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 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: August 8, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03414

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F DUDLEY'S br rthutuet
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ered with Po.tmaster of Bahamas for posta conces.on within the B.ahama.) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


VOL. LXX, No. 213 Wednesday, August 8, 1973. Price: 1 5 Cents
1_ i


Shareholders back board's decision to oust


St. Andrew's School head


By NICKI KELLY
SHAREHOLDERS of St.
Andrew's School last night
showed their confidence in the
school board by a vote of 670
to 301 after being informed at
length of the reasons behind
the board's decision not to
retain the services of
headmaster John Chaplin.
The details were outlirfed in
a comprehensive report read by
board chairman Bill lHolowesko
to some 200 shareholders and
their proxies meeting at 'the
school.
It alleged that the directors
decided not to rehire Mr.
Chaplin after August 31
because as a Board they no
longer had any reason for
continuing to have confidence
in him and were "no longer
able to rely on his integrity,
honesty or dedication to the
interests of the pupils anid of
the school."
"Under these circumstances,
to suggest or demand that an
employee, previously trusted
and given the many benefits of
doubt, should continue his
duties on a temporary,
provisional or any other basis.
is entirely out of order and out
of the question. No other
directors or employers would
entertain such an unacceptable,
unworkable proposal," the
report declared.
BACK TO 1955
To support its charges the
board referred to minutes of
meetings held as far back :is
1955, to conversations
between the board and Mr.
Chaplin, staff relations andi
statements made to the press
by the former headmaster,
The Board told the meeting
that after reaching a
unanimous decision in early
June not to renew Mr.
Chaplin's appointment as
headmaster it consulted with
some of the major shareholders
who were former members of
the Board or people \wh wide
experience and asked them it
they would accept the Board's
judgment on such a serious
matter.
"Without exception," said
the report, "those approached
by us replied 'Yes."'
The board said it was
aware that a new employer
might ask Mr. Chaplin for an
explanation of his departure
from St. Andrews.
To spare him professional
embarrassment the board asked
that a joint release be made
which would have been
satisfactory to all. "In this
case," said the report, "he
could have stated that he
resigned, retired or whatever."
NO COOPERATION
Mr. Chaplin's immediate
reply was "You will get no
cooperation from me," the
report said.
If therefore he was now
being embarrassed, it was
because he had chosen to take
the matter to the press "and
announce to the world what
happened."
Declared the report: "I he
directors were more than
willing to do all that they
could so that Mr.(' Chaplin
could have left with dignity
and grace."
In citing its reasons for not
rehiring Mr. Chaplin the Board
said that during the past several
months it had become evident
and obvious that the
headmaster was "less than
forthright with the Board, the
teachers and the parents."
With regard to the board the
report said that information
given them in June 1972
concerning one teacher was
subsequently shown to be
untrue after a personal
investigation by a member of
the board.
Secondly, the board had this
year been working on a scheme
to increase the salary of
teachers but this had been
represented by Mr. Chaplin to
the staff as an effort by the
board to decrease salaries.
Third, Mr. Chaplin this year


informed teachers who
happened to be popular that
the board instigated their
dismissal when in fact the


IMPORTED
SWAG LAMPS
AND
MATCHING TABLES

IYMAIM21 1FIIRIIEII
NASSAU -FREEPORT
,_jS


Board "accepted the advice
and recommendation of Mr.
(haplin who first suggested the
action."
The Board alleged that the
headmaster also conveyed this
impression to parents.
'FAL,SF' WORDS
In addition, the directors
claimed, Mr. Chaplin refused
to actively cooperate with the
board on serious matters of
policy or enunciated policies
that he "falsely" attributed to
the board.


One instance cited was the
proposed study of the
curriculum which Mr. Chaplin
had initially welcomed
enthusiastically.
When, however, the
curriculum committee wished
to inform the teachers of what
they were doing and enlist
their aid and assistance, Mr.
Chaplin penned certain
derogatory remarks about the
committee and left it with the
teachers before going on a trip.
The board said the


headmaster had also ignored
the policy of the admissions
committee by personally
guaranteeing admission for
children in classes already
overbooked.
Since the fall of 1971 Mr.
Chaplin had vacillated between
continuing at St. Andrew's and
going elsewhere. Further, his
"personal regard for members
of his staff is unpredictable and
contradictory. His managerial
conduct, too volatile, too
erratic, if not too autocratic,


shows little or no regard for
the fundamental rights of
teachers who may wish to air
their views or for the prestige
of the school." the report said.
FIRI DITHRILI:
The directors then referred
to the fact that lie objected to
equal pay for female teachers
and had attempted to fire three
teachers without notice and
without consulting the board.
"When asked why he had
not first come to the board, he
replied, 'I didn't think you


would have approved:" the
report said.
Mr. Chaplin was accused by
the hoard of "deliberately
violating ethical, professional
and company rules" by
attempting to meddle in the
composition of the board and
in annual general meetings.
The report said he had done
this during his first years at the
school and in 1972 "personally
solicited the votes of members
of the (St. Andrew's)company
to oust certain members of the


board at the 1972 annual
general meeting."
Contained in the report were
portions of an unsolicited
letter dated June 19. 1973
from a former chairman.
UNSUITIID
It described Mr. Chaplin as
a master of intrigue. I hope he
leaves the island soon as he is
capable of causing great
dissension," the writer said.
In his opinion Mr. Chaplin
was "'t emperamentally
unsuited to be a headmaster."


St. Andrew's Parents Committee




resolution is not entertained


AFTER STANDING for
over 20 minutes for
recognition from the chairman
of St. Andrew's School's
shareholders meeting last night,
the head of the Parents
Committee was eventually
permitted to read his
resolution, but not before a
vote of confidence in St.
Andrew's School Board had
been passed.
The Parents C'ommittee,
headed by Dr. Sidney
Sweeting, was formed after the
firing of Mr. John Chaplin on
.1une 18 without "'sufficient
cause," according to the
committee.
Mr. ( haplin had been
headmaster o St. ndrew's for
the past t1) years. The
extraordinary general meeting
of shareholders had been called
by the shareholders, at the
insistence of the parents, to
reconsider the Board's action.
The meeting scheduled for
7:3(l p.n. rt;, not start before
() p.m. because, according to
Mr. William lHolowesko, Board
Chairman, the Board was
waiting for a quorum to arrive
and he registered. Meanwhile a
15-page typewritten statement
presenting the Board's side in
the Chaplin affair, was
distributed to those present.
A bout 9 p.m. Mr.
llolowesko said that persons
should have had time to read at
least tt the first six pages of the
Board's report. It was agreed,
at Mr. Holoowesko's suggestion,
that discussion on the matter
be limited to half an hour.
After 45-minutes Dr.
Sweeting stood up to make
certain that the parents'
resolution wooldt be tlie first to
be considered. Mr. tIolowesko
asked hini to wait for a few
minutes until the particular
point that was then
under discussion had been
dealt with.
11 STOOD)
Instead of sitting down, Dr.
Sweeting, who had been
recognized by the chair,
continued standing. "I wanted
to make certain that the
parents' resolution would be
the first to be dealt with," he
said today.
Ilowever, Mr. Ilolowesko
told Dr. Sweeting that before
permitting him to present his
resolution, which, said Mr.


HOLOWESKO: 'I


DON'T WANT TO RAMROD'


DR.SWEETING: 'BUT THAT'S WHAT HE DID'


lolowesko had already been
read in the press, he would
rather not have too many
resolutions for consideration.
Ile suggested that all the
resolutions could be wrapped
up and the whole matter dealt
with in a vote of confidence or
no confidence in the
Board.
"Just a moment," Dr.
Sweeting retorted. "I have
been standing here for 20
minutes."
Mr. Hlolowesko replied that
he was not there to ramrod
anything through, "but that is
exactly what he did," Dr.
Sweeting told The Tribune
"With that," Dr. Sweeting
recalled, "Dr. Rassin jumped to
his feet to put the resolution of
confidence in the Board."
Dr. Meyer Rassin, who
formerly had two sons at St.
Andrew's, has no children
there today.
After this vote was carried
and the dismissal of Mr.
Chaplin confirmed, Dr.
Sweeting was allowed to read
his resolution.
Mr. Michael Stewart also
read a letter from two former
St. Andrew's Board chairmen,
Mr. Jimmy Miller, who is now
in Costa Rica, and Mr. Donald
d'Albenas. lie also read
extracts from a letter from
Mrs. Frances Miller,
headmistress of Lyford Cay
School.
Following is the resolution,
which was read by Dr.
Sweeting but neither voted nor
considered by the
shareholders:
BE IT RESOLVED:
1. That Mr. John Chaplin be
immediately reinstated in his
position as Headmaster of the
School for one year from the
commencement of the school
year in September 1973:
2. That a Committee of
Enquiry be and it is hereby
appointed to enquire into the
causes of the dispute between
Mr. Chaplin and the Board and
all matters connected
therewith and to consider
whether the operation of the
School under the present
corporate structure of the
Company is suitable to the size


SOLOMON M.P. DEMANDS P.M.


STATEMENT ABOUT VESCO


"ANY association between
the Prime Minister and any
member of the Government
and Mr. Vesco can only hurt
the Prime Minister, the
Government and the country,"
St. George and Dunmore M.P.
Norman Solomon declared
today.
Just back from a lengthy
European tour, the FNM
parliamentarian called on
Prime Minister Lynden
Pindling to make "some kind
of statement setting the record
straight."
New Jersey financier Robert
Vesco faces two indictments in
the U.S. one arising from the
alleged defrauding $224
million from the IOS empire,
and a donation of S200.000 to
the (onunittee for the
Re-election of P'resident Nixon.
Mr. Vesco has been linked in
American news reports to Mr.
Pindling's purchase recently of
a new $450,000 home.
Mr. Solomon said today:
"I think the man Vesco
obviously has gathered for
himself a very distasteful


reputation.'
Mr. Solomon said it will not
be known whether the charges
against Mr. Vesco are justified
until the matter goes to trial,
but he pointed out that Mr.
Vesco has repeatedly refused
to return to the U.S. to have
the matter settled.
"One must presume he is
frightened of the outcome, and
one therefore has to wonder
whether the charges have some
basis in fact.
"The foreign press is now
saying that this man is very
close to Mr. Pindling, and all I
say is that, while I don't expect
Mr. Pindling to leap up and
down every time some two-bit
reporter connects him with
something unsavoury, the
Prime Minister of the Bahamas
ought to make a statement
setting the record straight.
"I don't think the Prime
Minister helps himself or the
country by remaining silent,"
Mr. Solomon said.
Mr. Pindling is presently in
Ottawa, Canada at the
Commonwealth Heads of State
Conference.


and changed circumstances of
the School;
3. That the Committee of
Enquiry be empowered to hear
complaints and suggestions
from all persons concerned
with the School including
Parents, Teachers, Headmaster,
Board Members and
Shareholders:
4. That the Committee of
E n quiry comprise lion.
Godfrey lliggs, I)r. Paul
Albury, and Mr. Garth R.
Sweeting and be required to
submit a Report summarising
the results of its investigations
and its recommendations at the
next Annual General Meeting
of the Company.'
"Since the announcement of
the dismissal of Mr. John
Chaplin on June 18, the Board
of Directors has been
approached on several
occasions asking for reason's for
its action," Dr. Sweeting said.
"They agreed to meet with the
parents on June 30, and at that
meeting gave a report
pertaining to the dismissal, a
report which an overwhelming
majority of those parents
agreed was entirely
unsatisfactory,
"A representative group of
the Parents Committee, at our
request, met with the Board
again on July 11. After three
hours of discussion at that
meeting we were still not
satisfied, and as they spoke at
that meeting of "qualified
privilege", indicating that their
legal responsibility is to the
shareholders, then we firmly
resolved that we had no
alternative but to pursue this
meeting tonight.
"Since June 18 we have
attempted to learn the
following:
Justifiable reasons for the
dismissal of Mr. Chaplin with
only two weeks notice: and the
causes of the dispute between
the Headmaster and the Board
of Directos.
"On that basis, I must state
once again, categorically and
emphatically, that I am still
not satisfiedd" Dr. Sweeting
said.
"I am not satisfied because
we are here tonight to consider
the action of the Board in
dismissing a man who has
served St. Andrew's School for
the past 19 years. This same
man is the one to whom Dr.
Esfakis, a member of the
Board, has referred when he
said
"with a firm hand, sound
programme, and obvious,
talent, won the wholehearted
support and cooperation of
many Boards and the school
flourished."
"Again I quote Dr. Esfakis
"there is neither the need,
desire or intention to belittle in
any way the Headmaster's
achievements within the school
walls and classrooms for the
past 19 years. The record is
admirable and speaks for itself.
"I must ask everyone here
tonight to take some time to
carefully consider the man
John Chaplin the man who
came to the Bahamas as a
young bridegroom 19 years
ago. Their two children were
born here, and he and his wife
became one of us. With an able
staff, and working with many
Boards, helped to build St.
Andrew's School from
practically nothing to what we
now see here today. He is
supported by the majority of
his teachers, admired and loved
by his students, and highly


respected by the majority of
the parents a man with a
firm hand and obvious talent
with an admirable record for
19 years. Would this School, at
any time, have desired or
requested a lesser man.
"Now suddenly, after 19
years, this firm hand, this
obvious talent, this man with
an admirable record that
speaks so well for itself, has
been told to depart forwith-
do not tarry for a year, nor
even a term but depart, said
this Board with
"our sincere appreciation for
the invaluable
contribution which you have
made to the
School during your long
period of service."
"This begs the obvious
question Who is at fault?
"The man with an admirable
record for 19 years or a Board
which has served this School
for one and one halt years.
"I speak tonight as a
shareholder," said Dr.
Swecting, "but I also speak on
behalf of many of the parents
some of whom are not
shareholders and I want to-
make it perfectly clear that it is
not now, nor has it ever been,
our intention to enter into a
defense of Mr. John Chaplin in
the disputes between himself
and the Board of Directors. I
would be unreasonable, in fact
even absurd, to suggest or
imply that such disputes have
never occurred. We are most
interested, however, in having
the causes, and I repeat -- the
causes of the disputes
investigated to ensure that St.
Andrew's School is never again
placed in the position that it is
in today. And make no mistake
about it, a crisis does exist
because of the action of this
Board and its stated irrevocable
decision. We are convinced that
this decision can and must be
revoked, for unless it is, and
unless this School is given a
Ileadmaster who does nothavea
firm hand and obvious talent,
we can most assuredly have a
similar situation in the future.
Because I, and many of the
parents and shareholders are
concerned primarily with the
welfare of the School and
secondly, because we arr
concerned about the good
name of Mr. John Chaplin 1
have submitted the foregoing
resolution. Now at this time I
would like for you to hear two
letters which have been written
on this matter," Dr. Sweeting
said,
The following letter from
Mr. d'Albenas was read in full
by Mr. Michael Stewart,
followed by extracts from
letters front Mr. Miller and the
headmistress of the Lyford ('Cav
School.

Mr. d'Albenas', letter written
from Miami, follows:
"Before I left Nassau the
end of June, I was very
disturbed over the dispute
between the Headmaster, Mr.
John Chaplin, and the Board of
Directors of Saint Andrew's
School.
"It is my understanding that
at an extraordinary
On Page 3
MEMORIAL SERVICE
A MEMORIAL service will
be held at St. Anne's Church.
Fox Hill, at 4 p.m. on
Thursday, August 16, for Mrs.
Grace Callender, who died in
Miami at the age of 96 on
August 3.
Mrs. Callender, mother of
Ernest Callender, died at
Larkins General Hospital,
South Miami, after an
emergency operation.


BILL HOLOWESKO JOHN CHAPLIN
_. board head ... ousted head


Parents' spokesman charges


board ignored wishes of the


majority of parents completely

THE VOTE OF CONFIDENCE in St. Andrew's School Board
in, the firing of headmaster John Chaplin was seen as "a paper
victory over the parents" by a shareholder who did not agree with
the outcome of the meeting.
"I don't know how the "As far as I can see this
school will continue unless and meeting was called to act as a
in some way parents are given a jury, but the jury has heard
voice in its running. Obviously only one side of the story. It's
the parents' wishes were not incredible that intelligent
heeded last night," he said. people can accept that sort of
"To me," he said, "parents thing."
with children at schtuol are 'It's a shattcrina, :.,, 'rience
much more important than for me to come up against a
those without." power bloc like that, which
"There was a time when the completely ignores the wishes of
school started," he said. "when the majority of parents." he corn-
the shareholders and parents mented.
were one and the same. Now "Why one of the persons.
you have two distinct groups. who took an activE' part in the
almost two separate bodies. way the vote went," said Dr.
"'You now have a situation Sweeting, "'ad to ask my wife
where people who have a vital for directions to get to the
interest in the school have no school!"
say and people who halve no WIFE CHARGED
children have all the sayW. where
people who have contributed
most of the money in building WITH MURDER
the new school have no say and
those who have put little b HUSBAN
comparison have all the say." F HUSBAND
tle felt that this situation was A CHARGE of murder was
wrong and for the sake of the brought against 3')-year-old
school's future something cook Mrs. Elizabc't Gibson
should be done. who appeared in the
lie thought that the Board magistrate's court this
got their blocks of votes from morning.
old shareholders, many of The woman, unemployed at
whom were away and some of the time, was charged with the
whom were dead. "This is how murder of her husband Vernal
it was won," he said, "and with Gibson who died as a result of
great energy they gathered up stab wounds on Sunday,
these votes. The meeting had August 5.
no similarity with the meeting Gibson, a gardener, died at
held recently between the the Princess Margaret hospital
Board and the parents." after being taken there from
At that meeting on June 30, his home on Mackey Street
over 90'7 of over 300 parents with stab wounds in the chest.
present supported Mr. Chaplin. Chief Magistrate Hercules
"But at last night's ordered that the woman be
meeting," our informant said, kept in custody until August
"the Board had everything well 23 when a preliminary inquiry
organized. They had all the will be heard.
records of the school and so
were in a better position to HUNG JURY IN
organize."
Minister of-Works the Hon. RAPE CASE
Siurnon Bowe, one of the
speakers who favoured the TOUR CONDI)UCTOR
Parents Committee resolution, Walter Armbrister. 31, accused
thought the resolution a good of raping a 25-year-old
and reasonable one. le did not American school counselor on
know what the Board was February 17 was granted an
afraid of or why a committee extension of his bail after a
should not be appointed to Supreme Court jury failed to
investigate both sides of the return a clear verdict.
dispute. lHe thought that as Mr. Ordered released by Mr.
Chaplin had been at the school Justice James Smith after a
for the past 19 years and the second attempt to break a 7 to
school had had such a good 5 guilty finding resulted in a
rec o rd u n d e r his 6-6 tie, Armbrister will stand
headmastership, nothing could trial a second time.
possibly happen it Mr. Chaplin Armbrister was ordered to
were appointed for another re-appear in court for the
year. giving the committee opening of the next criminal
time to carry out its sessions on October 3.
investigations. On two other occasions,
FAITH SHAKEN juries in the Supreme Court
"This whole affair has July criminall Sessions have
shaken my faith in human returned hung verdicts.
nature," Dr. Sidney Sweeting, After returning their 7 to 5
head of the Parents verdict against the accused, the
Committee declared today. "I jury was again asked to retire
don't see h'ow people can treat and re-consider the matter by
someone like that. I am the judge.
concerned for the school, I lIe urged them to "come
have four children there and so back with a verdict that is
I have to be, but I am also acceptable to the law." They
concerned about John Chaplin, had been deliberating for 80
the man." minutes after his summation.


I have always thought he
should have been dismissed
when I was chairman.
However, he was stronger than
I and got me fired at the next
general meeting in a most
convincing manner," the letter
said.
The writer said he had never
liked dismissing people, but
where children's future was
concerned nothing "absolutely
nothing must stand in the way
of their being guided by the
most capable and dedicated
teachers obtainable."
According to the report, Mr.
Chaplin, this year in particular.
had "too often displayed
contempt for the board,
hurling innuendoes and
outright insults."
This had also been his
pattern of behaviour as far
back as 1955, the directors
claimed, and quoted from the
minutes of July 14 and
November 17 of that year.
INSUBORDINATION
These quoted the then
chairman as saying that "to the
best of his knowledge and
belief this was the fourth
special meeting called and
caused by Mr. Chaplin's
extraordinary behaviour and
his threats to resign and he felt
that the board should not have
to put up with this continued
insubordination."
This year, the board
charged, Mr. Chaplin answered
a letter from the Ministry of
Education involving school
policies despite the fact that he
was asked and instructed not
to make any reply until the
entire board met to study a
reply to the letter.
Dealing with Mr. Chaplin's
actions after he was told on
June 18 he would not be
rehired,. the board said he first
went to The Tribune to tell his
story to the press, then to the
teachers and told them he was
"fired" and "demanded their
unanimous support."
SIX POINTS
At the sale time the
headmaster presented the staff
with six points to consider
that the change of headmaster
should be done in a dignified
and professional manner; that
abrupt dismissal at this time of
year smacked of victimisation
and was unethical because,
among other reasons, it left no
opportunity for fresh
employment: that dismissal of
a headmaster with 19 years
"invaluable contribution" put
other members of staff in a
very insecure position; an
abrupt change of leadership
was bound to cause
bewilderment and
administrative confusion for
the school, its staff and pupils;
that the staff should put aside
personal feelings and demand
that the headmaster be allowed
one year to phase out of St.
Andrew's in a dignified
manner; that in view of the
timing of the dismissal staff
should immediately offer to
resign if their demand was not
met.
Refuting Mr. Chaplin's
allegations, the board said it
was the headmaster who ran to
the press in an "undignified
and unprofessional" manner
and then "without shame
accuses the other side of his
own faults."
Secondly, he had led
teachers to believe that his
salary ended August 31 and
that he was not to get anything
else. Nor did he tell them that
he had advised the directors
that he could get employment
at Simon Frasier University in
Vancouver and that he would
probably go there when he left
the Bahamas.
The Board said that Mr.
Chaplin also failed to tell the
teachers that it was the board
which had taken steps to
protect them further in their
contracts when the headmaster
"precipitously" fired two of
their number last year.
This required one school


term's notice in writing to take
effect at the end of any term
and written contracts for all
staff. Despite this, the report
said, Mr. Chaplin did not at
any time mention a contract
On Page 3


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TIGHT SECRECY OVER INVESTIGATION OF AGNEW
WASHINGTON (AP)- The Justice Department has clamped tight lid of
iserecy over its investigation of Vice President Agnew, but the story
continues to unfold anyway, the latest report concerning 50 thousand
dollars allegedly received by Angew from private contractors after he
became Vice President. That story is carried today by the Knight
newspaper chain.
The report quotes sources as saying federal prosecutors have been told
contractors paid Agnew one-thousand dollars each week over a period of
years when Agnew held local and state office in Maryland. That's in
addition to an alleged SO-thousand later payment after Angew became Vice
President.
ENGINEERS SAY WATERGATE TAPES CAN BE DOCTORED
WASHINGTON (AP)- The Senate Watergate hearings are in recess until
next month, but committee lawyer Samuel Dash continues his work and is
expected to file a law suit against President Nixon either today or
tomorrow. The suit would ask a federal judge to order Nixon to give the
committee tape recordings and documents related to Watergate.
The Associated Press has interviewed audio engineers and equipment
manufacturers to see how they feel about the possibility of detecting
whether White House tape recordings are doctored. The consensus is that
any doctoring could be detected, but some of those questioned told the
A-P there is a possibility that tests would be inconclusive.
President Nixon and his chief speech writer took a dinnertime cruise
aboard the presidential yacht last night. Observers consider that to be a
possible sign that Nixon is moving ahead with his promised public response
to Watergate.
SIX EXPELLED FROM WATERGATE HEARINGS
WASHINGTON (AP)- At least six men and women were expelled from
the Senate Watergate hearings Tuesday when they attempted to read a
statement.
Outside the Russell Senate office building meanwhile S4 other
demonstrators by actual count circled and chanted slogans aimed against
the Central Intelligence Agency.
Some of those escorted from the caucus room said they belong to an
organization called the Naitonal Caucus of Labour Committees of New
York City.
Sam J. Ervin Jr., D-Nc, ordered policemen to eject the demonstrators
but not to arrest them.
Outside the building leaflets on the letterhead of that organization were
being distributed which read: "CIA expose reaches Senate committee."
A man identifying himself as Tony Chaitkin, who said he is the Socialist
candidate for mayor of New York told newsmen the organization is
prepared to substantiate allegations of CIA activities inside the United
States and to give names of CIA front organizations and details of covert
CIA funding.
ASTRONAUTS MAY SPEND FULL 59 DAYS IN SPACE
HOUSTON SPACE CENTRE (AP)- Space Agency officials are
expressing confidence that the Skylab-Two mission will run its full 59-day
course. The mission got off to a rocky start, but the astronauts now are
settled into an orbital routine.
The astronauts plan more solar telescope experiments today, as well as
continued medical checks and a look at earth resources through
photosensors. The astronauts also plan to spend part of the day
trouble-shooting some of the numerous problems still outstanding aboard
Skylab.
CONTROL HURRICANES BY POURING OIL ON WATER?
MIAMI (AP) Remember the old addage about oil and water not
mixing'? Well, it was wrong at least in one area. Researchers in Miami,
Florida say pouring oil on troubled waters could kill the force of future
hurricanes. Although still experimental ... the idea is for a thin film of oil
on the water to decrease evaporation and weaken the storm.
ON THE PHNOM PENH & VIET CONG FRONTS
PHNOM PENH (AP) Cambodian insurgents attacked Phnom Penh's
main international radio transmission centre near the city's airport during
the night. Informed military sources have told the Associated Press that a
major part of the installation was blown up. It's said the insurgents who
numbered about 30--succeeded in getting 100 government troops to lay
down their weapons and run.
The sources report only the cable and radio circuits to Hong Kong
remain undamaged The attack was reported earlier by the Phnom Penh
government, but the government did not report such wide damage or the
fleeing from the scene by government troops.
The Senate Armed Services Committee is investigating reports that a
Viet Cong hospital was hit by an American air strike. A former fighter
pilot, Gerald Greven, is to testify on that before the committee today. Also
slated to appear in Army Chief of Staff Creighton Abrams, the generall
who was in charge of U.S. forces Vietnam during much of the secret
American strikes in Laos and Cambodia.
JURY FAILEIVTO REACH VERDICT AFTER 4 DAYS
CHRISTIANSTED, ST. CROIX (AP)- The Fountain Valley jury today
failed to reach a verdict after four days of deliberation.
The eight-women, four-men jury concluded at five and were then driven
back to the "Beach Hotel" where they are staying.
Deliberations in the 143-year-old government house building continue in
an atmosphere of complete calm. Tourists were on the streets buying as
usual, and islanders went about their regular business in a normal manner.
The five defendants in the Fountain Valley case are charged with first
degree murder in the slaying last September 6 of eight persons at the plush
Fountain Valley Golf Course in St. Croix.
SOVIET BIOLOGIST DEPRIVED OF CITIZENSHIP
LONDON, Aug. 8 (AP) Dr. Zhores tMedvedev, a world famous biologist
and critic of suppression in Russia, has been deprived of his Soviet
citizenship and forced into exile, the Soviet Embassy here said Wednesda .
A Soviet Embassy spokesman told a newsman Medvedev was called to
the Embassy Tuesday and told to surrender his Soviet passport.
The Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the U.S.S.R. the leading body
of the Soviet parliament -- deprived Medvedev of his citizenship on July
16, the spokesman added. The scientist was accused of "actions unbefitting
a Soviet citizen.
There was no elaboration. Medvedev has gone out of his way during a
year of research work in England to avoid any public statements critical of
the regime, but he has recently published in Russian a book documenting
the suffering of his friend, the writer Alexander Solzhenistsen. during the
last 10 years.
PACEMAKERS RECHARGED THROUGH UNBROKEN SKIN
SILVER SPRINGS, MD. (AP) The world's first rechargeable implanted
cardiac pacemakers, which are recharged weekly through the intact skin,
were reported Tuesday to be working successfully in many American
patients.
The patients include one over 90 years old and a 33 -ear old
non-professional weight-lifter who works out regularly with bar-bells.
The new devices were described as designed primarily to eliminate
repeated surgical operations required with conventional peacemakers to,
replace run-down chemical batteries.
The report came from scientists of the John Hopkins University who
developed the new rechargeable device. Made of stainless steel, it is about
the size of a flat cigarette-lighter.
The scientists said the new peacemakers could remain inside the body at
least 20 years, and they said they can be recharged weekly by patients
themselves by directing .an electric current from a household outlet
through the intact skin.
The Hopkins researchers said the new-type peacemakers are smaller.
lighter and easier and faster to implant than either conventional
chemical-battery powered peacemakers or nuclear powered ones.









"White Labelt


WASHINGTON (AP)-Presiden
federal prosecutors to withhold
Daniel Ellsberg's psychiatrist's of
official testified Tuesday.
Assistant Attorney (;General
Henry E. Petersen. head of the
department's criminal division.
said that when he first reported
the 1971 burglary to the
President last April 18, Nixon
indicated he already knew
about it and instructed: "You
stay out of that."
As a result, the Justice
Department sat on the
evidence for six days while the
trial of Pentagon Papers
defendant I llsherg proceeded
in Los Angeles, Petersen told
the Senate Watergate
committee.
But Nixon finally changed
his mind April 25 at the urging
of then-Attorney General
Richard Kleindienst. lHe
allowed the judge in the
Ellsberg trial to be notified
that members of the White
House "plumbers" unit had
burglarized the office of Dr.
Lewis Fielding, Ellsberg's
psychiatrist, in 1971, the
committee was told.
DIFFERED


VqIUVIUU V lUIII UIU QUJP



top justice dept. official


Wednesday, August 8, 1973.


UhP Oribune


S PETERSEN BLOWS THE TOP


TO BE KEPT

Nixon ordered burglary TO JUSTICE


ovidOanr uwithhpld cove DEPARTMENT


AGNEW PROBE NIXON FILES 34-PAGE BRIEF


nt Nixon personally ordered
evidence of the burglary of
fice, a top Justice Department


something was wrong.
"I had a visceral reaction,"
he said in response to a
question by Sen. Edward J.
Gurney, Republican of Florida.
"There was an overriding
concern. There were no
records. Things were
destroyed. They just didn't act
like innocent people. Innocent
people come in and say, 'What
do you want to know?' These
people didn't act that way. It
was just a visceral reaction."
lie insisted that no time was
there any effort to stop or slow
down the investigation.
"The only thing that could
be possibly cast in that
category was a call from John
I). Ehrlichman in connection
with the Stans subpoena. There
was pressure to get indictments
out by Sept. 1, but we couldn't
do it."
Petersen said he personally
urged Nixon on April 15 to rid
himself of Ehrlichman and H.
R. Haldeman, his domestic
adviser and chief of staff
respectively. The two resigned
two weeks later.
Petersen said he told Nixon
then that although it wasn't
certain a criminal case could be
made against the two, it was
certain they would be a source
of embarrassment.
OBLIGATION
"The President's response
sas interest," Petersen said.
"lie said yes, but he owed
them an obligation, too."
Petersen, who was in charge
of the Justice Department's
Watergate investigation, said
that five days after the break-in
at the Democratic Party
headquarters, he met with
Kleindienst and Dean and
urged that the President
publicly order the Attorney
General "to run an all-out
investigation and let the devil
take the hindmost." But
Petersen added:
"Unfortunately we never
heard anything from the
President."
Instead, he said, Dean told
them he had been assigned to
keep track of the investigation.
Dean denied he ever
conducted an investigation and
admitted to the committee e he
was covering up facts behind
the scandal.
On April 18, Petersen said,
the President told him Dean
was claiming to have received
immunity for his testimony
before the grand jury and
Petersen said that wasn't so -
that immunity was being
discussed.
At that point, he said Nixon
offered to let him hear a tape
recording of Dean's claim, but
Petersen turned down the


WASHINGTON (AP)-Justice
Department sources Tuesday
confirmed that Republican
fund-raising practices and
contributors are involved in its
investigation of an alleged kickback
scheme involving Vice President
Spiro T. Agnew.
At the same time, Atty. Gen.
Elliot L. Richardson decided to
keep the investigation inside the
Justice Department and not turn
over the case to special Watergate
prosecutor Archibald Cox.
Richardson made the decision
after discussing with U.S. Atty.
George Beall the ways to proceed
with the probe which reportedly
includes Agnew's handling of state
and local building contracts while
Maryland Governor and Baltimore
County executive during the
1960's.
The fund-raising aspect arose
when J. Walter Jones of Annapolis,
Maryland, a banker and real estate
developer, admitted in a statement
that he "was one of many,
including the Vice President, under
investigation for alleged violations
in connection with past fund-raising
efforts.
Jones, however, denied any
improper or illegal acts.
The Justice Department sources
also said the investigation involves a
great many persons other than
Jones who have been identified
publicly and has extended over a
period of several years.
SUBPOENAED
Meanwhile, the federal
prosecutors subpoenaed the records
of the Maryland department of
transportation for contracts
awarded while Agnew was
Governor. The prosecutors
requested records covering the
years from 1967 into at least 1971
so as to include projects which were
not completed until after he left
office.
Maryland Gov. Marvin Mandel
pledged in a statement "full
cooperation" in providing the
records.
Ronald L. Bean, an assistant U.S.
attorney, refused comment on the
request. Transportation department
officials were not immediately
available for comment.
One of those involved in the
investigation, Jerome B. Wolff,
headed the state roads commission
while Agnew was Governor. The
('omission became part of the
transportation department in an
executive reorganization under the
Mandel administration.
There were reports that the
probe also involved the award of
federal contracts in Maryland let by
the general services administration
since Agnew became Vice President
in 1969. However, Justice
Department officials refused to
confirm that aspect.
AGNEW DENIAL
Agnew, in a statement issued by
his office Monday night, confirmed
that he was under criminal
investigation but denied any
wrongdoing.
Justice Department officials said
Richardson also discussed the case
with Cox, who is conducting an
independent investigation of the
Watergate affair and other alleged
illegal activities by members of the
administration. But they said he
decided to leave the case with Beall,
the U.S. attorney in Baltimore who
began the investigation last
J anuary.
The investigation involves
charges of bribery, extortion and
tax evasion relating from payments
from private building
contractors to Maryland and
Baltimore County political figures.
The probe originally focused on
alleged political corruption in the
county where Agnew began his
political career in 1958 as a
member of the board of zoning
appeals. It reportedly was
broadened in recent months to
embrace state contracts awarded
during Agnew's two years as
Governor as well as the GSA
contracts in Maryland since he was
elected Vice President.


Petersen's account differed
somewhat from the President's
own version of these events. In
his May 22 Watergate
statement, Nixon said only
that he learned on April 18
that E. toward Hunt, one of
the plumbers, was to be
questioned by the U.S
attorney.
"I directed Assistant
Attorney General Petersen to
pursue every issue involving
Watergate but to confine his
investigation to Watergate and
related matters and to stay out
of National Security matters,"
Nixon said
"We would have broken that
case wide open and we would
have done it in the most
difficult of circumstances ...
that case was snatched out
from under us when we had it
90 per cent complete,"
Petersen told the committee.
The explosion came as
Petersen, the last witness
before the committee goes into
recess until next month with
the rest of Congress, was
defending the lack of
indictments a few months ago
when the Justice Department
had a great deal of information
about the Watergate break-in
and cover-up.
"Forgive my emotions,"
Petersen said after his outburst.
"I've been there too long and
this has been a terrible year."
The blunt-speaking Petersen,
testifying rapidly and in a
gravelly voice said, "I resent
the employment of a special
prosecutor" but came to the
conclusion later that it was
necessary "because of the
temper and the attitude of the
Senate." He said if he had been
a Senator he might have taken
the same position.
"Who made the decision to
appoint a special prosecutor?"
asked Senator Hlerman E.
Talmadge.
"I think it was the
President."
"That's what I thought,"
alhnadge said "You indicated
it was the Senate."
')UMFOUNDED'
Kleindienst. who preceded
Petersen to the witness chair,
had recounted his shock on
learning April 15 about
high-reaching involvement in
the Watergate scandal and of
telling the story to a
"dumbfounded ... very upset"
President.
But Petersen, who sat in on
a second meeting with the
President and Kleindienst that
day, described Nixon as
concerned, but said, "I
admired his calm."
The sequence that led
Kleindienst to the President
began the evening before when
then-Watergate prosecutor Earl
J. Silbert related to Petersen
what he had learned from the
grand jury testimony of John
W. Dean 111, the White House
counsel and Jeb Stuart
Magruder, the deputy Nixon
campaign director.
Petersen, Silbert and U.S.
attorney Harold Titus met in a
I a.m. to dawn conference
later with Kleindienst, who in
turn sought and got an
audience the following
afternoon with Nixon.
"Nothing was said to lme
that night that would implicate
the President of the United
States." Kleindienst said.
'VIS('CERAL REACTION'
Petersen, too, said he was
unaware until that time of the
cover-up, but he suspected


UIV l I Uagau y Vluki w u MVW "


of separation of powers

By JEAN HELLER
WASHINGTON (AP)-Lawyers for President Nixon told a
federal judge Tuesday that the courts have no authority to force
Nixon to turn over White House tape recordings. Watergate
investigators consider the tapes key evidence in determining who
knew what about the Watergate affair.
In a 34-page brief filed in The next move probably will
U.S. district court, the lawyers be Cox's. Judge John J. Sirica
said that any attempt by the gave the special prosecutor
courts to enforce a subpoena until next Monday. Aug. 13, to
for the tapes from special reply to Nixon's response.
Watergate prosecutor Sirica then told Buzhardt the
Archibald Cox "would be an White House could have until
unsupportable violation of the the following Friday, Aug. 17,
constitutional doctrine of for any additional written
separation of powers." response it wishes to make.
The Senate Watergate Sirica scheduled oral argument
Committee, which had planned for 10 a.m., EDT, Wednesday,
to file a lawsuit over access to Aug. 22.
Watergate-related White House Cox had subpoenaed nine
evidence, postponed the action conversations from among
until its lawyers could study those which were tape
the White House brief. The recorded by hidden
document formally outlined microphones and telephone
for the first time the arguments pickups at the White House, in
the President will use in this the executive office building
constitutional test of strength, and at the presidential retreat
The brief supported Nixon's at Camp David, Md. The
previous refusal to honour the Watergate Committee
Cox subpoena for the tapes subpoenas also demanded tape
ofprivate presidential recordings along with related
conversations and said if Nixon documents and other papers
were compelled to produce the and memoranda in Nixon's
material. "from that moment custody.
it would be simply impossible The President refused to
for the President of the United comply with all the subpoenas
States to function." on the grounds that to do so
"A President would be would violate the twin
helpless if he and his advisers doctrines of executive privilege
could not talk freely, if they and separation of powers.
were required always to guard The brief filed by Buzhardt
their words against the Tuesday rejected Cox's
possibility that next month or argument that Nixon had
next year those words might be waived any claim of executive
made public," the brief said. privilege when he permitted
"The issue in this case is aides to testify before the
nothing less than the continued Watergate Committee about
existence of the presidency as a the recorded conversations.
functioning institution." The White House contended
The Senate Watergate that the President's letter to
Committee had served Nixon Sirica on July 25 notifying the
with two subpoenas for tape judge that he would not
recordings and other comply with the Cox subpoena
Watergate-related White House "constitutes a valid and formal
material. Its planned lawsuit claim of executive privilege by
was aimed at having the Richard M. Nixon in his
subpoenas enforced, official capacity as President of
Sources inside the the United States to withhold
committee said the panel's information the disclosure of
lawyers are concerned that the which he has determined
federal courts will refuse to would be contrary to the
accept jurisdiction in the suit. public interest."
If that happened, the UNIQUE STATUS


Committee would have to seek
either special legislation that
could be tested in the courts or
initiate contempt proceedings
against Nixon.
"The committee met in
executive session Tuesday
morning and decided to
postpone filing a suit until
counsel for the committee has
had an opportunity to
ascertain and study the
reaction of the White House
attorneys to the motion of the
special prosecutor,"
Committee chairman Sam J.
Ervin Jr., (D-N.C.) said in
announcing the decision.
NO HINT
He gave no hint of how long
the delay might be.


of subjects inextricably
intertwined into one
conversation.
"Disclosure of information
allegedly relevant to this
inquiry would mean disclosure
as well of other information of
a highly confidential nature
relating to a wide range of
matters not relevant to this
inquiry ... the nature of
informal, private conversations
is such that it is not practicable
to separate what is arguably
relevant from what is clearly
irrelevant."
The brief concluded that
Nixon's refusal to turn over the
tape recordings "is supported
by premises that are, and
Page 10, Col. 8


offer.

Britain gains support at conference to


assail Uganda leader of racism charges


By Arthur L. Gavshon
OTTAWA (AP) More in
sorrow than in anger British
Prime Minister Edward Heath
and other leaders arranged
Wednesday to assail Ugandan
President Idi Amin for
breaking Commonwealth rules
that outlaw racism.
The issue of Amin's
expulsion of tens of thousands
of non-citizen Asians comes up
at the 32-nation summit
conference along with the
situation in Southern Africa
where white minority
governments run the lives of 30
million politically impotent
blacks.
Aides said Heath has
resolved to control the anger
he feels toward the maverick
East African ruler. le has been
promised backing by India.
Singapore, Fiji. Canada,
Bangladesh and others for a
cool. clear speech which he
hopes will rebut some of the
more excessive accusations
Amin has levelled against
Britain. These accusations rang
from conspiracies to
immorality.
Formally the question is
being examined under the
heading of "intra-Common-
wealth relations." This
provides member-nations with
the chance to swap
conipliments or insults. The
low-key tone of the concerted
onslaught against Amin has
been urged by Canadian Prime
Minister Pierre Trudeau. He is
anxious to avoid recriminations
which might pollute the


atmosphere of the conference.
Like Britain, India has taken
in thousands of the Uganda
refugees. Like Heath, Indian
foreign minister Swaram Singh
recalls the description given of
Amin's policy by such African
leaders as Zambian and
Tanzanian Presidents Kenneth
Kaunda and Julius Nyerere
that it is a policy as blatantly
racialist as that of Rhodesia's
white premier lan Smith whom
most blacks hate.
The influx of about 30,000
Ugandan Asians holding British
passports last year faced
Heath's Conservative
government with a major
political problem. As a result it
stiffened British immigration
laws.
Nevertheless Amin's
assailants know they have to
tread warily. They have to
balance their own home
political considerations against
the preservation of their
interests in Africa. They
recognize that mature leaders
of Black African opinion like
Kaunda and Nyerere are in
their own way ashamed of
Amin's actions. But they are
aware equally less mature
blacks tend to admire Amin
when he says "Boo" to Queen
Elizabeth II or thumbs his nose
at Heath or taunts President
Nixon. He has done this sort of
thing more than once.
BIG ISSUE
On the other big issue before
the meeting, the racial
situation in Southern Africa,


Heath is likely to rally much
support for the British
position. Most African and
Asian countries and even the
new labourite premiers of
Australia and New Zealand
are totally out of sympathy
with Britain's readiness to
preserve and expand its big
trade with South Africa; or
with its refusal to acknowledge
United Nation' rulings that
Namibia, formerly South West
Africa, should be freed of
South African rule; or with
what is taken to be Britain's
soft stance toward the
breakaway regime in Rhodesia,
or with its continuing political
friendship with the Portuguese
rulers of Mozambique and
Angola.
These two Portuguese
territories are in the grip of
insurrectionary movement with
Independence-seeking guerrillas
bogging down scores of
thousands of troops of a
country belonging to the North
Atlantic Treaty Organization.


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P H NO M PE N i
CAMBODIA, Aug. 8 (AP)
Cambodian insurgents attacked
Phnom Penh's main
international radio
transmission centre near the
city's airport Tuesday night"
and blew up a major part of
the installation, informed
military sources reported.
The 100-man government
force defending the station
threw down their weapons and
ran after the insurgents
shouted to them to lay down
their arms, the sources said.
The Communist force,
estimated at 30 men, then
occupied the main building
without resistance and laid
explosive charges in several
radio rooms. Seven troops
hiding around the buildings
were wounded by the
explosions, the sources said.
It was the second attack in
recent weeks against the radio
station at Kambol, about 11
miles west of Phnom Penh.
Government forces were
reported advancing against
insurgents entrenched along
Highways 1 and 3 south and
southeast of Phnom Penh.
while the rebels were pressing
in toward the capital from the
north and northwest, On
Highway 3 the target is a
concentration of insurgents
dug in around the village of
Kompong Tuol and along the
banks of the Prek Thnot River.
U.S. bombing in the
countryside in support of the
government continued to shake
Phnom Penh day and night. To
the north, the Communist-led
insurgents resumed their
attacks against the district
town of Muk Kampoul, six
miles from Phnom Penh. The
Tuol Leap railway station
northwest of the capital was
hit again by the rebels.
Cambodian military sources
reported eight persons killed
and 16 wounded in the
accidental U.S. bombing
Tuesday of a government
island in the Mekong River.
The Island, which was bombed
by an FIll fighter-bomber, was
six miles from Neak Luong, the
navMl base town in which an ,
accidental B52 strike the day
before killed 137 persons and
wounded 118.
A Pentagon spokesman in
Washington said the bombs
that hit Tachor Island should
have landed 1,800 feet away
on the west bank of the
Mekong. He said it appeared
that the mistake may have
been caused by an equipment
malfunction.


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- it never vanes





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SCOTCH WHISKY-by

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The brief said that
presidential papers have a
unique status, and that they
often are kept confidential for
years, for security reasons or
because they are personal or
highly sensitive.
"These reasons apply with
special force when recordings
of presidential conversations
are sought," the brief said
"Recordings are the raw
material of life. By their very
nature they contain
spontaneous, informal
tentative and frequently
pungent comments on a variety


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Wedesdy, ugut 8 193. hr riblw3


bTp ribunP
NUurus ADMcrus JURARE IN VERBA MACISTRI
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903- 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Publisher/Editor 1917-1972
Contributing Editor 1972 -
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972 .
Published Daily Monday to Saturday
Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207. Nassau, Bahamas.

EDITORIAL

What price glory!


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
GEORGETOWN, Grand Cayman, July 20: Until ten years ago,
when Jamaica took independence from Britain, the Cayman
Islands were a protectorate of Jamaica.
The Cayman Islanders decided they wanted freedom with
Britain, not independence with Jamaica which they felt had
treated them like a poor relative.
This desire is understandable because Jamaica is desperately
poor. Poverty is bad in itself. It must be a living hell to be
dependent on a poor relative.
Now.the 9,000 natives and 3,000 expatriates on this island are
presided over by a highly trained English Governor, product of
the splendid old British Colonial Service.
The two other islands Cayman Brac and Little Cayman -
that constitute the Cayman group are administered by the central
government in the city of Georgetown, Grand Cayman.
Until recently an Administrator presided over the islands but,
with its new level of importance in the field of international
finance, this office has been elevated to the rank of a
governorship.
Because of its long period of rule under the government in
Jamaica the people here are shy of any great influx of West
Indians, especially Jamaicans.

There are also other people who are not too happy about
present-day trends in the Caribbean.
A recent news despatch out of Washington reports that "a U.S.
Senate sub-committee is examining the purchase by American
firms of $508 million worth of U.S. government insurance to
protect their business in Jamaica from expropriation.
"Richard S. Reynolds, Jr., president of Reynolds Metals Co.,
testified that U.S. business investments in Jamaica would not be
nearly so great without the insurance from Overseas Private
Investment Corp. (OPIC).
"The OPIC programme protects American firms from loss
through seizure by foreign governments.
"Reynolds said the OPIC insurance programmes had been a
good thing for the economy of the developing nations and for
industry in general."
** ** * *** *
Why should foreign investors distrust the integrity of former
British colonies that have become independent territories?
The situation in Trinidad today probably provides the best
possible answer to this condition.
For over a year now there has been an undercurrent of Black
Power unrest in this large island off the South American coast.
The unrest broke out in the open three years ago when a unit
in the army revolted in an attempt to overthrow the Williams
government. The island was on the edge of civil war but the navy
was loyal to the government and succeeded in isolating the army
barracks where the uprising started. This enabled the government
to suppress the revolt.
A recent news despatch out of Port of Spain, Trinidad reports
that "guerrilla warfare seems wholly out of place in this
sun-splashed island steeped in carnival gaiety and calypso rythms.
Yet the violence that has erupted in recent weeks can only be
described as guerrilla warfare."
"There have been incidents of robbery, arson, sabotage and
homicide, and gunfire still echoes through the hills as troops and
police clash with insurgents."
The story goes on to tell of efforts by the government to
minimize the gravity of the situation and then proceeds:
"Not until February did the rebels actually emerge as an
organized group bent on overthrowing the government.
"Following a $128,000 robbery at Barclays Bank, police raided
a house in the slum district called Laventille and recovered an
unspecified portion of the bank loot. killing four men in the
process and turning up a revolutionary manifesto.
"This document proclaimed a national union of freedom
fighters, assumed responsibility for the bank holdup and a series
of other raids, and called for a popular uprising against the
government.
"It cited a long list of grievances in connection with what the
authors described as social and economic inequities echoing the
words heard here in the so-called black power disorders three
years ago.
"Although the island has been governed by the predominantly
black People's National Movement since independence from
Britain in 1962, dissident elements have continued to insist that
real power remains in the hands of white interests abroad.
"Trinidadian society, the manifesto argued, is dominated by
foreign investors who control banking, insurance and the oil
industry on which the island's economy is based. These investors,
it went on, have created a special class of local exploiters to
manage the nation's political, social and cultural life.
"Violence, it said, is the 'only way to struggle against this
oppression'." And it called for support from workers, farmers,
students and the unemployed who make up at least 20 percent of


the work force.

This reference to the creation of "a special class of local
exploiters" is a feeling that runs below the surface in most of the
islands of the Caribbean today .... and might be applied to the
new power group that has sprouted so quickly in Nassau, known
as the Square Deal Club.
It is because of this undercurrent of unrest that has reached
different levels of expression in the islands that American
investors feel the need for some guarantee from losses in the
event of expropriation provided by insurance with OPIC.
But now OPIC is also becoming cautious. In the concluding
paragraph in the news report quoted earlier in this article the
dispatch reports that on Thursday the Senate subcommittee
heard from U.S. ambassador to Jamaica, Vincent de Roulet, who
recommended against $18 million additional OPIC insurance on
top of the $132 million already purchased by Reynolds in
Jamaica.
Because of this statement by de Roulet, Prime Minister Manley
has declared him persona non grata and has requested Washington
to withdraw him from the island.
All of which further muddles the political situation in the
Caribbean.

It seems strange that during the last few years .... as the
Bahamas approached the final step into independence .... the
Pindling government trumpeted reports of big investment capital
.... hundreds of millions of dollars .... standing on the sidelines,
panting to come into the Bahamas but just waiting for the island
to take the final step into independence from Britain.


SPIRO T. AGNEW
... kickback charge

SPIRO AGNEW

BACK IN THE

HEADLINES


WASHINGTON (AP)-
During the past year, while the
Nixon administration has been
enmeshed in the Watergate
affair, Vice President, Spiro T.
Agnew has been untouched by
the political scandal.
Now the former Maryland
Governor is implicated in a
kickback probe being
investigated by the U.S.
Attorney's Office in Baltimore.
Agnew, son of a Greek
immigrant, has streaked to
fantastic political heights
during the past decade from
the man, by his own admission,
whose name was not a
household word to a possible
Republican candidate for
President in 1976.
From the start, he was a
crusading politician who began
his career in the suburbs of
Baltimore, where he bucked
the entrenched Democratic
machine in 1962 and was
elected chief executive because
he convinced the voters his
version of Republicanism was
more comparable with their
views than his Democratic
opponent.
He became Maryland
Governor in 1966 because he
stood as a knight in liberal
armour to a conservative
Democrat.
In 1968, however, history
moved him to the role of
hard-nosed disciplinarian and
even though he touted other
men for the presidential
nomination at first. Nixon
selected him to be the Vice
Presidential candidate and take
on the party's law and order
mantle.
The investigation in which
Agnew's name has arisen grew
out of a federal grand jury
probe in Baltimore County
into an alleged kickback
scandal involving dealings
between contractors and
officials of the Baltimore
County government, which
Agnew headed from 1962 until
1966, when he was elected
Governor.
It was during Agnew's years
as head of the county
government that Baltimore
county experienced a rapid
growth and building boom.
The 55-year-old Agnew
became embroiled in
con flict-of-interest charges
relating to his activities as
County executive and
Maryland Governor after he
won the Republican Vice
Presidential nomination in
1968.


If this is correct .... what kin
about because it seems that hon
areas after they break from Britai
government-backed company in th
******I


Shareholders back St. Andrew's board


I


wuhu will coordinate all the
a1n1ous elements in a school
and \who will not tell a teacher
whl, asks for help, "You are
supposed to be a teacher, so
\ ou ought to know what to
do'. as Mr. Chaplin has done."


,,., ws IRCTORS'JOB
Ihe report concluded by
I e 'iting the position of the
A .h dire,'tors "In performing our
.', i boardrd acls of management," they
said. "we do not act in the
S. t interests of the shareholders or
Sh ;ourselves or Mr. Chaplin or any
t ,rl\ 'r individual first, but
.. rather we always hold before


us the interests of the children
and the teachers. Our
motivation and our duty
compelled us to take the action
we did with regard to Mr.
Chaplin."
The report pointed out that
a fact which should not be lost
sight of was that the directors
did not begin or "instigate the
journey down this muddy
road. It was not our intention
for this to happen and we
cautioned all we could not to
pursue that tack and we
suggested what the proper
course of conduct was."


DEAN RUSK
SATISFACTORY
ROCHESTER, MINN. (AP)-A
Mayo Clinic spokesman said today
former Secretary of State Dean
Rusk is listed in satisfactory
condition at Methodist Hospital in
Rochester following "corrective
vascular surgery."
The spokesman said doctors
removed a "moderately sized"
abdominal aortic aneurysm. An
aneurysm is a ballooning or weak
spot of a vessel.
Rush, 64, was reported to be
resting comfortably. He is expected
to be released within two weeks.
Rusk served as Secretary of State
under Presidents Kennedy and
Johnson.


From Page 1
for himself.
Supporting their contention
that Mr. Chaplin considered
only his own interests, the
board said that he walked out
of his office on June 29
"without so much as a word to
the acting headmaster as to
what matters were pending,
what was where, what has to
be done.
"The fact is that a science
teacher had not been hired by
John Chaplin prior to the 18th
of June," the report said. A
person was subsequently found
by the acting headmaster to till
the vacancy with no help from
Mr. Chaplin.
Because they anticipated
the disruptions that would be
created, the board did not give
Mr. Chaplin notice until the
end of the school year. but
compensated for this
financially, the report said.
Further, a confidential
communication from the
teachers to the board was
delivered to The Tribune by
the Chaplins even before the
board had an opportunity to
read and consider the teachers'
statement, the report said.
Although the board advised
teachers they were prepared to


PARENTS RESOLUTION


John I ,,! 1c,", i i onii; i



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!icit i i ] I ". i ,I I ,* or


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It'i i ;h i I .i ; l iii i ts .
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i tih e ell i c .l rli, l ingc f th'
\l rs i ," ,:i \1 in e

I yf,. i e ,i S, h l. 1I. I :s hell
;nd ait]', i' i1 'I.|\ L' })c't'n very
"rt' i !'. ii i this
li:r n p< i! ),l', a> i incitdelitjl! w ', }ich l mak 's a
prtql r \ <;\it"ssiiig its

of lhe elfli i ilen runniing of lhe
sch >l ) ."


From Page 1
Shareholders Meeting, which
will be held next week, a
proposal to have a Special
-Committee formed to look into
the dispute will be put
forward. Further that Mr.
Chaplin continue on as the
Headmaster until this
Committee reports, and the
Shareholders make a decision
based on the report,
"In my opinion, this is a
proposal that both Mr. Chaplin
and the Board should welcome.
"As a former Chairman of
Saint Andrews School, and
Board member for many years,
I must state that I am
astonished at the Board's
decision to fire Mr. Chaplin. It
was my pleasure and privilege
to work with him, and while
we did not always agree, we
were always able to come to an
agreeable decision eventually.
"I had the pleasure of being
Chairman of the Fund Raising
Committee to build the new
Saint Andrews School; no one
could have been more helpful
than Mr. John Chaplin. Most of
the credit of what Saint
Andrews is today lies at the
doorstep of this man who has
served faithfully for so
many years. That he was able to
work and build with so many
past Chairmen is a tribute to
him, as he built Saint Andrews
into the School with the finest
Academic results in our
Country.
"I leave it to the good sense
of the Shareholders to appoint
this Committee, and reinstate
Mr. Chaplin until a decision is
made. This to me is the only
fair and decent solution.
"If you wish to read this at
the Meeting, you have my
permission."
*********** *****
Following is an extract from
a letter by former Board
chairman, Mr. James Miller,
written from Costa Rica:
written from Costa Rica:
"I have known and admired

d of money were they talking
est money won't go into these
in without the insurance from a
ie U.S.?
****


And now we come to another phase in the unfolding pattern in
island governments in this hemisphere.
England has ceased to interfere even in governments that :ire
not yet independent. They are left to do as they please, and so
there has been unrest in the St. Kitts-Nevis-Anguilla group.
resulting in the bold breakaway of Anguilla .... also in Antigua
and Grenada.
Now there is unrest in Dominica where a state of emergency
has been proclaimed, resulting in the suspension of publication of
The Dominican Herald. Even the government newspaper, 77iT
Educater, failed to publish one edition.
This proclamation arises out of a strike of the island's civil
servants.
**4*>*4***
Does this situation remind you of anything in the Bahamas?
The Hon. Clifford Darling was a struggling taxi driver. Then he
became the President of the Taxi Union. Since being elected to
the House he has held various senior posts in government. Now lihe
is Labour Minister.
This ironic position has brought from the general secretary of
one of the unions the comment: "just imagine the Minister telling
management he will support them when they fire workers
involved in a demonstration ...."

There is no stronger racist in the Caribbean than Dr. Eric
Williams, Prime Minister of Trinidad.
He rose to power on a racist programme.
Now racism threatens to strike him down and run wild in the
island.
The PLP rose to power on racist propaganda and the strength
of labour unionism. Dr. Williams has years of independence
behind him. The Pindling government is just starting but already
labour forces in the Bahamas are beginning to bare their teeth.
Hail glorious independence!

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
Speech is the index of the mind.
SENECA


S n tio f s
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Wednesday, August 8, 1973.


\,'


bShe (ribuur










4 Whp 'ribuntu


Wednesday, August 8, 1973.


A plea for understanding from


heart of a Bahamian stutterer

WHAT IS IT LIKE TO BE A STUTTERER? How does this phenomenon of speech develop? What are stutterers
I-fe? How can a stutterer alleviate his condition? And how can parents and society at large help the stutterer?


!n search n: .,;,sa sk, to these
ac e( i s 1 ;.t -I on ttlephioncd
t .' we:: .':- ot th.- lol'ow iiig
;' w ".{:' ilk,: til
Ai I:, sek to Ir \X
S 'c i o the 'plhonel no
-r %', "'c -pt to' an upl iaugih
iv party catme 'i the lin
;i it A isn't 1 ntilt tMrt"l shen t
1t0 t h i al'c th i t ... h et
thc "; n, ck
: 1 I was laughing bV .i!se
S vung man \ais a stutteres,
i later interv'li ed this
, -.ng Bahamian mnan who is a


stutittrer he i- vitail
i tel igent, 1 e d a t ed.
handsome, andi socially aware
his diction is excellent, aind
tiiN ,ocabutlar> extensive vet
t:' the voice that laughed could
see was that he was a stutterer.
Man's inhumanityv to man
takes a mocke.y of reactionn .
Next week I shall write
,abihoit this inter view and a
group ie therapI session of
suttcrers which I was
permitted to attend.
Meanwhile this week read
the words of an adult
Bahamian stutterer.


() GOod' ( it throu
hackbton: ":iy sttit
desire that thoull t hallt
the spinig a'; 'he impcd
I lihee we're lith, wtordst ii
on a cla ltlet ioutnd
)i. \il ,L A archat
fromll I ai\ens i d C t i d
ruins t o the hilkalt t(
Beth Shetces'h I irom lt
to- thii< d at\ !h a! crk
m ruacle 1, I .ili hc ati d i
pt ople O T hto' i ttih p
Stuittcri or i
whichever one prefers ti
does not discriminate


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*1


igh the C'harles I of England stopped
crying 1 stuttering when his head was
remove cut off. This phenomenon
iment.' called stuttering has puzzled
ascribed mankind for thousands of
by one years, but thanks to those
geologist pioneers, such as Dr. L. F
in the Travis, Dr. Wendall Johnson
o 1n of antd )r Charles Van Riper, the
hat dat latter two doctors being
tou a stultterers, the doors have' been
i those opened and new hope given to
rs'hblict stutterers.
However, speaking relative
i11 ''' to the Bahamas, the doors to
o call it. the best of my knowledge are
. King still closed to many stuttrerers
and particularly adult
S stutterers. Being an adult
stutterer myself and being
Bahamian, I have come to,
realize the need for the
treatment of stuttering for
who perhaps are just beginning
to experience the taste of
embarrassment from laughter
because of their stuttering, and
the adults who have niow
reached a point where laughter
and rejection are so coltlmmon a
thing :lih, don't even notice it
any longer.
Personally, I have been
doing some research into the
problem of stuttering in Nassau
and collecting a general
consensus into how mtan!
adults there are in Nassau whio
have the problem of stuttering.
and within five days I was able
to discover that there are ten iii
total that I personally know.
So. this may give you solime
idea of about how m an\
stutterers there really are ti
Nassau itself, not including tthe
Family Islands. I feel that the
problem of stuttering has been
neglected for too long a time
LTD. and it is high time to attempt
to do something constructive
and realistic about the matter.
I have been attempting to
encourage people with the
problem to seek information
and hopefully, professional
help.
Stuttering is one of thtosc
problems tha the public seem
to take very casually a.nd
usually find humour in hearing
someone who stutters, but
being a stutterer, I cannot say
that there is anything
humorous in it. Stuttering is
something that is not physical.
although it has physical results
S which are manifested b\ the
X psychological problem of
i stuttering. Stuttering has been
stated to be a type of
behaviour which can be
modified to a point where it is
not too much of a handicap.
Professional help can find ways


...by Daphne Wallace-Whitfield


to inodity it, but only by
professional help
'lhiere is a verx legitimate
quote made by an I english
ps ychologist: "11 soiieone
could find a cure for stuttering
they would solve all the ills of
SOCiety ." Do aln of VOtLi
reading this article agree with
that'.' Those of you who don't
stutter have so intich to be
thankiul for. It you as normal
speakers want to know how a
stutterer feels, try lifting an
arm and discovering youth can't
lift it all of a sudden. This
comparison imay give youi some
idea. so the next time you
encounter a stutterer iist think
aboutit the c' I'paiiso' with the
lifting ol ti al- the
tristiation and ri ,.' that
these admirablet individuals
experience every time they
speak. Do you nows feel that
stuttering is humoturous, or do
you think it's something that
you as human beings should
attempt to understand and be
patient i -.... I would say that
the most harinful reactions \ou
as normal speakers can do are
to first. turn your head away.
second, tr\ to rush the
person when lie is stuttering,
third> to shout or punish,
whether verbally or physically.
the person who is stuttering,
and fourthly, to finish saying
the word for the stutterer. It is


aV i
CHARMAINE HALL
...seeks drama degree


difficult enough for him to say
the word, so at least he is
entitled to speak for himself.
So if you have or know of
anyone who has a stuttering
problem, whether old or
young, ask him/her to seek
professional help, first by
calling the Ministry of
Education's Speech and
Hearing Department, and then
if you want to be directed to
professional help, call Mr. C.
Knowles at 41101 after 5:00
p.m. or 22912 between 9 a.m.
and 5 p.m. Stuttering should
not be concealed so don't be


shy to seek help.
Charmaine Hall, daughter ol
Captain and Mrs. "Skeeter"
Hall, of Blair Estates. Nassau, is
home after graduating from
Briarcliff Iligh School, Atlanta.
Georgia on June 6.
Charinaine will be returning
to Georgia in September where
she hopes to obtain a degree in
drama at Young Hiarris College.
This ex-St. tugustiine's
student is doing it the hard
way.
She is paying her own swas
through college by working Ii!
time as a model in Atlanta #
(harmaine love' the
Bahamas which is her home.
but her choice of a profession
in acting (or that profession
choosing her for we do not
choose our talents) will sadlx
necessitate her living most of
her life away from hter homrie
TWO YOUNG Bahamiiani
men with an interesting choe e
of career are Winston Jones
and Russell (Huyler) Carroll.
Winston Jones, soin o! ir
and Mrs. Geoffrey Jones oi
Nassau. after finishing high
school at Government llighi
and Queen's (College ii Nassau
attended the Robert Gordon's
Institute of Technoloegv n
Aberdeen, Scotland. where he
received a dipl(ona i;


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architecture in 1970 and a post
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Mr. Jones is tihe first
Bahamian to graduate i'rori
this Institute.
He is nmaiied to the tornmer
Marjorie Brooks of Banffshire,
Scotland., and is pi- nr
employed withthe Ministry of
Development.
Robert Isaacs another young
Bahamian is also presentih
attending the Robert Gordon's
Institute of T..,. ..l .i., and in
September will be going into
his final year
******** ********
Russell (Huyler) Carroll. also
an ex-Government High School
scholar, was graduated in June
from the University 01'
Minneapolis with a degree in
I'n n i ro nmen tal 1) Design
(Bt ID)r
Mr Carroll will be following
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Planning at Ohio State
I ni'erstl in September.
IHis guardians are Mr. and
Mrs. Kenneth Huvier of

\lr Carroll is a member iof
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Fraternity and while at ...,li.
worked tor two years on the
I.mii:ipus newspaper ;s an
Page 6. Col. 3


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AHOY THERE!

^ ^OUR AUGUST SPECIAL
Magnificent Big Colour Portrait

7 C Complete
PHOTOG PHY BY

Icofooiucln
on the waterfront at East Bay & William Sts.
Telephone 5-4641

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 1973
'IN THE SUPREME COURT No.19
Equity Side

NOTICE
THE QUIETING TITLES ACT, 1959

The Petition of Anna Edwards in respect of:-
ALL THAT Tract of land situate Six hundred
and Twenty-eight (628.00) feet Southeastward
of Blue Hill Road in the vicinity of Seven Hills
in the Southern District of the Island of New
Providence and said to contain Four and Eight
hundredths (4.08) acres which said tract of land
is bounded on the NORTHWEST by vacant land
but said to be the property of the Estate of Dr.
C. R. Walker and running thereon Six hundred
and Thirty-five and Fifth-four hundredths
(635.54) feet on the NORTHEAST by vacant
land and running thereon Three hundred and
Thirty-eight and Eighty-seven hundredths
(338.87) feet on the SOUTHEAST by vacant
land now or formerly said to be the property of
the Estate of Rupert Dean and running thereon
Six hundred and Forty-four and Forty-five
hundredths (644.45) feet and on the
SOUTHWEST by a Reservation for a Road
Thirty (30) feet wide leading to Blue Hill Road
and running thereon Two hundred and
Ninety-six and Seventy-five hundredths (296.75)
feet.
Anna Edwards claims to be the owner in fee
simple in possession of the parcel of land
hereinbefore described and the Petitioner has made
application to the Supreme Court of the Bahamas
under Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959
to have her title to the said land investigated.

Copies of the filed plan may be inspected at:-
(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court
(b) The Chambers of the undersigned.

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having
dower or a right to dower or an adverse claim or
a claim not recognized in the Petition shall before
the 18th day of September, 1973 file in the
Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the
undersigned a statement of his claim in the
prescribed form, verified by an affidavit to be filed
therewith. Failure of any such person to file and
serve a statement of his claim on or before the
18th day of September, 1973 will operate as a bar
to such claim.
CALLENDERS, ORR, PYFROM & ROBERTS,
Chambers, Mosmar House,
Queen Street,
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner.


A NEW SERIES of lectures
has been added to the Summer
seminar for the people of the
Grants Town area by the
Interdenominational Christian
Youth Association.
Especially aimed at the
adults of that community, the
lectures are to be held at the
T.A. Thompson public school
on Blue Hill Road (formerly
Western Senior), at 8 p.m. each
Friday.
Speaking this Friday will be
Mrs. Sylvia Bartlett, who will
lecture on "Family Budgeting
and Economising."
"The Citizen under the


Uhe P rtibutt


From page 4
assistant editor.
We hear much of freedom in
the Bahamas today.
Freedom is an expensive
commodity. The Washington
Post conglomerate, which
published the Ellsberg papers,
has had two of its T.V. licences
(which have to be approved by
government) challenged.
The loss of two T.V. stations
and we are talking now in
terms of millions of dollars is
a stiff price to pay for
publishing information.
Obviously the publisher was
willing to risk paying this price.
Obviously the American public
wanted the information. In
spite of the horrors being
exposed by the Watergate
investigation a public that
demands information and the
investigation of alleged
Irregularities and publishers
who risk much by supplying
information and exposing such
irregularities and corruption
protect and earn their
freedom.
In the busy lives
most of us lead nowadays we
do not get to see our friends
and even our relatives as often
as we would like. Yet out of
sight is not always out of mind.
To help keep our friends
abreast of our news please send
me details of birthdays, and
births, bethrothals,
anniversaries, graduations,
interesting houseguests,
happenings, departure from the
Bahamas and such like to me
c/o The Tribune, (with photos
if possible).
*********AND WHAT has happened
AND WHAT has happened


WINSTON JONES
... architect
to former UBP Senator
Reginald Lobosky?
A certain gentleman asked
this question recently and here
is his answer.
Reginald Lobosky is a law
student in London. A member
of Lincoln's Inn. He is taking
his law studies seriously and on
July 12 received news that he
had successfully passed his first
Bar exams.
In a letter to his mother,
Mrs. Esther Lobosky of
Mackey Street. and his sister.
Lillian, he wrote:
"I am now in school for the
summer and I am hoping to sit
for the next lot of Bar exams
in September, but I have not as
yet received permission to do
so."
On July 10 he attended the
service of thanksgiving in
Westminster Abbey, London,
to mark the independence of
the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas.


RUSSELL (HUYLER) CARROLL
... city planner
The fanfares were played by
the trumpeters from the Royal
Military School of Music
Kneller Hall, by permission of
the commandant, and under
the director of music, Lt. Col.
R. B. Bashford, M.B.E.,
L.R.A.M., A.R.C.M. At 10:45
a.m. His Royal Highness the
Duke of Kent was received by
the Dean and Chapter of
Wastminster at the Abby's west
door.
His Excellency the High
Commissioner, Mr. A. R.
Braynen, read the lesson.
The sermon was preached by
the Rt. Rev. Bernard Markham,
formerly Bishop of Nassau and
the Bahams.
The service ended with a
fanfare of trumpets and the
singing of the Bahamas
National Anthem.
The Bahamas flag was borne
in procession to the Great West
door, while the Abbey church
bells rang and the organ played
Bach's Fantasia in G.
Here is how Reg. described
the affair in his letter home:
"I was given a seat in the
nave along with all the big
shots from the U.K. govern
ment. ambassadors, etc. We all
sat in individual throne seats
about 12 feet above the floor.
just above the choir. Each
throne had the person's name
on it -- I was in No. 14.
Across from me was Mr. and
Mrs. Braynen. on my left was
British Cabinet Ministers and
on my right was Lord Grey,
Lord Ranfurly, Sir Ralph
Campbelll, etc.
"It was a very impressive
service and because Royalty
was there the Royal
Trumpeters played in addition
to the organ and choir.
"Bishop Markham preached
the sermon and had a lot of


very nice and complimentary
things to say about Sir Roland.
He also said good things about
Mr. Pindling and also about
how he had confirmed his son
as almost one of his last church
duties in the Bahamas, but
most of all his sermon was
about the good sense and
friendliness of the Bahamian
people as a whole.
"All in all, a very impressive
service. The English really
know how to put on a show.
By the way, you might tell
Alee Knowles. that his son,


Emeric, w
flag bearer
U


I


as an escort for the


ARRIVED TODAY:
Freeport II from Miami
SAILED TODAY: Olympia
for New York
ARRIVING TOMORROW:
Southward from Miami
SAILING TOMORROW:
Southward, Bahama Star for
Miami; Oceanic, Rotterdam for
New York.
WEATHER
WIND: North-easterly 6 to
14 m.p.h.
WEATHER: Mostly cloudy
with showers and few
thundershowers
SEA: Smooth to slight.


Constitution" will be the topic
of the lectures to be given by
the Hon. Eugene Dupuch.
Q.C., on Friday August 24,
with a follow-up by Mr. Keith
Duncombe, counsel and
attorney, on August 30.
Miss Jeanne Thompson, a
well-known woman barrister
will speak on "The Duties of
the Putative father toward the
Illegitimate Child on
September 7.
All adults in the Grants
Town community are
especially urged to attend the
series of lectures, an I.C.Y.A.
committee member said.


MARIA CALLAS SINGS AGAIN AFTER 8 YEARS
LONDON, Aug. 8 (AP)- Opera star Maria Callas is to sing in public
again for the first time for eight years.
The soprano will make a single appearance at London's Royal Festival
Hall on Sept. 22, accompanied by Italian tenor Giuseppe di Stefano and
pianist Ivor Newton in a recital of songs, arias and duets.
Mis Callas' last public appearance was also in London in 1965 when she
sang Tosca at Covent Garden.
Her Festival Hall recital the highlight of the start of the 1973-74
London music season will be the beginning of a world tour a spokesman
for the singer said.
ACTOR CRAWFORD 61, TO WED MARY MICHEL 49, TODAY
CLAYTON, Mo. (AP) Veteran actor Broderick Crawford and Mary
Alice Michel of Los Angeles will marry today at the St. Louis county
courthouse.
The 61-year-old actor and the 49-year-old widow applied for their
licence Tuesday in this St. Louis suburb. It will be the third marriage for
Crawford and the second for Mrs. Michel.
Crawford is best known for his role as a grumpy policeman in the
television series "Highway Patrol."


BTU
6300
9000
10,000
15,000
18,000
24,000


REVmEmIBER TO


Wednesday, August 8, 1973.



moderate in showers
TEMP: Min. tonight 72 Max.
tomorrow 87
TIDES
HIGH 3:05 a.m. and 3:41
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SUN
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Wednesday, August 8, 1973.


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~rihunr


Pursaant to the provisions of Sectio:n 33 of lIi
.Companies Act, notice is hereby given that The
Registered Office of Barclays Bank International
Limited has been transferred from Barclays Bank
International Limited. Local Head Office,
Beaumont House, Bay Street. Nassau, Bahamas to
Barclays Bank International Limited, Local Head
Office, Barclays Bank Building. Bay Street. Nassau,
Bahamas.
N. F. IRELANI)
Local Director
Pursuant to the provisions of Section 33 of The
Companies Act, notice is hereby given that The
Registered Office of Barclays (Nassau) Nominees
Company Ltd. has been transferred from Barclays
Bank International Limited, Local Head Office,
Beaumont House, Bay Street, Nassau. Bahamas to
Barclays Bank International Limited. Local Hlead
Office, Barclays Bank Building. Bay Street, Nassau,
Bahamas.
J. M. RANSOM,
Secretary
Pursuant to the provisions of Section 33 of The
Companies Act, notice is hereby given that The
Registered Office of Barclays Finance corporation n
Bahamas. Limited, has been transferred from
Barclays Bank International Limited, Local Head
Office, Beaumont House. Bay Street. Nassau,
Bahamas to Barclays Bank International Limited,
Local Head Office, Barclays Bank Building, Bay
Street, Nassau, Bahamas.
G(. GODDARD.r
Secretary


terrorist attack in (rreecce ,iince
to 30 people per Several other l tte"rpts "sere
foiled.
m, trim styling ... The Conminiittee. whichh represent,
y a square foot of at employees of htreign airlines
based in Athens. did nit sa\ wheel
e. Quick way to have W the ,boycott would t ake place or
freshmen in office, \what flrm it \\uld take. s nr did it
W name anN specific countries.
hop. No installation W The committee alo demanded
it in and plug it in. w that the t so Arabh gunmen accused
of the grenade and pistol assault at
S the airport "be punished as an
example. "
The committee condemned
l r' W ) Palestinian terrior,'t .acts e',pecially
those "\ 'ith nl, ideological
I purpose and called on the
-Interdtional a I('otllllltee of Airline
m employees to support their boycott
decis',ii.
'IF MAKARIOS WANTS WAR
HE WILL HAVE IT' GRIVAS
NICOSIA (Al') ( general George
(;rivas, the underground leader
issued \hat hie called a final
j warning to( ('Cprus P'resident
Archbishop Makarios Saturday,
Threatening w ar. if his terms
"If he wants war he will have it
... this is my final warning," (Grivas
declared.
E 2-8421 6 The threat was contained in a
lengthy six-page typewritten
statement hearing (;rivas'
handwrTittten i ink, which was
Distributed to three (Greek 'ypriot
right wing papers.


17


Wednesday, August 8, 1973.

DEVELOPMENT

MINISTER IN
I CHAMBER TALK
,ai gg g


..oooo.o....

IVA


jDeWoLA66




Divorcee took his

pillow talk seriously

DEAR ABBY: I am a married woman who has been
deeply involved with a married man for four years. He has
children and so have I.
I divorced my husband thinking he would divorce his
wife and marry me. I can't honestly say that he promised
to divorce his wife, but he said so many things like: "If we
were both free, I would marry you in a minute," and: "I
have never loved anyone the way I love you." I took it to
mean he would divorce his wife and marry me. I was
wrong.
My husband never suspected a thing until I made a full
confession. Now that he knows the truth he will have noth-
ing to do with me. Was I foolish? VIRGO
DEAR VIRGO: You were. Your mistake was taking
pillow talk seriously. Actually, it's nothing more than a lot
of horsefeathers.
DEAR ABBY: I am so angry I want to scream. I'm
expecting my first baby after wanting one for five years. I
am only six weeks along, so naturally we haven't told
anyone yet. Not even our parents.
Yesterday I attended a church luncheon. Afterwards,
the chairman stood up and said, "The floral centerpiece is
for one of our members who is expecting her first baby
after wanting one for so long!" Then she looked right at
me.
Abby, I must have turned the color of a tomato. Then
all the buzzing and chattering started. My mother and
mother in law were both there looking surprised and hurt. I
was so upset I wanted to run.
Neither my husband nor I told a soul, but yesterday he
did bring home a used crib, and somebody must have seen
him carry it into the house.
Why do people have to be so nosy? Now it's going to
seem like such a long pregnancy. I can just hear them
asking me the last two months, "Are YOU still walking
around?"
At the bottom of your column it says, "You'll feel
better if you get it off your chest." Thanks for listening.
BURNING IN DETROIT
DEAR BURNING: And you'll feel better when you get
it off. Thanks for writing.

DEAR ABBY: I love my inlaws, but they are my
problem. My husband and I have two children, 6 and 3.
They are the only grandchildren my inlaws have [which is
probably why they spoil them the way they do].
My husband travels a lot, and I like to go with him for
a few days every few months. This keeps our marriage
healthy.
My inlaws beg to keep our children when we're gone,
but after the children have been with their grandparents it
takes me a week to get them to mind.
My inlaws let the kiddies stay up as late as they want
to, and they feed them candy and soft drinks between
meals. Also, when I say something, my word is law, and I
don't put up with any back-talk. The grandparents never
discipline them, and when the kids talk back, they laugh
and think it's cute.
I don't want to seem ungrateful, Abby, but I resent my
inlaws spoiling all the work I've put into training my
children. I have stressed my rules several times, but they
don't pay any attention to them.
How can I drive my point home without getting them
angry with me? If I hired a sitter my inlaws would be
terribly hurt. TOO SOFT
DEAR TOO: Your signature sums up the reason for
your problem. Toughen up, and tell your inlaws that either
they must follow your rules, or you'll not leave your chil-
dren with them.
PRIME LENDING
RATE UP TO 9';
Ni W YORK (Al' [;.S.
corporate ho rrrwi ig costs reached
an all time high Monday as tile 9
N6 COLD WAER per" cent prime lidir rate initiated
last w'eek b became virtuallyv industry
The natioi n's largest ban ks,
including ~rst ranllked Hank if
ingh0use America. ..said tihe. \ ere raising the
minimum lending charges to
iu corporate ei tomers b t I/4
Tlif LE WATER
FLE WATER TO BOYCOTT AIRLINES OF
ARAB COUNTRIES
AHIll NS (AI') the executive
committee i iof i I edertion of
3CBLLB .reign Airline 1 i tplosees in
Atihens decided lIuesda.> t loIi citt
3a to enjoy the airlines belnging t .\i otr
ag lift of deliciously terrorists
g-fresh water end he delsie,,, ,<,loed ain i La
terrorist attack ,n tie tranit
em of harsh-tasting d Iuge oi Athens Airport Sunda.
r treated water. tt kie three p'rss a
S\r.ounded 55. It i si e t ihe ith


Li


e s^


LEONARD E. ATLAS

ELECTED CHIEF

OF SAN ANDROS

(BAHAMAS) LTD.
I 0( R I 1AI 'I RI) I .
1lorida: Leconard I Atlas.
has been clectetd presidccnt )t
San A\ndros, Itc.., a Fort
IL ;udcrdale-based firmn which
will handle worldwkidlc sales.
tnarkcting, advertising, and
public relationss for Sail
Andros iBahainas) I iniited.
I hce election '\as an notunced by
Peter J. Pra'th. president (if
San A ndrs I Bahamias)
I lilced, developer (t a
major 7(1,000 acre residential
and vacati inI resort project
on AIdio-,.
A t las' iniie Ca p l ( is.
n tl1Il's naO," tti e wVas
t ()t iCI 1\ It I thi (A('
( o pil.ilon for 13 ears,
tservinlg ais c ice-president.
sales atnd marketing (;.t\(
P1rope'rties, Inc andtd
president ,i (i ("'s ('ape
IFleuthera. lBa.thamias project.
rhe San Andros project has.
had more than $2.000,000
invested to date in airport,
harbour, tit(tcl, and land
dlcvchopment.n An additional
S.)750,00( in development
and amenities construction
is underway .


AT BAHAMA

SUPERMARKET

SCHOLAR DINNER
I)K. RI('IIARI V. Moore,
president of Bcthune-Cookman
College, Dayvtona Beach,
Florid:,. will serve as toast
master at the annual Bahama
Supermarket Scholarship
Dinner at the Shcraton British
Colonial I lotl. 8 ('clock
tolligh t. II his will be the second
time the Bahamas Supermarket
Ioundation has sponsored this
hancio)et, which wase jointll
ittionitic'ch l' \it. \ctrC;e d'll I .
'-Sit inn.. tim1 ti (cr lt .1.
F rC ers.
Currently there are twelve
Bahamian students enrolled ;it
B et hunc-(ookman College,
r ,I.1 ori ng in Biology,
Psy cho I o g ,. Bt, itness
Ad ministration arid Business
F ctuicat ion.
l'he banquet will ieal re irc
29-mtinute I ilm entitled Rock
In A Wcary Land, which
depCicts the historical
background of Bethune-(ook-
nian (iollcgc. 'The nimajor
addicss v.\\ lie given hby the
\linist i o f l ducticnl tile
l! 1. 1 Iingslton Co((akleC .
l)r. M ic is a graduate ot
Kiinox\ ilc (Colltege. where he
rcceivcd tite' A.3. 1 I)cegree:
A tlanti i i\ctiersity, where lic
received tile Master' IDegree
.ind lie shc titcd tol tthe
D)ciorate Degree at New sYork
1nivi csit, lie holds ten
honorary hdoctoratei degrees. lIe
has b ce n president oft
Bethln iiCookiman (Collcge tor
the past 2(o years. Dr. Moore
firmly hbhleves that the only
iway black people in this world.
regardless ofl the circuitstances,
can leach their e rightful places,
is tolr cicI generiatioIn to strive
to l e c ;111i nplovelilt on the
past g generation.


ENTIRELY NEW DECOR

plis PRISCILLA ROLLINS

SlfOlE M lENZl ITHE CITATIONS
Continuous dancing except Thursdays
from 10 p.m. until...
Cantonese Dining, Tasty Snacks from 7 p.m.
NO COVER, NO 'v'INIMUM
BRITANNIA BEACH HOTEL PARADISE ISLAND


1Ilt


\T24.


iMAN r' ACY KWAM, ROSS HAGEN
SSH RlERY W~AHIINGTwOr MISS BLkCK AMERICk
AND JiOHN KUIMNE
AT 9:50 RNN-MRBRE
I ROD TBRHEICR


DR. RICHARD MOORE


KEMP ROAD
YOUTH MEETING
THI RI:1 will be a special
nieeting of the Kemp Road
Youth for lPositive A\ction
beginning at S p.m. ,l the
nriah McPhie Primary Scthol
tonight.


THIE HlON. Carlton Francis.
Minister of Development, will
he the principal speaker at the
Chamber of Commerce
Meeting on Wednesday, August
15, at the Sheraton British
Colonial Iotel.
Mr. Francis will be joined by
Mr. Percy Campbell, director
of Industrial Development for
the Bahamas Development
Corporation, anti Mr. Robert
Lando, president of Lando
Marketing Bahamas I.td.
The August meeting will
start with cocktails at 7:15
p.m. followed by supper at 8
p.m. in the Governors Hall of
the Sheraton British Colonial
Hotel.





Opens 7 p.m. Shows Start 6: IS
No One tinder 17 Admitted.
BAIt(;F 8:: 15&12:13
"'()Nl'ANY" 10:25
STARTS TONITE *
Sec 2 features late as 10:25
I Y'. l


N,-r-am l Ihml-R Prmle
HOWARD W W Cl MPi .,
BADGE 373
DIan l U TU KPLunrITSr nMIUA
in r Pnt irAi A AHAMouNT PICTURE


'" ,


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Now thru Friday
Continuous Showings
from 3:00
"GOD FORGIVES,
I DON'T" PG.
Terence Hill
Bud Spencer
PLUS
"RAID ON ROMMEL" G.
Richard Burton
Wolfgang Preiss


8


NOW SHOWING
Matinee 2:45 & 5. Evening 9:00 'Phone 2-1004. 2-1005
~ ~ ~ l .... -,


ROGER !
MOORE

JAMES
BOND

LIVE
AND
LETDIE,"

Si ,(, .', ST/) FOR MA TURI A /'I)l C/S.
PA RE'TA I, I)SCRI :TI)O, A D I "ISI:D.
Reservations not claimed by 8:45, will be sold


on first come, first served basis


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1M


U


NOW SHOWING
Matinee Continuous from 2: 30, Evening 8: 30
'Phone 3-4666


NOW SHOWING AT 8:00 & 11:20


WILIAM MARSHALL DON MITCHELL PAM GRIER
MICHAEL CONRA COLOR a, o (star o "Coffy")


RUNS
AMOK H A E

COLORb a" ...f.. ... .CANIN.. ERA..IAL. ,R


SUGGESTED FOR MA TUREI A UDII:;\CES
PARENT L DISCRI:'TIONV AD VISED.
SORRY NO PASSES ACCEPTUID!


---- --- ----- ~ -- -- ---- -- --- -- -- ____ I'


_ __ ~__~ ____ __a


Now Showing
Matinee starts at 2: 15
Evening 9:00
"FISTS OF FURY"
PG.
Bruce Lee

PLUS
"THE DESERTER" PG.
Bekim Fehmiu
Richard Crenna
'Phone 2-2534


GIFT FOR PRISON REHABILITATION FUND
THE PRISON REHABILITATION FUND recently received $446.60 in surplus funds
collected by personnel of the Ministry of Home Affairs and its Departments for their
Independence float. Shown is the Minister of Home Affairs, the Hon. R.F. Anthony
Roberts presenting the Fund's Savings Account Book to Assistant Superintendent of
Prison, Mrs. Olivia Watkins. I Looking on are (from left) Mr. D.N. Pratt, Acting Director
of Local Government; Mrs. Mary Sweetnam, First Assistant Secretary, Ministry of Home
Affairs; Mr. Edwin Davis, Parliamentary Registrar, and Mrs. Sylvia Bonaby, Deputy
Registrar General.

Mk COLLEGE HEAD


a


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uihp aribunt


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WUL FF RD.: AMPLE PARKING


\I MF4






Wednesday, August 8, 1973.


Whw tribune


BIUi SPECIALS HOU WEEK ENUINiU AUU. 9-12
QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED

U.S. CHOICE MEATS AVAILABLE
SWIFT


FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE, OUR STORE HOURS ARE:
MONDAY THROUGH THURSDAY 8:30 A.M. 7:00 P.M.
FRIDAY & SATURDAY 8:30 A.M. 9:00 P.M., SUNDAY 7:00 -10:00 A.M.
--- - - - - -


BUTIRAI


DANISH LEAN CENTRE CUT


PORK


CHOPS


p
I'


MAPLE LEAF
HAMS


MAPLE LEAF
SHAMS SHANK/ BUTT HALF
MELLOW CRISP
CRISP BACON


BORDENS MILK GAL.
. LJATr-lBT RDAT


EGGS


VELD)
ICE


CRACKER
JACKS
13/4OZ.


7/99C


LB $1.29


LB. $1.19


S


LRG.


A
CREAM AVAILABLE


FROZEN sOODBU


BIRDSEYE
ORANGE


PLUS


(ANY KIND)
INTERNATIONAL


9 oz.


VEG. 10o


I
;1.49


SE
I
89C I

1I
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75t
z 69t
LRG
-.I





~ I


COMET CLEANSER REG 3/994
TANG
GRAPEFRUIT DRINK 1ioz $1.29


HORLICKS
POWDERED
ZEST SOAP
CAMPBELLS
VEG.SOUP


MARCAL TOWELS


NESTEA
ICE TEA
PAMPERS
COLGATE
TOOTH P


DRINK


BATH SIZE


1lb. $1.09


3/994


,10,z. 4/89


JUMBO
ROLL 65t


6/994
$1.39


1-7 oz


OVERNIGHT 12's


ASTE SUPERSIZE $1.29


GREEN GIANT
NIBLETS CORN


GOLDEN GRAIN
MACARONI
CHEESE


&
DIN


12-oz 2/794

NER 7oz 3/994


V


[r


JEWEL OIL
240Z.


TREETOP
ORANGE SQUASH


RED PATH
SUGAR
WISE
POTATO


5LB.


CHIP


$1.09


JUMBEY


PUNCH


12-z. 7/99


26oz. 794


850


TWIN PACK


89


STARKIST BLUE LABEL
TUNA
7 OZ.
2/.990


INK- SMEARED


L I


SMA POWDERED
MILK


16-OZ.
$1.69


ORANGES


DETERGENT
KING SIZE
$1.19


CARNATION
CREAM
14V OZ.
3/79


r FRS DAIRY "OODS


IY!\


4 ..


L












The Sribunt


Wednesday, August 8, 1973.


REAL ESTATE


I I


ONE lot in Stapleton Gardens
80 x 120. call 3-6164.

C10682
FOR SALE
BY OWNER
House in Highland Park-
executive type home. 4
bedrooms, 2'/? baths, living,
dining, family, kitchen, double
car garage and utility room on
2 lots of land, wall to wall
carpet and drapes, completely
furnished, large patio and pool.
18 x 36. Beautifully
landscaped, bearing fruit trees
Central airconditioning: To
view telephone 2-1722-3.

C10650
FOR SALE
BY OWNER
House in Highland Park. 3
bedrooms, 2 bath, living,
dining, kitchen, family room
and carport, utility rooms, on
2 lots of land beautifully
furnished, wall to wall carpet
and drapes throughout.
Completely walled and lovely
landscape. Airconditioned
throughout. Unusual
opportunity. To view
telephone 2-1722-3.

C10692
WOULD YOU LIKE to live
near the sea with access to a
private lake? Beach rights and
all underground facilities. $75
down. From $80 month. No
interest. From $5800.
Call Pat Rutherford at 4-1141
or Morley & O'Brien at 2-4148
or 2-3027 or come to the
YAMACRAW BEACH Model
Home.
C10778
EXCELLENT INVESTMENT
PROPERTIES
1. A choice location on Shirley
Street comprising the frontage
of a complete block with road
frontage on three sides.
2. A large apartment or office
lot Collins Ave. good elevation.
3. A large apartment site West
Bay Street approximately
47,000 sq. ft. 95 ft. elevation.
4. Lots and cottages Adelaide
Beach.
5. 62 acres prime development
property Eastern Road.
6. A 3 acres estate with a 22
room palatial mansion with an
additional option of 18 acres
of good developed land.
For prices information and
appointment call C. W. Sands
Bill's Real Estate 23921.

C10726
CHARMING BAHAMIAN
HOME on Queen Street 2
storey, wide porches, hidden
garden, bearing fruit trees.
Suitable for office and/or
residence. $75,000 but make
offer. Telephone Chester
Thompson 24777 (evenings
42035,31425)


C10684
HARBOUR ISLAND desirable
elevated lot adjoining
Residency ground 82' x 123'x
93' x 141'. Phone 31252
before 8 p.m.

C10760
FOR SALE fully furnished 3
bedroom house Ist Terrace.
Centreville. Rainwater tank
with pressure pump Lot 150 x
100, fully landscaped, all
underground utilities, cash
only, $60,000. Phone 5-8311.


FOR SALE OR RENT
C10771
3 BEDROOMS. one bath,
Joans Heights, South Beach
See Philip R. Vargas, West, S.
South-Street on Corner.
C 10732
UNFURNISHED two storey
house three bedrooms two
baths, Eastern District, Phone
4-1183 after 6 p.m.
C10796
FOR SALE OR LONG TERM
LEASE Fine elaborately
furnished house at Skyline
Heights. Four bedrooms and
baths. Main rooms designed for
entertaining. Suitable for
diplomatic or executive
residence. Il -acres, Beautiful
garden planted for privacy.
Phone 7-7205 or 2-8162 for
appointment to see.


FOR RENT
C10663
4500 sq. ft. warehouse or
office space, available
immediately. Montrose
Avenue. To view, telephone
2-1722-3.

C10652
2 2 BEDROOM APART-
MENTS consisting of living
dining room, kitchen and
bathroom, basically furnished
- Twynam Avenue. Phone
5-8185.

C10660
HILLC REST TOWERS
Spacious 2 bedroom 2 bath
apartment, large balcony,
airconditioning, swimming
pool, short or long term. $375
per month. Contact 2-1841
days.


FOR RENT


I Uulb


C'0791
FURNISiHED 1 HR F
BEDROOM two bath house i
Seabreeze Est rates,
airconditioner,. telephone,
garage, laundry room,
automatic washer anc diyer.
$400.00 Phone 5-8512.

C10790
Furnished two bed;foor
duplex apa tment. er;,losed
garden, airc o n it t .rt d
bedrooms, automati5t r- .
$260( Phone 5-85 12.

C10671
COMMERCIAL BUll tINiG,
Montrose Avenue. 3200 i. ft.,
suitable for store, offii, 1
warehouse, $290.00 rii t:hly.
Call 2-8165.

C10805
LUXURIOUS fully f... -d
21, bedroom ap .
Winton Highway i:a -
views. Phone 21631. 2 o


CARS FOR SALE
C10742
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD.
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
2 Dr. Aiit. Grnwi i -'-
1968 VAUXHALL VIVA
Automtir Red 5
1967 CHRYSLER
4 D,. Autu. White $ b.
1968 PONTIAC
STRATO CHIEF Yt,.i Ai;ACjL,
1970 HILLMAN HUNTERs,
4 Dr. Automatic, Whitlue ''
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
4 Dr. Std d (i i ci( $ "..".,
1968 JAVELIN A ( r. i
1970 PARISIENNE r i .. :
1968 VAUXHAI L VIVA
2 D,. Std li, $k- "
1967 TRIUMPH 1300
R d. CS d '.
1969 VAUXHALL VICTOR
S Vgnr Y''li.w S'd5 l '
1973 VAUXHALL VICTOR
S A FE ALto. ri "
856 rn0 les 4- 1.,
1970 RAMBLER SST
4 DO. Auto. Blue $;B100
1969 MORRIS OXFORD


Std. White
1971 MERCURY
AiC 4 Dr. Maqni,
1967GMC PICKUP
1964 CHRYSLFRR
1968 HILLMAN
Gieen S/W Auto.
1971 FORD CAPRI
Auto. Blue
1969 FORD GALAXIE
4 Di. A,C
1966 MORRIS 1100
4 Dr. Blue


$5500
5 40C


$11 00

1950

$18b0

$500


1971 VAUXHALL VICTOR
Std. Blue $1595
1970 HILLMAN MINX
4 Dr. Std. Green $8b0
1969 MORRIS 1100
4 Dr. Auto. White $895
Trad Nrns Welcome
Located Oakes Field
Phone 34636-7-8
Opposite the Ice Plant

C10731
1971 AUTOMATIC DODGE
AVENGER $1400. 36477 7
a.m. 5 p.m. 51327 6 a.m.
8.30 a.m.


CARS FOR SALE


C10739
1969 REBEL, Gcod
Condition. Telephone 2.33C319
a m. to 5 p.m. ask for Cha rules
Sturrup


C10677
OFFICE OR STORE SPACE
Charlotte near Bay. Immediate
occupancy, ample parking.
Inquire 4-2017.

C10676
LARGE ONF BEDROOMi,
apartment, nicely furnished.
$250 per month. Call
CHESTER THOMPSON REAL
ESTATE 2-4777-8.

C10653
ONE EXTRA LARGE two
bedrooms two bath, and one
extra large one bedroom
apartment. With large living
and dining all basically
furnished Victoria Court
Apartments on Elizabeth
Avenue between Shirley and
Bay Street. Facilities, Phone,
laundry, parking, T.V. antenna,
airconditionred. Phiioe 54631
between 8 a.m. and b l)p.m.
C10757
ONE & 2 Becdrorom apartments,
Centerville, Ring 5-8679 ask
for Mr. Priicha d.

C10651
2 BEDROOM APARTMENT
Montrose Avernue. Basic
furniture 1 bedroom
airconditioned, washer. To
view telephone 2-1 722-3.

C10772
QUEEN ST. 2 a, -coditioned
master bedi~riio anrd baths
Air-conditioned ibrarv with
bed sofa and full bath. Maid's
room and bath Living room,
dining 1oori, panrtry, kitchen.
utility room i stairs screened
sleeping pochti F ll sets linen,
china, glass. flatware. Al smr all
appliances iBoth i'lectri arid
gass fridges and stoves. Washing
machine Larne lighted
furnished patio. Separate
drying yard Large storage
room. Automatic PDS burglar
and fire radio .li, r m ssterns
TV antenna Availiable t on lease
Sept. 1st CLa l i. (Chnsrit,
Real Estate, 2 1 ,1 1


C 10801
ITEMS FOR SALE
50 Ft. Aluminum Spar with
main & Jib Halyard wench-ws,
sail track & roller reefi ng
boom. Stainless riggi ig.
Matching set of dacron sails &
two jib sheet wenches $15C0.
call 24635 or write P. 0. E-.ox
N4151.


I I rE Sr ES


C10688
PACEMAKER 44ft. Luxurious
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.

C10773
WORK BOATS
Tugs Dredges's Barges -
Landing Crafts Cargo Boats
Freeze Boats Steel Twin
Screw -- Diesel Call Mi. Nash
305-635-8602.
OCEAN MASTERS CORP.


CARD OF THANKS ]
C10804








4,






THE FAMILY of the late
Pansy Ingraham Reeves, who
died July 13, 1973,
acknowledge with sincere
gratitude, the many telegrams,
cards and floral gifts sent at
their bereavement. Special
thanks goes out to Fathers
Collingwood Cooper and
Bowleg; to her male co-workers
who acted as ushers & pall
bearers; and to her female
co-workers who rendered her a
hymn and sprays of her
favourite flower the red rose.


C10809

Il
A T

Central Garage

TODAY'S
SPECIAL BUY
1971 PLYMOUTH
SPORTS FURY
$3700.00
ALSO AVAILABLE
1970 FORD MAVERICK
Maroon Automatic
reconditioned a fine
family car only $160C t.00
1971 FORD CORTINA
Yellow Automatic A
good buy $120C0.00
1972 SUNBEAM VOGUE
S,'W Blue Automatic
Ideal For the
Medium size Family $1750m.00
1970 HILL MAN NINX
S/W Gold stick shift
Fair Condition $1000 .00
1970 CHEVELLE MALIBU
4 Door Sedan Automatic
Gold Family Type
Sport Car $2500 .00
1967 CHEVROLET PICKUP P
'- Ton Automatic $600 -00
1966 OLDSMOBILE DELTrA
88 Black Automatic
Air conditioned
A fine car for only $1050 00
1972 VAUXHALL FIRENZ A
Blue, Stick shift,
One owner good
condition only $2550 00
FINANCING AVAILABLE
COME IN AND SEEUS
Oakes Field near
Police Barracks
Phone 3-4711.
C10659
AT MOTOR CENTRE
WE HAVE
THE USED CAR
FOR YOU
1970 V/WAGON BUG
Rolls Royce hood
simulated spare wheel
trunk in very good conditior-n
at ONLY $1,600 00
1970 HILLMAN MINX
radio W/W tyres O.N O.
new paint work for
ONLY $2,500.00
:170 TOYOTA CRO0V-dr
O.N.O. New paint work Racr-io
A/C P/S P/B ice box W/Wtywres
in very good condition at
ONLY $2,500.00
1970 HILLMAN MlIX Rac=io
W/W Tyres O.NO. new pai nt
work for ONLY $1,300.00
1972 VAUXHALL VICTOR
SL O.N.O. in perfect conditicDn
at ONLY $2,000.00
1970 V/WAGON 1300 BLJG
with tape at ONLY $1,300.CD0
1969 CHEVY MALIBU AJC
Radio W/W tyres P/S P/B ai
ONLY $900.00
MECHANIC SPECIAL -'19f6
MUSTANG AT ONI Y
$300.00
MOTOR CENTRE LIMITED
THOMPSON BLVD.,
OPP. DAVIS ST.,
P. O. BOX N-3741,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
PHONE 5-6739


FOR SALE

10 777
(OV ING SALE! Wh ite
,rri.ought iron dinnette -.set
$200. stereo $100, lamrn=s,
v c- iilin cleaner, overstuff ed
f-1,nr, potted plants aind
ni sC lamieous items. C all
'31 1

C 10().9
On Steel Hull 125 ft. x 23 f t.
S5 ft Draft Powered by 1
Njvn 343 Cat Diesel
1 ib Ton Unite Crane
SC.irgo Hatch 14 x 24
ICrgo Hatch 14 x 36
Double Bottom. In Excelle-nt
Shape Duty Paid.
F or further informati on
contact Mr. Sidney San Iss,
Tieasure Cay, Abaco, Bahamn-as.
C 10803
1 500-LB. ICE MACHINE,. 1
N.C.R. Cash Register, Tables,
Chair s. Light fixtures, speaker rs,
1 apt. size refrigerator, air
condc itioners, liquors, 3 sof as,
and many more call 22619 10
a.m. to 7 p.m.


MARINE SUPPLIES
C10635
F OR SALE 31 fctot
BLRTRAM Sports-fisherma-nn,
$15.500. (Firm). Telephoirne
5-4641


Dead, she is just


THE INGRAHAM
FAMILY.
C10795
The family of Mrs. Agnes A.
Davies, wish to thank the many
friends for their messages and
cards of condolence, as well as
floral contributions which they
received during their
bereavement. Also special
thanks to Bishops Michael
Eldon, Donald Knowles,
Canons Addington Johnson,
E.W.G. Holmes, Rev. Irvin
Johnson and Demeritte
Funeral Home.
Mr. and Mrs. S. Edwin P. Davies
and Family. Miss Caroline Price
(sister) Messrs. J. Hartman and
Lewis Taylor (nephews). The
Misses Pearl, Mildred and
Naomi Taylor (nieces).

IN MEMOiAM
C10807


IN SAD and loving memory of
our dear mother, Miss Erma
Irene Davis who departed this
life August 9th 1967.
Sleep on Mother and take your
rest,
We love you but Jesus loves
you best.
Sadly missed by one daughter,
Mrs. Marion Simon, one son,
M r. Charles Scott,
grandchildren and a host of
relatives and friends. Gone but
not forgotten.


HELP WANTED
C10782
WANTED: Rooms Division
Manager for 370 Room Hotel
Resort on Cable Beach At
least three years experience in
similar position. Apply: In
person to Personnel Office
Hyatt Emerald Beach Hotel
Cable Beach.

C10767
WANTED AT OCEAN
CAY
FOLLOWING personnel are
needed for immediate
employment in the aragonite
project at Ocean Cay Interview
will be held in Nassau Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday,
August 7, 8 and 9. If you
believe you are qualified for
one of these jobs, Phone
2-1324 for an appointment.
TRACTOR OPERATORS
WELDER, heavy and light
metal, electrical and acetylene
CLERK TYPIST, male, for
reports and inventory.
ELECTRICIAN, 3 phase.
MECHANICS (HEAVY
EQUIPMENT). Must have 5'
years experience and be willing
to be sent abroad for
specialised training at company
expense.
MARCONA OCEAN
INDUSTRIES LTD., P. O.
Box N4177, Nassau.


S HELP WANTED


I


side of Mackey Street in the
vicinity of Wulff Road,
comprising a total of 15,000
sq. ft. with a frontage of 100
ft. on Mackey Street as
shown shaded on plan below.
Warehousing structures of
approximately 4,600 sq. ft.
floor area are erected on the
site.
Futher details may be ob-
tained from Shell Bahamas
Limited, phone 2-3252.
The vendors reserve the
right not to accept the
highest or any tender.


L TRADE SERVICES I TRADE SERVICES


C10763
'1


CECIL'S FRIENDLY
GIFT SHOP
Meadow St. & Blue Hill Rd.
Gifts for Parties & Weddings
FIGURINES
GLASS SETS
CHINA SETS
SILVER SETS
RUGS,
PUNCH BOWL SETS
PLACE-MAT SETS
5-PIECE SCARF SETS, etc.
Open 3 p.m. 8.30 p.m.

C10798
THE ELECTRONIC LAB
TAYLOR STREET
Specialist in repairing sewing
machine, Radio, watches,
jewellery and all electrical
appliances.


I


C1Ob6b

Plidor'S Customs

Brokerage Ltd.
Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. 0. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-3796
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434

AiRT SUPPLIES

C10683
COMPLETE range of artists'
supplies. Oils, acrylics, canvas,
easels, etc. Bahamian Paint
Supply Ltd., Bay St. Phone
2-2386, 2-2898.


I .


-- - ---


C10723
USED CAR mechanic come in
at Central Garage and ask for
Kendal Major.

C10787
BARCLAYS BANK
International Limited P. O.
Box F2404 Freeport requires
confidential executive
secretary able to type at 50
w.p.m. and take shorthand at
80-100 w.p.m. Applicants must
have at least 3 years
commercial experience
Bahamian only please
contact Mr. H. Spiers. Phone
27466 Nassau or telephone D.
R. Martin 352-5391, Freeport.

C10789
GERMAN SPEAKING lady
required for manageress
position for real estate
development company. Must
be able to compose and type
own correspondence in English
& German, deal with public,
supervise staff & accounts.
Please reply in writing stating
experience & salary
requirements to Love Beach
Clubs Ltd. P. O. Box 6202,
Nassau.
C10794
LYFORD CAY CLUB
REQUIRES a young lady to
work at our pool to be life
guard and to teach swimming
and diving.
Must be qualified swimming
instructress
Must have a certificate for life
saving
Have a full knowledge of water
safety
An attractive appearance and
pleasant personality
Must be Bahamian
Please write giving full details
of age, experience, and
qualifications to: General
Manager, Lyford Cay Club, P.
O. Box N7776 Nassau,
Bahamas.

C10800
STORE MANAGER
Responsible Bahamian, Age 30
to 35. Must have good
knowledge of selling beers,
spirits & French wines. Salary
$75.00 per week plus
commission. Reply in writing;
Adv. C10800 c/o The Tribune,
P. O. Box N3207, Nassau,
Bahamas.
C10799
BUSINESS DEVELOPER -
International Interior and
Industrial Design Company
with offices in Nassau requires
a self-motivated, poised and
personable individual to
develop significant new
business for the firm within the
Bahamas, the Caribbean and
southern Florida. An ability to
'meet and negotiate with
investors and top management
essential. Experience in
Marketing and Promotion
preferred. Graduate degree in
Art, Design or a related
creative field with full
understanding of Interior and
Industrial Design necessary.
Bahamians only.
Send letter with background
information to: R. Bolstad, P.
O. Box N7776, Nassau.

C10774
"QUALIFIED AUTOMOBILE
MECHANICS. Must have at
least 5 years proven experience
with good references. We are
looking for men with the
ability to turn out first class
work on all phases of
automobile repairs. Excellent
conditions and pay for the
right men.

service manager, Nassau Motor
Company, Shirley Street."

C10765
AMBITIOUS GENERAL office
clerk with typing ability, good
with figures, able to work on
own initiative. Phone 28431
tor appointment.


READ THE TRIBUNE




MACKEY STEET

COMMERCIAL SITE
Offers are invited for two
Freehold lots on the western





E' V


by Classified Counter at The Tribune or call xt.5 hNassau32 -08 in report from them. Mon.b done p.m.


Come by Classified Counter at The Tribune or call 2-1986 Ext.5 in Nassau,352 -6608 in Freeport from 9a.m. to 5p.m. Mon. to Fri. Sat 9a.m to 1p.m
I I I I I I I I I .


GRAND BAHAMA




CL ASSIFIED


IN FREEPORT TEL. 352111


READ THE TRIBUNE
NASSA"' .\D BAAHAMA /SI.4.VDS l.:'ADLIV(; NA 'SPAPRI'


M


Cr i o ii |


I





'~i~jF~
9~
;.*~il"


IIELP WANTED
C6153
REQUIRED By Bahamas Oil
Refining Company,
CONSTRUCTION
INSPECTOR. Applicant should
have at least a high school
education, however, experience
considered much more
essential.
Must have complete knowledge
of company standards and
practices covering the work
assigned for motors, turbines,
compressors and other
machinery.
Duties: Responsible to the
Construction Engineer for
ensuring that the work meets
requirements defined by the
drawings and specifications and
the workmanship is good
practice for the craft involved.
Please reply stating details of
qualifications and experience
to: Personnel Officer, P. O.
Box F-2435, Bahamas Oil
Refining Company, Freeport,
Grand Bahama.

C6151
PARTS MANAGER for
growing Automotive Supply
Company. Requirements:
Bahamian male, at least 10
years experience in automotive
parts add accessory work. Must
be able to do and supervise
sales, cardex stock control
system, stock ordering with
international trade, customs
clearing and receiving,
inventory controls and costing.
Must be bondable. Mail resume
with all references. Interviews
by appointment only. No
phone calls please.
The President, Freeport Jet
Wash and Auto Mart, Ltd., P.
0. Box F-238, Freeport, G.B.I.
C6140
METER MAN/TECHNICIAN
at Holmes Rock with minimum
of 4 years experience in all
aspects of mqter work, reading,
investigating complaints,
installation and use of check
meters, checking service
arrangements, calibration and
carrying out minor repairs,
etc.. All applicants should have
had appropriate training and be
in possession of references
attesting to good character as
well as their experience and
ability in the field. Only
persons NOT requiring a Work
Permit need apply.
Electrical Utilities Company
Ltd. P. O. Box F-170,
Freeport.
C6150
(2) SPRINKLER
PIPEFITTERS: Two Male
Sprinkler Pipefitters to work
on Construction. Must be able
to install sprinkler system and
be able to do necessary
pipefitting. Must be between
the ages of 30 and 45 years and
be able to read blueprints. High
School Education is required
with at least 7 years
experience. Salary $5 per hour.
Interested Persons Apply:
GRAND BAHAMA HOTEL,
WEST END, GRAND
BAHAMA, Personnel Office,
between the hours of 9 a.m.,
and 3 p.m., Monday through
Friday. Elon Martin, Jr.,
Personnel Director.


HELP WANTED
C6148
NEEDED: REAL ESTATE
SALES PERSON
Must be capable
of handling their own
correspondence and working
without direct supervision.
Commission basis only. Must
be member of Freeport/Lucaya
Real Estate Board or pass
exam. Applicant should have at
least two years experience in
Real Estate. Presentable car
and typing ability would be an
asset.
J. Stuart Robertson (Bahamas)
Ltd., No. 5 Savoy Bldg., P. 0.
Box F-93, Freeport, G.B.I.

C6152
GENERAL MANAGER: To
take full charge of Dairy
operation and ice cream
production. At least five years
current producing milk plant
experience at Managerial level.
PLANT SUPERINTENDENT:
Experienced in Dairy Plant
operation. At least three years
recent milk plant working
experience in Supervisory
capacity. Required to oversee
plant co-ordination as well as
supervise office management.
REFRIGERATION &
ELECTRICAL ENGINEER:
Must be experienced in all
phases of maintenance and
repair of 'specialized dairy
equipment. Certificates of
proficiency and proof of
experience required.
Apply: GRAND BAHAMA
DAIRY PRODUCTS LTD.,
Queen's Highway, P. 0. Box
F-17 Freeport, G.B.

C6149
M U R S E RY MAN
HORTICULTURAL: To
supervise and maintain
operation of Landscape
Nursery. Prepare schedules for
production and maintenance
programs. Supervise Landscape
Construction on job site. At
least five years previous
experience in supervisory
capacity.
E X P E RI E N C E D
GARDENERS: Previous
experience necessary. All
duties related to Nursery work
and outside maintenance.
OFFICE MANAGER: To
handle all business
administration of Landscape
Nursery. Billings and
Accounting procedures
through to monthly financial
statements. Horticultural
background necessary to be
able to converse intelligently
with clients and prospective
customers.
Apply: Lucaya Nursery &
Landscaping Limited, Pioneer's
Way, Freeport, G.B., P. O. Box
F-252.

THE TRIBUNE


CLASSIFIED ADVS.

BRING

RESULTS FAST


Ervin has called that an
impossible condition to meet.
The committee cannot identify
what it wants, Frvin said,
because it hasn't any idea what
exists.
The tape recordings at issue
are conversations between
Nixon and key aides, including
Dean, and are believed to
include discussion of last year's
burglary of Democratic
National Committee
headquarters in the Watergate
office building and the
subsequent attempts to cover
up the scandal.
Dean testified at the Senate
Watergate Committee hearings
that he had been present at and
taken part in several
discussions of the Watergate
affair.


She is not
a way.

Thank you


a I


-L


mI


- I .'


IITRADE SERVICES
C10638
PATIO AWNINGS
AND CARPORTS
HURRICANE AWNINGS,
SHUTTERS, PANELS
John S. George,
& Co. Ltd.,
For free estimates and prompt
service call 28421.

C10637
T.V. ANTENNAS Boosters for
homes, apartments and hotels.
Sales and services. Call Douglas
Lowe 5-9404 WORLD OF
MUSIC, Mackey Street next to
Frank's Place.

C10632

NEED A PROFESSIONAL
HANDYMAN
Call Odd Job Enterprises. We
do anything anytime.
Telephone 42724 55191
Quick Service


NIXON REFUSES
From Page 2
always have been, at the heart
of our constitutional system. It
is supported by the unvarying
practice of 184 years. It is
supported finally, and most
importantly, by the
consequences that would
follow if any other result were
to be reached."
A ruling that the President
"is personally subject to the
orders of a court would
effectively destroy the status
of the executive branch as an
equal and coordinant element
of government," the brief said.
"There is no precedent that
can be said to justify or permit
such a result.
"On the contrary, it is clear
that while courts and their
grand juries have the power to
seek evidence of all persons,
including the President, the
President has the power and
thus the privilege to withhold
information if he concludes
that disclosure would be
contrary to the public interest.-

NOT ANSWERABLE
"The President is answerable
to the nation but not to the
courts.
"The courts, a co-equal but
not a superior branch of
government, are not free to
probe the mental processes and
the private confidences of the
President and his advisers. To
do so would be a clear
violation of the constitutional
separation of powers."
The brief noted that there
are very few precedents on
which to base a claim on either
side of the argument, but said
that was because "other
branches of government have
respected claims of privilege by
the executive branch and have
recognized the inappro-
priateness of seeking resolution
in the courts of controversies
between branches of
g /iernment."
In the only previous case in
which a subpoena was served
on a President, an 1807 action
against Thomas Jefferson,
Chief Justice John Marshall
said the subpoena could be
served but questioned whether
it could be enforced.
Nixon has turned over to
Cox two documents the
prosecutor sought but has not
replied to requests for two
White House files, one on
International Telephone &
Telegraph Co. and another
identified only as former White
House counsel John W. Dean
Ill's intelligence file.
Nixon told the Watergate
Committee that while he
would not turn over to it any
of his tape recordings, he
would consider turning over
some White House documents
if the committee would specify
precisely what it wants.












Wednesday, August 8, 1973.

r l


"Stop singing 'Sweet Adeline' and tell me WHERE and
HOW you're entertaining our new client!"


'YWA... UTAFTER ME CAKE WAS GOE,
WoD o SnLU 4ee.0*___
~ "''''"" -I


W'hp Wrtbunt


SCARROLL RIGHTER'S



from the Carroll Righter Institute

/ GENERAL TENDENCIES: This is a
particularly good time to produce results in
which it is necessary to use much of the vitality that is
released today. You can easily impress others with your
ability to forge ahead. Rely more on your own intelligence.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) You have strength of mind
and body now to succeed in your aims, so don't waste time.
Concentrate on activities that are most important to you.
Make any necessary changes in travel plans.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Decide whatever is most
important to your well-being and put your ideas in operation
without delay. Strive for more harmony with associates.
Come to a better understanding with mate.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Talk with associates on
how to improve present operations, but make sure you don't
act as a "know-it-all." Evening should be for having more
harmony at home. Show more kindness to loved one.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Take the time
to come to a far better rapport with fellow workers. Take
the exercises that will improve your health. Mate would
appreciate dining out tonight. Enjoy life more.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Entertain those who have
done favors for you in the past. Think over an important
matter carefully before making a decision. Plan more
intelligent for the future. Do something nice for your mate.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) You can now improve
conditions at home and should waste little time in doing so.
Some entertaining in the evening can be very pleasurable
with kin. Do nothing that would irk others.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) It may take some travel to
obtain the information you require to improve your present
activities. Become more cooperative with co-workers. Avoid
one who likes to argue. Be more practical.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) This is an excellent day
for obtaining the data you need for a plan you have in
mind. Do those things for good friends that will let them
know you like them. They are in need of affection now.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) You have fine ideas
and can put them in operation early so be sure to do so in a
positive fashion. Don't be so demanding with others. Try not
to criticize others at this time.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) Don't confide data
that has been given you by higher-ups to others. Being
happy with those who mean a great deal to you is possible
now. Make sure that your diet is right.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) You are socially
minded now and should do something very constructive
along such lines. Improve your relations with good friends.
Gain the information you need to further your aims.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) Fine day for getting on the
good side of bigwigs and the public in general. Engage in
civic affairs and show that you are an excellent citizen.
Going on a tangent now could lead to trouble.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY ... he or she will be
one of those charming young people who is positive and
outgoing, but is not one to keep a secret very well. Direct
the education along pleasing the public in some way, or in
humanitarian endeavors. The field of investigation is fine
here, as well as government work. Spiritual training is a
must. Give some sports early in life.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make
of your life is largely up to YOU!

IA, .13IMS 0AZ Mv k-I R @


REX MORGAN. M.D.


By DAL CURTIS


WHAT WAS NO/ THE WELDON5 LEFT I'M WARNING YOU FOR IT' LL
THEIR NAME 7 AFTER WE DID/ THE LAST TIME ,TBRICE/ RIGHT i
I'M TRYING TO THINK, DIP THEY FRANK WAS / IF YOU -ON'T STOP BRICE--- B T ECEP LEAVE THE ALSOIN OTHERING JOAN, I'M
FOR ONE OTHER COUPLE, PARTY THE CAR4 CALLING THE POLICE
GORY AND I WERE BEFORE GAME
THE ONLY ONES AT 'vU
THE LAMBERTS' WHO
KNEW BARBA A










I UDGE PARKER By PAUL NICHOLS

NO! WE'VE CONCLUDED 5UT YOUR FORMER HE PROBABLY THEN 'YOU CERTAINLY Hti
SERGEANT, I HOPE IT WAS ACCIDENTAL, HUSBAND WAS NOT HIRED A PRIVATE DIDN'T PHONE DIDN'T ELLYOU
THE GUARD WON'T GET MISS FREMONT ARMED! HAVE YOU INVESTIGATOR TO AND TELL H; ANYTHING
INTO TROUBLE FOR ANY IDEA HOW HE FOLLOW ME! HE'S YOU WERE LIKE THAT
HAVING SHOT RICK! KNEW YOU WERE DONE THAT HERE
HERE AT SPENCER BEFORE!
FARMS? MAR


ARTMENT G By Ale Kotzk

WHYY 9PI YOU GET I TOLD YOU ONCE BEFORE --- I DON'T ONE CAN BE LONELY
A DIVORCE, ANN; NORM WASN'T VERY RESPONSI- UNDERSTAND-... EVEN IN THE PHYSICAL
BLE! THE CHILDREN MEANT VERY OTHER PEOPSENE
11 NOT EA5Y LITTLE TO HIM--- WR
FOR A WOMAN \
CHILDREN TO YO
MAKE FRIENDS, WHEN YOU E L
PROFESSOR WERE
ONE CAN GET MARRIED
VERY LONELY! TO HIM?








STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & overgard

ST KTE BUTT WHERE THEY ARE ME TO D "IVE'EM ARENT
UT MI KLEFFT ANK NTO-TOWJW16 ONTHE DID.THE-EE

IABO .,, uCTnDO l I q.T. LlKE.' )'.F:"T


CROSSWORD
PUZZLE
ACROSS
1. Minstrel 29. Depict
5. Sail 30. Service tree
8. Harvest 32. Criticize
goddess 34. Conceit
11. Huge toad 35. Burnish
12. One in Spain 37. Cruise port
13. Save 39. Three months


.14. Circle
15. Genius
17. Publicity
19. Acorn
:20. Valentine
symbol
.24. Before
27. Edible fish


Par time 23 min.


44. Dessert
47. Inlet
48. Poem
49. Pipe fitting
50. Sweetsop
51. Peace
52. Pronoun
53. Lease


AP Newsl


A UE 1ANIEA

0L 1 ZB
N E

L

0 lo F Illll
UIE NRL


SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE
DOWN 3. Small animal
4. Philistine deity
1. Farm building 5. Planet
2. Foreign trade 6. Concerning
discount 7. Shirley
8. Japanese sash
8 9 o1 9. Upturned nose
10. Hovel
1 3 I 16. Stained
18. Lament
16 21. Common verb
22. Tease
23. Number
20 21122 23 24. Sigmoid
25. Sinbad's bird
9 26. Wander
a 28. Tearpit
53 34 31. Ram
S33. Political graft
^ 36.Soup
S2 143 38. Hollywood
award
-rl 40. Arrow poison
41. Carry
0 42. Tied
S- 43. Remainder
S63 44. Pinnacle
45. Harem room
features 8-10 46. King


' Hallo, Mar9otl Have you come to buy some-
thing too?' Rupert joins his chum at the
shop window. "You can help me choose a
present for Pompey's birthday." Margot looks
wi;iful and points to a doll apart from the
Others. "I was hoping to buy that one with
the money my Uncle sent me." she says.
" But yesterday the shopkeeper said it wasn't


THE Make You terv CROSS-wlwd. The one with no numbers
and. except for the irrt In each Section, no order to the elites.
One hint by compnpr TIM MlcKV : Thle nine-letter word in the
Across settlion will helo von with lots of others Solutllon on
Monday.


- I-m -


Clues Acros
Executives. (8)
Regret. (3)
Legal force. (3)
Mend. (4)
Thought. (4)
Necessitv. (4)
Idges. (4)


Chess


By LEONARD BARDEN

-l III I

._ l -- :
L:t .I -" ;1



-alF .. ^-

k97311
Experienced solvers may well
consider today's puzzle too easy.
but a Soviet grandmaster f~alled
to solve it. The consequence for
him was one of the quickest
Russian Internatonal deeats
this century.
The position is from 'Tnman
v. Polugaevsky in the Hilversum
tournament. Polugaevsky (Black.
to move) didn't like 1. .. BxKt;
2 PxB. KtxQP; 3 KtxKP! or
1 . KtxKt; 2 KtxIKP! and
he naturally wasn't failing for
1 .. Q-Q2: 2 Kt-Kt6 dc. 1 . .
Q--B4 or 1... Q-Ktl are
Black's best chance, though
White keeps a strong attack.
Polugaevsky decided to solve


'ress. (4)
Furs. (6)
Boy's name. (3)
Vacancy. (7)
Tellings-off. (9)
Fastener. (5)
It once provided locomotive
power. (5)
Direction. (4)
Clues Down
Heavy roller. (9)
Goes with a holt. (3)
Helper. (9)
Dried coconut kernels. (5)
Above the dress circle, perhaps.
(.5, 4)
Inquire. (3)
Girl's name
G eEr an a iI
river. (4)
H u r r ie d.
(4)
Finish. (3)
Mow screen
(a n a Z.).
(9)
Extra. (4)
Annoy. (4)
CarD. (3) rlctridal'. .olNluot


his problem by 1 .. Q-R4.
What did he miss 7
Par times: 10 seconilt, grand-
master; 20 seconds, chess master;
45 seconds, chess expert: 2
minutes, county player; 6 min-
utes. club strength: 10 minutes.
average: 20 minutes. novice.
SOLUTION No 9734 -

'Chess Solution
1 . Q-R4?; 2 Kt-Qt3.
Resigns. Only now did Polugaev-
sky see that if 2 . QxP; 3
Kt-B3 traps his queen, while if
2 ... Q-R5: White forks kinq
and queen with 3 Kt-Kt6 ch.

Winning

Bridge
my VICTOR MOLLO
hMAY competitors to our
Char.;y Bridge congress 1'4th-
L7th August) will be new to
duplicate. The technique in
matches is much the same as at
rubber brndg. Declarer's prime
purpose is t: make his contract.
Defenders' main concern is to
beat. it.
In a piirz event match-point
corig : roduces a new clement.
The o-n;. ive now isn't so much
to make or break the contract as
to do better than the other pairs
-NS or EW-sittir.g the same
way and holding the same cards.
Ace Bobby Wolff. holder of two
world championships, gives this
example to illustrate me differ-
ence between teams and pairs
events


West
S84
AK73
S962
1086 3


for sale." Perhaps he will change his mind,"
says Rupert. "Cope in and ask him again."
So the chums enter the shop and to Margot's
surprise there is a young lady behind the
counter. "The shopkeeper is away today,"
explains the assistant. "I'm here to serve
customers. Can I help you?"
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


North
J 105
085
OKQS
AQJ94


South
A


North
3#


West leads the OK. East plays
the 06 and South the 09 How
should West continue.
The contract is unbeatable un-
less East has a void m clubs, so
ax rubber bridge or in a match,
W:-: switches to a club. If East
,.n uiff, 'he will put West in
with the OA for a second ruff.
In a pirs event this could be
fatal. f South's clubs are Kxx,
East won't ruff and West may
not live to m.ke his (?A. Other
Souths will ?core eleven tricks
and this one will score twelve, a
dlsaster-at match-point acorlng.


THERE THEY ARE
THE FACES OF
EVERY WOMAN
WHO ENIEREP
OR LEFT
998 OAK -
s,. THIS l
I PREARY

PAY! !

"I r ,.
/ ."


"You don't scare me a bit. I have workman's
compensation."


Rupert and Miss Samantha-9


TIC #AE U WOLD TALK
fAM. NE WOULD TMINKv
-- g-ag ufig


I


1











Wednesday, August 8, 1973.


12 TGhre ribunt

1 r"- Mens&womens volleyball championship BABY BOY HAS

7*1 TIIIRn FIANT


games tomorrow at C.I. Gibson gym
By OSCAR MILLER
THE BAHAMAS VOLLEYBALL FEDERRATION regular season will come to an end tomorrow
night when second place S.A.C.A. Dames take on defending knockout champions Paradise Island
Bees for top honours in the Ladies' Division and when Paradise Island Giants meet the Wardrobes
for the Men's Championship.


Both games sclduled to be
played at tire (' I Gibson (Gyn
promise to be cdi.ting and
keenly contested as top players
in the B.'.A. from the top
four teams clash to settle their
differences.
Paradise Island Bees.
de fending knock out
champions and Champions of
the Ladies' 1)ivsion, romped to
a 1 2-0 record this season.
"I he Bees squad which
operates like a smIoothly-oiled
n machine with graceful
Individual movements which in
turn leads to a graceful team
co-ordination, seems to be
much stronger this year than in
previous seas ons.
TOP PLAY RS
Leading the team is captain
Barbara Knowles, who is still
ren membered for her
ou t standing pertornmances
during the !engihsh-Speaking
Caribbean I tournament last
\ecir She provides the teani
with the needed inspiration
and all-round performance.
I op performance is again
cxpc,:ted from Winsome
Iav idson who tops the forward
line with her supreme spiking
arind blocking.
L[averne Jackman. Vivian
l.ckc\ anid l:;ine Thormpson
should provide all the back
courtt strength the Bees would
need. Margaret Albury could
crs well iind iher range and
prove to bc a terror to her
opponents with her hot spikes
S.A .cA on the other hand
could pull off anl upset only if
Linda Davis is at her best.
Standing about six feet tall
lDa\is controls the forward
position with her beautiful
dinks and well-placed spikes.
Captain Pattie Sviyonette.
despite tier dimIiutive s/e.
could tind gaps in the Bees
tightly knit defense.
LN DI:tFLE AT lD
Paradise Island giants s
c h a ni pI o in s o f t iI e
(Commonwealth League and
undefeated in nine games have
prove en a "tough nut to crack
I'he addition of brothers
Ralph and John Burrows along
with a hustling Oswald Moore
in the back court has made tihe
giants s a ruthless opponent.
Champion ot tihe Islanders
League and also undefeated in
iI re garlies is tile ,ci I tl alanced
quick-moving Wardrobes Star,,.
J oey Demerittc wtho last
week peeled off litteen straight
poInts against S.A.(C A men
te1m with is o 1 rhan d
top-spin service is s, i kini .1
Cpc at p ertoriman.l I
I hu rsda\ night.
Led b f inc .,ikuid
plat ing tfr( )in ali, l ert \
I ia kes and sharp spikl irm
\irk (lark. L eslli C rtwrriglht
IIId WalstIon I rancis', tih


KEY PLAYERS BEHIND Paradise Bees winning the
Bahamas Volleyball Federation's 1973 league
championship: (from left) Winsome Davidson, Wendy
Jackman, Margaret Albury and Erica Jackman (Birds) seek
double championship tomorrow night against S.A.C.A.
Dames PHOTO: Richard Rodgers.


Wardrobes could ctmerge as the
men's championss .
Bo t the Ladies and Men's
National Squad which won
respective championships in


last year's l:nglish-Speaking
Caribbean Tournament 'l1
del fend their titles next month
in the annual ('aribbcean
Tournament.


2 junior golfers back from


Arnold Palmer Academy
By GLADSTONE THURSTON
SEVENTEEN-YEAR-OL) VERNON LOCKHART and
sixteen-year-old Rory Higgs, son of Bahamas Hoerman Cup
player Fred Higgs, returned Saturday night from a successful
three weeks golfing course at the Arnold Palmer Golf Academy in
Vermont.
Liockhart. lwho) provedt to be golf including swings. grips and
the top junior golfer ot 17 address positions. "They told
others, was sponsored hi the ml e I as gripping the club too
Bahamnas (;t c \ association as strong which caused me to
part ol their juni )r pr)graimei h.,))k. said Lockhart. As
Higgs. who \was amiiong the top for liggs. his swing, grip and
three, was selt -sprnsored ad td cess ositi onl were
"It (tlic course) was prertt\ corrected.
interestingg," ,aidl orkhart. Hi iTI R IPLAY
" e'\c played a lot 11 g)all and These changes evidently
e hit a lot ol bhlls iand ie chad were for the better as tliese
so e til ine i 11i"Ilusti l Iu 0 \\ 11 ho cI[lg gol.e.'s are presently
liciped Ius uin eC ci\ posslhile a eraC L in the lowi 'ihtii.s.


"I s\crbod\ \ I\ s i1'nendlI
ov rC here .. is like hoi llmc."
added I tgi sI ,
A.t tile \cadclll\', the\ wer'
tutored on all lthe basics of


... IT ALL ADDS UP





your reusable but unwanted

items of

clothing, tools,

appliances, clocks,

fans, etc. .. clear out


sets, garage, storeroom.. .

all can be of help

to someone else.

Donate them to





Bazalr !

OSETTA STREET

DOORS WEST OF


MONTROSE AVE


Locklart's best round on the
Academy's par 72 course was a

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ON FRIDAY
By Gladstone Thurston

BOXING ACTION explodes
at the Birdland on Friday with
two top ten rounders
featuring Bahamas light
heavyweight champ Baby Boy
Rolle against Floridian
heavyweight Rene Kinsey and
the sensational light
heavyweight Bobby Lloyd
against former West Indies
heavyweight champ Carl Baker.
Rolle, who is still awaiting
that elusive bout with world
eighth ranked light
heavyweight contender Mike
Quarry and Vincente Rondon,
is working out at the
Southerners Sporting C'entre
on Blue Hill Road, According
to his manager, Marty
(oldstein, Rolle will be facing
the hardest test of his great
career.
Recently, Rolle gave way in
two controversial bouts to
Lloyd. This had a lot of effect
on the boxing fans who treated
him with boos and hisses every
time he was introduced during
a bout. Rolle, however, will be
going out to rectify this
misunderstanding.
Kinsey, recently returned
from New York where he acted
as chief sparring partner for
Jerry Quarry who was
preparing for the lrnie Shafers
bout until Shafers received a
broken jaw, comes here with
first hand information on Rolle
received from his stable mates
Johnny "llud" Hudgins and
Lloyd. lie is said to be a crafty
and hard slugger scoring eight
knockouts out of ten bouts last
year.
OUT IN FIVE'
"If Rolle is around for the
fifth round, I'll be surprised."
said Kinsey. lie is well
qualified to make this
statement since he is
considered one of the hardest
punchers in the heavyweight
division.
Lloyd, who will he fighting
out of his division. is still
seeking a rematch with Rolle in
order to settle all disputes. In
his first bout with Rolle, he
took a controversial technical
knockout loss and in the
second bout the draw that was
given hin was even more
controversial.
The rugged Carl Baker who
was scheduled to fight Lloyd
two weeks ago but had to
retire due to the short
notification which caught him
unprepared, returned to hard


training as he eyes a re
f i g h t w ith I
heavy weight and We
heavyweight champ
Blackic. Runmour has
win for Baker Friday
in order that he gets t
bout with Boston.
Three other bouts
card for the Frid
action.
. ; jifWg


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SUCCESSFUL THREE WEEKS COURSE at the
Palmer Golf Academy. Rory Higgs (left) andV
Lockhart now head for bigger things.
76. Higgs had an 87.
Lorkhart, who has been US Baseal
playing golt for a little over 18 NEW YORK, Aug.
Nolan Rayn tied his ow
months, is riuproving by leaps League record of eight
and bounds and inder the strikeouts as he pi
California Angels to a
guidance of senior members of over the Milwaukee
the B.G A. the Bahamas can Tuesday.
have yet athr re a Ryan. 13-13, began h
avyean r representative striking out George Sc
in international competition. the second inning and ti
Young Iliggs is a "chip off the by striking Bob Colucc(
b off the fifth. Ryan finish
old block" and with both his strikeouts.
father and I other (Mrs Bervl Tom Seaver of the
Mets set the major lea
tliggs) top golfers in the when he struck out
Island his advancement is April 22. 1970 again;
limitless. Diego Padres.
In other American Le
Iliggs, who is president of Detroit rallied for a
the B.(;.A.. said that he after losing the first
doubleheader to Oaklai
contacted the administration New York Yankees
of the Arnold Palmer Academy Texas. dropping a 2-1 g
and was given good verbal taking the nightcap 3
('City gained an I Ith
reports concerning Lockhart victory over Boston: Jen
and lHiggs. "lhey were first of 12th inning single gave
all surprised at how good they White Sox a 6-5 vi
cold play when they got Cleveland. and Minneso
pthe gt Baltimore 4-2 before
there." commented Mr. Higgs. second game of a twinbil


KID CRUZ (pictured at decisioned former lightweight
right) who unanimously champ Freddie Major in a four


LIGHT HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMP Baby Boy Rolle
returns to the ring Friday against Floridian heavyweight
Rene Kinsey.


SUMMERVILLE LOSES
MIAMI BEACH. I:LA.. AUG. 8
(AI')--Oliver Wright. formerly of
Kingston. Jamaica. and now of
Miami, won the Florida State
University heavy-w eight
championship TIuesday night with a
six-round technical knockout oser
Miamian James Summerville.
Wright. 197, gave away 40
pounds to Summerville and then
outpunched the heavier boxer
before Summerville's corner urged
referee Eddie I.ckert to end it after
2:46 in the sixth.
There were no knockdowns in
the scheduled 10-rounder. Wright's
record is 9-1 while Summerville's is
8-4-5.
The 2,364 fans on hand also saw
New York junior welterweight
Saoul Mamby, 138'2, stop Miguel
Morales, 137, of Puerto Rico, after
the sixth round. The bout was
halted on the suggestion of Dr.
Robert Lavey when Morales
suffered a sprained knee. Morales
had limped to his corner after the
sixth-round bell. evidently having
suffered the injury in the closing
seconds.


turn title PUTTEMANS JUST
Bahamas MISSES WORLD MARK
.st Indies STOCKHOLM (AP)--Emile
Puttemans of Belgium missed his
Boston attempt at an international track
it that a meet Tuesday.
is a must The 26 year-old Belgian gained
his return an impressive lead at the halfway
mark and built up a 25-yard
advantage which he kept to the
are on the end. His time of 13:14.6 was a
ay night record for the Olympic Stadium
here and a world best this year.
The former stadium record of
13: 16.6 ras set by former world
record holder Ron Clarke of
Australia seven years ago.
The Belgian set his world record
of 13:13.0 at Munich's Olympic
Games last year.
Dick Quax of New Zealand,
unbeaten in four previous starts
over the distance in Europe this
year, was second and bettered the
national record for the third time in
less than two weeks to 13:18.4.
European steeplechase Record
holder Anders Garderurgd of
Sweden came in third, clocking
13:32.8 for another national mark.
1,500 meters: (1) Rod Dixon,
New Zealand 3:37.99 (2) John
Walker, New Zealand 3:38.15, (3)
Knut Kvalheim, Norway 3:39.05,
- (4) Tom B. Hansen, Denmark
3:40.53, (5) Graham Crouch,
Australia 3:40.98, (6) Chuck la
Bent, United States 3:41.15.
800 meters: (1) Rick Wohlhuter,
United States 1:45.06, (2) Byron
Dyce, Jamaica 1:46.12, (3) Mark
Winzenreid, United States 1:46.21,
(4) Juris Luzins, United States
1:46.84, (7) Johann van Wezer,
S Belgium 1:47.78 (8) Bill Hooker,
Australia 1:49.69.
100 meters: (1) Christer
Garpenborg, Sweden 10.67, (2)
S David Stokes, Australia 10.71.
-' HALL OF FAME GAME
COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. (AP)-
S Jim Spencer's two-run single in the
seventh inning gave the Texas
Rangers a 6-5 victory over the
S Pittsburgh Pirates Monday in the
annual Hall of Fame exhibition
Arnold baseball game.
Vernon
ADMIRAL'S CUP
COWES, ISLE OF WIGHT
I (AP)- The Brazilian yacht Saga
reached the finish point first
8 (AP) Saturday in the 200 miles channel
n American race, the first event counting
consecutive toward the Admiral's Cup.
etched the Saga was closely pursued by two
6-5 victory American challengers, the Salty
S Brewers Goose, skippered by Jesse Phillips
of Dayton. Ohio, and Charisma,
is streak by with Robert Direcktor of
ott to end Mamaroneck, NY. in command.
ed the mark The winner is decided on
io, who led handicap.
hed with 13 There was no report on the finish
of the other American boat in the
New York race, Lightning, skippered by Ted
ague record Turner of Atlanta.
10 straight In all. 48 yachts from 16 nations
st the San were vying for the first leg of the
Admiral's Cup, considered the
ague games, world championship of yachting.
2-0 victory
game of a CZECHS BEAT ITALIANS
nd 8-4; the VIENNA (AP)- C/echoslovakia
solit with captured a decisive 3-1 lead over
game before Italy Monday in the group "B"
i-1; Kansas finals in the Davis Cup, and will
inning 7-6 meet Australia, the winner of the
Asia zone.
ry Hairson's The winning point was won by
the Chicago Jiri Hrebec who defeated Italy's
ctory over Corrado Barazzuti 9-7. 6-1 6-4 in
ta defeated the match In Prague. One more
losing the single was yet to be played, but it
II 10-4. can not change the Czechoslovak
lead.


round preliminary event
Monday night is lifted shoulder
high by his corner man the
Bahamas middleweight champ
Rennie Pinder. Entering the
ring as the underdog, Cruz
surprised all with his sharp
punching (SHOWN LEFT)
With the end in sight for the
courageous Afro Davis, he
turns around but finds
Cleveland Williams' left to the
midsection awaiting him.
Williams won by a technical
knockout. In the third of the
preliminary bouts on the Elisha
Obed/Doug Rogers main event
card, heavyweight contender
Bob Freeze, taking a 10 pound
weight advantage in the ring
with him, stopped K. O. Grant
midway in the third round for
a technical knockout. Grant
who was slated to fight Miami's
sensational light heavyweight
Bobby Lloyd never stood a
chance against the hard
slugging Freeze during their
scheduled six rounder.


Lister Blackstone (Caribbean) Ltd.


















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COUNCIL OF

LEGAL EDUCATION

PROFESSIONAL

LAW SCHOOLS LIBRARIES


WANTED



The Council of Legal Education is in the process
of acquiring library holdings for the Professional
Law Schools and is interested in buying the
following:-
1. The Statutes and subsidiary legislation of the
following countries:
(i) Antigua
(ii) Barbados
(iii) Bahamas
(iv) Belize (British Honduras)
(v) Cayman Islands
(Vi) Dominica
(vii) (;rnada
(viii) Guyana
(ix) Jamaica
(x) Montserrat
(xi) St. Christopher/Nevis/Anguilla
(xii) St. Lucia
(xiii) St. Vincent
(xiv) Tortola (British Virgin Islands)
(XV) Trinidad and Tobago
(XVi) Turks and Caicos Islands.

2. Old editions of the Statutes and subsidiary
legislation of the sixteen (16) countries named
in 1 above.

3. Text books whensoever published, theses,
monographs, articles and other works whether
published or unpublished on the common
law, statute law, or customary law of any of
the said countries.
4. Law Reports of Barbados, Guyana, Jamaica,
Trinidad and Tobago, the West Indies, the
United Kingdom and other Commonwealth
countries.
5. Private Law Libraries.
Any person wanting to sell or otherwise dispose
of any materials as described above should contact
the Librarian, Council of Legal Education, P. O.
Box 231, Mona, Kingston 7, Jamaica, or,
Telephone 927-6661 Extension 329, University of:
the West Indies, Trinidad.


~1N4-~


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