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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03416
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: August 10, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03416

Full Text

S N 2 306 2-3 7E.

FANS-FANS-FANS


you realy want Super Value


gygggy jj[

DESTROYS



....'EtinOODpMOU
investigating the mysterious
fire which completely
destroyed an unoccupied house
valued at $70,000 in Westward


.t.m
with the J. S. Johnson
Company.
The officer in charge of
fire-fighters at the scene noted
in his report that "this was a
curious fire," and Fire Chief
Leo Baillargeon described the
blaze as "an unusual fire; not a
straightforward fire at all."
The occupant of a house

lossbln Bdtqhe
reported the fire, and who lives
the same distance from the
destroyed house in a southwest
direction, said he heard no
unusual noise until he was
kwa dMb a ghbour Mr
to use his telephone.
Police were told of the fire
at 4:15 a.m., and the first of
five fire-fighting units
dispatched to the scene arrived
there at about 4:23.
They found the whole house
already engulfed in flames, and
the central portion of the roof
where Mr. Baillargeon
believes the fire started had
already collapsed.
Mr. Baillargeon discounted
the report of an explosion
because of the evidence of the
man who reported the fire and
of his wife, who also had heard
no unusual noise, and because
he thought if there had been an
explosion the fire would not
have been so at advanced
when neighbours noticed it and
called police.
However, Mr. Baillargeon
admitted "it was an unusual
fire, in that empty houses -
houses with no one living in
thern don't just start burning
by themselves."
,
PLP CORIOltill II

FFO8|10rt this year
TIllS year s Progressive
Liberal Party convention will
be held outside Nassau for the
first time in its 18-year history
A spokesman at PLP
headquarters confirmed today
that the national convention
will take place at the Holiday
Inn Hotel in Freeport from
October 15 through 20.
Party chairman Andrew
"Dud" Maynard indicated in
February that the convention
would in all likelihood be held
at Freeport, pending approval
of the National General
Council
The official announcement
is likely however to cause
considerable disappointment
among supporters, a majority
o eare resident in New
The PLP holds 17 of the 20
House seats for New
Provalence. These in total
represent some 18,000 voters,
It is expected the Grand
Bahama locale will also cause
difficulties for other Out Island
delegates who will have to first
come to Nassau then transfer
to Freeport-bound flights.
Mr. Maynard could not be
contacted for comment.
NEEDLEWORK GUILD
THE QUEEN Mary's
London and Bahamas
needlework Guild will meet at
Governmental House at 4 p.m.
ay.

RTED IN ACCIDENT


11 wicar w h hadnstopaped
signaL
Mr. Hanna, who was driving
a large American car, was
behind Mr. Johnson in the
tra sec 1 .k Miss Farquharson
to hospital. accompanied by
the policeman.


VOL. LXX, No. 216 Friday, August 10, 1973. Price: ii C t*


I


I


_ __ _~ _~_ __ __, __ L- -.- L----- -- -- ------ --------- - ---


__


'
TAKING THE OATH Pericles Maillis is sworn in by
Supreme Court clerk Mr. Fred Seymour after being
admitted to the Bahamas Bar this mh : Philip Symonette


Florida fishermen on their own terms.


IIIA G t WO 08 SS S WP8 0


00 BSilamas passports

By NICKI KELLY
THE RULE REQUIRING PROOF OF BIRTHPLACE for
Bahamians applying for passports has been necessitated by the
fact that a number of persons now holding passports issued here
may no longer be entitled to do so.


among other things, that the
crawfish reaches the export
market as a Bahamian product.
THE PROCEDURE
Applications for export
licenses will be considered in
the normal way.
po()nofssue at
licensee will be required to
clear his out going
considgn etnj lid cebeNoc ah
port may be used.
A copy of the exporter's
licence will be given to
Customs at that port at the
start of each season,
The exporter will be
required to complete an
Export Entry at that port in
respect of each outgoing
consignment.
He also will be required to
pay the Customs Officer at
that port an inspection fee at
the rate of 57 cents per 100
crawfish at the time of export.
The exporter will receive an
official receipt for that
payment and will have the
Export Entry validated. The"
two documents will be proof
to law enforcement agencies in
the United States that the
consignment has been exported
legally from the Bahamas.
All export licensees will be
required, in addition, to give a
monthly report to the Minister
stating the quantity and value
of the crawfish exported
during that period. Forms will
be supplied by the Ministry
upon issue of the licence and
failure to comply could result
in revocation of the licence.
The only persons who will
require exporters licenses are
those who wish to export
crawfish directly to a foreign
country or those who will sell
to non-Bahamians. No licence
is needed for those intending
to sell the crawfish for use
within the Bahamas.
"All persons who are
granted exporters licenses will
have the new rules and
procedures explained to them
on issue of the licence," the
Government release said.
"Licensees should note that
Fisheries Inspectors, Customs
Officers, Commissioners and
Police Officers wiU be making
spot checks to ensure
compliance with the new
procedure, and with existing


Government announced
today that it had amended the
Fisheries Rules to allow
Bahamian fisherman to use
traps to capture crawfish "so as
to increase the catch
significantly.
keHoweverco petifishermen
already in the fishing areas.
The season officially opened
etA ur abeaTd o rn an
when they learned that the
Ministry of Development had
put a last minute embargo on
crawfish licenses until August
20,
The reason given was that
the Ministry was finalizing a
programme of reorganization
of Bahamian fisheries including
amending the regulations,
"In view of the great value
of the crawfish industry to the
economy of the Bahamas," the
Government's release said
today, and "in cooperation
with those, engaged in the
fishing industry the
government has made several
important changes which affect
all those persons engaged in the
industry whether they be
fishermen, processors or
exporters.
A permit must be obtained
by the fisherman to use the
"Florida wooden slat trap" and
the exporter must also have a
licence to export the fish. The
Minister of Development has
designated certain ports
through which exporters will
be required to clear outgoing
consignments to ensure that
the crawfish reaches the export
market as "a Bahamian
product."
However no beence is
needed for crawfish sold in the
Bahamas.
RULES FOR FISHERMEN
Crawfish traps may only be
used by those who have first
obtained a permit to do so
from the Minister.
Any person wishing to apply
for a permit to use crawfish
traps will have to apply in
person at the offices of the
Ministry of Agriculture and
Fisheries, where ar
application form will be
completed and the regulations
explained.
All persons granted permits
for the use of crawfish traps
will have to comply with the
new rules regarding the design,
marking and use of the traps*
The rules permit only the
use of the standard "Florida
oodoen sl t ap"of maximum
width and 2 ft in height, with
the slats at least one inch apart.
All traps and buoys will be
required to display the assigned
permit number.
It should be noted that
fishermen may still use the
Hawaiian Sling to capture
crawfish, but the use of traps
as an alternative method is to
be encouraged as this is a more
efficient and less strenuous
method of capture.
Permits for traps will only
be issued after the traps, duly
numbered, have been examined
by a Fisheries Inspector.
Fishermen using traps will
be required to keep a copy of
the permit readily available on
board the vessel from which
the crawfishing is being
conducted.
RULES FOM iE PORTERS
Development has made an
order designating the ports in
the Bahamas through which
exporters will be required to
clear outgoing consignments of
crawfish.
The practice of submitting
bulk consignments for
inspection and payment of fees
in Miami and West Palm Beach
will be discontinued, and all
e rpoour% 2ua tama e Culs ared
within the Bahamas whether or
not the consignment is to be
exported by private carrier or
through normal freight
channels. This is to ensure,


STEPHANIE UNWALA


The reasons tor this were
explained today by Attorney
General and External Affairs
Minister Paul Adderley, in
whose portfolio cornes the
matter of passports-
He said that prior to
Independence on July 10, any
citizen of the United Kingdom
and Colonies who applied for a
passport in the Bahamas and
satisfied the passport oi:'C'
that he was entitled to such a
passport, was entitled to have
it issued here
Secondly persons
naturalized or registered under
the British Nationality Act
would have been entitled to
have a passport issued in the
Bahamas.
Third. Pe seas vhe be ame
Belongers unoer ane
Immigration Act were entitled
to have passports issued to
them in the Bahamas.
Four. There was an
"unknown number of persons"
who obtained passports
illegally and were never
entitled to have these issued in
the Bahamas, the Minister said.
ILLICIT TRADE
"So far as is humanely
possible, we hope to put an
end to what we know has been
an illicit trade to previously
obtain a passport by all kinds
of devious methods," Mr
Adderley said.
The Minister called a
mid-day press conference
expressly "to give as wide an
area of accurate publicity to
the new passport regulations
and the requirements for
obtaining Bahamian passports
for the first time.
He said the process of
issuing the new passports began
on July 12 and it was expected
that the transition period
would take 18 months. For
that reason existing passports
issued before July 10 wou!d
remain in force for 18 months
from that date, or so long as
the pasTportFremaiNd dlid.
Meantime, he continued. the
staff of the passport office has
had to be increased and certain
adj ustments made
administratively to meet the
demand and conform with the
new regulations.
"The process of application
takes time as the system is
presently being organized.
However we expect to reduce
the time between delivery of
an accurate application and
return of a passport, Mr.
Adderley said.
The Minister emphasized
that the speed with which an
application was processed
rested on an accurate
submission being made in the
first instance. He said many
applications came in with
errors and while some of these
puld be correercted on the spt
application had to be done
over.
Under the new regulations a
Bahamian-born person
applying for an ordinary
passport must submit with his
application a birth certificate

IMPORTED
MIRRORS


NASSAU. FREEPORT


"or such other evidence as
satisfied the Minister of birth."
Mr. Adderley explained that
a baptismal certificate would
be regarded as acceptable in
lieu of a birth certificate.
Where neither is available, a
sworn affidavit by persons
touching for the birth will
suffice.
it, as in the case of elderly
people, no such documentation
is possible, a younger person
can swear to having known the
person for a prescribed number
of 5 ears.
BETT ER RECORDS
The rules now governing the
issue of passports had also been
formulated to enable passport
officers to kece a record of the
evidence < An 'red by each
person in support of obtainmg
a passport automatically, the
Minister said.
Until the beginning of 1972,
only passport application
forms were kept on file in the
passport office. Each applicant
now had a separate file.
Rule 12 of the Citizenship
regulations provides that a
passport cannot be issued
unless the applicant appears in
person before the passport and
visa officer.
in addition a counter-sign-
ature was required at the end
of the application
authenticating the identity of
the applicant.
11r Adderley pointed out
that the person counter-signing
has to be a citizen of the
Bahamas. This was not
intended as a reflection on any
one who was not a Bahamian,
but was important in the event
something was found to be
wrong with the citizenship
application subsequently made
by the individual counter-
countersigning, he said.
Lender the new Constilition
there are other persons entitled
to citizenship in addition to
those qualifying by virtue of
b rt tihe it istdr said, but did
NOT AUTOMATIC
He emphasized however that
pe rsons who became
naturalized in the Bahamas
were not automatically entitled
to Bahamian citizenship, nor
were those who had registered
here.
"Those naturalized or
registered have to obtain a
certificate of citizenship under
the Bahamas Nationality Act,"
Mr. Adderley said.
"A naturalized person
becomes a citi z en
automatically provided he did
not on July 9 possess the
citizenship of some country
other than the United
Kingdom and Colonies, and has
indicated he wishes to be a
Bahamian citizen."
Individuals who were U.K.
a se ed anJul(esideandinbo
Bahamas on December 31 also
qualify for citizenship
providing they did not on
July 9 also possess the
citizenship of another country.
Belongers wishing to become
citizens must apply for
registration under the
Nationality Act.
in the event an existing
passport had expired it would
aecHmn dergeorcyatr e Mr
Adderley said. If the passport
was no longer renewable a
certificate of identity would be
issued for the same period until
avai bwe. passport was made


TENNYSON WELLS KENDOLYN CARTWRIGHT ALGERNON ALLEN.
a
5 g g g gg g g g g




By SIDNEY DORSETT
SUGGESTIONS THAT CERTAIN CHANGES BE MADE in the Bahamas' legal system were
voiced by young attorneys upon their call to the Bahamas Bar in the Supreme Court this morning.
Five Bahamians Pericles It is my view that law should Kenneth Cartwright of Blair
Alexander Maillis. Algernon be reflective of the conditions Estates. She attended college in
Sidney Allen. Tennyson prevailing in the society and Jamaica after graduating from
Roscoe Gabriel Wells. when a law ceases to represent St. Annes High School. Fox
Stephanie J. Nguyen-Unwala the people s interest in any Hill
and Kendolyn Valencia society it becomes repressue FIRST CALL
Cartwright had their fle said that repressiveness it was the first call to the
petitions presented to as could lead to rebellion and the b d d h
Lordship Chief Justice Astruct ion of society f ar since in epen ence, te
Leonard J. Knowles. It was the thorefore "the laws should be y rst time such a large group
Chief Justice s first reception lust Tad petitioned at one time and
at a call to the bar. \ir. Wells was described 51 the first ceremoni that the
The young people, four of Mr Cvril Fountain as the new Chief Justice was presiding
whom qualified at English second Long Islander to be ovaSrhto a ni nw law int "
universities where they were admitted to the Bahamas Bar e sat love it
called to the Bar after the first being attorney Lorma is not the system of study that
completing t heir final Pi lrom, now dead produces the good law er, but
examinations, assured the it is the person lumself who,
court that some law reform ill \fr. Wells, who s married to with application. makes the
the Bahamas is necessary. I mpso m tel lion e gooddlawyerJustice Knowles
Mr. Maillis, who had hi' Long Island and St. John's admitted that he had -heard
petition presented hi his ( oilege Nassau, before he many good suggestions for law
father. Senator Alexander I'. Became a student 1 St Mary s reforms and I trust that those
Alaillis, said however he woulti University, Canada He studied politicians present have taken
deal with matters "elsewhere law as an external student of noteof them,"hesaid.
in response to a challenge made the I university of London This comment was however
by Mr. Geoffrey Johnstone Like Mr. Allen. 11r. Maillis made after newly appointed
whose desire it was "to see the and Mrs. Nguyentawala, he Attorney General Paul
Bahamas Bar the envi 0: the was an honour student Adderley had left the
Caribbean.' p Wells said some ceremony
"There must be recognition
that the ordinary citizen, who Im a re tr t on hKendal Isaac peatr
is not a lawyer, banker or wife or husband should have associated himself with what
financier is at a great the right to a inst share of all the Chief Justice had said in
disadvantage in entering into f I J that the the f t
set'ng 1 1 as or in I n31 o an ou agan ttheno ta
an assistant Crown Counsel be up dated to refleet the type and acquire a general
with the Legal Department said of society and the times in acquaintance with ever\.
in reply- which we live. branch of the law before
He had his petition 110 said too that, the legal deciding which branch you
presented by counsel and profession should advocate the wish to specialise in." It was
attorney Mr. Perr\ Chnstic of establishment and operation of not good to have onli a slight
the law firm of Christie. a legal aid system which should acquaintance with those
Ingraham and Co., who said he he subsidised bi the aspects of law which were not
had observed Mr like n (;overninent their speciality, he said.
"ambition in school lif: It was his opinion that "the Mr. Johnstone saul the call
"It's up to the Legislature to legal profession seems to be to the Bar was also the first
correct this great injusti:e and steeped in and cherishes many since the passage of the
the courts should make a traditions. While some have Bahamas Bar Association Act
liberal interpretation of all value. "others have no utility in the Legislature.
arrangements that put the
ordinary citizens at the mere, and servethri rt ful pur thUrger gdhe five to istingthsh
of mammoth corporations should be abolished standards of the Bahamas Bar
Mr. Allen said
"There is a need for legal 11< said th t < ns ability\ to e sahde th tar in athe ibes bar
change; if one should he st' get justice should not depend enough for the Bahamas.
bold to say so, a need for
radicalization in many pt I tly e ie pt l"" DION HAMMA REPO
spheres," he added, to a silent
cou roolmen is the son of Harry ofTeheether he Ismnell s inrt6 SteTI eN Fa q a son ad
and Jestina Allen of Nassaulle 'ront making any suggestions believed to have suffered leg
was a student at the Western but merely thanked their injuries today when she was
Secondary and Government 'nends. members of their involved in an accident with a
High school nd studied at families, and also their tutors. car reportedly driven by Dion
Middle Tem lea Air Maillis, a of rs. JiNgt et a .bpledwif Hannuar ison of Finance Minister
former Queen s College herself to do her utmost to be anna.
student, studied at Lincoln's a credit to the legal profession The accident occurred at
I about 1:15 p.m. outside the
un. Her petition was presented Village Rice House after the
M Mr. Wells. son of Mr and by attorney Patrick Toothe policeman on duty had
D dma 1 gllssiand, art d 1 r of tithegronly signalled traffic to stop.
said that "as a nation develops. had her petition presented by meMrber Tf Tri co affa
Ilrn t its laws lierePr f it tJeanitl e Tholar n wha said Miss Farquharson was
th attempting to cross the street
ashne hssary, halso noting tlat day of "firsts. from the Rice House side when
becomeaamasnds es etnrejtion datMg er rtwrightint prethe she was injured. The injured
On July 10. Mrs. Vera Cartwright and Mr. patn.thhee r t rw d


regulations


concerning


~bP


~rittun~




FliHERMEN MUST PAY LICENCE FEES FIRST
AND EXPORT THROUGH 'DESIGNATED PORTS'




CYRWEShermen can use




7lor ida wooden traps

WHEN BAHAMIAN crawfishermen go to sea on August 20 for the first time, they will be competing with


,


HOLLAND SMITH
H ?881 tiltlRAV
U EltWL QURUM I
FUNERAL services for
Chamber of Commerce
president Holland G. Smith,
who died in a traffic accident
on the Eastern Road
Wednesday night, have been
tentatively set for St. Agnes
Anglican Church, Blue Hill
Road, on Sunday at 2:30 p.m.
Fr. William Thompson, the
St. Agnes pastor, is expected to
officiate.
Mr. Smith's Austin 1600
station wagon apparently
skidded and crashed into a wall
around the Eastern Road home
of Dr. W.H.P. Poad at about
I1:45 p.m. Wednesday.
He was alone in the car at
the time. He was pronounced
de dpon arrivpalt the Princess
Mr. Smith, 49, was first
elected president of the
Chamber in 1972, and was
re-elected for a second term
this year.
Upon his death first vice
president Bill Farquharson
took over the president's
duties
Mr. Smith's death brought
to 23 the number of persons
kiU d onsNee rPmvidence roads
He is survived by his wife,
Delores, five children, Cynthia,
23, Gary, 18, Rene, 15, Judy,
12, Ken, 10, four sisters and
two brothers.


IJNK-V(;-SMEAR~ri




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Ghep Grib~t~tt


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-
NIXON'S WATERGATE STATEMENT NEXT WEEK?
CAMP DAVID, MD. (AP)--President Nixon summoned additional st
members to his mountaintop retreat Thursday He was expected
::::::: :.::::-- ---
-
Deputy Press Secretary Gerald L. Warren. in Washington, said there
still been no decision made on how and when Nixon will make
Watergate statement. "It obviously will not be this week, Harren add
and, he said, he personally does not think it would be made on Mond
either.
There have been reports that the President s reph might come in
middle of next week and that it could be both through a televi
broadcast to the nation and an additional written commentary.
on isTo e rs m i as ternoorn a om rneijr
CREDIBILITY OF F.B.I. INFORMER QUESTIONED
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA (AP) -Attorneys for eight anti war active
sought yesterday to attack the credibility of FBI informer Willi
Lemmer. The attorneys questioned Lemmer about a marijuana arrest
i ofa trekeann a r mt s, oe raobJaenc e db
Arnow ruled the line of questioning inadmissible as evidence
Lemmer has testified that the defendants members of the Vietn
veterans against the war--conspired to create violence in the Miami at
a an Oe enRe5uMI %iNnDtinaP6RTSt >8AD REOPENED
PHNOM PENIf, CAMBODIA (AP) The Cambodian Command said
troops have reopened the highway to the naval base southeast of Phm
Penh Neak Luong. The highway to the city mistakenly bombed Mond
byNAe 1 e2a sha8twen cutb gthe in urgentiSasin ab< iila today iv
American fighter-bombers crossing over Phnom Penh almost constantly.
CIVILIANS CALLED SHOTS IN INDOCHINA WAR
ye et GndONsu oc sPentagonr me < ra um r andte c 1
authorities right up to the White House called the important shots throt
the air war in Indochina. The memorandum was written six deals with delegation of authority to the Jnint Chiets of Staff for 0
born ng s ike agas tci ntPapproved or disapproved at the my
House, the State Department and the Pentagon. but civilian officials es
directed what kind of bombs and other weapons could be used. Ma
veteran military officers contended this degree of control 1
unpute ted. The Pient a declassitriae he mem< show at a
administration
Another memo released yesterday during testimony before the Sen
Armed Services Committee said Secretary of Defense Melvin La
eir n aHydppbn>) ad abebborate plan for keeping6sec t th and of
ordered at a time when the U.S. was professing to observe the neutrality
the Cambodian government.
WHO ORDERED FALSIFYING OF REPORTS?
WASHINGTON (AP)--Deputy Secretary of Defense Williant Cleme
testified today that neither he nor former secretary Richardson was my
at the time it happened that false information on bombing in Carnbo
wasm e r wCjuxgresso ci mendsecti tr rate Arme n>s j
withhold any information or to provide data that wa not complete
accurate.
Ch@shore a ,Ms i thetimjesp /i\ 0 !$o <[no /
result of a duplicate method of record-keeping.
The Committee is trying to discover who ordered falsilling rept
involving more than 36-hundred B 52 raids in Cambodia in 1969 and 19
.JUSTICE COMPLAINS OF BEING OVERRULED BY OTHEF
WASHINGTON (APh U S. Supreme Court justice william H. Unus
has charged his colleagues on the court with acting beyond the law
overturning his order to halt U.S. bombing of Cambodia.
ouginicriticiamt < uat an order by Justice Thurgood 11ars|
The complex tegal paths taken by the Cambodian b >mbing issue be
when a U.S.District Court judge in New York ordered the bombing hall
The U.S.Circuit Court in New York stayed that order pending a heari
On Wednesday of last week, Marshall refused to tamper with the Ci"
Co teord es then went to Douglas \ the stay of the Court of Appeals, and the reinstated the ludgment of
District Court.
That action stood for less than seven hours. The Nixon administrat
a bro ght e 1 otuhg aPCa sh it antdedMinnfh not In{
contacted the seven other members of the court and they agreed with
action.
TOKYO REPORTS SAY PHNOM PENH ENTERED BY REBE
TOKYO (AP)- A unit of Communist-led Cambodian rebels has enter
the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh, Chugoku Tsushm. a pro Peks
infmati n outlettidiT t *Irep the information outlet of deposed Cambodian Prince NoroJam Sihanot
as its source of information.
ASTRONAUTS ENJOY THEIR FIRST DAY-OFF
HOUSTON SPACE CENTRE (AP) Skylab Two's astronauts schedul
their first day off in space toda\ after two weeks in the tr othis
laboratory. They will spend part of the da\ cleaning up atter I 1 ur> ht
dayThe astronauts passed up their first planned day off last Irida
to catch up on experiments that had tallen behind schedule he
technicalproblemsearlyinthemission.
ARABELLA THE SPACE SPIDER PERFORMS WELL
LEXINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS (AP) "I'm recall please!
performed so well. What an achievement." says Judith Miles of Arabe
the space spider busily spinning webs in the Skylab space station.
Judith was so ecstatic Thursday because Arabella is part of
gxup esnyssh e rd rr seld b r an !< i.
Skytab has been a wonderful success," says Judith, "and trabella
wonderful."
CCCM BILL TABLED IN BARBADOS HOUSE
BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS (AP)- The bill to establish the ( aribbe
Commonunity and Common Market has been tabled in the Barbus
House of Assembly by Leader and 1)eputs Prime Minister, Edwl lah
No date was set for debate on the hill to ratify Barbados participation
t
Cnoo nmnity and Common Market which came into being on the firs
The Opposition have severely criticized the government Mr committ
Barbados to the pact without first presenting the relevant documents i"
legislature.
I'LL NEVER UNDERSTAND MURDER SAYS SHARPLES JR
POMPANO BEACH, FLA., Aug. 10 (AP)- The son of the assassinal
Governor of Bermuda says he lost $180 in aLas Vegas easi,
i an dri ttlesA icin Arizo itande'isitehim f etrm nhifaI
/ didn't come to escape but the holiday has helped me forget :
father's death," David Sharples, 18. said in an interview from the home
a fHTs fat cern ir Richard Sharples, an aide de camp and Sharples dog w
killecdh unknown assassins outside Bermuda's Government House


I


Phone 2-8941/5


I ~- '-- --- -- -- -- ---- -- _


----


MAY BE UP TO 30 BODIES


19victiansinsex
an
to

has perversion slayings
his
ed f I TV
at IOilllO IR 110HSIOH
the
sed By Michael Lutz
HOUSTON, AUG. 10 (AP) With the bodies of 19 sex
i perversion slaying victims already recovered, authorities shift
their search Friday for possible additional graves of slain


r~:- *


teen-agers and young men.
Police were to search near
the town of High Island east of
here and in the piney woods of
East T exas. Two bodies were
unearthed late Thursday near
Lake Sam Rayburn in the
I'iney Woods area. The other
bodies were unearthed at a
boat storage stall in southwest
Ilouston
Police said Elmer Wayne
Henley, 17, has admitted

tb r s Ttthe th slaying and
Authorities said Henley.
who at first said he had killed
only the man responsible for
the mass slayings, changed his
statement Thursday and told
police he and another youth
helped lure young boys to
Dean Allen Coril. 33. for sex
parties that led to torture and
death.
Houston police Lt. Breek
Porter, who is heading the
investigation, said Henley told
him as illany as 30 victims may
be involved in the
three-year-long carnage.
Porter said Henley had also
told questioners some bodies
had been buried near High
Island. On Thursday he led
them to the graves of two
victims in the woods. The
other 17 victims were found
buried in the boat stall.
ADMISSION
Police said the case unfolded
early Wednesday morning
when Henley telephoned then'
and said he had killed Corll in
self-defense at Cor!Es suburban
Pasadena. Texas, home because
Coril threatened to kill Ilenle
and two other youths alter an
all-night sex party.
Henlev told officers that
Coril had killed other persons
and buried them in the boat
stall he had rented for the past
three years. But police said
f lenley then told them he had
participated in the sex slaying.
Authorities said HenleV
implicated another 18-year-old
Houston youth who has been
taken into custody and is being
held on suspicion of murder.
Police said he was expected to
sign a written statement
Friday.
Henley, a mustachioed,
long-haired > outh, said he had
known Coril for some time.
lienity S mother. Mary, who
also knew Carll, said, "Dean
loved to be around kids and
prattle with them about ears or
fishing.
'NICEST GUY'
Coworkers described Coril as
a man With an "infectious
smile...the nicest, most
courteous guy you 11 ever
meet.
Ilenley said it was a differ-
ent situation Tuesday night. He
said he had gone to Coril's
home with a 15-year-old girl
and there, he said, they all
a ffed spray paint, woke up tea
find Corn handcoffing all of
them, saving they must die
"He said he was going to kill
us all, but first he was going to

rI a dw en y ns d

lyikn ed pbr mi ds ee o
and kill them (the other youth
an girl) or him if he d let me

gso be di id the girl and
other youth were stripped
naked, gagged and lashed to a


i.)("9 "I ,i
while Corll planned to perform
homosexual acts on the other
youth.
But, lienlev told police, he
shot Coril with the cast aside
.22-caliber pistol when Corll
menaced him.
Police dug up Coril s back
yard but said they found no
evidence other bodies had been
buried there.
Pasadena police said lienley
is being held, but his case will
be referred to a grand jury for
action because of his claim of
self defense.
Pasadena police inspector


Rhodesia to see fair play for a
10-year period after power is
transferred to the black
majority under a new
independence constitution.
The purpose would be to
reassure the white minority
they would not be treated in
the way President Idi Amin of
Uganda has treated
non-citizen Astans.
Canadian Prime Minister
Pierre Tm cmed hteo e

Canadian Parliament that his
country should participate in
such a force. But Heath
insisted it was simply not on*
For one thing, Smith's
all-white regime would never
accept. For another thing
Rhodesia is a British, not a
Commonwealth, responsibility*
Heath spurned another
proposal citing the same
reasons advanced by Lynden
O. Pindling, Prime Minister of
the Bahamas, which is the
Commonwealth's newest state.
it envisaged a new
constitution-writing conference
for Rhodesia sponsored by the
Commonwealth as a whole
instead of by Britain alone.
Pindling's idea aroused interest
with. Trudeau among some of
the Presidents, Premiers and
other senior delegates
attending the 32-nation
summit conference.
The British leader stood by
his government's old position.
Any new attempt at a
settlement should be precede
by white-black agreement
inside Rhodesia.


The delegates drafted a
statement Thursday night
declaring that the Rhodesian
question must be resolved by a
peaceful settlement providing
for majority meaning
black-rule.
This bridged the gap
between African leaders who
wanted to express support for
Rhodesia's black guerrillas and
British Prime Minister Edward

Hsec bage h use fa( cde. to
The statement also urged
Rhodesian Prime Minister lan
Smith to enlarge his dialogue
with some of the country's
black leaders to include "all
groups represengtivt of
Rhodesian opimon.
Leaders from Black African
nations had sought a stronger
statement, and Prime Minister
Errol Barrow of Barbados
proposed that Commonwealth
countries send troops into
Rhodesia to insure the safety
of all races. But Heath rejected
these proposals and said
Barrow's suggestion might
work against the prospect of
new talks between his
government and Smith.
Heath agreed to the
compromise statement after
delegates from the other White
Commonwealth nations -
Australia, Canada and New
Zealand announced their
endorsement.
The statement said the
delegates all voiced their
intense concern about the
Rhodesian situation and
warned of dangerous
consequences if a settlement is
not reached.
Britain has said it will not
accept RhodesIan
independence until the new
government is accepted by the
entire Rhodesian population
including the large black
majority.
Britain's Prime Minister
rejected African demands for
phasing out world trade and
investment with South Africa;
tougher sanctions against
Rhodesia, and a cutoff of all
economic and military aid for
the Portuguese rulers of
Mozambique, Angola and
Guinea.
"We are not satisfied with
Britain's response over
Rhodesia," President Julius
Nyerere of Tanzania told
n
newsmen later. We still are
trying to get Britain to cross
the Rubicon by accepting that
there can be no independence
for Rhodesia before black
majority rule."
Nyerere then went on
bluntly to reject suggestions
made by the British that
Nigerian leader Gen. Yakubu
Gowan did not accept that
position.
"The whole Commonwealth
is united on that excepting
Britain,"he said.
Heath also turned down a
proposal by Prime Minister
Errol Barrow of Barbados

mon ealthh lit titisforA
ould d


Lee Gilbert said Thursday
more bodies may be burie I
across southeast Texas
Gilbert said the information
came from the 17-vear-old
junior high school dropout
who had led officers to the
graves at a southwest Houston
boat storage shed.
"We have information from
Henley there will possibly be
other bodies at High Island and

nRad rn Lake.t splas tte
after conferring with Houston
police," Gilbert said. When he
asked if the additional bodies
may number as many as 25 or
30, Gilbert replied: "Yes, we
have information that there are
more bodies."
Houston police Lt. Breck
Porter confirmed the 25 to 30
figure as a possibility. "It
remains to be seen whether we
find that many," Porter said
High Island is located on
Bolivar Peninsula, some 60
miles southeast of Houston
Rayburn Lake is near Lufkin
some 125 miles northeast of
Houston.

HUgilOS builds secret
. .
SGS IIIIllIII Ship
GFNEVA (AP) A mystery ship
that is to mine the wealth of the
ocean floors for American
billionaire Howard Hughes has
rp tio1s Te <> citamaUn
Nations conference to regulate
exploitation of the seabeds.
Chile and Peru both stated their
< erndt thde oyadtge in s9a nt
meeting here preparing the U.N.
Sea Law Conference that is to open
next spring in Santiago.
Both warned the 250 million
et arrdizi rees prinperi I hat
deep scus and ocean bottoms
should he a common heritage of
mankind. Chile said launching of
odenect atdt s time pointednted
the possible need of provisionally
freeing such exploitation under an
international moratorium.
Hug s M( < r mining ship. tim
reported this week to have sailed
out of Philadelphia where it was
built behind a high fence and a
shielhdeof ecrec'ose destination has
not been disclosed, is to work in
tandem with a gaint barge to scoop
up upplesired "nodules or rocks
attaining manganes .stia nickel
under the ocean surface. Daily
haulage is supposed to be 10 be
soootonsorminerals.
A spokesman for Hughes said in
Los Angeles earlier this week that
the Explorer will be testing
equipment 'for some time to
come" before it actually begins
undersea mining.
Ri0tiRg 1 kill011
9 9

10 MOffil if8188il
BE L F AS T. NORTHERN
IRELAND (AP) Rioting erupted
so a Roman Catholac section of
Belfast Thursday night as 4,000
versuinsg tattended dan I arrals
t he regulations permitting
internment without trial of persons
el eepdu I cheing m mbers of the
No casualties were reported in
tP t t 1 as kille 17tyear-old
were wounded in Antrim when
gunmrer ambush a minibus aking
us j sconfirmed ra alitydian te
Northern Ireland.
poli)cnee an str p atnds a
squads raced out to grab a dozen
youngsters The mob continued to
besiege the post but later dispersed.

::An cn
military post. One group set a car
on fire. Another band attacked a
police post with bottles and stones.
IRA snipers fired at army patrols,
but the army said the shooting was
sporadic and ineffective.
The London Daily Mail said
Britist undercover agents smashed
an IRA plot to kidnap a senior
British army officer and hold him
hostage for the release of interned
guerrillas. It said the agents arrested
a group of masked, armed Irishmen
in Luton. North of London, as they
E"t ready to hold up an engineering
factory to get money to finance the
kidnapping.
The paper said Scotland Yara
moved in after a tip five days ago
that the guerrillas planned a major
0 ei er mmnt e eastainnsversary


FOR *INVESTMENT


Friday, August 10, 1973.


WATERGATE

COMMITTEE

CH 9 1 0
gg g g g

WASHINGTON (AP)-
The Senate Watergate
committee sued "defendant
RichardM.Nixon"individually,
an in his capacity as President
Thursday, asking a federal
court to enforce its subpoena
for White House tape
records and documents
relating to the Watergate
investigation-
The committee also asked
the court to force a response
from the President within 20
days, seeking to obtain the
material before the vacationing
panel resumes its hearings next
month,
"The defendant President's
refusal and failure to make
available said electronic tapes
and other materials cannot be
excused or justified by resort

eroana ivepr idper 1 gep'owae
the suit. '
"If there be any doctrine of
presidential power, prerogative
or privilege that protects
materials ... such a doctrine
does not extend to the
protection of materials relating
to alleged criminal acts..."
RULING ASKED
The committee asked the
court to rule:
olts subpoenas were legally
issued and lawfully served on
the President "and must
therefore be responded to and
complied with..."
oNixon may not refuse to
comply "on the basis of any
claim of separation of powers
executive privilege, presidential
prerogative or otherwise.'
OThat the President in
revealing and permitting others
to reveal the subject matters of
some of the materials "has
breached the confidentiality of
those materials and has waived
any claim" to applying
separation of powers, executive
privilege of presidential
prerogative.
INJUNCTION
It also asked, if necessary,
that the court issue an
injunction directing the
President to make the materials
available.
The committee said Nixon's
continuing ref usal is
irreparably injuring the work
of the select committee and
the interests of the United
States on whose behalf and in
whose name the select
committee sues."
NIXOn is preparing to speak
out publicly on the Watergate
scandal, perhaps by the middle
,next wee .
I he suit is the second filed
against Nixon over the tape
recordings and documents.
Special Watergate prosecutor
Archibald Cox filed a similar
action
The President's law ers
Tuesday replied in court that
any attempt to enforce a
subpoena "would be an
unsupportable violation of the
constitutional doctrine of
separation of powers." Oral
arguments are scheduled for
Aug. 22.
ap gggggg gggy gg
U.4. WRRTLRHLe 15

BOMBING ERRORS


(A INO mel'ENFiwar IA B IIA
Cambodian government soldiers
and viliansqin at le t ve sepa o
weeks, military sources said
Thursday.of the bombing errors

camedbefora the2 2 trikedthat left
government base at Neak Luong on
aMotnd n of Indw% na bombing
On Tuesday, a U.S. 111 struck
a friendly village on an island near
Neak Luong, killing eight persons

a n or odma %yat:::
miles east of Phnom Penh on July
29, and at Setbo IS miles


southwest of Phnom Penh on July
30.
Sources said that at Prey Bang
three Cambodian soldiers were
killed, to wounded and four
persons listed as "missing" and
probably dead. At Setbo, eight
soldiers ard eight civilians were
wounded and four other persons
missing, the sources said.
At Prateah Lang, where there has
been heavy fighting for several
weeks, U.S. jets were reported to
have damaged an armored
personnel carrier, killing three
government soldiers and wounding
the sources said the bombing
gi[ceut eat da .but they did not


Pindling'sproposal

g a
on Rhodesia is




BY Arthur L. Gayshon
OTTAWA, AUG. 10 (AP) The 32 nations of the
Commonwealth prepared to adjourn their nine-day summit
conference today after agreement on a compromise position
toward the rebel African state of Rhodesia.


MAYRUN
I tT DD
g g g g gg
BUENOS AIRES (AP) A
powerful Marxist labour leader said
Thursday he might challenge Juan
D. Peron for the Presidency, but it
remained a mystery whether Peron
would really run and with whom
Peron still has not accepted the
nomination offered five days ago
by a convention of his party, which
unpnimouslydal hohnishth r w en
Isabel.
The 77-year-old ex President
confused the matter further, saying
his old enemy Ricardo Balbin of
the Radical Civil Union (UCR) was
tahdeer i c important political
Peron's remarks fanned
speculation that Isabel despite
her statements to the contrary
would drop out at the last minute,
towingwitPeronistsRa calcombin
Peron-Balbin ticket.
Meanwhile the labour leader
Agustin Tosco of Argentina s
exlpdlosive second city, Cordoba.
oup h a i tooru na
Tosco, 43, head of the
le -leanmg t and powe worke
outweighing his labour following
could possibly attract many
dillusioned Peronist leftists.
BalPeronsal illisw remarks abo
respective parties to decide whether
to combine forces, but it was clear
his wishes would direct the course
onT ePeron iscals were split.
were split on allowing Balbin to run
with Peron, and a radical
ee out ac en edcisila t
The decision was apparently being
left up to Balbin himself.
One major possibility was that
election a1outdanotchlei heldoat tall.
Peronist-dominated legislature to
simply designate Peron as successor
to temporary President Raul
La gress could change the law of
succession giving them power to
name a President and avoid the
elections which many don't want.
Since Peron is considered a sure
winner, manyoPero istst a ews
numbers. The radicals, too, are
reluctant to risk losing face.
President Hector J. Camphora,
"ubotituamp gnede openly as a
elections, gave upr s ficAlarch
month so Peron could take over,
Peron returned June 20


*RETiREMENT


( q
REAL SECURITY ISA-----....


#' ALARM SYSTEM

COMPLETE BURGLARY AND FIRE PROTECTION
24 HOUR CENTRAL STATION SURVEILLANCE
P.O. Box N.4205 TEL. 2-4296-9
CALL US TODAY NOT THE MORNING AFTER


Select the I~AN


TAR@B BMMETERSLTD.


111 Shiriey Street


Box N4806




- -- _J --- - --- --- - -


She Gribune
NULLIUs ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas OfNo Master
LEON E. If DUPUCH.Publisher/Editor 1903 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Publisher/Editor l917-1972
ContributingEditor1972.
EILFFN 1)UPUCH CARRONM.Sc., B.A., LL.B. '
Publisher/Editor l972.
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau. Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:



Ed teorrhiliO es(15 xt 8ions)2-1986




EDITORIAL Friday, August 10, 1973.

A happy people


IE~l~rrU~a


mouth in an isolated community because, back in the days when
Nassau was a quiet, isolated community, people had a mysterious
way of picking up news, often even in advance of the event. It
was said at the time that "Nass peo e got wireless ears".

A few years ago John Marquis, an English journalist on the
staff of The Dibune made a speech at East Rotary at which he
described the Bahamas as "a frightened society".
Since then I have become more and more conscious of this sad
condition to which our people have been reduced.
Perhaps the best example of this fact is the story I told you in
this column recently about a Kiwanis Club that voted me Man of
the Year just before the September 19th election when it
appeared that the Opposition had a chance of defeating the PLP.
The date was set for the presentation of the award. Just after
the election, which the PLP won, the club cancelled the award. A
majority of its members were afund!
I know that I have many "friends" in Nassau but when I now
visit the island I am conscious of the fact that some of these
"friends" would be happy if they didn't have to meet me in
public places. The old warmth is no longer there. These people

areBafr ntrast, this situation came into sharp focus during this
week in the Caymans where people who knew me in Nassau ....or
have heard about my work for the people of the Bahamas ..
greet me with open arms. This is an island where the people are
unconscious of political fears.

Ini mty travels in disita a sr allthe w Id I have lived briefly
My first experience of this terrible condition was in Buenos
Aires early in the 1950's just before the overthrow of dictator
Juan Peron, who was later driven out of the country but who has
recently returned to the Argentine and recaptured power.
There is a broad avenue in that city where no traffic is allowed.
It is reserved as a shopping centre.
I stood in this street and studied thousands of people as they
walked shoulder to shoulder along this avenue. They all walked
with their eyes straight in front of them. No one exchanged a
smile or a greeting. They were all afraid .... because no one knew
whom to trust.
You know .... this is the most awful thing that could happen to
any people. And so it was refreshing to spend a week among
people who are really free .... without being independent!

Knowing what I have gone through in the Bahamas over the
years many people find it difficult to understand why it has not
left any scars on my personality.
"I don't understand it," a woman told me last night, "you
show no signs of bitterness, you have no wrinkles. You look 20
years younger than your age. What is your secret?"
I don't suppose I have aged very much. My doctor commented
the other day that my body shows no signs of aging.
If there is any secret to extending youth into old age it is
because I refuse to worry .... and I am unconscious of fear. Nor
do I allow hate and envy to enter into my life.
These are the four things that age a man .... hate, envy, worry
and fear are destructive human forces. Learn to conquer these
elements in human experience and, whatever happens, you'll
always be on top of the world. I think it was Shakespeare who
wrote: 'Tis the mind that makes the lady rich".

I am surprised at the number of expatriates here who spent
years in the Bahamas and were driven out by the present
government. These were all first class men. This is probably why
the service at hotels and other public places in this island is so
good.
Murray Mitten is the Sales Manager at the Holiday Inn where
we have stayed here. He was on the staff of the Nassau Beach
Hotel, the Holiday Inn at Paradise Island and the Holiday Inn at
Freeport before coming to the Holiday Inn here in January.
Tourist travel to the Caymans has increased greatly during the
last five years. Not in really spectacular numbers but nevertheless
substantial for this island. These people don't want spectacular
numbers. They don't want the sidewalks in their main business
streets congested with people peddling native wares. For this
reason they are not encouraging the cruise ship business.
Mr. Mitten tells me that he sees here many of the "quality"
tourists who formerly came to Nassau.
Just guess who breezed in while I was talking with Mr. Mitten?
John Tull who was given a pretty raw deal by Immigration in
Nassau. He seemed to be bubbling over with happiness and asked
me to convey greetings to his friends in Nassau.
**********
The Hon. Clement Maynard, Minister of Tourism, recently
admitted that the tourist business in Nassau had suffered because
of a great decrease in the number of "quality" visitors to the
island. He said they must make an effort to get them back.
That won't be easy. The quality of life that attracted these
people to the Bahamas has been destroyed by Mr. Maynard and
his government .... and they wouldn't know how to restore it,
even if they wanted to, which I seriously doubt.
There is one hard fact of life the government in the Bahamas
needs to learn. It is that responsible people brought their money
to Nassau because they had confidence in the government, and
"quality" tourists built houses there because the environment was
pleasing to their taste and they felt both welcome and secure
among our people.
Destroy this abstract quality of confidence and this feeling of
goodwill and security .... and you have a bankrupt society.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
That's the way it is, folks, Too bad, too sad, too late.
DUPUCH


- -- --- ------ --,~


Friday, August 10, 1973.


3


B The Associated Press
to 221 RIDAY, U UT
T ljre 143Tda lie in theny
date
ir> ee I th t l is pilaecedeata
terror t actsin Northern Ireland.
1967 People of Gibraltar vote
to retain their link with Britain
rather than return to Spanish
wereignt?-
1962 Soviet Union rejects
proposed U.S. inspection plan as
part of any disarmament


agreement.
me rship itainhe ap sop tr
Eco mic Communi{ returned to
power in Canadian elections
Lib r 19s formh jail in rya
Belgium.
1945 Japanese offer to
surrender in World War Two if
Emperor will be permitted to keep
his throne.
1943 British Prime Minister
Winston Churchill, U.S. President
Franklin D.. Roosevelt and


Canadian Premier Mackenzie King
atioonference on Far East
Sar 19u3;u illevodt f Gene 1 Jo
suppressed.
out GermStrikes and riots break
1919 AngloWhite Russian
forces defeat Soviet forcesin North
Dvina
1914 France declares war on
Austria-Hungary: German forces
occupy Liege, Belgium.
1913 Peace ending Balkan War
is signed in Bucharest.


GO.


part of the fleet of the
n' aohna aof ial air carri
building isthefirst of its kind
to be erected in the
settlement of Mangrove Cay,


BY ETII \\1 DUPUCH
GEORGETOWN. Grand Cayinan. July 21 This week-end we
will return to (oral Gables alter spending a memorable week
among the happy people on this island.
This place fascinates me. It is so much like the Nassau in which
I spent a happy childhood when no one had a great deal but
everyone was friendly .... when people were honest because they
were contented with their simpic surroundings .... when everyone
helped his neighbour and no one envied 10s brother because there
was little cause for envy. When there was little .... but cycryone
shared and no one went hungr\.
in the midst of plents in Nassau today there is fear of hunger
because most people are reaching for the moon and the devil take
the hindmast. .... where real human values have been pushed to
the background and an artificial society has been superimposed
on an artificial economy.
Many people go to the Caymans today in search of the material
advantages that island is supposed to hold for people in a
frightened world. I have met people here who have made several
trips to the island. They were secretive about the object of their
interest in this area.
Curiosity brought my wife and me to the island. We will return
for another visit because it offers human values that we once
knew in Nassau and that no longer exist there.
see,
fhe sea here is most invitine. The weather has been good .... a
can sea a short distance from my hotel room.

in< to are i cleant11< i ppoll stioj1 w ranmirb eb
in mouthfuls of the salt water and rolling it around in my mouth
without feeling that I have opened my mouth to a sewer.
I am told that several years ago a major oil company sought
permission to build a refinery here. The government said an
mp at NO hey would not jeopardize the natural charm of
And so oil con les came to the Bahamas ... and apparently
the price was right.
The oil industry employs a small number of people. One big oil
spill .... and the tourist business in the Bahamas, which employs
thousands of our peopic and is the backbone of the colony's
economy .... might be ruined.
Was this worth the gamble?
We can only hope that the cards cut right for the islands.
..........
There are two weekly newspapers here. They are published on
the same day .... just like in the old days when both The Tribune
and 7he Guardian were semiAveeklies and were both published on
Wednesday and Saturdays. Here the two weeklies are published
on Thursdays. They are both first class publications. Their news
and editorial content are of a high standard and they are
produced in two colours on small offset presses.
But news doesn't wait for the Thursday publication of the
newspapers to get around.
It is said here that if you don't hear a rumour by 10 o'clock in
the morning .... star t one.
Back in the old days in Nassau this was called "Grants Town
wueless". Nothing could beat it. "Grants Town wireless" had a
way of making news before it happened. It must have been a
form of mental telepathy because very often the real thing
happened on the heels of the rumour.
Some remarkable things happened in the days before wireless
conununication was established in the islands.
The late Wilton Albury. Inspector of Schools, travelled
throughout the islands in his own sloop and he was full of stories
of events he could not explain,
He was at Governor's Harbour. Eleuthera the night the
Titanic struck an iceberg at sea and went to the bottom with a
heavy loss of life. He told me that the people of the settlement
were greatly disturbed that night because of a report that a big
ship had sunk at sea. This was before radio. There was no wireless
at the island and so no one could explain by what means this
information was conveyed to someone in an isolated community.
It is impossible to comes to young readers the complete
isolation of the Out Islands during the period that Mr. Albury was
Inspector of Schools. Today an inspector goes to the islands in a
comfortable cabin emiser or by air. In Mr. Albury's time he was
given a small travelling allowance, 110 bought a small sloop and
sailed from island to island, settlement to settlement, with a
native crew.
There were no roads in the islands .... only dirt paths
connecting settlements many miles apart. His was a hard life in
the service of education.
Mr. Albury told me that on one of his long walks between
settlements at one of the islands he came to a rugged steep hill
that was a short cut to his destination. A man lived alone in the
bush on the top of this hill. Should he take the short cut across
the hill or go the long route on the flat?
No one in the area expected him. There was no way of sending
a message. Certainly the man on the hill, who lived in complete
isolution even from the settlement would not know that he was
conung
fle decided to take the short cut over the hill. When he arrived
at this man's house no one was in sight. He was hot and thirsty,
he needed a drink of water badly and so he decided to stop for a
drink.
"Come in Mr. Albury," a voice deep inside the house answered
when he rapped on the door. "I've been exyx-cting you".
This man must have known in some mysterious way that Mr.
Albury was coming because when he opened the door he found
that the man had a glass of water waiting for him.
"How did you know I was coming?", he asked the man.
"Ever since yesterday I had a feeling that a white man was
coming to visit me and that he would need a drink of water." he
explained. "As you are the only white man who ever comes to
this area .... and as I never have visitors from the settlement .... I
just knew that when someone rapped on the door it had to be

ye nd so .... don't discount news reports circulated by word of


MANGO VE CA Y,
tANDROrS is aircraft
terminal building in the
background have something
in common: The aircraft is


on the island of Andros
Known as the Clarence A.
fgacinit airport, the $250,000
by th nider allyTowned
the Hon. Clement T.
Maynard, under whose
portfolio aviation falls, and
the Minister of Transport, the
Hon. Darrell E. Rolle. At the
held rm g Mr.ceMemonyd
said private flying has become
an important part of the
tourist industry in the
rec amas. Hesrevealed th in
25,000 private landings have
been recorded annually in the
Bahamas.

Up 10 0%p.c

4 *
NEW YORK (AP) First
National City Bank, America's
second-largest bank, said
Friday it was boosting its
prime lending rate from 9 to
9% per cent, effect ve Monday.
rn it m ow feei aE

credit-worthy corporate
customers.
Observers expected the
boost to become industry-wide
i on jt insat I da,= =
at the start of 1973, and has
been rising stea y


ALL AT 2^2'

TR EMENDOUS D COUNTS


The Associates ELIZABETH AVENUE


e hS Gribune


I~d~M~r~l,


CLEARANCE1


_~Clarencel A. Banarota nrs


EVERY THING MUST




1 I I I


A~NTBWIL PBI EOIIAOL StRVIC~


PETER GARDER

would like to thank NEIL BROkW for looking


ass a
2
a
whilehewasoperating

SNOW AND
a
in Switzerland
a
*
a
SUN AND... :
a
will be open all year with the same staffof 17 years
o a
We will enfor looking after our old and new friends
with a new menu from the Bahamas and Furope 1
a
o
The Staff of SUN AND ... *

2.12 SRR ARR


~C -~


4-- -- -~-~- --- --'- ---- "~4~le~ Irr


Friday, August~s 10, 1973,


By DAPHNE WALLACE WHITFIELD
ex nC q(BAH aASbm MIT D an old name and old company is one of those rapidly

up o-dn janon ial ce I aswhsich the businesses and the home: it glass and therature will last as fhe Sun Tint process com
also distributes and retails long as the glasses themselves. in two types a liquid coating
institutional and commercial There is stemmed glassit or e all which stops a certain amount a
glassware, sells the commercial in on piece not stuck heat and stops glare an
cleaning products and together as a the usual case, consequent fading of material
appliances it uses in its With this stem glassitate comes within inside range of th
janitorial business to a guarantee emernw the run or windows. ABCO treated th
homeowners who want to take foot bemy advantage of the speed, guarantee d was not cover Street with this type of Su
economy and professional breakages, uf course. hut 11 the Tint. which is practical
results of the products used hF rim or foot a shipped from invisible,
those who clean for a business any cause whatsouter. n < ABCO also sells and installs replaced free at charge. or the w---me*--nu-
-
sun-tint for galss windows and purchase pnee retunded on as
doors to reduce the heat and return.
banish the glare of the sun. CRYS I ALS
ABCO is the exclusive French lead cristal with
representative and distributor blown sternivare are 510.04 tor
of Libbey's glassware in the four water collets and SU 84
Bahamas. There is a discount for six brandy glasses.
of 20% on all Libbey glassware President Waine Allen
until August 18. explamed that .18CO do not
In the consumer line of round off then prices. e.g to
Libbey's glassware, which is the nearest on ents
very popular in the Bahamas no inmennon a nummov R


there are well over 100
o dM OA H oGLA AE fTerent styltel sAn hite st
o eir showroom on Harold fitting method of decoration
,
G.B. ENTERTAINERS

TRAINING PROGRAMME


THE GRAND BAHAMA
Entertainers' Association on
Monday launched fund-raising
efforts for the formation of an
entertainers training
programme, Association
president Ivan Bethel
announced.
An all-day beach party was
held at Taino Beach, followed
hy a music festival and dance
in the Independence Hall of
the-= > nn.
The proposed training
mt i ansivilld ebteerta rn wl
wish to improve their skills,
M r. Bethel said. In addition,
there also will be a programme
for the training of school
children who have their sights
set on careers in the
entertainment world.
Mr. Bethel said some of the
major hotels on Grand Bahama
have promised to make rooms
available for training sessions,


IVAN BETHEL
and have also offered to assist
with the fund-raising efforts.
Mr. Bethel said money is
needed to import qualified
teachers to provide proper
training.


Sl


Ghro Gribitty


service


ABCO offers niora than a janitorial


(F



. a


I N-K-





I


CITY MARKET
SCHOLARS
THE CITY MARKET
Scholarship Foundation
:-(.g.g.;gy..
students, Wednesday night in
the Nassau Room of the
Sheraton British Colonial
Hotel. Pictured with the
htoolar Ip rentp nts ,
Davis, chairman of the Board
of Directors of Winn Dixie
Stores; beside him is the
Minister of Education
e 7BeCho yhe disM
Richard Moore, right,
president of Bethune
Cookman College, Daytona
Beach and Mr. M.H.
Hollingworth, vice president
of Winn Dixie stores and
eed tr mC igMarkets. t
front row is Dr. Cleveland
Eneas, director of City
I Markets, and beside him is
Mr. Gerald Fryers, consulting
director and general manager


*
City Markets award 25 more
g
scholar ships to young Bahamian s
By LYNDA CRAWLED .
TWENTY FIVE MORE UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS were awarded to Bahamian students by the City
Markets Scholarship Foundation, it was announced last night by the foundation trustees at a buffet dinner held at
the Sheraton British Colonial Hotel in honour of the students. %


W INSUNCE CO.B.
8
P.O. BOX N1108 PHONE 5-5521
NOTICE TO HOLDERS OF
SAVINGS ASSURANCE PLAN POLICIES:
ANCHOR UNIT TRUST PRICES
AS OF AUGUST 8th, 1973
OFFEREDPRICE.. ..$1.34
BID PRICE . . . . . . . . . ..$1.26
YIELD ..... .... .. . .... .... .. 1.52'f


NOTICE
IN THE ESTATE OF Marion Maud Sands late of
the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence one of the Bahama islands
deceased.

ALL persons having claims against the above
state are require (1 to nd thod sarne duly ertifi
15th. day of September A.D. 1973 after which
date the Executors will proceed to distribute the
assets having regard only to the claims of which
they shall then have had notice.
AND ALL persons indebted to the said Hetate
are requested to make full settlement on or before
the date hereinbefore mentioned.
Dated this Third day of August A.D. 1973.
CLARKE, ALBURY & CO.
Attorneys for the Executors,
P. O. Box N.1699: 308 Bay Street,
Nassau, BahamaS.


forward to his first year at
Ki n shiStatin S n ber Nehw
former is pursuing a bachelor's
ttpolipi al scien e. ndor
degree in journabsm.
Donations may be sentto
the Godfrey McKenzie and
Stanley Jones Scholarship
Fund at the Chase Manhattan
Bank. Main Branch, P.O. Box
N4919.


II .U. t50x rHLZ4Uz tree ort e none anZ-sus? I


REGULAR SERVICE
EX LONDON & LIVERPOOL
GUE NASSAU
ORCOMA 14th AUGUST
\ ORDUNA 26th AUGUST
ORTEGA 17th SEPTEMBER
ORBITAL 14th OCTOBER
"'


Phone 2-8683 P.O. Box N8168 Bay St. Near Charlotte St.


I


I


j


Flidav. Aunust 10. 1973.


The scholarships represent
$48,100 for the 1973-74
school year. This makes a total
of over $500,000, set aside by
the foundation for scholarships
to 87 students since its
inception in 1968.
The scholarship dinner, held
in the Nassau Room, included
addresses by the Minister of
Education and Culture, Mr.


Livingston Coakley, Mr. Gerald
J Fryers. executive vice
president and general manager
of City Markets and Mr. J.E
Davis, chairman of the board
of directors of Winn Dixie
Stores. Inc.
in his address, the minister
revealed that approximately
$25 million was spent by his
ministry last year. This he said


was the largest government
spending for that year
Mr. Coakley also pointed
out that this budget is going to
be narrowed by getting people
to go into areas that will
benefit the Bahamas.
"Unlike previous years
when scholarships were given
to any qualified Bahamian
continued the Minister, "the
scholarships will now seek to
channel students into the areas
of expertise in line with
national objectives.
PARTNERS
The Supermarkets
scholarship scheme has
demonstrated to us." said Mr
Coakley "that they are
partners in this grementure of
educating Bahamians
It was also disclosed bi the
Minister that just befo"
independence the Munstri of
Education sent out letters to
private firms askmy for
donations, to aid go unent
scholarships.
The response from thest-
firms, according to the
Minister, was reasonah!< goo
liecadse o'abtl o it scholarships than be ure
sch loansti nlatitts on tl
success, the Minister said He
would like to work nore
zo aTvti ea tr ewla \
schlarslups twed to be g
he was not so consciousu
aware that ties is the film lear
that City Markets have been
awarding scholarships 1"
Bahamians.
The Minister saul that th<
City Markets scholarshiP
progdranune.el!2at /harm sa
liqirnNestimon3 a goodwi} r
develop#ent of our pl1a an
resources he added, we can be
an example to the world in
human development.
TheNOS SlilslL 11 also
emphasized that there was no
substitute for going away for
Bahamians, who shouki
imi plpr jud oplaridllicartr
the world, "whether they are
black, pink, green or blue." He
added that once the students
became involved in campus
life, they would find that they
would forget about bein8
prejudiced.
Mr. Coakley also urged the


scholarship recipients to be
"grateful and to remember the
people who helped them along.
110 added: "Remember you
not only have a responsibility
to yourself but to your nation
to make this country a
success "
Mr. Gerald Fryers, general
manager of City Markets, said
in his address, that City
Markets and its employees
were very proud to be able to
assist in the education of
deserving people.
FINE RECORDS
'1 would like to
congratulate all the current
scholarship holders, for the
fine record they have achieved
in their college careers to date.
lans confident that the new
recipIents will continue in the
same tradition.' Mr. Fryers
ag
Mr. J.E. Davis, chairman of
he B d of D f W.
ixic trores, t c s oudenin
that his com challer ed
pany is
erniasbu nes mpe w
them in education.
tic al made nientioBna he
imported the majority of its
a Pc It udents shouM
would be able to purchase
some of our produce locally,"
corianueRi DavisV. Moore,
president of Bethune Cookman
intrl2t guests, including Dr. Cleveland
Imeas(directorof CityMarkets
Limited), and Mrs. Eneas; Mr.
11 11. Hollingsworth (senior
vice president of Winn Dixie
Stores and Director of City
ket ;r kiG Tr y ur set
\lt LW. Rivers retail training
supers sior of citdy M k n dl
Williams (treasurer and
comptroller of City Markets)
and Mrs Williams.
selloalrls ilvingwin are ahe
colleges to which they are
gourg:
Reinault A. Johnson,
lioward Univensity Wa ingt n-
Grinnel College, Grinnell,
lowa; Tyrone A. Pyfrom,
University of the West Indies;
Robert B. Roberts, Lincoln
University and Philip II.
Williamson McMast er
University, Hamilton. Ontario.
Canada


Peter W. Isaacs, Iowa State
University; Barrington C.
Smith, Bethune Cookman
College. Daytona Beach,
Florida; Roland T. Albury,
University of West Indies:
Averell J. Mortimer, Bethune
Cookman College and Mavis
Ingraham, Fisk UniversityNash-
ville, tenneessee.
Karen I. Rigby, Fisk
University: Elain P. Ingraham,
Loma Linda University.
California; Mary E. Moncur.
Andrews University: Phyllis
Albury. Barry College, Miami.


Florida and Linda C. Smith,
Aquinas College, Grand
Rapids, Michigan.
George A. Zonicle. Texas
A&M College; Paulette S.
Archer. Western Michigan
University: Phyllis M. Brown,
Sorbonne University. Paris.
France: Charlotte K. Francis.
IIavergal College, Toronto,
Canada and Barbara ]
Lightbourn. Luther R. College.
Decorah, lowa.
Godfrey Rolle, Deborah
Saunders. Larry Ingraham
Ruth Mae Grey and Trevor
Hanna


Sailing ex-London and Liverpool
THE PACIFIC STEAM NAVIGATION CO.
DUE FREEPORT.
"ORCOMA" 16th AUGUST
"ORTEGA" 16th SEPTEMBER

KNHN
Sailing ex-Hamburg, Bremen
Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Antwerp.
Due Freeput
"SINON" 28th AUGUST
"SOCRATES" 15th SEPTEMBER


A FUND to assist Bahamians
(GBoodb McoKne ziermulhStatnh iy
fund-raising goal of $10,000 as
miteesy rsthe nextbte
established at the Chase
Manhattan Bank's main
branch, at Claughton House,
Shirley and Charlotte Streets.
The students have now
launched a public appeal for
b efot e. in attaining their
Classified as the "Godfrey
MohK a sehipnd Sta ev Jon"
account is open for public
donation. They also planned a
two man forty mile walkathon
last tu y.to the students
res on t th Ikath
pro ecsehasobeene m derateon
far. A fund raising show by
EoxruGmHSthedOb ah an sl
was rained out
The students are also
performing odd jobs to help
raise funds.
Godfrey hopes to be able to
enter his second year at
Belmont Abbey College later
this month, while Bobby looks


~J1-rp ~tt~buno


2 Student BRSOpe 80SCh018f siip


FEARED




1 I II I I


_ ___ ~


incident started him off on a
q u est for unusual
end-positions, and he later
became a well-known collector
of such curiosities. But from
that day until the day of his
death he was unable to explain
how it was that his dormant
mental faculties managed to
present him with a clear,
precise and meticulous
solution to a problem
which would stump
all but one in a million players.
Nor was he ever able to repeat


NOE NDEED TO IDEYURE


_ Id "C - I


on the waterfront at East
CDGD S Bay St. & William St. -
-=*- Phone 5-4641







IN THE ESTATE OF Neville Dantzler Sands late
of the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence one of the Bahama Islands deceased.


ALL persons having claims against the above
Estate are required to send the same duly certified
in writing to the undersigned on or before the
15th. day of September A.D. 1973 after which
date the Executors will proceed to distribute the
assets having regard only to the claims of which
they shall then have had notice.

AND ALL persons indebted to the said Estate
are requested to make full settlement on or before
the date hereinbefore mentioned.

Dated this Third day ofAugust A.D. 1973.
CLARKE, ALBURY & CO
Attorneys for the Executors,
P. O. Box N.1699: 308 Bay Street,
I Nassau, Bahamas.


NOTICE

EU the I irs of Lewis Philip Arthur
Neit church, Unice Alfred Newchurch and all
adver e claimants.
!hilan dark of Wullf Road. Nassau, Babullius,
Cl inn t he I wner of the unincumbered fee
sinw \ l pace or parcel of land situate
'55 1 more w last of Kemp Road in the
islan of \ci i idence bounded Northwardly
b anous vea 1 1 astwardly by land said to be
the property a Woods Southwardly partly by
Wulff Road al all by various occupants and
Weawardli n n 1 land the property of the sold
Hilton Added 8 parth hy various occupunts,
and has apphe the Court to have his title to
such land in\ unted under section 3 of The
Quieting litk 1.
Copies of the n filed herein may be inspected at
the Revistry the Supreme Court and at the
office of Rid 1. B. Curry, At torney for the
Petitioner, 001 Street. Nassau, Bahamas.
Any persnn lu dower or a right to dower or an
adverw claim before 31st August, 1973 file
in the Suprem ourt and serve on the Petitioner
or his alter statement of his claim in the
prescribed form wrilled by an affidavit to be filed
therewith.
Failure of an\ such person to file and serve a
statern nt of hR el sim on or before the 31st day of
Augus 3 \ll operate as a bar to such claim.
HI LTON ADDE RLE1'
Petitioner


~I e~i~Qf4Pi~f~E~~a~d I


WEEKEND SPEOALS


I


I


IEla~l~lB~IUIIRI _


such a feat, either conscious or
not. The rare and remarkable
freak of penetrating analysis
which had stood at his elbow
just that once, was never to
return. It makes you think,
doesn't it?
RC


Friday, August 10, 1973.


IF THIS were a case of
fiction. it might be dismissed as
being too far-fetched for
credibility. But as it is fully
authenticated truth, there are
some of my readers who will
be persuaded to believe it.
It all happened a long time
ago. back in the halcyon days
of I933, which was a good era
for spectacular events: it was
the year when Hitler's power
flared like the flames of the
Reichstag, the year that Duke
Ellington started at the old
Cotton Club: the year that gave
the seismograph needles more
to do than any previous year.
It was a time when Contract
Bridge, although relatively in
its infancy, had caught hold of
public imagination in the USA
U ES and when d up licat
tournaments were spreading
Vj across the States like bush
I fires. Each State had its own
State Championship, even in
t task those days, and we go now to
Anders New Hampshire, where Mr.
f the Norman Bonney, of Boston, is
ion, to visiting for the sole purpose of
o two taking part.
Mr. Bonney suffered from a
to the weak heart, but was
nd the determined to enjoy his game
d as a of Bridge. During the first
om the afternoon of play, a Pairs event
ion. In took place. Mr. Bonney found
n, Mr. himself sitting East on the
casi n following deal:
given
as Red A Q 40 3
a pteal A 5
g fo
r A 8 6 4


his head. "I have a feeling that
you could, but I really can't
see it" he replied. They got on
with their game.
The event was held in two
sessions, and just before the
evening session began, Mr.
Bonney was in the foyer of the
hotel. He noticed that a
well-known player, W. Mark
Noble, who was a cripple who
had lost the use of his legs and
had to be wheeled everywhere,
was waiting to be helped up to
the card-room. Apparently
there was no elevator, or else it
was out of order. Mr. Bonney
and another player cheerfully
agreed to carry Mr. Noble
bodily up the stairs and into
the card room. But as soon as
they had sat Mr. Noble down
into a chair to await his
wheel-chair, Mr. Bonney's
heart condition asserted itself,
and he passed out.
Very soon, he was
surrounded by a circle of
anxious players, who fanned
lum, undid his tie, poured cold
water onto his brow, and did
other useful acts to avoid
turning the Pairs into a
funeral. Then, without
warning, Mr. Bonney leapt to
his feet, white-faced and
shakmg. The others drew back
in alarm. Clod!" shouted
Bonney.
Nobody spoke, thinking that
they were about to witness his
last moment, and awaiting for
him to 113 he fl
But r. pBe on t oor.
much alive. He tn er to
nearest card table, found a
pack of cards, and started to
lay out the 7NT deal, with
every single card perfectly in
m trl[%enhhe pr ee
player could have made his
contract, using what is still
probably one of the most
fantastic squeeze positions ever
brought to light.
Norman Bonney worked
swiftly and confidently,
showing the hushed circle of
spectators around him just how
this unique end-play operated.
If it has to have a technical
description, it would be known
as a Triple-Double Automatic


Repeating Squeeze, and would
most likely be the only
specimen of its kind in the
whole museum-case of Bridge
wonders. But a bigger wonder
lay behind it.
Mr. Bonney, though a useful
performer, was by no means an
expert, certainly not an expert
analyst. The whole thing had
come to him while he lay
unconscious, card by card,
right down to the
extraordinary six-card ending.
Here is what he told his band
of onlookers:
"South lets the opening lead
run to his own hand. Then he
finesses dummy's Queen of
Spades and plays the Ace. Now
the Ace and Queen of Clubs,
followed by the Ace and
Queen of Diamonds. That
leaves six cards in each hand,
like this:"
Mr. Bonney pointed a
shaking finger at the lay-out of
the end-game:
none
A Q 10 3
none
8 6


d


CO11110 WI \l l11 OF Till BAHAMAS
IN Till WTRI MI COURT
EQ[I I1 51l)1


19)73


Our pasot


"M iniatu re


none


K


10
4
K 9
"Now", went on Bonney,
"South plays his two Kings,
and it doesn't matter which
order he plays them in. West
will have to throw a Heart in
order to keep the top Spade
and the Diamond. East must
t r ea at ref<>r n\
both opponents let go a Heart
they are subject to a repeating
squeeze in the other suits; if
they do let go a Heart, South,
pick upa difouellearthtrichsad
already seen some heart tricks
of a different kind, persuaded
Mr. Bonney to relax, and a
little while afterwards the game
Mr. Bonney didn't win. He
didn't win many games at all,
and was regarded as no more
than a useful player. But that


KJ


6 5


10 9 8 7
4
K Q 9 2
K Q 7 3
ha orth andtSoutohrig nhao d
Couple staggered into the
farcical contract of 7 No
Trumps, with South as the
declare. West led the 2 of
Spades, and a few minutes later
South was down 2, as indeed
he deserved to be. He turned to
Mr. Bonney, and with his own
hand and dummy spread out
on the table. said plaintively,
"Could I have made it?"
Mr. Bonney took a long look
at the cards and slowly shook


1971 FORD CORTINA Yellow Automatic
only one owner Good buy
1970 DODGE AVENGER 4 Door Automatic white
A Smart car only
1971 DODGE AVENGER Blue Stick Shift
4 Door
1972 VAUXHALL FIRENZA Blue 2 Door Stick Shift
Good Condition
1973 DODGE DART 4 Door Automatic Air Conditioned
Radio Custom Package Low Mileage
Company Demonstrator only
1972 CHEVY VEGA VAN 2 Door white Automatic
L. Mileage only
1972 CHEVY VEGA SEDAN 2 Door Air Conditioned
Radio very L. Mileage only
1972 CHEVY VEGA COUPE Brown 2 Door Automatic
Radio Air Conditionned only
1966 CHEVY IMPALA 4 Door Automatic Radio
Green Air Conditioned only


1972 Dodge Avenger G.L. ...$2550.00


1973 Chevy impala ........$5700.00


LET ONE


Oak:':. s, s,:. ::


C. Morrison


Elle artilittit


\ 9


THE: GENIUS ONLY KNOCKED ONCE:


ver its
He
ization
ork it
of the
praised
ieppt
nations
t) are:
urn
dge of
Maura.

ALE
umane
annual
day at
and


T WOCHEQ
IM flILIC F1A
I19 LIIT [.. Edt?
IT WAS a pleasant
recently for Mr.
Wiberg, President o
Bahamas Hotel Associat
Breshentm wo cheques
t
deserving of help. Te
of $500 each, went
Bahamas Red Cross a
Crippled Children's Fun
token of appreciation fr
Bahamas Hotel Associat
making the presentation
W gd t idsec ned t
year that the BHA had
a donation to the Baham
c)raodss in a wePri ean
the Hon. L.O. Pindlin
extra funds to help co
deficit of $25,000.
commended the organ
for the wonderful w
renders to the poor
community. He also
tCheil Mr ns em te
years. Receiving the do
from Mr. WJberg (righ
te rT leMmar dtreeass
and Miss Phyllis Aldri
the Bahamas Red Cross.
Photo: Fred

HUMANE JUMBLE S
THE BAllAMAS H
Society will hold its
jumble sale 10 a.m. Satur
the Kirk liall.
liousehold items
clothing will be on sale.


CE


TRAL


GARAGE


THE


EASIEST PLACE


N NASSAU


TO


TRAD E.


$1200.00

$1500.00

$1450.00

$2550.00


$5895.00

$2475.00

$3600.00

$3600.00

$1000.00


L. McCartney S. Seymour


E.Gbsn


CENTRAL 0 ARAC 0LT D.


NINK-


sMEAF




I I


0. 1



&

*
Liberated fiancee nixes


traditional stag party
DEAR ABBY: As the cliche goes: "I never thought I'd
be writing to Dear Abby, but here goes."
My oldest and dearest friend is marrying a gal he's
been living with for two years. Some of his buddies wanted
to have a stag for him-the typical kind-a dinner with
drinks, and a lot of gags about his "last chance" to enjoy
bachelorhood. We wouldn't go so far as to have any nude
girls jumping out of cakes or anything like that.
The problem is his fiancee. She says the traditional stag
is a "chauvinistic idea" and if his friends want to honor
him, they should entertain the two of them together.
The groom doesn't want to upset his fiancee, so he's
asked us to call off the stag. I am pretty burned up about
the whole thing. I think the decision should be the guy's,
and not his fiancee's. So you tell me, Abby, who is being
unreasonable here? D. R
DEAR D. R.: The decision WAS the guy's. He decided
not to upset his fiancee. So if you want to honor your
buddy, do it his way or not at all.
DEAR ABBY: Is it standard practice to charge close
relatiVes for wedding pictures? My sister in law has had
two children marry this past year. [My son was in one of
the wedding parties]. She had pictures taken of all the
guests as well as the bridal couple and wedding party.
Then she went ahead and had a lot of pictures made up,
and she charged her own parents, sisters, and brothers for
the cop of he picture i s, td ou n $5 is a little
Stiff for One fiVe by seven black and white glossy C'VELE

DEAR D.A.: It's standard practice Of one can afford
It] to GIVE close relatives one picture of themselves as
well as one of the bride and groom. Those who want addi-
tlonal pictures should order [and pay for] their own.
,,,.Alul es, I think $5 for one black and white glossy is a
DEAR ABBY: We had to write! Our oldest son, who
was a fine athlete before he entered the service, also step-
ped on a mine in Viet Nam. He lost one leg, and the sight
of one eye.
Three months later, he won a trophy in skiing competi-
tion, and we have several shelves of trophies he has won
every winter since his accident in 1970. He is still able to
surf, and has a license for scuba diving. Next year he
graduates from college with a degree in physical education-
Last March we attended a meeting of the National
Inconvenienced Sportsmen's Association in Winter Park,
Colo. There were both male and female entrants from 12
years old to 50, and some of their accomplishments were
absolutely unbelievable! The last thing these people want
is sympathy.
We were heartbroken when we heard the extent of our
son's injuries. Now we have the greatest admiration for his
courage. Do you wonder why we are such proud parents?
MR. AND MRS. O. W. RAYDER
Reseda bl.
DEAR ABBY: This is not a request tor advice. It's a
plea for understanding.
I am a widow of 63. The gentleman is a widower of 66.
I've been widowed for three years. He lost his wife five
years ago. We've known each other for many years and
were friends when our mates were alive.
We love each other and want to marry, but here is our
situation: The gentleman's income is a small Social Securi-
ty check. Mine is both Social Security and Veterans Admin-
istration from my deceased husband. If we were to marry,
I'd lose both pensions and we would have to live on the
gentleman's small income, which would be practically im-
possible. So we are doing what some of the college kids are
doing: We are "shacking up."
We both own homes, so I moved into his and am renting
mine out for the income.
Of course, you know what happened. Our families have
disowned us and our neighbors no longer speak to us. We
are social outcasts.
Our financial ties to this small town preclude our mov-
ing away. Besides, we both have members of our families
in the little cemetery on the hill, so we remain here.
Our only real sadness is our children's attitude. [One of
my daughters in law threatened to leave my son if he ever
visited "that whore".1
Why does a society that has become more understand-
ing toward young folks who are in love, condemn two old
no h ant to end their days togetherdn le
TIDES
High 4.04 a.m. and 4.32
ow 9.54 a m. and I0.55
p.m.


ENTIRELY NE W DECOR


g[alf MaWE O THE I
ith DEUil lit$[ [F IN 81
Continuous dancing except Thursdays
fro= e 10 p.m. until . .
Cantonese Dining, Tasty Snacks from 7 p.m
NO COV ER, NO MINIMUM
BRITANNIA BEACH HOTEL PARADISE ISt..AND


ng


UNDE"
or
T M EXCEMKES
T GOVERNOR GENERM SR tRO B BUTLER



I

0 N WILD LIF E: 6130 9100 PM ADMISSION 2 oo
BRITISH CO LO NIAL HOTEL. ^life"coTyg.> NrDOC NLDE V TION





COMMONWEALTH INDUSTRIAL

BANK LIMITED

LOANS
FOR
ANY
BL USEFUL ,

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OVER L000 represents ves
;\' ";,ty 6,.. sn
as tern so. we, eson
the Sheraton 8 C Hotel tor the
opening session Thursday ut
to unu -nn.
ad r ssect delega

Challenge of Change Just
before a Merit of Honour
Award was presented to
former Senator Charles
Rhodriques
Also a speaker at the
opening session was
Government senator the lion
Dr Doris L. Johnson, a
member of the Paler of
Eastern Stars in the Bahamas
Councilman Belt a board
member of the National
Associatton for the
Advancement of Coloural
People, the L rban League and
also a trustee of the But
Scouts of America said that
there is an unperative need
for a change in many of our
attitudes, and a re-statement of
our original goals and
re evaluation of our strategy.
in his speech. annect
primarily at the 1,500
conventioneers here from the
United States. He asserted that
"meeting the challenge of
cha e is one of the biggest

pr 3r ernst tiour na < ri King s
I ce > Itiop1, <1 1 spi 1 m3
to the black and all the poor
deprived peoples of America
he said. but he felt that there
was a need for a change in
strategy

prog test 1171< he ts eefor
a ns at ns exer3 Ohis wa

necessor because onli ,n
growth, retonn and change is
true security to be found. he
said.
f lis undience \ mainly of black Ammean
professional and blue collar
workers, all present in their
various regalia
To thin, he said that
"unfortunately, there are large
segments of black people who
are satisfied with the few
rewards their new affluence has
brought them.
"They have two jobs and
their mortgaged horne. t we
automobiles ... and credit cards
many are willing now to
declare the Civil Rights battle
won they are ready to settle
for the meager achievements ol
today
"Their present unsound
status of emplounent, together
with the 1act that
unemployment among black
Americans is higher than
anyone else does not seem to
disturb them in the least. The\
will say "black is beautiful
everybody knows we hate
rights so wh\ worry let the
good times roll. he notal.
Since this attitude affected
many others it had now
become a problem making it
necessary for them to change.
The Cleveland councilman
also emphasised that he was
not advocating sepautism He
stated that blacks needed the
cooperation of wates and in
order to maintain a strong
America. whites also needed
the c< perat develop business corporations
to produce goods and deliver
services therein creating inh
er Ie j t110 wall"
th e wr toolfdli
people must be supported with
the knowledge that no group
of people have a monopoly on
importance and superioriti in
human accomplishments then
we can sa\ It loud I "'
intelligent and Im pr oud he
1he keinute addre


FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157


YIY~rmr~MIW


MATINEE 3:0

5 "OIDGET GOES
Starry
JAMES DARREN
O
Except Sat. MatineN,0E eSH
Sunday Matinee 2:45 &



MD RE

JAMES
BOND


a
a & MI

L l@ph G

SUGGESTEDFORMA
PARENTAL DISCR
Reservations not claimed
on first come, first


Saturday Matinee Only
a Matinee Startsat 2:00
"WARKILL" PG'
George Montgomery
Tom Drake
PLUS
"SHENANDOAh" PG.
James Stewart
Doug McClure
Now Showing thru Tuesday
MSunday Matinee starts at 2:15
Evening 9:00
"FISTS OF FURY" PG.
M Bruce Lee
PLUS
"THE DESERTER" PG.
Bekim Fehmiu
Richard Crenna
'Phone 2-2534

)
SATURDAY MA
g MATINEE STA
5 "HOOK, LINE
starr
JERRY LEWIS P
PL

I "THE TRA
starr
M GORDON SCOTT

NOW SH
Except Sat. Matinee, Even
Sunday Continuou
DRACUI.A'S BI
t
1 stalks the earth a









agg
.. AMERCM INTE TM ww**- *
WILLIAM MARSHALL D
MICHAEL CONRAD COLOR emovena


AtlAS
'"
A coLoR
SUGGESTED FOR M
PARENTAL DIS
SORRY NO PAS


Saturday Only
Continuous Showings
from 3:00
"DR. PHIBES" PG
Vincent Price
Joseph Cotten

PLUS
"THE HELLFIGHTERS"
G
John Wayne
Jim Hutton
gg
PLUS Late Feature
Saturday night


*
INEE ONLY
S AT 2:15

NDSINKER" 5

TER LAWFORD
S -

LERS" I
g
OSEPH COTTEN

WING
8:30-'Phone 3-4666
rom 5:00 p.m.
BODBROTHER g
n in an orgy of m










ggg
MITCHELL* PAM GRIER
(star of "Coffy")





WEE An AMARICAN MWERNATIDIGM Aglasse 5
TURE AUDIENCES
ETION ADVISED 5
S ACCEPTED!


i_


ON
e





b DE
A
CR
SE


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_ _


I


I


Friday, August 10, 1973.


resources and she urged them.
"fyisne war ep.
morahty into the system ohhe
organisation.
Mr. Rhodriquez accepted
se s...., wyen sor ss v
adstfraternal wo rfrom Grand
Mason, Mr. M.J. Anderson


followed the introduction of
me., ememaster w
on n o tr u d
h \ir Ada C. Anderson.
o so......
n aid it was time
that the members pooled their


AU GUST 1 3


MllONlD A Y,


PURPOSE


r


TUREAUDIENCES
ETION ADVISED
d by 8:45, will be sold
served basis


Dunmore Lane
2-11S4
Opp. Maura's
Rudy Diedrick,
Manager


Palmdale 2-1421


1


She $7itfhNP


7

Over 1,000 masons here for


their sixteenth convention


BAIA\ CONSERVOA TION


SATURDAY MA


TINEE ONLY


L tt ~i~


I
Freeport 352-8307
Churchill Bidg.
Pete Walkine,
Manager


L


NOW SHOWING 8 & 11:20
TM Most Lethal
KUNG FU Team On Earth




AND AT 9:50
40MN MIBMNE

ggggg g


Lsrh~





__ __ ~


__ I__ ~I~


get the job alone


TRADE SERVICES


MAI rNEt SUPPLES


REA ESATEFOR RENT_ FOIIR SALE


__





I IELP WANTED


1


I I


I


I


C10637
T.V.ANTENNAS Boostersfor
homes, apartments and hotels.
Sales and services. Call Douglas
Lowe 5-9404 WORLD OF
MUSIC, Mackey Street next to
Frank's Place.

C10 0



"" "

FrOffe aresinvittede se
side of Mackey Street in the
vicinity of Wulff Road,
corn rising otalber 1 ,o
ft. on Mackey Street as
shown shaded on plan below,

rr e e t

taiFutherrdetailshmay bhe t
Limited, phone 2-3252
rig he vendors reserve the
highest or any tender






MACKEY STREET









Mrl D MTER
HELF 11 I LI#
C6155
(1) Golf Course Superinten
-dent: ls responsible for
maintenance to a fleet of
specialized electrical recreation
vehicles. Also is in charge of all
vehicular maintenance andji'Iff
course equipment. Supervision
of staff of twenty (20) persons.
Ex per fenced applicant
preferred.
(1) MECHANIC: Should be
able to diagnose and repair
mechanical and electrical faults
on specialized electrical
recreation vehicles, also must
be able to are and gas weld and
paint when necessary.
Experienced applicant
preferred.
(1) HOUSEMAN: To transport
clean and soiled linen to and
from main linen room.
Vacuumguestroomssweeping
of floors, hallways and take
instructions from Supervisor.
(1) LAUNDRY WORKER: To
sortfeedandfoldthroughflat
work ironer, plus folding of
towels. Must be willing to
work. INSPECTRESS: To

supervise Maids and Housemen
and to instruct them in their
daily performance. Also make
sure that guest rooms, hallways
and walkways are properly
kept.
(1) TAILOR/PRESSER: Must
be able to steam press all silk
and woollen garments,
including jackets, pants,
dresses, shirts, etc...
Experienced applicant
preferred.
Apply Monday through Friday
between 9:00 a.m. and 12:00
noon only to: King's inn &
Golf Club, P. O. Box F-207,
Freeport Pe rson nel
Department.

C6158
Taxi Driver with 10 years
experience.
3 Experienced Tailors.
Call: Audley's Enterprises
Limited, Freeport 352-5183.

C6159
5 LABORERS Must be
prepared to do menial work,
brushing and general yard
cleaning as well as other duties
assigned to him.
STENO GRAPHIC
SECRETARY with 5 years
experience. Duties: typing and
shorthand, bookkeeping, filing
and general office work
('ol ge graduate or equivalent

CASHIER with 3 years
experience.
Call: Russell Construction
Limited, Freeport 352-5183.


C10801
ITEMS FOR SALE
50 Ft. Aluminum Spar with
main & Jib Halyara wenches,
sail track & roller reefing
boom. Stainless rigging.
Matching set of dacron sails &
two jib sheet wenches $1500.
call 24635 or write P. O. Box
N4151.
C10688
PACEMAKER 44ft. Luxurious
CruiSing Yacht. Phone 3-2371.

C10773
WORK BOATS
d t sC or

Screw -- Diesel Call Mr. Nash
305-635-8602.
OCEAN MASTERS CORP.

C10830
18 HOUSEBOATS 37' x 12*
FULLY FURNISHED AND
AIRCONDITIONED, Kitchen,
living room, bedroom, bath,
sundeck. Luxury living at low

sdderS w be

C10831
YACHTS AND BOATS LTD.

CHRIS CRAFT

CONCORDE
IRWIN SAIL YACHTS

AVON INFLATABLES

31 foot Bertram flybridge
sport fisherman with twin G.M-
4-53 diesels just overhauled.
Boat has been gone over
completely and has new
cockpit floor. $25,000.00.
27 foot Chris-Craft flybridge
sport fisherman with twin 200
h.p. Chris-Craft engines. Well
equipped and excellent
condition throughout. A good
buy at $11,900.00
AT THE DIVE SHOP

Did you know our marine
department has cleaners for
batteries, fibreglass, vinyl
upholstery, even a mould
remover! Plus an assortment of
scrub brushes and mops.

Have you tried Rocket Fins?
The professional fin for the
avid diver who wants to get
there fast. Try before you buy.

NOTE: One space left in next
Scuba Classes. Teenage class
Aug. 19th to Sept 5th. Regular
Aug. 19th to Sept. 16th.
ALL AT NASSAU'S
COMPLETE DIVE SHOP AT
THE DIVE FLAG AWNING.
P. O. Box N1658
Telephone 2-4869

BUSINESS
OPPORTAIITIES
C10833
WANTED. Male business
partner, over 25, with $3,000
umall bdu i SS n tin asnar
live there. Must 'be single
personablehonest, intelligent'
Write immediately describing
skills, personal philosophy,
aspirations, age, education,
dollar assets, address, phone
number. T. FERRO, P. O. Box
N-3925.
(
I ART SUPPLIES

C10683
COMPLETE range of artists'
supplies. Oils, acrylics, carwas
easels, etc. Bahamian Paid
Supply Ltd., Bay St. Phone
2-2386, 2-2898.

TO

C10808
TOP $ PAID FOR used
furniture and appliances*
Leslie's Discount House
Dowdeswell St. (formerly
Besco Building). Telephone
28012.

HELP WANTED
C10723
USED CAR mechanic come in
at Central Garage and ask for
Kendal Major.


gggESS DEVELOPER -
international interior and
Industrial Design Company
with offices in Nassau requires
a self-motivated, poised and
personable individual to
develop signif scant new
business for the firm within the
Bahamas, the Caribbean and
Southern Florida. An ability to
'meet and negotiate with
investors and top management
essential. Experience in
Marketing and Promotion
preferred. Graduate degree in
Art, Design or a related
creative field with full
un r andin f Interior and

Bahamians only.gn necessary.
Send letter with background
information to: R. Bolstad, P.
O. Box N7776, Nassau-


C10787
BARCLA Y S BAN K
International Limited P. O.
Box F2404 Freeport requires
confidential executive
secretary able to type at 50
w.p.m. and take shorthand at
80-100 w.p.m. Applicants must
have at least 3 years
commercial experience
Bahamian only please
contact Mr. H. Skiers. Phone
274M6rt s3sa5u lepho eort
C10813 FARMERS, only

mians need apply. Phone

C10811
"SITUATIONS VACANT.,
WANTED IMMEDIATELY.

exop enweom a iep.re e
typing and bookkeeping
experience also necessary.
Reply in own handwriting to:
- Adv. C10811, c/o The
Tribune, P. O. Box N-3207,

a r emqls dp us

rSeaferen 5 hich e essential.
$110.00 per week depending
on age and previous
experience.

C10815MESSENGE R over 17

ars of ag M st wn otea
valid driver s licence. Apply in
person Nassau Dairy Products


C10661
e

a
Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P.O.BoxN3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUST MECtLEEARANCE
MOVINGCSKTORAGE

STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
AEONEANBTLEERR EE
CONTACT LYMAN PONDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-3796
2-3797,2-3798
Airport 77434

C10638

AAN OA PNGS
HURRICANE AWNINGS,
SHUTTERS, PANELS
John S. George
& Co. Ltd.,
For free estimates and prompt
service call 28421.


GRAN BHMA


BUiCK S Os'iL RK ad

OA CORONA
I of ONLY

uiN IC SPECI AL
1965 CHEVY MALIBU S/W at
(1NLY 1 0.00
E NTRE LIMITED
Box N 3741.
npson HIvd ,
>0. Davis Si
Nassau
Temphone 56 /39
C 10 742
ist \ND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD.
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
go or $1695
1968 VAUXHALL VIVA
9 .0 $500
1967 CHRYSLER
4 0.. Aute. White $950
1968 PONTIAC
ST RATO CHIEF Yelow$1400
1970 HILl. MAN HUNTERs,
1 Dr Automatic, White $995
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
1 0, sta Grow $1200
1968 JAVELIN AC $1200
1970 PARISIENNE AC $2400
1968 VAUXHALL VIVA
Th.V BHo 5695
1967 TPlUMPH 1300
r>od. 5' 5800
969 VAUXHALL VICTOR
5475
973VAUXHALVICTOR


C10824
HEAD CAPTAIN (Wine and

Waqit s)d Two Ungiuages
knowledge of wines. Must be
capable of standing in for
Maitre d Send reply with
recent photograph, references
and health certificate to Box
N641 Nassau.
C10821
HEAD CHEF required with,
seven years minimum practical
experience in French and
Continental Cuisine. Must be
able to supervise and
coordinate work for personnel
in kitchen. Must have ability to
plan menus and institute on
the job training for Bahamians
interested in culinary arts.
Send reply with recent
photograph, references and
health certificate to Box N641
- Nassau.
C10822
GOURMET CHEF (Saucier).
Chef wanted with five years
minimum experience to
prepare all types of food for
gourmet restaurant. Must have
experience in French and
Continentalcooking.Please
send reply with recent
photograph, references and
health certificate to Box N641
-Nassau.

C10823

rMsA rREtD Hobtiejtfortfrstdiass*
French, German and Italian'
Knowledge of carving serving
and cooking at tabie a must.
Must be able to plan menus.
10 15 years experience
required. Send reply with
recent photograph, references
and health certificate to Box
N641 Nassau.

cl0820
ADVERTISING accountant
executive, contact 3-4999.
C10827
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 Ltd. at Oakes Field
requires Cleaner for new and
used cars. Must be honest, hard
workingG and reliable. Apply:

S r. Gardiner, Sales
supervisor.
C10825
WANTED a Clerk for a busy
Ioans office. The applicant
should have a basic knowledge
of Banking and preferably
some previous experience in
the processing of loans.
Accuracy y essential .
Applications in writing should
be made to the Assistant
Personnel Manager, BOLAM P.
O. Box N-1262.
C10829
TWO CHILD-CARE assistants
(Female) for day Nursery
oddlers avPersons apdpil

standard of education, love
working with children and
should have two character
reference letters one of which
should be from a Minister of
religion.
For full particulars call at the
office of the Bahamas Gospel
Mission Chapel .... Pastor E. J.
Nottage or for appointment
call Mrs. Nottage c/o Phone
24534. Office hours Tuesdays
and Wednesdays 10 a.m. to 1
p.m. and 5.30 p.m. to 9 p.m.


I IIELP WANTED
C6150
( 2 ) SPRIN K LER
PIPEFITTERS: Two Male
Sprinkler Pipefitters to work
on Construction. Must be able
to install sprinkler system and
be able to do necessary
pipefitting. Must be between
the ages of 30 and 45 years and
be able to read blueprints. High
School Education is required
with at least 7 years
experience. Salary $5 per hour.
interested Persons Apply:
GRAND BAHAMA HOTEL,
WEST END, GRAND
BAHAMA, Personnel Office.
between the hours of 9 a.m.,
and 3 p.m., Monday through
Friday. Elon Martin, Jr.,
Personnel Director.

C6152
GENERAL MANAGER: To
take full charge of Dairy

au ion. aAntdlea eivec eam
current producing milk plant
experienceat Manageriallevel.
PLANT SUPERINTENDENT:
Experienced in Dairy Plant
operation. At least three years
recent milk plant working
experience in Supervisory
capacity. Required to oversee
plant co-ordination as well as
supervise office management.
RE FRIGER AT I ON &
ELECTRICAL ENGINEER:
Must be experienced in all
phases of maintenance and
repair of specialized dairy
equipment. Certificates of
proficiency and proof of
experience required.
Apply: GRAND BAHAMA
DAIRY PRODUCTS LTD.,
Queen's Highway, P. O. Box
F-17 Freeport, G.B.


C6157
ASSISTANT PORT
DIRECTOR
Requires experience and
capability to take fullI charge of
nd bi ingusn Harkboouw

stevedoring, handling, storage
and harbour charge practices in
line with Marine Accountin
When required must assist ir'
berthing and unberthing
operations and in Harbour
administration funct .onnel

Department, Grand Bahama
P rt Authorit rLs3 iPj O.
x F p ing
Building, report, Grand
ama.


Nassau & The Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper

... brings its readers the fullest coverage of any event in
the Commonwealth. Bahamians who latow read The
Tribune, the independent Bahamian newspaper that has
serviced the Bahamian public for the past 70 years.


special fe u as 51 .000
f had
3urne .
trueo t ed ?
resident< e di V II go
Living run a with Aning eH
den, tchu launchy, car port
etc 549,000 fun i.
Includenq new appliances
H. G. CHPISTIE RF/sL
ESTATE
309 Br, Street P. O. 80,
N8164 NY ou Tel 2-1041.
2-1042

C1087
FL ILl F UR N ISHE 0 t
bedroom townhouse ab lUhh
or w month sub lease or
longer. F oribtles Inchan
also ad uning and swant
pool go t. p evate lo 5 61 31

FOR SALE OR RENT
CIO771
3 BEDROOMS, one batti
Joans Heights. South Beach
See Philip R. Vargas, West, S
South-Street on Corner
C10796
FOR SALE OR LONG TE RM
LEASE Fine elaborately
furnished house at Skyline
Heights. Four bedrooms and
baths. Main rooms designed for
enterranung Suitable for
diplomatic or executive
residence. 11 acres, Beautiful
garden planted for privacy.
Phone 7-7205 of 2-8162 for
appointment to see.

READ THE TRIBUNE


___ ____


I


I


_ ~- c~ --I


L"


C10763


C10786


C 10ab3
4500 0 1
of f ice 0 < e available
i rn media I Montro se
Avenue. 7 toophone
2-1722 3.
--- ----
C10
in I





C 06
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and dina
ru n bed V cto

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a tw on as
----------
Clif 0
HILL CH

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on he


C10798
THE ELECTRONIC LAB
TAYLOR STREET
Specialist in repairing sewing
machine, Radio, watches,
jewellery and all electrical
appliances.


< 0 8
h Black & White
ha TV almost new
El '
I mth Riack & White
V 580 00
n Tunes and
University
al?5.
speed Schwinn
1 M 3 San d Schevinn

Chwinn Bicycle

1 00Encyclopedia

C 41 RDOWN

CARS FOR SALE
C10 MOTOR CENTRE
WE HAVE
THE USED CAR
FOR YOU
1971 V7WAGO
1 1 non go
972 DODG HA RGE A

7 HEVY MALitBONL


FO)R SALE


Palk


executive type home. 4
bedrooms, 2 baths. Hung,
dining, famliv, kitchen, double
ear gauge and utaty room on
my tS ad es a le
f urn shed. Iarge paho and poo
110 adscaped, I arin1E3 Tuti I

ecorard r tu 3
C10650

BO

or thghland Pad dining, kitchen, family tour
and coroort, utility toorns, on
2 105 of land beautifuliv
furnish d, wall to wall carpet
and drapes throughout.

it ro re t <

o3peppohro e 1 22-3.To view

C10fi92
WOULD VOU LI KL to live
near the sea with ac ce t
pr 10 la e Beach t lah ts and
am to 5

Oat 4 1141
1 241t
VA R PE CH Mode
He
C107/8
EXCEL.PR PER IESSTMENT
1. A choice location on Shirie
Street comprising the frontage
of cornpiote block with road
fromage on three 2 uge apar tme nt or on,

3 age aust unt West
S eat
tr to or xonately
L so decoCant: Adolaide

5 62 0< es or one deve on nent
r opedy Eas:0rn R >ad
A 3 Sues estate with a 22
latial
a a al opts f mi
of good developed land
F f
ap of t t in ormat n at d
Bill's Real Estate 2392 San


(

CECIL'S FRIENDLY
GIFT SHOP
Meadow St. & Blue Hill Rd.

ftsUforNP ties & Weddings

GHAN SETS
SILVER SETS
RUGS
PUNCH BOWL SETS
PLACE-MATSETS
5-PIECE SCARF SETS, etc
Open 3 p.m. 8.30 p.m.

C10632

NEED A PROFESSIONAL
HANDYMAN
Call Odd Job Enterprises. We
do anything anytime.
Telephone 42724 55191
Quick Service


7

I 970


VAUXALLVICTOR


AR (7~


OO


OF

ouu
Run


ente
for M


Ltd. Thmsn


Boulevard


C0 r f'


OU


URN
UP
r



---


a 1



U
an


i j ii


vah
00
modern
only 9

C10802
FURNISH L
Conchtest C


0 't. 1
$
370 RAMBLER SST
8 5
969 MORRIS OXFORD


,1400


HELP WANTED
C6151
PARTS MANAGER for
growing Automotive Supply
Company. Requirements:
Bahamian male, at least 10
years experience in automotive
parts add accessory work. Must
be able to do and supervise
sales, cardex stock control
system, stock ordering with
international trade, customs
clearing and receiving*
inventory controls and costing.
Must be bondable. Mail resume
with all references. Interviews
by appointment only. No
phone calls please.
The President, Freeport Jet
Wash and Auto Mart, Ltd., P.
O.BoxF-238,FreeportG.B.I.

C6149
NURSERY Y MAN
HORTICULTURAL: To
supervise and maintain
operation of Landscape
ruor tioPrepare scha a e
programs. Supervise Landscape
Construction on job site. At"
least five years previous
experience in supervisory
capacity.
EX EXPERIENCED
GARDENERS: Previous
experience necessary. AII
duties related to Nursery work
and outside maintenance.
OFFICE MANAGER: To
handle all business
administration of Landscape
Nursery. Billings and
Accounting procedures
through to monthly financial
statements. Horticultural
background necessary to be
able to converse intelligently
with clients and prospective
customers.
Apply: Lucaya Nursery &
Landscaping LimitedPioneer's
Way, Freeport, G.B., P. O. Box
F-252.


view beautifa
Two bedroom to
offers n regun

IC
] A et de:
Exte East
com as two bed oun
both tc. Price edoned
549, O Good invest,
Cer), anding president
Mout Heights. Tg
hree dr o :1
iving r un meparc e co
roorntq vo car garage
D
t ae area. at OMan


$995
R $5500
967 GMC PICKUP $640
1964CHRYSLFRR $800
1968 HILL MAN
: A' 51100
1971 FORD CAPRI
a 1950
1969 FORD GALAX1E
51850
1 966 MO RRIS 1 100
13L e 5500
1971 VAUXHALL VICTOR
$1595
970 HILLMAN MINX

1100 5850
to to 5895
Trad Ins welcome
Located Oa as Field
Phone 34636-7-8
Opposite the ice Plant
-------
I 8 T
LU 5
812
719 na medium sizect
ass bred dog. Colour
.vente answers to the
Bobby. Phone 31228


ggg 00LS

BTION fa the Day
(Toddlers) and the
Chool (Kindergarten)
n at the Office of the

so ??""" >"tuoen
Sh r cy Heights, Tuesdays and
Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to I
p.m & horn 5:30 p.m. to 9
9 "' Ages for the Toddlers
10vision lb months to 3 yrs.,
Ages f of the Kindergarten
'usion 3 years to 5. Both
departments open September
3rd. Further information may
b obtained from the office or
hv P no 24537.





SALE 31 foot
B RTR AM Sports-f fisherman.
$1b,500. (Firm). Telephone
5 464!.


Us


08 /

p II
5 0
"



C n pM
p on 3

PETS FOR SALE
C10819
euness
Fenate $100. Phone
Edorhn food L ad 2 3
033 ofte rn

IC

T
C10810
ON HITY ll F > he
west at < Bay P to
Station, 9 uth ade at ,treet,
Many huusehold sh rns
including
soft plants, patio furruture. 2
twin beds ($70 00 each)
assorted !arnps, 2 T.V.'s,

tfk or itsfunt tthai hyen 5, 2
August Fr iday 10th and
Saturday ilth from 10 a In.
G p.rn


C6154
INSURANCE BRANCH
SUPERINTENDENT required
to assist and to deputise for the
Manager Bahamas Branch. This
position entails the marketing
servicing and claims control of
all classes of Fire Accident Life
Marineand Aviation insurances
and the supervision and
training of Branch Staff and all
aspects of Risk Evaluation,
Rd ni trati aind Branch
The successful applicant will
have at least ten years
experience in General
Insurance and will have
obtained by examination, the
Associateship Diploma of the
Chartered Insurance Institute
or itsequivalent.
Salary will be commensurate
with experience, qualifications
and previous positions held,
but in any event will not be
less than BS12,000.00 per
annum.
Applications marked 'Private
and Confidential' should be in
own handwriting and addressed

tT Manager, Bahamas Branch,
Sun Alliance & London
Insurance Group, P. O. Box
F-26, Freeport, BAHAMAS.


READ
THE TRIBUNE
NASSAU AND BAHAMA
ISLANDSLEADING
NEWSPAPER


$hr GTribittit


Friday, August 10, 1973.


~f~=-


Come by Classified Counter at The Tribune or call 2-1986 Ext. 5 in Nassau,352 -6608 in Freeport from 9a.m. to 5p.m. Mon. to Fri. Sat. 9a.m. to 1p.m.


ITRAIDE SERVICE


IIELP WANTED


(NY


-SMEAR





_ _


I .1 --


By DAL CURTIS


.
or,= .


REX MORGAN, M.D.


~7~XI~E~lrl~


Yesterdan's solutson


I


ow many
H wora. or
N A r... amers
or more can
gun mm e
L Z setters....
markett na
M 0 B g:(dr enh
ulused
word must contain the large
letter, and there must he at
least one eight-letter word in the
list. No plurals; no foreign words*
oTp r 29ames.r d sTODAY'S
34 words, very good : 39 words
exceuent. solution tomorrow.
YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION :
Airman alry amain amid ada
arid dairy DAIRY MAN diary
draln inarm madia mald maidy
main mania marina mana minar
mind miry myriad nadir nalad
radian raid rain rainy rimy rind
,
Winning


SAPA RTMENT 3- G


By Ale K ofaky


STE VE ROPER & MI K E NOMAD by saunders & o ver gard


1 DE COS LORE
NELL RU 6 IC N
6 LEE URAauS
ESTE MENDS
SOLUTION OF SATURDAY'S PUZZLE


) 2 3 4 6 6 7 8 9 10
II 12 4
IN IS 16


19 20 21 22 23
2 25 Bo 26 31 27 32 M 3


34 35 36 37
38 3 80 qi
Ll2 43 MM RS


99 So St


Y1 . I~ ~' ----~-


Friday, August 10, 1973.


CARROLL RIGHTER'S

'HOROSCOPE
from the Carroll Righter institute
E -
/ GENERAL TENDENCIES: An adverse day for
making business commitments for there are
now likely to be facts and figures that have been concealed.
Study all phases of any situation of interest to you but hold
off making definite plans until a better time.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr 19) You may find that career
affairs may not work out very well today. Avoid business
appointments. Don't try to contact a higher-up who is in a bad
humor. Sidestep one who is a hypocrite.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) You need to study more and
be better prepared before putting new ideas in operation. Wait
until next week before trying to impress a new associate.
Keep temper under control at all times.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) If you listen to what others
have to say, you get good ideas and gain their goodwill as well.
Keep cool where mate is concerned or a quarrel could result.
Show that you are affectionate.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Make sure you
don't discuss any moot points with associates and a
disagreement can be avoided. Keep promises you have made to
others and gain their goodwill. Think constructively.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Pay those important bills without
father delay or you incur the disfavor of a respected business
associate. Your hunches are not good now so don't follow
them. Use your own good judgment.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Show mate that you have
good faith, otherwise there could be real trouble. Don't make
snide remarks with others and alienate them. Strive for more
harmony in the future. Be resolute.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) You need only to smile in
order to keep from having a serious argument at home. Take
steps in making your home more charming and pleasant. Don't
permit any person to disturb harmony at home.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Being very careful in motion
is most important now so that you keep out of possible
trouble. Any sarcasm would be regretted later. Try not to lose
friends but add to the number you now enjoy.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) You think that by
spending lavishly you can get what you want and still have
security, so be sensible instead. Listen carefully to what an
adviser is suggesting for your own good.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan 20) Try not to force any
issues simply because you are feeling restless or an unpleasant
situation may result. Take needed health treatments. Try not
to argue with anyone. Keep calm.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Make sure you don't do
anything unpredictable now or you could regret it later on.
Being conservative at this time is wise. Avoid one who has
been a thorn in your side for some time.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Steer clear of one who wants
you to make changes in your life that are not good for you at
all. Know what it is that friends expect of you. Wait until a
better time for making future plans.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY . he or she will be
one of those charming young people who is likely to stir up
trouble just to prove the ability at clearing it up. Teach the
importance of being less impulsive. Direct the education along
humanitarian vocations. Give sports early so that the body
becomes sound and strong. Give good books to read early in
life. Spiritual training is a must.
19 a hink ldly. (4)
5 6 21. Domestic animal (3)
23. Enemy. (3)
8 24. Some other time. (4)
Sil. Topping uD. (9)
5 A Down
1. Main entrance. (S. 4)
II 12 0 2. The correct length of this
is lmDortant to the well-
M 15 5 dressed man. (5. 4)
3. Golf term. (3)
4. Nursed. (6)
5. At a distance. (4)
6. Facial feature. (4)
5 8. Treat with disdain (5)
10. Label. (3)
23 4 11. Am ed.
can


PID OU USH VER STOP


" lLL *SGZ "


res ort.


(4)
16. Item
(.3)
3 sh
tl. Fr tend.
( )ekht.


No. 7.197 . by TIM McKAY
Across
1. Quick service. (4. 5)
7. Bed-linen. (5)
1 t r true ses em. >


f this may he
5


"To keep the moths out of her trunk, silly."


p y
11 Always
12 Sleeveless
garment
13 Chet
lounarlaire
17 Professional
fighter
19 Frock
20 Radar beacon
24 Unfavorable
26 Bits of interest


33 Clear gain
34 Evidence
36 Layer
38 Diocese
nesaamnd S
hemp
46 Khan
47 Lapse
48 Brain passage
49 Lemon
meringue


ARD BARDAN


50 Algerian
governor
51 Install
DOWN
1 Floe


8-13


2 Football field
3 H arem
4 Belief
5 Treeless plain
6 Second
7 Jacksonville
bowl
8 TUne
9 Constrictor
10 Roll
16 Epochal
18 Frigate bird
morseful
23 Boy s nickname
24 Rascal
25 Mala abbon
27 9udl h bows
30 Rounded
appendage
32 Also

sm si.nt
39 Forefather
40 Thought
41 Vehicle
42 Talk session
43 High priest
44 Compete


Unealvable !" wrote a dozen
battled readers when this puzzle
in a contdnental
urnn. "Itle composer, veteran
70-year-old F. Ge1gold, has a
utation for ems which
a limp Obl u've
imaginaltdon.
Here WhKe mates in three
moves at the latest, against
any defence; the whtte palwns

pose h a n
of play.
,
CHESS Sohtt.ion Wed, Jtay 26

Chess Solution
I Kt-B2 {threat 2 Kt-Ktd
mate), Q x Kt; 2 R-QB6 (threat
3MR-BS mete), K x R; 3 P-45
'


*
VI D
BE 0

HH ulzB V
Market Championship. the first
in which Britain was taking part.
North

$K Q 0
40
West East
66 10 9 8 3
K 9 8 5 2 J 10 7
4 K 9 8 7 5 6 J 10 4 3
South
4 K QJ 10 9 5 2

(A43
Contract 74: Lead C 6.
The same hands were played at
all the tables and several Souths
reached 74.
Not seeing the other hads.
declarer hopes, naturally. too set
up a long heart for hR thirteenth
trick. After drawing trumps in
two rounds, he tests the hearts
and learns t.he had news. No
hope there. Can he still bring
home tshe grand slam ?
Several stars, including Blue
Team champions, Garozao a.nd
Belladonna, made the contract,
but the biggest round of applause
was for Hollana s Bob S.ave n
burg, who played the hand at top
speed.
No technician should falter in
this situation and world cham-
pion Bob Slavenburg barely
paused, for breath.
After taking the toD hearts
and, throwine the 46 Imm his
hand, he ladd down the SA and
as ed out, his trum s. When the
Tea re kvomt31
facing dummy a QA6, SQ. and
West had to play firstr--*to bare
his OK or let go the AK.


AP Newsf~ooures


Por time 26 min.


e shop tater that day in search of
ht gift. But it won't be a rattle." he
on the way home. Soon Mrs. Bear
ring the new doll. That reminds me,"
ys. I have some pieces of cloth to
nice covers for your dati's prem*
"


PAGE


Whr QlrthunP


YES JOAN
APPARENTLY
DID GORDY PHONED HIM AT THE .
CAjEL V U, O ICTED O G
ON HER )
a cooR / /


"THE IY4~NG


14. Winner o
CROSSWORD ano!2 AE 9 sahu (
PUZZLE Ass LENE TUNE
CULL AMA SAD
ACROSS 28 Mascagni ETE PRINCESS
1 Autumn pear heroine MOAN WI 8 Br UKON
5 Slump 29 Correspondence
8 War arn 31 Finesse S NIFIC PE 19 I I MA l.,


HOL THE 2ONE TIE- SYBIL


lbspert and 2Miss Kamanthar-11


Margot hugs her parcel fondly. I wonder visit th
why the shopkeeper wouldn't sell the doll the rig
yesterday," she **ays. That's what I'd IIke laughs,
to know." murmurs Rupert. It's rather is admi
mysterious.-oh. I forgot all about Pompey's she sa
present I " Buy him a rattle," suggests make
Margot, but not now, Rupert. Ist's show your Margot.
Mummy my new doll." Rupert decides to


REDICR.EASE od




rr I I I I


: .


CEOTIN

IN THE ESTATE OF Thomas Peter Maury,
Senior late of the Eastern District of the
Island of New Providence one of the Bahama
Islands deceased.



ALL persons having claims against the above
Estate are required to send the same duly certified
in writing to the undersigned on or before the
15th. day of September A.D. 1973 after which
.
date the Executors will proceed to distribute the
assets having regard only to the claims of which
they shall then have had notice.

AND ALL persons indebted to the said Estate
are requested to make full settlement on or before
the date hereinbefore mentioned.

Dated this Third day of August A. D. 1973.

CLARKE, ALBURY & CO.
Attorneys for the Executors,
P. O. Box N.1699: 308 Bay Street,
Nassau, Bahamas.


PR FRS FO
In


To the selected player it
means consistent performance

def sivel ffen a long
his designated position
Throughout that particular
season he played his position
with authority and second to
none in the league and then is
finally rewarded when the
Wichita wreath is thrust upon
his head.
To the ardent baseball fan
the selected player becomes a
by-product of his incessant
support of the game and of
that individual player.
This year finds the local
player and fan caught up in the
same emotional whirlwind that
has occurred prior to all
previous Wichita tours
According to Eugene Simon,
skipper of this year's
contingent. practice sessions
have been going on every day
since the end of regular season
play last week. These light
work outs will continue until
the scheduled time of
departure Sunday morning.
As on previous trips the
Bahamas team will play
basically a running game in this
year's tournament.
"Our big asset in the past
and our big asset again this
year is our running. We have
good speed in many of our ball
players and we certainly do
intend to utilize tlus speed to
the fullest," Simon said.
However, manager Simon
stressed that besides a running
game the team pitching and
overall hitting and defence will
have to play an even greater
part if this year's group is to do
well.
"Because of our speed on
which we rely, most of our
offensive power will not be in
the long ball but rather in the
simple hit and run play." said a
somewhat shy Simon.
The 1973 Wichita squad
began its formation as early as
June 19 when the Bahamas
Baseball Association invited a
51-man squad to the Wichita
trials.
Since then this
massive body of players has
been meeting for light practice
sessions each Tuesday and
Thursday evening under the
watchful eyes of manager
Simon and a seven-man
steering committee.
SQUAD OF 22
In mid July the steering
committee released the names
of 15 of its 22-man Wichita
contingent later adding seven
pitchers to complete the squad.
Rudy Penn, acting president
of the BBA, said this year s
team is made up primarily of
young ball players selected on
the merit of their playing
abilities and their overall
attitude towards the game
One BBA official said he
thinks that the squad is one of
the best he has ever seen
because most of the players
this year are not depending on
the big super stars to do the
job as in previous years "The
guys will have to have
confidence in themselves as
they would be called upon to
do what is necessary to win,
he added.
Adrian Rodgers, a member
of the famous baseball Rodgers
clan, will be accompanying the
team in the capacity of a
pitching coach. He, too, is
optimistic about the success of


Like pitching and hitting, a
good defense is essential to a

winR er aid that he has
confidence in the defense and
if the defense holds up the
Bahamas will be a hard
contingent to eliminate from
the Tournament.
A competent Sidney Outten
and Lester Gardiner will be
doing the defensive chews
behind the plate Gardiner.
who is also a first baseman, has
seen action in Wichita on two
previous occassions and
whether he is stationed behind
the plate or at first base. He
will undoubtedly be a ket
factor in the success of this
year's team.
According to skioner Simon
the infield is a tightly-knit
defensive bloc. Roosevelt
Turner will be at third, Llody
Bowleg will probably se:
action in short. Lockhart n ill
handle second and Huyler will
take care of the first base
chores.
"We have good speed
in Eddie Ford. Willie Knowles
and John Williams and each
outfielder gets range easily on anything that is lut to
him," Simon said
BASE STF AL.iN(1
Roosevelt Turner, who led
the league in stolen bases with
37, will be accompanied I'
fleet-footed Willie Knowles and
Eddie Ford on the base path
But as on previous occasion'
Wichita has again proven to be
a bone of contention for '
players and other HI3
affilates.
Ed Moxey captain a 8"'
liarket and one li
accumulated a wealth of
baseball experience born
playing abroad, sees the whole
Witchita selection as being
done on a "friendly basis
"I am not in favour o!
sending a youthful team to
Wichita because m a
tournament like the National
Baseball Congress, you go to
win and not to show your local
talents if a player is 00 years
old and can do the job he
should be chosen
"Most of the teams that
compete in Wichita are
composed of old ex major
league ball players and this is
so because they go there to
win.
"The BBA should not try
and use Wichita as a techicle to
expose young Bahamian
players but should rather build
up the standards of baseball in
the Bahamas to the et tent that
scouts would come here to
look at our local talents." the
ex-major league ball player
said,
Former BBA conunissioner
Allan Jackson, who has
accompanied the team on
several trips to Wichita. said
that the selection is good but
could have seen better
Jackson said that one
particular plaier he wit should
have accompanied the team is
Paul Johnson o! the 13lenders.
"In Johnson :.au have three
men in one as he can play the
out field, play first base and
pitch and does all three well. '
Jackson said.
Johnson posted a 10-7
record this season with a 2.13
ERA and a 315 hating
average-
However, on the whole
Jackson said that local players
have improved a great deal
from the days when he
managed two Widata squads in
1964 and 65

OUT FOR 327
England's early breakthroughs
wr ic e sl eaSitt to xper"
the toss, would name a big are on
the featherbed pitch.
OI nd hde j < wie it an7
Arnold, who grabbed the other
two, the pitch was playing so vers
docile fashion.
It was ea lydildd e from th
fours but he defended rigorously
and often padded the bal away. lle
collected only three singles in one
spen or recesving 79 balls from
I and


kept it te $
seen of 27 overs for only is runs
with 18e it r cks k

abostF FK pt I
slips for 34, and Gary Sobers
howled by Old for 21.

PGA CHAMPIONSHIP
( I EVELANI) (AP) 1 oneshots
At Geiberger and Don Iverson
niatched early, four unde 67
r par s-
thent sat back and watched gusty
hSe es ag guthel halle eQ
first round of the 55th National
ampions tip


EUGNE IMN, angerof AD RIAN RDES


>^ 5 Be

DOUBLE CHI\fVIPIONS- The Wardrobe Stars, who last night won their fourth
consecutive B.V.F.'s Championship defeating Paradise Giants in three sets. From left
(standing): Carl Minns, Caswell Thompson (coach), Leslie Cartwright, Freddy Mackey,
Joey Demeritte, (kneeling) Mark Clarke, Leslie Fawkes and Walston Francis. Not shown,
David Bullard* PHOTO: Richard Rodgers


the team and shares the same
opinion that it is one of the
better squads he has seen
around.
"In Wichita you have to
make your own breaks. The
opposing teams there, which
are made up mainly of
ex-major league ball players.
will try to pressure you into
making mistakes and when you
do make mistakes they
capitalize on them. That's the
way they beat you.
"This year I think we have
togetherness which is very
important in winning. During
our practice sessions each
player tries to help the other in
a nice way that is conducive to
the spirit of the team.
"We will have to put out
110'7 effort if we are going to
do better this year than in
previous years," Rodgers said.
Manager Simon said that he
has found a phenomenon in
the present squad which is that
all the players are of the belief
that the team is one of
mediocrity in all departments.
"With this in their minds the
guys are going to Wichita to
prove that the team is not a
mediocre team but a winning
team," Simon said.
Taking a close look at the
team one will ponder whether
this year's team will do as well
or will try to emulate the
performance of the 1969 team
which earned the Bahamas
seventh place in a 32-man field
with three consecutive victories
from Frankie Sweetmg.
PITCHING
The key to the success of
any winning baseball team lies
in the depth and the durability
of the pitching staff The squad
this year probably boasts the
best pitching ever to make the
trip.
Heading the list is Don
Taylor who is making the trip
for the first time but who at
home has won some key
victories for Beck s late in the
season. This season Taylor
posted a 14-3 record pitching
some Ill complete innmgs and
ended the season witha
respectable ERA of 1.43.
Then there is Henry Williams
who for the past three seasons
has been the winningest pitcher
in the BBA. He led the league
this season with a seasonal
record of 15-3 striking out 109
batters and finishing up with a
creditable 1.60 ERA
local fans who have been
following the Wichita games
over the years will remember
Frankie Sweeting in the '69
Tournament when he won all
three games for the local side
fle won the first game in a
spectular four-hit shutout to


record the Bahamas first
shutout of the tournament,
Sweating, who has since
been named the "Cinderella
of Wichita had a good season
with Del Jane Saints posting a
7-1 record with an ERA of
1.67
Veteran right-handers Bertie
Murray and Roscoe Hall all
have good stuff and should
provide some good clutch
performances if and when
called upon.
Gregory Austin, Sherwin
Taylor and Larry Turnquest
have all demonstrated good
form and superb relief jobs are
expected from that pitching
trio.
However, as one observer
pointed out "only one left
hander is included on the staff
if the situation arises for the
need of another left-hander
and Larry Turnquest, who is
that lefty, is not ready then
this can lead to something
else," he said.
liffTING
Winning a Tournament like
the National Baseball Congress
becomes a foregone conclusion
if the team possess solid
hitters. Many fans have
complained about the lack of
the big but in the line up this
year to off-set the otherwise
good hitting team.
Manager Simon said that the
Bahamas has never produced a
whole lot of long ball hitters
and due to this pattern
previous Wichita teams and this
year s squad have built their
strength around the timely
singles, doubles and the like
but not the home run.
"In 1969 we had four
batters who led the
tournament in batting each
hitting over 400. This year our
plan remains the same and that
is basically the hit and run
game. We hope to win in this
manner rather than by the long
ball
Local batting
champion Anthony Huyler
tops the list with a batting
average of .446. Huyler banged
out some 50 base hits this
season picking up 33 rbis ard
nine key doubles during the
Bees late surge last season.
Veteran Lorenzo Lockhart
and Vince Albury have both
had excellent seasons with the
but occupying the league s fifth
and sixth spots in batting with
batting averages of .376 and
.367 respectively.
Also appearing in the BBA
list of the top ten batters are
Eddie Ford who walked a .361
and catcher Lester Gardiner
who ended the season with a
.340 batting average.
"The entire team can hit
well and for each game we will
try to set a line up that will be
jammed with hitters," manager
Simon said.

WEST INDICES ALL
BIRMINGH^M. ENGL^ND
0,2, hetVkst Indies e 1<
second Test match for 327 after
sorn tight bowling by the English
a Roy Fredericks was out 25
minutes after lunch, caught off "
skier by Dennis Amiss off Derek
Underwood for 150.
ce Ek*rnard Julienhmade a bri haW
caught by Tony Greig off Geoff
,Arno y e5n4d and tshutIndTas
resistance.
At lunch they had scored 263 for
saxingland's tone success of the
modrn good led ck M er
fork g tdt o kest Indiansnwere
their overnight 190 for five*
non wi tketllwn afathearb d n
Fredericks reached 150 not out
sleepy fashion. Bernard Julien was
the other not out player on 10.
The West Indies on Thursday
looked sick after England's pace
attack of Chris Old and Geoff
Arnold struck hard in the pre-lunch
period. At one stage they were 39
for use wthca e du hi I '"
back in the pavilion.


***

LADIES LEAGUE CHAMPIONS Paradise Bees, under the coaching of Oswald
Moore, dethroned the Coco Cola Jets and last night took the B.V.F.'s crown from
contenders S.A.C.A. Dames. They are from left (standing): Iva Simmons, Wendy
Jackman, Eulamae Smith, Margaret Albury, Winsome Davidson, (Kneeling): Elsine
Thompson, Claudia Ferguson, Oswald Moore (coach), and Vivian Lackey.


again stood supreme and took
their third consecutive set and
their fourth consecutive
championship.
SACA'S COURAGE
S.A.C.A. was just plain
courageous in their attempt to
upset the Bees last night. But
the Bees, who, according to
coach Moore, were "superb" in
their league performance were
together enough to victoriously
take on both S.A.C.A. and the
dethroned performance were
together enough to victoriously
take on both S.A.C.A. and the
dethroned Jets.
Their first set was evidence
of their when Elsine Thomas at
the line served seven
consecutive points. The
turnover which put Tangy
Armbrister at the line gave
S.A.C.A. two points.
The big hitters Margaret
Albury, Wendy Jackman and
Winsome Davidson were well
supplied with sets from Vivian
Leckey and Elsine Thompson.
With this powerful offence
against them, S.A.C.A.
managed only four more points
before the end of the set.
S.A.C.A.'s offence was led
by six-footer Linda Davis who
found herself labored with
the chores of both captain and
coach. Davis got adequate help
from Cora Hepburn and Tangy
Armbrister with Denise Whylly
and Lois Smith backing up on
defence,
This helped them hold the
Bees to four scoreless service
changes early in the second set.
The Bees however, turned on
the steam and Albury's seven
point service gave them a 12-7
lead
Hepburn and Stephanie
RahmingtalliedS.A.C.A.to11

Bees a t2 le d tgivi stt
five match.
The third set was all for the
Bees and they took no time in
swamping S.A.C.A. for the
Championship title.

BOXING POSTPONED
INCLEMENT WEATHER has
forced cancellation of the all-star
boxing show which was scheduled
for the Birdiand tonight. The two
ten-rouruit main e nts which w8etre

heavyweight champ Baby Boy
Rolle against Miamian heavyweight
ned s wea t rWt
kerp t edBut)tb( FLjayd n s
week. In the meantime, all boxers
will be working out at the Birdiand.
CRICKET FIXTURES
DE FENDING Cric ke t
Champions St. Bernards, having lost
all-rounder Eddie Ford for 12 runs,
seek to add to their stand of 39 for
two wickets when they meet the
strong St. Albans in the final of
t no no d3a0 at W ncdhsoPP r7.F
Albans were all out for 169.


Natural Menthol is why.


'


I


.- et
a



**


owan a assmatessesaccoso


$11& O'itrtitPe


Friday, August 10, 1973.


OSCAR MILLER TAKES A LOOK AT OUR WICHITA SQUAD




Bahamas hall players 'will play

*

IISSICSily 8 fuHHIHg game at Kansas

By OSCAR MILLER
WICHITA the sound of that name has carried a special connotation to both local baseball players and fans alike as long as the
Bahamas has been participating in the National Baseball Tournament staged in Wichita, Kansas.


Warifo'le Superstars win men's title,


- A ONSEATH R


Carl Minns. Leslie Cartwright


from player/coach Caswell
Thompson and Joey Demeritte
enroute to their fourth
consecutive championship,
defeating the up to then
undefeated Commonwealth
'
League Champions, Paradise
islaml ian 15 ,s lB5 a ad

Volleyball Federation's
Championship playoffs at the
C. I. Gibson Gym.
But the Paradise Islanders
struck out in the first game last
night when undefeated Ladies
League Champions, the Bees,
stopped Linda Davis and
S.A.C.A. Dames 15-6, 15-11
and 15-7 to win the B.V.F.
Ladies Championship.
The Stars, unmatched in
their performance throughout
the regular season walked
through the Islanders League
undefeated in eight games. The
only team that looked like
trouble to them was Garnett
Lockhart's second place Police
Royals whose sole loss went to
the Stars. The Wardrobe Stars,
however, easily eliminated
them in the semifinals.
The Giants, also undefeated
in their regular play, failed to
find in the Commonwealth
league the necessary
competition to give them
any push. Actually, the
competition was a battle for
second place between Pizza
Solos and B.E.C.
UNDEFEATED
(;oing into last night's
battle of the undefeated", the
Stars formerly Prince
Williams High, the name now
taken by the school's team and
still intact since their 1969
debut were out in full force
and all keyed up to set a long
standing record in the B.V.F.
series.
The Islanders coach Oswald
Moore on the other hand had
his eyes on equalizing coach
Tom Grant's record set in 1969
when his Tigerbells won the
Ladies Division and the
Heineken Gladiators won the
Men's Division. The Bees
started on the right foot, but
the Giants found it difficult
surpassing the Wardrobe Stars,
( oach Moore pointed out
that while the Giants were
missing two of their key
players the Stars were out in
fulL The Giants' Carter
Lighthourne and Timmy
Barrett who were off the Island
might have made the big
difference in the game last
night 'it s just a matter of us
losing out strength because of
people not being there," he
said.
Both sides stood strong
against each other for three
revolutions of services in the
first set until Ralph Burrows
service brought together Cecil
Thompson and Eddie Smith at
the line for a 3-0 lead.
SPARKS ACTION
This sparked the Wardrobe
Stars into action and the
setting of coach Thompson
gave Bullard and Minns lots to
work with as they moved to an
8-4 lead. And the all-rounder
Leslie Cartwright. who had
remained silent earlier in the
set, came to life and took
control of the spiking bringing
the Stars to a 12-4 command.
This came via the eight point
service of Freddie Mackey who
took over when both sides
were notched at four all.
With coach Moore the chief
setter concentrating around the
hitting of Cecil Thompson,
Obed Gardiner and Hubert
Williams, the Giants in two
change of services crept to
eight where they remained as
Minns served the Stars to a one
set lead in the best of five
championship.
Again in the second set, the
Gi tsbwite rNfoor aletheli t


then, the Stars with depth on
their bench brought in Mark
Clark on the forward line to
Join with Minns and Bullard
taking them ahead 7-5, off
Demeritte'S SerVice.
Although the Giants had a
strong forward line with Obed
Gardiner and Steve Barnett
they were unable to hold off
the experienced Stars who for
the remainder of the set gave
up only two more points,
taking a 2-0 lead,
The final set brought out the

pphne thwh9-4
off Ralph Burrows' service. It
seemed at one point that the
Stars' authority displayed in
the first two sets might have
vanished.
Ne verthele ss coach
, '
Ihompson brought his team
together with good defence
and caught the Giants at 11 all.
Behind the services of Leslie
Cartwright, the Stars once


PaladiSo Bees take women's


iti~lt


PhG