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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03415
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: August 9, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03415

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iRegiffeed with Postmaster of Bahama. for postage concessions within the Bahamas.) NassauP anu Bahama Islands L.eading iNews paper
VOL. LXX, No. 214 Thursday, August 9, 1973. Price: 1 5 Cents


WILLIAM ALLEN
... heads airline

WILLIAM ALLEN


IS CHAIRMAN


OF BAHAMASAIR
MINISTER of Tourism
Clement T. Maynard,
announced today that Mr.
William C. Allen has been
named chairman of the Board
for Bahamasair. Mr. Allen is
research manager at the
Bahamas Monetary Authority.
Mr. Allen, 36, has been a
member of the Airline
Negotiating Committee, which
was formed last year to set
guide lines and negotiate an
agreement with the then
existing domestic carriers for
the establishment of the
Bahamas flag carrier.
Bahamasair began operations in
June of this year.
Commenting on Mr All,'n'>
appointment the Minister saol
he was pleased that a Bahainian
of Mr. Allen's calibre was
heading the national airiine
management team.
"We believe he will assist in
bringing fresh and innovative
ideas which will result in a
more efficiently administered
national airline," Mr. Maynard
said.
-Mr. ,'-n T, 'di -^t-Ain
Nassau and New York where
he obtained a B.Sc. in
accounting at the New York
University and an M.B.A. in
international finance at Baruch
School, College of City of New
York. He also did post
graduate studies in economics.
From 1965-1968, Mr. Allen
was System Analyst at Stone
and Webster Securities and for
two years, financial analyst and
budget superivsor at J. ('.
Penny Company, also of New
York.
He joined the staff of the
Bahamas Monetary Authority
in 1970 after 13 years in New
York. He is married with four
children and lives on Skyline
Drive.

Clarence A.


opens at Ma

MANGROVE C'AY,
ANDROS, Scores of
Androsians were present
Monday to witness the
commissioning of the Clarence
A. Bain Airport in this Andros
settlement by the Minister of
Tourism, the Hon. Clement T.
Maynard and the Minister of
Transport the Hon. Darrell E.
Rolle, representative in
Parliament for this
constituency.
The hour and a half long
ceremony was attended by a
number of dignitaries,
including Andros-born Senator.
the Hon. Shadrack Morris,
newly appointed Permanent
Secretary to the Ministry of
Works, Mr. C. P.
Erskine-Lindop and the Rev
A. E. Bastian of Mangrove (ay,
who directed the airport's
construction.
In delivering the principal
address Mr. Maynard hailed Mr.
Bain as the man who
conceived the idea and laid the
foundation for the facility.
Mr. Maynard said the
airport, built by Mangrove Cay
people, was an important
means by which the standards
of living were raised in the
Family Islands. And he stressed
that it is government's policy
and his duty, as Minister of
Tourism, under whose
portfolio aviation falls, to see
that government airports

BEDSPREADS
KING
QUEEN


FULL
TWIN
LV MAiII FIINIIREI
SNASSAU FREEPORT
_.)- I


HOLLAND G. SMITH
... killed last night


MAJOR FOOD RETAILERS ONLY RECEIVE HALF

THEIR BEEF ORDERS FROM U.S. SUPPLIERS, SO--





Housewives will find






beef scarce in shops;





other meats costlier

By MIKE LOTHIAN
HOUSEWIVES WHO REACH THEIR GROCERS LATER than others this week are likely to find meat counters


TEACHERS WILL CONSIDER

THEIR ACTION LATER, BUT--



Teachers union will now



'blacklist' St.Andrews &



will see Prime Minister

THE PRESIDENT of the Bahamas Union of Teachers declared
today that in view of the approval by shareholders of the firing of
St. Andrew's School's headmaster the union would now
"blacklist the school in the appropriate areas.


empty of beef, and in the weeks ahead even first-comers might not be able to find any


Two major food retailers
and one of the largest meat
wholesalers on the island this
week received only half the
beef they ordered, and their
U.S. suppliers are unable to
give any firm promise as to
what quantities will be shipped
next week.
The beef shortage is a direct
result of price control in the
United States and of rising
demand on the international
market.
Ilven the optimists see only
a worsening of tlie beef
supplies at least until
September 12, when the U.S.
price freeze is lifted. One
knowledgeable source foresaw
i.o improvement for the rest of
the year.
And as beef becomes more
sca. 1e the alternatives
principally pork, ham and
chicken are becoming more
expensive.
Mr. Gerald Fryers, general
manager of City Markets, the
largest chain of food stores in
the Bahai:is, told 7 lie Tribune
S, .,


yesterday that "we got about
fifty percent of our beef this
week. Next week it could be
worse it's certainly not going
to be any better."
He said last week the chain
received about 90 percent of
its beef order.
UNTRIMMED MEAT
As beef becomes more
scarce, Mr. Fryers added, more
and more of the meat received
in the Bahamas is untrimmed
with a high percentage of waste
bone and fat, so that in effect
the cost of the meat is higher.
He said City Markets began
receiving untrimmed meat a
month to six weeks ago.
Mr. David Saunders, general
manager 6f Quality Markets,
said yesterday that he has
stopped advertising beef
because, although he has the
meat, it is not available at his
store in "normal quantities."
lHe said he had assurances
that this week he would be
getting about 75 percent of his
order but when his shipment
arrived today, The Tribune


learned, only half of his order
was there.
"I just can't say what next
week will bring," Mr. Saunders
said. "My suppliers can't give
me a quotation for next
week."
He said reduction in his
orders started about two weeks
ago.
His suppliers have also begun
sending untrimmed meat, and
"of course the price has gone
up, in effect, because so much
of what you buy is waste.
NO GUARANTIES
"And now even on the
untrimmed meat they aren't
making any guarantees. Next
week ... I just don't know."
Mr. Saunders noted that
pork supplies are sufficient to
meet demand, but local
farmers have just applied to the
Prices Commission for a ten
.percent price increase because
of higher feed costs,
American and Danish pork is
also available, "but the cost is
so high nobody will buy it."
There is also plenty of ham


f the prized meat.
available, "but it's just that
prices are so high we aren't
bringing it in. We're running
some ham this week, but it's
what we already had in stock.
We're selling it for $1.19 a
pound and first cost now is
$1.09.
Mr. Saunders said his
chicken is supplied locally, so
there is no supply problem.
However, "the cost went up
last Wednesday three cents a
pound for whole friers and
pre-wrapped went up four
cents, due to feed costs."
The island's largest chicken
producers, Gladstone Farms,
are reportedly anticipating
having to increase their prices
again within two weeks due to
further increases in the cost of
feed.
60 (ONLY
Mr. Redith Roberts,
merchandise manager at
Ronald A. Albury Limited, one
of the country's largest meat
wholesalers, said this morning
that "from what I gather 1
thipk we received about 60
percent of most of our beef
order this week.
"I spoke with Miami last
night and my supplier said
don't hold him to any quantity
or price, just send in the order
and he'll try his best."
lie said certain types of
beef, such as short loins and
bottom rounds, are not
available at all.
lie said the meat shortage
has reached a point where the
whole system of buying has
been reversed. In the past
suppliers would tell customers
how much meat they had for
sale and at what price, and the
customer would then place his
order, he said.
"Now we can only tell them
what we want and they try to
fill it and we pay the price
when it comes."
NOT HOPEFUL
Mr. Roberts said "1 am not
optimistic. I don't think there
will be any significant change
in the situation after
September. I'm not optimistic
if.: this year at all."
lIe, too, saw no real problem
in obtaining pork, and he
confirmed that prices have
been rising constantly. Pig feet.
lor instance, tripled in price in
a period of eight to ten weeks.
he said.
Ham prices have risen 40
percent in the last five to six
weeks, he continued, with the
result that demand has fallen
off "considerably."
At the same time, Mr.
Roberts said there are
indications of an impending
ham shortage.
He said normally by this
time of year orders for
Christmas hams would have
already been placed.
But, "when I enquired I was
told I just might get a price on
them in four weeks," and they
probably will not be able to
sell as many as usual because
by then the price will be about
50 cents a pound higher.
Mr. Roberts also said "I was
told that for the next several
weeks I could expect a 20
percent across the board
increase in beef and pork
prices."
The only bright spot in the
gloomy picture was the
position enjoyed by Supervalue
Food Stores, the second largest
chain.
HAVE ALL
Owner Rupert Roberts told
The Tribune that "we have our
whole shipment in for this
week, and our suppliers tell us
we are going to get the full
order next week. We hope to
get meat straight through,
Page 3, Col. 4


HOLLAND SMITH

KILLED IN

CAR CRASH
MR.HOLLAND G. Smith,
49-year-old president of the
Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce, was killed last
night when his Austin 1600
station wagon apparently
skidded and crashed into the
Eastern Road wall of Dr.
W.II.P. Poad at 11:45 p.m.
Mr. Smith's death brought
to 23 the number of traffic
fatalities in New Providence
since the beginning of the year.
Police said the car. NPR 605
was travelling in an easterly
direction when it hit the wall.
Mr. Smith, who lives on
Eastern Road, was the only
person in the vehicle. He was
pronounced dead on arrival at
the Princess Margaret Hospital.
Well known for his political
and civic activities. Mr. Smith
became the Chamber of
(Comn nerce's first black
president when he was elected
to office in 1972.
He was re-elected this year
and also served as a director of
the Chamber of Commerce of
the Americas and director,
Caribbean Association of
Industry and Commer c.
Mr. Smith was born in
George Town, Exuma, and
received his early education
there before entering Virginia
linion University. lie was
graduated from that institution
.in 1952 with a B.Sc. degree
magna cum laude in
Mathematics.
'his was followed
by post-graduate studies at
If toward Univ ersity .
Washington D.C. In 1955 he
was graduated from Michigan
State University, School of
Civil Engineering with a B.Sc.
in civil engineering.
TRAINEE
Before returning to Nassau
in 1958 Mr. Smith worked for
the Michigan State Ilighway
Department as a trainee
engineer and with the firms of
Giffles & Vallet & L. Rossetti
Engineers & Architects, Detroit
and Smith, Ilinchman & Grylls,
Detroit as structural draftsman,
designer and junior engineer.
In Nassau he opened his own
consulting firm known as I.G.
Smith & Associates Ltd.,
structural engineers. This firm
has now changed to Package
Engineering Construction and
is the authorized builders in
the Bahamas for Kirby
Building Systems. Houston,
Texas.
Other businesses include
Smitty's Package Store and the
Brass Rail liquor store
(wholesale and retail liquors)
and the Green Turtle Souvenir
and Gift Shop located in the
British Colonial Hotel
Shopping Arcade.
Besides his association with
the Chamber of Commerce,
Mr. Smith was a member of the
Kiwanis Club, the Bahamas
Society of Engineers and
Architects and a member of
the Bahamas Liquor Importers
Association.
From 1969 to 1971 he also
served as representative for the
Guild of Graduates, University
of the West Indies Board of
Governors.
Mr. Smith is survived by his
wife Delores, two sons, Gary
and Kent and two daughters.
Renee and Judy.
Funeral arrangements have
not yet been announced.

5 NEW LAWYERS
TO BE CALLED

FIVE YOUNG Bahamians
are to be called to the Bar
tomorrow at 10:30 a.m. They
are: Algernon Allen, Miss
Kendolyn Cartwright, Pericles
Maillis, Mrs. Stephanie Unwalla
and Tennyson Wells.


Mr. Cecil N. Curling said the
union would try to meet with
Prime Minister Pindling at "the
fist opportunity." Mr.
Pindling is now in Ottawa
attending the Heads of
Commonwealth Conference,
after which he is expected to
go on vacation.
While the BUT were
preparing to write letters to
other teachers' unions, a St.
Andrew's teacher told The
Tribune that the school's staff
would decide what they would
do when staff returned in
September. Only about four
St. Andrew's teachers are still
in Nassau. The others.
including fired headmaster
John Chaplin, are away on
vacation.
"We shall have to wait until
all staff return at the beginning
of September to discuss the
matter at a staff meeting and
decide what action will be
taken," the teacher said.
St. Andrew's School opens
on September 19.
Mr. Chaplin, headmaster of
St. Andrew's School for the
past 19 years, was fired by the
school's Board of Directors on
June 18.
Parents, teachers, students,
and the BUT protested the
firing. As a result :i Parents
Committee, headed by Dr.
Sidney Sweeting, was formed
to meet with the Board. They
wanted Mr. Chaplin reinstated
for a year while an impartial
committee investigated the
dispute between board and
headmaster. The Board said its
position was "irrevocable."
Meanwhile on June 1N, 21
of the 29 St Andrew's staff
members threatened to resign
unless the headmaster was
given a year's notice of'
termination of contract and
other members at least a term's
notice.
The B.U.T threatened to
"blacklist" the school,
although the union had "no
desire to hurt St. Andrew's or
its children."
REFUSII)
The Board of Directors
refused to call an extraordinary
meeting of shareholders as
requested by the Parents
Committee. The committee
then collected sufficient
shareholders votes to demand a
meeting.
This meeting was set for
Tuesday when the Parents
Committee's resolution was
held off until a vote of
confidence was taken in the
Board. Although the matter
had been settled without the
parents resolution having been
considered, Dr. Sweeting was


COL. BIDWELL

PAYS TRIBUTE
A FORMER Chamber ot
Commerce president today
paid tribute to the work of Mr.
Holland Smith and said that his
death was a "terrible loss to
the country and to the
Chamber."
"It was a terrible shock from
a personal standpoint because I
chose Mr. Smith to be my
running mate as first
vice-president." Colonel
Oakley Bidwell said this
morning.
"He worked very closely
with me during my time in
office and I expected him to
succeed me as he did."
Mr. Bidwell said Mr. Smith
had continued very ably what
they had done together for two
years, and that was to
Bahamianize the Chamber of
Commerce, and improve its
working relationship with the
government.
Mr. Smith had gone even
further in this and it was a
shock that his work in this
direction should have been cut
off in midstream.
"His death is a terrible loss
to the country and the
Chamber." Mr. Bidwell said.


Vanguard slam $2.5 million expenses



by government for Independence

THE VANGUARD NATIONALIST SOCIALIST PARTY has slammed the government for
spending $2.5 million on independence decorations and entertainment while unemployment is


running as high as 20 per cent.
Ini a sitrongly worded story
published in thie August issue
ot The Vanguard the party
declared that ever since their
accession to power in 1967 the
PI P leaders have methodically
gone about the process of


Bain airport


ngrove Cay

throughout the country are
elevated to meet international
standards. 1ce announced that
the Mangrove Cay facility
would be tlie pattern that
would he followed for those in
the future.
The Minister also brought to
the attention of those present
that private flying was a very
important part of the tourist
indisiry in the Bahamas. lHe
noted that there are more than
25.000 private landings in the
Bahamas annually. However,
he added that private landings
in themselves not enough and
encouragged Bahamians to take
an active part in the Ministry's
Domestic ITourism Programmne.


enriching themselves and have
"completely enamoured
themselves of the trappings of
authority.
"In this," said the Vanguard,
"they have followed the path
set by many other black West
Indian leaders who came to
power on a wave of popularity
only to betray the ideals they
once fostered in the interest of
preserving the capitalist-im-
perialist system."
The VNSP described the
independence activities as
satisfying the social yearnings
of the black, black
nouveau-riche camp followers
of the PLP and maintained that
"the eyes of government
officials were, ironically, most
aglitter when they were in the
presence of the 'hated' symbol
of British colonialism, the
Prince himself."
Corruption of what could
have been a meaningful event
was completely in character,
the Vanguard charged. It said
that since 1967 the
government had made no
effort to alter the established
colonialist-capitlalist system
"except to open the door to


'4


SIR MILO RECEIVES PIN
GOVERNOR GENERAL SIR MILO BUTLER this morning
received the first Flamingo Day pin before the pins go on sale
officially on August 13. Presenting pins to Sir Milo and Lady
Butler at Government House were Disa Campbell, a Guide of the
19th Girl Guide Company, and Pierre Coakley, a Scout with the
8th Bahamas Scout Troop. Standing in front is young Arthur
Butler, grandson of the Butlers. Sir Milo has consented to be
patron of Flamingo Day sponsored by the Bahamas National
Trust. The public is being asked to support the National Trust by
giving a donation of 50 cents or more for the pin. Flamingo Day
will be celebrated by an exhibition and show to be held at the
Sheraton British Colonial Hotel 6.30 p.m. August 13.


participation by a small group
of status seekers the black
bourgeoisie."
Declared the paper:
"Independence under PLP rule
(is) an official orgy
accumulating the status
symbols and social legacy of
the recently-departed colonial
masters. Government is not
concerned with developing the
nation. It is rather concerned
with developing the potential
for personal aggrandizement."
It said that in none of the
speeches "mouthed by the
leaders of the people" did
anyone dwell on the problems
facing the country or ways to
solve them ...
"What freshness of approach
there is in the PLP is confined
largely to finding new ways of
providing friends with favours
and spiting enemies. PLP
attitudes, with their
combination of elitism,
corruption and authoritarian-
ism are very reminiscent of the
beginnings of rightist one-party
rule."
The Vanguard was also
critical of the fact that the
PLP government had made no
move to recognize the
existence of China and the
Soviet Union -- "two of the
world's most powerful
countries."
"If a policy of
non-alignment is to be applied
then we must be objectively
realistic in our relationships
and develop associations with
any state that might he useful
to us in achieving our ultimate
economic and social goals.
"The decision to invite
Cuba to the independence
celebrations was a wise one,
but the decision not to invite
Russia and China was not. We
must seek help from all who
can give it regardless of their
distance in miles and
ideology," the paper said.
BRITISH-FRENCH CONCORDE
TO VISIT U.S. IN SEPT.
IONDON (AP) The
B rtish-French supersonic air!!i'er
Concorde will make its first v;sit to
the United States in September, the
British Aircraft Coiporation
announced Wednesday.
The plane, for which
development costs now surpass one
billion dollars, will take part in the
inauguration of the new Dallas-Fort
Worth Airport on Sept. 22.


allowed to read the resolution.
The Board's action in firing
Mr. Chaplin was approved by
shareholders by block votes of
672 to 301.
Mr. Curling said today
although the B.U.T. did not
want to hurt the school, it
would appear that shareholders
by their decision Tuesday "no
longer care for the future of
the school."
He said his union would
immediately write to all
teachers unions in Britain,
Canada, the United States and
the West Indies in an effort to
"blacklist" the school. The
union would urge "these
associations to instruct its
members not to apply for
teaching jobs at the school."
The union would also make
representation to the Prime
Minister, who is now in charge
of immigration, to prevent
"the granting of work permits
to any teacher who applies to
fill the posts" of a teacher who
might resign in protest.
Although the union had
threatened to do this as far
back as June 25 they took a
"hand off" attitude to give the
Parents Committee time to
negotiate a "reasonable
solution" with the Board of
Direct.'rs s :, ';., this they
were "confident that reason
and good sense" would prevail
at an extraordinary general
meeting of shareholders.
"Should the extraordinary
meeting of the shareholders fail
to come up with a satisfactory
solution to this problem the
B.U.T. will carry out its threat
to blacklist this school in the
appropriate areas," a B.U.T.
release said on July 17. At the
same time they called for the
resignation of Board chairman,
William ("Bill") flolowesko.
LIFE BELOW THE WAVES
FASCINATES PRINCE CHARLES
LONDON (AP) Prince Charles,
heir to the British throne, said
Wednesday that he has become
addicted to a new hobby
underwater diving.
'Since I joined the Navy two
years ago. I have been rapidly
discovering the supreme fascination
of life below the waves," said the
Prince, who is serving in the British
frigate Minerva in the Caribbean.
lie said he has brought up pieces
of eight and old musket balls from
a 17th century Spanish wreck off
Cartagena in Colombia and
explored an 1867 %sreck in the
British Virgin Islands.









I
. I





i-




Super Value raided
BURGLARS got away with
a "small amount" of cash last
night when they broke into the
Madeira Street branch of
Supervalue Food Store through
a back door, used a blow torch
to cut through the steel door
of a vault, and carried off a
smaller steel safe. The burglary
took place sometime between
6 p.m. yesterday and 8 a.m.
today. A CID officer is
pictured "dusting" the vault
door for the fingerprints of the
culprit.
PHOTO: Philip Symonette




II,--, ] I|IR]I
^^^^^^^ 11 ^^


O UDLEY'S
COR. ROSETTA ST. & MT. ROYAL AVE.
P.O. BOX S850 PHONE 2-1306/2-3237

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Tribune


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Thursday, August 9, 1973.


hie aribunt


UGANDA'S AMIN CONDEMNED CHILE BESET


'FALSE AND MALICIOUS'


U.S. JETS BLAST


WATERGATE LAWYERS BURNING MIDNIGHT OIL
WASHINGTON (AP)-Staff lawyers for the Senate Watergate (.Coinitter
worked late into the night on a law sun ainmeu at getting ireslsent Nixon
to release Watergate-related tapes and documents. Sources report tihe
lawyers were putting on finishing touches so that the suit could he tiled
today.
I-T-AND-T CASE FIRST ORDER OF BUSINESS
WASHINGTON (AP)--Special Watergate prosecutor Archibald (ox has
beefed up his investigation of the I-T AND-T anti-trust case. It will he one
of the first orders of business for the new Watergate grand jurl when it
convenes next Monday.
A spokesman for Cox's office confirmed today that the head of the
investigation of political spying and dirty tricks in the 1972 campaign lias
shifted temporarily to the I-T-and-T case.
The spokesman said the White House has not yet responded to Cox's
request for an I-T-and-T file the prosecutor has described as important
evidence.
EIGHT BODIES UNCOVERED IN MASS GRAVE
HOUSTON (AP)-- Authorities in Houston, Texas this morning \ere to
continue digging up a mass grave where eight bodies already have been
uncovered. The digging ended at two a.m. (ElT) today but will resume
later. The discovery was made after a 17 year-old, whose identity has not
yet been released, reportedly told authorities he shot a man to death who
had done the killings and buried the bodies now being discovered.
HEATH'S REPLY TO AMIN NOT REVEALED
OTTAWA (AP)-Prime Minister Edward Heath replied Wednesday tol
Ugandan charges that the British are practising racism and are threatening
the Commonwealth.
Heath's counter-attack at the closed-door meeting of Commonwealth
Heads of Government lasted about 15 minutes, a Commonwealth
spokesman said, but he would not say what the British Prime Minister had
told the other leaders.
The spokesman said the reply to Uganda's President Idi Amin, who
delivered the attack through his Foreign Minister, was firm and direct.
The Ugandans, in return, replied briefly to Heath.
Race relations in Southern Africa topped Wednesday's agenda at the
.conference following a free-swinging but friendly debate on trade and aid
*Tuesday. (9 SEE STORY THIS PAGE).
TO TAKE POLITICS OUT OF JUSTICE DEPARTMENT
WASHINGTON (AP)--Attorney-General Richardson has announced new
orders designed to take politics out of the Justice Department. Richardson
put the White House, Congress and private interest groups on notice today
that written files will be kept of all contacts between them and Justice
Department officials. The move was spurred by revelations which have
come forth in the Watergate affair.
The Attorney General also said he has ordered all top Justice
Department officials to stay out of political activities. He said he is
considering the setting up of a new office to insure the fair application of
the law.
Richardson outlined the orders in a speech in Washington before the
American Bar Association.
The Assembly of the American Bar Association has approved a call for
prompt and vigorous investigation of the ethical conduct of lawyers
involved in the Watergate case. The assembly rejected a proposal to caution
state and local bar associations, which have direct responsibility for lawyer
discipline, against taking any action before criminal proceedings are finally
decided.
MOTION FOR DECLARATION OF MISTRIAL DENIED
CHRISTIANSTEI, St. CROIX (AP).-Federal Judge Warren Young has
denied a motion to discharge the jury in the Fountain Valley murder case
and declare a mistrial.
Judge Young said 25 and one-half hours of deliberation was not ain
unreasonable time".
The federal judge was reacting to a petition placed in U.S. District Court
by defense attorneys for the five defendants.
The men, all Virgin Islanders, are charged with the slaying of eight
persons at the Fountain Valley golf course last September.
TRANSATLANTIC BALLOONIST FORCED TO DITCH
HALIFAX. NOVA SCOTIA, Aug. 9 (AP)--An American balloonist who
left Maine for Europe Wednesday ditched in the choppy Atlantic today
after running into thunderstorms along the coast of Newfoundland, the
Canadian Coast Guard reported.
It said Bob Sparks was afloat in his aluminum gondola and that the
Canadian Coast Guard ship Gilbert was en route from St. John's.
Newfoundland, to pick him up.
Capt. Rod MacMillan said Canadian Air Force planes were circling
overhead and keeping an eye on Sparks.
The Coast Guard reported earlier that Sparks began losing altitude east
on Prince Edward Island but later signaled his balloon had stabilized.
It said Sparks, who had hoped to make the first trans-Atlantic balloon
crossing, had broadcast a mayday distress signal about 10:30 p.m.
,Wednesday.
MAN WHO ATOM-BOMBED NAGASAKI IS 55 TODAY
SAIGON (APl) H- eavy fighting broke out today on South Vietnam's
central coastal plains and Central Highlands. The Saigon government claims
more than 70 killed on both sides, and Saigon claims 95 cease-fire
violations by Ilanoi and the Viet Cong in the latest 24-hour reporting
period.
The Pentagon reports U-S bombing over Cambodia has risen to its
highest level in one month because of increased pressure by insurgents oni
the Phnom Penh government army, and a Pentagon spokesman aidds the
bombing level increased markedly in the past few days.
The Senate Armed Services Committee was told yesterday that no
restriction were placed on U-S ground or air attacks against V'it on'ig or
North Vietnamese hospitals. One eye witness told the omrnittee he
believed hospitals were highly rated as potential targets because tlhei were
protected by large-site troop units.
Today marks the 28th anniversary of the I S nuclear iattak on
Nagasaki, Japan in which 36-thousand persons died. It .ils, miirks the
birthday of the main who pulled the switch that dropped that \ bonlb
Interviewed in Houston. Texas. 55-year-old Kermit Beahan sa s h'Jd do it
again ...that the use of the weapon was justified.

TODAY THE 28TH ANNIVERSARY OF ATOM BOMBING
NAGASAKI, JAPAN. Aug. 9 (AP) More than 10,000 persons.
including a number of foreigners, attended the 28th anniversary service
here Thursday for victims of the atomic bomb dropped on this southern
Japan city Aug. 9. 1945.
A total of 46,691 victims, including those who died this vear of
after-effects of the bomb have been identified. Some reports say 100,000
persons died in Nagasaki, three days after the first atomic bomb was
dropped on Hliroshima.
The throng attending Thursday's memorial observed one minute of
silent tribute at I 1:02, the exact moment of the explosion.
Yoshitake Moroya, mayor of Nagasaki City, condemned use if nuclear
weapons, which he said could eventually end human esxlstnlce. and
protested against any nuclear bomb tests by any country.

NIGERIA MILITARY HEAD TO VISIT U.S.A.
OTTAWA (tAl) General Yakubu (;oon who heads NigeriJ's military
government said W"ednesda.y he will be making a state visit to tile Unied
States in the not too distant future but he could not say wiheni
He said in an interview: "i have received an illvitation froti I'resident
Nixon but have not yet accepted it. but the decision has Ibeen Imadc and I
shall be going although the time has still to he arranged ."


Heath stresses 'callous


inhumanity' over Asians,


& Nyerere calls Amin


'blatant racial cynic'

By Arthur L. Gavshon
OTTAWA (AP) British Prime Minister Edward Heath
Wednesday denounced what he called "the callous inhumanity"
of the mass expulsion of Uganda's non-citizen Asians last year.


But (Gen. Yajubu Gowon iol
Ni gclia ex pressed
understanding of the wax
President Idi Amin had set out
to solve what for him plainly
was a serious and coniple\
problem.
Ileath's onslaught inside the
('omlmonwealth summit talks
and Gowon's modifying
counter-statement highlighted
a low-key discussion of an issue
that has aroused hot passions
among several member nations.
These arose after the
presentation of a message to
the conference by Amin
Monday in which he accused
the British of racism, political
immorality and actions that
threaten the future of the
32-nation global association.
A min's delegate here.
foreign minister Paul Etiang. In
a brief reply to Heath asserted
there was no getting around
the fact that the expelled
Asians as holders of British
passports were in fact Britain's
responsibility. lie insisted
Uganda has acted legally
throughout.
The British leader
announced through aides,
meantime, he will be flying
back to London Thursda\
night. He is known to want to
participate in a yachting
regatta at Cowes. England.
Heath. Prime Minister Lee
Kuan Yew of Singapore and
other leaders who broached the
Uganda affair spoke of it more
in sorrow than in anger
although it was plain some felt
strongly on the issue. But their
low-key approach had the aim
of heading off any crisis within
what thus far has been a;
relatively calm conference.
LESSON GIVEN
Nevertheless the British
leader used the occasion of
reading something of a lesson
to his colleagues about his
country's attitude toward the
Commonwealth. "The British
public and the British
government are not interested
in Commonwealth meetings
whose purpose is to bash
Britain," he said. "Nor will we
have our hands bound.'
turning to .niin's explusioni
of nearly 50.000 Asians of
whom about 30,000 were
absorbed by Britain Hleath
said the event had caused an
"enormnlous impact in his
country. "As these people had
come from Commonwealth
countries people in Britain
were asking themselves what
the C'onlinonwealth was about.
It was not a question of
international law. We recognize
the right of governments to
expel aliens who abuse
hospitality. But this was a
different matter." Quoting a
(omnlonwealth declaration of
principles that rejects all forms
of racial discrimination. Heath
said the two principal features
were "the callous inhumanity
of tle thing" and the harm it
had done to those in Britain
working for race harmony.
"We do not think we have
done too badly in absorbing
750.000 immigrants from the
('onmonwealth over the last
10 years," lHeath remarked.
ONLY WAY
(;owon, who is president of
the 46-nation Organization of
African Unity to whliich Uganda
belongs. took another line at a
news conference. Inlitially he
resisted commenting on a
matter he said involved Amini
and the British. Then on being
pressed to say if he approved
or disapproved of Amin's
actions (;owon replied: "tHe
had a problem. It was his only
way of resolving it. These
Asian had been brought in by
Britain around the turn of the
century. They did not accept
Ugandan citizenship. I do not
accuse President Amin of
racism. It was the only way he
saw. He chose a military
method."

conference e officials
reported, meantime, the
British had decided against
pressing for the inclusion of


some form of condemnation of
Uganda in the windup
communique due Friday.
essentially this was because
Ileath has recognized any such
demand would only stir tip
tempers and that in fact
although most of his colleagues
privately sympathized and
supported the British position
it would be hard for them to
say so out aloud.


The leaders of the 32
nations moved on to discuss
the situation in Southern
Africa where white minority
governments manage the lives
of 30,000.000 mostly
disenfranchised Blacks.
At his news conference
Gowon was blunt about South
Africa, where the government
of Prime Minister John Vorster
continues the traditional
system of racial apartheid or
separation of whites and
non-whites.
'BLATANT RACIALISM'
Inside the conference itself
President Julius Nyreree of
Tanzania let rip with a
blistering attack on Amin
proclaiming his action against
the Asians was no more and no
less than 'blatant racialism."
Neyerere, his voice rising.
cried: "I don't want to be
associated with it."
Amin, he said. had become a
racial cynic.
Turning to broader Southern
African issues Nyerere urged
Britain and other Atlantic
Pact powers to quit helping
the Portuguese and to stop
arming a country waging war
against the blacks of
Mozambique, Angola and
Guinea.
Addressing Heath, he said
the British should tell their
Portuguese friends to "seek
their riches in Europe" because
"there is no place for them in
Africa!"
I he Co m in o n weal th
governments, lie urged, should
begin providing money,
supplies, even military
equipment to the black
guerrillas seeking independence
from the Portuguese, the
Rhodesians, the South
Africans. As for Rhodesia,
Nyerere said the sanctions
campaign authorized by the
United Nations should be
strengthened to help the
process of bringing the white
settler regime of Premier lan
Smith to its knees.


The 49-year-old leader of
the People's National Party told
a news conference that other
Commonwealth heads gathered
for a nine-day conference here
had received his suggestions
with "active reaction."
Basis of the Jamaican
proposal is a system of price
indexing that would attempt to
set out the rates of growth of
prices in the various
Coin mon wealth countries.
From such indexes, the
33-nation group could "build
something of a flexible factor
into prices for exported
manufactured goods."
Mr Manley said such a
system goes to the root of the
problem now dividing rich and
poor nations. As it is, the
"greatest source of tension and
the greatest future threat to
world peace" lies in the fact
that rich nations have a
tendency to get richer and
poor nations, poorer.
HIe had urged the
commonwealth h to recommit
itself to finding strategies
aimed at over coming this
difference in wealth.
The bush-jacketed Prime
Minister said United Nations'
proposals recommended by the
Pearson commissionn named
after the late Canadian Prime
Minister would do nothing
to solve the problem.
Commission suggestion that
wealthy nations contribute one
per cent of their annual G;ross
National Products for the
betterment of poor countries.
"even if carried out, would
allow the reverse process to
take place."
Reason that such a system
would fail. he said, was that
many small African countries
have alarmingly low growth
rates. Even if the Pearson
Connmission recommendations
meant an increase of say six
per cent in a country's growth
rate it would mean an increase
in per capital wealth of only
$12 a year in a country where
the current per capital wealth
was about $200.
The same increase, if tied to


BY STRIKES


ALL AROUND

SANTIAGO, CHILE, Aug. 8
(AP)- Chile's 150,000
shopkeepers and storeowners
announced Wednesday they
were ringing down their metal
shutters for half a day to
support a national
transportation strike against
the leftist Government.
Two thousand professional
employees in the ministry of
public works and the state
railway system soon after
declared a 24-hour strike to
protest low salaries and
administrative problems.
The shops and stores were to
close down at 1200 EST
Thursday until Friday
morning.
The confederation of small
business said the half-day strike
was called to protest galloping
inflation, shortages of goods to
sell and to express its support
of striking truckers and owners
of taxis and buses.
The announcement also said
the stores and shops would be
shuttered Thursday afternoon
so as not to expose housewives
and other shoppers to
"unnecessary risks given the
present climate of threats and
acts of violence."
The Marxist-controlled
central workers confederation
has called a mammoth
pro-government rally for
' h u rsday in downtown
Santiago. Such rallies bring in
thousands of leftist workers,
trucked in on government
vehicles.
The Chilean Medical
Association has already called
for a 24-hour strike by doctors
Thursday to protest shortages
of medicines and instruments
and the alleged presence of
armed leftists in public
hospitals.
Five thousand miners at the
giant nationalized El Teniente
underground copper mine
south of the capital went on a
24-hour strike Tuesday. They
want the government to rehire
97 employees fired during a
strike last June. And they have
threatened to renew their
one-day walkout.
The truckers went out July
26 and have caused severe
shortages of food and fuel.
Gasoline is rationed but
government officials have had
so much trouble getting trucks
that many filling stations in the
capital have closed down


a North American standard
where per capital wealth
amounted to about $4,000 a
year, would mean in increase
of about $120.
The problem, Mr. Manley
said, cannot be solved unless
something is done with trade
between rich and poor nations.
His "flexible factor" price
formula was aimed at
overcoming this problem.
While the formula had a
number of complex technical
aspects that would have to be
worked out, it would attempt
to determine, the relative
worth, say, of Jamaican sugar.


Spiro Agnew brands INSURGENTS


kickback charges



as 'damned lies'
By Jim Luther
WASHINGTON (AP)- Vice President Spiro T. Agnew
described as "damned lies" Wednesday charges he was involved in
a kickback and bribery scheme and declared: "I have no


expectation of being indicted."
The nation's second-ranking
elected official assailed as
"false, scurrilous and
malicious" what he called
rumours which prompted a
federal investigation of bribery,
tax evasion, extortion and
conspiracy allegations.
He said he was giving no
thought to resigning, and that
President Nixon still had
confidence in him.
"I have nothing to hide,"
Agnew told a news conference
held to comment on stories
concerning a federal
in" estigation of his
involvement in alleged political
payoffs from Maryland
contractors. This was a switch
in tactics; he had said Monday
that he is innocent and would
say no more about the matter.
He said he was doing it
because of "defamatory
statements" being leaked to
the news media, by what he
characterized as "sources close
to the investigation."
The Vice President said he
has retained lawyers to advise
him about certain grand jury
requests for information.
He said President Nixon had
"expressed confidence in me,
which is all I need."
'ABSOLUTELY NOT'
Asked it he had ever
received money for his
personal use from companies
doing business with Maryland
or the federal government,
Agnew said: "Absolutely not."
Agnew said he had been
aware of the "true rumour" of
the investigation since January.
Fielding questions from a
packed auditorium of newsmen
vying for his attention, the
Vice President said he did not
know what had prompted the


investigation.
Asked whether he had
discussed the possibility of
resigning with Nixon, he said
he would not give any more
information about his meeting
with the President.
NOT RESIGNING
Asked if he has considered
stepping down even
temporarily, Agnew said "I
have not."
"Let me say right now, I
have no expectation of being
indicted and I am not going to
face any contingent thinking of
that type at this time." he said.
"Candidly I don't think it
would be advisable for me to
respond" to every report in the
media, he said, adding: "I have
no thought in mind of
scheduling another public
appearance before the media"
but added that he was not
completely ruling it out, either.
Agnew said that on the
so-called cocktail circuit,
various allegations coming out
of the investigation have
"mentioned my name."
The vice president said he
did not think it would be
correct for him personally to
contact the U.S. attorney's
office in Baltimore, so he hired
counsel.
He said he had told Nixon of
his plans for the press
conference but that it had been
his own idea to hold it.
Agnew said the letter given
his lawyers in Baltimore asked
him for "the usual financial
information" that is requested
in such an inquiry bank
records and the like.
The investigators have not
asked to see him personally, he
said.


SKYLAB 2 COMPILE GIANT


EARTH RESOURCES SURVEY


HOUSTON (AP)- In 35
minutes Wednesday, the
Skylab 2 astronauts gathered
information about the earth
that scientists said could have
taken decades to compile on
the ground.
It was the most extensive
earth resources photo survey
ever attempted.
Astronauts Alan L. Bean,
Jack R. Lousna and Dr. Owen
K. Garriott focused a battery
of power cameras on the earth
in a photo-sensing pass that
started in the Pacific Ocean,
sliced down across the United
States, over the Gulf of Mexico
and then through Brazil.
They focused on 42 key
sites,, more targets than on any
other pass, during the
8,400-mile run.
"Everything's going just
about perfect," Bean said as
they switched on cameras to
start the photo survey from
their orbiting laboratory.
Scientists said the data from
the cameras will be used to
search for minerals, help plan
urban land use, correct maps,
study water runoff and survey


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crop and forestlands.
"It would probably take
ground investigators decades to
get the same amount of
information as they are
gathering," said Dr. Thomas L.
Barnett, a space agency
scientist. "By the time ground
investigators got the
information, it would be
useless because everything
would have changed."
Even photo-equipped
airplanes would take at least
170 hours of flying time to
collect the same data, Barnett
said.
Photos from Skylab's six
cameras will aid studies of
Houston's urban development;
water runoff and soil moisture
in Oklahoma and Texas;
atmospheric conditions in the
Four Corners area where New
Mexico, Colorado, Arizona and
Utah meet: forestlands in
Colorado; regional planning in
several states; and surveys of
the Pacific Ocean and the Gulf
of Mexico.
The Skylab photo
experiment was supported by
five photo-equipped airplanes


IN CAMBODIA
P H N O M P F, N 1
CAMBODIA (AP) U.S.
warplanes, pushing their
attacks to the highest level in a
month, blasted suspected
positions of Communist-led
insurgents Wednesday in an
area 1/ miles from Phnom
Penh Airport.
The strikes were to cut off
the escape of infiltrators who
blew up the capital's
international radio
transmission station Tuesday
night, or to smash possible
troop buildup around the city.
Thirty infiltrators seized the
radio installation near the
airport without firing a shot
after government guards threw
down their weapons and fled,
military sources said.
The infiltrators planted
explosives in several radio
rooms. The charges cut much
of the capital's commercial
communications with thi
world.
At daybreak, Thailand-based
F4 Phantom jets began attacks
11/2 miles from the airport
Airliners continued to take off
and land during the tactical
strikes.
Passengers at the terminal
could see black smoke
billowing up from the attack
area. The daylong bombing
jarred Phnom Penh seven miles
away.
In Washington, the Pentagon
said that U.S. bombing is at its
highest level in a month
because of increased pressure
by Communist-led forces.
A Pentagon spokesman gave
no specific figures, but said the
number of single B52 missions
rose from 40 to about 50 per
day and that the number of
tactical fighter bomber
missions was higher than the
200 a day average of recent
weeks.
Scattered fighting was
reported around Phnom Penh
Wednesday. A battle to the
northeast at Siem Reap, near
th the ancient ruins of Ankor
Wat. killed several insurgents
and wounded five government
soldiers, the Cambodian
command said.
The Ankor Wat ruins have
been held by insurgent forces
for three years.
In Phnom Penh, a convoy of
about 150 trucks and trailers
laden with food and other
supplies arrived along Highway
4 from the seaport of
Kompong Som.
At Neak Luong. newsmen
were allowed to pay a
30-minute visit to the Mekong
River garrison town hit
Monday in a U.S. bombing
error that left at least 137
persons killed


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I I


Manley of Jamaica poses


solution for world trade

OTTAWA (AP) commonwealth h leaders have shown "very
great interest" in Jamaican suggestions aimed at tying the cost of
imported manufactured goods to a country's wealth, Prime
Minister Michael Manley of Jamaica said Wednesday.


McAllister Hotel
I)OWNTOWN MIAMI

SPI111

lhulaii lItit

Single $ 9
Double $11
Triple $13
Quadruple $16

Home of the
AMERICAN-BAHAMIAN
FEDERATION


Par-lant to tlh provi ions of Section 33 of TI '
Companies Act. notice is hereby given that Thli
Registered Office of Barclays Bank internalti. all
Limited has been transferred from Barclays Bank
International Limited, Local Hlead Office,
Beaumont House, Bay Street. Nassau, Bahaias to
Barclays Bank International Limnited. Local Head
Office, Barclays Bank Building, Bay Street. Nassau.
Bahamas.
N. E. IREI LANI)
Local Director

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 33 of The
Companies Act. notice is hereby given that The
Registered Office of Barclays (Nassau) Nominees
Company Ltd. has been transferred from Barclays
Bank International Limited, Local Hlead (Office,
Beaumont House, Bay Street. Nassau. Bahamas to
Barclays Bank International Limited. Local Head
Office, Barclays Bank Building, Bay Street. Nassau.
Bahaas. J. M. RANSOM.

Secretary
Pursuant to the provisions of Section 33 of The
Companies Act, notice is hereby given that The
Registered Office of Barclays Finance Corporation
Bahamas.! Limited.. has been transferred from
Barclays Bank International Limited, Local Head
Office, Beaumont House. Bay Street, Nassau,
Bahamas to Barclays Bank International Limited.
Local Head Office, Barclays Bank Building, Bay
Street, Nassau, Bahamas.
E. G. GODDARD.
Secretary


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F


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
GEORGETOWN, CAYMAN Island, July 20:- I got up early
this morning to do some reading. But when I pulled the curtains
from the door opening out on the beach and saw the calm sea
stretching to the horizon, I decided that I would take a dip.
My wife protested when I told her of my decision.
"It's too early," she said. "Nobody is on the beach at this hour
in the morning and I don't feel like getting up now."
She doesn't like me to go swimming alone, even in Nassau.
Someone must always be around in case something goes wrong.
"You're wrong," I said, "there is a young man on the beach.
He looks like a strong islander who could pull me out of the
water."
"All right then." she agreed, "but stay out front there so I can
watch you."
The young man on the beach was luxuriating in the early
morning sun in a lounge chair. I thought it strange that a native
would be sunning himself. People who live constantly in the sun
are not usually sun worshippers. This is the cult of the tourist
from the frozen north.
It also seemed that a young native would be going to work in
the morning and not lounging on the beach.
Yet ..... there lie was sunning himself.

We exchanged greetings as I passed him on my way to the
water. lie certainly looked like a bronzed native. They come in all
colours here .... anything from jet black to snowy white. But he
was behaving like a tourist. I was curious and so I walked in his
direction when I came out of the water.
"Enjoying the early morning sun?", I commented as a means
of opening up a conversation.
"Yes." he said with a pleasant smile, "It's really wonderful."
lie didn't have a Caymanian accent, nor does the average native
in a tropical climate speak of the sun as wonderful. It is usually
regarded as a damned "scorcher".
"Native here?", I asked.
"No," he said. "I'm visiting from Vancouver."
"What was your original background?", I asked, knowing that
he was too dark to be a Canadian of European stock.
"'\l grandparents were Jamaicans," he said, "They settled in
Canada."
"What brings you here?", I pursued, because it is unusual for
West Indians to visit the smaller and more quiet islands.
"I'm a realtor," he said. "I have been visiting Nassau and my
family in Jamaica. A relative of mine in Jamaica told me about
this place."
"I am from Nassau," I told him.
"Oh yes," he said, eyeing me sharply, "people are leaving that
island nowaren't they?"
"Yes. I know," I said, "it is unfortunate."
"Sad," he said.
This coloured man from Canada was interesting. I wanted to
know what he was really thinking.
'"How did you find Jamaica?", I asked. "Plenty of poverty and
crime there. My wife and I were there a couple of months ago," I
added, hoping that he would open up and talk freely.
"It is depressing," lie said. "I lived at the ......... hotel. I noticed
that they had just put sturdier locks on the doors. There were
marks on several of the doors that showed they had been pried
open. Anyway, I got away from the island without waking up in
the middle of the night to find a man standing over me."
"What do you think of this place?" I asked.
"Man," he replied enthusiastically, "it is really wonderful. 1
didn't think a place like this existed anywhere in the world. Man,
the peace and security and the quiet of this place is like a piece of
heaven."
"How long have you been here?", 1 asked.
"Only two days but I chartered a plane and flew over the
island. I wanted to see it from the air."
"Thinking of buying something here?", I asked.
"I bought a piece of land yesterday," he said.
"Do you mind telling me what you paid?"
"Sixty five thousand dollars," he said.
"That's a lot of ioney,"' commented, thinking that he had
bought a building lot.
"But look man, what I got for it," he smiled. "Sixty acres. It is
in ani undeveloped part of the island, not too much swamp, a
little section of beach. I feel it's a good buy because I believe this
isl;i:ul i. b,:omd to go ahead if the people continue to control
expansion and cep this peaceful atmosphere."
I agreed.
S* * :::::;:::
I returned to miy room and watched himt for a long time
absorbing the rays of the early morning sun.
This coloured tourist from the frozen north, who was
depressed by what he saw in the island of his forefathers and
other island resorts in this area, had not only found sun here ....
he had found something that he thought no longer existed in this
world .... a place where mixed races lived together at peace and in
perfect harmnnony.

We are going to have to get out of here soon now. The island is
small. The news of our presence here has got around and
invitations are pouring in for lunch, drinks, dinners, parties, and
what have you.
Knowing that I am a Catholic Peter Legett called a few minutes
ago to offer to pick us up for Mass Sunday morning. Mr. Legett, a
banker, was in Nassau for a number of years.
The visitor from Canada has found peace and a feeling of
security here. We have found this and something more. We have
found an outpouring of friendship that is heart wanning.

There was a big wedding reception on the patio at this hotel
last night.
It aroused a great deal of interest because it was unusual in two
respects.
"Six hundred guests," was the news being passed along the


3


(ow ribunt


There is fear all over the country today


1hwp ribunt
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903- 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Publisher/Editor 1917-1972
Contributing Editor 1972 -
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972.
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Thursday, August 9, 1973.


EDITORIAL

A talk on the beach


<


FDITOR. The Tribune,
Kindly allow some space in
your valuable columns for the
following comments as a public
service to the preservation of
democracy in action for an
Independent Bahamaland.
Sir, it makes me disgusted at
heart as a young person in this
country of ours to personally
witness the various forms of
victimization and brazen
political intimidation being
conducted by some prominent
members of the P.L.P.
government and high ranking
supporters to fellow Bahamians
who exercised their democratic
constitutional rights during the
General Elections, in support
of the opposition party Free
National Movement.
In many cases there is open
frustration of qualified
Bahamians who are forced out
of well merited positions on
the basis of political spite. It
would be most revealing to the
public if the truth was made
available on the rotten
conditions giving rise to the
resignation of the Permanent


Makes appeal for better driving


EDITOR, The Tribune,
I convey my condolence to
the parents and loved ones of
little four-year old Todd David
Hall.
Sir, I delivered my letter to
the Editor of the Tribune at
approximately 5:12 p.rm.
Friday last and just minutes
later little Todd so sad to say
became Nassau's 22nd traffic
fatality at about 5:30 p.m. that
same day Friday, 3 August
My fellow countrymen and
women when is this needless
slaughter 'of human lives and
limbs going to stop on our
highways because of
carelessness? What has become
of the mentality of our
society? There is already too

Former DevBoard

member dies in NY
MISS Jessie Lee Hall, who
was in charge of the old
Nassau, Bahamas Development
Board information office in
New York City for more than
30 years, died of pneumonia
on July 31 in West Nyack,
N.Y. She was 93 years old.
Miss Hall was employed by
the Stanley E. Gunnison
Advertising Agency when it
had the Bahamas travel
advertising account. When that
account moved to Kelly,
Nason, in the late thirties,
she accompanied it to
the new agency, to establish
the New York Information
Bureau which she maintained
for the Development Board
until she retired 20 years ago
She had an encyclopaedic
knowledge of Bahamian
history, laws, customs and
culture. lHer office was a
rendezvous for Bahamians
while in New York. lHer service
went far beyond advice to
prospective visitors. Bahamians
often relied on her efficiency
and her reputation for getting
difficult things done, When
transportation to the Bahamas
was still sporadic, she once
managed to rescue a stranded
church bell and get it to its Out
Island destination. Another
time she solved a problem
which was preventing arrival of
a piano at one of the Out
Islands.
tier interest in the Bahamas
and its people was still keen in
recent years. On her 93rd
birthday anniversary last
January she received greetings
from many of her Bahamian
friends.
She is survived by a sister,
Mrs. Victor Bonsall. 14
Sickeltown Road, West Nyack,
New York 10994.


much death and sorrow
because of shootings,
drownings and stabbings etc.
This is most pathetic!!
I am now again appealing to
citizens of our Commonwealth.
civic organizations such as the
Kiwanis International who
have shown their concern for
sometime, radio station Z.N.S.
constantly do. to join efforts
with f-'.,rn:"' organizations
and other suo' as the I.B.P.O.
Elks of the ,. k.id the Masons,
the Jaycees etc the Royal
Bahamas Police Furce, also our
many youth groups, to really
educate our people into being
more careful on our highways,
to obey the Rules and
Regulations of the Road
Traffic Act I am again


appealing to the police to
become dedicated to their
duties, set good examples
themselves and to enforce the
law to violators.
In conclusion, I am urging
Mr. Mervin Johnson whose
thoughts appear to be like
mine because both of us
expressed concern through the
same news media which
appeared in Tuesday's edition
of The Tribune to continue the
battle to "save human lives and
limbs". Our new nation needs
every human life so let us save
them". Thank you for this
valuable space.
JAMES H. NEYMOUR
South Beach Road,
Nassau,
August 8, 1973.


NAUSEATED BY ZNS


FDITOR, The Tribune,
It is nauseating to hear the
nu mbe r of words
mis-pronounced by announcers
over ZNS. Just to name a few:
Provost .,arshal. aide de camp,
Cockburn Street.


BEEF SCARCE
From Page I
because it is a standing order
and they are trying to do all
they can for us, ours is an
order they don't have to go out
and sell every week and we
don't go to competitors from
week to week."
\lr Roberts added, however,
that the high cost of beef
prohibits ad vertising beef
specials.
1 he price of beef in tile I:.S
is presently frozen at a level
where. cattlemen say, they
would stuffer a loss if they sold
their beef. Therefore a number
of beef producers are holding
their cattle until the freeze
ends on September 12 and
they can get a better price.
The end of the freeze will
inevitably see soaring beef
prices.
On the other hand, sources
in the industry anticipated that
any increased availability of
beet will reduce the demand
and the price for pork.
But Mr Roberts does not
think the end of the freeze will
result in a fresh flood of beef.
ie saiid countries which
recently became relatively
affluent Japan, Gernmany,
China and Russia are
prepared to pay high prices for
'American meat, creating an
entirely new market, which
strains the supplies.


corridors of the hotel. This was a most elaborate affair for this
quiet island.
And it was the first mixed marriage for one of the top families
in the island. When I say mixed marriage .... I mean a native white
girl of a wealthy family was marrying an English expatriate. These
island people have always married among themselves and there
are no racial barriers to cross because white families in this island
have black cousins and there is no consciousness of difference.
But a socially prominent native girl marrying a foreigner .... that
was something different and further evidence of changes that will
gradually invade the life of the island.
"Her father must be a wealthy man." I commented to the
native maitre d' in the dining room who has gone out of his way
to be courteous to us.
"Yes." he said "he is one of the island's leading men." adding
that lie owned most of the land when the island started to boom.
"'Oh yes." I agreed. "I can see that lie must have picked up a
great fortune in the last few years, but what does he work at?"
"He marries people privately at his house." he said.
"Is that what he works at'?". I asked, trying to find out what
he really meant.
"Yes, sir," he insisted, "he marries people at his house."
"You mean he is a Justice of the Peace and a marriage officer,"
I pursued.
"Yes, sir," he grinned. "that's it. he is a Justice of the Peace
who marries people quietly." And I wondered how much "peace"
this Justice injected into the knoit he hinds.
**********


Live and think.


A THOUGHT FOR TODAY

SAMUEL LOREN


everything democratically
possible to awaken the rest of
the voters to alarming
conditions in this country with
the PLP Square Deal Club
goggling up the wealth of the
land while destroying the
economy and slowly but surely
eroding personal freedom of
expression.


I would say publicly to the
FNM parliamentary members,
if they have no guts for politics
or political soul for the rights
of the nation as written in the
Constitution .... then get to
hell out of office and let the
people elect new men of action
worthy of our confidence!
Thank you for the space Mr.
Editor in allowing me to


express publicly what so many
freedom loving Bahamian
voters are talking privately ....
FEARFUL OF A SPITEFUL
PLP GOVERNMENT and
DISGUSTED OF A
WISHY-WASHY FNM
OPPOSITION.
DISGUSTED VOTER.
Baillou Hill Road,
Nassau.


Scotch Whisky


Can't someone in authority Lf l.-O ..m .. o_.. |"
give the announcers a lesson in *'. .
the pronunciations of common
everyday words? =
MILTON FOWLER Distributed in the Bahamas by Bethell Robertson and Co. Ltd.
Nassau,
August 3.


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VIVA!


see your authorized


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Thursday, August 9, 1973.


I


I I 1


__ I


__


I~IIIBL~UIIIP~ I


I


Secretary from the Ministry of
Education which is a typical
example of a frightened
Bahamian society. How sad
and frustrating to qualified
Bahamians now being treated
as "enemies of the people" ....
characteristics of Fascist and
(ommunist dictatorship in our
"Year of Jubilee"!
Mr. Editor. it is time for the
PLP government to shut up
their hypocritical shout; of
freedom for all Bahamians if in
subtle and many brazen forms
there is continued pressure on
Opposition supporters.
Will we end up like Haiti, a
one party state?
There is fear all over this
country today .. fear to
express one's political views
publicly if it is not pro-PLP.
The leaders of the FNM
should be ashamed of
themselves engaging in a public
battle among themselves while
the country needs an effective
Opposition to keep faith with


i --


its supporters as well as oppose
strongly the unfair corrupt
policies of the Government.
I would say to the present
leaders of the Opposition
discuss directly with the people
before making closed door
decisions, so the FNM would
be more than a paper party in
the near future.
If the present FNM leaders
are incapable of providing the
type of Opposition this
country needs and what the
voters deserve, then resign your
positions and let the FNM
voters have the opportunity of
electing dynamic, eloquent
leaders like Wallace-Whitfield
and Foulkes. This is no time
for wishy-washy, untouchable
men in politics. This country is
heading to a dictatorship by
default of an effective
Opposition.
The FNM leaders must make
effective links with the voters,
beginning with their own
supporters, then doing


Zti

B










_4 _hr t rib





Datsun sports car: beautiful



high performance car


"WHAT WAS THAT GREEN JAPANESE THING that passed
storming a new Datsun dealership in a small English town.


"Must have been the Datsun
240-Z," smiled the dealer. He
sold a Datsun on the spot.
The "green Japanese thing"
belonged to a well known
Bahamian historian, who
imported it to England for a
touring vacation.
"The Datsun dealer in that
little town had no 240-Z in
stock. He borrowed mine tor 'a
free overhaul.' When I
returned my 240-Z was
polished, inside and out, and
reclining in his show window,"
he reports.
The dealer took orders for
three Datsun sports cars on the
strength of his borrowed
display.
FASTEST
"That's the effect the
Datsun 240-Z has on people,"
says William Black, at Motor
Centre, Datsun dealer for the
Bahamas. "It's the sportiest car
in the Bahamas, the fastest on
the road, by far. There are
about eight in action here."
John Way of Bahamas
Commonwealth Bank is the
newest Datsun 240-Z driver.
Mrs. William Black is
another new owner. "Until I
drove it back from the airport I
didn't appreciate it properly. It
really handles beautifully,"
says Mrs. Black.
The 240-Z proved its touted
performance this year by
winning first, second and
fourth in overall performance
at the East Africa Rally, "the
biggest rally, and toughest, in
the world."
The sleek 240-Z is mounted
with a 2,393 cc, 6-cylinder,
SOHO (overhead cams) engine
with dual SU carburetors, keys
to its racing performance.
Its standard transmission has
5 speeds. "You would hardly
get it out of third gear in
Bahamas driving," reports a
racing veteran. It also comes
with a 3-speed automatic
transmission.
For driving ease and
manoeuvrability, the Datsun
240-Z Sports has a rack and
pinion steering gear, and a
turning circle of only 31 ft., 5
in. It offers individual
suspension on all four wheels


me going 124 miles an hour!" growled a sporting English type,


y.


FRED WHITE (LEFT), sales manager at
Way's new lime-green Datsun 240-Z.


for smooth cornering.
The excellence of
engineering doesn't stop with
the engine or all-steel body.
Inside, the 240-Z has other
sports car features, combined
for elegance and comfort. The
plush two bucket seats are
fully adjustable. Deep-set,
non-glare meters and gauges are
designed for instant
readability, with all operating
controls and switches located
within easy reach of the driver.
Datsun thought of everything,
including a lock-away atenna
and break-away and anti-dazzle
interior rearview mirror.
The steering column is
collapsible for increased safety.
Other safety features are thick
padding, three-point type seat
belts and two stage-door
hinges.
Optional equipment includes
the auto-tuning radio and
atenna (power or manual)
clock, stereo, hazard warning
switch, anti-sun windshield
glass, rear window electric
defroster, carpet, outside


rearview mirror, passing light
and air conditioning.
"It's a beautiful
performance car," says John
Way. "I've already been asked


when I'll sell mine. Somebody
wants it to be second-hand,
quickly."
The Datsun 240-Z is
available at Motor Centre Ltd.
on Thompson Blvd.


EI5 biIIIIhIEI E


RED CROSS DONATIONS
BAHAMAS Red Cross has
received the following
donations in response to Mrs.
Rowena Eldon's bi-annual
appeal of July 1.
Mr & Mrs. R. Wightman,
$200, Anonymous. $50, Rev.
Walter G. Martin, $5., Pupils of
Spanish Wells School, $110,
Red Cross Group South
Acklins $25, Mr. Bob Halliday,
$5. Taylor Industries Ltd.,
$100, Lane Knight. $100, Shell
Bahamas Limited, $200, David
M. Lightbourn, $25,
Anonymous. $25, Canadian
Imperial Bank of Commerce,
$50, Hon. Donald M. Fleming,
$100, Red Cross Group No. 2
Bimini, $40. Mr. & Mrs. Jack
Bott, $25, Sir Harold & Lady
Christie. $50. Women's
Missionary Society Zion
Baptist Church. $50, Mr. &
Mrs. J. Crothers. $25, Mr.
B.M.J. Hinds. $15,
International Credit Bank
(Bahamas) Ltd. $50, Mr. W. B.
Gray, $25, Anonymous. $100,
Bahamas Nationhood Limited,
$250, Bahamas Common-
wealth Bank, $750, Esso


Standard Oil S. A. Ltd., $200,
Bahamas Bus & Truck Co.
Ltd., $50, Lister Blackstone
(Caribbean) Ltd., $10,
Manufacturers National Bank
of Detroit, $25, Staff of
General Post Office, $57, Mr.
& Mrs. E. A. Boyce, $25, Mr. &
Mrs. Stedman Forbes. $5, Red
Cross Group Mason's Bay
Acklins, $28, Junior Red Cross
Link No. 2 Alice Town,
Bimini. $21.30, Ann R.
Fleisher, $5.97, E. H. Mundy &
Co. (Nassau) Ltd., $25, iJ4s
Ruth G. Cash, $20, Red Civis
Group Snug Corner. Ackltni.
$42.50, Bahamas Hotel
Association, $500. Bahamas
Taxi Cab Co-operative Union,
$100 and Mr. Donald Joss.
$25.
SINGSPI RATION
A SINGSPIRATION will be
held at the Faith Temple,
Palmdale on Wednesday,
August 15th, at 8:15 p.m.
There will be selections by
groups from different churches
taking part.
There also will be a short
quiz from the Bible.


Utinp Thursday, August 9, 1973.

0 0'
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uhuI~y


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FORTHE MONTH OF AUGUST


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DOORS WEST OF THOMPSON BLVD. opposite DAVIS STREET just WEST of COCA-COLA -
ONTROSE AVE PHONE 5-6739- P.O. BOX N3741



SNK- SMEARED]


Motor Centre Ltd., presents the keys to John


THE HIDDEN PICTURE
NO NEED TO HIDE YOUR
PASSPORT PICTURE IF IT'S
TAKEN AT TOOGOODS'!
Our passport "Miniature
Portraits" are admired by
everybody, even the
Immigration.

B S on the waterfront at East
:: hone 5-4641


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Equity Side

NOTICE
THE QUIETING TITLES ACT, 1959


The Petition of Anna Edwards in respect of :-
ALL THAT Tract of land situate Six hundred
and Twenty-eight (628.00) feet Southeastward
of Blue Hill Road in the vicinity of Seven Hills
in the Southern District of the Island of New
Providence and said to contain Four and Eight
hundredths (4.08) acres which said tract of land
is bounded on the NORTHWEST by vacant land
but said to be the property of the Estate of Dr.
C. R. Walker and running thereon Six hundred
and Thirty-five and Fifth-four hundredths
(635.54) feet on the NORTHEAST by vacant
land and running thereon Three hundred and
Thirty-eight and Eighty-seven hundredths
(338.87) feet on the SOUTHEAST by vacant
land now or formerly said to be the property of
the Estate of Rupert Dean and running thereon
Six hundred and Forty-four and Forty-five
hundredths (644.45) feet and on the
SOUTHWEST by a Reservation for a Road
Thirty (30) feet wide leading to Blue Hill Road
and running thereon Two hundred and
Ninety-six and Seventy-five hundredths (296.75)
feet.
Anna Edwards claims to be the owner in fee
simple in possession of the parcel of land
hereinbefore described and the Petitioner has made
application to the Supreme Court of the Bahamas
under Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959
to have her title to the said land investigated.

Copies of the filed plan may be inspected at:-
(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court
(b) The Chambers of the undersigned.

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having
dower or a right to dower or an adverse claim or
a claim not recognized in the Petition shall before
the 18th day of September, 1973 file in the
Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the
undersigned a statement of his claim in the
prescribed form, verified by an affidavit to be filed
therewith. Failure of any such person to file and
serve a statement of his claim on or before the
18th day of September, 1973 will operate as a bar
to such claim.
CALLENDERS, ORR, PYFROM & ROBERTS,
Chambers, Mosmar House,
Queen Street,
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner.


___.~ __ _ -- ---- I- ~. _I___,. --


1973
No. 19


~1CL~ ~'

r~7











Thursday, August 9, 1973.


Whither goest Theatre in the Bahamas J _ __


By DAPHNE WALLACE WHITFIELD
IN ORDER TO GIVE A MORE BALANCED PICTURE of the
drama situation in the Bahamas we should first look from where


it has come.
Mr. Fritz Stubbs, president
of the University Players, says
that basically straight theatre is
as foreign a medium to
Bahamians as is say the
goombay rhythm to the
English.
The proliferation of different
drama groups have resulted in
an increased interest in the
theatre. People go to see their
friends, colleagues, neighbours,
and family in a play they
wouldn't go to normally. Thus
more and more Bahamians are
now getting to the stage where
they're appreciating drama Mr.
Stubbs believes. "I see new
groups as an encouragement to
established groups", he says.
Each group will go to see the
other perform.
A drama group, Mr. Stubbs
explained to me, is as much a
social group and the tie that
binds is as much if not more
social than professional. The
drama group provides a
sympathetic home for people
from similar backgrounds with
similar interests and problems
and as such serves an important
function apart from staging
productions.
The three main groups,
which are now all legal entities,
Mr. Stubbs said are: -
The Nassau Players and the
Nassau Operatic Society are
basically expatriate. They excel
all other groups, Mr. Stubbs
says, in technical know-how


and set construction. However
most of their plays hold little
appeal for the majority of
Bahamians.
OLDER GROUP
The Bahama Drama Circle,
Mr. Stubbs explained, is
probably the first successful
basically Bahamian group. It
grew out of a drama workshop
at the Teachers' Training
College and its members are in
an older age bracket than his
group.
The University Players caters
to a younger group of young
men and women just out of
school. Because many of them
are preparing to go abroad for
further education there is a
high turnover in their
membership.
The Commonwealth Players
- a new group was recently
formed by Charles Bowleg who
is obviously at one with Fritz
Stubbs who supported
Rupert Missick's New Heart
Theatre in believing the
more the merrier.
The emphasis in the
University Players is on
workshops they have a small
workshop where they meet
weekly and the need is for
expert technical assistance.
Mr. Stubbs emphasised the
fact that there is practically no
friction between the various
groups and there is cooperation
between them as well as a
salutary competitiveness.


He emphasised the need in
the Bahamas for Bahamian
plays. He believes there is
much literary talent here but a
lack of familiarity with this
medium.
The choice of plays is
limited by this lack and also by
the lack of experienced
direction needed for the
production of the classics or
musicals.
In selecting a play to be
produced Mr. Stubbs says he is
guided by two principles. First
of all it is necessary to bring
the audience to the play so the
entertainment factor must be
there and secondly he wants a
play that will challenge and
develop the acting talent of the
cast.
HOBBY
It appears we are not yet
near to professional theatre in
the Bahamas. "Basically we're
in it as a hobby", says Mr.
Stubbs.
What is the future for
Bahamians who want to go
into the theatre as a
profession? Mr. Stubbs believes
the establishment of an Arts
Council is a necessary prelude
to putting theatre in the
Bahamas on a more
professional footing to which
and through which funds for
subsidies would be channelled,
theatre and playwright
workshops fostered and expert
direction obtained.
It is difficult to say which
should come first the chicken
or the egg. Should the
mechanics of professional


theatre be established first a
National Theatre an Arts
Council and hefty subsidies?
Or should those who wish to
make a career out of acting,
in the Bahamas go ahead in
spite of the lack of a
professional outlet and then
work for this latter to come
about while working in a
related field to earn their daily
bread?
A third alternative would be
to let things ride and wait until
a large amateur theatre
develops and demands
professional theatre. This,
however, raises the question
whether live theatre could
compete with the mechanised
mediums of movies and T.V.
Meanwhile what about those
Bahamians who have a natural
talent for acting and want to
make it their exclusive life's
work? Are they destined to the
choice of the frustration of not
working professional in their
chosen field or of solely
contributing their talents
outside the Bahamas?
However the lack of
established professional theatre
in the Bahamas has not
deterred Hexin McPhee, a
20-year-old Bahamian student
at the American Academy of
Dramatic Arts in New York.
On the 17th & 18th August at
the Teachers' Training College
the University Players are
staging a repeat performance of
two of their plays "Dr. Fish"
and "Lovers and Other
Strangers" (originally part of a
trilogy of plays performed


recently by the University
Players entitled: "Experience")
to help Hexin complete his
drama studies. Besides taking
part in both plays Hexin will
also perform two monologues,
one an excerpt from Marlow's
"Damnation of Faustus" and
the other from "All My Sons"
by Arthur Miller,
"What aristocratic writers
take from nature gratis, the less
privileged must pay for with
their youth. Try and write a
story about a young man the
son of a serf, a former grocer,
choir boy and university
student, raised on respect for
rank, kissing the priests'
hands,worshipping the ideas of
others ... receiving frequent
whippings ... brawling,
torturing animals ... needlessly
hypocritical before God and
man merely to acknowledge his
own significance write about
how this man squeezes the
slave out of himself drop by
drop and how, on waking up
one fine morning, he finds that
the blood coursing through his
veins is no longer the blood of
a slave, but that of a real
human being."
The words of a black artist
or writer finding his identity.
No, this is an extract from
the letters of Anton Chekhov,
late nineteenth century
Russian playwright whose
works are undergoing a current
revival.
Two collections of his letters
are fresh off the press.
So what? How is this
relevant to the cultural scene in


HOTEL PERSONNEL MANAGERS SEMINAR
HOTEL TRAINING Senior personnel from many of the leading hotels attended the
three-day seminar in personnel management conducted by Professor Donal Dermody
from the School of Hotel Administration, Cornell University. The above personnel who
took the course represent the Halcyon Balmoral; Flagler Inn; Loews, Paradise Island;
Xanadu Princess; Nassau Beach; Britannia Beach; Hyatt Emerald Beach; Princess
International; Cape Eleuthera and Sheraton British Colonial Hotel. There were also
observers from the Ministry of Labour. Members who took the course are shown with
Professor Dermody and Stephen Blundell, hotel training director of the Bahamas Hotel
Training Council.
PHOTO: Philip Symonettf


the Bahamas in 1973?
It is as relevant and fresh as
any classic in writing, music or
the visual arts is to any society
at any period of its history.
For underlying class,
nationality, race, time and
geography the basic problems
of the very stuff of life of
man's relationship to himself,


his God, his fellowman and his
environment -- transcend such
differences. The emotion of
John Glenn as he stepped onto
the moon was probably the
same as that of the first man


who created fire.
In the search for our own
personal identity, for our
national and racial identity we


national and racial identity we


are one with mankind past
present and future. For it is a
paradox of human nature that
we are all unique and yet the
same.
MOON
Rises 2.58 p.m.
Sets 12.51 a.m.


-m


THOUSANDS OF SMALL PARTS IN STOCK.
Virtually every Toyota engine and small body
part that could need replacing is kept in stock for
Econocars by ABC Motors in a special Toyota
Parts Department.


We're running this ad to make just one point:
no car is a good buy at any price unless you

know that the dealer can keep it running for
you.


L j- m
-JfJii


-1
?'


S HUNDREDS OF
LARGE PARTS
IN STOCK.
Doors, fenders,
hoods, radiators,
tail pipes, etc.
for all Toyota
models are kept
in liberal supply
in a separate
"sheet metal"
parts depot on
Mount Royal
I_ Avenue.


The Japanese


automobiles these


are turning out fine


days. In up-to-date


engineering and craftsmanlike workmanship,


they are setting


a standard American and


European manufacturers find hard to equal.


Toyota is the leader among all Japanese cars.
Econocars has sold hundreds of fine Toyotas in


Nassau.

Econocars imports and

Toyota parts.


' ,


VT
:


4'f I


iwfh


stocks thousands


Econocars has recently established a system

for quick delivery from Toyota's U.S. parts

depot of any part temporarily out-of-stock
in Nassau.
Econocars maintains at ABC Motors a staff of

mechanics trained on Toyota maintenance,


TRAINED MECHANICS REPAIR TOYOTAS
QUICKLY AND EXPERTLY AT ABC MOTORS.
Seen examining a job order at the centre right of
the photo is William Rolle, graduate of a 6-month
course in Toyota maintenance at the company's
factory in Japan.


TRADE-INS INVITED


SALES TEAM THAT WELCOMES YOU TO
DOWDESWELL STREET LOT. Friendly people
who make sure you get the car you really want.
Their eyes on not just this sale, but on the repeat
sales in years to come.


headed by


a Bahamian graduate of


months factory course in Japan.

Econocars suggests that your next car be a

Toyota, the trouble-free automobile. Like

they say, once you get your hands on a

Toyota, you'll never let go!


W-MIAL IUAHIAN
gOYmL~.18 QlA~n


ECONOMY CARS LIMITED


MANAGER: DONALD JOHNSON


P. O. BOX N1382


PHONE 2-1322


DOWDESWELL STREET BETWEEN CHRISTIE AND DEVEAUX

OPEN 8 AM TO 5 PM. MON. THRU SAT.


yir U*---L


----


FINANCING AVAILABLE


I


'-4


ma- I


;Ir I I


UhP iTribuni












Ghr Xributt


Thursday, Auust 9, 1973


I~cevt Abbct


' "


S : NI She's not a licensed retailer. [P. S.
-. nmt a tip. too. she's not any cheaper than
, l defeat her original scheme.]


L


East Nassau Rotary Club


opens students job centre


o u:








I






' '


e 'U


5q


Taxi Union gift to Bahamas Red Cross
PRESENTATION OF CHEQUE for $100 from Bahamas Taxi Cab Co-operative Union
was received on behalf of the Bahamas Red Cross by Miss Dorothy Hepburn, Branch
Officer. Left to right Harold Major, general secretary; Horace Ferguson, executive
member, Miss Dorothy Hepburn and Treadville Barry executive member.


Sarrang events


family decision

Ry Abigail Van Buren
Chncaqo Trbune-N. Y. News Synd., Inc.
Our brother is 21. He just graduated
,i has a job that pays him $100 a week.
'ie at home with our parents. They think
rtir a sense of responsibility if he pays
... his room and board.
S the oldest of six children, what goes
:'y'4 o for the rest of us.
.!.I Iren should have to pay to live with

,: would like to know how you feel
THE OTHER KIDS
hii Ilong should an able-bodied, gainfully
I od expect to live with Mama and Papa
Ihi.' \ Year? Forever? Circumstances and
;I families, however. reasonable people
!, tcriis that will satisfy both the


i r; i .120 year-old girl, living alone.
'i and lives at home. He called and
Si in ti from out of town and wanted to
s' i e ,re short of room at his house so
i ...ould sleep at a friend's house. Well,
h,: h, I e nme.
She could sleep here, I said: "Sure,"
i, on the soft. When it became appar-
;as going to share my bed, I said:

!rs-e'xed" land I threw him out of the

LINDA
Il'', over optimistic.

otherr wrote that her daughter want-
t' 'rik by a justice of the peace. She
h' : '(,tiee in anything, and neither
'i! ii:swer was absolutely right. A
a !' ppiaopriate one.
i':i,'\ of the clergy today is why so
-:i r!\ ignore the church, but when it
iI ':! d buried, they want a minister.
pi,:',pal priet and admit that I have
S,,;,-ii seddcings and funerals, but I am
7' ; ;,i showing Christian charity or
: FF'ISC(ll'Al.IAN PRIEST
i tld he inclined to say you showed


!aI a phrase in your column which
ic: l. are "terrific in bed, but lousy

'i up on a street corner. I was 18,
I' He had just been discharged
S'ear:s in Europe, and was look-
,' We didn't waste much time get-
i as amazed at his virility, and
"' r:t need for him.
S' hort. we were married, but
ri.sb over from the beginning, he
,'!I; 1!f his sight.
.:i ;iffi,(d domestic help, because
,'i My talent was in the bed-

: !e loses his virility, I'll leave
: l 'm afraid when his sexual
a: r i ;ant me anymore because

i .' n whuse only talent is in the
BEEN THERE
ai.and I were very much in love
va -, ngo She was brought up in one
S m i0 order to be "fair," we were
StPeace.
'un. she wanted it baptized [in
;a:d. Fine." Then she decided she
,; church again. I said, "All
"':g'ing me to go with you." She
.u-f ie didn't.
S.. p '.tism Pretty soon she started
: .'pi back with the man across the
n. kind of mixed marriage we had.
.urch '
tot', ".lry" You guessed it. My wife
'iid' "*( that they are "in love" and
"v ','h other.
1', i to this real-life soap opera,
r, in capitall letters! STUPID
S ' th,, moral. It's "DON'T SELL
"i r:' I)E I). IT'S ONLY SLEEP.


* :: *1ago I used to stop at the bar
e,... evening after work and have a
'h, fellows before coming home. The

.i 'nii wife made this proposition to
;, luikey by the case, and SELL it to
"' ,"rnt if I came straight home.
'a :id ihe bought many nice things

,',,"irr'r 1st, she has upped the price to
.:f htrg er costs.
'thii the ')o day freeze announced by Pres-
'a liahbe to a $5,000 fine? W. I. F.


P.M. IN OTTAWA
A GENERAL VIEW OF THE CONFERENCE ROOM at
the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in
Ottawa shows the chairman, Canada's Prime Minister Pierre
Elliott Trudeau, (foreground) and across from him from
left Mr. Gough Whitlam, the controversial Australian Prime
Minister, Bahamas Prime Minister, Lynden O. Pindling,
Errol Barrow, Barbados PM and Mr. Edward Heath, Prime
Minister of Britain.


Charles Rhodriquez to get


'merit of honour' plaque

MR. CHARLES RHODRIQUEZ, a former P.L.P. senator in the
Senate will be the recipient of the "Merit of Honour Plaque." to
be presented to him at today's opening of the 16th annual session
of the Federation of Masons of the World. Inc.


The convention will open
with its key-note speaker being
the lion. James H. Bell,
councilman. Cleveland. Ohio.
Some of the other events
will include a Federation of
Easter Stars Queen Coronation
ball at 8 p.m. Thursday and a
Shriner's Ball at 9 p.m. Friday.
Mr. Rhodriquez. 73, was
chosen for the award as a result
of his civic and fraternal work.
The Nassau businessman and
merchant received the plaque
before an estimated 1,500
delegates here tor the
convention at the Sheraton
British Colonial Ilotel at 10
a.m. from F.M.W. president,
M. J. Anderson of Austin,
Texas.
It is the first time that the
F.M.W. order and its sister
chapter of the Order of Eastern
Stars are meeting outside the
United States.
The "Merit of Ionour"
plaque is the highest award in
the F.M.W. honour systern
F.M.W. President Anderson
said that the organisation, here
for its convention, has as its
objective the unifying of all the
Masonic groups throughout the
world.
It is one of the largest
Masonic orders with an overall
membership of 300,000,
including fraternities and
Eastern Star chapters in
"nearly every state in
America," he said.
That membership also
extends outside the United
States to include the Bahamas,
Trinidad, Haiti and chapters
and orders in Europe. He said
that plans are underway to
hold their next convention in
California and in 1975. they
will move to England.
Membership in the Bahamas
includes several hundred, it is
understood. Mr. Rhodriquez. a
B.W.I. Regiment ex-serviceman
stationed on the Western Front
during World War I, is the


be helping to keep young
people usefully employed
during their holidays and at the
same time enable them to earn
some spending money."
The East Nassau Rotary
booth has been set up
in the Batelco building on East
Street. Manning it is St.
Augustine's student Rudolph
Cleare, who can be reached at
telephone 5-9440 daily
between 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Mr. Carey said the boys
assigned to the various jobs are


screened through recognized
youth organizations such as the
Boy Scouts and Boys Brigade.
Therefore householders and
businessmen could be assured
that the work would be well
done.
The Rotary placement
project has been in operation
for a month. If it proves
successful this summer the East
Nassau club plans to maintain
it throughout the year to assist
students in obtaining part-time
employment.


BAHAMAS NATIONAL TRUST

WILD LIFE PROTECTION &

CONSERVATION


MONDAY. AUGUST 13


PROTECTION AD ONwII





ON WILD LIFE: 6:30 9:00 PM: mwm :,2
BRITISH C IAL HT ALL PROCEEDS TO WILD LIFE
BRITISH COLONIAL HOTEL: PROTECTION AND CONSERVATION


Grand Master and President of
the Victoria Union Lodge in
the Bahamas.
lie is also Grand Patron of
Bethsheba Grand Chapter,
Order of the Eastern Stars of
the Bahamas.
The Masonic lodges in the
Bahamas, of which Mr.
Rhodriquez is head, are linked
with the F.M W. fraternity
which was organized on April
4. 1958 in Detroit. Michigan.
The order was established
"to recognize the various
established jurisdictions of
:reemasons, and to protect the
Masonic gains made in the past
and possess in the present."
It is also their objective to
"have friendly relationships
among the established Masonic
jurisdictions and ... to bring
about uniformity of Masonic
practices."
F.M.W. president Anderson
is the President of the Texas
Mortgage Investment Co., and
also the director of the
Citizen's National Bank in
Austin, Texas. Accompanying
him here, with the other
delegates, is his wife, Ada.. and
also Eastern Stars of the
World president. Amy Butler.
Mrs. Anderson is the
executive secretary of the
E.S.W. chapter.

SCOUTS TAKE-AWAY
DINNER SALE
THE COMMITTEE I for
Parents and Friends of the 8th
Bahamas Boy Scout (Trinity
Troop) will hold a take-away
dinner sale on Saturday at
Trinity Church Hall, Frederick
Street, beginning at 12:30 p.m.
Tickets may be purchased
from members of the
committee or dinners may be
bought direct from Trinity
Hall.
The public has been asked to
support this effort in aid of
funds for the Scouts Summer
Camp.


': I

t. [ ,. ij: -6- :.-
o~lUl
I v~i


II IFUL LAND FOR SALE IN


4.POSTA RICA
1. I MI *RETIREMENT
II l k*VIEW LOTS
I* Ul RON I *RECREATION
/ RIN('ON RESORTS
APTDO. 5060
SANr J')S,;, COSTA RICA, C.A.


_ L -F T


I


rr ~r r


THE EAST Nassau Rotary
Club has opened a student
placement centre and is seeking
the assistance of the
community in providing
temporary jobs for students
this summer.
"There are many jobs like
cleaning windows, mowing
lawns and washing cars that the
public may want done but
cannot find help," Rotary
member Cyril Carey said.
"By letting us know what is
available to be done, they will


Thursday, August 9, 1973.


kikt^









Thursday, August 9, 1973. GIle N ibIUt 7
ROYAL BANK SCHOLARSHIP HOLDER M
Nassau A successfully GRADUATES oviepresentation by National Trust ready for Flamingo Day
Ias sAcIe.ssfuI G


completed 4 years of study at
the UWI Mona Campus and has


'VALENTINE GRIMES





pens 7 p.m. Shows Start : 15
- No One Under 17 Admitted.
'See 2 features late as 10:25
S EXCLUSIVE.
NOW thru TUES.! *
S"BADGE" 8:15 & 12:13
"COMPANY" 10:25


Nl rr un Pcrmo p-,,
AHW RD W. Kl.OCH.
BADGE 373
I' p 1- Priah n.VW!A P AlHAWdNT P!TMIRI.

BAi

TOLn FMST200 CARS


received a degree of Bachelor
of Arts, majoring in economics
and business management.
Born in Nassau, Mr. Grimes
joined The Royal Bank in
August, 1966 after attending
St. John's College, Nassau and
Government High School.
in 1969, he was awarded a
Royal Bank James Muir
Scholarship, enabling him to
enroll in his chosen university
programme. He has now
rejoined The Royal Bank on a
fulltime basis as Assistant
Systems Officer in the District
Manager's Department, Trade
Winds Building.
Mr. Grimes is married to the
former Thelma Barnett and
they have one son.
WEATHER
WIND: East-southeast to
southeast 5 to 12 m.p.h.
WEATHER: Mostly cloudy,
few showers; clearing
tomorrow
SEA: Smooth to slight
TEMP: Min. tonight 74
Max. tomorrow 89








NOW SHOWING 8 & 11:20
The Most Lethal
KUNG FU Team On Earth...



AND AT 9:50
JOHN EIURNE
THE TBRIN
ROBBERS
Panavison* Technicolor"
li I ift t iff tf ~lyt11


W.I 32 I


I Matinee 2:45 &


NUW SHOWING
5, Evening 9:00-'Phone 2-1004, 2-1005


"LIVE
AND
LETDiE"

SUGGESTED FOR MA TURE A UDII:NCES.
PARENTAL DISCRETION AD VISED.
Reservations not claimed by 8:45, will be sold
on first come, first served basis


Now Showing
Matinee starts at 2: 15
Evening 9:00
"FISTS OF FURY"
PG
Bruce Lee
PLUS
THE DESERTER" PG.
Bekim Fehmiu
Richard Crenna
PLUS Late Feature
Friday night
'Phone 2-2534


Last Day Friday
Continuous Showings
from 3:00
"GOD FORGIVES.
I DON'T" PG.
Terence Hill
Bud Spencer
PLUS
"RAID ON ROMMEL" G.
Richard Burton
Wolfgang Preiss


NOW SHOWING
Matinee Continuous from 2:30, Evening 8:30
'Phone 3-4666
DRACULA'S BLOODBROTHER
stalks the earth againin an orgy of
AM g vengeance! f


WILLIAM MARSHALL DON MITCHELL PAM GRIER
ilCHAEL CONRAD COLOR .oas..h (star of "Coffy")
SCIE N.. T
RUNS


SUGGESTED FOR MA TURE A I DIF',DCES
PARENTAL DISCRETION AD VISED.
SORRY NO PASSES ACCEPTED!


By DONITA ROLLE
MOVIE FILMS, which show
the beauty of wild life and the
importance of its conservation,
will be featured at 6:30 p.m.
on August 13, during a two
and one half hour long
Flamingo Day Programme.
The programme will be held
at the British Colonial Hotel
and will be sponsored by the
Bahamas National Trust under
the patronage of their
Excel lencies the
Governor-General Sir Milo and
Lady Butler.
Yesterday morning, in the
ball room of Government
House, the Governor General
and Lady Butler along with


ARRIVED TODAY:
Southward from Miami
SAILED TODAY:
Rotterdam, Oceanic for New
York
ARRIVING TOMORROW:
Mardi Gras, Skyward from St.
Thomas
r


members of the press, saw a
preview of the films..
Two of the three films told
of the life story of the
naturalist, Audubon, and his
fanatical love for birds.
He described them as "little
feathered people with human
feelings and emotions."
The third film described the
Kirtland Warbler, known as the
"Bird of Fire".
The Warbler, a rare song
bird, spends its winters in the
Bahamas.
BURNING
It flies in from the Jack Pine
trees of Michigan. These trees
bear cones which are difficult


TIDES
High 3.05 a.m. and 3.41
p.m.
Low 8.58 a.m. and 10.06
p.m.
SUN
RISES 5.39 a.m.
Sets 6.53 p.m.


to open unless burned. Planned
fire ecology programmes are
set up, in order to burn these
cones so that the seeds can be
released and scattered for
germination.
Because the Warbler's
summer home is in the
Bahamas, and because its
existence is threatened, the
Bahamas National Trust is
doing some study into the
causes of its possible
extinction.
Also shown on film are habits
of undersea life.
Flamingo Day is designed to
stimulate greater public


awareness ot the urgent need
for all wild life conservation.
and to rise funds for
conservation projects. TIhis will
include the guarding by
wardens ot the largest nesting
colony ot the West Indian
flamingo, which is located on
Great Inagua Island.
In order to preserve
permanently the memory ot
Flamingo Day in the Bahamas.
the Bahamnas Monetary
Authority has again authorised
the Franklin Mint to strike, in
strictly limited numbers, a
special sterling silver two dollar
flamingo coin. Ilhese coins will


NOTICE is hereby given that an Fxtraordinary
General Meeting of the Gym Tennis Club will be
held at the Bahamas Air Sea Rescue headquarters
on East Bay Street on Wednesday, 15th August at
8:30 p.m. for the purpose of discussing the plans
for the proposed new club house and transacting
such further and other business as miay properly
come before the meeting.
Dated the 7th day of August, AI).., 1973.
('ARMIL KNOWLES
Secretary


-II--" -


be distributed free to each
member of the Trust as was
done in commemoration of
Flamingo Day 1972.
The Bahamas Trust, which
was founded in 1959, for the
conservation of wildlife in the
Bahamas, maintains a number
ot land and sea parks
throughout the Bahamas and
undertakes programmes of


conservation-related research
and education. It also advises
government on conservation
policy.
Also during the Flamingo
Day programme, there will be a
talk on the White-Headed
Pigeon. The Bahamas is the
greatest sanctuary of this bird,
which has been extinguished in
many other parts of the world.


ENTIRELY NEW DECOR
pll1 r111110 11111[111
I|ll' t PrllEIO I auIIIS
Continuous dancing except Thursdays
fro-n 10 p.m. until...
Cantonese Dining, Tasty Snacks from 7 p.m.
NO COVER, NO MINIMUM
BRITANNIA BEACH HOTEL PARADISE ISLAND


Happy to meet you...




I'm the Helpful Banker


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"Yu'll find me at any branch



of the Royal Bank"






The Royal 1 The Helpful Bank
ROYAL BAN K
Branches throughout the Bahamas.


FEARED


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i i. ii iw mget tie joi doneU



Come by Classified Counter at The Tribune or call 2-1986 Ext. 5 in Nassau,352 -6608 in Freeport from 9a.m. to 5p.m. Mon. to Fri. Sat. 9a.m. to 1p.m.

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT CARS FOR SALE FOR SALE HELP WANTED TRADE SERVICES TRADE SERVICES HELP WANTED
I ,^ ne. .. -- -


C10786
ONE lot in Stapleton Gardens
80 x 120. call 3-6164.

C10682
FOR SALE
BY OWNER
House in Highland Park -
executive type home. 4
bedrooms, 21'1 baths, living,
dining, family, kitchen, double
car garage and utility room on
2 lots of land, wall to wall
carpet and drapes, completely
furnished, large patio and pool.
18 x 36. Beautifully
landscaped, bearing fruit trees
- central airconditioning. To
view telephone 2-1722-3.

C10692
WOULD YOU LIKE to live
near the sea with access to a
private lake? Beach rights and
all underground facilities. $75
down. From $80 month. No
interest. From $5800.
Call Pat Rutherford at 4-1141
or Morley & O'Brien at 2-4148
or 2-3027 or come to the
YAMACRAW BEACH Model
Home.

C10650
FOR SALE
BY OWNER
House in Highland Park. 3
bedrooms, 2 bath, living,
dining, kitchen, family room
and carport, utility rooms, on
2 lots of land beautifully
furnished, wall to wall carpet
and drapes throughout.
Completely walled and lovely
landscape. Airconditioned
throughout. Unusual
opportunity. To view
telephone 2-1722-3.

C10778
EXCELLENT INVESTMENT
PROPERTIES
1. A choice location on Shirley
Street comprising the frontage
of a complete block with road
frontage on three sides.
2. A large apartment or office
lot Collins Ave. good elevation.
3. A large apartment site West
Bay Street approximately
47,000 sg. ft. 95 ft. elevation.
4. Lots and cottages Adelaide
Beach.
5. 62 acres prime development
property Eastern Road.
6. A 3 acres estate with a 22
room palatial mansion with an
additional option of 18 acres
of good developed land.
For prices information and
appointment call C. W. Sands
Bill's Real Estate 23921.

C10802
FURNISHED apartment
Conchrest, Cable Beach. Sea
view beautifully appointed.
Two bedroom, 2 bathrooms,
offers in region of $85,000.
21741-2.
C10793
1. Attractive duplex in Blair
Extension. East apartment
contains two bedrooms and
bath, etc. Price reduced to
$49,000. Good investment
property.
2. Outstanding residence in
Montagu Heights. Two storeys,
three bedrooms, three baths,
living room, separate dining
room, two-car garage, etc.
Delightful swimming pool and
patio area. Fruit orchard. Many
special features. $150,000
furnished.
3. Excellent buy in
three-bedroom, two-bath
residence off Village Road.
Living room with dining ell,
den, kitchen, laundry, carport
etc. $49,000 furnished,
including new appliances.
H. G. CHRISTIE REAL
ESTATE
309 Bay Street, P. O. Box
N8164, Nassau Tel: 2-1041,
2-1042.


FOR SALE OR RENT
C10771
3 BEDROOMS, one bath,
Joans Heights, South Beach.
See Philip R. Vargas, West, S.
South-Street on Corner.


C10796
FOR SALE OR LONG TERM
LEASE Fine elaborately
furnished house at Skyline
Heights. Four bedrooms and
baths. Main rooms designed for
entertaining. Suitable for
diplomatic or executive
residence. 1Vz-acres, Beautiful
garden planted for privacy.
Phone 7-7205 or 2-8162 for
appointment to see.

FOR RENT

C10757
ONE & 2 Bedroom apartments,
Centerville, Ring 5-8679 ask
for Mr. Pritchard.

C10653
ONE EXTRA LARGE two
bedrooms two bath, and one
extra large one bedroom
apartment. With large living
and dining all basically
furnished Victoria Court
Apartments on Elizabeth
Avenue between. Shirley and
Bay Street. Facilities, Phone,
laundry, parking, T.V. antenna,
airconditioned. Phone 54631
between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.


C10791
FURNISHED THREE
BEDROOM two bath house in
Seabreeze Estates,
airconditioners, telephone,
garage, laundry room,
automatic washer and dryer.
$400.00 Phone 5-8512.

C10660
HILLCREST TOWERS
Spacious 2 bedroom 2 bath
apartment, large balcony,
airconditioning, swimming
pool, short or long term. $375
per month. Contact 2-1841
days.

C10652
2 2 BEDROOM APART-
MENTS consisting of living
dining room, kitchen and
bathroom, basically furnished
- Twynam Avenue. Phone
5-8185.

C10677
OFFICE OR STORE SPACE
Charlotte near Bay. Immediate
occupancy, ample parking.
Inquire 4-2017.

C10676
LARGE ONE BEDROOIV
apartment, nicely furnished.
$250 per month. Call
CHESTER THOMPSON REAL
ESTATE 2-4777-8.

C10663
4500 sq. ft. warehouse or
office space, available
immediately. Montrose
Avenue. To view, telephone
2-1722-3.

C10651
2 BEDROOM APARTMENT
Montrose Avenue. Basic
furniture.. 1 bedioon,
airconditioned, washer. To
view telephone 2-1722-3.

C10790
Furnished two bedioorn
duplex apartment, enclosed
garden, air-conditioned
bedrooms, automatic wnshln
$260,00. Phone 5-8512.

C10772
QUEEN ST. 2 air corndtonerl
master bedrooms aiid bath.
Air-conditioned library with
bed/sofa and full bath. Maid's
room and bath. Living roorn
dining room, pantry, kitchen,
utility room, upstairs screor'd
sleeping porch. Full sets Il .
china, glass, flatware. All si.i,,j
appliances. Both elect( al 1J
gass fridges and stoves. Washing
machine. Large lghtiln
furnished patio. Spa ar
drying yard. Large st'ar: a
room. Automatic PDS h,,g .j
and fire radio-alarm sy,:I :'..
TV antenna. Available on lear
Sept. 1st. Call H. G. ( hl .-tih
Real Estate, 2-1041.

C10805
LUXURIOUS fully furis',hed
2V12 bedroom apart m-rt.
Winton Highway, fa ntao'ta
views. Phone 21631, 2 or 3

C10818
NICE LOCATION. Tenwvch


Street, Sh
Bedroom
apartment.
5-3471.


irley Heights.
un f urn ishe -i
Call Mr. Ca.r v,


C10817
LARGE 1 bedroom hilltop
apartment, fully furnished,
partially a irconditioncd,
$225.00 per month, all utilitic,
included. Phone 5-8327.

CARS FOR SAL

C10816



AT

Central Garage

TODAY'S
SPECIAL BIUY
1973 CHEVROLE r
IMPALA
$5700.00
ALSO AVAILABLE
1972 VAUXHALL VICTOR
4 door automatic
green only one owner $2650.00
1972 FORD CORTINA
S/W white stick
shift $1850.00
1971 DODGE AVENGER
Automatic 4 door sedan
radio $1195.00
1971 FORD CORTINA
Sedan green
Reconditioned stick
shift $1675.00
1972 DODGE AVENGER
Blue automatic
4 door $1175.00
1967 MERCURY COUGAR
2 door coupe
green automatic $800.00
1972 CHEVY VEGA VAN
2 door white automatic
Low mileage only $2475.00
1972 CHEVY VEGA SEDAN
2 door coupe,
Automatic, radio $3600.00

FINANCING AVAILABLE
COME IN AND SEE US
Oakes Field near
Police Barracks
Phone 3-4711


C10814
AT MOTOR CENTRE
WE HAVE
THE USED CAR
FOR YOU
1971 V/WAGON
1300 radio Iat
ONLY $1.900.00
1972 DODGE CHARGER A/C
PS P'B A T radio tape at
ONLY $4,000.ro0
1970 CHEVY MALIBU A/C
P S P B radio A'T at ONLY.
$2.700.00
1972 VAUXHALL VICTOR
radti S'T W'W tyres at ONLY.
$2.0000 0.
1970 HILLMAN SUPER
MINX -,r-w paint work at
O N LY i' ,"'
1969 BUICK SKYLARK radio
P S P B A,T vinyl top at
ONLY a"2.500.00
1971 TOYOTA CORONA
madiI \ Af'T at ONLY
$1,700.0(C0
L lii ANIC SPECIAL
1965 CHEVY MALIBU S/W at
ONLY $100.00.
%OTO ENTIRE LIMITED
P. Box N-37411.
T1 r: inm ori Blvd..
(5oni Dav, St.,
Nassau.
I-: -;,hoim: 56739
C10739
1969 REBEL, Good
Conrditon Telephone 2-3301 9
a. i. o 5 p.ri. as;n for Charles
Sturn up

C10742
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD.
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
2 D A.to. Grtee $1695
1968 VAUXHALL VIVA
SRed $500
1967 CHRYSLER
4 ) A-ut Whit' $950
1968 PONTIAC
STRArO CHIEF Yellow$1400
1970 HiLLMAN HUNTERs,
- D! Ait:--m.tic. ,White $995
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
4 r. s*d.'c;, ; $1200
1968 JAVELIN i C $1200
1970 PARISIENNF A/iC $2400
1968 VAUXHALL VIVA
2 D,. 5', 1 ,e $695
1967 TRIUMPH 1300
R'c(. Std. $800
1969 VAUXHALL VICTOR
SV,'Vn. V\Yellow Std. $475
1973 VAUXHALL VICTOR
5 ` FE Auto. Blue
85c6 nilt- $4400
1970 RAMBLER SST
- D / L.to $2100
1969 MORRIS OXFORD
Std. White $995
1971 MERCURY
"C 4 D). r : $5500
1967 GMC PICKUP $640
1964 CHRYSLERR $800
1968 HILLMAN
GC0eI S'VW iut ,. $1100
1971 FORD CAPRI
Aiuto. lue 1950
1969 FORD GALAXIES
D4 .'. AC $1850
1966 MORRIS 1100
a B). BILe $500
1971 VAUXHALL VICTOR
5td. i e $1595
1970 HILLMAN MINX
4 Dr. Std. Gree, $850
1969 MORRIS 1100
- A:, Auto. Wimite $895
Trad \ns Welcome
Located Oakes Field
Phone 34636-7-8
Opposite the e Plant

L FOR SALE
PATIO SALE


C10810
ON BAY STREET 5
we.,t of West Bay
Station, South side of
.' Ma y household
including-


houses
Police
street.
items


sofa, plants, patio furniture. 2
twin bods ($70.00 each)
assorted lamps, 2 T.V.'s,
floor polisher, 2 hairdryers, 2
tri. yVes, table tennis table.
Asirguit Friday 10th and
S' tuiday 11th from 10 a.m. -
6 p.m.

C 1033
1 500.LB. ICE MACHINE, 1
P." .. Cash Register, Tables,
'n.ajs, Light fixtures, speakers,
! apt. size refrigerator, air
conditiornrs, liquors, 3 sofas,
amd rany more call 22619 10
a.m. to 7 p.m.
C10806

MACKEY SIREEt

COMMERCIAL SHE
Offers are invited for two
Freehold lots on the western
side of Mackey Street in the
vicinity of Wulff Road,
comprising a total of 15,000
sq ft. with a frontage of 100
ft. on Mackey Street as
shown shaded on plan below.
approximately 4,600 sq. ft.
fi or area ar erected on the
site
Father details may be ob-
tained from Shell Bahamas
Lirrted, phone 2-3252.
The vendors reserve the
right not to accept the
highest or any tender.


C 10696
One Steel Hull 125 ft. x 23 ft.
x 5 ft. Draft Powered by 1
New 343 Cat Diesel
1 15 Ton Unite Crane
1 Cargo Hatch 14 x 24
ICargo Hatch 14 x 36
Double Bottom. In Excellent
Shape. Duty Paid.
For further information
contact Mr. Sidney Sands,
Treasure Cay, Abaco, Bahamas.

MARINE SUPPLIES
C10688
PACEMAKER 44ft. Luxurious
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.

C10801
ITEMS FOR SALE
50 Ft. Aluminum Spar with
main & Jib Halyard wenches,
sail track & roller reefing
boom. Stainless rigging.
Matching set of dacron sails &
two jib sheet wenches $1500.
call 24635 or write P. 0. Box
N4151.

C10635
FOR SALE 31 foot
BERTRAM Sports-fisherman.
$15,500. (Firm). Telephone
5-4641.
C10773
WORK BOATS
Tugs Dredges's Barges -
Landing Crafts Cargo Boats
Freeze Boats -- Steel Twin
Screw Diesel Call Mr. Nash
305-635-8602.
OCEAN MASTERS CORP.


PETS FOR SALE
C10819
PUREBRED DALMATIAN
puppies for sale. Males $125,
Females $100. Phone Joe &
Berlin Food Land 2-3245, or
3-2033 after 6 p.m.

LOST
C10812
2 YEAR old medium sized
male cross bred dog. Colour
black & white answers to the
name of Bobby. Phone 31228
-57946.

WANTED

C10808
TOP $ PAID FOR used
furniture and appliances.
Leslie's Discount House
Dowdeswell St. (formerly
Besco Building). Telephone
28012.


HELP WANTED
C10787
BARCLAYS BANK
International Limited P. O.
Box F2404 Freeport requires
confidential executive
secretary able to type at 50
w.p.m. and take shorthand at
80-100 w.p.m. Applicants must
have at least 3 years
commercial experience
Bahamian only please
contact Mr. H. Spiers. Phone
27466 Nassau or telephone D.
R. Martin 352-5391, Freeport.

C10767
WANTED AT OCEAN
CAY
FOLLOWING personnel are
needed for immediate
employment in the aragonite
project at Ocean Cay Interview
will be held in Nassau Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday,
August 7, 8 and 9. If you
believe you are qualified for
one of these jobs, Phone
2-1324 for an appointment.
TRACTOR OPERATORS
WELDER, heavy and light
metal, electrical and acetylene
CLERK TYPIST, male, for
reports and inventory.
ELECTRICIAN, 3 phase.
MECHANICS (HEAVY
EQUIPMENT). Must have 5'
years experience and be willing
to be sent abroad for
specialised training at company
expense.
MARCONA OCEAN
INDUSTRIES LTD., P. O.
Box N4177, Nassau.

C 10800
STORE MANAGER -
Responsible Bahamian, Age 30
to 35. Must have good
knowledge of selling beers,
spirits & French wines. Salary
$75.00 per week plus
commission. Reply in writing;
Adv. C10800 c/o The Tribune,
P. O. Box N3207, Nassau,
Bahamas.


C10811
"SITUATIONS VACANT"
WANTED IMMEDIATELY.
Young woman with previous
experience as a cashier. Some
typing and bookkeeping
experience also necessary.
Reply in own handwriting to:
- Adv. C10811, c/o The
Tribune, P. O. Box N-3207.
Nassau, Bahamas giving resume
of personal details and previous
experience and quoting
references which are essential.
Salary in the range $80.00 to
$110.00 per week depending
on age and previous
experience.


C10815
MALE MESSENGER over 17
years of age. Must own scooter
and have in his possession a
valid driver's licence. Apply in
person Nassau Dairy Products
Ltd. Thompson Boulevard
2:30 4:30 p.m.

C10813
TWO FARMERS, only
Bahamians need apply. Phone
34858.

C10774
"QUALIFIED AUTOMOBILE
MECHANICS. Must have at
least 5 years proven experience
with good references. We are
looking for men with the
ability to turn out first class
work on all phases of
automobile repairs. Excellent
conditions and pay for the
right men.
Apply with references to
service manager, Nassau Motor
Company, Shirley Street."

C10799
BUSINESS DEVELOPER -
International Interior and
Industrial Design Company
with offices in Nassau requires
a self-motivated, poised and
personable individual to
develop significant new
business for the firm within the
Bahanmas, the Caribbean and
southern Florida. An ability to
'meet and negotiate with
investors and top management
essential. Experience in
Marketing and Promotion
preferred. Graduate degree in
Art, Design or a related
creative field with full
understanding of Interior and
Industrial Design necessary.
Bahamians only.
Send letter with background
information to: R. Bolstad, P.
O. Box N7776, Nassau.

C10723
USED CAR mechanic come in
at Central Garage and ask for
Kendal Major.

ART SUPPLIES

C10683
COMPLETE range of artists
supplies. Oils, acrylics, canvas,
easels, etc. Bahamian Paint
Supply Ltd., Bay St. Phone
2-2386, 2-2898.

TRADE SERVICES
C 10763
S .


CECIL'S FRIENDLY
GIFT SHOP
Meadow St. & Blue Hill Rd.
Gifts for Parties & Weddings
FIGURINES
GLASS SETS
CHINA SETS
SILVER SETS
RUGS,
PUNCH BOWL SETS
PLACE-MAT SETS
5-PIECE SCARF SETS, etc.
Open 3 p.m. 8.30 p.m.

C10638
PATIO AWNINGS
AND CARPORTS
HJRRICANE AWNINrS,
SHUTTERS, PANELS
John S. George,
& Co. Ltd.,
For free estimates and prompt
service call 28421.

C10632

NEED A PROFESSIONAL
HANDYMAN
Call Odd Job Enterprises. We
do anything anytime.
Telephone 42724- 55191
Quick Service
C10661

Padeor's Cutoms

Brokerage Ltd.
Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-3796
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434


C10798
THE ELECTRONIC LAB
TAYLOR STREET
Specialist in repairing sewing
machine, Radio, watches,
jewellery and all electrical
appliances.


C10637
T.V. ANTENNAS' Boosters for
homes, apartments and hotels.
Sales and services. Call Douglas
Lowe 5-9404 WORLD OF
MUSIC, Mackey Street next to
Frank's Place.


II I I=


- Immmm


GRAND BAHAMA




CLASSIFIED


II FIEEPlI TEL. 352-SUll


I LP WANTED
C6151
PARTS MANAGER for
growing Automotive Supply
Company. Requirements:
Bahamian male, at least 10
years experience in automotive
parts add accessory work. Must
be able to do and supervise
sales, cardex stock control
system, stock ordering with
international trade, customs
clearing and receiving,
inventory controls and costing.
Must be bondable. Mail resume
with all references. Interviews
by appointment only. No
phone calls please.
The President, Freeport Jet
Wash and Auto Mart, Ltd., P.
O. Box F-238, Freeport, G.B.I.
C6155
(1) Golf Course Superinten
-dent: is responsible for
maintenance to a fleet of
specialised electrical recreation
vehicles. Also is in charge of all
vehicular maintenance and golf
course equipment. Supervision
of staff of twenty (20) persons.
Experienced applicant
preferred.
(1) MECHANIC: Should be
able to diagnose and repair
mechanical and electrical faults
on specialised electrical
recreation vehicles, also must
be able to arc and gas weld and
paint when necessary.
Experienced applicant
preferred.
(1) HOUSEMAN: To transport
clean and soiled linen to and
from main linen room.
Vacuum guest rooms, sweeping
of floors, hallways and take
instructions from Supervisor.
(1) LAUNDRY WORKER: To
sort, feed and fold through flat
work ironer, plus folding of
towels. Must be willing to
work.
(1) INSPECTRESS: To
supervise Maids and Housemen
and to instruct them in their
daily performance. Also make
sure that guest rooms, hallways
and walkways are properly
kept.
(1) TAILOR/PRESSER: Must
be able to steam press all silk
and woollen garments,
including jackets, pants,
dresses, shirts, etc...
Experienced applicant
preferred.
Apply Monday through Friday
between 9:00 a.m. and 12:00
noon only to: King's Inn &
Golf Club, P. 0. Box F-207,
Freeport, Personnel
Department.


Ii__


door


We make things happen. -
The Tribune opens doors to
homes, apartments, hotels,
stores and offices by providing
latest up-to-the-minute news
both local & foreign...


HELP WANTED
C6149
M U R S E RYM A N
HORTICULTURAL: To
supervise and maintain
operation of Landscape
Nursery. Prepare schedules for
production and maintenance
programs. Supervise Landscape
Construction on job site. At
least five years previous
experience in supervisory
capacity.
E X P E R I EN CE D
GARDENERS: Previous
experience necessary. All
duties related to Nursery work
and outside maintenance.
OFFICE MANAGER: To
handle all business
administration of Landscape
Nursery. Billings and
Accounting procedures
through to monthly financial
statements. Horticultural
background necessary to be
able to converse intelligently
with clients and prospective
customers.
Apply: Lucaya Nursery &
Landscaping Limited, Pioneer's
Way, Freeport, G.B., P. O. Box
F-252.
C6153
REQUIRED By Bahamas Oil
Refining Company,
CONST RUCTION
INSPECTOR. Applicant should
have at least a high school
education, however, experience
considered much more
essential.
Must have complete knowledge
of company standards and
practices covering the work
assigned for motors, turbines,
compressors and other
machinery.
Duties: Responsible to the
Construction Engineer for
ensuring that the work meets
requirements defined by the
drawings and specifications and
the workmanship is good
practice for the craft involved.
Please reply stating details of
qualifications and experience
to: Personnel Officer, P. O.
Box F-2435, Bahamas Oil
Refining Company, Freeport,
Grand Bahama.


C6152
GENERAL MANAGER: To
take full charge of Dairy
operation and ice cream
production. At least five years
current producing milk plant
experience at Managerial level.
PLANT SUPERINTENDENT:
Experienced in Dairy Plant
operation. At least three years
recent milk plant working
experience in Supervisory
capacity. Required to oversee
plant co-ordination as well as
supervise office management.
REFRIGERATION &
ELECTRICAL ENGINEER:
Must be experienced in all
phases of maintenance and
repair of specialized dairy
equipment. Certificates of
proficiency and proof of
experience required.
Apply: GRAND BAHAMA
DAIRY PRODUCTS LTD.,
Queen's Highway, P. 0. Box
F-17 Freeport, G.B.

C6150
(2) SPR I NKLER
PIPEFITTERS: Two Male
Sprinkler Pipefitters to work
on Construction. Must be able
to install sprinkler system and
be able to do necessary
pipefitting. Must be between
the ages of 30 and 45 years and
be able to read blueprints. High
School Education is required
with at least 7 years
experience. Salary $5 per hour.
Interested Persons Apply:
GRAND BAHAMA HOTEL,
WEST END, GRAND
BAHAMA, Personnel Office,
between the hours of 9 a.m.,
and 3 p.m., Monday through
Friday. Elon Martin, Jr.,
Personnel Director.

C6154
INSURANCE BRANCH
SUPERINTENDENT required
to assist and to deputise for the
Manager Bahamas Branch. This
position entails the marketing
servicing and claims control of
all classes of Fire Accident' Life
Marine and Aviation Insurances
and the supervision and
training of Branch Staff and all
aspects of Risk Evaluation,
Rating and Branch
Administration.
The successful applicant will
have at least ten years
experience in General
Insurance and will have
obtained by examination, the
Associateship Diploma of the
Chartered Insurance Institute
or its equivalent.
Salary will be commensurate
with experience, qualifications
and previous positions held,
but in any event will not be
less than B$12,000.00 per
annum.
Applications marked 'Private
and Confidential' should be in
own handwriting and addressed
to:-
The Manager, Bahamas Branch,
Sun Alliance & London
Insurance Group, P. O. Box
F-26, Freeport, BAHAMAS.


bargains for sale or wanted..
public notices...
real estate ? rental offerings...
job opportunities....

As a result, The Tribune now
reaches 33 1/3% more readers
than any other daily distributed
in the Bahamas. That's a lot of
doors. And they're opening
more every day.


I L.I


8


Thursday, August 9. 1973.



ae n-I


bIe Criburn

Nassau & The Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper

... brings its readers the fullest coverage of any event in
the Commonwealth. Bahamians who know read The
Tribune, the independent Bahamian newspaper that has
serviced the Bahamian public for the past 70 years.


I-1


I


MMENNOW
--MMM"


-













973.


~~o~


"No WONDER it's getting lighter as I get closer to the
bank!"


'I WS GOaNA GETA HAIRCUT 'I I THE 8W R8R TOLDME
ABOUTALL THE SWELL THINGS I COULD UY /,STrA40"I


'Goodness, what happened?" "I had an aquapuncture."


CROSSWORD

PUZZLE
ACROSS 19. Anne or Grace
1. Nutmeg 21. Route
6. Computes 22. Legal wrong
10. Without 23. Groan
principles 25. White lie
11. Indiana 26. Inducing sleep
senator 28. Limited
12. Ike's boyhood 31. Orf
home 32. Cheat at dice
13. Melody 33. Tradition
14. Select 34. Dickens
15. Medical heroine
association 36. Italian river
17. Spoiled 38. Mirth
18. French season 39. Sacred asp


Par time 30 min.


AP Newsfe


A ER RN v


SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE
DOWN
40. Italian noble 1. Bright look
house 2. Count
41. Heals 3. Fury
4. Caged bird
S I 8 5. Oily resin
S6. German
I I composer
S - 7. Mud wasp
S 8. Ruler
~ 9. Farm buildings
10. Adjoin
2o 12. Topnotcher
16. Caper
S19. Fright
S- 20. Corn spike
21. Pallid
.- 23. Cover girls
3 24. Menu item
S25. Calculate
26. Burn
S- 27. Meeting place
28. Concentrate
S29. Love.god
S- 30. Cyst
33. German Song
I 35. Protection
otures 8-11 37. Exclude


9.


Thursday, August 9, 1E

'* j 'IL -


OW
H words of
wtD A tour letters
S or more can
you make
from the
letters shown
Here? In
B~ u \ word, each
R A letter may
be used once
only. Each
word must contain the large
letter, and there must be at
least one eight-letter word Im the
list. No plurals; no foreign words:


No. 7.19( . by TIM McKAY


Across
1. Three crib (anag.)
9 Composer. (5)
10. Ulrl's name. (3)
11. Leaves the throne.
12. Hold-up. (5)
14. Measure. (4)
15. Osculates. (6)

Chess


(5. 4)

(9)


By LEONARD GARDEN


T A" :i alli









(9735)
Boris Sassky, bead in action
after Rey lavik, tooted to have
a long flgt on hs hands in ths
tion against the ttleknown
Rytv at aelnn. But epaesiny
( la, to move) spotted a forced
Iuene In ts n, whch
d him a big advatge. Can
you do a well as Boris ?
Par times: 10 seconds, grand-
master; 20 seconds, chess ma~ber;
45 seconds, chess expert; 2
minutes, county plyer 4 nin-
utes, club strength; 10 minutes,
average: 26 minutes, novice.


Rupert and Miss Samantha-10


Timidly Margot points out her favourite doll.
"I came yesterday to buy that one," she
says. But the shopkeeper- Oh, I
expect you want to know how much it costs,"
breaks in the assistant. t's not with the
others and there il no label on it, but the
shopkeeper told me the dolls were all one


prtoe, so I'll charge you the same for ft."
Hardly able to believe her good fortune, Margot
carefully count* out fer money whlte the
young lady wrap the doll. Rupert looks on,
pleased at his chum's happiness but wondering
why the shopkeeper had refused to sell th
doH the day before. ALL RIGHTS RIIERVED


Do proper names. TODAY'S
TARGET: 19 words good;
24 words, very good; 29 words,
excellent. Solution tomorrow.
SATURDAY'S SOLUTION :
Arrest aster atom east mart
mast master mate meat moat
morat mort mortar most mote
oast orate rate REARMOST
remast resort rest roast roaster
roster rota rote sate seat smart
smote sort sorter star stare
steam stem store storm stormer
stream tame tare team tear
term termor tome tore tram
tremor


17. Line-up. (3)
19. Mine. (3)
20. Fall In small quantltles (4)
21. Wild parties. (6)
24. Sister. (3)
25. Possess. (3)
20. Artificial tresses. (4)
27. Eavesdroppers. (9)
Down
I. Lancashire resort. (9)
2. SId's green (anag.). (9)
3. Neat and feminine. (4)
4. Cut rouhbly. (6)
5. Ensnares. (3)
i. Leaving work. (8)
7. Smooth. (4)
H. Cold blows. (4, 5)
13. Fruit of
w i l d MAN GERI A
rose. (3)'
16. Working R 1.1I
session L A IL
(5) ILI [
18. Musical
w ofrk
(4) r
2-!. S h .ep oP H
(3) RnUa Nu
:23. DoH %ronl. TA S "ITRI V I
(3)


Chess So


II-


I


CARROLL RIGHTER'S



from the Carroll Righter Institute
\ GENERAL TENDENCIES: The morning is fine
for continuing along the same lines as the two
previous days. It is advisable that you avoid overly hasty
actions in the afternoon and accept delays and obstacles with
patience. Use extreme care in travel.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) You can get fine ideas in the
morning regarding the future so talk them over with associates.
Don't go off on any tangents. Show that you are a fine citizen.
Improve harmony at home.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Follow your hunches during
the morning. A business matter needs your full attention in
the afternoon. Don't give advice to others unless asked to do
so. Avoid one who likes to quarrel.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) During the morning come to
a better understanding with those who mean much to you.
You know exactly how to drive away opposition trended your
way. Engage in amusements you enjoy.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Attend to
important duties early in the day so that you can later.be with
others for exchanging ideas. Show co-workers more
cooperation than you have in the past.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Make appointments early in the
day and then carry through with the work you have to do.
Make sure you keep promises you have made. Assisting others
will be greatly appreciated at this time.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Handle family affairs early
and then make plans to engage in the recreations you enjoy.
Strive for more harmony with associates. An ally should be
treated with understanding now.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Think out a new arrangement
that can put your life on a more satisfactory basis. Exercise
utmost care in travel. Do your shopping early. Avoid going out
in the evening if you can.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Handle money matters as
soon as possible today. Use tact in alliances, especially those of
long standing. Don't argue with family in afternoon. Learn to
depend on yourself more.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Plan social affairs
early in the day before handling financial matters that mean
much to you. Sidestep an opponent who could cause
unexpected trouble. Help someone in need.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) Study your plans
carefully before putting them in operation later in the day.
Attending a group affair in the evening can bring fine results
now. Show that you a good citizen.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Discuss your ambitions
with good friends before attending to regular routines. Show
others that you are a friendly person and get good results. The
evening is fine for the social.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Make sure you handle
financial matters skillfully today. Use your own ingenuity to
gain your objectives instead of depending on others so much
and gain the favor of higher-ups.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY ... he or she will be
one of those dynamic young people with fine ideas who will
accomplish a great deal early in life. Be sure to permit your
progeny to get into life's work as early as possible so that
much abundance can be realized.


LL. l IN MANY WAYS, THE MOST IF U WERE TO MARRY WAL
COMMON REASON FOR DYORCE WHOM YOU ADMITTEDLY AR
IS LONELINESS! A COUPLE STOPS COMMUNICAT- I LOVE, COULP YOU COMMON
.ING AND EACH EXPERIENCES A LONELINESS THAT \ WITH HIM---OR WOULD YOU
- IS INTOLERABLE! BECOME VERY LO


SSTEVE ROPER


w
UAJ
0
1
uj
-7
UJ


& MIKE NOMAD


Saturday's solution

lution -
lution


Spassky won a keypawn by
I ... PxP. (I ... KtxQP is
inaccurate because of 2 KtxKt,
PxKt; 3 Kt-Kt5 attacking two
pawns); 2 KtxP (it now
2 Kt-KtS, P-K4), KtxKt;
3 QxKt, KtxPI; 4 QxKt,
BxKt and if White now
captures S PxB, he loses
rook and pawn for bishop by
5 ... B-B4 and 6 ... x R. So
Spassky stayed pawn up and
won the game with ltle dffi-
culty.

Bridge
TODAY'S hand illuscrates yet
again the difference, imposed by
matchpoint scoring, between
duplicate pairs and rubber
bridge. It came up at the
Guardian's Easter Tournament.
Omar Sharif and Boris Schapiro,
who will be playing in my team
with Louis Tarlo, in the Evening
StandCard arLty Bridge Con-
Soess, sat 86nth and North res-
pectively.
Dealer North: Love All.
North
4+96532
A K 2 9
OAKQ109
West East
S-- 4mK84
J10 843 4 7
42 1J85
A98653 iKQJ1074
South
tAQJ107
SA052
0763
42
West North East South
5 5 Pass
74 D Pass ?
In the diussion which follow-
ed, before the VuOraph screen,
Omar Sharif maintained that he
should have bid 74.
Boris Schapio's double was a
warning. Having opened on a
suit headed by the nine, he
couldn't make a forcing pass,
inviting a grand slam. But Omar
lakew that 74 would probably
depend on a finesse. At rubber
bridge, a grand slam on a finesse
is a orime. Not so In a pairs
event. Pew East-Wests will
sacrifice n 74 so North-South
at ths table bhve been unlucky.
Going down in 2 will be only a
:t:tEe wcrse 'Chan collectIng 500
or 700, or 900. But if the grand
slam succeeds as It would do
here, a near-bottom will look
very much Me a top.


LTER WITH MEANWHILE
?E NOT IN
I41CATE
AGAIN
)NELY?













by saunders & overgard


I GOT TROUBLE ENOUGH WITHOUT
ANSWERIl CRAZY QUESTION$,
DINK./' 60 EAT YOUi '/UPPE.. /



i.









i A TAXI TRAVELLER, NO

lBll Iv BLACKMAIL MOHEY A LITTLE
EARLY


REX MORGAN, M.D. By DAL CURTIS

JOAN, I SORRY I IFI'VE BRICE, WAIT
UPSET YOU/ r N FOR ME
r THINK YOU SHOULD STOP TRYING T0 BOTHER YOU AGAIN/ FOR ME
RY P DETECTIVE, BRICE / IF ANYONE O AGA
SLVES MARBARA'S MURDER, IT WLL
- THE POLICE, NOT yOu /

SIT'5 ALL
gt. RIGHT/


I JUDGE PARKER By PAUL NICHOLS]

KHE NOWS THAT HE INSISTS THAT HE WAS ABOUT WHEN THE GUARDS REFUSED HE'S ALWAY5-
RICK LASSITER'S A HES CRITICALLY TO RETURN TO NEW YORK BUT HI ENTRANCE, HE WAS HAD A
PATHOLOGICAL LIAR, HURT AND MAY THAT YOU PHONED HIM AT THE FEARFUL THAT YOU WERE FANTASTIC
SERGEANT! YOU'LL NOT MAKE IT, HOTEL AND ASKED HIM TO BEING MELD AGAINST IMAGINATION'
NEVER GET THE MISS FREMONT! COME BY HERE AND YOUR WILL!
T PTHMOUT M N PICK YOU UP!












APARTMENT 3-G By Alex Kotzky


in


a -


- -- --- -- -


I


I


B


- -. -- -P,


,he Comic age











U~hp iribunt


Bahamas in 3rd. spot


after first round in ladies


Virgin Isles golf tourney

TEAM CAPTAIN BERYL HIGGS AND JERI SMITH shot net
scores of 78 each while Eileen Halliday and Eloise Lockhart
scored 80 and 84 respectively placing the Bahamas third in that
division with a net total of 320 following the first round of the
Caribbean Ladies Golf Tournament being played in St. Croix in


the U.S. Virgin Islands.
The second and final round
of plain began today and the
team is expected back on
Friday
r ii.!iji the par 72 course
v-ry hIllI which is something
the B:iltinian competitors are
not iussd to- the Bahamas
girls found themselves in fitth
plaet in the gross division with
a t.'tjl score of 425. Smith's 96
\was the best gross score on the
B ah inius' sitde
nevertheless Mrs. lliggs
rep.ltetd that the team was
prrlorming a little better than
f-\p.'teld and that so far the
toinariment was proving to be
o \rld of experience."
Hes:.hs being extremely well
orgat.ii/t'd, and exciting she
said tihat it was ver\ much like
a ladis Ifoerman (up
S lie following are the first
lo ld i.' total
rS I ,ix 292
PuI 'o Rico 31 1
Bahallaui 320


Jamaica
Santo Domingo
G;uantanamoi
The Bahamas'


net


were.
Beryl tliggs
Jenri Smith
1:loise Lockhart
Eileen flalliday
Sue Bennett
Muriel incas
First round gross total:
Jamaica
Puerto Rico
St Croix
Santo Domingo
Bahamas
Guantanamo
The Baham as' gross sco
Jeri Smith
Beryl Hliggs
Iloise Lockhart
lileen Halliday
Sue Bennett
Mluriel Eneas
As with the lHoerman
only the four best sco:
each day count


323
324
373
scores
78
78
84
80
88


3
3
3
4
4
4
ire.


.-.-



t- ;1 1\A


ROLLEVILLE REGATTA WINNER


ROLLEVILLE REGATTA WINNER


95 ROLLEVILLE, EXUMA, August 8 When it comes to staging regattas, some people
say that Exuma is the place! But these Exumians in the photo say that Rolleville is the
60 place! And the annual Rolleville Regatta held August Monday was really "Something
61 else", as one spectator put it. The regatta was part of the Exuma Water Festival which got
78 underway in July and ended during the past week-end. Member of Parliament for
08 Rolleville, Mr. George Smith, is seen presenting Mr. Sherwin Grey with a trophy. Mr.
-5 Grey's "Sea Wind" was the winner of Class A sloops during the regatta sailed off the blue
48 waters of Rolleville. Left to riqht are: Charles Clarke, Commissioner C. S. Marche,
Kermitt Rolle, Mr. Grey, Raul Maynard, organizer of the Exuma Water Festival, L. E.
Moss, Mr. Smith and Exuma businessman John Marshall. Mr. Grey received the
96 Representative's Trophy. Photo: Fred Maura.


I


BECKS TO SPONSOR NASSAU

CITY GOLF TOURNAMENT


111F DISTRIBUTORS of
Becks Beer are to sponsor the
Becks' Nassau City Golf
championshipp on September
15, Il. 22 and 23 to be played
at the South Ocean golf course
The format of the
toulrlic-ii 'nt will be unique in
that cachl player will be
matched with someone of their
own abilt\ No handicaps will
be meccssair\ .
The first round will be an 18
round medal play and the
scores will determine the
match play draw.
The field will consist of 20
flights with the championship
division being made up of 16


plai,,'rs and all the other flights
consisting of eight players
each.
Trophies will be awarded to
the winners and runners-up in
each flight and will bt
presented immediately
following the final round of
play. -.ntries may be obtained
from any of the committee
members or at the South
Ocean Golf Club.
The Nassau City Golf
championship p committee
members are Jim Malone.
-\idnel Clarke, Ben Stewart.
Bob Slatter Freddie lliggs.
Slnc Gibson, Oliver Wingrove,
Donald Butler and Wilfred
Horton.


'BIG JIM' MEMORIAL CLASSIC SUNDAY


THil TWOSOME: of Hugh
Bethel and George Knowlcs
defend their "Big Jim"
Memorial Championship title
Sunday during the fourth
annual "Big Jim" McPherson
Memorial Golf Tournament
scheduled for the Sonesta
Beach Golf Course. Charles
Saunders and Beryl Higgs will
defend their best-hall title.
Four years ago, the B.G.A.
decided that in menlory of Jim
McPherson, a person who was





AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
I I 'ct. (,iB
Detroit (2 51.549 -
Baltimore 0 50 )545 ,4
New York t,3 54 .53 I1
Boston (>0 52 .53> I
Milwaukee 53 5 X.477 8
Cleveland 44 7 I .383 19)
West Division
Kansas (its (5 530 .Si,5
Oakland (4 50 .5(1
Minnesota 56 55 .505 7
(Chicago 56 58 .491 X'
(alift rnia 52 58 473 10 :
Texas 42 70 .375 2 1
Wednesday's Results
New York 3, Teas 2
Detroit 3. Oakland 2
Boston 9. Kansas Cits 4
Mtilwaukee 8, Califonliia 2
Baltimore 6, Minnesota I
Cleveland 13, Chicagl I
Today's Games
Chicago (Wood 210- or l rosterr
3-4) at I)ctroit (Col imaiil I h-8), 8
p.m.
Boston (Lec 12-6) at Kansas ( 1t
(Busbhy 9 11), 8.30 p.in
IBaltiiiore (('ucllar I-12) t
Minnesota (IlyleS en 14- 11). i ( m.i1
Tuesday's Results
Texas 2-1. New York I-
Oakland 8-0, Detroit 4-2
Minnesota 4-4, Baltiim,,r 2-10
Kansas C'ity 7, lIost (,, I I I llni1ng,
(alifornia 6, Milwauki- 5. 10
innings
Chicago 6, C'lecland 5. 12
innings
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W 1 'ct. ( B
St. Louis 61 53 .535 -
Pittsburghl 55 51 .4,)5 4
Montreal 55 57 .491 5
Chicago 55 5 .491 5
'hiladelphia 52 1 .4(0 9'.
New York 5 1 60 459 81'
West Division
Los Angeles 7143.623 -
Cincinnati 69 47 .595 3
San I.rancisco 62 50 .554 8
Houston 59 58 .504 14
Atlanta 53 64 .453 19'
San Iiego 38 75 .336 33
Wednesday's Results
San Francisco 2, Montreal I
Cincinnati 4, Chicago 3
Pittsburgh 4, Houston 3
Atlanta 4, St. Louis I
San Diego, 3, Philadelphia 0
New York 1, Los Angeles 0
Today's Games
Atlanta (P Niekro 11-5) at St.
Louis (IFoster 9-6), 9 p.m.
Philadelphia (Lonborg 9-9) at San
Diego (Jones 2-3), 10.30 p.m.
New York (Koosman 8-12) at Los
Angeles (Osteen 12-S), 11 p.m.
Tuesday's Results
New York 6, St. Louis 5
Houston 2, Pittsburgh 0
Cincinnati 1, Chicago 0
Los Angeles 6, San Diego I
Montreal 2, San Francisco 1


liked by many and did so much
for the game in the Bahamas,
including breaking the colour
barrier at his home club the
Sonesta Beach, formerly the
Nassau Golf Club it would
sponsor a golf tournament
dedicated to his memory.
This year, like 1972, the
competition is being combined
as a fund raising venture to
help raise finances for the
many international teams going
abroad. It takes the form of
Calcutta,
On Friday as a part of the
(alcutta, the teams which are
normally drawn from a hat.
and then auctioned to the
highest bidder, will be sold as
entered, that is. golfers may
enter as prearranged teams and
will not be drawn.
This function takes place in
the Churchill Room of the
Sonesta Beach HIotel 8 p.m.
beginning with a Johnny
Walker tlappy Hour to be
followed with dancing and the
auctioning of the teams.
golfers s may enter the
Tournament at the Paradise
Island, Blue Hill, Sonesta
Beach or South Ocean Golf
Clubs.

US Baseball

roundup
NI M YORK. Aug. 9 (4\1')
I)esignated hitter Orland ('epeda
tr.cked four doubles and drove in
sit runs e'dnesda night. powering
the iostoin Red Sox to a 9 4
ictorls over the Kansas City
(o\ als
Itie 35 sear-old (epeda hit his
first double ith the bases loaded
in the opening inning, and drove
hotline another run in the fifth.
caring Luis I i.nt to his 15th
vict- rs of the season.
Jilin Mayherrs drove in three
Kansas City runs with a double and
his 23rd home run ot the baseballs
season, raising his American League
leading rhi total to 90.
I'lsewhere in the American
.eague. the Cleveland Indians
crushed the (hicago White Sox
1 3 1. the Milwaukee Brewers
topped the California Angels 8 2:
the New York Yankees nipped the
lTexas Rangers 3 2. the Detroit
I gers edged the Oakland A's 3-2,.
and the Baltimore Orioles defeated
the Minnesota Twi ns 6 1.
In the National League, the San
I rancisco ;iants rode Willie
McCovey's 400-foot homer to a 2 1
triumph over the Montreal Ir pos.;
the Iittsburgh I'rates nipped the
Houston Astros 4-3. the Atlanta
Braves took the St ouis cardinalss
4-1; the Cincinnati Reds trimmed
the Chicago Cubs 4 3; and the San
Diego Padres blanked the
Philadelphia Ihillies 3-0 in the
fastest National League game this
season.
The New York Mets heat the [.os
Angeles Dodgers I -0 in a late game
on the west coast.


tough Rene Kinsey of


Miami meets Baby Boy tomorrow


By Gladstone Thurston
EVERY MAJOR BOXING GYM in the world has one fighter who is known as the gym's "tough
guy." He is the fellow who is always in the most spirited sparring sessions, always willing to go one
more round no matter how tough the opponent is, and most important, he never backs down or
gives in to anyone. At Miami Beach's Fifth Street Gym, that fighter is Rene Kinsey.
Rene Kinsey meets Bahamas and yesterday's session at the Many other preliminary
light heavyweight champ Baby Southerners Lounge saw bouts are scheduled fo
Boy Rolle in one of two evidence of this, tomorrow
featured ten rounders
tomorrow night at Birdland.
situated on the corner of
Carew Street and Mount Royal
Avenue. Former West Indies
heavyweight chaip Carl Baker
meets Bobby Lloyd in the
second bout.
Rated as one of the hardest
punchers in his division, Kinsey
has recorded many spectacular
one-punch knockouts and has
also had many "wars" in his
ring career. One of his bouts
was reported in the Ring
Magazine as the most vicious
and brutal on Miami Beach in
the last twenty years.
If it can be termed a
weakness. Kinsey has been
known to absorb two, three or
even more punches in return
for one of his own. The losses
on his record have been as a
result of this.
ROLLED'S PLAN
Rolle, aware of Kinsey's
tactics, says he will take
advantage of this in their fight
tomorrow night. "I plan to
punch in combinations and not
let Kinsey get off his big
punch," commented Rolle,
whose training sessions have
moved to the Southerners
Sporting Lounge the home
of Bahamas and West Indies
Ileavyweight champ Boston
Blackie. If Rolle follows
through with lus pre-fight plan,
this bout could be one of the
hardest fought in Nassau's
boxing history, explained
Rolle's m manager Martyx'
Goldstein. .
Kinsey, coining out of the
Johnny "Hud" lludgins/Bobby
Lloyd camp, said that Hludgins
had a slight problem with
Rolle's constant "in" fighting
and holding tactics. "Bobby .,
Lloyd's problem, he said,
"was letting the fight go the
distance. Neither of these will
be a problem to me as I intend
to knock him out within five
rounds."
Born and raised in Lyons,
Georgia. the muscular
25-year-old, 185 pounds
Kinsey stands 5 ft. 11 ins. tall. W O
Since turning pro in 1969 after
winning the (olden Gloves
Heavyweight division, Kinsey D R IE S
has amassed an impressive s
record and last year. eight of
his ten wins came by
knockouts IN
Rolle, on the other hand, is
no less impressive than Kinsey
and during his career has
scored victories over present
heavyweight champ Boston
Blackie and former
heavyweight champ Bert Perry.
Rolle went on to stop Johnny
Iludgns and in two bouts has
won and drawn with Bobby
Lloyd,
Although it seemed that he
lost a few fans because of a
controversial draw with Lloyd
during their last bout, Rolle is
quickly gathering them back
SOFTBALL ACTION
ACTION in the New
Providence Softball
Association returns to John F.
Kennedy Softball Park tonight
when Jet Set meet Schlitz Beer
in the first game at 7 o'clock
and Free Town Stoppers take
on Golden Glades in the
second game.


Thursday, August 9, 1973.


BILLIE lEAN & St. Agles poiSGII f or Wil

NEWCOl SIGN
g jg gigggggpg gyg g y ,


UP WITH WTT
NEW YORK (AP)- Billie Jean
King, the 1973 Wimbledon
champion, and Australia's John
Newcombe were first players to
sign with the newly created
16-team World Team Tennis (WTT)
organization, George McCall,
commissioner of the league,
announced over the weekend.
Mrs. King, selected by
Philadelphia and Newcombe by
Houston, were picked as
"preferential choices". which
allowed a franchise to sign a player
prior to the draft and forfeit its
first round selection.
When the regular phase of the
draft got underway, Chris Evert of
the U.S. was tabbed by Miami,
which had the number one choice.
There was no indication,
however, whether Miss Evert. who
first came onto the national tennis
scene in 1971 at the age of 16 by
becoming the youngest U.S. Open
semifinalist ever, would sign with
Miami.
The decision Miss Evert, and
other drafted players would have to
make. was whether they wanted to
join the new league and therefore
miss the opportunity of playing in
many of the world's most
prestigious tournaments.
The scheduled season for the
new league, which would begin
operation in 1974. is May through
July when many of the top tennis
events are held.
Boston, choosing second,
selected Australia's Kerrs Melville.
Rod Laver of Australia, the first
man selected, was chosen by San
Diego.
Australia's Ken Rosewall was the
first pick of the Pittsburgh
franchise, rounding out the top five
draft choices.
The Golden Gate franchise.
representing the Oakland-San
Francisco area, selected Australia's
Margaret Court.
Los Angeles picked John
Alexander of Australia.
New York chose Roy Fmerson
of Australia.
Cleveland selected Swedish
sensation Bjorn Borg.
Toronto picked Tom Okker of
the Netherlands.
Denver selected Tony Roche of
Australia, closing out the first
round.


ST. AGNES CRI stand poised for yet another ten-points as they lead the Paradise
Islandsers by an innings and 58 runs going into the ::ccond day's
play Sunday of their two day match at Haynes Oval.


The Islanders were all out
for 60 runs. St. Agn es replied
with 118 all out by3" close of
play.
A ten-point win over St.
Georges Cricket Clu-b a week
ago has moved St.Agnes from
seventh in the league to a
respectable fourth place, seven
points behind th-e league
leading Southerners with 29,
two away from second place
Carroll's Adventurers- and one
behind third place -defending
champions St. Bernards, tied
with the Islanders,
Opening pacer George
Shannon helped nullify the
attack of the Islande rsand in
an 11 over-two rnaideim spell, he
bagged six wicketsfo r 15 runs.
Skipper Tyrone WiLson who
replaced opening bower Alfred
Ingraham took anotlfer three
for 20 runs in six overs.
Ingraham had the other wicket.
Ingraham was the f first to hit
out against the lslarnders and
with the second ball cf his first
over had A. Estwick 3.b,w. for
a duck, with only orme run on
the board. Shannon alsostruck
in his first over as E. Haynes
was caught by Thornapson for
three and the Islanders were
two down for six runs-
L. Braithwaite and L. John
together were able to carry the
Islnders to only 23 when
Braithwaite fell to S hannon's
bowling. That star-ted the
downfall of Paradise Island
who never recovered from the
pace bowling of Wilson and
Shannon.
John with 17 and Suffort
with 11 were the only Islanders


to reach double figures.
Opening batsman Vianny
Jacques, who was good enough
for only two during their last
match, contributed a fine
knock of 25 and together with
Gary Wilson moved the Saints
to 37 for two when he and
Jacques fell in succession.
Paradise's star bowler Val
Lawrence's dramatic maiden
fifth over captured Nathaniel
Bain and Phillip Deveaux
placing the Saints at 38 for
three wickets.
Delray Witiker and Harry
Allen however, pulled St.
Agnes above the Islanders' first
inning score as they went on to
lead by 58 runs.
Ten extras were made up of
one bye, six leg byes, two
wides and one no ball.
ST. AGNES
V. Jacques c, b Brown 25
G. Wilson l.b.w., b Brown 8
D. Witiker stp. wkpr, b Roach 23
N. Bain, b Lawrence, 1
P. Deveaux, b Lawrence, 0
H. Allen, l.b.w. Lawrence, 13
T. Wilson l.b.w. John, 12
G. Turner, b. Roach, 8
L. Powellc. b John 0
Shannon, b Roach 10
A. Ingraham, not out 6
Extras 10
Total 118
Wickets fell at 1-37, 2-37, 3-38,
4-38, 5-61, 6-86, 7-96, 8-97, and
9-101.
BOWLING


V. Lawrence
I). Brown
F. Roach
L. John


mr w
1 36 3
0 34 2
1 14 3
0 22 2


Um


Rough,


I


__


--If- " t ~


I


1


116
116
120
131
C up,
res of