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 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: August 7, 1973
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03413

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Irtibutw


(Regiered with Postmaster of Bahamaa for postage concenons within the Bahamas.) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newsaoer


VOL. LXX, No. 212 Tuesday, August 7, 1973. Price: 1 5 Cents


LAST MINUTE EMBARGO BY FISHERIES MINISTRY

HAS SPANISH WELLS FISHERMEN ANGRY


Bahamas crawfishermen


stand to lose out badly


to


By NICKI KELLY
WHILE BAHAMIAN CRAWFISHERMEN remain in port Florida fishing interests are reaping thousands of
dollars in catch, a Spanish Wells captain said today.


AKES UP IASS Pig farmers want 10 cents
TAKES UP HIS Pi


POST IN BAHAMAS
RONALD 1. Spiers. of South
Londonderry, Vermont. was
sworn in as the first United
States Ambassador to the
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas of Friday
Mr. Spiers, a
career foreign
service officer of
class one, had been
serving as director
of the Departiment
i of State's Bureau
of Politico-Mini-
tary Affairs,.
with the rank of
4 assistant Secretary
SPIERS of State since
August 1969.
Mr. Spiers was born on July
9, 1925 in South Orange, New
Jersey. He received his B.A.
degree from Dartmouth
College .n 1'.' .Ate; s.,.iitg
as a Lt. (J.G.) in the U.S. Navy
from 1943-1946. He received
his Master of Public
Administration degree from
Princeton University's
Woodrow Wilson School of
Public International Affairs in
1950. He entered Government
service in 1950 as a Foreign
Affairs Officer with the
Atomic Energy Commission
and joined the Department of
State in 1955.
Mr. Spiers served as
Counselor of Embassy for
Political Affairs in London
from 1966-1969, and from
1962-1966 he was deputy
director, then director, of the
Office of NATO and Atlantic
Politico-Military Affairs in the
Bureau of European Affairs.
From 1957-1961 he was
officer-in-charge of
Disarmament Affairs.
He has served as a member
of nany delegations to the UN
and other International
organizations, to NATO and
in the arms control field,
including. Nuclear Test Ban
negotiations, Non-Proliferation
Talks, and SALT.
Mr. Spiers is married to the
former Patience Baker, they
have three daughters and one
son.


STORY ON PM's HOUSE
THE MIAMI Herald Sunday
published a front-page article
on Prime Minister Lynden
Pindling's purchase of his new
home Woodstar on Highland
Drive.
The story, by staff writer
Mike Baxter, details certain
financial transactions allegedly
involved in the sale of Mr.
Pindling's home on Soldier
Road and a three-storey office
building on Dowdeswell Street.


rise in pork prices due



to higher US feed costs


INCREASES IN THE COST OF IMPORTED ANIMAL FEEDS
have led Bahamian pig farmers to seek Government approval for a
ten-cent rise in pork prices, and have sparked a move to begin
producing feed locally.
Feed costs have been experimenting with .1
spiralling for months under the soy bean-substitute. Animal
impetus of both inflation and feeds need a high protein
shortages. In March the content, and soybean has been
increases forced the local the protein additive most
farmers to raise their prices frequently used. Mr. Pinder
from 70 cents to 90 cents per would not identify the
pound of pork. soybean-substitute. Hle said the
A spokesman for the substitute, although it has a
Bahamas livestock and lower protein content than
Agric ultu ra I Farmers' soybean, is 16 percent protein
'4ssoci ft Ion IBLAFA) and "that's good enough for
culfiulleii ius iim iiiig that us."
the farmers are now seeking Mr. Pinder could give no
governmentt approval to hike projection of when local
their prices up to I a pound. farmers would begin full-seihle'
BLAFA assistant secretary production of feed ingredients.
elementt Pinder said an as a certain amount of
application for the price experimentation will be
increase was sent to the Prices required to find the right
Commission early last week by formula.
president Ilenry Burrows, ITH
although pork prices are not COMMONWEALTH
controlled by the Price Control
Regulations. CONFERENCE DISCOR
"We're practising voluntary
controls because we don't want OTTAWA (AP) Discord
to come under Government T u e s d a y cl ou ded
price controls," Mr. Pinder Commonwealth summit talks
said. on the world's trade and


lie added that BLAFA
expected a favourable reply to
the application in "eight to ten
weeks."
LOSS
Meanwhile, farmers are
suffering a loss of up to ten
cents on every pound of pork
they sell, Mr. Pinder said. His
view was confirmed by pig
farmer Mike Stubbs.
A shortage of soybeans, a
key ingredient in animal feeds,
has resulted in a general
shortage of feed itself.
That fact led the U.S.
Government in June to impose
limits in the export of animal
feeds.
On July 25 the export
restrictions were tightened
further. however, Mr. Burrows
went to the U.S. and on behalf
of the Association won a
100-ton per week quota.
Bahamian pig fanners need
about 150 tons of feed each
week, Mr. Pinder said.
As a result of the shortage,
BLAFA has asked the
University of Gainsville to
conduct a study of feed
production. The ultimate goal
is to make the Bahamas
completely independent of
U.S. feed supplies.
Mr. hinder said some of
BLAFIA's members are already
growing one ingredient, guinea
corn, and one farmer is


POLICE INVESTIGATING DEATH OF

GARDENER FOUND WITH STAB WOUNDS


THE DEATH of a Mackey
SStreet gardener, Vernal Gibson,
is being investigated by officers


NEW SHIPMENT
OF

LAMPS

LLYMAISON FIURNIITU
NASSAU, FREEPORT
V -":S


of the Criminal Investigation
Department.
G(ibson, employed by
Modernestic (arden ant Pet
Supply, died after he iwas taken
to the Princess Marganret
Hospital at 2:30 p.m. Sunday.
lie was sutiering trom stab
wounds in thie chest, a C.I.1).
officer said.
It is understood that a
woman is assisting the police in
their inquiries.


D


money woes after Prime
Minister lEdward Heath of
Britain rebuffed separate
Australian and Indian calls for
special action.
The 32-nation conference, at
its halfway stage, faced the
problem of concerning their
approach to a series of
international negotiations
slated in the next few months.
It looked as though the task
would not be easy.
('lashes of political
philosophy as well is Idual
loyalties marked thie opening
stages of the discussion
Monday. Britain, which joined
the Furopean ('Common Market
Jan. 1, was at the centre of
both.
I he first cane when (outgh
W h11 I la 1Australia's
newlyV-eclected Labour Prime
Minister. called attention to
the latter-davy danger of
multination a al com npanies
overriding the interests of
national governments They
haie a life of their oi\n. lie tol
his colleagues. I'he industries
and output of a nontinally
developed country like
Australia, he said, was
controlled from overseas. This
tlcprlv-ed the state of real
control over its own economy.
A scornful Heath dismissed
W h i t I an'is complaint as
"economic nationalism" irking
the burly Australian visibily,
conference officials reported.
I'he British leader then spoke
of the ('ommon Market's
approach to the issue. It
encouraged the free movement
of capital across national
frontiers It favoured the
liberalization of trade.
The second clash was over
an Indian plea for Britain once
within the ('Common Market,
for a one year extension of
arrangements permitting
Commonwealth Countries to
go on trading in the British
Market as in the past. This
would mean continuation of
preferences on both sides.


ihe Bahamians put into port
Friday afti learning tlhe
lirnistry of I)evelopmentr had
put a last irinute embargo
on crawfish licences until
ALugust 20.
The Spanish Wlls fleet had
already sailed i c talet the
opening of the season on
August I when they learned no
licences hlad been granted loc i
exporters to b!uo\ or sell
crawfish
Although the crawrfishermen
were not barred from fishing,
the Ministry asked in a radio
broadcast Jul\ 31 that tlhey
"cooperate full" by .1, IL. ;ri
their activities until Aiugust 20.
The reason riven was that
the l Ministi \ of ).h,ixlop nt
was finahsiis g 1 ;''(:);alrnirre of
rco rgani/cation (, Blahanlian
fisheries inJliic.lmn amendcnting
the regulation s.
The fleet. ..... i ..', large
vessels andt fiV' snall oines.
were located at Ragged Island
and South \inlros and had
already don e day'sr fishing
when they hmeard the r.ew.1 I
(( Iklll'l I I 1(1\
"Between us we had already
caught about 7,000 pounds of
crawfish. \When we left the
fishing grounds. Florida b'its
were putting down hundreds .fA
traps." T[he Trihunei's
informant said.
Although the Bahamianr s had
a chance to sell their catch t,
the Americans they' refused to
d(o so as it might encourage
them to come into Bahamian
waters in greater numbers. The
Tribune was told.
Instead the Spanish Well,
boats put into Nassa' witith
their catch and were allowed
by tihe M inistr of
Developine ti toi s~el tIr
crawl ish locally to hotels and
restaurants.
BAI) POSITION
"We didn't take a loss, biu
right now we're in a bad
position unless we can fish."
the Spanish Wells captain said
The fishermen sell the crawfish
tails at $2.50 per lb.
lie estimated that the local
fleet had invested abi uit
S40,000 in ltel arid gas to List
them for the first tlou \i eks
of fishing. "Anid unless wie c.in
get outi again before the 20th,
each (of s 'will lose oxer
S1000," tie added.
I'he captain said that when
hie left the crawfish grouinds
thie .\rillcrican boat tfslI ing
alongside had jiust put do i\I
55( traps
None of tIle fishermen could
understand- why they had to
put into port until changes
could be rinade in the fishing
regulations. "'If they' are going
to allow us to rUse pots it will
be too late for this season
,airr way, anil it the\ want us to
pay for fishing licenses wec
could do that when we caeirc
back in," I' he l'ribiunce
informant said.
('raxwfish licenses to
exporters ,are usually issued in
July, but members of tlhe
Bahamas Fisheries Association
did not learn of the ban onil
licences until seven hours
before the season was to open.


BISHOP'S BIRTHDAY
SERVICE AT ST. MARY'S
Till LORD Bishop of
Nassau and the Bahamas, the
Rt. Rev. Michael II. Fldon, will
be the celebrant at the 7 a.n.
Mass tomorrow, his birthday iat
St. Mary the Virgin Church.
Virginia Street.
This is the church of his
baptism and also near tos hinm
because his father, the late
Ion. Sidney Eldon, was a life
deacon, vestryman and
treasurer of this church for
many years.


.' L -? .. . .
"'] -h _

E4 -. -';-t


I --B B
THE ROMANTIC IN
NASSAU The Romantica,
now known as the Patricia
III, was seized by U.S.
Customs agents in Miami last
week. She is berthed For
repairs at the Merrill-Stevens
shipyard. Here she is seen on
one of her recent trips to
Nassau tied up at the Nassau
Yacht Haven. It is believed
that the boat is owned by
Robert Vesco.
PHOTO: Philip Symonette


VESCO'S MEN


REPORTEDLY

THREATEN

SWRIT SERVER
NEW YORK (AP) -
('lub-bearing men guard the
residence of American
financier Robert L. Vesco in
Nassau against attempts to
serve him legal papers, the Wall
Street Journal said today.
According to the paper's
story, Lois S. Yohonn, of the
legal firm Shea, Gould.
Climenko & Kramer, was
"threatened" by such men last
week after she threw a
summons and a complaint in a
civil suit on Mr. Vesco's front
Slawn.
3 The law firm represents


RAPE ACCUSED yacht believed owned by


CLAIMS WOMAN

'LED HIM ON'
.A IN iF'corrndiustofr, accused
if r piiniig i s;?- iii xl
Arerx .' i '. so ii i r ie night
of their a;cquaintltance. denied
the haliire iwhen lie op'rlnted his
teIstlii Inon II\ i lth S prenie
(Co~ uil I 'eo;;' \i l5 i'is .c J.tunes
S tll h this morning.

SlC li\ ri h il i. Waltnon
Annri le, i. (of R,s-. It:,i M rc -t
saudl thilt l did ot! force tihe
wornII nItoii ha~ll rg se xuall
inlert i i t' e with hlor hly
th i.'l I;' l 1' inm' an!itU f ~l
*l' b i ,.,r\ I "7
lie mi et tie girl i'rr two
()tihci \TI rioeian wo n who

\tlerdvk Balr ol the lMontagul
Ber cli Hote'l suirl ih \ :et hc er
on t 'l u \a i\ tos thr e thBaihlitas
I lies asked him llo invite her
to tiicii tible .iiid hIe did so;
aIl'r irskg lictsh to hi.s a dance
witl him. lie fauld
le Ic al n ed \\ ilih tilhe gi;

so l he ,n l h ie \.i ld kiss rand
pull hlin isr to i her IHe
caressed ier with his ir.inl
\\thile the\ di ced, lie said
Arml brisler said th fr otsi il
.o imnei. Kareci and Robi: ai-'.'
dsl.ced with tlinr but. at 0iisr
point, Karen cominplained thJ!
lie was paying more attemii', i
to the colmplainrant than 1r her
and her other friend
IHis conversation with lith
girl, a school counselor lcinl!itr
on several topics inchidiniir ra,.
relations in the Bihai'..is.
places of interest .iuS d thlirgs 1 ,.
do while here. fhe s.iul
"Shie q(1uestioned ie .1 'bout
prostitutes on the island
Where they hung iut .a -d
what they got for a \ ."
Air ibrister said lie told hir hi
dul not have the answer to aWi\
of thC'ese (questions, lie siid
LOVI RS
A\nd, tle, also t.lkued
'i ouit love-nmakinrg \ ik .
were the best love imaikrs 'r 1
tIle r world Am eric an s. I ,i ',.i
(an,idian or Bahainian.rt She fli
! it \clntiure any opinion tii
lwhio .nrllong itlese win tr ie
grc,.tesi bt' l shre told Mt ii' i.it
slre could nolt litd al.n\ tui.ll
will licr bo\ -fnend at it i :;r
.il lie \\as A\ Iutrl '.' "
.riulrister sai l she tl l hniil .
-lie IcFrench were rnce t'!e
gtctes't lovers bul the
l3,ih.iliailalli t.iave taken mx 't
Irom thili ,'" e I said lie t todl ie
His testimony \ was broken
by th coue courtss rsoUirinC'it
this ifterrnoon. is i [ts! t iin -\
conit tnlued whien rt is r .'l
altci tlhe lunch Ieon brejrK
In stat lem enlt \\f iI, ,
IelId to ltlw' courtI b dc


lie diove til Ve W o0 a1 7n0 i tI0 ,'
caves aC m d t ihey pl. c.i \\ %k !I
e.ich olrtir RLi il lhe1 I reC
interrupted b\ the % ihead -li.l !
ot cars passing tlie area.
So. hie drove her ir o Wintliiin
I states and resuinied x t.it ti'0
had left off. After some trnie tn
the front seat. he became tiired
and suggested the\t go into i th
back of the tour bits hfe v.is
driving. It xwas there itial she
allowed hint to hiave 1 e\ \I'it
his lie said.
ilowever, before thIe were
through she said sIhe did not
wantt to do it an\ more" an id
asked him to stop.
She told him she had nert r
gone that far with iher
boyfriend, he said. "I told her
if she felt she was forced, she
should tell the police." arnd
drove her to the I astern PIslice
Station, he said.


Vesco,claim $70,000 due


The 121-foot yacht Patricia III, believed to belong to financier
Robert Vesco, was seized by U.S. Customs agents in Miami last
week.


.t hfI 1 e sk irme' time a t' S
I )isin rl I i lI g issued
temnporary restraining order
last Fridal toI present tlhe
vessel saying beyond U .S
tenr ir l w',,ters Ih le Patricia
Ill is presenthi berthed for
repairs ,at lt e .Merrill-Steven
shipt .ird.
T in' ( I':f or' agents atI'
cla dining h!,it nt Jul\ wr\isi paid
x 'hensi thi' Prtiric 111 was sold
last spring i\ a l)utIch charter
company tlor S1.4 nlilon, and
thal S 7(I.0)0 is dlue if their
u\ er s,'s an \nllrrcall .
I le restrIiining order wvas
isueid after attorneys ti5r the
nte nat i o n a l (' ont rol
( 'orpof ,iaion ot ) uinecticut .'
laIiiled the lirin \\, s 'lufl' d
w i e utnde \ e ts c
11aiiJViCe l 't' n1t IFhe \ wxias the
Patrica III as partial redress tor
J, ii iinlll tii 1'5 li .1clam111
.iga11int Vesco TIhe \irairr
IIerall reported trodsta
I lie Patricia Ill as
i' 1 viotl',Il known as iIhe
Rtonuiiaitic. which anchored at
tile \assa u Harbou, r Cilub
several weeks ago. I he I rinbun
\. is told at the tlir e thai all
iloi tio',latun about the ve'swel
could be obtained through
(olumbus 'I rust ( Cotip.any
A IIOLDl)IN;
( olumbus Irust. according
tO the Securitm s I changee
( 'o11111isslon, is onei f Mtl r.
Vsc,'s holdings
('I attorneys sasii Mr.
V co bu, inght the \acht last
\pi l si part ol his fItfort to
make his ,iasss pr tablee an!td
itha holding the boat reaillv
tl',t means Ire'ti/ng a. \'Vescor
assrt.
\ I -irshiIW tI I N. Y. \' acht
broker' )aniC Rhiodus was


rep;,rted by The Herald as
sa inge that he sold the
Roniantica in late April to the
Andean creditt Corporation of
Panama. a firm I'C attorney
sa\y \r Vesco controls.
before the vessel, built in
I'ti8 in England, was owned
bI the Orange Yacht Charter
Inc rut Roosendaal. Holland.
"Just after the sale," Rhodes
recalls, "1 had a call from Tony
\V'scL.o (thie financier's
Mliami-based son) who asked if
the Rom antica could
ac.conrrmodate a Cigarette
Speedster, an ocean-racing
boat." The Herald said.
Mr. Rhodes inferred from
that that it was Mr. Vesco who
bought the yacht. The Herald
reported.
WIFI:'S NAME
(Continued The Herald:
"Another Vesco connection
emerged Mondayl on July 23
Merrill-Stevens received a
S40.000 cheque tofr repairs on
the Patricia 111. signed by
Patricia Melzer. That s Vesco's
wife's maiden name
"Later that chequei was
withdrawn in fa\our of a bank
transfer from C'oluuimbus Trust
Company of Nassau. a
su b sid i ary t the
V esco- c controlled Baha mas
C' o m on o n e ,a II t h
Bank." According to fhe
Herald. Merrill-Stervens work
rep o rt edl 1 included
modifications to the Patricia
II to enable it to carry a
Cigarette Speedster
Judge Robert J. Ward's
restraining order expires
August 13 bI which time he is
expected to have acted on a
permanent cirder pressed by,
IC'(C attorneys.


RETAIL PRICE INDEX UP


NEARLY lp.c. IN JUNE


lHE RETAIL PRICE INDEX continued to inch upwards in
June. rising ahnost one percent to a point 9 percent above the
Novenber/Decetmber, 1971 base period, figures released by the
Department iof Statistics reveal.


I he .tin n1 inl'deI \w as up
nine ten' ths l a point o er lhl
\lai le', el. an increase ,t u.. S




2 FINED $100

ON GUN CHARGE
I \ 1, innie Stree' t .indl
hi htriisot n Read l ess lder' ts.



lbItor is Il)\er co rnt ('hiet
\i gLstiat It' \lhton l rc< rules this
nmm ning
(Cliaulemui arniett Newbold.
.2, ind tl'\ ithia l)D \eau\, 2or.


I he charge arose out of an
alleged assault complaint which
police officers \e e called to
investigate. Ihe police arrested
D)eveaux. caretaker, in
connection % with the matter,
but slie said thi' gun was her
hb y friend's.
They were charged S100
each or three months in prison
by Magistrate Iercules who
also ordered that the gun
be confiscated.


I ood costs went up only
nirine-tentihs of a point, while
clothing and tloowear prices
dropped three-tenths of a

tir tiniiisport went up 1 .
poistiint, us,,ing rose a full
poillft. he.th a,ulnd personal care
lLic.I, 0 i poir)!uns, and other
gom l, ,tmid sI ices, rose 1 3

.'scctrling no hisc Statistics
l)epail menrinni thi e ease in the
ho1usin,1g niT Ili was due to price

nrllt\clnnlts on unfturlnished
re nit iIs. tulrnriture costs,
cleaners and insecticides. The
increases offset small drops in
the cost of television antennas
and boosters and bed linen.

No single itemin the tood
index went up more than
one-tenth of a point, but a
combination of increases in the
cost of Kentucky Fried
('Chicken, pork, sweet potatoes,
rice, chicken, lamb and turkey
offset minimal decreases in ice
cream, fish and cereals for an
overall rise of nine-tenths of a
point.


ROBERT L. VESCO
... guards with clubs
directors appointed by a
federal U.S. judge in March to
take over International
Controls Corporation, the
paper said. The ICC is a New
Jersey concern Vesco founded
and formerly headed, whose
new board filed a suit accusing
him and others of defrauding
the company and wasting
assets, according to the Wall
Street Journal.
"In an affidavit filed in
federal court yesterday," the
story continued, "Miss Yohonn
said on her first visit to the
Vesco residence, which is
protected by a wall and barred
gate, the guards and one of Mr.
Vesco's teen-aged sons refused
to accept the papers and threw
them back at her."
Then she telephoned federal
judge Charles E. Stewart in
New York, who authorised her
to serve the papers by simply
"depositing them on the
premises". She returned to the
Vesco residence in a taxi, the
Wall Street Journal account
said, and did as instructed and
photographed the documents
on the Vesco residence's lawn.
"Then,' she said, "the two
guards ran out, one with a
piece of pipe and the other
with a stick, opened the taxi
door and ordered her to get
out.'
INTERVENTION
In her affidavit Miss Yohonn
said the taxi driver intervened.
fle told the men that she was
in his care and that as long as
she was with him they could
do nothing to her. One of the
guards suggested calling the
(C.I.D.
They ordered her to "get
out and take back those
papers"
Miss Yohonn refused to get
out or to retl eve the papers.
A\s the i.ixi driver pulled
away. she said in her affidavit,
she looked back and saw
Vesco's son standing in the
middle of the road watching
"the altercation."
As the taxi continued, the
driver told her that they were
being followed. She said she
was in fear for her safety.
She ordered the taxi to take
her to the Britannia Beach
IHotel.
Miss Yohonn said she arrived
in Nassau on July 28 to serve
the writ. She had heard that
Vesco's home on Brace Ridge
Road was guarded and o she
tried to locate him outside of
ius home to serve the writ
personally.
She said she searched for
him in various restaurants and
hotels in Nassau and the casino
and other places that had been
suggested on Paradise Island.
She was unsuccessful in all
these attempts and so on July
30 she went by car to his
home.

Ii
ll N EW JJl


IiNK-SMEARED


I DUDLEY'S
COR. ROSETTA ST. & MT. ROYAL AVE. W i
P.O. BOX 5850 PHONE 2.1306/2-3237

FANS-FANS -FANS


RUSSELL'S
ORANGE JUICE
available at your
SUPERMARKET


Florida fishermen


US customs seize luxury


I-- ---- - ----- --- -- - --- ---- - -- -- -------- -- -- -


1h1











Tuesday, August 7, 1973.


7,.... ..



CONFLICT SURROUNDING DIVISION OF POWERS
WASHINGTON (AP) In a court appearance lasting less than two
minutes attorneys for President Nixon filed a lengthy legal argument
Tuesday justifying his refusal to comply with a subpoena issued by
Watergate special prosecutor Archibald ('ox.
Contents of the legal argument were not immediately disclosed.
Cox wants tapes of presidential conversations relating to the Watergate
case.
J. Fred Burhardt represented the President in an appearance before U.S.
district court judge John J. Scbuifbiia.
Sirica gave Cox until Aug. 13 to respond to the argument of Nixon's
lawyers. The judge then granted Buzhardt's request to have until Aug. 17
to reply to Cox's filing and scheduled oral arguments for Aug. 22.
AGNEW UNDER FIRE; NO WATERGATE CONNECTION
WASHINGTON, Aug 7 (AP) U.S. Vice President Spiro 1. Agnew said
Monday night he had been informed he is under investigation for possible
criminal violations. The Wall Street Journal reported in its Tuesday
editions that the investigation involved allegations of bribery, extortion
and tax fraud.
Agnew was notified formally by the Justice Department last week that
he is involved in a far-ranging criminal investigation by the U.S. attorney's
office in Baltimore, the Journal said.
Agnew made the disclosure through his press secretary, J. Marsh
Thomson, and declined further comment "other than to say that I am
innocent of any wrongdoing that have confidence in the criminal justice
system of the United States and that I am equally confident my innocence
will be affirmed."
The investigation is being carried on in strictest secrecy, the Journal said.
On receiving the Justice Department notice, the paper said, the Vice
President sought a White House audience, presumably to inform President
Nixon.
The Journal said the allegations against Agnew stem from the award of
state contracts during Agnew's tenure as Governor of Maryland in 1967
and 1968 and from federal contracts in Maryland let by the General
Services Administration since Agnew became Vice President in 1969. The
GSA is the agency in charge of constructing federal buildings.
$10 MILLION SPENT ON NIXON'S PRIVATE PROPERTY
WASHINGTON (AP) President Nixon has hired a private accounting
firm to prepare what the White House says will be a detailed audit of
Nixon's purchase of homes in I lorida and California. The White House says
the report will be released within one month. Yesterday the fed-ral
government acknowledged that nearly ten million dollars have been spent
since 1969 on Nixon's out-oftown residences for security,
communications and other work.
The question of Nixon's purchase of homes in Key Biscayne and Sail
Clemente has been raised several times since May when it was reported the
President had borrowed 625-thousand dollars from industrialist Robert
Abplanalp. That loan was for the purchase of the San Clemente White
House in July, 1969, but the loan was cancelled 18 months later in a
complicated financial deal with Abplanalp that assigned the industrialist
most of the San Clemente property.
MORE ON THE S10 MILLION EXPENDITURE
WASHINGTON (AP) The Nixon administration has disclosed that the
federal government has spent about ten million dollars for
communications, security and administrative support at President Nixon's
home and office complexes in California and Florida. A presidential
spokesman says the military has spent five million, 900-thousand dollars in
San Clemente, California and Key Biscayne, -lorida. The costs previously
had been kept secret.
The Secret Service has disclosed it spent less than 300-thousand dollars,
and the General Services Administration announced its spending has
totalled three million, 700-thousand dollars for security and support costs.
The Secret Service and military spending totals do not include salaries and
related costs. The figures include security equipment, installation and
similar expenses.
NO LEGAL PRECEDENT SAYS DIXON
WASHINGTON (AP) A top Justice Department official.
assistant-attorney-general Robert Dixon, says he can find no legal
precedents which would require President Nixon to turn over White House
tapes, even if they could be evidence in criminal prosecutions.
Dixon told the American Bar Association convention in Washington
today that actual practice does not seem to support the barring of
executive privilege in criminal cases.
Dixon spoke to the convention the day before the federal court deadline
for the President to comply with a subpoena from special Watergate
prosecutor Archibald C('ox.
8 TO I REDUFF TO JUSTICE WILLIAM DOUGLAS
WASHIN(;TON (AP) Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall
Saturday issued an order permitting continued U.S. bombing of Cambodia.
Marshall's action in effect reversed an order issued earlier Saturday by
Justice William O. Douglas which would have stopped the bombing.
In a two page statement. Marshall said he had conferred with the other
members of the court and all agreed, making it in effect an 8-1 rebuff to
-- Douglas.
U.S. bombing raids over Cambodia had continued Saturday despite the
order issued by Douglas at 1330 GMT.
Marshall's action came in response to an urgent government plea aimed
at knocking down I)ouglas' action.
Senate Majority Leader Mike Mansfield and Speaker of the House Carl
Albert had declined comment on the Douglas order. Mansfield says he
assumes it is a matter for the full court to consider.
NAVAL BASE BOMBED BY MISTAKE OVER 100 KILLED
PHOM P'ENII. 'AMBODIA (A')- An American B52 mistakenly
bombed a Cambodian naval base Monday. killing or wounding hundreds of
Cambodian servicemen and their families, military sources said
Casualty figures from Phnom Penh hospitals and reports Irn)i the
bombed Mekong River garrison town of Neak long indicated that as
many as 100 men. women and children were K;iled and up tn 300 were
wounded.
Seasoned observers in Indochina could not recall any previous bombing
accidents in which so many persons were killed and wounded.
Pentagon spokesman Jerry W. Friedheim said in Washington the base
was hit when part of the bomb load from an eight-jet 1)52 fell short (if
its target "into an area where there were some Cambodian inlit.r\ and
dependents."
lie declined to speculate on the cause of the accident, saying the
Defense Department was still gathering information.
BAT1STA TO BE BURIED IN MADRID
MADRID, Aug. 7 (AP) The body of former Cuban dictator I ulgencio
Batista arrived in Madrid Tuesday by private plane for burial.
A small group of friends, most of them exiles from FIidel Castro's ('Cuba,
were on hand as the plane landed after a flight from Malaga. A Cuban flag
was wrapped around the coffin.
Hatista. 72, died early Monday of a heart attack at the family chalet near
Marbella on the south coast. His body was accompanied bh his widio\u,


WATERGATE DEVELOPMENTS


Nixon refuses to


comply with



Watergate subpoena

WASHINGTON (AP) Lawyers for President Nixon told a
federal judge Tuesday that the court lacks jurisdiction to enforce
the subpoena served on the President by Watergate special
prosecutor Archibald Cox.
An attempt to enforce the postpone filing the suit until
subpoena demanding counsel for the committee have
presidential tape recordings, an opportunity to ascertain
they said, "would be an and study the reaction of the
unwarranted and unsupportable White House attorneys to the
violation of the constitutional motion of the special
doctrine of separation of prosecutor," Watergate
powers." Conmmittee chainnan, Sam J.
J Fred Bu/hardt, special Irvin Jr., announced before
presidential counsel, in a court the state of the day's hearings.
appearance lasting less than ten The committee's suit had
minutes, filed a lengthy legal been expected Tuesday or
brief supporting the President's Wednesday. Ervin gave no hint
refusal to turn over White of how long postponement of
House tapes subpoenaed by the action might be.
Cox. The action action came After Nixon's lawyers filed
shortly after the Senate their opinion, U.S. Dist. Court
Watergate committee e decided judge John J. Sirica gave Cox
to postponed any legal action until Monday, Aug. 13, to
of its own to obtain tapes and respond.
related documents pending Buzhardt asked for and was
disclosure of Nixon's reply to granted until Aug. 17 for any
the Cox subpoena, additional written reply. Sirica
The committee apparently scheduled oral argument for
decided to put off its lawsuit Aug. 22.
because of some concern that Cox had subpoenaed tapes
federal courts might refuse to of nine presidential
accept the case on grounds that conversations related to the
they lacked jurisdiction. Watergate case.
"The committee decided to


'No legal precedents for


President Nixon to comply


WASIIINGTON (AP) A
top justice department official
said Monday he could find no
legal precedents that would
require President Nixon to turn
over White House tapes even it
they could be evidence in
criminal prosecutions.
"It has been said
occasionally that the President
is precluded from invoking
executive privilege where
violations of the criminal law
are involved," Asst. Atty. Gen.
Robert G. Dixon Jr., said in a
speech to the American Bar
Association convention.
"Actual practice does not
seem to support this
statement," he said.
Iixon spoke on the eve of
the federal court deadline for
the President to respond to an
order demanding he justify his
refusal to comply with a
subpoena from Watergate
special prosecutor Archibald
Cox.
Cox has demanded Nixon
supply tapes of nine
presidential conversations
related to Watergate and also
certain White House
documents.
The president refused to
supply the tapes but said he
was voluntarily turning over
the documents none of
which was written by or for
him.
The Senate Watergate
committee also subpoenaed
presidential tapes and was
turned down.
Dixon, head of the justice
department's office of legal
counsel, said in his speech he
could not discuss the Watergate
subpoenas directly.
But he added: "I he theory
that presidents are bound to
comply with congressional


requests for information
relating to criminal activities
appears to be based mainly on
remarks relating to
impeachment."
In his prepared text, Dixon
did not directly discuss the
validity of a federal court order
for such information.
TWO INSTANCES
Hle said, "we have found
only two instances where
presidents released information
concerning criminal activities."
The first was when President
Thomas Jefferson, acting in
response to a federal judge's
subpoena, turned over to
Congress material related to
Aaron Burr's trial for treason.
The second was when President
John F. Kennedy gave
Congress investigative material
relating to the Billie Sol Estes
probe.
"Whether or not the
President is personally subject
to judicial process is
enlightened only by the Burr
case." Dixon said.
"Apart from present still
unresolved developments, the
view has been that the
President is not subject to a
discretional subpoena powers,"
he said, "but that the
President's subordinates are
subject to that power."
However, Dixon added,
"this does not mean that those
demands for information and
documents must be complied
with automatically.
Appropriate privileges may still
be invoked."
lie said a President has the
right under the separation of
powers doctrine of the
Constitution to refuse
disclosure when he determines
it is necessary to protect the
public interest.


'I gave Nixon enough warning'


says Gray 'but got no reaction'


WAMIIIIVG0I_\ (API)
President Nixon should have
concluded last year that
something improper and illegal
was going on among members
of his staff, the former acting
director of the FBI said
Monday.
But L. Patrick Gray Ill said
even he didn't suspect the lull
truth about the cover-up of the
wiretapping.
lie said 1BI agents
investigating the affair were
skeptical even last spring that
anyone high in the government
would have had anything to do
with the wiretapping., He said
they suspected that a
)Democratic double agent might
have engineered the bungled
burglary to embarrass the
Republicans.
(;ray told the Senate
Watergate (Committee that
when he talked to the
President by telephone July 6,
1972, less than three weeks
after the break-in at
Democratic National
Headquarters, he warned him
that White House staff men
were trying to wound him by
confusing the investigation.
Gray said thi:: should have
been enough to warn Nixon
that something illegal and
improper was going on. But he
said Nixon didn't ask who was


trying to wound him, and Gray
didn't tell.
Hlad Nixon asked, Gray said
lie would have told the
President that two of his aides,
John W. Dean III and John D.
Fhrlichnan, were trying to use
the FBI and the Central
Intelligence Agency. But he
said when no questions were
asked, he assumed he had been
unduly alarmed.
Sen. Daniel K Inouye,
(D-Hawaii) asked:
"Did you think your
conversation with the President
on July 6. 1972, was sufficient
to adequately pult him on
notice that the White louse
staff was engaged in
obstructing justice''"
A. I don't know that I
though in terms of obstructing
justice, but I certainly think it
was adequate to put him on
notice that members of the
White Iouse staff were using
the FBI and the ('IA.
Q. Do "ou think a
reasonable and prudent man,
on the basis of the warning you
gave him at that time, would
have been alerted to the fact
that his staff was engaged in
something improper, unlawful,
illegal?
A. I do...


SKYLAB 2 MEN BOMBSHELL IN OTTAWA

SET NEW SPACE Amin's bitter charges


WALK RECORD
SPACE CENTRE,
HOUSTON, Aug. 7 (AP)
With a record space walk in the
books, Skylab 2's astronauts
today resume experiments in
their orbiting laboratory.
The flight plan called for
mostly medical experiments
for Alan L. Bean, Dr. Owen K.
Garriott and Jack R. Lousma.
But Garriott, a solar physicist,
planned a long-awaited study
of the sun with a battery of
eight telescopes.
Garriott and Lousma loaded
the telescope cameras with film
Monday during a record space
walk in which they were
outside the station 6 hours, 31
minutes, nearly double the
previous mark set by two
Skylab I astronauts in June.
During the excursion, they
also raised a new sunshade over
their space home, worked with
two scientific experiments and
examined three trouble areas
on the spacecraft. They
discovered no new clues to
Skylab's problems.
The major problems
afflicting the station on the
llth day of the Skylab 2
mission are:
Leaks in two steering
rocket systems on the Apollo
taxi ship in which the
astronauts are to return to
Earth on Sept. 25 after 59 days
in space. Experts say the craft
is still flyable. In case they
don't understand the problem,
or it worsens, the space agency
has ordered a rescue rocket
prepared at Cape Kennedy for
a possible launch Sept. 10 or
later.
A large short circuit that
occurred in the solar telescope
system last week. It's origin is a
puzzle, but so far it has not
affected the experiments.
Partial failure of a system
that removes excess moisture
from the cabin atmosphere. It
requires frequent servicing to
maintain proper pressure.
Garriott, the first to step
outside, commented "what a
view" as he gazed on the
panaorama of Earth, Sun and
stars surrounding the station.
DELAYED
Minor problems in checking
out their suits and the airlock
depressurization system
delayed the astronauts'
departure from the station for
about 90 minutes.
Skylab 2's commander
monitored the walk from
inside the station, relaying
mission control's instructions.
Bean also wore a space suit,
ready to assist in case of
trouble.
Bean remained relatively
quiet during the early part of
the walk. prompting Garriott
to say: "I believe that guy's in
there eating lunch while we're
out here working."
The space walk originally
was scheduled last Tuesday but
was postponed four times
because of illness among the
astronauts.
''Everything's going
smoothly." said Garriott
during the sunshade
deployment.
Installation of the sunshade
involved locking together 22
rods to make two 55-toot
poles. The poles clamp to a
spacecraft strut, creating a
V-shaped mast. A
white-painted, aluminum
coated awning reefs over the
mast. shading the spacecraft
roof.
An orange parasol style
shade installed in May by the
Skvlab 1 astronauts is covered
up by the new awning. Both
shades protect the space
station from the heat of the
Sun, replacing a metal shield
which ripped off when the
station was launched.
PROBLEMS
Skylab 2 has been peppered
with problems from the
beginning.
l)uring a pass over the
western United States, the
astronauts mounted a
television camera outside to


record their activity. The first
pictures received at mission
control showed Lousma
hanging upside down in foot
restraints, gazing back at the
Earth.
"Looks like we're whistling
down the west coast," he
reported. "I can see Los
Angeles and the Imperial
Valley and ... yeah, that must
be San Clemente down there.


against Britain at


Commonwealth talks

By Arthur L. Gavshon


OTTAWA (AP) Ugandan
political grenade into the Cot
with bitter charges of racism
Britain.
The maverick East African
leader's onslaught, read to the
conference on his behalf by
foreign minister Paul Etiang,
was icily received by
presidents, premiers and other
chief delegates including
Britain's Edward Heath.
In a first reaction Heath
rejected Amin's charges either
as untrue or totally contrary to
the spirit of the meeting.
Picking up one of Amin's
references to Uganda as being
"a truly black state" Heath
said this showed it was Amin
who was the racist.
Amin taunted Britain with
having permitted Israel to take
over Palestine; with
"permitting" Premier lan
Smith to consolidate his illegal
white regime in Rhodesia; with
displaying support for what he
called Portugal's "murderous
regime" in Mozambique and
Angola.
"Is this the Britain which
with all the resources at her
disposal fought Hitler?" he
asked. "Mobilized the whole
world opinion against tyranny
of the Axis powers. Crushed
Nazism with the aid of her
allies? It it the same Britain
which now tells us that it is too
weak to fight Smith, too poor
to give material support to the
freedom fighters in Southern
Africa, too inaudible to raise
her voice against Israel in the
Middle East? Now that Britain
appears to be devoid of any
principles or any moral
strength, can we place any
more confidence in her for
guidance on Commonwealth
matters?"
BRITAIN'S TROUBLE
It is Britain, Amin charged,
which is threatening the very
foundation of the
Commonwealth.
Leaders of the
Commonwealth sought to play
down the political effects of a
speech that in fact had stunned
them for its contravention of
the rules of their association.
In private, they suggested that
Amin's style and temperament
had become well known and
they were not taking his
intervention too seriously.
These leaders, with Heath
among them, expressed
sympathy for Etiang personally
who, they said. was under
orders to deliver the speech at
all costs.
Heath himself, meantime,
reserved the right to reply in
greater detail to the Ugandan
barrage at a proper moment in
the conference proceedings. It
was clear, from the comments
of his aides and from his own
remarks to friends, the British
leader was attempting to
control his anger by remaining
cool.
'NOT DULL'
Ar n old Smith
Secretary-General of the
Commolonwealth, was
questioned about the
development by newsmen. He,
too, sought to play down the
affair. "I did not find it a dull
speech," he said grinning.
Smith said a claim earlier in the
day by Etiang that he had been
prevented from delivering the
address in the opening stage of
the conference was nonsense.


n President Idi Amin tossed a
nmonwealth summit conference
and political immorality against

The Ugandan President's
message was distributed to
delegates and newsmen alike in
the form of a printed
document carrying the
country's colours on its cover
and pictures of Queen
Elizabeth II and Amin himself
inside. Its 15 pages of text
took around 40 minutes to
read. A large part of it was
devoted to a defense of
Uganda's legal rights to have
expelled nearly 50,000
non-citizen Asians who held
British passports.
HEATH SCORNFUL
Heath in what listeners said
was a scornful three-minute
initial retort said Britain could
not accept the nature or
content of Amin's statement.
However he was anxious not to
upset the constructive mood so
far displayed by his
fellow-leaders.
The British leader
proceeded, nevertheless, to
make a few points declaring:
The Ugandan claim that
Britain only had been affected
by expulsion of the Asians
simply is not true. India,
Kenya, Malawi, Fiji, Canada
all had taken some of the
expellees and some had
indicated the repercussions of
the 1972 exodus had been felt
in other countries.
-Amin had failed singularly
to take any account in his
statement of the element of
suffering that had been caused
by the expulsions. Promises of
compensation had been made
but in reality the expellees had
been barred from taking
anything with them and thus
far had received nothing.

MANX FIRE WORST IN U.K.
SINCE 1927.
DOUGLAS, ISLE OF MAN
(AP)-- Fifty-one persons were
known Saturday to have died in the
Isle of Man fun palace holocaust. It
was the worst fire disaster recorded
in the British Isles since 1927.
One person still was missing.
Police said they were treating the
blaze as probable arson.
Britain's worst fire was in June
1883, when 183 people died in a
Sunderland concert hall.
In 1927, seventy children
perished in a movie theater at
Paisley. Scotland. Forty-nine textile
workers died in a Huddersfield
factory fire in 1941.


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ilhe Zribtunt


2 ARABS KILL

3, WOUND 55 IN

ATHENS AIRPORT
ATHENS, Aug. 7 (AP) 'he
two Arabs who attacked a line
of passengers in the Athens
airport terminal Sunday said
they had been ordered to kill
travellers en route to Israel,
"but they got their flights
mixed up," the Greek police
reported.
"Their mission was to attack
Trans World Airlines passengers
heading for Tel Aviv," said one
investigator. Those passengers
boarded their plane minutes
before the two men opened up
with grenades and pistols.
The gunmen attacked a line
waiting to board a TWA flight
to New York. They killed two
Americans from New Jersey-
and an Austrian and wounded
55 persons. The Arabs
surrendered after failing to
negotiated safe passage to the
Middle East.
The police said the two
killers claimed they were
members of Black September.
the Arab terrorist organization
responsible for the attack on
the Israeli team at the Munich
Olimpics. But a Black
September spokesman in
Beirut said his organization had
"nothing to do with the
Athens operation."
"I assure you they cannot be
Black September. They made
too many mistakes," the
spokesman told the newspaper
Al Moharrer.
The gunmen were identified
as Mohammed Zemod, 21, a
Palestinian refugee, and Talal
Kadoooral, 21, a native of
Egypt. Greek authorities said
they would be tried for the
killings.
Police officials said Zemod
told them he arrived by plane
from Libya shortly before the
attack while Kadooral landed
from Beirut. The police
believed they obtained their
weapons from accomplices at
the airport and said they were
holding two women and a man
who might be the accomplices.
The two flights bound for
Tel Aviv departed 10 minutes
before the Arabs lobbed the
grenades and sprayed the
lounge with pistol fire. More
than 1,000 persons were in the
transit lounge at the time.
Police said the two men had
told them they had hoped to
bargain the lives of their
hostages to win their freedom'










.Tuqsday,.August 7, 1973.


uhbr 0i ibunt
NULLIUS. AIbicrsS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI s
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master What's becomeof speed


LEONE. H. DUPUCH,Publishet/Editor 1903- 19 14
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.CS.G.G, .Litt:, LL.n;
Publisherjfditor 1917-1972
Contributing Editor 1972 -
..'EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON.M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972-
Published Daily Monday to Saturday


Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 2-4532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Tuesday, Auqust 7. 1973.

EDITORIAL

The signs are here


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
GEORGE TOWN, Cayman, July 19: It is now 4 o'clock in the
morning. My wife and I flew into this island yesterday afternoon.
I had no idea of writing anything for a few days. I felt I should
get a "feel" of the place before I wrote anything. But something
seemed to knock me on my head while I slept and I woke up with
the urge to write a few things that seemed to develop in my
sub-conscious mind while I slept. I have already completed two
articles on changing patterns in the West Indies and on the
Commonwealth concept which was stirred by seeing a Union Jack
proudly flying from the hood of the taxicab that brought us from
the airport to a.hotel on the outskirts of the town.
My wife is fast asleep. And so I had to scrounge around in our
travelling bags to find where she had packed paper and pens. I
managed to find them without disturbing her. She is so
accustomed to my getting up in the middle of the night to write
that.l no longer disturb her rest. And fortunately I can thrive on a
very little sleep.
I envy people who can lay down any time and sleep. My brain
keeps going even while I sleep and it-wakes me up when it wants
to get to work.

There must be a great many people here who have lived in the
Bahamas because everywhere I turn oeoole are calling me by
name, It is embarrassing because they know me but I don't know
them. This is my first visit to the island. I thought I could move
around quietly without being known. But now I know that this is
impossible.
I am writing this article to show how real are the reports that
many people are moving away from the Bahamas.
It all started when I phoned the island from my hotel in Coral
Gables to make a hotel reservation. When I gave my name the girl
who answered the phone started talking to me. She knew me.
After we passed through Immigration here, we went to get our
bags for Customs. I got one of the bags and then disappeared.
"Where have you been?", my wife asked me when 1 returned
to her. She was a little irritated because she had lifted the other
bags on to the Customs bench.
"Didn't you hear a woman call me?", I asked. No. she hadn't.
I heard my name called. When I turned around a woman at the
entrance to the building was beckoning to me.
She said she recognized me and just had to speak. I didn't
know her although she mentioned her name. She said that she
and her husband had lived in the Bahamas. Now they are
somewhere in Europe and they have interests in South America.
The information didn't register at the time because I didn't
realize how many people were here who had left the Bahamas;
and I was also anxious to get back to my wife who I knew
wouldn't wait for me to handle the bags.
When I registered at the hotel .... all the people at the desk said
they knew me.
When I got to my room I telephoned a business man in the
town from whom I wanted to get sonie information. He was away
in Canada. His secretary took the call. She said she knew me and
gave me the information I wanted.

I had always heard that this island had no good beaches and
that the mosquitoes were terrible.
Let us deal with the mosquito story first.
We were not sure that we could get mosquito repellent here.
We had no idea of how backward this island still might be and so
we came armed with two bottles of "Off". So far ... no
mosquitoes.
We have a room in the hotel opening on the ocean. I was
surprised when 1 opened the door and walked out on the portico
to find myself looking out on a seven mile stretch of beach with
beautiful clear water lapping its edges. This might easily be a spot
in the Bahamas.
I immediately got out my bathing trunks and left the room to
take a swim.
"I know you," a voice in the corridor said as I walked through
the hotel.
"Who am I?". I asked turning around.
"Mr. Dupuch," he said. "I used to live in the Bahamas." I
didn't know him.
My wife stopped in the shade by the side of a large swimming
pool in the grounds while I went down the beach for a dip.
Before I could get into the water someone called me by name. We
talked briefly. lie knew me. I didn't know him.
I took a short swim and then returned to the poolside with my
wife. She didn't go swimming. And so I finally went into the
pool.
The pool is large. It is built around a centre piece where
refreshments are served. As I swam from one section of the pool,
around the centre piece, to the other side. someone in the centre
piece called my name.
It was in a low section of the pool and so I stood up and we
talked. He knew the Bahamas well.
"You will find that this island is very much like Eleuthera,
Without the hills," he said. "The people here are really friendly."
he added.
The hotel is several miles from the townt and so I asked himn
about transportation.
"You can rent a small car here for $8 to S10 a day," he told
me. "If you want to see the island, this is cheaper than using a
taxi".
We had just sat down to dinner in the dining room when I
heard my name called again. I turned around and a woman was
standing behind my chair.
"I saw you come in and felt I just had to come over and
Speak," she said.
In the course of conversation I gathered that her husband, who
is retired, owns a pent house at a condominium on Nassau's Cable
Beach where they have lived for several years. Here they are
occupying the pent house, the most expensive rooms in the hotel.
. And. so they must. be wealthy people.
"Have you 'otjeed the beach and the water'..'.she asked. "I
was really surprised.I ';', .


STh.ey apparently caip. here looking for something but, they.
~kj: to be nearT'.. and.so the y. re going to take a-look ,.t hc


FEAREDD


cops in our city today?


i


EDITOR, The Tribune,
The following is a copy of a
letter sent to the Nassau
Guardian on a matter so
important that I think it
should have the benefit of
publication in the Tribune also.
The Editor,
The Nassau Guardian.
In a recent editorial on
current road traffic problems it
was disappointing that you did
not include some reference to
the state of total lawlessness
now the order of the day on
the roads of New Providence.
There is absolutely no
compliance whatever with the
lawful speed limit, and no
apparent effort on the part of
the police to enforce it. One of
your columnists recently
asked, as well he might, "What
has become of the speed
limit?"
Motor cycles streak up and
down the roads both in and
out of the City, weaving
through traffic in fine disregard
of any speed restrictions and
existing traffic conditions. To
this lawless group the
motorcycle police certainly do
not set a good example, it is
sad to say.
Trucks are restricted by law
to lesser speed than cars, but
although there are numerous
road signs clearly indicating
this fact, I don't believe there
is a single truck driver who
pays the slightest attention to
it; in fact they usually overtake
every car ahead which is not
racing other cars or trying to


STOP BEING CARELESS

ON OUR HIGHWAYS


EDITOR, The Tribune,
It is most alarming how
many human lives and limbs
have been destroyed on our
streets especially in Nassau and
Freeport because of motor
vehicle accidents. Sir, the
Royal Air Force (R.A.F.)
stated that the cause of
accidents is carelessness, which
I consider as being a fact. Sir,
this has been of great concern
for a long time to many of our
citizens, civic organizations,
the police etc. but still too
often the bell tolls for a loved
one departed because of an
accident, fellow countrymen
and women do you know who
would be next?
It can be you or one of your
dearly beloved ones obituary
"Record of death" or
"account of deceased person"
as the Oxford dictionary
defines it; so let all of us do
something about it right now.
My first suggestion is stop
being careless on our highways
that is the cause of all
accidents. Second, obey the
rules and regulations of the
Road Traffic Act. Third,
remember the many
suggestions made such as, slow
down and live, don't play in
the street, look up and down
before crossing the street, if
driving, pull to the side of the
street for emergency vehicles
such as the ambulance, fire
engines etc as soon as you hear
their siren, always face traffic
when walking and do not wear
dark coloured clothes when
walking at night, use side walks
where they are provided, it's
for your safety, if you drive
don't drink or if you drink don't
drive, pull over to the side of


the street when taking in or
letting out passengers or if you
have a flat tyre or breakdown.
Use your commonsense your
100 lbs- 200 lbs or whatever it
is can't win against the metal
and steel of a motor vehicle,
which standing still weighs as
much as 3600 lbs. and more
plus if in motion this great
weight is even so increased, so
don't dare these man-made
machines, watch out for them,
move out of its path when
walking or standing in the
street, remember you only
have one life and this is for real
no second chance. Please take
heed to these suggestions.
please for your family's sake.
In conclusion I am making
my final appeal to the
Commissioner of The Royal
Bahamas Police Force and its
members, especially traffic
division, please take these
things seriously. I feel as if all
members of this honouratIle
force become dedicated to
their duties and really enforce
the law to violators, there
would be less destruction of
human lives and limbs, but first
of all, policemen themselves
must set examples and stop
this buddy buddy or my home
boy or family stuff, this is an
encouragement that can cause
the death or crippling for life
to an innocent child or to
themselves as many have
already died, and so young.
Our new nation needs everiv
human life so let's save them.
JAMES H. NEYMOUR
Sonesta Beach Road.
Nassau,
August 3, 1973.


Florida Keys.
"I am intrigued by the name of a cay there," she said. "It's
named Conch Key." In tile Bahamas we spell it "Cay". In Florida
it is "Key".
In Nassau I heard a great deal of talk about the evacuation of
the Bahamas by long-time residents but during the few hours I
have been on this island I realize how real this evacuation appears
to be.
We are going into the town tomorrow and I am curious to
know what I might find there.
So the story unfolds .... and Nero fiddles while Rome burns.
I have written 45 pages of manuscript. Now I hope I can go
back to bed and sleep until daylight when I plan to have another
swim before breakfast.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
It is no time to swap horses when you are crossing the stream.
ABRAHAM LINCOLN
I do not choose to be a common man. It is my right to be
uncollmlon If I can.
I seek opportunity not security. I do not wish to be a kept
citizen, humbled and dulled by having a state look after me.
I want to take the calculated risk; to dream and to build, to fail
and to succeed.
I refuse to barter incentive for a dole. I prefer the challenges of
life to the guaranteed existence; the thrill of fulfilment of the
stale calm of utopia.
I will not trade freedom for beneficence nor my dignity for a
handout. I will never cower before any master nor bend to any
threat.
It is my heritage to stand erect, proud and unafraid; to think
and act for myself, enjoy the benefit of my creations and to face
the world boldly and say, this I have done.
DEAN ALFANGE in

S. "All this is what it means to be.ap American".


keep up with the motorcycles.
Is it to be wondered at that
in accounts of a recent motor
car accident the driver excused
himself of decapitating a
pedestrian, knocking down a
wall, and finally coming to a
stop on a dwelling house
porch, where he broke the
owners leg, on the ground that
he was trying to avoid the
pedestrians dog? Need I add
that the dog was killed also?
Anyone who may be
concerned over this most
deplorable state of affairs
should look into some of the
wreckers' vehicle cemeteries
which now abound. There he
will see the fantastically
twisted and distorted remains
of vehicles which are silent
witnesses to the violent climax
to many a racing spree. He can,
if he likes, ruminate on the
price paid in injuries by the
lawbreakers and sometimes
their innocent victims.
Where are the traffic police'?
In the local newspapers not
long ago there were
photographs showing a
splendid array of patrol cars,
and a most surprising number
of motorcycle policemen
standing by their chargers. Why
are they hardly ever seen on
the road? The more policemen
we have, the more invisible
they become. This is a
situation which should be
regarded with concern by all
law abiding citizens.
MERVYN JOHNSON


A%-.ISI RI) ,\1M (AP)
For ni world i I hlilllpilll
[igrai x -rlPet r >-, i o tile' So viet
Ulii)r iand l ri lavi lbir
Plani I n_ SiltIurdal halre vict m r inI the 13th
inler-nation il \IB chess
toulm aien t
In a tension() pak-
ed 15th and last s tound.
Planii~c, p hl a k crushed
llollar-d's B'rt hIiklaar in 26
move-'-, I \ perts s,aid the wiln
was mlot s'rlprrllsing ;is Planini
fouigtl t the battle o(n taimiliar
grolurmid: hi. ciountered the
Dutct-inian'-, Rua Lope/ withi a
variat ion tll t is na,.imed after
hinm Ihe Il'mmiiiic \ianritiin".
P'et:rosi.in \\liii p la ted white
in hir s last round game, heat
Oivart Radulv oif Bulgaria
alter 35 movesvs i1 modern
flank opening
Th e Ion rmer world li.iampion
and tMhe Y ugoslarv grandmaster
share i- fir-,t pri/e ol ahort
2.30CD drlla rs,
Ll bnmir Kavalek ot tlhe
Unitt.-d States liniislhed thiid. At
theory 'tiset )t tile final round lie
share al lhe clead v\th Petrusiant
and Flanincr but the .\iimerici.an
granLItillSlc r e)lud liot lfor-e a
win -against ilungiriani \rVet.-rn
Laszl- o S/a bo Alfter 24 moves
in a Queein' gambit the game.i
endccr_. in a draw. and Kavalek
had to settle tor third place,
which-Hi earned him 2.000
dll 0lr I l,-.., 8 0 dolllars).
2.000 F. \ S
Th.-e gae glic et wct\ ll former
Russianr world champirion Boris
Spas.sky aind yourniig )iDutch
vmastk -.mrJimn imlnnir drew most
oi' line altc ntioll ot tie nearly
2,0L) fans.
Sp assky who lost his wov(rld
title to Boi bb y Fischer of the
U.S. last \ ar. has been
work g1 hlard towards a
co0nI -back In June e won anl
inter mriliori al tournament in

U,.C .SPY CHIEF'S
CO\o/ER IS BLOWN
I0) *tl()0\ ( \') Irlvin's new
sli) L irl si tarlied \s)rk \tlirdi j
rllld t -(tiild I' s co er i t -n hel(re
llere-ic' dti l t Ih e fice.
l'hll=, r\ieric.ml nesewma .galine
New,,--reek ilJeititilie tlhe new head
0f lririth st ,.'rel sor Il e' s .is MLturice
0tlf'ic- id, a 5 7N57 ear li 1 li chelor
ho lla been a counsellor at the
i'iriei'-i inn ('n innom non health Office
SiNc 1%r9 65. s S
Ake, -1 ito confirms (ldfield's
n'l'poi rIlllll t t oi tht the delenset
Milliv tIr) la J ti h I tregin Office
replied dh'rse I \' ,No c(onrlnlt "


M OW YOU


Stt


IT


b *


...NOW YOU



DON)T!


WITI4 A


BREAK


BAR\CLAYS SAVING$


ACCOUNTf


former chess champ Spassky, disappoints


I ~I I


i~hu ij~ritrunP


Aafa R BARCLAY


_


-- I' -~ ~~ --~~ -~~~----~---II~~~ ~~-~---- I


____~_.~ ____. ---- --c -----~~-_~_ --- -~~- -- -- -----~-- -~ ---- - -- -~- - -- -~~ -- --~-


UN, -__-A III~.


j


Dortmund, west Germany, anu his 1lth round game against the fourth place.
early July he helped his Petrosian. Spassky still.trailed FINAL ST.A\)Il(,S
,contri to a victory in the him by. two points. 1-2. Petrosian and Planinc.
F uropean chess teams In the final round he seemed both 10 points.
championship in Bath, determined to give a last show 3. Kavalek 9 1-2
t ngland of strength. After Szabo, who 4. Spassky 9
Ilis performance in the IBM shared fourth place with 5. Szabo 8 1-2
trurament, however, was Spassky at the outset of the 6. Marovic 8
somewhat disappointing. He last round, drew his game, the 7-11. Tiinman, Donner,
drew 10 of his 15 games and a ormer world champ forced Ribli. Andersson and Smejkal,
surprising loss against Dutch Timman, who had chosen a 7 1/2 each.
grandmaster Jan Hein Donner Kings Indian defense, into a .12-13. Radulov and Ree,
in the ninth round ruined his hopeless position At the 51st both 6
chaesof atleast a shared move the )utchman resigned. 14-15. Enklaar and
victor ,, Even after giving Spassky the full point he Quinteros, both 5 1/2
front-runner Planinc had lost needed to overtake Szabo for 16. Langeweg 4 1/2







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Tuesday, August 7, 1973.


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10 BaHaMaS


GOOMBAY



I ISUMMER'73
June 3rd to Sept. 9th.




What goombay is all about

By Daphne Wallace Whitfield
WHAT IS GOOMBAY? Mr. Clement Bethel says "I thought it was just a name we used to describe our Bahamian
music which incorporates the sound of the individual goat-skin drum as opposed to the music of say Trinidad or


Jamaica".
G( 0o 1ln~ha\ Slllb MI CII .^ .
begun three .cars at o i .1 a
promotional program llne tI
attract n it l pli l
ellntertaillnment I) to is
tld rilti tilt' l 1 hi\ s ll l ll' i i ';t,(iI!
-w hen ialitii S Ii I t '
scare.c
M aii IILi\ thClclei rc l cc
gooIlliba) s(ilcl\ in si ocial niiiil
recreational tiermis. cl t il
lliore than this.
It11 sc take giooilllha\ in th
broad sense 1.' c LLi sa, thlat ii
is tih folk musiit i and da.iiic' '
the Bahaltma It is t, tllk l 'ii
troiii the blues Ot the I S.
which carries a particular om ii
mn essa.gc tr tlie cal p' 1 i|
Trinidad whttiMlh st\ le is 1n1ll
1\ rical aid Irltn iIcgga.C andi l l .4
in Jamaica. It is Bahalmian.
The educated tsophistiate
niia s \ "So i '. .li ii IIc mi a\i
disniss iig its carnival eCx pl Cssio
"'Ju ik a n i" and thei
accomlpant in ig folklore ,
"()hbeali" and tc Il as IIICei'
clownish noii'oense and beneath
his dignit. either to perftornim o


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,. .11 a I ila it se) rious stud\ .
Yet tlih mere superficial
knows that even the Imolst
cM s1cously rational iiid is
N L' s'oed by impulses and habits
whosee orginis are obscure. A nd
thie onl wa ty to shed light oni
these seemniilngly irrational]
ii"aspcts (ot hiiuman nature is ib.
lthe sltud otf folklore, danceC
Airtl music which fit llinto lhe
1 istudy of social anthropoloui!
S ih tci s i "Itfolklolre" \l ist
i' st suggested hy W illiam .1.
I hloms illn 18 4(> to designate
lthe stuildy ot traditions,.
custollms aInd superstitions
.IIun I t lamonllllg Ilthe 'coil1ii i )1
Ipi,pl' i't civihii/ed c u llt IiIths.
I Ini sttudi as iot vailt iin
the 'elucidation of the social
listlor otf mani kind and l I( s
spiritual .c (lutiln I andtI lhe
imlpetLus or ithe gathering ,tI
'u1h lilformlationll in l ngland
camlle at an opportune tiil in
tIi.it country r 's history. ( ieati
liiigc's were taking place in
hic rural life if BrilaIn.
I igration to lt'e utrban
iindtistrialied areas, imlprostedf
standards of education and ith
I'c Iliiig of social condilitionsi
\w ere resulting in tlle
destruction of the old culture.
So in the Bahamilas we have
leached, if not passed, a
parallel period. Years ago)
migration from the out-islands
1o the cosmnopolitian city of


N'ass;tI a1nd late Freepoi)t was
accelerated. Political and
economtittic changes have taken
place. ihus time is against the
collector of flklore data
before it bec iomes s;o mixed
with outside influences that it
will be in possible to
distinguish the historical
origins.
Iolk dance began with
primitive manl when it served as
his first and only means of
oi11 111un I i iC a tion through
dildancC. he endetlavouired to
understand, as well as to
control by means of magic, his
supernatural world. We have
A.lrcadi seen tile importance of
li hc drum in communication in
.t fca.
I'liere are primary themes
cilIm1ntt i toI all races and
nations in tflklore, dance and
musicL. Sot111 authit ties believe
that it was in the rmisty
da owning iof mankind before
thec spread out thousands and
tholulialdanls t v yea-s ago to
popullat the earth that therein
lies the underlying similar
themes of folklore, music and
dance thrimoght(out the world
and throughout time that
the details differ according to
the poetic, aesthetic sense, the
tlentality and the type and
quality of life io each race.
Others believe that the
similarities are accounted for
by the same psychological


TW IGGY A V knitted formal while Lenora
takes to the more casual look
MADRONA WATKINS in a jump suit. The Goombay
and Lenora Walkes put up Fashion Show is sponsored
striking poses for each week by the Ministry of
photographers during the Tourism and the
Goombay Fashion Show last Nassau/Paradise Island
Monday at the Flagler Inn Promotion Board.
Hotel on Paradise Island.
Madrona wears a sky blue, i


B

NI \\ ()RKI NI 1 AI .INl)RI
\NI) I \II N 1 I. I It helm) a

p l l ll st iier J ,l ,i bl ki s ire erv i )
\\ ,1)11 \\111 \hlll c 1\ 1 c \, ,l\ \hc
I oLl \ il (, \\it lcll 1\\t lI I )s I. 1 .1 )
\! i S I I I I dI\ Id \\.11 fS
I llt, l li t it In l ''i l i '. \ \ \)rleI nll
lIan l, It l

()t\Ii Ni St t Nl i
\.1l 1 1S i Ki I Nl li l\ I I N I &
S I I) I ) I I k i I I I '
SI\II.i 11 1,1, h 11 til lr
m, ili h i \ lCn ii(il \\ h rip1 1 L(
h lii cs ili & ler
\ i, l \i ii i. "r \ It ". ,ir (
i l ii) i I h, p ii I (, |\
II t 'ill 1 I lr n
N NI I I \ il Ti 111 1
\Out & i ft ii i ,' \rtilifli
upphli 1,\ lS' i 11 1.,n, &
,holul pants I'i,1 t r & Irl n)l
Ilong & ,hortlll [i. perma pre,
airic \ihito11"I & 0 tiMlit rilt pre


Sclitu l I t i l i r li
AliA Ntri 1n 1 r % 'Il


S c, h 11 tl 1nit- Irm s I I ir (,1 i\ttng
College. stephen Iilll 'niai
s cPhert Kinitifi\l \ iI & 'tll' .
(olm&umh%1u PrimrlnPr


reactions to the environment
common to human nature in
all parts of the world.
For whatever reason
similarities existed between
cultures and races before they
had any contact. Basic themes
of fertility of man, animals and
plants and war were common
among all peoples.
The classicist may consider
folk art unworthy of his study
but much in folk music and
dance contains the antecedents
of classical music and dance.
The highly stylized Scottish
dances contain many basic
elements of classical ballet and
the Irish jigs of classical tap
dance.
Thus the gathering and
recording of material in the
Bahamas before it is too late is
essential if the Bahamas is to
make and artistic contribution


GOOMBAY SPECIAL


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PHONE 2-4406-7-8 S/S or 2-2352 M/S



ARRIVING


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SCHOOL SUPPLIES

BOYS
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POLYESTER & COT rON
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PERMA-PRESS SHIRTS & SOCKS
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Goombay


mmi


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Tuesday, August 7, 1973.


Cl__ LriubutP


-I~


s,,


FDeo&. c~b6


By Abigail Van Buren
c 1973 by Chicag Tribune-N. Y. News Synd., Inc.
DEAR ABBY: Mine is a very embarrassing problem. I
am a 20-year-old college junior at a large university. For a
while I dated what seemed to be a nice guy I'll call Bill.
He attends the same "U," and is an art major.
Bill took some harmless photographs of me on the
beach in my two-piece bathing suit last summer. After that
I sort of broke off with Bill and started seeing another
fellow.
I recently learned thru friends that Bill is painting a
nude portrait of me, using as a model the picture he took
of me in the bathing suit. Of course, he's using his imagina-
tion, but I don't like the idea. He's planning to use this
"nude" portrait of me in an art exhibit. I do have a great
body, but I don't want half the world seeing me naked, in
addition to which I don't want people to think that I am the
kind of girl who would pose for a picture like that. It could
destroy my reputation.
Is there anything I can do to stop him?
NO NUDE MODEL
DEAR NO NUDE: Since it's your "great body" Bill
wants to immortalize on canvas, ask him to please use
somebody else's face. If he refuses, ask him to please leave
the suit on, or you will see a lawyer about bringing another
kind of "suit" into the picture.

DEAR ABBY: This girl I like knows hand sign-lan-
guage. Big deal! She is always using it in front of me to
talk to her friends. I never know what she's saying, except
that she points to me, so I know she's "talking" about me.
I have asked her to please refrain from doing this, but
she just laughs it off and continues.
This drives me up a wall. How can I get her to stop?
SPEECHLESS
DEAR SPEECHLESS: Why don't you learn a little
hand sign-language, and surprise her by "telling" her what
you think of her?

DEAR ABBY: My husband has worked at the same
office for many years. He seldom took me to any of their
social functions.
Two months ago we were invited to a small party-
about 20 people. My husband asked if I would mind if we
picked up one of the girls from his office. I said it was all
right with me.
At the party there were many friendly gestures be-
tween my husband and this girl, but the clincher came
when a man from the office who did not know me, asked
my husband if he had brought Sally.
My name is not Sally. My husband looked embarrassed
and the girl from the office, who of course was Sally, gave
the man who asked the question a reprimanding look.
I have lost a lot of trust in my husband. What do you
say about this? DUMB DORA
DEAR DORA: There were at least three people at the
party far "dumber" than you.
DEAR ABBY: Our only child is 14. I was 38, and my
husband was 52 when he was born. He has always been a
joy to us.
We've never had any trouble with him until this sum-
mer, when he became enamored of a 13-year-old girl. The
girl's mother is a twice-divorced lady bartender who leaves
her 13-year-old to baby-sit for her four younger children.
We allow our son to stay out until 10 p. m., and he
always abides by our wishes, but we know he goes to see
this girl every evening and I am worried about what may
happen.
I feel it is a very unhealthy situation. Dynamite, in fact.
I even telephoned the girl's mother and told her I didn't
want my son over there. She said, "So, keep him home."
My husband feels the boy will outgrow this fascination.
I think he should have a talk with the boy and positively
forbid him to see that girl.
What do you think? WORRIED
DEAR WORRIED: Forbidding him to see the girl is not
the answer. To a 14-year-old boy, having a "girl friend"
is exciting, and if you "forbid" him to see her, he'll become
resentful, and he'll probably see her anyway. His father
should have a talk with him to be sure he knows everything
a boy should know when he first becomes "enamored" of a
girl.

DEAR ABBY: I am 17 and have been a Baptist all my
life, until about two years ago when I started studying with
Jehovah's Witnesses. Six mouths later, I decided that this
should be my religion, and ever since then I have been
persecuted by my family. They think I am "confused" and
they insist that I should quit going to the Jehovah's Witness
church and go back to the Baptist church.
Do you think it is fair of my parents to try to keep me
from going to the church of my choice? CAGED
DEAR CAGED: I think everyone should be allowed to
serve God in his own way.

DEAR ABBY: How would you suggest I handle a sister
in law who offers unsolicited advice on my marriage, how I
run my home, and how I handle my finances?
She makes my personal business her concern. I would
rather keep my affairs private. If she were not my dear hus-
band's sister, I wouldn't worry about diplomacy. Any
suggestions? BOILING
DEAR BOILING: You need not hold still for any unsolic-
ited advice unless you want it. When she proceeds to offer
it, simply tell her that you appreciate her interest and
concern, but prefer to do things in your own way. Then
change the subject.

DEAR ABBY: Any waitress will tell you that men are
much easier to wait on than women. Also, men are more
appreciative of good service, and their tips show it.
Also, nurses who have worked in both men's and wom-


men's wards will tell you that men patients are far more
considerate of each other than women are.
Furthermore, salespeople [both men and women] will
tell you they would much rather wait on a man than a
woman. DON IN PENNA.
What's your problem? You'll feel better if you get it off
your chest. Write to ABBY. Box 69700. Los Angeles. Cal.
9009. For a personal reply enclose stamped, addressed
envelope.
DEAR ABBY: I'm married to a beautiful gal who's
crazy about pants. She wears pants everywhere. Sometimes
we go to a party and my wife is the only lady there in
pants. She has pants for every occasion and she tells me
they're in style and acceptable everywhere.
We've been married for two years and I can't remem-
ber the last time I saw her in a dress. She has pretty legs


Portrait isn't proper


and no reason to hide them.
She has a nice figure and she
wo-uld like to see her in a dress
suggestions?


looks good in pants, but I
again for a change. Any
ROGER


DEAR ROGER: Yes. Tell her you'd like to see her in a
dress. Then you'll see who really wears the pants in your
family.

CONFIDENTIAL TO JACK CLARK, REALTOR, AURO-


enough to
<


5

suit' her -


RA. II.I..: Please send me your complete address. I owe
you S5.
Problems? You'll feel better if you get it off your chest.
For a personal reply, write to ABBY: Box No. 69700, L. A.,
Calif. 90069. Enclose stamped, self-addressed envelope,
please.
For Abby's new booklet, "What Teen-Agers Want to
Know," send $1 to Abby, Box 69700, Los Angeles, Cal. 90069.


Arrived today: Joma from
Jac. ksonville; RotlIrdaim.
()_ cani n from \.cw Ynrk.
()ii Illpi I rruin rcpoirt
Bllia i. Star. Il li a I iI eralid
Scj', l'i)[ lMiadlil
Sailed tda. J J olia for
Jacksonville
.\ rrivin g in)mrrow
I'riccport I1 fr m \lia ii
WEATHER
Wind: I-a,,t to (soith-cast 5


to 12 m.p.h.
Weather: Mainly fair
Sea: Smooth to slight
I'np. Min. tonight 75
Max tomorrow X)
TIDES
Iligh 2:04 am. and 2:45
p.m. a. and :02
Low 8 02 a.m. and 9:02


VP


ERfTAIl- 414


JUSTARRIVED! 74 MODELS


T.V S COLOR/BLACK &WHITE 12" PORTABLES TO 25" CONSOLES.


CONSOLE STEREOS WITH AM-FM RADIO RECORD CHANGER, 8-TRACK TAPE PLAYER, PORTABLE CASSETTE 8-
STRACK TAPE PLAYERS & RECORDERS. DUAL POWER PORTABLE RECORD PLAYERS. ADDITIONAL ZENITH SPEAKERS.


STEREO 8-TRACK
CASSETTE
Cartridge PLAYER &
RECORDER


'PORTABLE RADIOS
*TAPE RECORDERS

ETC.




MAURA'S ALSO OFFER
YOU A 10% CASH
DISCOUNT ON ALL EXISTING 1973


UR


(MAURA LUMBER COMPANY LTD.)
PHONE 2-4001 2-4101
P. O. BOX N8177 NASSAU


$185.0


EARED


SEE O1UR COMPLETE 1971 LINE
OFEVEI POPULAR


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REFRIGERATORS
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WASHING MACHINES
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THIS DISCOUNT APPLIES TO KELVINATOR
PRODUCTS ONLY


I












Tuesday, August 7, 1973.


AHOY THERE I


OUR AUGUST SPECIAL
Magnificent Big Colour Portrait

495mplete
W 0 Complete


'HY BY


/7ooc/go so/
PHOTOOIAPHT
on the waterfront at East Bay & William Sts.
Telephone b-4641


TODAY IS TUESDAY AUGUST
7th, the 219th day of
1973. There are 146 days left in the
year.
1972 South Vietnamese
militiamen fight off waves of
Communist infantry in northern
South Vietnam.
1971 three Apollo IS
astronauts make a safe splashdown
in Pacific Ocean after their Moon,
landing.
1967 Richard Nixon wins the
Republican Party nomination for


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 1973
IN THE SUPREME COURT No. 19
Equity Side

NOTICE
THE QUIETING TITLES ACT, 1959

The Petition of Anna Edwards in respect of :-
ALL THAT Tract of land situate Six hundred
and Twenty-eight (628.00) feet Southeastward
of Blue Hill Road in the vicinity of Seven Hills
in the Southern District of the Island of New
Providence and said to contain Four and Eight
hundredths (4.08) acres which said tract of land
is bounded on the NORTHWEST by vacant land
but said to be the property of the Estate of Dr.
C. R. Walker and running thereon Six hundred
and Thirty-five and Fifth-four hundredths
(635.54) feet on the NORTHEAST by vacant
land and running thereon Three hundred and
Thirty-eight and Eighty-seven hundredths
(338.87) feet on the SOUTHEAST by vacant
land now or formerly said to be the property of
the Estate of Rupert Dean and running thereon
Six hundred and F,,rtI-fiulr and Forty-five
hundredths (644.45) feet and on the
SOUTHWEST by a Reservation for a Road
Thirty (30) feet wide leading to Blue Hill Road
and running thereon Two hundred and
Ninety-six and Seventy-five hundredths (296.75)
feet.
Anna Edwards claims to be the owner in fee
simple in possession of the parcel of land
hereinbefore described and the Petitioner has made
application to the Supreme Court of the Bahamas
under Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act. 1959
to have her title to the said land investigated.

Copies of the filed plan may be inspected at:-
(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court
(b) The Chambers of the undersigned.

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having
dower or a right to dower or an adverse claim or
a claim not recognized in the Petition shall before
the 18th day of September, 1973 file in the
Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the
undersigned a statement of his claim in the
prescribed form, verified by an affidavit to be filed
therewith. Failure of any such person to file and
serve a statement of his claim on or before the
18th day of September, 1973 will operate as a bar
to such claim.
CALLENDERS, ORR, PYFROM & ROBERTS,
Chambers, Mosmar House.
Queen Street,
Nassau. Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner.


SEA OF GALILEE


I'L AVIV (AP) The Sea
of Galilee is dropping at the
rate of almost three inches a
week. Israel's Ministry of)
Agriculture reported recently.
The violin-shaped Biblical
lake is now three and a halt' to
four feet below its normal level
and dropping by one
centimeter a day, a spokesman
for the Ministry said.
With at least 100 more days
to go before the first rains, the
lake may well drop another
five feet, revealing large areas
of its bottom never seen in
recent times.. The lake, 211
meters below sea level is
Israel's main source of fresh
water.
The drop in the level of the
lake is due to a shortage of rain
last winter.


BE COA)OL & COMFORTABLE E THIS SUMMER


BIT AN


AMANA AIR CONDITIONER


...EVERYONE DOES.


(COOLING ONLY call us for prices on Heat and Cool Models)


Model
6P-2J l
109-2J
11-2J
215-3J
218,3J
624-3J


BTU
6300
9000
10,000
15,000
18,000
24,000


ALL INSTALLATION COSTS ARE EXTRA.

FACTORY GUARANTEE ON ALL UNITS.


DON'T DELAY- DO TODAY.


TAYLOR INDUSTRIES LIMITED.


.O. tOX 4806


It will cost 20 million Israeli
pounds almost five million
dollars to drill for water to
provide a substitute for the
depleted Galilee reserves.


President of the United States:
Arab merchants go on strike in the
old city area of Jerusalem to
protest Israel's annexation of the
old quarter from Jordon.
1965 Constitutional talks
onAden and the South Arabian
Federation break down.
1964 -- People's Republic of the
Congo is inaugurated.
1962 Britain and United Arab
Republic reach accord.
1959 Communist Chinese
invade northeast frontier province


of India; Russia increases its aid to
Hungary.
1957 A U.S. grand jury in New
York Indicts Colonel Rudolf Abel
as a Soviet spy.
1951 U.S. Congress rejects
Russian proposal for agreement
on arms and atomic weapons.
1942 U.S. forces land at
Guadalcanal in the Pacific during
World War Two.
1913 France passes army bill
imposing three years' military
service.


CLEARANCE



SALE

(MOVING TO NEW LOCATION)


EVERYTHING MUST


GO...


The Associates ELIZABETH AVENUE


SINK-SMEARE


1 -

PHOTOG RAP


-i
HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR GENERAL, Sir Milo Butler, shown at
Government House reception on August 1, to commemorate his swearing in as Bahamas
first Governor General that day, with (from left) ADC Charles Fernander, His Lordship
Michael Eldon, Anglican Bishop of Nassau and the Bahamas, the Hon. Simeon L.Bowe,
Minister of Works; Mrs. Bowe, and Rev. Clive Abdullah, Bishop of Trinidad and Tobago.
___ Photo: Jock Hall.


C'Wealth bans all

nuclear testing
OTTAWA (Al') leadIers of 32
Commonwealth nations I rida,
called unaninmousl,, for a %,rl,,l ban
on nuclear vweapionp tests in space,
the skies and the seas.
'I ie agreement, reached .lter
twAo days of s-lniectilines shliirp
exchanges, was aniloiinced bh
Prime Minister Niirmian Kirk ,o
New Z/ealland vho 'said the ailil wa,
to sl\owi down the arms race alnd
stop radioactive contaminination.
The Coinmniionealth declaration
was published SundaI on the Ioth
anniversary of tlie A-
merican-British- Russian treaty tor a
partial ban on nuclear testing.
Although no country was nanied
in the statement adopted hy the
C o m ni o nw e a I 1 h s ut n m i t
conference, it \as plainly directed
at I rance and (China. rlhe are the
Nworld's onl tw nuclear powers
which ha\l\e not signed ti. 19')i.3 test
h:i treaty.
It ws iks Iur h.cLeit iy
Austrili.i'a Prime Mint icir ;'ughll
Whitlanm sto prop osed the
(ommonwesalth mitiv. NNew
'Zealand has sent a i rigatr int, tilt
'.acitfic t'sti.L fregin


PHONE 28941-5


I II I


1 -


-- I


I1


eht iribett


"- ~
- '~--- -
f
r
it ~
;szci3 5-CI.
~ 1












Tuesday, August 7, 1973.


Home Insurance parent _



SD. company wins award


with a domestic line to I
to the Far East. Arrivals an
t I ithe same terminal to ensure
trouble-free
Send for free booklet on Pa
unescorted tot


Pan Am The world's most experienced airline
Sheraton British Colonial Hotel, Box N-900, Nassau, Bahamas


..---------------
e


N am e ......... ...... .......................... ... ....... ... ....... ... .......................
A address ...................................................... ... .........................................
T ravel A gent ........................................... ........................ Tel .......................


II A lK First in the Bahamas.
Please send me your free booklet on Tours of the Far East.
For information: Call your Travel Agent or Pan Am 7-7441.
........--...... ------------------..........................


AFIA Worldwide Insurance,
one of America's most
prominent underwriters of
overseas general insurance-who
write in the Bahamas through
their member, The Home
Insurance Company-this week
received the President's "E"
Award.
The "E" Award is presented
for "an outstanding
contribution to the Export
Expansion Programme of the
United States of America.
Tony Lancaster, Hlome
Insurance Company Manager
for the Bahamas, points out
"AFIA and The Home"
insurance facilities support
American capital to be invested
overseas.
AFIA, founded in 1918,
serves as foreign manager for
10 American insurance
companies, including The
Home Insurance Co. with
combined assets in excess of
$8-billion. lome Insurance
alone has assets of $1,2-billion.
AFIA operates in 80 countries
with more than 200 foreign
branch offices and in the
Bahamas has a staff of 16 and
n numerous qualified and







1 l l





K' v, A


experienced agents.
Clifford R. Lincoln,
Director. U.S. Department of
Commerce District Office,
Newwark, New Jersey, cited
these factors in AFIA's award .
winning performance :
Facilitation of exports and
foreign investment
development by reduction or -
elimination of many risk -
deterrents through "'i
comprehensive insurance
programmes at equitable cost;
and educational campaigns
describing risks and insurance
characteristics in foreign
countries.
The Commerce official
stressed that AFIA and its
member companies pioneer in
the introduction of broad
insurance policies to countries -
formerly knowing only limited ;
and less adequate forms.


AFIA is the first foreign
insurance organization to
receive the "E" Award. AFIA's
headquarters are in Wayne.
New Jersey. Home Insuranci
has its branch office at the
Dominion Life building,
Collins Ave.


TON
Insurai


'1pr


IY LANCASTER, Bahamas manager of The Home
nce Company.


ladonna graduate conducts


workshop at her alma mater r


Eastern--Wings of Boys!
COMPLIMENTARY SIGHTSEEING FLIGHTS Some
500 Nassau youngsters from the Children's Emergency
Hostel, Ranfurly Homes, Stapleton School and various
other local schools and homes, were given a birds-eye view
of Nassau during Independence week compliments of
Eastern Air Lines. An Eastern Electra made six flights over
the island with the captain giving a running commentary for
the children. Seen boarding the first flight are several boys
with Hon. Clement Maynard, Minister of Tourism, and Bill
Biermann, Director of Eastern Air Lines in the Bahamas.


LIVONIA, Mich. It was
like a return to her college days
for Bernadette Pini, 1968
graduate of Madonna College,
when she conducted a series of
workshop sessions here
recently.
The representative of the
Bahama Islands tourist Office
in Detroit was guest lecturer to
three groups of prospective
students at Madonna College
here on July 29. when
representatives of the
Admissions Office for
"Summer Open House" asked
the popular Detroit native to
appear. "Bernie", as Miss Pini
is familiarly known, spoke on
Career Training and how
Madonna College helped her in
her chosen field as
representative for the Bahamas.
More than 100 prospective
students enjoyed Miss Pini's
remarks.
A question-and-answer
period followed Miss Pini's
discussions, based on her
educational training and in her
two years handling tourism
requirements for the Bahamas
throughout Kentucky and
Indiana: Cincinnati, Dayton
and Toledo, Ohio; and several
areas of Metropolitan Detroit.
Her specialty is "student
marketing" -advising students


PROBE INTO KENT STATE KILLINGS REOPENED


WASIlll\GTON (AP) The
Justice Department Friday
reopened its investigation of
the 1970 killing of four Kent
State University students and
suggested the case may go to a
federal grand jury.
Atty. Gen. Elliot L.
Richardson said he revived the
case "to make sure the
department knows as much as


can possibly be learned as to
whether there were violations
of federal law in this matter."
Four students were killed
and nine others wounded by
Ohio national guardsmen who
fired a 13-second burst of
gunfire into a group of
students demonstrating on May
4, 1970, against the dispatch of
troops in Cambodia.


The national guard,
stationed on campus after
three days of disruptions, at
first said shots were fired in
response to a sniper but later
said there was no evidence of
sniper fire.
A state grand jury
exonerated the national guard,
and former Atty. Gen. John N.
Mitchell dropped the case in
August 1971, saying there was
no evidence to justify calling a
federal grand jury.
Richardson said he had no
reason to believe Mitchell's
decision was wrong, but that
"there are some areas where an
additional inquiry is desirable."


of the benisons of selecting the
Bahamas as a tourism
destination.
After a successful brief
career as Junior High School
teacher. Miss Pini was
graduated from the B.I.T.O.
Training Course in Detroit two
years ago. Since that time, she
has been a full-fledged
representative for the Bahamas,
having conducted several
familiarization tours to Nassau,
Freeport and the Out Islands
for travel agents in those North
Central States which are under
the supervision of Regional
Manager Adel Falimy of the
Detroit Bahama Island Tourist
Office.
Her Detroit offices are at
26400 Lahser, Southfield.
Miss Pini is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Pini, 2009
Melton Road, Utica, Mich.

ELECTRIC SHOCKS

EASE PAIN OF

CANCER PATIENTS

LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND
(AP) Doctors at Walton
Hospital here have been using
electric current to ease the pain
of cancer patients, according to
a doctor involved in the
project.
Nerves in the neck which
carry pain messages are
destroyed by an electric
current "fired" from an
electrode, says Dr. Sampson
Lipton of the hospital's centre
for pain relief.
He described the operation
in the "proceedings of the
Royal Society of Medicine."
Dr. Lipton said the
45-minute surgery is offered to
patients expected to live more
than two weeks.
A needle with an electrode is
inserted into the spinal chords
at a point where the pain fibers
come together. The fibers are
then destroyed by short bursts
of electricity.


mNo
P.;r.iiwnt to the provisions of Section 33 of The
Companies Act, notice is hereby given that The
Registered Office of Barclays Bank International
Limited has been transferred from Barclays Bank
International Limited, Local Head Office,
Beaumont House, Bay Street. Nassau, Bahamas to
Barclays Bank International Limited, Local Head
Office, Barclays Bank Building, Bay Street. Nassau,
Bahamas.
N. E. IRELAND
Local Director

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 33 of The
Companies Act, notice is hereby given that The
Registered Office of Barclays (Nassau) Nominees
Company Ltd. has been transferred from Barclays
Bank International Limited, Local Head Office,
Beaumont House, Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas to
Barclays Bank International Limited, Local Head
Office. Barclays Bank Building, Bay Street, Nassau.
Bahamas. J.M. RANSOME.
Secretary

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 33 of The
Companies Act, notice is hereby given that The
Registered Office of Barclays Finance Corporation
Bahamas. Limited, has been transferred from
Barclays Bank International Limited, Local Head
Office, Beaumont House. Bay Street, Nassau,
Bahamas to Barclays Bank International Limited,
Local Head Office, Barclays Bank Building, Bay
Street, Nassau. Bahamas.
E. G. GODDARD,
Secretary


ED

ED


i


ShPe ribune









Tuesday, August 7, 1973.


C(lir Eributr


THE BAHAMAS



MONETARY AUTHORITY



OFFICIAL NOTICE


Struck in pure gold (916.66,1,000) by
the Royal Canadian Mint, the coins
shown here are beautiful masterworks
sculpted by Arnold Machin of the
British Royal Mint. Of the 3,500 sets
available, only 1,250 will be proof
finish.
These sets are destined to be treasured
as fine and rare collectors' items, not
only because of their historic signif-
icance but because this issue is one of
the truly unique modern gold curren-
cies in circulation. An exceptionally
low minting limit was authorized for
this final issue prior to independence.
The number authorized for the past
issue (1971) was almost double the
limit for this issue and it was sold out
in a very few months.


This remarkable collection of pure
gold (916.66/1,000) legal tender coins
may be purchased as a complete set,
mounted in a leather case bearing the
coat of arms of the Commonwealth
of the Bahama Islands.
A Mini-Set (one each of the $10B and
$20B BU coins) is also available in a
miniature version of the large case.
Single brilliant uncirculated $10 and
$20 coins are also available in individ-
ual wallets.
Illustrations sculpted on the coins are:
100B Dollar Bahamas Coat of Arms
50B Dollar Columbus' "Santa Maria"
20B Dollar Lighthouse, Hope Town
10B Dollar Fort Montagu, New
Providence
All coins display on the obverse a portrait
of H.M. Queen Elizabeth II.


Common reverse


D. Former Bahamian Coat of Arms


C. Columbus' "Santa Maria"


B. Lighthouse, Hope Town


A. Fort Montagu


All coins enlarged to show detail


Available from:
BANK OF MONTREAL
BARCLAYS BANK INTERNATIONAL
CANADIAN IMPERIAL BANK OF COMMERCE
ROYAL BANK OF CANADA


FOR MAIL ORDERS, WRITE:




ITALCAMBIO, C.A.
(exclusive world agent)


P.O. Box N 4014 / Nassau, N.P.


(Tel. 2 4292)


-- -- -- -- -- --- -- --- -
IOFFICIAL RESERVATION FORM: 1972 COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
SPECIMEN GOLD 916/1000 LEGAL TENDER
For your convenience, make your selections and present this form with your order
Iat the locations listed. For mail orders, send to Italcambio, C.A.
Box N-4014 / Nassau, N.P. Mail orders outside Nassau add $5.00.

A _Fort Montagu (BU) 10 B Dollars 19mm; 3.19 grams (No Limit) @ $ 23 $
B Lighthouse (BU) 20 B Dollars 22mm; 6.38 grams (No Limit) @ $ 46 $
C "Santa Maria" (PROOF) 50 B Dollars 28mm; 15.97 grams (Singles not available)
D. Coat of Arms (PROOF) 100 B Dollars 36mm; 31.95 grams (Singles not available)
SComplete 4 coin (BU) (A,B,C, & D) (2,250 sets available) (Limit 2) @ $414 $
Complete 4 coin (PROOF) (A,B,C, & D) (1,250 sets available) (Limit 1) @ $565 $
I (Each set is individually numbered)
I Mini Sets (BU) (A & B only) (12,000 sets available) (Limit 5) @ $ 69 $

TOTAL: $
-------- m- --- --- -- -----


INK- SMEARED.


0 ITALCAMBIO, C.A. 1973


___ __ _ L J. ---~ -- --., -- -~- ----.- -- -~-~--- ---- ---_-_


Bd Ikifil1 ISSUEB

THE LAST GO~fLDfBAHAMAN OIN
^H|^jMINTEDUNDER THE CROWN











Tuesday, August 7, 1973.


tJ~,~E r


1 A-i' 7.

THE LEAGUE LEADING SOUTHERNERS CRICKET CLUB (from left: standing)
John Deveaux, Peter Hall, George Ferguson, Cedric Laing, Tyrone Thompson, George
Deveaux (skipper); (Kneeling) Mackey Bain, Harry Dean, Sidney McPhee, Prince Stubbs
and James Peterson. Photo: Rickey Wells


- R0Bob Slatter recaptures



SBGA amateur title


from 'off day' Duncombe

By GLADSTONE THURSTON
ROBERT SLATTER IS A UNIQUE GOLFER. This no one can
dispute, as he has proved his ability over and over. Defying all the
hazards of the challenging South Ocean golf course, Slatter shot a
commanding 78 yesterday recapturing the Bahamas Golf
S Association's 1973-'74 Amateur Championship with a gross total
'I of 156 following the two-day tournament which began on


Sunday.
The four handicapper, who
is also a member of the
Bahamas' Hoerman Cup team,
to compete in Jamaica in
September, first won the
Amateur Championship in
1970 when he outplayed
Donald "Nine" Rolle. Rolle


Southern skipper bags 4 wickets in 14 balls





By GLADSTONE THURSTON
SKIPPER GEORGE DEVEAUX in one over and six balls bagged four wickets while giving up
seven runs as the league leading Southerners Cricket Club rattled second place Carrcll's
Adventurers for a meagre 62 runs all out in less than one and a half hours Sunday during the first
day's play of their two day match at Windsor Park.


AND at 8:10 & 11:50
AN EYE FOR AN EYE
ISM1 1i1n l tllIl


a ~~~~, iIun:ii u; -


NOW SHOWING
Matinee 2:45 & 5, Evening 9:00-'Phone 2-1004, 2-1005



ROGER
MOORE
7a

JAMES
BOND


"LIVE

AND

LErDIEPG.


SUGGE;STI:D IFOR MA TURE A ULDIENCEtS.
PARENT L DISCRETION AD VISED.
Reservations not claimed by 8:45, will be sold


on first come, first



Starts Wednesday
Matinee starts at 2:15
Evening 9:00
"FISTS OF FURY"
PG.
Bruce Lee

PLUS

"THE DESERTER" PG.
Bekim Fehmiu
Richard Crenna

'Phone 2-2534


served basis



Wednesday thru Friday
Continuous Showings
from 3:00

"GOD FORGIVES,
I DON'T" PG.
Terence Hill
Bud Spencer

PLUS
"RAID ON ROMMEL" G.
Richard Burton
Wolfgang Preiss


NOW SHOWING
Matinee Continuous from 2:30, Evening 8: 30
'Phone 3-4666


alai all 'I
WILLIAM MARSHALL DON MITCHELL PAM GRIER
MICHAEL CONRAD COLOR eo _.Me (star of "Coffy")

SCIE E C T e
RUNS



m 4.~.. m_. _
I SUGGESTED FOR MA TL 'R A 'DIl.\ (: 'S
PARENTAL DISCRI:TION A D ISEDD.
SORRY NO PASSES ACCEPTED


The Southerners replied
with an easy 157 all out.
The medium pacing of
Tyrone Thompson again told
the tale for the Southerners.
Opening with John Deveaux.
Thompson in seven overs took
four wickets for 26 runs.
Deveaux, took the other two
for 13 runs in three overs.
In John Deveaux's first over,
he had the Adventurers' G;.
Dean out for duck witl only
one run on the board.
Thompson at the other end
had the Adventurers two for
10 when he clean bowled C.
Demeritte for two runs.
E. McQuay joined opening
batsman P. Forbes but was
only able to take the
Adventurers to 17.
Thompson in his third over
finally picked up his length and
took a wicket in each of his
following overs. George
Ferguson joined him for three
overs to bring on Deveaux,
who, along with Thompson,
finished the damage.
The Adventurers at 48 were
at a standstill for three wickets.
Not out batsman R. Dean at 24
was the only one to reach
double fighters.
The Southerners in the
bottom of the first innings
seemed as if they were
following the same road of
collapse as the Adventurers and
were three down for seven.
George Ferguson brought a ray
of hope which was soon
extinguished when they fell to
five for 13. Ferguson, however
batted strongly and
contributed 31 runs before he
went.
Cedric Laing, the seventh
batter of the inning continued
Ferguson's rally and added 25.
Deveaux contributed 20 as the
Southerners climbed to 101 for
eight.
Not out batsman Mackey
Bain scored an innings high of
46. The match enters its final
day Sunday afternoon 1:30 at
Windsor Park.


Medium pacer Francis Scott
bagged five wickers for 4 1 runs
in eight overs and skipper
James Wood took another
three for 41 in 14 overs
including two maidens as
defending cricket champs, St.
Bernards Club, skittled the
strong St. Albans for 169 all
out Saturday in the first day's
play of their two-day match at
Windsor Park.
St. Bernards, in an air of
controversy, replied with 39
for two going into Saturday's
second day's play.
A first wicket partnership by
opening batsmen Clive Bisphan
and II. Kingston which
produced a total of 64 runs
before Kingston was run out
proved to be the backbone of
St. Albans' stand. They carried
the Saints to 101 for two.
Kingston scored 40 and
Bisphan went on to score in
innings' high of 55 falling lbw
to James Wood.
Five runs following the fall
of Kingston went II. Smith
stumped for five off the
bowling of A. Shillingford.
Skipper Horace Stewart then
joined Bisphan and
strengthened St. Albans with a
good knock of 31. It was not

long before Bisphan went and
St. Albans were I 19 for four
Scott, who gave up 12 runs
during three earlier overs.
returned and on the fourth ball
had Stewart clean bowled.
This, however, spelt the end
for St. Albans and Scott, two
overs later had the remaining
three batters falling for only
three runs.
One of St. Bernard's big
downfalls came when
all-rounder Eddie Ford was
given a controversial out,
caught by the wicket keeper
for 12. Following him was
opening batsman 11. Stuart
who was trapped lbw for nine.
At the close of play, Wright
and Scott were respectively 10
and four not out.


has since turned pro.
Defending champion Jim
Duncombe, who was favoured
to win, had two bad days and
came through with a 169
which was good enough only
for fifth place. Surprisingly
though, )uncombe on
Saturday in a practice match at
the South Ocean shot a one
under par 70 which was one
stroke short of the course
record. During the same round
he had a hole in one on the
118 yards long I th hole. He
used a pitching wedge.
Wilfred lorton, a former
Hoerman ('up player, who led
the first round Sunday with a
sizzling 74. a four stroke lead
over Slatter, found the greens
yesterday two much to control
and ended the second round
with an 86 which gave him
second place. Mike Taylor,
another lioerrian Cup player.
had a gross total of 161 for
third place.
Valdo Prosa who also had a
third place 161 captured the
net honours with 151. Taylor
was second with 153.
SHAKY START
Asked about his game. Slater
said: "You just try to play it
and keep it in play and let the
other guy make the mistake."
Slater who moved into the
lead on the front nine, got off
to a shaky start with a double
bogey on the first hole and a
bogey on the second and third.
However, his turning point was
the fourth hole which he
birdied. lie also birdied the
seventh and parred the
remainder going out with a 38
one stroke behind Prosa.
"That really made me feel
good," he said. Slatter at that
point led Horton by six strokes
and Duncombe by three.
"All I was thinking during
the back nine was to keep it
straight and not make anything
worse than a bogey," recalled
Slater. "I knew that if I didn't
have a bad hole I would have
won." With that in mind
Slatter bogeyed the 10th, 12th,
17th and 18th holes and parred
the remainder going in with a
40 on the formidable back
nine.
Slatter found that "the
greens were hard and it nmadi
the course much harder to
pla\y. I think the course is
playing as hard as it ever will
play," he said. Nevertheless, all
weekend, Slatter's game was
real good and in the end, "I'm
real satisfied," he said.
Horton, who yesterday
collected a total of four double
bogeys and two three putt
determining factor in his game
yesterday. "That's the
difference between winning
and second place." he said.
20-FOOT PUTT
Sunday really was Iorton's
day. tie collected three birdies,


WE HAVE TRAVELLERS'



CHEQUES IN



EUROPEAN CURRENCIES!

The currently unsettled international monetary
situation makes it very adviseable when visiting
Europe to convert your travel funds to European
currency before leaving the Bahamas.

As always, the safest way to carry money is in the
form of universally accepted travellers' cheques. As
a service, the Royal now offers travellers' cheques in
the following currencies at three of its local offices:
Main Branch, Bay Street; Palmdale; Nassau In-
ternational Airport.


POUNDS STERLING
DEUTCHEMARKS


FRENCH FRANCS
SWISS FRANCS


Also, as usual, U.S. and CANADIAN DOLLARS.


The Royal


The Helpful Bank hf
Mlji' utlie li runilioughoutl l ic B luini.


HE IS NOT CALLED "CONSISTENT BOB" FOR
NOTHING. Bahamas Golf Association's Amateur
Champion Robert Slatter here birdies the fourth hole which


proved to be the turning
Photo: Richard Rodgers
one of which came from a 20
foot putt. Although he found
the course a little tight which
forced the golfers to keep the
ball right down the middle or
fall into the dangerous hazardss,
"the course is in very good
shape." he commented.
Hlorton started the second
plagued with bogies and the
fifth and sixth holes were his
only escapes. lHe birdied the
fifth and parred the sixth going
out with a 44. Ils back nine
was a near repeat of the front
nine but he managed to cut
two strokes and went in with a
42.
For Fred lliggs, president of
the B.(.A. and another
member of the Hoerman Cup
whose gross total of 172 placed
him far down in the standings.
"golf being what it is. you have
good days and bad days," he
said. "I know what I could do
in golf and I know my time is
going to come again." Iliggs
has just won a tournament in
East Africa.
In order to have a good
round of golf. liggs t igured
that one needs a few good
breaks to go along with it A
good example of this was
Slatter's hook shot onn tile 19 th
hole which went straight in tlie
bushes and then skipped out
on the fairway on its own
accord. "Today. I was hitting
the ball good but getting thad
breaks," said lliggs.
Although one is never happy
with his game when he has a
bad score, "it didn't upset me
at all," said Higgs confidently.
"Under normal conditions I
would have scored an 86."
BI(; SURPRISE
The big surprise of the
tournament was Blair Antoni's
163 which gave him fourth
place. Antoni, one of tour
players from Freeport. carded
an 86 following the first round
and 77 yesterday, le shot the
best round on the tback
nine-a-par 3(. IHis bogey on tIhe
eighteenth hole was made up
with his birdie on the
thirteenth.


point in his game yesterday.


CROSSWORD
PUZZLE


ACROSS
Foreign news
agency
6 Amphora
9. Patch up
11. Extra
13. Cordial
14. Reference
books
16. Totality
17. Stannum
19. Stipend
20. Juliet's love
22. Temper
23. Surveys


Par time 25 min.


26 Scorched
28. Pogonia
30. Savory
31. Jujube
32. Excursion
34. Shelter
36. Might
37. Rolled tea
40 Distant
42. Perceptible
44. Swamp fever
45. Ibsen
enchantress
46. Culbertson
47. Unskilled


SOLUTI NOF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE
DOWN 3. Maius





4. Tariff
1. S u race 5 Direct celi
2.1 ickens divsi on
character 6. Tittle

- -- 10. Decorous
18 Pen pointE
SOLUTICOBN0F YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE




19 2 ert a lkaious





-L 21 Away from
- Z 2. the center
- 1-- 23. Hooded sncke
4. Smalff
1.Swurface 5 Direct cel,
2. D ickens division




c-- ar- ter 6. Tittle
25. Delarez





- 27. Moonbeam
29. River barrier
1033. Molten rock
1235. Unpleasant
f I 15 Shabby




1837. Cunning
- -- 2-38. Leveretkal
39. Astronaut





-- -- Shepard
4"7 41. Clairvoyant
S43. Misthe center
23.Hooded snc!e
24. Small
25. Ebenezer
27. Moonbeam
29. River barrier
-1 W3S 33. Molten rock
35. Unpleasant
43 37. Cunning
38. Leveret
39. Astronaut
Shepard
41. Clairvoyant
43. Mister


AP Newsfeatures


ENTIRELY NEW DECOR

plis PRISCILLA hO LINES

SIEIE HIclEl TIE EIATIAONS
Continuous dancing except Thursdays
fro,' 10 p.m. until,..
Cantonese Dining, Tasty Snaacksfrom 7 p.m
NO COVER, NOMI fNIMUMI
BRITANNIA BEACH HOTEL PARADISE ISLAND


111 Shirley Street


Phone 2-8941/5


Box rM48D0


rhe Zribunt


Select the FAN



of yourchoice



FROM 812.0UP


PAY UB nfEU LLTLI.


S so. I rmi't r"iaLn,!rtyne


-


-


....













she 0tributm


Tuesday,August 7,1973.


... .. .. ... ... .


get ^ ;;W

Come by Classified Counter at The Tribune or call 2-1986 Ext.5 in Nassau,352 -6608 in Freeport from 9a.m. to 5p.m. Mon. to Fri. Sat. 9a.m. to 1p.m.


REAL ESTATE


I i


C10682
FOR SALE
BY OWNE.
House in Highland P&ak
executive typr lie. 1
bedrooms, 2, baths, lici'nj,
dining, family, k l0lcnri. '.,t!h
car garage avid utility ,i!:i i
2 lots of ldnd, wa' l t ..,l
carpet and diapes, (.n*p' '
furnished, laige ptlio .d :
18 x 36. lieu' ,
landscaped, bearing fiu-t ,i ,
central aircondcitie 'i I1
view telephone ?-1 /7;2 3


C10650
FOR SALt
BY OWUif R
House in HicJiland i .
bedrooms, 2 !itl', ', i
dining, kitchen, fu.Irn I ci':
and carport. utility oom :
2 lots of land )(rLijuti i !.
furnished, wall to '. *ll c:'pH '
and drapes till (.i hou
Completely walled aid i v,'
landscape. Ar d. :'.
t h r o u g hou :.
S opportuO ity. T .*,..
telephone 2-1722-3.

C10692
WOULD YOU LIK
near the sea wth at .., t -
private lake' Beach injtl:s J1,1
al! undergrCound fJauc ita i '
down. Fiom $80 ni,,t- ;r ;
interest. Fiomr $5800.
Call Pat Ruther'orid i* 4 i4
or Morlcy & O'Biin at 2 41 1
or 2-3027 or o0n.' ti ie ,
YAMACRC AV BEACH V c d
Home.

C10718
MONTAGU HEiCiGTS c.-.;,,J
on. Windor i d Av- i.' i J
bedroomii, bath, r,'idi ..
atd car poit. Large ei i;,.i ;
lot. Own r"i l st ,.i";
brl ow -eplar--ni"i ,
$40.000 or nemtar: : :
31172 for appoi-an-

C10726
CHARMING B1/AHAM: '
HOME on Qoue-n Stheet '
storey, wide porches, hiddi I;
garden, bearing fruit : .:!
Suitable for office aj. i (
residence $75,000 ibt rmai
offer. Telephone C(
Thompson 24777 (i-e:u c-!
42035, 31425)

C10786
ONE lot in Stapletuo Gr,, .
80 x 120. call 3-6164
C10778
EXCELLENT INVESTMENT
PROPERTIES
1. A choice location n r e i: ,
Street comprising th! '. ;
of a complete t:o(. v.''' ..
frontage on tlhre sioe'-
2. A larie ,iparni bn t ,
lot Collin A.- g
3. A large apar tm'c,! .
Bay Stroee JaD; : ."
47,000 sq. ..
4. Lots and cottage Adr' i
Beach.
5. 62 acres prime- devcoe:-, e -
property Easteri Rcoad
6. A 3 acres estate wit :
room palatial m.nsi:,; .
additional option of 1 1 ,
of good develope-,l ia,'
For prices information p r
appointment call C. W Sc-nc-
Bill's Real Estate 23921.


FOR SALE OR RENTj

C10732
UNFURNISHED two storey
house three bedrooms two
baths. Eastern District, Phone
4-1183 after 6 p.m.

C1079O
F OR SAl I OP HCi, .
LEASE I -
fur ishedri t I ,
Heights. F O ,* '
fathl:. M l, n i '
ente ta urinq. '- .'
diplonmatr
residence. ic (-',, ,
garden pl,itited '
Phone 7-720'i -:' .
appointnment !i c;

C 10771
3 BERjUROO-/.. : .
Joans Hieiihti .
See Philip P V /.,.
South-Street of'. Cui n


FOR RENT
C10791
FURNISHED 1 1 ER i
BEDROOM two bath ihf;fs. '
Seabroeee F
a i r c o n d it io n er s l 0.,- t .'; l ( .
garage, laundry ci"i
automatic washer and dci,,
$400.00 Phone 5-8512.
C10653
ONE EXTRA LARGE two
bedrooms two bath, and one
extra large one bedroom
apartment. With large living
and dining all basically
furnished Victoria Court
Apartments on Elizabeth
Avenue between Shirley and
Bay Street. Facilities, Phonie,
laundry, parking, T.V. antenna,
airconditioned. Phone 54631
between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.


C10660
HILLCREST TOWERS
Spacious 2 bedroom 2 bath
apartment, large balcony,
airconditioning, swimming
pool, short or long term. $375
per month. Contact 2-18411
days.


FOR RENT


F I PS -?


! I


S: i(, t APART-
,* ": i- A, R living


it


; :, l


-T '; ,i '['ACl
+ {, ;. I l i l-d it "
:,:, pji P g.


,)ROO .
r' i o r .Od.
( .ll
Pt ; AI


- -: - -


t-.?:'T' l 1KV
--

3- I i,


S t i
- e-I


A.


CARS SALE -]







S; .





197i SPORT r,Iy
3 38(0, 0,0

1-70 TfI'I ,' I 3,.0


- .1,


KE- ., ,AL.' %



: t. 4 *


' .-:, v i :J


1 ON i Y ' :
1970 (HI L I'Ar MI'I X


ONLY "
'70 T Y..-Ti
O ,.. :..

ONLY j,, ..,' ,


K f0


1970 HILLMAN Mii IX X.6 i
L' ; T O. -. :, ; .

1972 VAJUXHi-\I. VICTOR
s ; ().'.4 .) *, ., !'r, i t '.,,
. ONI. Y i.. i
1970 V/WAGKON 1300 BUG
vw C .I Y - 'O.tI 1
1969 It V Y M l. i J /.

ONLY *).oi
1ACHA!IC SPECIAL 1966
MUSTANG AT Oi!Y
50 .00 .(i)
MOTOR CENTRE LIMITED
THOMPSON BLVD.,
OPP. DAVIS ST.,
P. O. BOX N-3741,
NASSAU. BAHAMAS
PHONE 5 6729


CARS FOR SALE


C10742
ISLAND MOTOR COMPANY
1970 LTD.
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
2 D Alii. Gt'ef $1695
1968 VAUXHALL VIVA
Auto:in tic Red $500
1967 CHRYSLER
4 D,. Auto. White $950
1968 PONTIAC
STRATO CHIEF Yellow$1400
1970 HILLMAN HUNTERs,
i U. Automatic. White $995
1971 VAUXHALL VIVA
4 fr. Std. Green $1200
1968 JAVELIN AC $1200
1970 PARISIENNE A/C $2400
1968 VAUXHALL VIVA
:' )i. Std BlueI $695
1967 TRIUMPH 1300
Rod. Std. $800
1969 VAUXHALL VICTOR
SVrgn. Yellow Std. $475
1973 VAUXHALL VICTOR
V W F E ALto. Blue
5bGI miles $4400
1970 RAMBLER SST
Su. Au '. Blue $2100
1969 MORRIS OXFORD
stC Wnite $995
1971 MERCURY
SC 4 [Di. Maquis $5500
1967 GMC PICKUP $640
1964 CHRYSLERR $800
1968 HILLMAN
(Giren S,W Auto. $1100
1971 FORD CAPRI
,'t. Blue 1950
1969 FORD GALAXIE
S AI. AC $1850
1966 MORRIS 1100
I hI HIIIe $500
1971 VAUXHALL VICTOR
std. Blue $1595
1970 HILLMAN MINX
4 'ir Std. Green $850
1969 MORRIS 1100
4 A,. Auto. White $895
Trad'4ns Welcome
I.ocated Oakes Field
Phone 34636-7-8
Opposite the Ice Plant

C10731
1971 AUTOMATIC DODGE
A.vFTNGER $1400. 36477 7
S. 5 p.m. 51327 6 a,m. -
.30 an. ..


C 10739
1969

i r to i


REBEL, .Good
Telephone.2-:301 9
p.m. ask for Charles


Stu t UI U p

FOR SALE
S10096
()':" Steel Hilt 125 ft. x 23 ft.
S ft DDiaft Powered by I
IN:cw 343 Cat Diesel
1 Il Ton Unite Crane
i Carrg Hatch 14 x 24
itargo Hatch 14 x 36
i ),o ble Bottom. In Excellent
Shape Duty Paid.
I fi r ftliher information
Siinitact Mr. Sidney Sands,
FTeasuie Cay. Abaco, Bahamas.
C 10792
1'l61 MORRIS good condition

I-f66 VAUXHALL VIVA $100
.isci laneous household
irfniture owner leaving.
Phone 3-4358.


1 L P itash register 4 total

; N.C 1H. ashi iegistet 9 total
.1 100
'Des $'i0
S8 ft Drug Store check-out
ie r $150
i 'll Sihow Cases $150 each
'.'etai DiIplav Shoe Rack $40
a;' ; Cart (a tainiess steel)

: C cabinet .1 drawers $60
n i 'i Cabinet 2 drawers $40
i e" t) e ,.een at Merthandise
:ri'i; i L.1d.. Shlnlea Phone


S"AL E White
-. 'Ih! ino-i dininette set
r:.''i mrn $100. lamps,
S. ( lenir overstuffcl
S dotted plants anld
: I* '..*"' is item s C all





' - i'nt', thi. Public that

I V/r' i t Endi Grand
; ''- i (I- c i nier I- of
,' i ".' ddt ti, [N asiJ u, a f'
-. t h vi' I e e been.
a'J ,cdI tIo Ia ciO




COMPLETE range of artists'
supplies. Oils, acrylics, canvas,
easels, etc. Baharmian Paint
Supply Ltd., Bay St. Phone
2- 2386, 2-2898.

MARINE SUPPLIES
S 10635
F OR SALE 31 foot
rl RTRAM .Sports-fisherman.
115,500. (Firm). Telephone
5-4641

C10773
WORK BOATS
Tuqs Dredges's Barges -
Landing Crafts Cargo Boats
Freeze Boats Steel Twin
Screw Diesel Call Mr. Nash
305-635-8602.
OCEAN MASTERS CORP.


I I MIE SwPUES


C10688
PACEMAKER 44ft. Luxurious
Cruising Yacht. Phone 3-2371.


CARD OF THANKS
C10797
















The family of the late Austin
V. Roberts, wish to thank
their many friends and relatives
for the flowers, cards, calls and
telegrams they received during
the time of their bereavement.
Special thanks to Pastor S. G.
Cole and the Grant's Town
Adventist Church, doctors and
nurses of the Male Wards of the
Princess Margaret Hospital, The
British Legion, the Good
Samaritan Lodge and Mr. Fealy
Demeritte of Derneritte's
Funeral Home.


HELP WANTED
C10753
REGISTERED or Practical
Nurse should have office
experience including typing.
Pleasant working conditions
good salary. Apply Renaissance
77481.

C10723
USED CAR mechanic come iii
at Central Garage and ask for
Kendal Major.

C10750
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
Publishing is stimulating,
interesting business where you
learn something new every day.
We are always looking for the
very best staff in the Baharas.
Senior position now available
for Executive Secretary. Must
be self-starter, five years
experience, able to type 70
w.p.m. Shorthand ideal but not
necessary. Etienne Dupuch Jr.
Publications, 3-5665.

C10657
JOB TITLE: MOBILE
EQUIPMENT REPAIRMAN
LEADER
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
GOOD basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Directs and plans work of
workmen as required tor
inspect, test, adjust, dismantle
and replace unit assemblies or
parts and male complete
repairs to gasoline or diesel
powered equipment.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. O. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


C10658
JOB TITLE: WELDER
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBIL CITIES:
Must be a certified welder
capable of pei forcing
hor izont.il, vertical and
overhead welding, bihaing and
cutting of any material using
gas and olrctiI( geldingg
equipment.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Peisonnel
Department, Bahama Cerment
Company, P. O. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Baharna.

C10672
JOB TITLE: STRUCTURAL
STEEL ERECTOR
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic edt.'.atcn n Qualified
In steel construction
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Work on str ctu-ral steel
erection during modifications
of buildings and eqCuipment in
Cement plant
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cerment
Company, P. 0 Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C10656
JOB TITLF: (FOUR)
MILLWRIGHTS
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education. Good
Cement Plant mechanical
background
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 yea s
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Inspects, repairs, replaces,
installs, adjusts and maintains
all mechanical equipment in a
cement manufacturing plant
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P O Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama


HELP WANTED


I I


C10655
JOB TITLE: CRANE
OPERATOR AND RIGGER
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3-5
years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Operates crane as required to
perform erection of structures
and equipment and loading of
materials. Makes minor repairs
and adjustments to crane such
as changing cables, booms,
buckets, etc..
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0 Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C10654
JOB TITLE: ERECTION
SUPERINTENDENT
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education Must be
able to read blueprints
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Supervise the construction and
erection modifications to
buildings and equipment in
cement plant.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. O. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C10775
WANTED Live-In Maid.
References needed also health
certificate. To take care of
infant & regular housekeeping
duties. Middle age preferred.
Write Box N4269.

C10782
WANTED: Rooms Division
Manager for 370 Room Hotel
Resort on Cable Beach At
least three years experience in
similar position.. Apply: In
person to Personnel Office
Hyatt Emerald Beach Hotel
Cable Beach.

C10794
LYFORD CAY CLUB
REQUIRES a young lady to
work at our pool to be life
guard and to teach swimming
and diving.
Must be qualified swimming
instructress
Must have a certificate for life
saving
Have a full knowledge of water
safety
An attractive appearance and
pleasant personality
Must be Bahamian
Please write giving full details
of age, experience, and
qualifications to: General
Manager, Lyford Cay Club, P.
O. Box N7776 Nassau,
Bahamas.

C10767
WANTED AT OCEAN
CAY
FOLLOWING personnel are
needed for immediate
employment in the aragonite
project at Ocean Cay Interview
will be held in Nassau Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday,
August 7, 8 and 9. If you
believe you are qualified for
one of these jobs, Phone
2-1324 for an appointment.
TRACTOR OPERATORS
WELDER, heavy and light
metal, electrical and acetylene
CLERK TYPIST, male, for
reports and inventory.
ELECTRICIAN, 3 phase.
MECHANICS (HEAVY
EQUIPMENT). Must have 5
years experience and be willing
to be sent abroad fo'
specialised training at company
expense.
MARCONA OCEAN
INDUSTRIES LTD., P. O.
Box N4177. Nassau.

C10789
GERMAN SPEAKING lady
required for manageress
position for real estate
development company. Must
be able to compose and type
own correspondence in Englislh
& German, deal with public,
supervise staff & accounts.
Please reply in writing stating
expert ience & salary
requirements to Love Beach
Clubs Ltd. P. O. Box 6202,
Nassau.

C10787
BARCLAYS BANK
International Limited P. O.
Box F2404 Freeport requires
confidential executive
secretary able to type at 50
w.p.m. and take shorthand at
80-100 w.p.m. Applicants must
have at least 3 years


commercial experience
Bahamian only please
contact Mr. H. Spiers. Phone
27466 Nassau or telephone D.
R. Martin 352-5391, Freeport.


C10774
"QUALIFIED AUTOMOBILE
MECHANICS. Must have at
least 5 years proven experience
with good references. We are
looking for men with the
ability to turn out first class
work on all phases of
automobile repairs. Excellent
conditions and pay for the
eight men.
Apply with references to
service manager, Nassau Motor
Company, Shirley Street."


HELP WANTED


HELP WANTED
C10655
JOB TITLE: CRANE
OPERATOR AND RIGGER
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE: 3-5
years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Operates crane as required to
perform erection of structures
and equipment and loading of
materials. Makes minor repairs
and adjustments to crane such
as changing cables, booms,
buckets, etc..
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. O. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C10657
JOB TITLE: MOBILE
EQUIPMENT REPAIRMAN
LEADER
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
GOOD basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Directs and plans work of
workmen as required to
inspect, test, adjust, dismantle
and replace unit assemblies or
parts and make complete
repairs to gasoline or diesel
powered equipment.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. O. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama,


C6145
MANAGER for busy gourmet
type Dining Room and Bar
needed.
Minimum education: Must be a
High School Graduate or have
equivalent education.
Minimum experience: Must
have had 8 years experience in
fast food service and gourmet
type dining room, including 2
years experience in broiler
cooking and one year as
bartender. Applicant must be
between 27 and 35 years of
age.
Must have had experience in
supervising staff and must have
the ability to find replacements
or additional staff that meet
requirements of General
Manager, as they are needed.
Must have had experience in
Inventory and Stock Control
and Purchasing.
Must have some knowledge of
accounting to maintain proper
daily records and to handle and
control cash receipts. Police
Certificate required.
Must be prepared to work
more than average 48 hour
week in order to supervise
establishment properly.
Tuesday is day off. Salary
$900.00 monthly.
Applications and resume
accepted by mail only,
addressed to: James A. Wilson,
Bonanza (Bahamas) Limited,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


& U


II


C10765
AMBITIOUS GENERAL office
clerk with typing ability, good
with figures, able to work on
own initiative. Phone 28431
tcr appointment.

TRADE SERVICES
C10661

Pinder's Customs

Brokerage Ltd.
Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P. O. Box N3714
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE: 2-3795, 2-3796
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 77434

C 10632

NEED A PROFESSIONAL
HANDYMAN
Call Odd Job Enterprises. We
do anything anytime.
Telephone 42724 55191
Quick Service


TRADE SERVICES I


I C10763


t

CECIL'S FRIENDLY
GIFT SHOP
Meadow St. & Blue Hill Rd.
Gifts for Parties & Weddings
FIGURINES
GLASS SETS
CHINA SETS
SILVER SETS
RUGS,
PUNCH BOWL SETS
PLACE-MAT SETS
5-PIECE SCARF SETS, etc.
Open 3 p.m. 8.30 p.m.

C10638
PATIO AWNINGS
AND CARPORTS
HURRICANE AWNINGS,
SHUTTERS, PANELS
John S. George,
& Co. Ltd.,
For free estimates and prompt
service call 28421.

C10637
T.V. ANTENNAS Boosters for
homes, apartments and hotels.
Sales and services. Call Douglas
Lowe 5-9404 :WORLD OF
MUSIC,'Mackey Street next to
Frank's Place.


I HELP WANTED
C 10788
PROCESS DEVELOPMENT
CHEMIST Ph.D.
Applicant will be responsible
for the performing of technical
and scientific assignments in
the development of new
processes to produce
marketable chemicals and the
improvement in existing plant
processes to produce high
quality products. Develops a
wide variety of organic
synthetic reactions including
Oxidations, Reductions,
Hydrogenations,
Esterifications. The successful
candidate must possess a Ph.D.
in organic Chemistry.
Experience in fine chemicals
and pharmaceutical industry
desirable.
Applicants should apply in
Persib at Syntex Corporation,
West Sunrise Highway, or write
P. O. Box F-2430, Freeport,
Telephone: 352-8171.


C10654
JOB TITLE: ERECTION
SUPERINTENDENT
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education. Must be
able to read blueprints
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Supervise the construction and
erection modifications to
buildings and equipment in
cement plant.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. O. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C10672
JOB TITLE: STRUCTURAL.
STEEL ERECTOR
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education Qualified
in steel construction
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESFONSIBILITIES:
Work on structural steel
erection during modifications
of buildings and equipment in
Cement plant.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
C10658
JOB TITLE: WELDER
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Must be a certified welder
capable of performing
horizontal, vertical and
overhead welding, brazing and
cutting of any material using
gas and electric welding
equipment.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. 0. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


I I I w -


C6152
GENERAL
take full
operation
production.


MANAGER: To
charge of Dairy
and ice cream
At least five years


current producing milk plant
experience at Managerial level.
PLANT SUPERINTENDENT:
Experienced in Dairy Plant
operation. At least three years
recent milk plant working
experience in Supervisory
capacity. Required to oversee
plant co-ordination as well as
supervise office management.
REFRIGERATION &
ELECTRICAL ENGINEER:
Must be experienced in all
phases of maintenance and
repair of specialized dairy
equipment. Certificates of
proficiency and proof of
experience required.
Apply: GRAND BAHAMA
DAIRY PRODUCTS LTD.,
Queen's Highway, P. O. Box
F-17 Freeport, G.B.

C6149
M U R SE RY MAN
HORTICULTURAL: To
supervise and maintain
operation of Landscape
Nursery. Prepare schedules for
production and maintenance
programs. Supervise Landscape
Construction on job site. At
least five years previous
experience in supervisory
capacity.
EX PERIENCED
GARDENERS: Previous
experience necessary. All
duties related to Nursery work
and outside maintenance.
OFFICE MANAGER: To
handle all business
administration of Landscape
Nursery. Billings and
Accounting procedures
through to monthly financial
statements. Horticultural
background necessary to be
able to converse intelligently
with clients and prospective
customers.
Apply: Lucaya Nursery &
Landscaping Limited, Pioneer's
Way, Freeport, G.B., P. O. Box
F-252.

C6153
REQUIRED By Bahamas Oil.
Refining Company,-
CONSTRUCTION
INSPECTOR. Applicant should .
have at least a high school
education, however, experience
considered much more
essential.
Must have complete knowledge
of company standards and
practices covering the work
assigned for motors, turbines, -
compressors and other
machinery.
Duties: Responsible to the
Construction Engineer for
ensuring that the work meets
requirements defined by the
drawings and specifications and
the workmanship is good
practice for the craft involved.
Please reply stating details of
qualifications and experience
to: Personnel Officer, P. O.
Box F-2435, Bahamas .Oil
Refining Company, Freeport,-
Grand Bahama.


SINK- .
; I


GRAND BAHAMA




CLASSIFIED


IN FIEEPIT TEL. 352-6113

i____________________________________


M


_ _ _


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src~-!


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I


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I


INELP HINTED
C6148
NEEDED: REAL ESTATE
SALES PERSON
Must be capable
of handling their own
correspondence and working
without direct supervision.
Commission basis only. Must
be member of Freeport/Lucaya
Real Estate Board or pass
exam. Applicant should have at
least two years experience in
Real Estate. Presentable car
and typing ability would be an
asset.
J. Stuart Robertson (Bahamas)
Ltd., No. 5 Savoy Bldg., P. 0.
Box F-93, Freeport, G.B.I.

C10656
JOB TITLE: (FOUR)
MILLWRIGHTS
MINIMUM EDUCATION:
Good basic education. Good
Cement Plant mechanical
background
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE:
5-10 years.
DUTIES/RESPONSIBILITIES:
Inspects, repairs, replaces,
installs, adjusts and maintains
all mechanical equipment in a
cement manufacturing plant.
INTERESTED APPLICANT
CONTACT: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company, P. O. Box F-100,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

C6140
METER MAN/TECHNICIAN
at Holmes Rock with minimum
of 4 years experience in all
aspects of meter work, reading,
investigating complaints,
installation and *use of check
meters, checking service
arrangements, calibration and
carrying out minor repairs,
etc.. All applicants should have
had appropriate training and be
in possession of references
attesting to good character as
well as their experience and
ability in the field. Only
persons NOT requiring a Work
Permit need apply
Electrical Utilities Company
Ltd. P. O. Box F-170,
Freeport.










Tuesday, August 7, 1973.


GRAND BAHAMA




CLASSIFIED

II FrENIrT TEL. 352n


HELP WANTED
C6150
(2) SP R I NKLER
PIPEFITTERS: Two Male
Sprinkler Pipefitters to work
on Construction. Must be able
to install sprinkler system and
be able to do necessary
pipefitting. Must be between
the ages of 30 and 45 years and
.be able to read blueprints. High
'School Education is required
-with at least 7 years
experience. Salary $5 per hour.
Interested Persons Apply:
GRAND BAHAMA HOTEL,
WEST END, GRAND
BAHAMA, Personnel Office,
between the hours of 9 a.m.,
and 3 p.m., Monday through
'Friday. Elon Martin, Jr.,
Personnel Director.



1911MMU611i-


HELP WANTED
C6151
PARTS MANAGER for
growing Automotive Supply
Company. Requirements:
Bahamian male, at least 10
years experience in automotive
parts add accessory work. Must
be able to do and supervise
sales, cardex stock control
system, stock ordering with
international trade, customs
clearing and receiving,
inventory controls and costing.
Must be bondable. Mail resume
with all references. Interviews
by appointment only. No
phone calls please.
The President, Freeport Jet
Wash and Auto Mart, Ltd., P.
O. Box F-238, Freeport, G.B.I.


"Is my sweet, thoughtful husband ready to take me out
for the birthday lunch he promised me?"


S1. Point of time
S4. Preserves
7. Blemish
1i. Seaman
I? One in Rome
13 Gorse
)4. Rich tapestry
16. Auricles
i7 Autoclave
19. About
20. Whit
i3. Sweetsop
6 Short flight
7. Moray


29. Favoring
30. Playing card
31. Majestic
33 Sun god
34 Gabriel's
sweetheart
39 Grandma
Moses
41 Seers
42. Employer
43. Offer
44. Circuit


CABOT
ORM LU
RO BBIlER
I CES
BUR RIE
IS WET
CA
C NOR U
RAH TO
ABOUT
V VISTA
ETHEAL.


AL'


EU
DSK
HI
JET
ES
W D
ELT
Lm


&ELY
WE


SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE
DOWN
5. Indigo
1. Poached items 6. Trusted pupil
2. Origin 7. Gratifying
e 3. French cleric 8. Hire a bus
4. Mrs. 9. Tune
Eisenhower 10. Nurses
7 8 9 o10 15. Wanders
S __ 18. Energy
13 21.Trevino
22. English
16 cathedral city
23. Leaflets
24. Greek T
I- 22 25. Cost
26. Rubs elbows
27 with
29. Friar
o30 30. Soapstone
32. Enlarging
33 VA gradually
- 33. All set
3 31 8 35. Pluck
36. Sicknesses
37. Lowest high
4 tide
38. Discover
Y 4qI 39. German
composer
,atures 8- 40. And not


1htp rtibunt


CARROLL RIGHTER'S

00 4HOROSCOPE
from the Carroll Righter Inrtitute
/ GENERAL TENDENCIES: A day to fill your
thoughts and your plans with much outside
activity. Look outward instead of inward to make the
decisions that will best extend your present interests. Be
more decisive if you wish to make process in the days ahead.
ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) Becoming more friendly
with associates whose thinking has been different from yours
is wise. A good day to plan a trip. Don't be too eager to
take up with strangers at this time. Be alert.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Put those good ideas to
work that will make you more skillful and give you more
abundance. Show more devotion to loved one. Don't become
disturbed at the strange behavior of a friend, Be helpful.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Meet with associates who
are important to your well-being and be willing to make
changes in agreements so that better results occur. Use more
direct methods with one who opposes you.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) You can
increase your work output and get excellent results at this
time. Find new items to add to your wardrobe and improve
your appearance. Have a delightful time with kin tonight.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Once you have done
important work, go to the amusements that you enjoy.
Engage in those creative outlets that you like so much. Make
sure you don't argue with others or trouble could result.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) If you are more kind with
kin and give them a pat on the back instead of criticizing
them, you get a more harmonious reaction. Make little
changes around the house for added comfort.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Being more cooperative
with associates brings good results now. Work in a more
efficient way and get more benefits in the future. Make sure
you do any shopping early in the day. Relax tonight.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Fretting over little things
you cannot change is not wise. Concentrate on whatever is
important and make far greater progress. Obtain the advice
you need from a successful businessman.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) You can improve
your present position by getting busy at whatever really
pleases you and is important to your welfare. Make sure you
dress well before keeping a vital appointment.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) If you first talk with
a trusted adviser, you can take a course of action with
confidence. Forget civic work for the time being. Avoid
persons who are detrimental to your progress.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Getting in touch with
good friends early makes it possible for you to be the
gregarious person you are. Take time to go after your finest
aims. A kind manner with mate brings fine results.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar 20) You are now able to add a
good deal to your present success because of the fine
capabilities you possess and put to use. Don't forget to pay
an important bill. Relax at home tonight.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY... he or she will be
one of those confident young people who will be full of
pride in any endeavor. Direct the education along civic or
governmental lines, and there could be no limit to the
advancement in such fields. Give good spiritual training early
in life, plus musical lessons or whatever is of a cultural
nature. Teach fair play.


M -I a I -.-A -
No. 7.194 by TIM McKAY
Across
1. Plait boot (anac.). ( )-4
9. Boy's name. (4)
10. Dlsaxreement. (4)
I1. Got the ship off the sand
bank. (9)
12. Slumbers. (6)
13. Axe. (3)
15. Flower. (6)
18. Nothing. (3)
19. Chatham area. (4)
20. Jump. (3)
22. Bound to be In American
song. (7)
25. Cooling device. (3)
26. Otherwise. (4)
27. Merry font (ana.). (5. 4)
Down
I. Famous chaos. (9)
2. Anger. (3)
3. For rescue work. (4. 5)
4. Cancer or Caoricorn could
describe it. (6)
5 Leaning. (4)
(i. More than a few times (5)
7. Consumed. (3)
8. Mav describe a wave. (5)


Rupert and Miss Samantha-7


SYou'll find what you want under 'Birthdays'
onr page nine," says the Owl. "Oh, dear, it
seems such nonsense," thinks the little bear.
ut I'd better do as I'm told." He counts
the blank pages and, finding the right one,
peers at it through the strange magnifying
glass. To his amazement the words appear
as, if by magic. It says here Apply Miss


Rupert and Mi









14,






The Wise Owl has begun to snore, so Rupert
climbs down the tree and continues his
journey. I wish the Owl hadn't been so
leepy." he sighs. "I'd like to have known
more about this Miss Samantha. What has
she to do with birthdays? Would she be able
S to tell me the sort of present to buy for




SMEARED


Samantha,'" murmurs Rupert. "That's right,"
yawns the Owl. Now you know what to do."
But I don't," says Rupert. "Who's Miss
Samantha 7 And where does she IEve?" The
bird has closed its eyes. "Come back another
time," it says, when I'm not in the middle
of a nap."
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


ss Samantha--8




3 7;


Pompey?" On reaching the village Rupert
pauses. Now which Is the best shop to go
to?" he asks himself. "There's one in New
Street that sells toys and gifts. I'll try there
first." As he rounds a corner he ses Margot
at the very shop he means to visit. "COo.ee,
k -or- #" ~6 .fo( 0! 1r anlrl s *FayVroD


14. Disorders.
16. Part to i
17. Amerl-


ca n
c o ln.
(4)
A ii r a.
(4)
V e r se.
(4)
For legal
e x nerts
(3)
One or
ot i e r.
(3)


Chess
By LEONARD BARDEN


White mates in two moves.
against any defence (by M
Schneider). Tne line-up on the
long white diagonal is a signal
that one of the white rooks is
the key oiece-but which rook.
and which square does it move
to ?
Par times : 2 minutes, problem
master; 5 minutes. problem ex-
per:; 12 minutes, goed; 20 min-
utes, averagee 40 minutes. novice.
Solution o 9733-
1 h--KKt4. and mate next
move Traps for solvers are 1
R-B6? R-Q3' or 1 R-K5?
Rx B! or 1 RK4)-K3? PxP! or
I R-B7? P-K4! or 1 R-BI,
P-K4 Only by 1 R-KKt4 does
White have a mating answer to
all these Black relences.

Bridge
By VICTOR MOLLO
TODAY'S hand crune up mi the
match between O inna's team
and Portugal, in Lisbon, during
last month's Evening Standard
Bridge Oruise.
Dealer West: Both Vul
North
#Q,.'9
r'Q6
QR84
4AQ873
West East
SA 8 4 3 2 10
* AK 8 10953
A AK 5 2 J.197
42 4 K.1 9 54
South
K765
3742
01063
4106
West Nor" East South
14 Dble Pass 1 NT
Dole Pass Pass 2C
Dble
Ntico Gadener. Wc't. led the
4*A and continued with the #8,
his highest, s.gnalline intre'it in
diamonds. Jeremy Flint rufted
and duly returned a diamond.
Thinking ahead. Nico switched to
the 62. and since he might have
made the same play from 4K2.
declare finessed. Jeremy won
and gave Nico a club ruff.
A spade ruff followed, then a
third club, ruffed by declarer and
over-ruffed with the CK by Nico.
That was seven tricks for the
defence. The OA was the eighth.
A fourth spade was ruffed by
declarer in oummy with the VQ.
Jeremy shedding his last
diamond, and when Gardener
came in with the CA, he gave
Flint a diamond ruff. the tenth
trick for the defence-a penalty
of 1400.
In the other room. where I
was playing with Honor Flint,
we collected 100, defending a
part-score. The resulting 17
IMPs swing played a major part
in our victory over Portugal b-
23 IMPs.


BUT YOU NO! THE GUN
DIDN'T TRY DISCHARGED
TO SHOOT/ACCIDENTALLY
HIM ? WHEN HE
S ALMOST RAN
*X ME DOWN!.,


11


I J c
II~ --I-II-IH- --l-I


REX MORGAN, M.D. By DAL CURTIS

4 I'P SETTER GET I'VE TOLD C>tU I'A CONVINCED PD SHE k-NOW I DON'T KNOW
THERE BEFORE V EvE 'THNG I OF OF ONE THING, ANY OF THE PEOPLE OFFHAND ---
HAVING RECEIVED A GORDON CALLS .\ kNOW ABOUT JOAN---THE PERSON WHO WERE AT THE I'P HAVE TO
CALL FROM GORDON THE POLICE / I'LL THAT NIGHT, WHO KILLED HER LAMBERT PARTY THINK
THAT BRICE IS AGAIN TRY TO BE BACK BRICE WAS SOMEONE SHE WITH YOU AND GORDY ABOUT IT
TRYING TO QUESTION WITHIN AN EW TA EENIN
JOAN, REX-MORGAN HOUR, JUNE~ T'.
HURRIEDLY LEAVES
HIS OFFICE /


/ A






DR MORGAN FiM SURE GLAD YOU COULD
S __ --- WAIT GET HERE/ JOAN PHONED
ME AT THE OFFICE / SHE
WAS IN A PANIC/ RICE
i WAS HAMMERING



./- 2 K -..





I I .


JUDGE PARKER


YOU SAY YE5! I THOUGHT HE
You HAD YOUR MIGHT BE ARMED!
BEFORE TALKING GUN DRAWN,
POLICE QUESTION i
THE GUARD
WHOSE GUN SHOT
RICK LASSITER!


LASSITER'S MISS FREMONT'STI DON'T KNOW!
FORMER HUSBAND, BUT -YOU QUESTIONED
HOW DID HE KNOW SHE r HIM! WHAT WAS
WAS STAYING HERE AT / HIS STORY?
SPENCER FARMS ? h1 T


By PAUL NICHOLS,


APARTMENT 3-G By Alex Kotzky


FELLA I OWE A
WHAT PO56IBLE REASON \ FA\OQ TO WA-7T5
COULD YOU HAVE FOR ,- M, M.'AM
HOLDING US HERE,
MR. KEREY? :w Ai. i



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STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & overgard


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2 hr Classic end to 1913 baseball season as

F Classic end to 1973 baseball season as


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Becks edge Schlitz




for BBA championship

By OSCAR MILLER
WITH TWO OUT AND THE BASES LOADED in the bottom of
the ninth inning, catcher Vianny Jacques ripped a sharp single to
left field to drive in third baseman Fred Taylor with the winning
run to edge Schlitz Beer 2-1 allowing Beck's Bees to capture the
Bahamas Baseball Association's 1973 Championship Crown.


Jacques dramatic blow was
dealt in the second and final of
two best of three games played
for the BBA title Saturday
night between the pennant
winner Beck's Bees and Schlit,
Beer at the Queen's Flizabeth
Sports Centre.
IFo 2 nine full innings local
baseball fans eagerly watched a
tinse and clo selt contested
game alnd throughout the
match sporadic shouts of
"Wow. this is really a good
game." could he heard from
the bleaches.
Saturday n lgh t 's
Championship game brought
the 1'73 BBA season to an
end. It was a season that was
marred with controversy,
controversial figures arnd
unexpected BBA resignations,
but local baseball fans still saw
the best of baseball in the
Bahamas
PITCHING DU EL
The championshipp final was
plain ed in thie mIanner of a
World Series with superb
pitching from Schlitz's starter
Bertie Murray and Beck's Don
Taylor who were both
deadlocked in a classic pitching
duel eight long innings.
With his curve ball at its best
Taylor held Schlit/ scoreless
scattering four hits throughout
stome nine innings, while
Murray. with a splendid
asso rtmlent of curves


lit t&"- .


change-ups and his fastball,
blanked the Bees until the
eighth.
Turner broke the
nil-and-tuck contest in the
bottom half of the eighth when
lie slashed a single to left for
the Bees' third hit of the night.
The crafty little shortstop then
stole second and quickly raced
hole when catcher Mackey
Baml's throw,i missing the mark.
rolled into centerfield.
But Schlit/ played tlieir
characteristic aggressive gained
and rebounded with a run to
lie the game in the top ot the
ninth.
The lone tally came whenl
shortstop L[lo d Bov,'leg
slanimmed a long drive to left
field and scurried on a second
for a stand-up-double to begin
the ninth. Second baseman
Loren/o Lockhart then
scorched a long sacrifice fly to
right pushing Bowleg to thild
followed by another sacrifice
fly by catcher Bain to knot the
score at 1-1
Batting champion Anthony
Huyler opened the bottom half
of the ninth with a hit to left
but was quickly erased on a
forced out when Fred Taylor
bounced out to short.
FINE BUNT
Fleet-footed Willie Knowles
placed a beautiful bunt down
the third base line and legged
it oult for a single. With


CATCHER VIANNY JACQUES seen stroking the
game-winning single in Saturday night's final BBA
Championship game to give Beck's Bees a 2-1 edge over
Schlitz Beer. The Bees, who ended the season on a 16-game
winning streak, won the BBA Crown by defeating Schlitz
Beer two straight games in the Championship series.
Photo: Richard Rodgers.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
IDetroit 50) 545 ---
tBaltimore 55 4) 542
Nesw York 01 53 535
lt to,ll 5) S 5 5 36 I
Mil\\,iukeet 5 57 477 71'
Cle teland 43 70 3.1 IA'8
West Division
i)akland 63 495 6OA
Kainsa,- ('It 64 49 5 -66
Mirinesota 5 53 .50) 6'
('licago s 5 7 4 1 S'
(alif rnia S~ 5' .472 10'
I.-xa. 41 I R 17() 2
Monday's Results
lBston 5, lialtimo rc 4
D)ttroit 5. Net' York 4 ( 10 innings)
(Cleveland7. (hicago 3 .
Sunday's Results
('leVcland 6 4.1 Mili ankcc 1
('hiciago 7 5. lr\e .1 4
I)t-roit A, Nrc 12r ork 12
NiIIInei il St 7, Kan1 1k (It\
hst n1 7. lialtimorc- 4
()1 iklind 6. (Califoirl iu 2
Today's Games
tIillinoiirc (1\lNall\ I9 12 ind1 HI id
22) it M\lllntsota (Die k'r 6 5 a.nd
KI.at I I 1 I). 3. 6 30 p.m .
l s\is (Mclrrit 4 6 .tiid Sl crl s -rI 8)
.it Nr. 'l ork (Medj.ch 7 6 .6 a1
.St, tllh'ne re 12 2)), 5 p.m .
( ).I lind t(Blue 10 7 and I ndidblad
0 1i I)ctroiit (I .lich I I 9 andJ
hiost2m (Pole 0 1) at kaslas C(it\
(Iraig 1I 10), 8:30 p.m.
California (RN;an I 1 3) aI
Milkwaukee (Hrell 9 8).p.m.
(leveland (Timmermanl 4 3) at
(Chicgo(> (Wood 20 16). 9 p.m.
NATIONAL League
East Division
W\ I. Ict, (;B
St l ouis 61 5 1 .545
(Chiciago 5(, 56 500 5
I'ittsl0utrglI 54 55 .595 5'
'lontreal 54 56 .491 6
I'hiladelphla. 52 60 464 II
Ne,,w York 44 60 .450 10'
West Division
I 5 IAng-eles 70 42 625
(iCicinnatt 67 47 588 4
San I rancisIco 61 41 .555 8
Hiustoni 5Sl 57 504 1.3':
Atlallla 52 64 .448 20
San DiegoI 37 74 .333 32';
Monday's Results
Monrtreal 7. (Cli.agO 3.
Ihj uston 5. ('incinniijti 4
Ne%. York 10. St l.ouis 3
I os Aingeles 2. Sanil Iieg 0
Sunday's Results
St I ,uis 3-4, New\ York 2 I
Pit shurgh 4. Philadelphla I
Montlreal 3. Chicago 2
Atlanta 9. San Iiego 0
(Cincinnati 7. Houston 1
L.os Angeles 4, San I ranciscio 3
Today's Games
IHouston (Wilson 7-12) at
P'ittslurgh (Briles 10 10). 8:05 p il.
Chicago (Pappas 5 10) a ('incinnaiti
(Gullett 12-8). 8:05 p.m.
Los Angeles (Slut(on 13-7) at San
Diego (Troedson 5-3), 10:30 p.m.
Montreal (Renko 1I-7) at San
Irancisco (Bradley 9-10). II p.m.


runners oil the corners and one
out Schlit/ decided to issue
centerfielder Simeon Hulnes a
free pass to first to load the
bases with Bees.
lMurray w5as successful in
getting pinch hitter S. Taylor
to pop tip to second baseman
Lockhart for the second out of
the frame thus setting the stage
for catcher Vianny Jacques
who nervously stepped into the
batter's box.
Jacques. who had failed to
come up with a hit during the
night's activities and who was a
Murray strike out victim the
inning before, was soon down
with a 0-2 count with two fast
balls from Murrau
Reali/ing that the success of
a whole season rested squarely
on his shoulders Jacques again
stepped out of the batter's box
to check his signs with manager
Bernie lumquest in the third
base coach's box.
Once again he took his
stance in the batter's box and
once again Murrax came back
with on o lof his si//ling fast ball
hut rather than tike the pitch
like lie did on the two previous
occasions lie ined it to left
field for the game winning base
hit
Ace nghthandder Don la~ lor.
who went the full nine Innings
for Beck's picked up the win
while Bertie Murray, who also
went the distance for Schlitz,
was tagged with the loss.
BOX SCORES
S(O i IT/
Namell AB R 11 BI
A. Smith 4 0 1 0
1.. lowleg. ss 4 1 I 0
I Iockhart. 2h 4 0 I 0
M hIhin. 3 0 0 i
K. Smith. 3b 4 0 I 0
I Mlurra). p 3 0 0 0
1. I mountain, Ib 3 0 o O
V. Strachan, rt 3 0 0 O
T()TA[, 32 I h I
BI (KS
R. Turner. ss 3 1 I o
S. Haven, 2h 3 0 0 Il
A. lIusler. ) b 4 0 1 I
I'. Taylor. 3h 4 1 1 0
W. Knowles. If 4 0 I 0
S. Hlumes. 0 3 0 1 0
.(. Mincur, rf 3 0 0 0
S. l'a Ior, ph I 0 0
V. Jacques, c 4 0 I I
1). Taylor. p 3 0 0 0
(TOlTAL 32 2 6 I
Schlit/o 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 -1
Beck's 0 00 0 00 0 1 2
raFlor (w) 9 I 6 I 07
Murray (I) 9 2 6 0 3 1 I


'BOOKIE' JOHNSON

TO MISS WICHITA,

DUE TO APPENDIX
DUF 10 TO AN APl \l)
injury suffered oer lhec
weekend, Paradise Island.
slugger Salllu, el "H; i,2k o .ic"
Jo(1lhn1l n s wil hi1 e LIunuI o Ict
accomnl)palny the Blhiillas
all-star squad to \ wich(a,
Kansas for the annual Naitional
Baseball Congress TouIrnl.itnnt
scheduled to begin lhite1 I his
month.
Right-hander Roscoc Iall.
from )Del Jane Sa,111s is
expected to replace John-son
on the 2 limian leaim which
leaves Nass:iu on SatnirJl,
August 11.
Johnson had a loftt bittig
average of .397 with IPlr.dise
Island during the earlier pirt of
the season before the team \\as
suspended from BBA action a1
a result of not pa\ in ,.


LADIES GOLF
ILFFLN DI )AN, following a
score card comparison took the
edge over Slue Bennett
following Sundal' .is BIhanias
(olof Association ". Ladies
Division "BOn Voyage"
Tournament ait lthe Coral
llarbour (oIll ('Course. Both
shot a (10(, In he nClet division,
Pauline V.andci2pol wonl
against I ilecr n I llidalo with a
net S3
Pl'is lournm.inri t concludCd.
an intcnsifihed piaclicc session
for thie ladies 1 ILockhart, S.
Bennettll, M s.1 s. I Ilallida)
B. hliggs, and (;. Snithi wiho
will represents the ialhamas in
the (Carihbean ILadies (;(olf
T 1i rna11 cilnt in St. (roix
tomorrow\\ and hl ursday.
I he ltean accomI)panled by
coach C('harl s S.aunlders left
Nassau eslerda\, Ihic will
pla\ a Ppract1c. e 1ound today\ .
I]ollowino g complletion oi the
Bon Vo' age toilrnaniment, the
team membnhers in their bright
blue jackets and snow whieii
slacks displaying the 1 iahalias"
emlblenII and miIttot proceeded
to the Southi Ocea.n (olf (Club
\ie're thle\ l oilnid thie menel in a
cocktail part\

GOLF MEETING
I I aI nahuii es niiteur s (;o11f
Club Iiollts a s nembershitp
meeting tlotniMrrtl, night 7:30
at their Blu 11111 (; ll (Club. All
nl elbers ind inte Ia 2'rested
persons are welcomind.
&^ d i


DOUBLE CHAMPIONS BECKS BEES, winners of the
Bahamas Baseball Association's 1973 pennant and
Championship playoffs are (from left standing):- Sonny
Haven, Sim Humes, Anthony Huyler, Stephen Humes,
Sherwin Taylor, Willie Knowles, Bernie Turnquest
(manager), Paul Johnson, Fred Taylor, Gregory Austin,
Vianny Jacques, Lenny Taylor; (Kneeling): Don Taylor,
Gilbert Moncur, Roosevelt Turner, Jeff Stuart, Nat Dorsett
(coach) and little Byron the batboy. Photo: Richard
Rodgers


Donnie Lee hammers 3-run


homer to pace Golden Glades


in 23-6 slugfest over Flagler
B (oscar Miller
ISHORTSTOP)' (D NNII 11 1. hanlnered a three runi hnler1 1 and picked
up a total of four rbis as he led the (Glden (Glades Io a 2 .t1- defeat over
I lagler Inin Sunda% in tlie noon gam. of l lie Ns\s I'roiidence' Sfthball
Association action at 1he Southern |Recreation (;rounds


Also sharing sIomre o f Golden
(Glades offensive firewos rks w'as
third baseman I(onnie Turnc uest
who lashed out a pair of singles and
a triple to net a total ol four rbis in
a productive da\ ait bh.
l he leaders s marched .ll
incredible 16 ime to the plate and1
scored 1 3 bhi tallies in llte top half
of the first trame
Ilailin! 13 0 I lacier Inn was
onlll ahle to muster up three runs in
their half ot the first ,o a towering
three-run Illell its centre by
catcher 1. Minus.
I lagler Inn i ended their day's
scoring activities with oneI run in
the second another ill the third and
the final tally il the fomirth.
Still not being content with a
1. 3 lead the (Gladers stormed back
in the second frame for for ur more
tallies, with winning pitcher foster
lIethel scoring the first run in that
frame.
Catcher 1'. Demerritte who got on
\whIn lhe waf;s hit b1 a pitch, and
third h.isenan Turnquest lwho11 got
.,loard1 ailn error rode hot e lll o
LI.ee, slong homel shot to push the
sirI- 17 3.
(.lden (Glades hatters who
seemed t o have nothing more than
an c\xtnded hitting practice picked
up t\\lo more runs in the third and
four more inl the fifth to end their
scoring for tlhe da .
\ eterall right-hander I foster
lethel \1as credited with tlhe win
xwhlle t. I rice was tagged with the

In otheri softball action ron
SuindaI rightlfielder Roosevelt
I ur ner's t\wo run homer
sandwiched between a double and a
single helped to push St. Michael's
Dodgers t an 8 6 victor> over
Past tBeer in the final contest at
tle Southern Recreation (;rounds.
As starring at the plate for St.
'Michel's \,Is second baseman
AntIllny Duvalier \-wh[o picked up
Ilree singles in four trips to the
plate and scored two of the
Dodgers eight runs.
SN Mtichael's had a big first
inning when they scored three runs
o1i ke\ base hits b lead off hatter
I urner. second baseman )avalier
and third baseman Iddie lord to
lake a comfortable 3-0 lead.
The Dodgers bounced back in
the sec.lond frame to continue their
scoring.. turner and centrefielder
Ainthon.I Iluhler had the big blows
in that frame w ith I urler drilling a
two run homer and lluls er slashing
a run scoring single.
St. Michael's closed the day's
soIrinig activities with another tally
inl the third.
Winning pitcher M. Joihnson held
I'abs scoreless until the fourth
frame \\en they picked up their
first tall\ on a run-scoring single h)
third basenian I'owler to drive in
second baseman Adderler wlio had
hanged a double to start the frame.
I'abst picked up four more tallies
ill tie si\th and one more in the
sev enth butt the beerlmen s were
unable tI catch St. Mtichael's and
had to2 settle for an 8-6 loss. I.
white e took the loss for Pabst.
I irst baseman C(olin Thompson
hbnlged out three hits includingL a


;: ` z
s -




SHORTSTOP DONNIE LEE being congratulated by
teammate D. Bartlett on crossing home plate after drilling a
three run homer to give Golden Glades a 17-3 lead over
Flagler Inn on Sunday. The Gladers won the contest 23-6.
Photo: Rickey Wells.


three runl h)mier and nlted a total
of four rhis as hIe l.ad (. Customs to
12 4 %icitors over I'freetown
Stoppers ill Sunldal's 4 p.m. contest
also played at Ille Southern
Recreation I roundlti


Obed's decisive victory last
night has cleared the way for
his proposed bout with
Jamaica's welterweight champ.
B u rnnI Grant. Proinoter
Wilfred ('oaklei has tentatively
scheduled tle bout for August
3 1.
"Now that lie is ranking
number nine in the British
I empire andi ten in the World'
Boxing association, everybody
wants to know who he is."
noted Obed's manager Mike
l)undee, son of famed
promo.tcr (Chris Dundee.
Obed's success has reached tile
ears of English promoter
Mickey Duff who last night
witnessed his triumph. Duff
said he was trying to arrange
sonic matches here with
English fighters against Obed
and Bahamas light heavyweight
champ Baby Boy Rolle.
After the (;rant fight,
I)Dundee said that Obed will
probably go to England where
lie will sign up for a few
matches finally taking on the
British Empire welter weight
chalipion.
FROM ilTE BELL
Entering the ring to a
standing ovation, the
21-year-old champion was on


A SOLID LEFT TO THE BODY of Doug Rogers is only
one of the many he took from Bahamas Welterweight
Champ Elisha Obed last night enroute to a fourth round
technical knockout. Obed easily handled Rogers, a
middleweight, and clearly paved the way for his next bout
against Jamaica's welterweight champ Bunny Grant
tentatively scheduled for August 31. Watching Obed's
victory last night was English promoter Mickey Duff who
came to Nassau seeking bouts for Obed and Baby Boy Rolle
against English boxers. Obed's manager Mike Dundee said
that following the Grant fight, Obed will go to England
where he will sign up for a few bouts before taking a shot at
the B.E. welterweight title. Photo: Rickev Wells.


The second round was a near
repeat of the first as the
aggressive Obed moved in on his
man scoring easily and freely
with jabs and uppercuts. By
the end of the second round,
Rogers barely landed seven
punches most of which were
just soft taps as if Obed had
already knocked the steam out
of him.
Fairly in the fourth round,
the end was evident for Rogers
and a solid right to the head
only aggravated it more. Seeing
his man in double trouble,
Obed let loose with scorching
lefts and rights at the then
helpless Rogers and trainer Mac
(oodman threw in the towel,
giving the local champ his 37th
victory in as many ring
appearances.
"lHe is the type of boy who
doesn't like to hang around. He
takes care of himself and
that's the making of a good
fighter." commented the
50-year ring veteran Fleischer.
"lle learns everything and he
picks it up quick." Obed, who
Fleischer said reminds of
former welterweight champ
Kid Chocklate of Cuba, is said
to be one of the best in his
class around Florida.


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Tuesday, August 7, 1973.



Obed does it again,



ready for Grant & U.K.

By GLADSTONE THURSTON
BAHAMAS WELTERWEIGHT KING Elisha Obed easily added
another notch to his undefeated record when he pounded
Miamian Middleweight Doug Rogers to submission in two
minutes and ten seconds of the fourth round of their scheduled
ten rounder last night at the A.F. Adderley Gym
"He is ready now for better top of Rogers from the sound
opposition." commented of the bell. Riddling a
Obed's trainer Moe Fleischer. continuous flow of left jabs,
"He is more aggressive now. Obed literally punched his
Before. he used to throw a opponent around the ring.
punch and back tLp putting himn Within the first two minutes of
off balance. Now. he keeps on the three minute round Rogers
top of his opponents and does did not throw a punch. He just
not give them a chance to set could not get started against
lp." Obed.


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