western end of
will continue to increase. New Providence.
agriculture and fisheries should "We see not so very far
offer substantial opportunities a way, therefore, the
for conserving foreign development of real
exchange and aiding foreign agri-business as well as an
exchange earnings, assisting in agri-industrial complex This is
economic stability, a:id basically a set up with
improving the chances of agriculture as the nucleus with
import substitution and export Page 9, Col. 6


DOUBLE ROOMS at single
room rates are the special
feature of the Nassau/Paradise
Island Promotion Board's
"Pack-A-Partner" programme.
aimed at filling the
September-December gap in
the flow of tourists between
the ending of Goombay
Summer and the beginning of
the winter season.
Twenty-four hotels on New
Providence and Paradise
Island are involved in
the programme, scheduled to
run from September 9 to
December 16, traditionally the
weakest tourism period of the
year.
The programme consists of
an eight-day package trip, with
free admission to various
attractions and the late show at
the Drumbeat Club, a hotel
manager's cocktail party and
co inm plimentary champagne
among the extras.
The new Pack-A-Partner
package programme is
expected to benefit
considerably from the
inauguration last month of the
Board's toll-free telephone line
in Miami. Anyone in the U.S.
or Canada can call the number.
free of charge, to reserve rooms
in any one of 24 hotels in New
Providence and Paradise Island.
PRINCE CHARLES VISITS
NOVA SCOTIA
HALIiAX, NOVA SCOTIA (API
The Prince of Wales arrived in
this historic port city Tuesday
aboard the British destroyer on
which he serves as a gunnerN
officer.
No special ceremonies wser
planned to honour the first visit i)t
Prince Charles, a lieutenant in Her
Majesty's Navy. The destroyer
Minerva made a brief stopover herr
after a cruise up the easter seaboard
of the United States.


LAND MARKETING

OPENS A BAY

STREET OFFICE

LANDO Marketing Bahamas,
Ltd., announced Monday
the opening of its new
Bahamas office, located in
the Kings Court Building,
250 Bay Street, Nassau.
The announcement of the
office opening was made by
Robert N. Lando, president
of the Bahamian firm and of
its parent company,
Lando/Bishopric, Inc., a
major national and
international communica-
tions agency.
The announcement was made
following the recent
appointment of Lando
Marketing Bahamas, Ltd., to
handle promotional
activities on behalf of the
Bahamas Development
Cor portation, which
operates as an arm of the
Ministry of Development.
The agency is not new to the
Bahamas, however, having
been involved with the
islands for several years
directing the advertising and
public relations activities for
Cape Eleuthera, GAC
Corporation's $30 million
residential/resort on the
island of Eleuthera. The
company also handles all
advertising for the Holiday
Inns of the Caribbean,
including the Holiday Inns
of Paradise Island and
Freeport.
"The formation of a Bahamas
agency, with offices in
Nassau and employing
Bahamians, creates a new
and important local source
to serve the marketing
communications needs of
major Bahamian
advertisers," a release from
Lando Marketing said.


CROSSWORD
PUZZLE
ACROSS 32 Winding
34. Mornings
1.Mrs. 37. Clip
7. Plating alloy 38. Boy
12. Sweet flag 41. Age
13. Soup 43. Pine Tree
ingredient State
14. Oared 45. "The Hunter"
15. Adorned 46. Half
16. Period 47. Yellow iris
17. Shack 48. San Diego
18. Chicago baseball team
transportation DOWN
19. Tapestry 1. Sea on the
23. Oval moon
25. Polite word 2. Acidity
29. Embrace 3. Dignified
31. Liquid rubber woman


SAD PACT PD
1140 OSAR AA



|RUMTo EN
FPRA RO k NE
NALMEO K E
R R SEKWN EL

SOLUTION OF SATURDAY'S PUZZLEslllEL
SOLUTION OF SATURDAY'S PUZZLE


4. Common verb
5. Mire
6. FPural
ending
7. Spanish


8. Alfonso's
queen
9. Food staple
10. Christmas
11. Remnants
15. Swallow hard
17. That man
20. Bills
21. Aircraft carrier
22. Shipshape
23. Electric
current
24. Sun god
26. Studio
27. Compass point
28. Formerly
30. TV
interference
33. At bat
34. Book of the
Bible
35. Only
36. Skidded
39. Poker stake
40. Pashas
42. Record
43. Extinct bird
44. Lend a hand
46. Army police


ow Bahamasair jets


ami 6 jets a day.


Nowthere are4 nonstopsfrom Nassau to Miami. At 8 a.m.,10 a.m.,3:15 p.m.
and 8 p.m. And 2 nonstops from Freeport to Miami at 11:30 a.m. and 4:45 p.m.
(Freeport-to-Miami flights originate in Nassau at 10:30 a.m. and 3:45 p.m.)
The fares won't stop you either. $32 round trip from Freeport (1-21 days
excursion). $38 round trip from Nassau (1-day excursion) and $42 round trip
from Nassau (2-21 days excursion).


What's more, you get more than a plane. You get a super BAC-111 Jet.
You get more than a ride. Your lovely Bahamaian stewardess will serve you a
complimentary Bahama Rum Punch. And you can sip it in comfort, knowing
you have a captain who has flown more than a million miles.
Now that you're going to Miami, aren't you glad we're going there too?
For reservations, you can telephone Bahamasair in Nassau at 7,8511. In
Freeport, at 352-5771. Or see your travel agent.


Nobody knows the Bahamas





like Bahamasair.


ROBERT N. LANDO ... Lando's chief executive


you to A

We're adding more flights to our jetstream.


I


--


ROSEMARY ARCHER

Account manager at

Lando's office
ROSEMARY P. ARCHER
has been appointed an account
manager of Lando Marketing
Bahamas, Ltd., a subsidiary of
Lando/Bishopric, Inc., Miami
and Pittsburgh advertising,
marketing and public relations
agency.
Lando Marketing and its
parent agency were recently
appointed by the Bahamas
Development Corporation to
assist in handling public
relations activities abroad
aimed at promoting industrial
investment in the
Commonwealth.
I n addition to her
administrative duties for the
agency's Bay Street office, Mrs.
Archer will provide liaison
between Lando Marketing and
the Bahamas Development
Corporation.
Mrs. Archer has previously
worked with Batelco, the
Ministry of Works and the
Nassau Beach Hotel. Born at
Knowles, Cat Island, she is a
graduate of Knowles Public
School on Cat Island and the
Nassau Academy of Business.
She has also received training
in PBX switchboard operation
at Lindsey Hopkins in Miami,
Page 7, Col. I












Thursday, August 23, 1973.


AtPM fIItUI


ur UAI

AT C.A.S. ON

SATURDAY
THE VITAL role of
agriculture in the future
growth and development of the
Bahamas will be spotlighted
during an "Open Day" at the
Central Agriculture Station on
Saturday.
The keynote addresses at the
all-day affair will be by the
Hon. Carlton E. Francis,
Minister of Development, and
Deputy Prime Minister Arthur
D. Hanna, beginning at 10:30
a.m.
"Open Day" will begin at 9
'-am until 4 p.m., and the first
50 people arriving will be given
a lime tree free of charge. This
excludes official guests and
members of the Department
-,. and their families.
Also there will be a free
raffle with prizes of three pigs
and three sheep. Each person
should complete a slip for the
drawing which will be held the
following Saturday during the
ZNS farm forum broadcast. As
part of the prize, persons
wanting their animal
slaughtered can do so free of
charge.
Guided tours of the station,
located on Gladstone Road,
will be conducted by
Agriculture Department
officials throughout the day.
Mr. Lionel Davis, M.P.,
Parliamentary Secretary to
Agriculture and Fisheries, will
deliver the welcoming address
and Mr. Claude Smith, Director
of Agriculture and Fisheries,
will speak on Agriculture -
The General Picture. Mr. S.E.
Russell will speak on the role
of C.A.S.

ACCOUNT


From Page 6
Florida.
She is a member of the
Anglican Church Women's
Association and of Past Dt.
Ruler's Counsel of
I.B.P.O.E.W., and is financial
secretary of the South Beach
Constituency, PLP Branch.
Mr. and Mrs. Archer and
their six children live in
Adderley's Terrace.


fflht Urribtuit


Prime Minister & wife, patrons of


George Sands scholarship fund


A one-man

theatre show

Tonight
NASSAU PLAYERS will
present on Thursday an
unusual form of entertainment,
a One-Man-Theatre. Brian D.
Barnes, a professional actor
from London, England, will
perform as "The Incredible
Samuel Pepys" in the Colony
Room of the Montagu Beach
hotel at 8:30 p.m. Mr. Barnes
has been to Nassau twice
before but this is an entirely
new addition to his already
popular repertoire.
In Britain much has been
seen of Barnes and his current
programmes. Festivals, theatre
clubs and arts associations have
received him with constant
acclaim.
While London is home-base
for planning and arranging
tours, a large portion of each
year is spent on the Continent;
he has presented shows in towns
as far north as the Artic Circle
in Finland to the southern
centres of Italy.


GENERAL OMAR BRADLEY
IMPROVING
LOS ANGELES (AP) General
of the Army Omar N. Bradley
continues to show improvement
after undergoing surgery to prevent
blood clots from entering his lungs.
Surgeons at the University of
California at Los Angeles last
Thursday inserted a sieve-like
device in a major artery. Hospital
officials Monday said the
80-year-old general continued to
show improvement, sitting up and
taking nourishment.


A banquet will be held
tomorrow under the patronage
of the Hon. Lynden 0.
Pindling, Prime Minister of the
Bahamas and Mrs. Pindling, at
the Holiday Inn, to raise
money for a Memorial
Scholarship established for the
four children of the late
George Sands. The fund-raising
programme was organized by
the National General Council
of the Progressive Liberal
Party.
Mr. Sands died while on a
mission for his Party at Lower
Bogue, Eleuthera, earlier this
year. First vice president of the
Progressive Liberal Party, Mr.
Sands has been described as "a
man of many parts, beloved of
his professional colleagues, the
political party which he served
so well, his friends and his
family".
In a programme which will
be published to commemorate
the event, the Prime Minister,
in his message, describes the








SAN


cause as "one of special
significance to many of us who
are aware of our brother's
devotion and sense of duty to
his four children."
Mr. Clenwith E. Dean,
Secretary General of the PLP,
is quoted in part, "When the
history of the Progressive
Liberal Party is written, it will
certainly include the name of
the late George G. Sands, Ist
vice/chairman and a dedicated
National General Council
member for more than a
decade. It is a fitting tribute
that this scholarship fund has
been established to bring aid
and assistance to his children".
Mr. Andrew "Dud"
Maynard, chairman of the
party, describes Mr. Sands as
"an outstanding human being,"
and the fund as a "practical
dedication not only to
George's four children, but to
the youth of the Bahamas".
For many years a staff


member of The NT assau
Guardian, George Sands was
described by Publisher/iPresi-
dent Mark E. Bethel, as "a
warm, friendly person who
became involved" and whose
"vitality was contagious. VWe, at
The Guardian, are sure that
George would appreciate this
sincere effort to educate his
children, as a man whohirnself
perpetually sought
knowledge".
"It is hoped that sufficient
funds will be realized frorim the
banquet and individual
subscription to cover slicool
fees at Queen's College for all
four children until they attain
the age of eighteen," a release
from Diversified Services said.
Principal speaker will be
Sinclair Outten. Earl
Thompson will serve as Mldaster
of Ceremonies. Senator Dr.
Doris Johnson, Sexator
Lochinvar Lockhart and Ezra
Thompson will also speak.


Bahamas Blenders aid youths
YOUNGSTERS OFF TO SEMINAR Kirk and Melvin Seymour, members of the
recently formed Bahamas National Youth Congress, have been selected to attend an
International Youth Seminar in Chicago, from August 27 to September 8. Their trips
were sponsored in part, by Bahamas Blenders Ltd. Pictured presenting the cheque on
behalf of his company is Mr. Ernest Rolle, Expenditure Accountant.


IN THE SUPREME COURT OF THE 1973
COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS No. 24
Equity Side

NOTICE
THE QUIETING TITLES ACT

The Petition of Little San Salvador Limited a
Company incorporated under the Laws of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas and having its
Registered Office in the Chambers of Higgs and
Johnson Sandringham House 83 Shirley Street in
the City of Nassau in the Island of New Providence
in respect of: -
ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land
containing Thirty-four and Twenty-eight
hundredths (34.28) acres more or less known as
"The Stephen Gaitor Tract" situate at Sandy
Point on the Northeast coast of Cat Island in the
vicinity of the Settlement of the New Bight and
bounded Northwestwardly by the New Port
Estate the property of Cream Properties Limited
and running thereon Five hundred and Ninety
(590) feet more or less Northeastwardly and
Eastwardly by the Sea and running thereon
Three thousand and eighty-one (3,081) feet
more or less Southeastwardly by the Crown land
under lease to Ronald Johnson and Lemuel
Johnson and running thereon Four hundred and
Ninety-three (493) feet more or less and
Southwardly and Southwestwardly partly by
Salt Ponds and partly by land originally granted
to Thomas Pratt known as "George Land" and
running thereon Three thousand and
Eighty-eight (3,088) feet more or less.
Little San Salvador Limited the Petitioner in
this matter claims to be the owner in fee simple in
possession of the said tract of land and has made
application to the Supreme court of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas under Section 3 of
the Quieting Titles Act to have its title to the said
land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to
be granted by the Court in accordance with the
provisions of the Act.

Copies of the filed plan may be inspected at
the Registry of the Supreme Court, the office of
the Commissioner at New Bright, Cat Island and at
the office of the undersigned.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any person
having dower or right to dower or an averse claim
shall on or before the Fifteenth day of October
A.D. 1973 file in the Supreme Court and serve on
the Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of his
claim in the prescribed form verified by an
Affidavit to be filed therewith.
Failure of such persons to file and serve a
statement of claim on or before the said Fifteenth
day of October will operate as a bar to such claim.
HIGGS AND JOHNSON
Chambers.
P. 0. Box N3247
Sandringham House
83 Shirley Street
Nassau.


U Zr


;MEAREDI


--


Oghp gPrthui










l t hillesoupe

Questions upset childless couple


By Abigail Van Buren
0 1973 ly COicai TribN-N. Y. NeWs Sy1., Inc.
DEAR ABBY: I have a problem many others have, and
if you answer me in your column, maybe others will benefit
from it.
I have been married for nine years and am childless.
Our first child was born so severely brain-damaged he had
to be institutionalized. Then I had a miscarriage. [Twin
boys. I A year later I miscarried a baby girl. After that, I
had a hysterectomy.
We put in for adoption, and finally got a beautiful baby
girl. At eleven months she died. Crib death! A beautiful,
healthy child simply died for no apparent reason, leaving
us heartbroken, frustrated, and filled with needless guilt.
Obviously, we have no children, and we probably never
will have any. We both have been thru a great deal.
My problem: Well-meaning strangers ask upon meeting
me: "Have you a family?" Or: "How many children have
you?"
This question throws me into a state of depression.
What do I say without going into my whole tragic
history? I avoid going places where strangers may inquire
about my "family."
Have you an answer, Abby? STILL TORTURED
DEAR STILL: Before you are asked, meet the expected
question head on. Say: "We have no children, which is such
an unhappy subject. I am not yet able to talk about It. so
let's talk about something else." Then change the subject.
DEAR ABBY: I was one of 10 children in a very poor


family so I had to quit school in the 6th grade. I always
wanted to get a better education, but I never had the
chance.
I feel so bad when my 8th grade son asks me to help
him with his homework, and I am too dumb to help him.
My husband can't help him either, as he never got thru the
7th grade.
I asked around and found out there is a night school for
grownups. I could go four nights a week from 6 to 8.
My husband laughed at me and said he never heard of
a 32-year-old woman going back to school. My heart is
broken. Please tell me what to do. WANTS TO LEARN
DEAR WANTS: Your husband should quit laughing
long enough to learn a few things. Adult education has been
a lifesaver to many who have decided to complete their
educations In their forties, fifties, and sixties. You are to be
commended.
DEAR ABBY: I have often been tempted to write to
you in rebuttal to certain letters, but simply never found
the time. Now I am so incensed, I must make the time. In
reply to the self-righteous ex-reader signed "Believer in
Buffalo," who states that: "God determines who shall die
and when, not you or anybody else." Are the physicians
who maintain a human body by needles, tubes, and ma-
chines long after the human being in that suffering body is
gone, God? Having seen both my parents in this situation
recently, I do not believe it is humane or even moral .to
allow it. When they finally died, they no longer even looked
like human beings.
I do not believe that kind of suffering is the will of God.


Tuesday, August 23, 1973.
Furthermore, I believe those people who are so quick to
tell you what God's will is are being very presumptuous.
Thank you for taking a stand for the dignity of man in his
final hours. Sign me.
"ALSO A BELIEVER IN NEW JERSEY"
CONFIDENTIAL TO M. N. IN LAKESIDE, ORE.: No,
I am not encouraging permissiveness, but what has been
done is done, so why carry a grudge for a lifetime? The
past is but a bucket of ashes.
ProblemsT You'll feel better if youe get it ol yo ehest.
Far a perseal reply. wre to ABBY: Bes No. SMM, L. A..
Calif. M M ele stamped self-addresed envelse.
please.





ENTIRELY NEW DECOR
plis PRISCILLA ROLLINS
1 BEDIE MeKENZ & THE CITAIMNS
Continuous dancing except Thursdays
ftro' 0 10p.m. until ..


Canionese Dining, Tasty Snacks from 7 p.in
NO CO'v EFR, NO MINIMUM
BRITANNIA BEACH HOTEL PARADISE


ISLAND


SUGGESTED FOR MATL4 RP A
PARENTAL. DISCRF 'TI() V
Reservations not claimed by 8:4
on first come, first served b


Last Day Friday
Matinee starts at 2:15
Evening 9:00
"THE CLONES" PC
Michael Greene
Susan Hunt
PLUS
"THE BRUTE AND
THE BEAST" PG.
George Hilton
PLUS Late Feature
Friday night.
'Phone 2-2534


I IS1


SH


WULFiFRD.


me 2-1004. 2-1005
ENSE!" U










* PG ;=-
*\11)\I'lSt/).

5, will be sold
basis


Last Day Friday
nitintious Showings
from 3
S OF FURY" PG.
Bruce Lee
PLUS
OOK, LINE AND
SINKER" C
Jerry Lewis
Peter Lawford
00K LI^N^^^^ XN
SINaBKER C IB^
Jerr Lewis f


NOW SHOWING
Matinee Continuous from 2: 30, evening 8:30
'Phone 3-4666


Dynamite'








TAMARA DOBSON LLEYWINTERS



SUGGESTED FOR AMA TURI AC l'l)El: S
PARENT I, DISCRETION A V ISED.
SORRY NO PASSES A 'CCPTIEI)'


i
I

I

I


II
I
I

I



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"Happy to meet you...




I'm the Helpful Banker


"You'll find me at any branch


of the Royal Bank"


The Royal U The Helpful Bank
ROYAL BANK
Branches throughout the Bahamas.


NK SME


I









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Thursday, August 23, 1973.


Sht rSribUttP


'I
5%


The effect of nationalism on the arts


By DAPHNE WALLACE WHITFIELD
THE QUESTION I'd like to explore this week is the effect the
cultivation of Nationalism has on the Arts.


In the Bahamas this
cultivation has quite naturally
taken on a racial emphasis -
after all 85% of the population
is black.
This was probably necessary.
The effect of slavery and white
dominance in America and the
Caribbean areas did cause a
feeling of inferiority on the
part of black people. Even
today you hear isolated
incidents of a black person
usually middle aged or old
referring to another black
person's hair as "bad" hair, i.e.,
that it is more negroid than
caucasian or white.
Contrary to what is usually
regarded as Christianity the
psychologists say that self love
and consequently self esteem
are essential before a
meaningful love relationship
can be developed with another
human being. It would seem
logical, therefore, that on a
larger scale a country must be
proud of itself and love itself
before it can enter into a
genuine egalitarian relationship
with another country.
What would be tragic and,
incidentally, have a narrowing
effect on the Arts in the
Bahamas would be the
application of a black and a
white yardstick to measure
excellence. This in effect
would be an acceptance of the
white racist's classification of
the division of mankind along
racial lines. In reality "Black"
is no better nor more beautiful


than "White" because it is an
irrelevant measuring stick. If a
black and a white athlete are
competing the one who wins is
the best athlete. Colour or
ethnic origins have nothing
whatsoever to do with it.
ILLUSTRATION
I was privy to a conversation
the other day in which a young
man he is black, Bahamian
and proud was expressing his
frustration in his work. I won't
tell you his line of work in
order to protect his identity -
besides it really isn't necessary
- but let's say for the sake of
argument that he's a road
sweeper he isn't of course.
His argument was against being
promoted (himself) for the
wrong reasons. He wants to be
good at his job. His words were
"I don't want to be a good
Bahamian (road sweeper). I
want to be just as good a (road
sweeper) in New York or
London or Geneva". He is a
Bahamian and proud of his
country. It offends him that a
lower standard of excellence
might be accepted from him.
Another danger the
cultivation of Nationalism has
on the Arts is the possible
creation of a climate in which
certain ideas are considered
acceptable and others
non-acceptable where certain
persons are regarded as heroes
and others as persona non
grata.
ONE SIDED
M.P. Oscar Johnson


publishes a magazine entitled
"International Bahama Life.
From a professional viewpoint
of layout and literary standards
it measures up. However the
articles present a dangerously
one-sided view of topics and
personalities.
The article on Sir Etienne
Dupuch in the pre-Indepen-
dence edition is such a case in
point. Sir Etienne and I differ
fundamentally on many issues
but I would be the last to
belittle the contribution he has
made to the Bahamas, to black
people, to journalism or to
deny the respect and influence
he commands in international
press circles. Furthermore I
have complete freedom to
express my opinions and
thoughts in HIS publication
and he pays me for it too!
Sir Etienne is out of fashion
now as many of our present
Bahamian heroes will be some
time in the future.
For those who do not
believe this there is a poem by
Robert Browning called "The
Patriot". It consists of two
paragraphs. Both begin with
the line "It was roses roses all
the way". In the first verse the
population of the town are
bearing their hero on their
shoulders. In the second they
are carting him out in a coffin
having killed him.
The Vanguard newspaper -
organ of the young Black
Bahamian militants says in
an article entitled "Our
Patriach Must Reject Queen's
Honours" "We acknowledge
what our courageous


forerunners have done. What
they sought to achieve will be
accomplished by us".
At least they give credit
where credit is due and their
publication does not claim to
be "International" it is quite
openly a political propaganda
organ.
SAME FATE
To those who wish to tear
down the Patriarchs of the
Bahamas I'm sure both Sir
Etienne and Sir Milo would
both be shocked at being
included in the same company
- must be willing if and
when they become Patriarchs
- to look forward with the
same good grace to being torn
down themselves and accept
the same fate as Browning's
hero.
At the dawn of Nationhood
are we headed towards the
same situation as existed in
Russia after the Revolution
with the history books having
to be re-written with the
demise and disqualification of
national hero after national
hero?
As Bahamians proud of our
new nation should we not also
be proud and pay tribute to
those giants of yesteryear no
matter how at this present time
we disagree with them
ideologically?
There are many different
ways to the Promised Land,
many differing opinions as to
what constitutes the Promised
Land, many different speeds of
travelling and many different
opinions as to whether we've
reached it or not.


How far we recognize this
will depend on our maturity
and sure enough our Arts will
reflect this.
Will the classics be accepted
for what they are true and
relevant to all people at all
times or will they he rejected
as alien and will we create an
artificial, unrealistic and
unenrichening isolation?
Or will we develop things
Bahamian and give our culture
the serious study it merits
along with the comparative
study of other people's folk art
and the cultivation of the
classics?
These are questions I cannot
answer but I think it might be
useful to keep them in mind as
we explore the Arts in the
Bahamas.


RED CROSS

DONATIONS
THE BAHAMAS Red Cross
acknowledges the following
donations to the President's
Bi-Annual Appeal of July I.
Proceeds Cook Out Luncheon,
$626.90, Lyford Cay Members
Club, $100; Trust Corporation of
Bahamas $250, New Providence -
Group No. I $45: Red Cross Group
- Millars Long Island $49.47;
Mr. & Mrs. Roscoe N. Pyfrom $20;
Red Cross Group Old Grays -
Long Island $10; Mrs. V. I. Esfakis
$20; Red Cross Group Arthur's
Town Cat Island $20; Red Cross
Group Major's Cay Crooked
Island $25; Red Cross Group -
Salina Point Acklins $20; Mr. A.
T. Gooding $25.
American Women's Club To
Meals On Wheels $195.


"


3*1r


THE RING OF QUALITY AWARD presented Joe BI alyden by ITT Corporation last
week made the Bahamian banquet and catering mnnagear the first winner of the award
outside the continental United States. Mr. Blyden Is her- e presented the award by John
Greene, Resident Manager of the Sheraton British Colonimial Hot& I on behalf of ITT.,Other
hotel executives present were, from left: Jacob Hlins,., executive chef; Peter Roberts,
assistant catering manager; Alicia Stockdale, telephonesmaltchboard supervisor; Thaddeus
Hall, Wharf Restaurant manager; Louis Thurston, food amand beverage cost controller; Mr.
Blyden; Mr. Greene; Oswald Marshall, personnel director r; Lionel Brown, bar manager;
Mrs. Rachael Moxey, Housekeeper; and Godfrey Bruno,irwmmcome auditor.


ITT CITES

BAHAMIAN

FOR SPECIAL

QUALITY AWARD
THE ITT CORPORATION,
parent company of Sheraton
hotels, has cited Mr. Joseph
Blyden for its annual "Ring of
Quality Award."
Mr. Blyden is the Banquet
Manager of the Sheraton-
British Colonial Hotel, and has
been employed with that hotel
since 1946.
Of the 400,000 people who
work for the ITT hotels all
over the world, only 100
receive the award each year.
Mr. Blyden's receipt of the
award marks the first occasion
upon which it was given to an
employee working in a hotel
outside the continental United
States.
The recommendation to the
international body came from
the Quality Improvement
Committee at the Sheraton
here. This committee is chaired
by Lewis Thurston, the food
and beverage cost controller at
the downtown hotel.
Mr. Blyden joined the old
British Colonial Hotel as a
waiter back in 1946. He next
became a captain, and moved
up through the ranks from
there. In 1970 he attended a
banquet catering course at
Cornell University. He spent
two weeks there and came
back to the Bahamas qualified
to handle banquet and catering
chores at the Sheraton.
Last week all Sheraton
executives met to congratulate
Mr. Blyden on his achievement
of the coveted award. He was
handed the citation by Mr.
John Greene, Resident
Manager of the hotel.
Mr. Greene noted that Joe
Blyden is "an important and
indispensable arm of the
hotel's operations" and that
the long years he has put in on
the property has been a major
asset to the hotel here over the
years.

AGRICULTURE
From Page 6
complementary industries
arising out of agriculture: food
processing, teed and flour mill,
pork factory, etc. Andros, for
example, lends itself admirably
to such a complex."
On the question of fishing,
Mr. Francis told the Chamber
members that "the great
assistance we are receiving
from the UNDP fishing team,
the recent re-organisation of
aspects of the fishing industry,
the projected plans for a fish
processing plant, will all help in
the drive to feel a greater
economic impact from the
more than 70,000 square miles
of our accessible fishing
grounds."
FIVE YOUTHS HELD FOR
QUESTIONING FOR RAPE
ST. GEORGS,. GREINAD)A
(AP) Police have held five youths
for questioning in connection with
the rape of a young North
American woman. The incident
occurred last week near the tourist
resort of tLevera. about 20 miles
from the capital.

[o) 0 I"[-J"


SPEAR SAWS 4


IMPRESSED BY
BAHAMIAN PEOP ?LE:
Moncrief J. Spear Clhriarge
d'Affaires at the United Sriatates
Embassy here shown (at left)
a dressing the luncW=heon
meeting of the Nassau Rc: otary
Club at the Sheraton Banritish
Conolial Hotel Tues-sday,
August 14.
Mr. Spear, who leavesas the
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas in three weeksto o take
up an appointment inViettsnam,
said that during his three= years
FILM SHOW ON
HURRICANE
THE BAHAMAS RED
CROSS will be showinga- film
"A LADY CAL -LED
CAMILLE" at Red Cross
Head qu arters, Dowdaswell
Street, on Tuesday, Augue-st 28,
at 8 p.m. It is open tc:.o the
general public and is free,
"The purpose of this a film
showing is to alert andreamind
volunteers of the hurr-rricane
precautions necessary arw md of
the general action w which
should be taken," a Red Cross
spokesman said.

5 BAHAMIAN
From Page 5
G government finisI tries,
including that of Tourismwri, and
industries, the delegatinr-n will
set '!p a Bahamian exhill-bition
and cultural presentation ra. The
conference will be pres.-ented
with a considerable numn:l ber of
books and literature or-n n the
B ahamas and a brief
memorandum prepared bAy the
N.Y.C.
There also will be i the
presentation of independence
films, a flag of the Bal-1 hamas
and musical records, incl I lauding
sacred ones.
While in Chicago, the
delegation will hold talks s with
Caribbean delegatesconcem earning
establishing a Caribbean YY0oung
Peoples Federation. "The
Bahamian nation, in its quest
to further extend its
international identify and
recognition, must ac =tively
explore and contribute to a
growing understanding a among
the Caribbean nations in
particular," Mr. Martinsaii-id.


~~..
"4












'I
'5 '1
'II
.0I~l
*1






i~
'I
sq
'dl










Eu.


II


-Ii


GOODBYE 1
in the Bahamas, he had been a
impressed by the volunteer .
spirit, cultural talents, spirit of
co-operation and the stability *
of the Bahamian people.
Mr. Spear also said he S ".
greatly impressed by the w
the Bahamian commune
pulled together for the
independence celebrations. Mr.
Bill Farquharson, President of
the Club is seen left of Mr.
Spear.


Intimacy I
andthe I



married

woman. |













The need to be sure
It's so important for your well-
being as a woman to feel sure -
about the functioning and fresh- Z
ness of your body.
Because douching isn't practi-
cal, or even always advisable, cau-
tious married women of today rely 3
on Norforms feminine supposito-
ries.


VEIN I UIK1

Every compact is supposed to
help save you money. And the Ven-
tura is designed to do just that -
and more. Besides the unusual
st,.ndard equipment which includes
a 250 cubic inch overhead valve en-
gine plus many other unusual stand-
ard features, you have an unusual
choice of optional equipment, in-
cluding a 350 cubic inch, 2 barrel
carburetor V.8 engine, Bucket seats
on 2 door models, variable-ratio
power steering, Power front disc
brakes, Distinctive front end and
grille, plus many other options.
Overall length 197.5 inches, Wheel
base 111.0 inches on the 2 Door
Coupe. The Ventura gives you a
compact power package with class
and flexibility that makes it a stand-
out in its price field.


FEARED


Positive protection two ways
Norformns do a two fold job most
effectively. They protect you :
against embarrassing problems
with their highly perfected germi-
cidal formula. And they protect
you against offensive odors with
their rapid deodorant action.
Complete confidence 0
So simple and convenient, Nor- j
forms dissolve at normal body temr.
perature to form a protective film. WJ
They do not harm delicate internal
tissue.
Next time ask for Norforms, an *
ideal way to have the confidence Z
you need as a married woman.
Sold at pharmacies in packages
of 6, 12 and 24.
Informative booklet, write to:
Norwich International
410 Park Avenue,
New York,
NY 10022 'm


SEE YOUR AUTHORIZED PONTIAC DEALER


,m


V-


r w ww v -- -


]













gWht rtbutt


Thursday August 23 1 .


CLASSIFIED


SECTION


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS-FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV. TELEPHONE 21986 EXT. 5


REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE FOR RENT CARS FOR SALE MARINE SUPPLIES HELP WANTED HELP WANTED uppy stargear


FOR SALE
BY OWNER
House in Highland Park. 3
bedrooms, 2 bath, living,
dining, kitchen, family room
and carport, utility rooms, on
2 lots of land beautifully
furnished, wall to wall carpet
and drapes throughout.
Completely walled and lovely
landscape. Airconditioned
throughout. Unusual
opportunity. To view
telephone 2-1722-3.

C10682
FOR SALE
BY OWNER
House in Highland Park -
executive type home. 4
bedrooms, 2V2 baths, living,
dining, family, kitchen, double
car garage and utility room on
2 lots of land, wall to wall
carpet and drapes, completely
furnished, large patio anc pool.
18 x 36. Beautifully
landscaped, bearing fruit trees
central airconditioning. To
view telephone 2-1722-3.

C 10888
FOR THE DEPOSIT of $75
you can sucure a 70 x 100 lot
near the sea and a private lake.
All utilities underground. No
interest charges. From $5,800.
Lakefront lots from $7500.
Excellent swimming. Call Pat
Rutherford at 4-1141 or
Morley & O'Brien at 2-4148 or
2-3027 or come to the
YAMACRAW BEACH Model
Home.

C 10894
ONE GOOD investment,
Duplex apartments each with 2
bedroom, 1 bathroom. Located
Westward Villas, near shopping
centre and the sea. Price
$55,000. McPherson & Brown
Telephone 2-2680.

C 10947
MUST SELL IMMEDIATELY
$60,000.00 WORTH of Real
Estate will be given aw'y for
$35,000.00. Four bedroom, 2
bathroom, 17,000 sq ft. Patio,
wall to wall carpet, and much
much more. Owner leaving
Nassau end of August. Phone
32527, 32140. This property
must be sold.

C10938
1. Nassau's newest prestige
subdivision Winton Meadows
Section 2 deposit only $200.00
down.
2. The largest lots with the
lowest down payment and no
interest at Yamacraw Beach
Estates.
3. Lots in Nassau East and
Nassau East-North at $300.oo
down.
4. Lots in Monastary Park
$100.00 down.
5. Lots in Eastwood $200.00
down
6. Lots in Tropical Gardens
terms to suit your budget.
7. Canal and inland lots
Seabreeze Estates all a
minimum of 100 x 100 ft.
good cash prices and terms
available
8 Also lots in South Beach
Estates Gleniston Gardens
Emerald Ridge High Vista
Estates, Bamboo Town Seven
Hills Estates, Sunshine Park
Golden Gates 1, 2 and 2
addition Bel Air and Colony
Village East.
For information and
appointment call Bill's Real
Estate 23921-

C 10990
FOR SALE
WATERFRONTAGE has
three bedrooms with space for
a fourth bedroom. Dock,
views, good swimming, skiing,
boating. See anytime.
Reasonably priced for
immediate sale.
HIGHLAND PARK AREA -
have house with 3 bedrooms,
21/2 baths, screened-in porch,
maids quarters. Grounds 80 by
1 78, enclosed. Only
$47,500.00 Furnished.
HILLTOP SANS SOUCI
302 ft. on the hilltop by 97
depth. House has three
bedrooms, 2 baths, furnished.
Landscaped grounds, and can
be had for $57,500.00. Price
should be $65,000.00. Come
see -- this hilltop commands
gorgeous views of the Sea.
HOUSE POOL COTTAGE
(Out West) 3 bedrooms 3
baths, 2-storey affair, furnished
with 40 x 20 pool, patio, bar.
Spacious garden, garages, and
TWO BEDROOM ONE BATH
COTTAGE, furnished anf
Air-cond. Ideal for large


family, or Executive. High class
area with facilities for high
class entertaining. Rights to a
beach. Immediate occupancy.
Asking only $155,000.00.
Without Cottage much
cheaper.
VILLAGE ROAD AREA we
have houses as low as
$40,000.00 and up. One only
for $35,000.00 with 4
bedrooms 212/ baths, furnished,
ideal income unit.
SEMI-HILLTOP GROVE. High
and dry 3 bedrooms 2 baths,
spacious corner lot, porte
cochere, gardens, ideal for
entertaining. Asking only
$75,000.00 See anytime.
Situate Out West.
DIAL THE ACTION
NUMBERS 22033, 22305,
evenings 41197.
DAMIANOS REALTY -- THE
ACTION PEOPLE.


r106nr-0


C10652
2 2 BEDROOM APART-
MENTS consisting of living
dining room, kitchen and
bathroom, basically furnished
- Twynam Avenue. Phone
5-8185.

C10663
4500 sq. ft. warehouse ca
office space, available
immediately. Montrose
Avenue. To view, telephone
2-1722-3.

C10877
COTTAGES and apartments
daily, weekly or monthly
airconditioned, fully furnished,
maid service available. Lovely
gardens & swimming pool.
Telephone 31297, 31093.

C 10660
HILLCREST TOWERS
Spacious 2 bedroom 2 bath
apartment, large balcony,
airconditioning, swimming
pool, short or long term. $400
per month. Contact 2-1841
days.

C10931
' 'INTERNATIONAL
HOUSE": Site of the original
quarters for the West Indies
Regiment is available for
leasing. Located downtown on
the corner of Bay. West and
Virginia Streets, the three
storey building is an excellent
example of traditional
Bahamian architecture. The
interior has been renovated for
office purposes, including
lighting, central ain
conditioning, partitioning etc.
Approximately 2,000 sq. ft. is
available with car parking
facilities.
Please call 2-2945 2-2946
during office hours.
C10895
1. 3. Bedroom, 1 bathroom,
unfurnished house, Trelawny
Gardens
2. 2 Bedroom, 1 bath house,
unfurnished, Davis Street,
$160.00 per month.
3. Large 2 storey, 4 bedroom,
3 bathroom house Cable Beach
$650.00 per month.
4. Spacious 2 bedroom, 1
bathroom apartment,
Westward Villas nice garden,
$275.00 per month.
5. 2 bedroom I bathroom,
Townhouse, Second Terrace,
basically furnished $275.00 per
month.
6. One & Two bedroom
apartments in Village Road in
town and in Westward Villas
$200. $285 per month.
For all y')ir rental inquiries
contact: McPherson & Brown
tel. 22680


i


C10957
1969 FIAT TORINO (sports),
one owner. Call 42141
between 7:00 and 9:00 p.m.


17


C10973
2C ACRES FOX HILL
property, commercial or
residential. Suitable for
Subdivision, or business place
with 2 Buildings thereon.
Contact: DAVSON'S REAL
ESTATE AGENCY, Phone
21178 or 55408.

FOR SALE OR RENT
C10771
3 BEDROOMS, one bath,'
Joans Heights, South Beach.
See Philip H. Vargas, West, S.
South-Street on Corner.

[ WANTS TO RENT
C10971
BANK EXECUTIVE just
arrived requires to rent fully
furnished 3 to 4 bedroom
house for two years. Phone H.
J. Milborrow at Tel: 28711
ext. 22.

FORRENT
C10677
OFFICE OR STORE SPACE--
Charlotte near Bay. Immediate
occupancy, ample parking.
Inquire 4-2017.
C10653
ONE EXTRA LARGE two
bedrooms, two bath, and one
extra large one bedroom
apartment. With large living
and dining all, basically
furnished Victoria Court
Apartments on Elizabeth
Avenue between Shirley and
Bay Street. Facilities, Phone,
laundry, parking, T.V. antenna,
airconditioned.
Phone 54631 between 8 a.m.
and 5 p.m.


LARGE ONE BEDROOF'i
apartment, nicely furnished.
$250 per month. Call
CHESTER THOMPSON REAL
ESTATE 2-4777-8.

C10919
ATTRACTIVE FULLY
FURNISHED House two
bedroom, 2 bath, Cable Beach,
Private Pool & Sea. Phone
7-7530.
C10651
2 BEDROOM APARTMENT-
Montrose Avenue. Basic
furniture. 1 bedroom
airconditioned, washer. To
view telephone 2-1722-3.

C10954
FURNISHED TWO-BED-
ROOM duplex apartment,
enclosed garden ,
airconditioned bedrooms,
automatic washer, $250.00.
Phone 5-8512.

C10953
COMPLETELY FURNISHED
one bedroom apartment,
airconditioned, carpeted, T V.
antenna, automatic washer &
dryer, $200.00 Phone 5-8512

C10962
ONE BEDROOM, furnished
apartment, upstairs over
Buccaneer Inn $180.00
including light & water. For
information call 5-4616.2-4087

C10970
ONE BEDROOM furnished
apartment in Private road off
Mackey Street. Air
conditioned, garden, recently
decorated. $180.00 per
month, water included. Tel.
53115, 56034

C10980
A THREE bedroom fully
furnished house corner Mount
Royal and Madeira $250.00
per month. Call 5-8954
evenings.

CARS FOR SALE
C10946
AT MOTOR CENTRE
WE HAVE
THE USED CAR
FOR YOU

1971 CORTINA S/W 0. N. 0.
new paint work radio a very
clean car AT ONLY $1.400.00
1971 V/WAGON 1300 O.N.O.
radio in good condition at
ONLY $1,800.00
1970 ROVER 2000 A/C A/T
right hand drive at ONLY
$2,000.00
1969 CHEVY IMPALA 2-dr.
Coupe vinyl roof radio console
shift bucket seat new paint
work at ONLY $2,200.00
1972 VAUXHALL VICTOR S
L. with bucket seats console
shift radio O.N.O. in very good
condition at ONLY $2,000.00
$2,000.00
1972 DODGE CHARGER 0.
N 0. radio A/T P/S P/B A/C
*apc at ONLY $4,000.00
1970 HILLMAN SUPER
MINX new paint work at
ONLY $1,200.00
1969 BUICK SKYLARK vinyl
top A/T A/C radio P/B P/S in
good condition at ONLY
$2,200.00
1968 OLDSMOBILE
CUTLASS standard
transmission 3-speed on the
floor 8-cyl. radio A/C at ONLY
$1,000.00
1970 TOYOTA CROWN A/C
A/T P/B radio ice box in trunk
new paint work at ONLY
$2,300.00
1966 AUSTIN CAMBRIDGE
S/wagon S/T radio at ONLY
$800.00
1970 FORD CAPRI AfT radio
W/W tyres mag wheel at ONLY
$1,700.00
1971 MORRIS MINI
CLUBMAN estate car A/T
radio new paint work in good
condition at ONLY $1,500.00
1971 AUSTIN 1300 sedan
radio A/T at ONLY $1,400.00
1971 CHEVY IMPALA 4-dr.
Sedan vinyl top A/C P/S P/B
A/T the perfect taxi at only
$3,700.00
Thompson Blvd. Opp Davis St.
Phone 56739 Box N3741
Nassau N.P. Bahamas

C10975
1963 FORD TRUCK, Flat
Dump, $1,600. Phone 3-1519.


I I


CI10944


New Providenc LemiU Ltd.
P.O. BOX N3920 NASSAU, BAHAMAS.


NOTICE
NEW PROVIDENCE LEASING LIMITED HAVE A LARGE NUMBER OF
USED MOTOR CARS FOR DISPOSAL. WE HAVE ALL MAKES, MODELS
AND PRICES. REGARDLESS OF COST THESE CARS MUST BE SOLD
IMMEDIATELY. NO REASONABLE OFFER REFUSED. FIRST COME,
FIRST SERVED. SOME CARS FINANCED FOR AS LITTLE AS $250.00
DOWN-PAYMENT. IMMEDIATE INSURANCE COVER GIVEN.


LOT LOCATION: GIBBS CORNER, OPPOSITE LAUNDROMAT OUR
FRIENDLY SALESMAN "WOODY" WILL BE HAPPY TO SEE YOU.


L..E U


I


C10981


AT
CntralGatege

"The (.siesstrPlace in assault u Trane
TcOAY'S
SPECIAL BU Y
1972 VAUXHALL VIVA
S/WAGON $2350.00
Also Available
1972 VAUXHALL FIRENZA
2 door coupe, stick shift on
the floor, blue, good condition
W/W tyre only $2450.00
1971 DODGE AVENGER 4
door sedan, stick shift on the
floor, blue, a fine car $1275.00
1972 VAUXHALL VIVA
S/wagon green, two door,
automatic, one owner, a good
buy $2350.00
1972 DODGE AVENGER 4
door sedan, automatic, green
resprayed, two new tyres, only
$1250.00
1966 CHEVY INPALA 4
door sedan, automatic, power
steering & brakes, air
conditioned $800.00
1971 CHEVY VEGA S/wagon
white, 2 door, automatic,
radio, a good buy only
$2350.00
1972 CHEVY IMPALA 4
door sedan, automatic, blue,
full power steering & brakes,
radio, clock, air conditioned
W/W tyre only $5875.00
1969 TRIUMPH 2000 4
door sedan, automatic, blue,
air conditioned, reconditioned,
reupholstered, fully carpeted, a
good buy at $160.00
FINANCING AVAILABLE
COME IN AND SEE US
Oakes Field near
Police Barracks
Phone 3-4711
C10911
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD
P. 0. BOX 640
NASSAU BAHAMAS
USED CARS
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
2 door auto $1695
1967 CHRYSLER NEWPORT
4 door $950
1968 PONTIAC
STRATOCHIEF $1400
971 VAUXHALL VIVA
4 door Std. $1200
1968 JAVELIN A/C $1200
1970 PONTIAC PARISIENNE
A/C $2400
1968 VAUXHALL VIVA
2 door std. $695
1967 TRIUMPH 1300
Std. $800
1969 VAUXHALL VICTOR
S/W std. $475.00
1973 VAUXHALL VICTOR
S/W $4400
1970 RAMBLER SST
4 door $2100
1969 MORRIS OXFORD
standard $995.

1970 FORD MAVERICK
A/C $2150
1970 VOLKSWAGEN
Standard $1300
1964 CHRYSLER
NFW YORKER $800
1971 FORD CAPRI $1950.
1969 FORp GALAXIES
A/C $1850
1970 HILLMAN MINX
Standard $850
1971 CHEVROLET IMPALA
A/C $3500
1966 MORRIS 1100 $50C
Trade-Ins Welcome
Located Oakes Field
Phone 34636-7-8
Opposite the Ice Plant


S FOR SALE
C10985
Zenith T.V. also STEREO,
TV-Radio combination,
mahogany cabinet $150.
Owner leaving. Call 2-2125,
77385.
C10986
1973 SUZUKI 50 cc, as new.
Owner leaving. $450.00. Call
2-2125 or 77385.
C10901
1967 TRIUMPH Herald, and
18 Ft. outboard BOAT. Phone
31619.




C10951


C 10969
THE BANK OF NOVA
SCOTIA requires the services
of an assistant accountant.
Persons applying must have at
least 7 years experience on this
particular position in
commercial banking; be
familiar with all aspects of
Canadian & International
banking ahd have experience in
the Euro Dollar & the
Bahamian Dollar money
market. Please apply in person
at the Bank of Nova Scotia,
Bay Street and Rawson Square.


I


C 10988
PARADISE ISLAND
LIMITED requires an
experienced acrobatic dancer
and a chorus-line dancer for its
Le Cabaret Theatre show.
Successful applicants must be
willing to attend regular show
rehearsals and perform a
6-night, 13-show week. Salary
commensurate with
experience. Only experienced
dancers need apply. For
interview appointment contact
Mr. George W. Mackey at
5-7511.
C 10966
POSITION in Out Islands for
male comptroller. Job, includes
knowledge of cost accounting,
handling of confidential files,
correspondence, operating
NCR machine, accurate typing
and filing essential and
purchasing of hotel supplies
and inventory control only
persons with 5 years
experience and first class
references need apply. Salary
by arrangement. Apply c/o The
Tribune Adv. No. C10966, Box
N3207, Nassau N. P. Bahamas.


C 10688
PACEMAKER 44ft. Luxurious
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.

C10974
14ft. McKee Craft Whaler.
Chrysler 35 h.p. outboard.
Bottom re-painted, wood
re-varnished. Call Chuck at
3-1308.
C10949
10 FT. SAILFISH. $250.00 or
exchange for boat engine.
Phone Henry 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
22355.
C10967
PACEMAKER MOTOR
YACHT
43' SFFB twin diesels 6V53N,
recently overhauled, generator.
New paint, wall-to-wall
carpeting, new fresh water
tanks, central air, refrigerator,
freezer, ice maker, electric
range and oven. Three radios,
hatter, auto pilot, depth finder,
stereo, etc. Diving platform,
live well, out riggers, gym pole.
Four fighting chairs, all fishing
equipment, GOOD FOR
FISHING. Dinghy, dinnerware,
sheets and blankets, etc.
$45,000.00 O.N.O. Duty
included. Reply to: Box 5021,
Miami, Florida, 33101.

PETS FOR SALE
C10961
AIRE DALE TERRIER I year
old male very good watch dog
loves children. Call 74221.

ART SUPPLIES

C10683
COMPLETE range of artists'
supplies. Oils, acrylics, canvas,
easels, etc. Bahamian Paint
Supply Ltd., Bay St. Phone
2-2386, 2-2898.


IN MEMORIAL
C10987















In sad but loving memory of
our dear loved one Nelson
Porter who departed this life
August 23rd 1971. Sadly
missed by wife Jenniemae,
mother Hurlean Porter, six
daughters, one step-daughter,
two sisters, four brothers and a
host of relatives and friends.
Gone but not forgotten.

SCHOOLS

C10959
ENTER A NEW WORLD
OF FASHION
Learn to sew with and without
patterns.
You may Register Daily
Monday Saturday 8 a.m. to
8 p.m. at The Elegant School
of Fashions and Dressmaking
Corner Shirley and Fowler
Streets. Term begins
September 3, 1973. for more
information call 53223.


C10909
AUTOMOTIVE PARTS
counterman must have 2
years experience and
recommendation from former
employer. See A. B. Malcolm -
Malcolm Tyre Service. Phone
2-2444.

C 10935
SECRETARY to Management
required for approximately 4
hours each day, 5 days a week.
Must be of high calibre and
fully experienced in all phases
of secretarial work. Salary by
arrangement. Bahamians and
Belongers only requested to
reply to: Adv. C-10935. c/o
The Tribune, P. 0. Box
N-3207, Nassau.
C10964
B R I T I S H H I GH
COMMISSIONER requires the
following staff, experienced
with highest references:
1. Butler, preferably to live in.
Must have knowledge of all
aspects of household
management.
2. Qualified Chef, experienced
in international cuisine. Living
accommodation available if
required.
3. Two experienced full-time
Maids.
4. Laundry Maid.
Apply: British High
Commission, Telephone
57474.
C10936
SECRETARY REQUIRED.
Must have several years
experience in similar position
in busy commercial office.
Duties involved require
secretary of high capabilities.
Salary to be arranged. Only
Bahamians or those with
Bahamian status need apply.
Applications invited to: Adv.
C-10936, c/o The Tribune, P.
0. Box N-3207, Nassau.

C10913
PEST CONTROL. Experienced
pest control servicemen and
trainee Supervisor required by
Rentokil Laboratories Ltd.
Permanent employment
offered to reliable, trustworthy
men. Driver essential. Apply in
writing to P. 0. Box N395,
Nassau.

C10857
FIRST NATIONAL CITY
TRUST COMPANY
(BAHAMAS) LTD. P. 0. Box
N1576, Thompson Blvd.,
Oakes Field, Nassau Bahamas
TRUST AND COMPANY
MANAGE EMENT
ACCOUNTANTS
The Trust Company requires
several experienced
accountants to maintain
financial -records for personal
and pension trusts and for
managed companies.
Excellent opportunities for
advancement are available
commensurate with applicant's
experience and technical
qualifications in the accounting
field.
Applications to Mr. E.
Lightbourne, Personnel
Department, Telephone
24241/9.

C10965
ASSISTANT Manager required
with experience in running out
island operation. Required to
live-in, and willingness to work
irregular and long hours.
Responsibility for guest
bookings, menu planning,
supervising of kitchen and
dining room facilities. Salary
by arrangement. Only persons
with a minimum of five years
consecutive experience, and
first class references need apply
c/o The Tribune Adv. C10965,
Box N3207, Nassau, N.P.
Bahamas.

C10915
CHEMICAL ENGINEER or
equivalent experience, to fill
position with established firm.
Applicant must have some
experience or training in
analytical chemistry and
laboratory test work, also field
experimental work. Bahamian
only. For confidential
interview please send resume,
family status, to General
Manager, Morton Bahamas
Limited, Matthewtown,
Inagua.


C 10984




II


C 10958
TWO VERY COMPETENT
Dressmakers with thorough
knowledge of sewing. Please
apply in person 8 a.m. to 8
p.m. at Elegant Fashion's Dress
Shop or The Elegant School of
Fashions and Dressmaking.
Corner Shirley and Fowler
Streets.
C10979
BRIDGE MANAGER
WANTED to establish,
administer and supervise
accounting procedures
especially designed to control
cash receipts and bridge
tokens, Must be able to
supervise the activities of toll
plaza attendants. Preserve and
maintain IBM toll system
computers.
Call George W. Mackey at
5-7511 for appointment or
write to Paradise Island
Limited, P. 0. Box N4777,
Nassau, Bahamas.

C10978
FIRST NATIONAL CITY
TRUST COMPANY
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED P. 0.
BOX N1576, THOMPSON
BLVD., OAKES FIELD,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, TRUST
AND COMPANY
M A N A G EM ENT
ACCOUNTANTS.
The Trust Company requires
several experienced
accountants to maintain
financial records for personal
and pension trusts and for
managed companies. Excellent
opportunities for advancement
are available commensurate
with applicants experience and
technical qualifications in the
accounting field. Applications
to Mrs. E. Lightbourne,
Personnel Department,
telephone 24241/9.

C10991
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
required for partner in
international firm of Chartered
Accountants. Pleasant outgoing
personality and efficient with
minimum typing and
shorthand speeds of 50 and
100 words per minute
respectively. Good Salary and
working conditions. Please
telephone 2-1062 or write P.
0. Box N596, Nassau.

C 10989
GOLF PROFESSIONAL AND
CONTROLLER WANTED
FOR RESORT GOLF CLUB.
Must be able to assume general
control of golf course and shop
operation. Knowledge of
proper stock control and
overall golf course management
and maintenance also required.
Salary commensurate with
experience. For interview
appointment contact Mr.
George W. Mackey at 5-7511.


POSITION WANTED

C 10930
SEEKS WORK as a salesman or
office worker, 10 years
experience as an Insurance
Salesman. Honest and reliable,
phone 5-1828.

WANTED

C 10963
WANTED ACCOMMODA-
TION for Sept. 1st, 1,2, or 3
bedrooms for new teachers
from England. Please reply
Queen's College Primary
School, Box N7127 or
Telephone 31666 32153.


CLASSIFIED


ADVS.


BRING

RESULTS FAST


1NK-SMI


C10937


CHEVROLET


and BUICK

ALL 1973 MODELS MUST
BE SOLD REGARDLESS


HURRY TO





THOMPSON BLVD.
NEXT DOOR TO COCA-COLA


Ilt ytPU


-- -----


Wishing little Doris Goodman a
Happy Birthdav on her 7th
birthday ( i.,is 23rd of.
August,. 197:, irom I-ar mother
and father, Mr. & Mrs. George
Goodman, and her 4 brothers,
Kirk, Donn, Roberto and
Stroyan, also family and
friends.
Little Doris resides on Windsor
Lane, west.
THANK YOU, from Mother,
HETTY GOODMAN


TRADE SERVICES|
C10661

Piad her's Customs

Brokerage Ltd.
Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE.
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE:
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-3796
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434

C10972
LAWNS, HEDGES, BEACHES.
For all your gardening needs,
trimming, hedqinq, pruning.
beach cleaning, for prompt,
reasonable and efficient service
call 5-1044.

C 10638
PATIO AWNINGS
AND CARPORTS
HURRICANE AWNINgrS,
SHUTTERS, PANFLS
John S. George,
& Co. Ltd.,
For free estimates and prompt
service call 28421.

C 10637
T.V. ANTENNAS Boosters for
homes, apartments and hotels.
Sales and services. Call Douglas
Lowe 5-9404 WORLD OF
MUSIC, Mackey Street next to
Frank's Place.


hI hhribunt


C10828
REGISTRATION for the Day
Nursery (Toddlers) and the
Day School (Kindergarten)
continues at the Office of the
Bahamas Gospel Mission
Chapel Montrose Avenue,
Shirley Heights, Tuesdays and
Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 1
p.m. & from 5:30 p.m. to 9
p.m. Ages for the Toddlers
Division 15 months to 3 yrs.,
Ages for the Kindergarten
Division 3 years to 5. Both
departments open September
3rd. Further information may
be obtained from the office or
by calling Mrs. G. Nottage c/o
Phone 24537._

HELP WANTED_
C10914
ACC OU NTANT-ASSISTANT.
Position in out islands for
person with minimum two
years accounting experience
capable of preparing financial
statements, working
independently and assuming
responsibility. Knowledge of
cost accounting an advantage.
Salary commensurate with
experience and ability.
Bahamian only. For
confidential interview send
resume to General Manager,
Morton Bahamas Limited,
Matthewtown, Inagua.


I


-A- I


. . r .


BERTRAM 20' -- 1968 -
160 Mercruiser plus Aux
engine Radio New Top -
Trailer, $5,000. Telephone Mr.
Page 2-4276.


I


ulhp lribunt












Tuesday, August 23, 1973.

C10993

'BLOOD DONORS'
HELP for Rudolph "Dykes" Albury respected
gentleman from Harbour Island. Blood Donors
needed urgently. All interested persons, especially
"BRILANDERS" living in Nassau are urged to go
to The Blood Bank at PMH immediately. Be
certain your donation is credited to "Rudolph
Albury."
RICHARD MALCOLM


I GRAND BAHAMA


CLASSIFIED


II FIEENI TEL. 352-N


REAL ESTATE
C6162
HAWKSBILL Area, 4
bedroom, 1 bath home. Call
owner for more information at
Freeport 352-7539.

HI ELP NOTED
C6190
Executive Barber Shops and
Beauty Salons require (3)
BARBERS and (2)
HAIRDRESSERS with 3 years
experience.
Must apply in person to: R.
Gibson, Manager.

G6196
Grand Bahama Telephone
Company. Limited is taking
applications for the following
positions:
PLANT OPERATIONS
MANAGER A minimum of
10 years in North American
Telephony with the last 5 in a
position of responsibility.
.Specific experience in OSP
engineering and construction,
purchasing required. A broad
background in all phases of
telephony is desirable.
TELECOMMUNICATIONS
ENGINEER (TECHNICIAN
PBX & PABX) A minimum
of 5 years experience in station
installation with 2 years
emphasis on PBX & PABX
installations and maintenance.
Specific training or
experience on one or more of
the following equipment type
is required: NE 605, Norelco
300, USI 20, 30, IAI and
related models.
Qualified applicants may apply
at Personnel Department,
Grand Bahama Telephone
Company Limited, 2C Kipling
Building, P. 0. Box F-2478,
Freeport or call for application
form 352-9352, Ext. 19.


C6192
HARBOUR PILOT/DOCK
SUPERINTENDENT
Applicant must possess
extensive experience and
ability in piloting vessels in and
out of Harbour, berthing and
unberthing cargo vessels up to
30,000 D.W.T. (20,000
G.R.T.). Passenger vessels up to
26,000 G.R.T. and piloting
vessels in restricted coastal
roadsteads no restrictions on
tonnage. Individual should
have working knowledge of
Meteorological and
Oceanographic instruments for
the purpose of recording
various observations and
attending to the instruments.
Minimum certification of
competency by the board of
trade or equivalent as first
mate foreign-going and should
be able to carry out the duties
of a Harbour Pilot and Dock
Superintendent in shifts as
arranged by the Harbour
Master.
Apply to Personnel
Department, Grand Bahama
Port Authority, Limited, P. 0.
Box F-2666 or 30C Kipling
Building, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.


C6193
WANTED -
SUPERVISOR respond
job scheduling, liais'
owner's representative
layout and supervision
foreman and crews. F
ex perience ,
commensurate
experience.
Bahamians only ai
writing: Waugh Cons
Box F-3, Freeport.






Rul
















: Yes, I'll do it for
Willingly Rupert takes
it as he walks betwe
-" It's nothing but suri
I didn't know that S
S-We all send letters
presents, but I've




MEARED,


SI TE
sible for
on with
ve, job
n of job
ive years
salary
with

apply in
truction,


I _________


HELP WANTED

C6194
CATALYTIC WEST INDIES,
LTD., P. 0. Box F-2544,
Freeport, Grand Bahama, has
job opportunities for
Bahamians in the Industrial
Maintenance Field, Freeport,
for the following positions.
Each of the following
Craftsmen must have five (5)
years Refinery or Process
Industrial experience.
INSTRUMENT TECHNICIAN
- Pneumatic and Electronic
Instrumentation experience in
installation, trouble-shooting
and maintenance of Pneumatic
Equipment, Automatic Tank
Gauging, Servo Mechanisms,
Digital and Solid State
Electronics, Telepulse I and II
Telemetering and other
Electronic and Pneumatic
Instrumentation pertaining to
Refinery operations.
MAINTENANCE FOREMAN
(MECHANICAL) Must have
a minimum of eight (8) years
Refinery or Chemical Process
Plant experience in
trouble-shooting, repair and
maintenance of all related
Refinery Rotation Equipment,
such as Pumps, Turbines,
Compressors and Transfer
Equipment.
Qualified Applicants should
reply to: Deputy Chief
Industrial Officer Ministry of
Labour Freeport, Grand
Bahama Island.


C 10968
WANTED: Aggressive part
time Bahamian Sales
Representative for a Nassau
based souvenir manufacturing
firm. Salary on % basis. Earn $
in your spare time! Write
Shanti Productions, Ltd. P. 0.
Box 6191, Nassau, N.P.
C6189
CHEF DE PARTIES: One (1)
Chef de Partie; preferably
European trained; must have
apprenticeship papers; must
have complete knowledge of
Gourmet dishes and
international cooking; must
have two years experience as
Chef de Partie.
For the above please apply to
Mr. John A. T. Roker,
Personnel Director, Holiday
Inn, P. 0. Box F-760,
Freeport, Grand Bahama,
373-1333.


C6191
FOOD AND BEVERAGE
DIRECTOR required. Must be
competent in all phases of
Food and Beverage operation
including service, purchasing,
inventory control, menu
planning and pricing, full
knowledge of wines. Will be
responsible for planning and
'directing all banquet functions,
etc.. Planning and arranging
training program for his
department. High school
education and hotel school
training. Should be 35 to 50
years of age, with not less than
5 years experience in similar
position. References and clean
police certificate.
Interested applicants please
apply in person to:
International Hotel, Personnel
Office for interview. Vincent
Russell, Assistant Manager.


READ


hl5p (Uribunp


S11


973.


Winning Bridge


By VICTOR MOLLO
COMPETITORS in our forth-
coming Charity Bridge Congress
could take as their model this
hand played by Pletro Forquet.
It was one of his tope in winning
the 1971 Cino del Duae Cup.
Dealer West: Love All.
North
SAK J 10 6 4
0 J 10 4
4 AQ63
West East
4 108' A 4 Q 9
0 93 V Q 7 5 2
0 KQ 87 63
4 851 A J 9 7 4
South
4 KJ6543
S8
0 A952
4K 10
West North East South
Pass 1 Ps s 4I
Pass 34 Pass 3NT
When dummy went down, Por-
quet realized that most N/S pairs
would tbe in 40. scoring at least

Chess
By LEONARD BAr.3EN




-._








An international grandmaster
turns problem composer in
today's puzzle, by Pal Benko.
White mates in two moves,
against any defence.
Par times: 1 minute, problem
master; 3 minutes. problem
expert; 7 minutes, good; 12
minutes, average; 30 minutes,
novice.

Chess Solution
I B-Kt2. If I .. K-K4; 2
Q-K6, or if K-Q6; 2 Q-K2, or
if Kt-B3; 2 Q-Kt6, or if
Kt-B4; 2 Q-B3.


pert and Miss Samantha-23


you, Miss Samantha "
the handbell and shakes
en the rows of houses.
rises today," he smiles.
Santa Claus had a sister.
to Santa for Christmas
never heard of anyone


writing to Miss Samantha about birthdays."
The silvery tinkling of the bell soon arouses
the sleeping helpers. Oooah I Is it time to
get up ? yawns one of the tiny folk. Why,
it's not Miss Samantha-it's someone else I "
"Yes, I'm here on a visit I laughs Rupert.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


420. To do better he would have
to make 10 tricks in no trumps.
Such are the mechanics of dupli-
cate in which the true opponents
are the players holding the same
cards at other tables.
The 48 was led. Pletro cap.
tured East's 4J with his 4K and
took the losing finesse in hearts.
A diamond came back. won with
the OQ by East, who promptly
returned a heart.
Forquet had 10 winners, if only
he could entov dummy's fourth
club. Could it be done? He began
by cashing the hearts. Reduced
to five cards, East kept the 4AQ
and A 9 7 4. Now came the oA
and East harl to bare his AA.
Thereupon Forquet cashed his
A10 and exited with a spade.
forcing East to return a club to
dummy's 4AQ.
For full details of the Evening
Standard Br'dee Congreas to be
held Auqust Bank Holiday week-
end. write or phone: Bridge.
Grand Met House. 7 Stratford
Place, W.I (629 0818).



HOW many
r words of
four letters
or more can
yen make
C f "romn the
letters shown
hI i here? In
snaking a
word. each
letter may
be used once
only. Each
word must contain the large
letter, and there must he at
least one eight-letter word In the
list. No plurals; no foreign words;
no proper names. TODAY'S
TARGET: 26 words. good;
32 words, very good ; 39 words,
excellent. Solution tomorrow.
YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION:
Goer gore ..ape group gruel
looper lore lour lure ogler ogre
orlop poor pore porge pour
PROLOGUE pare purge purl
rogue role rope rouge roup rule
urge.
-6

I


14






i. Trousers. (

S worrying. ()
i- --- -- -



8. Old time king. (,')
19. idt up. (6)
II. Trousers. (.)
13. Cricket Internallonal (4 ;*)
1t>. Chastised. (8)
I? Worrying. (9)
1 HIdden. (6)
20. Meadow. (3)
2l. Requires. (5)
12! Disarray. (4)
Do.vn
1. l'oItail transport l 4. 3)
Friends. I()
3. Occupies one's leisure., 5. 4)
4. Explode. (5)
5. Wild animal. (4)
6. Relation. (4)
I'r elen-
tlous air.
(4)
IU. Unn airl-
led. (3)
12. % ews.
(6)
II. ('ontmmen.
tal river.
(4)
16. (' aIl r ni
I. rVIoped
rocl (3) eg|rrtam', M0161106


I fJhe Comic Par I



REX MORGAN, M.D. By DAL CURTIS


CARROLL RIGHTER'S

H1OROSCO)PE
f^ >s from the Carroll R tWer Institute
i"'Vk GENERAL TENDENCIES: An excellent day
v / and evening to put your attention upon the
little affairs of daily living that improve matters at home. It is
also a good time for showing courtesies and thoughtfulness to
loved one. Be more cheerful.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) Buy appliances for the home
that will make it more functional. A little entertainment at
home brightens everyone's appearance. Take positive steps to
make the future more successful.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Improve routines in the
home so they are running more smoothly. Convene with
associates and plan the future more wisely. Show loyalty to
those who have been that way toward you.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Study property matters and
see where any repairs need to be made. Anything you are not
sure about should be discussed with trusted advisers. Express
the finest talent you possess.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) By improving
your health and appearance you can make progress where
personal and business appointments are concerned. The social
can be very pleasurable in the evening.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Plan your time well so that you
can get those intimate matters handled well and quickly. See
what a trusted adviser has to say regarding whether you are
headed in the right direction
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) A good day to show your
appreciation for steadfast friends who may need help at this
time. A personal goal can be achieved by exerting more effort.
Evening is fine for reading.
LIBRA (Sept 23 to Oct 22) Don't waste that Libran
magnetism on small things when it could prove to be so useful
on more important matters Make certain you have the kind of
career you are really suited for.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) You are interested in a new
outlet but you must first study it well before jumping into it
or there could be considerable losses. Seek advice from
experts. Go out for amusement tonight.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Find a new system
that can make your life easier and more profitable. Keep
promises made with associates, Try to please your mate more
and come to a finer understanding.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) A little firmness on your
part can do much to control a person within the family fold
who is getting too emotional Know what is expected of you
and do your part willingly
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Work is the keynote now.
Forgetting frivolity during the daytime winds this work week
up very nicely, and you get ahead faster. Take steps to become
a more dynamic person.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) During spare time do
something to make yourself look more charming so that others
will respect you more. Plan some time to help good friends
feel happier if they are depressed.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY ... he or she will be
one of those most interesting young people who has much
vitality and will work hard for whatever practical purpose to
succeed in life. Teach early to be objective in dealing with
others, particularly where the personal side of life is
concerned, otherwise too much emotionalism could be a
deterrent. Sports will be helpful.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


APARTMENT 3-G By Alex Kotzky


STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & overgard
t zmmmmmmmm 1 1.1,11,11- 1 '


I'M URE THE TOWN I DON'T KNOW, --BUT I
1I THIS WAY CORA./ WISH A CAR WOULD COME
____ ALOG, 'ZANDRA .



,-- - --- -- - -



-' -.2
7.. / I

.,-'


---- SOMETHIMW IS
O WITH MY
PLANT
-- L ']


,-- :


4'


JUDGE PARKERBy PAUL NICHOLS


a
nan a
7th
1 of.
other
eorge
others,
and
and
rdsor

other ,
MAN


[2


HES.
eeds,
ninq,

rviCe


ompt



rs for
3tels.
uglas
OF
xt to


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t IL











Thursday, August 23, 1973.


I' W1 W4914


Champion Foster punishes


South African challenger


for 15 gruelling rounds
By JACK STEVENSON .,
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) Hometown hero Bob Foster h
felt his black race had been slurred and, for 15 rounds in the
boxing ring, the lightheavyweight champion a of the world ^ -
bombarded South Africa's Pierre Fourie in a successful defense of LOW


histitle.
"I wanted the fight to go 1 5
rounds, I wanted to punish
him," the 34-year-old king of
the 175-pounders said alter the
bout. "Nobody calls me a
'boy' and gets awash with it"
Fourie frankly was confused
over whether he had called the
black champion "ho\-" when
they met at the morning
weigh-in Tuesday. But he did
apologize and said, "I wouldn't
insult a champion."
The South Atrican's
manager, Alan l' oweel.
maintained that his tighter had
greeted the champion and said,
"tonight's the night, Bohhy,"
and Foster miisunderstood the
South African accent
BLOO()Y
The champ doesn't heiCese
that.
Foster pumped hundreds of
left jabs into Iourie's litc, amnd
the challenger was blood\ frou
the first round wh cn lie
suffered a cut over his right
eye. lie did finallts rcpa' the
compliment by slicing Ithe
champion over his left ce>, an
abrasion that required sitc.
Still, there was no doulit tii e
six-foot three-inch chapi on
dominated his foe. swho \',;s
four inches shorter and hadl
seven inches less in reach 770
inches to 72.
Referee Jim C('le.a and
Judge Willis Barnes, both liont
Foster's home town o1
Albuquerque, scored the' light


AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
i l I' t (v ,
Baltimore 71 52 .577 --
Boston 68 57 .544 4
Detroit 68 58 .540 4'
New York 68 61 .527 6
Milwaukee 60 62 .492 10'
Cleveland 52 75 .409) 21
West Division
Oakland 74 52 .5S7 --
Kansas 'ity 73 55 .570 2
Minnesota 51) (,i .472 14'
Chicago 59 1,7 .46h I 5
California 56 65 .46,3 I '
Texas 43 I ..347 Mi
Wednesday's Results
Kansas City 8. Ne\\ 'i irk 7. 10 i-
inp.
lloston 9, Te'xas
Cleveland 1, ('lctip) 0(), 1 2 inninirI
Baltimore 4. Minnesota 3
Oakland 7. Ictroiit 5
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W i I '1 L, 1 1
St. I.ouis 64 62 50 -o
Pittsburgh 61 62 .4'(6 i
('hicagi) 60 65 .4SO 31
Montreal 59 66 .4"72 4'
P'hiladeilphla 58 67 .464 S
New 'Ntrk 57 67.460 1
West Division
Los Angeles 77 49) .( l
('incinnati 76 52 .5.94 2
Sun I rancisco 70 55 .56(1 w'
Houston 66 63.1 I 2 12I
Atlanta 61 68 .473 17 '
San Diego 46 7) ..6,8 Ito
Wednesday's Results
Chicag 6. Ccicinnati 5
San Diego 8, 'Philadlphii .3
St. Louis 6, Atlanta 4
New York 4, Los Angclcs 3
San I rancisco 3, Minmtreal 2
Pittsburgh 4. Houston 0
Today's Games
San Diego (Kirhb 7-13) at PhIltli1 i .,11
(L.onhorg I0-10). 7 35 p.m.
L.os Angeles (Oseen I 4-6)ait .N' ,r
(Matlack i0-15), p.m.


148-120 and 149-130,
respectively Judge Sydney
Beck o ('apetown, South
Africa. saw it 149-138.
CONTROVI RSV
Foster scaled 173, t7wo
pounds under the limit. at the
controversial weigh-in ihilc
Fouric, rtrom Johi:nncsburg.
was 168.
Lacking height and reach,
I-ourie came out tr\mg to bull
lhi,. wsai inside l'osit 's Ions1 g
arnis but stiwound tip \\lith his
e\c Cut tI aI id hIlooo\ di tose
quickly Hie lost all the carl\
rounds to the jabbing attack of
the champion. IFostier did
appear to tiss some )' pent
(hooks and right Ltsses.
however
In thle 10tt i io tind, I ouin
ssitchcd tl r tile second tinic
lo a left-hainIeld attack, ind the
gash appeared o\er I'ostc'ts left
1)ll)\'T IIt RI
I he c liaiinpli n's tlohtited
daughter, D)iii n lS. a
fearful in Ihc dilessinini i o iti
beC ticL', t Of1 li cLit. ]]ci i lIh'i
then assure tie h r. "it e iltul't
hit in ', ho1 nc I I htulted i nI C
ic didn l't ihurl t ilt.."
-ourie's camp galvc credit
to j roundhliouse nrilghl -hld
so it l ior unlnl i the d'ignl i iii.
I ln il l nt t hi tcl i inp s.
ikni' dit l pun hstlit I ] stier
isse itedl "'I sl t sed i1 \ im ill's. I
could have put him out al. :i\
ltile."
t(ii|s oi e' either lighter R
\iilh rson. ls \ Ig the it t' e
in I slt I's ] .2 lI le d lefelsc .


DANIELS WINS

MASSACHUSETTS

SCHOONER RACE
VETERAN YACHTSMAN
Mike Daniels sailed his
Nassau- based schooner
Agamemnon to first place in
the Fifth Great Schooner Race
recently in Gloucester,
Massachusetts thereby winning
the right to represent the
United States at the Nova
Scotia Fisheries Exhibition
next summer in Canada.
In the 12.5 miles race to
Newcomb's Ledge and back,
Daniels beat a field of 12 boats
nine of which finished the
race. lIe won the City of
G loucester Trophy. the
Thomas J. Lipton Trophy and
the Gorton Trophy.
With perfect scoring in the
sail d rill and scoring high in the
anchoring drill at the end of
the race, Daniel's vessel was .21
points ahead of the second
place Pleiades which was
skippered by Pete Tibbetts of
(;loucester. George Matterson's
Pioneer coming out of New
US S O York was third.
SUS "It's rather a great honour
to represent the United States
in Lunenburg'," said )aniels
after collecting four of the five
nch s1top trophy es. "It's wonderful
pu U S C to be here and as long as there


MOSCOW (AP) The United States men's basketball team


beat Cubha 98 76 Wednesday at
contest that erupted into a wild
Ihe f '.rawl broke out \\[Ie
with I : n lnutlcs left t i II ti
g.lii'. !)()t 4 ,I I Bii ii o i
oI \orith (arolirlni Stte ,:nJ
( uli.In JlJ ii )tDomloI I ell 11-1 i
sr.1n1hic !(,I the ball
( il111 pla. rs leaped t ro;;,
tliheir clinch and bhegIn
thnrownIg pInchs,. and (L IhAi1
c.oaich m'i "esto l)1;I/ V, eiI ,;
\mCricaIC odach Id Badge2 IJL
bhgian kicking hun in the
sltmladh.
A bio)ile \;ja tliro\wn,.
aIpparently tr tll Ihc ('nbhaIn
he'ih aniid i\I V Walker io
\'ire'mni: teil on the shtatt'rc d


US swimmers disappoint at


World University Games
MOSCOW I AP) The U.S men's basketball team survived a
fist-flying, chair-swinging, bottle-throwing attack by its Cuban
rival and American swimmers suffered startling reverses


Wednesday in a day of violence
Unit ersitv (;aimes.
i k bah.skt 'l t i l kit i n1 u -) t lt
t h el ln I t hl l i I' C II Ft a IIn I ,
the ( ibains. Wh 7(. 1o gilln lhe
tollnt .liienl se i n m1 al, I u[l
p.ttd i hel'\\ prIn.e In knoI.1
\ Ih Ia nlt.\ I I in lT es t I
pll.j .inlt 1 l I \ IcI i ei't I
3l i: l klilt o l \ .i th C taioltinj
St l. rI \k .all \VW ilkei ol the
'Ili\e- ai\ V i- in i a en, t oi
I ln- e itt! \I s il ( th j l tlill
I)" 'n ', lie lh1i! e.' l lm
CHI e 1 p ii ij 1 H IP ( l l l ie , )()1
x\1i 11 Illul nn ieW Itt ll itei
(Ie uen. h en [t'set st ,'
nt.,. t It s I.~ht g ofit
Ihe ,. \ 1 se,! t the, I S
leCaIII :nI t It iheC 'i !iiii d ]n agajilIst
Bra il. ,! i \\ inner o\e'
( /. h ,sl \ k i
then [tle nii \Il ,ep is
I n ulj > ', ; n ,ii A ili re [t lte
h lle S i tlt I i.nn. boastin[I
sevc raIl pla.k es \, ln ruined
\ l ,n A', ,ker ()1i nilpic
l',pkel hIli r icnL' .jI M Iunich I he
SLL." Cd Ii', l C se final
hcrt1 h\ I)\ e1 tint BulgaIl.
" I .e I .I1n wo 1 e ',


and disappointment at the World
I e,1it i iIl i new coiit ld C t'c .
gau mn th e U n al v i\] h a 5 t -55
itillent-t i CC triuli ph ot \er
( lI xI iel Tli' ti p r 1 rslda
shiwtd tn v\ith tlie Ruwisis .
I h eal the .1c nie ins- .
0 1 5. h I l l ie first outnd
\il .n11 \ lilc, lhc Russs i tti i'',
S nll three OI tihe sI\ eC\ ntl s at
lie ( enlral en in S\% imn 1in'g
I)P,,, beating C(,th\ (.lr.
\iten'cca's record-holtder iand
d tl ble ()Il\ iplt gnOlid medalist.
!:i the womenlt' 1 "'s I I0- inter
hrc.i,,tstoke and added three
gu)ld mcdal in tennisI
Is hi boosted the Russian
e, -Iall total to 54 gold
medals. 20 i silver anlld 25
hil/e Ilihe United States
addietii three golds antd three
oilers in swimming and hlad a
melda.l count of eight golds.
seven slivers and 13 broi)tI/C
I he t ail 's big test surprise'
was thlie dete.t lot ithe
I carr tk ld 11iss ('Irr o tI lihe
I nliversiti I \t N w 'k e'\lt't Itl
tt1 e' t'woA tlie nI's 1100- I tn'er
hreststrokc. lher he t event
l.ubli RusLai;dno a t. swiuniing
behind Miss', ( rr almost all lite
wa\ spurted with 20 yardss tw
go and touched )out it I
utilc i 1 5 5 s e'oiuIds


Strike a light

POWDER-PUF ----
SNOT, IAIN YOu r H
f MAVE QUIT ON TE
j SHOT AND LOST A
LOT OF POWER
YOUR CLUB WAS
GONE THROUGH
THE BALL FAR /
TOO StOWLY!

TO ACtIEVE MAXIMUM '
-W CLUBHEAD SPEED, YOU
MUST PULt DOWN FROM THE
TOP OF THE SWING. DON'T
THROW TME CLUBMEAD OUT
he ost imporIKE A FISHING ROD

The most important thing


the World University Games in a
list light.
class .and it i his right hlainl
I hlie cut w "ls not beliectdl
IDuring the list tight, the
Ainencjn t i'ealm IlanagIer
Sl)ii.ite \ oid/1 n i t 1 .i I.1 1 'll
('ollrege. wias kicked in llihe
groin lHe collapsed on tlhe
Itloor al0 doctors had to tretI
Iu iTn Ior a lew minutes b'eoic
he could regain his t'eel.
PI'PSI F
B.dgcer was upset .d' 1
disti ,iuIght and woukIt d n! l t
di cuss tihe incident at uaT
lengglh
I"\ e knew tlhe\ won!! In
1o ti oiille w Ien theC\ W'ere _'(
]ois lU', el id.' tlie i LI. Ilie\
h,\e "dw) il e 'er t e th \
pll.\ d ul s
ith' Cub' l 1ts up 1set thl
li 1 n, ,I l [I .I n c l Il al r. oltugh
,inI J l (J I l(' 1 "olo 11'",I,. m1
1 1. 'in the Pan \Iners s"
)it, Ih lie pl cI'ers was


g I Ilnd.' l c\

t I Cle r teut
I lie cro%
hilt leecd th1


sI ;I rtiles. a
S!\t 'n t ltot u a.s
t nul,, II allcally
,t ,()000 had
1 l 1 i Cu('1banl s
( ( L1i',1n pla, ers


dutii g the biti l I whi hI la ted
,1b1oui 11i\le mlwltc
I he igaii ics'iimtcd with a
cordon tol ptle niniilg the
I h' l and p(licce h'i! d the
('ailohn bench
Wlicn thl tea. ms \\alkecd back
ontoni thIe Ilio(r, lth crowd
began y. II "'I mtlled States.
Yes Cuba., \o "
I lie I' S \.us t,,o 'ia thle
lwinnei ofl ;. .iter ssinmc Cesween
Bra/il jnd /c'lhosho\ak]. for
the right it enter I inday's
filial. pi l, I abl\ .g.im st
dctendc ng I hg 1 nip 1 i1 1 1 w ussI't
I lic hbaskei lii lei hnical
t.'lll.l 1 .titu' i ii!t'l .Vi
1us e u n ttit


(S ('() C o1a e


l 'l 1\ sltmi ( ,i i",


Cuban cagers lose ti


they start throwing


Bob Willis takes all 3 wickets as


West Indies score 231 for three

LONDON (AP)--The West Indies recovered from a shaky start in the last Test Thursday and
despite some fiery bowling by lanky England fast bowler Bob Willis the tourists amassed 106 for


two wickets at the first interval.
The visitors won the toss
and looked to have an easy
task on a bone-hard pitch. But
Willis. playing at home for
England for the first time, used
his full 6 foot 5 inches to good
effect Hie looked by far
England's most lethal bowler
and not only took two valuable
wickets but also held the West
Indian run rate in check.
First to go was Deryck
Murray promoted to opener
from the middle order after
some solid displays this season.
Willis knocked his off stump
back and Murray was out for
four with the West Indies on
eight for one.
Roy Fredericks was in
punchy mood and with
captain Roland Kanhai at the
other end the West Indians
pulled themselves out of deep
trouble until the score reached
87, when Willis struck again.
Fredericks skied a hook shot
and Derek Underwood took a
grateful catch at mid-on.
Lefthander Fredericks scored
52.
MAJESTIC FORM
Kanhai and Lloid were inl
majestic form in lhe afternoon
session and at tea the West


KIDNAP CASE


From Page 1
examination to prove whether
or not any calls were placed
from there could be made in a
matter of hours.
"Would you say the
Britannia Pub is within walking
distance of the Lucayan
Towers?" McLean then
inquired.
"Yes, I think it is," Mr.
Brown said.
He also agreed that the
Britannia pub is within the area
of the Lucaya exchange and
that he did say one of the calls
was placed from there.
DISTANCES
He was also questioned on
the distance it would take to
travel from the Lucayan
Towers to the Holiday Inn
Hotel from where Mr. Brown
said another call had been
placed.
Mr. Brown said that it was
five minutes driving distance
from the condominium to the
hotel. Hlie said it would take
about seven minutes to drive
from the condimninium to the
Cove House, however.
Mr. Brown said his company
also traced a call from the (ove
House to the home of Mr.
Spencer.
McLean did not get far with
his cross-examination,
however, as Mr. Hilton said
"this line of cross-examination
may be somewhat irrelevant in
that the accused is soliciting
evidence from the witness as to
the approximate distance from
the Lucayan Towers to various
areas from which calls were
placed to the Spencer
residence.
"As far as the court is
aware...the only persons who
might be able to attest to the
distance from the l.uca an
Towers to the points where the
telephone calls were made
from, and the times at which
those calls were made husc
already given evidence and
were not cross-examined.
"If. unless there is any such
posit ion., e idence tor
contradiction or agreement by
any SLIuh person who may be
alleged to have travelled thos,'
distances or made calls from


Indies were on a formidable
231 for three.
The West Indies powered
along at almost a run a minute.
Both batsmen had the
occasional slice of luck but
Kanhai, in particular, was in
fine fettle. A Kanhai cover
drive off Underwood and
another drive off Geoff Arnold
for boundaries were shots out
of the text book.
Lloyd swept Underwood for
a glorious six to give him his
half century. But he was the
only batsman to fall between
lunch and tea.
Once again it was Willis who
got tile breakthrough withI a
caught and bowled effort.
Lloyd was out for 63.
Captain Kanhai reached his
century with lithe help of a
piece of misfielding from Brian
Luckhurst 10 minutes before
tea. It took hiim 21 1 minutes
and included 14 fours.
At tea Kanhai was 101 not
out with Alvin Kallicharran the
other undefeated batsman on
two.
Willis, used by captain Ray
Illingworth in four short
bursts, had taken three wickets
for 43 in 14 overs.


those phones, it will be
impossible ... for the defence
to make any inferences or
suggestions while summing utp
the evidence in this case that
some other party may have
made those calls. If that
submission is correct, this line
of questioning will not only be
irrelevant, but purposeless."
fHe sat down.
OBJECTION
McLean, however, objected
to the submission made by the
Solicitor General and said he
felt his line of cross-examina-
tion was in order. He
attempted to quote authority
but had his submission
over-ruled by Mr. Justice
Graham who said his reference
did not support his submission.
"I am questioning the
witness in respect of his
opinion to distances and the
reason for my doing so is that
the proximity of the distance
between places from which
several calls were made in
relation to the Lucayan
Towers is of paramount
importance in respect of my
defence."
lie was, however, told by Mr
Justice Graham that he had not
said anything.
McLean then said he felt he
was "perfectly within my
rights ... when Mr. Justice
Graham informed him that he
was not concerned with
opinions or feelings. He said he
was in a court of law. lie said
McLean had "brushed aside"
his right to have counsel,
probably because he felt
himself more competent than
his former attorney.
"I did not imply that I felt
myself more competent than
MNr. Fawkes," McLean replied,
with a tremor in his voice.
"I submit that it is proper
foi me to cross-examine the
witness on his opinion in
respect to distance. The
grounds 0oi that is under the
evidence act. C('hapter 43,
subsection 44," McLean said.
Describing the authority
quoted as "basic and like
"A.B.C." Mr. Justice (rahami
said it did not support
McLean s submlission at all.
Court then adjourned.


BIG6 HOPES

FOR OUR

VOLLEYBALLERS
OF ALL THE SPORTS to
take root in the Bahamas and
which enter international
competitions one should not
overlook the vast contribution
volleyball has made in making
the Bahamas respected among
the top teams in their region.
The Bahamas won the Region
Six Championship'earlier this
year.
"I am confident that we
have the material and ability to
go places," commented Ladies
National Coach Oswald Moore.
"When I look at the team I am
working with, I see all the
material I want to work with.
It's just up to the girls to
realize the seriousness of the
ga mie."
Moore was referring to the
20 top girls picked by the
Bahamas Volleyball Federation
as tryouts for the new National
Team. From this 20, the
National Team consisting of 12
players and ajour member taxi
squad will be chosen.
Assistant coach for the
ladies squad for the past two
years, Moore was promoted to
head coach this year when
former head coach Dr. Norman,
Gay M.P. was made manager of
both the Men and Ladies
Teams. Moore during the
B.V.F.'s regular season coached
the Paradise Island Bees to
double championship honours
and the Paradise Island Giants
to pennant victory.
Moore immediately went to
work conditioning the squad
for what could be a very
competitive international
season coming. Besides doing
gym work, they were out on
the track for physical work.
With the defence of their
English-Speaking Caribbean
Tournament next month,
coach Moore is out to capture
"everything we go into."
The determining factor in
the ladies team is the fact that
"we have a team without
weakness," noted Moore.
Before, they had about one
strong player, then it moved
to two. Now they have about
seven or eight good competent
players.
The road to true
championship is not easy for
the Bahamas' squad and in
order to be represented even in
the Olympics will require
victory over Cuba, Mexico and
Brazil, which are the top teams
in the Western Hemisphere.

NATIONAL ATHLETIC
CHAMPIONSHIPS
ATHLETES from
throughout the Bahamas are
expected to convene at the
Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre
tomorrow and Saturday nights
for the Bahamas Amateur
Athletic Association's Annual
track and field championships.
Tomorrow night weather
pennitting the athletes will
go through eliminations and on
Saturday, all successful athletes
will compete in the finals. The
winner of any particular event
will be the National Champion
of that event.
Superb athletic
performances are expected
especially from those of the
Family Islands who during the
Bahamas Independence games
literally swept the major
events. This includes the
setting of new world records in
the junior divisions.


is schooner racing I'll be back.
"As for Lunenburg, I'm no
stranger to those waters and
we'll certainly be out to do our
best up there next summer."
he added.




Tells Wenty

Ford: 'Cool it!'
I I)IT OR The Tribune:
There hase been several
contnents in the local press
recently about the pitching
ability of our local baseball
player Wenty Ford, and his
being by-passed by his parent
club According to an interview
with Wenty by one of Z.N.S.'
reporters. Wenty also expressed
disappointment that he had
not been called up by the
parent club.
club
I don't know what pitching
ability Wenty has, but I do
believe that the press and radio
reports are not helping his
ca.ise one bit. As a matter of
fact. it is my feeling that these
reports only hurt whatever
chances Ford has. and if he
keeps on voicing his
disappointment in print he
isn't doing his cause any good
either
I amt1 by no means
discounting the powers of the
press or radio, but I doubt
whether our local medias have
any influence in the baseball
world and, although we would
like Wenty and all the other
Bahamian boys to make good,
it would take the American
press to really help our ball
players One fact that we must
remember is baseball is a very
competitive sport, and if any
Bahamian wants recognition.
then lie must not only be good,
tie must be very good. I would
venture to say he must be
twice as good as his
conmpetittirs, and if a label of
trouhble-maker is placed upon
hiim then his career is finished
before it starts
It is true that Wenty has a
winning percentage, but he is
pitching in the minor league. It
is also true that for him to
prove his ability as a major
leaguer he has to be given the
opportunity to pitch in the big
league. Again it is true that one
v, inning season in the big
league does not establish one as
a big leaguer. although one is
able to demand a salary in
accordance witlth last season's
pet orm dance.
A case in point is Mr. Vida
Blue I his young man's name
was on eCer\ one's lips and he
was labeled a super-star
because tof one year's
pertrna since iu 1072. but what
about I)73',' More is being
heard about Wenty Ford. at
least Went, is winning games.
It goes ithti)out saying that I
would be as proud of any
Bahl.iian. that makes good in
Ihs or her chosen field. so the
reason tor this article is in the
hope that the local press and
radio wouldd leave Wenty alone.
and that Went\ himself would
keep his mouth shut and do his
talking on the baseball
diamond No one can argue
with success and whether the
parent club likes it or not. if
Wenti has the ability they
can't ignore it indefinitely
because their aims are to win
pennants.
AUDLEY HUMES
Chippingham,
August 18. 1973.


CHAMPION BOB FOSTER
... wanted to fight 15 rounds


* K


* A College preparatory school for boys announces that its representative +
* will interview interested parents and students for admission to Florida *
SAir Academy for the Fall Term Enrolment.
K M ajorK Frank Y. !,,a n, ,. K


* For appointments in Nassau, call the Nassau Beach Hotel and leave
S message. Interviews will be held there Thursday, August 23rd, Friday, '
S August 24th & Saturday, August 25th.




S Grades 1 8 -- Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. Grades 9- 12 Melbourne, Fla.


K ages 15 & up Melbourne, Fla. 3


-, _-------------.-1


She Wrthittit


Lwr9 --- -.~ --- -- - ------- --


1'.a d c I t! Ilkl ,i .111


I


1